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Sample records for late neandertal femur

  1. A late Neandertal femur from Les Rochers-de-Villeneuve, France

    PubMed Central

    Beauval, Cédric; Maureille, Bruno; Lacrampe-Cuyaubère, François; Serre, David; Peressinotto, David; Bordes, Jean-Guillaume; Cochard, David; Couchoud, Isabelle; Dubrasquet, David; Laroulandie, Véronique; Lenoble, Arnaud; Mallye, Jean-Baptiste; Pasty, Sylvain; Primault, Jérôme; Rohland, Nadin; Pääbo, Svante; Trinkaus, Erik

    2005-01-01

    In 2002, a Neandertal partial femoral diaphysis was discovered at Les Rochers-de-Villeneuve (Vienne, France). Radiocarbon dated to ≈40,700 14C years before present, this specimen is one of the most recent Middle Paleolithic Neandertals. The diaphysis derives from an archeological level indicating alternating human and carnivore (mostly hyena) occupation of the cave, reinforcing the close proximity and probable competition of Middle Paleolithic humans with large carnivores for resources and space. Morphological aspects of the diaphysis and ancient DNA extracted from it indicate that it is aligned with the Neandertals and is distinct from early modern humans. However, its midshaft cortical bone distribution places it between other Middle Paleolithic Neandertals and the Châtelperronian Neandertal from La Roche-à-Pierrot, supporting a pattern of changing mobility patterns among late Middle Paleolithic Neandertals on the eve of modern human dispersals into Europe. PMID:15878988

  2. A muscular imprint on the anterolateral surface of the proximal femurs of the Krapina Neandertal collection.

    PubMed

    Belcastro, Maria Giovanna; Mariotti, Valentina

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to report and interpret a feature on the anterolateral surface of the proximal femurs of the Krapina hominid collection that we briefly described in 2006 (Periodicum Biologorum, 108, 319-329). We recorded the presence or absence of the feature in all the proximal femurs of the Krapina collection (six specimens recordable) and in 622 modern human adult femurs. The feature consists in a series of crests delimitating three raised or depressed areas. This feature has been found in three out of four adult Neandertal femurs observable. The two observable subadult Neandertal femurs do not show this character. None of the modern femurs displayed the feature. We interpret this feature as a muscular imprint, probably representing the m. vastus intermedius origin and discuss a possible interpretation. We did not find any other references for such imprint in the existing literature regarding the Neandertal femurs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Late neandertals in southeastern Iberia: Sima de las Palomas del Cabezo Gordo, Murcia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Michael J; Gibert, Josep; López, Mariano V; Lombardi, A Vincent; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro; Zapata, Josefina; Ortega, Jon; Higham, Thomas; Pike, Alistair; Schwenninger, Jean-Luc; Zilhão, João; Trinkaus, Erik

    2008-12-30

    Middle Paleolithic fossil human remains from the Sima de las Palomas in southeastern Iberia (dated to Neandertal and/or retained ancestral morphological features in the mandibular symphysis, mandibular ramus, dental occlusal morphology, and distal hand phalanx. These traits are combined with variation in the mandibular corpus, discrete dental morphology, tooth root lengths, and anterior dental size that indicate a frequency difference with earlier Iberian and more northern European Neandertals. The Palomas Neandertals therefore confirm the late presence of Neandertals associated with the Iberian persistence of the Middle Paleolithic, but suggest microevolutionary processes and/or population contact with contemporaneous modern humans to the north.

  4. Late Neandertals in Southeastern Iberia: Sima de las Palomas del Cabezo Gordo, Murcia, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Michael J.; Gibert, Josep; López, Mariano V.; Lombardi, A. Vincent; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro; Zapata, Josefina; Ortega, Jon; Higham, Thomas; Pike, Alistair; Schwenninger, Jean-Luc; Zilhão, João; Trinkaus, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Middle Paleolithic fossil human remains from the Sima de las Palomas in southeastern Iberia (dated to ≤43,000–40,000 calendar years before present) present a suite of derived Neandertal and/or retained ancestral morphological features in the mandibular symphysis, mandibular ramus, dental occlusal morphology, and distal hand phalanx. These traits are combined with variation in the mandibular corpus, discrete dental morphology, tooth root lengths, and anterior dental size that indicate a frequency difference with earlier Iberian and more northern European Neandertals. The Palomas Neandertals therefore confirm the late presence of Neandertals associated with the Iberian persistence of the Middle Paleolithic, but suggest microevolutionary processes and/or population contact with contemporaneous modern humans to the north. PMID:19074275

  5. Neandertals revised

    PubMed Central

    Roebroeks, Wil; Soressi, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has seen a significant growth of our knowledge of the Neandertals, a population of Pleistocene hunter-gatherers who lived in (western) Eurasia between ∼400,000 and 40,000 y ago. Starting from a source population deep in the Middle Pleistocene, the hundreds of thousands of years of relative separation between African and Eurasian groups led to the emergence of different phenotypes in Late Pleistocene Europe and Africa. Both recently obtained genetic evidence and archeological data show that the biological and cultural gaps between these populations were probably smaller than previously thought. These data, reviewed here, falsify inferences to the effect that, compared with their near-modern contemporaries in Africa, Neandertals were outliers in terms of behavioral complexity. It is only around 40,000 y ago, tens of thousands of years after anatomically modern humans first left Africa and thousands of years after documented interbreeding between modern humans, Neandertals and Denisovans, that we see major changes in the archeological record, from western Eurasia to Southeast Asia, e.g., the emergence of representational imagery and the colonization of arctic areas and of greater Australia (Sahul). PMID:27274044

  6. New data on the late Neandertals: direct dating of the Belgian Spy fossils.

    PubMed

    Semal, Patrick; Rougier, Hélène; Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Jungels, Cécile; Flas, Damien; Hauzeur, Anne; Maureille, Bruno; Germonpré, Mietje; Bocherens, Hervé; Pirson, Stéphane; Cammaert, Laurence; De Clerck, Nora; Hambucken, Anne; Higham, Thomas; Toussaint, Michel; van der Plicht, Johannes

    2009-04-01

    In Eurasia, the period between 40,000 and 30,000 BP saw the replacement of Neandertals by anatomically modern humans (AMH) during and after the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition. The human fossil record for this period is very poorly defined with no overlap between Neandertals and AMH on the basis of direct dates. Four new (14)C dates were obtained on the two adult Neandertals from Spy (Belgium). The results show that Neandertals survived to at least approximately 36,000 BP in Belgium and that the Spy fossils may be associated to the Lincombian-Ranisian-Jerzmanowician, a transitional techno-complex defined in northwest Europe and recognized in the Spy collections. The new data suggest that hypotheses other than Neandertal acculturation by AMH may be considered in this part of Europe.

  7. The Late Neandertal permanent lower left third premolar from Walou Cave (Trooz, Belgium) and its context.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Michel; Verna, Christine; Le Cabec, Adeline; Gómez-Robles, Aida; Draily, Christelle; Richards, Michael P; Pirson, Stéphane

    2017-09-01

    We describe a hominin permanent lower left third premolar unearthed in 1997 at Walou Cave (Belgium), found in direct association with a Mousterian lithic industry, in a layer directly dated to 40-38,000 years BP. The taxonomical attribution of the tooth is addressed through comparative morphometric analyses, and stable isotope analyses aimed at determining the diet of the individual. The Walou P3 plots within the Neandertal range of variation and is significantly different from recent modern humans in all morphometric assessments. The isotope data showed that like other Neandertals, the Walou individual acquired its dietary proteins primarily from terrestrial food sources. We discuss the implications of the existence of a clearly Neandertal premolar dating to the period of the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition in the Meuse river basin. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Neandertal clavicle length

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik; Holliday, Trenton W.; Auerbach, Benjamin M.

    2014-01-01

    The Late Pleistocene archaic humans from western Eurasia (the Neandertals) have been described for a century as exhibiting absolutely and relatively long clavicles. This aspect of their body proportions has been used to distinguish them from modern humans, invoked to account for other aspects of their anatomy and genetics, used in assessments of their phylogenetic polarities, and used as evidence for Late Pleistocene population relationships. However, it has been unclear whether the usual scaling of Neandertal clavicular lengths to their associated humeral lengths reflects long clavicles, short humeri, or both. Neandertal clavicle lengths, along with those of early modern humans and latitudinally diverse recent humans, were compared with both humeral lengths and estimated body masses (based on femoral head diameters). The Neandertal do have long clavicles relative their humeri, even though they fall within the ranges of variation of early and recent humans. However, when scaled to body masses, their humeral lengths are relatively short, and their clavicular lengths are indistinguishable from those of Late Pleistocene and recent modern humans. The few sufficiently complete Early Pleistocene Homo clavicles seem to have relative lengths also well within recent human variation. Therefore, appropriately scaled clavicular length seems to have varied little through the genus Homo, and it should not be used to account for other aspects of Neandertal biology or their phylogenetic status. PMID:24616525

  9. The origin of Neandertals

    PubMed Central

    Hublin, J. J.

    2009-01-01

    Western Eurasia yielded a rich Middle (MP) and Late Pleistocene (LP) fossil record documenting the evolution of the Neandertals that can be analyzed in light of recently acquired paleogenetical data, an abundance of archeological evidence, and a well-known environmental context. Their origin likely relates to an episode of recolonization of Western Eurasia by hominins of African origin carrying the Acheulean technology into Europe around 600 ka. An enhancement of both glacial and interglacial phases may have played a crucial role in this event, as well as in the subsequent evolutionary history of the Western Eurasian populations. In addition to climatic adaptations and an increase in encephalization, genetic drift seems to have played a major role in their evolution. To date, a clear speciation event is not documented, and the most likely scenario for the fixation of Neandertal characteristics seems to be an accretion of features along the second half of the MP. Although a separation time for the African and Eurasian populations is difficult to determine, it certainly predates OIS 11 as phenotypic Neandertal features are documented as far back as and possibly before this time. It is proposed to use the term “Homo rhodesiensis” to designate the large-brained hominins ancestral to H. sapiens in Africa and at the root of the Neandertals in Europe, and to use the term “Homo neanderthalensis” to designate all of the specimens carrying derived metrical or non-metrical features used in the definition of the LP Neandertals. PMID:19805257

  10. Paleobiology and comparative morphology of a late Neandertal sample from El Sidrón, Asturias, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Rosas, Antonio; Martínez-Maza, Cayetana; Bastir, Markus; García-Tabernero, Antonio; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Huguet, Rosa; Ortiz, José Eugenio; Julià, Ramón; Soler, Vicente; de Torres, Trinidad; Martínez, Enrique; Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; Sánchez-Moral, Sergio; Cuezva, Soledad; Lario, Javier; Santamaría, David; de la Rasilla, Marco; Fortea, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Fossil evidence from the Iberian Peninsula is essential for understanding Neandertal evolution and history. Since 2000, a new sample ≈43,000 years old has been systematically recovered at the El Sidrón cave site (Asturias, Spain). Human remains almost exclusively compose the bone assemblage. All of the skeletal parts are preserved, and there is a moderate occurrence of Middle Paleolithic stone tools. A minimum number of eight individuals are represented, and ancient mtDNA has been extracted from dental and osteological remains. Paleobiology of the El Sidrón archaic humans fits the pattern found in other Neandertal samples: a high incidence of dental hypoplasia and interproximal grooves, yet no traumatic lesions are present. Moreover, unambiguous evidence of human-induced modifications has been found on the human remains. Morphologically, the El Sidrón humans show a large number of Neandertal lineage-derived features even though certain traits place the sample at the limits of Neandertal variation. Integrating the El Sidrón human mandibles into the larger Neandertal sample reveals a north–south geographic patterning, with southern Neandertals showing broader faces with increased lower facial heights. The large El Sidrón sample therefore augments the European evolutionary lineage fossil record and supports ecogeographical variability across Neandertal populations. PMID:17164326

  11. Neandertal cannibalism and Neandertal bones used as tools in Northern Europe.

    PubMed

    Rougier, Hélène; Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Beauval, Cédric; Posth, Cosimo; Flas, Damien; Wißing, Christoph; Furtwängler, Anja; Germonpré, Mietje; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Semal, Patrick; van der Plicht, Johannes; Bocherens, Hervé; Krause, Johannes

    2016-07-06

    Almost 150 years after the first identification of Neandertal skeletal material, the cognitive and symbolic abilities of these populations remain a subject of intense debate. We present 99 new Neandertal remains from the Troisième caverne of Goyet (Belgium) dated to 40,500-45,500 calBP. The remains were identified through a multidisciplinary study that combines morphometrics, taphonomy, stable isotopes, radiocarbon dating and genetic analyses. The Goyet Neandertal bones show distinctive anthropogenic modifications, which provides clear evidence for butchery activities as well as four bones having been used for retouching stone tools. In addition to being the first site to have yielded multiple Neandertal bones used as retouchers, Goyet not only provides the first unambiguous evidence of Neandertal cannibalism in Northern Europe, but also highlights considerable diversity in mortuary behaviour among the region's late Neandertal population in the period immediately preceding their disappearance.

  12. Neandertal cannibalism and Neandertal bones used as tools in Northern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Rougier, Hélène; Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Beauval, Cédric; Posth, Cosimo; Flas, Damien; Wißing, Christoph; Furtwängler, Anja; Germonpré, Mietje; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Semal, Patrick; van der Plicht, Johannes; Bocherens, Hervé; Krause, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Almost 150 years after the first identification of Neandertal skeletal material, the cognitive and symbolic abilities of these populations remain a subject of intense debate. We present 99 new Neandertal remains from the Troisième caverne of Goyet (Belgium) dated to 40,500–45,500 calBP. The remains were identified through a multidisciplinary study that combines morphometrics, taphonomy, stable isotopes, radiocarbon dating and genetic analyses. The Goyet Neandertal bones show distinctive anthropogenic modifications, which provides clear evidence for butchery activities as well as four bones having been used for retouching stone tools. In addition to being the first site to have yielded multiple Neandertal bones used as retouchers, Goyet not only provides the first unambiguous evidence of Neandertal cannibalism in Northern Europe, but also highlights considerable diversity in mortuary behaviour among the region’s late Neandertal population in the period immediately preceding their disappearance. PMID:27381450

  13. The expert Neandertal mind.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Thomas; Coolidge, Frederick L

    2004-04-01

    Cognitive neuropsychology, cognitive anthropology, and cognitive archaeology are combined to yield a picture of Neandertal cognition in which expert performance via long-term working memory is the centerpiece of problem solving. This component of Neandertal cognition appears to have been modern in scope. However, Neandertals' working memory capacity, which is the ability to hold a variety of information in active attention, may not have been as large as that of modern humans. This characteristic helps us understand features of the archaeological record, such as the rarity of innovation, and allows us to make empirically based speculations about Neandertal personality.

  14. A Hominin Femur with Archaic Affinities from the Late Pleistocene of Southwest China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wu; Bao, Zhende; Taçon, Paul S. C.; Ren, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The number of Late Pleistocene hominin species and the timing of their extinction are issues receiving renewed attention following genomic evidence for interbreeding between the ancestors of some living humans and archaic taxa. Yet, major gaps in the fossil record and uncertainties surrounding the age of key fossils have meant that these questions remain poorly understood. Here we describe and compare a highly unusual femur from Late Pleistocene sediments at Maludong (Yunnan), Southwest China, recovered along with cranial remains that exhibit a mixture of anatomically modern human and archaic traits. Our studies show that the Maludong femur has affinities to archaic hominins, especially Lower Pleistocene femora. However, the scarcity of later Middle and Late Pleistocene archaic remains in East Asia makes an assessment of systematically relevant character states difficult, warranting caution in assigning the specimen to a species at this time. The Maludong fossil probably samples an archaic population that survived until around 14,000 years ago in the biogeographically complex region of Southwest China. PMID:26678851

  15. A Hominin Femur with Archaic Affinities from the Late Pleistocene of Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Curnoe, Darren; Ji, Xueping; Liu, Wu; Bao, Zhende; Taçon, Paul S C; Ren, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The number of Late Pleistocene hominin species and the timing of their extinction are issues receiving renewed attention following genomic evidence for interbreeding between the ancestors of some living humans and archaic taxa. Yet, major gaps in the fossil record and uncertainties surrounding the age of key fossils have meant that these questions remain poorly understood. Here we describe and compare a highly unusual femur from Late Pleistocene sediments at Maludong (Yunnan), Southwest China, recovered along with cranial remains that exhibit a mixture of anatomically modern human and archaic traits. Our studies show that the Maludong femur has affinities to archaic hominins, especially Lower Pleistocene femora. However, the scarcity of later Middle and Late Pleistocene archaic remains in East Asia makes an assessment of systematically relevant character states difficult, warranting caution in assigning the specimen to a species at this time. The Maludong fossil probably samples an archaic population that survived until around 14,000 years ago in the biogeographically complex region of Southwest China.

  16. New Neandertal remains from Cova Negra (Valencia, Spain).

    PubMed

    Arsuaga, J L; Villaverde, V; Quam, R; Martínez, I; Carretero, J M; Lorenzo, C; Gracia, A

    2007-01-01

    New Neandertal fossils from the Mousterian site of Cova Negra in the Valencia region of Spain are described, and a comprehensive study of the entire human fossil sample is provided. The new specimens significantly augment the sample of human remains from this site and make Cova Negra one of the richest human paleontological sites on the Iberian Peninsula. The new specimens include cranial and postcranial elements from immature individuals and provide an opportunity to study the ontogenetic appearance of adult Neandertal characteristics in this Pleistocene population. Children younger than 10 years of age constitute four of the seven minimum number of individuals in the sample, and this relative abundance of children at Cova Negra is similar that in to other Neandertal sites in Europe and southwest Asia. The recognition of diagnostic Neandertal features in several of the specimens, as well as their western European context and late Pleistocene age, suggests that all the human remains from Cova Negra represent Neandertals. The archaeological evidence from Cova Negra indicates sporadic, short-term occupations of the site, suggesting a high degree of mobility among Neandertals.

  17. Early and late intramedullary nailing of femur fracture: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Alobaidi, Ahmad S.; Al-Hassani, Ammar; El-Menyar, Ayman; Abdelrahman, Husham; Tuma, Mazin; Al-Thani, Hassan; Aldosari, Mohammed A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Femur fracture (FF) is a common injury, and intramedullary nailing (IMN) is the standard surgical fixation. However, the time of intervention remains controversial. We aimed to describe the reamed IMN (rIMN) timing and hospital outcomes in trauma patients presenting with FF. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted for all patients admitted with FF and they underwent fixation at level 1 trauma unit between January 2010 and January 2012. Patients were divided into Group I with early rIMN (<12 h) and Group II with late rIMN (≥12 h). Patients’ demographics, clinical presentations, mechanism of injury, pulmonary complications, organ failure, length of stay, and mortality were described. Results: A total of 307 eligible patients with FF were identified (156 patients in Group I and 151 patients in Group II). Patients in Group II were older (36 ± 18 vs. 29 ± 9; P = 0.001) and had higher rate of polytrauma (35% vs. 18%, P = 0.001), head injury (5% vs. 12%, P = 0.68) and bilateral FF (10.7% vs. 5.1%; P = 0.07) in comparison to Group I. Group II had longer stay in Intensive Care Unit (7 [1–56] vs. 2 [1–17] days; P = 0.009) and hospital (13 [2–236] vs. 9 [1–367]; P = 0.001). There were no significant differences in outcomes between the two groups in terms of sepsis, renal failure, fat embolism, adult respiratory distress syndrome and death. Conclusions: Based on this analysis, we believe that early rIMN is safe in appropriately selected cases. In patients with traumatic FFs, early rIMN is associated with low hospital complications and shorter hospital stay. The rate of pulmonary complications is almost the same in the early and late group. Further prospective randomized studies with large sample size would be ideal using the information garnered from the present study. PMID:27722116

  18. Use of red ochre by early Neandertals

    PubMed Central

    Roebroeks, Wil; Sier, Mark J.; Nielsen, Trine Kellberg; De Loecker, Dimitri; Parés, Josep Maria; Arps, Charles E. S.; Mücher, Herman J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of manganese and iron oxides by late Neandertals is well documented in Europe, especially for the period 60–40 kya. Such finds often have been interpreted as pigments even though their exact function is largely unknown. Here we report significantly older iron oxide finds that constitute the earliest documented use of red ochre by Neandertals. These finds were small concentrates of red material retrieved during excavations at Maastricht-Belvédère, The Netherlands. The excavations exposed a series of well-preserved flint artifact (and occasionally bone) scatters, formed in a river valley setting during a late Middle Pleistocene full interglacial period. Samples of the reddish material were submitted to various forms of analyses to study their physical properties. All analyses identified the red material as hematite. This is a nonlocal material that was imported to the site, possibly over dozens of kilometers. Identification of the Maastricht-Belvédère finds as hematite pushes the use of red ochre by (early) Neandertals back in time significantly, to minimally 200–250 kya (i.e., to the same time range as the early ochre use in the African record). PMID:22308348

  19. The complete genome sequence of a Neandertal from the Altai Mountains

    PubMed Central

    Prüfer, Kay; Racimo, Fernando; Patterson, Nick; Jay, Flora; Sankararaman, Sriram; Sawyer, Susanna; Heinze, Anja; Renaud, Gabriel; Sudmant, Peter H.; de Filippo, Cesare; Li, Heng; Mallick, Swapan; Dannemann, Michael; Fu, Qiaomei; Kircher, Martin; Kuhlwilm, Martin; Lachmann, Michael; Meyer, Matthias; Ongyerth, Matthias; Siebauer, Michael; Theunert, Christoph; Tandon, Arti; Moorjani, Priya; Pickrell, Joseph; Mullikin, James C.; Vohr, Samuel H.; Green, Richard E.; Hellmann, Ines; Johnson, Philip L. F.; Blanche, Hélène; Cann, Howard; Kitzman, Jacob O.; Shendure, Jay; Eichler, Evan E.; Lein, Ed S.; Bakken, Trygve E.; Golovanova, Liubov V.; Doronichev, Vladimir B.; Shunkov, Michael V.; Derevianko, Anatoli P.; Viola, Bence; Slatkin, Montgomery; Reich, David; Kelso, Janet; Pääbo, Svante

    2014-01-01

    We present a high-quality genome sequence of a Neandertal woman from Siberia. We show that her parents were related at the level of half siblings and that mating among close relatives was common among her recent ancestors. We also sequenced the genome of a Neandertal from the Caucasus to low coverage. An analysis of the relationships and population history of available archaic genomes and 25 present-day human genomes shows that several gene flow events occurred among Neandertals, Denisovans and early modern humans, possibly including gene flow into Denisovans from an unknown archaic group. Thus, interbreeding, albeit of low magnitude, occurred among many hominin groups in the Late Pleistocene. In addition, the high quality Neandertal genome allows us to establish a definitive list of substitutions that became fixed in modern humans after their separation from the ancestors of Neandertals and Denisovans. PMID:24352235

  20. Neandertal postcranial remains from the Sima de las Palomas del Cabezo Gordo, Murcia, southeastern Spain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Michael J; Ortega, Jon; López, Mariano V; Parmová, Klára; Trinkaus, Erik

    2011-04-01

    The Sima de las Palomas, southeastern Spain, has yielded a series of Neandertal postcranial remains, including immature and mature isolated elements and the fragmentary partial skeleton of a young adult (Palomas 92). The remains largely conform to the general late archaic/Neandertal morphological pattern in terms of humeral diaphyseal shape, pectoralis major tuberosity size and pillar thickness, ulnar coronoid process height, manual middle phalangeal epiphyseal breadth, manual distal phalangeal tuberosity shape and breadth, femoral diaphyseal shape, and probably body proportions. Palomas 92 contrasts with the Neandertals in having variably gracile hand remains, a more sellar trapezial metacarpal 1 facet, more anteroposteriorly expanded mid-proximal femoral diaphysis, and less robust pedal proximal phalanges. The Palomas Neandertals contrast with more northern European Neandertals particularly in various reflections of overall body size.

  1. Late Neandertals and the intentional removal of feathers as evidenced from bird bone taphonomy at Fumane Cave 44 ky B.P., Italy

    PubMed Central

    Peresani, Marco; Fiore, Ivana; Gala, Monica; Romandini, Matteo; Tagliacozzo, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    A large and varied avifaunal bone assemblage from the final Mousterian levels of Grotta di Fumane, northern Italy, reveals unusual human modifications on species that are not clearly relatable to feeding or utilitarian uses (i.e., lammergeier, Eurasian black vulture, golden eagle, red-footed falcon, common wood pigeon, and Alpine chough). Cut, peeling, and scrape marks, as well as diagnostic fractures and a breakthrough, are observed exclusively on wings, indicating the intentional removal of large feathers by Neandertals. The species involved, the anatomical elements affected, and the unusual type and location of the human modifications indicate an activity linked to the symbolic sphere and the behavioral modernity of this European autochthonous population. PMID:21368129

  2. Lower limb entheseal morphology in the Neandertal Krapina population (Croatia, 130,000 BP).

    PubMed

    Mariotti, Valentina; Belcastro, Maria Giovanna

    2011-06-01

    Although the Neandertal locomotor system has been shown to differ from Homo sapiens, characteristics of Neandertal entheses, the skeletal attachments for muscles, tendons, ligaments and joint capsules, have never been specifically investigated. Here, we analyse lower limb entheses of the Krapina Neandertal bones (Croatia, 130,000 BP) with the aim of determining how they compare with modern humans, using a standard developed by our research group for describing modern human entheseal variability. The entheses examined are those of the gluteus maximus, iliopsoas and vastus medialis on the femur, the quadriceps tendon on the patella, and soleus on the tibia. For the entheses showing a different morphological pattern from H. sapiens, we discuss the possibility of recognising genetic versus environmental causes. Our results indicate that only the gluteus maximus enthesis (the gluteal tuberosity), falls out of the modern human range of variation. It displays morphological features that could imply histological differences from modern humans, in particular the presence of fibrocartilage. In both H. sapiens and the Krapina Neandertals, the morphological pattern of this enthesis is the same in adult and immature femurs. These results can be interpreted in light of genetic differences between the two hominins. The possibility of functional adaptations to higher levels of mechanical load during life in the Neandertals seems less likely. The particular morphology and large dimensions of the Krapina enthesis, and perhaps its fibrocartilaginous nature, could have been selected for in association with other pelvic and lower limb characteristics, even if genetic drift cannot be ruled out.

  3. Neandertal birth canal shape and the evolution of human childbirth.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Timothy D; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2009-05-19

    Childbirth is complicated in humans relative to other primates. Unlike the situation in great apes, human neonates are about the same size as the birth canal, making passage difficult. The birth mechanism (the series of rotations that the neonate must undergo to successfully negotiate its mother's birth canal) distinguishes humans not only from great apes, but also from lesser apes and monkeys. Tracing the evolution of human childbirth is difficult, because the pelvic skeleton, which forms the margins of the birth canal, tends to survive poorly in the fossil record. Only 3 female individuals preserve fairly complete birth canals, and they all date to earlier phases of human evolution. Here we present a virtual reconstruction of a female Neandertal pelvis from Tabun, Israel. The size of Tabun's reconstructed birth canal indicates that childbirth was about as difficult in Neandertals as in present-day humans, but the canal's shape indicates that Neandertals had a more primitive birth mechanism. A significant shift in childbirth apparently occurred quite late in human evolution, during the last few hundred thousand years. Such a late shift underscores the uniqueness of human childbirth and the divergent evolutionary trajectories of Neandertals and the lineage leading to present-day humans.

  4. The landscape of Neandertal ancestry in present-day humans

    PubMed Central

    Sankararaman, Sriram; Mallick, Swapan; Dannemann, Michael; Prüfer, Kay; Kelso, Janet; Pääbo, Svante; Patterson, Nick; Reich, David

    2014-01-01

    Analyses of Neandertal genomes have revealed that Neandertals have contributed genetic variants to modern humans1–2. The antiquity of Neandertal gene flow into modern humans means that regions that derive from Neandertals in any one human today are usually less than a hundred kilobases in size. However, Neandertal haplotypes are also distinctive enough that several studies have been able to detect Neandertal ancestry at specific loci1,3–8. Here, we have systematically inferred Neandertal haplotypes in the genomes of 1,004 present-day humans12. Regions that harbor a high frequency of Neandertal alleles in modern humans are enriched for genes affecting keratin filaments suggesting that Neandertal alleles may have helped modern humans adapt to non-African environments. Neandertal alleles also continue to shape human biology, as we identify multiple Neandertal-derived alleles that confer risk for disease. We also identify regions of millions of base pairs that are nearly devoid of Neandertal ancestry and enriched in genes, implying selection to remove genetic material derived from Neandertals. Neandertal ancestry is significantly reduced in genes specifically expressed in testis, and there is an approximately 5-fold reduction of Neandertal ancestry on chromosome X, which is known to harbor a disproportionate fraction of male hybrid sterility genes20–22. These results suggest that part of the reduction in Neandertal ancestry near genes is due to Neandertal alleles that reduced fertility in males when moved to a modern human genetic background. PMID:24476815

  5. A Draft Sequence of the Neandertal Genome

    PubMed Central

    Green, Richard E.; Li, Heng; Zhai, Weiwei; Fritz, Markus Hsi-Yang; Hansen, Nancy F.; Durand, Eric Y.; Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Jensen, Jeffrey D.; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Alkan, Can; Prüfer, Kay; Meyer, Matthias; Burbano, Hernán A.; Good, Jeffrey M.; Schultz, Rigo; Aximu-Petri, Ayinuer; Butthof, Anne; Höber, Barbara; Höffner, Barbara; Siegemund, Madlen; Weihmann, Antje; Nusbaum, Chad; Lander, Eric S.; Russ, Carsten; Novod, Nathaniel; Affourtit, Jason; Egholm, Michael; Verna, Christine; Rudan, Pavao; Brajkovic, Dejana; Kucan, Željko; Gušic, Ivan; Doronichev, Vladimir B.; Golovanova, Liubov V.; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; de la Rasilla, Marco; Fortea, Javier; Rosas, Antonio; Schmitz, Ralf W.; Johnson, Philip L. F.; Eichler, Evan E.; Falush, Daniel; Birney, Ewan; Mullikin, James C.; Slatkin, Montgomery; Nielsen, Rasmus; Kelso, Janet; Lachmann, Michael; Reich, David; Pääbo, Svante

    2016-01-01

    Neandertals, the closest evolutionary relatives of present-day humans, lived in large parts of Europe and western Asia before disappearing 30,000 years ago. We present a draft sequence of the Neandertal genome composed of more than 4 billion nucleotides from three individuals. Comparisons of the Neandertal genome to the genomes of five present-day humans from different parts of the world identify a number of genomic regions that may have been affected by positive selection in ancestral modern humans, including genes involved in metabolism and in cognitive and skeletal development. We show that Neandertals shared more genetic variants with present-day humans in Eurasia than with present-day humans in sub-Saharan Africa, suggesting that gene flow from Neandertals into the ancestors of non-Africans occurred before the divergence of Eurasian groups from each other. PMID:20448178

  6. A context for the last Neandertals of interior Iberia: Los Casares cave revisited

    PubMed Central

    Alcolea-González, Javier; Kehl, Martin; Albert, Rosa-María; Baena-Preysler, Javier; de Balbín-Behrmann, Rodrigo; Cuartero, Felipe; Cuenca-Bescós, Gloria; Jiménez-Barredo, Fernando; López-Sáez, José-Antonio; Piqué, Raquel; Rodríguez-Antón, David; Yravedra, José; Weniger, Gerd-Christian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction and objectives Although the Iberian Peninsula is a key area for understanding the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition and the demise of the Neandertals, valuable evidence for these debates remains scarce and problematic in its interior regions. Sparse data supporting a late Neandertal persistence in the Iberian interior have been recently refuted and hence new evidence is needed to build new models on the timing and causes of Neandertal disappearance in inland Iberia and the whole peninsula. In this study we provide new evidence from Los Casares, a cave located in the highlands of the Spanish Meseta, where a Neandertal-associated Middle Paleolithic site was discovered and first excavated in the 1960’s. Our main objective is twofold: (1) provide an updated geoarcheological, paleoenvironmental and chronological framework for this site, and (2) discuss obtained results in the context of the time and nature of the last Neandertal presence in Iberia. Methods We conducted new fieldwork in an interior chamber of Los Casares cave named ‘Seno A’. Our methods included micromorphology, sedimentology, radiocarbon dating, Uranium/Thorium dating, palinology, microfaunal analysis, anthracology, phytolith analysis, archeozoology and lithic technology. Here we present results on site formation processes, paleoenvironment and the chronological setting of the Neandertal occupation at Los Casares cave-Seno A. Results and discussion The sediment sequence reveals a mostly in situ archeological deposit containing evidence of both Neandertal activity and carnivore action in level c, dated to 44,899–42,175 calendar years ago. This occupation occurred during a warm and humid interval of Marine Isotopic Stage 3, probably correlating with Greenland Interstadial 11, representing one of the latest occurrences of Neandertals in the Iberian interior. However, overlying layer b records a deterioration of local environments, thus providing a plausible explanation for the

  7. A context for the last Neandertals of interior Iberia: Los Casares cave revisited.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz-Castaño, Manuel; Alcolea-González, Javier; Kehl, Martin; Albert, Rosa-María; Baena-Preysler, Javier; de Balbín-Behrmann, Rodrigo; Cuartero, Felipe; Cuenca-Bescós, Gloria; Jiménez-Barredo, Fernando; López-Sáez, José-Antonio; Piqué, Raquel; Rodríguez-Antón, David; Yravedra, José; Weniger, Gerd-Christian

    2017-01-01

    Although the Iberian Peninsula is a key area for understanding the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition and the demise of the Neandertals, valuable evidence for these debates remains scarce and problematic in its interior regions. Sparse data supporting a late Neandertal persistence in the Iberian interior have been recently refuted and hence new evidence is needed to build new models on the timing and causes of Neandertal disappearance in inland Iberia and the whole peninsula. In this study we provide new evidence from Los Casares, a cave located in the highlands of the Spanish Meseta, where a Neandertal-associated Middle Paleolithic site was discovered and first excavated in the 1960's. Our main objective is twofold: (1) provide an updated geoarcheological, paleoenvironmental and chronological framework for this site, and (2) discuss obtained results in the context of the time and nature of the last Neandertal presence in Iberia. We conducted new fieldwork in an interior chamber of Los Casares cave named 'Seno A'. Our methods included micromorphology, sedimentology, radiocarbon dating, Uranium/Thorium dating, palinology, microfaunal analysis, anthracology, phytolith analysis, archeozoology and lithic technology. Here we present results on site formation processes, paleoenvironment and the chronological setting of the Neandertal occupation at Los Casares cave-Seno A. The sediment sequence reveals a mostly in situ archeological deposit containing evidence of both Neandertal activity and carnivore action in level c, dated to 44,899-42,175 calendar years ago. This occupation occurred during a warm and humid interval of Marine Isotopic Stage 3, probably correlating with Greenland Interstadial 11, representing one of the latest occurrences of Neandertals in the Iberian interior. However, overlying layer b records a deterioration of local environments, thus providing a plausible explanation for the abandonment of the site, and perhaps for the total disappearance of

  8. Locomotion and body proportions of the Saint-Césaire 1 Châtelperronian Neandertal

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik; Ruff, Christopher B.; Churchill, Steven E.; Vandermeersch, Bernard

    1998-01-01

    The initial Upper Paleolithic (Châtelperronian) of western Europe was associated with late European Neandertals, best known through the Saint-Césaire 1 partial skeleton. Biomechanical cross-sectional analysis of the Saint-Césaire 1 femoral diaphysis at the subtrochanteric and midshaft levels, given the plasticity of mammalian diaphyseal cortical bone, provides insights into the habitual levels and patterns of loading on the lower limbs from body mass, proportions, and locomotion. The overall robustnesses of the femoral diaphyses of European Neandertals and early modern humans are similar once contrasts in body proportions are incorporated into the body size scaling. Saint-Césaire 1 matches these samples only if it is provided with Neandertal-like hyperarctic body proportions. And the rounded proximal femoral diaphysis of Saint-Césaire 1 is similar to those of earlier Neandertals, likely also reflecting similar cold-adapted broad pelvic regions. However, although morphologically similar to those of archaic Homo, the Saint-Césaire 1 femoral midshaft exhibits the anteroposterior reinforcement characteristic of early modern humans. Consequently, Saint-Césaire 1 appears as a morphological Neandertal with hyperarctic body proportions who nonetheless had shifted locomotor patterns to more closely resemble those of other Upper Paleolithic humans. PMID:9576971

  9. Radiocarbon dates from the Grotte du Renne and Saint-Césaire support a Neandertal origin for the Châtelperronian.

    PubMed

    Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Talamo, Sahra; Julien, Michèle; David, Francine; Connet, Nelly; Bodu, Pierre; Vandermeersch, Bernard; Richards, Michael P

    2012-11-13

    The transition from the Middle Paleolithic (MP) to Upper Paleolithic (UP) is marked by the replacement of late Neandertals by modern humans in Europe between 50,000 and 40,000 y ago. Châtelperronian (CP) artifact assemblages found in central France and northern Spain date to this time period. So far, it is the only such assemblage type that has yielded Neandertal remains directly associated with UP style artifacts. CP assemblages also include body ornaments, otherwise virtually unknown in the Neandertal world. However, it has been argued that instead of the CP being manufactured by Neandertals, site formation processes and layer admixture resulted in the chance association of Neanderthal remains, CP assemblages, and body ornaments. Here, we report a series of accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dates on ultrafiltered bone collagen extracted from 40 well-preserved bone fragments from the late Mousterian, CP, and Protoaurignacian layers at the Grotte du Renne site (at Arcy-sur-Cure, France). Our radiocarbon results are inconsistent with the admixture hypothesis. Further, we report a direct date on the Neandertal CP skeleton from Saint-Césaire (France). This date corroborates the assignment of CP assemblages to the latest Neandertals of western Europe. Importantly, our results establish that the production of body ornaments in the CP postdates the arrival of modern humans in neighboring regions of Europe. This new behavior could therefore have been the result of cultural diffusion from modern to Neandertal groups.

  10. Radiocarbon dates from the Grotte du Renne and Saint-Césaire support a Neandertal origin for the Châtelperronian

    PubMed Central

    Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Talamo, Sahra; Julien, Michèle; David, Francine; Connet, Nelly; Bodu, Pierre; Vandermeersch, Bernard; Richards, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    The transition from the Middle Paleolithic (MP) to Upper Paleolithic (UP) is marked by the replacement of late Neandertals by modern humans in Europe between 50,000 and 40,000 y ago. Châtelperronian (CP) artifact assemblages found in central France and northern Spain date to this time period. So far, it is the only such assemblage type that has yielded Neandertal remains directly associated with UP style artifacts. CP assemblages also include body ornaments, otherwise virtually unknown in the Neandertal world. However, it has been argued that instead of the CP being manufactured by Neandertals, site formation processes and layer admixture resulted in the chance association of Neanderthal remains, CP assemblages, and body ornaments. Here, we report a series of accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dates on ultrafiltered bone collagen extracted from 40 well-preserved bone fragments from the late Mousterian, CP, and Protoaurignacian layers at the Grotte du Renne site (at Arcy-sur-Cure, France). Our radiocarbon results are inconsistent with the admixture hypothesis. Further, we report a direct date on the Neandertal CP skeleton from Saint-Césaire (France). This date corroborates the assignment of CP assemblages to the latest Neandertals of western Europe. Importantly, our results establish that the production of body ornaments in the CP postdates the arrival of modern humans in neighboring regions of Europe. This new behavior could therefore have been the result of cultural diffusion from modern to Neandertal groups. PMID:23112183

  11. Absolute and relative endocranial size in Neandertals and later Pleistocene Homo.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    Eurasian Neandertals encompass the entire observed range of recent and fossil Homo sapiens in absolute, but not relative endocranial volume, and Neandertals attest an average EQ significantly lower than their Upper Pleistocene successors. While the cognitive, social, and evolutionary implications of this phenomenon have been emphasised, the statistical basis of a mean inference of EQ in the Neandertal hypodigm has not been appropriately demonstrated. A demonstrable male bias in the available postcranial, not cranial, series has skewed perceptions of Neandertal brain-to-body size scaling towards a rejection of the null hypothesis. A simple resolution to this problem is a concise assessment of paired associated covariates against a suitable recent human comparator series. Permutations of Fisher's z and Student's t statistics are valid metrics in tests of significance in single datum hypotheses. Bootstrapped single observation tests determined significance in body size, absolute and relative endocranial volume in Pleistocene archaic, early modern, and late Pleistocene H. sapiens. With respect to absolute ECV, all current Middle-Upper Pleistocene crania fall within the substantial recent Homo range. Nevertheless, simple indices derived from raw and modified data in normal and logarithmic space reveal that Western European Neandertal males approach the lower extremes of our observed size range in relative ECV, yet none exceed statistical significance. Results confirm that relative ECV/brain size in Neandertals was not significantly depressed relative to recent and fossil H. sapiens and this is consistent with a substantial body of data from living humans dismissing any simple correspondence of relative brain size with intelligence and, by extension, evolutionary success. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Neandertal growth: what are the costs?

    PubMed

    Mateos, Ana; Goikoetxea, Idoia; Leonard, William R; Martín-González, Jesús Ángel; Rodríguez-Gómez, Guillermo; Rodríguez, Jesús

    2014-12-01

    Energetic approaches have been increasingly used to address key issues in Neandertal palaeoecology and palaeobiology. Previous research has focused exclusively on the energy requirements of adults and highlights the high energy demands of these individuals compared with modern humans. Less attention has been paid to the energy requirements of sub-adult Neandertals, even though this age group could provide clues for a better understanding of Neandertal life history. Accordingly, herein, we estimate the energy costs of maintenance and growth in Neandertal infants and children from one to six years of age and compare these costs with values for modern humans. Statural growth models for two modern human populations (Beasain and Evenki) and an average Neandertal model population are used to establish weight growth models. In turn, these models of body weight growth are used to estimate key components of energetic variables (basal metabolic rate, total energy expenditure, energy of growth and daily energy requirements). Between three and six years of age, Neandertal children have slightly lower basal and growth energy costs than do modern humans of the same age, due primarily to their smaller body mass and slower growth rates. The reduction in energy allocated to growth is likely the result of metabolic adaptations to other somatic factors and thermal stress. Data from contemporary human infants and children suggest that even mild cold stress increases non-shivering thermogenesis, thus elevating metabolic needs by 50% or more. These results suggest that thermal stress likely played a strong role in shaping the delayed developmental patterns and lower energy allocated to growth during early life in Neandertals relative to Homo sapiens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Vergisson 4: a left-handed Neandertal.

    PubMed

    Condemi, Silvana; Monge, Janet; Quertelet, Sylvain; Frayer, David W; Combier, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Handedness is an important marker for lateralization of humans in the modern and fossil record. For the most part, Neandertals and their ancestors are strongly right-handed. We describe a single tooth from a Neandertal level at Vergisson 4 (Vg 4-83). This left upper central incisor shows all the features typical of Neandertal incisors. It also exhibits a predominance of left-handed striations. Striations on the incisor's labial surface were mapped at 20x magnification using Photoshop. Angulations of the striations were determined from their deviation from the maximum mesio-distal line and were analyzed using NIH's freeware, Image J. Of the 60 labial surface striations, Vg 4-83 shows a strong predominance of left-handed striations (46; 76.7%), which are statistically significantly different (p < .001 with a two-tailed chi(2) test) from the small number (3) of right-handed striations. The identification of another left-handed Neandertal adds to our understanding about handedness variation in this fossil hominin. Given the high frequency of right-handed Neandertals, the 90: 10 modern ratio is still preserved in this group. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Revised direct radiocarbon dating of the Vindija G1 Upper Paleolithic Neandertals.

    PubMed

    Higham, Tom; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Karavanić, Ivor; Smith, Fred H; Trinkaus, Erik

    2006-01-17

    The 1998/1999 direct dating of two Neandertal specimens from level G(1) of Vindija Cave in Croatia to approximately 28,000 and approximately 29,000 radiocarbon ((14)C) years ago has led to interpretations concerning the late survival of Neandertals in south-central Europe, patterns of interaction between Neandertals and in-dispersing early modern humans in Europe, and complex biocultural scenarios for the earlier phases of the Upper Paleolithic. Given improvements, particularly in sample pretreatment techniques for bone radiocarbon samples, especially ultrafiltration of collagen samples, these Vindija G(1) Neandertal fossils are redated to approximately 32,000-33,000 (14)C years ago and possibly earlier. These results and the recent redating of a number of purportedly old modern human skeletal remains in Europe to younger time periods highlight the importance of fine chronological control when studying this biocultural time period and the tenuous nature of monolithic scenarios for the establishment of modern humans and earlier phases of the Upper Paleolithic in Europe.

  15. Revised direct radiocarbon dating of the Vindija G1 Upper Paleolithic Neandertals

    PubMed Central

    Higham, Tom; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Karavanić, Ivor; Smith, Fred H.; Trinkaus, Erik

    2006-01-01

    The 1998/1999 direct dating of two Neandertal specimens from level G1 of Vindija Cave in Croatia to ≈28,000 and ≈29,000 radiocarbon (14C) years ago has led to interpretations concerning the late survival of Neandertals in south-central Europe, patterns of interaction between Neandertals and in-dispersing early modern humans in Europe, and complex biocultural scenarios for the earlier phases of the Upper Paleolithic. Given improvements, particularly in sample pretreatment techniques for bone radiocarbon samples, especially ultrafiltration of collagen samples, these Vindija G1 Neandertal fossils are redated to ≈32,000–33,000 14C years ago and possibly earlier. These results and the recent redating of a number of purportedly old modern human skeletal remains in Europe to younger time periods highlight the importance of fine chronological control when studying this biocultural time period and the tenuous nature of monolithic scenarios for the establishment of modern humans and earlier phases of the Upper Paleolithic in Europe. PMID:16407102

  16. Neandertal mandibles from the Sima de las Palomas del Cabezo Gordo, Murcia, southeastern Spain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Michael J; Lombardi, A Vincent; Zapata, Josefina; Trinkaus, Erik

    2010-06-01

    The Middle Paleolithic levels of the Sima de las Palomas have yielded eight partial mandibles (Palomas 1, 6, 7, 23, 49, 59, 80, and 88). Palomas 7, 49, 80, and 88 are immature, and Palomas 49, 59, 80, and 88 are among the latest Neandertals (approximately 40,000 cal BP). Palomas 1 is geologically older (approximately 50,000-60,000 cal BP), and the other three were found ex situ. The mandibles exhibit a suite of characteristics that align them with the Neandertals among later Pleistocene humans, including symphyseal morphology, symphyseal orientation, corpus robusticity, distal mental foramen position, retromolar space presence, wide immature dental arcade, and high-coronoid process with an asymmetrical mandibular notch. However, Palomas 6 lacks a retromolar space, Palomas 59 has a narrow lateral corpus, and Palomas 80 has a mesial mental foramen and open mandibular foramen. The Palomas mandibles therefore help to document that the late Middle Paleolithic of southern Iberia was the product of Neandertals. They also reinforce the presence of variability in both metric and discrete aspects of Neandertal mandibular morphology, both within and across samples, some of which may be temporal and/or geographic in nature.

  17. Region-dependent patterns of trabecular bone growth in the human proximal femur: A study of 3D bone microarchitecture from early postnatal to late childhood period.

    PubMed

    Milovanovic, Petar; Djonic, Danijela; Hahn, Michael; Amling, Michael; Busse, Björn; Djuric, Marija

    2017-10-01

    Parallel with body growth and development, bone structure in non-adults is reorganized to achieve the particular design observed in mature individuals. We traced the changes in three-dimensional trabecular microarchitectural design during the phases of locomotor maturation to clarify how human bone adapts to mechanical demands. Micro-CT was performed on biomechanically-relevant subregions of the proximal femur (medial, intermediate and lateral neck regions, intertrochanteric region, metaphyseal region) from early postnatal period to late childhood. Developmental patterns of trabecular microarchitecture showed that gestationally overproduced bone present at birth underwent the most dramatic reduction during the first year, followed by a reversing trend in some of the quantitative parameters (e.g., bone volume fraction, trabecular anisotropy). Certain regional anisotropy already present at birth is further accentuated into the childhood suggesting an adaptation to differential loading environments. Trabecular eccentricity in the femoral neck was particularly accentuated during childhood, giving the medial neck-the site mostly loaded in walking-superior microarchitectural design (high bone volume fraction and anisotropy, the earliest appearance and predominance of plate- and honeycomb-shaped trabeculae). While providing quantitative data on how bone microarchitecture adapts to increasing mechanical demands occurring during the phases of locomotor maturation, the study reveals how regional anisotropy develops in the proximal femur to ensure a functional and competent bone structure. Decomposing the region-specific patterns of bone mass accrual is important in understanding skeletal adaptations to bipedalism, as well for understanding why fractures often occur location-dependent, both in pediatric and elderly individuals. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The Date of Interbreeding between Neandertals and Modern Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sankararaman, Sriram; Patterson, Nick; Li, Heng; Pääbo, Svante; Reich, David

    2012-01-01

    Comparisons of DNA sequences between Neandertals and present-day humans have shown that Neandertals share more genetic variants with non-Africans than with Africans. This could be due to interbreeding between Neandertals and modern humans when the two groups met subsequent to the emergence of modern humans outside Africa. However, it could also be due to population structure that antedates the origin of Neandertal ancestors in Africa. We measure the extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the genomes of present-day Europeans and find that the last gene flow from Neandertals (or their relatives) into Europeans likely occurred 37,000–86,000 years before the present (BP), and most likely 47,000–65,000 years ago. This supports the recent interbreeding hypothesis and suggests that interbreeding may have occurred when modern humans carrying Upper Paleolithic technologies encountered Neandertals as they expanded out of Africa. PMID:23055938

  19. The Neandertal vertebral column 1: the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Been, Ella; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Stock, Jay T

    2013-06-01

    This paper provides a metric analysis of the Neandertal cervical spine in relation to modern human variation. All seven cervical vertebrae have been analysed. Metric data from eight Neandertal individuals are compared with a large sample of modern humans. The significance of morphometric differences is tested using both z-scores and two-tailed Wilcoxon signed rank tests. The results identify significant metric and morphological differences between Neandertals and modern humans in all seven cervical vertebrae. Neandertal vertebrae are mediolaterally wider and dorsoventrally longer than modern humans, due in part to longer and more horizontally oriented spinous processes. This suggests that Neandertal cervical morphology was more stable in both mid-sagittal and coronal planes. It is hypothesized that the differences in cranial size and shape in the Neandertal and modern human lineages from their Middle Pleistocene ancestors could account for some of the differences in the neck anatomy between these species.

  20. Neandertal faces were not long; modern human faces are short

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik

    2003-01-01

    Neandertal faces have been described as being derived with respect to their overall length or degree of anterior projection. A comparison of cranial and mandibular indicators of lower facial projection across archaic and modern Homo indicates that Neandertal facial lengths on average are similar to those of preceding archaic Homo and principally contrast with those of recent humans. Neandertal facial length is not derived. The shortness of recent human facial skeletons is the evolutionarily derived condition. PMID:12815095

  1. Dynamics of genetic and morphological variability within Neandertals.

    PubMed

    Hawks, John

    2012-01-01

    Paleogenomics may suggest changes to the way anthropologists have discussed the dynamics and morphological diversity among Neandertals. Genetic comparisons show that later Neandertals had relatively low autosomal genetic variation compared to recent humans. The known mitochondrial sample from Neandertals covers a broader geographic and temporal range, and shows greater diversity. This review addresses how genetic data compare to morphological and archaeological evidence about Neandertal variation and dynamics. Traditional views emphasized the morphological differences between western and eastern Neandertal populations, and between early and later Neandertals. Genomes broadly support these groupings, without resolving the outstanding question of the affinities of specimens from southwest Asia. However, the pattern of genetic variation appears to reject a long, in situ transformation of Neandertal groups over time, suggesting instead a more rapid process of regional dispersal and partial population replacement. Archaeological indicators sample dynamics on a much finer timescale than morphological or genetic evidence, and point to dispersal and turnover among Neandertals on a regional scale. In this way, genetic evidence may provide a bridge between the timescales relevant to morphological and archaeological comparisons. New ways of looking at the morphology of Neandertals may yield a better picture of their interactions and movements.

  2. IBD Sharing between Africans, Neandertals, and Denisovans

    PubMed Central

    Povysil, Gundula

    2016-01-01

    Interbreeding between ancestors of humans and other hominins outside of Africa has been studied intensively, while their common history within Africa still lacks proper attention. However, shedding light on human evolution in this time period about which little is known, is essential for understanding subsequent events outside of Africa. We investigate the genetic relationships of humans, Neandertals, and Denisovans by identifying very short DNA segments in the 1000 Genomes Phase 3 data that these hominins share identical by descent (IBD). By focusing on low frequency and rare variants, we identify very short IBD segments with high confidence. These segments reveal events from a very distant past because shorter IBD segments are presumably older than longer ones. We extracted two types of very old IBD segments that are not only shared among humans, but also with Neandertals and/or Denisovans. The first type contains longer segments that are found primarily in Asians and Europeans where more segments are found in South Asians than in East Asians for both Neandertal and Denisovan. These longer segments indicate complex admixture events outside of Africa. The second type consists of shorter segments that are shared mainly by Africans and therefore may indicate events involving ancestors of humans and other ancient hominins within Africa. Our results from the autosomes are further supported by an analysis of chromosome X, on which segments that are shared by Africans and match the Neandertal and/or Denisovan genome were even more prominent. Our results indicate that interbreeding with other hominins was a common feature of human evolution starting already long before ancestors of modern humans left Africa. PMID:28158547

  3. Climate-mediated shifts in Neandertal subsistence behaviors at Pech de l'Azé IV and Roc de Marsal (Dordogne Valley, France).

    PubMed

    Hodgkins, Jamie; Marean, Curtis W; Turq, Alain; Sandgathe, Dennis; McPherron, Shannon J P; Dibble, Harold

    2016-07-01

    Neandertals disappeared from Europe just after 40,000 years ago. Some hypotheses ascribe this to numerous population crashes associated with glacial cycles in the late Pleistocene. The goal of this paper is to test the hypothesis that glacial periods stressed Neandertal populations. If cold climates stressed Neandertals, their subsistence behaviors may have changed-requiring intensified use of prey through more extensive nutrient extraction from faunal carcasses. To test this, an analysis of Neandertal butchering was conducted on medium sized bovid/cervid remains composed of predominately red deer (Cervus elaphus), reindeer (Rangifer tarandus), and roe deer (Capreolus caprelous) deposited during global warm and cold phases from two French sites: Pech de l'Azé IV (Pech IV, Bordes' excavation) and Roc de Marsal (RDM). Analysis of surface modification on high survival long bones and proximal and middle phalanges demonstrates that skeletal elements excavated from the cold levels (RDM Level 4, Pech IV Level I2) at each cave have more cut marks and percussion marks than elements from the warm levels (RDM Level 9, Pech IV Level Y-Z) after controlling for fragment size. At both sites, epiphyseal fragments are rare, and although this pattern can result from carnivore consumption, carnivore tooth marks are almost nonexistent (<0.1%). Alternatively, processing epiphyseal ends for bone grease may have been a Neandertal survival strategy, and epiphyses were more intensively percussed in cold levels than in warm levels at both RDM and Pech IV. The exploitation of low marrow yield elements such as phalanges does not show a consistent pattern relating to climate, but may have been a general Neandertal behavioral characteristic, suggesting that these hominids were regularly on the edge of sufficient nutrient availability even during interglacials. Overall, the faunal assemblages from Roc de Marsal and Pech IV provide some support for the hypothesis that Neandertals were processing

  4. Complex History of Admixture between Modern Humans and Neandertals

    PubMed Central

    Vernot, Benjamin; Akey, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent analyses have found that a substantial amount of the Neandertal genome persists in the genomes of contemporary non-African individuals. East Asians have, on average, higher levels of Neandertal ancestry than do Europeans, which might be due to differences in the efficiency of purifying selection, an additional pulse of introgression into East Asians, or other unexplored scenarios. To better define the scope of plausible models of archaic admixture between Neandertals and anatomically modern humans, we analyzed patterns of introgressed sequence in whole-genome data of 379 Europeans and 286 East Asians. We found that inferences of demographic history restricted to neutrally evolving genomic regions allowed a simple one-pulse model to be robustly rejected, suggesting that differences in selection cannot explain the differences in Neandertal ancestry. We show that two additional demographic models, involving either a second pulse of Neandertal gene flow into the ancestors of East Asians or a dilution of Neandertal lineages in Europeans by admixture with an unknown ancestral population, are consistent with the data. Thus, the history of admixture between modern humans and Neandertals is most likely more complex than previously thought. PMID:25683119

  5. Morphology and function of Neandertal and modern human ear ossicles

    PubMed Central

    David, Romain; Gunz, Philipp; Schmidt, Tobias; Spoor, Fred; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The diminutive middle ear ossicles (malleus, incus, stapes) housed in the tympanic cavity of the temporal bone play an important role in audition. The few known ossicles of Neandertals are distinctly different from those of anatomically modern humans (AMHs), despite the close relationship between both human species. Although not mutually exclusive, these differences may affect hearing capacity or could reflect covariation with the surrounding temporal bone. Until now, detailed comparisons were hampered by the small sample of Neandertal ossicles and the unavailability of methods combining analyses of ossicles with surrounding structures. Here, we present an analysis of the largest sample of Neandertal ossicles to date, including many previously unknown specimens, covering a wide geographic and temporal range. Microcomputed tomography scans and 3D geometric morphometrics were used to quantify shape and functional properties of the ossicles and the tympanic cavity and make comparisons with recent and extinct AMHs as well as African apes. We find striking morphological differences between ossicles of AMHs and Neandertals. Ossicles of both Neandertals and AMHs appear derived compared with the inferred ancestral morphology, albeit in different ways. Brain size increase evolved separately in AMHs and Neandertals, leading to differences in the tympanic cavity and, consequently, the shape and spatial configuration of the ossicles. Despite these different evolutionary trajectories, functional properties of the middle ear of AMHs and Neandertals are largely similar. The relevance of these functionally equivalent solutions is likely to conserve a similar auditory sensitivity level inherited from their last common ancestor. PMID:27671643

  6. Did viral disease of humans wipe out the Neandertals?

    PubMed

    Wolff, Horst; Greenwood, Alex D

    2010-07-01

    Neandertals were an anatomically distinct hominoid species inhabiting a vast geographical area ranging from Portugal to western Siberia and from northern Europe to the Middle East. The species became extinct 28,000 years ago, coinciding with the arrival of anatomically modern humans (AMHs) in Europe 40,000 years ago. There has been considerable debate surrounding the main causes of the extinction of Neandertals. After at least 200,000 years of successful adaption to the climate, flora and fauna of Eurasia, it is not clear why they suddenly failed to survive. For many years, climate change or competition with anatomically modern human (AMH) have been the leading hypotheses. Recently these hypotheses have somewhat fallen out of favour due to the recognition that Neandertals were a highly developed species with complex social structure, culture and technical skills. Were AMHs lucky and survived some catastrophe that eradicated the Neandertals? It seems unlikely that this is the case considering the close timing of the arrival of AMHs and the disappearance of Neandertals. Perhaps the arrival of AMHs also brought additional new non-human microscopic inhabitants to the regions where Neandertals lived and these new inhabitants contributed to the disappearance of the species. We introduce a medical hypothesis that complements other recent explanations for the extinction of Neandertals. After the ancestors of Neandertals left Africa, their immune system adapted gradually to the pathogens in their new Eurasian environment. In contrast, AMHs continued to co-evolve with east African pathogens. More than 200,000 years later, AMHs carried pathogens that would have been alien to pre-historic Europe. First contact between long separated populations can be devastating. Recent European and American history provides evidence for similar events, where introduction of viral, protozoan or bacterial pathogens to immunologically naïve populations lead to mass mortality and local

  7. Neandertal DNA sequences and the origin of modern humans.

    PubMed

    Krings, M; Stone, A; Schmitz, R W; Krainitzki, H; Stoneking, M; Pääbo, S

    1997-07-11

    DNA was extracted from the Neandertal-type specimen found in 1856 in western Germany. By sequencing clones from short overlapping PCR products, a hitherto unknown mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequence was determined. Multiple controls indicate that this sequence is endogenous to the fossil. Sequence comparisons with human mtDNA sequences, as well as phylogenetic analyses, show that the Neandertal sequence falls outside the variation of modern humans. Furthermore, the age of the common ancestor of the Neandertal and modern human mtDNAs is estimated to be four times greater than that of the common ancestor of human mtDNAs. This suggests that Neandertals went extinct without contributing mtDNA to modern humans.

  8. The Neandertal vertebral column 2: The lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Arlegi, Mikel; Barash, Alon; Stock, Jay T; Been, Ella

    2017-05-01

    Here we provide the most extensive metric and morphological analysis performed to date on the Neandertal lumbar spine. Neandertal lumbar vertebrae show differences from modern humans in both the vertebral body and in the neural arch, although not all Neandertal lumbar vertebrae differ from modern humans in the same way. Differences in the vertebral foramen are restricted to the lowermost lumbar vertebrae (L4 and L5), differences in the orientation of the upper articular facets appear in the uppermost lumbar vertebrae (probably in L1 and L2-L3), and differences in the horizontal angle of the transverse process appear in L2-L4. Neandertals, when compared to modern humans, show a smaller degree of lumbar lordosis. Based on a still limited fossil sample, early hominins (australopiths and Homo erectus) had a lumbar lordosis that was similar to but below the mean of modern humans. Here, we hypothesize that from this ancestral degree of lumbar lordosis, the Neandertal lineage decreased their lumbar lordosis and Homo sapiens slightly increased theirs. From a postural point of view, the lower degree of lordosis is related to a more vertical position of the sacrum, which is also positioned more ventrally with respect to the dorsal end of the pelvis. This results in a spino-pelvic alignment that, though different from modern humans, maintained an economic postural equilibrium. Some features, such as a lower degree of lumbar lordosis, were already present in the middle Pleistocene populations ancestral to Neandertals. However, these middle Pleistocene populations do not show the full suite of Neandertal lumbar morphologies, which probably means that the characteristic features of the Neandertal lumbar spine did not arise all at once. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Neandertals made the first specialized bone tools in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Soressi, Marie; McPherron, Shannon P.; Lenoir, Michel; Dogandžić, Tamara; Goldberg, Paul; Jacobs, Zenobia; Maigrot, Yolaine; Martisius, Naomi L.; Miller, Christopher E.; Rendu, William; Richards, Michael; Skinner, Matthew M.; Steele, Teresa E.; Talamo, Sahra; Texier, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Modern humans replaced Neandertals ∼40,000 y ago. Close to the time of replacement, Neandertals show behaviors similar to those of the modern humans arriving into Europe, including the use of specialized bone tools, body ornaments, and small blades. It is highly debated whether these modern behaviors developed before or as a result of contact with modern humans. Here we report the identification of a type of specialized bone tool, lissoir, previously only associated with modern humans. The microwear preserved on one of these lissoir is consistent with the use of lissoir in modern times to obtain supple, lustrous, and more impermeable hides. These tools are from a Neandertal context proceeding the replacement period and are the oldest specialized bone tools in Europe. As such, they are either a demonstration of independent invention by Neandertals or an indication that modern humans started influencing European Neandertals much earlier than previously believed. Because these finds clearly predate the oldest known age for the use of similar objects in Europe by anatomically modern humans, they could also be evidence for cultural diffusion from Neandertals to modern humans. PMID:23940333

  10. Pediatric Thighbone (Femur) Fracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... fractures in infants under 1 year old is child abuse. Child abuse is also a leading cause of thighbone fracture ... contact sports • Being in a motor vehicle accident • Child abuse Types of Femur Fractures (Classification) Femur fractures vary ...

  11. Femur fracture repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000166.htm Femur fracture repair - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had a fracture (break) in the femur in your leg. It ...

  12. The Divergence of Neandertal and Modern Human Y Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Fernando L.; Poznik, G. David; Castellano, Sergi; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing the genomes of extinct hominids has reshaped our understanding of modern human origins. Here, we analyze ∼120 kb of exome-captured Y-chromosome DNA from a Neandertal individual from El Sidrón, Spain. We investigate its divergence from orthologous chimpanzee and modern human sequences and find strong support for a model that places the Neandertal lineage as an outgroup to modern human Y chromosomes—including A00, the highly divergent basal haplogroup. We estimate that the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes is ∼588 thousand years ago (kya) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 447–806 kya). This is ∼2.1 (95% CI: 1.7–2.9) times longer than the TMRCA of A00 and other extant modern human Y-chromosome lineages. This estimate suggests that the Y-chromosome divergence mirrors the population divergence of Neandertals and modern human ancestors, and it refutes alternative scenarios of a relatively recent or super-archaic origin of Neandertal Y chromosomes. The fact that the Neandertal Y we describe has never been observed in modern humans suggests that the lineage is most likely extinct. We identify protein-coding differences between Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes, including potentially damaging changes to PCDH11Y, TMSB4Y, USP9Y, and KDM5D. Three of these changes are missense mutations in genes that produce male-specific minor histocompatibility (H-Y) antigens. Antigens derived from KDM5D, for example, are thought to elicit a maternal immune response during gestation. It is possible that incompatibilities at one or more of these genes played a role in the reproductive isolation of the two groups. PMID:27058445

  13. The Divergence of Neandertal and Modern Human Y Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Fernando L; Poznik, G David; Castellano, Sergi; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2016-04-07

    Sequencing the genomes of extinct hominids has reshaped our understanding of modern human origins. Here, we analyze ∼120 kb of exome-captured Y-chromosome DNA from a Neandertal individual from El Sidrón, Spain. We investigate its divergence from orthologous chimpanzee and modern human sequences and find strong support for a model that places the Neandertal lineage as an outgroup to modern human Y chromosomes-including A00, the highly divergent basal haplogroup. We estimate that the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes is ∼588 thousand years ago (kya) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 447-806 kya). This is ∼2.1 (95% CI: 1.7-2.9) times longer than the TMRCA of A00 and other extant modern human Y-chromosome lineages. This estimate suggests that the Y-chromosome divergence mirrors the population divergence of Neandertals and modern human ancestors, and it refutes alternative scenarios of a relatively recent or super-archaic origin of Neandertal Y chromosomes. The fact that the Neandertal Y we describe has never been observed in modern humans suggests that the lineage is most likely extinct. We identify protein-coding differences between Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes, including potentially damaging changes to PCDH11Y, TMSB4Y, USP9Y, and KDM5D. Three of these changes are missense mutations in genes that produce male-specific minor histocompatibility (H-Y) antigens. Antigens derived from KDM5D, for example, are thought to elicit a maternal immune response during gestation. It is possible that incompatibilities at one or more of these genes played a role in the reproductive isolation of the two groups.

  14. Genetic characterization of the ABO blood group in Neandertals

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The high polymorphism rate in the human ABO blood group gene seems to be related to susceptibility to different pathogens. It has been estimated that all genetic variation underlying the human ABO alleles appeared along the human lineage, after the divergence from the chimpanzee lineage. A paleogenetic analysis of the ABO blood group gene in Neandertals allows us to directly test for the presence of the ABO alleles in these extinct humans. Results We have analysed two male Neandertals that were retrieved under controlled conditions at the El Sidron site in Asturias (Spain) and that appeared to be almost free of modern human DNA contamination. We find a human specific diagnostic deletion for blood group O (O01 haplotype) in both Neandertal individuals. Conclusion These results suggest that the genetic change responsible for the O blood group in humans predates the human and Neandertal divergence. A potential selective event associated with the emergence of the O allele may have therefore occurred after humans separated from their common ancestor with chimpanzees and before the human-Neandertal population divergence. PMID:19108732

  15. Neandertal versus Modern Human Dietary Responses to Climatic Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    El Zaatari, Sireen; Grine, Frederick E.; Ungar, Peter S.; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The Neandertal lineage developed successfully throughout western Eurasia and effectively survived the harsh and severely changing environments of the alternating glacial/interglacial cycles from the middle of the Pleistocene until Marine Isotope Stage 3. Yet, towards the end of this stage, at the time of deteriorating climatic conditions that eventually led to the Last Glacial Maximum, and soon after modern humans entered western Eurasia, the Neandertals disappeared. Western Eurasia was by then exclusively occupied by modern humans. We use occlusal molar microwear texture analysis to examine aspects of diet in western Eurasian Paleolithic hominins in relation to fluctuations in food supplies that resulted from the oscillating climatic conditions of the Pleistocene. There is demonstrable evidence for differences in behavior that distinguish Upper Paleolithic humans from members of the Neandertal lineage. Specifically, whereas the Neandertals altered their diets in response to changing paleoecological conditions, the diets of Upper Paleolithic humans seem to have been less affected by slight changes in vegetation/climatic conditions but were linked to changes in their technological complexes. The results of this study also indicate differences in resource exploitation strategies between these two hominin groups. We argue that these differences in subsistence strategies, if they had already been established at the time of the first contact between these two hominin taxa, may have given modern humans an advantage over the Neandertals, and may have contributed to the persistence of our species despite habitat-related changes in food availabilities associated with climate fluctuations. PMID:27119336

  16. Neandertal versus Modern Human Dietary Responses to Climatic Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    El Zaatari, Sireen; Grine, Frederick E; Ungar, Peter S; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The Neandertal lineage developed successfully throughout western Eurasia and effectively survived the harsh and severely changing environments of the alternating glacial/interglacial cycles from the middle of the Pleistocene until Marine Isotope Stage 3. Yet, towards the end of this stage, at the time of deteriorating climatic conditions that eventually led to the Last Glacial Maximum, and soon after modern humans entered western Eurasia, the Neandertals disappeared. Western Eurasia was by then exclusively occupied by modern humans. We use occlusal molar microwear texture analysis to examine aspects of diet in western Eurasian Paleolithic hominins in relation to fluctuations in food supplies that resulted from the oscillating climatic conditions of the Pleistocene. There is demonstrable evidence for differences in behavior that distinguish Upper Paleolithic humans from members of the Neandertal lineage. Specifically, whereas the Neandertals altered their diets in response to changing paleoecological conditions, the diets of Upper Paleolithic humans seem to have been less affected by slight changes in vegetation/climatic conditions but were linked to changes in their technological complexes. The results of this study also indicate differences in resource exploitation strategies between these two hominin groups. We argue that these differences in subsistence strategies, if they had already been established at the time of the first contact between these two hominin taxa, may have given modern humans an advantage over the Neandertals, and may have contributed to the persistence of our species despite habitat-related changes in food availabilities associated with climate fluctuations.

  17. The false dichotomy: a refutation of the Neandertal indistinguishability claim.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Thomas; Overmann, Karenleigh; Coolidge, Frederick

    2016-06-20

    In the debate about the demise of the Neandertal, several scholars have claimed that humanity's nearest relatives were indistinguishable archaeologically, and thus behaviorally and cognitively, from contemporaneous Homo sapiens. They suggest that to hold otherwise is to characterize Neandertals as inferior to H. sapiens, a false dichotomy that excludes the possibility that the two human types simply differed in ways visible to natural selection, including their cognition. Support of the Neandertal indistinguishability claim requires ignoring the cranial differences between the two human types, which have implications for cognition and behavior. Further, support of the claim requires minimizing asymmetries in the quantity and degree of behavioral differences as attested by the archaeological record. The present paper reviews the evidence for cognitive and archaeological differences between the two human types in support of the excluded middle position.

  18. The Spy VI child: a newly discovered Neandertal infant.

    PubMed

    Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Bayle, Priscilla; Rougier, Hélène; Maureille, Bruno; Higham, Thomas; van der Plicht, Johannes; De Clerck, Nora; Semal, Patrick

    2010-12-01

    Spy cave (Jemeppe-sur-Sambre, Belgium) is reputed for the two adult Neandertal individuals discovered in situ in 1886. Recent reassessment of the Spy collections has allowed direct radiocarbon dating of these individuals. The sorting of all of the faunal collections has also led to the discovery of the remains of a Neandertal child, Spy VI. This individual is represented by two mandibular corpus fragments. The left fragment is the most complete and both sides preserve the mental foramen. Four deciduous teeth are associated with these mandibular remains: three incisors and one canine. The lower left canine (Spy 645a) conjoins with the corresponding alveolar socket in the left part of the mandible. Following extant standards, the developmental stage of the preserved teeth indicate an age at death of about one and a half years. In addition to performing a classical morphometric comparative study of the mandible and teeth, we have evaluated the dental tissue proportions using high-resolution microtomographic techniques. Our results show that Spy VI generally falls within the Neandertal range of variation. However, this specimen also exhibits particular traits, notably in the dental internal structural organization, which reveals that variation in the immature Neandertal variation is larger than what was variation currently represented by the available fossil record. These observations demonstrate the need for investigating the frequency and expression of immature Neandertal traits in fossil anterior teeth, as well as their temporal and geographic variation. Direct radiocarbon dating of the Spy VI specimen has been conducted in two different laboratories. The results of Spy VI confirm the age previously determined for the two adults, making the Spy Neandertal remains the youngest ever directly dated in northwest Europe. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional implications of Neandertal introgression in modern humans.

    PubMed

    Dannemann, Michael; Prüfer, Kay; Kelso, Janet

    2017-04-03

    Admixture between early modern humans and Neandertals approximately 50,000-60,000 years ago has resulted in 1.5-4% Neandertal ancestry in the genomes of present-day non-Africans. Evidence is accumulating that some of these archaic alleles are advantageous for modern humans, while others are deleterious; however, the major mechanism by which these archaic alleles act has not been fully explored. Here we assess the contributions of introgressed non-synonymous and regulatory variants to modern human protein and gene expression variation. We show that gene expression changes are more often associated with Neandertal ancestry than expected, and that the introgressed non-synonymous variants tend to have less predicted functional effect on modern human proteins than mutations that arose on the human lineage. Conversely, introgressed alleles contribute proportionally more to expression variation than non-introgressed alleles. Our results suggest that the major influence of Neandertal introgressed alleles is through their effects on gene regulation.

  20. The vertebral column of the Regourdou 1 Neandertal.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Couture-Veschambre, Christine; Madelaine, Stéphane; Maureille, Bruno

    2013-06-01

    The Regourdou 1 partial skeleton was found in 1957 in level IV of the eponymous site located in Montignac-sur-Vézère (Dordogne, France) and until now it has been only partially published. The ongoing revision of the faunal remains from the site has yielded additional fossils that pertain to this skeleton. Here we study the vertebral column of this individual, providing for the first time detailed descriptions for all of the fossils and reassessing the anatomical position of all of the fragments. The vertebral column of Regourdou 1 is one of the most complete in the Neandertal fossil record with at least 20 pre-sacral vertebrae (seven cervicals, nine thoracic and four lumbars), a partial sacrum and a fragmentary first coccygeal vertebra. When compared with modern humans, the vertebrae of Regourdou 1 display significant metric differences, and fit well within the range of Neandertal variability. A preliminary analysis of the most complete thoracic vertebrae of this individual indicates that Neandertals displayed significant differences from modern humans in the thoracic spine, which adds to the differences already observed in the cervical and lumbar regions. Finally, we have also observed mild signs of osteoarthrosis, albeit to a lower degree of that present in other Neandertals such as La Chapelle-aux-Saints, La Ferrassie 1 or Shanidar 3. This is consistent with the younger adult age for Regourdou 1.

  1. Anterior dental microwear texture analysis of the Krapina Neandertals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Kristin L.; Ungar, Peter S.

    2012-12-01

    Some Neandertal anterior teeth show unusual and excessive gross wear, commonly explained by non-dietary anterior tooth use, or using the anterior dentition as a tool, clamp, or third hand. This alternate use is inferred from aboriginal arctic populations, who used their front teeth in this manner. Here we examine anterior dental microwear textures of the Krapina Neandertals to test this hypothesis and further analyze tooth use in these hominins. Microwear textures from 17 Krapina Dental People were collected by white-light confocal profilometry using a 100x objective lens. Four adjacent scans were generated, totaling an area of 204x276 μm, and were analyzed using Toothfrax and SFrax SSFA software packages. The Neandertals were compared to six bioarchaeological/ethnographic samples with reported variation in diet, abrasive load, and non-dietary anterior tooth use. Results indicate that Krapina anterior teeth lack extreme microwear textures expected of hominins exposed to heavy abrasives or those that regularly generated high stresses associated with intense use of the front teeth as tools. Krapina hominins have microwear attributes in common with Coast Tsimshian, Aleut, and Puye Pueblo samples. Collectively, this suggests that the Krapina Neandertals faced moderate abrasive loads and only periodically used their anterior teeth as tools for non-diet related behaviors.

  2. Anterior dental microwear texture analysis of the Krapina Neandertals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Kristin; Ungar, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Some Neandertal anterior teeth show unusual and excessive gross wear, commonly explained by non-dietary anterior tooth use, or using the anterior dentition as a tool, clamp, or third hand. This alternate use is inferred from aboriginal arctic populations, who used their front teeth in this manner. Here we examine anterior dental microwear textures of the Krapina Neandertals to test this hypothesis and further analyze tooth use in these hominins. Microwear textures from 17 Krapina Dental People were collected by white-light confocal profilometry using a 100x objective lens. Four adjacent scans were generated, totaling an area of 204x276 μm, and were analyzed using Toothfrax and SFrax SSFA software packages. The Neandertals were compared to six bioarchaeological/ethnographic samples with reported variation in diet, abrasive load, and non-dietary anterior tooth use. Results indicate that Krapina anterior teeth lack extreme microwear textures expected of hominins exposed to heavy abrasives or those that regularly generated high stresses associated with intense use of the front teeth as tools. Krapina hominins have microwear attributes in common with Coast Tsimshian, Aleut, and Puye Pueblo samples. Collectively, this suggests that the Krapina Neandertals faced moderate abrasive loads and only periodically used their anterior teeth as tools for non-diet related behaviors.

  3. Functional morphology of the Neandertal scapular glenoid fossa.

    PubMed

    Macias, Marisa E; Churchill, Steven E

    2015-01-01

    Neandertals and Homo sapiens are known to differ in scapular glenoid fossa morphology. Functional explanations may be appropriate for certain aspects of glenoid fossa morphology; however, other factors--e.g., allometry, evolutionary development--must be addressed before functional morphology is considered. Using three-dimensional geometric morphometrics, shape of the scapular glenoid fossa was compared among Neandertals, early and recent modern humans, chimpanzees, orangutans, Australopithecus afarensis, and Au. sediba. Permutation analysis revealed that side, sex, and lifestyle did not correlate with shape. Of the features we found to differ between groups, anterior glenoid rim morphology and fossa curvature did not correlate with the aforementioned shape variables; thus, a functional explanation is appropriate for these components of glenoid fossa shape. Shared morphology among recent humans and chimpanzees (to the exclusion of Neandertals and orangutans) suggests independent forces contributing to these morphological configurations. Potential explanations include adaptations to habitual behavior and locomotor adaptations in the scapulae of recent humans and chimpanzees; these explanations are supported by clinical and experimental literature. The absence of these morphological features in Neandertals may support the lack of these selective forces on their scapular glenoid fossa morphology.

  4. A high-coverage Neandertal genome from Vindija Cave in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Prüfer, Kay; de Filippo, Cesare; Grote, Steffi; Mafessoni, Fabrizio; Korlević, Petra; Hajdinjak, Mateja; Vernot, Benjamin; Skov, Laurits; Hsieh, Pinghsun; Peyrégne, Stéphane; Reher, David; Hopfe, Charlotte; Nagel, Sarah; Maricic, Tomislav; Fu, Qiaomei; Theunert, Christoph; Rogers, Rebekah; Skoglund, Pontus; Chintalapati, Manjusha; Dannemann, Michael; Nelson, Bradley J; Key, Felix M; Rudan, Pavao; Kućan, Željko; Gušić, Ivan; Golovanova, Liubov V; Doronichev, Vladimir B; Patterson, Nick; Reich, David; Eichler, Evan E; Slatkin, Montgomery; Schierup, Mikkel H; Andrés, Aida; Kelso, Janet; Meyer, Matthias; Pääbo, Svante

    2017-10-05

    To date the only Neandertal genome that has been sequenced to high quality is from an individual found in Southern Siberia. We sequenced the genome of a female Neandertal from ~50 thousand years ago from Vindija Cave, Croatia to ~30-fold genomic coverage. She carried 1.6 differences per ten thousand base pairs between the two copies of her genome, fewer than present-day humans, suggesting that Neandertal populations were of small size. Our analyses indicate that she was more closely related to the Neandertals that mixed with the ancestors of present-day humans living outside of sub-Saharan Africa than the previously sequenced Neandertal from Siberia, allowing 10-20% more Neandertal DNA to be identified in present-day humans, including variants involved in LDL cholesterol levels, schizophrenia and other diseases. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. The Neandertals of northeastern Iberia: new remains from the Cova del Gegant (Sitges, Barcelona).

    PubMed

    Quam, Rolf; Sanz, Montserrat; Daura, Joan; Robson Brown, Kate; García-González, Rebeca; Rodríguez, Laura; Dawson, Heidi; Rodríguez, Rosa Flor; Gómez, Sandra; Villaescusa, Lucía; Rubio, Ángel; Yagüe, Almudena; Ortega Martínez, María Cruz; Fullola, Josep Maria; Zilhão, João; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2015-04-01

    The present study describes a new juvenile hominin mandible and teeth and a new juvenile humerus from level V of the GP2 gallery of Cova del Gegant (Spain). The mandible (Gegant-5) preserves a portion of the right mandibular corpus from the M1 distally to the socket for the dc mesially, and the age at death is estimated as 4.5-5.0 years. Gegant-5 shows a single mental foramen located under the dm1/dm2 interdental septum, a relatively posterior placement compared with recent hominins of a similar developmental age. The mental foramen in Gegant-5 is also placed within the lower half of the mandibular corpus, as in the previously described late adolescent/adult mandible (Gegant-1) from this same Middle Paleolithic site. The Gegant-5 canine shows pronounced marginal ridges, a distal accessory ridge, and a pronounced distolingual tubercle. The P3 shows a lingually-displaced protoconid cusp tip and a distal accessory ridge. The P4 shows a slightly asymmetrical crown outline, a continuous transverse crest, a mesially placed metaconid cusp tip, a slight distal accessory ridge, and an accessory lingual cusp. The M1 shows a Y5 pattern of cusp contact and a well-developed and deep anterior fovea bounded posteriorly by a continuous midtrigonid crest. Gegant-4 is the distal portion of a left humerus from a juvenile estimated to be between 5 and 7 years old at death. The specimen shows thick cortical bone. Although fragmentary, the constellation of morphological and metric features indicates Neandertal affinities for these specimens. Their spatial proximity at the site and similar ages at death suggest these remains may represent a single individual. The addition of these new specimens brings the total number of Neandertal remains from the Cova del Gegant to five, and this site documents the clearest evidence for Neandertal fossils associated with Middle Paleolithic stone tools in this region of the Iberian Peninsula. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic evidence for patrilocal mating behavior among Neandertal groups

    PubMed Central

    Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Rosas, Antonio; Estalrrich, Almudena; Gigli, Elena; Campos, Paula F.; García-Tabernero, Antonio; García-Vargas, Samuel; Sánchez-Quinto, Federico; Ramírez, Oscar; Civit, Sergi; Bastir, Markus; Huguet, Rosa; Santamaría, David; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Willerslev, Eske; de la Rasilla, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The remains of 12 Neandertal individuals have been found at the El Sidrón site (Asturias, Spain), consisting of six adults, three adolescents, two juveniles, and one infant. Archaeological, paleontological, and geological evidence indicates that these individuals represent all or part of a contemporaneous social group of Neandertals, who died at around the same time and later were buried together as a result of a collapse of an underground karst. We sequenced phylogenetically informative positions of mtDNA hypervariable regions 1 and 2 from each of the remains. Our results show that the 12 individuals stem from three different maternal lineages, accounting for seven, four, and one individual(s), respectively. Using a Y-chromosome assay to confirm the morphological determination of sex for each individual, we found that, although the three adult males carried the same mtDNA lineage, each of the three adult females carried different mtDNA lineages. These findings provide evidence to indicate that Neandertal groups not only were small and characterized by low genetic diversity but also were likely to have practiced patrilocal mating behavior. PMID:21173265

  7. The Neandertal type site revisited: Interdisciplinary investigations of skeletal remains from the Neander Valley, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Ralf W.; Serre, David; Bonani, Georges; Feine, Susanne; Hillgruber, Felix; Krainitzki, Heike; Pääbo, Svante; Smith, Fred H.

    2002-01-01

    The 1856 discovery of the Neandertal type specimen (Neandertal 1) in western Germany marked the beginning of human paleontology and initiated the longest-standing debate in the discipline: the role of Neandertals in human evolutionary history. We report excavations of cave sediments that were removed from the Feldhofer caves in 1856. These deposits have yielded over 60 human skeletal fragments, along with a large series of Paleolithic artifacts and faunal material. Our analysis of this material represents the first interdisciplinary analysis of Neandertal remains incorporating genetic, direct dating, and morphological dimensions simultaneously. Three of these skeletal fragments fit directly on Neandertal 1, whereas several others have distinctively Neandertal features. At least three individuals are represented in the skeletal sample. Radiocarbon dates for Neandertal 1, from which a mtDNA sequence was determined in 1997, and a second individual indicate an age of ≈40,000 yr for both. mtDNA analysis on the same second individual yields a sequence that clusters with other published Neandertal sequences. PMID:12232049

  8. Neonatal postcrania from Mezmaiskaya, Russia, and Le Moustier, France, and the development of Neandertal body form

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Timothy D.; Coqueugniot, Hélène; Golovanova, Liubov V.; Doronichev, Vladimir B.; Maureille, Bruno; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Neandertal and modern human adults differ in skeletal features of the cranium and postcranium, and it is clear that many of the cranial differences—although not all of them—are already present at the time of birth. We know less, however, about the developmental origins of the postcranial differences. Here, we address this deficiency with morphometric analyses of the postcrania of the two most complete Neandertal neonates—Mezmaiskaya 1 (from Russia) and Le Moustier 2 (from France)—and a recent human sample. We find that neonatal Neandertals already appear to possess the wide body, long pubis, and robust long bones of adult Neandertals. Taken together, current evidence indicates that skeletal differences between Neandertals and modern humans are largely established by the time of birth. PMID:27217565

  9. A complete Neandertal mitochondrial genome sequence determined by high-throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Green, Richard E.; Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Krause, Johannes; Briggs, Adrian W.; Johnson, Philip L. F.; Uhler, Caroline; Meyer, Matthias; Good, Jeffrey M.; Maricic, Tomislav; Stenzel, Udo; Prüfer, Kay; Siebauer, Michael; Burbano, Hernán A.; Ronan, Michael; Rothberg, Jonathan M.; Egholm, Michael; Rudan, Pavao; Brajković, Dejana; Kućan, Željko; Gušić, Ivan; Wikström, Mårten; Laakkonen, Liisa; Kelso, Janet; Slatkin, Montgomery; Pääbo, Svante

    2008-01-01

    Summary A complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence was reconstructed from a 38,000-year-old Neandertal individual using 8,341 mtDNA sequences identified among 4.8 Gb of DNA generated from ~0.3 grams of bone. Analysis of the assembled sequence unequivocally establishes that the Neandertal mtDNA falls outside the variation of extant human mtDNAs and allows an estimate of the divergence date between the two mtDNA lineages of 660,000±140,000 years. Of the 13 proteins encoded in the mtDNA, subunit 2 of cytochrome c oxidase of the mitochondrial electron transport chain has experienced the largest number of amino acid substitutions in human ancestors since the separation from Neandertals. There is evidence that purifying selection in the Neandertal mtDNA was reduced compared to other primate lineages suggesting that the effective population size of Neandertals was small. PMID:18692465

  10. Hyperostosis frontalis interna in a Neandertal from Marillac (Charente, France).

    PubMed

    Garralda, María Dolores; Maureille, Bruno; Vandermeersch, Bernard

    2014-02-01

    The site of Marillac (Charente, France) has yielded an important stratigraphic sequence containing numerous Neandertal remains (some of them with peri-mortem manipulations) from lithofacies 2 (Quina Mousterian). This level has been correlated with MIS 4 and is associated with a TL date of 57,600 ± 4600 years BP (before present). The study of one of the cranial fragments (Marillac 3) revealed a grade 2 or Type B Hyperostosis frontalis interna (HFI), remodelling and altering the internal table of the thick frontal bone. This pathology has been analysed macroscopically together with radiography and sections made using a microscanner and a scanner. The development of the HFI is compared with published evidence for Sangiran 3 (Homo erectus), two other Neandertals (Forbes' Quarry and Shanidar 5), and several archaeological samples. Forbes' Quarry seems to display more advanced HFI than either Shanidar 5 or Marillac 3. The three Neandertals may be considered mature individuals (≥40 years) and it seems likely that the aetiology of this pathology may be associated with hormonal alterations, as has been suggested for past and extant populations. While the prevalence of HFI in contemporary post-menopausal women is well documented, the identification of HFI amongst males from several archaeological samples (Neanderthals, Ancient Egypt, Syrian Bronze Age or the Anasazi), with different stages of development, confirm that the pathology affected both sexes in past populations. Additional data and research are still needed to elucidate the etiopathogenesis of this illness and to better understand the relationship between environmental factors and their possible influences/consequences for the development of metabolic disorders in prehistoric populations.

  11. Assessing eye orbits as predictors of Neandertal group size.

    PubMed

    Traynor, Sarah; Gurtov, Alia N; Senjem, Jess Hutton; Hawks, John

    2015-08-01

    The objective is to investigate the hypothesis that Neandertal eye orbits can predict group size and social cognition as presented by Pearce et al. (Proc R Soc B Biol Sci 280 (2013) 20130168). We performed a linear regression of known orbital aperture diameter (OAD), neocortex ratio, and group size among 18 extant diurnal primate species. Our data were derived from Kirk (J Hum Evol 51 (2006) 159-170) and Dunbar (J Hum Evol 22 (1992), 469-493; J Hum Evol 28 (1995) 287-296). There is a positive correlation between OAD and group size; a positive correlation between neocortex and group size; and a positive correlation between OAD and neocortex size. The strength of the collinearity between OAD and neocortex ratio accounts for any significance of OAD in a model. The model that best accounts for variation in group size is one that includes only neocortex ratio; including OAD does not strengthen the model. OAD accounts for 29 percent of the variation in group size. Larger orbits are correlated with larger group sizes in primates, although not significantly when controlling for neocortex ratio. Moreover, the amount of variation in group size that can be explained by OAD is negligible. The larger orbits of Neandertals compared to the average modern human population do not permit any interpretation of cognitive ability related to group size. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. European early modern humans and the fate of the Neandertals

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik

    2007-01-01

    A consideration of the morphological aspects of the earliest modern humans in Europe (more than ≈33,000 B.P.) and the subsequent Gravettian human remains indicates that they possess an anatomical pattern congruent with the autapomorphic (derived) morphology of the earliest (Middle Paleolithic) African modern humans. However, they exhibit a variable suite of features that are either distinctive Neandertal traits and/or plesiomorphic (ancestral) aspects that had been lost among the African Middle Paleolithic modern humans. These features include aspects of neurocranial shape, basicranial external morphology, mandibular ramal and symphyseal form, dental morphology and size, and anteroposterior dental proportions, as well as aspects of the clavicles, scapulae, metacarpals, and appendicular proportions. The ubiquitous and variable presence of these morphological features in the European earlier modern human samples can only be parsimoniously explained as a product of modest levels of assimilation of Neandertals into early modern human populations as the latter dispersed across Europe. This interpretation is in agreement with current analyses of recent and past human molecular data. PMID:17452632

  13. An X-linked haplotype of Neandertal origin is present among all non-African populations.

    PubMed

    Yotova, Vania; Lefebvre, Jean-Francois; Moreau, Claudia; Gbeha, Elias; Hovhannesyan, Kristine; Bourgeois, Stephane; Bédarida, Sandra; Azevedo, Luisa; Amorim, Antonio; Sarkisian, Tamara; Avogbe, Patrice Hodonou; Chabi, Nicodeme; Dicko, Mamoudou Hama; Kou' Santa Amouzou, Emile Sabiba; Sanni, Ambaliou; Roberts-Thomson, June; Boettcher, Barry; Scott, Rodney J; Labuda, Damian

    2011-07-01

    Recent work on the Neandertal genome has raised the possibility of admixture between Neandertals and the expanding population of Homo sapiens who left Africa between 80 and 50 Kya (thousand years ago) to colonize the rest of the world. Here, we provide evidence of a notable presence (9% overall) of a Neandertal-derived X chromosome segment among all contemporary human populations outside Africa. Our analysis of 6,092 X-chromosomes from all inhabited continents supports earlier contentions that a mosaic of lineages of different time depths and different geographic provenance could have contributed to the genetic constitution of modern humans. It indicates a very early admixture between expanding African migrants and Neandertals prior to or very early on the route of the out-of-Africa expansion that led to the successful colonization of the planet.

  14. Anterior dental microwear textures show habitat-driven variability in Neandertal behavior.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Kristin L; Ungar, Peter S; Guatelli-Steinberg, Debbie; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro; Trinkaus, Erik; Willman, John C

    2017-04-01

    The causes of Neandertal anterior tooth wear patterns, including labial rounding, labial scratches, and differential anterior-posterior wear, have been debated for decades. The most common explanation is the "stuff-and-cut" hypothesis, which describes Neandertals clamping down on a piece of meat and slicing a portion close to their lips. "Stuff-and-cut" has been accepted as a general aspect of Neandertal behavior without fully assessing its variability. This study analyzes anterior dental microwear textures across habitats, locations, and time intervals to discern possible variation in Neandertal anterior tooth-use behavior. Forty-five Neandertals from 24 sites were analyzed, represented by high-resolution replicas of permanent anterior teeth. The labial surface was scanned for antemortem microwear using a white-light confocal profiler. The resultant 3D-point clouds, representing 204 × 276 μm for each specimen, were uploaded into SSFA software packages for texture characterization. Statistical analyses, including MANOVAs, ANOVAs, and pairwise comparisons, were completed on ranked microwear data. Neandertal descriptive statistics were also compared to 10 bioarchaeological samples of known or inferred dietary and behavioral regimes. The Neandertal sample varied significantly by habitat, suggesting this factor was a principal driving force for differences in Neandertal anterior tooth-use behaviors. The Neandertals from open habitats showed significantly lower anisotropy and higher textural fill volume than those inhabiting more closed, forested environments. The texture signature from the open-habitat Neandertals was most similar to that of the Ipiutak and Nunavut, who used their anterior teeth for intense clamping and grasping behaviors related to hide preparation. Those in more closed habitats were most similar to the Arikara, who did not participate in non-dietary behaviors. These Neandertal individuals had a broad range of texture values consistent with non

  15. Patterns of coding variation in the complete exomes of three Neandertals

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Sergi; Parra, Genís; Sánchez-Quinto, Federico A.; Racimo, Fernando; Kuhlwilm, Martin; Kircher, Martin; Sawyer, Susanna; Fu, Qiaomei; Heinze, Anja; Nickel, Birgit; Dabney, Jesse; Siebauer, Michael; White, Louise; Burbano, Hernán A.; Renaud, Gabriel; Stenzel, Udo; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; de la Rasilla, Marco; Rosas, Antonio; Rudan, Pavao; Brajković, Dejana; Kucan, Željko; Gušic, Ivan; Shunkov, Michael V.; Derevianko, Anatoli P.; Viola, Bence; Meyer, Matthias; Kelso, Janet; Andrés, Aida M.; Pääbo, Svante

    2014-01-01

    We present the DNA sequence of 17,367 protein-coding genes in two Neandertals from Spain and Croatia and analyze them together with the genome sequence recently determined from a Neandertal from southern Siberia. Comparisons with present-day humans from Africa, Europe, and Asia reveal that genetic diversity among Neandertals was remarkably low, and that they carried a higher proportion of amino acid-changing (nonsynonymous) alleles inferred to alter protein structure or function than present-day humans. Thus, Neandertals across Eurasia had a smaller long-term effective population than present-day humans. We also identify amino acid substitutions in Neandertals and present-day humans that may underlie phenotypic differences between the two groups. We find that genes involved in skeletal morphology have changed more in the lineage leading to Neandertals than in the ancestral lineage common to archaic and modern humans, whereas genes involved in behavior and pigmentation have changed more on the modern human lineage. PMID:24753607

  16. On the phylogenetic position of the pre-Neandertal specimen from Reilingen, Germany.

    PubMed

    Dean, D; Hublin, J J; Holloway, R; Ziegler, R

    1998-05-01

    This paper describes the morphology and phylogenetic significance of a well-preserved fossil human cranium found near Reilingen, Germany in 1978. The specimen consists of two complete parietals, most of the right temporal, and 70% of the occipital. The specimen displays several features characteristic of early "archaic" Homo sapiens: maximum breadth at the supramastoid crests, roughly pentagonal occipital view, an angular torus, superoinferiorly elongate/ anteroposterior shortened squamous temporal, strong mastoid, and separation of the tympanic and mastoid temporal portions. Other features align the Reilingen cranium with the "classic" Neandertals: developed suprainiac fossa, bilaterally protuberant occipital torus, strong juxtamastoid eminence, a highly convex occipital plane, and lambdoid flattening. This morphology and our cephalometric analysis support the assignment of this specimen to a Stage 2 "pre-Neandertal" group (e.g., Steinheim, Swanscombe, and Atapuerca [SH site]). Following an "Accretion Model" of European hominid evolution, Stage 2 succeeds Stage 1 European "early-pre-Neandertals" (e.g., Mauer and Petralona), and precedes both the Saale-Eem Stage 3 "early Neandertals" (e.g., Biache 1), which present greater platycephaly, a reduced mastoid process, an enlarged juxtamastoid eminence, and true "en-bombe" (parieto-occipital form), and Weichsel Stage 4 "Neandertals" (sensu stricto, i.e., "classic" Neandertals).

  17. Neandertal Demise: An Archaeological Analysis of the Modern Human Superiority Complex

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Paola; Roebroeks, Wil

    2014-01-01

    Neandertals are the best-studied of all extinct hominins, with a rich fossil record sampling hundreds of individuals, roughly dating from between 350,000 and 40,000 years ago. Their distinct fossil remains have been retrieved from Portugal in the west to the Altai area in central Asia in the east and from below the waters of the North Sea in the north to a series of caves in Israel in the south. Having thrived in Eurasia for more than 300,000 years, Neandertals vanished from the record around 40,000 years ago, when modern humans entered Europe. Modern humans are usually seen as superior in a wide range of domains, including weaponry and subsistence strategies, which would have led to the demise of Neandertals. This systematic review of the archaeological records of Neandertals and their modern human contemporaries finds no support for such interpretations, as the Neandertal archaeological record is not different enough to explain the demise in terms of inferiority in archaeologically visible domains. Instead, current genetic data suggest that complex processes of interbreeding and assimilation may have been responsible for the disappearance of the specific Neandertal morphology from the fossil record. PMID:24789039

  18. Unconstrained cranial evolution in Neandertals and modern humans compared to common chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Timothy D.; Stringer, Chris B.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of lines of evidence support the idea that neutral evolutionary processes (genetic drift, mutation) have been important in generating cranial differences between Neandertals and modern humans. But how do Neandertals and modern humans compare with other species? And how do these comparisons illuminate the evolutionary processes underlying cranial diversification? To address these questions, we used 27 standard cranial measurements collected on 2524 recent modern humans, 20 Neandertals and 237 common chimpanzees to estimate split times between Neandertals and modern humans, and between Pan troglodytes verus and two other subspecies of common chimpanzee. Consistent with a neutral divergence, the Neandertal versus modern human split-time estimates based on cranial measurements are similar to those based on DNA sequences. By contrast, the common chimpanzee cranial estimates are much lower than DNA-sequence estimates. Apparently, cranial evolution has been unconstrained in Neandertals and modern humans compared with common chimpanzees. Based on these and additional analyses, it appears that cranial differentiation in common chimpanzees has been restricted by stabilizing natural selection. Alternatively, this restriction could be due to genetic and/or developmental constraints on the amount of within-group variance (relative to effective population size) available for genetic drift to act on. PMID:26468243

  19. Unconstrained cranial evolution in Neandertals and modern humans compared to common chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Timothy D; Stringer, Chris B

    2015-10-22

    A variety of lines of evidence support the idea that neutral evolutionary processes (genetic drift, mutation) have been important in generating cranial differences between Neandertals and modern humans. But how do Neandertals and modern humans compare with other species? And how do these comparisons illuminate the evolutionary processes underlying cranial diversification? To address these questions, we used 27 standard cranial measurements collected on 2524 recent modern humans, 20 Neandertals and 237 common chimpanzees to estimate split times between Neandertals and modern humans, and between Pan troglodytes verus and two other subspecies of common chimpanzee. Consistent with a neutral divergence, the Neandertal versus modern human split-time estimates based on cranial measurements are similar to those based on DNA sequences. By contrast, the common chimpanzee cranial estimates are much lower than DNA-sequence estimates. Apparently, cranial evolution has been unconstrained in Neandertals and modern humans compared with common chimpanzees. Based on these and additional analyses, it appears that cranial differentiation in common chimpanzees has been restricted by stabilizing natural selection. Alternatively, this restriction could be due to genetic and/or developmental constraints on the amount of within-group variance (relative to effective population size) available for genetic drift to act on.

  20. Neandertal demise: an archaeological analysis of the modern human superiority complex.

    PubMed

    Villa, Paola; Roebroeks, Wil

    2014-01-01

    Neandertals are the best-studied of all extinct hominins, with a rich fossil record sampling hundreds of individuals, roughly dating from between 350,000 and 40,000 years ago. Their distinct fossil remains have been retrieved from Portugal in the west to the Altai area in central Asia in the east and from below the waters of the North Sea in the north to a series of caves in Israel in the south. Having thrived in Eurasia for more than 300,000 years, Neandertals vanished from the record around 40,000 years ago, when modern humans entered Europe. Modern humans are usually seen as superior in a wide range of domains, including weaponry and subsistence strategies, which would have led to the demise of Neandertals. This systematic review of the archaeological records of Neandertals and their modern human contemporaries finds no support for such interpretations, as the Neandertal archaeological record is not different enough to explain the demise in terms of inferiority in archaeologically visible domains. Instead, current genetic data suggest that complex processes of interbreeding and assimilation may have been responsible for the disappearance of the specific Neandertal morphology from the fossil record.

  1. Dating the demise: neandertal extinction and the establishment of modern humans in the southern Caucasus.

    PubMed

    Adler, Daniel S; Bar-Yosef, Ofer; Belfer-Cohen, Anna; Tushabramishvili, Nicholas; Boaretto, E; Mercier, N; Valladas, H; Rink, W J

    2008-11-01

    This paper considers the recent radiometric dating (14C-AMS, TL, ESR) of 76 late Middle and early Upper Paleolithic samples from Ortvale Klde Rockshelter, located in the Republic of Georgia. We present a critical evaluation of each date based on its stratigraphic and archaeological context, its pretreatment and contamination history, and its resulting accuracy and precision, the goal being to establish a sound chronology for the site. Only by systematically identifying aberrant dates within a data set and isolating them from further analysis can we hope to understand cultural and biological phenomena on an accurate temporal scale. Based on the strict discard protocol outlined here, we omit 25% of the dated samples from the analysis. The remaining data speak to the lengthy tenure of Neandertals in the region, but also to their relatively rapid demise and the establishment of modern human populations approximately 38-34 ka 14C BP (42-39 kacalBP(Hulu)). We compare these chronometric data with those from the neighboring sites of Bronze and Dzudzuana caves, as well as Mezmaiskaya Cave, located in the northern Caucasus. While the lack of key contextual information limit our ability to subject these other data sets to the same critical evaluation procedure, they provide the first interregional temporal assessment of the Middle to Upper Paleolithic "transition," the results of which suggest an initial expansion of modern humans into the southern Caucasus followed by expansion along the Black Sea coast and into the northern Caucasus.

  2. Selection and reduced population size cannot explain higher amounts of Neandertal ancestry in East Asian than in European human populations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bernard Y; Lohmueller, Kirk E

    2015-03-05

    It has been hypothesized that the greater proportion of Neandertal ancestry in East Asians than in Europeans is due to the fact that purifying selection is less effective at removing weakly deleterious Neandertal alleles from East Asian populations. Using simulations of a broad range of models of selection and demography, we have shown that this hypothesis cannot account for the higher proportion of Neandertal ancestry in East Asians than in Europeans. Instead, more complex demographic scenarios, most likely involving multiple pulses of Neandertal admixture, are required to explain the data. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Selection and Reduced Population Size Cannot Explain Higher Amounts of Neandertal Ancestry in East Asian than in European Human Populations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bernard Y.; Lohmueller, Kirk E.

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the greater proportion of Neandertal ancestry in East Asians than in Europeans is due to the fact that purifying selection is less effective at removing weakly deleterious Neandertal alleles from East Asian populations. Using simulations of a broad range of models of selection and demography, we have shown that this hypothesis cannot account for the higher proportion of Neandertal ancestry in East Asians than in Europeans. Instead, more complex demographic scenarios, most likely involving multiple pulses of Neandertal admixture, are required to explain the data. PMID:25683122

  4. Morphology, body proportions, and postcranial hypertrophy of a female Neandertal from the Sima de las Palomas, southeastern Spain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Michael J; Ortega, Jon; Parmová, Klara; López, Mariano V; Trinkaus, Erik

    2011-06-21

    Considerations of Neandertal geographical variation have been hampered by the dearth of remains from Mediterranean Europe and the absence there of sufficiently complete associated postcrania. The 2006 and 2007 excavation of an articulated partial skeleton of a small adult female Neandertal at the Sima de las Palomas, Murcia, southeastern Spain (Sima de las Palomas 96) provides substantial and secure information on body proportions among southern European Neandertals, as well as further documenting the nature of Neandertal biology in southern Iberia. The remains exhibit a suite of cranial, mandibular, dental, and postcranial features, of both Neandertals and archaic Homo generally, that distinguish them from contemporary and subsequent early modern humans. Its lower limbs exhibit the robustness of later Pleistocene Homo generally, and its upper limbs conform to the pattern of elevated robustness of the Neandertals. Its body proportions, including relative clavicular length, distal limb segment lengths, and body mass to stature indicators, conform to the "cold-adapted" pattern of more northern Neandertals. Palomas 96 therefore documents the presence of a suite of "Neandertal" characteristics in southern Iberia and, along with its small body size, the more "Arctic" body proportions of other European Neandertals despite the warmer climate of southern Iberia during marine isotope stage 3.

  5. Morphology, body proportions, and postcranial hypertrophy of a female Neandertal from the Sima de las Palomas, southeastern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Michael J.; Ortega, Jon; Parmová, Klara; López, Mariano V.; Trinkaus, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Considerations of Neandertal geographical variation have been hampered by the dearth of remains from Mediterranean Europe and the absence there of sufficiently complete associated postcrania. The 2006 and 2007 excavation of an articulated partial skeleton of a small adult female Neandertal at the Sima de las Palomas, Murcia, southeastern Spain (Sima de las Palomas 96) provides substantial and secure information on body proportions among southern European Neandertals, as well as further documenting the nature of Neandertal biology in southern Iberia. The remains exhibit a suite of cranial, mandibular, dental, and postcranial features, of both Neandertals and archaic Homo generally, that distinguish them from contemporary and subsequent early modern humans. Its lower limbs exhibit the robustness of later Pleistocene Homo generally, and its upper limbs conform to the pattern of elevated robustness of the Neandertals. Its body proportions, including relative clavicular length, distal limb segment lengths, and body mass to stature indicators, conform to the “cold-adapted” pattern of more northern Neandertals. Palomas 96 therefore documents the presence of a suite of “Neandertal” characteristics in southern Iberia and, along with its small body size, the more “Arctic” body proportions of other European Neandertals despite the warmer climate of southern Iberia during marine isotope stage 3. PMID:21646528

  6. Neandertal talus bones from El Sidrón site (Asturias, Spain): A 3D geometric morphometrics analysis.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Antonio; Ferrando, Anabel; Bastir, Markus; García-Tabernero, Antonio; Estalrrich, Almudena; Huguet, Rosa; García-Martínez, Daniel; Pastor, Juan Francisco; de la Rasilla, Marco

    2017-10-01

    The El Sidrón tali sample is assessed in an evolutionary framework. We aim to explore the relationship between Neandertal talus morphology and body size/shape. We test the hypothesis 1: talar Neandertal traits are influenced by body size, and the hypothesis 2: shape variables independent of body size correspond to inherited primitive features. We quantify 35 landmarks through 3D geometric morphometrics techniques to describe H. neanderthalensis-H. sapiens shape variation, by Mean Shape Comparisons, Principal Component, Phenetic Clusters, Minimum spanning tree analyses and partial least square and regression of talus shape on body variables. Shape variation correlated to body size is compared to Neandertals-Modern Humans (MH) evolutionary shape variation. The Neandertal sample is compared to early hominins. Neandertal talus presents trochlear hypertrophy, a larger equality of trochlear rims, a shorter neck, a more expanded head, curvature and an anterior location of the medial malleolar facet, an expanded and projected lateral malleolar facet and laterally expanded posterior calcaneal facet compared to MH. The Neandertal talocrural joint morphology is influenced by body size. The other Neandertal talus traits do not co-vary with it or not follow the same co-variation pattern as MH. Besides, the trochlear hypertrophy, the trochlear rims equality and the short neck could be inherited primitive features; the medial malleolar facet morphology could be an inherited primitive feature or a secondarily primitive trait; and the calcaneal posterior facet would be an autapomorphic feature of the Neandertal lineage. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Femur Shaft Fractures (Broken Thighbone)

    MedlinePlus

    ... lengths and diameters to fit most femur bones. Plates and screws. During this operation, the bone fragments ... are held together with special screws and metal plates attached to the outer surface of the bone. ...

  8. Timing of human protein evolution as revealed by massively parallel capture of Neandertal nuclear DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Burbano, Hernán A.; Hodges, Emily; Green, Richard E.; Briggs, Adrian W.; Krause, Johannes; Meyer, Matthias; Good, Jeffrey M.; Maricic, Tomislav; Johnson, Philipp L.F.; Xuan, Zhenyu; Rooks, Michelle; Bhattacharjee, Arindam; Brizuela, Leonardo; Albert, Frank W.; de la Rasilla, Marco; Fortea, Javier; Rosas, Antonio; Lachmann, Michael; Hannon, Gregory J.; Pääbo, Svante

    2010-01-01

    Whole genome shotgun sequencing is now possible for extinct organisms, as well as the targeted capture of specific regions. However, targeted resequencing of megabase sized parts of nuclear genomes has yet to be demonstrated for ancient DNA. Here we show that hybridization capture on microarrays can be used to generate large scale targeted data from Neandertal DNA even in the presence of ~99.8% microbial DNA. It is thus now possible to generate high quality data from large regions of the nuclear genome from Neandertals and other extinct organisms. Using this approach we have sequenced ~14,000 protein coding positions that have been inferred to have changed on the human lineage since the last common ancestor shared with chimpanzees. We identify 88 amino acid substitutions that have become fixed in all humans since the divergence from the Neandertals. PMID:20448179

  9. Neandertal roots: Cranial and chronological evidence from Sima de los Huesos.

    PubMed

    Arsuaga, J L; Martínez, I; Arnold, L J; Aranburu, A; Gracia-Téllez, A; Sharp, W D; Quam, R M; Falguères, C; Pantoja-Pérez, A; Bischoff, J; Poza-Rey, E; Parés, J M; Carretero, J M; Demuro, M; Lorenzo, C; Sala, N; Martinón-Torres, M; García, N; Alcázar de Velasco, A; Cuenca-Bescós, G; Gómez-Olivencia, A; Moreno, D; Pablos, A; Shen, C-C; Rodríguez, L; Ortega, A I; García, R; Bonmatí, A; Bermúdez de Castro, J M; Carbonell, E

    2014-06-20

    Seventeen Middle Pleistocene crania from the Sima de los Huesos site (Atapuerca, Spain) are analyzed, including seven new specimens. This sample makes it possible to thoroughly characterize a Middle Pleistocene hominin paleodeme and to address hypotheses about the origin and evolution of the Neandertals. Using a variety of techniques, the hominin-bearing layer could be reassigned to a period around 430,000 years ago. The sample shows a consistent morphological pattern with derived Neandertal features present in the face and anterior vault, many of which are related to the masticatory apparatus. This suggests that facial modification was the first step in the evolution of the Neandertal lineage, pointing to a mosaic pattern of evolution, with different anatomical and functional modules evolving at different rates.

  10. Virtual ancestor reconstruction: Revealing the ancestor of modern humans and Neandertals.

    PubMed

    Mounier, Aurélien; Mirazón Lahr, Marta

    2016-02-01

    The timing and geographic origin of the common ancestor of modern humans and Neandertals remain controversial. A poor Pleistocene hominin fossil record and the evolutionary complexities introduced by dispersals and regionalisation of lineages have fuelled taxonomic uncertainty, while new ancient genomic data have raised completely new questions. Here, we use maximum likelihood and 3D geometric morphometric methods to predict possible morphologies of the last common ancestor of modern humans and Neandertals from a simplified, fully resolved phylogeny. We describe the fully rendered 3D shapes of the predicted ancestors of humans and Neandertals, and assess their similarity to individual fossils or populations of fossils of Pleistocene age. Our results support models of an Afro-European ancestral population in the Middle Pleistocene (Homo heidelbergensis sensu lato) and further predict an African origin for this ancestral population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Neandertal origin of genetic variation at the cluster of OAS immunity genes.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Fernando L; Watkins, Joseph C; Hammer, Michael F

    2013-04-01

    Analyses of ancient DNA from extinct humans reveal signals of at least two independent hybridization events in the history of non-African populations. To date, there are very few examples of specific genetic variants that have been rigorously identified as introgressive. Here, we survey DNA sequence variation in the OAS gene cluster on chromosome 12 and provide strong evidence that a haplotype extending for ~185 kb introgressed from Neandertals. This haplotype is nearly restricted to Eurasians and is estimated to have diverged from the Neandertal sequence ~125 kya. Despite the potential for novel functional variation, the observed frequency of this haplotype is consistent with neutral introgression. This is the second locus in the human genome, after STAT2, carrying distinct haplotypes that appear to have introgressed separately from both Neandertals and Denisova.

  12. Hand to Mouth in a Neandertal: Right-Handedness in Regourdou 1

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Virginie; Macchiarelli, Roberto; Guatelli-Steinberg, Debbie; Fiore, Ivana; Bondioli, Luca; Frayer, David W.

    2012-01-01

    We describe and analyze a Neandertal postcranial skeleton and dentition, which together show unambiguous signs of right-handedness. Asymmetries between the left and right upper arm in Regourdou 1 were identified nearly 20 years ago, then confirmed by more detailed analyses of the inner bone structure for the clavicle, humerus, radius and ulna. The total pattern of all bones in the shoulder and arm reveals that Regourdou 1 was a right-hander. Confirmatory evidence comes from the mandibular incisors, which display a distinct pattern of right oblique scratches, typical of right-handed manipulations performed at the front of the mouth. Regourdou's right handedness is consistent with the strong pattern of manual lateralization in Neandertals and further confirms a modern pattern of left brain dominance, presumably signally linguistic competence. These observations along with cultural, genetic and morphological evidence indicate language competence in Neandertals and their European precursors. PMID:22937134

  13. Archaeology. The makers of the Protoaurignacian and implications for Neandertal extinction.

    PubMed

    Benazzi, S; Slon, V; Talamo, S; Negrino, F; Peresani, M; Bailey, S E; Sawyer, S; Panetta, D; Vicino, G; Starnini, E; Mannino, M A; Salvadori, P A; Meyer, M; Pääbo, S; Hublin, J-J

    2015-05-15

    The Protoaurignacian culture is pivotal to the debate about the timing of the arrival of modern humans in western Europe and the demise of Neandertals. However, which group is responsible for this culture remains uncertain. We investigated dental remains associated with the Protoaurignacian. The lower deciduous incisor from Riparo Bombrini is modern human, based on its morphology. The upper deciduous incisor from Grotta di Fumane contains ancient mitochondrial DNA of a modern human type. These teeth are the oldest human remains in an Aurignacian-related archaeological context, confirming that by 41,000 calendar years before the present, modern humans bearing Protoaurignacian culture spread into southern Europe. Because the last Neandertals date to 41,030 to 39,260 calendar years before the present, we suggest that the Protoaurignacian triggered the demise of Neandertals in this area.

  14. The Roc de Marsal Neandertal child: a reassessment of its status as a deliberate burial.

    PubMed

    Sandgathe, Dennis M; Dibble, Harold L; Goldberg, Paul; McPherron, Shannon P

    2011-09-01

    Whether Neandertals buried their dead has considerable bearing on the debate concerning the nature of their cultural behavior. Among the claims for intentional Neandertal burial in Europe, the child from Roc de Marsal has long been one of the less contentious examples because its articulated skeleton was found in what has become widely accepted as an intentionally excavated pit. However, what is known about the context of the Roc de Marsal remains from the original descriptions, coupled with new stratigraphic, sedimentological, and archaeological data on the site from recent excavations, cast serious doubt on this interpretation.

  15. A fossil hominoid proximal femur from Kikorongo Crater, southwestern Uganda.

    PubMed

    DeSilva, Jeremy; Shoreman, Eleanor; MacLatchy, Laura

    2006-06-01

    The external morphology of a fragmentary right proximal femur from southwestern Uganda is described here. Discovered in the Kikorongo Crater of Queen Elizabeth National Park in 1961, this specimen was informally assigned to Homo sapiens (although never described) and tentatively dated to the late Pleistocene. However, because aspects of the external morphology of the femur align the fossil with the African great apes, we suggest that the Kikorongo femur may be the first postcranial fossil of the genus Pan. Like the African apes, the Kikorongo specimen lacks both an obturator externus groove and an intertrochanteric line. It has a short femoral neck with a circular cross section, and a narrow and deep superior notch. Using resampling statistics and discriminant function analysis, the Kikorongo femur clustered with the genus Pan, as opposed to Gorilla or Homo. However, if the specimen is from Pan, it would be large for this taxon. Furthermore, features that clearly distinguish the external morphology of Plio-Pleistocene hominin proximal femora from African ape femora, such as the shape of the femoral neck in cross section and femoral neck length, have converged in Holocene humans and African apes. Unfortunately, the internal morphology of the femoral neck of the Kikorongo fossil was not discernable. Although we hypothesize that the Kikorongo femur is from the genus Pan, there is such variability in the proximal femora of modern humans that, although it would be an unusual human, it remains possible that this fossil represents H. sapiens.

  16. [Application of the musculo-skeletal modelling software lhpFusionBox to a paleoanthropological problem: the Spyrou Neandertal moves!].

    PubMed

    Chapman, Tara; Semal, Patrick; Moiseev, Fedor; Louryan, Stéphane; Rooze, Marcel; Van Sint Jan, Serge

    2013-01-01

    LhpFusionBox is a program originally designed for biomechanical and clinical studies relating to the musculoskeletal system of anatomically modern humans (AMH). The program has recently been adapted for paleontological purposes and used to reconstruct and biomechanically analyse a fossil hominid. There is no complete Neandertal skeleton in the fossil record. The aim of the study was to reconstruct a complete three-dimensional (3D) model of a Neandertal using the relatively complete Spy II Neandertal and to conduct biomechanical feasibility studies on the knee and hamstring moment arms of the skeleton. Different Neandertal specimens were scaled to the size of Spy II to replace incomplete or missing bones. Biomechanical feasibility studies performed on the knee seem to show that Neandertal and AMHh gait is similar and Neandertals were shown to have larger moment arms in the hamstring muscles, which would have given them a mechanical advantage. The complete Neandertal was printed in 3D and used as the base to create the artistic model of "Spyrou" housed at l'Espace de l'Homme de Spy (EHoS) museum. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  17. [Proximal and total femur replacement].

    PubMed

    Pennekamp, P H; Wirtz, D C; Dürr, H R

    2012-07-01

    Reconstruction of segmental bone defects of the proximal femur following wide tumor resection or revision arthroplasty. Aggressive benign or primary malignant bone tumors of the proximal femur; destructive metastases; massive segmental bone defects of the proximal femur; periprosthetic fractures. Local infection; very short life expectancy (< 3 months); massive deficiency of acetabular bone stock. Anterolateral approach. Exposure and detachment of the iliopsoas and gluteus medius muscle from the proximal femur with a sufficient safety margin to the bone; distal transsection of the vastus lateralis/intermedius and rectus femoris muscle according to the extraosseous tumor extension; distal femur osteotomy al least 3 cm beyond the farthest point of tumor extension; in case of total femur replacement, additional lateral arthrotomy of the knee with resection of the ligaments and menisci; reaming of the medullary canal after securing the shaft with a Verbrugge clamp; trial assembly and reduction followed by the definitive implantation of the prosthesis with adjustment of the femoral neck anteversion in 5° increments; soft tissue reconstruction and fixation to an attachment tube covering the prosthesis; in case of total femur replacement, the preparation of the tibia is followed by the coupling of the tibial and femoral components. Infection prophylaxis, 20 kg partial weight bearing, continuous passive motion. A total of 20  patients with proximal femur replacement and 2 patients with total femur replacement implanted between June 2007 and December 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Three patients had primary malignant bone tumors, while 19 patients underwent resection for metastatic disease. The mean age at surgery was 62.0 ± 18.1 years (18-82 years). Fifteen patients with a mean follow-up of 20.3 ± 17.2 months (4-51 months) were studied. Among the 22 cases, periprosthetic infection occurred in 3 patients (13.6%), dislocation in 2 patients (9

  18. Shanidar 3 Neandertal rib puncture wound and paleolithic weaponry.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Steven E; Franciscus, Robert G; McKean-Peraza, Hilary A; Daniel, Julie A; Warren, Brittany R

    2009-08-01

    Since its discovery and initial description in the 1960s, the penetrating lesion to the left ninth rib of the Shanidar 3 Neandertal has been a focus for discussion about interpersonal violence and weapon technology in the Middle Paleolithic. Recent experimental studies using lithic points on animal targets suggest that aspects of weapon system dynamics can be inferred from the form of the bony lesions they produce. Thus, to better understand the circumstances surrounding the traumatic injury suffered by Shanidar 3, we conducted controlled stabbing experiments with replicas of Mousterian and Levallois points directed against the thoraces of pig carcasses. Stabs were conducted under both high and low kinetic energy conditions, in an effort to replicate the usual impact forces associated with thrusting spear vs. long-range projectile weapon systems, respectively. Analysis of the lesions produced in the pig ribs, along with examination of goat ribs subjected primarily to high kinetic energy stabs from an independent experiment, revealed consistent differences in damage patterns between the two conditions. In the case of Shanidar 3, the lack of major involvement of more than one rib, the lack of fracturing of the affected and adjacent ribs, and the lack of bony defects associated with the lesion (such as wastage, hinging, and radiating fracture lines) suggests that the weapon that wounded him was carrying relatively low kinetic energy. While accidental injury or attack with a thrusting spear or knife cannot absolutely be ruled out, the position, angulation, and morphology of the lesion is most consistent with injury by a low-mass, low-kinetic energy projectile weapon. Given the potential temporal overlap of Shanidar 3 with early modern humans in western Asia, and the possibility that the latter were armed with projectile weapon systems, this case carries more than simple paleoforensic interest.

  19. The Reality of Neandertal Symbolic Behavior at the Grotte du Renne, Arcy-sur-Cure, France

    PubMed Central

    Caron, François; d'Errico, Francesco; Del Moral, Pierre; Santos, Frédéric; Zilhão, João

    2011-01-01

    Background The question of whether symbolically mediated behavior is exclusive to modern humans or shared with anatomically archaic populations such as the Neandertals is hotly debated. At the Grotte du Renne, Arcy-sur-Cure, France, the Châtelperronian levels contain Neandertal remains and large numbers of personal ornaments, decorated bone tools and colorants, but it has been suggested that this association reflects intrusion of the symbolic artifacts from the overlying Protoaurignacian and/or of the Neandertal remains from the underlying Mousterian. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested these hypotheses against the horizontal and vertical distributions of the various categories of diagnostic finds and statistically assessed the probability that the Châtelperronian levels are of mixed composition. Our results reject that the associations result from large or small scale, localized or generalized post-depositional displacement, and they imply that incomplete sample decontamination is the parsimonious explanation for the stratigraphic anomalies seen in the radiocarbon dating of the sequence. Conclusions/Significance The symbolic artifacts in the Châtelperronian of the Grotte du Renne are indeed Neandertal material culture. PMID:21738702

  20. Neandertal Admixture in Eurasia Confirmed by Maximum-Likelihood Analysis of Three Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Lohse, Konrad; Frantz, Laurent A. F.

    2014-01-01

    Although there has been much interest in estimating histories of divergence and admixture from genomic data, it has proved difficult to distinguish recent admixture from long-term structure in the ancestral population. Thus, recent genome-wide analyses based on summary statistics have sparked controversy about the possibility of interbreeding between Neandertals and modern humans in Eurasia. Here we derive the probability of full mutational configurations in nonrecombining sequence blocks under both admixture and ancestral structure scenarios. Dividing the genome into short blocks gives an efficient way to compute maximum-likelihood estimates of parameters. We apply this likelihood scheme to triplets of human and Neandertal genomes and compare the relative support for a model of admixture from Neandertals into Eurasian populations after their expansion out of Africa against a history of persistent structure in their common ancestral population in Africa. Our analysis allows us to conclusively reject a model of ancestral structure in Africa and instead reveals strong support for Neandertal admixture in Eurasia at a higher rate (3.4−7.3%) than suggested previously. Using analysis and simulations we show that our inference is more powerful than previous summary statistics and robust to realistic levels of recombination. PMID:24532731

  1. Evidence of toothpick groove formation in Neandertal anterior and posterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Estalrrich, Almudena; Alarcón, José Antonio; Rosas, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    During the microscopic examination of the Neandertal dentitions from El Sidrón (Spain) and Hortus (France), we found unusual fine parallel microstriations on the mesial and distal sides of all tooth types, near the cervix. As its appearance was similar to toothpick grooves described in other Homo species, it could correspond to early stages on its formation. To test this hypothesis we developed an experimental replication of a groove using grass stalks. Comparisons between 204 isolated Neandertal teeth and the two experimental dental specimens corroborate that the marks correspond to initial stages of toothpick groove formation, and we propose a five-grade recording scale that summarized the groove formation process. Using this new recording procedure, we found that Hortus individuals have higher incidence of this trait (eight individuals out of nine) than the El Sidrón individuals (nine out of 11). Toothpick grooves from El Sidrón show the earliest stages of development, whereas the grooves found on Hortus Neandertals were well-developed. Toothpick grooves were also found in 21 incisors and canines. These differences could be due to the more advanced occlusal dental wear in Hortus individuals, maybe age-related and with a more meat-based diet maybe favoring the inclusion of food debris and thus probing as the cleaning methodology. Our results allow the identification and characterization of incipient toothpick grooves on the human fossil record and contribute to increase our knowledge on Neandertals behavioral and oral care habits. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Late Mousterian persistence near the Arctic Circle.

    PubMed

    Slimak, Ludovic; Svendsen, John Inge; Mangerud, Jan; Plisson, Hugues; Heggen, Herbjørn Presthus; Brugère, Alexis; Pavlov, Pavel Yurievich

    2011-05-13

    Palaeolithic sites in Russian high latitudes have been considered as Upper Palaeolithic and thus representing an Arctic expansion of modern humans. Here we show that at Byzovaya, in the western foothills of the Polar Urals, the technological structure of the lithic assemblage makes it directly comparable with Mousterian Middle Palaeolithic industries that so far have been exclusively attributed to the Neandertal populations in Europe. Radiocarbon and optical-stimulated luminescence dates on bones and sand grains indicate that the site was occupied during a short period around 28,500 carbon-14 years before the present (about 31,000 to 34,000 calendar years ago), at the time when only Upper Palaeolithic cultures occupied lower latitudes of Eurasia. Byzovaya may thus represent a late northern refuge for Neandertals, about 1000 km north of earlier known Mousterian sites.

  3. Balancing Selection on a Regulatory Region Exhibiting Ancient Variation That Predates Human–Neandertal Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Iskow, Rebecca C.; Austermann, Christian; Scharer, Christopher D.; Raj, Towfique; Boss, Jeremy M.; Sunyaev, Shamil; Price, Alkes; Stranger, Barbara; Simon, Viviana; Lee, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Ancient population structure shaping contemporary genetic variation has been recently appreciated and has important implications regarding our understanding of the structure of modern human genomes. We identified a ∼36-kb DNA segment in the human genome that displays an ancient substructure. The variation at this locus exists primarily as two highly divergent haplogroups. One of these haplogroups (the NE1 haplogroup) aligns with the Neandertal haplotype and contains a 4.6-kb deletion polymorphism in perfect linkage disequilibrium with 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across diverse populations. The other haplogroup, which does not contain the 4.6-kb deletion, aligns with the chimpanzee haplotype and is likely ancestral. Africans have higher overall pairwise differences with the Neandertal haplotype than Eurasians do for this NE1 locus (p<10−15). Moreover, the nucleotide diversity at this locus is higher in Eurasians than in Africans. These results mimic signatures of recent Neandertal admixture contributing to this locus. However, an in-depth assessment of the variation in this region across multiple populations reveals that African NE1 haplotypes, albeit rare, harbor more sequence variation than NE1 haplotypes found in Europeans, indicating an ancient African origin of this haplogroup and refuting recent Neandertal admixture. Population genetic analyses of the SNPs within each of these haplogroups, along with genome-wide comparisons revealed significant FST (p = 0.00003) and positive Tajima's D (p = 0.00285) statistics, pointing to non-neutral evolution of this locus. The NE1 locus harbors no protein-coding genes, but contains transcribed sequences as well as sequences with putative regulatory function based on bioinformatic predictions and in vitro experiments. We postulate that the variation observed at this locus predates Human–Neandertal divergence and is evolving under balancing selection, especially among European populations. PMID

  4. Dietary reconstruction of the El Sidrón Neandertal familial group (Spain) in the context of other Neandertal and modern hunter-gatherer groups. A molar microwear texture analysis.

    PubMed

    Estalrrich, Almudena; El Zaatari, Sireen; Rosas, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Here, we present the analysis of occlusal molar microwear textures of eight individuals from the El Sidrón Neandertal group (Spain). The aims of the study were: 1) to document potential age-, sex-, and maternal lineage-related differences in diet within a Neandertal familial group, and 2) to place the diet of El Sidrón individuals in the context of those of other Neandertal groups. This study also offers an interpretation of the diet of the El Sidrón Neandertals by comparing their microwear signatures to those of recent hunter-gatherer populations with diverse but known diets. The intra-group examination of the microwear signatures are consistent with the females of the El Sidrón group having had more abrasive diets or having used their teeth in more para-masticatory activities than did the males. Aside from the potential sex-related differences in diet, no additional intra-group dietary separation, such as by age group or maternal lineage, was observed. In comparison to other Neandertals, El Sidrón individuals, as a group, have microwear signatures most similar to those of other Neandertals from wooded habitats and different from those that lived in more open habitats. This result is expected based on the available paleoenvironmental reconstructions from El Sidrón Cave. The diet of the El Sidrón Neandertals, just like their Neandertal counterparts from similar wooded habitats, is interpreted as having been mixed, consisting of both meat and vegetable foods.

  5. X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg) KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg) Print A A A ... You Have Questions What It Is A femur X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  6. Denisovans, Melanesians, Europeans, and Neandertals: The Confusion of DNA Assumptions and the Biological Species Concept.

    PubMed

    Caldararo, Niccolo

    2016-08-01

    A number of recent articles have appeared on the Denisova fossil remains and attempts to produce DNA sequences from them. One of these recently appeared in Science by Vernot et al. (Science 352:235-239, 2016). We would like to advance an alternative interpretation of the data presented. One concerns the problem of contamination/degradation of the determined DNA sequenced. Just as the publication of the first Neandertal sequence included an interpretation that argued that Neandertals had not contributed any genes to modern humans, the Denisovan interpretation has considerable influence on ideas regarding human evolution. The new papers, however, confuse established ideas concerning the nature of species, as well as the use of terms like premodern, Archaic Homo, and Homo heidelbergensis. Examination of these problems presents a solution by means of reinterpreting the results. Given the claims for gene transfer among a number of Mid Pleistocene hominids, it may be time to reexamine the idea of anagenesis in hominid evolution.

  7. Separating endogenous ancient DNA from modern day contamination in a Siberian Neandertal

    PubMed Central

    Skoglund, Pontus; Northoff, Bernd H.; Shunkov, Michael V.; Derevianko, Anatoli P.; Pääbo, Svante; Krause, Johannes; Jakobsson, Mattias

    2014-01-01

    One of the main impediments for obtaining DNA sequences from ancient human skeletons is the presence of contaminating modern human DNA molecules in many fossil samples and laboratory reagents. However, DNA fragments isolated from ancient specimens show a characteristic DNA damage pattern caused by miscoding lesions that differs from present day DNA sequences. Here, we develop a framework for evaluating the likelihood of a sequence originating from a model with postmortem degradation—summarized in a postmortem degradation score—which allows the identification of DNA fragments that are unlikely to originate from present day sources. We apply this approach to a contaminated Neandertal specimen from Okladnikov Cave in Siberia to isolate its endogenous DNA from modern human contaminants and show that the reconstructed mitochondrial genome sequence is more closely related to the variation of Western Neandertals than what was discernible from previous analyses. Our method opens up the potential for genomic analysis of contaminated fossil material. PMID:24469802

  8. Evidence supporting an intentional Neandertal burial at La Chapelle-aux-Saints

    PubMed Central

    Rendu, William; Beauval, Cédric; Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Bayle, Priscilla; Balzeau, Antoine; Bismuth, Thierry; Bourguignon, Laurence; Delfour, Géraldine; Faivre, Jean-Philippe; Lacrampe-Cuyaubère, François; Tavormina, Carlotta; Todisco, Dominique; Turq, Alain; Maureille, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The bouffia Bonneval at La Chapelle-aux-Saints is well known for the discovery of the first secure Neandertal burial in the early 20th century. However, the intentionality of the burial remains an issue of some debate. Here, we present the results of a 12-y fieldwork project, along with a taphonomic analysis of the human remains, designed to assess the funerary context of the La Chapelle-aux-Saints Neandertal. We have established the anthropogenic nature of the burial pit and underlined the taphonomic evidence of a rapid burial of the body. These multiple lines of evidence support the hypothesis of an intentional burial. Finally, the discovery of skeletal elements belonging to the original La Chapelle aux Saints 1 individual, two additional young individuals, and a second adult in the bouffia Bonneval highlights a more complex site-formation history than previously proposed. PMID:24344286

  9. Evidence supporting an intentional Neandertal burial at La Chapelle-aux-Saints.

    PubMed

    Rendu, William; Beauval, Cédric; Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Bayle, Priscilla; Balzeau, Antoine; Bismuth, Thierry; Bourguignon, Laurence; Delfour, Géraldine; Faivre, Jean-Philippe; Lacrampe-Cuyaubère, François; Tavormina, Carlotta; Todisco, Dominique; Turq, Alain; Maureille, Bruno

    2014-01-07

    The bouffia Bonneval at La Chapelle-aux-Saints is well known for the discovery of the first secure Neandertal burial in the early 20th century. However, the intentionality of the burial remains an issue of some debate. Here, we present the results of a 12-y fieldwork project, along with a taphonomic analysis of the human remains, designed to assess the funerary context of the La Chapelle-aux-Saints Neandertal. We have established the anthropogenic nature of the burial pit and underlined the taphonomic evidence of a rapid burial of the body. These multiple lines of evidence support the hypothesis of an intentional burial. Finally, the discovery of skeletal elements belonging to the original La Chapelle aux Saints 1 individual, two additional young individuals, and a second adult in the bouffia Bonneval highlights a more complex site-formation history than previously proposed.

  10. Neandertal Humeri May Reflect Adaptation to Scraping Tasks, but Not Spear Thrusting

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Colin N.; Hofmann, Cory L.; Petraglia, Michael D.; Stock, Jay T.; Gottschall, Jinger S.

    2012-01-01

    Unique compared with recent and prehistoric Homo sapiens, Neandertal humeri are characterised by a pronounced right-dominant bilateral strength asymmetry and an anteroposteriorly strengthened diaphyseal shape. Remodeling in response to asymmetric forces imposed during regular underhanded spear thrusting is the most influential explanatory hypothesis. The core tenet of the “Spear Thrusting Hypothesis”, that underhand thrusting requires greater muscle activity on the right side of the body compared to the left, remains untested. It is unclear whether alternative subsistence behaviours, such as hide processing, might better explain this morphology. To test this, electromyography was used to measure muscle activity at the primary movers of the humerus (pectoralis major (PM), anterior (AD) and posterior deltoid (PD)) during three distinct spear-thrusting tasks and four separate scraping tasks. Contrary to predictions, maximum muscle activity (MAX) and total muscle activity (TOT) were significantly higher (all values, p<.05) at the left (non-dominant) AD, PD and PM compared to the right side of the body during spear thrusting tasks. Thus, the muscle activity required during underhanded spearing tasks does not lend itself to explaining the pronounced right dominant strength asymmetry found in Neandertal humeri. In contrast, during the performance of all three unimanual scraping tasks, right side MAX and TOT were significantly greater at the AD (all values, p<.01) and PM (all values, p<.02) compared to the left. The consistency of the results provides evidence that scraping activities, such as hide preparation, may be a key behaviour in determining the unusual pattern of Neandertal arm morphology. Overall, these results yield important insight into the Neandertal behavioural repertoire that aided survival throughout Pleistocene Eurasia. PMID:22815742

  11. Neandertal humeri may reflect adaptation to scraping tasks, but not spear thrusting.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Colin N; Hofmann, Cory L; Petraglia, Michael D; Stock, Jay T; Gottschall, Jinger S

    2012-01-01

    Unique compared with recent and prehistoric Homo sapiens, Neandertal humeri are characterised by a pronounced right-dominant bilateral strength asymmetry and an anteroposteriorly strengthened diaphyseal shape. Remodeling in response to asymmetric forces imposed during regular underhanded spear thrusting is the most influential explanatory hypothesis. The core tenet of the "Spear Thrusting Hypothesis", that underhand thrusting requires greater muscle activity on the right side of the body compared to the left, remains untested. It is unclear whether alternative subsistence behaviours, such as hide processing, might better explain this morphology. To test this, electromyography was used to measure muscle activity at the primary movers of the humerus (pectoralis major (PM), anterior (AD) and posterior deltoid (PD)) during three distinct spear-thrusting tasks and four separate scraping tasks. Contrary to predictions, maximum muscle activity (MAX) and total muscle activity (TOT) were significantly higher (all values, p<.05) at the left (non-dominant) AD, PD and PM compared to the right side of the body during spear thrusting tasks. Thus, the muscle activity required during underhanded spearing tasks does not lend itself to explaining the pronounced right dominant strength asymmetry found in Neandertal humeri. In contrast, during the performance of all three unimanual scraping tasks, right side MAX and TOT were significantly greater at the AD (all values, p<.01) and PM (all values, p<.02) compared to the left. The consistency of the results provides evidence that scraping activities, such as hide preparation, may be a key behaviour in determining the unusual pattern of Neandertal arm morphology. Overall, these results yield important insight into the Neandertal behavioural repertoire that aided survival throughout Pleistocene Eurasia.

  12. On the antiquity of language: the reinterpretation of Neandertal linguistic capacities and its consequences

    PubMed Central

    Dediu, Dan; Levinson, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    It is usually assumed that modern language is a recent phenomenon, coinciding with the emergence of modern humans themselves. Many assume as well that this is the result of a single, sudden mutation giving rise to the full “modern package.” However, we argue here that recognizably modern language is likely an ancient feature of our genus pre-dating at least the common ancestor of modern humans and Neandertals about half a million years ago. To this end, we adduce a broad range of evidence from linguistics, genetics, paleontology, and archaeology clearly suggesting that Neandertals shared with us something like modern speech and language. This reassessment of the antiquity of modern language, from the usually quoted 50,000–100,000 years to half a million years, has profound consequences for our understanding of our own evolution in general and especially for the sciences of speech and language. As such, it argues against a saltationist scenario for the evolution of language, and toward a gradual process of culture-gene co-evolution extending to the present day. Another consequence is that the present-day linguistic diversity might better reflect the properties of the design space for language and not just the vagaries of history, and could also contain traces of the languages spoken by other human forms such as the Neandertals. PMID:23847571

  13. A functional test of Neandertal and modern human mitochondrial targeting sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Gralle, Matthias; Schaefer, Ingo; Seibel, Peter; Paeaebo, Svante

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} Two mutations in mitochondrial targeting peptides occurred during human evolution, possibly after Neandertals split off from modern human lineage. {yields} The ancestral and modern human versions of these two targeting peptides were tested functionally for their effects on localization and cleavage rate. {yields} In spite of recent evolution, and to the contrary of other mutations in targeting peptides, these mutations had no visible effects. -- Abstract: Targeting of nuclear-encoded proteins to different organelles, such as mitochondria, is a process that can result in the redeployment of proteins to new intracellular destinations during evolution. With the sequencing of the Neandertal genome, it has become possible to identify amino acid substitutions that occurred on the modern human lineage since its separation from the Neandertal lineage. Here we analyze the function of two substitutions in mitochondrial targeting sequences that occurred and rose to high frequency recently during recent human evolution. The ancestral and modern versions of the two targeting sequences do not differ in the efficiency with which they direct a protein to the mitochondria, an observation compatible with the neutral theory of molecular evolution.

  14. Brain, calvarium, cladistics: A new approach to an old question, who are modern humans and Neandertals?

    PubMed

    Mounier, Aurélien; Balzeau, Antoine; Caparros, Miguel; Grimaud-Hervé, Dominique

    2016-03-01

    The evolutionary history of the genus Homo is the focus of major research efforts in palaeoanthropology. However, the use of palaeoneurology to infer phylogenies of our genus is rare. Here we use cladistics to test the importance of the brain in differentiating and defining Neandertals and modern humans. The analysis is based on morphological data from the calvarium and endocast of Pleistocene fossils and results in a single most parsimonious cladogram. We demonstrate that the joint use of endocranial and calvarial features with cladistics provides a unique means to understand the evolution of the genus Homo. The main results of this study indicate that: (i) the endocranial features are more phylogenetically informative than the characters from the calvarium; (ii) the specific differentiation of Neandertals and modern humans is mostly supported by well-known calvarial autapomorphies; (iii) the endocranial anatomy of modern humans and Neandertals show strong similarities, which appeared in the fossil record with the last common ancestor of both species; and (iv) apart from encephalisation, human endocranial anatomy changed tremendously during the end of the Middle Pleistocene. This may be linked to major cultural and technological novelties that had happened by the end of the Middle Pleistocene (e.g., expansion of the Middle Stone Age (MSA) in Africa and Mousterian in Europe). The combined study of endocranial and exocranial anatomy offers opportunities to further understand human evolution and the implication for the phylogeny of our genus.

  15. Posttraumatic cortical defect of femur.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Srivastava, Deep N; Malhotra, Rajesh; Palaniswamy, Aravindh

    2013-01-01

    Posttraumatic cortical defect of bone is a rare entity which occurs in a maturing skeleton following green stick or torus fracture. Most of the cases are asymptomatic and they are detected incidentally on radiograph. These lesions usually require no treatment. However, the appearance of these lesions can mimic various pathological conditions affecting bone. Knowledge about this entity is important as it avoids unnecessary investigations. We present this case as the occurrence of this entity in femur is very rare and the child was symptomatic.

  16. The effects of distal limb segment shortening on locomotor efficiency in sloped terrain: implications for Neandertal locomotor behavior.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Ryan W; Ruff, Christopher B

    2011-11-01

    Past studies of human locomotor efficiency focused on movement over flat surfaces and concluded that Neandertals were less efficient than modern humans due to a truncated limb morphology, which may have developed to aid thermoregulation in cold climates. However, it is not clear whether this potential locomotor disadvantage would also exist in nonflat terrain. This issue takes on added importance since Neandertals likely spent a significant proportion of their locomotor schedule on sloped, mountainous terrains in the Eurasian landscape. Here a model is developed that determines the relationship between lower limb segment lengths, terrain slope, excursion angle at the hip, and step length. The model is applied to Neandertal and modern human lower limb reconstructions. In addition, for a further independent test that also allows more climateterrain cross comparisons, the same model is applied to bovids living in different terrains and climates. Results indicate that: (1) Neandertals, despite exhibiting shorter lower limbs, would have been able to use similar stride frequencies per speed as longer-limbed modern humans on sloped terrain, due to their lower crural indices; and (2) shortened distal limb segments are characteristic of bovids that inhabit more rugged terrains, regardless of climate. These results suggest that the shortened distal lower limb segments of Neandertals were not a locomotor disadvantage within more rugged environments.

  17. Comments on Soltysiak's paper: "Comment: low dental caries rate in Neandertals: the result of diet or the oral flora compositions?".

    PubMed

    Tomczyk, Jacek

    2012-08-01

    A low frequency of dental caries in Neandertal population is still puzzling. Many authors stress that the lower frequency of dental caries was related to a meat diet. However, a recent publication in HOMO - Journal Comparative Human Biology presented a new interpretation of dental caries in Neandertals. In this article, Soltysiak supports the thesis that the lower frequency of caries in the Neandertal population from the Near East could not be related to the low-sugar diet, but rather to the absence of cariogenic bacteria species (S. mutans). Although this hypothesis is interesting, I suspect it to be based on several erroneous assumptions, and a misunderstanding of caries as a disease. Although he stressed that the caries lesion is related to many different factors, in his argument he considers one of two alternatives "a low-sugar diet or a lack of cariogenic bacterial species". Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. The Neandertal lower right deciduous second molar from Trou de l'Abîme at Couvin, Belgium.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Michel; Olejniczak, Anthony J; El Zaatari, Sireen; Cattelain, Pierre; Flas, Damien; Letourneux, Claire; Pirson, Stéphane

    2010-01-01

    A human lower right deciduous second molar was discovered in 1984 at the entrance of Trou de l'Abîme at Couvin (Belgium). In subsequent years the interpretation of this fossil remained difficult for various reasons: (1) the lack of taxonomically diagnostic elements which would support its attribution to either Homo (sapiens) neanderthalensis or H. s. sapiens; (2) the absence of any reliable chronostratigraphic interpretation of the sedimentary sequence of the site; (3) the contradiction between archaeological interpretations, which attributed the lithic industry to a transitional facies between the Middle and Early Upper Palaeolithic, and the radiocarbon date of 46,820+/-3,290BP obtained from animal bone remains associated with the tooth and the flint tools. Thanks to recent progress regarding these three aspects, the tooth from Trou de l'Abîme may now be studied in detail. Analyses of the morphology and enamel thickness of the fossil yielded diagnostic characters consistent with an attribution to Neandertals. Re-examination of the lithic industry of Couvin shows that it corresponds to the late Middle Palaeolithic rather than a transitional facies. Furthermore, a new analysis of the site stratigraphy indicates that the unit situated above the archaeological layer in which the tooth was found is probably a palaeosol of brown soil type. Comparison with the regional cave sequences as well as with the reference sequence from the Belgian loess belt tends to show that the most recent palaeosol of this type is dated between 42,000 and 40,000BP. This is consistent with both a recently obtained AMS result at 44,500BP and the published conventional date.

  19. Neandertals' large lower thorax may represent adaptation to high protein diet.

    PubMed

    Ben-Dor, Miki; Gopher, Avi; Barkai, Ran

    2016-07-01

    Humans are limited in their capacity to convert protein into energy. We present a hypothesis that a "bell" shaped thorax and a wide pelvis evolved in Neandertals, at least in part, as an adaptation to a high protein diet. A high protein diet created a need to house an enlarged liver and urinary system in a wider lower trunk. To test the hypothesis, we applied a model developed to identify points of nutritional stress. A ratio of obligatory dietary fat to total animal fat and protein sourced calories is calculated based on various known and estimated parameters. Stress is identified when the obligatory dietary fat ratio is higher than fat content ratios in available prey. The model predicts that during glacial winters, when carbohydrates weren't available, 74%-85% of Neandertals' caloric intake would have had to come from animal fat. Large animals contain around 50% fat calories, and their fat content is diminished during winter, so a significant stressful dietary fat deficit was identified by the model. This deficit could potentially be ameliorated by an increased capability to convert protein into energy. Given that high protein consumption is associated with larger liver and kidneys in animal models, it appears likely that the enlarged inferior section of the Neandertals thorax and possibly, in part, also his wide pelvis, represented an adaptation to provide encasement for those enlarged organs. Behavioral and evolutionary implications of the hypothesis are also discussed. Am J Phys Anthropol 160:367-378, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Stratigraphic context and direct dating of the Neandertal mandible from Cova del Gegant (Sitges, Barcelona).

    PubMed

    Daura, J; Sanz, M; Pike, A W G; Subirà, M E; Fornós, J J; Fullola, J M; Julià, R; Zilhão, J

    2010-07-01

    Stratigraphic study of the Cova del Gegant's sedimentary fill revealed different cycles of accumulation of typical interior cave and delta facies. A precise chronology for these deposits, the faunal remains and stone tools contained therein was obtained by radiocarbon, U-Th and OSL. Our results indicate that the Upper Pleistocene archaeological sequence dates between 49.3 +/- 1.8 ka BP, the U-Th age of the overlying flowstone, and 60.0 +/- 3.9 ka BP, the OSL age of the basal deposits. We have also directly dated the site's Neandertal mandible to 52.3 +/- 2.3 ka by U-Th.

  1. Handedness in Neandertals from the El Sidrón (Asturias, Spain): Evidence from Instrumental Striations with Ontogenetic Inferences

    PubMed Central

    Estalrrich, Almudena; Rosas, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The developed cognitive capabilities for Homo sapiens seems to be the result of a specialized and lateralized brain, and as a result of this, humans display the highest degree of manual specialization or handedness among the primates. Studies regarding its emergence and distribution within the genus Homo show that handedness is present very early. The mode in which it was articulated and spread across the different species during the course of human evolution could provide information about our own cognitive capacities. Here we report the manual laterality attributed to eleven 49,000 old Neandertal individuals from El Sidrón cave (Spain), through the study of instrumental or cultural striations on the anterior dentition. Our results show a predominant pattern addressed to right-handers. These results fit within the modern human handedness distribution pattern and provide indirect evidence for behavior and brain lateralization on Neandertals. They support the early establishment of handedness in our genus. Moreover, the individual identified as Juvenile 1 (6–8 years old at death), displays the same striation pattern as the adult Neandertals from the sample, and thereby the ontogenic development of manual laterality in that Neandertal population seems to be similar to that of living modern humans. PMID:23671635

  2. Symbolic use of marine shells and mineral pigments by Iberian Neandertals

    PubMed Central

    Zilhão, João; Angelucci, Diego E.; Badal-García, Ernestina; d’Errico, Francesco; Daniel, Floréal; Dayet, Laure; Douka, Katerina; Higham, Thomas F. G.; Martínez-Sánchez, María José; Montes-Bernárdez, Ricardo; Murcia-Mascarós, Sonia; Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen; Roldán-García, Clodoaldo; Vanhaeren, Marian; Villaverde, Valentín; Wood, Rachel; Zapata, Josefina

    2010-01-01

    Two sites of the Neandertal-associated Middle Paleolithic of Iberia, dated to as early as approximately 50,000 years ago, yielded perforated and pigment-stained marine shells. At Cueva de los Aviones, three umbo-perforated valves of Acanthocardia and Glycymeris were found alongside lumps of yellow and red colorants, and residues preserved inside a Spondylus shell consist of a red lepidocrocite base mixed with ground, dark red-to-black fragments of hematite and pyrite. A perforated Pecten shell, painted on its external, white side with an orange mix of goethite and hematite, was abandoned after breakage at Cueva Antón, 60 km inland. Comparable early modern human-associated material from Africa and the Near East is widely accepted as evidence for body ornamentation, implying behavioral modernity. The Iberian finds show that European Neandertals were no different from coeval Africans in this regard, countering genetic/cognitive explanations for the emergence of symbolism and strengthening demographic/social ones. PMID:20080653

  3. Encephalization and allometric trajectories in the genus Homo: Evidence from the Neandertal and modern lineages

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, Emiliano; Manzi, Giorgio; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2003-01-01

    The term “encephalization” is commonly used to describe an enlargement in brain size, considered as either absolute endocranial volumes or relative values in relation to body size. It is widely recognized that a considerable endocranial expansion occurred throughout the evolution of the genus Homo. This article aims to evaluate whether this phenomenon was the outcome of distinct evolutionary lineages, reaching similar brain expansions but through different trajectories. Endocranial morphology was studied in a sample of fossil hominines by multivariate approaches using both traditional metrics and geometric morphometrics. The analysis was focused on the transition from a generalized archaic pattern within the genus Homo to the modern morphology and compared with changes that occurred along the Neandertal lineage. The main result was the identification of two different evolutionary trajectories, in which a similar expansion in endocranial size has been reached by different changes in shape. Along the Neandertal lineage we observed maintenance of an “archaic” endocranial model, in which a large amount of variability is based on a single allometric trend. By contrast, when modern endocasts were compared with nonmodern ones, we found important differences apparently led by a parietal expansion. In this light, the origin of our species may have represented the opportunity to surpass the constraints imposed on encephalization by the ontogenetic pattern shared by nonmodern Homo representatives. PMID:14673084

  4. Symbolic use of marine shells and mineral pigments by Iberian Neandertals.

    PubMed

    Zilhão, João; Angelucci, Diego E; Badal-García, Ernestina; d'Errico, Francesco; Daniel, Floréal; Dayet, Laure; Douka, Katerina; Higham, Thomas F G; Martínez-Sánchez, María José; Montes-Bernárdez, Ricardo; Murcia-Mascarós, Sonia; Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen; Roldán-García, Clodoaldo; Vanhaeren, Marian; Villaverde, Valentín; Wood, Rachel; Zapata, Josefina

    2010-01-19

    Two sites of the Neandertal-associated Middle Paleolithic of Iberia, dated to as early as approximately 50,000 years ago, yielded perforated and pigment-stained marine shells. At Cueva de los Aviones, three umbo-perforated valves of Acanthocardia and Glycymeris were found alongside lumps of yellow and red colorants, and residues preserved inside a Spondylus shell consist of a red lepidocrocite base mixed with ground, dark red-to-black fragments of hematite and pyrite. A perforated Pecten shell, painted on its external, white side with an orange mix of goethite and hematite, was abandoned after breakage at Cueva Antón, 60 km inland. Comparable early modern human-associated material from Africa and the Near East is widely accepted as evidence for body ornamentation, implying behavioral modernity. The Iberian finds show that European Neandertals were no different from coeval Africans in this regard, countering genetic/cognitive explanations for the emergence of symbolism and strengthening demographic/social ones.

  5. Automated Acquisition of Proximal Femur Morphological Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakovic, Slobodan; Zeljkovic, Milan; Milojevic, Zoran

    2014-10-01

    The success of the hip arthroplasty surgery largely depends on the endoprosthesis adjustment to the patient's femur. This implies that the position of the femoral bone in relation to the pelvis is preserved and that the endoprosthesis position ensures its longevity. Dimensions and body shape of the hip joint endoprosthesis and its position after the surgery depend on a number of geometrical parameters of the patient's femur. One of the most suitable methods for determination of these parameters involves 3D reconstruction of femur, based on diagnostic images, and subsequent determination of the required geometric parameters. In this paper, software for automated determination of geometric parameters of the femur is presented. Detailed software development procedure for the purpose of faster and more efficient design of the hip endoprosthesis that ensures patients' specific requirements is also offered

  6. Morphometry of Proximal Femur in Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sheetal; Tuli, Anita; Raheja, Shashi; Jain, Priyanka; Srivastava, Priyanka

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Total hip arthroplasty is a commonly performed surgery now-a-day. There are regional and racial variations in the stature of the population worldwide. So there is always need of population specific data for making best fit prosthesis. Aim The present study was done to measure the parameters of proximal femur and to analyse their correlation by using standard statistical analysis. Materials and Methods Ninety one dry bones (44 left and 47 right) were used. Femur Head Diameter (FHD), Femur Neck Length (FNL), Femur Neck Diameter (FND), Femur Neck Thickness (FNT), Cervicodiaphyseal Angle (CDA) was directly measured with the help of anthropometric instruments. Femur Head Offset (FHO) and Vertical Offset (VO) were measured in the anteroposterior digital photographs. Results Normally distributed variables were compared using Student’s t-test (Unpaired data) to analyse significant effect. There was a significant difference between right and left side of FND and CDA. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to analyse the relationship among variables. FHO had high correlation with the VO (0.687, p<0.001). Conclusion These parameters can be used for designing the prosthesis and plates for hip joint reconstructive surgeries suitable for Indian population. PMID:28384844

  7. Pathological fracture of the femur ten years after successful radiation therapy for metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Hiroshi; Morita, Tetsuro; Kobayashi, Hiroto; Ito, Takui; Segawa, Hiroyuki; Saito, Mari

    2004-01-01

    We describe a case involving a 75-year-old woman presenting with a femur fracture 10 years after radiation therapy for metastatic breast cancer, which developed in the right femur. The lesion showed complete response with bone healing following radiation therapy; however, the patient sustained a femur fracture ten years later. Histological examination of the specimens obtained from the lesion revealed features of radiation osteonecrosis, but there was no histological evidence of tumor. To our knowledge, there has been no reported case of pathological fracture ten years after radiation therapy from radiation osteonecrosis rather than progression of the metastatic lesion. Late complications of radiation therapy should be considered with care, even when metastatic lesions demonstrate complete response to treatment.

  8. The relevance of the first ribs of the El Sidrón site (Asturias, Spain) for the understanding of the Neandertal thorax.

    PubMed

    Bastir, Markus; García-Martínez, Daniel; Estalrrich, Almudena; García-Tabernero, Antonio; Huguet, Rosa; Ríos, Luis; Barash, Alon; Recheis, Wolfgang; de la Rasilla, Marco; Rosas, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Reconstructing the morphology of the Neanderthal rib cage not only provides information about the general evolution of human body shape but also aids understanding of functional anatomy and energetics. Despite this paleobiological importance there is still debate about the nature and extent of variations in the size and shape of the Neandertal thorax. The El Sidrón Neandertals can be used to contribute to this debate, providing new costal remains ranging from fully preserved and undistorted ribs to highly fragmented elements. Six first ribs are particularly well preserved and offer the opportunity to analyze thorax morphology in Neandertals. The aims of this paper are to present this new material, to compare the ontogenetic trajectories of the first ribs between Neandertals and modern humans, and, using geometric morphometrics, to test the hypothesis of morphological integration between the first rib and overall thorax morphology. The first ribs of the El Sidrón adult Neandertals are smaller in centroid size and tend to be less curved when compared with those of modern humans, but are similar to Kebara 2. Our results further show that the straightening of the first ribs is significantly correlated with a straightening of the ribs of the upper thorax (R = 0.66; p < 0.0001) in modern humans, suggesting modularity in the upper and lower thorax units as reported in other hominins. It also supports the hypothesis that the upper thorax of Neandertals differs in shape from modern humans with more anteriorly projecting upper ribs during inspiration. These differences could have biomechanical consequences and account for stronger muscle attachments in Neandertals. Different upper thorax shape would also imply a different spatial arrangement of the shoulder girdle and articulation with the humerus (torsion) and its connection to the upper thorax. Future research should address these inferences in the context of Neandertal overall body morphology.

  9. [Fractures of the shaft of the femur].

    PubMed

    Lögters, T; Windolf, J; Flohé, S

    2009-07-01

    The femur is the largest, longest and strongest bone in the human skeleton. Fractures of the shaft of the femur can result from high energy as well as low energy trauma and 30% of patients have multiple injuries. In the clinical diagnostic special attention must be paid to the peripheral neurovascular status as well as the possibility of a compartment syndrome. Fractures of the femur shaft are defined according to the AO classification. Treatment is as a rule operative, except for children up the end of 4 years old. Medullary nailing is nowadays the method of choice and the nails can be implanted in an anterograde or retrograde direction. The introduction of nails after boring out the medullar is associated with an increased healing rate in comparison to non-boring techniques. Various techniques are available for the often promising method of repositioning and the intraoperative controls. Plating is reserved only for special situations. External fixation is of great value in adults for temporary fixation of fractures of the femur shaft. Full weight bearing is possible immediately following the operation depending on the type of fracture and method of treatment. Uncomplicated fracture healing does not result in a reduction in the ability to work. Despite the generally good prognosis and improvement in design and technology of implants, fractures of the femur shaft still represent a special challenge for the treating casualty surgeon.

  10. A Neandertal mandible from the Cova del Gegant (Sitges, Barcelona, Spain).

    PubMed

    Daura, J; Sanz, M; Subirá, M E; Quam, R; Fullola, J M; Arsuaga, J L

    2005-07-01

    A human mandible from the site of Cova del Gegant is described here for the first time and compared with other Middle and Upper Pleistocene representatives of the genus Homo from Europe and Southwest Asia. The specimen was recovered from sediments which also yielded Mousterian stone tools and Pleistocene fauna. The preserved morphology of the mandible, particularly in the region of the mental foramen, clearly aligns it with the Neandertals, making the Cova del Gegant the only known site in Catalonia documenting diagnostic human skeletal remains in association with Middle Paleolithic stone tools. This represents an important new addition to the human fossil record from the Iberian Peninsula and joins the Bañolas mandible in documenting the course of human evolution in the northern Mediterranean region of Spain.

  11. A Gradualist Scenario for Language Evolution: Precise Linguistic Reconstruction of Early Human (and Neandertal) Grammars

    PubMed Central

    Progovac, Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    In making an argument for the antiquity of language, based on comparative evidence, Dediu and Levinson (2013) express hope that some combinations of structural features will prove so conservative that they will allow deep linguistic reconstruction. I propose that the earliest stages of syntax/grammar as reconstructed in Progovac (2015a), based on a theoretical and data-driven linguistic analysis, provide just such a conservative platform, which would have been commanded also by Neandertals and the common ancestor. I provide a fragment of this proto-grammar, which includes flat verb-noun compounds used for naming and insult (e.g., rattle-snake, cry-baby, scatter-brain), and paratactic (loose) combinations of such flat structures (e.g., Come one, come all; You seek, you find). This flat, binary, paratactic platform is found in all languages, and can be shown to serve as foundation for any further structure building. However, given the degree and nature of variation across languages in elaborating syntax beyond this proto-stage, I propose that hierarchical syntax did not emerge once and uniformly in all its complexity, but rather multiple times, either within Africa, or after dispersion from Africa. If so, then, under the uniregional hypothesis, our common ancestor with Neandertals, H. heidelbergensis, could not have commanded hierarchical syntax, but “only” the proto-grammar. Linguistic reconstructions of this kind are necessary for formulating precise and testable hypotheses regarding language evolution. In addition to the hominin timeline, this reconstruction can also engage, and negotiate between, the fields of neuroscience and genetics, as I illustrate with one specific scenario involving FOXP2 gene. PMID:27877146

  12. A Gradualist Scenario for Language Evolution: Precise Linguistic Reconstruction of Early Human (and Neandertal) Grammars.

    PubMed

    Progovac, Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    In making an argument for the antiquity of language, based on comparative evidence, Dediu and Levinson (2013) express hope that some combinations of structural features will prove so conservative that they will allow deep linguistic reconstruction. I propose that the earliest stages of syntax/grammar as reconstructed in Progovac (2015a), based on a theoretical and data-driven linguistic analysis, provide just such a conservative platform, which would have been commanded also by Neandertals and the common ancestor. I provide a fragment of this proto-grammar, which includes flat verb-noun compounds used for naming and insult (e.g., rattle-snake, cry-baby, scatter-brain), and paratactic (loose) combinations of such flat structures (e.g., Come one, come all; You seek, you find). This flat, binary, paratactic platform is found in all languages, and can be shown to serve as foundation for any further structure building. However, given the degree and nature of variation across languages in elaborating syntax beyond this proto-stage, I propose that hierarchical syntax did not emerge once and uniformly in all its complexity, but rather multiple times, either within Africa, or after dispersion from Africa. If so, then, under the uniregional hypothesis, our common ancestor with Neandertals, H. heidelbergensis, could not have commanded hierarchical syntax, but "only" the proto-grammar. Linguistic reconstructions of this kind are necessary for formulating precise and testable hypotheses regarding language evolution. In addition to the hominin timeline, this reconstruction can also engage, and negotiate between, the fields of neuroscience and genetics, as I illustrate with one specific scenario involving FOXP2 gene.

  13. Statistical Analyses of Femur Parameters for Designing Anatomical Plates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; He, Kunjin; Chen, Zhengming

    2016-01-01

    Femur parameters are key prerequisites for scientifically designing anatomical plates. Meanwhile, individual differences in femurs present a challenge to design well-fitting anatomical plates. Therefore, to design anatomical plates more scientifically, analyses of femur parameters with statistical methods were performed in this study. The specific steps were as follows. First, taking eight anatomical femur parameters as variables, 100 femur samples were classified into three classes with factor analysis and Q-type cluster analysis. Second, based on the mean parameter values of the three classes of femurs, three sizes of average anatomical plates corresponding to the three classes of femurs were designed. Finally, based on Bayes discriminant analysis, a new femur could be assigned to the proper class. Thereafter, the average anatomical plate suitable for that new femur was selected from the three available sizes of plates. Experimental results showed that the classification of femurs was quite reasonable based on the anatomical aspects of the femurs. For instance, three sizes of condylar buttress plates were designed. Meanwhile, 20 new femurs are judged to which classes the femurs belong. Thereafter, suitable condylar buttress plates were determined and selected.

  14. Statistical Analyses of Femur Parameters for Designing Anatomical Plates

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Femur parameters are key prerequisites for scientifically designing anatomical plates. Meanwhile, individual differences in femurs present a challenge to design well-fitting anatomical plates. Therefore, to design anatomical plates more scientifically, analyses of femur parameters with statistical methods were performed in this study. The specific steps were as follows. First, taking eight anatomical femur parameters as variables, 100 femur samples were classified into three classes with factor analysis and Q-type cluster analysis. Second, based on the mean parameter values of the three classes of femurs, three sizes of average anatomical plates corresponding to the three classes of femurs were designed. Finally, based on Bayes discriminant analysis, a new femur could be assigned to the proper class. Thereafter, the average anatomical plate suitable for that new femur was selected from the three available sizes of plates. Experimental results showed that the classification of femurs was quite reasonable based on the anatomical aspects of the femurs. For instance, three sizes of condylar buttress plates were designed. Meanwhile, 20 new femurs are judged to which classes the femurs belong. Thereafter, suitable condylar buttress plates were determined and selected. PMID:28044087

  15. Paleoclimate during Neandertal and anatomically modern human occupation at Amud and Qafzeh, Israel: the stable isotope data.

    PubMed

    Hallin, Kristin A; Schoeninger, Margaret J; Schwarcz, Henry P

    2012-01-01

    The δ(13)C(en) and δ(18)O(en) values of goat and gazelle enamel carbonate indicate that Neandertals at Amud Cave, Israel (53-70 ka) lived under different ecological conditions than did anatomically modern humans at Qafzeh Cave, Israel (approximately 92 ka). During the Last Glacial Period, Neandertals at Amud Cave lived under wetter conditions than those in the region today. Neither faunal species ate arid-adapted C(4) plants or drought-stressed C(3) plants. The variation in gazelle δ(18)O(en) values suggests multiple birth seasons, which today occur under wetter than normal conditions. The magnitude and pattern of intra-tooth variation in goat δ(18)O(en) values indicate that rain fell throughout the year unlike today. Anatomically modern humans encountered a Qafzeh Cave region that was more open and arid than Glacial Period Amud Cave, and more open than today's Upper Galilee region. Goat δ(13)C(en) values indicate feeding on varying amounts of C(4) plants throughout the year. The climate apparently ameliorated higher in the sequence; but habitats remained more open than at Amud Cave. Both gazelles and goats fed on C(3) plants in brushy habitats without any inclusion of C(4) plants. The magnitude of intra-tooth variation in goat δ(18)O(en) values, however, suggest that some rain fell throughout the year, and the relative representation of woodland dwelling species indicates the occurrence of woodlands in the region. Climate differences affecting the distribution of plants and animals appear to be the significant factor contributing to behavioral differences previously documented between Neandertals and anatomically modern humans in the region. Climate forcing probably affected the early appearances of anatomically modern humans, although not the disappearance of Neandertals from the Levant.

  16. Paleoneurology of two new neandertal occipitals from El Sidrón (asturias, Spain) in the context of homo endocranial evolution.

    PubMed

    Peña-Melián, Angel; Rosas, Antonio; García-Tabernero, Antonio; Bastir, Markus; De La Rasilla, Marco

    2011-08-01

    The endocranial surface description and comparative analyses of two new neandertal occipital fragments (labelled SD-1149 and SD-370a) from the El Sidrón site (Asturias, Spain) reveal new aspects of neandertal brain morphological asymmetries. The dural sinus drainage pattern, as observed on the sagittal-transverse system, as well as the cerebral occipito-petalias, point out a slightly differential configuration of the neandertal brain when compared to other Homo species, especially H. sapiens. The neandertal dural sinus drainage pattern is organized in a more asymmetric mode, in such a way that the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) drains either to the right or to the left transverse sinuses, but in no case in a confluent mode (i.e. simultaneous continuation of SSS with both right (RTS) and left (LTS) transverse sinuses). Besides, the superior sagittal sinus shows an accentuated deviation from of the mid-sagittal plane in its way to the RTS in 35% of neandertals. This condition, which increases the asymmetry of the system, is almost nonexistent neither in the analyzed Homo fossil species sample nor in that of anatomically modern humans. Regarding the cerebral occipito-petalias, neandertals manifest one of the lowest percentages of left petalia of the Homo sample (including modern H. sapiens). As left occipito-petalia is the predominant pattern in hominins, it seems as if neandertals would have developed a different pattern of brain hemispheres asymmetry. Finally, the relief and position of the the cerebral sulci and gyri impressions observed in the El Sidrón occipital specimens look similar to those observed in modern H. sapiens. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Comparative morphology and morphometric assessment of the Neandertal occipital remains from the El Sidrón site (Asturias, Spain: years 2000-2008).

    PubMed

    Bastir, Markus; Rosas, Antonio; Tabernero, Antonio García; Peña-Melián, Angel; Estalrrich, Almudena; de la Rasilla, Marco; Fortea, Javier

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses the occipital remains recovered from the El Sidrón (Asturias, Spain) Neandertal site between the years of 2000-2008. The sample is represented by three specimens, SD-1219, SD-1149, and SD-370a. Descriptive morphology, linear measurements, 3D geometric morphometrics, and virtual anthropological methods were employed to address the morphological, morphometric, and phylogenetic affinities of these fossils. The fossils display Neandertal autapomorphies (e.g., bilaterally protruding transverse occipital torus, suprainiac fossa). SD-1219 also preserves a strongly projecting juxtamastoid eminence and shows occipital bunning. In linear distances, the El Sidrón occipitals are similar to each other and close to the Neandertal mean. The centroid size of SD-1219 is slightly larger than the Neandertal average. All of the evidence taken together points to the hypothesis that SD-1219 belongs to a smaller Neandertal male. Linear measurements and the vault thickness of SD-1149 also suggest a robust male individual. The gracility of SD-370a points towards an immature individual. Virtual anthropological methods were used to reconstruct a 3D model of the SD-1219 occipital for geometric morphometrics, which reveals that SD-1219 shows relatively broad and low occipital plane proportions. Within the European Pleistocene lineage sample, this fossil falls geometrically closer to primitive rather than to derived morphologies because of its increased width, and a lower, anterior position of inion relative to the biasterionic axis. These results may imply that cranial sphericity could be an important feature of intraspecific Neandertal variability. Our findings open the way for further studies of intraspecific variation in Neandertal populations, in which the El Sidrón sample may play a significant role.

  18. Comparing models on the genealogical relationships among Neandertal, Cro-Magnoid and modern Europeans by serial coalescent simulations.

    PubMed

    Belle, E M S; Benazzo, A; Ghirotto, S; Colonna, V; Barbujani, G

    2009-03-01

    Populations of anatomically archaic (Neandertal) and early modern (Cro-Magnoid) humans are jointly documented in the European fossil record, in the period between 40 000 and 25 000 years BP, but the large differences between their cultures, morphologies and DNAs suggest that the two groups were not close relatives. However, it is still unclear whether any genealogical continuity between them can be ruled out. Here, we simulated a broad range of demographic scenarios by means of a serial coalescence algorithm in which Neandertals, Cro-Magnoids and modern Europeans were either part of the same mitochondrial genealogy or of two separate genealogies. Mutation rates, population sizes, population structure and demographic growth rates varied across simulations. All models in which anatomically modern (that is, Cro-Magnoid and current) Europeans belong to a distinct genealogy performed better than any model in which the three groups were assigned to the same mitochondrial genealogy. The maximum admissible level of gene flow between Neandertals and the ancestors of current Europeans is 0.001% per generation, one order of magnitude lower than estimated in previous studies not considering genetic data on Cro-Magnoid people.

  19. Division of labor by sex and age in Neandertals: an approach through the study of activity-related dental wear.

    PubMed

    Estalrrich, Almudena; Rosas, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of activity-related dental wear patterns in prehistoric anatomically modern humans and modern hunter-gatherers has shown sex differences attributable to a gendered division of labor. Neandertals are known to have extensive anterior dental wear related to the use of their front teeth as a tool. In this study we analyze the i) cultural striations (scratches on the labial surface of the anterior teeth with a cut-mark morphology), and ii) dental chipping (ante-mortem microfracture involving enamel or both enamel and dentine) in 19 Neandertal individuals from the l'Hortus (France), Spy (Belgium), and El Sidrón (Spain) sites, and compare the characteristics of those traits with the age and sex estimation for the individuals and among samples. The study reveals that all individuals have cultural striations, but those detected on the adult females are longer than the striations found in adult males. Regarding the distribution of dental chipping, the prevalence of this trait is higher in the maxillary dentition of males whereas females have the majority of dental chipping on their mandibular teeth. The differences detected on the overall activity-related dental wear pattern denote a difference or a division of labor by age and sex in Neandertals while using the mouth as a third hand, i.e., in activities other than the provisioning of food, and provide new evidence for the lifestyle of this Pleistocene fossil human species.

  20. Experimental methods for the Palaeolithic dry distillation of birch bark: implications for the origin and development of Neandertal adhesive technology.

    PubMed

    Kozowyk, P R B; Soressi, M; Pomstra, D; Langejans, G H J

    2017-08-31

    The destructive distillation of birch bark to produce tar has recently featured in debates about the technological and cognitive abilities of Neandertals and modern humans. The abilities to precisely control fire temperatures and to manipulate adhesive properties are believed to require advanced mental traits. However, the significance given to adhesive technology in these debates has quickly outgrown our understanding of birch bark tar and its manufacture using aceramic techniques. In this paper, we detail three experimental methods of Palaeolithic tar production ranging from simple to complex. We recorded the fuel, time, materials, temperatures, and tar yield for each method and compared them with the tar known from the Palaeolithic. Our results indicate that it is possible to obtain useful amounts of tar by combining materials and technology already in use by Neandertals. A ceramic container is not required, and temperature control need not be as precise as previously thought. However, Neandertals must have been able to recognize certain material properties, such as adhesive tack and viscosity. In this way, they could develop the technology from producing small traces of tar on partially burned bark to techniques capable of manufacturing quantities of tar equal to those found in the Middle Palaeolithic archaeological record.

  1. Cutmarked human remains bearing Neandertal features and modern human remains associated with the Aurignacian at Les Rois.

    PubMed

    Ramirez Rozzi, Fernando V; d'Errico, Francesco; Vanhaeren, Marian; Grootes, Pieter M; Kerautret, Bertrand; Dujardin, Véronique

    2009-01-01

    The view that Aurignacian technologies and their associated symbolic manifestations represent the archaeologicalproxy for the spread of Anatomically Modern Humans into Europe, is supported by few diagnostic human remains, including those from the Aurignacian site of Les Rois in south-western France. Here we reassess the taxonomic attribution of the human remains, their cultural affiliation, and provide five new radiocarbon dates for the site. Patterns of tooth growth along with the morphological and morphometric analysis of the human remains indicate that a juvenile mandible showing cutmarks presents some Neandertal features, whereas another mandible is attributed to Anatomically Modern Humans. Reappraisal of the archaeological sequence demonstrates that human remains derive from two layers dated to 28-30 kyr BP attributed to the Aurignacian, the only cultural tradition detected at the site. Three possible explanations may account for this unexpected evidence. The first one is that the Aurignacian was exclusively produced by AMH and that the child mandible from unit A2 represents evidence for consumption or, more likely, symbolic use of a Neandertal child by Aurignacian AMH The second possible explanation is that Aurignacian technologies were produced at Les Rois by human groups bearing both AMH and Neandertal features. Human remains from Les Rois would be in this case the first evidence of a biological contact between the two human groups. The third possibility is that all human remains from Les Rois represent an AMH population with conserved plesiomorphic characters suggesting a larger variation in modern humans from the Upper Palaeolithic.

  2. Failure analysis of stainless steel femur fixation plate.

    PubMed

    Hussain, P B; Mohammad, M

    2004-05-01

    Failure analysis was performed to investigate the failure of the femur fixation plate which was previously fixed on the femur of a girl. Radiography, metallography, fractography and mechanical testing were conducted in this study. The results show that the failure was due to the formation of notches on the femur plate. These notches act as stress raisers from where the cracks start to propagate. Finally fracture occurred on the femur plate and subsequently, the plate failed.

  3. Fractures of the Femur. End Results*

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    guidance [5]. We reproduce here an article in which Dr. Henderson reviewed 222 consecutive cases of femur fractures, 165 of which had been referred late because of complications of fractures treated elsewhere (clearly, by 1921, the Mayo Clinic was a referral source for others) [2]. Followup could not have been easy at a time when patients often came from a distance and travel was difficult, but it was described when available and in 40 of the 57 recent fractures, Henderson reported 87.5% were “cured.” Of the 165 old fractures, he was able to trace 143 (87%), a remarkable figure even today. He reported 90% of the femoral neck fractures were cured by various sorts of nonsurgical (6 patients) or surgical reconstructive (39 patients) means; 85% of the femoral shaft fractures were cured by either nonoperative (29 patients) or operative (69 patients) means. While he did not use the sort of outcomes we use today (the earliest orthopaedic outcome instruments were not introduced for four more decades: by Carroll B. Larson in 1963 [3] and William H. Harris in 1969 [1]), we can only presume Henderson meant union was achieved when patients were “cured” since nonunion or malunion would not have likely produced good results. That being the case, his rate of union was remarkable and would be enviable today in these sometimes difficult situations, attesting to his understanding of the individual situations and his skills. Melvin S. Henderson, MD is shown. Photograph is reproduced with permission and ©American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Fifty Years of Progress, 1983. References Harris WH. Traumatic arthritis of the hip after dislocation and acetabular fractures: treatment by mold arthroplasty: an end-result study using a new method of result evaluation. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1969;51:737–755. Henderson MS. Fractures of the femur: end results. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1921;3:520–528. Larson CB. Rating scale for hip disabilities. Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1963;31:85–93. Mostofi

  4. Endoprosthetic reconstruction for metastatic phaeochromocytoma in the distal femur: A case report.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Kanchana Pala; Srinivas, Chirukuri; Gowrishankarswamy, Lakshmipura Gangadharaiah; Chandrasekar, Chikkamuniyappa

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic spread of malignant phaeochromocytoma is known to involve multiple organs including the axial skeleton. Its presentation as a solitary lesion in the long bones of the extremities is extremely rare. We report a unique case of solitary metastatic phaeochromocytoma presenting in the distal femur, 16 years after excision of primary abdominal tumor. A 60 year old female, operated for adrenal phaeochromocytoma 16 years back was detected to have a bone tumor in her left distal femur. Chest and abdominal CT evaluation including bone scintigraphy confirmed the lesion to be solitary. Magnetic resonance imaging of the left femur revealed the tumor to be of aggressive nature. It involved whole of the distal femoral metaphysis with bone destruction, soft tissue extension and an impending pathological fracture. The tumor was histopathologically confirmed to be phaeochromocytoma. Patient underwent wide surgical resection of the tumor along with simultaneous endoprosthetic reconstruction. Following surgery, rehabilitation was rapid and effortless with patient ambulating independently. She had pain free full range of knee movements and resumed her daily activity uneventfully. On 18 months follow up the patient had no recurrence or complications. Late and solitary skeletal metastasis of malignant phaeochromocytoma although rare, can occur in the distal femur mimicking a primary bone tumor. Wide surgical excision and simultaneous endoprosthetic reconstruction should be considered as a treatment option. This not only permits limb salvage and early rehabilitation, but also restores form and function of the limb.

  5. A biomechanical comparison of composite femurs and cadaver femurs used in experiments on operated hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Basso, Trude; Klaksvik, Jomar; Syversen, Unni; Foss, Olav A

    2014-12-18

    Fourth generation composite femurs (4GCFs, models #3406 and #3403) simulate femurs of males <80 years with good bone quality. Since most hip fractures occur in old women with fragile bones, concern is raised regarding the use of standard 4GCFs in biomechanical experiments. In this study the stability of hip fracture fixations in 4GCFs was compared to human cadaver femurs (HCFs) selected to represent patients with hip fractures. Ten 4GCFs (Sawbones, Pacific Research Laboratories, Inc., Vashon, WA, USA) were compared to 24 HCFs from seven females and five males >60 years. Proximal femur anthropometric measurements were noted. Strain gauge rosettes were attached and femurs were mounted in a hip simulator applying a combined subject-specific axial load and torque. Baseline measurements of resistance to deformation were recorded. Standardized femoral neck fractures were surgically stabilized before the constructs were subjected to 20,000 load-cycles. An optical motion tracking system measured relative movements. Median (95% CI) head fragment migration was 0.8mm (0.4 to 1.1) in the 4GCF group versus 2.2mm (1.5 to 4.6) in the cadaver group (p=0.001). This difference in fracture stability could not be explained by observed differences in femoral anthropometry or potential overloading of 4GCFs. 4GCFs failed with fracture-patterns different from those observed in cadavers. To conclude, standard 4GCFs provide unrealistically stable bone-implant constructs and fail with fractures not observed in cadavers. Until a validated osteopenic or osteoporotic composite femur model is provided, standard 4GCFs should only be used when representing the biomechanical properties of young healthy femurs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Subtrochanteric fractures of the femur: update.

    PubMed

    Barbosa de Toledo Lourenço, Paulo Roberto; Pires, Robinson Esteves Santos

    2016-01-01

    Because of the anatomical peculiarities of the subtrochanteric region, treatment of fractures in this region remains challenging. The undeniable evolution of implants has not been accompanied by the expected decrease in the complication rate. The aim of this study was to discuss critical points in detail, such as preoperative planning, reduction tactics and the current scientific evidence concerning treatment of subtrochanteric fractures of the femur.

  7. First direct dating of a presumed Pleistocene hominid from China: AMS radiocarbon age of a femur from the Ordos Plateau.

    PubMed

    Keates, Susan G; Hodgins, Gregory W L; Kuzmin, Yaroslav V; Orlova, Lyobov A

    2007-07-01

    Human remains from the Xarusgol Valley, Ordos Plateau, northwestern China, have been considered to date to the Late Pleistocene. In order to ascertain their true age, direct AMS (14)C dating of a femur collected in the early 1920s was conducted. The results demonstrate that the femur is very young, with one sample of 'post-bomb' age and the other sample c. 200 years old. This first direct dating of a Chinese fossil hominid underscores the need to apply the same methodology to other Chinese modern human fossils currently believed to be of Pleistocene age.

  8. Genetic Adaptation and Neandertal Admixture Shaped the Immune System of Human Populations.

    PubMed

    Quach, Hélène; Rotival, Maxime; Pothlichet, Julien; Loh, Yong-Hwee Eddie; Dannemann, Michael; Zidane, Nora; Laval, Guillaume; Patin, Etienne; Harmant, Christine; Lopez, Marie; Deschamps, Matthieu; Naffakh, Nadia; Duffy, Darragh; Coen, Anja; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Clément, Frederic; Boland, Anne; Deleuze, Jean-François; Kelso, Janet; Albert, Matthew L; Quintana-Murci, Lluis

    2016-10-20

    Humans differ in the outcome that follows exposure to life-threatening pathogens, yet the extent of population differences in immune responses and their genetic and evolutionary determinants remain undefined. Here, we characterized, using RNA sequencing, the transcriptional response of primary monocytes from Africans and Europeans to bacterial and viral stimuli-ligands activating Toll-like receptor pathways (TLR1/2, TLR4, and TLR7/8) and influenza virus-and mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). We identify numerous cis-eQTLs that contribute to the marked differences in immune responses detected within and between populations and a strong trans-eQTL hotspot at TLR1 that decreases expression of pro-inflammatory genes in Europeans only. We find that immune-responsive regulatory variants are enriched in population-specific signals of natural selection and show that admixture with Neandertals introduced regulatory variants into European genomes, affecting preferentially responses to viral challenges. Together, our study uncovers evolutionarily important determinants of differences in host immune responsiveness between human populations.

  9. Adult Neandertal clavicles from the El Sidrón site (Asturias, Spain) in the context of Homo pectoral girdle evolution.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Antonio; Rodriguez-Perez, Francisco Javier; Bastir, Markus; Estalrrich, Almudena; Huguet, Rosa; García-Tabernero, Antonio; Pastor, Juan Francisco; de la Rasilla, Marco

    2016-06-01

    We undertook a three-dimensional geometric morphometric (3DGM) analysis on 12 new Neandertal clavicle specimens from the El Sidrón site (Spain), dated to 49,000 years ago. The 3DGM methods were applied in a comparative framework in order to improve our understanding of trait polarity in features related to Homo pectoral girdle evolution, using other Neandertals, Homo sapiens, Pan, ATD6-50 (Homo antecessor), and KNM-WT 15000 (Homo ergaster/erectus) in the reference collection. Twenty-nine homologous landmarks were measured for each clavicle. Variation and morphological similarities were assessed through principal component analysis, conducted separately for the complete clavicle and the diaphysis. On average, Neandertal clavicles had significantly larger muscular entheses, double dorsal curvature, clavicle torsion, and cranial orientation of the acromial end than non-Neandertal clavicles; the El Sidrón clavicles fit this pattern. Variation within the samples was large, with extensive overlap between Homo species; only chimpanzee specimens clearly differed from the other specimens in morphometric terms. Taken together, our morphometric analyses are consistent with the following phylogenetic sequence. The primitive condition of the clavicle is manifest in the cranial orientation of both the acromial and sternal ends. The derived condition expressed in the H. sapiens + Neandertal clade is defined by caudal rotation of both the sternal and acromial ends, but with variation in the number of acromia remaining in a certain cranial orientation. Finally, the autapomorphic Neandertal condition is defined by secondarily acquired primitive cranial re-orientation of the acromial end, which varies from individual to individual. These results suggest that the pace of phylogenetic change in the pectoral girdle does not seem to follow that of other postcranial skeletal features. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Pech-de-l'Azé I Neandertal child: ESR, uranium-series, and AMS 14C dating of its MTA type B context.

    PubMed

    Soressi, M; Jones, H L; Rink, W J; Maureille, B; Tillier, A-M

    2007-04-01

    The Pech-de-l'Azé I skull and mandible are included in the juvenile Neandertal remains from Europe. However, some preserved features in the cranial skeleton seem to distinguish the specimen from other Neandertal children. Unfortunately, the stratigraphic position and dating of this child has never been clear. Our recent work on unpublished archives show that the Pech-de-l'Azé I Neandertal child was discovered at the bottom of layer 6, attributed to the Mousterian of Acheulean tradition type B. These skull and mandible are the first diagnostic human remains (aside from an isolated tooth) attributed to the Mousterian of Acheulian tradition (MTA) type B. Consequently, we confirm that Neandertals were the makers of this Mousterian industry, which is characterized by unusual high frequencies of Upper Paleolithic type tools, elongated blanks and blades. We were able to date the context of the hominid remains by dating layer 6 and the layers above and beneath it using ESR, coupled ESR/(230)Th/(234)U (coupled ESR/U-series), and AMS (14)C. Coupled ESR/U-series results on 16 mammalian teeth constrain the age of the uppermost layer 7 to 41-58ka, and layer 6 to 37-51ka. The wide spread in each age estimate results mainly from uncertainties in the gamma-dose rate. These ages are concordant with AMS (14)C ages of two bones coming from the top of layer 6, which provide dates of about 41.7-43.6ka cal BP. A combination of stratigraphic arguments and dating results for layers 6 and 7 show that the Neandertal child cannot be older than 51ka or younger than 41ka. The lowermost layer 4 is shown to be older than 43ka by the principle of superposition and ESR dating in the immediately overlying layer 5. This study shows that the MTA type B had been manufactured by Neandertals before the arrival of anatomically modern humans in the local region. Additionally, by providing a firm chronological framework for the specific morphometric the features of Pech-de-l'Azé I Neandertal child, this

  11. Direct radiocarbon dates for Vindija G1 and Velika Pećina Late Pleistocene hominid remains

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Fred H.; Trinkaus, Erik; Pettitt, Paul B.; Karavanić, Ivor; Paunović, Maja

    1999-01-01

    New accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dates taken directly on human remains from the Late Pleistocene sites of Vindija and Velika Pećina in the Hrvatsko Zagorje of Croatia are presented. Hominid specimens from both sites have played critical roles in the development of current perspectives on modern human evolutionary emergence in Europe. Dates of ≈28 thousand years (ka) before the present (B.P.) and ≈29 ka B.P. for two specimens from Vindija G1 establish them as the most recent dated Neandertals in the Eurasian range of these archaic humans. The human frontal bone from Velika Pećina, generally considered one of the earliest representatives of modern humans in Europe, dated to ≈5 ka B.P., rendering it no longer pertinent to discussions of modern human origins. Apart from invalidating the only radiometrically based example of temporal overlap between late Neandertal and early modern human fossil remains from within any region of Europe, these dates raise the question of when early modern humans first dispersed into Europe and have implications for the nature and geographic patterning of biological and cultural interactions between these populations and the Neandertals. PMID:10535913

  12. Comparison of two pressurisers for cementation of the proximal femur.

    PubMed

    Morishima, Takkan; Choy, Godwin G H; Crawford, Ross W; Wilson, Lance J

    2014-08-01

    To compare pressures generated by 2 different cement pressurisers at various locations in the proximal femur. Two groups of 5 synthetic femurs were used, and 6 pressure sensors were placed in the femur at 20-mm intervals proximally to distally. Cement was filled into the femoral canal retrogradely using a cement gun with either the half-moon pressuriser or the femoral canal pressuriser. Maximum pressures and pressure time integrals (cumulative pressure over time) of the 2 pressurisers were compared. At all sensors, the half-moon pressuriser produced higher maximum pressures and pressure time integrals than the femoral canal pressuriser, but the difference was significant only at sensor 1 (proximal femur). This may result in reduced cement interdigitation in the proximal femur. The half-moon pressuriser produced higher maximum cementation pressures and pressure time integrals than the femoral canal pressuriser in the proximal femur region, which is critical for rotational stability of the implant and prevention of implant fracture.

  13. Elastic modulus varies along the bovine femur.

    PubMed

    Nobakhti, Sabah; Katsamenis, Orestis L; Zaarour, Nizar; Limbert, Georges; Thurner, Philipp J

    2017-07-01

    Bone is a heterogeneous material and its mechanical properties vary within the body. Variations in the mechanical response of different bone samples taken from the body cannot be fully explained by only looking at local compositional information at the tissue level. Due to different states of the stress within bones, one might expect that mechanical properties change over the length of a bone; this has not been a matter of systematic research in previous studies. In this study, the distribution of the tissue elastic modulus along the bovine femur is investigated using three-point bending tests. Two bovine femora were split to seven and eight blocks from proximal to distal metaphysis, respectively and twenty beam shaped bone samples were extracted and tested from each block. Based on our findings, the longitudinal elastic modulus follows a gradient pattern along the bovine femur as it increases along the bone from the proximal metaphysis to mid-diaphysis and then decreases toward the distal metaphysis again. Considering long bones to be subjected to bending loads, this mechanism alters the bone structure to support load in the regions where it is needed; similar as outlined by Wolff's law. In another part of this study, microfocus X-ray computed tomography (μCT) was found unable to predict the same trend of changes for the elastic modulus via image-based or density-based elastic moduli calculations. This is insofar important as conventional finite element models of bone are often directly shaped from μCT data. Based on our findings, it seems that current computed tomography based finite element models generated in this manner may not adequately capture the local variation of material behavior of bone tissue, but this may be improved by considering the changes of the elastic modulus along the femur. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Salter Harris Fractures of the Distal Femur

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Steven W.; Barker, Simon L.

    2013-01-01

    Salter Harris–type injuries of the distal femur should be treated as a dislocation of the knee and therefore as a medical emergency. Senior medical staff should be involved early, ankle–brachial index ratio should be measured in all patients and the clinician should have a high index of suspicion for a vascular injury. Ideally reduction, stabilization, and vascular repair, if necessary, should be carried out within 6 hours of the initial event. There should be a low threshold for fasciotomies. These 2 cases demonstrate the importance of having a high index of suspicion for vascular injury and the need for continued reassessment. PMID:26425580

  15. Periprosthetic proximal femur fractures: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Javad; Vegari, David N

    2011-06-01

    With the increase in demand for total hip and knee arthroplasty, the orthopaedic community has seen a dramatic increase in periprosthetic fractures. Given the high morbidity and mortality associated with these fractures, the orthopaedic surgeon needs to be prepared to deal with this difficult problem. The purpose of this article is to provide the surgeon with an algorithmic approach that allows for easy classification and treatment options for periprosthetic fractures of the proximal femur. Such an approach should prevent the mismanagement of these complications.

  16. Possible Further Evidence of Low Genetic Diversity in the El Sidrón (Asturias, Spain) Neandertal Group: Congenital Clefts of the Atlas.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Luis; Rosas, Antonio; Estalrrich, Almudena; García-Tabernero, Antonio; Bastir, Markus; Huguet, Rosa; Pastor, Francisco; Sanchís-Gimeno, Juan Alberto; de la Rasilla, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We present here the first cases in Neandertals of congenital clefts of the arch of the atlas. Two atlases from El Sidrón, northern Spain, present respectively a defect of the posterior (frequency in extant modern human populations ranging from 0.73% to 3.84%), and anterior (frequency in extant modern human populations ranging from 0.087% to 0.1%) arch, a condition in most cases not associated with any clinical manifestation. The fact that two out of three observable atlases present a low frequency congenital condition, together with previously reported evidence of retained deciduous mandibular canine in two out of ten dentitions from El Sidrón, supports the previous observation based on genetic evidence that these Neandertals constituted a group with close genetic relations. Some have proposed for humans and other species that the presence of skeletal congenital conditions, although without clinical significance, could be used as a signal of endogamy or inbreeding. In the present case this interpretation would fit the general scenario of high incidence of rare conditions among Pleistocene humans and the specific scenariothat emerges from Neandertal paleogenetics, which points to long-term small and decreasing population size with reduced and isolated groups. Adverse environmental factors affecting early pregnancies would constitute an alternative, non-exclusive, explanation for a high incidence of congenital conditions. Further support or rejection of these interpretations will come from new genetic and skeletal evidence from Neandertal remains.

  17. Possible Further Evidence of Low Genetic Diversity in the El Sidrón (Asturias, Spain) Neandertal Group: Congenital Clefts of the Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Ríos, Luis; Rosas, Antonio; Estalrrich, Almudena; García-Tabernero, Antonio; Bastir, Markus; Huguet, Rosa; Pastor, Francisco; Sanchís-Gimeno, Juan Alberto; de la Rasilla, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We present here the first cases in Neandertals of congenital clefts of the arch of the atlas. Two atlases from El Sidrón, northern Spain, present respectively a defect of the posterior (frequency in extant modern human populations ranging from 0.73% to 3.84%), and anterior (frequency in extant modern human populations ranging from 0.087% to 0.1%) arch, a condition in most cases not associated with any clinical manifestation. The fact that two out of three observable atlases present a low frequency congenital condition, together with previously reported evidence of retained deciduous mandibular canine in two out of ten dentitions from El Sidrón, supports the previous observation based on genetic evidence that these Neandertals constituted a group with close genetic relations. Some have proposed for humans and other species that the presence of skeletal congenital conditions, although without clinical significance, could be used as a signal of endogamy or inbreeding. In the present case this interpretation would fit the general scenario of high incidence of rare conditions among Pleistocene humans and the specific scenariothat emerges from Neandertal paleogenetics, which points to long-term small and decreasing population size with reduced and isolated groups. Adverse environmental factors affecting early pregnancies would constitute an alternative, non-exclusive, explanation for a high incidence of congenital conditions. Further support or rejection of these interpretations will come from new genetic and skeletal evidence from Neandertal remains. PMID:26418427

  18. Pindborg tumor in the distal femur.

    PubMed

    Sussela, Alex Oliboni; Alves, Paulo Ricardo Picon; Silva, Vinicius Duval da; Bolze, Carlos Daniel de Garcia; Serafini, Osvaldo André

    2017-01-01

    To describe a case of possible diagnosis of Pindborg tumor on the distal femur. A 32-years-old female patient, a native of Bolivia, resident in Brazil, arrived to this service for tumor research in the right femur. After biopsies and resection of the lesion, the case was referred to analysis and consultancy in the United States. In a report of review by the Pathology Laboratory, it was characterized the histological appearance and immunohistochemical profile were characteristic of Pindborg tumor. Currently, the patient is being followed-up at the Orthopedics and Traumatology Department of this institution, and presents a good evolution. This study presents the case of a patient with a rare tumor that was investigated for an extensive period and through many tests. Pindborg tumor was suggested as a diagnostic hypothesis due to the characteristics and behavior of the neoplastic lesion. Although this lesion is more commonly observed in odontology, the neoplasia was compatible with the diagnosis. Therefore, despite the fact that this tumor has benign characteristics, long-term monitoring is necessary, given the high rate of tumor recurrence.

  19. Lifelong sedentary behaviour and femur structure.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, H; Gonçalves, D; Figueiredo, P; Mota, M P; Duarte, J A

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the lifelong differences of femur structure in sedentary and physically active animal models. Thirty male C57BL/6 mice, 2 months old, were either: i) housed in cages with running wheel (AA; n=10), ii) housed in cages without running wheel (AS; n=10), iii) or sacrificed without intervention (Y; n=10). AA and AS animals were sacrificed after 23 months of housing. Right femur structure was analyzed in all animals by histomorphometry. Significant differences in several microarchitectural parameters of cancellous and cortical bone were identified between Y mice and both groups of aged mice, as well as between AA and AS groups. Lifelong physically active mice had significantly higher cancellous bone surface (Cn.BS) and trabecular number (Tb.N) and decreased trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) at both epiphyses when compared to AS animals. No differences were observed between Y and AA groups regarding osteocyte number (N.Ot) despite its significant reduction in AS animals, suggesting that age alone was not a cause for decreases in N.Ot. Our results suggest that the reduced bone quality observed in the elderly is not only a consequence of age but also of lack of physical activity since sedentary behaviour significantly aggravated the degenerative age-related bone differences.

  20. Analysis of Aurignacian interstratification at the Châtelperronian-type site and implications for the behavioral modernity of Neandertals

    PubMed Central

    Zilhão, João; d’Errico, Francesco; Bordes, Jean-Guillaume; Lenoble, Arnaud; Texier, Jean-Pierre; Rigaud, Jean-Philippe

    2006-01-01

    The Châtelperronian is a Neandertal-associated archeological culture featuring ornaments and decorated bone tools. It is often suggested that such symbolic items do not imply that Neandertals had modern cognition and stand instead for influences received from coeval, nearby early modern humans represented by the Aurignacian culture, whose precocity would be proven by stratigraphy and radiocarbon dates. The Grotte des Fées at Châtelperron (France) is the remaining case of such a potential Châtelperronian–Aurignacian contemporaneity, but reanalysis shows that its stratification is poor and unclear, the bone assemblage is carnivore-accumulated, the putative interstratified Aurignacian lens in level B4 is made up for the most part of Châtelperronian material, the upper part of the sequence is entirely disturbed, and the few Aurignacian items in levels B4-5 represent isolated intrusions into otherwise in situ Châtelperronian deposits. As elsewhere in southwestern Europe, this evidence confirms that the Aurignacian postdates the Châtelperronian and that the latter’s cultural innovations are better explained as the Neandertals’ independent development of behavioral modernity. PMID:16894152

  1. The growth pattern of Neandertals, reconstructed from a juvenile skeleton from El Sidrón (Spain).

    PubMed

    Rosas, Antonio; Ríos, Luis; Estalrrich, Almudena; Liversidge, Helen; García-Tabernero, Antonio; Huguet, Rosa; Cardoso, Hugo; Bastir, Markus; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; de la Rasilla, Marco; Dean, Christopher

    2017-09-22

    Ontogenetic studies help us understand the processes of evolutionary change. Previous studies on Neandertals have focused mainly on dental development and inferred an accelerated pace of general growth. We report on a juvenile partial skeleton (El Sidrón J1) preserving cranio-dental and postcranial remains. We used dental histology to estimate the age at death to be 7.7 years. Maturation of most elements fell within the expected range of modern humans at this age. The exceptions were the atlas and mid-thoracic vertebrae, which remained at the 5- to 6-year stage of development. Furthermore, endocranial features suggest that brain growth was not yet completed. The vertebral maturation pattern and extended brain growth most likely reflect Neandertal physiology and ontogenetic energy constraints rather than any fundamental difference in the overall pace of growth in this extinct human. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  2. Neandertal mobility and large-game hunting: the exploitation of reindeer during the Quina Mousterian at Chez-Pinaud Jonzac (Charente-Maritime, France).

    PubMed

    Niven, Laura; Steele, Teresa E; Rendu, William; Mallye, Jean-Baptiste; McPherron, Shannon P; Soressi, Marie; Jaubert, Jacques; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2012-10-01

    Neandertals were effective hunters of large ungulates throughout their geographic and temporal ranges. Equipped with this knowledge, researchers in paleoanthropology continue to seek insight on the relationships between hunting and subsistence strategies with other components of the Neandertals' niche, such as mobility, site use, and lithic technology. The Quina Mousterian deposits from the rockshelter site of Chez Pinaud Jonzac (Charente-Maritime, France; hereafter Jonzac) offer an excellent opportunity to pursue these issues. This paper focuses on the extensive and well-preserved skeletal remains of reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) recovered from recent excavations of the site, representing at least 18 individuals that were hunted by Neandertals during the fall through winter. Our zooarchaeological results indicate that all ages of reindeer were hunted but adult individuals predominate. No bias is evident in the comparable frequencies of males and females. These prey were butchered on-site, with abundant evidence of meat filleting and marrow exploitation. In the excavated sample, the absence of hearths and the almost complete lack of burned bones or stones suggest that Neandertals were not using fire to assist with processing the reindeer carcasses. The zooarchaeological results presented here indicate that reindeer were hunted during a restricted window of time when they were seasonally abundant in the local area near Jonzac. Taken together with the lithic industry based on bifacial elements, the evidence is consistent with a pattern of site use by highly mobile hunter-gatherers making frequent, short-term visits. Ongoing research at Jonzac and other Quina Mousterian localities will contribute to a better understanding of Neandertal behavior during cold climate phases.

  3. Femur Model Reconstruction Based on Reverse Engineering and Rapid Prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tongming; Zhang, Zheng; Ni, Hongjun; Deng, Jiawen; Huang, Mingyu

    Precise reconstruction of 3D models is fundamental and crucial to the researches of human femur. In this paper we present our approach towards tackling this problem. The surface of a human femur was scanned using a hand-held 3D laser scanner. The data obtained, in the form of point cloud, was then processed using the reverse engineering software Geomagic and the CAD/CAM software CimatronE to reconstruct a digital 3D model. The digital model was then used by the rapid prototyping machine to build a physical model of human femur using 3D printing. The geometric characteristics of the obtained physical model matched that of the original femur. The process of "physical object - 3D data - digital 3D model - physical model" presented in this paper provides a foundation of precise modeling for the digital manufacturing, virtual assembly, stress analysis, and simulated surgery of artificial bionic femurs.

  4. Size variation in early human mandibles and molars from Klasies River, South Africa: comparison with other middle and late Pleistocene assemblages and with modern humans.

    PubMed

    Royer, Danielle F; Lockwood, Charles A; Scott, Jeremiah E; Grine, Frederick E

    2009-10-01

    Previous studies of the Middle Stone Age human remains from Klasies River have concluded that they exhibited more sexual dimorphism than extant populations, but these claims have not been assessed statistically. We evaluate these claims by comparing size variation in the best-represented elements at the site, namely the mandibular corpora and M(2)s, to that in samples from three recent human populations using resampling methods. We also examine size variation in these same elements from seven additional middle and late Pleistocene sites: Skhūl, Dolní Vestonice, Sima de los Huesos, Arago, Krapina, Shanidar, and Vindija. Our results demonstrate that size variation in the Klasies assemblage was greater than in recent humans, consistent with arguments that the Klasies people were more dimorphic than living humans. Variation in the Skhūl, Dolní Vestonice, and Sima de los Huesos mandibular samples is also higher than in the recent human samples, indicating that the Klasies sample was not unusual among middle and late Pleistocene hominins. In contrast, the Neandertal samples (Krapina, Shanidar, and Vindija) do not evince relatively high mandibular and molar variation, which may indicate that the level of dimorphism in Neandertals was similar to that observed in extant humans. These results suggest that the reduced levels of dimorphism in Neandertals and living humans may have developed independently, though larger fossil samples are needed to test this hypothesis.

  5. Anatomy-based 3D skeleton extraction from femur model.

    PubMed

    Gharenazifam, Mina; Arbabi, Ehsan

    2014-11-01

    Using 3D models of bones can highly improve accuracy and reliability of orthopaedic evaluation. However, it may impose excessive computational load. This article proposes a fully automatic method for extracting a compact model of the femur from its 3D model. The proposed method works by extracting a 3D skeleton based on the clinical parameters of the femur. Therefore, in addition to summarizing a 3D model of the bone, the extracted skeleton would preserve important clinical and anatomical information. The proposed method has been applied on 3D models of 10 femurs and the results have been evaluated for different resolutions of data.

  6. Pitfalls in the application of distal femur plates for fractures.

    PubMed

    Collinge, Cory A; Gardner, Michael J; Crist, Brett D

    2011-11-01

    Despite design features intended to aid the surgeon in restoring proper alignment, malunion and implant-related problems are relatively common after a distal femur fracture treated with plate fixation. This article presents case examples of these problems followed by a discussion of the relevant distal femoral anatomy, design features of modern locked distal femur plating systems, and technical points necessary to avoid malunion and implant-related problems when using these devices.

  7. “Atypical” atypical femur fractures and use of bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    van de Laarschot, Denise M.; Somford, Matthijs P.; Jager, Agnes; Oei, Edwin H.; Bos, P. Koen; Zillikens, M. Carola

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Atypical femur fractures (AFFs) present a rare but serious condition associated with use of bisphosphonates. Underlying mechanisms and clinical risk factors remain unclear. According to the diagnostic criteria formulated by the ASBMR, a lateral localization of an AFF is required. Case history We present a patient who developed bilateral leg pain while using an oral bisphosphonate and aromatase inhibitor in the course of adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. Initially she was diagnosed with bone metastases and received radiotherapy on the right femur. However, the bilateral periosteal reactions of the subtrochanteric femur are highly suggestive of AFFs. Our case meets all criteria for AFF except that she presented with lesions at the medial side of the femur. Therefore they could be best described as “atypical” atypical femur fractures. Discussion Since the pathogenesis of AFFs is not fully understood, we cannot rule out that AFFs also occur in the medial femur or in other weight-baring bones. Hence we propose that medial stress reactions belong to a spectrum of atypical fractures associated with use of antiresorptive drugs. The localization may depend on yet unknown biomechanical factors. Conclusion We propose that these periosteal reactions of the subtrochanteric femur are in fact AFFs with uncommon medial localization and could hence be considered “atypical” AFFs. We recommend being alert of AFFs in patients with bone pain and medial subtrochanteric lesions. More epidemiological studies are needed to investigate the occurrence of both medial and lateral AFFs and to gain more insight into its frequency and pathogenesis. PMID:28228783

  8. Effect of Pentoxifylline Administration on an Experimental Rat Model of Femur Fracture Healing With Intramedullary Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Vashghani Farahani, Mohammad Mahdi; Masteri Farahani, Reza; Mostafavinia, Ataroalsadat; Abbasian, Mohammad Reza; Pouriran, Ramin; Noruzian, Mohammad; Ghoreishi, Seyed Kamran; Aryan, Arefe; Bayat, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Globally, musculoskeletal injuries comprise a major public health problem that contributes to a large burden of disability and suffering. Pentoxifylline (PTX) has been originally used as a hemorheologic drug to treat intermittent claudication. Previous test tube and in vivo studies reported the beneficial effects of PTX on bony tissue. Objectives: This study aims to evaluate the effects of different dosages of PTX on biomechanical properties that occur during the late phase of the fracture healing process following a complete femoral osteotomy in a rat model. We applied intramedullary pin fixation as the treatment of choice. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was conducted at the Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. We used the simple random technique to divide 35 female rats into five groups. Group 1 received intraperitoneal (i.p.) PTX (50 mg/kg, once daily) injections, starting 15 days before surgery, and group 2, group 3, and group 4 received 50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, and 200 mg/kg i.p. PTX injections, respectively, once daily after surgery. All animals across groups received treatment for six weeks (until sacrificed). Complete surgical transverse osteotomy was performed in the right femur of all rats. At six weeks after surgery, the femurs were subjected to a three-point bending test. Results: Daily administration of 50 mg/kg PTX (groups 1 and 2) decreased the high stress load in repairing osteotomized femurs when compared with the control group. The highest dose of PTX (200 mg/kg) significantly increased the high stress load when compared with the control group (P = 0.030), group 1 (P = 0.023), group 2 (P = 0.008), and group 3 (P = 0.010), per the LSD findings. Conclusions: Treatment with 200 mg/kg PTX accelerated fracture healing when compared with the control group. PMID:26756019

  9. Curvature reduces bending strains in the quokka femur

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Kyle; Henderson, Keith; Pantinople, Jess; Milne, Nick

    2017-01-01

    This study explores how curvature in the quokka femur may help to reduce bending strain during locomotion. The quokka is a small wallaby, but the curvature of the femur and the muscles active during stance phase are similar to most quadrupedal mammals. Our hypothesis is that the action of hip extensor and ankle plantarflexor muscles during stance phase place cranial bending strains that act to reduce the caudal curvature of the femur. Knee extensors and biarticular muscles that span the femur longitudinally create caudal bending strains in the caudally curved (concave caudal side) bone. These opposing strains can balance each other and result in less strain on the bone. We test this idea by comparing the performance of a normally curved finite element model of the quokka femur to a digitally straightened version of the same bone. The normally curved model is indeed less strained than the straightened version. To further examine the relationship between curvature and the strains in the femoral models, we also tested an extra-curved and a reverse-curved version with the same loads. There appears to be a linear relationship between the curvature and the strains experienced by the models. These results demonstrate that longitudinal curvature in bones may be a manipulable mechanism whereby bone can induce a strain gradient to oppose strains induced by habitual loading. PMID:28348929

  10. Geometric morphometric analysis reveals sexual dimorphism in the distal femur.

    PubMed

    Cavaignac, Etienne; Savall, Frederic; Faruch, Marie; Reina, Nicolas; Chiron, Philippe; Telmon, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    An individual's sex can be determined by the shape of their distal femur. The goal of this study was to show that differences in distal femur shape related to sexual dimorphism could be identified, visualized, and quantified using 3D geometric morphometric analysis. Geometric morphometric analysis was carried out on CT scans of the distal femur of 256 subjects living in the south of France. Ten landmarks were defined on 3D reconstructions of the distal femur. Both traditional metric and geometric morphometric analyses were carried out on these bone reconstructions; these analyses identified trends in bone shape in sex-based subgroups. Sex-related differences in shape were statistically significant. The subject's sex was correctly assigned in 77.3% of cases using geometric morphometric analysis. This study has shown that geometric morphometric analysis of the distal femur is feasible and has revealed sexual dimorphism differences in this bone segment. This reliable, accurate method could be used for virtual autopsy and be used to perform diachronic and interethnic comparisons. Moreover, this study provides updated morphometric data for a modern population in the south of France. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Far cortical locking screws in distal femur fractures.

    PubMed

    Adams, John D; Tanner, Stephanie L; Jeray, Kyle J

    2015-03-01

    Distal femur fractures routinely heal by secondary bone healing, which relies on interfragmentary motion. Periarticular locking plates are commonly used for fixation in distal femur fractures but are associated with a high nonunion rate, likely due to the stiffness of the constructs. Far cortical locking (FCL) screws are designed to allow micromotion at the near cortex while maintaining purchase in only the far cortex. Although clinical data are limited, these screws have been shown in biomechanical studies to provide excellent interfragmentary motion, and animal models have shown increased callus formation compared with traditional locking screws. The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical effects that FCL screws have on healing in distal femur fractures treated with locked constructs. In this retrospective case series, 15 patients with a distal femur fracture treated with MotionLoc screws (Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana) were analyzed. Serial radiographs were evaluated for callus presence and time to union. All fractures were either 33-A3 or 33-C2 according to the AO classification system, and 5 (33%) were open. Bone loss was recorded in 2 patients. There were no nonunions, and average time to union was 24 weeks. There were no implant failures, and all 5 open fractures, including the 2 with bone loss, healed without intervention. There was 1 reoperation due to painful hardware. Although this is a small case series, these results are promising. Far cortical locking screws may provide the answer to the high nonunion rate associated with distal femur fractures treated with traditional locked constructs.

  12. Discriminant function sexing of fragmentary femur of South African blacks.

    PubMed

    Asala, S A; Bidmos, M A; Dayal, M R

    2004-10-04

    When fragmentary and incomplete bones are all that are available to the forensic anthropologist for use in sex determination, non-metric and metric sex discriminating parameters that have been derived from complete bones may be of little use. In such circumstances, sex discriminating metric methods that are of specific application to fragmentary bones will be more useful. Since such studies have not been systematically carried out in bones of South African blacks, the aim of this study was to begin to provide such data. Two hundred and twenty left femurs of black South Africans were obtained from the Raymond A. Dart Collection of African Skeleton, School of Anatomical Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. Five variables from the upper end of the femur and three variables from the lower end of the femur were measured and subjected to univariate and multivariate discriminant function analyses. The vertical head diameter and the medial condylar length were most successful in sex identification from the upper and lower ends of the femur respectively. The combined variables were more useful than the use of variables individually. Discriminant function score equations were derived for individual and combined variables from the upper and lower ends of the femur of the South African blacks.

  13. Curvature reduces bending strains in the quokka femur.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Kyle; Henderson, Keith; Pantinople, Jess; Richards, Hazel L; Milne, Nick

    2017-01-01

    This study explores how curvature in the quokka femur may help to reduce bending strain during locomotion. The quokka is a small wallaby, but the curvature of the femur and the muscles active during stance phase are similar to most quadrupedal mammals. Our hypothesis is that the action of hip extensor and ankle plantarflexor muscles during stance phase place cranial bending strains that act to reduce the caudal curvature of the femur. Knee extensors and biarticular muscles that span the femur longitudinally create caudal bending strains in the caudally curved (concave caudal side) bone. These opposing strains can balance each other and result in less strain on the bone. We test this idea by comparing the performance of a normally curved finite element model of the quokka femur to a digitally straightened version of the same bone. The normally curved model is indeed less strained than the straightened version. To further examine the relationship between curvature and the strains in the femoral models, we also tested an extra-curved and a reverse-curved version with the same loads. There appears to be a linear relationship between the curvature and the strains experienced by the models. These results demonstrate that longitudinal curvature in bones may be a manipulable mechanism whereby bone can induce a strain gradient to oppose strains induced by habitual loading.

  14. Trabecular architecture analysis in femur radiographic images using fractals.

    PubMed

    Udhayakumar, G; Sujatha, C M; Ramakrishnan, S

    2013-04-01

    Trabecular bone is a highly complex anisotropic material that exhibits varying magnitudes of strength in compression and tension. Analysis of the trabecular architectural alteration that manifest as loss of trabecular plates and connection has been shown to yield better estimation of bone strength. In this work, an attempt has been made toward the development of an automated system for investigation of trabecular femur bone architecture using fractal analysis. Conventional radiographic femur bone images recorded using standard protocols are used in this study. The compressive and tensile regions in the images are delineated using preprocessing procedures. The delineated images are analyzed using Higuchi's fractal method to quantify pattern heterogeneity and anisotropy of trabecular bone structure. The results show that the extracted fractal features are distinct for compressive and tensile regions of normal and abnormal human femur bone. As the strength of the bone depends on architectural variation in addition to bone mass, this study seems to be clinically useful.

  15. Fracture of Human Femur Tissue Monitored by Acoustic Emission Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Aggelis, Dimitrios. G.; Strantza, Maria; Louis, Olivia; Boulpaep, Frans; Polyzos, Demosthenes; van Hemelrijck, Danny

    2015-01-01

    The study describes the acoustic emission (AE) activity during human femur tissue fracture. The specimens were fractured in a bending-torsion loading pattern with concurrent monitoring by two AE sensors. The number of recorded signals correlates well with the applied load providing the onset of micro-fracture at approximately one sixth of the maximum load. Furthermore, waveform frequency content and rise time are related to the different modes of fracture (bending of femur neck or torsion of diaphysis). The importance of the study lies mainly in two disciplines. One is that, although femurs are typically subjects of surgical repair in humans, detailed monitoring of the fracture with AE will enrich the understanding of the process in ways that cannot be achieved using only the mechanical data. Additionally, from the point of view of monitoring techniques, applying sensors used for engineering materials and interpreting the obtained data pose additional difficulties due to the uniqueness of the bone structure. PMID:25763648

  16. Periprosthetic Femur Fracture Occuring after Contralateral Neglected Femoral Neck Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cankaya, Deniz; Toprak, Ali; IKilic, Enver; Bingol, Olgun; Tabak, Yalcin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Periprosthetic fractures of the femur are uncommon, but at times may lead to complications especially in elderly patients. As treatment of these fractures is difficult, prevention by identifying the risk factors is the best way to overcome these complex problems. Case Report: A periprosthetic right femur fracture associated with a neglected left femoral neck fracture in the contralateral femur in a 78-year-old elder woman patient is reported in the present article. We discuss the prevention of periprosthetic fractures after hip arthroplasty and address the risk factors associated with this complication. Conclusion: The present case emphasizes the importance of investigating and treating the cause of sudden onset of restriction on full weight-bearing in the contralateral limb, to prevent periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty in elderly patients. PMID:27299115

  17. Femur Fractures in Professional Athletes: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Robby; Fetzer, Gary; Hunkele, Thomas; Sugarman, Eric; Boyd, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To discuss return to play after femur fractures in several professional athletes. Background: Femur fractures are rare injuries and can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. No reports exist, to our knowledge, on return to play after treatment of isolated femur fractures in professional athletes. Return to play is expected in patients with femur fractures, but recovery can take more than 1 year, with an expected decrease in performance. Treatment: Four professional athletes sustained isolated femur fractures during regular-season games. Two athletes played hockey, 1 played football, and 1 played baseball. Three players were treated with anterograde intramedullary nails, and 1 was treated with retrograde nailing. All players missed the remainder of the season. At an average of 9.5 months (range, 7–13 months) from the time of injury, all athletes were able to return to play. One player required the removal of painful hardware, which delayed his return to sport. Final radiographs revealed that all fractures were well healed. No athletes had subjective complaints or concerns that performance was affected by the injury at an average final follow-up of 25 months (range, 22–29 months). Uniqueness: As the size and speed of players increase, on-field trauma may result in significant injury. All players returned to previous levels of performance or exceeded previous statistical performance levels. Conclusions: In professional athletes, return to play from isolated femur fractures treated with either an anterograde or retrograde intramedullary nail is possible within 1 year. Return to the previous level of performance is possible, and it is important to develop management protocols, including rehabilitation guidelines, for such injuries. However, return to play may be delayed by subsequent procedures, including hardware removal. PMID:25680071

  18. Human species and mating systems: Neandertal-Homo sapiens reproductive isolation and the archaeological and fossil records.

    PubMed

    Overmann, Karenleigh; Coolidge, Frederick

    2013-01-01

    The present paper examined the assumption of strong reproductive isolation (RI) between Homo neanderthalensis and Homo sapiens, as well as the question of what form it might have taken, using insights from the parallel case of chimpanzee–bonobo hybridization. RI from hybrid sterility or inviability was thought unlikely based on the short separation-to-introgression timeline. The forms of RI that typically develop in primates have relatively short timelines (especially for partial implementation); they generally preclude mating or influence hybrid survival and reproduction in certain contexts, and they have the potential to skew introgression directionality. These RI barriers are also consistent with some interpretations of the archaeological and fossil records, especially when behavioral, cognitive, morphological, and genetic differences between the two human species are taken into consideration. Differences potentially influencing patterns of survival and reproduction include interspecies violence, Neandertal xenophobia, provisioning behavior, and ontogenetic, morphological, and behavioral differences affecting matters such as kin and mate recognition, infanticide, and sexual selection. These factors may have skewed the occurrence of interbreeding or the survival and reproduction of hybrids in a way that might at least partially explain the pattern of introgression.

  19. The pelvis and femur of Ardipithecus ramidus: the emergence of upright walking.

    PubMed

    Lovejoy, C Owen; Suwa, Gen; Spurlock, Linda; Asfaw, Berhane; White, Tim D

    2009-10-02

    The femur and pelvis of Ardipithecus ramidus have characters indicative of both upright bipedal walking and movement in trees. Consequently, bipedality in Ar. ramidus was more primitive than in later Australopithecus. Compared with monkeys and Early Miocene apes such as Proconsul, the ilium in Ar. ramidus is mediolaterally expanded, and its sacroiliac joint is located more posteriorly. These changes are shared with some Middle and Late Miocene apes as well as with African apes and later hominids. However, in contrast to extant apes, bipedality in Ar. ramidus was facilitated by craniocaudal shortening of the ilium and enhanced lordotic recurvature of the lower spine. Given the predominant absence of derived traits in other skeletal regions of Ar. ramidus, including the forelimb, these adaptations were probably acquired shortly after divergence from our last common ancestor with chimpanzees. They therefore bear little or no functional relationship to the highly derived suspension, vertical climbing, knuckle-walking, and facultative bipedality of extant African apes.

  20. Osseous Hydatidosis of Femur in a Patient with Fracture Non-union: An Uncommon Entity

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Anne Jennifer; George, Shyjumon

    2016-01-01

    Hydatid disease caused by the larval form of the parasitic tapeworm, Echinococcus granulosus, commonly affects the liver and lungs. Bone involvement by Hydatid is extremely uncommon and is reported in 1-3% of cases. It is often a dormant disease, presenting at a late stage with non-specific clinical and radiological findings. Usually they occur as an isolated entity without liver/lung involvement and a clinical suspicion of this disease is not possible. We report a rare case of Hydatid cyst of femur in a 25-year-old female, with unresolving non-union of fracture for five years. The occurrence of this disease in atypical locations and lack of a specific radiological sign makes the diagnosis challenging and it is important for the orthopaedicians and pathologists to be aware of this entity for a precise diagnosis. PMID:28208867

  1. Case report 207: Giant cell reparative granuloma of left femur arising in polyostatic fibrous dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    De Smet, A.A.; Travers, H.; Neff, J.R.

    1982-08-01

    Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of lytic lesions in the femur are discussed. Roentgenograms, a tomogram and pathological studies of a giant cell reparative granuloma of left femur arising in polyostotic fibrous dysplasia are presented.

  2. A geometric morphometrics comparative analysis of Neandertal humeri (epiphyses-fused) from the El Sidrón cave site (Asturias, Spain).

    PubMed

    Rosas, Antonio; Pérez-Criado, Laura; Bastir, Markus; Estalrrich, Almudena; Huguet, Rosa; García-Tabernero, Antonio; Pastor, Juan Francisco; de la Rasilla, Marco

    2015-05-01

    A new collection of 49,000 year old Neandertal fossil humeri from the El Sidrón cave site (Asturias, Spain) is presented. A total of 49 humeral remains were recovered, representing 10 left and 8 right humeri from adults, adolescents, and a juvenile (not included in the analyses). 3D geometric morphometric (GM) methods as well as classic anthropological variables were employed to conduct a broad comparative analysis by means of mean centroid size and shape comparisons, principal components analysis, and cluster studies. Due to the fragmentary nature of the fossils, comparisons were organized in independent analyses according to different humeral portions: distal epiphysis, diaphysis, proximal epiphysis, and the complete humerus. From a multivariate viewpoint, 3D-GM analyses revealed major differences among taxonomic groups, supporting the value of the humerus in systematic classification. Notably, the Australopithecus anamensis (KP-271) and Homo ergaster Nariokotome (KNM-WT 15000) distal humerus consistently clusters close to those of modern humans, which may imply a primitive condition for Homo sapiens morphology. Australopithecus specimens show a high degree of dispersion in the morphospace. The El Sidrón sample perfectly fits into the classic Neandertal pattern, previously described as having a relatively wide olecranon fossa, as well as thin lateral and medial distodorsal pillars. These characteristics were also typical of the Sima de los Huesos (Atapuerca) sample, African mid-Pleistocene Bodo specimen, and Lower Pleistocene TD6-Atapuerca remains and may be considered as a derived state. Finally, we hypothesize that most of the features thought to be different between Neandertals and modern humans might be associated with structural differences in the pectoral girdle and shoulder joint. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Osteosynthesis of the proximal femur anchorage of a cervical nail.

    PubMed

    el Banna, S; Burny, F; Bourgois, R; Donkerwolcke, M; Moulart, F

    1994-01-01

    One of the factors determining the stability of osteosynthesis is the mechanical strength of the bone fragments required for the anchorage of the implant. The aim is to study the driving of a Thornton nail in the proximal epiphysis of a human femur as a way to measure the strength of the trabecular bone and to predict the stability of the implanted system.

  4. Fibrous Dysplasia in the Epiphysis of the Distal Femur

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jung Ho; Lee, Jae Woo

    2017-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia is a common benign skeletal lesion that may involve a single bone or multiple bones. Although fibrous dysplasia can affect any bone, monostotic fibrous dysplasia of the long bone typically occurs in the diaphysis or metaphysis. We report a very rare case of monostotic fibrous dysplasia involving the epiphysis of the distal femur in a young man. PMID:28231652

  5. Automatic detection and measurement of femur length from fetal ultrasonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Prateep; Swamy, Gokul; Gupta, Madhumita; Patil, Uday; Krishnan, Kajoli Banerjee

    2010-03-01

    Femur bone length is used in the assessment of fetal development and in the prediction of gestational age (GA). In this paper, we present a completely automated two-step method for identifying fetal femur and measuring its length from 2D ultrasound images. The detection algorithm uses a normalized score premised on the distribution of anatomical shape, size and presentation of the femur bone in clinically acceptable scans. The measurement process utilizes a polynomial curve fitting technique to determine the end-points of the bone from a 1D profile that is most distal from the transducer surface. The method has been tested with manual measurements made on 90 third trimester femur images by two radiologists. The measurements made by the experts are strongly correlated (Pearson's coefficient = 0.95). Likewise, the algorithm estimate is strongly correlated with expert measurements (Pearson's coefficient = 0.92 and 0.94). Based on GA estimates and their bounds specified in Standard Obstetric Tables, the GA predictions from automated measurements are found to be within +/-2SD of GA estimates from both manual measurements in 89/90 cases and within +/-3SD in all 90 cases. The method presented in this paper can be adapted to perform automatic measurement of other fetal limbs.

  6. Electron microprobe analysis of elemental distribution in excavated human femurs

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, J.B.; Simpson, S.V.; Buikstra, J.E.; Hanson, D.

    1983-12-01

    Elemental distributions have been determined for femur cross sections of eight individuals from the Gibson and Ledders Woodland sites. The analyses were obtained by x-ray fluorescence with a scanning electron microscope. Movement of an element from soil to bone should give rise to inhomogeneous distributions within the bone. We found that the distributions of zinc, strontium, and lead are homogeneous throughout the femur. In contrast, iron, aluminum, potassium, and manganese show clear buildup along the outer surface of the femur and sometimes along the inner (endosteal) surface, as the result of postmortem enrichment. The buildup penetrates 10-400 micron into the femur. The major elements calcium and sodium show homogeneous distributions, but considerable material could be lost by leaching (10-15%) without causing a palpable effect on the electron maps. Magnesium shows buildup on the outer edge of some samples. These results suggest that diagenetic contamination may exclude Fe, Al, K, Mn, and probably Mg from use as indicators of ancient data. The homogeneous distributions of Zn, Sr, and Pb suggest that these elements are not altered appreciably and may serve as useful dietary indicators.

  7. The Odocoileus virginianus Femur: Mechanical Behavior and Morphology.

    PubMed

    Hedgeland, Mark J; Libruk, Morgan A; Corbiere, Nicole C; Ciani, Mario J; Kuxhaus, Laurel

    2016-01-01

    Biomechanical research relies heavily on laboratory evaluation and testing with osseous animal structures. While many femora models are currently in use, including those of the European red deer (Cervus elaphus), the Odocoileus virginianus femur remains undocumented, despite its regional abundance in North America. The objective of this study was to compare biomechanical and morphological properties of the Odocoileus virginianus femur with those of the human and commonly used animal models. Sixteen pairs of fresh-frozen cervine femora (10 male, 6 female, aged 2.1 ± 0.9 years) were used for this study. Axial and torsional stiffnesses (whole bone) were calculated following compression and torsion to failure tests (at rates of 0.1 mm/sec and 0.2°/sec). Lengths, angles, femoral head diameter and position, periosteal and endosteal diaphyseal dimensions, and condylar dimensions were measured. The results show that the cervine femur is closer in length, axial and torsional stiffness, torsional strength, and overall morphology to the human femur than many other commonly used animal femora models; additional morphological measurements are comparable to many other species' femora. The distal bicondylar width of 59.3mm suggests that cervine femora may be excellent models for use in total knee replacement simulations. Furthermore, the cervine femoral head is more ovoid than other commonly-used models for hip research, making it a more suitable model for studies of hip implants. Thus, with further, more application-specific investigations, the cervine femur could be a suitable model for biomechanical research, including the study of ballistic injuries and orthopaedic device development.

  8. The Odocoileus virginianus Femur: Mechanical Behavior and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Corbiere, Nicole C.; Ciani, Mario J.; Kuxhaus, Laurel

    2016-01-01

    Biomechanical research relies heavily on laboratory evaluation and testing with osseous animal structures. While many femora models are currently in use, including those of the European red deer (Cervus elaphus), the Odocoileus virginianus femur remains undocumented, despite its regional abundance in North America. The objective of this study was to compare biomechanical and morphological properties of the Odocoileus virginianus femur with those of the human and commonly used animal models. Sixteen pairs of fresh-frozen cervine femora (10 male, 6 female, aged 2.1 ± 0.9 years) were used for this study. Axial and torsional stiffnesses (whole bone) were calculated following compression and torsion to failure tests (at rates of 0.1 mm/sec and 0.2°/sec). Lengths, angles, femoral head diameter and position, periosteal and endosteal diaphyseal dimensions, and condylar dimensions were measured. The results show that the cervine femur is closer in length, axial and torsional stiffness, torsional strength, and overall morphology to the human femur than many other commonly used animal femora models; additional morphological measurements are comparable to many other species’ femora. The distal bicondylar width of 59.3mm suggests that cervine femora may be excellent models for use in total knee replacement simulations. Furthermore, the cervine femoral head is more ovoid than other commonly-used models for hip research, making it a more suitable model for studies of hip implants. Thus, with further, more application-specific investigations, the cervine femur could be a suitable model for biomechanical research, including the study of ballistic injuries and orthopaedic device development. PMID:26757205

  9. Bisphosphonates and fractures of the subtrochanteric or diaphyseal femur.

    PubMed

    Black, Dennis M; Kelly, Michael P; Genant, Harry K; Palermo, Lisa; Eastell, Richard; Bucci-Rechtweg, Christina; Cauley, Jane; Leung, Ping Chung; Boonen, Steven; Santora, Arthur; de Papp, Anne; Bauer, Douglas C

    2010-05-13

    A number of recent case reports and series have identified a subgroup of atypical fractures of the femoral shaft associated with bisphosphonate use. A population-based study did not support this association. Such a relationship has not been examined in randomized trials. We performed secondary analyses using the results of three large, randomized bisphosphonate trials: the Fracture Intervention Trial (FIT), the FIT Long-Term Extension (FLEX) trial, and the Health Outcomes and Reduced Incidence with Zoledronic Acid Once Yearly (HORIZON) Pivotal Fracture Trial (PFT). We reviewed fracture records and radiographs (when available) from all hip and femur fractures to identify those below the lesser trochanter and above the distal metaphyseal flare (subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femur fractures) and to assess atypical features. We calculated the relative hazards for subtrochanteric and diaphyseal fractures for each study. We reviewed 284 records for hip or femur fractures among 14,195 women in these trials. A total of 12 fractures in 10 patients were classified as occurring in the subtrochanteric or diaphyseal femur, a combined rate of 2.3 per 10,000 patient-years. As compared with placebo, the relative hazard was 1.03 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.06 to 16.46) for alendronate use in the FIT trial, 1.50 (95% CI, 0.25 to 9.00) for zoledronic acid use in the HORIZON-PFT trial, and 1.33 (95% CI, 0.12 to 14.67) for continued alendronate use in the FLEX trial. Although increases in risk were not significant, confidence intervals were wide. The occurrence of fracture of the subtrochanteric or diaphyseal femur was very rare, even among women who had been treated with bisphosphonates for as long as 10 years. There was no significant increase in risk associated with bisphosphonate use, but the study was underpowered for definitive conclusions. 2010 Massachusetts Medical Society

  10. Modular endoprosthetic replacement for metastatic tumours of the proximal femur

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekar, Coonoor R; Grimer, Robert J; Carter, Simon R; Tillman, Roger M; Abudu, Adesegun T

    2008-01-01

    Background and aims Endoprosthetic replacements of the proximal femur are commonly required to treat destructive metastases with either impending or actual pathological fractures at this site. Modular prostheses provide an off the shelf availability and can be adapted to most reconstructive situations for proximal femoral replacements. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and functional outcomes following modular tumour prosthesis reconstruction of the proximal femur in 100 consecutive patients with metastatic tumours and to compare them with the published results of patients with modular and custom made endoprosthetic replacements. Methods 100 consecutive patients who underwent modular tumour prosthetic reconstruction of the proximal femur for metastases using the METS system from 2001 to 2007 were studied. The patient, tumour and treatment factors in relation to overall survival, local control, implant survival and complications were analysed. Functional scores were obtained from surviving patients. Results and conclusion There were 45 male and 55 female patients. The mean age was 60.2 years. The indications were metastases. Seventy five patients presented with pathological fracture or with failed fixation and 25 patients were at a high risk of developing a fracture. The mean follow up was 15.9 months [range 0–77]. Three patients died within 2 weeks following surgery. 69 patients have died and 31 are alive. Of the 69 patients who were dead 68 did not need revision surgery indicating that the implant provided single definitive treatment which outlived the patient. There were three dislocations (2/5 with THR and 1/95 with unipolar femoral heads). 6 patients had deep infections. The estimated five year implant survival (Kaplan-Meier analysis) was 83.1% with revision as end point. The mean TESS score was 64% (54%–82%). We conclude that METS modular tumour prosthesis for proximal femur provides versatility; low implant related complications and

  11. Characteristics of femorotibial joint geometry in the trochlear dysplastic femur

    PubMed Central

    Frosch, Stephan; Brodkorb, Tobias; Schüttrumpf, Jan Philipp; Wachowski, Martin Michael; Walde, Tim Alexander; Stürmer, Klaus Michael; Balcarek, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The medial and lateral tibia plateau geometry has been linked with the severity of trochlear dysplasia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the tibial slope and the femoral posterior condylar offset in a cohort of consecutive subjects with a trochlear dysplastic femur to investigate whether the condylar offset correlates with, and thus potentially compensates for, tibial slope asymmetry. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the severity of trochlear dysplasia as well as the tibial slope and posterior offset of the femoral condyles separately for the medial and lateral compartment of the knee joint in 98 subjects with a trochlear dysplastic femur and 88 control subjects. A significant positive correlation was found for the medial tibial slope and the medial posterior condylar offset in the study group (r2 = 0.1566; P < 0.001). This relationship was significant for all subtypes of trochlear dysplasia and was most pronounced in the severe trochlear dysplastic femur (Dejour type D) (r2 = 0.3734; P = 0.04). No correlation was found for the lateral condylar offset and the lateral tibial slope in the study group or for the condylar offset and the tibial slope on both sides in the control group. The positive correlation between the medial femoral condylar offset and the medial tibial slope, that is, a greater degree of the medial tibial slope indicated a larger offset of the medial femoral condyle, appears to represent a general anthropomorphic characteristic of distal femur geometry in patients with a trochlear dysplastic femur. PMID:25040233

  12. Late Pleistocene adult mortality patterns and modern human establishment.

    PubMed

    Trinkaus, Erik

    2011-01-25

    The establishment of modern humans in the Late Pleistocene, subsequent to their emergence in eastern Africa, is likely to have involved substantial population increases, during their initial dispersal across southern Asia and their subsequent expansions throughout Africa and into more northern Eurasia. An assessment of younger (20-40 y) versus older (>40 y) adult mortality distributions for late archaic humans (principally Neandertals) and two samples of early modern humans (Middle Paleolithic and earlier Upper Paleolithic) provides little difference across the samples. All three Late Pleistocene samples have a dearth of older individuals compared with Holocene ethnographic/historical samples. They also lack older adults compared with Holocene paleodemographic profiles that have been critiqued for having too few older individuals for subsistence, social, and demographic viability. Although biased, probably through a combination of preservation, age assessment, and especially Pleistocene mobility requirements, these adult mortality distributions suggest low life expectancy and demographic instability across these Late Pleistocene human groups. They indicate only subtle and paleontologically invisible changes in human paleodemographics with the establishment of modern humans; they provide no support for a life history advantage among early modern humans.

  13. Late Pleistocene adult mortality patterns and modern human establishment

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The establishment of modern humans in the Late Pleistocene, subsequent to their emergence in eastern Africa, is likely to have involved substantial population increases, during their initial dispersal across southern Asia and their subsequent expansions throughout Africa and into more northern Eurasia. An assessment of younger (20–40 y) versus older (>40 y) adult mortality distributions for late archaic humans (principally Neandertals) and two samples of early modern humans (Middle Paleolithic and earlier Upper Paleolithic) provides little difference across the samples. All three Late Pleistocene samples have a dearth of older individuals compared with Holocene ethnographic/historical samples. They also lack older adults compared with Holocene paleodemographic profiles that have been critiqued for having too few older individuals for subsistence, social, and demographic viability. Although biased, probably through a combination of preservation, age assessment, and especially Pleistocene mobility requirements, these adult mortality distributions suggest low life expectancy and demographic instability across these Late Pleistocene human groups. They indicate only subtle and paleontologically invisible changes in human paleodemographics with the establishment of modern humans; they provide no support for a life history advantage among early modern humans. PMID:21220336

  14. An alternative model of vascularized bone marrow transplant: partial femur transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Wu; Chen, Chen; Su, Ying-Jun; Yan, Lun; Wang, Shi-Ping; Guo, Shu-Zhong

    2014-12-01

    The vascularized whole femur transplantation model is one of the commonly used vascularized bone marrow transplant models. It involves technical complexity and morbidities. To optimize this model, we took 2/3 femur as the carrier of bone marrow cells, and developed a vascularized partial femur model. Four experimental groups were carried out, namely, the syngeneic partial femur transplantation, allogeneic partial femur transplantation with or without cyclosporine A, and allogeneic whole femur transplantation with cyclosporine A. The results showed that the partial femur model was technically simpler and shortened the operative and ischemia time compared to the whole femur model. Gross and histologic appearance confirmed the viability of femur, and its bone marrow inside the bone could also maintain normal morphologically at 60-day posttransplant. Besides, donor multilineage chimerism could be continuously detected in immunosuppressed allogeneic partial femur recipients at 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 8-week posttransplant, and it showed no significant differences when compared with whole femur transplantation. Meanwhile, long-term engraftment of donor-origin cells was also confirmed in recipients' bone marrow, lymph nodes, and spleen, but not in thymus. Therefore, the vascularized partial femur can serve as a continuous resource of bone morrow cells and may provide a useful tool for the study of immune tolerance in vascularized composite allotransplantation.

  15. How The Rapid Climatic Variability of The Last Ice Age Affected Neandertal Extinction and Cultural Changes During The Upper Palaeolithic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Errico, F.; Sanchez Goñi, M.-F.; Vanhaeren, M.; Grousset, F.; Valladas, H.

    We present a synthesis of the results obtained in the framework of a multidisciplinary research project funded by the ECLIPSE CNRS program the objectif of which is to explore possible relationships between cultural and climatic changes during the OIS 1- 3. With this goal in mind, a comprehensive database including European Palaeolithic sites location and C14 conventional and AMS dates was created and correlated to climatic variations as established by continental and marine proxies. This database in- cludes the C14 dates from living sites and painted caves as well as palaeoclimatic data (isotopes, pollen, foraminifers, alkenones, Ice Rafted Detritus) from IMAGES marine cores and, in particular, from two cores retrieved off the Iberian margin. Correlation of archeological and climatic data for the Middle-Upper Palaeolithic transition indicates that at a global scale, climate was not the driving force determining the colonisation of Europe by Anatomically Modern Humans. At a regional scale, however, climate might have conditionned the timing of this colonisation and of neandertal extinction, particularly in the mediterranean area. We also found that a clear and previously unde- tected synchronism exists between the beginning of each Heinrich events (4 to1) and the developpment of Upper Palaeolithic cultures (Aurignacian, Gravettian, Solutrean and Magdalenian respectively). Cave art also seems affected by the climatic variabil- ity. We discovered that a major gap in cave art production corresponding to the period between 22.7 and 19.4 ky 14C BP (26 and 23.3 cal ky BP) is contemporary with the Heinrich 2 climatic deterioration.

  16. Introgression of Neandertal- and Denisovan-like Haplotypes Contributes to Adaptive Variation in Human Toll-like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dannemann, Michael; Andrés, Aida M.; Kelso, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens and the diseases they cause have been among the most important selective forces experienced by humans during their evolutionary history. Although adaptive alleles generally arise by mutation, introgression can also be a valuable source of beneficial alleles. Archaic humans, who lived in Europe and Western Asia for more than 200,000 years, were probably well adapted to this environment and its local pathogens. It is therefore conceivable that modern humans entering Europe and Western Asia who admixed with them obtained a substantial immune advantage from the introgression of archaic alleles. Here we document a cluster of three Toll-like receptors (TLR6-TLR1-TLR10) in modern humans that carries three distinct archaic haplotypes, indicating repeated introgression from archaic humans. Two of these haplotypes are most similar to the Neandertal genome, and the third haplotype is most similar to the Denisovan genome. The Toll-like receptors are key components of innate immunity and provide an important first line of immune defense against bacteria, fungi, and parasites. The unusually high allele frequencies and unexpected levels of population differentiation indicate that there has been local positive selection on multiple haplotypes at this locus. We show that the introgressed alleles have clear functional effects in modern humans; archaic-like alleles underlie differences in the expression of the TLR genes and are associated with reduced microbial resistance and increased allergic disease in large cohorts. This provides strong evidence for recurrent adaptive introgression at the TLR6-TLR1-TLR10 locus, resulting in differences in disease phenotypes in modern humans. PMID:26748514

  17. Introgression of Neandertal- and Denisovan-like Haplotypes Contributes to Adaptive Variation in Human Toll-like Receptors.

    PubMed

    Dannemann, Michael; Andrés, Aida M; Kelso, Janet

    2016-01-07

    Pathogens and the diseases they cause have been among the most important selective forces experienced by humans during their evolutionary history. Although adaptive alleles generally arise by mutation, introgression can also be a valuable source of beneficial alleles. Archaic humans, who lived in Europe and Western Asia for more than 200,000 years, were probably well adapted to this environment and its local pathogens. It is therefore conceivable that modern humans entering Europe and Western Asia who admixed with them obtained a substantial immune advantage from the introgression of archaic alleles. Here we document a cluster of three Toll-like receptors (TLR6-TLR1-TLR10) in modern humans that carries three distinct archaic haplotypes, indicating repeated introgression from archaic humans. Two of these haplotypes are most similar to the Neandertal genome, and the third haplotype is most similar to the Denisovan genome. The Toll-like receptors are key components of innate immunity and provide an important first line of immune defense against bacteria, fungi, and parasites. The unusually high allele frequencies and unexpected levels of population differentiation indicate that there has been local positive selection on multiple haplotypes at this locus. We show that the introgressed alleles have clear functional effects in modern humans; archaic-like alleles underlie differences in the expression of the TLR genes and are associated with increased [corrected] microbial resistance and increased allergic disease in large cohorts. This provides strong evidence for recurrent adaptive introgression at the TLR6-TLR1-TLR10 locus, resulting in differences in disease phenotypes in modern humans.

  18. Proximal Femur Locking Plate for Sub-Trochanteric Femur Fractures: Factors Associated with Failure.

    PubMed

    Zubairi, Akbar; Rashid, Rizwan Haroon; Zahid, Marij; Hashmi, Pervaiz Mahmood; Noordin, Shahryar

    2017-01-01

    Proximal femur locking compression plates (PF-LCP) have gained popularity since their inception due to superior biomechanical stability and durability but clinical experience has shown conflicting results including implant failure. To study the incidence of implant failure in patients with sub-trochanteric fractures managed with proximal femoral locking compression plate and identify potential risk factors associated with the failure. Fifty patients with sub-trochanteric fractures, operated upon with titanium PF-LCP were included in the study from January 2012 to December 2014. These plates were of two designs including one five 5.0 mm proximal locking screws (implant A) and other with three 6.5 mm proximal locking screws (implant B). Fractures were classified according to AO/OTA and Seinsheimer classification. Patients had regular follow-up visits for at least a year, allowing for clinical and radiological assessment of union and implant-related complications. A total of 13 out of 50 (26%) plates failed of which 7 were implant fractures, 3 screw breakage and 3 screw cut outs. 70% of the failures occurred in elderly females. Overall implant failure was significantly more common in patients >50 years (p 0.04). Comparing the two different designs of implants used, implant A was more likely to fail at a plate screw density of 0.8 or more (p 0.02), whereas implant B was associated with significant failure when less than 4 proximal screws were used (p 0.03). This study revealed a high failure rate (26%) of this implant. Attention to the neck shaft angle difference, number of proximal screws and plate screw density may help reduce failure rates, particularly in elderly osteoporotic females.

  19. A long femur scan field does not alter proximal femur bone mineral density measurements by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    McKiernan, Fergus Eoin; Hocking, Jane; Cournoyer, Susan; Berg, Richard L; Linneman, James

    2011-01-01

    A longer dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) femur scan field might be useful for the detection of atypical, subtrochanteric femur fractures (ASFF). Thirty adult subjects underwent triplicate measures of femoral neck (FN) and total hip (TH) bone mineral density (BMD) by DXA using a conventional (i.e., short) and a longer femur scan field. Differences in measured BMD between the 2 scan field lengths were small and less than the precision error inherent in DXA testing. A longer proximal femur scan field does not substantially alter BMD measurements made at the FN and TH and may be useful for the detection of ASFF in clinical practice.

  20. Rabbits in the grave! Consequences of bioturbation on the Neandertal "burial" at Regourdou (Montignac-sur-Vézère, Dordogne).

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Maxime; Royer, Aurélien; Holliday, Trenton W; Discamps, Emmanuel; Madelaine, Stéphane; Maureille, Bruno

    2017-09-01

    The understanding of Neanderthal societies, both with regard to their funerary behaviors and their subsistence activities, is hotly debated. Old excavations and a lack of taphonomic context are often factors that limit our ability to address these questions. To better appreciate the exact nature of what is potentially the oldest burial in Western Europe, Regourdou (Montignac-sur-Vézère, Dordogne), and to better understand the taphonomy of this site excavated more than 50 years ago, we report in this contribution a study of the most abundant animals throughout its stratigraphy: the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). In addition to questions surrounding the potential bioturbation of the site's stratigraphy, analysis of the Regourdou rabbits could provide new information on Neandertal subsistence behavior. The mortality profile, skeletal-part representation, breakage patterns, surface modification, and comparison with modern reference collections supports the hypothesis that the Regourdou rabbit remains were primarily accumulated due to natural (attritional) mortality. Radiocarbon dates performed directly on the rabbit remains give ages ranging within the second half of Marine Isotope Stage 3, notably younger than the regional Mousterian period. We posit that rabbits dug their burrows within Regourdou's sedimentological filling, likely inhabiting the site after it was filled. The impact of rabbit activity now brings into question both the reliability of the archaeostratigraphy of the site and the paleoenvironmental reconstructions previously proposed for it, and suggests rabbits may have played a role in the distribution of the Neandertal skeletal remains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Treatment of fractures of the distal femur on total knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Hernigou, P; Poignard, A; Manicom, O; Chabane-Sari, M A

    2006-04-01

    Fractures of the distal femur near a total knee arthroplasty are usually observed in patients aged over 70 years victims of low-energy trauma. The rate of complications is high: in the literature 25-75 %, even when treated by experienced surgeons. The purpose of this study was to detail therapeutic modalities used for the treatment of these fractures with their advantages and disadvantages and to determine the morbidity of complications which do occur. Twenty distal fracture of the femur were treated between 1990 and 2000 in twenty patients who had a total knee arthroplasty. Mean patient age at surgery was 72 years (range 69-77). The fracture was a short oblique fracture in four, transversal in five, long and spiral in four and comminuted in the others. In four fractures, the preoperative radiographic analysis suggested concomitant loosening. Therapeutic modalities included suspension traction for two, femorotibial external fixation for two. Retrograde nailing was possible in two patients. Fixation with a screw plate or a blade plate was used for nine fractures. The prosthesis was revised systematically if loosening was observed. This was done in three cases with preservation of the tibial piece and in two cases, changing the complete prosthesis, using a long femoral stem in all. Mean follow-up was two to ten years. Immediate weight bearing was possible for four of the five patients for whom only the femoral piece was changed with a long stem. For the others, weight bearing was deferred until fracture healing was obtained after a mean five months (range 4-42). Bone healing required one, or two, revisions in three patients. Three patients died within one year of their fracture of the distal femur. There were no cases of infection or late healing. At last follow-up, the knee and function score regressed after treatment of the fracture. The two scores dropped 20 points compared with the pre-operative score (78 +/- 15 to 56 +/- 19 for the knee score and 72 +/- 16 to 54

  2. Short adolescence in early hominids: infantile and adolescent growth of the human femur.

    PubMed

    Tardieu, C

    1998-10-01

    Did the first hominids have a short developmental period similar to that of the great apes or a longer period closer to that of modern humans? Evidence from studies on dental and facial growth favors the first point of view. Additional evidence presented in this report is provided by a morphogenetic analysis of the lower limb. Some morphological modifications undergone by the human femur during infantile and adolescent growth are shown to be excellent markers of different developmental stages. The angular remodelling of the femoral diaphysis, which results in femoral bicondylar angle, is a marker of infancy, while the reshaping of the distal femoral epiphysis is a marker of adolescence. This reshaping of the bony epiphysis consists of the strong projection of the external lip of the femoral trochlea, the increase of the radius of curvature of the external condyle, and the anteroposterior lengthening of the whole epiphysis. The growth spurt in linear dimensions of the femur, characteristic of human adolescence, is shown to be associated with qualitative changes of the distal femoral epiphysis engendered by the late closure of the distal epiphysis. The femur of the first hominids (Australopithecus afarensis) shows only features of infantile growth, whereas characters of both precocious and later growth are typical of later hominids (Homo). The absence of the derived epiphyseal features in Australopithecus would be linked to their early epiphyseal closure and short adolescent growth period; their presence in Homo would have been promoted by their delayed epiphyseal closure and prolonged adolescent growth period. The transition from Australopithecus to Homo appears to have involved a heterochronic process of time hypermorphosis (Gould, [1977], Ontogeny and Phylogeny [Cambridge: Harvard University Press]) in which the size of the femur increases, the epiphysis is modified, and the period of peripubertal growth is prolonged. The shape of the distal epiphyses of KNM

  3. Does femur length affect the stride length? Forensic implications.

    PubMed

    Krishan, Kewal

    2010-01-01

    All the long bones in the human body have a linear and positive relationship with stature. This principle has been used by forensic scientists and anthropologists to estimate stature in many kinds of medico-legal and forensic examinations. The present proposition states that the femur length may have a positive relationship with stride length. This relationship can help the forensic scientist to estimate stride length from the length of the femur and vice versa which can further be extended to formulate opinion in person's gait, biomechanics, movement, and posture analysis of the suspects in forensic case work. This can further be used to give opinion while handling certain evidences like closed-circuit television footage and video surveillance system in crime scene investigation.

  4. Fatigue fracture of the femur after navigated total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Panasiuk, Michał; Bończak, Oktawiusz

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of fatigue fracture of the femur after navigated total knee arthroplasty with the Orthopilot system. A 60-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis (T-score = -3.1) reported increasing pain of the thigh 8 weeks after the surgery. A fatigue fracture of the right femur through the pinholes was diagnosed and stabilized with an intramedullary nail, achieving union and a good functional result. To our knowledge, this is the first described fracture through the pinholes after Orthopilot-assisted surgery with 4.5 mm threaded pins for tracker fixation. We believe that the number of such complications is underestimated because reports are not published. Patients with osteoporosis should be informed about the possibility of this complicating fracture if they are undergoing navigated surgery.

  5. Femur Neck Fracture in a Young Marfan Syndrome Patient.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong-Uk; Kong, Gyu-Min; Park, Jun-Ho

    2016-12-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant and could decrease bone mineral density. So patients with Marfan syndrome could vulnerable to trauma in old ages. We present the first report, to the best of our knowledge, of a rare fracture of the femoral neck with a minor traumatic history in a juvenile Marfan syndrome patient whose physis is still open. Although the patient is young, her bone mineral density was low and the geometry of femur is changed like old ages. The femur neck fracture in children is very rare and only caused by high energy trauma, we concluded that the Marfan syndrome makes the bone weaker in young age and preventative medications to avoid fractures in younger Marfan syndrome patients are necessary in early ages.

  6. Effects of extracorporeal shock waves on immature rabbit femurs.

    PubMed

    Saisu, Takashi; Takahashi, Kenji; Kamegaya, Makoto; Mitsuhashi, Shigeru; Wada, Yuichi; Moriya, Hideshige

    2004-05-01

    We hypothesized that extracorporeal shock waves induce overgrowth and local increases in bone mineral content (BMC) in immature long bones. Immature male rabbits (n=14; 9 weeks old) were randomized equally between group I, which received 1000 100 MPa shock waves on the femoral shaft and group II, which received 5000. Unexposed femurs were used as controls. No fractures occurred in group I; three occurred in group II. Six weeks after exposure, the length and width were significantly larger (1.0 and 14.9%, respectively), and the BMC was significantly higher (22.8%) than those of control femurs in group I. These results of differences in width and BMC might be clinically useful.

  7. [Pathological proximal femur fracture: consider also primary bone tumour].

    PubMed

    van de Sande, Michiel A J; van Rijswijk, Carla S P; Dijkstra, P D Sander; Taminiau, Antonie M H

    2010-01-01

    Two male and one female patient, aged 64, 70 and 51 respectively, were surgically treated for pathological fracture of the proximal femur without preoperative biopsy. In contrast to their benign radiological diagnosis, all three patients were finally diagnosed as having a malignant primary bone tumour. The proximal femur is the primary location of pathological fractures in the appendicular skeleton. Metastases to bone are the most common cause of a destructive lesion of the skeleton in an adult. Although rare, a primary bone tumour must be included in differential diagnosis of a pathological fracture. A systematic diagnostic strategy is critical to avoid complications that make curative treatment impossible. A solitary bone lesion seen on radiography should never be assumed to be a bone metastasis. Without further diagnostic research, surgical treatment for a pathological fracture should never be commenced before a definitive diagnosis is made.

  8. Intraoperative Periprosthetic Femur Fracture: A Biomechanical Analysis of Cerclage Fixation.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Charters, Michael A; Sikora-Klak, Jakub; Banglmaier, Richard F; Oravec, Daniel J; Silverton, Craig D

    2015-08-01

    Intraoperative periprosthetic femur fracture is a known complication of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and a variety of cerclage systems are available to manage these fractures. The purpose of this study was to examine the in situ biomechanical response of cerclage systems for fixation of periprosthetic femur fractures that occur during cementless THA. We compared cobalt chrome (CoCr) cables, synthetic cables, monofilament wires and hose clamps under axial compressive and torsional loading. Metallic constructs with a positive locking system performed the best, supporting the highest loads with minimal implant subsidence (both axial and angular) after loading. Overall, the CoCr cable and hose clamp had the highest construct stiffness and least reduction in stiffness with increased loading. They were not demonstrably different from each other. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Femur Neck Fracture in a Young Marfan Syndrome Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong-Uk; Park, Jun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant and could decrease bone mineral density. So patients with Marfan syndrome could vulnerable to trauma in old ages. We present the first report, to the best of our knowledge, of a rare fracture of the femoral neck with a minor traumatic history in a juvenile Marfan syndrome patient whose physis is still open. Although the patient is young, her bone mineral density was low and the geometry of femur is changed like old ages. The femur neck fracture in children is very rare and only caused by high energy trauma, we concluded that the Marfan syndrome makes the bone weaker in young age and preventative medications to avoid fractures in younger Marfan syndrome patients are necessary in early ages. PMID:28097118

  10. Adamantinoma of the proximal femur: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ii, Sadao; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Takazawa, Koutaro; Minato, Hiroshi; Tomita, Katsuro

    2004-01-01

    Adamantinoma is a rare low-grade malignant bone tumor with an indolent course. The tibia is involved in 85%-90% of long-bone cases. We encountered a patient with primary adamantinoma of the proximal femur. A 60-year-old woman fell and fractured her proximal left femur in the area of a cystic lesion. She underwent an osteosynthesis procedure, and bone union was obtained. After 3 years she developed pain in the left thigh, and a radiographic abnormality was found at the fracture site. A metastatic bone tumor was suspected, and curettage and cementing were carried out. Histologically, we found an epithelial component but failed to detect any primary cancer. Local recurrence became evident after another 6 years. A marginal excision was performed and a bipolar femoral prosthesis was implanted. We finally diagnosed the patient with adamantinoma. In this report we describe the characteristics of this tumor and discuss the reasoning concerning the differential diagnosis and therapeutic plan.

  11. Accuracy of dual photon absorptiometry in excised femurs

    SciTech Connect

    Erman, J.; Ott, S.M.

    1988-11-01

    We investigated the accuracy of assessment of bone mineral content (BMC) by dual photon absorptiometry (DPA). Measurements were compared between BMC and ashed weight using two related scanners. The BMC in different locations of the femur was determined. Twelve cadaver femurs were cleaned of all soft tissue, divided into four parts (head, neck, trochanteric region, and shaft), and measured for BMC in an ethanol/water solution. The bones were then ashed and weighed. Volumetric density was also determined. The correlation coefficient between ash weight and BMC was 0.99 with an s.e.e. of 0.51 g and relative error of 4.8%. Similar correlations were seen within each region. The correlation between the machines was 0.99. Differences in volumetric density were found, with the density of the shaft greater than other regions, and the neck greater than the head or trochanteric regions.

  12. Conservative treatment of a BCG osteomyelitis of the femur.

    PubMed Central

    Pauker, M; Seelefreund, M; Morain, G

    1977-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy presented with an osteolytic lesion and periosteal reaction in the distal metaphysis of the right femur which failed to respond to immobilization and intensive antibiotic treatment. Since the infection seemed to be of low virulence and fewer than 4 years had elapsed since BCG vaccination BCG osteomyelitis was suspected. Tuberculostatic treatment led to rapid recovery and surgical measures were unnecessary. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:871219

  13. The Safe Zone for External Fixator Pins in the Femur

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    Jando VT, Lu T, et al. Muscle function and functional outcome following standard antegrade reamed intramedullary nailing of isolated femoral shaft...distance from the superior reflection of the suprapatellar pouch to the last branch of the femoral nerve crossing the anterior femur was measured, defining...inadvertent knee joint penetration through the suprapatellar pouch, and may lead to heterotopic ossification (HO) within the quadriceps muscle with resul- tant

  14. Morphological characteristics of the developing proximal femur: a biomechanical perspective.

    PubMed

    Djurić, Marija; Milovanović, Petar; Djonić, Danijela; Minić, Arsa; Hahn, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to a plethora of studies on the proximal femur in adults, its external and internal morphology in growing children has not been sufficiently analyzed. We analyzed changes in external and internal morphology of the proximal femur during growth and development to interpret the links between them and concepts of the human femoral biomechanics. We assessed external geometry, internal trabecular and cortical arrangement, and bone mineral density (BMD) of the proximal femur in 29 children (age at death from 1 month to 14 years) from archaeological context by using microscopic and radiographic methods. Results The results showed that both the femoral neck width and length increased with age, with the femoral neck becoming more elongated, while the collo-diaphyseal angle decreased. A strong relationship between age and adjusted areal BMD was found, showing continuous increase during childhood. Parallel trabecular pattern at birth changed to mature three distinct trabecular groups (longitudinal-principal compressive, transversal-tensile and randomly scattered) starting from the age of 8 months. In older children the superior and inferior aspects of the femoral neck differently changed with growth, with medial neck having thicker cortex and trabeculae. In the light of bone adaptation principle, the observed changes in external and internal morphology are governed by mechanical forces acting on the developing femur. Our findings on the development of trabecular pattern and cortical distribution are compatible with recent views on the femoral biomechanics which point out the predominance of compressive stresses in the femoral neck, adaptation to shear stresses, multiaxial loading perspective, prevalence of muscle effects over body weight, and existence of adaptational eccentricity.

  15. Splitting of the Proximal Femur With a New Femoral Nail

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    offset from the top of this particular nail to its long axis. Key Words: lateral entry, trochanteric nail , intramedullary nailing , femur, complication...trochanteric intramedullary femoral nailing . J Orthop Trauma. 2005;19:681–686. 8. McConnell T, Tornetta P III, Benson E, et al. Gluteus medius tendon injury...Germany: Stryker Trauma; 2006: 191–199. 11. Gerhard Küntscher. Practice of Intramedullary Nailing . Translated by Herman Rinne. Springfield, IL: Thomas

  16. Fetal ultrasound biometry: 2. Abdomen and femur length reference values.

    PubMed

    Kurmanavicius, J; Wright, E M; Royston, P; Zimmermann, R; Huch, R; Huch, A; Wisser, J

    1999-02-01

    To create reliable reference ranges and calculate Z scores for fetal abdomen and femur ultrasound biometry using a large sample size which is evenly distributed from 12 to 42 weeks of pregnancy. A prospective, cross-sectional study. Obstetric clinics (outpatient and delivery units) at the University Hospital of Zurich. The study data were obtained from 6557 pregnant women. Only the first ultrasound examination between 12 and 42 weeks of each fetus with certainly established gestational age was used for analysis. No exclusions were made on the grounds of small-for-date birthweight, prematurity or other events several weeks after the examination. Separate regression models were fitted to estimate the mean and standard deviation at each gestational age for each parameter. A total of 5807 mean abdominal diameters and abdominal circumferences were derived from fetal transverse and anterio-posterior fetal abdominal diameter measurements. Fetal femur length was measured in 5860 instances. The charts, tables and regression formulae of the biometrical measurements are presented. A comparison of our charts with others showed no significant difference. Only Merz's centiles for abdominal biometry were lower and for femur length higher than ours. An application to calculate Z scores was developed using Excel (Microsoft Corporation, USA); the macros are presented in detail in the Figure 6 footnote. We have presented centile charts, tables and formulae for fetal abdominal diameter and circumference and femur length derived from a large and minimally selected sample size in a carefully designed cross-sectional study. Complete tables and regression formulae to calculate reference ranges and Z scores are presented to use in computer-aided evaluation of fetal ultrasound biometry.

  17. High-Energy Proximal Femur Fractures in Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hahnhaussen, Jens; Hak, David J; Weckbach, Sebastian; Ertel, Wolfgang; Stahel, Philip F

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is limited information in the literature on the outcomes and complications in elderly patients who sustain high-energy hip fractures. As the population ages, the incidence of high-energy geriatric hip fractures is expected to increase. The purpose of this study was to analyze the outcomes and complications in patients aged 65 years or older, who sustained a high-energy proximal femur fracture. Methods: Retrospective review of a prospective trauma database from January 2000 to April 2011 at a single US academic level-1 trauma center. Inclusion criteria consisted of all patients of age 65 years or older, who sustained a proximal femur fracture related to a high-energy trauma mechanism. Details concerning injury, acute treatment, and clinical course and outcome were obtained from medical records and radiographs. Results: We identified 509 proximal femur fractures in patients older than 65 years of age, of which 32 (6.3%) were related to a high-energy trauma mechanism. The mean age in the study group was 72.2 years (range 65-87), with a mean injury severity score of 20 points (range 9-57). Three patients died before discharge (9.4%), and 22 of 32 patients sustained at least one complication (68.8%). Blunt chest trauma represented the most frequently associated injury, and the main root cause of pulmonary complications. The patients' age and comorbidities did not significantly correlate with the rate of complications and the 1-year mortality. Conclusions: High-energy proximal femur fractures in elderly patients are not very common and are associated with a low in-hospital mortality rate of less than 10%, despite high rate of complications of nearly 70%. This selective cohort of patients requires a particular attention to respiratory management due to the high incidence of associated chest trauma. PMID:23569690

  18. Anatomical evaluation and stress distribution of intact canine femur.

    PubMed

    Verim, Ozgur; Tasgetiren, Suleyman; Er, Mehmet S; Ozdemir, Vural; Yuran, Ahmet F

    2013-03-01

    In the biomedical field, three-dimensional (3D) modeling and analysis of bones and tissues has steadily gained in importance. The aim of this study was to produce more accurate 3D models of the canine femur derived from computed tomography (CT) data by using several modeling software programs and two different methods. The accuracy of the analysis depends on the modeling process and the right boundary conditions. Solidworks, Rapidform, Inventor, and 3DsMax software programs were used to create 3D models. Data derived from CT were converted into 3D models using two different methods: in the first, 3D models were generated using boundary lines, while in the second, 3D models were generated using point clouds. Stress analyses in the models were made by ANSYS v12, also considering any muscle forces acting on the canine femur. When stress values and statistical values were taken into consideration, more accurate models were obtained with the point cloud method. It was found that the maximum von Mises stress on the canine femur shaft was 34.8 MPa. Stress and accuracy values were obtained from the model formed using the Rapidform software. The values obtained were similar to those in other studies in the literature. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Proximal femur segmentation in conventional pelvic x ray

    SciTech Connect

    Pilgram, Roland; Walch, Claudia; Kuhn, Volker; Schubert, Rainer; Staudinger, Roland

    2008-06-15

    A solid and accurate proximal femur segmentation technique using the popular active shape model (ASM) is proposed. For generating an optimal shape prior, the minimum description length, based on 200 supervised manual segmented proximal femur shapes, is used. The segmentation is based on a coarse to fine scaling technique including a profile scale space method. The segmentation results are compared using an optimal defined initial pose and a pose based on a registration technique. Using ideal template initialization, 95% of the shapes have been recovered exactly (average point-to-point error {approx}13 pixels, average point-to-boundary error {approx}7 pixels). Using a template-based initialization based on a registration technique, a successful segmentation rate of {approx}89% is achieved, with an average point-to-point error {approx}12 pixels, and an average point-to-boundary error {approx}8 pixels. With an adequate template initialization and an improved ASM, this method seems to provide an accurate tool for segmentation of the proximal femur shapes on conventional hip overview x-ray images.

  20. Developing CT based computational models of pediatric femurs.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinshan; Viceconti, Marco; Cohen, Marta C; Reilly, Gwendolen C; Carré, Matt J; Offiah, Amaka C

    2015-07-16

    The mechanisms of fracture in infants and toddlers are not well understood. There have been very few studies on the mechanical properties of pediatric bones and their responses under fracture loading. A better understanding of fracture mechanisms in children will help elucidate both accidental and non-accidental injuries, as well as bone fragility diseases. The aim of this study is to develop in silico femoral models from CT scans to provide detailed quantitative information regarding the geometry and mechanical response of the femur, with the long term potential of investigating injury mechanisms. Fifteen anonymized QCT scans (aged 0-3 years) were collected and used to create personalized computational models of femurs. The elastic modulus of femur was illustrated at various ages. The models were also subjected to a series of four point bending simulations taking into account a range of loads perpendicular to the femoral shaft. The results showed that mid-shaft cross-section at birth appeared circular, but the diameter in the anteroposterior axis gradually increased with age. The density, and by implication modulus of elasticity at the mid-shaft became more differentiated with growth. Pediatric cortical bone with density close to the peak values found in adults was attained a few weeks after birth. The method is able to capture quantitative variations in geometries, material properties and mechanical responses, and has confirmed the rapid development of bone during the first few years of life using in silico models.

  1. Load along the femur shaft during activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    D'Angeli, V; Belvedere, C; Ortolani, M; Giannini, S; Leardini, A

    2013-08-09

    A comprehensive knowledge of the loads applied during activities of daily living to the femur shaft is necessary to the design of direct attachments of relevant prostheses. A motion analysis system was used together with an established protocol with skin markers to estimate the three components of the forces and moments acting on ten equidistant points along the full femur shaft. Twenty healthy young volunteers were analyzed while performing three repetitions of the following tasks: level walking at three different speeds, straight-line and with sudden changes of direction to the right and to the left, stairs ascending and descending, squat, rising from a chair and sitting down. Average load patterns, after normalisation for body weight and height, were calculated over subjects for each point, about the three anatomical axes, and for each motor task. These patterns were found consistent over subjects, but different among the anatomical axes and tasks. In general, the moments were observed limitedly influenced by the progression speed, and higher for more proximal points. The moments were also higher in abd/adduction (8.1% body weight*height on average), nearly three times larger than those in flex/extension (2.6) during stair descending. The largest value over all moments was 164.8 N m, abd/adduction in level walking at high speed. The present results should be of value also for a most suitable level for amputation in transfemoral amputation, for in-vitro mechanical tests and for finite element models of the femur.

  2. Uncertainty quantification for personalized analyses of human proximal femurs.

    PubMed

    Wille, Hagen; Ruess, Martin; Rank, Ernst; Yosibash, Zohar

    2016-02-29

    Computational models for the personalized analysis of human femurs contain uncertainties in bone material properties and loads, which affect the simulation results. To quantify the influence we developed a probabilistic framework based on polynomial chaos (PC) that propagates stochastic input variables through any computational model. We considered a stochastic E-ρ relationship and a stochastic hip contact force, representing realistic variability of experimental data. Their influence on the prediction of principal strains (ϵ1 and ϵ3) was quantified for one human proximal femur, including sensitivity and reliability analysis. Large variabilities in the principal strain predictions were found in the cortical shell of the femoral neck, with coefficients of variation of ≈40%. Between 60 and 80% of the variance in ϵ1 and ϵ3 are attributable to the uncertainty in the E-ρ relationship, while ≈10% are caused by the load magnitude and 5-30% by the load direction. Principal strain directions were unaffected by material and loading uncertainties. The antero-superior and medial inferior sides of the neck exhibited the largest probabilities for tensile and compression failure, however all were very small (pf<0.001). In summary, uncertainty quantification with PC has been demonstrated to efficiently and accurately describe the influence of very different stochastic inputs, which increases the credibility and explanatory power of personalized analyses of human proximal femurs.

  3. Finite element analysis of the femur during stance phase of gait based on musculoskeletal model simulation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeong-Woo; Kang, Dong-Won; Kim, Ju-Young; Yang, Seung-Tae; Kim, Dae-Hyeok; Choi, Jin-Seung; Tack, Gye-Rae

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the accuracy of the inputs required for finite element analysis, which is mainly used for the biomechanical analysis of bones, was improved. To ensure a muscle force and joint contact force similar to the actual values, a musculoskeletal model that was based on the actual gait experiment was used. Gait data were obtained from a healthy male adult aged 29 who had no history of musculoskeletal disease and walked normally (171 cm height and 72 kg weight), and were used as inputs for the musculoskeletal model simulation to determine the muscle force and joint contact force. Among the phases of gait, which is the most common activity in daily life, the stance phase is the most affected by the load. The results data were extracted from five events in the stance phase: heel contact (ST1), loading response (ST2), early mid-stance (ST2), late mid-stance (ST4), and terminal stance (ST5). The results were used as the inputs for the finite element model that was formed using 1.5mm intervals computed tomography (CT) images and the maximum Von-Mises stress and the maximum Von-Mises strain of the right femur were examined. The maximum stress and strain were lowest at the ST4. The maximum values for the femur occurred in the medial part and then in the lateral part after the mid-stance. In this study, the results of the musculoskeletal model simulation using the inverse-dynamic analysis were utilized to improve the accuracy of the inputs, which affected the finite element analysis results, and the possibility of the bone-specific analysis according to the lapse of time was examined.

  4. [Surgical treatment of pathologic fractures of the humerus and femur].

    PubMed

    Gruber, G; Zacherl, M; Leithner, A; Giessauf, C; Glehr, M; Clar, H; Windhager, R

    2009-04-01

    The life expectancy of patients with malignant tumours and the incidence of osseous metastases have increased over the last decades. Operations for skeletal metastases of the extremities represent the most frequent surgery in orthopaedic oncology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the different operative treatment options for patients with pathologic fractures of the humerus and femur in terms of complications, postoperative recovery, and survival.From 2000 to 2005, 109 patients were surgically treated for pathologic fractures of the humerus (n=19) or femur (n=90). The study group consisted of 60 women and 43 men, with a mean age of 67 years (13-88). Breast carcinoma (36%) was the most common primary tumour, followed by kidney (17%) and bronchial (16%) carcinoma. Of all patients, 75 (73%) had numerous skeletal metastases, and 38 (37%) had visceral metastases.Wide or marginal resection was performed in seven fractures of the humerus and 14 fractures of the femur; intralesional resection was done in seven humeral and 73 femoral fractures; and stabilisation alone was done in five fractures of the humerus and three fractures of the femur. The median survival time for all patients was 6 months (0-102). The survival rate at 1 year was 25% (25% for both humeral and femoral fractures), 15% at 2 years (17% for humeral and 15% for femoral fractures), and 8% at 3 years (16% for humeral and 7% for femoral fractures). The overall complication rate was 11%, and revision surgeries were performed in seven patients (6.4%). The majority of patients (n=65; 60%), especially those with fractures close to the articular joint, were successfully treated with endoprosthetic replacement. Patients with fractures stabilised by intramedullary nails had shorter operating times, a shorter hospital stay, and fewer complications than patients treated with plating systems. Therefore, we recommend intralesional resection of the metastasis and stabilisation with intramedullary

  5. Bone Mineral Density, Mechanical, Microstructural Properties and Mineral Content of the Femur in Growing Rats Fed with Cactus Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill. (Cactaceae) Cladodes as Calcium Source in Diet.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Becerra, Ezequiel; Gutiérrez-Cortez, Elsa; Del Real, Alicia; Rojas-Molina, Alejandra; Rodríguez-García, Mario; Rubio, Efraín; Quintero-García, Michelle; Rojas-Molina, Isela

    2017-02-04

    Mechanical, microstructural properties, mineral content and bone mineral density (BMD) of the femur were evaluated in growing rats fed with Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill. (Cactaceae) cladodes at different maturity stages as calcium source. Male weanling rats were fed with cladodes at early maturity stage (25 and 60 days of age, belonging to groups N-60 and N-200, respectively) and cladodes at late maturity stage (100 and 135 days of age, belonging to groups N-400 and N-600, respectively) for 6 weeks. Additionally, a control group fed with calcium carbonate as calcium source was included for comparative purposes. All diets were fitted to the same calcium content (5 g/kg diet). The failure load of femurs was significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05) in groups N-60 and N-200 in comparison to N-400, N-600 and control groups. The cortical width (Ct.Wi) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) of the femurs in control and N-600 groups were significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) than Ct.Wi and Tb.Th of femurs in groups N-60 and N-200. Trabecular separation of the femurs in N-60 and N-200 groups showed the highest values compared with all experimental groups. The highest calcium content in the femurs were observed in control, N-600 and N-400 groups; whereas the lowest phosphorus content in the bones were detected in N-200, N-600 and N-400 groups. Finally, the BMD in all experimental groups increased with age; nevertheless, the highest values were observed in N-600 and control groups during pubertal and adolescence stages. The results derived from this research demonstrate, for the first time, that the calcium found in Opuntia ficus indica cladodes is actually bioavailable and capable of improving mineral density and mechanical and microstructural properties of the bones. These findings suggest that the consumption of cladodes at late maturity stage within the diet might have a beneficial impact on bone health.

  6. Static or dynamic intramedullary nailing of femur and tibia.

    PubMed

    Omerovic, Djemil; Lazovic, Faruk; Hadzimehmedagic, Amel

    2015-04-01

    The basic principle of non-surgical fracture treatment is to restore the original anatomical position of fractured fragments by different techniques, without direct access to the bone and without further traumatizing of tissues. Intramedullary nailing is synthesis and consolidation of fracture fragments with the main goal to gain strength and permanent placement of the implants. Two techniques of intramedullary osteosynthesis are used: with dynamic or with static intramedullary nail. Dynamization include conversion of static nail by removing screws from the longest fragment. The aim of this study is to determine whether there is a difference in the speed and quality of healing of the type A and B fractures of the femur and tibia treated by static or dynamic intramedullary nails and to compare the results. The study was conducted at the Clinic for Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Clinical Center University Sarajevo from January 2004 to June 2009. The study was retrospective-prospective, manipulative, controlled and it was conducted on a total of 129 patients with closed fractures of the diaphysis of the femur and tibia type A and type B, with different segments of bone, regardless of sex and age structure, with the exception of children under 14 years of age. Precisely there were 47 patients with femoral fractures and 82 patients with tibial fractures. The average number of weeks of healing femoral and tibial fractures was slightly in advantage of static intramedullary osteosynthesis, it was 17.08 weeks (SD=3.382). The average number of weeks of healing in 23 patients with fractures of the femur, treated by dynamic intramedullary osteosynthesis was 17.83 (SD=2.978). We can conclude that static intramedullary nailing osteosynthesis unable movements between fragments which directly stimulates bone formation and formation of minimal callus. Static intramedullary osteosynthesis resolve the problem of stabilizing the fracture, limb shortening and rotation of fragments.

  7. [Hip arthroplasty after corrective osteotomies : Pelvis and proximal femur].

    PubMed

    Rath, B; Eschweiler, J; Betsch, M; Quack, V; Lüring, C; Tingart, M

    2016-08-01

    Pelvic and femoral osteotomies are frequently performed in patients with hip dysplasia. The aim of these surgeries are optimal biomechanical conditions of the hip joint thereby avoiding the occurrence of hip osteoarthritis or the delay of initial hip osteoarthritis progression. Nevertheless even with good biomechanical conditions of the hip joint, progression of hip osteoarthritis can be recognized postoperatively. A total hip arthroplasty is indicated even more after a time period with conservative treatment. In preparation for the operation, a detailed documentation of the initial clinical situation, appropriate imaging, implant selection and preoperative planning are mandatory. In addition, a biomechanical model representing the desired pre- and postoperative situation can be included in the preoperative planning. According to the previous osteotomy, the size and shape of the acetabulum after the osteotomy and the current pivot centre of the hip joint should be considered. Depending on these observations the acetabular cup can be directly inserted into the bone stock of the acetabulum or an acetabular plasty is necessary before implantation of the acetabular cup. With respect to the previous osteotomy of the femur, it needs to be clarified wether hardware removal will be necessary before total hip replacement; moreover, the anatomy of the proximal femur is critical. In addition, if necessary, a re-osteotomy of the femur is required to enable a hip stem implantation. Cementless total hip replacement should be preferred due to the younger patient age. The load of the hip replacement depends on the osseous anchoring and primary stability of the acetabular and femoral component.

  8. Percutaneous Stabilization of Impending Pathological Fracture of the Proximal Femur

    SciTech Connect

    Deschamps, Frederic Farouil, Geoffroy Hakime, Antoine Teriitehau, Christophe Barah, Ali Baere, Thierry de

    2012-12-15

    Objective: Percutaneous osteosynthesis plus cementoplasty (POPC) is a minimally invasive technique that has never been reported before and that we have prospectively evaluated for patients with impending pathological fracture of the proximal femur. Methods: We performed POPC in 12 patients (3 males, 9 females) with metastasis of the proximal femur with a high risk of fracture (Mirels' score {>=}8) between February 2010 and July 2011. Patients were not candidates for standard surgical stabilization. We analyzed the feasibility, duration, and complication of the procedure, the risk of fracture, the decrease in pain (Visual Analog Scale, VAS), and length of stay in hospital. Data were prospectively collected in all patients. Results: The mean Mirels' score was 9.8 {+-} 1.2 (range, 8-11). The technical success was 100%. POPC was performed under general anesthesia (n = 6) or conscious sedation (n = 6). The mean duration was 110 {+-} 43 (range, 60-180) minutes. All patients stood up and walked the second day after the procedure. The average length of stay in the hospital was 4 {+-} 1.6 (range, 2-7) days. We experienced two hematomas in two patients and no thromboembolic complication. For symptomatic patients (n = 8), VAS decreased from 6.5/10 (range, 2-9) before treatment to 1/10 (range, 0-3) 1 month after. No fracture occurred after a median follow-up of 145 (range, 12-608) days. Conclusions: POPC for impending pathological fracture of the proximal femur seems to be a promising alternative for cancer patients who are not candidates for surgical stabilization. Further studies are required to confirm this preliminary experience.

  9. [Reduplication of femur - course observation and treatment (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Stürz, H; Matzen, K A; Witt, A N

    1980-12-01

    The paper reports on the further growth of the leg in the case of a 7- year-old boy with congenital reduplication of the femur, tibial aplasia and dysplasia of the foot, who was treated conservatively until now. The possibilities of conservative and operative treatment to reconstruct the limb and to improve the function were discussed and finally the operative treatment carried out is explained. The case report is an example of the variety of problems in the reconstruction of dysplastic limbs in childhood.

  10. Primary osteosarcoma of the distal femur in two consecutive brothers.

    PubMed

    Chin, K R; Mankin, H J; Gebhardt, M C

    2001-01-01

    The following report describes two consecutive brothers from a nonimmigrant family, with no identifiable predisposing factors, who presented with osteosarcomas of their distal femurs, one at the age of 18 years and the other at the age of 21 years. Until a cost-effective program is developed to screen for osteosarcoma, a detailed family history should be obtained from every new patient with osteosarcoma and parents should be urged to schedule early evaluations of siblings with complaints of painful extremities. Increased frequency of cytogenetic studies to screen for genetic abnormalities in patients with osteosarcoma is recommended to help elucidate the cause of osteosarcoma.

  11. Digital image enhancement improves diagnosis of nondisplaced proximal femur fractures.

    PubMed

    Botser, Itamar Busheri; Herman, Amir; Nathaniel, Ram; Rappaport, Dan; Chechik, Aharon

    2009-01-01

    Today most emergency room radiographs are computerized, making digital image enhancement a natural advancement to improve fracture diagnosis. We compared the diagnosis of nondisplaced proximal femur fractures using four different image enhancement methods using standard DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) after window-leveling optimization. Twenty-nine orthopaedic residents and specialists reviewed 28 pelvic images consisting of 25 occult proximal femur fractures and three images with no fracture, using four different image filters and the original DICOM image. For intertrochanteric fractures, the Retinex filter outperforms the other filters and the original image with a correct fracture type diagnosis rate of 50.6%. The Retinex filter also performs well for diagnosis of other fracture types. The Retinex filter had an interobserver agreement index of 53.5%, higher than the other filters. Sensitivity of fracture diagnosis increased to 85.2% when the Retinex filter was combined with the standard DICOM image. Correct fracture type diagnosis per minute for the Retinex filter was 1.43, outperforming the other filters. The Retinex filter may become a valuable tool in clinical settings for diagnosing fractures. Level I, diagnostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  12. Digital Image Enhancement Improves Diagnosis of Nondisplaced Proximal Femur Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Amir; Nathaniel, Ram; Rappaport, Dan; Chechik, Aharon

    2008-01-01

    Today most emergency room radiographs are computerized, making digital image enhancement a natural advancement to improve fracture diagnosis. We compared the diagnosis of nondisplaced proximal femur fractures using four different image enhancement methods using standard DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) after window-leveling optimization. Twenty-nine orthopaedic residents and specialists reviewed 28 pelvic images consisting of 25 occult proximal femur fractures and three images with no fracture, using four different image filters and the original DICOM image. For intertrochanteric fractures, the Retinex filter outperforms the other filters and the original image with a correct fracture type diagnosis rate of 50.6%. The Retinex filter also performs well for diagnosis of other fracture types. The Retinex filter had an interobserver agreement index of 53.5%, higher than the other filters. Sensitivity of fracture diagnosis increased to 85.2% when the Retinex filter was combined with the standard DICOM image. Correct fracture type diagnosis per minute for the Retinex filter was 1.43, outperforming the other filters. The Retinex filter may become a valuable tool in clinical settings for diagnosing fractures. Level of Evidence: Level I, diagnostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18791776

  13. Valgus osteotomy for nonunion and neglected neck of femur fractures

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Viju Daniel; Livingston, Abel; Boopalan, P R; Jepegnanam, Thilak S

    2016-01-01

    Nonunion neck of femur can be a difficult problem to treat, particularly in the young, and is associated with high complication rates of avascular necrosis due to the precarious blood supply and poor biomechanics. The various treatment options that have been described can be broadly divided according to the aim of improving either biology or biomechanics. Surgeries aimed at improving the biology, such as vascularized fibula grafting, have good success rates but require high levels of expertise and substantial resources. A popular surgical treatment aimed at improving the biomechanics-valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy-optimizes conditions for fracture healing by converting shear forces across the fracture site into compressive forces. Numerous variations of this surgical procedure have been developed and successfully applied in clinical practice. As a result, the proximal femoral orientation for obtaining a good functional outcome has evolved over the years, and the present concept of altering the proximal femoral anatomy as little as possible has arisen. This technical objective supports attaining union as well as a good functional outcome, since excessive valgus can lead to increased joint reaction forces. This review summarizes the historical and current literature on valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy treatment of nonunion neck of femur, with a focus on factors predictive of good functional outcome and potential pitfalls to be avoided as well as controversies surrounding this procedure. PMID:27190758

  14. Fat Embolism Syndrome After Femur Fracture Fixation: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Akoh, Craig C; Schick, Cameron; Otero, Jesse; Karam, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is a multi-organ disorder with potentially serious sequelae that is commonly seen in the orthopaedic patient population after femur fractures. The major clinical features of FES include hypoxia, pulmonary dysfunction, mental status changes, petechiae, tachycardia, fever, thrombocytopenia, and anemia. Due to technological advances in supportive care and intramedullary reaming techniques, the incidence of FES has been reported as low as 0.5 percent. Here, we present a rare case of FES with cerebral manifestations. A previously healthy 24-year old nonsmoking male was admitted to our hospital after an unrestrained head-on motor vehicle collision. The patient's injuries included a left olecranon fracture and closed bilateral comminuted midshaft femur fractures. The patient went on to develop cerebral fat embolism syndrome (CFES) twelve hours after immediate bilateral intramedullary nail fixation. His symptoms included unresponsiveness, disconjugate gaze, seizures, respiratory distress, fever, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and visual changes. Head computed tomography and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed pathognomonic white-matter punctate lesions and watershed involvement. With early recognition and supportive therapy and seizure therapy, the patient went on to have complete resolution of symptoms without cognitive sequelae. PMID:25328460

  15. Effects of Hip Geometry on Fracture Patterns of Proximal Femur

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Seyyed Morteza; Qoreishy, Mohamad; Keipourfard, Ali; Sajjadi, Mohammadreza Minator; Shokraneh, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    Background: Some studies have previously shown that geometry of proximal femur can affect the probability of fracture and type of fracture. It happens since the geometry of the proximal femur determines how a force is applied to its different parts. In this study, we have compared proximal femur’s geometric characteristics in femoral neck (FNF), intertrochanteric (ITF) and Subtrochanteric (STF) fractures. Methods: In this study, 60 patients who had hip fractures were studied as case studies. They were divided into FNF, ITF and STF groups based on their fracture types (20 patients in each group). Patients were studied with x-ray radiography and CT scans. Radiological parameters including femoral neck length from lateral cortex to center of femoral head (FNL), diameter of femoral head (FHD), diameter of femoral neck (FND), femoral head neck offset (FHNO), neck-shaft angle (alpha), femoral neck anteversion (beta) were measured and compared in all three groups. Results: Amount of FNL was significantly higher in STF group compared to FNF (0.011) while ITF and STF as well as FNT and ITF did not show a significant different. Also, FND in FNF group was significantly lower than the other two groups, i.e. ITF and STF. In other cases there were no instances of significant statistical difference. Conclusion: Hip geometry can be used to identify individuals who are at the risk of fracture with special pattern. Also, it is important to have more studies in different populations and more in men. PMID:27517071

  16. Surgical treatment of metastatic disease of the femur.

    PubMed

    Swanson, K C; Pritchard, D J; Sim, F H

    2000-01-01

    Nearly every malignant neoplasm has been described as having the capability to metastasize to bone. Of the estimated 1.2 million new cases of cancer diagnosed annually, more than 50% will eventually demonstrate skeletal metastasis. Advances in systemic and radiation therapy have led to a considerable improvement in the prognosis of patients with metastatic disease. As a result, orthopaedic surgeons are being asked with increasing frequency to evaluate and treat the manifestations of skeletal metastases. The femur is commonly the site of large impending lesions and complete pathologic fractures. Although the health status of some patients may preclude operative intervention, established pathologic fractures of the femur and metastatic lesions deemed likely to progress to imminent fracture generally should be treated surgically. A rational approach to selection of the proper treatment for these problems includes consideration of the patient's overall medical condition and the type, location, size, and extent of the tumor. Treatment principles are the same regardless of location. A construct should ideally provide enough stability to allow immediate full weight bearing with enough durability to last the patient's expected lifetime. All areas of weakened bone should be addressed at the time of surgery in anticipation of disease progression. To minimize disease progression and possible implant or internal fixation failure, postoperative external-beam irradiation should be considered.

  17. Angle of torsion of the femur and its correlates.

    PubMed

    Prasad, R; Vettivel, S; Isaac, B; Jeyaseelan, L; Chandi, G

    1996-01-01

    Unpaired femora (171), devoid of gross pathology and grouped by gender (94 male and 77 female) and side (88 left and 83 right), were used to measure the angle of femoral torsion and the maximum femur length and to score the degree of prominency of the superior cervical tubercle, intertrochanteric line, quadrate tubercle, linea aspera, and adductor tubercle. The angle of torsion ranged from -9 to +35 degrees with a mean of +12.3 degrees. The means were not significantly different either by gender or side. The angle correlated negatively with superior cervical tubercle, intertrochanteric line, and adductor tubercle (P < 0.001), positively with quadrate tubercle (P < 0.001) but not with linea aspera, neck-shaft angle, or length of femur. Bony prominences were significantly more apparent in males. There was no significant association between prominency and side. The torsion seems to be brought about by muscular activity and capsular and ligamentous strain at the hip. This study suggests to clinicians the possibility of correction of torsion defects in certain hip diseases of growing children by suitable alteration in posture of the lower extremity.

  18. Valgus osteotomy for nonunion and neglected neck of femur fractures.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Viju Daniel; Livingston, Abel; Boopalan, P R; Jepegnanam, Thilak S

    2016-05-18

    Nonunion neck of femur can be a difficult problem to treat, particularly in the young, and is associated with high complication rates of avascular necrosis due to the precarious blood supply and poor biomechanics. The various treatment options that have been described can be broadly divided according to the aim of improving either biology or biomechanics. Surgeries aimed at improving the biology, such as vascularized fibula grafting, have good success rates but require high levels of expertise and substantial resources. A popular surgical treatment aimed at improving the biomechanics-valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy-optimizes conditions for fracture healing by converting shear forces across the fracture site into compressive forces. Numerous variations of this surgical procedure have been developed and successfully applied in clinical practice. As a result, the proximal femoral orientation for obtaining a good functional outcome has evolved over the years, and the present concept of altering the proximal femoral anatomy as little as possible has arisen. This technical objective supports attaining union as well as a good functional outcome, since excessive valgus can lead to increased joint reaction forces. This review summarizes the historical and current literature on valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy treatment of nonunion neck of femur, with a focus on factors predictive of good functional outcome and potential pitfalls to be avoided as well as controversies surrounding this procedure.

  19. The management and outcome of open fractures of the femur sustained on the battlefield over a ten-year period.

    PubMed

    Bennett, P M; Sargeant, I D; Myatt, R W; Penn-Barwell, J G

    2015-06-01

    This is a retrospective study of survivors of recent conflicts with an open fracture of the femur. We analysed the records of 48 patients (48 fractures) and assessed the outcome. The median follow up for 47 patients (98%) was 37 months (interquartile range 19 to 53); 31 (66%) achieved union; 16 (34%) had a revision procedure, two of which were transfemoral amputation (4%). The New Injury Severity Score, the method of fixation, infection and the requirement for soft-tissue cover were not associated with a poor outcome. The degree of bone loss was strongly associated with a poor outcome (p = 0.00204). A total of four patients developed an infection; two with S. aureus, one with E. coli and one with A. baumannii. This study shows that, compared with historical experience, outcomes after open fractures of the femur sustained on the battlefield are good, with no mortality and low rates of infection and late amputation. The degree of bone loss is closely associated with a poor outcome. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  20. [Non-arthrosic geodes in the femur head. Isolated or predominant geodes].

    PubMed

    Lequesne, M; Castaing, N; Lamotte, J

    1985-04-01

    The isolated or predominant geodes of the femoral head without signs of coxarthritis or coxitis, seem to form in response to: osteochondritis dissecans in 9 cases where the sequester was only visible in profile films or oblique images for 5 cases, and only at time of operation in 2 cases; incipient necrosis in 3 adult cases, not evidenced in frontal films and only seen in profile films with the patient under axial traction; femoral head dysmorphia in 6 cases among which were 4 polyepiphyseal dysplasias and 2 coxa plana without radiographically apparent sequesters; induced increased pressure caused by congenital subluxation or a major disorder of posture and locomotion of lower limbs in 3 cases. In 2 cases no classification could be assigned to isolated or predominant geodes of the femoral head in spite of anatomic examination. The diagnosis of these isolated or predominant geodes of the head of the femur necessitates excellent films made from different angles of view (profile, "false" profile, usual profile, sometimes oblique shots, tomograms) and often enough a biopsy which must be obtained directly through the joint, not transcervically through the neck if a reliable specimen is desired. The surgical treatment indicated is voiding and packing to a maximum the geodes possibly correcting the former increased pressure discordance. But, in lots of cases the intensity of pain and discomfort remains moderate for years, so indication for surgery arises late after onset.

  1. Sex determination using discriminant analysis of the medial and lateral condyles of the femur in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deog-Im; Kwak, Dai-Soon; Han, Seung-Ho

    2013-12-10

    The proximal and distal parts of the femur show the differences between the sexes. Head diameter and the breadth of the epicondyle of the femur are known to distinguish males from females. The proximal end of the femur is studied to determine sex using discriminant analysis but; its distal end is not done. This study aims to develop an equation specific to Koreans by using the medial and lateral condyles of the femur, and to demonstrate the usefulness of equations for specific population groups. We used three-dimensional images from 202 Korean femurs. Twelve variables were measured with a computer program after the femurs were in alignment. Eleven variables showed a statistically significant difference between the sexes (P<0.01). The most accurate equation used width of the medial and lateral condyles (WDC), with of the medial condyle (WMC), depth of the lateral condyle (DLC), and depth of the intercondylar notch (DIN) (94.1%), and is as follows: D = 0.336 × WDC + (-0.097) × WMC + (-0.153) × DLC + 0.372 × DIN - 20.912. The second highest accuracy was 90.1% for the width dimensional group and WDC. This study shows that the medial and lateral condyles of the femur should be helpful for sex determination in situations where the skull and pelvis are missing and part of the femur is available. The study also demonstrates the need for different equations for different population groups.

  2. [Atypical subtrochanteric femur fracture under alendronate therapy in spite of an intramedullar implant].

    PubMed

    Sobotta, H-P; Gösling, T

    2017-02-01

    There are a number of case reports about women undergoing long-term bisphosphonate therapy who have suffered an atypical subtrochanteric or femoral shaft fracture due to an inadequate trauma.The present case reports on a patient who underwent a subtrochanteric femur fracture with the inserted AO femur interlocking nail.

  3. Accuracy of femur reconstruction from sparse geometric data using a statistical shape model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ju; Besier, Thor F

    2017-04-01

    Sparse geometric information from limited field-of-view medical images is often used to reconstruct the femur in biomechanical models of the hip and knee. However, the full femur geometry is needed to establish boundary conditions such as muscle attachment sites and joint axes which define the orientation of joint loads. Statistical shape models have been used to estimate the geometry of the full femur from varying amounts of sparse geometric information. However, the effect that different amounts of sparse data have on reconstruction accuracy has not been systematically assessed. In this study, we compared shape model and linear scaling reconstruction of the full femur surface from varying proportions of proximal and distal partial femur geometry in combination with morphometric and landmark data. We quantified reconstruction error in terms of surface-to-surface error as well as deviations in the reconstructed femur's anatomical coordinate system which is important for biomechanical models. Using a partial proximal femur surface, mean shape model-based reconstruction surface error was 1.8 mm with 0.15° or less anatomic axis error, compared to 19.1 mm and 2.7-5.6° for linear scaling. Similar results were found when using a partial distal surface. However, varying amounts of proximal or distal partial surface data had a negligible effect on reconstruction accuracy. Our results show that given an appropriate set of sparse geometric data, a shape model can reconstruct full femur geometry with far greater accuracy than simple scaling.

  4. Geode of the femur: an uncommon manifestation potentially reflecting the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonuk; Terk, Michael R; Hu, Bing; Garber, Elayne K; Weisman, Michael H

    2006-12-01

    Geodes are noted frequently in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but large geodes of the femur are uncommon. We describe a patient with RA and a large geode in his femur; histological findings were consistent with a rheumatoid nodule and chronically inflamed synovium. We review the literature of large femoral geodes and what this particular manifestation may reflect about the pathogenesis of RA.

  5. [Progress on tantalum rod implanting for the treatment of femur head necrosis].

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-kang; Ye, Fu-sheng; Tong, Pei-jian; Fan, Yan-hua; Li, Min; Ying, Hang; Xiao, Lu-wei

    2013-07-01

    Incorrect treatment for femur head necrosis can cause collapse of femoral head and tresult in severe harm for the patients (especially for the patient with middle-aged and young). The structure and mechanics characteristics of tantalum rod is similar to bone tissue, it higher strength and can adapt the internal environment of organism, so it has a large potency in treating femur head necrosis. Treatment of early femur head necrosis with tantalum rod implanting had alreadly widey applied at home and abroad, the method has the advantages of simple operation, little risk, less complication and beseems the patient with stage I - II of ARCO. But reasons that the difficult diagnosis of early femur head necrosis, localized effect of tantalum rod, different experience of medical worker,caused the contentions about effect of tantalum rod implanting. With development of science, tantalum rod implanting combined with correlative biotechnology should raise the effect in treating femur head necrosis.

  6. Using of Bezier Interpolation in 3D Reconstruction of Human Femur Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth-Tascau, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan; Menyhardt, Karoly; Rosu, Serban; Rusu, Lucian; Vigaru, Cosmina

    2011-09-01

    The paper is focused on image acquisition and processing of CT scans of a human femur bone in order to obtain 3D reconstructions of the human femur. The objective of the presented study was to obtain 3D realistic model of the human femur bone. The reconstructed model provides useful data to the physician but more important are the data and 3D models that can be used for virtual testing of femoral implants and endoprosthesis. Using the B-spline patch a 3D volume model of the human femur bone can be achieved. This model can be easy imported in any CAD system, resulting a virtual femur model witch can be used in FEM analysis.

  7. Long bone (humerus, femur, tibia) measuring procedure in cadavers.

    PubMed

    Menéndez Garmendia, Antinea; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge A; Hernández, Francisco; Wesp, Julie K; Sánchez-Mejorada, Gabriela

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we present a measuring methodology for long bones of the limbs (humerus, femur, and tibia) of human corpses. Measurements of cadaveric height and long bone lengths were conducted on 72 corpses (20 females and 52 males) from the School of Medicine at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. Additionally, these measurements were compared with those taken from dry bones of a subsample of individuals. Our results show marginal differences (TEM% = 0.59) between cadaveric and dry bone measurements, resulting from different osteometric technical procedures. This note outlines the measuring methodology, which will be subsequently used to create regression formulas for stature estimation. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  8. Analysis of the biocompatibility of ALCAP ceramics in rat femurs.

    PubMed

    Mattie, D R; Bajpai, P K

    1988-12-01

    Ceramics composed of aluminum, calcium, and phosphorus oxides (ALCAP) were tested for compatibility as bone replacement biomaterials. Implantation of ALCAP ceramics in rat femurs had no deleterious effect on body weights, organ/body weight ratios, muscle, bone, blood, and kidney function. Aluminum resorbed from ALCAP ceramic bone implants was excreted in the urine and was not deposited in adjacent muscle. Plasma levels of aluminum were not elevated in rats implanted with ALCAP ceramics. Alkaline phosphatase activity of excised implant sites indicated greater bone formation in ALCAP ceramic implants than in bone autografts. Radiographs and implant histology demonstrated excellent bone association with implants and ingrowth of new bone into ALCAP ceramic implants. ALCAP ceramics are biocompatible and suitable for reconstruction of bone.

  9. Vascularized bone graft from the supracondylar region of the femur.

    PubMed

    Doi, Kazuteru; Hattori, Yasunori

    2009-01-01

    Free vascularized thin corticoperiosteal grafts and small periosteal bone grafts harvested from the supracondylar region of the femur are described. These grafts are nourished from the articular branch of the descending genicular artery and vein. Unlike currently used vascularized bone grafts, this graft can be successfully harvested with disturbing the vascularity. Thin corticoperiosteal grafts consist of periosteum with a thin layer of outer cortical bone and include the cambium layer, which has a better osteogenic capacity. This graft is elastic and readily conforms to the recipient bed configuration. Thin corticoperiosteal grafts were used for fracture nonunion of the long bone with smaller bone defect and to treat forty-six patients with avascular necrosis of the body of the talus, scaphoid, and lunate bone.

  10. Growth after extendible endoprosthetic replacement of the distal femur.

    PubMed

    Cool, W P; Carter, S R; Grimer, R J; Tillman, R M; Walker, P S

    1997-11-01

    We report our results in 24 children with malignant primary bone tumours of the distal femur treated with a Stanmore extendible endoprosthesis (SEER). This consists of a femoral component that can be lengthened, a constrained knee and an uncemented sliding tibial component which crosses the proximal tibial physeal plate perpendicularly. The average age of the patients at diagnosis was ten years and the mean follow-up was 4.7 years (2.5 to 7.9). The mean growth of the affected tibia was 76% (18 to 136) and of the fibula 83% (15 to 750) of the growth of the unaffected limb. Measurement of growth arrest lines showed that the mean growth of the proximal tibial physis on the affected side was 69% (43 to 100) of that of the normal side. The great variability in the growth of the physis cannot yet be explained.

  11. Determination of muscle effort at the proximal femur rotation osteotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachenkov, O.; Hasanov, R.; Andreev, P.; Konoplev, Yu

    2016-11-01

    The paper formulates the problem of biomechanics of a new method for treatment of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. Numerical calculations of the rotational flexion osteotomy have been carried out for a constructed mathematical model of the hip joint, taking into account the main set of muscles. The work presents the results of the calculations and their analysis. The results have been compared with the clinical data. The calculations of the reactive forces arising in the acetabulum and the proximal part of the femur allowed us to reveal that this reactive force changes both in value and direction. These data may be useful for assessing the stiffness of an external fixation device used in orthopedic intervention and for evaluating the compression in the joint.

  12. Stress Analysis of Human Femur under Different Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghili, A. Latif; Hojjati, M. H.; Goudarzi, A. Moazemi; Rabiee, M.

    2011-12-01

    Stress fracture is a type of biomechanical failure of bone caused by loads during intense physical training. This failure is very important for aged persons and athletics. Because of cell death, in some cases after emergency surgery the injured person may suffer from lifelong disability. In this research, a three-dimensional finite element model of human femur has been created and analyzed under single, expanded and partial expanded loads. Analysis has been performed using commercially available software. The material is assumed to have isotropic elastic characteristics. The results indicated that the maximum stress occurred at the inferior root of the femoral neck. The magnitude of the strain shows good agreement with the published experimental results. This verifies the finite element modeling and the simplified model used.

  13. Titanium implants in rabbit femur: a histologic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Nociti Júnior, F H; Sallum, A W; Sallum, E A; Bozzo, L

    1997-01-01

    The success achieved by Scandinavian researchers in the development of long-term implants has stimulated many dentists to apply them worldwide. However, most of the implants did not have sufficient scientific support. The purpose of this study was to evaluate host tissue response to the insertion of an endosseous dental implant. Twenty adult New Zealand rabbits were used. Histological evaluation was prepared from the femurs. Results showed a hemorrhagic aspect and inflammatory infiltration which was subsequently substituted by granulation tissue, and later, formation of bone tissue. In the cortical bone, the presence of a necrotic area was observed which was later remodelled, and also an intense proliferation of endosteum and periosteum in the regions next to the implant, resulting in a thickening of the cortical bone surface close to the implant. Therefore, it was observed that titanium implants (Carbontec-Special Materials Ltda.) did not interfere with the bone healing process.

  14. [Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis of the neck of the femur in children: 28 cases].

    PubMed

    Jenzri, M; Safi, H; Nessib, M N; Jalel, C; Smida, M; Ammar, C; Ben Ghachem, M

    2008-02-01

    . Little data is available in the literature on isolated osteomyelitis of the femoral neck. Based on the pathogenic mechanisms known for osteomyelitis, an isolated localization in the neck of the femur, with no other site in the hip joint, is quite possible in an early stage of infection. We discuss the specific clinical and imaging features of this localization. Analysis of our findings show that the prognosis of femoral neck osteomyelitis is directly related to time to management. Outcome is poorer when treatment is started late. Prognosis is poor if pandiaphysitis develops.

  15. Blocking screws for the treatment of distal femur fractures.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Mustafa; Cakmak, Selami; Donmez, Ferdi; Gereli, Arel

    2013-07-01

    Intramedullary nailing is one of the most convenient biological options for treating distal femoral fractures. Because the distal medulla of the femur is wider than the middle diaphysis and intramedullary nails cannot completely fill the intramedullary canal, intramedullary nailing of distal femoral fractures can be difficult when trying to obtain adequate reduction. Some different methods exist for achieving reduction. The purpose of this study was determine whether the use of blocking screws resolves varus or valgus and translation and recurvatum deformities, which can be encountered in antegrade and retrograde intramedullary nailing. Thirty-four patients with distal femoral fractures underwent intramedullary nailing between January 2005 and June 2011. Fifteen patients treated by intramedullary nailing and blocking screws were included in the study. Six patients had distal diaphyseal fractures and 9 had distal diaphyseo-metaphyseal fractures. Antegrade nailing was performed in 7 patients and retrograde nailing was performed in 8. Reduction during surgery and union during follow-up were achieved in all patients with no significant complications. Mean follow-up was 26.6 months. Mean time to union was 12.6 weeks. The main purpose of using blocking screws is to achieve reduction, but they are also useful for maintaining permanent reduction. When inserting blocking screws, the screws must be placed 1 to 3 cm away from the fracture line to avoid from propagation of the fracture. When applied properly and in an adequate way, blocking screws provide an efficient solution for deformities encountered during intramedullary nailing of distal femur fractures. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Development of a locking femur nail for mice.

    PubMed

    Holstein, J H; Menger, M D; Culemann, U; Meier, C; Pohlemann, T

    2007-01-01

    We herein report on a novel locking intramedullary nail system in a murine closed femur fracture model. The nail system consists of a modified 24-gauge injection needle and a 0.1-mm-diameter tungsten guide wire. Rotation stability was accomplished by flattening the proximal and distal end of the needle. Torsional mechanical testing of the implants in osteotomized cadaveric femora revealed a superiority of the locking nail (3.9+/-1.0 degrees rotation at a torque of 0.9 Nmm, n=10) compared to the unmodified injection needle (conventional nail; 52.4+/-3.2 degrees, n=10, p<0.05). None of the implants, however, achieved the rotation stability of unfractured femora (0.3+/-0.5 degrees, n=10). In a second step, we tested the feasibility of the in vivo application of the locking nail to stabilize a closed femoral midshaft fracture in C57BL/6 mice. Of interest, none of the 10 animals showed a dislocation of the locking nail over a 5-week period, while 3 of 4 animals with conventional nail fracture stabilization showed a significant pin dislocation within the first 3 days (p<0.05). Mechanical testing after 5-weeks stabilization with the locking nail revealed an appropriate bone healing with a torque at failure of 71.6+/-3.4% and a peak rotation before failure of 68.4+/-5.3% relative to the unfractured contralateral femur. With the advantage that closed fractures can be fixed with rotation stability, the herein introduced model may represent an ideal tool to study bone healing in transgenic and knockout mice.

  17. Bisphosphonates and atypical subtrochanteric fractures of the femur

    PubMed Central

    Kharwadkar, N.; Mayne, B.; Lawrence, J. E.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Bisphosphonates are widely used as first-line treatment for primary and secondary prevention of fragility fractures. Whilst they have proved effective in this role, there is growing concern over their long-term use, with much evidence linking bisphosphonate-related suppression of bone remodelling to an increased risk of atypical subtrochanteric fractures of the femur (AFFs). The objective of this article is to review this evidence, while presenting the current available strategies for the management of AFFs. Methods We present an evaluation of current literature relating to the pathogenesis and treatment of AFFs in the context of bisphosphonate use. Results Six broad themes relating to the pathogenesis and management of bisphosphonate-related AFFs are presented. The key themes in fracture pathogenesis are: bone microdamage accumulation; altered bone mineralisation and altered collagen formation. The key themes in fracture management are: medical therapy and surgical therapy. In addition, primary prevention strategies for AFFs are discussed. Conclusions This article presents current knowledge about the relationship between bisphosphonates and the development of AFFs, and highlights key areas for future research. In particular, studies aimed at identifying at-risk subpopulations and organising surveillance for those on long-term therapy will be crucial in both increasing our understanding of the condition, and improving population outcomes. Cite this article: N. Kharwadkar, B. Mayne, J. E. Lawrence, V. Khanduja. Bisphosphonates and atypical subtrochanteric fractures of the femur. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:144–153. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.63.BJR-2016-0125.R1. PMID:28288986

  18. Epigenetic regulation during fetal femur development: DNA methylation matters.

    PubMed

    de Andrés, María C; Kingham, Emmajayne; Imagawa, Kei; Gonzalez, Antonio; Roach, Helmtrud I; Wilson, David I; Oreffo, Richard O C

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are heritable changes in gene expression without changes in DNA sequence. DNA methylation has been implicated in the control of several cellular processes including differentiation, gene regulation, development, genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation. Methylated cytosine residues at CpG dinucleotides are commonly associated with gene repression; conversely, strategic loss of methylation during development could lead to activation of lineage-specific genes. Evidence is emerging that bone development and growth are programmed; although, interestingly, bone is constantly remodelled throughout life. Using human embryonic stem cells, human fetal bone cells (HFBCs), adult chondrocytes and STRO-1(+) marrow stromal cells from human bone marrow, we have examined a spectrum of developmental stages of femur development and the role of DNA methylation therein. Using pyrosequencing methodology we analysed the status of methylation of genes implicated in bone biology; furthermore, we correlated these methylation levels with gene expression levels using qRT-PCR and protein distribution during fetal development evaluated using immunohistochemistry. We found that during fetal femur development DNA methylation inversely correlates with expression of genes including iNOS (NOS2) and COL9A1, but not catabolic genes including MMP13 and IL1B. Furthermore, significant demethylation was evident in the osteocalcin promoter between the fetal and adult developmental stages. Increased TET1 expression and decreased expression of DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) in adult chondrocytes compared to HFBCs could contribute to the loss of methylation observed during fetal development. HFBC multipotency confirms these cells to be an ideal developmental system for investigation of DNA methylation regulation. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate the role of epigenetic regulation, specifically DNA methylation, in bone development, informing and opening

  19. Is clinical measurement of anatomic axis of the femur adequate?

    PubMed

    Wu, Chi-Chuan

    2017-08-01

    Background and purpose - The accuracy of using clinical measurement from the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) to the center of the knee to determine an anatomic axis of the femur has rarely been studied. A radiographic technique with a full-length standing scanogram (FLSS) was used to assess the adequacy of the clinical measurement. Patients and methods - 100 consecutive young adult patients (mean age 34 (20-40) years) with chronic unilateral lower extremity injuries were studied. The pelvis and intact contralateral lower extremity images in the FLSS were selected for study. The angles between the tibial axis and the femoral shaft anatomic axis (S-AA), the piriformis anatomic axis (P-AA), the clinical anatomic axis (C-AA), and the mechanical axis (MA) were compared between sexes. Results - Only the S-AA and C-AA angles were statistically significantly different in the 100 patients (3.6° vs. 2.8°; p = 0.03). There was a strong correlation between S-AA, P-AA, and C-AA angles (r > 0.9). The average intersecting angle between MA and S-AA in the femur in the 100 patients was 5.5°, and it was 4.8° between MA and C-AA. Interpretation - Clinical measurement of an anatomic axis from the ASIS to the center of the knee may be an adequate and acceptable method to determine lower extremity alignment. The optimal inlet for antegrade femoral intramedullary nailing may be the lateral edge of the piriformis fossa.

  20. Biomechanical measurements of axial crush injury to the distal condyles of human and synthetic femurs.

    PubMed

    Crookshank, Meghan; Coquim, Jason; Olsen, Michael; Schemitsch, Emil H; Bougherara, Habiba; Zdero, Rad

    2012-04-01

    Few studies have evaluated the 'bulk' mechanical properties of human longbones and even fewer have compared human tissue to the synthetic longbones increasingly being used by researchers. Distal femur fractures, for example, comprise about 6% of all femur fractures, but the mechanical properties of the distal condyles of intact human and synthetic femurs have not been well quantified in the literature. To this end, the distal portions of a series of 16 human fresh-frozen femurs and six synthetic femurs were prepared identically for mechanical testing. Using a flat metal plate, an axial 'crush' force was applied in-line with the long axis of the femurs. The two femur groups were statistically compared and values correlated to age, size, and bone quality. Results yielded the following: crush stiffness (human, 1545 +/- 728 N/mm; synthetic, 3063 +/- 1243 N/mm; p = 0.002); crush strength (human, 10.3 +/- 3.1 kN; synthetic, 12.9 < or = 1.7 kN; p = 0.074); crush displacement (human, 6.1 +/- 1.8 mm; synthetic, 2.8 +/- 0.3 mm; p = 0.000); and crush energy (human, 34.8 +/- 15.9J; synthetic, 18.1 +/- 5.7J; p = 0.023). For the human femurs, there were poor correlations between mechanical properties versus age, size, and bone quality (R2 < or = 0.18), with the exception of crush strength versus bone mineral density (R2 = 0.33) and T-score (R2 = 0.25). Human femurs failed mostly by condyle 'roll back' buckling (15 of 16 cases) and/or unicondylar or bicondylar fracture (7 of 16 cases), while synthetic femurs all failed by wedging apart of the condyles resulting in either fully or partially displaced condylar fractures (6 of 6 cases). These findings have practical implications on the use of a flat plate load applicator to reproduce real-life clinical failure modes of human femurs and the appropriate use of synthetic femurs. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to have done such an assessment on human and synthetic femurs.

  1. Three-Dimensional Analysis of the Curvature of the Femoral Canal in 426 Chinese Femurs

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiu-Yun; Zhao, Zhe; Zhao, Jing-Xin; Zhang, Li-Cheng; Long, An-Hua; Zhang, Li-Hai; Tang, Pei-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The human femur has long been considered to have an anatomical anterior curvature in the sagittal plane. We established a new method to evaluate the femoral curvature in three-dimensional (3D) space and reveal its influencing factors in Chinese population. Methods. 3D models of 426 femurs and the medullary canal were constructed using Mimics software. We standardized the positions of all femurs using 3ds Max software. After measuring the anatomical parameters, including the radius of femoral curvature (RFC) and banking angle, of the femurs using the established femur-specific coordinate system, we analyzed and determined the relationships between the anatomical parameters of the femur and the general characteristics of the population. Results. Pearson's correlation analyses showed that there were positive correlations between the RFC and height (r = 0.339, p < 0.001) and the femoral length and RFC (r = 0.369, p < 0.001) and a negative correlation between the femoral length and banking angle (r = −0.223, p < 0.001). Stepwise linear regression analyses showed that the most relevant factors for the RFC and banking angle were the femoral length and gender, respectively. Conclusions. This study concluded that the banking angle of the femur was significantly larger in female than in male. PMID:26640785

  2. Ossification of the femur and tibia of the post-hatching Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Yasser A; Soliman, Soha A; Abdel-Hafez, Enas A

    2013-09-01

    The current study aimed to describe the histological changes of the femur and tibia of the post-hatching quail. Femur and tibia from 1-day- to 6-weeks post-hatching quail were processed for light microscopy. Histological examination revealed that endochondral ossification was a delayed process in the development of femur and tibia preceded by periosteal ossification. Femur and tibia of 1-day-post-hatching quail consisted of growth cartilage enclosed in a tube of periosteal bone collar. The collar extended toward the epiphysis dividing it into articular cartilage proper and lateral articular cartilage. Down to the articular cartilage, there was a physeal growth cartilage, in which the chondrocytes were organized into resting, proliferative and hypertrophic zones. Focal areas of hypertrophic chondrocytes were observed in the epiphysis of the tibia but not of the femur, which acted as a nidus for formation of the secondary ossification centre after in 2-week-posthathcing quail. Primary ossification centre was seen in both femur and tibia after 2 weeks and ossification continued replacing the cartilage until the 6th week when only permanent articular cartilage remained. Cartilage canals were present in both femur and tibia starting from the day 1, but chondrified and completely disappeared after the 6th week. The current study suggests that the periosteal ossification preceded the endochondral ossification and plays an important role in quail long bones development.

  3. Simultaneous Periprosthetic Fractures of the Femur and the Acetabulum After Bipolar Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Verettas, Dionysios-Alexandros; Chloropoulou, Pelagia-Paraskevi; Drosos, Georgios; Vogiatzaki, Theodosia; Tilkeridis, Konstantinos; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 68 Final Diagnosis: Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum and femur after bipolar hip arthroplasty Symptoms: Inability to walk Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Revision cup and internal fixation femur Specialty: Orhopedics and Traumatology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Although periprosthetic fractures of the femur are a recognized complication of total hip arthroplasty, periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are rare. Simultaneous periprosthetic fractures of both the acetabulum and the femur have not been reported, to our knowledge. Case Report: We report a simultaneous fracture of the acetabulum and the femur in a 68-year-old female patient who had previously sustained a subcapital fracture of the femur, treated with a bipolar uncemented prosthesis. We discuss the possible mechanism of this combination of fractures. Conclusions: Simultaneous periprosthetic fractures of the femur and the acetabulum can occur if, in the presence of osteoporotic bone, the metallic femoral head has migrated medially in the acetabulum while the femoral stem is not loose. PMID:28003639

  4. Short-stem reconstruction for megaendoprostheses in case of an ultrashort proximal femur

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumors of the distal femur and diaphysis with proximal metaphyseal extension into the femur present a challenge for limb salvage. The conventional treatment consists of limb salvage with total femur replacement. This case study aims to present preliminary results and experience with short-stem reconstruction, focusing on the mechanical stability of the procedure. Methods Sixteen short stems were implanted in 15 patients. The patients’ mean age was 33,3 years (range 11–73). In 10 patients, the stem was used for distal femur reconstruction, in one patient for diaphyseal reconstruction, and in four for a stump lengthening procedure. All of the patients had a primary sarcoma in their history. The mean follow-up period was 37 months (range 5–95 months). The clinical and functional follow-up data were analyzed. Results Ten patients (67%) were still alive at the time of evaluation. Three complications associated with the stem were noted. In one case, there was aseptic loosening after 58 months; in another, aseptic loosening occurred because the diameter of the stem had initially been too small; and in one case, there was breakage of the fixation screw, without any clinical symptoms. The average Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score for all patients was 23 (range 9–28). The mean result for the distal femur replacement was 24 (range 22–28). None of the surviving patients with distal femur replacements needed any crutches or had a Trendelenburg limp. Both living patients who underwent a stump lengthening procedure were able to walk with an exoprosthesis. Conclusions The short stem is a good solution that can prevent or delay proximal femur resection in patients with tumors extending into the proximal metaphyseal femur. Additional risks of proximal femur resection, such as dislocation, opening of another oncological compartment, Trendelenburg limp, and chondrolysis can be avoided. PMID:24885859

  5. Prevalence of abuse among young children with femur fractures: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical factors that affect the likelihood of abuse in children with femur fractures have not been well elucidated. Consequently, specifying which children with femur fractures warrant an abuse evaluation is difficult. Therefore the purpose of this study is to estimate the proportion of femur fractures in young children attributable to abuse and to identify demographic, injury and presentation characteristics that affect the probability that femur fractures are secondary to abuse. Methods We conducted a systematic review of published articles written in English between January 1990 and July 2013 on femur fracture etiology in children less than or equal to 5 years old based on searches in PubMed/MEDLINE and CINAHL databases. Data extraction was based on pre-defined data elements and included study quality indicators. A meta-analysis was not performed due to study population heterogeneity. Results Across the 24 studies reviewed, there were a total of 10,717 children less than or equal to 60 months old with femur fractures. Among children less than 12 months old with all types of femur fractures, investigators found abuse rates ranging from 16.7% to 35.2%. Among children 12 months old or greater with femur fractures, abuse rates were lower: from 1.5% - 6.0%. In multiple studies, age less than 12 months, non-ambulatory status, a suspicious history, and the presence of additional injuries were associated with findings of abuse. Diaphyseal fractures were associated with a lower abuse incidence in multiple studies. Fracture side and spiral fracture type, however, were not associated with abuse. Conclusions Studies commonly find a high proportion of abuse among children less than 12 months old with femur fractures. The reported trauma history, physical examination findings and radiologic results must be examined for characteristics that increase or decrease the likelihood of abuse determination. PMID:24989500

  6. Late results.

    PubMed

    Daly, B D

    1999-08-01

    Pneumonectomy is performed for a number of benign and malignant conditions. It is most commonly performed for lung cancer. Adjuvant and neoadjuvant protocols have increased the number of these operations being performed and the long-term results are improving. Pneumonectomy may also be performed for metastases to lung and for mesothelioma with encouraging results. Some bronchial adenomas require pneumonectomy. Treatment of resistant mycobacteria or the complications of tuberculosis frequently require pneumonectomy. Late bronchopleural fistulae, esophagopleural fistulae, and empyema may occur.

  7. Lateral decubitus positioning for intramedullary nailing of the femur without the use of a fracture table.

    PubMed

    Carr, James B; Williams, Daniel; Richards, Mike

    2009-10-01

    In closed intramedullary nailing of the femur in the lateral decubitus position without the use of a fracture table, access to the proximal femur is enhanced as compared to supine nailing, especially in large patients. The hip is typically flexed during the nailing, which allows the nail to be placed posterior to the gluteus medius, thus minimizing abductor damage. The deforming forces of flexion and abduction in proximal fracture patterns can be readily overcome by this technique. Proper rotation of the leg can be assessed clinically or with the use of a femoral neck anteversion guide wire. Fluoroscopic visualization of the proximal femur is excellent, including the femoral head, thus facilitating reconstruction nailing.

  8. Pathological Fracture of the Femur by Metastatic Carcinoma Penis-a Rare Presentation.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Shabbir; Solanki, Fanindra Singh; Sharma, Deepti B; Sharma, Dhananjay

    2016-04-01

    We report herein a clinical case of a patient with femur fracture due to metastasis from penile squamous cell carcinoma. A young man, who was treated for carcinoma penis, presented with pathological fracture of femur and lung metastasis from metastatic carcinoma penis after 18 months. Long bone metastasis from penile cancer is extremely rare, to the best of our knowledge; this is the first report of a patient with penile cancer spread to the femur from primary squamous cell carcinoma of the penis.

  9. Compartment syndrome of the thigh complicating surgical treatment of ipsilateral femur and ankle fractures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. R.; Garfin, S. R.; Hargens, A. R.

    1987-01-01

    A 26-year-old man presented with ipsilateral femur and ankle fractures. The patient was treated with interlocking nail of his femur fracture, followed by open reduction and internal fixation of his ankle fracture under tourniquet control. Postoperatively, the patient developed compartment syndrome of his thigh with elevated pressures, requiring decompressive fasciotomies. This case illustrates the possible complication of treating a femur fracture with intramedullary nailing and then immediately applying a tourniquet to treat an ipsilateral extremity fracture. Because of the complication with this patient, we feel the procedure should be staged, or a tourniquet should be avoided if possible.

  10. Distal Femur Locking Plate: The Answer to All Distal Femoral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Sudhir Kumar; Gupta, Parmanand; Jangira, Vivek; Singh, Jagdeep; Rana, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Good results have been published by researchers with distal femur nail, dynamic condylar screw and even addition of a medial plate to a distal femur locking plate for treating distal femur fractures. By this study, we explore the capability of a distal femur locking plate to counter distal femur fractures of extra- articular, partial or intra- articular nature. Positive results have been published by various groups from all over the world. Aim To study the functional and radiological outcome of distal femoral fractures in skeletally mature patients treated by open reduction and internal fixation with distal femur locking plate. Materials and Methods This was a prospective study conducted from January 2012 to March 2014 at the Government Medical College and Hospital (GMCH) with a 2 year follow-up. Twenty five skeletally mature patients with post-traumatic distal femur fractures were included. Patients with open grade 3B and 3C distal femur fractures, according to the Gustilo- Anderson classification and pathological distal femur fractures were excluded from the study. Patients with any fracture other than the distal femur in the ipsilateral limb were excluded from the study. Follow-up at 3 months, 6 months, 1 year and 2 years was carried out and evaluation was done according to the Neer scoring system. The statistical data analysis was carried out using SPSS version 20 (IBM, Chicago, USA). The p-value <0.05 was considered significant. Results Following all principles of fracture reduction, union was achieved in all patients with mean time to radiological union being 19 weeks. The mean Range of Motion (ROM) was 109 degrees with 20 patients having a Neer score graded as excellent to satisfactory. Our study had nine cases which required additional surgeries. Out of these, all nine cases required bone grafting, three also required antibiotic cement bead insertion initially. Three patients developed complications in the form of infection (two cases) and mal

  11. Modeling of the mechanical behavior of the human femur: Stress analysis and strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belaid, Dalila; Bouchoucha, Ali

    2015-12-01

    The strength of bone depends on its state of mineralization, its geometry, and even supported loads. The femur is the longest bone, the largest and strongest of the human skeleton. It provides standing and walking and running, due to its hip joints with the one side, and with the patella and tibia across. The approach of this paper is to numerically model the mechanical behavior of the femur to determine the stress and strain distribution field. Modeling is performed on the ANSYS software. The results show the influence of different positions of the femur in different cases of postures.

  12. [Fractures of the proximal femur: rehabilitation and socioeconomic repercussions].

    PubMed

    Meine, J; Regazzoni, P; König, W

    1993-01-01

    Only insufficient statistical data for epidemiologic analysis and calculations of socioeconomic costs are available in Switzerland. The total number of fractures of the proximal femur per year has nearly doubled in the 10 years from 1980 to 1990, climbing from 5500 to 9800 cases. A number of 15,000 cases is foreseen for the year 2020. In 85% of the cases the patients are older than 65 years. The global annual incidence is estimated to be 145/100,000, the partial incidence for the population of more than 65 years being 825/100,000. The mean hospitalization is 30 days. The total number of hospital days per year climbed from 200,000 to 300,000 in ten years, thus increasing the number of required beds by 50%. The mean costs for primary hospitalization is estimated to 15,000.-Swiss francs per case in 1990 and 146 Million francs globally per annum, i.e. the double of the amount in 1980. In the statistics of the National Accident Insurance Company the mean global economic costs for a fracture of the proximal femur in the active population is 57,000.-Swiss francs approximately and 72,000.-francs for patients of more than 45 years of age. Only roughly 20% of the costs are caused by medical treatment, whereas pensions, per diems and other compensations produce 80% of the costs. The mortality for patients over 65 varies from 2-7% during the primary hospitalization and rises up to 30% after 1 to 2 years after the accident. The relationship between the duration of acute hospitalization and rehabilitation is essential for planning. The evaluation of the chances for a successful rehabilitation is very important, the general medical conditions of the patients before the accident being the main determinant factor. A mean hospitalization of 3 weeks in a surgical unit and 6 to 7 weeks in a rehabilitation hospital seems to be realistic. Appropriate criteria for the selection of patients amenable to successful rehabilitation are essential. The question of the social outcome of these

  13. Wave dispersion and attenuation on human femur tissue.

    PubMed

    Strantza, Maria; Louis, Olivia; Polyzos, Demosthenes; Boulpaep, Frans; van Hemelrijck, Danny; Aggelis, Dimitrios G

    2014-08-15

    Cortical bone is a highly heterogeneous material at the microscale and has one of the most complex structures among materials. Application of elastic wave techniques to this material is thus very challenging. In such media the initial excitation energy goes into the formation of elastic waves of different modes. Due to "dispersion", these modes tend to separate according to the velocities of the frequency components. This work demonstrates elastic wave measurements on human femur specimens. The aim of the study is to measure parameters like wave velocity, dispersion and attenuation by using broadband acoustic emission sensors. First, four sensors were placed at small intervals on the surface of the bone to record the response after pencil lead break excitations. Next, the results were compared to measurements on a bulk steel block which does not exhibit heterogeneity at the same wave lengths. It can be concluded that the microstructure of the tissue imposes a dispersive behavior for frequencies below 1 MHz and care should be taken for interpretation of the signals. Of particular interest are waveform parameters like the duration, rise time and average frequency, since in the next stage of research the bone specimens will be fractured with concurrent monitoring of acoustic emission.

  14. Allograft selection for distal femur through cutting contour registration.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Qing; Xu, Lihui; Niu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Li

    2016-12-01

    Allograft reconstruction is an acceptable procedure for the recovery of normal anatomy after the bone tumor resection. During the past few years, several automated methods have been proposed to select the best anatomically matching allograft from the virtual donor bone bank. The surface-based automated method uses the contralateral healthy bone to obtain the normal surface shape of the diseased bone, which could achieve good matching of the defect and the selected allograft. However, the surface-based method focuses on the matching of the whole bone so that the matching of the contact surface between the allograft and the recipient bone may not be optimal. To deal with the above problem, we propose a cutting contour based method for the allograft selection. Cutting contour from the recipient bone could reflect the structural information of the defect and is seldom influenced by tumor. Thus the cutting contour can be used as the matching template to find the optimal alignment of the recipient bone and the allograft. The proposed method is validated using the data of distal femurs where bone transplantation is commonly performed. Experimental results show that the proposed method generally outperforms the surface-based method within modest extra time. Overall, our contour-based method is an effective complementary technique for allograft selection in the virtual bone bank.

  15. Endoprosthetic proximal femur replacement: metastatic versus primary tumors.

    PubMed

    Potter, Benjamin K; Chow, Vincent E; Adams, Sheila C; Letson, G Douglas; Temple, H Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Few studies have examined the impact of underlying diagnosis on the functional and oncologic outcomes following endoprosthetic proximal femur replacement (PFR). We performed a retrospective review of 61 consecutive cemented bipolar PFR in 59 patients for treatment neoplastic lesions with a minimum follow-up of 24 months. Twenty-two patients had primary bone tumors and 39 had metastatic disease. Average follow-up for the 30 surviving patients was 55.4 months and the mean postoperative survival for the 29 patients who died was 12.2 months. Patients with primary tumors demonstrated significantly better functional outcomes than those with metastatic disease, with mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society functional scores of 80.2 and 66.8%, respectively (p=0.0002). Age correlated inversely with functional scores (r=-0.48; p=0.0002), while femoral resection length did not. Preoperative pathologic fracture did not appear to adversely impact final functional outcomes. The Kaplan-Meier 5-year implant survival estimate was 92.5%, with aseptic loosening as the endpoint. Both functional results and survival are increased for primary tumors versus metastatic disease following PFR. However, PFR results in excellent local disease control, reliable pain relief and good functional results in both groups, with prosthesis survival exceeding that of the patient in many cases.

  16. Foetal biometry in polyhydramnios: Does femur length fall behind?

    PubMed

    Ipek, Ali; Idilman, Ilkay S; Kurt, Aydın; Cay, Nurdan; Unal, Ozlem; Erdogan, Beyza Doganay; Keskin, Huseyin Levent; Arslan, Halil

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify the growth patterns in polyhydramnios, and therefore evaluated 108 singleton pregnancies complicated with polyhydramnios according to the changes in biparietal diameter (BPD), abdominal circumference (AC) and femur length (FL) percentiles. The pregnancy outcomes according to the growth features were analysed. In the study population, BPD and AC percentiles exhibited a significant increase (p = 0.023 and 0.05, respectively), although FL percentiles showed a significant decrease (p = 0.006) according to the changes in third trimester relative to second trimester. In the overgrown group (n = 52), the FL/BPD ratio was lower (p < 0.001), with more foetuses with FL/BPD ratios below 71 (p = 0.05). In conclusion, there was a significant increase in BPD and AC percentiles and a decrease in FL percentiles in third trimester relative to second trimester in foetuses with polyhydramnios. However, we observed a shorter FL and a lower FL/BPD ratio without associated skeletal dysplasia in overgrown foetuses.

  17. Morphological analysis of the proximal femur using quantitative computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Donald; Carrera, Guilermo

    2006-01-01

    The anatomy of the proximal femur was studied in 35 specimens using quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and compared with anatomical sections studied by plane radiography and gross dissection. We found the primary supporting structure of the femoral head to be the primary compressive strut, which is a dense column of trabecular bone projecting from the pressure buttress of the medial femoral neck to the epiphyseal scar. Trabecular bone mushroomed from the epiphyseal scar and terminated at right angles to the cortex of the femoral head. We believe the primary compressive strut is the predominant load-bearing structure connecting the femoral head to the femoral neck, as many specimens lacked continuity of the head cortex to the femoral neck. Based on the CT number, the primary compressive strut had similar bone density to cortical structures such as the lesser trochanter, calcar femorale and posterior lateral femoral cortex. Ward’s triangle lacked structural integrity in many cases, and we doubt the significance of tensile trabculae for sharing load. Surgical techniques such as femoral fracture fixation, resurfacing hip arthroplasty and allograft transplantation may benefit from this knowledge. PMID:16896872

  18. Internal fixators: a safe option for managing distal femur fractures?

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Bruno Bellaguarda; Salim, Rodrigo; Paccola, Cleber Antonio Jansen; Kfuri, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Evaluate safety and reliability of internal fixator for the treatment of intra-articular and periarticular distal femur fractures. METHODS: Retrospective data evaluation of 28 patients with 29 fractures fixed with internal fixator was performed. There was a predominance of male patients (53.5%), with 52% of open wound fractures, 76% of AO33C type fractures, and a mean follow up of 21.3 months. Time of fracture healing, mechanical axis deviation, rate of infection and postoperative complications were registered. RESULTS: Healing rate was 93% in this sample, with an average time of 5.5 months. Twenty-seven percent of patients ended up with mechanical axis deviation, mostly resulting from poor primary intra-operative reduction. There were two cases of implant loosening; two implant breakage, and three patients presented stiff knee. No case of infection was observed. Healing rate in this study was comparable with current literature; there was a high degree of angular deviation, especially in the coronal plane. CONCLUSION: Internal fixators are a breakthrough in the treatment of knee fractures, but its use does not preclude application of principles of anatomical articular reduction and mechanical axis restoration. Level of Evidence II, Retrospective Study. PMID:25061424

  19. Accidental Bolt Gun Injury to Femur - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kattimani, Ravi Prasad; Shetty, Sanath; Mirza, Humayun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Bolt gun or slaughterer’s guns are used in meat industry for “humane killing” of animals. Injuries caused by bolt gun are rare, reported exclusively from central European countries. We report a case of 28 year old male, who accidentally shot himself with a bolt gun to his right thigh. Case Report: A 28 years old male presented to our Accident and Emergency department after accidental injury to his right thigh with bolt gun. He had an entry wound measuring 2 cm in length and 1 cm in breadth over anterior aspect of lower one third of thigh at lower and sustained Grade II compound fracture of right femur shaft at distal one third. The wound was treated with multiple debridements, negative pressure wound therapy and intravenous antibiotics based on culture and sensitivity. Conclusion: Bolt gun or slaughterer’s guns are weapons used in meat industry for slaughtering animals. Wounds inflicted by bolt guns have specific morphological feature, distinctive from wounds made by other kinds of hand firearms. Most of the time wound will be infected at presentation. Lesions caused by these weapons are likely to have a more serious character than is to be expected from the size of the entrance wound. The mainstay of treatment is liberal wound exploration, multiple debridement’s and intra venous antibiotics based on culture reports to treat infection and prevent morbidity. PMID:28164044

  20. Measurement of elastic wave dispersion on human femur tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strantza, M.; Louis, O.; Polyzos, D.; Boulpaep, F.; Van Hemelrijck, D.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2014-03-01

    Cortical bone is one of the most complex heterogeneous media exhibiting strong wave dispersion. In such media when a burst of energy goes into the formation of elastic waves the different modes tend to separate according to the velocities of the frequency components as usually occurs in waveguides. In this study human femur specimens were subjected to elastic wave measurements. The main objective of the study is using broadband acoustic emission sensors to measure parameters like wave velocity dispersion and attenuation. Additionally, waveform parameters like the duration, rise time and average frequency, are also examined relatively to the propagation distance as a preparation for acoustic emission monitoring during fracture. To do so, four sensors were placed at adjacent positions on the surface of the cortical bone in order to record the transient response after pencil lead break excitation. The results are compared to similar measurements on a bulk metal piece which does not exhibit heterogeneity at the scale of the propagating wave lengths. It is shown that the microstructure of the tissue imposes a dispersive behavior for frequencies below 1 MHz and care should be taken for interpretation of the signals.

  1. Predictors of direct home discharge following fractured neck of femur.

    PubMed

    Salar, O; Baker, P N; Forward, D P; Ollivere, B J; Weerasuriya, N; Moppett, I K; Moran, C G

    2017-07-01

    INTRODUCTION Direct home discharge (DHD) following hip fracture surgery represents a challenging proposition. The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing the discharge destination (home vs alternative location) for patients admitted from their own home with a fractured neck of femur. METHODS A retrospective cohort study of prospectively collected major trauma centre data was performed, identifying 10,044 consecutive hip fracture admissions between 2000 and 2012. RESULTS Two-thirds of the patients (n=6,742, 67%) were admitted from their own home. Half of these (n=3,509, 52%) returned directly to their own home while two-fifths (n=2,640, 39%) were discharged to an alternative location; 593 (9%) died. The following were identified as independent variables associated with a higher likelihood of DHD: younger patients, female sex, an abbreviated mental test score of 10, absence of certain co-morbidities, cohabiting, walking independently outdoors, no use of walking aids, no assistance required with basic activities of daily living and intracapsular fracture. CONCLUSIONS Identifying those at risk of being discharged to an alternative location following admission from home on the basis of identified preoperative indices could assist in streamlining the postoperative care phase. Pre-emptive action may help increase the numbers of patients discharged directly home and reduce the number requiring additional rehabilitation prior to discharge home with its associated socioeconomic effect.

  2. [Changes of femur minerals and serum BGP in hindlimb unloaded rats during convalescence].

    PubMed

    Wan, Y M; Zhang, M F; Cui, W; Song, J P

    2000-08-01

    Objective. To observe bone mass changes during convalescence after simulated weightlessness. Method. 7-week-old rats were tail-suspended for 21 d then reloaded for 7 d and 21 d to recover, and measured serum BGP. Result. Tail suspension of rats for 21 d caused significant decrease of serum BGP and phosphorus as well as femur minerals. Serum BGP and femur minerals were still lower than control levels, but serum contents of calcium, phosphorus and magnesium increased significantly after reloading for 7 d. Femur minerals and serum BGP, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium returned to control levels after reloading for 21 d. Conclusion. The deficit in femur mineral induced by hindlimb unloading in rats can be restored by return to normal weight bearing, BGP can be used to monitor the case of its recovery.

  3. SUPRA AND INTRACONDYLAR OPEN FRACTURE OF THE FEMUR IN A MOTOCROSS ATHLETE: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Jorge Sayum; Sayum, Jorge; de Carvalho, Rogério Teixeira; Nicolini, Alexandre; Matsuda, Marcelo Mitsuro; Cheng, Wu Tu; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the case of a patient (amateur motocross competitor) who suffered a fall during a motocross competition resulting in a supra and intracondylar open fracture in the right femur. PMID:27027061

  4. Trends in subtrochanteric, diaphyseal, and distal femur fractures, 1984-2007.

    PubMed

    Ng, A C; Drake, M T; Clarke, B L; Sems, S A; Atkinson, E J; Achenbach, S J; Melton, L J

    2012-06-01

    The incidence of non-hip femur fractures increased between 1984 and 2007, with an increase in the rates for women after 1996. Recent reports have suggested that non-hip femur fractures may be decreasing over time, similar to proximal femur fractures. Incidence rates for non-hip femur fractures among Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents were assessed before and after 1995 when the oral bisphosphonate, alendronate, was approved in the USA. From 1984 to 2007, 727 non-hip femur fractures were observed in 690 Olmsted County residents (51% female [median age, 71.6 years] and 49% male [21.4 years]). Altogether, 20% of the fractures were subtrochanteric, 51% were diaphyseal, and 29% involved the distal femur. Causes included severe trauma in 51%, minimal to moderate trauma in 34%, and pathologic causes in 15%. The overall age- and sex-adjusted annual incidence of first non-hip femur fracture was 26.7 per 100,000 (25.0 per 100,000 for women and 26.6 per 100,000 for men). Incidence rates increased with age and were greater in women than men. Between 1984-1995 and 1996-2007, age-adjusted rates increased significantly for women (20.4 vs. 28.7 per 100,000; p = 0.002) but not for men (22.4 vs. 29.5 per 100,000; p = 0.202). The incidence of first non-hip femur fractures rose between 1984 and 2007, with an increase in the rates for women after 1995.

  5. Which Implant Is Best After Failed Treatment for Pathologic Femur Fractures?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    sal- vage of failed femoral implants . Specifically, only four of 61 patients in the EP group required reoperation. Endo- prosthetic reconstruction is...SYMPOSIUM: PAPERS PRESENTED AT THE 2011 ISOLS MEETING IN BEIJING, CHINA Which Implant Is Best After Failed Treatment for Pathologic Femur Fractures...Successful treatment of pathologic femur fractures can preserve a patient’s independence and quality of life. The choice of implant depends on several disease

  6. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1-Immunoreactive Innervation Increases in Fractured Rat Femur

    PubMed Central

    Kawarai, Yuya; Suzuki, Miyako; Yoshino, Kensuke; Inoue, Gen; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Kubota, Go; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Nakamura, Junichi; Takaso, Masashi; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Pain from vertebral or femoral neck fractures is a particularly important problem in clinical orthopaedics. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a ligand-gated nonselective cation channel, and there are recent reports on an association between bone pain and TRPV1. However, an increase in TRPV1 activity has not been reported following femoral fracture. Materials and Methods We applied a neurotracer [Fluoro-gold (FG)] onto femur to detect dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) innervating the cortex of the femur in 30 Sprague Dawley rats. Seven days after application, a closed mid-diaphyseal fracture of the femur was performed. FG labeled TRPV1-immunoreactive (ir) DRGs innervating the femur were examined in nonfractured controls, and 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks after fracture. We evaluated bone healing of the femur and compared the ratio of TRPV1-ir DRG neurons innervating the femur at the time points. Results Four weeks after fracture, complete bone union was observed. There was no significant difference in the ratio of FG labeled DRG neurons to total DRG neurons at each time point. The percentages of TRPV1-ir neurons in DRGs innervating the femur at 3 days and 1 week after fracture were significantly higher than those in control, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks after fracture (p<0.05). Conclusion Fracture induced an increase of TRPV1-ir neurons in DRGs innervating the fractured femur within 3 days, and decreased during bone healing over 4 weeks. These findings show that TRPV1 may play a role in sensory sensation of bone fracture pain. PMID:24339305

  7. Predicting the stiffness and strength of human femurs with real metastatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Yosibash, Zohar; Plitman Mayo, Romina; Dahan, Gal; Trabelsi, Nir; Amir, Gail; Milgrom, Charles

    2014-12-01

    Predicting patient specific risk of fracture in femurs with metastatic tumors and the need for surgical intervention are of major clinical importance. Recent patient-specific high-order finite element methods (p-FEMs) based on CT-scans demonstrated accurate results for healthy femurs, so that their application to metastatic affected femurs is considered herein. Radiographs of fresh frozen proximal femur specimens from donors that died of cancer were examined, and seven pairs with metastatic tumor were identified. These were CT-scanned, instrumented by strain-gauges and loaded in stance position at three inclination angles. Finally the femurs were loaded until fracture that usually occurred at the neck. Histopathology was performed to determine whether metastatic tumors are present at fractured surfaces. Following each experiment p-FE models were created based on the CT-scans mimicking the mechanical experiments. The predicted displacements, strains and yield loads were compared to experimental observations. The predicted strains and displacements showed an excellent agreement with the experimental observations with a linear regression slope of 0.95 and a coefficient of regression R(2)=0.967. A good correlation was obtained between the predicted yield load and the experimental observed yield, with a linear regression slope of 0.80 and a coefficient of regression R(2)=0.78. CT-based patient-specific p-FE models of femurs with real metastatic tumors were demonstrated to predict the mechanical response very well. A simplified yield criterion based on the computation of principal strains was also demonstrated to predict the yield force in most of the cases, especially for femurs that failed at small loads. In view of the limited capabilities to predict risk of fracture in femurs with metastatic tumors used nowadays, the p-FE methodology validated herein may be very valuable in making clinical decisions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rigid bridging of massive femur defect using double vascularized fibula graft with hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Toshihiro; Sugita, Takashi; Shimose, Shoji; Kubo, Tadahiko; Sunagawa, Toru; Yasunaga, Yuji; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2008-09-01

    The presence of large and massive segmental defects of the diaphyseal bone following tumor resection is a significant problem for orthopedic surgeons. Double or folded free vascularized fibula graft (FVFG) is used in massive femur defects and is considered to be a reliable reconstructive procedure. However, folded or double fibula grafts cannot prevent stress fractures. Here, a novel surgical procedure for bridging of massive femur defects using double FVFG and hydroxyapatite with autogenous bone grafts to prevent stress fractures is reported.

  9. Influence of lower limb configuration on walking cost in Late Pleistocene humans.

    PubMed

    Hora, Martin; Sladek, Vladimir

    2014-02-01

    It has been proposed that Neandertals had about 30% higher gross cost of transport than anatomically modern humans (AMH) and that such difference implies higher daily energy demands and reduced foraging ranges in Neandertals. Thus, reduced walking economy could be among the factors contributing to the Neandertals' loss in competition with their anatomically modern successors. Previously, Neandertal walking cost had been estimated from just two parameters and based upon a pooled-sex sample. In the present study, we estimate sex-specific walking cost of Neandertals using a model accounting for body mass, lower limb length, lower limb proportions, and other features of lower limb configuration. Our results suggest that Neandertals needed more energy to walk a given distance than did AMH but the difference was less than half of that previously estimated in males and even far less pronounced in females. In contrast, comparison of the estimated walking cost adjusted to body mass indicates that Neandertals spent less energy per kilogram of body mass than AMH thanks to their lower limb configuration, males having 1-5% lower and females 1-3% lower mass-specific net cost of transport than AMH of the same sex. The primary cause of high cost of transport in Neandertal males is thus their great body mass, possibly a consequence of adaptation to cold, which was not fully offset by their cost-moderating lower limb configuration. The estimated differences in absolute energy spent for locomotion between Neandertal and AMH males would account for about 1% of previously estimated daily energy expenditure of Neandertal or AMH males. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dietary arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid elevate femur calcium and reduce zinc content in piglets.

    PubMed

    Mollard, Rebecca C; Weiler, Hope A

    2006-10-01

    Specific dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and long chain PUFAs (LCPUFAs) elevate femur calcium content and enhance calcium balance. Mother's milk is associated with enhanced calcium balance and contains LCPUFAs; arachidonic acid (AA), and docosahexanoic acid (DHA). However, the effect of AA and DHA on calcium metabolism and other bone minerals during infancy is unknown. Thus, piglets received one of four formulas (15 d): control or with AA:DHA (0.5:0.1 g, 1.0:0.2 g, or 2.0:0.4 g/100 g of fat). Calcium absorption, femur mineral composition, and urinary mineral excretion. Main effects identified using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc analysis conducted using Duncan's multiple range test. Significant effects of diet were observed in femur calcium and zinc content, but not calcium absorption, urinary mineral excretion, femur ash weight, femur phosphorus, or femur magnesium content. The piglets receiving AA:DHA as 1.0:0.2 g/100 g of fat had 1.9% higher mg calcium/g of ash, but 8.6% lower mug zinc/g of ash compared with control. Thus, AA:DHA in a ratio of 5:1 does not affect mineral accretion, but AA plus DHA, in amounts similar to the upper limit of human milk, might be detrimental to bone mineralization over time due to lower zinc.

  11. Development and Validation of Statistical Models of Femur Geometry for Use with Parametric Finite Element Models.

    PubMed

    Klein, Katelyn F; Hu, Jingwen; Reed, Matthew P; Hoff, Carrie N; Rupp, Jonathan D

    2015-10-01

    Statistical models were developed that predict male and female femur geometry as functions of age, body mass index (BMI), and femur length as part of an effort to develop lower-extremity finite element models with geometries that are parametric with subject characteristics. The process for developing these models involved extracting femur geometry from clinical CT scans of 62 men and 36 women, fitting a template finite element femur mesh to the surface geometry of each patient, and then programmatically determining thickness at each nodal location. Principal component analysis was then performed on the thickness and geometry nodal coordinates, and linear regression models were developed to predict principal component scores as functions of age, BMI, and femur length. The average absolute errors in male and female external surface geometry model predictions were 4.57 and 4.23 mm, and the average absolute errors in male and female thickness model predictions were 1.67 and 1.74 mm. The average error in midshaft cortical bone areas between the predicted geometries and the patient geometries was 4.4%. The average error in cortical bone area between the predicted geometries and a validation set of cadaver femur geometries across 5 shaft locations was 2.9%.

  12. Femur Rotation Increases Patella Cartilage Stress in Females with Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Liao, Tzu-Chieh; Yang, Nicholas; Ho, Kai-Yu; Farrokhi, Shawn; Powers, Christopher M

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to test the hypothesis that internal rotation of the femur increases patellofemoral joint stress in persons with patellofemoral pain (PFP). Patella cartilage stress profiles of nine female participants with PFP were obtained during squatting using subject-specific finite element (FE) models of the patellofemoral joint (15° and 45° of knee flexion). Input parameters for the FE model included joint geometry, quadriceps muscle forces during squatting, and weight-bearing patellofemoral joint kinematics. The femur of each model was then internally rotated 5° and 10° along its long axis beyond that of the natural degree of rotation. Using a nonlinear FE solver, quasistatic loading simulations were performed to quantify patellofemoral joint stress. Compared with those at the natural position of the femur, mean hydrostatic pressure and mean octahedral shear stress were significantly higher when the femur was internally rotated 5° and 10°. No significant differences in stress variables were observed when the femur was rotated from 5° to 10°. These findings were consistent across both knee flexion angles (15° and 45°). The finding of elevated hydrostatic pressure and octahedral shear stress with internal rotation of the femur supports the premise that females with PFP who exhibit abnormal hip kinematics may be exposed to elevated patellofemoral joint stress.

  13. Cancellous impaction grafting in the human femur: histological and radiographic observations in 6 autopsy femurs and 8 biopsies.

    PubMed

    Linder, L

    2000-12-01

    6 whole postmortem femurs and 8 femoral biopsies were studied histologically, 3 months to 8 years after cancellous impaction grafting with a cemented stem for aseptic loosening. All stems were stable. Radiographs showed cortical healing in 5 cases, trabecular remodelling in 1, and trabecular incorporation in 9. There was a radiolucent line in 1 case. The histology varied. There was always a viable cortical shell around the grafted area. 1 patient showed complete bony restitution. The others still had varying amounts of remaining graft in the neo-medullary cavity, even after 8 years. The graft particles were usually embedded in dense fibrous tissue, thus forming a supporting composite tissue capable of carrying load. There was no time-dependent deterioration in the histological appearance. Radiographically, cortical healing and trabecular remodeling corresponded to viable bone. The lack of a radiolucent line said little about the viability of the tissue closest to the cement. The radiographs did not detect thin soft tissue membranes. Radiographic criteria used to assess primary total joint replacement do not necessarily apply to impaction grafting, and radiographic changes should be interpreted cautiously, especially as regards tissue viability.

  14. The effect of the dimensions of the distal femur and proximal tibia joint surfaces on the development of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Işik, Derya; Işik, Çetin; Apaydin, Nihal; Üstü, Yusuf; Uğurlu, Mahmut; Bozkurt, Murat

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the dimensions of the distal femur and proximal tibia joint surfaces affect the etiology of knee osteoarthritis (OA). The study comprised the records of 1,324 patients who had been admitted to hospital with knee pain. Anterioposterior (AP) and lateral radiographs of the knee were taken. Using the Kellgren-Lawrence Scale, the patient group comprised Stages 2, 3, and 4 radiographs and the controls comprised Stages 0 and 1 radiographs. Four lengths were measured for each patient in both groups: femur mediolateral (femur ML), tibia mediolateral (tibia ML), femur anteroposterior (femur AP), and tibia anteroposterior (tibia AP). Osteophytes were not included in the measurements in the patient group. All the measurements were repeated by two researchers at two different times. The groups were compared in terms of these measurements and the correlations between them. The mean femur ML length was significantly greater in the patient group than the control group (P = 0.032) and the mean femur AP length was significantly less (P = 0.037). In addition, the difference between the femur ML and AP lengths was significantly high in the patient group (P < 0.001). The difference between the tibia and femur ML lengths was significantly high in the patient group (P < 0.001) and the difference between the tibia and femur AP lengths was higher in the control group (P = 0.001). A longer femur ML and a shorter femur AP, together with a greater difference between these two lengths and a greater difference between the tibia ML and femur ML lengths, could be a risk factor for developing knee OA. More extensive anatomical and biomechanical studies in the future will enable these results to be corroborated.

  15. The shifting trajectory of growth in femur length during gestation.

    PubMed

    Bjørnerem, Ashild; Johnsen, Synnøve L; Nguyen, Tuan V; Kiserud, Torvid; Seeman, Ego

    2010-05-01

    Bone size is a determinant of bone strength and tracks in its percentile of origin during childhood and adolescence. We hypothesized that the ranking of an individual's femur length (FL) is established in early gestation and tracks thereafter. Fetal FL was measured serially using 2D ultrasound in 625 Norwegian fetuses. Tracking was assessed using Pearson correlation, a generalized estimating equation model, and by calculating the proportion of fetuses whose FL remained within the same quartile. Baseline FL Z-score (weeks 10 to 19) and later measurements correlated, but more weakly as gestation advanced: r = 0.59 (weeks 20 to 26); r = 0.45 (weeks 27 to 33); and r = 0.32 (weeks 34 to 39) (p < 0.001). Tracking within the same quartile throughout gestation occurred in 13% of fetuses. Of the 87% deviating, 21% returned to the quartile of origin, so 34% began and ended in the same quartile, 38% deviated by one quartile, and 28% deviated by two or more quartiles by the end of gestation. A standard deviation higher baseline FL Z-score, placental weight (150 g), maternal height (5 cm), and weight (10 kg), was associated with a 0.25, 0.15, 0.10, and 0.05 SD higher FL Z-score at the end of gestation, respectively (p ranging from <0.001 to 0.02). Tracking within the same percentile throughout the whole of gestation, as suggest by growth charts, is uncommon. Deviation from tracking is more common and is the result of changes in growth velocity within and between fetuses and is partly influenced by maternal, fetal, and placental factors.

  16. Paediatric femur fractures at the emergency department: accidental or not?

    PubMed Central

    Vrolijk-Bosschaart, Thekla F; Bakx, Roel; Van Rijn, Rick R.

    2016-01-01

    Only a small proportion of all paediatric fractures is caused by child abuse or neglect, especially in highly prevalent long bone fractures. It can be difficult to differentiate abusive fractures from non-abusive fractures. This article focuses on femoral fractures in young children. Based on three cases, this article presents a forensic evidence-based approach to differentiate between accidental and non-accidental causes of femoral fractures. We describe three cases of young children who were presented to the emergency department because of a suspected femur fracture. Although in all cases, the fracture had a similar location and appearance, the clinical history and developmental stage of the child led to three different conclusions. In the first two cases, an accidental mechanism was a plausible conclusion, although in the second case, neglect of parental supervision was the cause for concern. In the third case, a non-accidental injury was diagnosed and appropriate legal prosecution followed. Any doctor treating children should always be aware of the possibility of child abuse and neglect in children with injuries, especially in young and non-mobile children presenting with an unknown trauma mechanism. If a suspicion of child abuse or neglect arises, a thorough diagnostic work-up should be performed, including a full skeletal survey according to the guidelines of the Royal College of Radiologists and the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health. In order to make a good assessment, the radiologist reviewing the skeletal survey needs access to all relevant clinical and social information. PMID:26642309

  17. Reducing returns to theatre for neck of femur fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Graham, Selina; Dahill, Mark; Robinson, Derek

    2017-01-01

    The Royal United Hospital, Bath, admits approximately 550 patients with neck of femur fractures per year. The risks from returning to theatre for this patient group are often life-threatening. Post-operative wound ooze was noted to cause a significant rate of return to theatre, with increased lengths of stay and patient morbidity. A wound closure protocol was agreed by the consultant body. This information was disseminated by email and teaching sessions to all members of the multidisciplinary team, including surgeons, theatre staff and ortho-geriatricians. The plan-do-study-act model for improvement was used to reduce rates of returns to theatre for wound ooze. Interventions included cyclical teaching during each trainee rotation, updated inductions, posters, email reminders and scrub team involvement to open the protocol sutures unprompted. The primary outcome measure was returns to theatre for wound complications. Baseline data showed 4 returns to theatre over a two month period (4.40% of patients). Length of stay for each patient affected by wound ooze was also compared to the departmental mean. In the 6 month intervention period there was one return to theatre (0.36% of patients). The observed reduction saved the department an estimated £13,831 in length of stay alone. The standardisation of wound closure protocol, with continued reinforcement to all members of the multidisciplinary team, improves patient outcome in this group. Mobilising a group of clinicians across a variety of specialities, with one common goal, is highly effective for patients, improves multidisciplinary working and reduces cost.

  18. Interpretation of hip fracture patterns using areal bone mineral density in the proximal femur.

    PubMed

    Hey, Hwee Weng Dennis; Sng, Weizhong Jonathan; Lim, Joel Louis Zongwei; Tan, Chuen Seng; Gan, Alfred Tau Liang; Ng, Jun Han Charles; Kagda, Fareed H Y

    2015-12-01

    Bone mineral density scans are currently interpreted based on an average score of the entire proximal femur. Improvements in technology now allow us to measure bone density in specific regions of the proximal femur. The study attempts to explain the pathophysiology of neck of femur (NOF) and intertrochanteric/basi-cervical (IT) fractures by correlating areal BMD (aBMD) scores with fracture patterns, and explore possible predictors for these fracture patterns. This is a single institution retrospective study on all patients who underwent hip surgeries from June 2010 to August 2012. A total of 106 patients (44 IT/basi-cervical, 62 NOF fractures) were studied. The data retrieved include patient characteristics and aBMD scores measured at different regions of the contralateral hip within 1 month of the injury. Demographic and clinical characteristic differences between IT and NOF fractures were analyzed using Fisher's Exact test and two-sample t test. Relationship between aBMD scores and fracture patterns was assessed using multivariable regression modeling. After adjusted multivariable analysis, T-Troc and T-inter scores were significantly lower in intertrochanteric/basi-cervical fractures compared to neck of femur fractures (P = 0.022 and P = 0.026, respectively). Both intertrochanteric/basi-cervical fractures (mean T.Tot -1.99) and neck of femur fractures (mean T.Tot -1.64) were not found to be associated with a mean T.tot less than -2.5. However, the mean aBMD scores were consistently less than -2.5 for both intertrochanteric/basi-cervical fractures and neck of femur fractures. Gender and calcium intake at the time of injury were associated with specific hip fracture patterns (P = 0.002 and P = 0.011, respectively). Hip fracture patterns following low energy trauma may be influenced by the pattern of reduced bone density in different areas of the hip. Intertrochanteric/basi-cervical fractures were associated with significantly lower T-Troc and T-Inter scores

  19. Pulsed electromagnetic fields promote bone formation around dental implants inserted into the femur of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, H; Ochi, M; Abiko, Y; Hirose, Y; Kaku, T; Sakaguchi, K

    2000-08-01

    The present study examined the effect of applying a pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on bone formation around a rough-surfaced dental implant. A dental implant was inserted into the femur of Japanese white rabbits bilaterally. A PEMF with a pulse width of 25 microseconds and a pulse frequency of 100 Hz was applied. PEMF stimulation was applied for 4 h or 8 h per day, at a magnetic intensity of 0.2 mT, 0.3 mT or 0.8 mT. The animals were sacrificed 1, 2 or 4 weeks after implantation. After staining the resin sections with 2% basic fuchsin and 0.1% methylene blue, newly formed bone around the implant on tissue sections was evaluated by computer image analysis. The bone contact ratios of the PEMF-treated femurs were significantly larger than those of the control groups. Both the bone contact ratio and bone area ratio of the 0.2 mT- and 0.3 mT-treated femurs were significantly larger than the respective value of the 0.8 mT-treated femurs (P < 0.001). No significant difference in bone contact ratio or bone area ratio was observed whether PEMF was applied for 4 h/day or 8 h/day. Although a significantly greater amount of bone had formed around the implant of the 2-week treated femurs than the 1-week treated femurs, no significant difference was observed between the 2-week and 4-week treated femurs. These results suggest that PEMF stimulation may be useful for promoting bone formation around rough-surfaced dental implants. It is important to select the proper magnetic intensity, duration per day, and length of treatment.

  20. Femur performed better than tibia in autologous transplantation during hemipelvis reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pelvic reconstruction after hemipelvectomy can greatly improve the weight-bearing stability of the supporting skeleton and improve patients’ quality of life. Although an autograft can be used to reconstruct pelvic defects, the most suitable choice of autograft, i.e., the use of either femur or tibia, has not been determined. We aimed to analyze the mechanical stresses of a pelvic ring reconstructed using femur or tibia after hemipelvectomy using finite element (FE) analysis. Methods FE models of normal and reconstructed pelvis were established based on computed tomography images, and the stress distributions were analyzed under physiological loading from 0 to 500 N in both intact and restored pelvic models using femur or tibia. Results The vertical displacement of the intact pelvis was less than that of reconstructed pelvis, but there was no significant difference between the two reconstructed models. In FE analysis, the stress distribution of the intact pelvic model was bilaterally symmetric and the maximum stresses were located at the sacroiliac joint, arcuate line, ischiatic ramus, and ischial tuberosity. The maximum stress in each part of the reconstructed pelvis greatly exceeded that of the intact model. The maximum von Mises stress of the femur was 13.9 MPa, and that of the tibia was 6.41 MPa. However, the stress distribution was different in the two types of reconstructed pelvises. The tibial reconstruction model induced concentrated stress on the tibia shaft making it more vulnerable to fracture. The maximum stress on the femur was concentrated on the connections between the femur and the screws. Conclusions From a biomechanical point of view, the reconstruction of hemipelvic defects with femur is a better choice. PMID:24387189

  1. Effects of ligation of lateral intermuscular septum perforating vessels on blood supply to the femur.

    PubMed

    Grob, K; Manestar, M; Lang, A; Ackland, T; Gilbey, H; Kuster, M S

    2015-12-01

    With a subvastus approach to the femur, the vessels that perforate the lateral intermuscular septum (LISP-vessels) must be ligated. The effect on the blood supply to the femur remains unclear. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of ligation of the LISP-Vessels on the blood supply and to examine the anatomy of the LISP-vessels and the anastomoses around the femur. In six human cadavers the LISP vessels were ligated by a lateral subvastus approach on one side. The contralateral side served as control group. After bilateral injection of different coloured silicon dyes into the lateral and medial circumflex femoral artery (green), deep femoral artery (red) and the superficial femoral artery (blue) dissection was performed bilaterally. The arterial perfusion on both sides was compared and the anatomy of the LISP vessels studied. The medullary perfusion of the femur was not altered by the ligation of the LISP vessels. It did also not lead to a decrease in periosteal vessel filling. The LISP vessels were shown to be a part of a complex and rich anastomotic network and play an important role in the perfusion of the femur and quadriceps muscle group. The ligature could be compensated for by this anastomotic network. Branches to the periosteum separate from the LISP vessels immediately after perforating the lateral intermuscular septum. The linea aspera turned out to be an important area for the femoral blood supply. Exposure of the femur through a lateral subvastus approach with ligation of LISP vessels causes a certain degree of soft tissue trauma. However, by using a gentle surgical technique the periostal perfusion of the femur can be preserved by a potent anastomotic network after ligation of the LISP vessels if they are not ligated to close to the lateral intermuscular septum and the linea aspera is not unnecessarily exposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bone Mineral Density, Mechanical, Microstructural Properties and Mineral Content of the Femur in Growing Rats Fed with Cactus Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill. (Cactaceae) Cladodes as Calcium Source in Diet

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Becerra, Ezequiel; Gutiérrez-Cortez, Elsa; Del Real, Alicia; Rojas-Molina, Alejandra; Rodríguez-García, Mario; Rubio, Efraín; Quintero-García, Michelle; Rojas-Molina, Isela

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical, microstructural properties, mineral content and bone mineral density (BMD) of the femur were evaluated in growing rats fed with Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill. (Cactaceae) cladodes at different maturity stages as calcium source. Male weanling rats were fed with cladodes at early maturity stage (25 and 60 days of age, belonging to groups N-60 and N-200, respectively) and cladodes at late maturity stage (100 and 135 days of age, belonging to groups N-400 and N-600, respectively) for 6 weeks. Additionally, a control group fed with calcium carbonate as calcium source was included for comparative purposes. All diets were fitted to the same calcium content (5 g/kg diet). The failure load of femurs was significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05) in groups N-60 and N-200 in comparison to N-400, N-600 and control groups. The cortical width (Ct.Wi) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) of the femurs in control and N-600 groups were significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) than Ct.Wi and Tb.Th of femurs in groups N-60 and N-200. Trabecular separation of the femurs in N-60 and N-200 groups showed the highest values compared with all experimental groups. The highest calcium content in the femurs were observed in control, N-600 and N-400 groups; whereas the lowest phosphorus content in the bones were detected in N-200, N-600 and N-400 groups. Finally, the BMD in all experimental groups increased with age; nevertheless, the highest values were observed in N-600 and control groups during pubertal and adolescence stages. The results derived from this research demonstrate, for the first time, that the calcium found in Opuntia ficus indica cladodes is actually bioavailable and capable of improving mineral density and mechanical and microstructural properties of the bones. These findings suggest that the consumption of cladodes at late maturity stage within the diet might have a beneficial impact on bone health. PMID:28165410

  3. A method for accounting for test fixture compliance when estimating proximal femur stiffness.

    PubMed

    Rossman, Timothy; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2016-09-06

    Fracture testing of cadaveric femora to obtain strength and stiffness information is an active area of research in developing tools for diagnostic prediction of bone strength. These measurements are often used in the estimation and validation of companion finite element models constructed from the femora CT scan data, therefore, the accuracy of the data is of paramount importance. However, experimental stiffness calculated from force-displacement data has largely been ignored by most researchers due to inherent error in the differential displacement measurement obtained when not accounting for testing apparatus compliance. However, having such information is necessary for validation of computational models. Even in the few cases when fixture compliance was considered the measurements showed large lab-to-lab variation due to lack of standardization in fixture design. We examined the compliance of our in-house designed cadaveric femur test fixture to determine the errors we could expect when calculating stiffness from the collected experimental force-displacement data and determined the stiffness of the test fixture to be more than 10 times the stiffness of the stiffest femur in a sample of 44 femora. When correcting the apparent femur stiffness derived from the original data, we found that the largest stiffness was underestimated by about 10%. The study confirmed that considering test fixture compliance is a necessary step in improving the accuracy of fracture test data for characterizing femur stiffness, and highlighted the need for test fixture design standardization for proximal femur fracture testing.

  4. Variation between femurs as measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA).

    PubMed

    Hall, M L; Heavens, J; Ell, P J

    1991-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that there is minimal variation between the hips in an individual, but is densitometry of one femur representative of the other? We performed bone mineral density (BMD) measurements of both hips using a Hologic QDR 1000 densitometer. There were 110 patients, all of whom were right handed, and three main groups of subjects: (1) normal volunteers (n = 36); (2) subjects with known hip pathology (n = 36); (3) subjects with medical conditions not affecting the hip (n = 38). The mean age of the subjects was 46 (21-87) years and a standard analysis protocol was followed in all patients. The coefficient of variation (COV) for femurs was 0.9-3%, depending upon the region studied and the BMD. The left femur had a greater BMD 48% of the time and there were variable differences between femurs in each group studied. While the greatest differences were found in people with unilateral hip pathology, all groups had mean differences greater than the COV. It may be acceptable to study only one hip, but the large variation between femurs in individuals should be borne in mind when interpreting data.

  5. The shape of the hominoid proximal femur: a geometric morphometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Elizabeth H

    2007-01-01

    As part of the hip joint, the proximal femur is an integral locomotor component. Although a link between locomotion and the morphology of some aspects of the proximal femur has been identified, inclusive shapes of this element have not been compared among behaviourally heterogeneous hominoids. Previous analyses have partitioned complex proximal femoral morphology into discrete features (e.g. head, neck, greater trochanter) to facilitate conventional linear measurements. In this study, three-dimensional geometric morphometrics are used to examine the shape of the proximal femur in hominoids to determine whether femoral shape co-varies with locomotor category. Fourteen landmarks are recorded on adult femora of Homo, Pan, Gorilla, Pongo and Hylobates. Generalized Procrustes analysis (GPA) is used to adjust for position, orientation and scale among landmark configurations. Principal components analysis is used to collapse and compare variation in residuals from GPA, and thin-plate spline analysis is used to visualize shape change among taxa. The results indicate that knucklewalking African apes are similar to one another in femoral shape, whereas the more suspensory Asian apes diverge from the African ape pattern. The shape of the human and orangutan proximal femur converge, a result that is best explained in terms of the distinct requirements for locomotion in each group. These findings suggest that the shape of the proximal femur is brought about primarily by locomotor behaviour. PMID:17310545

  6. Geometric morphometric analysis reveals age-related differences in the distal femur of Europeans.

    PubMed

    Cavaignac, Etienne; Savall, Frederic; Chantalat, Elodie; Faruch, Marie; Reina, Nicolas; Chiron, Philippe; Telmon, Norbert

    2017-12-01

    Few studies have looked into age-related variations in femur shape. We hypothesized that three-dimensional (3D) geometric morphometric analysis of the distal femur would reveal age-related differences. The purpose of this study was to show that differences in distal femur shape related to age could be identified, visualized, and quantified using three-dimensional (3D) geometric morphometric analysis. Geometric morphometric analysis was carried out on CT scans of the distal femur of 256 subjects living in the south of France. Ten landmarks were defined on 3D reconstructions of the distal femur. Both traditional metric and geometric morphometric analyses were carried out on these bone reconstructions. These analyses were used to identify trends in bone shape in various age-based subgroups (<40, 40-60, >60). Only the average bone shape of the < 40-year subgroup was statistically different from that of the other two groups. When the population was divided into two subgroups using 40 years of age as a threshold, the subject's age was correctly assigned 80% of the time. Age-related differences are present in this bone segment. This reliable, accurate method could be used for virtual autopsy and to perform diachronic and interethnic comparisons. Moreover, this study provides updated morphometric data for a modern population in the south of France. Manufacturers of knee replacement implants will have to adapt their prosthesis models as the population evolves over time.

  7. Outcome of Fetuses with Diagnosis of Isolated Short Femur in the Second Half of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Roselló, José; Peralta LLorens, Núria

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the outcome of fetuses with isolated short femur detected at 19–41 weeks and determine to what extent this incidental finding should be a cause of concern in fetuses with a normal previous follow-up. Methods. 156 fetuses with isolated short femur were compared with a control group of 637 fetuses with normal femur length. FL values were converted into Z-scores and classified into 4 groups: control group: Z-score over −2, group 1: Z-score between −2 and −3, group 2: Z-score between −3 and −4, and group 3: Z-score below −4. FL values were plotted with the curves representing Z-scores −2, −3, and −4. To assess fetal outcome, the frequency of SGA, IUGR, abnormal umbilical Doppler (AUD), Down's syndrome, and skeletal dysplasia was determined for each group after delivery, and the relative risk in comparison with the control group was obtained. Finally, ROC curves were drawn in order to evaluate the FL diagnostic ability for the conditions appearing with increased frequency. Results. SGA, IUGR, and AUD were more frequent in the fetuses with short femur. Conversely, none of them presented Down's syndrome or skeletal dysplasia. According to ROC analysis, FL measurement behaved as a good diagnostic test for SGA and IUGR. Conclusions. A short femur diagnosis in a fetus with an otherwise normal follow-up determines just a higher risk of being small (SGA or IUGR). PMID:22577572

  8. Poly-N-acetyl glucosamine fibers activate bone regeneration in a rabbit femur injury model.

    PubMed

    Muise-Helmericks, Robin C; Demcheva, Marina; Vournakis, John N; Seth, Arun

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of a membrane material, consisting only of short poly-N-acetyl glucosamine (sNAG) nanofibers, to regenerate bone tissue after implantation into circular holes in the rabbit femur. Three circular holes were created in the femurs of five male New Zealand white rabbits. The holes were ∼ 2.0 mm in diameter. Three holes in the left femur were implanted with the comparative control substance (Bone Wax; Ethicon, Inc.); three holes in the right femur were implanted with the sNAG membrane test article. Animals were killed 4 weeks after surgery, and macroscopic evaluation of the implant sites was made. Hematoxylin and eosin histology was performed on both control and test sites. All control (bone wax) sites had visible holes (defects) at the 28-day end point of the study and showed no evidence of new bone formation. All the 15 sNAG test sites were found to have new bone tissue present in the bone hole defects. Hematoxylin and eosin histology of the sNAG-treated test sites showed the presence of osteoblasts, osteocytes, and trabecula of new bone formation at the 28-day end point of the study. The sNAG membrane test material activated the regeneration of new bone tissue in a rabbit femur bone model after 28 days of implantation, whereas the control bone wax material did not.

  9. Consideration of multiple load cases is critical in modelling orthotropic bone adaptation in the femur.

    PubMed

    Geraldes, Diogo M; Modenese, Luca; Phillips, Andrew T M

    2016-10-01

    Functional adaptation of the femur has been investigated in several studies by embedding bone remodelling algorithms in finite element (FE) models, with simplifications often made to the representation of bone's material symmetry and mechanical environment. An orthotropic strain-driven adaptation algorithm is proposed in order to predict the femur's volumetric material property distribution and directionality of its internal structures within a continuum. The algorithm was applied to a FE model of the femur, with muscles, ligaments and joints included explicitly. Multiple load cases representing distinct frames of two activities of daily living (walking and stair climbing) were considered. It is hypothesised that low shear moduli occur in areas of bone that are simply loaded and high shear moduli in areas subjected to complex loading conditions. In addition, it is investigated whether material properties of different femoral regions are stimulated by different activities. The loading and boundary conditions were considered to provide a physiological mechanical environment. The resulting volumetric material property distribution and directionalities agreed with ex vivo imaging data for the whole femur. Regions where non-orthogonal trabecular crossing has been documented coincided with higher values of predicted shear moduli. The topological influence of the different activities modelled was analysed. The influence of stair climbing on the properties of the femoral neck region is highlighted. It is recommended that multiple load cases should be considered when modelling bone adaptation. The orthotropic model of the complete femur is released with this study.

  10. The femur as a musculo-skeletal construct: a free boundary condition modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Phillips, A T M

    2009-07-01

    Previous finite element studies of the femur have made simplifications to varying extents with regard to the boundary conditions used during analysis. Fixed boundary conditions are generally applied to the distal femur when examining the proximal behaviour at the hip joint, while the same can be said for the proximal femur when examining the distal behaviour at the knee joint. While fixed boundary condition analyses have been validated against in vitro experiments it remains a matter of debate as to whether the numerical and experimental models are indicative of the in vivo situation. This study presents a finite element model in which the femur is treated as a complete musculo-skeletal construct, spanning between the hip and knee joints. Linear and non-linear implementations of a free boundary condition modelling approach are applied to the bone through the explicit inclusion of muscles and ligaments spanning both the hip joint and the knee joint. A non-linear force regulated, muscle strain based activation strategy was found to result in lower observed principal strains in the cortex of the femur, compared to a linear activation strategy. The non-linear implementation of the model in particular, was found to produce hip and knee joint reaction forces consistent with in vivo data from instrumented implants.

  11. Pterosauria from the Late Triassic of Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaparte, J. F.; Schultz, C. L.; Soares, M. B.

    A few postcranial remains of a Late Triassic pterosaur from the early Coloradian Caturrita Formation of Rio Grande do Sul are communicated. The general morphology of the coracoid, proximal portion of the humerus, femur, tibia and fibula suggests that it is more primitive than the pterosaurs from the Norian of northern Italy. The morphology and proportions of the different bones support their assignment to a primitive pterosaur. An almost complete maxilla with three teeth is tentatively referred to the same taxon because it was collected at some distance from the postcrania cited above.

  12. Percutaneous cementoplasty for painful osteolytic distal femur metastases: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Mingxing; Liu, Yaosheng; Yang, Shaoxing; Jiang, Weigang; Cao, Yuncen; Liu, Shubin

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous cementoplasty has been shown to immediately restore the mechanical stability of affected bones, prevent further risk of bone fractures, and allow immediate weight bearing. It is emerging as one of the most promising procedures for patients with painful bone metastasis who are unsuitable for surgery or who show resistance to radiotherapy and/or analgesic therapies. This study aimed at describing the procedure, indications, and benefits of percutaneous cementoplasty for painful osteolytic distal femur metastases. We report the case of a painful metastatic lesion in the left distal femur secondary to non-small-cell lung cancer in a 58-year-old woman. The patient underwent percutaneous cementoplasty and experienced effective pain relief and recovery of knee function postoperatively. In addition, no perioperative complication was observed. Percutaneous cementoplasty for osteolytic distal femur metastases offers effective pain relief and restores impaired knee function. Although this method may be a safe option, larger samples of retrospective or prospective confirmation are warranted. PMID:27799817

  13. Percutaneous cementoplasty for painful osteolytic distal femur metastases: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lei, Mingxing; Liu, Yaosheng; Yang, Shaoxing; Jiang, Weigang; Cao, Yuncen; Liu, Shubin

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous cementoplasty has been shown to immediately restore the mechanical stability of affected bones, prevent further risk of bone fractures, and allow immediate weight bearing. It is emerging as one of the most promising procedures for patients with painful bone metastasis who are unsuitable for surgery or who show resistance to radiotherapy and/or analgesic therapies. This study aimed at describing the procedure, indications, and benefits of percutaneous cementoplasty for painful osteolytic distal femur metastases. We report the case of a painful metastatic lesion in the left distal femur secondary to non-small-cell lung cancer in a 58-year-old woman. The patient underwent percutaneous cementoplasty and experienced effective pain relief and recovery of knee function postoperatively. In addition, no perioperative complication was observed. Percutaneous cementoplasty for osteolytic distal femur metastases offers effective pain relief and restores impaired knee function. Although this method may be a safe option, larger samples of retrospective or prospective confirmation are warranted.

  14. How High Can You Go?: Retrograde Nailing of Proximal Femur Fractures.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Kevin M; Cannada, Lisa K; Watson, J Tracy; Ali, Ashley; Boudreau, John A; Mir, Hassan R; Bauer, Jennifer M; Mullis, Brian; Hymes, Robert; Genova, Renee; Tucker, Michael; Schlatter, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    There are no data-supported recommendations on how proximal is too proximal for retrograde nailing (RGN). At six level 1 trauma centers, patients with femur fractures within the proximal one-third of the femur treated with RGN were included. This article describes a proximal segment capture ratio (PSCR) and nail segment capture ratio to evaluate RGN of proximal fractures. The study included 107 patients. The average follow-up was 44 weeks. There were two nonunions and three malunions. There was no significant difference between PSCR of 0.3 or less and need for secondary procedures or time to full weight bearing (p>.05). In this study, a smaller (< 0.3) PSCR was not associated with an increased number of complications. A higher Orthopaedic Trauma Association classification was predictive of malunion and increased time to union. These data demonstrate that retrograde nailing is safe and effective for the treatment of supraisthmal femur fractures.

  15. The epidemiology and treatment of femur fractures at a northern tanzanian referral centre

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Alexander Conor; Ebbs, Samuel Robert; Mandari, Faiton Ndesanjo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Femoral fractures are the most common presenting injury at the orthopaedic department in a large Tanzanian hospital. To date, there has been no current examination of the epidemiology of femoral fractures and the disease burden has not been quantified. Methods A retrospective descriptive study of patient records in the orthopaedic department at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC) was performed. Patient demographics, aetiology of fractures, diagnosis and treatment were all recorded. Results A total of 540 consecutive patient admission records were reviewed over a 9 month period. Of these 540 cases, 213 (39%) were diagnosed with a femoral fracture. The 21-30 age group were the most commonly affected by femur fractures (20% n = 42). Within this group, motor traffic accidents (MTA) were the cause of 71% of injuries (n = 30). For males, MTA's caused 59% of all femur fractures (n = 80), while falls were the most common cause of femur fractures in females (70%; n = 49). 80% of the fractures in the 51-100 age group were caused by falls (n = 52). In both the male and female groups the most common fracture seen was mid shaft femoral fracture (males 33% (n = 48), females 25% (n = 18)). The most common treatment was skeletal traction used in 40% (n = 85) of patients. Conclusion Femur fracture most commonly presented in males under age 30. Femur fracture was most commonly cause by MTAs in males and by falls in females. The most common diagnosis was mid shaft of femur fracture. Skeletal traction was the most frequent treatment. PMID:26977245

  16. Mechanical, biochemical and morphometric alterations in the femur of mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Nakagaki, Wilson Romero; Bertran, Celso Aparecido; Matsumura, Cintia Yuri; Santo-Neto, Humberto; Camilli, José Angelo

    2011-02-01

    The bone tissue abnormalities observed in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy are frequently attributed to muscle weakness. In this condition, bones receive fewer mechanical stimuli, compromising the process of bone modeling. In the present study we hypothesize that other factors inherent to the disease might be associated with bone tissue impairment, irrespective of the presence of muscle impairment. Mdx mice lack dystrophin and present cycles of muscle degeneration/regeneration that become more intense in the third week of life. As observed in humans with muscular dystrophy, bone tissue abnormalities were found in mdx mice during more intense muscle degeneration due to age. Under these circumstances, muscle deficit is probably one of the factors promoting these changes. To test our hypothesis, we investigated the changes that occur in the femur of mdx mice at 21 days of age when muscle damage is still not significant. The mechanical (structural and material) and biochemical properties and morphometric characteristics of the femur of mdx and control animals were evaluated. The results demonstrated a lower strength, stiffness and energy absorption capacity in mdx femurs. Higher values for structural (load and stiffness) and material (stress, elastic modulus and toughness) properties were observed in the control group. Mdx femurs were shorter and were characterized by a smaller cortical area and thickness and a smaller area of epiphyseal trabecular bone. The hydroxyproline content was similar in the two groups, but there was a significant difference in the Ca/P ratios. Thermogravimetry showed a higher mineral matrix content in cortical bone of control animals. In conclusion, femurs of mdx mice presented impaired mechanical and biochemical properties as well as changes in collagen organization in the extracellular matrix. Thus, mdx mice developed femoral osteopenia even in the absence of significant muscle fiber degeneration. This weakness of the mdx femur is

  17. Three-dimensional geometric morphometric analysis reveals ethnic dimorphism in the shape of the femur.

    PubMed

    Cavaignac, Etienne; Li, Ke; Faruch, Marie; Savall, Frederic; Chiron, Philippe; Huang, W; Telmon, Norbert

    2017-12-01

    Ethnic dimorphism in the distal femur has never been studied in a three-dimensional analysis focused on shape instead of size. Yet, this dimorphism has direct implications in orthopedic surgery and in anthropology. The goal of this study was to show that differences in distal femur shape related to ethnic dimorphism could be identified, visualized, and quantified using 3D geometric morphometric analysis. CT scans of the distal femur were taken from 482 patients who were free of any bone-related pathology: 240 patients were European (E) and 242 were Asian (A). Ten osteometric landmarks based on standard bone landmarks used in anthropometry were placed on these scans. Geometric morphometric analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), canonical variates analysis (CVA), and other discriminant analyses (Goodall's F-test and Mahalanobis distance) were performed. A cross-validation analysis was carried out to determine the percentage of cases in which the ethnicity was correctly estimated. The shape of the E and A distal femur differed significantly (Goodall's F = 94.43, P < 0.001 and Mahalanobis D2 distance = 1.85, P < 0.001). PCA identified a difference in distal femur shape between A and E. The CVA revealed that correct ethnicity was assigned in 82% of cases and the cross-validation revealed a 75% rate of correct ethnic group estimation. The distal femur exhibits ethnic dimorphism. 3D geometric morphometric analysis made it possible to demonstrate these differences. The large number of subjects studied has helped modernize the references for certain bone measurements, with direct implication for orthopedic surgery and anthropology.

  18. The Analysis of Biomechanical Properties of Proximal Femur after Implant Removal

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jae Hyuk; Jung, Tae Gon; Honnurappa, Arjun Rupanagudi; Cha, Jae Min; Ham, Chang Hwa; Kim, Tae Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To compare the biomechanical stability of the femur following the removal of proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA-II) and dynamic hip screw (DHS). Material and Methods. 56 paired cadaveric femurs were used as experimental and control groups. In the experimental group, PFNA-II and DHS were randomly inserted into femurs on both sides and then removed. Thereafter, compression load was applied until fracture occurred; biomechanical stability of the femurs and associated fracture patterns were studied. Results. The ultimate load and stiffness of the control group were 6227.8 ± 1694.1 N and 990.5 ± 99.8 N/mm, respectively. These were significantly higher than experimental group (p = 0.014, <0.001) following the removal of PFNA-II (4085.6 ± 1628.03 N and 656.3 ± 155.3 N/mm) and DHS (4001.9 ± 1588.3 N and 656.3 ± 155.3 N/mm). No statistical differences in these values were found between the 2 device groups (p = 0.84, 0.71), regardless of age groups. However, fracture patterns were different between two devices, intertrochanteric and subtrochanteric fractures. Conclusions. Mechanical stability of the proximal femurs does not differ after the removal of 2 different of fixation devices regardless of the age. However, it was significantly lower compared to an intact femur. Different fracture patterns have been shown following the removal of different fixation devices as there are variations in the site of stress risers for individual implants. PMID:27597807

  19. Femur fractures should not be considered distracting injuries for cervical spine assessment.

    PubMed

    Dahlquist, Robert T; Fischer, Peter E; Desai, Harsh; Rogers, Amelia; Christmas, A Britton; Gibbs, Michael A; Sing, Ronald F

    2015-12-01

    The National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study (NEXUS) clinical decision rule is extremely sensitive for clearance of cervical spine (C-spine) injury in blunt trauma patients with distracting injuries. We sought to determine whether the NEXUS criteria would maintain sensitivity for blunt trauma patients when femur fractures were not considered a distracting injury and an absolute indication for diagnostic imaging. We retrospectively analyzed blunt trauma patients with at least 1 femur fracture who presented to our emergency department as trauma activations from 2009 to 2011 and underwent C-spine injury evaluation. Presence of C-spine injury requiring surgical intervention was evaluated. Of 566 trauma patients included, 77 (13.6%) were younger than 18 years. Cervical spine injury was diagnosed in 53 (9.4%) of 566. A total of 241 patients (42.6%) had positive NEXUS findings in addition to distracting injury; 51 (21.2%) of these had C-spine injuries. Of 325 patients (57.4%) with femur fractures who were otherwise NEXUS negative, only 2 (0.6%) had C-spine injuries (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.2%-2.2%); both were stable and required no operative intervention. Use of NEXUS criteria, excluding femur fracture as an indication for imaging, detected all significant injuries with a sensitivity for any C-spine injury of 96.2% (95% CI, 85.9%-99.3%) and negative predictive value of 99.4% (95% CI, 97.6%-99.9%). In our patient population, all significant C-spine injuries were identified by NEXUS criteria without considering the femur fracture a distracting injury and indication for computed tomographic imaging. Reconsidering femur fracture in this context may decrease radiation exposure and health care expenditure with little risk of missed diagnoses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Growth prognosis after para-epiphyseal tangential epiphysial injuries of the lower extremity exemplified by the distal femur: outcome after injuries of epiphyses of the distal femur].

    PubMed

    Weinberg, A M; Castellani, C; Werner, C; Mayr, J

    2002-01-01

    Fractures of the distal end of the femur are rare. Premature partial closure of the physis may occur after metaphyseal fractures. After epiphyseal fractures it has a high incidence of occurrence. The cause of physeal arrest is not known. Stimulation of the physes ends in leg length discrepancy and was seen in 50% of all cases. Spontaneous correction of an axis deviation is possible after antecurvation up to an age of 5 years. But this should be only accepted during therapy of metaphyseal fractures of the distal femur. Side-to-Side deviations remodel in all cases. Aim of therapy in distal epiphyseal fractures should be an anatomical reduction and a definitive retention. Screw osteosynthesis seems to have an advantage.

  1. Femur ontogeny in humans and great apes: heterochronic implications for hominid évolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardieu, Christine

    1997-12-01

    Did the first hominids have a short developmental period similar to that of the great apes, or a longer period closer to that of modern humans? Some morphological modifications undergone by the human femur during growth are shown to be excellent markers of different developmental stages. The femur of the first hominids ( Australopithecus afarensis) shows only features of infantile growth, whereas characters of both infantile and adolescent growth are typical of later hominids ( Homo). In the first australopithecines the period of peripubertal growth would have still been short. The prolongation of the adolescent period appears to be a characteristic of Homo.

  2. Not all secondary bone tumours are secondaries. Concurrent metastatic breast carcinoma and chondrosarcoma of the femur.

    PubMed

    Nath, Preethy; Sankey, Elizabeth; Murray, Elisabeth; Kurup, Harish

    2015-04-09

    We present a case of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the breast in a patient who sustained a pathological fracture of the distal femur. Histology of the distal femur lesion excised at the time of endoprosthetic replacement confirmed this to be a primary chondrosarcoma. We have reviewed the literature and identified previously documented cases of concurrent breast carcinoma and chondrosarcoma of bone. A high index of suspicion is warranted and the diagnosis must be first confirmed before rushing to internal fixation (therapeutic or prophylactic) assuming them to be secondary bone lesions from the known primary cancer even in patients with multiple metastases.

  3. Reducing subtrochanteric femur fractures: tips and tricks, do's and don'ts.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Richard S; Donegan, Derek J; Liporace, Frank A

    2015-04-01

    Treatment of subtrochanteric fracture remains a challenge, but evolution of strategy has allowed for reliable results with low complications. Although several fixation options exist, reamed, antegrade intramedullary nailing (IMN) has evolved as the standard of care. Cognizant effort to achieve anatomic reduction before IMN passage allows for desired outcomes. Several reduction techniques can be used to overcome the deforming forces present in the proximal femur to allow for proper IMN placement. The purpose of this article is to review the tips, tricks, and pitfalls to avoid in the treatment of subtrochanteric femur fractures with IMN.

  4. Use of auxiliary locking plates for the treatment of unstable pertrochanteric femur fractures.

    PubMed

    Yun, Ho Hyun; Lee, Yong In; Kim, Kyoung Ho; Yun, Se Hyeok

    2015-05-01

    Pertrochanteric femur fractures are successfully treated by orthopedic surgeons worldwide, but maintaining the reduction status or fixation of the greater trochanter is sometimes difficult in unstable cases in elderly patients. Several biomechanical advantages have been reported in locking plates when compared with conventional plates; locking plates provide angular and axial stability, better rigidity, and no toggling, and they preserve periosteal blood supply. The authors describe the use of auxiliary locking plates in unstable pertrochanteric femur fractures in elderly patients. Mini locking plates are simple, straightforward, and versatile enough to be used in elderly patients.

  5. Segmentierung des Femurs aus MRT-Daten mit Shape-Based Level-Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekomien, Claudia; Busch, Martin; Teske, Wolfram; Winter, Susanne

    Inhalt dieser Arbeit ist die Segmentierung des Femurs aus MRT-Datensätzen mit einem Shape-based Level-Set-Ansatz. Der Algorithmus besteht aus zwei Phasen, der Modellerstellung und der Segmentierungsphase. In der Segmentierungsphase wurde ein kantenbasiertes und ein auf Intensitäten basierendes Optimierungskriterium mit einander kombiniert. Für eine lokale Verbesserung des Ergebnisses wurde zusätzlich ein Laplacian Level-Set-Verfahren angewendet. Der Femur konnte mit diesem Ansatz in drei verschiedenen MRT-Sequenzen und einem Fusionsdatensatz gut segmentiert werden.

  6. Biomechanical measurements of surgical drilling force and torque in human versus artificial femurs.

    PubMed

    MacAvelia, Troy; Salahi, Meisam; Olsen, Michael; Crookshank, Meghan; Schemitsch, Emil H; Ghasempoor, Ahmad; Janabi-Sharifi, Farrokh; Zdero, Rad

    2012-12-01

    Few experimental studies have examined surgical drilling in human bone, and no studies have inquired into this aspect for a popular commercially-available artificial bone used in biomechanical studies. Sixteen fresh-frozen human femurs and five artificial femurs were obtained. Cortical specimens were mounted into a clamping system equipped with a thrust force and torque transducer. Using a CNC machine, unicortical holes were drilled in each specimen at 1000 rpm, 1250 rpm, and 1500 rpm with a 3.2 mm diameter surgical drill bit. Feed rate was 120 mm/min. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Force at increasing spindle speed (1000 rpm, 1250 rpm, and 1500 rpm), respectively, showed a range for human femurs (198.4 ± 14.2 N, 180.6 ± 14.0 N, and 176.3 ± 11.2 N) and artificial femurs (87.2 ± 19.3 N, 82.2 ± 11.2 N, and 75.7 ± 8.8 N). For human femurs, force at 1000 rpm was greater than at other speeds (p ≤ 0.018). For artificial femurs, there was no speed effect on force (p ≥ 0.991). Torque at increasing spindle speed (1000 rpm, 1250 rpm, and 1500 rpm), respectively, showed a range for human femurs (186.3 ± 16.9 N·mm, 157.8 ± 16.1 N·mm, and 140.2 ± 16.4 N·mm) and artificial femurs (67.2 ± 8.4 N·mm, 61.0 ± 2.9 N·mm, and 53.3 ± 2.9 N·mm). For human femurs, torque at 1000 rpm was greater than at other speeds (p < 0.001). For artificial femurs, there was no difference in torque for 1000 rpm versus higher speeds (p ≥ 0.228), and there was only a borderline difference between the higher speeds (p = 0.046). Concerning human versus artificial femurs, their behavior was different at every speed (force, p ≤ 0.001; torque, p < 0.001). For human specimens at 1500 rpm, force and torque were linearly correlated with standardized bone mineral density (sBMD) and the T-score used to clinically categorize bone quality (R

  7. Osteoporosis and low bone mass at the femur neck or lumbar spine in older adults: United States, 2005-2008

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many current clinical guidelines recommend that assessment of osteoporosis or low bone mass, as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) (1), be based on bone mineral density at either the femur neck region of the proximal femur (hip) or the lumbar spine (2,3). This data brief presents the mos...

  8. Cryptococcal osteomyelitis of the femur: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Zainal, A I; Wong, S L; Pan, K L; Wong, O L; Tzar, M N

    2011-08-01

    Fungal osteomyelitis is a rare opportunistic infection. It exhibits some clinical and radiological similarities to several other bone pathologies. A diagnostic delay may result in significant increase in morbidity. We report a case of a 37-year-old man with underlying hypogammaglobulinaemia presented with isolated cryptococcal osteomyelitis of the femur.

  9. Femur bone strength in Tyrannosaurus rex: A study of sexual dimorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Scott

    2012-04-01

    Tyrannosaurus rex is the iconic species of a fearsome predator and is held in fascination by virtually everyone. Like many other species, Tyrannosaurs rex displayed sexual dimorphism with the females larger than the males. The femur bones of 14 fossil specimens were examined to determine if the maximum running abilities were significantly different for the two genders. No significant difference is observed.

  10. Bone morphology in 46 BXD recombinant inbred strains and femur-tibia correlation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yueying; Huang, Jinsong; Jiao, Yan; David, Valentin; Kocak, Mehmet; Roan, Esra; Di'Angelo, Denis; Lu, Lu; Hasty, Karen A; Gu, Weikuan

    2015-01-01

    We examined the bone properties of BXD recombinant inbred (RI) mice by analyzing femur and tibia and compared their phenotypes of different compartments. 46 BXD RI mouse strains were analyzed including progenitor C57BL/6J (n = 16) and DBA/2J (n = 15) and two first filial generations (D2B6F1 and B6D2F1). Strain differences were observed in bone quality and structural properties (P < 0.05) in each bone profile (whole bone, cortical bone, or trabecular bone). It is well known that skeletal phenotypes are largely affected by genetic determinants and genders, such as bone mineral density (BMD). While genetics and gender appear expectedly as the major determinants of bone mass and structure, significant correlations were also observed between femur and tibia. More importantly, positive and negative femur-tibia associations indicated that genetic makeup had an influence on skeletal integrity. We conclude that (a) femur-tibia association in bone morphological properties significantly varies from strain to strain, which may be caused by genetic differences among strains, and (b) strainwise variations were seen in bone mass, bone morphology, and bone microarchitecture along with bone structural property.

  11. Treatment of proximal femur infections with antibiotic-loaded cement spacers

    PubMed Central

    Kelm, J.; Bohrer, P.; Schmitt, E.; Anagnostakos, K.

    2009-01-01

    In case of periprosthetic hip infections the implantation of antibiotic-loaded PMMA spacers is accepted for an adequate treatment option. Although their indication for the treatment of destructive, bacterial infections of the proximal femur would make sense, literature data are scarce. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of antibiotic-impregnated spacers in the treatment of proximal femur infections. In 10 consecutive patients (5 M/ 5 F, mean age 66 y.) with bacterial proximal femur infections, a femoral head/neck resection was prospectively performed with a subsequent implantation of an antibiotic-loaded spacer. The joint-specific outcome was evaluated by the Merle d´Aubigne and the Mayo hip score, the general outcome by SF-36. The time periods were divided into “infection situation”, “between stages” and meanly 1 year “after prosthesis implantation”. The spacers were meanly implanted over 90 [155-744] days. In all cases an infection eradication could be achieved. After infection eradication, a prosthesis implantation was performed in 8 cases. The general scores showed significant increases at each time period. With regard to the dimension “pain”, both scores demonstrated a significant increase between “infection situation” and “between stages”, but no significance between “between stages” and “after prosthesis implantation”. Spacers could be indicated in the treatment of proximal femur infections. Besides an infection eradication, a pain reduction is also possible. PMID:19841730

  12. Multiple vibration displacements at multiple vibration frequencies stress impact on human femur computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Ezenwa, Bertram; Yeoh, Han Teik

    2011-01-01

    Whole-body vibration training using single-frequency methods has been reported to improve bone mineral density. However, the intensities can exceed safe levels and have drawn unfavorable comments from subjects. In a previous article, whole-body vibration training using multiple vibration displacements at multiple vibration frequencies (MVDMVF) was reported. This article presents the computational simulation evaluation of stress dispersion on a femur with and without the MVDMVF input. A model of bone femur was developed from a computed tomography image of the lower limb with Mimics software from Materialise (Plymouth, Michigan). We analyzed the mesh model in COMSOL Multiphysics (COMSOL, Inc; Burlington, Massachusetts) with and without MVDMVF input, with constraints and load applied to the femur model. We compared the results with published joint stresses during walking, jogging, and stair-climbing and descending and with standard vibration exposure limits. Results showed stress levels on the femur are significantly higher with MVDMVF input than without. The stress levels were within the published levels during walking and stair-climbing and descending but below the stress levels during jogging. Our computational results demonstrate that MVDMVF generates stress level equivalent to the level during walking and stair-climbing. This evidence suggests that MVDMVF is safe for prolonged use in subjects with osteoporosis who ambulate independently.

  13. Tea drinking habits and osteoporotic hip/femur fractures: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chenshu; Tang, Rongrui

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between tea drinking habits and osteoporotic hip/femur fractures. Methods: Paired case-control method was used for face-to-face interviews from January 2010 to June 2014. Patients (n=435) with newly osteoporotic hip/femur fracture and 435 controls with the same gender and age (±3) were given questionnaire survey. The survey content included general situation, detailed tea drinking and other diet condition, health-related behavior and family history of fractures, etc. Results: Single factor logistic analysis showed that the habit of drinking tea can significantly reduce the risk of hip/femur fracture. Cumulative year of tea drinking, the cumulative amount of tea and tea concentration (low dose group) have the maximum protection for fracture, while the high dose group is weaker in protection (trend test, P<0.05). After adjustment for age, energy, BMI, education degree, parents’ history of fracture, second hand smoke exposure, calcium supplements, and equivalent energy consumption of physical activity, etc, the above association still showed significant linear trend, but the associated strength was slightly reduced. But stratified analysis found that the effect of tea drinking was only statistically significant in men. And there were no statistically significant differences of people with different education degree. Conclusions: Regular tea drinking can reduce the risk of osteoporotic hip/femur fractures in middle-aged and elderly men. PMID:27182250

  14. Immediate hip spica casting for femur fractures in pediatric patients. A review of 175 patients.

    PubMed

    Infante, A F; Albert, M C; Jennings, W B; Lehner, J T

    2000-07-01

    Immediate closed reduction and application of a well-molded hip spica cast is a safe and effective treatment option for closed, isolated femur fractures in children who weigh between 10 and 100 pounds. Between 1988 and 1996, 190 immediate hip spica casts were placed on children with isolated femoral shaft fractures who weight between 10 and 100 pounds. Fifteen patients were lost to followup leaving 175 children who were evaluated and followed up for at least 2 years after the hip spica cast was removed (range 2-10 years). The femur fractures were reduced closed and placed in a 1 1/2 hip spica cast in the emergency room with the patient under conscious sedation or in the operating room with the patient under general anesthesia. All of the children returned home within 24 hours of the procedure. All 175 femur fractures united within 8 weeks. The only complication was a refracture in a 25 pound child who fell 1 week after the cast was removed. No significant residual angular deformities were present in any of the children at last followup. None of the children required external shoe lifts, epiphysiodesis, antibiotics, irrigation and debridements, or limb lengthening procedures for leg length inequalities. The authors think that immediate closed reduction and placement of a well-molded hip spica cast is a safe and reliable treatment option for isolated, closed femur fractures in children from birth to 10 years of age who weigh less than 80 pounds.

  15. A comparative study of orthotropic and isotropic bone adaptation in the femur

    PubMed Central

    Geraldes, Diogo M; Phillips, Andrew T M

    2014-01-01

    Functional adaptation of the femur has been studied extensively by embedding remodelling algorithms in finite element models, with bone commonly assumed to have isotropic material properties for computational efficiency. However, isotropy is insufficient in predicting the directionality of bone's observed microstructure. A novel iterative orthotropic 3D adaptation algorithm is proposed and applied to a finite element model of the whole femur. Bone was modelled as an optimised strain-driven adaptive continuum with local orthotropic symmetry. Each element's material orientations were aligned with the local principal stress directions and their corresponding directional Young's moduli updated proportionally to the associated strain stimuli. The converged predicted density distributions for a coronal section of the whole femur were qualitatively and quantitatively compared with the results obtained by the commonly used isotropic approach to bone adaptation and with ex vivo imaging data. The orthotropic assumption was shown to improve the prediction of bone density distribution when compared with the more commonly used isotropic approach, whilst producing lower comparative mass, structurally optimised models. It was also shown that the orthotropic approach can provide additional directional information on the material properties distributions for the whole femur, an advantage over isotropic bone adaptation. Orthotropic bone models can help in improving research areas in biomechanics where local structure and mechanical properties are of key importance, such as fracture prediction and implant assessment. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24753477

  16. Numerical simulation of stress amplification induced by crack interaction in human femur bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alia, Noor; Daud, Ruslizam; Ramli, Mohammad Fadzli; Azman, Wan Zuki; Faizal, Ahmad; Aisyah, Siti

    2015-05-01

    This research is about numerical simulation using a computational method which study on stress amplification induced by crack interaction in human femur bone. Cracks in human femur bone usually occur because of large load or stress applied on it. Usually, the fracture takes longer time to heal itself. At present, the crack interaction is still not well understood due to bone complexity. Thus, brittle fracture behavior of bone may be underestimated and inaccurate. This study aims to investigate the geometrical effect of double co-planar edge cracks on stress intensity factor (K) in femur bone. This research focuses to analyze the amplification effect on the fracture behavior of double co-planar edge cracks, where numerical model is developed using computational method. The concept of fracture mechanics and finite element method (FEM) are used to solve the interacting cracks problems using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) theory. As a result, this study has shown the identification of the crack interaction limit (CIL) and crack unification limit (CUL) exist in the human femur bone model developed. In future research, several improvements will be made such as varying the load, applying thickness on the model and also use different theory or method in calculating the stress intensity factor (K).

  17. A PTH-responsive circadian clock operates in ex vivo mouse femur fracture healing site.

    PubMed

    Kunimoto, Tatsuya; Okubo, Naoki; Minami, Yoichi; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Hosokawa, Toshihiro; Asada, Maki; Oda, Ryo; Kubo, Toshikazu; Yagita, Kazuhiro

    2016-02-29

    The circadian clock contains clock genes including Bmal1 and Period2, and it maintains an interval rhythm of approximately 24 hours (the circadian rhythm) in various organs including growth plate and articular cartilage. As endochondral ossification is involved not only in growth plate but also in fracture healing, we investigated the circadian clock functions in fracture sites undergoing healing. Our fracture models using external fixation involved femurs of Period2::Luciferase knock-in mice which enables the monitoring of endogenous circadian clock state via bioluminescence. Organ culture was performed by collecting femurs, and fracture sites were observed using bioluminescence imaging systems. Clear bioluminescence rhythms of 24-hour intervals were revealed in fracture healing sites. When parathyroid hormone (PTH) was administered to fractured femurs in organ culture, peak time of Period2::Luciferase activity in fracture sites and growth plates changed, indicating that PTH-responsive circadian clock functions in the mouse femur fracture healing site. While PTH is widely used in treating osteoporosis, many studies have reported that it contributes to improvement of fracture healing. Future studies of the role of this local clock in wound healing may reveal a novel function of the circadian timing mechanism in skeletal cells.

  18. Detecting Early Biomechanical Effects of Zoledronic Acid on Femurs of Osteoporotic Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Palacio, Evandro Pereira; Müller, Sérgio Swain; Sardenberg, Trajano; Mizobuchi, Roberto Ryuiti; Galbiatti, José Antônio; Durigan, Alcides; Savarese, Aniello; Ortolan, Érika Veruska Paiva

    2012-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the biomechanical effects of zoledronic acid (ZA) on femurs of female osteoporotic rats after follow-up periods of 9 and 12 months. Methods. Eighty female Wistar rats were prospectively assessed. At 60 days of age, the animals were randomly divided into two groups: bilateral oophorectomy (O) (n = 40) and sham surgery (S) (n = 40). At 90 days of age, groups O and S were randomly subdivided into four groups, according to whether 0.1 mg/kg of ZA or distilled water (DW) was intraperitoneally administered: OZA (n = 20), ODW (n = 20), SZA (n = 20), and SDW (n = 20). The animals were sacrificed at 9 and 12 months after the administration of the substances, and then their right femurs were removed and analyzed biomechanically. Axial compression tests that focused on determining the maximum load (N), yield point (N), and stiffness coefficient (N/mm) of the proximal femur were performed in the biomechanical study. Results. ZA significantly increased the maximum load and yield point, reducing the stiffness coefficient concerning the oophorectomy status and follow-up period. Conclusion. Zoledronic acid, at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg, significantly increased the maximum loads and yield points and reduced the stiffness coefficients in the femurs of female rats with osteoporosis caused by bilateral oophorectomy. PMID:23304634

  19. Biomechanical characterisation of osteosyntheses for proximal femur fractures: helical blade versus screw.

    PubMed

    Al-Munajjed, Amir A; Hammer, Joachim; Mayr, Edgar; Nerlich, Michael; Lenich, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Proximal femur fractures are of main concern for elderly and especially osteoporotic patients. Despite advanced implant modifications and surgical techniques, serious mechanical complication rates between 4-18% are found in conventional osteosyntheses of proximal femur fractures. Clinical complications such as the rotation of the femoral head and the cut-out phenomenon of the fracture fixation bolt are often diagnosed during post-operative treatments. Therefore, efforts in new intramedulary techniques focus on the load bearing characteristics of the implant by developing new geometries to improve the implant-tissue interface. The objective of this investigation was to analyse the osteosynthesis/femur head interaction of two commonly used osteosyntheses, one with a helical blade and the other one with a screw design under different loading conditions. For the comparative investigation the helical blade of the Proximal Femur Nail Antirotation was investigated versus the screw system of the Dynamic Hip Screw. After implantation in a femoral head the loads for rotational overwinding of the implants were analysed. Pull-out forces with suppressed rotation were investigated with analysis of the influence of the previous overwinding. All investigations were performed on human femoral heads taken of patients with average age of 70.3+/-11.8. The bone mineral densities of the human specimens were detected by QCT-scans (average BMD: 338.9+/- 61.3$\\frac[\\mathit[mg

  20. Polymicrobial Chronic Infection Including Acinetobacter Baumannii in a Plated Segmental Defect in the Rat Femur

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Including Acinetobacter baumannii in a Plated Segmental Defect in the Rat Femur PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dean T. Tsukayama, MD...FEB 2007 - 31 DEC 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Polymicrobial Chronic Infection Including Acinetobacter baumannii 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER in a Plated...bone isolate of Acinetobacter baumannii exhibited very little osteolytic involvement when used alone in the model. Qualitative cultures indicated very

  1. Anesthetic management in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta for rush nail removal in femur

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Divanshu; Purohit, Alaka

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare genetically inherited syndrome involving connective tissues, resulting in anatomic and physiologic abnormalities, which results in any form of anesthesia, a challenging task. We hereby report a case of OI type I presented with distinctively blue sclera, hearing loss, kyphoscoliosis, and mild pulmonary restrictive disease who underwent rush nail removal in the femur. PMID:27746572

  2. A fracture risk assessment model of the femur in children with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) during gait.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Jessica M; Guan, Yabo; Wang, Mei; Smith, Peter A; Harris, Gerald F

    2009-11-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable bone fragility disorder characterized by skeletal deformities and increased bone fragility. There is currently no established clinical method for quantifying fracture risk in OI patients. This study begins the development of a patient-specific model for femur fracture risk assessment and prediction based on individuals' gait analysis data, bone geometry from imaging and material properties from nanoindentation (Young's modulus=19 GPa, Poisson's ratio=0.3). Finite element models of the femur were developed to assess fracture risk of the femur in a pediatric patient with OI type I. Kinetic data from clinical gait analysis was used to prescribe loading conditions on the femoral head and condyles along with muscle forces on the bone's surface. von Mises stresses were analyzed against a fracture strength of 115 MPa. The patient with OI whose femur was modeled showed no risk of femoral fracture during normal gait. The highest stress levels occurred during the mid-stance and loading responses phases of gait. The location of high stress migrated throughout the femoral diaphysis across the gait cycle. Maximum femoral stress levels occurred during the gait cycle phases associated with the highest loading. The fracture risk (fracture strength/von Mises stress), however, was low. This study provides a relevant method for combining functional activity, material property and analytical methods to improve patient monitoring.

  3. Femur-mounted navigation system for the arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. H.; Hwang, D. S.; Yoon, Y. S.

    2013-07-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement stems from an abnormal shape of the acetabulum and proximal femur. It is treated by resection of damaged soft tissue and by the shaping of bone to resemble normal features. The arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement has many advantages, including minimal incisions, rapid recovery, and less pain. However, in some cases, revision is needed owing to the insufficient resection of damaged bone from a misreading of the surgical site. The limited view of arthroscopy is the major reason for the complications. In this research, a navigation method for the arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement is developed. The proposed navigation system consists of femur attachable measurement device and user interface. The bone mounted measurement devices measure points on head-neck junction for registration and position of surgical instrument. User interface shows the three-dimensional model of patient's femur and surgical instrument position that is tracked by measurement device. Surgeon can know the three-dimensional anatomical structure of hip joint and surgical instrument position on surgical site using navigation system. Surface registration was used to obtain relation between patient's coordinate at the surgical site and coordinate of three-dimensional model of femur. In this research, we evaluated the proposed navigation system using plastic model bone. It is expected that the surgical tool tracking position accuracy will be less than 1 mm.

  4. Incidence and analysis of open fractures of the midshaft and distal femur.

    PubMed

    Kovar, Florian M; Jaindl, Manuela; Schuster, Rupert; Endler, Georg; Platzer, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether different forms of stabilization for open femur fractures can be performed without influencing outcome, in particular infection and delayed unions/nonunions. Although the traditional management of these injuries is external fixation, a trend toward definitive stabilization techniques has evolved in the current literature. All open fractures of the femur shaft and the distal femur presenting to our urban Level I trauma center during a 10 year period were reviewed. A total of 40 patients (41 fractures) were initially treated at the above institution within 6 h of injury. All patients underwent emergent wound irrigation, debridement, and antibiothic theraphy. The method of fracture immobilization was left to the discretion of the attending trauma surgent. Study population consited of 12 (29 %) GI, 10 (25 %) GII, and 19 (46 %) GIII fractures. Initially, fracture management was performed with external fixation (EF) 19 (43.2 %), intramedullary nailing (IM) 18 (38.6 %), plating (PL) 3 (6.8 %), screw fixation (SF) 1 (2.3 %) and without treatment 4 (9.1 %). In all, 3 (6.8 %) fractures were complicated by infection, 7 (15.9 %) had implant failure, and 5 (11.4 %) developed delayed union. Using external fixation in acute fracture treatment for open femur fractures is a safe and effective surgical technique. Based on our results, external fixation might be superior to intramedullary nailing or plating when evaluating outcome parameters and complications.

  5. A Validated Open-Source Multisolver Fourth-Generation Composite Femur Model.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Alisdair R; Rose, Hannah; Gill, Harinderjit S

    2016-12-01

    Synthetic biomechanical test specimens are frequently used for preclinical evaluation of implant performance, often in combination with numerical modeling, such as finite-element (FE) analysis. Commercial and freely available FE packages are widely used with three FE packages in particular gaining popularity: abaqus (Dassault Systèmes, Johnston, RI), ansys (ANSYS, Inc., Canonsburg, PA), and febio (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT). To the best of our knowledge, no study has yet made a comparison of these three commonly used solvers. Additionally, despite the femur being the most extensively studied bone in the body, no freely available validated model exists. The primary aim of the study was primarily to conduct a comparison of mesh convergence and strain prediction between the three solvers (abaqus, ansys, and febio) and to provide validated open-source models of a fourth-generation composite femur for use with all the three FE packages. Second, we evaluated the geometric variability around the femoral neck region of the composite femurs. Experimental testing was conducted using fourth-generation Sawbones® composite femurs instrumented with strain gauges at four locations. A generic FE model and four specimen-specific FE models were created from CT scans. The study found that the three solvers produced excellent agreement, with strain predictions being within an average of 3.0% for all the solvers (r2 > 0.99) and 1.4% for the two commercial codes. The average of the root mean squared error against the experimental results was 134.5% (r2 = 0.29) for the generic model and 13.8% (r2 = 0.96) for the specimen-specific models. It was found that composite femurs had variations in cortical thickness around the neck of the femur of up to 48.4%. For the first time, an experimentally validated, finite-element model of the femur is presented for use in three solvers. This model is freely available online along with all the supporting validation data.

  6. Sex determination from the head of the femur of South African whites and blacks.

    PubMed

    Asala, S A

    2001-03-01

    The current practice whereby criminals dismember the remains of their victims in an attempt to make their identification difficult requires that simple methods of sex determination from fragmented skeletal remains are available to forensic anthropologists and skeletal biologists. The head of the femur is an example of such bone fragments. Identification and demarking points have been derived from the diameters of the head of the femur and used to determine the sex of individuals. It has been shown, however, that the numerical values of these parameters that permit sex identification vary between races. The objectives of the present study were therefore to establish the standard numerical values of the identification and demarking points for sex determination in South African whites and blacks and to see if these standards are different in the two races. A total of 520 femurs of white (160 males and 100 females) and black (160 males and 100 females) South Africans were obtained from the Raymond Dart Skeletal Collection in the Department of Anatomical Sciences of the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. The vertical and transverse diameters of the heads of the femurs were measured by means of a stainless steel vernier caliper. Identification and demarking points were derived from the values of these diameters. The head diameter identification point and demarking point were found to be sexually dimorphic in both white and black South Africans. The mean head diameter of the male femur was significantly greater than the mean head diameter of the female femur in both population groups (significant at P<0.001). These values were correspondingly greater in the white than the black population. The numerical values of the male identification and demarking points were higher than the corresponding female values in the two population. In both sexes, these values were greater in the whites than the blacks South Africans. It is concluded that the

  7. Treatment of open femur fractures in children: comparison between external fixator and intramedullary nailing.

    PubMed

    Ramseier, Leonhard Erich; Bhaskar, Atul R; Cole, William G; Howard, Andrew W

    2007-01-01

    Open femur fractures in children are uncommon and usually associated with other injuries. In adults, there is a current trend to treat open fractures with intramedullary (IM) devices. The goal of this study was to compare external fixator (EF) to IM devices in the treatment of open femur fractures in children. Diaphyseal femur fractures without growth plate involvement were included. Thirty-five patients (12 IM; 23 EF) were identified. Age, hospital stay, polytrauma, mechanism of injury, and Gustilo-Anderson grade were recorded. Follow-up was at least until the fracture was clinically and radiographically healed. Patients with EFs were 5.2 times more likely (95% confidence interval, 1.05-25.5) to have any complication. Excluding pin track infections, patients with EFs were 2.7 times as likely (95% confidence interval, 0.567-13.2) to have a complication. Refractures occurred only in the EF group (6/23, 26%) and not in the IM nailing group (P = 0.062, Fischer exact test). These were associated with varus malunions-all 3 of the EF group with more than 15 degrees of varus at fracture union suffered a refracture. Treatment of open femur fractures in children is a challenging problem. Treatment with IM devices had fewer complications than the EF. We think that whenever possible, the use of IM devices for the treatment of open femur fracture in children should be considered, especially grade 1 open injuries. If EFs are used, avoiding varus malunion may decrease the refracture rate, and secondary change to an IM device should be considered. Comparative cohort study. Grade 3 level of evidence.

  8. The effect of simulated metastatic lesions on the biomechanical behavior of the proximal femur.

    PubMed

    Benca, Emir; Reisinger, Andreas; Patsch, Janina M; Hirtler, Lena; Synek, Alexander; Stenicka, Sandra; Windhager, Reinhard; Mayr, Winfried; Pahr, Dieter H

    2017-02-27

    Pathologic fractures of femora in patients with metastatic cancer are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Prediction of impending fractures is based on unspecific clinical criteria or past clinician's experience, which leads to underestimation or overtreatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the site of metastatic lesions on biomechanical behavior of the proximal femur. Sixteen pairs of human femora were scanned with quantitative computed tomography (QCT) to asses bone mineral density. One femur of each pair remained intact while a defined lesion was reamed out in either the superolateral or inferomedial portion of the femoral neck of the contralateral femur. All femora were loaded in a mechanical test set-up mimicking one-legged stance and stiffness, failure load, and fracture location were determined. In the biomechanical experiments the superolateral lesion and the inferomedial lesion caused a stiffness reduction of 19% and 66%, respectively. The average failure load was 40% and 75% lower for specimens with the superolateral (4.53 ± 1.56 kN) and inferomedial (1.89 ± 1.73 kN) lesions, respectively, compared to intact specimens (7.66 ± 3.34 kN). Lesions in the femoral neck led to reduction in both stiffness and failure load of the proximal femur. Further, the site of the lesion had a large effect on the magnitude of the reduction in biomechanical properties. The presented data emphasize the importance of differentiating between locations of the lesion in pathologic fracture prediction of the metastatic femur and underline the insufficient accuracy of current predictive guidelines. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Femur specific polyaffine model to regularize the log-domain demons registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, Christof; Pennec, Xavier; Ritacco, Lucas; Reyes, Mauricio

    2011-03-01

    Osteoarticular allograft transplantation is a popular treatment method in wide surgical resections with large defects. For this reason hospitals are building bone data banks. Performing the optimal allograft selection on bone banks is crucial to the surgical outcome and patient recovery. However, current approaches are very time consuming hindering an efficient selection. We present an automatic method based on registration of femur bones to overcome this limitation. We introduce a new regularization term for the log-domain demons algorithm. This term replaces the standard Gaussian smoothing with a femur specific polyaffine model. The polyaffine femur model is constructed with two affine (femoral head and condyles) and one rigid (shaft) transformation. Our main contribution in this paper is to show that the demons algorithm can be improved in specific cases with an appropriate model. We are not trying to find the most optimal polyaffine model of the femur, but the simplest model with a minimal number of parameters. There is no need to optimize for different number of regions, boundaries and choice of weights, since this fine tuning will be done automatically by a final demons relaxation step with Gaussian smoothing. The newly developed synthesis approach provides a clear anatomically motivated modeling contribution through the specific three component transformation model, and clearly shows a performance improvement (in terms of anatomical meaningful correspondences) on 146 CT images of femurs compared to a standard multiresolution demons. In addition, this simple model improves the robustness of the demons while preserving its accuracy. The ground truth are manual measurements performed by medical experts.

  10. FE and experimental study on how the cortex material properties of synthetic femurs affect strain levels.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Vitor M M; Neto, Maria A; Amaro, Ana M; Roseiro, Luis M; Paulino, M F

    2017-08-01

    The primary aim of this work was to validate the "numerical" cortex material properties (transversely isotropic) of synthetic femurs and to evaluate how the strain level of the cancellous bone can be affected by the FE modeling of the material's behavior. Sensitivity analysis was performed to find out if the parameters of the cortex material affect global strain results more than the Polyurethane (PU) foam used to simulate cancellous bone. Standard 4th generation composite femurs were made with 0.32g/cm(3) solid PU foam to model healthy cancellous bone, while 0.2g/cm(3) cellular PU was used to model unhealthy cancellous bone. Longitudinal and transversal Young's moduli of cortical bone were defined according the manufacturer data, while shear modulus and Poisson's ratios were defined from the literature. All femurs were instrumented with rosette strain gauges and loaded according to ISO7206 standards, simulating a one-legged stance. The experimental results were then compared with those from finite element analysis. When cortical bone was modelled as transversely isotropic, an overall FE/experimental error of 11% was obtained. However, with isotropic material the error rose to 20%. Strain field distributions predicted inside the two bone models were similar, but the strain state of a healthy cancellous bone was much more a compression state than that of unhealthy bone, the compression state decreased about 90%. Strain magnitudes show that average strain-levels of cancellous bone can be significantly affected by the properties of the cortical bone material and, therefore, simulations of femur-implanted systems must account for the composite behavior of the cortex, since small shear strains would develop near isotropic cancellous bone-implant interfaces. Moreover, the authors suggest that changing the volume fraction of glass fibers used to manufacture the cortical bone would allow a more realistic osteoporotic synthetic femurs to be produced. Copyright © 2017 IPEM

  11. [Experience of using anterior windowing of the femur in revision total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Li, Hu; Lin, Jian-hao

    2012-05-01

    To discuss the clinical results of anterior windowing of the femur to remove the femoral component and cement in revision total hip arthroplasty. From September 1999 to May 2011, 31 revision cases received anterior windowing of the femur in operation. There were 12 male and 19 female, with the average age in operation was 61.8 years (from 40 to 83 years). The reason for revision included aseptic loosening in 12 cases, infection in 4 cases, breakage of femoral stem in 11 cases and acetabular liner wear in 4 hemi-arthroplasties. Nine cases were cemented and 22 were non-cemented for the primary stem. The position of the window located in the anterior femur with 6 cases of complete windowing from the proximal to the end of the stem. Another 25 cases received regional windowing just around the tip of the stem. In revisions, non-cemented rectangular revision stem were used for 27 cases and two-stage surgery were used for 4 infection cases. In all revisions, femoral stems and cement fragments were removed successfully and safely without any complications of fracture and perforation of new stems. All femur windows showed successfully union for average 14 weeks (12-18 weeks). There were some postoperative complications. One recurrent dislocation was treated using plaster external fixation for 8 weeks. One case with dislocation and fracture along with the window was revised by cerclage fixation. One periprosthetic fracture due to trauma was treated by cerclage fixation. The average Harris score of the hip improved to 83 points (75 to 90 points) at an average 5.5 years follow-up (0.5 to 12.0 years). Twenty six cases were completely followed up. Revision femoral stems were well-fixed without any subsidence or loosening. Anterior windowing of the femur is a proven technique which can be used to remove femoral stem and cement conveniently and safely without any fractures in revision total hip arthroplasty.

  12. What is new in distal femur periprosthetic fracture fixation?

    PubMed

    Tosounidis, Theodoros H; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2015-12-01

    Distal femoral periprosthetic fractures are on the rise. Increased mortality of these injuries is also evident from recent data. Their incidence and risk factors have been extensively reported in the past but new data are being available that merit attention. The increased incidence and the even higher projected incidence should direct the focus of future strategies to the education of surgeons, relevant capacity of hospital and reconfiguration of health care resources. New and potentially modifiable risk factors should be taken into consideration to the informed consent process and new studies should be developed to clarify the causative relationship of the new risk factors such as the peptic ulcer disease and the COPD. The main internal fixation techniques remain the lateral locking plating and the retrograde intramedullary nailing. New techniques in plating are the supplementary medial plate in selected cases and the far cortical locking. Nailing is considered a valid option especially in fractures located well above the anterior flange of the femoral component of the arthroplasty. Results and outcomes from good quality studies are still sparse regarding the comparison between plating and nailing. Interprosthetic fractures constitute an entity that is lately gaining considerable attention. The best method of management of these injuries is still evolving with considerable amount of work being done in the clinical and biomechanical level.

  13. Ipsilateral Fracture Shaft Femur with Neglected Dislocation of Prosthesis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jain, Mantu; Bihari, Amar Jyoti; Sriramka, Bhavna

    2013-01-01

    Neglected hip dislocation is rare in today's world and after prosthesis replacement even rarer finding. However such patients may not report to surgeons until they develop secondary complications. Management of such patient's is a challenge to the treating surgeon and need to be tailored suiting to patient's demands, expectations and constraints of financial resources. We did not find a similar case in the electronic and print media and therefore report this case which was innovatively managed. A 60 year farmer presented with fracture shaft femur and ipsilateral dislocation prosthesis of right hip. He had a hemiarthroplasty done for fracture neck of femur in the past but used to walk with a lurch since he started to ambulate after discharge. However he was satisfied despite "some problems" which had caused shortening of his limb. The patient was informed of the various treatment options and their possible complications. He expressed his inability to afford a Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) at any stage and consented for other options discussed with him. The patient was positioned supine and adductor tenotomy done. Next he was positioned laterally and the fracture was fixed with heavy duty broad dynamic compression plate and screws. The wound was temporarily closed. Now through the previous scar via posterior approach the hip was exposed. The prosthesis was found to be firmly fixed to the proximal femur. The acetabulum was cleared with fibrous tissue. All attempts the prosthesis to relocate the prosthesis failed after several attempts and it was best decided to leave alone. Post operatively period was uneventful. At follow up he refused for any further manoeuvre in future inform of heavy traction and attempts to reduce the same. At one year when he was walking unaided and his X-rays showed that fracture had well united his SF-36 score was PCS - 49.6 and MCS - 51.9. Ipsilateral shaft femur fracture in chronically dislocated prosthesis, done for fracture neck of femur is

  14. Surgically Relevant Bony and Soft Tissue Anatomy of the Proximal Femur

    PubMed Central

    Philippon, Marc J.; Michalski, Max P.; Campbell, Kevin J.; Goldsmith, Mary T.; Devitt, Brian M.; Wijdicks, Coen A.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hip endoscopy facilitates the treatment of extra-articular disorders of the proximal femur. Unfortunately, current knowledge of proximal femur anatomy is limited to qualitative descriptions and lacks surgically relevant landmarks. Purpose: To provide a quantitative and qualitative analysis of proximal femur anatomy in reference to surgically relevant bony landmarks. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Fourteen cadaveric hemipelvises were dissected. A coordinate measuring device measured dimensions and interrelationships of the gluteal muscles, hip external rotators, pectineus, iliopsoas, and joint capsule in reference to osseous landmarks. Results: The vastus tubercle, superomedial border of the greater trochanter, and femoral head-neck junction were distinct and reliable osseous landmarks. The anteroinferior tip of the vastus tubercle was 17.1 mm (95% CI: 14.5, 19.8 mm) anteroinferior to the center of the gluteus medius lateral insertional footprint and was 22.9 mm (95% CI: 20.1, 25.7 mm) inferolateral to the center of the gluteus minimus insertional footprint. The insertions of the piriformis, conjoint tendon of the hip (superior gemellus, obturator internus, and inferior gemellus), and obturator externus were identified relative to the superomedial border of the greater trochanter. The relationship of the aforementioned footprints were 49% (95% CI: 43%, 54%), 42% (95% CI: 33%, 50%), and 64% (95% CI: 59%, 69%) from the anterior (0%) to posterior (100%) margins of the superomedial border of the greater trochanter, respectively. The hip joint capsule attached distally on the proximal femur 18.2 mm (95% CI: 14.2, 22.2 mm) from the head-neck junction medially on average. Conclusion: The vastus tubercle, superomedial border of the greater trochanter, and the femoral head-neck junction were reliable osseous landmarks for the identification of the tendinous and hip capsular insertions on the proximal femur. Knowledge of the

  15. Replacement of bone marrow by bone in rat femurs: the bone bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Cuartas, Esteban; Mehta, Nozer; Gilligan, James; Ke, Hua-Zhu; Saltzman, W Mark; Kotas, Maya; Ma, Mandy; Rajan, Sonali; Chalouni, Cécile; Carlson, Jodi; Vignery, Agnès

    2008-02-01

    During development and repair of bone, two distinct yet complementary mechanisms, intramembranous and endochondral, mediate new bone formation via osteoblasts. Because mechanical bone marrow ablation leads to the rapid and transient formation of new bone in the marrow cavity, we postulated that parathyroid hormone (PTH), which is a bone anabolic hormone, enhances the formation of new bone that forms after marrow ablation. We subjected the left femur of rats to mechanical marrow ablation, or sham operation, and injected the animals daily with PTH or vehicle for 1, 2, or 3 weeks in a first experiment, then with PTH, parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), or vehicle for 3 weeks in a second experiment. We subjected both femurs from each rat to soft X-ray, peripheral quantitative computed tomography, computed tomography on a microscale, and histological analysis, and determined the concentration of serum osteocalcin. In addition, in the second experiment, we determined the serum concentration of calcium, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), and receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL) at 3 weeks, and subjected femurs to biomechanical testing. Following treatment with PTH or PTHrP for 3 weeks, bone filled the marrow cavity of the shafts whose marrow had been ablated. PTH increased trabecular density in the right femur, but failed to induce bone formation in the medullary region of the right unoperated femoral shafts. The newly formed bone endowed left femoral shafts with improved biomechanical properties when compared to those of right femurs and left femurs from control, sham-operated, and vehicle-treated rats. PTHrP, like PTH, increased serum osteocalcin, but neither increased serum calcium, TRAP, or RANKL at 3 weeks. Our results reveal that the newly formed bone that follows marrow ablation is responsive to PTH, expand the role of PTH in bone, and might open new avenues of investigations to the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering

  16. Osteosynthesis of fractures of the femur with flexible metallic intramedullary nails.

    PubMed

    Firica, A; Troianescu, O; Petre, M

    1978-04-01

    The authors discuss their use of Ender's method in the treatment of fractures of the femur. The diameter and length of the nails depends on the type of fracture. 1) Three nails of 4 mm diameter are introduced in parallel from the medial condyle in fractures of the femoral neck; 2) 5 mm nails are used, in similar fashion, for the fixation of intertrochanteric and subtrochanteric fractures; 3) 5 mm nails are used for diaphyseal, supracondylar and intercondylar fractures, introduced in crossed fashion ("Eiffel Tower" technique) from both medial and lateral condyles. This method of fixation has proved to be extremely stable. The operation itself is quick, with no blood loss or shock. The patient can resume partial weight bearing after a week in stabilised intertrochanteric and shaft fractures, after a month in less stable types, and after three to four months in fractures of the neck of the femur. This report is based on the first 250 cases treated by this method.

  17. Bilateral Neck of Femur Fractures in a Bilateral Below-Knee Amputee: A Unique Case

    PubMed Central

    Lancer, Hannah R.

    2016-01-01

    According to the National Hip Fracture Database, over 64,000 patients were admitted with a hip fracture across England, Wales, and Northern Ireland in 2013, but very few are bilateral, and there are no current cases in the literature of bilateral neck of femur fractures in a patient with bilateral below-knee amputations. We present a case of a 69-year-old bilateral below-knee amputee male admitted to the emergency department with bilateral hip pain and radiological evidence of bilateral displaced neck of femur fractures. The patient subsequently underwent synchronous bilateral total hip replacements under general anaesthetic and an epidural and then went on to make a full recovery. He was discharged 27 days after arrival in hospital. Outpatient follow-up at 3 months has shown that the patient has returned to a similar level of preinjury function and is still able to carry out his daily activities with walking aids and bilateral leg prostheses. PMID:26881162

  18. Radiographic anatomy of the proximal femur: correlation with the occurrence of fractures

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Robinson Esteves Santos; Prata, Eric Fontes; Gibram, Athos Vilela; Santos, Leandro Emilio Nascimento; Lourenço, Paulo Roberto Barbosa de Toledo; Belloti, João Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the correlation between radiographic parameters of the proximal femur anatomy and fractures. Methods Three hundred and five digital x-rays of the pelvis were analyzed in the anteroposterior view. Of these x-rays, twenty-seven showed femoral neck or transtrochanteric fractures. The anatomical parameters analyzed were: femoral neck width (FNW), femoral neck length (FNL), femoral axis length (FAL), cervicodiaphyseal angle (CDA), acetabular tear-drop distance (ATD) and great trochanter-pubic symphysis distance (GTPSD). The analysis was performed by comparing the results of the x-rays with and without proximal femoral fracture, to establish a correlation between them. Results No differences were found between the anatomical parameters of the groups with and without proximal femoral fracture. Conclusion There was no association between anatomical changes in the proximal femur and greater susceptibility to fractures. Level of evidence IV, Cross-sectional Study. PMID:24453585

  19. [Effect of prosthesis shaft coating on postoperative load bearing of the femur].

    PubMed

    Baroud, G; Willmann, G; Kreissig, R

    1998-01-01

    Stems and cups for total hip replacement (THR) must be coated with hydroxyapatite (HA), which enhances the osseo-integration of the implant. The aim of the present report was to investigate the basic influence of coating on the biomechanical situation, for example, the mechanical stress in the femur and at the femur-implant interface. Using the finite element method, three types of stems for THR were investigated: non-coated, completely HA-coated, and proximally HA-coated. All three stems were of the same design, and had identical material properties. In addition, all other conditions were identical. The results show that, in terms of the nature of the coating, the HA-coated stem is biomechanical superior to the non-coated stem, and the proximally coated stem is superior to the completely coated stem.

  20. Grade 3C open femur fractures with vascular repair in adults.

    PubMed

    Balci, Halil I; Saglam, Yavuz; Tunali, Onur; Akgul, Turgut; Aksoy, Murat; Dikici, Fatih

    2015-06-01

    Grade 3C open femur fractures are challenging injuries with higher rates of complications. This is a retrospective review of grade 3C open femur fractures with vascular repair between 2002 and 2012. Outcomes included initial MESS score, additional injuries, duration of operation, complications, secondary operations or amputations, and social life implications. Thirty-one of 39 total patients were selected for revascularization and fracture fixation based on soft tissue injury and MESS score. The intra-operative approach included temporary arterial shunt replacement, orthopedic fixation, arterial reconstruction venous and/or nerve repair and routine fasciotomies. An external fixation and reverse saphenous vein graft was used in a majority of the patients (respectively; 93.5%, 90.3%). The mean follow up was 5.4 years (range 2.2-10). The decision to amputate versus salvage should be left up to patients and their care teams after discussing options and future possibilities rather than using a scoring system.

  1. The femur of Orrorin tugenensis exhibits morphometric affinities with both Miocene apes and later hominins.

    PubMed

    Almécija, Sergio; Tallman, Melissa; Alba, David M; Pina, Marta; Moyà-Solà, Salvador; Jungers, William L

    2013-01-01

    Orrorin tugenensis (Kenya, ca. 6 Ma) is one of the earliest putative hominins. Its proximal femur, BAR 1002'00, was originally described as being very human-like, although later multivariate analyses showed an australopith pattern. However, some of its traits (for example, laterally protruding greater trochanter, medially oriented lesser trochanter and presence of third trochanter) are also present in earlier Miocene apes. Here, we use geometric morphometrics to reassess the morphological affinities of BAR 1002'00 within a large sample of anthropoids (including fossil apes and hominins) and reconstruct hominoid proximal femur evolution using squared-change parsimony. Our results indicate that both hominin and modern great ape femora evolved in different directions from a primitive morphology represented by some fossil apes. Orrorin appears intermediate between Miocene apes and australopiths in shape space. This evidence is consistent with femoral shape similarities in extant great apes being derived and homoplastic and has profound implications for understanding the origins of human bipedalism.

  2. Desmoplastic fibroma in the proximal femur: A case report with long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    GONG, YU-BAO; QU, LI-MEI; QI, XIN; LIU, JIAN-GUO

    2015-01-01

    Desmoplastic fibroma of the bone is an extremely rare primary benign tumor. The present study reports a case of desmoplastic fibroma of the bone with the longest published follow-up. A 21-year-old female presented to The First Hospital of Jilin University (Changchun, Jilin, China) with thigh pain. Radiography demonstrated a lytic expansile lesion in the proximal femur. Curettage was performed, followed by use of an allogeneic graft. One month later, the patient suffered a pathological fracture and was treated with an open reduction and internal fixation. There was no recurrence of the tumor over a 28-year follow-up period. In conclusion, desmoplastic fibroma in the proximal femur is rare and an intralesional resection is strongly recommended to prevent recurrence. The disease may be misdiagnosed as a bone cyst, so the diagnosis should be confirmed with a histological examination. PMID:26622872

  3. A B-spline based heterogeneous modeling and analysis of proximal femur with graded element.

    PubMed

    Pise, Uday V; Bhatt, Amba D; Srivastava, R K; Warkedkar, Ravi

    2009-08-25

    Bone is a complex biological tissue and natural heterogeneous object. The main objective of this study is to simulate quasi-static loading of bio-objects like human femur with B-spline based modeling and its 3D finite element analysis with graded element. B-spline surface representation method is extended to represent material composition to develop heterogeneous solid model of proximal femur. Lagrangian graded element is used to assign inhomogeneous isotropic elastic properties in finite element model to improve the performance. Convergence study is carried out with finite element model in single leg stance load condition. To test the feasibility of the model, sensitivity of simulation is investigated. To validate the model, numerical results are compared with those of an experimental work for the same specimen in simple stance load condition obtained from one of the reference paper. Good agreement is achieved for vertical displacement and strains in most of the locations.

  4. A comparative approach to computer aided design model of a dog femur.

    PubMed

    Turamanlar, O; Verim, O; Karabulut, A

    2016-01-01

    Computer assisted technologies offer new opportunities in medical imaging and rapid prototyping in biomechanical engineering. Three dimensional (3D) modelling of soft tissues and bones are becoming more important. The accuracy of the analysis in modelling processes depends on the outline of the tissues derived from medical images. The aim of this study is the evaluation of the accuracy of 3D models of a dog femur derived from computed tomography data by using point cloud method and boundary line method on several modelling software. Solidworks, Rapidform and 3DSMax software were used to create 3D models and outcomes were evaluated statistically. The most accurate 3D prototype of the dog femur was created with stereolithography method using rapid prototype device. Furthermore, the linearity of the volumes of models was investigated between software and the constructed models. The difference between the software and real models manifests the sensitivity of the software and the devices used in this manner.

  5. Atypical femur fractures: a review of the evidence and its implication to clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Girgis, Christian M.

    2011-01-01

    Whilst bisphosphonates are an established modality in the treatment of osteoporosis, there have been increasing concerns regarding the risk of an unusual form of femur fracture amongst patients receiving bisphosphonates for prolonged periods. These fractures, referred to as ‘atypical’, have been characterized by a number of clinical and radiographic features that distinguish them from ‘typical’ osteoporotic fractures. The evidence base is currently split between a large number of case series demonstrating an association between the occurrence of atypical fractures and bisphosphonate use and several population-based studies that do not confirm such an association. Hence, a degree of uncertainty surrounds this important issue. In this review, we examine the emerging evidence on atypical femur fractures, assess hypotheses on their biomechanical evolution and discuss the wider clinical implications of this phenomenon. PMID:22870488

  6. Spontaneous bilateral fracture neck of femur secondary to vitamin D deficiency: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Mihir; Nadkarni, Sambprasad

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report a case of a patient who presented with inability to walk for 2 days which was acute in onset, with no history or preceeding trauma. On examination it was found to have stable vitals. Both lower limbs were in the flexed, abducted & externally rotated attitude, with no sensory motor deficit. Radiological investigations revealing osteoporosis and bilateral fracture neck of femur and blood investigations indicated severe vitamin D deficiency. PMID:26811714

  7. Experimental validation of finite element model for proximal composite femur using optical measurements.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Lorenzo; Väänänen, Sami P; Amin Yavari, Saber; Weinans, Harrie; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Zadpoor, Amir A; Isaksson, Hanna

    2013-05-01

    Patient-specific finite element models have been used to predict femur strength and fracture risk in individuals. Validation of the adopted finite element modelling procedure against mechanical testing data is a crucial step when aiming for clinical applications. The majority of the works available in literature used data from strain gages to validate the model, thus having up to 15 experimental measurements. Optical techniques, such as digital image correlation, can help to improve the models by providing a continuous field of deformation data over a femoral surface. The main objective of this study was to validate finite element models of six composite femora against strain data from digital image correlation, obtained during fracture tests performed in quasi-axial loading configuration. The finite element models were obtained from CT scans, by means of a semi-automatic segmentation. The principal strains both during the elastic phase and close to the fracture were compared, and showed a correlation coefficient close to 0.9. In the linear region, the slope and intercept were close to zero and unity, while for the case when fracture load was simulated, the slope decreased somewhat. The accuracy of the obtained results is comparable with the state-of-the-art literature, with the significant improvement of having around 50,000 data points for each femur. This large number of measurements allows a more comprehensive validation of the predictions by the finite element models, since thousand of points are tracked along the femoral neck and trochanter region, i.e., the sites that are most critical for femur fracture. Moreover, strain measurement biases due to the strain gage reinforcement effect, were avoided. The combined experimental-numerical approach proved to be ready for application to in-vitro tests of human cadaver femurs, thus helping to develop a suitable mechanistic fracture risk criterion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Anatomic variation in the elastic anisotropy of cortical bone tissue in the human femur

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza Orías, Alejandro A.; Deuerling, Justin M.; Landrigan, Matthew D.; Renaud, John E.; Roeder, Ryan K.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental investigations for anatomic variation in the magnitude and anisotropy of elastic constants in human femoral cortical bone tissue have typically focused on a limited number of convenient sites near the mid-diaphysis. However, the proximal and distal ends of the diaphysis are more clinically relevant to common orthopaedic procedures and interesting mechanobiology. Therefore, the objective of this study was to measure anatomic variation in the elastic anisotropy and inhomogeneity of human cortical bone tissue along the entire length (15-85% of the total femur length) and around the periphery (anterior, medial, posterior and lateral quadrants) of the femoral diaphysis using ultrasonic wave propagation in the three orthogonal specimen axes. The elastic symmetry of tissue in the distal and extreme proximal portions of the diaphysis (15-45% and 75-85% of the total femur length, respectively) was, at most, orthotropic. In contrast, the elastic symmetry of tissue near the mid- and proximal mid-diaphysis (50-70% of the total femur length) was reasonably approximated as transversely isotropic. The magnitudes of elastic constants generally reached maxima near the mid- and proximal mid-diaphysis in the lateral and medial quadrants, and decreased toward the epiphyses, as well as the posterior and anterior quadrants. The elastic anisotropy ratio in the longitudinal and radial anatomic axes showed the opposite trends. These variations were significantly correlated with the apparent tissue density, as expected. In summary, the human femur exhibited statistically significant anatomic variation in elastic anisotropy, which may have important implications for whole bone numerical models and mechanobiology. PMID:19627830

  9. Mono- versus polyaxial locking plates in distal femur fractures: a prospective randomized multicentre clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hanschen, Marc; Aschenbrenner, Ina M; Fehske, Kai; Kirchhoff, Sonja; Keil, Leonhard; Holzapfel, Boris M; Winkler, Sebastian; Fuechtmeier, Bernd; Neugebauer, Rainer; Luehrs, Sven; Liener, Ulrich; Biberthaler, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Treatment of complex fractures of the distal femur utilizing monoaxial locking plates (e.g. Less Invasive Stabilisation System, LISS®, Synthes) is considered to be superior to conventional plating systems. Due to the limitation that the thread forces the screw into pre-determined positions, modifications have been made to allow screw positioning within a range of 30° (Non Contact Bridging, NCB®-DF, Zimmer). For the first time, this multicenter prospective randomized clinical trial (RCT) investigates the outcome of LISS® vs. NCB®-DF treatment following complex fractures of the distal femur. Since June 2008, 27 patients with a fracture of the distal femur (AO ASIF 33-A-C and periprosthetic fractures) were enrolled in this study by four university trauma centres in southern Germany. Clinical (e.g. range of motion, Oxford knee score, Tegner score) and radiological (e.g. axis deviation, secondary loss of realignment) follow-ups were conducted one and six weeks, as well as three, six, and 12 months after the operation. This study comprises data of 27 patients (8 male, 19 female; 15 NCB®-DF, 12 LISS®). Polyaxial osteosynthesis using the NCB® system tended to result in better functional knee scores and a higher range of motion. Interestingly, fracture union tended to be more rapid using the polyaxial plating system. We present the analysis of a multicenter prospective RCT to compare the monoaxial LISS® vs. the polyaxial NCB®-DF treatment following complex fractures of the distal femur. NCB®-DF treatment tended to result in better functional and radiological outcomes than LISS® treatment. Level I.

  10. Outcome of Titanium Elastic Intramedullary Nail in the Treatment of Shaft of Femur Fracture in Children.

    PubMed

    Khan, J A; Singh, G P; Pandey, A

    2015-01-01

    Background Femoral-shaft fractures are among the most common fractures of the lower extremity in children. There are several different options for treating femoral-shaft fractures in children. Elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) has become the standard treatment for fractures of shaft of femur in children for reasons including mini-invasive surgery, no need for casting, early mobilization and discharge as well as growing concerns toward cost-effectiveness. Objective To demonstrate the effectiveness of intramedullary fixation of fracture shaft of femur in skeletally immature children using the titanium elastic intramedullary nails. Method Forty children who underwent fixation with titanium intramedullary nails because of fracture of shaft of femur (Winquist and Hansen type 1 and 2) were reviewed. There were 60% male and 40% female patients and mean follow-up was six months. Time of union, deformity at fracture site, limb length discrepancy, knee range of motion and complications were assessed. Result Average age of the patients was 5.17 years (range 3 to 10). All patients achieved complete healing at a mean 12.8 weeks (range 10 to 20 weeks). Average limb length discrepancy was -0.16 cm (range -1.0 to 1.1 cm) average knee range of motion was 137.55 degrees (range 118 to 152 degrees). Complications were recorded in 13 (31.7%) patients and included: Five malunion which did not show any deformity or functional impairment and eight superficial wound infections which were healed after removal of nail. All patients were active as their pre injury levels at six months follow up. Conclusion Elastic stable intramedullary nailing is the method of choice for the simple pediatrics fracture shaft of femur, as it is minimally invasive and shows good functional and cosmetic results. It allows short hospital stay and quick recovery from pain and is cast-free.

  11. Loading mechanics of the femur in tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum) during terrestrial locomotion.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, K Megan; Blob, Richard W

    2011-08-01

    Salamanders are often used as representatives of the basal tetrapod body plan in functional studies, but little is known about the loads experienced by their limb bones during locomotion. Although salamanders' slow walking speeds might lead to low locomotor forces and limb bone stresses similar to those of non-avian reptiles, their highly sprawled posture combined with relatively small limb bones could produce elevated limb bone stresses closer to those of avian and mammalian species. This study evaluates the loads on the femur of the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) during terrestrial locomotion using three-dimensional measurements of the ground reaction force (GRF) and hindlimb kinematics, as well as anatomical measurements of the femur and hindlimb muscles. At peak stress (29.8 ± 2.0% stance), the net GRF magnitude averaged 0.42 body weights and was directed nearly vertically for the middle 20-40% of the contact interval, essentially perpendicular to the femur. Although torsional shear stresses were significant (4.1 ± 0.3 MPa), bending stresses experienced by the femur were low compared with other vertebrate lineages (tensile: 14.9 ± 0.8 MPa; compressive: -18.9 ± 1.0 MPa), and mechanical property tests indicated yield strengths that were fairly standard for tetrapods (157.1 ± 3.7 MPa). Femoral bending safety factors (10.5) were considerably higher than values typical for birds and mammals, and closer to the elevated values calculated for reptilian species. These results suggest that high limb bone safety factors may have an ancient evolutionary history, though the underlying cause of high safety factors (e.g. low limb bone loads, high bone strength or a combination of the two) may vary among lineages.

  12. Weakness in the mechanical properties of the femurs of growing female rats exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Brzóska, Małgorzata M; Majewska, Katarzyna; Moniuszko-Jakoniuk, Janina

    2005-09-01

    The study assessed the effect of cadmium (Cd) intoxication on the risk of deformities and fractures of the growing bones of female rats, in order to model human exposure to this metal. For this purpose, bone mineral density and mechanical properties of the proximal and distal ends and diaphysis of the femur were investigated in female Wistar rats exposed to 1, 5 and 50 mg Cd/l in drinking water for 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after the onset of weaning. Daily Cd doses received from drinking water during the treatment period were in the following ranges: 0.059-0.219, 0.236-1.005 and 2.247-9.649 mg/kg body weight at 1, 5 and 50 mg Cd/l, respectively. Biomechanical properties of the femoral proximal and distal ends were evaluated in a compression test, and those of the femoral diaphysis in a cutting test, with loading perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the bone in all tests. The mineralization and mechanical properties of the bone tissue at various locations on the femur were affected by exposure to Cd in a dose- and duration-dependent manner. Exposure to 1 mg Cd/l (corresponding to low human exposure) during skeletal development weakened the fracture strength of the femoral neck and the trabecular bone at the level of the distal end of the femur and affected the elastic properties of the cortical bone at the femoral diaphysis. At higher levels of Cd exposure, adverse effects were generally observed after a shorter exposure period than for 1 mg Cd/l, and were more advanced. The cadmium-induced weakening of the biomechanical properties of bone at particular sites on the femur correlated with the decreased bone mineralization. The results indicate that even a low exposure to Cd may affect the mineralization and biomechanical properties of growing bone, thus enhancing the risk of fracture.

  13. Weakness in the mechanical properties of the femur of growing female rats exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Brzóska, Małgorzata M; Majewska, Katarzyna; Moniuszko-Jakoniuk, Janina

    2005-05-01

    This study was aimed at assessing the effect of cadmium (Cd) intoxication on the risk of deformities and fractures of the growing bone on a female rat model of human exposure to this metal. For this purpose, bone mineral density (BMD) and mechanical properties of the proximal and distal ends and diaphysis of the femur were investigated in female Wistar rats exposed to 1, 5, and 50 mg Cd L(-1) in drinking water for 3, 6, 9, and 12 months since weaning. Daily Cd doses received from the drinking water during the treatment period were in the ranges 0.059-0.219, 0.236-1.005, and 2.247-9.649 mg kg(-1) body weight at 1, 5, and 50 mg Cd L(-1), respectively. Biomechanical properties of the femoral proximal and distal ends were evaluated in a compression test and those of the femoral diaphysis in a cutting test with loading perpendicular to the bone longitudinal axis in all tests. Cd dose- and exposure duration-dependently affected the mineralization and mechanical properties of the bone tissue at various locations of the femur. Exposure to 1 mg Cd L(-1) (corresponding to low human exposure) during skeletal development weakened the fracture strength of the femoral neck and of the trabecular bone at the level of the distal end of the femur and affected the elastic properties of the cortical bone at the femoral diaphysis. At the higher levels of Cd treatment, the adverse action generally occurred after shorter exposure than at 1 mg Cd L(-1) and was more seriously advanced. The Cd-induced weakening in the bone biomechanical properties at particular sites of the femur correlated with the decreased bone mineralization. The results indicate that even low exposure to Cd may affect the mineralization and biomechanical properties of growing bone, thus increasing the risk of fractures.

  14. The surgical management and treatment of metastatic lesions in the proximal femur

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Helin; Wang, Jin; Xu, Jianfa; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Yingze

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Review current treatments of metastatic lesions in the proximal femur. We reviewed published literature related to diagnosis and surgical treatments and summarized current treatment options. Surgical management mainly consist of internal fixation, hip replacement, and percutaneous femoroplasty (PFP) which has been newly applied in clinical practice. An appropriate series of treatments is necessary for patients to avoid the occurrence of paraplegia and prolong survival time. PMID:27428183

  15. Damage characterization on human femur bone by means of ultrasonics and acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strantza, M.; Polyzos, D.; Louis, O.; Boulpaep, F.; Van Hemelrijck, D.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2015-07-01

    Human bone tissue is characterized as a material with high brittleness. Due to this nature, visible signs of cracking are not easy to be detected before final failure. The main objective of this work is to investigate if the acoustic emission (AE) technique can offer valuable insight to the fracture process of human femur specimens as in other engineering materials characterization. This study describes the AE activity during fracture of whole femur bones under flexural load. Before fracture, broadband AE sensors were used in order to measure parameters like wave velocity dispersion and attenuation. Waveform parameters like the duration, rise time and average frequency, were also examined relatively to the propagation distance as a preparation for the AE monitoring during fracture. After the ultrasonic study, the samples were partly cast in concrete and fixed as cantilevers. A point load was applied on the femur head, which due to the test geometry resulted in a combination of two different patterns of fracture, bending and torsion. Two AE broadband sensors were placed in different points of the sample, one near the fixing end and the other near the femur head. Preliminary analysis shows that parameters like the number of acquired AE signals and their amplitude are well correlated with the load history. Furthermore, the parameters of rise time and frequency can differentiate the two fracture patterns. Additionally, AE allows the detection of the load at the onset of fracture from the micro-cracking events that occur at the early loading stages, allowing monitoring of the whole fracture process. Parameters that have been used extensively for monitoring and characterization of fracture modes of engineering materials seem to poses characterization power in the case of bone tissue monitoring as well.

  16. Technique for gentle accurate reproducible closed reduction of intracapsular fracture of neck of femur.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Ravindra H; Kumar, Sachin; Mishra, Bhanu

    2017-03-01

    Non-anatomic reduction with either inferior offset or varus angulation was the strongest predictor of re-displacement of the fracture and poor outcome after fixation of intracapsular fracture of neck of femur. There are many techniques for closed reduction and can be broadly divided into non-invasive and invasive techniques. We describe a minimally invasive technique, which we believe is easy, reproducible and successful in achieving good anatomical reduction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A new technique of endoprosthetic replacement for osteosarcoma of proximal femur with intra-articular extension

    PubMed Central

    Oragui, E.; Nannaparaju, M.; Sri-Ram, K.; Khan, W.; Hashemi-Nejad, A.; Skinner, J.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant tumour of bone and commonly involved sites are the distal femur, proximal tibia, and humerus. Osteosarcoma of proximal femur usually arises at the metaphysis and articular cartilage acts as a relative barrier to tumour spread, with extension into the hip joint being extremely rare. PRESENTATION OF CASE A previously fit and well sixteen-year-old male presented with a 2 month history of right hip pain and a limp. Plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an expansile lesion in the right femoral neck, extending 16 cm distally from the proximal femoral articular surface through the intertrochanteric region into the upper right femoral shaft. There was also clear evidence of intra-articular extension into the acetabulum. DISCUSSION Endoprosthetic replacement following resection is a good treatment option for proximal femoral tumours due to the low complication rate and achievement of good postoperative function. However, treatment of a proximal femoral lesion with intra-articular involvement by prosthetic reconstruction is challenging. We report a patient who presented with osteosarcoma of the proximal femur extending into the hip joint and describe the technique of en-bloc extra-articular resection of the acetabulum and proximal femur with reconstruction using a custom made prosthesis. CONCLUSION We conclude that extra-articular resection and endoprosthetic reconstruction using a coned hemi-pelvic implant with fluted stem and a modular femoral implant is a useful treatment option in the management of a proximal femoral lesion involving the hip-joint. It allows adequate tumour clearance and stable reconstruction for rapid post-operative recovery with early mobilisation. PMID:23147775

  18. Early result of hemiarthroplasty in elderly patients with fracture neck of femur

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Mue; Mohammed, Salihu; Francis, Awonusi; William, Yongu; Joseph, Kortor; Cornilius, Elachi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fractured neck of femur is a frequent and severe injury in elderly patients with consequent high morbidity and mortality. Hemiarthroplasty is an established treatment modality for displaced intracapsular femoral neck fractures in elderly patients above 60 years. This study analysed the early functional outcome and complications of Austin Moore endoprosthesis in elderly patients above 60 years with fractured neck of femur. Materials and Methods: Retrospective data were obtained over a 5 year period from January 2007 to December 2012. Thirty-five elderly patients of 60 years and above with displaced intracapsular fracture neck of femur treated with hemiarthroplasty using Austin Moore endoprosthesis were included. Data were analysed using SPSS version 21. Results: A total of 35 patients were involved. The age-range was 60-90 years with mean age of 69.7 ± 7 years. The predominant mechanism of injury was trivial falls in 18 (66.7%) patients. The commonest complication was pressure sore in 2 (5.7%) patients, followed by surgical site infection in 1 (2.9%) patient and periprosthetic fracture in 1 (2.9%) patients. Early post-operative mortality was 2.9%. Post-operative hip functional status according to Postel and Merle d Aubigne revealed that majority (66.6%) of patients had satisfactory hip function. Conclusion: Functional outcome of Austin Moore in elderly patients above 60 years with fracture neck of femur was satisfactory in most of the cases with minimal morbidity. Careful patient selection for hemiarthroplasty is vital and may decrease the incidence of complications and ameliorate the outcomes in the treatment of intracapsular femoral neck fractures. PMID:25657497

  19. Association of sarcopenia and physical activity with femur bone mineral density in elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Inhwan; Ha, Changduk; Kang, Hyunsik

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the association of femur bone mineral density (BMD) with body composition and physical activity in elderly women. [Methods] This was a cross sectional study involving 119 women with mean age of 73.1±5.5 years. Body composition parameters including body mass index (BMI), percent of body fat (%BF), appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM) index and femur BMD was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Physical activity was assessed by the uniaxial accelerometer for 7 consecutive days including weekends. Based on femur BMD T-scores, subjects were classified as optimal group, osteopenia group, and osteoporosis group. Based on ASM index, subjects were classified as normal group and sarcopenia group. According to WHO recommendations of physical activity for elderly, the subjects were classified as active group or inactive group. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine the odds ratio (OR) for osteopenia and osteoporosis. [Results] There were linear decreases for body composition parameters including weight (P=.023), BMI (P=.039), lean mass (P=.032), ASM index (P=.007) and physical activity parameters including daily of step (P<.001), low intensity physical activity (P<.001), moderate intensity physical activity (P=.001) across femur BMD levels. Compared to the normal group (OR=1), the sarcopenia group had a significantly higher OR (OR=4.823; P=.042), and the inactive group had a significantly higher OR (OR=5.478; P=.005) having osteopenia and osteoporosis when compared to the active group (OR=1). [Conclusion] The findings of this study suggested that physical activity along with a healthy nutrition should be promoted as a preventive strategy against osteopenia and osteoporosis in elderly women. PMID:27298809

  20. Plate fixation of periprosthetic femur fractures: What happens to the cement mantle?

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, Lukas; Schmidt, Benjamin; Bernstein, Anke; Hirschmüller, Anja; Schröter, Steffen; Südkamp, Norbert Paul; Helwig, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Osteosynthesis of periprosthetic femur fractures by screw fixation around the implanted prosthetic stem is currently regarded as the biomechanically superior option compared with cerclage. The aim of this biomechanical study was damage analysis of the cement mantle after revision screw insertion. A prosthetic stem (Bicontact) was implanted in 20 cadaveric femora in cemented technique. A locking compression plate (Synthes) was then applied to the lateral femur at the level of the prosthetic stem. The method of plate fixation to the femur was assigned randomly to three groups: bicortical non-locking screws, monocortical locking screws, and bicortical locking screws. This was followed by applying a fluctuating axial load (2100 N, 0.5 Hz) for 20,000 cycles. After testing, macroscopic and microscopic evaluations of the cement mantle were conducted. Cracks formed in the cement mantle in 14% of the 80 screw holes. The type of screw (bicortical or monocortical; locking or non-locking) had no significant effect on the number of cracks (p = 0.52). The relationship between manifestation of crack damage and cement mantle thickness was not significant (p = 0.36), whereas the relationship between crack formation and screw position was significant (p = 0.019). Those screws whose circumference was only partially within the cement mantle yielded a significantly lower number of cracks compared with screws positioned completely within the cement mantle or even touching the prosthetic stem. In order to reduce the incidence of crack formation in the cement mantle during plate osteosynthesis of periprosthetic femur fractures, the screws should not be either placed within the cement mantle or make direct contact with the stem.

  1. Influence of the upper femur and pelvic geometry on the risk and type of hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Partanen, J; Jämsä, T; Jalovaara, P

    2001-08-01

    The geometry of the upper femur has been reported to associate with the hip fracture risk in postmenopausal women. However, these associations seem to be partly conflicting, probably because of differences in measurement setup. Here, we compared the upper femur and pelvic geometries of 70 hip fracture patients (46 cervical and 24 trochanteric fractures) and 40 age-adjusted controls based on plain anteroposterior radiographs, eliminating the possible sources of inaccuracy as far as possible by using a standardized patient position and calibrated dimension measurements by digital image analysis. The femoral neck/shaft angle (NSA) was larger in the fracture patients compared with the controls (p < 0.001). The fracture group had thinner cortices in the upper femur than the controls (p < 0.001). The femoral shaft diameter (FSD; p < 0.001), trochanter width (TW; p < 0.01), and the pelvic dimensions, that is, the smallest outer pelvic diameter (SOPD; p < 0.01) and the largest inner pelvic diameter (LIPD; p < 0.05) were smaller in the fracture group. Comparing the fracture types, we found NSA larger in the cervical hip fracture patients than in the patients with a trochanteric fracture (p < 0.01). The femoral neck/shaft cortex ratio was lower and the FSD was smaller in the cervical hip fracture group (p < 0.05). Acetabular width (AW) was greater and the SOPD was wider in the cervical fracture patients (p < 0.01). We concluded that the upper femur and pelvic dimensions as defined from calibrated and position-standardized plain radiographs are useful in the evaluation of hip fracture risk and fracture type.

  2. Osteoporosis or Low Bone Mass at the Femur Neck or Lumbar Spine in Older Adults: United States, 2005-2008

    MedlinePlus

    ... the femur neck or lumbar spine differ by sex? The prevalence of osteoporosis or low bone mass ... after adjusting for age differences between the two sexes ( Figure 4 ). The age-adjusted prevalence of osteoporosis ...

  3. Integrated remodeling-to-fracture finite element model of human proximal femur behavior.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha; Lespessailles, Eric; Benhamou, Claude-Laurent

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop an integrated remodeling-to-fracture finite element model allowing for the combined simulation of (i) simulation of a human proximal femur remodeling under a given boundary conditions, (ii) followed by the simulation of its fracture behavior (force-displacement curve and fracture pattern) under quasi-static load. The combination of remodeling and fracture simulation into one unified model consists in considering that the femur properties resulting from the remodeling simulation correspond to the initial state for the fracture prediction. The remodeling model is based on phenomenological one based on a coupled strain and fatigue damage stimulus. The fracture model is based on continuum damage mechanics in order to predict the progressive fracturing process which allows to predict the fracture pattern and the complete force-displacement curve under quasi-static load. To prevent mesh-dependence that generally affects the damage propagation rate, regularization technique was applied in the current work. To investigate the potential of the proposed unified remodeling-to-fracture model, we performed remodeling simulations on a 3D proximal femur model for a duration of 365 days under five different daily loading conditions followed by a side fall fracture simulation reproducing previously published experimental tests (de Bakker et al. (2009), case C, male, 72 years old). We show here that the implementation of an integrated remodeling-to-fracture model provides more realistic prediction strategy to assess the bone remodeling effects on the fracture risk of bone.

  4. Comparing discriminant analysis and neural network for the determination of sex using femur head measurements.

    PubMed

    Alunni, Véronique; Jardin, Philippe du; Nogueira, Luisa; Buchet, Luc; Quatrehomme, Gérald

    2015-08-01

    The measurement of the femoral head is usually considered an interesting variable for the sex determination of skeletal remains. To date, there are few published reference measurements of the femoral head in a modern European population for the purpose of sex determination. In this study, 116 femurs from 58 individuals of the South of France (Nice Bone Collection, Nice, France) were studied. Three measurements of the femoral head were taken: the vertical head diameter (VHD), the transversal head diameter (THD) and the head circumference (HC). The results show that: (i) there is no statistical difference between the right and left femurs for each of the three measurements (VHD, THD and HC). Therefore we arbitrarily chose to use the measures from the right femurs (N=58) to pursue our experiments; (ii) the measurements of the femoral head are similar to those of contemporary American populations; (iii) the dimensions of the femoral head place the measurements of the French population somewhere between Germany or Croatia, and Spain; (iv) there is no significant secular trend (in contrast with the femoral neck diameter); (v) the femoral head measurement as a single variable is useful for sex determination: a 96.5% rate of accuracy was obtained using THD and HC measurements with the artificial neural network; and a 94.8% rate of accuracy using VHD, both with the discriminant analysis and the neural network.

  5. Anthropometric measurements of the human distal femur: a study of the adult Malay population.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Fitdriyah; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Sa'at, Azlin; Aziz, Azian Abd; Hossain, Golam; Kamarul, T; Syahrom, Ardiyansyah

    2013-01-01

    The distal femurs of 100 subjects (50 men, 50 women) from the Malay population aged between 19 and 38 years were scanned to measure the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) width. The mean AP values were 64.02 ± 3.38 mm and 57.33 ± 3.26 mm for men and women, respectively, and the mean ML values were 74.91 ± 3.52 mm and 64.53 ± 3.07 mm. We compared our data to that published previously for the Chinese and Indian populations. It was found that the Malay population had smaller distal femur than that of the Chinese but was larger than that of the Indian population (P < 0.05). In conclusion, although it is well established that Asians have a smaller distal femur size than that of the Western population, the variations in different Asian ethnicities may need to be considered when designing the appropriate knee implant.

  6. Treatment of femoral subtrochanteric fractures with proximal lateral femur locking plates

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sun-jun; Zhang, Shi-min; Yu, Guang-rong

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the outcome of subtrochanteric hip fractures treated with proximal lateral femur locking plate. METHOD: We retrospectively reviewed the clinical results of 48 cases of femoral subtrochanteric fractures treated with proximal lateral femur locking plates from January 2008 to May 2010. The progress of fracture healing, as well as the occurrence of complications, was recorded. The function of the hip joint was evaluated by the Harris social index and the Parker and Palmer mobility score one year after the operation. RESULT: 45 patients were followed up until fracture union or a revision surgery. Among the 45 patients, 43 patients obtained fracture union without further intervention. Thirty-eight fractures healed with no loss of position at 1-year follow-up. There were no cases of hip screw cutting through the femoral head. The mean score of the Harris social index was 86.5±9.8 (73~95). The mean Parker and Palmer mobility score was 7.4±2.1 (3~9). CONCLUSION: The proximal lateral femur locking plate is the kind of stable and effective internal fixation for treating subtrochanteric hip fractures which has the advantage of stable fixation especially for the lateral femoral wall fracture. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453626

  7. Shape Ontogeny of the Distal Femur in the Hominidae with Implications for the Evolution of Bipedality.

    PubMed

    Tallman, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Heterochrony has been invoked to explain differences in the morphology of modern humans as compared to other great apes. The distal femur is one area where heterochrony has been hypothesized to explain morphological differentiation among Plio-Pleistocene hominins. This hypothesis is evaluated here using geometric morphometric data to describe the ontogenetic shape trajectories of extant hominine distal femora and place Plio-Pleistocene hominins within that context. Results of multivariate statistical analyses showed that in both Homo and Gorilla, the shape of the distal femur changes significantly over the course of development, whereas that of Pan changes very little. Development of the distal femur of Homo is characterized by an elongation of the condyles, and a greater degree of enlargement of the medial condyle relative to the lateral condyle, whereas Gorilla are characterized by a greater degree of enlargement of the lateral condyle, relative to the medial. Early Homo and Australopithecus africanus fossils fell on the modern human ontogenetic shape trajectory and were most similar to either adult or adolescent modern humans while specimens of Australopithecus afarensis were more similar to Gorilla/Pan. These results indicate that shape differences among the distal femora of Plio-Pleistocene hominins and humans cannot be accounted for by heterochrony alone; heterochrony could explain a transition from the distal femoral shape of early Homo/A. africanus to modern Homo, but not a transition from A. afarensis to Homo. That change could be the result of genetic or epigenetic factors.

  8. Shape Ontogeny of the Distal Femur in the Hominidae with Implications for the Evolution of Bipedality

    PubMed Central

    Tallman, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Heterochrony has been invoked to explain differences in the morphology of modern humans as compared to other great apes. The distal femur is one area where heterochrony has been hypothesized to explain morphological differentiation among Plio-Pleistocene hominins. This hypothesis is evaluated here using geometric morphometric data to describe the ontogenetic shape trajectories of extant hominine distal femora and place Plio-Pleistocene hominins within that context. Results of multivariate statistical analyses showed that in both Homo and Gorilla, the shape of the distal femur changes significantly over the course of development, whereas that of Pan changes very little. Development of the distal femur of Homo is characterized by an elongation of the condyles, and a greater degree of enlargement of the medial condyle relative to the lateral condyle, whereas Gorilla are characterized by a greater degree of enlargement of the lateral condyle, relative to the medial. Early Homo and Australopithecus africanus fossils fell on the modern human ontogenetic shape trajectory and were most similar to either adult or adolescent modern humans while specimens of Australopithecus afarensis were more similar to Gorilla/Pan. These results indicate that shape differences among the distal femora of Plio-Pleistocene hominins and humans cannot be accounted for by heterochrony alone; heterochrony could explain a transition from the distal femoral shape of early Homo/A. africanus to modern Homo, but not a transition from A. afarensis to Homo. That change could be the result of genetic or epigenetic factors. PMID:26886416

  9. Finite element analysis of a femur to deconstruct the paradox of bone curvature.

    PubMed

    Jade, Sameer; Tamvada, Kelli H; Strait, David S; Grosse, Ian R

    2014-01-21

    Most long limb bones in terrestrial mammals exhibit a longitudinal curvature and have been found to be loaded in bending. Bone curvature poses a paradox in terms of the mechanical function of limb bones, for many believe the curvature in these bones increases bending stress, potentially reducing the bone's load carrying capacity (i.e., its mechanical strength). The aim of this study is to investigate the role of longitudinal bone curvature in the design of limb bones. In particular, it has been hypothesized that bone curvature results in a trade-off between the bone's mechanical strength and its bending predictability. We employed finite element analysis (FEA) of abstract and realistic human femora to address this issue. Geometrically simplified human femur models with different curvatures were developed and analyzed with a commercial FEA tool to examine how curvature affects the bone's bending predictability and load carrying capacity. Results were post-processed to yield probability density functions (PDFs) describing the circumferential location of maximum equivalent stress for various curvatures in order to assess bending predictability. To validate our findings, a finite element model was built from a CT scan of a real human femur and compared to the simplified femur model. We found general agreement in trends but some quantitative differences most likely due to the geometric differences between the digitally reconstructed and the simplified finite element models. As hypothesized by others, our results support the hypothesis that bone curvature can increase bending predictability, but at the expense of bone strength.

  10. Effect of lengthening along the anatomical axis of the femur and its clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Emara, Khaled M; Mahmoud, Ahmed Nageeb; Emara, Ahmed K; Emara, Mariam K

    2017-05-18

    To review and study the effect of lengthening along the anatomical axis of long bones and its relation to the mechanical axis deviation. We try in this review to calculate and discuss the exact clinical impact of lengthening along the anatomical axis of the femur on affecting the limb alignment. Also we used a trigonometric formula to predict the change of the femoral distal anatomical mechanical angle (AMA) after lengthening along the anatomical axis. Lengthening along the anatomical axis of the femur by 10% of its original length results in reduction in the distal femoral AMA by 0.57 degrees. There is no objective experimental scientific data to prove that the Mechanical axis is passing via the center of the hip to the center of the knee. There is wide variation in normal anatomical axis for different populations. In deformity correction, surgeons try to reproduce the normal usual bone shape to regain normal function, which is mainly anatomical axis. Lengthening of the femur along its anatomical axis results in mild reduction of the distal femoral AMA. This may partially compensate for the expected mechanical axis lateralisation and hence justify its minimal clinical impact.

  11. Investigation of hyperelastic models for nonlinear elastic behavior of demineralized and deproteinized bovine cortical femur bone.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, M; Ghoreishi, M; Narooei, K

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the hyperelastic models of demineralized and deproteinized bovine cortical femur bone were investigated and appropriate models were developed. Using uniaxial compression test data, the strain energy versus stretch was calculated and the appropriate hyperelastic strain energy functions were fitted on data in order to calculate the material parameters. To obtain the mechanical behavior in other loading conditions, the hyperelastic strain energy equations were investigated for pure shear and equi-biaxial tension loadings. The results showed the Mooney-Rivlin and Ogden models cannot predict the mechanical response of demineralized and deproteinized bovine cortical femur bone accurately, while the general exponential-exponential and general exponential-power law models have a good agreement with the experimental results. To investigate the sensitivity of the hyperelastic models, a variation of 10% in material parameters was performed and the results indicated an acceptable stability for the general exponential-exponential and general exponential-power law models. Finally, the uniaxial tension and compression of cortical femur bone were studied using the finite element method in VUMAT user subroutine of ABAQUS software and the computed stress-stretch curves were shown a good agreement with the experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ligament of the head of femur: A comprehensive review of its anatomy, embryology, and potential function.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Vivek; Woodley, Stephanie J; Nicholson, Helen D

    2016-03-01

    The functional significance of the ligament of the head of femur (LHF), or ligamentum teres has often been debated. Having gained recent attention in clinical practice, it is suggested to partly provide some mechanical stability to the hip joint. However, the anatomy of this ligament is not well studied. This paper systematically reviews the anatomy of the LHF with the aim of exploring our current understanding of this structure and identifying any gaps in knowledge regarding its morphology and function. A systematic search of Medline, Embase, ProQuest, Web of Science, and Scopus databases was undertaken and relevant data extracted, analyzed. A total of 69 references were obtained, that included 53 full text articles, three published abstracts, and 13 textbooks. Many publications related to clinical studies (n = 11) rather than gross anatomy (n = 7), with one report on variation of the LHF. Considerable inconsistency in the naming and description of the LHF morphology was observed. Variable attachment sites were reported except for the acetabular notch, transverse acetabular ligament, and the femoral fovea. Presence and patency of the ligamental arteries supplying the head of the femur and their exact location were variably described and were often incomplete. The LHF is believed to be taught in extreme hip adduction, but there is little evidence to support this. In conclusions, further investigation of the anatomy of the LHF is recommended, particularly to clarify its mechanical role, innervation, and vascular contribution to the developing and adult femur, so to better inform clinical practice.

  13. Towards automatic measurement of anteversion and neck-shaft angles in human femurs using CT images.

    PubMed

    Casciaro, Mariano E; Craiem, Damian

    2014-01-01

    Automatic assessment of human femur morphology may provide useful clinical information with regard to hip and knee surgery, prosthesis design and management of hip instability. To this end, neck-shaft and anteversion angles are usually used. We propose a full automatic method to estimate these angles in human femurs. Multislice CT images from 18 dried bones were analysed. The algorithm fits 3D cylinders to different regions of the bone to estimate the angles. A manual segmentation and a conventional angle assessment were used for validation. We found anteversion angle as 20 ± 7° and neck-shaft angle as 130 ± 9°. Mean distances from femur surface to cylinders were 5.5 ± 0.6, 3.5 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 0.4 mm for condyles, diaphysis and neck regions, respectively. Automatic and conventional angles were positively correlated (r(2)>0.85). Manual and automatic segmentations did not differ. The method was fast and 100% reproducible. A robust in vivo segmentation algorithm should be integrated to advance towards a clinically compliant methodology.

  14. [Effect of a Chinese herbal prescription on collagen I in rat's femur under simulated weightlessness].

    PubMed

    Hu, Su-min; Zhou, Peng; Fu, Qian; Yang, Jia-jia; Gao, Xue-min

    2010-02-01

    To investigate the effect of a Chinese herbal prescription on collagen I in rat's femur under simulated weightlessness. Thirty Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: blank control group (10 rats), tail suspension group (TS, 10 rats), TS with Chinese medicine group (10 rats). Rats in TS with Chinese medicine group took a Chinese herbal prescription (contains Radix Rehmanniae Praeparata, Radix Achyranthis Bidentatae, Radix Astragali, Radix Angelicae Sinensis, Concha Ostreae prepared by acetic acid)by oral administration. After 1 week adaption and 3 weeks tail suspending, rat's left femur was colleced, and collagen I in femur neck was detected by immunohistochemical method. Counts and integral optical density (IOD) of collagen I coloration decreased significantly in TS group (P < 0.001), but no significant change in TS with Chinese medicine group (P > 0.05), as compared with control group. Generation of collagen I become weaken under simulated weightlessness, while the Chinese herbal prescription is effective to prevent the change, thus biochemistry environment of bone calcium deposition may be improved by this Chinese herbal prescription under simulated weightlessness.

  15. Computer assisted 3D pre-operative planning tool for femur fracture orthopedic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, Pavan; Xie, Sheng Quan; Delmas, Patrice; Xu, Wei Liang

    2010-02-01

    Femur shaft fractures are caused by high impact injuries and can affect gait functionality if not treated correctly. Until recently, the pre-operative planning for femur fractures has relied on two-dimensional (2D) radiographs, light boxes, tracing paper, and transparent bone templates. The recent availability of digital radiographic equipment has to some extent improved the workflow for preoperative planning. Nevertheless, imaging is still in 2D X-rays and planning/simulation tools to support fragment manipulation and implant selection are still not available. Direct three-dimensional (3D) imaging modalities such as Computed Tomography (CT) are also still restricted to a minority of complex orthopedic procedures. This paper proposes a software tool which allows orthopedic surgeons to visualize, diagnose, plan and simulate femur shaft fracture reduction procedures in 3D. The tool utilizes frontal and lateral 2D radiographs to model the fracture surface, separate a generic bone into the two fractured fragments, identify the pose of each fragment, and automatically customize the shape of the bone. The use of 3D imaging allows full spatial inspection of the fracture providing different views through the manipulation of the interactively reconstructed 3D model, and ultimately better pre-operative planning.

  16. Predicting the biomechanical strength of proximal femur specimens with Minkowski functionals and support vector regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chien-Chun; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Huber, Markus B.; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Bauer, Jan S.; Baum, Thomas; Eckstein, Felix; Lochmüller, Eva-Maria; Link, Thomas M.; Wismüller, Axel

    2014-03-01

    Regional trabecular bone quality estimation for purposes of femoral bone strength prediction is important for improving the clinical assessment of osteoporotic fracture risk. In this study, we explore the ability of 3D Minkowski Functionals derived from multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) images of proximal femur specimens in predicting their corresponding biomechanical strength. MDCT scans were acquired for 50 proximal femur specimens harvested from human cadavers. An automated volume of interest (VOI)-fitting algorithm was used to define a consistent volume in the femoral head of each specimen. In these VOIs, the trabecular bone micro-architecture was characterized by statistical moments of its BMD distribution and by topological features derived from Minkowski Functionals. A linear multiregression analysis and a support vector regression (SVR) algorithm with a linear kernel were used to predict the failure load (FL) from the feature sets; the predicted FL was compared to the true FL determined through biomechanical testing. The prediction performance was measured by the root mean square error (RMSE) for each feature set. The best prediction result was obtained from the Minkowski Functional surface used in combination with SVR, which had the lowest prediction error (RMSE = 0.939 ± 0.345) and which was significantly lower than mean BMD (RMSE = 1.075 ± 0.279, p<0.005). Our results indicate that the biomechanical strength prediction can be significantly improved in proximal femur specimens with Minkowski Functionals extracted from on MDCT images used in conjunction with support vector regression.

  17. Increased intrinsic stiffness and mineralization in femurs of adult rats after high intensity treadmill running training.

    PubMed

    Bozzini, Clarisa; Viscor, Ginés; Kristjánsson, Juan C Ríos; Picasso, Emilio; Champin, Graciela; Alippi, Rosa M; Bozzini, Carlos E

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity plays a tremendous role in determining bone mechanical behavior, which is superimposed to gravidity. Compare the geometric and material responses of the rat femur to a high intensity treadmill running training of a relatively short duration, as assessed by 3-point mechanical test. Mature male rats (180.0 ± 30 g) were assigned (7 rats/group) to no exercise (NE) or treadmill exercise (EX). After a preconditioning period, the running speed was set at 45 cm.seg-1 during 2 wks, frequency 5 d/wk, 2-hour sessions/day. Body weight and weight of the crural quadriceps were registered at euthanasia. The right femur was mechanically tested through 3-point bending. The left femur was ashed to estimate bone mineral content. Geometric and material bone properties were estimated directly or calculated by appropriate equations. 1) Final body weight was 14% reduced in EX rats, while the crural quadriceps was 47% increased. Yield and fracture loads, and structural stiffness were significantly higher in the EX rats, as were the apparent elastic modulus, the bone mineral content and the degree of mineralization. Geometric properties were not affected. High intensity treadmill running training increases bone strength and stiffness by increasing material stiffness and mineralization, without affecting geometric bone parameters.

  18. [Zinc deficiency on pathological changes of femur epiphyseal growth plate in rats].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuehong; Cheng, Yiyong; Hong, Yan; Li, Shutian

    2003-01-01

    To study zinc deficiency on pathological changes of femur epiphyseal growth plate in rats thirty Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: zinc-deficient group (Zd), control group (Ctr), and pair-fed group (Zp) to study the effects of zinc deficiency on femur epiphyseal growth plate of rats and the mechanism involved. After 8 weeks feeding, the histomorphology of right femur indicated that chondrocytes in the epiphyseal growth plate of Zd group were generally ill-organized and mis-shaped. The number of chondrocytes decreased. Trabecular bone in the epiphyseal of Zd group were also ill-organized, scarce and slim. The cavities of marrow in Zd animals were significantly larger than those of Ctr and Zp. The volume of trabecular bone, the mean trabecular plate density of Zd rats were significantly decreased, but their mean trabecular plate space was significantly increased. In addition, the Zd animals had significantly lower concentration of osteocalcin and growth hormone in sera. The above results suggested that zinc deficiency impaired proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes and balance between osteoblast and osteoclast function by reduce growth hormone levels in sera. The lack of zinc in diet resulted in disorder of bone molding and ultrastructure.

  19. Implant Augmentation: Adding Bone Cement to Improve the Treatment of Osteoporotic Distal Femur Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Wähnert, Dirk; Hofmann-Fliri, Ladina; Richards, R. Geoff; Gueorguiev, Boyko; Raschke, Michael J.; Windolf, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The increasing problems in the field of osteoporotic fracture fixation results in specialized implants as well as new operation methods, for example, implant augmentation with bone cement. The aim of this study was to determine the biomechanical impact of augmentation in the treatment of osteoporotic distal femur fractures. Seven pairs of osteoporotic fresh frozen distal femora were randomly assigned to either an augmented or nonaugmented group. In both groups, an Orthopaedic Trauma Association 33 A3 fractures was fixed using the locking compression plate distal femur and cannulated and perforated screws. In the augmented group, additionally, 1 mL of polymethylmethacrylate cement was injected through the screw. Prior to mechanical testing, bone mineral density (BMD) and local bone strength were determined. Mechanical testing was performed by cyclic axial loading (100 N to 750 N + 0.05N/cycle) using a servo-hydraulic testing machine. As a result, the BMD as well as the axial stiffness did not significantly differ between the groups. The number of cycles to failure was significantly higher in the augmented group with the BMD as a significant covariate. In conclusion, cement augmentation can significantly improve implant anchorage in plating of osteoporotic distal femur fractures. PMID:25415673

  20. Femur length, body mass, and stature estimates of Orrorin tugenensis, a 6 Ma hominid from Kenya.

    PubMed

    Nakatsukasa, Masato; Pickford, Martin; Egi, Naoko; Senut, Brigitte

    2007-07-01

    To understand the palaeobiology of extinct hominids it is useful to estimate their body mass and stature. Although many species of early hominid are poorly preserved, it is occasionally possible to calculate these characteristics by comparison with different extant groups, by use of regression analysis. Calculated body masses and stature determined using these models can then be compared. This approach has been applied to 6 Ma hominid femoral remains from the Tugen Hills, Kenya, attributed to Orrorin tugenensis. It is suggested that the best-preserved young adult individual probably weighed approximately 35-50 kg. Another fragmentary femur results in larger estimates of body mass, indicative of individual variation. The length of the femur of the young adult individual was estimated, by using anthropoid-based regression, to be a minimum of 298 mm. Because whole-femur proportions for Orrorin are unknown, this prediction is conservative and should be revised when additional specimens become available. When this predicted value was used for regression analysis of bonobos and humans it was estimated to be 1.1-1.2 m tall. This value should, however, be viewed as a lower limit.

  1. Three-dimensional measurement of femur based on structured light scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Ouyang, Jianfei; Qu, Xinghua

    2009-12-01

    Osteometry is fundamental to study the human skeleton. It has been widely used in palaeoanthropology, bionics, and criminal investigation for more than 200 years. The traditional osteometry is a simple 1-dimensional measurement that can only get 1D size of the bones in manual step-by-step way, even though there are more than 400 parameters to be measured. For today's research and application it is significant and necessary to develop an advanced 3-dimensional osteometry technique. In this paper a new 3D osteometry is presented, which focuses on measurement of the femur, the largest tubular bone in human body. 3D measurement based on the structured light scanning is developed to create fast and precise measurement of the entire body of the femur. The cloud data and geometry model of the sample femur is established in mathematic, accurate and fast way. More than 30 parameters are measured and compared with each other. The experiment shows that the proposed method can meet traditional osteometry and obtain all 1D geometric parameters of the bone at the same time by the mathematics model, such as trochanter-lateral condyle length, superior breadth of shaft, and collo-diaphyseal angle, etc. In the best way, many important geometric parameters that are very difficult to measure by existing osteometry, such as volume, surface area, and curvature of the bone, can be obtained very easily. The overall measuring error is less than 0.1mm.

  2. Three-dimensional measurement of femur based on structured light scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Ouyang, Jianfei; Qu, Xinghua

    2010-03-01

    Osteometry is fundamental to study the human skeleton. It has been widely used in palaeoanthropology, bionics, and criminal investigation for more than 200 years. The traditional osteometry is a simple 1-dimensional measurement that can only get 1D size of the bones in manual step-by-step way, even though there are more than 400 parameters to be measured. For today's research and application it is significant and necessary to develop an advanced 3-dimensional osteometry technique. In this paper a new 3D osteometry is presented, which focuses on measurement of the femur, the largest tubular bone in human body. 3D measurement based on the structured light scanning is developed to create fast and precise measurement of the entire body of the femur. The cloud data and geometry model of the sample femur is established in mathematic, accurate and fast way. More than 30 parameters are measured and compared with each other. The experiment shows that the proposed method can meet traditional osteometry and obtain all 1D geometric parameters of the bone at the same time by the mathematics model, such as trochanter-lateral condyle length, superior breadth of shaft, and collo-diaphyseal angle, etc. In the best way, many important geometric parameters that are very difficult to measure by existing osteometry, such as volume, surface area, and curvature of the bone, can be obtained very easily. The overall measuring error is less than 0.1mm.

  3. Periosteal chondroma of the femur: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kai; Yu, Xiuchun; Xu, Songfeng; Xu, Ming

    2015-04-01

    Periosteal chondroma is a rare benign cartilage tumor located on the cortical bone, which may be mistaken clinically and histologically for other and more common tumors in this location. The current study reports the case of periosteal chondroma located in the distal femur of a 14-year-old female. A non-tender swelling, 5×4 cm in diameter, was identified on computed tomography, a radiological study of which revealed an overhanging edge and a radiolucent shadow with stippled calcification in radiographs and a lobular heterogeneous mass in magnetic resonance imaging. Cytological examination of the excision biopsy revealed cellular pleomorphism and binucleate cells. The patient underwent en bloc resection of the tumor and covering periosteum, and the histological diagnosis was subsequently determined to be periosteal chondroma. The present study also reviews nine previously reported cases of periosteal chondroma in the femur, with a discussion of the demographic characteristics, imaging features, differential diagnosis and treatment of bone tumors in this location. This study aims to inform clincians that periosteal chondromas may occur in the distal femur although osteochondromas are more common and to discuss making a differential diagnosis between periosteal chondroma and other bone tumors.

  4. Blood flow changes to the proximal femur during total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hupel, Thomas M.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Aksenov, Sergei A.; Waddell, James P.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine the changes in perfusion to the proximal femur that occur during cemented and uncemented total hip arthroplasty (THA). Design Case series. Setting A single tertiary-care centre. Patients Twenty-two consecutive patients. Those who had undergone previous hip surgery or received systemic corticosteroid therapy were excluded. Intervention Cemented (11 procedures) or uncemented (12 procedures) THA. Main outcome measure Changes in blood flow at the level of the proximal femur, measured with laser Doppler flowmetry at 4 different times during THA. Results In both the cemented and the uncemented procedure overall proximal femoral blood flow was reduced (p = 0.002, p = 0.008, respectively). A greater reduction in overall proximal femoral perfusion was seen in the cemented group compared with the uncemented group (p = 0.004). This greater reduction in perfusion was seen primarily in the proximal femoral diaphysis (p = 0.004). Conclusion The extensive canal preparation involved with the cemented procedure or the introduction of bone cement under pressure into the femoral canal may contribute to the greater reduction in perfusion to the proximal femur. PMID:11045094

  5. Anthropometric Measurements of the Human Distal Femur: A Study of the Adult Malay Population

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Fitdriyah; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Sa'at, Azlin; Aziz, Azian Abd.; Hossain, Md. Golam; Kamarul, T.; Syahrom, Ardiyansyah

    2013-01-01

    The distal femurs of 100 subjects (50 men, 50 women) from the Malay population aged between 19 and 38 years were scanned to measure the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) width. The mean AP values were 64.02 ± 3.38 mm and 57.33 ± 3.26 mm for men and women, respectively, and the mean ML values were 74.91 ± 3.52 mm and 64.53 ± 3.07 mm. We compared our data to that published previously for the Chinese and Indian populations. It was found that the Malay population had smaller distal femur than that of the Chinese but was larger than that of the Indian population (P < 0.05). In conclusion, although it is well established that Asians have a smaller distal femur size than that of the Western population, the variations in different Asian ethnicities may need to be considered when designing the appropriate knee implant. PMID:24294597

  6. Lateral drill holes decrease strength of the femur: an observational study using finite element and experimental analyses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Internal fixation of femoral fractures requires drilling holes through the cortical bone of the shaft of the femur. Intramedullary suction reduces the fat emboli produced by reaming and nailing femoral fractures but requires four suction portals to be drilled into the femoral shaft. This work investigated the effect of these additional holes on the strength of the femur. Methods Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to calculate compression, tension and load limits which were then compared to the results from mechanical testing. Models of intact femora and fractured femora internally fixed with intramedullary nailing were generated. In addition, four suction portals, lateral, anterior and posterior, were modelled. Stresses were used to calculate safety factors and predict fatigue. Physical testing on synthetic femora was carried out on a universal mechanical testing machine. Results The FEA model for stresses generated during walking showed tensile stresses in the lateral femur and compression stresses in the medial femur with a maximum sheer stress through the neck of the femur. The lateral suction portals produced tensile stresses up to over 300% greater than in the femur without suction portals. The anterior and posterior portals did not significantly increase stresses. The lateral suction portals had a safety factor of 0.7, while the anterior and posterior posts had safety factors of 2.4 times walking loads. Synthetic bone subjected to cyclical loading and load to failure showed similar results. On mechanical testing, all constructs failed at the neck of the femur. Conclusions The anterior suction portals produced minimal increases in stress to loading so are the preferred site should a femur require such drill holes for suction or internal fixation. PMID:24004617

  7. Proximal Femur Shape Differs Between Subjects with Lateral and Medial Knee Osteoarthritis and Controls: The Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Barton L.; Kritikos, Lisa; Lynch, John A.; Liu, Felix; Parimi, Neeta; Tileston, Kali Luker; Nevitt, Michael C.; Lane, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study examined the association of proximal femur shape with ipsilateral medial and lateral compartment knee OA. Design Radiographs were obtained from the NIH-funded Osteoarthritis Initiative. Cases of isolated radiographic lateral compartment knee OA were defined on baseline radiographs as Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L) Grade > = 2 and joint space narrowing (JSN) > 0 in the lateral compartment and JSN=0 in the medial compartment; isolated medial compartment knee OA had K/L ≥ 2 and JSN > 0 medially with JSN=0 in the lateral compartment. Controls had K/L < 2 and JSN = 0 in both compartments. Controls were frequency matched to cases by sex and 10-year age intervals. We characterized the shape of the proximal femurs on radiographs using Active Shape Modeling and determined the association of proximal femur shape with knee OA using logistic regression. Results There were 168 lateral compartment knee OA cases (mean BMI 29.72 ±5.26), 169 medial compartment knee OA cases (mean BMI 29.68±4.83) and 168 controls (mean BMI 26.87±4.2). Thirteen modes were derived for femur shape which described 95.5% of the total variance in proximal femur shape in the population. Modes 6, 8 and 12 were associated with prevalent lateral compartment knee OA. Medial compartment knee OA was associated with proximal femur modes 1, 5, 8, and 12. Conclusions Prevalent lateral and medial compartment knee OA are associated with different ipsilateral proximal femur shapes. Additional studies are needed to better define how the shape of the proximal femur influences compartment specific knee OA. PMID:25194496

  8. Three-dimensional conformal intensity-modulated radiation therapy of left femur foci does not damage the sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wanlong; Zhao, Xibin; Wang, Qing; Sun, Jungang; Xu, Jiangbo; Zhou, Wenzheng; Wang, Hao; Yan, Shigui; Yuan, Hong

    2014-01-01

    During radiotherapy to kill femoral hydatid tapeworms, the sciatic nerve surrounding the focus can be easily damaged by the treatment. Thus, it is very important to evaluate the effects of radiotherapy on the surrounding nervous tissue. In the present study, we used three-dimensional, conformal, intensity-modulated radiation therapy to treat bilateral femoral hydatid disease in Meriones meridiani. The focus of the hydatid disease on the left femur was subjected to radiotherapy (40 Gy) for 14 days, and the right femur received sham irradiation. Hematoxylin-eosin staining, electron microscopy, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-dUTP nick end labeling assays on the left femurs showed that the left sciatic nerve cell structure was normal, with no obvious apoptosis after radiation. Trypan blue staining demonstrated that the overall protoscolex structure in bone parasitized with Echinococcus granulosus disappeared in the left femur of the animals after treatment. The mortality of the protoscolex was higher in the left side than in the right side. The succinate dehydrogenase activity in the protoscolex in bone parasitized with Echinococcus granulosus was lower in the left femur than in the right femur. These results suggest that three-dimensional conformal intensity-modulated radiation therapy achieves good therapeutic effects on the secondary bone in hydatid disease in Meriones meridiani without damaging the morphology or function of the sciatic nerve. PMID:25422645

  9. Salter-Harris type III fractures of the distal femur: plain radiographs can be deceptive.

    PubMed

    Lippert, William C; Owens, Richard F; Wall, Eric J

    2010-09-01

    Salter-Harris (SH) III fractures of the distal femur, although rare, can have devastating effects. The purposes of this study were to: (1) compare the intra-articular fracture displacement measured on plain x-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) scan and (2) report the outcomes of patients with a SH III fracture of the distal femur. All SH III distal femur fractures treated at a large Children's Hospital with a Level I Pediatric Trauma Center between 1995 and 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 14 patients (average age: 13 y, 11 mo; range: 7 y, 8 mo to 17 y, 11 mo) with an average follow-up time of 21.50 months (range: 2 to 47 mo) were included in this study. Fracture displacement on plain x-ray was compared with the fracture displacement measured on MRI or CT scan. The average time between the initial plain x-ray and MRI or CT scan was 37.48 days (range: 3 h to 6 mo). Plain x-rays significantly underestimated the displacement of SH III fractures versus MRI or CT scan. Six patients who had both plain x-ray and MRI or CT scan had a measured displacement of 0.42 mm and 2.70 mm, respectively (paired Student t test, P=0.005). Ten of the 14 patients (71%) had no physical limitations and full knee motion at their most recent follow-up visit. The treatment of 4 patients (29%) was changed based on the findings of the additional MRI or CT scan. This study and earlier studies have shown a high rate of poor results with SH III fractures of the distal femur. This type of fracture pattern is extremely unstable and the true displacement is often underestimated by x-rays. Thus, it is strongly recommended that an MRI or CT scan be obtained on every SH III fracture of the distal femur. Moreover, any SH III fracture visible on plain radiographs should be treated with open reduction, internal fixation. Level IV.

  10. Automatic multi-parametric quantification of the proximal femur with quantitative computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bonaretti, Serena; Saeed, Isra; Harnish, Roy; Recker, Robert; Burghardt, Andrew J.; Keyak, Joyce H.; Harris, Tamara; Khosla, Sundeep; Lang, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) imaging is the basis for multiple assessments of bone quality in the proximal femur, including volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), tissue volume, estimation of bone strength using finite element modeling (FEM), cortical bone thickness, and computational-anatomy-based morphometry assessments. Methods Here, we present an automatic framework to perform a multi-parametric QCT quantification of the proximal femur. In this framework, the proximal femur is cropped from the bilateral hip scans, segmented using a multi-atlas based segmentation approach, and then assigned volumes of interest through the registration of a proximal femoral template. The proximal femur is then subjected to compartmental vBMD, compartmental tissue volume, FEM bone strength, compartmental surface-based cortical bone thickness, compartmental surface-based vBMD, local surface-based cortical bone thickness, and local surface-based cortical vBMD computations. Consequently, the template registrations together with vBMD and surface-based cortical bone parametric maps enable computational anatomy studies. The accuracy of the segmentation was validated against manual segmentations of 80 scans from two clinical facilities, while the multi-parametric reproducibility was evaluated using repeat scans with repositioning from 22 subjects obtained on CT imaging systems from two manufacturers. Results Accuracy results yielded a mean dice similarity coefficient of 0.976±0.006, and a modified Haussdorf distance of 0.219±0.071 mm. Reproducibility of QCT-derived parameters yielded root mean square coefficients of variation (CVRMS) between 0.89-1.66% for compartmental vBMD; 0.20-1.82% for compartmental tissue volume; 3.51-3.59% for FEM bone strength; 1.89-2.69% for compartmental surface-based cortical bone thickness; and 1.08-2.19% for compartmental surface-based cortical vBMD. For local surface-based assessments, mean CVRMS were between 3.45-3.91% and 2

  11. Estimation of total Length of Femur From Its Fragments in South Indian Population.

    PubMed

    Solan, Shweta; Kulkarni, Roopa

    2013-10-01

    Establishment of identity of deceased person also assumes a great medicolegal importance. To establish the identity of a person, stature is one of the criteria. To know stature of individual, length of long bones is needed. To determine the lengths of the femoral fragments and to compare with the total length of femur in south Indian population, which will help to estimate the stature of the individual using standard regression formulae. A number of 150, 72 left and 78 right adult fully ossified dry processed femora were taken. The femur bone was divided into five segments by taking predetermined points. Length of five segments and maximum length of femur were measured to the nearest millimeter. The values were obtained in cm [mean±S.D.] and the mean total length of femora on left and right side was measured. The proportion of segments to the total length was also calculated which will help for the stature estimation using standard regression formulae. The mean total length of femora on left side was 43.54 ± 2.7 and on right side it was 43.42 ± 2.4. The measurements of the segments-1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 were 8.06± 0.71, 8.25± 1.24, 10.35 ± 2.21, 13.94 ± 1.93 and 2.77 ± 0.53 on left side and 8.09 ± 0.70, 8.30 ± 1.34, 10.44 ± 1.91, 13.50 ± 1.54 and 3.09 ± 0.41 on right side of femur. The sample size was 150, 72 left and 78 right and 'p' value of all the segments was significant (‹0.001). When comparison was made between segments of right and left femora, the 'p' value of segment-5 was found to be ‹0.001. Comparison between different segments of femur showed significance in all the segments.

  12. Estimation of total Length of Femur From Its Fragments in South Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Solan, Shweta; Kulkarni, Roopa

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Establishment of identity of deceased person also assumes a great medicolegal importance. To establish the identity of a person, stature is one of the criteria. To know stature of individual, length of long bones is needed. Aims and Objectives: To determine the lengths of the femoral fragments and to compare with the total length of femur in south Indian population, which will help to estimate the stature of the individual using standard regression formulae. Material and Methods: A number of 150, 72 left and 78 right adult fully ossified dry processed femora were taken. The femur bone was divided into five segments by taking predetermined points. Length of five segments and maximum length of femur were measured to the nearest millimeter. The values were obtained in cm [mean±S.D.] and the mean total length of femora on left and right side was measured. The proportion of segments to the total length was also calculated which will help for the stature estimation using standard regression formulae. Results: The mean total length of femora on left side was 43.54 ± 2.7 and on right side it was 43.42 ± 2.4. The measurements of the segments-1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 were 8.06± 0.71, 8.25± 1.24, 10.35 ± 2.21, 13.94 ± 1.93 and 2.77 ± 0.53 on left side and 8.09 ± 0.70, 8.30 ± 1.34, 10.44 ± 1.91, 13.50 ± 1.54 and 3.09 ± 0.41 on right side of femur. Conclusion: The sample size was 150, 72 left and 78 right and ‘p’ value of all the segments was significant (‹0.001). When comparison was made between segments of right and left femora, the ‘p’ value of segment-5 was found to be ‹0.001. Comparison between different segments of femur showed significance in all the segments. PMID:24298451

  13. Linear densitometry and digital image processing of proximal femur radiographs: implications for archaeological and forensic anthropology.

    PubMed

    Macchiarelli, R; Bondioli, L

    1994-01-01

    Age- and sex-related patterns of proximal femur trabecular bone loss have previously been used to establish radiographic reference standards for estimating age at death for human skeletal remains. Such standards are of interest to both anthropologists and forensic scientists. However, osteopenia as a physiological phenomenon is dependent on numerous genetic, environmental, and cultural factors. Thus, while general age- and sex-related trends can be clearly observed for trabecular bone loss, such patterns also demonstrate marked variation among individuals of both sexes at all ages. Moreover, clinical evidence shows that rates of bone loss are not steady but episodic, and that radiographically "normal" (i.e., young adult) patterns of trabecular bone architecture can also exist in femora of older individuals, particularly within samples of African origin. In this study, adult proximal femur radiographs were used to explore patterns of age- and sex-related proximal femur cancellous bone involution among a sample of 66 African-American individuals from the Terry collection (33 males and 33 females), ranging in age from 19 to 71 years. The proximal femur radiographs of these subjects were analyzed by digital image processing (DIP), and the results were compared to those obtained by laser linear densitometric analyses (LDA) previously performed on the same series (Macchiarelli et al., 1987). Results of LDA and DIP analyses indicate (a) more pronounced bone density decrease in females; (b) sex- and site-specific structural patterns of proximal femur trabecular bone loss; (c) a high level of individual variability, in which predicted age deviated from real age by as much as 22.26 (males) and 30.78 years (females); (d) a moderate linear correlation with age for all the variables analyzed; and (e) an average discrepancy between known age and predicted age (measured by root mean squared residual values) of 10.34 (males) and 12.71 years (females) for the most satisfactory DIP

  14. Adaptation of the proximal femur to skeletal reloading after long-duration spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Lang, Thomas F; Leblanc, Adrian D; Evans, Harlan J; Lu, Ying

    2006-08-01

    We studied the effect of re-exposure to Earth's gravity on the proximal femoral BMD and structure of astronauts 1 year after missions lasting 4-6 months. We observed that the readaptation of the proximal femur to Earth's gravity entailed an increase in bone size and an incomplete recovery of volumetric BMD. Bone loss is a well-known result of skeletal unloading in long-duration spaceflight, with the most severe losses occurring in the proximal femur. However, there is little information about the recovery of bone loss after mission completion and no information about effect of reloading on the structure of load-bearing bone. To address these questions, we carried out a study of the effect of re-exposure to Earth's gravity on the BMD and structure of the proximal femur 1 year after missions lasting 4-6 months. In 16 crew members of the International Space Station (ISS) making flights of 4.5-6 months, we used QCT imaging to measure the total, trabecular, and cortical volumetric BMD (vBMD) of the proximal femur. In addition to vBMD, we also quantified BMC, bone volume, femoral neck cross-sectional area (CSA), and femoral neck indices of compressive and bending strength at three time-points: preflight, postflight, and 1 year after mission. Proximal femoral bone mass was substantially recovered in the year after spaceflight, but measures of vBMD and estimated bone strength showed only partial recovery. The recovery of BMC, in the absence of a comparable increase in vBMD, was explained by increases in bone volume and CSA during the year after spaceflight. Adaptation of the proximal femur to reloading entailed an increase in bone size and an incomplete recovery of vBMD. The data indicate that recovery of skeletal density after long-duration space missions may exceed 1 year and supports the evidence in the aging literature for periosteal apposition as a compensatory response for bone loss. The extent to which this compensatory effect protects against fracture remains to be

  15. Dynamic hip screw versus proximal femur locking compression plate in intertrochanteric femur fractures (AO 31A1 and 31A2): A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Prabhat; Gaba, Sahil; Das, Saubhik; Singh, Ranjit; Kumar, Arvind; Yadav, Gajanand

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Intertrochanteric fractures are common in elderly population and pose a significant financial burden to the society. Anatomically contoured proximal femur locking compression plate (PFLCP) is the latest addition in the surgeons’ armamentarium to deal with these fractures. It creates an angular stable construct, which will theoretically lessen the risk of failure by screw cut-out and varus collapse, the common mode of DHS failure. We compared DHS with PFLCP in AO type 31A1 and 31A2 intertrochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: A randomized prospective study was carried out between June 2011 and June 2013. 26 cases each of DHS and PFLCP were included. Results: Functional and radiological outcome was similar in both groups. Conclusion: Both DHS and PFLCP are good choices for stable intertrochanteric fractures, and both lead to excellent functional outcomes, but non-union might be more common with PFLCP.

  16. Osteoporotic fractures of proximal femur: clinical and epidemiological features in a population of the city of São Paulo.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, A C; Lazaretti-Castro, M; Hauache, O; Vieira, J G; Takata, E; Cafalli, F; Tavares, F

    2001-03-01

    It is believed that about 25% of menopausal women in the USA will exhibit some kind of fracture as a consequence of osteoporosis. Fractures of the proximal femur are associated with a greater number of deaths and disabilities and higher medical expenses than all the other osteoporotic fractures together. To study the clinical and epidemiological features of patients with proximal femur fracture in hospitals in São Paulo. Transversal and retrospective study. LOCAL: Hospital São Paulo and Hospital Servidor Público Estadual "Francisco Morato Oliveira". Patients aged sixty-five years or more hospitalized because of proximal femur fracture, from March to November 1996 (N = 73). This group was compared to patients of the same age without fracture of the proximal femur. Evaluation of weight, height, body mass index; lifestyle habits (physical activity at home, ingestion of dairy calcium, drinking of coffee, smoking habit), gynecological history (ages at menarche and menopause, number of pregnancies and lactations), previous morbidity, use of medications, history of previous fractures, family history of osteoporosis. The comparison of the different data regarding lifestyle habits between the two groups was made using the chi-squared test. Other data were analyzed using the Mann--Whitney test. P pound 0.05 was considered significant. We noted a predominance of proximal femur fracture among females in relation to males (a female/male ratio of 3.3:1) with a progressive increase in the frequency of proximal femur fracture with age in both sexes. The group with proximal femur fracture, in comparison with the control group, showed a lower body mass index, less physical activity, and a greater number of pregnancies and lactations. Other data were not different. In accordance with the literature, we found a predomination of proximal femur fracture in women in relation to men, and a favorable effect of higher body mass index and physical activity for decreasing the frequency of

  17. Late recurrence of medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Brittney; Razzaqi, Faisal; Yu, Lolie; Craver, Randall

    2008-01-01

    We present a child with a cerebellar medulloblastoma, diagnosed at age three, treated with near total surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, that recurred 13 years after the initial diagnosis. This late recurrence exceeds the typical 10-year survival statistics that are in common use, and exceeds the Collins rule. Continued follow-up of these children is justified to increase the likelihood of detecting these late recurrences early and to learn more about these late recurrences.

  18. Clinical and Radiological Comparison of Femur and Fibular Allografts for the Treatment of Cervical Degenerative Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hyeong-Seok; Shim, Chan Shik; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Objective This consecutive retrospective study was designed to analyze and to compare the efficacy and outcomes of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using a fibular and femur allograft with anterior cervical plating. Methods A total of 88 consecutive patients suffering from cervical degenerative disc disease (DDD) who were treated with ACDF from September 2007 to August 2010 were enrolled in this study. Thirty-seven patients (58 segments) underwent anterior interbody fusion with a femur allograft, and 51 patients (64 segments) were treated with a fibular allograft. The mean follow-up period was 16.0 (range, 12-25) months in the femur group and 19.5 (range, 14-39) months in the fibular group. Cage fracture and breakage, subsidence rate, fusion rate, segmental angle and height and disc height were assessed by using radiography. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a visual analog scale and neck disability index. Results At 12 months postoperatively, cage fracture and breakage had occurred in 3.4% (2/58) and 7.4% (4/58) of the patients in the femur group, respectively, and 21.9% (14/64) and 31.3% (20/64) of the patients in the fibular group, respectively (p<0.05). Subsidence was noted in 43.1% (25/58) of the femur group and in 50.5% (32/64) of the fibular group. No difference in improvements in the clinical outcome between the two groups was observed. Conclusion The femur allograft showed good results in subsidence and radiologic parameters, and sustained the original cage shape more effectively than the fibular allograft. The present study suggests that the femur allograft may be a good choice as a fusion substitute for the treatment of cervical DDD. PMID:23439721

  19. Clinical and radiological comparison of femur and fibular allografts for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc diseases.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyeong-Seok; Shim, Chan Shik; Kim, Jin-Sung; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2013-01-01

    This consecutive retrospective study was designed to analyze and to compare the efficacy and outcomes of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using a fibular and femur allograft with anterior cervical plating. A total of 88 consecutive patients suffering from cervical degenerative disc disease (DDD) who were treated with ACDF from September 2007 to August 2010 were enrolled in this study. Thirty-seven patients (58 segments) underwent anterior interbody fusion with a femur allograft, and 51 patients (64 segments) were treated with a fibular allograft. The mean follow-up period was 16.0 (range, 12-25) months in the femur group and 19.5 (range, 14-39) months in the fibular group. Cage fracture and breakage, subsidence rate, fusion rate, segmental angle and height and disc height were assessed by using radiography. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a visual analog scale and neck disability index. At 12 months postoperatively, cage fracture and breakage had occurred in 3.4% (2/58) and 7.4% (4/58) of the patients in the femur group, respectively, and 21.9% (14/64) and 31.3% (20/64) of the patients in the fibular group, respectively (p<0.05). Subsidence was noted in 43.1% (25/58) of the femur group and in 50.5% (32/64) of the fibular group. No difference in improvements in the clinical outcome between the two groups was observed. The femur allograft showed good results in subsidence and radiologic parameters, and sustained the original cage shape more effectively than the fibular allograft. The present study suggests that the femur allograft may be a good choice as a fusion substitute for the treatment of cervical DDD.

  20. Ontogeny of the female femur: geometric morphometric analysis applied on current living individuals of a Spanish population

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Aniol; Rissech, Carme; Ventura, Jacint; Badosa, Joaquim; Turbón, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In this study we describe the development of the female femur based on the analysis of high-resolution radiographic images by means of geometric morphometrics, while assessing the usefulness of this method in these kinds of studies. The material analysed consisted of digital images in DICOM format (telemetries), corresponding to 184 left femora in anterior view, obtained from the database of the Hospital Sant Joan de Déu of Barcelona (Spain). Bones analysed corresponded to individuals from 9 to 14 years old. Size and shape variation of the entire femur was quantified by 22 two-dimensional landmarks. Landmark digitisation errors were assessed using Procrustes anova test. Centroid size (CS) variation with age was evaluated by an anova test. Shape variation was assessed by principal component analysis. A mancova test between the first five principal components and age, using the CS as covariable, was applied. Results indicated that both size and shape vary significantly with age. Several age-related shape changes remained significant after removing the allometric effect. In general, an increase in the robustness of the bone and noticeable phenotypic changes in certain areas of the femur were observed. During growth in the proximal region of the femur, the collo-diaphyseal angle decreases, the neck of the femur widens and the fovea moves to a lower position, standing more in line with the plane of the neck. Likewise, the size of the greater and lesser trochanters increase. In the distal region, a significant increase of epiphyseal dimensions was recorded, mainly in the medial condyle. The angular remodelling of the neck and the bicondylar region of the femur in females continues until 13 years old. The information provided in the present study increases our knowledge on the timing and morphology of the femur during development, and in particular the morphology of the different femoral ossification centres during development. PMID:24975495

  1. Deformation pattern and load transfer of an uncemented femoral stem with modular necks. An experimental study in human cadaver femurs.

    PubMed

    Enoksen, Cathrine H; Gjerdet, Nils R; Klaksvik, Jomar; Arthursson, Astvaldur J; Schnell-Husby, Otto; Wik, Tina S

    2016-02-01

    Modular necks in hip arthroplasty allow variations in neck-shaft angles, neck version and neck lengths and have been introduced to improve accuracy when reconstructing the anatomy and hip joint biomechanics. Periprosthetic bone resorption may be a consequence of stress shielding in the proximal femur after implantation of a femoral stem. The purpose of this study was to investigate the deformation pattern and load transfer of an uncemented femoral stem coupled to different modular necks in human cadaver femurs. A cementless femoral stem was implanted in twelve human cadaver femurs and tested in a hip simulator corresponding to single leg stance and stair climbing activity with patient-specific loading. The stems were tested with four different modular necks; long, short, retro and varus. The long neck was used as reference in statistical comparisons, as it can be considered the "standard" neck. The deformation of bone during loading was measured by strain gauge rosettes at three levels of the proximal femur on the medial, lateral and anterior side. The cortical strains were overall reduced on the medial and lateral side of femur, for all implants tested, and in both loading conditions compared to the unoperated femur. Although there were statistical significant differences between the necks, the results did not show a consistent pattern considering which neck retained or lost most strain. In general the differences were small, with the highest significant difference between the necks of 3.23 percentage points. The small differences of strain between the modular necks tested in this study are not expected to influence bone remodeling in the proximal femur. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Unstable Proximal Femur Fractures Treated With Proximal Femoral Locking Plates: A Retrospective, Multicenter Study of 111 Cases.

    PubMed

    Collinge, Cory A; Hymes, Robert; Archdeacon, Michael; Streubel, Phillip; Obremskey, William; Weber, Timothy; Watson, J Tracy; Lowenberg, David

    2016-09-01

    A few small case series have found that proximal femur fractures treated with a proximal femur locking plate (PFLP) have experienced more failures than expected. The purpose of this study was to review the clinical results of patients with acute, unstable proximal femur fractures treated with proximal femoral locking plates in a large, multicenter patient cohort. This is a retrospective clinical study. The study included patients from 12 regional trauma centers and tertiary referral hospitals. One hundred eleven consecutive patients with unstable proximal femur fractures stabilized with a PFLP and having required clinical and radiographic follow-up at a minimum of 12 months after injury. Surgical repair of an unstable proximal femur fracture with a PFLP. Treatment failures (failure of fixation, nonunion, and malunion) and need for revision surgery. Forty-six patients (41.4%) experienced a major treatment failure, including failed fixation with or without nonunion (39), surgical malalignment or malunion (18), deep infection (8), or a combination of these. Thirty-eight (34%) patients underwent secondary surgeries, including 30 for failed fixation, nonunion, or both. Treatment failure was found to occur at a significantly higher rate in patients with major comorbidities, in femurs repaired in varus malalignment, and using specific plate designs. Proximal femoral locking plates are associated with a high complication rate, frequently requiring revision or secondary surgeries in the treatment of unstable proximal femur fractures. Given the high complication rate with PFLPs, careful attention to reduction, use of a PFLP implant, and consideration should be given to alternative implants or fixation techniques when appropriate. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  3. Investigation of Association Between Hip Osteoarthritis Susceptibility Loci and Radiographic Proximal Femur Shape

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajah, Shankar; Wilkinson, J. Mark; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Day‐Williams, Aaron G.; Cootes, Timothy F.; Wallis, Gillian A.; Loughlin, John; Arden, Nigel; Birrell, Fraser; Carr, Andrew; Chapman, Kay; Deloukas, Panos; Doherty, Michael; McCaskie, Andrew; Ollier, William E. R.; Rai, Ashok; Ralston, Stuart H.; Spector, Timothy D.; Valdes, Ana M.; Wallis, Gillian A.; Mark Wilkinson, J.; Zeggini, Eleftheria

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test whether previously reported hip morphology or osteoarthritis (OA) susceptibility loci are associated with proximal femur shape as represented by statistical shape model (SSM) modes and as univariate or multivariate quantitative traits. Methods We used pelvic radiographs and genotype data from 929 subjects with unilateral hip OA who had been recruited previously for the Arthritis Research UK Osteoarthritis Genetics Consortium genome‐wide association study. We built 3 SSMs capturing the shape variation of the OA‐unaffected proximal femur in the entire mixed‐sex cohort and for male/female‐stratified cohorts. We selected 41 candidate single‐nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously reported as being associated with hip morphology (for replication analysis) or OA (for discovery analysis) and for which genotype data were available. We performed 2 types of analysis for genotype–phenotype associations between these SNPs and the modes of the SSMs: 1) a univariate analysis using individual SSM modes and 2) a multivariate analysis using combinations of SSM modes. Results The univariate analysis identified association between rs4836732 (within the ASTN2 gene) and mode 5 of the female SSM (P = 0.0016) and between rs6976 (within the GLT8D1 gene) and mode 7 of the mixed‐sex SSM (P = 0.0003). The multivariate analysis identified association between rs5009270 (near the IFRD1 gene) and a combination of modes 3, 4, and 9 of the mixed‐sex SSM (P = 0.0004). Evidence of associations remained significant following adjustment for multiple testing. All 3 SNPs had previously been associated with hip OA. Conclusion These de novo findings suggest that rs4836732, rs6976, and rs5009270 may contribute to hip OA susceptibility by altering proximal femur shape. PMID:25939412

  4. Deformities in conservatively treated closed fractures of the shaft of the femur in children.

    PubMed

    Puttaswamaiah, Ravindra; Chandran, Prakash; Sen, Ramesh; Kataria, Sudha; Gill, Shivender Singh

    2006-04-01

    We present the outcome of non-operative management of fractures of the shaft of the femur in children. Thirty children with non-operatively managed unilateral fractures of the shaft of the femur were studied. The mean age was 6.5 years (range: 1.2 to 12). Axial, angular and rotational malunion were assessed clinically and radiologically by plain films and computed tomography (CT). All children had shortening of the fractured limb with a mean shortening of 1.8 cm (range: 0.5 to 3.5). A significant level of shortening was seen in children over 7 years. In the sagittal plane, all had anterior angulation ranging from 4 degrees to 31 degrees (mean: 17.8 degrees) and in the coronal plane, lateral angulation (varus) was seen in 90% (27 patients) with a mean angle of 8.9 degrees. Rotational malunion ranged from -43 degrees to +43 degrees (mean: 9.5 degrees), 30% had rotational malunion of > 20 degrees compared to the uninjured side; 73% had internal rotation malunion and 27% had external rotation malunion. We conclude that non-operative management of fractures of the shaft of the femur in children often results in malunion at the fracture, particularly in the older age group and in comminuted fractures. Perhaps a longer follow-up might have shown lower levels of malunion. Frequent monitoring of fracture position may reduce the occurrence of deformity. It may be appropriate to consider reduction and operative stabilisation of such fractures whenever neces-

  5. Bone density of the radius, spine, and proximal femur in osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mazess, R.B.; Barden, H.; Ettinger, M.; Schultz, E.

    1988-02-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured in 140 normal young women (aged 20 to 39 years) and in 423 consecutive women over age 40 referred for evaluation of osteoporosis. Lumbar spine and proximal femur BMD was measured using dual-photon absorptiometry (/sup 153/Gd), whereas the radius shaft measurement used single-photon absorptiometry (/sup 125/I). There were 324 older women with no fractures, of which 278 aged 60 to 80 years served as age-matched controls. There were 99 women with fractures including 32 with vertebral and 22 with hip fractures. Subsequently, another 25 women with hip fractures had BMD measured in another laboratory; their mean BMD was within 2% of that of the original series. The mean age in both the nonfracture and fracture groups was 70 +/- 5 years. The BMD in the age-matched controls was 20% to 25% below that of normal young women for the radius, spine, and femur, but the Ward's triangle region of the femur showed even greater loss (35%). The mean BMD at all sites in the crush fracture cases was about 10% to 15% below that of age-matched controls. Spinal abnormality was best discriminated by spine and femoral measurements (Z score about 0.9). In women with hip fractures, the BMD was 10% below that of age-matched controls for the radius and the spine, and the BMD for the femoral sites was about 25% to 30% below that of age-matched control (Z score about 1.6). Femoral densities gave the best discrimination of hip fracture cases and even reflected spinal osteopenia. In contrast, neither the spine nor the radius reflected the full extent of femoral osteopenia in hip fracture.

  6. Skeletal metastatic disease of the femur: results by management with intramedullary nailing.

    PubMed

    Märdian, S; Schaser, K-D; Ruppert, M; Melcher, I; Haas, N P; Schwabe, P

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY This study aimed to analyse the outcome following intramedullary nailing for metastases of the femur in a large cohort with special regard to mechanical, implant associated complications and patient survival. Furthermore, we aimed to identify factors influencing the overall survival. MATERIAL AND METHODS All patients (n = 74) that underwent intramedullary nailing for metastatic disease of the femur between 2004 and 2008 and were retrospectively reviewed. Data were recorded from the patients' medical record and the outpatients' clinics files. Details about the tumour biology, the surgery performed as well as the postoperative care were documented. Survival data were extracted from patient records or obtained via communication with outpatient oncologists or the community registration office. RESULTS 74 (28 (37.8%) male, 46 (62.2%) female; p = 0.048) patients with a mean age of 64.4 ± 11.7 years were included. Breast (25, 33.8%), lung (18, 24.3%), bone marrow (7, 9.5%) and kidney (6, 8.1%) were the primary tumours in more than 75% of all patients. The mean overall survival was 17.5 (95% CI: 9.6 - 25.5) months. Patients with osseous metastases had a significant longer survival than patients with visceral and/or cerebral metastases (p = 0.025 and p = 0.032). CONCLUSION Intramedullary nailing represents a valuable fixation method for pathologic fractures or impending fractures of the femur in patients with an advanced stage of metastatic disease. It provides adequate stability to outlast the patient s remaining life-span. However, the balance must be found between therapeutic resignation and surgical overtreatment since operative treatment may be accompanied with serious complications. Key words: bone metastases, intramedullary nailing, metastatic disease, cement augmentation, osteolytic defect.

  7. Mechanical Properties of a Single Cancellous Bone Trabeculae Taken from Bovine Femur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enoki, Shinichi; Sato, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Kazuto; Katayama, Tsutao

    The increase of patients with osteoporosis is becoming a social problem, thus it is an urgent issue to find its prevention and treatment methods. Since cancellous bone is metabolically more active than cortical bone, cancellous bone is often used for diagnosis of osteoporosis and has received much attention within the study of bone. Bone is a hierarchically structured material and its mechanical properties vary at different structural levels, therefore it is important to break down the mechanical testing of bone according to the various levels within bone material. Mechanical properties of cancellous bone is said to be depended on quantities and orientation of trabecular bone. It is supposed that mechanical properties of trabecular bone are constant without depending on any structural arrangement and parts. However, such assumption has not been established in studies of trabecular bone. Furthermore test results have a large margin of error caused by insufficient shape assessment. In this study, three point bending tests of single cancellous bone trabeculae extracted from bovine femur were conducted to evaluate the effects of directions to the femur major axis direction on the mechanical properties. X-ray μCT was used to obtain shape of trabecular bone specimens. Furthermore compression tests of cancellous bone specimens, which were extracted in 10mm cubic geometry, were conducted for evaluation of directional properties.There were small difference in the elastic modulus of the trabecular bones which were extracted in parallel and in perpendicular to the major axis of femur. Considering from the results that the cancellous bone specimens, which were extracted in 10mm cubic geometry, have different elastic properties depending on the tested directions; the bone structure has larger influence than bone material property on the mechanical properties of cancellous bone.

  8. In vivo strains in the femur of the nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus).

    PubMed

    Copploe, Joseph V; Blob, Richard W; Parrish, John H A; Butcher, Michael T

    2015-08-01

    The capacity of limb bones to resist the locomotor loads they encounter depends on both the pattern of those loads and the material properties of the skeletal elements. Among mammals, understanding of the interplay between these two factors has been based primarily on evidence from locomotor behaviors in upright placentals, which show limb bones that are loaded predominantly in anteroposterior bending with minimal amounts of torsion. However, loading patterns from the femora of opossums, marsupials using crouched limb posture, show appreciable torsion while the bone experiences mediolateral (ML) bending. These data indicated greater loading diversity in mammals than was previously recognized, and suggested the possibility that ancestral loading patterns found in sprawling lineages (e.g., reptilian sauropsids) might have been retained among basal mammals. To further test this hypothesis, we recorded in vivo locomotor strains from the femur of the nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus), a member of the basal xenarthran clade of placental mammals that also uses crouched limb posture. Orientations of principal strains and magnitudes of shear strains indicate that armadillo femora are exposed to only limited torsion; however, bending is essentially ML, placing the medial aspect of the femur in compression and the lateral aspect in tension. This orientation of bending is similar to that found in opossums, but planar strain analyses indicate much more of the armadillo femur experiences tension during bending, potentially due to muscles pulling on the large, laterally positioned third trochanter. Limb bone safety factors were estimated between 3.3 and 4.3 in bending, similar to other placental mammals, but lower than opossums and most sprawling taxa. Thus, femoral loading patterns in armadillos show a mixture of similarities to both opossums (ML bending) and other placentals (limited torsion and low safety factors), along with unique features (high axial tension

  9. Parathyroid hormone resets the cartilage circadian clock of the organ-cultured murine femur.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Naoki; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Minami, Yoichi; Kunimoto, Tatsuya; Hosokawa, Toshihiro; Umemura, Yasuhiro; Inokawa, Hitoshi; Asada, Maki; Oda, Ryo; Kubo, Toshikazu; Yagita, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock governs endogenous day-night variations. In bone, the metabolism and growth show diurnal rhythms. The circadian clock is based on a transcription-translation feedback loop composed of clock genes including Period2 (Per2), which encodes the protein period circadian protein homolog 2. Because plasma parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels show diurnal variation, we hypothesized that PTH could carry the time information to bone and cartilage. In this study, we analyzed the effect of PTH on the circadian clock of the femur. Per2::Luciferase (Per2::Luc) knock-in mice were used and their femurs were organ-cultured. The bioluminescence was measured using photomultiplier tube-based real-time bioluminescence monitoring equipment or real-time bioluminescence microscopic imaging devices. PTH or its vehicle was administered and the phase shifts were calculated. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect PTH type 1 receptor (PTH1R) expression. Real-time bioluminescence monitoring revealed that PTH reset the circadian rhythm of the Per2::Luc activity in the femurs in an administration time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. Microscopic bioluminescence imaging revealed that Per2::Luc activity in the growth plate and the articular cartilage showed that the circadian rhythms and their phase shifts were induced by PTH. PTH1R was expressed in the growth plate cartilage. In clinical practice, teriparatide (PTH (1-34)) treatment is widely used for osteoporosis. We found that PTH administration regulated the femoral circadian clock oscillation, particularly in the cartilage. Regulation of the local circadian clock by PTH may lead to a more effective treatment for not only osteoporosis but also endochondral ossification in bone growth and fracture repair.

  10. Proximal femur elastic behaviour is the same in impact and constant displacement rate fall simulation.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, S; Nishiyama, K K; de Bakker, P; Guy, P; Boyd, S K; Oxland, T; Cripton, P A

    2014-11-28

    Understanding proximal femur fracture may yield new targets for fracture prevention screening and treatment. The goal of this study was to characterize force-displacement and failure behaviours in the proximal femur between displacement control and impact loading fall simulations. Twenty-one human proximal femurs were tested in two ways, first to a sub-failure load at a constant displacement rate, then to fracture in an impact fall simulator. Comparisons of sub-failure energy and stiffness were made between the tests at the same compressive force. Additionally, the impact failure tests were compared with previous, constant displacement rate failure tests (at 2 and 100mm/s) in terms of energy, yield force, and stiffness. Loading and displacement rates were characterized and related to specimen stiffness in the impact tests. No differences were observed between the sub-failure constant displacement and impact tests in the aforementioned metrics. Comparisons between failure tests showed that the impact group had the lowest absorbed energy, 24% lower maximum force and 160% higher stiffness than the 100mm/s group (p<0.01 for all), but suffered from low statistical power to differentiate the donor age and specimen BMD. Loading and displacement rates for the specimens tested using impact varied during each test and between specimens and did not show appreciable viscoelasticity. These results indicate that constant displacement rate testing may help understand sub-failure mechanical behaviour, but may not elucidate failure behaviours. The differences between the impact and constant displacement rate fall simulations have important ramifications for interpreting the results of previous experiments.

  11. Prophylactic augmentation of the proximal femur: an investigation of two techniques.

    PubMed

    Raas, Christoph; Hofmann-Fliri, Ladina; Hörmann, Romed; Schmoelz, Werner

    2016-03-01

    Osteoporotic hip fractures are an increasing problem in an ageing population. They result in high morbidity, mortality and high socioeconomic costs. For patients with poor bone quality, prophylactic augmentation of the proximal femur might be an option for fracture prevention. In two groups of paired human femora the potential of limited polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) augmentation (11-15 ml) in a V-shape pattern and the insertion of a proximal femur nail antirotation (PFNA) blade were investigated. The testing was carried out pair wise simulating the single leg stand. The untreated femur in each pair served as control. An axial load was applied until failure. Load displacement parameters and temperature increase during the augmentation process were recorded. In the PMMA group no significant difference was found between the augmented and non-augmented specimen concerning load to failure (p = 0.35) and energy to failure (p = 0.9). A median temperature increase of 9.5 °C was observed in the augmented specimen. A significant correlation was found between the amount of applied PMMA and the temperature increase (Cor. Coef. = 0.82, p = 0.042). In the PFNA group, a significant decrease of load to failure and a non-significant decrease of energy to failure were observed (p = 0.037 and p = 0.075). Limited V-shaped PMMA augmentation and PFNA blade insertion did not show any improvement in failure load or energy to failure. Volumes of up to 15 ml PMMA did not cause a critical surface temperature increase.

  12. Antegrade Peroneal Flap through the Interosseous Membrane for Knee and Distal Femur Coverage.

    PubMed

    Angrigiani, Claudio; Artero, Guillermo; Neligan, Peter C; Escudero, Ezequiel; Sereday, Carlos; Khouri, Roger K

    2016-09-01

    Antegrade peroneal flaps can be rotated around the fibula to cover defects in the lower leg and lateral knee. However, these flaps cannot reliably cover the distal femur and anterior and medial knee. In the present article, the authors describe a novel technical modification that involves creating a tunnel through the interosseous membrane, through which the flap can be passed, circumventing the need to rotate around the fibula, allowing it to reach the entire knee and distal femur. An anatomical study was performed in five cadaveric specimens to measure the gain in pedicle reaching distance when the flap is tunneled compared to transferred around the fibula. A clinical study in 12 patients was also performed to measure the gain in pedicle reaching distance and the long-term viability of the tunneled interosseous flap. In the anatomical study, the mean reaching distance was 7.4 ± 0.9 cm for the flaps rotated around the fibula and 17.0 ± 1.6 for the tunneled interosseous flaps (p < 0.001). In the clinical study, the mean reaching distance was 2.6 ± 1.4 cm for the flaps rotated around the fibula and 11.4 ± 2.4 for the tunneled interosseous flaps (p < 0.0000000001). Patients were followed for up to 4 years (mean, 2.5 years). All flaps survived completely, and there were no complications. By passing the antegrade peroneal flap through the interosseous membrane, instead of around the fibula, the flap reaching distance can be increased by approximately 8 cm, allowing for effective coverage of distal femur and knee defects. Therapeutic, IV.

  13. Structural Analysis and Optimization of the Support Device Used for a Proximal Fracture of the Femur

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    L bend for valgus curvature. The end caps on both the short and long nail are offered in three sizes: standard, +5mm and +10mm. Both nails are...of the iliac crest [3]. Once the incision is made, a cannulated curved awl is used to open the medullary canal. When reaming the medullary canal...forces produce a bending moment on the proximal end of the femur. By simulating this load, the bone and gamma nail are tested to the limits. The

  14. Osteoid osteoma of the proximal femur: new techniques in diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.J.; Harcke, H.T.; MacEwen, G.D.; Ger, E.

    1984-11-01

    The nonspecific symptoms and radiographic findings associated with osteoid osteoma in the proximal femur mimic inflammatory conditions and delay diagnosis. A review of four cases showed high resolution computerized axial tomography in conjunction with a radioisotope bone scan best demarcated the location and size of the lesion. The combination of careful preoperative localization and intraoperative use of a radiation probe made adequate resection possible while limiting the amount of bone excised. This technique eliminated the need for internal fixation and reduced the duration of the recovery period.

  15. Arthroscopic Excision of an Intraarticular Osteoid Osteoma in the Distal Femur

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Suk; Kim, Young Sung; Lee, Ho Min; Lee, Min Young

    2016-01-01

    An intraarticular osteoid osteoma of the knee is uncommon, and its treatment is challenging. The authors present a case of arthroscopic excision of an intraarticular osteoid osteoma in the distal femur, which was accessible through the knee joint. After confirming the nidus of the osteoid osteoma by computed tomography, the lesion was completely removed arthroscopically. The patient reported complete pain relief immediately after surgery. This case demonstrates that intraarticular osteoid osteomas in the knee joint can be treated by arthroscopic excision and that good results can be obtained. PMID:27904732

  16. Arthroscopic Excision of an Intraarticular Osteoid Osteoma in the Distal Femur.

    PubMed

    Kang, Suk; Kim, Young Sung; Lee, Ho Min; Lee, Min Young; Kim, Jong Pil

    2016-12-01

    An intraarticular osteoid osteoma of the knee is uncommon, and its treatment is challenging. The authors present a case of arthroscopic excision of an intraarticular osteoid osteoma in the distal femur, which was accessible through the knee joint. After confirming the nidus of the osteoid osteoma by computed tomography, the lesion was completely removed arthroscopically. The patient reported complete pain relief immediately after surgery. This case demonstrates that intraarticular osteoid osteomas in the knee joint can be treated by arthroscopic excision and that good results can be obtained.

  17. Salter Harris Fractures of the Distal Femur: Learning Points From Two Cases Compared.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Sean M; Hamilton, Steven W; Barker, Simon L

    2013-01-01

    Salter Harris-type injuries of the distal femur should be treated as a dislocation of the knee and therefore as a medical emergency. Senior medical staff should be involved early, ankle-brachial index ratio should be measured in all patients and the clinician should have a high index of suspicion for a vascular injury. Ideally reduction, stabilization, and vascular repair, if necessary, should be carried out within 6 hours of the initial event. There should be a low threshold for fasciotomies. These 2 cases demonstrate the importance of having a high index of suspicion for vascular injury and the need for continued reassessment.

  18. Precision of volumetric assessment of proximal femur microarchitecture from high-resolution 3T MRI.

    PubMed

    Hotca, Alexandra; Ravichandra, Shreyas; Mikheev, Artem; Rusinek, Henry; Chang, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the precision of measures of bone volume and bone volume fraction derived from high-resolution 3T MRI of proximal femur bone microarchitecture using non-uniformity correction. This HIPAA compliant, institutional review board approved study was conducted on six volunteers (mean age 56 ± 13 years), and written informed consent was obtained. All volunteers underwent a 3T FLASH MRI hip scan at three time points: baseline, second scan same day (intra-scans), and third scan one week later (inter-scans). Segmentation of femur images and values for total proximal femur volume (T), bone volume (B), and bone volume fraction (BVF) were calculated using in-house developed software, FireVoxel. Two types of non-uniformity corrections were applied to images (N3 and BiCal). Precision values were calculated using absolute percent error (APE). Statistical analysis was carried out using one-sample one-sided t test to observe the consistency of the precision and paired t test to compare between the various methods and scans. No significant differences in bone volume measurements were observed for intra- and inter-scans. When using non-uniformity correction and assessing all subjects uniformly at the level of the lesser trochanter, precision values overall improved, especially significantly (p < 0.05) when measuring bone volume, B . B values using the combination of N3 or BiCal with CLT had a significant consistent APE values of less than 2.5 %, while BVF values were all consistently and significantly lower than 2.5 % APE. Our results demonstrate the precision of high-resolution 3D MRI measures were comparable to that of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Additional corrections to the analysis technique by cropping at the lesser trochanter or using non-uniformity corrections helped to improve precision. The high precision values from these MRI scans provide evidence for MRI of the proximal femur as a promising tool for osteoporosis diagnosis and treatment.

  19. [Indications for usage of oncological prostheses in the treatment of proximal femur methastases].

    PubMed

    Nazar, Jerzy; Nowakowski, Andrzej; Michalski, Paweł; Jaszczak, Tomasz; Bartochowski, Łukasz

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present indications for usage of oncological prosthesis in the treatment of metastases in proximal femur. According to our experience, based on clinical material of 78 patients treated between year 1997 and 2007 in Spine Surgery, Onclological Orthopaedics and Taumatology Clinic, University of Medical Sciences in Poznan, the indications are: massive bone loss, second surgery in the same place, damage of articular surface, small possibility of stable union, threatening patological fracture. At the appropriately selected group of patients application of onclological prosthesis lets for restoring the function of the limb, reducing or bearing pain complaints or removing the entire methastasis.

  20. Closing wedge osteotomy of the tibia and the femur in the treatment of gonarthrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Courtney

    2009-01-01

    New developments in osteotomy techniques and methods of fixation have caused a renewed interest in closing wedge osteotomies of the tibia and femur in the treatment of gonarthrosis. The rationale, definition and techniques of closing wedge tibial and femoral osteotomies in the treatment of gonarthrosis are discussed. The principal indications include unicompartmental medial and much less so, varus knee gonarthrosis and unicompartmental lateral or valgus knee gonarthrosis with a well-maintained range of motion in patients who are physiologically young. Newer techniques have provided more rigid fixation and improved accuracy of correction. PMID:19830426

  1. Bone induction using demineralized bone in the rabbit femur: a long-term study.

    PubMed

    Concannon, M J; Boschert, M T; Puckett, C L

    1997-06-01

    While traditional bone grafting is the standard for replacement of segmental bony defects, alternative options (avoiding morbidity of autologous grafts) are attractive and continue to be sought. This study attempted to determine whether demineralized bone powder could be used reliably to replace a significant bony deficit at a weight-bearing site. The long-term functional characteristics of this induced bone were analyzed to determine whether it maintained its strength and shape and reacted normally to physiologic stress over an extended period of time (12 months). In 55 New Zealand White rabbits, a 1-cm length of femur was removed (approximately 20 percent of the total length of the rabbit femur). The femur was then reconstructed with a titanium mandibular plate, leaving the gap intact. In 38 of the animals, this gap was filled with demineralized bone powder in an attempt to induce bone to form across the defect. In group 1 (n = 23), the mandibular plate remained in place for the duration of the study (12 months). In group 2 (n = 15), the plate was removed 8 weeks after placement of the demineralized bone powder, and the animals were followed for an additional 12 months. In group 3 (n = 10), nothing was placed within the bony gap. In group 4 (n = 7), the gap was repaired with autologous bone graft. All the animals that received demineralized bone powder completely filled the osteotomy gap with new bone within 6 to 8 weeks after implantation. None of control group 3 formed bone across the gap (p < 0.001). Eighty-six percent of control group 4 (autologous bone graft) successfully formed bone across the osteotomy gap. In addition, 90 percent of control group 3 had hardware failure within 8 weeks after surgery compared with 0 percent (0 of 38) of the group that received demineralized bone powder (p < 0.001). In group 1, analysis after 12 months revealed that the bone formed ultimately became thin and easily fractured, most likely because of shielding from stress

  2. Physical therapy in the postoperative of proximal femur fracture in elderly. Literature review

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Mariana Barquet; Alves, Débora Pinheiro Lédio; Mercadante, Marcelo Tomanik

    2013-01-01

    The proximal femoral fracture in the elderly is a serious public health problem. Surgical treatment of this fracture is used to reduce morbidity, together with postoperative physical therapy. The objective was to conduct a systematic review of physical therapy protocols in postoperative for fractures of the proximal femur in elderly. We selected randomized controlled trials in elderly in the past 10 years, in Portuguese and English. There were 14 articles in the literature. Physical therapy has an important role in functional recovery of the elderly. Level of Evidence I, Systematic Review RCTs (Study results were homogenous). PMID:24453665

  3. Principles of management and results of treating the fractured femur during and after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Greidanus, Nelson V; Mitchell, Philip A; Masri, Bassam A; Garbuz, Donald S; Duncan, Clive P

    2003-01-01

    The management of fractures of the femur during and after total hip arthroplasty can be difficult, and treatment can be fraught with complications. The ideal scenario would be one in which these fractures are prevented. It is important that the surgeon has a through understanding of the principles of managing these fractures and has access to a variety of fixation and prosthetic devices and allograft bone when necessary in order to provide the best treatment. Because periprosthetic fractures range from the very simple (requiring no surgical intervention) to the complex (requiring major revision), a classification system of these fractures aids in understanding both the principles of management and results of treatment.

  4. The prevention of periprosthetic fractures of the femur during and after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Philip A; Greidanus, Nelson V; Masri, Bassam A; Garbuz, Donald S; Duncan, Clive P

    2003-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of periprosthetic fractures of the femur associated with total hip arthroplasty (THA) is caused by several factors, including the increasing use of cementless prostheses in both primary and revision procedure, the rise in THAs in younger patients, who are more at risk of high-energy trauma, and the increasing longevity of elderly patients after THA. With approximately 200,000 THAs performed annually in North America, fracture prevention is extremely important for the individual patient and has a significant impact on the health care system.

  5. High Salt Diets, Bone Strength and Mineral Content of Mature Femur After Skeletal Unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Michael T. C.

    1998-01-01

    It is known that high salt diets increase urinary calcium (Ca) loss, but it is not known whether this effect weakens bone during space flight. The Bone Hormone Lab has studied the effect of high salt diets on Ca balance and whole body Ca in a space flight model (2,8). Neither the strength nor mineral content of the femurs from these studies has been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of high salt diets (HiNa) and skeletal unloading on femoral bone strength and bone mineral content (BMC) in mature rats.

  6. [Age-related force distribution at the proximal end of the femur in normally growing children].

    PubMed

    Heimkes, B; Posel, P; Plitz, W; Zimmer, M

    1997-01-01

    In a group of normally developed children and adolescents the age dependent distribution of forces at the proximal end of the femur was to be described. The results should explain why the shape of the proximal end of the femur changes significantly during the time of growth and why the neck shaft angle decreases. The method applied was the biomechanical computation analyzing in the coronal plane according to Pauwels' biomechanical hip model. The necessary age relevant data was derived from 675 anteroposterior pelvis radiographs of healthy children of both sexes and of varying age. The following can be put down as a result: 1. The proximal end of the femur is stressed by two resultant forces: the hip resultant force R controls the growth of the capital growth plate, the trochanteric resultant force RT regulates the growth of the greater trochanter growth plate. 2. During the growing period the hip resultant force R adjusts itself less vertically: during the second year of life it inclines at an average of 11,6 degrees towards the vertical, towards the end of the growing period it is incident with an inclination angle of 20 degrees. With the older child the magnitude of the hip resultant force R decreases in relation to the exerting body weight. 3. During the time of growth the trochanteric resultant force RT maintains its direction stability with inclination angles of 50-52 degrees towards the vertical. Its magnitude increases significantly (in relation to the exerting body weight). 4. From age 2 to 10 the projected neck shaft angle decreases from an average of 148.2 degrees to 133.7 degrees and usually remains stable. It can be concluded that the shape of the proximal end of the femur is determined by the muscle forces stimulating the greater trochanter apophysis and by gravity. With increasing age the growth of the greater trochanter apophysis shifts the insertions of abductor muscles laterally. As a result the directions of the hip abductors and the hip resultant

  7. [Incidence of proximal femur fractures in relation to seasons of the year and weather].

    PubMed

    Burget, F; Pleva, L; Kudrna, K; Kudrnová, Z

    2012-01-01

    The opinion that proximal femur fractures occur mainly in the winter season and are related to slippery surfaces prevails in both the lay and medical communities. The elucidation of this relationship would lead to a better understanding of the aetiology of these fractures and may help to prevent them in the elderly population. In a retrospective study conducted at two departments, the occurrence of proximal femur fractures in patients 60+ years old in relation to weather conditions (air temperature and its humidity, atmospheric pressure, rain and mist) between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2005 was investigated. Patients with high-energy or pathological fractures were excluded. The results were evaluated by Statistika software. A total of 1720 patients were studied, of whom 1313 were women and 407 were men. The numbers of fractures did not differ significantly among either the seasons or months of the year. No correlation was found between the number of fractures and each of the weather characteristics (air temperature and its humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind speed and visibility). It is widely believed that hip fractures are connected with winter months and temperatures below zero. This is supported by several facts related to winter characteristics, such as slippery icy pavements, clumsiness due to warm bulky clothes, bodies affected by cold and thus predisposed to a fall and poorer visibility on shorter winter days. The effect of seasonal variation on hip fracture incidence has been investigated in 10 studies of which only one has taken the influence of daily temperature into consideration. All studies were conduced in the countries north of 40° latitude, i.e., in climatic conditions similar to our country, with temperatures falling below zero and ice-glazed pavements in winter months. Of them, six have found no relation between proximal femur fractures and weather conditions, two have reported an increased incidence of these fractures in winter months

  8. High Salt Diets, Bone Strength and Mineral Content of Mature Femur After Skeletal Unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Michael T. C.

    1998-01-01

    It is known that high salt diets increase urinary calcium (Ca) loss, but it is not known whether this effect weakens bone during space flight. The Bone Hormone Lab has studied the effect of high salt diets on Ca balance and whole body Ca in a space flight model (2,8). Neither the strength nor mineral content of the femurs from these studies has been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of high salt diets (HiNa) and skeletal unloading on femoral bone strength and bone mineral content (BMC) in mature rats.

  9. Long bone florid reactive periostitis ossificans: a case in the distal femur mimicking osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Azorín, Daniel; López-Pino, Miguel A; González-Mediero, Imelda; Epeldegui, Tomás; López-Barea, Fernando

    2008-11-01

    Florid reactive periostitis ossificans is a well-known benign lesion classically described in hands and feet which histopathological features can lead to a misdiagnosis of osteosarcoma. To the best of our knowledge, there is only one previous report of this lesion in a long bone. In this study we report a case of florid reactive periostitis ossificans located in the distal metaphysis of the left femur that histologically mimicked an osteosarcoma and discuss the differential diagnosis between these two entities to warn about a diagnostic pitfall.

  10. Late preterm: obstetric management.

    PubMed

    Meloni, Alessandra; Antonelli, Antonello; Deiana, Sara; Rocca, Alessio; Atzei, Alessandra; Paoletti, Anna Maria; Melis, Gian Benedetto

    2010-10-01

    Late preterm is the recommended definition for infants born at 34 0/7 to 36 6/7 weeks' gestation after the onset of the mother's last menstrual period. Late-preterm infants are known to have greater mortality and morbidity when compared with term infants during the neonatal period. Obstetric management plays a substantial role in influencing neonatal outcomes. We conducted a retrospective study on late-preterm births based on data collected by regional certificates of birth attendance, comparing overall data with those relative to our Department, the aim of our study was to evaluate if obstetric management, related to different delivery settings, could influence the prevalence and the method of delivery in late preterm gestational age. Preterm births represent about 10% of 25,011 births in Sardinia, and 72.6% of them are late preterm. Elective cesarean section results significantly higher in late preterm than in term deliveries. In our Department, both late-preterm delivery rate and elective cesarean sections rate were lower if compared with country region data. Obstetric management strategies play an important role in delaying deliveries and reducing late-preterm birth rates.

  11. Early Alterations in Bone Characteristics of Type I Diabetic Rat Femur: A Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Ozlem; Bilgin, Mehmet Dincer; Evis, Zafer; Pleshko, Nancy; Severcan, Feride

    2016-12-01

    Alterations in microstructure and mineral features can affect the mechanical and chemical properties of bones and their capacity to resist mechanical forces. Controversial results on diabetic bone mineral content have been reported and little is known about the structural alterations in collagen, maturation of apatite crystals, and carbonate content in diabetic bone. This current study is the first to report the mineral and organic properties of cortical, trabecular, and growth plate regions of diabetic rat femurs using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy and the Vickers microhardness test. Femurs of type I diabetic rats were embedded into polymethylmethacrylate blocks, which were used for FT-IR imaging and microhardness studies. A lower mineral content and microhardness, a higher carbonate content especially labile type carbonate content, and an increase in size and maturation of hydroxyapatite crystals were observed in diabetic femurs, which indicate that diabetes has detrimental effects on bone just like osteoporosis. There was a decrease in the level of collagen maturity in diabetic femurs, implying a decrease in bone collagen quality that may contribute to the decrease in tensile strength and bone fragility. Taken together, the findings revealed alterations in structure and composition of mineral and matrix components, and an altered quality and mechanical strength of rat femurs in an early stage of type I diabetes. The results contribute to the knowledge of structure-function relationship of mineral and matrix components in diabetic bone disorder and can further be used for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.

  12. Comparison of Percutaneous Cementoplasty with and Without Interventional Internal Fixation for Impending Malignant Pathological Fracture of the Proximal Femur

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Qing-Hua He, Cheng-Jian Wu, Chun-Gen Li, Yong-Dong Gu, Yi-Feng Wang, Tao Xiao, Quan-Ping Li, Ming-Hua

    2016-01-15

    PurposeTo compare the efficacy of percutaneous cementoplasty (PCP) with and without interventional internal fixation (IIF) on malignant impending pathological fracture of proximal femur.MethodsA total of 40 patients with malignant impending pathological fracture of proximal femur were selected for PCP and IIF (n = 19, group A) or PCP alone (n = 21, group B) in this non-randomized prospective study. Bone puncture needles were inserted into the proximal femur, followed by sequential installation of the modified trocar inner needles through the puncture needle sheath. Then, 15–45 ml cement was injected into the femur lesion.ResultsThe overall excellent and good pain relief rate during follow-ups were significantly higher in group A than that in group B (89 vs. 57 %, P = 0.034). The average change of VAS, ODI, KPS, and EFES in group A were significantly higher than those in group B at 1-, 3-, 6-month, 1-year (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, The stability of the treated femur was significantly higher in group A than that in group B (P < 0.05).ConclusionPCP and IIF were not only a safe and effective procedure, but resulted in greater pain relief, bone consolidation, and also reduced the risk of fracture than the currently recommended approach of PCP done on malignant proximal femoral tumor.

  13. Thermomechanical investigation of the cortical bone analogue in third-generation Sawbones femurs.

    PubMed

    Bell, C G R; Weinrauch, P; Crawford, R; Pearcy, M

    2007-02-01

    The mechanical properties of the short glass fibre reinforced (SGFR) epoxy resin used as the cortical bone analogue in the third-generation Sawbones femurs were investigated for use within orthopaedic benchtop tests. Tensile and four-point bending tests were used to assess the material properties of the SGFR epoxy at both room (22 'C) and body temperatures (37 degrees C). The 20 standardized specimens used for the materials testing were machined from third-generation Sawbones femurs. The flexural properties of the specimens were determined using ASTM D6272-02 and the tensile properties were obtained using ASTM D638-02. The mean (and standard deviation, or SD) values of the modulus of elasticity in four-point bending for room and body temperature specimens of 7.8 (0.64) GPa and 2.8 (0.66) GPa respectively were significantly different (P < 0.001). The mean (and SD) values of the modulus of elasticity in tension for the room and body temperature specimens of 9.4 (0.8) GPa and 5.4 (1.3) GPa respectively were also significantly different (P = 0.02). The modulus of elasticity of SGFR epoxy is highly temperature dependent. A reduction in the modulus of elasticity of up to 63 per cent was observed when increasing the temperature of the specimens from room to body temperature. SGFR epoxy Sawbones do not accurately represent the material properties of bone at body temperature.

  14. Effect of chromium on vertebrae, femur and calvaria of adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Sankaramanivel, S; Jeyapriya, R; Hemalatha, D; Djody, S; Arunakaran, J; Srinivasan, N

    2006-06-01

    Alloys of chromium have a long history of success in the surgical treatment of many orthopaedic defects. Nonetheless, prostheses loosening are commonly found around arthoplasties due to corrosion of metals. On this basis, it is hypothesized that chromium accumulation interferes with remodeling of bone. The present study aims to analyse the toxic effects of chromium on bone phosphatases in various regions of the bone in rats. Rats were treated with chromium intraperitoneally (0.5 mg/kg) in the form of potassium dichromate for 5 days. The accumulation of chromium is approximately 5.2-fold in the vertebrae, 8.9-fold in the femur and 8.7-fold in the calvaria, when compared to control. Chromium administration significantly reduced the activity of enzymes, eg, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). The study revealed a significant increase in the concentration of calcium, altered bone formation rate and bone morphology in the femur, vertebrae and calvaria. The interesting findings of the current study suggest altered bone turnover.

  15. Effects of chronic lead exposure on bone mineral properties in femurs of growing rats.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Lloret, Pedro; Lee, Ching Ming; Conti, María Inés; Terrizzi, Antonela Romina; González-López, Santiago; Martínez, María Pilar

    2017-02-15

    Lead exposure has been associated with several defective skeletal growth processes and bone mineral alterations. The aim of the present study is to make a more detailed description of the toxic effects of lead intoxication on bone intrinsic material properties as mineral composition, morphology and microstructural characteristics. For this purpose, Wistar rats were exposed (n=12) to 1000ppm lead acetate in drinking water for 90days while control group (n=8) were treated with sodium acetate. Femurs were examined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and micro-Computed Tomography (μCT). Results showed that femur from the lead-exposed rats had higher carbonate content in bone mineral and (Ca(2+)+Mg(2+)+ Na(+))/P ratio values, although no variations were observed in crystal maturity and crystallite size. From morphological analyses, lead exposure rats showed a decreased in trabecular bone surface and distribution while trabecular thickness and cortical area increased. These overall effects indicate a similar mechanism of bone maturation normally associated to age-related processes. These responses are correlated with the adverse actions induced by lead on the processes regulating bone turnover mechanism. This information may explain the osteoporosis diseases associated to lead intoxication as well as the risk of fracture observed in populations exposed to this toxicant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative Study of Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty for Femur Neck Fractures Treated with Cemented versus Cementless Stem

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung-Yun; Kim, Joo-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare and analyze clinical and radiologic outcomes of cemented versus cementless bipolar hemiarthroplasty for treatment of femur neck fractures. Materials and Methods A total of 180 patients aged 65 years and over older who underwent bipolar hemiarthroplasty for treatment of displaced femur neck fractures (Garden stage III, IV) from March 2009 to February 2014 were included in this study. Among the 180 patients, 115 were treated with cemented stems and 65 patients with cementless stems. Clinical outcomes assessed were: i) postoperative ambulatory status, ii) inguinal and thigh pain, and iii) complications. The radiologic outcome was femoral stem subsidence measured using postoperative simple X-ray. Results The cemented group had significantly lower occurrence of complications (postoperative infection, P=0.04) compared to the cementless group. There was no significant difference in postoperative ambulatory status, inguinal and thigh pain, and femoral stem subsidence. Conclusion For patients undergoing bipolar hemiarthroplasty, other than complications, there was no statistically significant difference in clinical or radiologic outcomes in our study. Selective use of cemented stem in bipolar hemiarthroplasty may be a desirable treatment method for patients with poor bone quality and higher risk of infections. PMID:28097110

  17. Sex Assessment Using the Femur and Tibia in Medieval Skeletal Remains from Ireland: Discriminant Function Analysis.

    PubMed

    Novak, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Sex determination based on discriminant function analysis of skeletal measurements is probably the most effective method for assessment of sex in archaeological and contemporary populations due to various reasons, but it also suffers from limitations such as population specificity. In this paper standards for sex assessment from the femur and tibia in the medieval Irish population are presented. Six femoral and six tibial measurements obtained from 56 male and 45 female skeletons were subjected to discriminant function analysis. Average accuracies obtained by this study range between 87.1 and 97%. The highest level of accuracy (97%) was achieved when using combined variables of the femur and tibia (maximum diameter of femoral head and circumference at tibial nutrient foramen), as well as two variables of the tibia (proximal epiphyseal breadth and circumference at nutrient foramen). Discriminant functions using a single variable provided accuracies between 87.1 and 96% with the circumference at the level of the tibial nutrient foramen providing the best separation. High accuracy rates obtained by this research correspond to the data recorded in other studies thus confirming the importance of discriminant function analysis in assessment of sex in both archaeological and forensic contexts.

  18. A Method to Estimate Cadaveric Femur Cortical Strains During Fracture Testing Using Digital Image Correlation.

    PubMed

    Rossman, Timothy; Uthamaraj, Susheil; Rezaei, Asghar; McEligot, Sean; Giambini, Hugo; Jasiuk, Iwona; Yaszemski, Michael J; Lu, Lichun; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2017-09-14

    This protocol describes the method using digital image correlation to estimate cortical strain from high speed video images of the cadaveric femoral surface obtained from mechanical testing. This optical method requires a texture of many contrasting fiduciary marks on a solid white background for accurate tracking of surface deformation as loading is applied to the specimen. Immediately prior to testing, the surface of interest in the camera view is painted with a water-based white primer and allowed to dry for several minutes. Then, a black paint is speckled carefully over the white background with special consideration for the even size and shape of the droplets. Illumination is carefully designed and set such that there is optimal contrast of these marks while minimizing reflections through the use of filters. Images were obtained through high speed video capture at up to 12,000 frames/s. The key images prior to and including the fracture event are extracted and deformations are estimated between successive frames in carefully sized interrogation windows over a specified region of interest. These deformations are then used to compute surface strain temporally during the fracture test. The strain data is very useful for identifying fracture initiation within the femur, and for eventual validation of proximal femur fracture strength models derived from Quantitative Computed Tomography-based Finite Element Analysis (QCT/FEA).

  19. Forensic Applicability of Femur Subtrochanteric Shape to Ancestry Assessment in Thai and White American Males.

    PubMed

    Tallman, Sean D; Winburn, Allysha P

    2015-09-01

    Ancestry assessment from the postcranial skeleton presents a significant challenge to forensic anthropologists. However, metric dimensions of the femur subtrochanteric region are believed to distinguish between individuals of Asian and non-Asian descent. This study tests the discriminatory power of subtrochanteric shape using modern samples of 128 Thai and 77 White American males. Results indicate that the samples' platymeric index distributions are significantly different (p≤0.001), with the Thai platymeric index range generally lower and the White American range generally higher. While the application of ancestry assessment methods developed from Native American subtrochanteric data results in low correct classification rates for the Thai sample (50.8-57.8%), adapting these methods to the current samples leads to better classification. The Thai data may be more useful in forensic analysis than previously published subtrochanteric data derived from Native American samples. Adapting methods to include appropriate geographic and contemporaneous populations increases the accuracy of femur subtrochanteric ancestry methods. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. Locking plate fixation of periprosthetic femur fractures with and without cerclage wires.

    PubMed

    Ebraheim, Nabil A; Sochacki, Kyle R; Liu, Xiaochen; Hirschfeld, Adam G; Liu, Jiayong

    2013-08-01

    The number of patients requiring knee and hip arthroplasty has been steadily increasing, and periprosthetic fractures are on the rise. Locking plates are the most common treatment for periprosthetic fractures, but the use of cerclage wires with locking plate fixation has been controversial. Forty-seven patients with periprosthetic femur fractures were reviewed retrospectively. Twenty-four patients received locking plate alone and twenty-three patients were treated with locking plate and cerclage wires. Patients were evaluated for clinical and radiographic signs of union at two, six, twelve, twenty-four, and forty-eight weeks postoperatively. The average follow-up time in the plate group was 9.4 ± 6.7 months, while it was 6.0 ± 4.2 months in the cerclage wire group. The time to union in the cerclage wire group (3.6 ± 1.0 months) was significantly less than the plate group (4.8 ± 2.6 months). The group with the cerclage wires had a significantly lower revision rate of 0% compared to 20.8%. There was no statistical significance of union rate and complication rate between the two groups. Cerclage wires used with locking plate fixation successfully treats periprosthetic fractures of the femur with faster time to union, less complication, and fewer revisions. © 2013 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Radiographic study on the anatomical characteristics of the proximal femur in Brazilian adults☆

    PubMed Central

    de Farias, Tércio Henrique Soares; Borges, Vinícius Quadros; de Souza, Eduardo Soares; Miki, Natália; Abdala, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Objective To ascertain the geometry of the femur in the Brazilian population by means of a radiographic study and to correlate the values with regard to sex and right/left side. Methods Five hundred anteroposterior radiographs of the pelvis of skeletally mature patients (250 of each sex) who did not present any osteoarthrosis, fractures or tumoral or infectious lesions were analyzed. The length and width of the femoral neck, length of the femoral axis, neck-shaft angle and femoral offset were measured. Results The following means were observed: 36.54 mm for the length of the femoral neck; 37.48 mm for the width of the femoral neck; 108.42 mm for the length of the femoral axis; 130.47° for the neck-shaft angle; and 44.4 mm for the femoral offset. Conclusion The mean values for the main measurements on the proximal femur in Brazilians differed from those of previous studies. It could also be shown that there was a statistically significant mean difference between men and women for all the variables, both on the left and on the right side, and that the men had greater means than the women. PMID:26229891

  2. [Treatment of adamantinoma of femur with limb preservation. A case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Carrera-Muiños, Aurelio; Díaz-González, Carlos; Monges-Jones, Jorge Enrique; Carballo-Zarate, Adrian; Colin-Carrasco, Josemaria

    2015-01-01

    Adamantinoma is a rare lesion of low-grade malignancy, and represents 1% of malignant bone tumours of bones, and is mainly located in two regions of the body, jaw (ameloblastoma), and lower extremities. The treatment of choice is surgery due to it being a radio- and chemotherapy-resistant neoplasia. A 39 year old male with a history of neonatal hydrocephalus with moderate psychomotor retardation. He began with pain in the posterior region of the left thigh for one year before admission, which was managed as posterior radicular syndrome. He had sudden intense pain on walking, that led him to fall over. In the examination, left pelvic limb with deformity in the distal third with increase in volume in the thigh, with pain to palpation, and presence of crackles in the distal third of the femur. A biopsy of the thigh was performed, with subsequent local wide excision + replacement of bone with cadaver bone and a central medullary nail. The final diagnosis was adamantinoma of femur. The adamantinomas are rare tumours. It is important to recognise this type of tumor from the beginning, since its prognosis is excellent in initial stages. It is important to have free margins as survival is very high. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Surgical treatment of skeletal metastatic lesions of the proximal femur: endoprosthesis or reconstruction nail?

    PubMed

    Wedin, R; Bauer, H C F

    2005-12-01

    We report positive and negative factors associated with the most commonly-used methods of reconstruction after pathological fracture of the proximal femur. The study was based on 142 patients treated surgically for 146 metastatic lesions between 1996 and 2003. The local rate of failure was 10.3% (15 of 146). Of 37 operations involving osteosynthetic devices, six failed (16.2%) compared with nine (8.3%) in 109 operations involving endoprostheses. Of nine cases of prosthetic failure, four were due to periprosthetic fractures and three to recurrent dislocation. In the osteosynthesis group, three (13.6%) of 22 reconstruction nails failed. The two-year risk of re-operation after any type of osteosynthesis was 0.35 compared with 0.18 after any type of endoprosthetic reconstruction (p = 0.07). Endoprosthetic reconstructions are preferable to the use of reconstruction nails and other osteosynthetic devices for the treatment of metastatic lesions in the proximal third of the femur.

  4. Evaluation of Decalcification Techniques for Rat Femurs Using HE and Immunohistochemical Staining

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haixia; Zhu, Ruyuan; Liu, Chenyue; Ma, Rufeng; Wang, Lili; Chen, Beibei; Li, Lin; Niu, Jianzhao; Mo, Fangfang; Fu, Min; Brömme, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    Aim. In routine histopathology, decalcification is an essential step for mineralized tissues. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of different decalcification solutions on the morphological and antigenicity preservation in Sprague Dawley (SD) rat femurs. Materials and Methods. Four different decalcification solutions were employed to remove the mineral substances from rat femurs, including 10% neutral buffered EDTA, 3% nitric acid, 5% nitric acid, and 8% hydrochloric acid/formic acid. Shaking and low temperature were used to process the samples. The stainings of hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and immunohistochemical (IHC) were employed to evaluate the bone morphology and antigenicity. Key Findings. Different decalcification solutions may affect the quality of morphology and the staining of paraffin-embedded sections in pathological examinations. Among four decalcifying solutions, 3% nitric acid is the best decalcifying agent for HE staining. 10% neutral buffered EDTA and 5% nitric acid are the preferred decalcifying agents for IHC staining. Significance. The current study investigated the effects of different decalcifying agents on the preservation of the bone structure and antigenicity, which will help to develop suitable protocols for the analyses of the bony tissue. PMID:28246608

  5. The Tribology of Explanted Hip Resurfacings Following Early Fracture of the Femur

    PubMed Central

    Lord, James K.; Langton, David J.; Nargol, Antoni V.F.; Meek, R.M. Dominic; Joyce, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    A recognized issue related to metal-on-metal hip resurfacings is early fracture of the femur. Most theories regarding the cause of fracture relate to clinical factors but an engineering analysis of failed hip resurfacings has not previously been reported. The objective of this work was to determine the wear volumes and surface roughness values of a cohort of retrieved hip resurfacings which were removed due to early femoral fracture, infection and avascular necrosis (AVN). Nine resurfacing femoral heads were obtained following early fracture of the femur, a further five were retrieved due to infection and AVN. All fourteen were measured for volumetric wear using a co-ordinate measuring machine. Wear rates were then calculated and regions of the articulating surface were divided into “worn” and “unworn”. Roughness values in these regions were measured using a non-contacting profilometer. The mean time to fracture was 3.7 months compared with 44.4 months for retrieval due to infection and AVN. Average wear rates in the early fracture heads were 64 times greater than those in the infection and AVN retrievals. Given the high wear rates of the early fracture components, such wear may be linked to an increased risk of femoral neck fracture. PMID:26501331

  6. A metric method for sex determination using the hipbone and the femur.

    PubMed

    Albanese, John

    2003-03-01

    Since the earliest descriptions of the pubis length measurement, it has been recognized that the location of the key landmark in the acetabulum has to be estimated. Using samples from the Terry Collection (n = 324) and the Coimbra Collection (n = 232), the purpose of this research is to, first, test the reproducibility of a new alternative to the traditional measurement of the pubis, and second, to use the best measurement of the pubis along with other measurements of the hipbone and femur to develop a metric method that can be used with confidence to determine the sex of individuals of various geographic origins and time periods. In this study, it was found that, first, the alternative pubis measurement, known as the superior pubis ramus length (SPRL), can be collected more reliably with less mean intra-observer error (0.57%) than the more commonly used manner of measuring the pubis (2.7%). Second, a logistic regression sex determination method using the SPRL, along with other measurements of the hipbone and femur, has an allocation accuracy of 90% to 98.5% (depending on the model used and the manner of testing) across independent samples. Third, traditional racial categorization was irrelevant to the accuracy of the method. Fourth, measurement error greater than 2% in the measurement of the pubis can be the difference between a correct and an incorrect allocation of sex, particularly in borderline cases.

  7. TOMOGRAFIC AND TENSIOMETRIC ASSESSMENT ON FEMURS FROM OOPHORECTOMIZED RATS SUBJECTED TO HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Martynetz, Fábio Alexandre; Pessole Biondo-Simões, Maria de Lourdes; Martynetz, Juliano Rodrigo; Martynetz, Tatiana Daher; Zimerman, Elise; Neto, Heraldo Mello

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the biomechanical and tomographic effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on femurs from rats subjected to induced menopause. Methods: Forty-five adult Wistar rats were divided equally into three groups. The first and second groups consisted of rats subjected to oophorectomy, and the third was the control group, consisting of nonoophorectomized rates. After verifying that hormone failure had occurred (exfoliative cytological test), only the first group received HRT, over a two-month period. After this period, the femurs were disarticulated and subjected to biomechanical tests in a universal testing machine to evaluate their strength, and were subjected to tomographic evaluation to determine the bone mineral density. Results: The exfoliative cytological test showed that hormone failure was induced in all the oophorectomized animals. A significant difference (p = 0.030) in maximum strength measurements was observed between the groups (higher in the group with HRT). Greater bone fragility was observed in the oophorectomized animals without HRT than in those with HRT (p = 0.010), in relation to the control group (p = 0.0107). There was greater bone strength in the oophorectomized rats with HRT than in those without HRT, and these values were similar to those of the control group (p = 0.179). In the tomographic evaluation, no significant differences were found between the groups (p = 0.625). Conclusion: A significant increase in bone strength was observed with the use of HRT. However, treatment with HRT did not show any significant change in bone mineral density. PMID:27019837

  8. An Uncemented Spreading Stem for the Fixation in the Metaphyseal Femur: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Daniel; Pumberger, Matthias; Fuchs, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment to restore full range of motion and full weight bearing after extensive femoral bone resection in patients with primary or metastatic femoral tumours is individually challenging. Especially when the remaining distal or proximal bone is very short, a rigid fixation of an implant is difficult to achieve due to the reverse funnel shape of the metaphysis. Herein, we present a novel implant design using a spreading mechanism in the distal part of the prosthesis for rigid, uncemented fixation in the remaining femoral bone after extensive tumour resection of the femur. We present the outcome of 5 female patients who underwent implantation of this spreading stem after extensive proximal or distal femoral bone resection. There was no radiological or clinical loosening or implant-related revision surgery in our follow-up (mean 21.46 months, range 3.5–46 months). This uncemented spreading stem may therefore represent an alternative option for fixation of a prosthetic device in the remaining metaphyseal femur. PMID:27293377

  9. Sodium tungstate alleviates biomechanical properties of diabetic rat femur via modulation of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Donmez, Baris O; Ozturk, Nihal; Sarikanat, Mehmet; Oguz, Nurettin; Sari, Ramazan; Ozdemir, Semir

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus leads to bone disorders such as osteopenia and osteoporosis that can increase fracture risk. On the other hand, sodium tungstate is an inorganic compound which exerts anti-diabetic activity in experimental studies due to its suggested insulin-mimetic or antioxidant activity. Therefore this study was designed to investigate the effect of tungstate on bone quality in diabetic rat femurs. The rats were divided into four groups: Control (C), tungstate-treated control (C+Tung), diabetes (STZ-D) and tungstate-treated diabetes (STZ-D+Tung). Diabetes mellitus was induced by single injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). The treated rats received 150 mg/kg/day of sodium tungstate for 12 weeks. Sodium tungstate achieved a little (17%) but significant reduction on blood glucose levels, while it didn't recover the reduced body weights of diabetic rats. In addition, impaired bone mechanical quality was reversed, despite the unchanged mineral density. Sodium tungstate administration significantly lowered the 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and restored the activity of tissue antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase in diabetic rats. On the other hand, glutathione levels didn't change in either case. These findings indicate that tungstate can improve the reduced mechanical quality of diabetic rat femurs due probably to reduction of reactive oxygen species and modulation of antioxidant enzymes as well as reduction in blood glucose levels.

  10. The Effect of Irreversible Electroporation on the Femur: Experimental Study in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yue; Zheng, Jingjing; Yan, Mingwei; Ding, Weidong; Xu, Kui; Fan, Qingyu; Li, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel ablation method that has been tested in humans with lung, prostate, kidney, liver, lymph node and presacral cancers. As a new non-thermal treatment, the use of IRE to ablate tumors in the musculoskeletal system might reduce the incidence of fractures. We aimed to determine the ablation threshold of cortical bone and to evaluate the medium- and long-term healing process and mechanical properties of the femur in a rabbit model post-IRE ablation. The ablation threshold of cortical bone was between 1090 V/cm and 1310 V/cm (120 pulses). IRE-ablated femurs displayed no detectable fracture but did exhibit signs of recovery, including osteoblast regeneration, angiogenesis and bone remodeling. In the ablation area, revascularization appeared at 4 weeks post-IRE. Osteogenic activity peaked 8 weeks post-IRE and remained high at 12 weeks. The mechanical strength decreased briefly 4 weeks post-IRE but returned to normal levels within 8 weeks. Our experiment revealed that IRE ablation preserved the structural integrity of the bone cortex, and the ablated bone was able to regenerate rapidly. IRE may hold unique promise for in situ bone tissue ablation because rapid revascularization and active osteogenesis in the IRE ablation area are possible. PMID:26655843

  11. What is the role of bosentan in healing of femur fractures in a rat model?

    PubMed

    Aydin, Ali; Halici, Zekai; Akpinar, Erol; Aksakal, A Murat; Saritemur, Murat; Yayla, Muhammed; Kunak, C Semih; Cadirci, Elif; Atmaca, H Tarik; Karcioglu, S Sena

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects bosentan (which is a strong vasoconstrictor) on bone fracture pathophysiology, and investigate the roles of the nonselective endothelin 1 receptor blocker bosentan on the bone fractures formed in rats through radiographic, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical methods. The rats were divided into three groups (six rats in each group): a femoral fracture control group, a femoral fracture plus bosentan at 50 mg/kg group, and a femoral fracture plus bosentan at 100 mg/kg group. The femoral fracture model was established by transversely cutting the femur at the midsection. After manual reduction, the fractured femur was fixed with intramedullary Kirschner wires. The radiographic healing scores of the bosentan 100 and 50 mg/kg groups were significantly better that those of the fracture control group. The fracture callus percent of new bone in the bosentan 100 mg/kg group was significantly greater than that in the control group. Also, semiquantitative analysis showed higher positive vascular endothelial growth factor and osteocalcin staining and lower positive endothelin receptor type A staining in the treatment groups than in the control group. Bosentan treatment also decreased tissue endothelin 1 expression relative to that in the fracture control group. As a result of our study, the protective effect of bosentan was shown in experimental femoral fracture healing in rats by radiographic, histopathologic, and molecular analyses.

  12. Associated ilium and femur from Koobi Fora, Kenya, and postcranial diversity in early Homo.

    PubMed

    Ward, Carol V; Feibel, Craig S; Hammond, Ashley S; Leakey, Louise N; Moffett, Elizabeth A; Plavcan, J Michael; Skinner, Matthew M; Spoor, Fred; Leakey, Meave G

    2015-04-01

    During the evolution of hominins, it is generally accepted that there was a shift in postcranial morphology between Australopithecus and the genus Homo. Given the scarcity of associated remains of early Homo, however, relatively little is known about early Homo postcranial morphology. There are hints of postcranial diversity among species, but our knowledge of the nature and extent of potential differences is limited. Here we present a new associated partial ilium and femur from Koobi Fora, Kenya, dating to 1.9 Ma (millions of years ago) that is clearly attributable to the genus Homo but documents a pattern of morphology not seen in eastern African early Homo erectus. The ilium and proximal femur share distinctive anatomy found only in Homo. However, the geometry of the femoral midshaft and contour of the pelvic inlet do not resemble that of any specimens attributed to H. erectus from eastern Africa. This new fossil confirms the presence of at least two postcranial morphotypes within early Homo, and documents diversity in postcranial morphology among early Homo species that may reflect underlying body form and/or adaptive differences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Computational study of Wolff's law with trabecular architecture in the human proximal femur using topology optimization.

    PubMed

    Jang, In Gwun; Kim, Il Yong

    2008-08-07

    In the field of bone adaptation, it is believed that the morphology of bone is affected by its mechanical loads, and bone has self-optimizing capability; this phenomenon is well known as Wolff's law of the transformation of bone. In this paper, we simulated trabecular bone adaptation in the human proximal femur using topology optimization and quantitatively investigated the validity of Wolff's law. Topology optimization iteratively distributes material in a design domain producing optimal layout or configuration, and it has been widely and successfully used in many engineering fields. We used a two-dimensional micro-FE model with 50 microm pixel resolution to represent the full trabecular architecture in the proximal femur, and performed topology optimization to study the trabecular morphological changes under three loading cases in daily activities. The simulation results were compared to the actual trabecular architecture in previous experimental studies. We discovered that there are strong similarities in trabecular patterns between the computational results and observed data in the literature. The results showed that the strain energy distribution of the trabecular architecture became more uniform during the optimization; from the viewpoint of structural topology optimization, this bone morphology may be considered as an optimal structure. We also showed that the non-orthogonal intersections were constructed to support daily activity loadings in the sense of optimization, as opposed to Wolff's drawing.

  14. Cemented endoprosthetic replacement for metastatic bone disease in the proximal femur.

    PubMed

    Selek, Hakan; Başarir, Kerem; Yildiz, Yusuf; Sağlik, Yener

    2008-01-01

    In long bones, the most common site for metastases is the proximal femur. For lesions involving this region, osteosynthetic devices frequently fail, and for this reason, endoprosthetic reconstruction may be the optimal choice for treatment. Here, we present a series of 44 patients in whom 45 endoprosthetic reconstructions were performed for metastatic disease. In 28 patients (63.63%), endoprosthetic reconstruction was performed for pathologic fractures, and in 16 patients (36.37%), it was performed for impending fractures indicated by complaints of pain and problems with walking. Full weight bearing was achieved in the early postoperative period in 72.09% of our patients, and sufficient pain control was obtained in all patients. Four patients did not survive past the first 72 hours after surgery, and 11 more patients died within 2 months after surgery. A total of 29 patients (65.9%) survived to the 2-month follow-up visit, and of these, only 12 patients (27.2%) survived past the first postoperative year. We believe that in patients with metastatic disease in the proximal femur, endoprosthetic reconstruction can provide early and stable fixation with pain reduction and good functional results.

  15. Confocal scanning optical microscopy of a 3-million-year-old Australopithecus afarensis femur.

    PubMed

    Bromage, T G; Goldman, H M; McFarlin, S C; Perez Ochoa, A; Boyde, A

    2009-01-01

    Portable confocal scanning optical microscopy (PCSOM) has been specifically developed for the noncontact and nondestructive imaging of early human fossil hard tissues, which here we describe and apply to a 3-million-year-old femur from the celebrated Ethiopian skeleton, "Lucy," referred to Australopithecus afarensis. We examine two bone tissue parameters that demonstrate the potential of this technology. First, subsurface reflection images from intact bone reveal bone cell spaces, the osteocyte lacunae, whose density is demonstrated to scale negatively with body size, reflecting aspects of metabolism and organismal life history. Second, images of a naturally fractured cross section near to Lucy's femoral mid-shaft, which match in sign those of transmitted circularly polarized light, reveal relative collagen fiber orientation patterns that are an important indicator of femoral biomechanical efficacy. Preliminary results indicate that Lucy was characterized by metabolic constraints typical for a primate her body size and that in her femur she was adapted to habitual bipedalism. Limitations imposed by the transport and invasive histology of unique or rare fossils motivated development of the PCSOM so that specimens may be examined wherever and whenever nondestructive imaging is required.

  16. Treatment of a Femur Nonunion with Microsurgical Corticoperiosteal Pedicled Flap from the Medial Femoral Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Guzzini, Matteo; Guidi, Marco; Civitenga, Carolina; Ferri, Germano; Ferretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The vascularized corticoperiosteal flap is harvested from the medial femoral condyle and it is nourished by the articular branch of the descending genicular artery and the superomedial genicular artery. This flap is usually harvested as a free flap for the reconstruction of bone defects at forearm, distal radius, carpus, hand, and recently at lower limb too. Case Report. A 50-year-old Caucasian man referred to our department for hypertrophic nonunion of the distal femur, refractory to the conservative treatments. The first surgical choice was the revision of the nail and the bone reconstruction with a corticoperiosteal pedicled flap from the medial femoral condyle. We considered union to have occurred 3.5 months after surgery when radiographs showed bridging of at least three of the four bony cortices and clinically the patient was able to walk with full weight bearing without any pain. At the last follow-up (25 months), the patient was completely satisfied with the procedure. Discussion. The corticoperiosteal flap allows a faster healing of fractures with a minimal morbidity at the donor site. We suggest that the corticoperiosteal pedicled flap graft is a reliable and effective treatment for distal femur nonunion. PMID:27064589

  17. Evaluation of Decalcification Techniques for Rat Femurs Using HE and Immunohistochemical Staining.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haixia; Zhu, Ruyuan; Liu, Chenyue; Ma, Rufeng; Wang, Lili; Chen, Beibei; Li, Lin; Niu, Jianzhao; Zhao, Dandan; Mo, Fangfang; Fu, Min; Brömme, Dieter; Zhang, Dongwei; Gao, Sihua

    2017-01-01

    Aim. In routine histopathology, decalcification is an essential step