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Sample records for late phase immunity

  1. Inhibitory effect of heat-killed Lactobacillus strain on immunoglobulin E-mediated degranulation and late-phase immune reactions of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Takeshi

    2010-12-01

    This study investigated the in vitro effect of Lactobacillus strains, a major group of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, on immunoglobulin E (IgE)- and antigen-induced mast cell degranulation and subsequent gene expression. Bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) from DBA/2 mice were cultured with heat-killed Lactobacillus strains for 24 h. Some strains significantly inhibited IgE- and antigen-induced β-hexosaminidase release from BMMCs. Furthermore, Lactobacillus reuteri NBRC 15892, which exhibited the strongest inhibitory activity, significantly reduced the elevated interleukin (IL)-4, IL-13, tumor necrosis factor-α, and cyclooxygenase-2 expression levels that was induced by 1-2 h of stimulation with IgE and antigens. The suppressive effect of NBRC 15892 strain on BMMC degranulation was significantly reduced in the presence of a toll-like receptor (TLR)2-neutralizing antibody. In addition, downregulation of cell surface FcεRIα expression was observed after 6 h of NBRC 15892 treatment. These results suggest that some Lactobacillus strains inhibited IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation and subsequent late-phase reactions involving mast cells via a TLR2-dependent mechanism with FcεRIα downregulation.

  2. Late-time cosmological phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the potential galaxy formation and large scale structure problems of objects existing at high redshifts (Z approx. greater than 5), structures existing on scales of 100 M pc as well as velocity flows on such scales, and minimal microwave anisotropies ((Delta)T/T) (approx. less than 10(exp -5)) can be solved if the seeds needed to generate structure form in a vacuum phase transition after decoupling. It is argued that the basic physics of such a phase transition is no more exotic than that utilized in the more traditional GUT scale phase transitions, and that, just as in the GUT case, significant random Gaussian fluctuations and/or topological defects can form. Scale lengths of approx. 100 M pc for large scale structure as well as approx. 1 M pc for galaxy formation occur naturally. Possible support for new physics that might be associated with such a late-time transition comes from the preliminary results of the SAGE solar neutrino experiment, implying neutrino flavor mixing with values similar to those required for a late-time transition. It is also noted that a see-saw model for the neutrino masses might also imply a tau neutrino mass that is an ideal hot dark matter candidate. However, in general either hot or cold dark matter can be consistent with a late-time transition.

  3. Late-time cosmological phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1990-11-01

    It is shown that the potential galaxy formation and large-scale structure problems of objects existing at high redshifts (Z {approx gt} 5), structures existing on scales of 100M pc as well as velocity flows on such scales, and minimal microwave anisotropies ({Delta}T/T) {approx lt} 10{sup {minus}5} can be solved if the seeds needed to generate structure form in a vacuum phase transition after decoupling. It is argued that the basic physics of such a phase transition is no more exotic than that utilized in the more traditional GUT scale phase transitions, and that, just as in the GUT case, significant random gaussian fluctuations and/or topological defects can form. Scale lengths of {approximately}100M pc for large-scale structure as well as {approximately}1 M pc for galaxy formation occur naturally. Possible support for new physics that might be associated with such a late-time transition comes from the preliminary results of the SAGE solar neutrino experiment, implying neutrino flavor mixing with values similar to those required for a late-time transition. It is also noted that a see-saw model for the neutrino masses might also imply a tau neutrino mass that is an ideal hot dark matter candidate. However, in general either hot or cold dark matter can be consistent with a late-time transition. 47 refs., 2 figs.

  4. A nonequilibrium phase transition in immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Qi, An-Shen

    2004-07-01

    The dynamics of immune response correlated to signal transduction in immune thymic cells (T cells) is studied. In particular, the problem of the phosphorylation of the immune-receptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAM) is explored. A nonlinear model is established on the basis of experimental observations. The behaviours of the model can be well analysed using the concepts of nonequilibrium phase transitions. In addition, the Riemann-Hugoniot cusp catastrophe is demonstrated by the model. Due to the application of the theory of nonequilibrium phase transitions, the biological phenomena can be clarified more precisely. The results can also be used to further explain the signal transduction and signal discrimination of an important type of immune T cell.

  5. EXTREMELY LARGE EUV LATE PHASE OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kai; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong; Zhang, Jie; Cheng, Xin

    2015-03-20

    The second peak in the Fe xvi 33.5 nm line irradiance observed during solar flares by the Extreme-Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) is known as the EUV late phase. Our previous paper in 2013 by Liu et al. found that the main emissions in the late phase are originated from large-scale loop arcades that are closely connected to but different from the post-flare loops (PFLs), and we also proposed that a long cooling process without additional heating could explain the late phase. In this paper, we define the extremely large late phase because it not only has a bigger peak in the warm 33.5 irradiance profile, but also releases more EUV radiative energy than the main phase. Through detailed inspection of the EUV images from three points of view, it was discovered that aside from the later-phase loop arcades, the main contributor of the extremely large late phase is a hot structure that fails to erupt. This hot structure is identified as a flux rope, which is quickly energized by the flare reconnection and later on continuously produces the thermal energy during the gradual phase. Together with the late-phase loop arcades, the flux rope failing to erupt with the additional heating create the extremely large EUV late phase.

  6. Extremely Large EUV Late Phase of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Wang, Yuming; Zhang, Jie; Cheng, Xin; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong

    2015-04-01

    The second peak in the Fe XVI 33.5 nm line irradiance observed during solar flares by Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) is known as Extreme UltraViolet (EUV) late phase. Our previous paper found that the main emissions in the late phase are originated from large-scale loop arcades that are closely connected to but different from the post flare loops (PFLs), and we also proposed that a long cooling process without additional heating could explain the late phase. In this paper, we define the extremely large late phase because it not only has a bigger peak in the warm 33.5 irradiance profile, but also releases more EUV radiative energy than the main phase. Through detailedly inspecting the EUV images from three point-of-view, it is found that, besides the later phase loop arcades, the more contribution of the extremely large late phase is from a hot structure that fails to erupt. This hot structure is identified as a flux rope, which is quickly energized by the flare reconnection and later on continuously produces the thermal energy during the gradual phase. Together with the late-phase loop arcades, the fail to erupt flux rope with the additional heating creates the extremely large EUV late phase.

  7. Extremely Large EUV Late Phase of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Wang, Yuming; Zhang, Jie; Cheng, Xin; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong

    2015-03-01

    The second peak in the Fe xvi 33.5 nm line irradiance observed during solar flares by the Extreme-Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) is known as the EUV late phase. Our previous paper in 2013 by Liu et al. found that the main emissions in the late phase are originated from large-scale loop arcades that are closely connected to but different from the post-flare loops (PFLs), and we also proposed that a long cooling process without additional heating could explain the late phase. In this paper, we define the extremely large late phase because it not only has a bigger peak in the warm 33.5 irradiance profile, but also releases more EUV radiative energy than the main phase. Through detailed inspection of the EUV images from three points of view, it was discovered that aside from the later-phase loop arcades, the main contributor of the extremely large late phase is a hot structure that fails to erupt. This hot structure is identified as a flux rope, which is quickly energized by the flare reconnection and later on continuously produces the thermal energy during the gradual phase. Together with the late-phase loop arcades, the flux rope failing to erupt with the additional heating create the extremely large EUV late phase.

  8. The late maintenance of hippocampal LTP: requirements, phases, 'synaptic tagging', 'late-associativity' and implications.

    PubMed

    Reymann, Klaus G; Frey, Julietta U

    2007-01-01

    Our review focuses on the mechanisms which enable the late maintenance of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP; >3h), a phenomenon which is thought to underlie prolonged memory. About 20 years ago we showed for the first time that the maintenance of LTP - like memory storage--depends on intact protein synthesis and thus, consists of at least two temporal phases. Here we concentrate on mechanisms required for the induction of the transient early-LTP and of the protein synthesis-dependent late-LTP. Our group has shown that the induction of late-LTP requires the associative activation of heterosynaptic inputs, i.e. the synergistic activation of glutamatergic and modulatory, reinforcing inputs within specific, effective time windows. The induction of late-LTP is characterized by novel, late-associative properties such as 'synaptic tagging' and 'late-associative reinforcement'. Both phenomena require the associative setting of synaptic tags as well as the availability of plasticity-related proteins (PRPs) and they are restricted to functional dendritic compartments, in general. 'Synaptic tagging' guarantees input specificity and thus the specific processing of afferent signals for the establishment of late-LTP. 'Late-associative reinforcement' describes a process where early-LTP by the co-activation of modulatory inputs can be transformed into late-LTP in activated synapses where a tag is set. Recent evidence from behavioral experiments, which studied processes of emotional and cognitive reinforcement of LTP, point to the physiological relevance of the above mechanisms during cellular and system's memory formation.

  9. Domain wall formation in late-time phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Wang, Yun

    1992-01-01

    We examine domain wall formulation in late time phase transitions. We find that in the invisible axion domain wall phenomenon, thermal effects alone are insufficient to drive different parts of the disconnected vacuum manifold. This suggests that domain walls do not form unless either there is some supplemental (but perhaps not unreasonable) dynamics to localize the scalar field responsible for the phase transition to the low temperature maximum (to an extraordinary precision) before the onset of the phase transition, or there is some non-thermal mechanism to produce large fluctuations in the scalar field. The fact that domain wall production is not a robust prediction of late time transitions may suggest future directions in model building.

  10. LIMP-2 Links Late Phagosomal Trafficking with the Onset of the Innate Immune Response to Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-Marín, Eugenio; Fernández-Prieto, Lorena; Rodriguez-Del Rio, Estela; Madrazo-Toca, Fidel; Reinheckel, Thomas; Saftig, Paul; Alvarez-Dominguez, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    The innate immune response to Listeria monocytogenes depends on phagosomal bacterial degradation by macrophages. Here, we describe the role of LIMP-2, a lysosomal type III transmembrane glycoprotein and scavenger-like protein, in Listeria phagocytosis. LIMP-2-deficient mice display a macrophage-related defect in Listeria innate immunity. They produce less acute phase pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, MCP-1, TNF-α, and IL-6 but normal levels of IL-12, IL-10, and IFN-γ and a 25-fold increase in susceptibility to Listeria infection. This macrophage defect results in a low listericidal potential, poor response to TNF-α activation signals, impaired phago-lysosome transformation into antigen-processing compartments, and uncontrolled LM cytosolic growth that fails to induce normal levels of acute phase pro-inflammatory cytokines. LIMP-2 transfection of CHO cells confirmed that LIMP-2 participates in the degradation of Listeria within phagosomes, controls the late endosomal/lysosomal fusion machinery, and is linked to the activation of Rab5a. Therefore, the role of LIMP-2 appears to be connected to the TNF-α-dependent and early activation of Listeria macrophages through internal signals linking the regulation of late trafficking events with the onset of the innate Listeria immune response. PMID:21123180

  11. MIF is necessary for late-stage melanoma patient MDSC immune suppression and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yaddanapudi, Kavitha; Rendon, Beatriz E.; Lamont, Gwyneth; Kim, Eun Jung; Al Rayyan, Numan; Richie, Jamaal; Albeituni, Sabrin; Waigel, Sabine; Wise, Ashley; Mitchell, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Highly aggressive cancers “entrain” innate and adaptive immune cells to suppress anti-tumor lymphocyte responses. Circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) constitute the bulk of monocytic immunosuppressive activity in late stage melanoma patients. Previous studies revealed that monocyte-derived macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is necessary for the immune suppressive function of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and MDSCs in mouse models of melanoma. In the current study we sought to determine whether MIF contributes to human melanoma MDSC induction and T-cell immunosuppression using melanoma patient-derived MDSCs and an ex vivo co-culture model of human melanoma-induced MDSC. We now report that circulating MDSCs isolated from late stage melanoma patients are reliant upon MIF for suppression of antigen-independent T-cell activation and that MIF is necessary for maximal reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in these cells. Moreover, inhibition of MIF results in a functional reversion from immune suppressive MDSC to an immunostimulatory dendritic cell (DC)-like phenotype that is at least partly due to reductions in MDSC prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). These findings indicate that monocyte-derived MIF is centrally involved in human monocytic MDSC induction/immune suppressive function and that therapeutic targeting of MIF may provide a novel means of inducing anti-tumor DC responses in late stage melanoma patients. PMID:26603621

  12. Endogenous cortisol regulates immunoglobulin E-dependent late phase reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Herrscher, R F; Kasper, C; Sullivan, T J

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the impact that physiological variation in serum cortisol has on IgE-mediated events, 10 atopic subjects underwent cutaneous antigen challenge with measurement of the early phase wheal (EPW) at 20 min and the late phase reaction (LPR) at 6 h. All subjects were challenged during control conditions between 8:00 and 9:00 a.m. Repeat challenges were performed in five subjects at 6:00 p.m. and in eight subjects after ingestion of metyrapone, a specific inhibitor of cortisol synthesis. Compared with control values, mean serum cortisol was suppressed in the evening and after metyrapone (P less than 0.05 all time points). No effect was seen on the EPW, but mean LPR diameters at three antigen dilutions were significantly increased by cortisol suppression (P less than 0.05). Replacement doses of hydrocortisone given in the evening and with metyrapone abrogated these increases. Blinded analysis of LPR biopsies from cortisol-suppressed subjects revealed increases in leukocytoclasis (P less than or equal to 0.0001), interstitial leukocytes (P less than or equal to 0.01), and eosinophils (P less than or equal to 0.04). These results indicate that physiological levels of serum cortisol can regulate IgE-dependent cutaneous inflammation by affecting the expression of cellular events at late phase sites. Images PMID:1644926

  13. Endogenous cortisol regulates immunoglobulin E-dependent late phase reactions.

    PubMed

    Herrscher, R F; Kasper, C; Sullivan, T J

    1992-08-01

    To investigate the impact that physiological variation in serum cortisol has on IgE-mediated events, 10 atopic subjects underwent cutaneous antigen challenge with measurement of the early phase wheal (EPW) at 20 min and the late phase reaction (LPR) at 6 h. All subjects were challenged during control conditions between 8:00 and 9:00 a.m. Repeat challenges were performed in five subjects at 6:00 p.m. and in eight subjects after ingestion of metyrapone, a specific inhibitor of cortisol synthesis. Compared with control values, mean serum cortisol was suppressed in the evening and after metyrapone (P less than 0.05 all time points). No effect was seen on the EPW, but mean LPR diameters at three antigen dilutions were significantly increased by cortisol suppression (P less than 0.05). Replacement doses of hydrocortisone given in the evening and with metyrapone abrogated these increases. Blinded analysis of LPR biopsies from cortisol-suppressed subjects revealed increases in leukocytoclasis (P less than or equal to 0.0001), interstitial leukocytes (P less than or equal to 0.01), and eosinophils (P less than or equal to 0.04). These results indicate that physiological levels of serum cortisol can regulate IgE-dependent cutaneous inflammation by affecting the expression of cellular events at late phase sites.

  14. Light sterile neutrinos from a late phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchi, Luca

    2016-12-01

    Light sterile neutrinos represent a well-motivated extension of the 3-neutrino paradigm. However, the impressive agreement between standard cosmology and data casts doubts on their existence. Here, we present a class of scenarios that robustly avoids this tension. In these models the sterile neutrinos are light, chiral states of a new sector interacting with the Standard Model via the right-handed neutrino portal, and crucially active-sterile neutrino oscillations require a phase transition in the hidden sector. We explore the hidden-couplings/critical-temperature plane and identify regions where several sterile neutrinos can be accommodated. A late phase transition is usually preferred and may also ward off a potential threat posed by the formation of topologically stable defects.

  15. Regulation of the acute phase and immune responses

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal, P.B.; Grieninger, G.; Tosato, G.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the conference entitled Regulation of the acute phase and immune responses: Interleukin-L. Topics covered include: Interferon-B{sub 2}/26kDa Protein, Regulation of acute phase liver gene expression, and Genetics and regulation of expression of IL-6.

  16. Identification and analysis of immune-related transcriptome in Asian seabass Lates calcarifer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fish diseases caused by pathogens are limiting their production and trade, affecting the economy generated by aquaculture. Innate immunity system is the first line of host defense in opposing pathogenic organisms or any other foreign material. For identification of immune-related genes in Asian seabass Lates calcarifer, an important marine foodfish species, we injected bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a commonly used elicitor of innate immune responses to eight individuals at the age of 35 days post-hatch and applied the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technique to selectively amplify spleen cDNA of differentially expressed genes. Results Sequencing and bioinformatic analysis of 3351 ESTs from two SSH libraries yielded 1692 unique transcripts. Of which, 618 transcripts were unknown/novel genes and the remaining 1074 were similar to 743 known genes and 105 unannotated mRNA sequences available in public databases. A total of 161 transcripts were classified to the category "response to stimulus" and 115 to "immune system process". We identified 25 significantly up-regulated genes (including 2 unknown transcripts) and 4 down-regulated genes associated with immune-related processes upon challenge with LPS. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed the differential expression of these genes after LPS challenge. Conclusions The present study identified 1692 unique transcripts upon LPS challenge for the first time in Asian seabass by using SSH, sequencing and bioinformatic analysis. Some of the identified transcripts are vertebrate homologues and others are hitherto unreported putative defence proteins. The obtained immune-related genes may allow for a better understanding of immunity in Asian seabass, carrying out detailed functional analysis of these genes and developing strategies for efficient immune protection against infections in Asian seabass. PMID:20525308

  17. Acute brief heat stress in late gestation alters neonatal calf innate immune functions.

    PubMed

    Strong, R A; Silva, E B; Cheng, H W; Eicher, S D

    2015-11-01

    Heat stress, as one of the environmental stressors affecting the dairy industry, compromises the cow milk production, immune function, and reproductive system. However, few studies have looked at how prenatal heat stress (HS) affects the offspring. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of HS during late gestation on calf immunity. Calves were born to cows exposed to evaporative cooling (CT) or HS (cyclic 23-35°C) for 1 wk at 3 wk before calving. Both bull and heifer calves (CT, n=10; HS, n=10) were housed in similar environmental temperatures after birth. Both CT and HS calves received 3.78 L of pooled colostrum within 12 h after birth and were fed the same diet throughout the study. In addition to tumor necrosis factor α, IL-1β, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), and toll-like receptor (TLR)2, and TLR4 mRNA expression, the expression of CD14(+) and CD18(+) cells, and DEC205(+) dendritic cells were determined in whole blood samples at d 0, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28. The neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio, differential cell counts, and the hematocrit were also determined. During late gestation, the HS cows had greater respiration rates, rectal temperatures, and tended to spend more time standing compared with the CT cows. The HS calves had less expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and TLR2 and greater levels of IL-1β, IL-1RA, and TLR4 compared with CT calves. The HS calves also had a greater percentage of CD18(+) cells compared with the CT calves. Additionally, a greater percentage of neutrophils and lesser percentage of lymphocytes were in the HS calves compared with the CT calves. The results indicate that biomarkers of calves' immunity are affected in the first several weeks after birth by HS in the dam during late gestation.

  18. PRR11 regulates late-S to G2/M phase progression and induces premature chromatin condensation (PCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chundong; Zhang, Ying; Li, Yi; Zhu, Huifang; Wang, Yitao; Cai, Wei; Zhu, Jiang; Ozaki, Toshinori; Bu, Youquan

    2015-03-13

    Recently, we have demonstrated that proline-rich protein 11 (PRR11) is a novel tumor-related gene product likely implicated in the regulation of cell cycle progression as well as lung cancer development. However, its precise role in cell cycle progression remains unclear. In the present study, we have further investigated the expression pattern and functional implication of PRR11 during cell cycle in detail in human lung carcinoma-derived H1299 cells. According to our immunofluorescence study, PRR11 was expressed largely in cytoplasm, the amount of PRR11 started to increase in the late S phase, and was retained until just before mitotic telophase. Consistent with those observations, siRNA-mediated knockdown of PRR11 caused a significant cell cycle arrest in the late S phase. Intriguingly, the treatment with dNTPs further augmented PRR11 silencing-mediated S phase arrest. Moreover, knockdown of PRR11 also resulted in a remarkable retardation of G2/M progression, and PRR11-knockdown cells subsequently underwent G2 phase cell cycle arrest accompanied by obvious mitotic defects such as multipolar spindles and multiple nuclei. In addition, forced expression of PRR11 promoted the premature Chromatin condensation (PCC), and then proliferation of PRR11-expressing cells was massively attenuated and induced apoptosis. Taken together, our current observations strongly suggest that PRR11, which is strictly regulated during cell cycle progression, plays a pivotal role in the regulation of accurate cell cycle progression through the late S phase to mitosis. - Highlights: • PRR11 started to increase in the late S phase and was retained until just before mitotic telophase. • PRR11-knockdown caused a significant cell cycle arrest in the late S phase and G2 phase. • The treatment with dNTPs further augmented PRR11 silencing-mediated S phase arrest. • PRR11-knockdown led to multipolar spindles and multiple nuclei. • Forced expression of PRR11 promoted the PCC and inhibited

  19. On the nature of the extreme-ultraviolet late phase of solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Ding, M. D.; Guo, Y.; Dai, Y.

    2014-10-01

    The extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) late phase of solar flares is a second peak of warm coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI) for many minutes to a few hours after the GOES soft X-ray peak. It was first observed by the EUV Variability Experiment on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The late-phase emission originates from a second set of longer loops (late-phase loops) that are higher than the main flaring loops. It is suggested to be caused by either additional heating or long-lasting cooling. In this paper, we study the role of long-lasting cooling and additional heating in producing the EUV late phase using the enthalpy based thermal evolution of loops model. We find that a long cooling process in late-phase loops can well explain the presence of the EUV late-phase emission, but we cannot exclude the possibility of additional heating in the decay phase. Moreover, we provide two preliminary methods based on the UV and EUV emissions from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board SDO to determine whether or not additional heating plays a role in the late-phase emission. Using nonlinear force-free field modeling, we study the magnetic configuration of the EUV late phase. It is found that the late phase can be generated either in hot spine field lines associated with a magnetic null point or in large-scale magnetic loops of multipolar magnetic fields. In this paper, we also discuss why the EUV late phase is usually observed in warm coronal emissions and why the majority of flares do not exhibit an EUV late phase.

  20. On the Nature of the EUV Late Phase of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Ding, Mingde; Guo, Yang; Dai, Yu

    2014-06-01

    The EUV late phase of solar flares is a second peak of the warm coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI) many minutes to a few hours after the GOES soft X-ray peak, which was first observed by the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The late phase emission originates from a second set of longer loops (late phase loops) that are higher than the main flaring loops. It is explained as being caused by either additional heating or long-lasting cooling. In this paper, we study the role of long-lasting cooling and additional heating in producing the EUV late phase using the "enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops'" (EBTEL) experiments. We find that the long cooling process in late phase loops, which definitely exists, can sufficiently explain the emission property of the EUV late phase; meanwhile, we cannot exclude the role of an additional heating of these loops that possibly occurs. Moreover, we provide two preliminary methods based on the UV and EUV emissions from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board SDO to determine whether an additional heating plays some role or not in the late phase emission. Through the nonlinear force-free field modeling, we study the magnetic configuration related to the EUV late phase. It is found that the late phase can be generated either in hot spine field lines associated with a magnetic null point or large-scale magnetic loops in multipolar magnetic fields. In this paper, we also explain why the EUV late phase appears most obviously in the warm coronal emissions and why the majority of flares do not exhibit an EUV late phase.

  1. Sirtinol abrogates late phase of cardiac ischemia preconditioning in rats.

    PubMed

    Safari, Fereshteh; Shekarforoosh, Shahnaz; Hashemi, Tahmineh; Namvar Aghdash, Simin; Fekri, Asefeh; Safari, Fatemeh

    2016-09-27

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sirtinol, as an inhibitor of sirtuin NAD-dependent histone deacetylases, on myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury following early and late ischemia preconditioning (IPC). Rats underwent sustained ischemia and reperfusion (IR) alone or proceeded by early or late IPC. Sirtinol (S) was administered before IPC. Arrhythmias were evaluated based on the Lambeth model. Infarct size (IS) was measured using triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. The transcription level of antioxidant-coding genes was assessed by real-time PCR. In early and late IPC groups, IS and the number of arrhythmia were significantly decreased (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01 vs IR, respectively). In S + early IPC, incidences of arrhythmia and IS were not different compared with the early IPC group. However, in S + late IPC the IS was different from the late IPC group (P < 0.05). In late IPC but not early IPC, transcription levels of catalase (P < 0.01) and Mn-SOD (P < 0.05) increased, although this upregulation was not significant in the S + late IPC group. Our results are consistent with the notion that different mechanisms are responsible for early and late IPC. In addition, sirtuin NAD-dependent histone deacetylases may be implicated in late IPC-induced cardioprotection.

  2. MIF Is Necessary for Late-Stage Melanoma Patient MDSC Immune Suppression and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yaddanapudi, Kavitha; Rendon, Beatriz E; Lamont, Gwyneth; Kim, Eun Jung; Al Rayyan, Numan; Richie, Jamaal; Albeituni, Sabrin; Waigel, Sabine; Wise, Ashley; Mitchell, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Highly aggressive cancers "entrain" innate and adaptive immune cells to suppress antitumor lymphocyte responses. Circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) constitute the bulk of monocytic immunosuppressive activity in late-stage melanoma patients. Previous studies revealed that monocyte-derived macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is necessary for the immunosuppressive function of tumor-associated macrophages and MDSCs in mouse models of melanoma. In the current study, we sought to determine whether MIF contributes to human melanoma MDSC induction and T-cell immunosuppression using melanoma patient-derived MDSCs and an ex vivo coculture model of human melanoma-induced MDSC. We now report that circulating MDSCs isolated from late-stage melanoma patients are reliant upon MIF for suppression of antigen-independent T-cell activation and that MIF is necessary for maximal reactive oxygen species generation in these cells. Moreover, inhibition of MIF results in a functional reversion from immunosuppressive MDSC to an immunostimulatory dendritic cell (DC)-like phenotype that is at least partly due to reductions in MDSC prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). These findings indicate that monocyte-derived MIF is centrally involved in human monocytic MDSC induction/immunosuppressive function and that therapeutic targeting of MIF may provide a novel means of inducing antitumor DC responses in late-stage melanoma patients.

  3. Effects of late-gestation heat stress on immunity and performance of calves.

    PubMed

    Dahl, G E; Tao, S; Monteiro, A P A

    2016-04-01

    Lactating cows that experience heat stress will have reduced dry matter intake and milk yield and shift metabolism, which ultimately reduces the efficiency of milk production. Dry cows that are heat stressed similarly experience lower intake, reduced mammary growth, and compromised immune function that ultimately results in a poorer transition into lactation and lower milk yield in the next lactation. A recent focus in our laboratory is on the effects of late gestation, in utero heat stress on calf survival and performance. We have completed a series of studies to examine preweaning growth and health, and later reproductive and productive responses, in an attempt to quantify acute and persistent effects of in utero heat strain. Late gestation heat stress results in calves with lower body weight at birth, shorter stature at weaning, and failure to achieve the same weight or height at 12 mo of age observed in calves from dams that are cooled when dry. A portion of the reduced growth may result from the lower immune status observed in calves heat stressed in utero, which begins with poorer apparent efficiency of immunoglobulin absorption and extends to lower survival rates through puberty. Heat-stressed calves, however, have permanent shifts in metabolism that are consistent with greater peripheral accumulation of energy and less lean growth relative to those from cooled dams. Comparing reproductive performance in calves heat stressed versus those cooled in utero, we observe that the cooled heifers require fewer services to attain pregnancy and become pregnant at an earlier age. Tracking the milk production in calves that were heat stressed in utero versus those cooled in late gestation revealed a significant reduction of yield in the first lactation, approximately 5 kg/d through 35 wk of lactation, despite similar body weight and condition score at calving. These observations indicate that a relatively brief period of heat stress in late gestation dramatically alters

  4. On the Importance of the Flare's Late Phase for the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R.; Hock, Rachel; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A.; Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell; Mariska, John; Bailey, Scott; Tobiska, W. Kent; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Webb, David F.; Warren, Harry

    2011-01-01

    The new solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) have revealed a new class of solar flares that are referred to as late phase flares. These flares are characterized by the hot 2-5 MK coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) showing large secondary peaks that appear many minutes to hours after an eruptive flare event. In contrast, the cool 0.7-1.5 MK coronal emissions (e.g., Fe IX 17.1 nm) usually dim immediately after the flare onset and do not recover until after the delayed second peak of the hot coronal emissions. We refer to this period of 1-5 hours after the fl amrea sin phase as the late phase, and this late phase is uniquely different than long duration flares associated with 2-ribbon flares or large filament eruptions. Our analysis of the late phase flare events indicates that the late phase involves hot coronal loops near the flaring region, not directly related to the original flaring loop system but rather with the higher post-eruption fields. Another finding is that space weather applications concerning Earth s ionosphere and thermosphere need to consider these late phase flares because they can enhance the total EUV irradiance flare variation by a factor of 2 when the late phase contribution is included.

  5. Effect of late-gestation maternal heat stress on growth and immune function of dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Tao, S; Monteiro, A P A; Thompson, I M; Hayen, M J; Dahl, G E

    2012-12-01

    Heat stress during the dry period affects the cow's mammary gland development, metabolism, and immunity during the transition period. However, the effect of late-gestation heat stress on calf performance and immune status is unknown. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of heat stress during the final ~45 d of gestation on growth and immune function of calves. Calves (17/treatment) were born to cows that were exposed to cooling (CL) or heat stress (HT) during the dry period. Only heifer calves (CL, n=12; HT, n=9) were used in measurements of growth and immune status after birth. Heifer calves were managed under identical conditions. All were fed 3.78 L of colostrum from their respective dams within 4 h of birth and were weaned at 2 mo of age (MOA). Body weight (BW) was obtained at weaning and then monthly until 7 MOA. Withers height (WH) was measured monthly from 3 to 7 MOA. Hematocrit and plasma total protein were assessed at birth, 1, 4, 7, 11, 14, 18, 21, 25, and 28 d of age. Total serum IgG was evaluated at 1, 4, 7, 11, 14, 18, 21, 25, and 28 d of age, and apparent efficiency of absorption was calculated. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated at 7, 28, 42, and 56 d of age, and proliferation rate was measured by (3)H-thymidine incorporation in vitro. Blood cortisol concentration was measured in the dams during the dry period and in calves in the preweaning period. Gestation length was 4d shorter for HT cows compared with CL cows. Calves from CL cows had greater BW than calves from HT cows at birth (42.5 vs. 36.5 kg). Compared with CL heifers, HT heifers had decreased weaning BW (78.5 vs. 65.9 kg) but similar BW (154.6 vs. 146.4 kg) and WH (104.8 vs. 103.4 cm) from 3 to 7 MOA. Compared with CL, heifers from HT cows had less total plasma protein (6.3 vs. 5.9 g/dL), total serum IgG (1,577.3 vs. 1,057.8 mg/dL), and apparent efficiency of absorption (33.6 vs. 19.2%), and tended to have decreased hematocrit (33 vs. 30%). Additionally, CL heifers had

  6. Cells and secretagogues involved in the human late-phase response.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, E N; Iliopoulos, O; MacDonald, S M; Kagey-Sobotka, A; Lichtenstein, L M

    1989-01-01

    Those scientists interested in allergic inflammatory processes have recently been focusing on the late-phase response, since it appears most similar to the chronic disease states observed in allergic patients. In this review we will focus on the pattern of mediator release and cellular traffic observed in two in vivo human models of the late-phase reaction, one involving the upper airways and the other the skin. We have observed in these models, as had been observed earlier in blood, that the late-phase reaction is associated with a second increase in the level of mediators. We also describe our studies of the secretagogues responsible for this late-phase mediator release and, in so doing, introduce the subjects of histamine-releasing factors and IgE heterogeneity.

  7. National Institutes of Health Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Late Effects Initiative: The Immune Dysregulation and Pathobiology Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Gea-Banacloche, Juan; Komanduri, Krishna V; Carpenter, Paul; Paczesny, Sophie; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Young, Jo-Anne; El Kassar, Nahed; Le, Robert Q; Schultz, Kirk R; Griffith, Linda M; Savani, Bipin N; Wingard, John R

    2016-10-14

    Immune reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) beyond 1 year is not completely understood. Many transplant recipients who are free of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and not receiving any immunosuppression more than 1 year after transplantation seem to be able to mount appropriate immune responses to common pathogens and respond adequately to immunizations. However, 2 large registry studies over the last 2 decades seem to indicate that infection is a significant cause of late mortality in some patients, even in the absence of concomitant GVHD. Research on this topic is particularly challenging for several reasons. First, there are not enough long-term follow-up clinics able to measure even basic immune parameters late after HCT. Second, the correlation between laboratory measurements of immune function and infections is not well known. Third, accurate documentation of infectious episodes is notoriously difficult. Finally, it is unclear what measures can be implemented to improve the immune response in a clinically relevant way. A combination of long-term multicenter prospective studies that collect detailed infectious data and store samples as well as a national or multinational registry of clinically significant infections (eg, vaccine-preventable severe infections, opportunistic infections) could begin to address our knowledge gaps. Obtaining samples for laboratory evaluation of the immune system should be both calendar and eventdriven. Attention to detail and standardization of practices regarding prophylaxis, diagnosis, and definitions of infections would be of paramount importance to obtain clean reliable data. Laboratory studies should specifically address the neogenesis, maturation, and exhaustion of the adaptive immune system and, in particular, how these are influenced by persistent alloreactivity, inflammation, and viral infection. Ideally, some of these long-term prospective studies would collect information on long

  8. American cutaneous leishmaniasis: In situ immune response of patients with recent and late lesions.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Aparecida Helena Souza; Martines, Roosecelis Brasil; Kanamura, Cristina Takami; Barbo, Maria Lourdes Peris; Iglezias, Silvia D'Andretta; Lauletta Lindoso, José Angelo; Pereira-Chioccola, Vera Lucia

    2017-02-26

    TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-17, CD68, and CD57 were evaluated in biopsies of patients with American cutaneous leishmaniasis living in Sorocaba, Brazil. The analyses were performed considering the time of lesions from 23 patients with recent lesions (Group I) and 19 patients with late lesions (Group II). All patients were infected with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis. Immunostaining cells for CD68, CD57, TNF- α, IFN-γ, IL-10, and IL-17 were performed by immunohistochemistry. Except for CD68 and IL-17, the distribution of in situ for CD57, IL-10, TNF-α and IFN-γ showed that patients with recent lesions expressed higher levels than those with late lesions. The comparison of cytokine expression/group showed that IL-10 was significantly higher than IL-17 and IFN-γ (similar data was shown in IL-17 compared with TNF-α), suggesting an immunological balance between inflammatory-anti-inflammatory agents. This balance was similar for two Groups of patients. In conclusion, these data suggested that: i. patients from Group I had recent lesions (in the beginning of chronic phase) compared to those from Group II; ii. the modulation of inflammatory response in patients with recent ACL was correlated with IL-10 expression in skin lesions preventing the development of mucosal forms. The parasite treatment also prevented the evolution of severe forms. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Ultrastructure of Pseudomonas saccharophila at early and late log phase of growth.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, H. L.; Chao, F.-C.; Turnbill, C.; Philpott, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    Description of the fine structure of Pseudomonas saccarophila at the early log phase and the late log phase of growth, such as shown by electron microscopy with the aid of various techniques of preparation. The observations reported suggested that, under the experimental conditions applied, P. saccharophila multiplies by the method of constrictive division.

  10. Maternal health literacy and late initiation of immunizations among an inner-city birth cohort.

    PubMed

    Pati, Susmita; Feemster, Kristen A; Mohamad, Zeinab; Fiks, Alex; Grundmeier, Robert; Cnaan, Avital

    2011-04-01

    To determine if maternal health literacy influences early infant immunization status. Longitudinal prospective cohort study of 506 Medicaid-eligible mother-infant dyads. Immunization status at age 3 and 7 months was assessed in relation to maternal health literacy measured at birth using the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (short version). Multivariable logistic regression quantified the effect of maternal health literacy on immunization status adjusting for the relevant covariates. The cohort consists of primarily African-American (87%), single (87%) mothers (mean age 23.4 years). Health literacy was inadequate or marginal among 24% of mothers. Immunizations were up-to-date among 73% of infants at age 3 months and 43% at 7 months. Maternal health literacy was not significantly associated with immunization status at either 3 or 7 months. In multivariable analysis, compared to infants who had delayed immunizations at 3 months, infants with up-to-date immunizations at 3 months were 11.3 times (95%CI 6.0-21.3) more likely to be up-to-date at 7 months. The only strong predictors of up-to-date immunization status at 3 months were maternal education (high school graduate or beyond) and attending a hospital-affiliated clinic. Though maternal health literacy is not associated with immunization status in this cohort, later immunization status is most strongly predicted by immunization status at 3 months. These results further support the importance of intervening from an early age to ensure that infants are fully protected against vaccine preventable diseases.

  11. Hemodynamic response during standing test after blood donation can predict the late phase vasovagal reaction.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masayoshi; Ando, Shin-Ichi; Eura, Emi; Hayashi, Atsumi; Kawamura, Natsumi; Narita, Sumito; Matsumoto, Mari; Momii, Hidetoshi; Kadokami, Toshiaki; Kiyokawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    A major complication of blood donation is vasovagal reaction (VVR) with or without syncope. VVR occurs not only in the early phase, but also in the late phase after blood donation. We previously reported the hemodynamic characteristics of blood donors susceptible to early phase VVR. In the present study, we investigated the hemodynamic characteristics of those who developed late VVR. Ninety-six healthy volunteers donating 400 ml of whole blood were studied. After asking about their physical condition or routine questions for blood donation, blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded while the donors were kept standing up for 3 min before and after blood collection. Questionnaires were distributed to all donors for reporting late VVR symptoms within 24 h. Those with younger age and lower diastolic blood pressure were more susceptible to late VVR (both p < 0.05). Furthermore, we identified the increase in HR during the standing test after blood collection as a good predictor of late VVR (odds ratio 1.063, 95 % CI 1.005-1.124; p = 0.031). Also, analysis of questions asked before donation revealed that significantly more donors considered themselves as sensitive to pain in the late VVR group (Odds ratio 0.070, 95 % CI 0.008-0.586; p = 0.014). Excessive HR response to standing after blood collection and subjective sensitivity to pain as well as younger age and lower diastolic BP may be useful to detect donors at high risk for late VVR.

  12. Models and correlations of the DEBRIS Late-Phase Melt Progression Model

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.C.; Gasser, R.D.

    1997-09-01

    The DEBRIS Late Phase Melt Progression Model is an assembly of models, embodied in a computer code, which is designed to treat late-phase melt progression in dry rubble (or debris) regions that can form as a consequence of a severe core uncover accident in a commercial light water nuclear reactor. The approach is fully two-dimensional, and incorporates a porous medium modeling framework together with conservation and constitutive relationships to simulate the time-dependent evolution of such regions as various physical processes act upon the materials. The objective of the code is to accurately model these processes so that the late-phase melt progression that would occur in different hypothetical severe nuclear reactor accidents can be better understood and characterized. In this report the models and correlations incorporated and used within the current version of DEBRIS are described. These include the global conservation equations solved, heat transfer and fission heating models, melting and refreezing models (including material interactions), liquid and solid relocation models, gas flow and pressure field models, and the temperature and compositionally dependent material properties employed. The specific models described here have been used in the experiment design analysis of the Phebus FPT-4 debris-bed fission-product release experiment. An earlier DEBRIS code version was used to analyze the MP-1 and MP-2 late-phase melt progression experiments conducted at Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  13. Intramammary immunization with ultraviolet-killed Escherichia coli shows partial protection against late gestation intramammary challenge with a homologous strain.

    PubMed

    Pomeroy, B; Gurjar, A; Sipka, A; Klaessig, S; Salmon, S; Quesnell, R; Schukken, Y H

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intramammary immunization with UV-killed Escherichia coli ECC-Z on prevention of intramammary colonization after a challenge with a dose of the homologous E. coli ECC-Z live bacteria. A total of 10 cows were included in a study to evaluate the efficacy of intramammary immunization. All 10 cows received an intramammary immunization of 100 cfu of UV-killed E. coli ECC-Z bacteria into one hind quarter at the time of dry off. Approximately 2wk before the anticipated calving date, both hind quarters of all cows were challenged with 100 cfu of live E. coli ECC-Z bacteria. Five of the cows were vaccinated parenterally with a commercial J5 bacterin, and 5 cows served as controls with no parenteral vaccination. The cows were then followed over time and infection risk, clinical scores, somatic cell count, and milk production were observed over time. The results of these 10 cows showed partial protection of intramammary immunization on the outcome of a subsequent homologous intramammary challenge. Immunization resulted in a lower probability of infection, a lower bacteria count, lower somatic cell counts and milk conductivity, a lower clinical mastitis score, and increased milk production compared with unimmunized control quarters. Once the analysis was corrected for immunization, parenteral J5 vaccination had no significant effect on any of the measured parameters. These results provide the first evidence that intramammary immunization may improve the outcome of an intramammary E. coli infection in late gestation and onset of mastitis immediately following parturition. Unlike systemic vaccination, which generally does not reduce the intramammary infection risk, the intramammary immunization did show a 5-times reduced odds of an established intramammary infection after challenge. Cytokine profiles indicated a local return of proinflammatory response after challenge as the data showed a more pronounced increase in in

  14. Inducible Defenses Stay Up Late: Temporal Patterns of Immune Gene Expression in Tenebrio molitor

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Paul R; Makarova, Olga; Rolff, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The course of microbial infection in insects is shaped by a two-stage process of immune defense. Constitutive defenses, such as engulfment and melanization, act immediately and are followed by inducible defenses, archetypically the production of antimicrobial peptides, which eliminate or suppress the remaining microbes. By applying RNAseq across a 7-day time course, we sought to characterize the long-lasting immune response to bacterial challenge in the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor, a model for the biochemistry of insect immunity and persistent bacterial infection. By annotating a hybrid de novo assembly of RNAseq data, we were able to identify putative orthologs for the majority of components of the conserved insect immune system. Compared with Tribolium castaneum, the most closely related species with a reference genome sequence and a manually curated immune system annotation, the T. molitor immune gene count was lower, with lineage-specific expansions of genes encoding serine proteases and their countervailing inhibitors accounting for the majority of the deficit. Quantitative mapping of RNAseq reads to the reference assembly showed that expression of genes with predicted functions in cellular immunity, wound healing, melanization, and the production of reactive oxygen species was transiently induced immediately after immune challenge. In contrast, expression of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides or components of the Toll signaling pathway and iron sequestration response remained elevated for at least 7 days. Numerous genes involved in metabolism and nutrient storage were repressed, indicating a possible cost of immune induction. Strikingly, the expression of almost all antibacterial peptides followed the same pattern of long-lasting induction, regardless of their spectra of activity, signaling possible interactive roles in vivo. PMID:24318927

  15. Effects of laser immunotherapy on late-stage, metastatic breast cancer patients in a Phase II clinical trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Zhou, Feifan; Li, Xiaosong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Alleruzzo, Luciano; Chen, Wei R.

    2014-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT), a novel technique with a local intervention to induce systemic antitumor effects, was developed to treat metastatic cancers. The pre-clinical studies of LIT have shown its unique characteristics in generating a specific antitumor immunity in treating metastatic tumors in rats and mice. For late-stage, metastatic breast cancer patients, who were considered to be out of other available treatment options, we conducted a small Phase II clinical trial using LIT starting in 2009 in Lima, Peru. This Phase II study was closed in December of 2012, as acknowldged by the Ministry of Health (MOH) of Peur letter 438-2014-OGITT/INS dated March 5th, 2014. Ten patients were enrolled and received LIT in one or multiple 4-week treatment cycles. At the study closing date, four patients were alive and two of them remained cancer free. Here, following the successful conclusion of our Phase II study, we report the clinical effects of LIT on metastatic breast cancer patients. Specifically, we present the overall status of all the patients three years after the treatment and also the outcomes of two long-term surviving patients.

  16. Role of mast cell in the late phase of contact hypersensitivity induced by trimellitic anhydride

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Ok Hee

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are known as effector cells of IgE-mediated allergic responses, but role of mast cells in contact hypersensitivity (CHS) has been considered controversial. In this study, we investigated role of mast cell in trimellitic anhydride (TMA)-induced CHS. The mice were sensitized to TMA on the back and repeatedly challenged with TMA on the left ear at 1-week intervals. The ear after challenge showed biphasic responses. The repetition of TMA challenge shifted in time course of ear response and enlarged the extent of early and late phase reactions in proportion to the frequency of TMA challenges in C57BL/6 mice. In late phase reaction, peak of ear response by single challenge showed at 24 hours after challenge, but the peak by repeat challenges at 8 hours after the last challenge. Number of mast cells and eosinophils per unit area increased in proportion to frequency of TMA challenges. However, mast cell-deficient WBB6F1/J-KitW/KitW-v mice developed the late phase reaction without the early phase reaction. The repetition of TMA challenge shifted in time course of ear response and enlarged the extent of ear response and the infiltration of eosinophils. The magnitude of these responses observed according to the frequency of the TMA challenge in mast cell-deficient WBB6F1/J-KitW/KitW-v mice was significantly lower than that in C57BL/6 mice. Also TMA elicited mast cell degranulation and histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusively, TMA induces the early and late phase reactions in CHS, and mast cells may be required for TMA-induced CHS. PMID:26770872

  17. Mapracorat, a selective glucocorticoid receptor agonist, causes apoptosis of eosinophils infiltrating the conjunctiva in late-phase experimental ocular allergy

    PubMed Central

    Baiula, Monica; Bedini, Andrea; Baldi, Jacopo; Cavet, Megan E; Govoni, Paolo; Spampinato, Santi

    2014-01-01

    Background Mapracorat, a novel nonsteroidal selective glucocorticoid receptor agonist, has been proposed for the topical treatment of inflammatory disorders as it binds with high affinity and selectivity to the human glucocorticoid receptor and displays a potent anti-inflammatory activity, but seems to be less effective in transactivation of a number of genes, resulting in a lower potential for side effects. Contrary to classical glucocorticoids, mapracorat displays a reduced ability to increase intraocular pressure and in inducing myocilin, a protein linked to intraocular pressure elevation. Allergic conjunctivitis is the most common form of ocular allergy and can be divided into an early phase, developing immediately after allergen exposure and driven primarily by mast cell degranulation, and a late phase, developing from 6–10 hours after the antigen challenge, and characterized by conjunctival infiltration of eosinophils and other immune cells as well as by the production of cytokines and chemokines. Methods In this study, mapracorat was administered into the conjunctival sac of ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized guinea pigs 2 hours after the induction of allergic conjunctivitis, with the aim of investigating its activity in reducing clinical signs of the late-phase ocular reaction and to determine its mechanism of anti-allergic effects with respect to apoptosis of conjunctival eosinophils and expression of the chemokines C-C motif ligand 5 (CCL5), C-C motif ligand 11 (CCL11), and interleukin-8 (IL-8) and the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Results Mapracorat, administered into the conjunctival sac of OVA-sensitized guinea pigs 2 hours after allergen exposure, was effective in reducing clinical signs, eosinophil infiltration, and eosinophil peroxidase activity in the guinea pig conjunctiva; furthermore, it reduced conjunctival mRNA levels and protein expression of both CCL5 and CCL11. Mapracorat was more

  18. Early and late B cell immune responses in lethal and self-cured rodent malaria.

    PubMed

    Azcárate, Isabel G; Marín-García, Patricia; Pérez-Benavente, Susana; Diez, Amalia; Puyet, Antonio; Bautista, José M

    2015-05-01

    ICR mice have heterogeneous susceptibility to lethal Plasmodium yoelii yoelii 17XL from the first days of experimental infection as evidenced by the different parasitemia levels and clinical outcomes. This mouse model has revealed specific immune responses on peripheral blood correlating with the infection fate of the animals. To search for immune-markers linked to parasitemia we examined B lymphocytes in organs of the immune system as key effectors of rodent immunity against malaria. To determine changes in immune cellularity fostered by the different prognostic parasitemia we examined B cell subsets in low (<15%) and high (>50%) parasitized mice during the first days of the infection. In the case of surviving mice, we studied the preservation of memory immune response 500 days after the primary P. yoelii challenge. Correlating with the parasitemia level, it was observed an increase in total cellularity of spleen during the first week of infection which remained after 16 months of the infection in surviving animals. B cell subsets were also modified across the different infection fates. Subpopulation as follicular B cells and B-1 cells proportions behaved differently depending on the parasitemia kinetics. In addition, peritoneal cavity cells proliferated in response to high parasitemia. More significantly, P. yoelii -specific memory B cells remained in the spleen 500 days after the primo-infection. This study demonstrates that B cell kinetics is influenced by the different parasitemia courses which are naturally developed within a same strain of untreated mice. We show that high levels of parasitemia at the beginning of infection promote an extremely fast and exacerbate response of several cell populations in spleen and peritoneal cavity that, in addition, do not follow the kinetics observed in peripheral blood. Furthermore, our results describe the longest persistence of memory B cells long time upon a single malaria infection in mice.

  19. Cosmic ray anisotropies observed late in the decay phase of solar flare events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allum, F. R.; Palmeira, R. A. R.; Mccracken, K. G.; Rao, U. R.; Fairfield, D. H.; Gleeson, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Data was obtained from instrumentation on Explorers 34 and 41 on cosmic-ray anisotropy and magnetic field vectors during five solar flare events. The analysis was conducted in the energy range from 0.7 to 7.6 MeV, of the late decay phase, to evaluate the dependence of net cosmic-ray anisotropy vector amplitude and direction on the magnetic field azimuth. Results showed that in the late decay phase the direction of the net cosmic-ray anisotropy vector was invariant in relation to the direction of the magnetic field, particle energy, and species. Within the statistical error of the available data the invariant direction was perpendicular to the mean magnetic field direction.

  20. Effect of vitamin E on the immune system of ewes during late pregnancy and lactation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present experiment was designed to determine the effects of a regimen of repeated, intramuscular (i.m.) injections of vitamin E (VE) on innate and humoral components of the immune response of pregnant and lactating ewes. Pregnant ewes were randomly assigned to two treatments consisting of i.m. i...

  1. Acute brief heat stress in late gestation alters neonatal calf innate immune functions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress (HS), as one of the environmental stressors affecting the dairy industry, compromises the cow's milk production, immune function, and reproductive system. However, few studies have looked at how prenatal HS affects the offspring. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of ...

  2. IRAK-M regulates the inhibition of TLR-mediated macrophage immune response during late in vitro Leishmania donovani infection.

    PubMed

    Srivastav, Supriya; Saha, Amrita; Barua, Jayita; Ukil, Anindita; Das, Pijush K

    2015-10-01

    Intramacrophage protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani, causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis, escapes Toll-like receptor (TLR) dependent early host immune response by inducing the deubiquitinating enzyme A20, which is sustained up to 6 h postinfection only. Therefore, Leishmania must apply other means to deactivate late host responses. Here, we elucidated the role of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase M (IRAK-M), a negative regulator of TLR signaling, in downregulating macrophage proinflammatory response during late hours of in vitro infection. Our data reveal a sharp decline in IRAK1 and IRAK4 phosphorylation at 24 h postinfection along with markedly reduced association of IRAK1-TNF receptor associated factor 6, which is mandatory for TLR activation. In contrast, IRAK-M was induced after A20 levels decreased and reached a maximum at 24 h postinfection. IRAK-M induction coincided with increased stimulation of TGF-β, a hallmark cytokine of visceral infection. TGF-β-dependent signaling-mediated induction of SMAD family of proteins, 2, 3, and 4 plays important roles in transcriptional upregulation of IRAK-M. In infected macrophages, siRNA-mediated silencing of IRAK-M displayed enhanced IRAK1 and IRAK4 phosphorylation with a concomitant increase in downstream NF-κB activity and reduced parasite survival. Taken together, the results suggest that IRAK-M may be targeted by L. donovani to inhibit TLR-mediated proinflammatory response late during in vitro infection.

  3. Improvement in non-specific immunity and disease resistance of barramundi, Lates calcarifer (Bloch), by diets containing Daphnia similis meal.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Shieh-Tsung; Shiu, Ya-Li; Wu, Tsung-Meng; Lin, Yu-Syuan; Liu, Chun-Hung

    2015-05-01

    A 42-day study was conducted with barramundi, Lates calcarifer, to evaluate the effects of Daphnia meal derived from Daphnia similis on fish growth, immune response, and disease resistance to Aeromonas hydrophila. Three isonitrogenous (45%) and isolipid (10%) experimental diets were formulated to contain 0% (control), 5% (D5), and 10% (D10) Daphnia meal. Growth was depressed when fish were fed with the D10 diet for 42 days compared to control. However, the growth in fish fed with control and D5 diets for 42 days was not significantly different. By day 42, the leukocyte phagocytic activity and respiratory burst activity were significantly increased in D5 and D10 groups compared to control. Mx gene expression in the spleen and head kidney of fish after being injected with nerve necrosis virus was also significantly up-regulated in both groups compared to control. In an increased immune response, D5 and D10 fish had significantly higher survival rates than control after being challenged by A. hydrophila. Therefore, we suggest that a 5% Daphnia-meal diet could improve the barramundi immune response and disease resistance without a negative impact on growth.

  4. Phenotypic characterisation of the cellular immune infiltrate in placentas of cattle following experimental inoculation with Neospora caninum in late gestation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite Neospora caninum being a major cause of bovine abortion worldwide, its pathogenesis is not completely understood. Neospora infection stimulates host cell-mediated immune responses, which may be responsible for the placental damage leading to abortion. The aim of the current study was to characterize the placental immune response following an experimental inoculation of pregnant cattle with N. caninum tachyzoites at day 210 of gestation. Cows were culled at 14, 28, 42 and 56 days post inoculation (dpi). Placentomes were examined by immunohistochemistry using antibodies against macrophages, T-cell subsets (CD4, CD8 and γδ), NK cells and B cells. Macrophages were detected mainly at 14 days post inoculation. Inflammation was generally mild and mainly characterized by CD3+, CD4+ and γδ T-cells; whereas CD8+ and NK cells were less numerous. The immune cell repertoire observed in this study was similar to those seen in pregnant cattle challenged with N. caninum at early gestation. However, cellular infiltrates were less severe than those seen during first trimester Neospora infections. This may explain the milder clinical outcome observed when animals are infected late in gestation. PMID:23876124

  5. Baseline Naive CD4+ T-cell Level Predicting Immune Reconstitution in Treated HIV-infected Late Presenters

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fu-Ping; Li, Yi-Jia; Qiu, Zhi-Feng; Lv, Wei; Han, Yang; Xie, Jing; Li, Yan-Ling; Song, Xiao-Jing; Du, Shan-Shan; Mehraj, Vikram; Li, Tai-Sheng; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Background: Among HIV-infected patients initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART), early changes in CD4+ T-cell subsets are well described. However, HIV-infected late presenters initiating treatment present with a suboptimal CD4+ T-cell reconstitution and remain at a higher risk for AIDS and non-AIDS events. Therefore, factors associated with CD4+ T-cell reconstitution need to be determined in this population, which will allow designing effective immunotherapeutic strategies. Methods: Thirty-one adult patients with baseline CD4+ T-cell count <350 cells/mm3 exhibiting viral suppression after ART initiation were followed in the HIV/AIDS research center of Peking Union Medical College Hospital in Beijing, China, from October 2002 to September 2013. Changes in T-cell subsets and associated determinants were measured. Results: Median baseline CD4+ T-cell count was 70 cells/mm3. We found a biphasic reconstitution of T-cell subsets and immune activation: a rapid change during the first 6 months followed by a more gradual change over the subsequent 8 years. Baseline CD4+ T-cell count >200 cells/mm3 in comparison to CD4+ T-cell count ≤200 cells/mm3 was associated with more complete immune Reconstitution (77.8% vs. 27.3% respectively; P = 0.017) and normalized CD4/CD8 ratio. We showed that the baseline percentage of naive CD4+ T-cell was a predictive marker for complete immune reconstitution (area under receiver operating characteristic curve 0.907), and 12.4% as cutoff value had a sensitivity of 84.6% and a specificity of 88.2%. Conclusions: Baseline naive CD4+ T-cell percentage may serve as a predictive marker for optimal immune reconstitution during long-term therapy. Such study findings suggest that increasing thymic output should represent an avenue to improve patients who are diagnosed late in the course of infection. PMID:27824000

  6. Improved noise-immune phase-unwrapping algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusack, R.; Huntley, J. M.; Goldrein, H. T.

    1995-02-01

    An algorithm for unwrapping noisy phase maps has recently been proposed, based on the identification of discontinuity sources that mark the start or end of a 2 pi phase discontinuity. Branch cuts between sources act as barriers to unwrapping, resulting in a unique phase map that is independent of the unwrapping route. We investigate four methods for optimizing the placement of the cuts. A modified nearest neighbor approach is found to be the most successful and can reliably unwrap unfiltered speckle-interferometry phase maps with discontinuity source densities of 0.05 sources pixel-1.

  7. Two phase deglaciation incorporating a late-stage readvance in the Brunswick, Maine area

    SciTech Connect

    Borelli, C.; Smity, P. . Dept. of Geoscience)

    1993-03-01

    Reinterpretation of late Wisconsinan glacial deposits indicate that retreat of the Laurentide ice margin occurred west of the marine limit in the Brunswick area. Marine transgression deposited the overlying Presumpscot Formation which locally contains organic rich, silty sand. A regionally extensive readvance deformed and truncated the uppermost glaciomarine sediments during the oceanic highstand. Striations and other ice flow indicators which are found underlying the Presumpscot Formation consistently trend NW-SE, while those found on exposed outcrops above the Presumpscot Formation dominantly trend NE-SW. These otherwise anomalous directional flow indicators support a late stage readvance of the ice sheet. Areally extensive, stratified, and locally imbricated outwash caps the glaciomarine sediments. Mineral composition of the basal outwash differs from the upper outwash sequences, supporting the readvance model by indicating different source areas. Multi-phase emergence characterized by terraced landforms caused a reworking and redeposition of sediment in a fluvial, tidally influenced environment. Localized eolian deposits record a late phase reworking of sediment.

  8. Late Protein Synthesis-Dependent Phases in CTA Long-Term Memory: BDNF Requirement

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Moreno, Araceli; Rodríguez-Durán, Luis F.; Escobar, Martha L.

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that long-term memory (LTM) persistence requires a late protein synthesis-dependent phase, even many hours after memory acquisition. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an essential protein synthesis product that has emerged as one of the most potent molecular mediators for long-term synaptic plasticity. Studies in the rat hippocampus have been shown that BDNF is capable to rescue the late-phase of long-term potentiation as well as the hippocampus-related LTM when protein synthesis was inhibited. Our previous studies on the insular cortex (IC), a region of the temporal cortex implicated in the acquisition and storage of conditioned taste aversion (CTA), have demonstrated that intracortical delivery of BDNF reverses the deficit in CTA memory caused by the inhibition of IC protein synthesis due to anisomycin administration during early acquisition. In this work, we first analyze whether CTA memory storage is protein synthesis-dependent in different time windows. We observed that CTA memory become sensible to protein synthesis inhibition 5 and 7 h after acquisition. Then, we explore the effect of BDNF delivery (2 μg/2 μl per side) in the IC during those late protein synthesis-dependent phases. Our results show that BDNF reverses the CTA memory deficit produced by protein synthesis inhibition in both phases. These findings support the notion that recurrent rounds of consolidation-like events take place in the neocortex for maintenance of CTA memory trace and that BDNF is an essential component of these processes. PMID:21960964

  9. Late Protein Synthesis-Dependent Phases in CTA Long-Term Memory: BDNF Requirement.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Moreno, Araceli; Rodríguez-Durán, Luis F; Escobar, Martha L

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that long-term memory (LTM) persistence requires a late protein synthesis-dependent phase, even many hours after memory acquisition. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an essential protein synthesis product that has emerged as one of the most potent molecular mediators for long-term synaptic plasticity. Studies in the rat hippocampus have been shown that BDNF is capable to rescue the late-phase of long-term potentiation as well as the hippocampus-related LTM when protein synthesis was inhibited. Our previous studies on the insular cortex (IC), a region of the temporal cortex implicated in the acquisition and storage of conditioned taste aversion (CTA), have demonstrated that intracortical delivery of BDNF reverses the deficit in CTA memory caused by the inhibition of IC protein synthesis due to anisomycin administration during early acquisition. In this work, we first analyze whether CTA memory storage is protein synthesis-dependent in different time windows. We observed that CTA memory become sensible to protein synthesis inhibition 5 and 7 h after acquisition. Then, we explore the effect of BDNF delivery (2 μg/2 μl per side) in the IC during those late protein synthesis-dependent phases. Our results show that BDNF reverses the CTA memory deficit produced by protein synthesis inhibition in both phases. These findings support the notion that recurrent rounds of consolidation-like events take place in the neocortex for maintenance of CTA memory trace and that BDNF is an essential component of these processes.

  10. Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Get Weight Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A What's in this article? Why Are Vaccinations Important? Why Do I Need Shots? Which Vaccinations Do ...

  11. Late time cosmological phase transitions 1: Particle physics models and cosmic evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Hill, Christopher T.; Watkins, Richard

    1991-01-01

    We described a natural particle physics basis for late-time phase transitions in the universe. Such a transition can seed the formation of large-scale structure while leaving a minimal imprint upon the microwave background anisotropy. The key ingredient is an ultra-light pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson with an astronomically large (O(kpc-Mpc)) Compton wavelength. We analyze the cosmological signatures of and constraints upon a wide class of scenarios which do not involve domain walls. In addition to seeding structure, coherent ultra-light bosons may also provide unclustered dark matter in a spatially flat universe, omega sub phi approx. = 1.

  12. Extreme Ultraviolet Late-Phase Flares: Before and During the Solar Dynamics Observatory Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.

    2014-09-01

    The solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) have revealed interesting characteristics of warm coronal emissions, such as Fe xvi 335 Å emission, which peak soon after the hot coronal X-ray emissions peak during a flare and then sometimes peak for a second time hours after the X-ray flare peak. This flare type, with two warm coronal emission peaks but only one X-ray peak, has been named the EUV late phase (Woods et al., Astrophys. J. 739, 59, 2011). These flares have the distinct properties of i) having a complex magnetic-field structure with two initial sets of coronal loops, with one upper set overlaying a lower set, ii) having an eruptive flare initiated in the lower set and disturbing both loop sets, iii) having the hot coronal emissions emitted only from the lower set in conjunction with the X-ray peak, and iv) having the first peak of the warm coronal emissions associated with the lower set and its second peak emitted from the upper set many minutes to hours after the first peak and without a second X-ray enhancement. The disturbance of the coronal loops by the eruption is at about the same time, but the relaxation and cooling down of the heated coronal loops during the post-flare reconnections have different time scales with the longer, upper loops being significantly delayed from the lower loops. The difference in these cooling time scales is related to the difference between the two peak times of the warm coronal emission and is also apparent in the decay profile of the X-ray emissions having two distinct decays, with the first decay slope being steeper (faster) and the delayed decay slope being smaller (slower) during the time of the warm-coronal-emission second peak. The frequency and relationship of the EUV late-phase decay times between the Fe xvi 335 Å two flare peaks and X-ray decay slopes are examined using three years of SDO/ EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) data, and the X-ray dual-decay character is

  13. Cutaneous late-phase reaction to environmental antigen in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Oyama, K

    1993-01-01

    Intradermal testing with 7 environmental allergens was performed on 71 patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) with respiratory atopy (RAT) and 30 pure AD patients, and the cutaneous late-phase reaction (CLPR) was observed several to 48 h after challenge. CLPR was not seen in pure AD. In AD patients with RAT, CLPR was positive in 29 of 71 patients. No macroscopic eczematous lesions appeared. All CLPR-positive patients showed RAST scores of 2 or more. We assume that CLPR can be an exacerbating factor in AD with RAT, while it is not directly involved in pure AD.

  14. Maternal stress during late gestation has moderate but long-lasting effects on the immune system of the piglets.

    PubMed

    Couret, David; Jamin, Agnès; Kuntz-Simon, Gaëlle; Prunier, Armelle; Merlot, Elodie

    2009-09-15

    Events acting prenatally on developing foetuses are important determinants for disorders later in life. Prenatal stress (PNS) is one of these events. The purpose of this study was to determine the consequences of a repeated social stress applied during late gestation of the pregnant gilt on the immune system and hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity of the piglets from birth to two months of age. Pregnant gilts were submitted to repeated social stress which was induced by housing unfamiliar gilts in pairs modified twice a week during 4 weeks between days 77 and 105 of gestation (S group, n=18). Control gilts were housed in stable pairs during the same period (C group, n=18). Blood cortisol, haptoglobin and IgG levels, immune cell counts, mitogen-induced whole-blood proliferation and TNF-alpha production were evaluated in piglets at 4 days of age (D4), before and after weaning (D26 and 28) and before and after relocation to a new building (D60 and 62). We found that PNS did not affect growth rate of the progeny. It decreased the relative weight of adrenal glands on D4 (P<0.05) but plasma cortisol levels were similar in both groups at all ages. IgG levels in colostrum and in the serum of piglets were not affected. PNS decreased the total numbers of white blood cells, lymphocytes and granulocytes from D26 to D60 (P<0.05), the CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cell ratio on D4 (P<0.05), and LPS induced-TNF-alpha production on D60 (P<0.05). PNS increased the ConA-induced lymphocyte proliferation on D4 and D60 and the PWM-induced proliferation on D60 (P<0.05). Our results demonstrate that a repeated social stress applied to pregnant sows during late gestation can induce long-lasting effects on several parameters of the immune function of the offspring. These effects are not due to modifications of the HPA axis activity and may impair the abilities of the piglets to efficiently react against infections during the suckling period and around weaning.

  15. A late phase of germ plasm accumulation during Drosophila oogenesis requires lost and rumpelstiltskin.

    PubMed

    Sinsimer, Kristina S; Jain, Roshan A; Chatterjee, Seema; Gavis, Elizabeth R

    2011-08-01

    Asymmetric mRNA localization is an effective mechanism for establishing cellular and developmental polarity. Posterior localization of oskar in the Drosophila oocyte targets the synthesis of Oskar to the posterior, where Oskar initiates the assembly of the germ plasm. In addition to harboring germline determinants, the germ plasm is required for localization and translation of the abdominal determinant nanos. Consequently, failure of oskar localization during oogenesis results in embryos lacking germ cells and abdominal segments. oskar accumulates at the oocyte posterior during mid-oogenesis through a well-studied process involving kinesin-mediated transport. Through live imaging of oskar mRNA, we have uncovered a second, mechanistically distinct phase of oskar localization that occurs during late oogenesis and results in amplification of the germ plasm. Analysis of two newly identified oskar localization factors, Rumpelstiltskin and Lost, that are required specifically for this late phase of oskar localization shows that germ plasm amplification ensures robust abdomen and germ cell formation during embryogenesis. In addition, our results indicate the importance of mechanisms for adapting mRNAs to utilize multiple localization pathways as necessitated by the dramatic changes in ovarian physiology that occur during oogenesis.

  16. Identification and initial assessment of candidate BWR late-phase in-vessel accident management strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, S.A.

    1991-04-15

    Work sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) to identify and perform preliminary assessments of candidate BWR (boiling water reactor) in-vessel accident management strategies was completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during fiscal year 1990. Mitigative strategies for containment events have been the subject of a companion study at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The focus of this Oak Ridge effort was the development of new strategies for mitigation of the late phase events, that is, the events that would occur in-vessel after the onset of significant core damage. The work began with an investigation of the current status of BWR in-vessel accident management procedures and proceeded through a preliminary evaluation of several candidate new strategies. The steps leading to the identification of the candidate strategies are described. The four new candidate late-phase (in-vessel) accident mitigation strategies identified by this study and discussed in the report are: (1) keep the reactor vessel depressurized; (2) restore injection in a controlled manner; (3) inject boron if control blade damage has occurred; and (4) containment flooding to maintain core and structural debris in-vessel. Additional assessments of these strategies are proposed.

  17. Hymenolepis diminuta and H. nana: cross immunity against the lumen phase in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, A; Onitake, K

    1987-08-01

    When BALB/c mice initially given cysticercoids of Hymenolepis diminuta orally (Day 0) were challenged with eggs or cysticercoids of H. nana, almost all the mice became completely resistant to H. nana challenges from Day 30 onward, and no luminal adults of H. nana were established. There was a tendency for the number of tissue cysticercoids recovered 4 days after egg challenge in immunized mice to be much less than that in control mice (P less than 0.001, Student's t test). However, when these cysticercoids recovered from immune group mice were inoculated into uninfected mice, they matured in the lumen. Thus, the cross immunity to H. nana challenge evoked by an initial prepatent infection with H. diminuta appeared to be directed not against the tissue phase but against the lumen phase of H. nana. When BALB/c mice initially given eggs of H. nana were challenged with H. diminuta, they became resistant to H. diminuta from Day 15 onward. When the mice given eggs of H. nana were treated with a cestocide, praziquantel, at the beginning of the expected luminal development of H. nana and experienced a tissue phase only before challenge with H. diminuta, they showed no resistance to H. diminuta. Thus, the cross immunity to H. diminuta challenge evoked by an initial patent infection with H. nana appeared to be due to the immunogens of the lumen phase of H. nana but not those of the tissue phase. The cross immunity may be, therefore, essentially evoked by the lumen phase of these two phylogenetically closely related species and not by or against the tissue phase of H. nana.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. A controlled study of light therapy in women with late luteal phase dysphoric disorder.

    PubMed

    Lam, R W; Carter, D; Misri, S; Kuan, A J; Yatham, L N; Zis, A P

    1999-06-30

    Previous studies suggest that light therapy, as used to treat seasonal affective disorder, may be beneficial for pre-menstrual depressive disorders. We conducted a six-menstrual cycle randomized, double-blind, counter-balanced, crossover study of dim vs. bright light therapy in women with late luteal phase dysphoric disorder (LLPDD). Fourteen women who met DSM-III-R criteria for LLPDD completed two menstrual cycles of prospective baseline monitoring of pre-menstrual symptoms, followed by two cycles of each treatment. During the 2-week luteal phase of each treatment cycle, patients were randomized to receive 30 min of evening light therapy using: (1) 10000 lx cool-white fluorescent light (active condition); or (2) 500 lx red fluorescent light (placebo condition), administered by a light box at their homes. After two menstrual cycles of treatment, patients were immediately crossed over to the other condition for another two cycles. Outcome measures were assessed at the mid-follicular and luteal phases of each cycle. Results showed that the active bright white light condition significantly reduced depression and pre-menstrual tension scores during the symptomatic luteal phase, compared to baseline, while the placebo dim red light condition did not. These results suggest that bright light therapy is an effective treatment for LLPDD.

  19. The Late Gradual Phase of Large Flares: The Case of November 3, 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auraß, H.

    2014-12-01

    The hard X-ray time profiles of most solar eruptive events begin with an impulsive phase that may be followed by a late gradual phase. In a recent article (Aurass et al. in Astron. Astrophys. 555, A40, 2013), we analyzed the impulsive phase of the solar eruptive event on November 3, 2003 in radio and X-ray emission. We found evidence of magnetic breakout reconnection using the radio diagnostic of the common effect of the flare current sheet and, at heights of ±0.4 R⊙, of a coronal breakout current sheet (a source site that we called X). In this article we investigate the radio emission during the late gradual phase of the previously analyzed event. The work is based on 40-400 MHz dynamic spectra (Radio Spectrograph Observatorium Tremsdorf, Leibniz Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, AIP) combined with radio images obtained by the French Nançay Multifrequency Radio Heliograph (NRH) of the Observatoire de Paris, Meudon. Additionally we use Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) hard X-ray (HXR) flux records, and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) and Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) images. The analysis shows that the late gradual phase is subdivided into two distinct stages. Stage 1 (here lasting five minutes) is restricted to reoccurring radio emission at source site X. We observe plasma emission and an azimuthally moving source (from X toward the NE; speed ∼1200 kms) at levels radially ordered against the undisturbed coronal density gradient. These radio sources mark the lower boundary of an overdense region with a huge azimuthal extent. By the end of its motion, the source decays and reappears at point X. This is the onset of stage 2 traced here during its first 13 minutes. By this time, NRH sources observed at frequencies ≤236.6 MHz radially lift off with a speed of ∼400 kms (one third of the front speed of the coronal mass ejection (CME)) as one slowly decaying

  20. The SIT4 protein phosphatase functions in late G1 for progression into S phase.

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, A; Immanuel, D; Arndt, K T

    1991-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains containing temperature-sensitive mutations in the SIT4 protein phosphatase arrest in late G1 at the nonpermissive temperature. Order-of-function analysis shows that SIT4 is required in late G1 for progression into S phase. While the levels of SIT4 do not change in the cell cycle, SIT4 associates with two high-molecular-weight phosphoproteins in a cell-cycle-dependent fashion. In addition, we have identified a polymorphic gene, SSD1, that in some versions can suppress the lethality due to a deletion of SIT4 and can also partially suppress the phenotypic defects due to a null mutation in BCY1. The SSD1 protein is implicated in G1 control and has a region of similarity to the dis3 protein of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We have also identified a gene, PPH2alpha, that in high copy number can partially suppress the growth defect of sit4 strains. The PPH2 alpha gene encodes a predicted protein that is 80% identical to the catalytic domain of mammalian type 2A protein phosphatases but also has an acidic amino-terminal extension not present in other phosphatases. Images PMID:1848673

  1. TRIM33 switches off Ifnb1 gene transcription during the late phase of macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Federica; Parcelier, Aude; Petit, Vanessa; Gallouet, Anne-Sophie; Lewandowski, Daniel; Dalloz, Marion; van den Heuvel, Anita; Kolovos, Petros; Soler, Eric; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; De Palma, Michele; Davidson, Irwin; Rousselet, Germain; Romeo, Paul-Henri

    2015-01-01

    Despite its importance during viral or bacterial infections, transcriptional regulation of the interferon-β gene (Ifnb1) in activated macrophages is only partially understood. Here we report that TRIM33 deficiency results in high, sustained expression of Ifnb1 at late stages of toll-like receptor-mediated activation in macrophages but not in fibroblasts. In macrophages, TRIM33 is recruited by PU.1 to a conserved region, the Ifnb1 Control Element (ICE), located 15 kb upstream of the Ifnb1 transcription start site. ICE constitutively interacts with Ifnb1 through a TRIM33-independent chromatin loop. At late phases of lipopolysaccharide activation of macrophages, TRIM33 is bound to ICE, regulates Ifnb1 enhanceosome loading, controls Ifnb1 chromatin structure and represses Ifnb1 gene transcription by preventing recruitment of CBP/p300. These results characterize a previously unknown mechanism of macrophage-specific regulation of Ifnb1 transcription whereby TRIM33 is critical for Ifnb1 gene transcription shutdown. PMID:26592194

  2. TRIM33 switches off Ifnb1 gene transcription during the late phase of macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Federica; Parcelier, Aude; Petit, Vanessa; Gallouet, Anne-Sophie; Lewandowski, Daniel; Dalloz, Marion; van den Heuvel, Anita; Kolovos, Petros; Soler, Eric; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; De Palma, Michele; Davidson, Irwin; Rousselet, Germain; Romeo, Paul-Henri

    2015-11-23

    Despite its importance during viral or bacterial infections, transcriptional regulation of the interferon-β gene (Ifnb1) in activated macrophages is only partially understood. Here we report that TRIM33 deficiency results in high, sustained expression of Ifnb1 at late stages of toll-like receptor-mediated activation in macrophages but not in fibroblasts. In macrophages, TRIM33 is recruited by PU.1 to a conserved region, the Ifnb1 Control Element (ICE), located 15 kb upstream of the Ifnb1 transcription start site. ICE constitutively interacts with Ifnb1 through a TRIM33-independent chromatin loop. At late phases of lipopolysaccharide activation of macrophages, TRIM33 is bound to ICE, regulates Ifnb1 enhanceosome loading, controls Ifnb1 chromatin structure and represses Ifnb1 gene transcription by preventing recruitment of CBP/p300. These results characterize a previously unknown mechanism of macrophage-specific regulation of Ifnb1 transcription whereby TRIM33 is critical for Ifnb1 gene transcription shutdown.

  3. Cutaneous immediate and late phase reactions to schistosomin in schistosomiasis patients.

    PubMed

    Marotto, P C; Michalany, N S; Vilela, M P; Mendes, N F; Mendes, E

    1995-01-01

    Cutaneous immediate and late phase reactions (LPR) to schistosomin were studied in 29 patients with schistosomiasis mansoni. In 12 of these patients, the determination of total and specific serum IgE by immunoenzymatic method against schistosome antigen was carried out using serum samples obtained on the same day as the cutaneous tests. Skin biopsies were taken from 4 typical LPRs. Immediate reactions occurred in all except one and LPRs in 12 (41.3%). Patients with positive cutaneous reactions had highe levels of specific serum IgE against schistosome antigen. Histopathological studies showed a moderate exudate consisting mainly of neutrophils (60%) and eosinophils (40%). LPRs in schistosomiasis have the same characteristics reported in the medical literature in relation to time of appearance, morphology and histopathology. The immunopathogenic role played by LPRs in the patients remains to be clarified.

  4. Late-phase melt progression experiment: MP-2. Results and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gasser, R.D.; Gauntt, R.O.; Bourcier, S.C.

    1997-05-01

    In-pile experiments addressing late-phase processes in Light Water Reactors (LWRs) were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories. Melt Progression (MP) experiments were designed to provide information to develop and verify computer models for analysis of LWR core damage in severe accidents. Experiments examine the formation and motion of ceramic molten pools in disrupted reactor core regions. The MP-2 experiment assembly consisted of: (1) a rubble bed of enriched UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} simulating severely disrupted reactor core regions, (2) a ceramic/metallic crust representing blockage formed by early phase melting, relocation, and refreezing of core components, and (3) an intact rod stub region that remained in place below the blockage region. The test assembly was fission heated in the central cavity of the ACRR at an average rate of about 0.2 KA, reaching a peak molten pool temperature around 3400 K. Melting of the debris bed ceramic components was initiated near the center of the bed. The molten material relocated downward, refreezing to form a ceramic crust near the bottom of the rubble bed. As power levels were increased, the crust gradually remelted and reformed at progressively lower positions in the bed until late in the experiment when it penetrated into and attacked the ceramic/metallic blockage. The metallic components of the blockage region melted and relocated to the bottom of the intact rod stub region before the ceramic melt penetrated the blockage region from above. The ceramic pool penetrated halfway into the blockage region by the end of the experiment. Measurements of thermal response and material relocation are compared to the results of the computer simulations. Postexperiment examination of the assembly with the associated material interactions and metallurgy are also discussed in detail with the analyses and interpretation of results. 16 refs., 206 figs., 24 tabs.

  5. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... remembers" the germ and can fight it again. Vaccines contain germs that have been killed or weakened. When given to a healthy person, the vaccine triggers the immune system to respond and thus ...

  6. Late Quaternary intensified monsoon phases control landscape evolution in the northwest Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookhagen, Bodo; Thiede, Rasmus C.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2005-02-01

    The intensity of the Asian summer-monsoon circulation varies over decadal to millennial time scales and is reflected in changes in surface processes, terrestrial environments, and marine sediment records. However, the mechanisms of long-lived (2 5 k.y.) intensified monsoon phases, the related changes in precipitation distribution, and their effect on landscape evolution and sedimentation rates are not yet well understood. The arid high-elevation sectors of the orogen correspond to a climatically sensitive zone that currently receives rain only during abnormal (i.e., strengthened) monsoon seasons. Analogous to present-day rainfall anomalies, enhanced precipitation during an intensified monsoon phase is expected to have penetrated far into these geomorphic threshold regions where hillslopes are close to the angle of failure. We associate landslide triggering during intensified monsoon phases with enhanced precipitation, discharge, and sediment flux leading to an increase in pore-water pressure, lateral scouring of rivers, and oversteepening of hillslopes, eventually resulting in failure of slopes and exceptionally large mass movements. Here we use lacustrine deposits related to spatially and temporally clustered large landslides (>0.5 km3) in the Sutlej Valley region of the northwest Himalaya to calculate sedimentation rates and to infer rainfall patterns during late Pleistocene (29 24 ka) and Holocene (10 4 ka) intensified monsoon phases. Compared to present-day sediment-flux measurements, a fivefold increase in sediment-transport rates recorded by sediments in landslide-dammed lakes characterized these episodes of high climatic variability. These changes thus emphasize the pronounced imprint of millennial-scale climate change on surface processes and landscape evolution.

  7. On the thermal stability of late blooming phases in reactor pressure vessel steels: An atomistic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonny, G.; Terentyev, D.; Bakaev, A.; Zhurkin, E. E.; Hou, M.; Van Neck, D.; Malerba, L.

    2013-11-01

    Radiation-induced embrittlement of bainitic steels is the lifetime limiting factor of reactor pressure vessels in existing nuclear light water reactors. The primary mechanism of embrittlement is the obstruction of dislocation motion produced by nanometric defect structures that develop in the bulk of the material due to irradiation. In view of improving the predictive capability of existing models it is necessary to understand better the mechanisms leading to the formation of these defects, amongst which the so-called "late blooming phases". In this work we study the stability of the latter by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations and Monte Carlo simulations based on a here developed quaternary FeCuNiMn interatomic potential. The potential is based on extensive DFT and experimental data. The reference DFT data on solute-solute interaction reveal that, while Mn-Ni pairs and triplets are unstable, larger clusters are kept together by attractive binding energy. The NiMnCu synergy is found to increase the temperature range of stability of solute atom precipitates in Fe significantly as compared to binary FeNi and FeMn alloys. This allows for thermodynamically stable phases close to reactor temperature, the range of stability being, however, very sensitive to composition.

  8. What was the phase relationship between precession and sedimentation in the Mediterranean during the Late Miocene?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzocchi, Alice; Flecker, Rachel; Lunt, Dan; Gladstone, Rupert; Hilgen, Frits; Krijgsman, Wout; Sierro, Francisco; Ivanovic, Ruza

    2014-05-01

    The Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) drastically modified the environment of the Mediterranean Sea. The large signal-noise ratio preserved in the geological record for this extreme event makes it a perfect target for exploring the biogeochemical processes involved through palaeoclimate modelling. In addition, Late Miocene sequences in the Mediterranean have been astronomically tuned, providing a very high-resolution age model that resolves sediment data on a millennial timescale or shorter. Consequently it is possible to carry out robust model-data comparison where the precise orbital phasing is equivalent. Sequences of laminated sapropelitic beds interbedded within homogeneous marls are frequently found in Late Miocene sections in the Mediterranean and have been associated with orbitally-driven climate responses. In fact, the deposition of these sediments has been linked to freshwater input causing both stratification of the water column and increased surface productivity, at times of high summer insolation. Most of the hypotheses relating the phasing of the sedimentary record to the orbital forcing are, however, still untested. Insight can therefore be gained by investigating the impact of varying orbital parameters on the Mediterranean's hydrologic budget using global climate models. A series of 22 fully coupled atmosphere-ocean-vegetation snap-shot simulations have been run at evenly spaced intervals (1kyr) through an entire precession cycle during the pre-evaporite stage of the MSC (~6.5 Ma). In our simulations, the Mediterranean Sea's hydrologic budget exhibits high seasonal variability. Model results can be directly compared with high-resolution geological data that is available for our selected time slice; for instance, cyclic changes in microfaunal assemblages that have a strong seasonal bias can be compared with our model output. This allows us to test the biogeochemical phasing of Mediterranean successions in relation to orbital forcing. Our simulations

  9. Dynamics of cellular immune responses in the acute phase of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Saito, Akatsuki; Katakai, Yuko; Iwasaki, Yuki; Kurosawa, Terue; Hamano, Masataka; Higashino, Atsunori; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Kurane, Ichiro; Akari, Hirofumi

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we examined the dynamics of cellular immune responses in the acute phase of dengue virus (DENV) infection in a marmoset model. Here, we found that DENV infection in marmosets greatly induced responses of CD4/CD8 central memory T and NKT cells. Interestingly, the strength of the immune response was greater in animals infected with a dengue fever strain than in those infected with a dengue hemorrhagic fever strain of DENV. In contrast, when animals were re-challenged with the same DENV strain used for primary infection, the neutralizing antibody induced appeared to play a critical role in sterilizing inhibition against viral replication, resulting in strong but delayed responses of CD4/CD8 central memory T and NKT cells. The results in this study may help to better understand the dynamics of cellular and humoral immune responses in the control of DENV infection.

  10. Repeated ethanol exposure during late gestation alters the maturation and innate immune status of the ovine fetal lung.

    PubMed

    Sozo, Foula; O'Day, Luke; Maritz, Gert; Kenna, Kelly; Stacy, Victoria; Brew, Nadine; Walker, David; Bocking, Alan; Brien, James; Harding, Richard

    2009-03-01

    Little is known about the effects of fetal ethanol exposure on lung development. Our aim was to determine the effects of repeated ethanol exposure during late gestation on fetal lung growth, maturation, and inflammatory status. Pregnant ewes were chronically catheterized at 91 days of gestational age (DGA; term approximately 147 days). From 95-133 DGA, ewes were given a 1-h daily infusion of either 0.75 g ethanol/kg (n = 9) or saline (n = 8), with tissue collection at 134 DGA. Fetal lungs were examined for changes in tissue growth, structure, maturation, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Between treatment groups, there were no differences in lung weight, DNA and protein contents, percent proliferating and apoptotic cells, tissue and air-space fractions, alveolar number and mean linear intercept, septal thickness, type-II cell number and elastin content. Ethanol exposure caused a 75% increase in pulmonary collagen I alpha1 mRNA levels (P < 0.05) and a significant increase in collagen deposition. Surfactant protein (SP)-A and SP-B mRNA levels were approximately one third of control levels following ethanol exposure (P < 0.05). The mRNA levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-8 were also lower (P < 0.05) in ethanol-exposed fetuses compared with controls. Pulmonary malondialdehyde levels tended to be increased (P = 0.07) in ethanol-exposed fetuses. Daily exposure of the fetus to ethanol during the last third of gestation alters extracellular matrix deposition and surfactant protein gene expression, which could increase the risk of respiratory distress syndrome after birth. Changes to the innate immune status of the fetus could increase the susceptibility of the neonatal lungs to infection.

  11. Evaporative cooling in late-gestation Murrah buffaloes potentiates immunity around transition period and overcomes reproductive disorders.

    PubMed

    Aarif, Ovais; Aggarwal, Anjali

    2015-10-15

    The objective of the study was to observe the effect of evaporative cooling during late gestation on immunity around the transition period and the probable outcome on reproductive disorders in Murrah buffaloes. Sixteen pregnant dry Murrah buffaloes at 60 days prepartum were selected and divided into two groups of eight animals each. Group 1 buffaloes remained without the provision of cooling, whereas the second group of buffaloes was managed under fans and mist cooling during the dry period. After parturition, all the animals were managed under evaporative cooling. Dry matter intake was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in cooled relative to noncooled animals at -15, 0, and +20 days of parturition. Cortisol and prolactin levels were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in noncooled relative to cooled animals at -15 and 0 days of parturition. However, prolactin was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in cooled animals at +20 days. Messenger RNA expression of prolactin receptor gene (PRL-R) was upregulated and suppressor of cytokine signaling gene 1 (SOCS-1) was downregulated in cooled animals at -20, 0, and +20 days of parturition. Tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 4 levels remained significantly (P < 0.05) higher in cooled animals at -20, 0, and +20 days of parturition. Interleukin 6 was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in cooled animals at -20 and 0 days. Interferon γ levels were significantly higher at -20 and +20 days of parturition in cooled relative to noncooled animals. The reproductive disorders such as retention of placenta, metritis, and endometritis occurred at the rate of 37.25%, 25%, and 12.25% in the noncooled group, whereas only retention of placenta was observed in the cooled (12.5%) group.

  12. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  13. High susceptibility to repeated, low-dose, vaginal SHIV exposure late in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle of pigtail macaques.

    PubMed

    Vishwanathan, Sundaram A; Guenthner, Patricia C; Lin, Carol Y; Dobard, Charles; Sharma, Sunita; Adams, Debra R; Otten, Ron A; Heneine, Walid; Hendry, R Michael; McNicholl, Janet M; Kersh, Ellen N

    2011-08-01

    Fluctuations in susceptibility to HIV or SHIV during the menstrual cycle are currently not fully documented. To address this, the time point of infection was determined in 19 adult female pigtail macaques vaginally challenged during their undisturbed menstrual cycles with repeated, low-dose SHIV(SF162P3) exposures. Eighteen macaques (95%) first displayed viremia in the follicular phase, as compared with 1 macaque (5%) in the luteal phase (P < 0.0001). Due to a viral eclipse phase, we estimated a window of most frequent virus transmission between days 24 and 31 of the menstrual cycle, in the late luteal phase. Thus, susceptibility to vaginal SHIV infection is significantly elevated in the second half of the menstrual cycle when progesterone levels are high and when local immunity may be low. Such susceptibility windows have been postulated before but not definitively documented. Our data support the findings of higher susceptibility to HIV in women during progesterone-dominated periods including pregnancy and contraceptive use.

  14. Theta Frequency Stimulation Induces a Local Form of Late Phase LTP in the CA1 Region of the Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yan-You; Kandel, Eric R.

    2005-01-01

    The late phase of LTP (L-LTP) is typically induced by repeated high-frequency stimulation. This form of LTP requires activation of transcription and translation and results in the cell-wide distribution of gene products that can be captured by other marked synapses. Here we report that theta frequency stimulation (5 Hz, 30 sec) applied to the…

  15. Proteasome Inhibition Enhances the Induction and Impairs the Maintenance of Late-Phase Long-Term Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Chenghai; Upadhya, Sudarshan C.; Ding, Lan; Smith, Thuy K.; Hegde, Ashok N.

    2008-01-01

    Protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway plays important roles in synaptic plasticity, but the molecular mechanisms by which proteolysis regulates synaptic strength are not well understood. We investigated the role of the proteasome in hippocampal late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP), a model for enduring synaptic plasticity.…

  16. Deconstructing the Late Phase of Vimentin Assembly by Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM)

    PubMed Central

    Winheim, Stefan; Hieb, Aaron R.; Silbermann, Marleen; Surmann, Eva-Maria; Wedig, Tatjana; Herrmann, Harald; Langowski, Jörg; Mücke, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative imaging of intermediate filaments (IF) during the advanced phase of the assembly process is technically difficult, since the structures are several µm long and therefore they exceed the field of view of many electron (EM) or atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Thereby quantitative studies become extremely laborious and time-consuming. To overcome these difficulties, we prepared fluorescently labeled vimentin for visualization by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). In order to investigate if the labeling influences the assembly properties of the protein, we first determined the association state of unlabeled vimentin mixed with increasing amounts of labeled vimentin under low ionic conditions by analytical ultracentrifugation. We found that bona fide tetrameric complexes were formed even when half of the vimentin was labeled. Moreover, we demonstrate by quantitative atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy that the morphology and the assembly properties of filaments were not affected when the fraction of labeled vimentin was below 10%. Using fast frame rates we observed the rapid deposition of fluorescently labeled IFs on glass supports by TIRFM in real time. By tracing their contours, we have calculated the persistence length of long immobilized vimentin IFs to 1 µm, a value that is identical to those determined for shorter unlabeled vimentin. These results indicate that the structural properties of the filaments were not affected significantly by the dye. Furthermore, in order to analyze the late elongation phase, we mixed long filaments containing either Alexa 488- or Alexa 647-labeled vimentin. The ‘patchy’ structure of the filaments obtained unambiguously showed the elongation of long IFs through direct end-to-end annealing of individual filaments. PMID:21544245

  17. Swimming Exercise in the Acute or Late Phase after Sciatic Nerve Crush Accelerates Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Teodori, Rosana Macher; Betini, Joice; de Oliveira, Larissa Salgado; Sobral, Luciane Lobato; Takeda, Sibele Yoko Mattozo; Montebelo, Maria Imaculada de Lima

    2011-01-01

    There is no consensus about the best time to start exercise after peripheral nerve injury. We evaluated the morphological and functional characteristics of the sciatic nerves of rats that began to swim immediately after crush nerve injury (CS1), those that began to swim 14 days after injury (CS14), injured rats not submitted to swimming (C), and uninjured rats submitted to swimming (S). After 30 days the number of axons in CS1 and CS14 was lower than in C (P < 0.01). The diameter of axons and nerve fibers was larger in CS1 (P < 0.01) and CS14 (P < 0.05) than in C, and myelin sheath thickness was lower in all crushed groups (P < 0.05). There was no functional difference between CS1 and CS14 (P > 0.05). Swimming exercise applied during the acute or late phase of nerve injury accelerated nerve regeneration and synaptic elimination after axonotmesis, suggesting that exercise may be initiated immediately after injury. PMID:21876821

  18. Mapping Gene Expression in Excitatory Neurons during Hippocampal Late-Phase Long-Term Potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Patrick B.; Kawaguchi, Riki; Blum, Charles; Achiro, Jennifer M.; Coppola, Giovanni; O'Dell, Thomas J.; Martin, Kelsey C.

    2017-01-01

    The persistence of long-lasting changes in synaptic connectivity that underlie long-term memory require new RNA and protein synthesis. To elucidate the temporal pattern of gene expression that gives rise to long-lasting neuronal plasticity, we analyzed differentially-expressed (DE) RNAs in mouse hippocampal slices following induction of late phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) specifically within pyramidal excitatory neurons using Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification RNA sequencing (TRAP-seq). We detected time-dependent changes in up- and down-regulated ribosome-associated mRNAs over 2 h following L-LTP induction, with minimal overlap of DE transcripts between time points. TRAP-seq revealed greater numbers of DE transcripts and magnitudes of LTP-induced changes than RNA-seq of all cell types in the hippocampus. Neuron-enriched transcripts had greater changes at the ribosome-loading level than the total RNA level, while RNA-seq identified many non-neuronal DE mRNAs. Our results highlight the importance of considering both time course and cell-type specificity in activity-dependent gene expression during memory formation. PMID:28275336

  19. SN 2009ip: CONSTRAINING THE LATEST EXPLOSION PROPERTIES BY ITS LATE-PHASE LIGHT CURVE

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2015-04-20

    We constrain the explosion and circumstellar properties at the 2012b event of SN 2009ip based on its recently reported late-phase bolometric light curve. The explosion energy and ejected mass at the 2012b event are estimated as 0.01 M{sub ⊙} and 2 × 10{sup 49} erg, respectively. The circumstellar medium is assumed to have two components: an inner shell and an outer wind. The inner shell, which is likely created at the 2012a event, has a mass of 0.2 M{sub ⊙}. The outer wind is created by the wind mass loss before the 2012a mass ejection, and the progenitor is estimated to have had a mass-loss rate of about 0.1 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} with a wind velocity of 550 km s{sup −1} before the 2012a event. The estimated explosion energy and ejected mass indicate that the 2012b event is not caused by a regular SN.

  20. Mechanical Ventilation Induces an Inflammatory Response in Preinjured Lungs in Late Phase of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Wei; Zhou, Quanjun; Yao, Shanglong; Deng, Qingzhu; Wang, Tingting; Wu, Qingping

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) may amplify the lung-specific inflammatory response in preinjured lungs by elevating cytokine release and augmenting damage to the alveolar integrity. In this study, we test the hypothesis that MV exerts different negative impacts on inflammatory response at different time points of postlung injury. Basic lung injury was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery in rats. Physiological indexes including blood gases were monitored during MV and samples were assessed following each experiment. Low V T (tidal volume) MV caused a slight increase in cytokine release and tissue damage at day 1 and day 4 after sepsis induced lung injury, while cytokine release from the lungs in the two moderately ventilated V T groups was amplified. Interestingly, in the two groups where rats received low V T MV, we found that infiltration of inflammatory cells was only profound at day 4 after CLP. Marked elevation of protein leakage indicated a compromise in alveolar integrity in rats that received moderate V T MV at day 4 following CLP, correlating with architectural damage to the alveoli. Our study indicates that preinjured lungs are more sensitive to mechanical MV at later phases of sepsis, and this situation may be a result of differing immune status.

  1. Decision making for late-phase recovery from nuclear or radiological incidents.

    PubMed

    Chen, S Y

    2015-02-01

    Much of the effort on radiological emergency preparedness has focused on the initial responses to an event (e.g., rescuing or triaging missions), while guidance on the more complex issues (e.g., radiological remediation or population resettlement) of long-term recovery has been lacking. The recent major nuclear accidents at Chernobyl, Ukraine, in 1986 and Fukushima, Japan, in 2011 have clearly shown that radiological effects can spread over extended areas and last for a long period of time, thus making planning for long-term recovery an essential extension to the overall response. Similar challenges may be encountered in the aftermath of malicious acts involving devices such as radiological dispersal devices or improvised nuclear devices. Given the potentially unprecedented nature of the impact, the affected communities would have to face a series of daunting tasks in attempting to return to normality. To achieve this objective, a top priority is to conduct an effective and timely remediation of the contaminated areas. In contrast to emergency responses, the late-stage recovery effort is necessarily community focused and therefore will be driven by stakeholders. However, given the nature of the contamination and the widespread impact, cleanup in the aftermath of a major incident could involve a rather complex decision-making process for which the requisite experiences may not be readily available. To this end, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) established a scientific committee to prepare a comprehensive study that develops a framework and recommends an approach to optimizing decision making in late-phase recovery in the wake of major nuclear or radiological incidents. This study, published as NCRP Report No. 175, addresses all relevant dimensions in decision making for long-term recovery. The report describes optimization as a flexible, graded, and iterative process that consists of a series of steps, all of which involve

  2. Intensification of β-poly(L: -malic acid) production by Aureobasidium pullulans ipe-1 in the late exponential growth phase.

    PubMed

    Cao, Weifeng; Luo, Jianquan; Zhao, Juan; Qiao, Changsheng; Ding, Luhui; Qi, Benkun; Su, Yi; Wan, Yinhua

    2012-07-01

    β-Poly(malic acid) (PMLA) has attracted industrial interest because this polyester can be used as a prodrug or for drug delivery systems. In PMLA production by Aureobasidium pullulans ipe-1, it was found that PLMA production was associated with cell growth in the early exponential growth phase and dissociated from cell growth in the late exponential growth phase. To enhance PMLA production in the late phase, different fermentation modes and strategies for controlling culture redox potential (CRP) were studied. The results showed that high concentrations of produced PMLA (above 40 g/l) not only inhibited PMLA production, but also was detrimental to cell growth. Moreover, when CRP increased from 57 to 100 mV in the late exponential growth phase, the lack of reducing power in the broth also decreased PMLA productivity. PMLA productivity could be enhanced by repeated-batch culture to maintain cell growth in the exponential growth phase, or by cell-recycle culture with membrane to remove the produced PMLA, or by maintaining CRP below 70 mV no matter which kind of fermentation mode was adopted. Repeated-batch culture afforded a high PMLA concentration (up to 63.2 g/l) with a productivity of 1.15 g l(-1) h(-1). Cell-recycle culture also confirmed that PMLA production by the strain ipe-1 was associated with cell growth.

  3. Azadirachta indica (neem) leaf dietary effects on the immunity response and disease resistance of Asian seabass, Lates calcarifer challenged with Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Talpur, Allah Dad; Ikhwanuddin, Mhd

    2013-01-01

    The present study was aimed to address the possible evaluation of Azadirachta indica (neem) leaf-supplemented diets on innate immune response in Asian seabass, Lates calcarifer fingerlings against Vibrio harveyi infection. Fish were fed for two weeks diets containing six graded levels of neem leaf at 0 g, 1 g, 2 g, 3 g, 4 g and 5 g per kg feed. Fish fed neem leaf-supplemented diet displayed significant differences (p < 0.05) in weight gain, specific growth rate (SGR) and feed conversion ratio (FCR) compared to the control group fed without neem leaf-supplemented diet. Various innate immune parameters were examined pre-challenge and post-challenge. Fish was injected intraperitoneally with a lethal dose of V. harveyi containing 10(8) cells mL(-1). Supplementation of neem leaf diet significantly increased phagocytic activity, superoxide anion production, serum lysozyme, serum bactericidal activity, serum anti-protease activity throughout the experimental period when compared with the control group. Dietary doses of neem leaf diet significantly influenced the immune parameters, haematological parameters and blood biochemical indices of treated fish. The results suggested that fish fed neem leaf-supplemented diet improved the immune system and increased survival rate in L. calcarifer fingerlings against V. harveyi infection.

  4. CpG ODN mimicking CpG rich region of myxosporean Myxobolus supamattayai stimulates innate immunity in Asian sea bass (Lates calcarifer) and defense against Streptococcus iniae.

    PubMed

    U-Taynapun, Kittichon; Chirapongsatonkul, Nion; Itami, Toshiaki; Tantikitti, Chutima

    2016-11-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing unmethylated cytosine-phosphate-guanine CpG dinucleotides within specific sequence contexts (CpG motifs) have been reported as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Its immunostimulatory effects have been demonstrated in diverse vertebrate models. CpG ODN is typically found in bacterial or viral genome and recognized by a non-self recognition receptor Toll-like receptor9 (TLR9). Here, a new CpG ODN 1013 which mimics sequence of SSU rDNA of early eukaryotic organism myxosporidia, Myxobolus supamattayai, was employed to stimulate the immune responses of Asian sea bass Lates calcarifer. Its immunostimulant potentiality was comparatively compared with that of CpG ODN 1668, a widely used as functional immunostimulant. Both unmethylated CpG ODNs with some modified phosphorothioated positions were intraperitoneally injection (5 μg/fish). Hematological examination, immunological assays and immune-related genes expression were evaluated 12 h, 1, 3 and 5 d after post CpG ODN challenge. The immunosimulatory effect of these CpG ODNs on fish immunity to protect the bacterial pathogen Streptococcus iniae was also determined. The results demonstrated that these two CpG ODNs could induce immune responses in Asian sea bass including the significant (P < 0.05) increase level of WBC, peroxidase activity and oxidative radicals in head kidney (HK) leukocyte, serum innate immune parameters and up-regulation of four immune responsive genes compared with the control group. Most of immune responses induced by ODN 1668 were strong within 1 d but lesser extended while ODN 1013 prolonged the stimulatory effects during the whole experimental period. After challenge with S. iniae, the survival proportion in ODN 1013-treated fish was apparently higher than that treated with ODN 1668 and PBS, respectively. The results together suggested that CpG ODN 1013 enhanced innate immune responses, including humoral and cellular responses, through

  5. Taurine-induced synaptic potentiation and the late phase of long-term potentiation are related mechanistically.

    PubMed

    del Olmo, N; Handler, A; Alvarez, L; Bustamante, J; Martín del Río, R; Solís, J M

    2003-01-01

    The application of taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) induces a long-lasting increase of synaptic efficacy and axon excitability (LLP-TAU) in rat hippocampal CA1 area. After taurine withdrawal, LLP-TAU lasted at least 3 h. This fact prompted us to assess whether the mechanisms involved in the maintenance of this particular potentiation were similar to those implicated in the late phase of long-term potentiation (L-LTP). In the presence of KN-62, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, taurine perfusion (10 mM, 30 min) did not affect the induction of LLP-TAU. However, LLP-TAU maintenance was completely suppressed by KT5720, an inhibitor of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Moreover, the late phase of LLP-TAU was blocked by inhibiting protein synthesis with anisomycin. In addition, taurine perfusion increased the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), although did not affect cAMP levels. These features of LLP-TAU do not appear to be caused by the activation of D1/D5 dopamine receptors, as taurine also induced synaptic potentiation in the presence of SCH23390, an antagonist of this type of receptors. Finally, the late phase of both L-LTP and LLP-TAU occluded mutually. These results suggest that taurine triggers the sequence of some of the molecular events involved in the induction of L-LTP.

  6. Role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in shaping the effector phase of the antitumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Franciszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Boutet, Marie; Combadière, Christophe; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia

    2012-12-15

    Immune system-mediated eradication of neoplastic cells requires induction of a strong long-lasting antitumor T-cell response. However, generation of tumor-specific effector T cells does not necessarily result in tumor clearance. CTL must first be able to migrate to the tumor site, infiltrate the tumor tissue, and interact with the target to finally trigger effector functions indispensable for tumor destruction. Chemokines are involved in circulation, homing, retention, and activation of immunocompetent cells. Although some of them are known to contribute to tumor growth and metastasis, others are responsible for changes in the tumor microenvironment that lead to extensive infiltration of lymphocytes, resulting in tumor eradication. Given their chemoattractive and activating properties, a role for chemokines in the development of the effector phase of the antitumor immune response has been suggested. Here, we emphasize the role of the chemokine-chemokine receptor network at multiple levels of the T-cell-mediated antitumor immune response. The identification of chemokine-dependent molecular mechanisms implicated in tumor-specific CTL trafficking, retention, and regulation of their in situ effector functions may offer new perspectives for development of innovative immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer treatment.

  7. Too little but not too late: Results of a literature review to improve routine immunization programs in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Ryman, Tove K; Dietz, Vance; Cairns, K Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Background Globally, immunization services have been the center of renewed interest with increased funding to improve services, acceleration of the introduction of new vaccines, and the development of a health systems approach to improve vaccine delivery. Much of the credit for the increased attention is due to the work of the GAVI Alliance and to new funding streams. If routine immunization programs are to take full advantage of the newly available resources, managers need to understand the range of proven strategies and approaches to deliver vaccines to reduce the incidence of diseases. In this paper, we present strategies that may be used at the sub-national level to improve routine immunization programs. Methods We conducted a systematic review of studies and projects reported in the published and gray literature. Each paper that met our inclusion criteria was rated based on methodological rigor and data were systematically abstracted. Routine-immunization – specific papers with a methodological rigor rating of greater than 60% and with conclusive results were reported. Results Greater than 11,000 papers were identified, of which 60 met our inclusion criteria and 25 papers were reported. Papers were grouped into four strategy approaches: bringing immunizations closer to communities (n = 11), using information dissemination to increase demand for vaccination (n = 3), changing practices in fixed sites (n = 4), and using innovative management practices (n = 7). Conclusion Immunization programs are at a historical crossroads in terms of developing new funding streams, introducing new vaccines, and responding to the global interest in the health systems approach to improving immunization delivery. However, to complement this, actual service delivery needs to be strengthened and program managers must be aware of proven strategies. Much was learned from the 25 papers, such as the use of non-health workers to provide numerous services at the community level. However

  8. Connexin-43 induces chemokine release from spinal cord astrocytes to maintain late-phase neuropathic pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Park, Chul-Kyu; Xie, Rou-Gang; Berta, Temugin; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that spinal cord astrocytes play an important role in neuropathic pain sensitization by releasing astrocytic mediators (e.g. cytokines, chemokines and growth factors). However, it remains unclear how astrocytes control the release of astrocytic mediators and sustain late-phase neuropathic pain. Astrocytic connexin-43 (now known as GJ1) has been implicated in gap junction and hemichannel communication of cytosolic contents through the glial syncytia and to the extracellular space, respectively. Connexin-43 also plays an essential role in facilitating the development of neuropathic pain, yet the mechanism for this contribution remains unknown. In this study, we investigated whether nerve injury could upregulate connexin-43 to sustain late-phase neuropathic pain by releasing chemokine from spinal astrocytes. Chronic constriction injury elicited a persistent upregulation of connexin-43 in spinal astrocytes for >3 weeks. Spinal (intrathecal) injection of carbenoxolone (a non-selective hemichannel blocker) and selective connexin-43 blockers (connexin-43 mimetic peptides 43Gap26 and 37,43Gap27), as well as astroglial toxin but not microglial inhibitors, given 3 weeks after nerve injury, effectively reduced mechanical allodynia, a cardinal feature of late-phase neuropathic pain. In cultured astrocytes, TNF-α elicited marked release of the chemokine CXCL1, and the release was blocked by carbenoxolone, Gap26/Gap27, and connexin-43 small interfering RNA. TNF-α also increased connexin-43 expression and hemichannel activity, but not gap junction communication in astrocyte cultures prepared from cortices and spinal cords. Spinal injection of TNF-α-activated astrocytes was sufficient to induce persistent mechanical allodynia, and this allodynia was suppressed by CXCL1 neutralization, CXCL1 receptor (CXCR2) antagonist, and pretreatment of astrocytes with connexin-43 small interfering RNA. Furthermore, nerve injury persistently increased excitatory

  9. Differential role of afferent and efferent renal nerves in the maintenance of early- and late-phase Dahl S hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Foss, Jason D.; Fink, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data suggest that renal denervation (RDNX) may be an effective treatment for human hypertension; however, it is unclear whether this therapeutic effect is due to ablation of afferent or efferent renal nerves. We have previously shown that RDNX lowers arterial pressure in hypertensive Dahl salt-sensitive (S) rats to a similar degree observed in clinical trials. In addition, we have recently developed a method for selective ablation of afferent renal nerves (renal-CAP). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the antihypertensive effect of RDNX in the Dahl S rat is due to ablation of afferent renal nerves by comparing the effect of complete RDNX to renal-CAP during two phases of hypertension in the Dahl S rat. In the early phase, rats underwent treatment after 3 wk of high-NaCl feeding when mean arterial pressure (MAP) was ∼140 mmHg. In the late phase, rats underwent treatment after 9 wk of high NaCl feeding, when MAP was ∼170 mmHg. RDNX reduced MAP ∼10 mmHg compared with sham surgery in both the early and late phase, whereas renal-CAP had no antihypertensive effect. These results suggest that, in the Dahl S rat, the antihypertensive effect of RDNX is not dependent on pretreatment arterial pressure, nor is it due to ablation of afferent renal nerves. PMID:26661098

  10. Single-cell gene expression analyses of cellular reprogramming reveal a stochastic early and hierarchic late phase

    PubMed Central

    Buganim, Yosef; Faddah, Dina A.; Cheng, Albert W.; Itskovich, Elena; Markoulaki, Styliani; Ganz, Kibibi; Klemm, Sandy L.; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2012-01-01

    During cellular reprogramming only a small fraction of cells become induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Previous analyses of gene expression during reprogramming were based on populations of cells, impeding single-cell level identification of reprogramming events. We utilized two gene expression technologies to profile 48 genes in single cells at various stages during the reprogramming process. Analysis of early stages revealed considerable variation in gene expression between cells in contrast to late stages. Expression of Esrrb, Utf1, Lin28, and Dppa2 is a better predictor for cells to progress into iPSCs than expression of Fbxo15, Fgf4, and Oct4 previously suggested to be reprogramming markers. Stochastic gene expression early in reprogramming is followed by a late hierarchical phase with Sox2 being the upstream factor in a gene expression hierarchy. Finally, downstream factors derived from the late phase, which do not include Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Myc and Nanog, can activate the pluripotency circuitry. PMID:22980981

  11. Effects of hirami lemon, Citrus depressa Hayata, leaf meal in diets on the immune response and disease resistance of juvenile barramundi, Lates calcarifer (bloch), against Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Ya-Li; Lin, Hsueh-Li; Chi, Chia-Chun; Yeh, Shinn-Pyng; Liu, Chun-Hung

    2016-08-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the dietary supplementation of leaf meal from Citrus depressa Hayata on the growth, innate immune response, and disease resistance of juvenile barramundi, Lates calcarifer. Four diets were formulated to contain 0% (control), 1% (C1), 3% (C3), and 5% (C5) leaf meal, respectively. During a 56 d feeding trial, fish survival, growth performance, and feed efficiency were not significantly different among all groups. For immune response, respiratory burst, superoxide dismutase and lysozyme activities were not significantly different among all groups. However, fish fed the C5 diet for 56 d had significantly higher phagocytic activity. Also, fish fed C3 and C5 diets had significantly higher Mx gene expressions in spleens and head kidneys with nerve necrosis virus injections after 24 h. Disease resistance against Aeromonas hydrophila was increased by the C5 diet. In this study, barramundi fed on a diet containing 5% C. depressa Hayata leaf meal had significantly better innate immune response and disease resistance against A. hydrophila.

  12. Prognostic significance of host immune status in patients with late relapsing renal cell carcinoma treated with targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Matteo; Buti, Sebastiano; Conti, Alessandro; Porta, Camillo; Procopio, Giuseppe; Sternberg, Cora N; Bracarda, Sergio; Basso, Umberto; De Giorgi, Ugo; Rizzo, Mimma; Derosa, Lisa; Ortega, Cinzia; Massari, Francesco; Milella, Michele; Bersanelli, Melissa; Cerbone, Linda; Muzzonigro, Giovanni; Burattini, Luciano; Montironi, Rodolfo; Santini, Daniele; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to assess the prognostic role of pretreatment neutrophilia, lymphocytopenia, and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) in patients treated with vascular endothelial growth factor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (VEGFR-TKIs) for late relapsing (>5 years) metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Data were collected from 13 Italian centers involved in the treatment of metastatic RCC. Late relapse was defined as >5 years after initial radical nephrectomy. One hundred fifty-one patients were included in this analysis. Among them, MSKCC risk score was favorable in 68 %, intermediate in 29 %, and poor in 3 %. Fifty-six patients (37 %) had NLR ≥3 at the start of VEGFR-TKI therapy (group A), while 95 had lower NLR (63 %, group B). The median overall survival (OS) was 28.8 months in group A and 68.7 months (95 % confidence interval (CI) 45.3-NA) in group B (p < 0.001). The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 15.8 months in group A and 25.1 months in group B (p = 0.03). At multivariate analysis, MSKCC risk group and NLR were independent prognostic factors for both OS and PFS. Pretreatment NLR is an independent prognostic factor for patients with late relapsing mRCC treated with first-line VEGFR-TKIs. A better characterization of baseline immunological impairment may optimize the management of this RCC subpopulation.

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi: dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and immune response during the chronic phase of the experimental Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Leony Cristina; Santello, Fabricia Helena; Del Vecchio Filipin, Marina; Brazão, Vânia; Caetano, Luana Naiara; Toldo, Miriam Paula Alonso; Caldeira, Jerri C; do Prado Júnior, José Clóvis

    2009-07-07

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has long been considered as a precursor for many steroid hormones. It also enhances the immune responses against a wide range of viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. The aims of this work were to evaluate the influences of exogenous DHEA treatment on Wistar rats infected with the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi during the acute and its influence on the chronic phase of infection. Animals were subcutaneous treated with 40 mg/kg body weight/day of DHEA. DHEA treatment promoted increased lymphoproliferative responses as well as enhanced concentrations of NO and IL-12. So, we point in the direction that our results validate the utility of the use of DHEA as an alternative therapy candidate against T. cruzi.

  14. Age-Related Enhancement of a Protein Synthesis-Dependent Late Phase of LTP Induced by Low Frequency Paired-Pulse Stimulation in Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yan-You; Kandel, Eric R.

    2006-01-01

    Protein synthesis-dependent late phase of LTP (L-LTP) is typically induced by repeated high-frequency stimulation (HFS). This form of L-LTP is reduced in the aged animal and is positively correlated with age-related memory loss. Here we report a novel form of protein synthesis-dependent late phase of LTP in the CA1 region of hippocampus induced by…

  15. A Bayesian three-parameter logistic model for early- and late-onset DLTs in oncology Phase I studies.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Zhao, Yang; Lu, Yuefeng; Miao, Harry; Liu, Hengchang

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a three-parameter logistic model to analyze the dose limiting toxicity (DLT) as a time-to-event endpoint in oncology Phase I trials. In the proposed model, patients are allowed to stay on trial without the constraint of a maximum follow-up time. Our model accommodates late-onset DLT as well as early-onset DLT, by both of which the dose recommendation is informed. A Bayesian approach is used to incorporate prior knowledge of the test treatment into dose recommendation. Simulation examples show that our proposed model has good operating characteristics in assessing the maximum tolerated dose (MTD).

  16. Effects of maternal protein or energy restriction during late gestation on immune status and responses to lipopolysaccharide challenge in postnatal young goats.

    PubMed

    He, Z X; Sun, Z H; Yang, W Z; Beauchemin, K A; Tang, S X; Zhou, C S; Han, X F; Wang, M; Kang, J H; Tan, Z L

    2014-11-01

    Knowledge of maternal malnutrition of ruminants and effects on development of the immune system of their offspring is lacking. A study was conducted to investigate the effects of maternal protein or energy restriction during late gestation on immune status of their offspring at different ages. Sixty-three pregnant goats (local breed, Liuyang black goat, 22.2 ± 1.5 kg at d 90 of gestation) were fed control (CON, ME = 9.34 MJ/kg and CP = 12.5%, DM basis), 40% protein restricted (PR), or 40% energy restricted (ER) diets from d 91 of gestation to parturition, after which all animals received an adequate diet for nutritional recovery. Plasma concentrations of complement components (C3, C4), C-reactive protein (CRP) and immunoglobulins (IgG and IgM), jejunum cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, and IL-10) expression levels and morphology in the offspring were measured. Additionally, plasma concentration of complement and IL-6, and cytokines expression levels in gastrointestinal tract obtained at 6 wk from young goats were assessed under saline or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenging conditions. Maternal PR or ER decreased (P < 0.05) plasma C3, C4, IgG, and IgM concentrations, and IL-2 and IL-6 mRNA expression in the jejunum from neonatal kids, but did not alter (P > 0.05) plasma CRP concentration. The IL-10 mRNA expression of jejunum from PR kids was also less (P < 0.01) than that from CON kids. Moreover, jejunum villous height (P < 0.10 in PR, P < 0.05 in ER) and crypt depth (P < 0.05 both in PR and ER) were reduced in neonatal kids from malnourished mothers. At 6 wk of age, there were no differences (P > 0.05) in any plasma or tissue immune parameters among the 3 treatments. However, when given a LPS challenge, ER and PR kids had greater (P = 0.02) IL-6 concentration compared with CON kids. Our results suggest that both PR and ER during late gestation induced short-term as well as long-lasting alterations on immune responses in their offspring, which may make the animals more

  17. Deformed phase space Kaluza-Klein cosmology and late time acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabido, M.; Yee-Romero, C.

    2016-06-01

    The effects of phase space deformations on Kaluza-Klein cosmology are studied. The deformation is introduced by modifying the symplectic structure of the minisuperspace variables. In the deformed model, we find an accelerating scale factor and therefore infer the existence of an effective cosmological constant from the phase space deformation parameter β.

  18. Chronic transplantation immunity in newts: temperature susceptibility of an effector phase in allo-skin graft rejection.

    PubMed

    Kinefuchi, Kenjiroh; Kushida, Yoshihiro; Johnouchi, Masato; Shimizu, Yuiko; Ohneda, Hikaru; Fujii, Masato; Hosono, Masamichi

    2011-07-01

    Urodele amphibians are unique due to their greatly reduced immune responsiveness compared to bony fishes, which show acute immune responsiveness. In newts, the mean survival time of allogenic skin grafts in the transplantation immunity was 48.8 ± 8.3 days at 25°C, suggesting that it occurs in a chronic manner. The graft rejection process was categorized into three stages: a latent stage with frequent blood circulation, or the immune induction phase; a vascular stoppage stage with dominant infiltrating cells of T cells; and a rejection stage showing the change of the dominant cells to monocytes/macrophages, probably as effector cells, tetntatively referred to as the immune effector phase. The immune induction phase is susceptible to the cyclophosphamide (CY) mitosis inhibitor, but not to a temperature shift from 18 to 27°C, while the immune effector phase is susceptible to temperature shifts, but not CY-treatment, although the temperature shift failed to shorten the graft survival time to less than 25 days, which nearly equals that of the secondary set of grafts where the lack of complete blood circulation is remarkable and graft rejection is resistant to CY-treatment. In contrast, a very low temperature (5-10°C) completely prevented effector generation in newts; in frogs, however, it is reported that such low temperatures did not prevent the generation of effectors. Taken together, these data suggest that chronic responses in newts are due to effector cells other than cytotoxic T cells; possible effector cells are discussed.

  19. PRODUCTION OF THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET LATE PHASE OF AN X CLASS FLARE IN A THREE-STAGE MAGNETIC RECONNECTION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Y.; Ding, M. D.; Guo, Y.

    2013-08-20

    We report on observations of an X class flare on 2011 September 6 by the instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The flare occurs in a complex active region with multiple polarities. The Extreme-Ultraviolet (EUV) Variability Experiment observations in the warm coronal emission reveal three enhancements, the third of which corresponds to an EUV late phase. The three enhancements have a one-to-one correspondence to the three stages in flare evolution identified by the spatially resolved Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations, which are characterized by a flux rope eruption, a moderate filament ejection, and the appearance of EUV late phase loops, respectively. The EUV late phase loops are spatially and morphologically distinct from the main flare loops. Multi-channel analysis suggests the presence of a continuous but fragmented energy injection during the EUV late phase resulting in the warm corona nature of the late phase loops. Based on these observational facts, we propose a three-stage magnetic reconnection scenario to explain the flare evolution. Reconnections in different stages involve different magnetic fields but show a casual relationship between them. The EUV late phase loops are mainly produced by the least energetic magnetic reconnection in the last stage.

  20. Mathematical model reveals how regulating the three phases of T-cell response could counteract immune evasion

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Tommaso; Chisholm, Rebecca H; Melensi, Matteo; Lorz, Alexander; Delitala, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    T cells are key players in immune action against the invasion of target cells expressing non-self antigens. During an immune response, antigen-specific T cells dynamically sculpt the antigenic distribution of target cells, and target cells concurrently shape the host’s repertoire of antigen-specific T cells. The succession of these reciprocal selective sweeps can result in ‘chase-and-escape’ dynamics and lead to immune evasion. It has been proposed that immune evasion can be countered by immunotherapy strategies aimed at regulating the three phases of the immune response orchestrated by antigen-specific T cells: expansion, contraction and memory. Here, we test this hypothesis with a mathematical model that considers the immune response as a selection contest between T cells and target cells. The outcomes of our model suggest that shortening the duration of the contraction phase and stabilizing as many T cells as possible inside the long-lived memory reservoir, using dual immunotherapies based on the cytokines interleukin-7 and/or interleukin-15 in combination with molecular factors that can keep the immunomodulatory action of these interleukins under control, should be an important focus of future immunotherapy research. PMID:26119966

  1. Mathematical model reveals how regulating the three phases of T-cell response could counteract immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Tommaso; Chisholm, Rebecca H; Melensi, Matteo; Lorz, Alexander; Delitala, Marcello

    2015-10-01

    T cells are key players in immune action against the invasion of target cells expressing non-self antigens. During an immune response, antigen-specific T cells dynamically sculpt the antigenic distribution of target cells, and target cells concurrently shape the host's repertoire of antigen-specific T cells. The succession of these reciprocal selective sweeps can result in 'chase-and-escape' dynamics and lead to immune evasion. It has been proposed that immune evasion can be countered by immunotherapy strategies aimed at regulating the three phases of the immune response orchestrated by antigen-specific T cells: expansion, contraction and memory. Here, we test this hypothesis with a mathematical model that considers the immune response as a selection contest between T cells and target cells. The outcomes of our model suggest that shortening the duration of the contraction phase and stabilizing as many T cells as possible inside the long-lived memory reservoir, using dual immunotherapies based on the cytokines interleukin-7 and/or interleukin-15 in combination with molecular factors that can keep the immunomodulatory action of these interleukins under control, should be an important focus of future immunotherapy research.

  2. Effect of anabolic implants on adrenal cortisol synthesis in feedlot beef cattle implanted early or late in the finishing phase.

    PubMed

    Gifford, C A; Branham, K A; Ellison, J O; Gómez, B I; Lemley, C O; Hart, C G; Krehbiel, C R; Bernhard, B C; Maxwell, C L; Goad, C L; Hallford, D M; Hernandez Gifford, J A

    2015-01-01

    Implantation of anabolic steroids to increase growth rate in beef cattle impacts adrenal glucocorticoid production. The mechanism by which combination androgen and estrogen implants reduce cortisol biosynthesis in heifers is not clear. The objective of this study was to identify whether pituitary or adrenal gene expression and liver enzyme activity may contribute to altered serum cortisol concentrations in heifers receiving a combination implant. On d 0 of a 122-d finishing phase, 187 predominantly Angus heifers (361 kg) approximately 14 months old were randomly assigned to one of three implant groups: (1) non-implanted control, (2) implanted at the beginning of the finishing phase (d 0; early implant) with a combination implant (200mg TBA+20mg E2; Revalor 200®), and (3) implanted during the late stage of the finishing phase (d 56; late implant) with Revalor 200®. At d 56, body weight (BW) was greater (P<0.0001) for the early implanted heifers (456 ± 1.9 kg) compared to 437 and 435 (± 1.8) kg for control and late implanted heifers, respectively. Final BW (d 122) was similar between both implanted groups and heavier than non-implanted controls (P<0.0001). Serum cortisol was similar among groups at d 0 (P=0.86) however, by d 28 heifers receiving the combination implant had reduced (P<0.05) serum cortisol concentrations (31.2 ng/mL) compared to controls (49.4 ng/mL) and late (48.2 ng/mL) groups. On d 84 cortisol was similar (P=0.75) among implanted heifers and was less (P<0.01) than non-implanted heifers. Expression of pituitary and adrenal genes involved in glucocorticoid synthesis was evaluated at d 28/29 or 84/85; however, despite decreased serum cortisol in implanted heifers, no change in mRNA expression was demonstrated. Liver CYP3A enzyme activity at d 28/29 was decreased 59% in early implanted heifers compared to control heifers (P=0.01). Additionally, at d 84/85 AKR1C activity was greatest (P=0.01) in control heifers compared to both implanted groups. Data

  3. The role of Cajal bodies in the expression of late phase adenovirus proteins.

    PubMed

    James, Nicola J; Howell, Gareth J; Walker, John H; Blair, G Eric

    2010-04-10

    Cajal bodies (CBs) are subnuclear structures involved in RNA metabolism. Here we show that, following infection of HeLa cells by adenovirus type 5 (Ad5), CBs fragment and form ordered structures, which we have termed "rosettes". Formation of CB rosettes was prevented by inhibition of viral DNA synthesis and preceded expression of the L4-33K protein. CB rosettes localised to the periphery of E2A-72K-containing replication centers and to the edges of ASF/SF2 and hnRNP A1 ring structures that demarcate sites of viral transcription and splicing. At later times of infection, CB rosettes were undetectable. Furthermore, knock-down of p80-coilin (the major structural protein of CBs) by RNA interference reduced the yield of infectious Ad5 and expression of the late proteins IIIa (from L1), hexon (from L3) and fiber (from L5), whereas the E2A-72K protein was unaffected. We conclude that CBs have an important role in the expression of adenovirus major late gene products.

  4. The acute phase response of cod (Gadus morhua L.): expression of immune response genes.

    PubMed

    Audunsdottir, Sigridur S; Magnadottir, Bergljot; Gisladottir, Berglind; Jonsson, Zophonias O; Bragason, Birkir Th

    2012-02-01

    An acute phase response (APR) was experimentally induced in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) by intramuscular injection of turpentine oil. The change in the expression of immune related genes was monitored in the anterior kidney and the spleen over a period of 7 days. The genes examined were two types of pentraxins, apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA-I), the complement component C3, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), transferrin, cathelicidin, and hepcidin. All genes were constitutively expressed in both organs and their expression amplified by the turpentine injection. A pattern of response was observed both with respect to the organ preference and to the timing of a maximum response. The increased gene expression of the pentraxins, ApoA-I and C3 was restricted to the anterior kidney, the gene expression of IL-1β, cathelicidin, and transferrin increased in both organs, while hepcidin gene expression was only significantly increased in the spleen. The pentraxins and ApoA-I appear to be early mediators of APR in cod, possibly stimulating C3 and IL-1β response, while the antimicrobial peptides may play a minor role. The increase in transferrin gene expression in both organs, and apparent indifference to cortisol release associated with the turpentine injection, suggests that this could be a typical acute phase protein in cod.

  5. Discovery of Dihydrobenzoxazepinone (GS-6615) Late Sodium Current Inhibitor (Late INai), a Phase II Agent with Demonstrated Preclinical Anti-Ischemic and Antiarrhythmic Properties.

    PubMed

    Zablocki, Jeff A; Elzein, Elfatih; Li, Xiaofen; Koltun, Dmitry O; Parkhill, Eric Q; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Martinez, Ruben; Corkey, Britton; Jiang, Haibo; Perry, Thao; Kalla, Rao; Notte, Gregory T; Saunders, Oliver; Graupe, Michael; Lu, Yafan; Venkataramani, Chandru; Guerrero, Juan; Perry, Jason; Osier, Mark; Strickley, Robert; Liu, Gongxin; Wang, Wei-Qun; Hu, Lufei; Li, Xiao-Jun; El-Bizri, Nesrine; Hirakawa, Ryoko; Kahlig, Kris; Xie, Cheng; Li, Cindy Hong; Dhalla, Arvinder K; Rajamani, Sridharan; Mollova, Nevena; Soohoo, Daniel; Lepist, Eve-Irene; Murray, Bernard; Rhodes, Gerry; Belardinelli, Luiz; Desai, Manoj C

    2016-10-03

    Late sodium current (late INa) is enhanced during ischemia by reactive oxygen species (ROS) modifying the Nav 1.5 channel, resulting in incomplete inactivation. Compound 4 (GS-6615, eleclazine) a novel, potent, and selective inhibitor of late INa, is currently in clinical development for treatment of long QT-3 syndrome (LQT-3), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and ventricular tachycardia-ventricular fibrillation (VT-VF). We will describe structure-activity relationship (SAR) leading to the discovery of 4 that is vastly improved from the first generation late INa inhibitor 1 (ranolazine). Compound 4 was 42 times more potent than 1 in reducing ischemic burden in vivo (S-T segment elevation, 15 min left anteriorior descending, LAD, occlusion in rabbits) with EC50 values of 190 and 8000 nM, respectively. Compound 4 represents a new class of potent late INa inhibitors that will be useful in delineating the role of inhibitors of this current in the treatment of patients.

  6. Effects of early or late prenatal immune activation in mice on behavioral and neuroanatomical abnormalities relevant to schizophrenia in the adulthood.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Vivian T; Medeiros, Daniel de Castro; Ropke, Jivago; Guidine, Patricia A; Rezende, Gustavo H; Moraes, Marcio Flavio D; Mendes, Eduardo Mazoni A M; Macedo, Danielle; Moreira, Fabricio A; de Oliveira, Antonio Carlos P

    2017-05-01

    Maternal immune activation (MIA) during pregnancy in rodents increases the risk of the offspring to develop schizophrenia-related behaviors, suggesting a relationship between the immune system and the brain development. Here we tested the hypothesis that MIA induced by the viral mimetic polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) in early or late gestation of mice leads to behavioral and neuroanatomical disorders in the adulthood. On gestational days (GDs) 9 or 17 pregnant dams were treated with poly I:C or saline via intravenous route and the offspring behaviors were measured during adulthood. Considering the progressive structural neuroanatomical alterations in the brain of individuals with schizophrenia, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to perform brain morphometric analysis of the offspring aged one year. MIA on GD9 or GD17 led to increased basal locomotor activity, enhanced motor responses to ketamine, a psychotomimetic drug, and reduced time spent in the center of the arena, suggesting an increased anxiety-like behavior. In addition, MIA on GD17 reduced glucose preference in the offspring. None of the treatments altered the relative volume of the lateral ventricles. However, a decrease in brain volume, especially for posterior structures, was observed for one-year-old animals treated with poly I:C compared with control groups. Thus, activation of the maternal immune system at different GDs lead to neuroanatomical and behavioral alterations possibly related to the positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. These results provide insights on neuroimmunonological and neurodevelopmental aspects of certain psychopathologies, such as schizophrenia.

  7. Late-phase miRNA-controlled oncolytic adenovirus for selective killing of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fillat, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-specific detargeting by miRNAs has been demonstrated to be a potent strategy to restrict adenoviral replication to cancer cells. These studies have generated adenoviruses with miRNA target sites placed in the 3′UTR of early gene products. In this work, we have studied the feasibility of providing tissue-specific selectivity to replication-competent adenoviruses through the regulation of the late structural protein fiber (L5 gene). We have engineered a 3′UTR containing eight miR-148a binding sites downstream the L5 coding sequence (Ad-L5-8miR148aT). We present in vitro and in vivo evidences of Ad-L5-8miR148aT miRNA-dependent regulation. In vitro data show that at 72 hours post-infection miR-148a-regulation impaired fiber expression leading to a 70% reduction of viral release. The application of seven consecutive rounds of infection in miR-148a cells resulted in 10.000-fold reduction of viral genomes released. In vivo, liver production of infective viral particles was highly impaired, similarly to that triggered by an adenovirus with miRNA target sites regulating the early E1A gene. Noticeably, mice treated with Ad-L5-8miR148aT showed an attenuation of adenoviral-induced hepatotoxicity but retained full lytic activity in cancer cells and exhibited robust antitumoral responses in patient-derived xenografts. Thus, miRNA-control of late proteins constitutes a novel strategy to provide selectivity to adenoviruses. PMID:25714032

  8. Systemic and local immune responses in sheep after Neospora caninum experimental infection at early, mid and late gestation.

    PubMed

    Arranz-Solís, David; Benavides, Julio; Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Horcajo, Pilar; Castaño, Pablo; del Carmen Ferreras, María; Jiménez-Pelayo, Laura; Collantes-Fernández, Esther; Ferre, Ignacio; Hemphill, Andrew; Pérez, Valentín; Ortega-Mora, Luis Miguel

    2016-01-06

    Besides its importance in cattle, Neospora caninum may also pose a high risk as abortifacient for small ruminants. We have recently demonstrated that the outcome of experimental infection of pregnant sheep with 10(6) Nc-Spain7 tachyzoites is strongly dependent on the time of gestation. In the current study, we assessed peripheral and local immune response in those animals. Serological analysis revealed earlier and higher IFN-γ and IgG responses in ewes infected at early (G1) and mid (G2) gestation, when abortion occurred. IL-4 was not detected in sera from any sheep. Inflammatory infiltrates in the placenta mainly consisted of CD8+ and, to a lesser extent, CD4+ T cells and macrophages (CD163+). The infiltrate was more intense in sheep infected at mid-gestation. In the foetal mesenchyme, mostly free tachyzoites were found in animals infected at G1, while those infected in G2 displayed predominantly particulate antigen, and parasitophorous vacuoles were detected in sheep infected at G3. A similar pattern of placental cytokine mRNA expression was found in all groups, displaying a strengthened upregulation of IFN-γ and IL-4 and milder increases of TNF-α and IL-10, reminiscent of a mixed Th1 and Th2 response. IL-12 and IL-6 were only slightly upregulated in G2, and TGF-β was downregulated in G1 and G2, suggestive of limited T regulatory (Treg) cell activity. No significant expression of TLR2 or TLR4 could be detected. In summary, this study confirms the pivotal role of systemic and local immune responses at different times of gestation during N. caninum infection in sheep.

  9. Apoptotic markers and DNA damage are related to late phase of stroke: Involvement of dyslipidemia and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pascotini, Eduardo Tanuri; Flores, Ariane Ethur; Kegler, Aline; Gabbi, Patricia; Bochi, Guilherme Vargas; Algarve, Thais Doeler; Prado, Ana Lucia Cervi; Duarte, Marta M M F; da Cruz, Ivana B M; Moresco, Rafael Noal; Royes, Luiz Fernando Freire; Fighera, Michele Rechia

    2015-11-01

    Oxidative stress and brain inflammation are thought to contribute to the pathophysiology of cerebral injury in acute stroke, leading to apoptosis and cell death. Lipid accumulation may lead to progression of carotid plaques and inflammation, contributing to increased acute stroke risk. However, little is known about these events and markers in the late stroke (>6 months) and if dyslipidemia could contribute to disease's pathophysiology in a later phase. In this case-control study, we recruited patients in the late stroke phase (n=40) and health subjects (control group; n = 40). Dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCFH), nitrite/nitrate (NOx), Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), Caspase 8 (CASP 8), Caspase 3 (CASP 3) and Picogreen (PG) were measured in periphery blood samples. Furthermore, a correlation among all measured markers (DCFH, NOx, TNF-α, AChE, CASP 8, CASP 3 and PG) was realized. The marker levels were also compared to triglycerides (TG), total (CHO), LDL and HDL cholesterol levels and medications used. Statistical analyses showed that stroke patients presented an increase of DCFH, NOx, TNF-α and AChE levels when compared to control subjects. In addition, we observed that stroke patients had significantly higher CASP 8, CASP 3 and PG levels than control group. A significant correlation between TNF-α with CASP 8 (r = 0.4) and CASP 3 (r = 0.4) levels was observed, but not with oxidative/nitrosative markers. Moreover, we observed that stroke patients with dyslipidemia had significantly higher TNF-α, CASP 8 and CASP 3 levels than stroke without dyslipidemia and control groups. Our findings suggest that oxidative and inflammatory markers may be still increased and lead to caspase activation and DNA damage even after 6 months to cerebral injury. Furthermore, it is plausible to propose that dyslipidemia may contribute to worsen proinflammatory state in a later phase of stroke and an increased risk to new neurovascular events.

  10. Radiocarbon dating of the Late Cycladic building and destruction phases at Akrotiri, Thera: New evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniatis, Yannis

    2012-01-01

    Akrotiri was a flourishing prehistoric settlement on the Cycladic island of Santorini (Thera) until its life was ended by a huge volcanic eruption in the LCI period. There is much debate as to when this final destruction occurred. Based on the Egyptian historical dating this happened around 1540-1530 BC, while, based on radiocarbon and other scientific data, around 1640-1600 BC. This work is an attempt to date with radiocarbon the whole settlement's life starting from the earlier phases of occupation but focusing in the sequence of the latest events. The samples, coming from the deep shafts dug in the site for the pillars of the new shelter, are pieces of wood and charcoal from house architectural elements and other constructions, including the final earthquake victims temporary camps. Therefore, the dates obtained represent the beginning of the different cultural phases plus the latest events. The results provide novel absolute dates for the commencement of the LMC and LCI Phases at Akrotiri, giving mean ranges around 1820-1790 BC and 1775-1722 BC, respectively, while the final destruction is dated around 1622-1548 BC. These results show that the LCI phase started about 100 years earlier than estimated with the Egyptian Historical chronology while the final destruction around 60 years or less earlier.

  11. Low-Dose Priming Before Vaccination with the Phase I Chloroform-Methanol Residue Vaccine Against Q Fever Enhances Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses to Coxiella Burnetii

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Vaccination with the Phase I Chloroform-Methanol Residue Vaccine against Q Fever Enhances Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses to Coxiella burnetii David... I Coxiella burnetii cellular vaccine is completely efficacious in humans, adverse local and systemic reactions may develop if immune individuals are...inadvertently vaccinated. The phase I chloroform- methanol residue (CMRI) vaccine was developed as a potentially safer alternative. Human volunteers

  12. Characterization of the Histopathologic Features in Patients in the Early and Late Phases of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Saldanha, Maíra G.; Queiroz, Adriano; Machado, Paulo Roberto L.; de Carvalho, Lucas P.; Scott, Phillip; de Carvalho Filho, Edgar M.; Arruda, Sérgio

    2017-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), characterized by an ulcerated lesion, is the most common clinical form of human leishmaniasis. Before the ulcer develops, patients infected with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis present a small papule at the site of the sandfly bite, referred to as early cutaneous leishmaniasis (E-CL). Two to four weeks later the typical ulcer develops, which is considered here as late CL (L-CL). Although there is a great deal known about T-cell responses in patients with L-CL, there is little information about the in situ inflammatory response in E-CL. Histological sections of skin biopsies from 15 E-CL and 28 L-CL patients were stained by hematoxilin and eosin to measure the area infiltrated by cells, as well as tissue necrosis. Leishmania braziliensis amastigotes, CD4+, CD8+, CD20+, and CD68+ cells were identified and quantified by immunohistochemistry. The number of amastigotes in E-CL was higher than in L-CL, and the inflammation area was larger in classical ulcers than in E-CL. There was no relationship between the number of parasites and magnitude of the inflammation area, or with the lesion size. However, there was a direct correlation between the number of macrophages and the lesion size in E-CL, and between the number of macrophages and necrotic area throughout the course of the disease. These positive correlations suggest that macrophages are directly involved in the pathology of L. braziliensis–induced lesions. PMID:28115669

  13. The Toqua site, 40MR6: A late Mississippian, Dallas phase town

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, J.; Polhemus, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    Archaeological work in the Little Tennessee River Valley was very much affected by the fluctuations in the Tellico Reservoir scheduling and funding. Stated project goals were: ''Questions regarding Cherokee origins, culture change and acculturation, and the length of time during which the valley was inhabited by man will be among the major ones to be considered.'' From the project inception, the principal research commitment was to the eighteenth century Overhill Cherokee occupation of the valley. By 1967, the inundation date was set for 1971. Four main research problems were identified: (1) a complete survey of the reservoir area to locate all prehistoric and historic sites that will be inundated; (2) a thorough testing of the eighteenth century Cherokee towns to determine the effects of acculturation; (3) to determine how long the Overhill Cherokee have occupied the Little Tennessee Valley by excavating a late prehistoric Mississippian village or an early Historic Cherokee village to discover by (sic) continuities between the prehistoric Mississippian complexes and the Historic Cherokee; and (4) to test intensively occupied sites in depth to find earlier Woodland and Archaic complexes in stratigraphic succession (Guthe, 1967). This report describes the results of these investigations.

  14. Interaction of menstrual cycle phase and sexual activity predicts mucosal and systemic humoral immunity in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Tierney K; Demas, Gregory E; Heiman, Julia R

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have documented shifts in humoral immune parameters (e.g., immunoglobulins) across the menstrual cycle in healthy women. It is thought that these shifts may reflect dynamic balancing between reproduction and pathogen defense, as certain aspects of humoral immunity may disrupt conception and may be temporarily downregulated at ovulation. If so, one could expect maximal cycle-related shifts of humoral immunity in individuals invested in reproduction - that is, women who are currently sexually active - and less pronounced shifts in women who are not reproductively active (i.e., abstinent). We investigated the interaction of sexual activity, menstrual cycle phase, and humoral immunity in a sample of 32 healthy premenopausal women (15 sexually active, 17 abstinent). Participants provided saliva samples during their menses, follicular phase, ovulation (as indicated by urine test for LH surge), and luteal phase, from which IgA was assayed. Participants also provided blood samples at menses and ovulation, from which IgG was assayed. Sexually active participants provided records of their frequency of sexual activity as well as condom use. At ovulation, sexually active women had higher IgG than abstinent women (d=0.77), with women reporting regular condom use showing larger effects (d=0.63) than women reporting no condom use (d=0.11). Frequency of sexual activity predicted changes in IgA (Cohen's f(2)=0.25), with women reporting high frequency of sexual activity showing a decrease in IgA at ovulation, while women reporting low frequency or no sexual activity showing an increase in IgA at ovulation. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that shifts in humoral immunity across the menstrual cycle are associated with reproductive effort, and could contribute to the mechanisms by which women's physiology navigates tradeoffs between reproduction and immunity.

  15. Oscillation Phase Locking and Late ERP Components of Intracranial Hippocampal Recordings Correlate to Patient Performance in a Working Memory Task

    PubMed Central

    Kleen, Jonathan K.; Testorf, Markus E.; Roberts, David W.; Scott, Rod C.; Jobst, Barbara J.; Holmes, Gregory L.; Lenck-Santini, Pierre-Pascal

    2016-01-01

    In working memory tasks, stimulus presentation induces a resetting of intracranial temporal lobe oscillations in multiple frequency bands. To further understand the functional relevance of this phenomenon, we investigated whether working memory performance depends on the phase precision of ongoing oscillations in the hippocampus. We recorded intra-hippocampal local field potentials in individuals performing a working memory task. Two types of trials were administered. For high memory trials presentation of a list of four letters (“List”) was followed by a single letter memory probe (“Test”). Low memory load trials, consisting of four identical letters (AAAA) followed by a probe with the same letter (A), were interspersed. Significant phase locking of ongoing oscillations across trials, estimated by the Pairwise Phase Consistency Index (PPCI) was observed in delta (0.5–4 Hz), theta (5–7 Hz), and alpha (8–12 Hz) bands during stimulus presentation and recall but was increased in low memory load trials. Across patients however, higher delta PPCIs during recall in the left hippocampus were associated with faster reaction times. Because phase locking could also be interpreted as a consequence of a stimulus evoked potential, we performed event related potential analysis (ERP) and examined the relationship of ERP components with performance. We found that both amplitude and latency of late ERP components correlated with both reaction time and accuracy. We propose that, in the Sternberg task, phase locking of oscillations, or alternatively its ERP correlate, synchronizes networks within the hippocampus and connected structures that are involved in working memory. PMID:27378885

  16. Opposing regulation of the late phase TNF response by mTORC1-IL-10 signaling and hypoxia in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Linda; Kusnadi, Anthony; Park, Sung Ho; Murata, Koichi; Park-Min, Kyung-Hyun; Ivashkiv, Lionel B

    2016-08-25

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is best known for inducing a rapid but transient NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response. We investigated later phases of TNF signaling, after the initial transient induction of inflammatory genes has subsided, in primary human macrophages. TNF signaling induced expression of late response genes, including inhibitors of NF-κB and TLR signaling, with delayed and sustained kinetics 6-24 hr after TNF stimulation. A subset of late phase genes was expressed in rheumatoid arthritis synovial macrophages, confirming their expression under chronic inflammatory conditions in vivo. Expression of a subset of late phase genes was mediated by autocrine IL-10, which activated STAT3 with delayed kinetics. Hypoxia, which occurs at sites of infection or inflammation where TNF is expressed, suppressed this IL-10-STAT3 autocrine loop and expression of late phase genes. TNF-induced expression of IL-10 and downstream genes was also dependent on signaling by mTORC1, which senses the metabolic state of cells and is modulated by hypoxia. These results reveal an mTORC1-dependent IL-10-mediated late phase response to TNF by primary human macrophages, and identify suppression of IL-10 responses as a new mechanism by which hypoxia can promote inflammation. Thus, hypoxic and metabolic pathways may modulate TNF responses during chronic inflammation.

  17. Late-time vacuum phase transitions: Connecting sub-eV scale physics with cosmological structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, Amol V.; Fuller, George M.

    2014-09-01

    We show that a particular class of postrecombination phase transitions in the vacuum can lead to localized overdense regions on relatively small scales, roughly 106 to 1010M⊙, potentially interesting for the origin of large black hole seeds and for dwarf galaxy evolution. Our study suggests that this mechanism could operate over a range of conditions which are consistent with current cosmological and laboratory bounds. One byproduct of phase transition bubble-wall decay may be extra radiation energy density. This could provide an avenue for constraint, but it could also help reconcile the discordant values of the present Hubble parameter (H0) and σ8 obtained by cosmic microwave background (CMB) fits and direct observational estimates. We also suggest ways in which future probes, including CMB considerations (e.g., early dark energy limits), 21-cm observations, and gravitational radiation limits, could provide more stringent constraints on this mechanism and the sub-eV scale beyond-standard-model physics, perhaps in the neutrino sector, on which it could be based. Late phase transitions associated with sterile neutrino mass and mixing may provide a way to reconcile cosmological limits and laboratory data, should a future disagreement arise.

  18. cAMP initiates early phase neuron-like morphology changes and late phase neural differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linxia; Seitz, Linsey C; Abramczyk, Amy M; Liu, Li; Chan, Christina

    2011-03-01

    The intracellular second messenger cAMP is frequently used in induction media to induce mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into neural lineage cells. To date, an understanding of the role cAMP exerts on MSCs and whether cAMP can induce MSCs into functional neurons is still lacking. We found cAMP initiated neuron-like morphology changes early and neural differentiation much later. The early phase changes in morphology were due to cell shrinkage, which subsequently rendered some cells apoptotic. While the morphology changes occurred prior to the expression of neural markers, it is not required for neural marker expression and the two processes are differentially regulated downstream of cAMP-activated protein kinase A. cAMP enabled MSCs to gain neural marker expressions with neuronal function, such as, calcium rise in response to neuronal activators, dopamine, glutamate, and potassium chloride. However, only some of the cells induced by cAMP responded to the three neuronal activators and further lack the neuronal morphology, suggesting that although cAMP is able to direct MSCs towards neural differentiation, they do not achieve terminal differentiation.

  19. cAMP initiates early phase neuron-like morphology changes and late phase neural differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linxia; Seitz, Linsey C.; Abramczyk, Amy M.; Liu, Li

    2010-01-01

    The intracellular second messenger cAMP is frequently used in induction media to induce mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into neural lineage cells. To date, an understanding of the role cAMP exerts on MSCs and whether cAMP can induce MSCs into functional neurons is still lacking. We found cAMP initiated neuron-like morphology changes early and neural differentiation much later. The early phase changes in morphology were due to cell shrinkage, which subsequently rendered some cells apoptotic. While the morphology changes occurred prior to the expression of neural markers, it is not required for neural marker expression and the two processes are differentially regulated downstream of cAMP-activated protein kinase A. cAMP enabled MSCs to gain neural marker expressions with neuronal function, such as, calcium rise in response to neuronal activators, dopamine, glutamate, and potassium chloride. However, only some of the cells induced by cAMP responded to the three neuronal activators and further lack the neuronal morphology, suggesting that although cAMP is able to direct MSCs towards neural differentiation, they do not achieve terminal differentiation. PMID:20725762

  20. Global and local current sheet thickness estimates during the late growth phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Baker, D. N.; Mitchell, D. G.; Mcpherron, Robert L.; Huang, C. Y.; Frank, L. A.

    1992-01-01

    The thinning and intensification of the cross tail current sheet during the substorm growth phase are analyzed during the CDAW 6 substorm (22 Mar. 1979) using two complementary methods. The magnetic field and current sheet development are determined using data from two spacecraft and a global magnetic field model with several free parameters. These results are compared with the local calculation of the current sheet location and structure previously done by McPherron et al. Both methods lead to the conclusion that an extremely thin current sheet existed prior to the substorm onset, and the thicknesses estimated by the two methods at substorm onset agree relatively well. The plasma data from the ISEE 1 spacecraft at 13 R(sub E) show an anisotropy in the low energy electrons during the growth phase which disappears just before the substorm onset. The global magnetic model results suggest that the field is sufficiently stretched to scatter such low energy electrons. The strong stretching may improve the conditions for the growth of the ion tearing instability in the near Earth tail at substorm onset.

  1. Climate-driven sediment aggradation and incision phases since the Late Pleistocene in the NW Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Saptarshi; Thiede, Rasmus C.; Schildgen, Taylor F.; Wittmann, Hella; Bookhagen, Bodo; Scherler, Dirk; Jain, Vikrant; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2016-04-01

    Deciphering the response of sediment routing systems to climatic forcing is fundamental for understanding the impacts of climate change on landscape evolution and depositional systems. In the Sub-Himalaya, late Pleistocene to Holocene alluvial fills and fluvial terraces record periodic fluctuations of sediment supply and transport capacity on timescale of 103 to 105 years, most likely related to past climatic fluctuations. To evaluate the climatic control on sediment supply and transport capacity, we analyze remnant alluvial fans and terraces in the Kangra Basin of the northwestern Sub-Himalaya. Based on field observations and OSL and CRN-dating, we recognized two sedimentary cycles with major sediment aggradation and subsequent re-incision phases. The large one developed over the entire last glacial period with ˜200 m high alluvial fan (AF1) and the second one during the latest Pleistocene/Holocene with ˜50 m alluvial fan (AF2) and its re-incision . Surface-exposure dating of six terrace levels with in-situ cosmogenic nuclides (10Be) indicates the onset of channel abandonment and ensuing incision phases. Two terrace surfaces from the highest level (T1) sculpted into the oldest-preserved AF1 dates back to 48.9 ± 4.1 ka and 42.1 ± 2.7 ka (2σ error). T2 surfaces sculpted into the remnants of AF1 have exposure ages of 16.8 ± 2 ka and 14.1 ± 0.9 ka, while terraces sculpted into the late Pleistocene- Holocene fan (AF2) provide ages of 8.4± 0.8 ka, 6.6± 0.7 ka, 4.9± 0.4 ka and 3.1± 0.3 ka. Together with previously-published ages on the timing of aggradation, we find a correlation between variations in sediment transport with oxygen-isotope records from regions affected by Indian Summer Monsoon. During stronger monsoon phases and post-LGM glacial retreat manifested by increased sediment delivery (moraines and hillslope-derived) to the trunk streams, causing aggradation in the basin; whereas, weakened monsoon phases characterized by reduced sediment

  2. Interferon-related and other immune genes are downregulated in peripheral blood leukocytes in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Dosiou, Chrysoula; Lathi, Ruth B; Tulac, Suzana; Huang, S-T Joseph; Giudice, Linda C

    2004-05-01

    Interaction between the endocrine and the immune systems has been suggested by observations of sexual dimorphism of the immune response, differential susceptibility to autoimmunity between the sexes, changes in autoimmune disease activity during the menstrual cycle and in pregnancy and in vitro studies of hormonal influence on cytokine production.We hypothesized that if there is hormonal regulation of the immune response, this would be manifest in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) at different phases of the menstrual cycle. In this study, we describe gene profiling of PBLs from the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. We observe important differences in immune gene expression, with significant down-regulation of the Th1 immune response in the luteal phase. A significant number of interferon (IFN)-related genes are amongst the downregulated genes. These results support significant hormonal regulation of the immune system and may have therapeutic implications in diseases of autoimmunity in women.

  3. Late-onset neutropenia after treatment with rituximab for rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases: data from the AutoImmunity and Rituximab registry

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, J H; Cacoub, P; Combe, B; Sibilia, J; Pallot-Prades, B; Fain, O; Cantagrel, A; Dougados, M; Andres, E; Meyer, O; Carli, P; Pertuiset, E; Pane, I; Maurier, F; Ravaud, P; Mariette, X; Gottenberg, J E

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the prevalence of late-onset neutropenia and its complications in patients treated with rituximab (RTX) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune diseases (AIDs) in a prospective registry. Methods The AutoImmunity and Rituximab registry is an independent 7-year prospective registry promoted by the French Society of Rheumatology. For each episode of neutropenia, data were validated by the clinician in charge of the patient. Results Among 2624 patients treated with RTX for refractory AIDs, and at least 1 follow-up visit (a total follow-up of 4179 patient-years in RA and 987 patient-years in AIDs), late-onset neutropenia was observed in 40 patients (25 RA (1.3% of patients with RA, 0.6/100 patient-years), and AIDs in 15 (2.3% of patients with AIDs, 1.5/100 patient-years)). 6 patients (15%) had neutrophils <500/mm3, 8 (20%) had neutrophils between 500 and 1000/mm3, and 26 (65%) had neutrophils between 1000 and 1500/mm3. Neutropenia occurred after a median period of 4.5 (3–6.5) months after the last RTX infusion in patients with RA, and 5 (3–6.5) months in patients with AIDs. 5 patients (12.5%), 4 of them with neutrophils lower than 500/mm3, developed a non-opportunistic serious infection and required antibiotics and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor injections, with a favourable outcome. After resolution of their RTX-related neutropenia, 19 patients (47.5%) were re-treated, and neutropenia reoccurred in 3 of them. Conclusions Late-onset neutropenia might occur after RTX and may result in serious infections. Thus, monitoring of white cell count should be performed after RTX. However, in this large registry of patients with AIDs, the frequency of RTX-induced neutropenia was much lower than that previously reported in patients treated for blood malignancies or AIDs. PMID:26509060

  4. Biphasic CD8+ T-Cell Defense in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Control by Acute-Phase Passive Neutralizing Antibody Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Iseda, Sumire; Takahashi, Naofumi; Poplimont, Hugo; Nomura, Takushi; Seki, Sayuri; Nakane, Taku; Nakamura, Midori; Shi, Shoi; Ishii, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Shota; Harada, Shigeyoshi; Naruse, Taeko K.; Kimura, Akinori; Matano, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Identifying human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) control mechanisms by neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is critical for anti-HIV-1 strategies. Recent in vivo studies on animals infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and related viruses have shown the efficacy of postinfection NAb passive immunization for viremia reduction, and one suggested mechanism is its occurrence through modulation of cellular immune responses. Here, we describe SIV control in macaques showing biphasic CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses following acute-phase NAb passive immunization. Analysis of four SIVmac239-infected rhesus macaque pairs matched with major histocompatibility complex class I haplotypes found that counterparts receiving day 7 anti-SIV polyclonal NAb infusion all suppressed viremia for up to 2 years without accumulating viral CTL escape mutations. In the first phase of primary viremia control attainment, CD8+ cells had high capacities to suppress SIVs carrying CTL escape mutations. Conversely, in the second, sustained phase of SIV control, CTL responses converged on a pattern of immunodominant CTL preservation. During this sustained phase of viral control, SIV epitope-specific CTLs showed retention of phosphorylated extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK)hi/phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)lo subpopulations, implying their correlation with SIV control. The results suggest that virus-specific CTLs functionally boosted by acute-phase NAbs may drive robust AIDS virus control. IMPORTANCE In early HIV infection, NAb responses are lacking and CTL responses are insufficient, which leads to viral persistence. Hence, it is important to identify immune responses that can successfully control such HIV replication. Here, we show that monkeys receiving NAb passive immunization in early SIV infection strictly control viral replication for years. Passive infusion of NAbs with CTL cross-priming capacity resulted in induction of functionally

  5. CFD modeling of debris melting phenomena during late phase Candu 6 severe accident

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolici, S.; Dupleac, D.; Prisecaru, I.

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this paper was to study the phase change of the debris formed on the Candu 6 calandria bottom in a postulated accident sequence. The molten pool and crust formation were studied employing the Ansys-Fluent code. The 3D model using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) predicts the conjugate, radiative and convective heat transfer inside and from the corium pool. LES simulations require a very fine grid to capture the crust formation and the free convection flow. This aspect (fine mesh requirement) correlated with the long transient has imposed the use of a slice from the 3D calandria geometry in order not to exceed the computing resources. The preliminary results include heat transfer coefficients, temperature profiles and heat fluxes through calandria wall. From the safety point of view it is very important to maintain a heat flux through the wall below the CHF assuring the integrity of the calandria vessel. This can be achieved by proper cooling of the tank water which contains the vessel. Also, transient duration can be estimated being important in developing guidelines for severe accidents management. The debris physical structure and material properties have large uncertainties in the temperature range of interest. Thus, further sensitivity studies should be carried out in order to better understand the influence of these parameters on this complex phenomenon. (authors)

  6. Late Quaternary landscape development at the margin of the Pomeranian phase (MIS 2) near Lake Wygonin (Northern Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Florian; Schneider, Anna; Nicolay, Alexander; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Kordowski, Jarosław; Noryskiewicz, Agnieszka M.; Tyszkowski, Sebastian; Raab, Alexandra; Raab, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In Central Europe, Late Quaternary landscapes experienced multiple phases of geomorphologic activity. In this study,we used a combined geomorphological, pedological, sedimentological and palynological approach to characterize landscape development after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) near Lake Wygonin in Northern Poland. The pedostratigraphical findings from soil pits and drillings were extrapolated using ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and electric resistivity tomography (ERT). During the Pomeranian phase, glacial and fluvioglacial processes dominated the landscape near Lake Wygonin. At the end of the glacial period, periglacial processes became relevant and caused the formation of ventifacts and coversands containing coated sand grains. At approximately 15,290-14,800 cal yr BP, a small pond formed in a kettle hole (profile BWI2). The lacustrine sediments lack eolian sand components and therefore indicate the decline of eolian processes during that time. The increase of Juniperus and rock-rose (Helianthemum) in the pollen diagram is a prominent marker of the Younger Dryas. At the end of the Younger Dryas, a partial reshaping of the landscape is indicated by abundant charcoal fragments in disturbed lake sediments. No geomorphologic activity since the beginning of the Holocene is documented in the terrestrial and wetland archives. The anthropogenic impact is reflected in the pollen diagram by the occurrence of rye pollen grains (Cerealia type, Secale cereale) and translocated soil sediments dated to 1560-1410 cal yr BP, proving agricultural use of the immediate vicinity. With the onset of land use, gully incision and the accumulation of colluvial fans reshaped the landscape locally. Since 540-460 cal yr BP, further gully incision in the steep forest tracks has been associated with the intensification of forestry. Outside of the gully catchments, the weakly podzolized Rubic Brunic Arenosols show no features of Holocene soil erosion. Reprinted from CATENA, Volume 124

  7. NCI, NHLBI/PBMTC First International Conference on Late Effects after Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Persistent Immune Deficiency in Pediatric Transplant Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Bunin, Nancy; Small, Trudy; Szabolcs, Paul; Baker, K. Scott; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Torgerson, Troy

    2011-01-01

    Defective immune reconstitution is a major barrier to successful hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), and has important implications in the pediatric population. There are many factors which affect immune recovery, including stem cell source and GVHD. Complete assessment of immune recovery, including T and B lymphocyte evaluation, innate immunity and response to neoantigens, may provide insight as to infection risk and optimal time for immunizations. The increasing use of cord blood grafts requires additional study regarding early reconstitution and impact upon survival. Immunization schedules may require modification based upon stem cell source and immune reconstitution, and this is of particular importance as many children have been incompletely immunized, or not at all, prior to school entry. Additional studies are needed in children post HCT to evaluate the impact of differing stem cell sources upon immune reconstitution, infectious risks and immunization responses. PMID:22100979

  8. Cyclin A/Cdk2 regulates Cdh1 and claspin during late S/G2 phase of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Vanessa; Wang, Weili; Harrington, Brittney; Lee, Won Jae; Beamish, Heather; Chia, Kee Ming; Pinder, Alex; Goto, Hidemasa; Inagaki, Masaki; Pavey, Sandra; Gabrielli, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Whereas many components regulating the progression from S phase through G2 phase into mitosis have been identified, the mechanism by which these components control this critical cell cycle progression is still not fully elucidated. Cyclin A/Cdk2 has been shown to regulate the timing of Cyclin B/Cdk1 activation and progression into mitosis although the mechanism by which this occurs is only poorly understood. Here we show that depletion of Cyclin A or inhibition of Cdk2 during late S/early G2 phase maintains the G2 phase arrest by reducing Cdh1 transcript and protein levels, thereby stabilizing Claspin and maintaining elevated levels of activated Chk1 which contributes to the G2 phase observed. Interestingly, the Cyclin A/Cdk2 regulated APC/C(Cdh1) activity is selective for only a subset of Cdh1 targets including Claspin. Thus, a normal role for Cyclin A/Cdk2 during early G2 phase is to increase the level of Cdh1 which destabilises Claspin which in turn down regulates Chk1 activation to allow progression into mitosis. This mechanism links S phase exit with G2 phase transit into mitosis, provides a novel insight into the roles of Cyclin A/Cdk2 in G2 phase progression, and identifies a novel role for APC/C(Cdh1) in late S/G2 phase cell cycle progression.

  9. Reduced early and late phase insulin response to glucose in isolated spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus) islets: a defective link between glycolysis and adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Nesher, R; Abramovitch, E; Cerasi, E

    1989-09-01

    The spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus) exhibits low insulin responsiveness to glucose with a nearly absent early phase release. The alternative fuel-secretagogue glyceraldehyde (10 mmol/l) produced a maximal early insulin response in rat islets but failed to affect early response in Acomys; however, it potentiated the late insulin response in both species alike. Glucagon (1.5 mumol/l) potentiated the early insulin response to intermediate (8.3 mmol/l) glucose in rat and Acomys islets by two- and four-fold, respectively. Glucose doubled cyclic AMP levels in rat islets but no significant response was noted in Acomys islets. Isobutylmethylxanthine (0.1 mmol/l) and forskolin (25 mumol/l) caused a significant rise in islet cyclic AMP levels in both types of islets; however, neither agent restored the glucose stimulation of cyclic AMP in spiny mouse islets. Forskolin and isobutylmethylxanthine potentiated early and late phase insulin release in both species; however, neither augmented the early response in the Acomys to the degree observed in rat islets. Thus: (1) A deficient link exists in Acomys between glycolysis and subsequent signals. (2) These islets contain a glucose-insensitive adenylate cyclase. (3) The early insulin response may be potentiated by direct activation of adenylate cyclase. (4) The glucose effects on early and late phase insulin release are probably mediated by distinct pathways. (5) In the spiny mouse the signals mediating the early response are deranged to a greater extent than those activating the late phase insulin release.

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF IMMEDIATE AND LATE PHASE AIRWAY RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE CHALLENGE IN BROWN NORWAY RATS AND CORRELATIONS AMONG PHYSIOLOGICAL MEDIATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    CHARACTERIZATION OF IMMEDIATE AND LATE PHASE AIRWAY RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE CHALLENGE IN BROWN NORWAY RATS AND CORRELATIONS AMONG PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL MEDIATORS (P.
    SinghI, D.W. Winsett2, M.J. Daniels2, J. Richards2, K. Crissman2, D.L. Doerfler2 and M.I. Gilmour2, 1NCSU, Ra...

  11. HSP70.1 AND -70.3 ARE REQUIRED FOR LATE-PHASE PROTECTION INDUCED BY ISCHEMIC PRECONDITIONING OF MOUSE HEARTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heat-Shock Proteins 70.1 and 70.3 Are Required for Late-phase Protection
    Induced by Ischemic Preconditioning of the Mouse Heart
    Craig R. Hampton 1 , Akira Shimamoto 1 , Christine L. Rothnie 1 , Jeaneatte Griscavage-Ennis 1 ,
    Albert Chong 1 , David J. Dix 2 , Edward D. Ve...

  12. Effects of maternal protein or energy restriction during late gestation on antioxidant status of plasma and immune tissues in postnatal goats.

    PubMed

    He, Z X; Sun, Z H; Tan, Z L; Tang, S X; Zhou, C S; Han, X F; Wang, M; Wu, D Q; Kang, J H; Beauchemin, K A

    2012-12-01

    Maternal malnutrition can have temporary or long-lasting effects on development and physiological function of offspring. Our objective was to investigate whether maternal protein or energy restriction in late gestation affects the antioxidant status of plasma, immune organs (thymus and spleen), and natural barrier organs (jejunum) in neonatal goats and whether the effects could be reversed after nutritional recovery. Forty-five pregnant goats (Liuyang Blacks) of similar age (2.0 ± 0.3 yr) and BW (22.2 ± 1.5 kg at d 90 of gestation) were assigned to 3 dietary treatments during late gestation: control (ME = 9.34 MJ/kg and CP = 12.5%, DM basis), 40% protein restricted (PR), and 40% energy restricted (ER) until parturition, after which offspring received the normal diet for nutritional recovery. Plasma and tissues of kids were sampled to determine antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), and catalase (CAT)] and gene expression of antioxidant enzymes (Cu/Zn-SOD [SOD1], CAT, and peroxiredoxin 2 [PRDX2]). Maternal protein or energy restriction decreased (P < 0.05) SOD activities in plasma, liver, thymus, and spleen and SOD1 expression in thymus, and maternal energy restriction also decreased (P < 0.05) plasma GSH-Px activity and expressions of SOD1 and CAT in liver at birth. After nutritional recovery of 6 wk, SOD activities in thymus (both in PR and ER) and spleen (only in PR) were greater (P < 0.05), but CAT activity of thymus (both in PR and ER) and CAT expression (only in ER) were less (P < 0.01) than those in control. After nutritional recovery of 22 wk, SOD1 and PRDX2 expression in thymus (both in PR and ER) and SOD1 expression in liver (only in ER) were greater (P < 0.05) whereas CAT expression in thymus (both in PR and ER) was less (P < 0.001) than in control. The current results indicate that maternal protein or energy restriction can decrease the antioxidant capacity of the neonatal

  13. MyD88 Shapes Vaccine Immunity by Extrinsically Regulating Survival of CD4+ T Cells during the Contraction Phase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huafeng; Hung, Chiung Yu; Sinha, Meenal; Lee, Linda M.; Wiesner, Darin L.; LeBert, Vanessa; Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; Suresh, Marulasiddappa; DeFranco, Anthony L.; Lowell, Clifford A.; Klein, Bruce S.; Wüthrich, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Soaring rates of systemic fungal infections worldwide underscore the need for vaccine prevention. An understanding of the elements that promote vaccine immunity is essential. We previously reported that Th17 cells are required for vaccine immunity to the systemic dimorphic fungi of North America, and that Card9 and MyD88 signaling are required for the development of protective Th17 cells. Herein, we investigated where, when and how MyD88 regulates T cell development. We uncovered a novel mechanism in which MyD88 extrinsically regulates the survival of activated T cells during the contraction phase and in the absence of inflammation, but is dispensable for the expansion and differentiation of the cells. The poor survival of activated T cells in Myd88-/- mice is linked to increased caspase3-mediated apoptosis, but not to Fas- or Bim-dependent apoptotic pathways, nor to reduced expression of the anti-apoptotic molecules Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL. Moreover, TLR3, 7, and/or 9, but not TLR2 or 4, also were required extrinsically for MyD88-dependent Th17 cell responses and vaccine immunity. Similar MyD88 requirements governed the survival of virus primed T cells. Our data identify unappreciated new requirements for eliciting adaptive immunity and have implications for designing vaccines. PMID:27542117

  14. FcRγ-dependent immune activation initiates astrogliosis during the asymptomatic phase of Sandhoff disease model mice

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Sano, Takafumi; Irisa, Masahiro; Kodama, Takashi; Saito, Takahiro; Furusawa, Eiri; Kaizu, Katsutoshi; Yanagi, Yusuke; Tsukimura, Takahiro; Togawa, Tadayasu; Yamanaka, Shoji; Itoh, Kohji; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Oishi, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is caused by the loss of β-hexosaminidase (Hex) enzymatic activity in lysosomes resulting from Hexb mutations. In SD patients, the Hex substrate GM2 ganglioside accumulates abnormally in neuronal cells, resulting in neuronal loss, microglial activation, and astrogliosis. Hexb−/− mice, which manifest a phenotype similar to SD, serve as animal models for examining the pathophysiology of SD. Hexb−/− mice reach ~8 weeks without obvious neurological defects; however, trembling begins at 12 weeks and is accompanied by startle reactions and increased limb tone. These symptoms gradually become severe by 16–18 weeks. Immune reactions caused by autoantibodies have been recently associated with the pathology of SD. The inhibition of immune activation may represent a novel therapeutic target for SD. Herein, SD mice (Hexb−/−) were crossed to mice lacking an activating immune receptor (FcRγ−/−) to elucidate the potential relationship between immune responses activated through SD autoantibodies and astrogliosis. Microglial activation and astrogliosis were observed in cortices of Hexb−/− mice during the asymptomatic phase, and were inhibited in Hexb−/− FcRγ−/− mice. Moreover, early astrogliosis and impaired motor coordination in Hexb−/− mice could be ameliorated by immunosuppressants, such as FTY720. Our findings demonstrate the importance of early treatment and the therapeutic effectiveness of immunosuppression in SD. PMID:28084424

  15. Social Isolation During Adolescence Strengthens Retention of Fear Memories and Facilitates Induction of Late-Phase Long-Term Potentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji-Hong; You, Qiang-Long; Wei, Mei-Dan; Wang, Qian; Luo, Zheng-Yi; Lin, Song; Huang, Lang; Li, Shu-Ji; Li, Xiao-Wen; Gao, Tian-Ming

    2015-12-01

    Social isolation during the vulnerable period of adolescence produces emotional dysregulation that often manifests as abnormal behavior in adulthood. The enduring consequence of isolation might be caused by a weakened ability to forget unpleasant memories. However, it remains unclear whether isolation affects unpleasant memories. To address this, we used a model of associative learning to induce the fear memories and evaluated the influence of isolation mice during adolescence on the subsequent retention of fear memories and its underlying cellular mechanisms. Following adolescent social isolation, we found that mice decreased their social interaction time and had an increase in anxiety-related behavior. Interestingly, when we assessed memory retention, we found that isolated mice were unable to forget aversive memories when tested 4 weeks after the original event. Consistent with this, we observed that a single train of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) enabled a late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) in the hippocampal CA1 region of isolated mice, whereas only an early-phase LTP was observed with the same stimulation in the control mice. Social isolation during adolescence also increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the hippocampus, and application of a tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor inhibitor ameliorated the facilitated L-LTP seen after isolation. Together, our results suggest that adolescent isolation may result in mental disorders during adulthood and that this may stem from an inability to forget the unpleasant memories via BDNF-mediated synaptic plasticity. These findings may give us a new strategy to prevent mental disorders caused by persistent unpleasant memories.

  16. The Late S-Phase Transcription Factor Hcm1 Is Regulated through Phosphorylation by the Cell Wall Integrity Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Negishi, Takahiro; Veis, Jiri; Hollenstein, David; Sekiya, Mizuho; Ammerer, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) checkpoint in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae coordinates cell wall construction and cell cycle progression. In this study, we showed that the regulation of Hcm1, a late-S-phase transcription factor, arrests the cell cycle via the cell wall integrity checkpoint. Although the HCM1 mRNA level remained unaffected when the cell wall integrity checkpoint was induced, the protein level decreased. The overproduction of Hcm1 resulted in the failure of the cell wall integrity checkpoint. We identified 39 Hcm1 phosphorylation sites, including 26 novel sites, by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. A mutational analysis revealed that phosphorylation of Hcm1 at S61, S65, and S66 is required for the proper onset of the cell wall integrity checkpoint by regulating the timely decrease in its protein level. Hyperactivation of the CWI mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway significantly reduced the Hcm1 protein level, and the deletion of CWI MAPK Slt2 resulted in a failure to decrease Hcm1 protein levels in response to stress, suggesting that phosphorylation is regulated by CWI MAPK. In conclusion, we suggest that Hcm1 is regulated negatively by the cell wall integrity checkpoint through timely phosphorylation and degradation under stress to properly control budding yeast proliferation. PMID:26729465

  17. A late phase II study of RP56976 (docetaxel) in patients with advanced or recurrent breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, I.; Watanabe, T.; Takashima, S.; Narabayashi, M.; Horikoshi, N.; Aoyama, H.; Taguchi, T.

    1996-01-01

    A late phase II clinical trial of RP56976 (docetaxel), derived from Taxus baccata was performed to evaluate anti-tumour activity, time to progression and clinical toxicity in patients with advanced or recurrent breast cancer. The patients, between 15 and 80 years old with performance status (PS) of 0-2, received at least two cycles of docetaxel 60 mg m-2 intravenously at 3-4 week intervals. Of the 81 patients enrolled, the 72 eligible for the study were given a total of 327 cycles, with a median of four cycles each. Five patients obtained a complete response (CR) and 27 a partial response (PR); the response rate (RR) was 44.4% (95% confidence interval 32.7-56.6%). A relatively high RR of 9/28 (32.1%) was observed in patients who had received prior chemotherapy involving anthracyclines. The dose-limiting toxicity was grade 3-4 leucocytopenia or neutropenia, found in 78.9% and 85.9% patients respectively. Other severe (grade > 3) toxicities included alopecia (38%), anorexia (18.3%), nausea/vomiting (11.3%), and fatigue (9.9%). Hypersensitivity reactions, oedema and skin toxicity were not severe and were reversible. One therapy-related death occurred 10 days after the initial dose was given. These findings indicate that docetaxel has potent activity against metastatic breast cancer, and that the dose of 60 mg m-2 is safe. PMID:8546908

  18. Dendritic BDNF synthesis is required for late-phase spine maturation and recovery of cortical responses following sensory deprivation.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Megumi; Xie, Yuxiang; An, Juan Ji; Stryker, Michael P; Xu, Baoji

    2012-04-04

    Sensory experience in early postnatal life shapes neuronal connections in the brain. Here we report that the local synthesis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in dendrites plays an important role in this process. We found that dendritic spines of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons of the visual cortex in mutant mice lacking dendritic Bdnf mRNA and thus local BDNF synthesis were normal at 3 weeks of age, but thinner, longer, and more closely spaced (morphological features of immaturity) at 4 months of age than in wild-type (WT) littermates. Layer 2/3 of the visual cortex in these mutant animals also had fewer GABAergic presynaptic terminals at both ages. The overall size and shape of dendritic arbors were, however, similar in mutant and WT mice at both ages. By using optical imaging of intrinsic signals and single-unit recordings, we found that mutant animals failed to recover cortical responsiveness following monocular deprivation (MD) during the critical period, although they displayed normally the competitive loss of responsiveness to an eye briefly deprived of vision. Furthermore, MD still induced a loss of responsiveness to the closed eye in adult mutant mice, but not in adult WT mice. These results indicate that dendritic BDNF synthesis is required for spine pruning, late-phase spine maturation, and recovery of cortical responsiveness following sensory deprivation. They also suggest that maturation of dendritic spines is required for the maintenance of cortical responsiveness following sensory deprivation in adulthood.

  19. Extracellular and intracellular cleavages of proBDNF required at two distinct stages of late-phase LTP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Petti T.; Nagappan, Guhan; Guo, Wei; Lu, Bai

    2016-05-01

    Although late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) is implicated in long-term memory, its molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here we provide evidence that L-LTP can be divided into two stages: an induction stage (I) and a maintenance stage (II). Both stages require mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor (mBDNF), but involve distinct underlying mechanisms. Stage I requires secretion of existing proBDNF followed by extracellular cleavage by tPA/plasmin. Stage II depends on newly synthesized BDNF. Surprisingly, mBDNF at stage II is derived from intracellular cleavage of proBDNF by furin/PC1. Moreover, stage I involves BDNF-TrkB signaling mainly through MAP kinase, whereas all three signaling pathways (phospholipase C-γ, PI3 kinase, and MAP kinase) are required for the maintenance of L-LTP at stage II. These results reveal the molecular basis for two temporally distinct stages in L-LTP, and provide insights on how BDNF modulates this long-lasting synaptic alternation at two critical time windows.

  20. Status Update on the NCRP Scientific Committee SC 5-1 Report: Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Incidents - 13450

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.Y.

    2013-07-01

    In August 2008, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued its final Protective Action Guide (PAG) for radiological dispersal device (RDD) and improvised nuclear device (IND) incidents. This document specifies protective actions for public health during the early and intermediate phases and cleanup guidance for the late phase of RDD or IND incidents, and it discusses approaches to implementing the necessary actions. However, while the PAG provides specific guidance for the early and intermediate phases, it prescribes no equivalent guidance for the late-phase cleanup actions. Instead, the PAG offers a general description of a complex process using a site-specific optimization approach. This approach does not predetermine cleanup levels but approaches the problem from the factors that would bear on the final agreed-on cleanup levels. Based on this approach, the decision-making process involves multifaceted considerations including public health, the environment, and the economy, as well as socio-political factors. In an effort to fully define the process and approach to be used in optimizing late-phase recovery and site restoration following an RDD or IND incident, DHS has tasked the NCRP with preparing a comprehensive report addressing all aspects of the optimization process. Preparation of the NCRP report is a three-year (2010-2013) project assigned to a scientific committee, the Scientific Committee (SC) 5-1; the report was initially titled, Approach to Optimizing Decision Making for Late- Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Terrorism Incidents. Members of SC 5-1 represent a broad range of expertise, including homeland security, health physics, risk and decision analysis, economics, environmental remediation and radioactive waste management, and communication. In the wake of the Fukushima nuclear accident of 2011, and guided by a recent process led by the White House through a Principal Level Exercise (PLE), the optimization approach has since

  1. Differential signaling circuits in regulation of ultraviolet C light-induced early- and late-phase activation of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shiyong; Tong, Lingying

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet C light (UVC) induces nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation via a complex network. In the early phase (4-12 h) of irradiation, NF-κB activation is accompanied with IκBα reduction via a translation inhibition pathway. In the late phase of UVC-induced NF-κB activation (16-24 h), the IκBα depletion is a combined result of regulation at both transcriptional and translational levels. However, the NF-κB activation appears to be independent of the level of IκBα. In this review, we will discuss the multiple signaling circuits that regulate NF-κB activation during the early and late phases of UVC irradiation.

  2. Differential expression profiles of Streptococcus mutans ftf, gtf and vicR genes in the presence of dietary carbohydrates at early and late exponential growth phases.

    PubMed

    Shemesh, Moshe; Tam, Avshalom; Feldman, Mark; Steinberg, Doron

    2006-09-04

    Dental caries is one of the most common infectious diseases that affects humans. Streptococcus mutans, the main pathogenic bacterium associated with dental caries, produces a number of extracellular sucrose-metabolizing enzymes, such as glucosyltransferases (GTFB, GTFC and GTFD) and fructosyltransferase (FTF). The cooperative action of these enzymes is essential for sucrose-dependent cellular adhesion and biofilm formation. A global response regulator (vicR) plays important roles in S. mutans ftf and gtf expression in response to a variety of stimuli. A real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain-reaction was used to quantify the relative levels of ftf, gtfB, gtfC, gtfD and vicR transcription of S. mutans in the presence of various dietary carbohydrates: sucrose, D-glucose, D-fructose, D-glucitol (D-sorbitol), D-mannitol and xylitol. Ftf was highly expressed at late exponential phase in the presence of sorbitol and mannitol. GtfB was highly expressed in the presence of all the above carbohydrates except for xylitol at early exponential growth phase and glucose and fructose at late exponential growth phase. Similar to gtfB, the expression of gtfC was also induced with the presence of all the tested carbohydrates except for xylitol at early growth and glucose and fructose at late exponential phase. In addition, no effect of mannitol on gtfC expression at early exponential phase was observed. GtfD was less influenced compared to the gtfB and gtfC, demonstrating enhanced expression especially in the presence of sorbitol, glucose, mannitol and xylitol at early exponential phase and mannitol at late exponential phase. VicR expression was induced only at the presence of xylitol at late exponential phase, and a decrease in expression was recorded at early exponential phase. Our findings show that dietary carbohydrates have a major influence on the transcription of ftf, gtfB, gtfC and gtfD, but less on vicR. Sorbitol and mannitol, which are considered as noncariogenic

  3. Impaired error processing in late-phase psychosis: Four-year stability and relationships with negative symptoms.

    PubMed

    Foti, Dan; Perlman, Greg; Hajcak, Greg; Mohanty, Aprajita; Jackson, Felicia; Kotov, Roman

    2016-10-01

    Error processing is impaired in psychosis, and numerous event-related potential studies have found reductions in the error-related negativity (ERN) and, more recently, the error positivity (Pe). The stability of reduced ERN/Pe in psychosis, however, is unknown. In a previous cross-sectional report, reduced ERN was associated with negative symptom severity and reduced Pe with a diagnosis of schizophrenia versus other psychosis. Here, we test the stability of impaired error processing over a four-year follow-up and relationships with subdimensions of negative symptoms. The ERN and Pe were recorded from individuals with psychotic disorders twice: 79 individuals were assessed 15years after first hospitalization, and 69 were assessed at 19years; 59 (26 with schizophrenia, 33 with other psychotic disorders) had data at both assessments. At 19years the Pe was blunted in schizophrenia. The ERN and Pe exhibited temporal stability over the four years (r=0.59 and 0.60, respectively). Reduced ERN and Pe correlated with the negative symptom subdimensions of inexpressivity and avolition, respectively, and not with psychotic or disorganized symptoms. Moreover, 15-year ERN predicted an increase in inexpressivity by year 19. No evidence was found for the reverse: negative symptoms did not predict change in ERN/Pe. Similar to non-clinical samples, the ERN and Pe show impressive four-year stability in late-phase psychosis. The ERN and Pe are promising neural measures for capturing individual differences in psychotic disorders, particularly with regard to negative symptomatology. They may prove to be useful clinically for forecasting illness course and as treatment targets.

  4. The fetal sheep lung does not respond to cortisol infusion during the late canalicular phase of development

    PubMed Central

    McGillick, Erin V; Orgeig, Sandra; McMillen, I Caroline; Morrison, Janna L

    2013-01-01

    The prepartum surge in plasma cortisol concentrations in humans and sheep promotes fetal lung and surfactant system maturation in the support of air breathing after birth. This physiological process has been used to enhance lung maturation in the preterm fetus using maternal administration of betamethasone in the clinical setting in fetuses as young as 24 weeks gestation (term = 40 weeks). Here, we have investigated the impact of fetal intravenous cortisol infusion during the canalicular phase of lung development (from 109- to 116-days gestation, term = 150 ± 3 days) on the expression of genes regulating glucocorticoid (GC) activity, lung liquid reabsorption, and surfactant maturation in the very preterm sheep fetus and compared this to their expression near term. Cortisol infusion had no impact on mRNA expression of the corticosteroid receptors (GC receptor and mineralocorticoid receptor) or HSD11B-2, however, there was increased expression of HSD11B-1 in the fetal lung. Despite this, cortisol infusion had no effect on the expression of genes involved in lung sodium (epithelial sodium channel -α, -β, or -γ subunits and sodium–potassium ATPase-β1 subunit) or water (aquaporin 1, 3, and 5) reabsorption when compared to the level of expression during exposure to the normal prepartum cortisol surge. Furthermore, in comparison to late gestation, cortisol infusion does not increase mRNA expression of surfactant proteins (SFTP-A, -B, and -C) or the number of SFTP-B-positive cells present in the alveolar epithelium, the cells that produce pulmonary surfactant. These data suggest that there may be an age before which the lung is unable to respond biochemically to an increase in fetal plasma cortisol concentrations. PMID:24400136

  5. Maternal immune activation in late gestation enhances locomotor response to acute but not chronic amphetamine treatment in male mice offspring: role of the D1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Zager, Adriano; Mennecier, Gregory; Palermo-Neto, João

    2012-06-15

    Exposure to elevated levels of maternal cytokines can lead to functional abnormalities of the dopaminergic system in the adult offspring, including enhanced amphetamine (AMPH)-induced locomotion. Therefore, it seems reasonable to consider that offspring of challenged mothers would behave differently in models of addictive behavior, such as behavioral sensitization. Thus, we sought to evaluate the effects of prenatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the locomotor response to acute and chronic AMPH treatment in male mice offspring. For this purpose, LPS (Escherichia coli 0127:B8; 120 μg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally to pregnant Swiss mice on gestational day 17. At adulthood, male offspring were studied under one of the following conditions: (1) locomotor response to acute AMPH treatment (2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg) in an open field test; (2) behavioral sensitization paradigm, which consists of a daily injection of AMPH (1.0 mg/kg) for 10 days and observation of locomotion in the open field on days 1, 5, 10 (development phase), 15 and 17 (expression phase). The LPS stimulated offspring showed enhancement of the locomotor-stimulant effect after an acute AMPH challenge in comparison to baseline and saline pre-treated mice. They also showed development of behavioral sensitization earlier than the saline pre-treated group, although no changes between saline and LPS pre-treated groups were observed on development or expression of locomotor behavioral sensitization to AMPH. Furthermore, there was up-regulation of D1 receptor protein level within striatum in the LPS-stimulated offspring which was strongly correlated with increased grooming behavior. Taken together, our results indicate that motor and dopaminergic alterations caused by maternal immune activation are restricted to the acute AMPH challenge, mostly due to up-regulation of the D1 receptor within the mesolimbic and nigrostriatal pathways, but no locomotor differences were observed for behavioral

  6. Modulation by enteral nutrition of the acute phase response and immune functions.

    PubMed

    Bengmark, Stig

    2003-01-01

    To use nutrition in order to limit the negative consequences of physical and mental stress is not new. Recent advances in immunology and particularly in the understanding of the chemical language used to communicate both by eukarytic and prokarotic cells has made it easier to objectively evaluate effects of various immunomodulating efforts including the use of nutrients, vitamins and antioxidants in preventing or limiting the development of disease and its late consequences.

  7. The Origin of the EUV Late Phase: A Case Study of the C8.8 Flare on 2010 May 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hock, R. A.; Woods, T. N.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Eparvier, F. G.; Jones, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    Since the launch of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory on 2010 February 11, the Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) has observed numerous flares. One interesting feature observed by EVE is that a subset of flares exhibit an additional enhancement of the 2-3 million K emission several hours after the flares soft X-ray emission. From the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) images, we observe that this secondary emission, dubbed the EUV late phase, occurs in the same active region as the flare but not in the same coronal loops. Here, we examine the C8.8 flare that occurred on 2010 May 5 as a case study of EUV late phase flares. In addition to presenting detailed observations from both AIA and EVE, we develop a physical model of this flare and test it using the Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops (EBTEL) model.

  8. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Beta (PPARβ) activity increases the immune response and shortens the early phases of skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mothe-Satney, Isabelle; Piquet, Jessica; Murdaca, Joseph; Sibille, Brigitte; Grimaldi, Paul A; Neels, Jaap G; Rousseau, Anne-Sophie

    2016-12-07

    Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Beta (PPARβ) is a transcription factor playing an important role in both muscle myogenesis and remodeling, and in inflammation. However, its role in the coordination of the transient muscle inflammation and reparation process following muscle injury has not yet been fully determined. We postulated that activation of the PPARβ pathway alters the early phase of the muscle regeneration process, i.e. when immune cells infiltrate in injured muscle. Tibialis anteriors of C57BL6/J mice treated or not with the PPARβ agonist GW0742 were injected with cardiotoxin (or with physiological serum for the contralateral muscle). Muscle regeneration was monitored on days 4, 7, and 14 post-injury. We found that treatment of mice with GW0742 increased, at day 4 post-damage, the recruitment of immune cells (M1 and M2 macrophages) and upregulated the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and TGF-β mRNA. Those effects were accompanied by a significant increase at day 4 of myogenic regulatory factors (Pax7, MyoD, Myf5, Myogenin) mRNA in GW0742-treated mice. However, we showed an earlier return (7 days vs 14 days) of Myf5 and Myogenin to basal levels in GW0742- compared to DMSO-treated mice. Differential effects of GW0742 observed during the regeneration were associated with variations of PPARβ pathway activity. Collectively, our findings indicate that PPARβ pathway activity shortens the early phases of skeletal muscle regeneration by increasing the immune response.

  9. Solar Wind Sources in the Late Declining Phase of Cycle 23: Effects of the Weak Solar Polar Field on High Speed Streams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    solar wind model (Arge and Pizzo, 2000), based on daily updating solar magnetic field synoptic maps, is then used to map the outflows from the corona ...worldwide. University of California Peer Reviewed Title: Solar Wind Sources in the Late Declining Phase of Cycle 23: Effects of the Weak Solar Polar...currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2009 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Solar Wind

  10. Comparison of methods for measuring viable E. coli cells during cultivation: great differences in the early and late exponential growth phases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hengwei; Cheng, Hairong; Wei, Dongzhi; Wang, Fengqing

    2011-01-01

    Four methods, namely enumeration of colony-forming units (CFU), aerobic respiration, MTT reduction capacity and succinate dehydrogenase activity were compared to determine the viability of E. coli cells at the early and late exponential growth phases. Our results revealed that great differences in cell viability existed between these methods and that the choice of method to determine cell viability must be made with caution.

  11. Association of immune response to endothelial cell growth factor with early disseminated and late manifestations of Lyme disease but not posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kevin S; Klempner, Mark S; Wormser, Gary P; Marques, Adriana R; Alaedini, Armin

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial cell growth factor has been recently proposed as a potential autoantigen in manifestations of Lyme disease that are thought to involve immune-mediated mechanisms. Our findings indicate that a humoral immune response to this protein is not associated with posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome.

  12. Association of Immune Response to Endothelial Cell Growth Factor With Early Disseminated and Late Manifestations of Lyme Disease but Not Posttreatment Lyme Disease Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kevin S.; Klempner, Mark S.; Wormser, Gary P.; Marques, Adriana R.; Alaedini, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cell growth factor has been recently proposed as a potential autoantigen in manifestations of Lyme disease that are thought to involve immune-mediated mechanisms. Our findings indicate that a humoral immune response to this protein is not associated with posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome. PMID:26219695

  13. Spinal 5-HT1A, not the 5-HT1B or 5-HT3 receptors, mediates descending serotonergic inhibition for late-phase mechanical allodynia of carrageenan-induced peripheral inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joung Min; Jeong, Seong Wook; Yang, Jihoon; Lee, Seong Heon; Kim, Woon Mo; Jeong, Seongtae; Bae, Hong Beom; Yoon, Myung Ha; Choi, Jeong Il

    2015-07-23

    Previous electrophysiological studies demonstrated a limited role of 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor (5-HT3R), but facilitatory role of 5-HT1AR and 5-HT1BR in spinal nociceptive processing of carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain. The release of spinal 5-HT was shown to peak in early-phase and return to baseline in late-phase of carrageenan inflammation. We examined the role of the descending serotonergic projections involving 5-HT1AR, 5-HT1BR, and 5-HT3R in mechanical allodynia of early- (first 4h) and late-phase (24h after) carrageenan-induced inflammation. Intrathecal administration of 5-HT produced a significant anti-allodynic effect in late-phase, but not in early-phase. Similarly, intrathecal 5-HT1AR agonist (8-OH-DPAT) attenuated the intensity of late-phase allodynia in a dose dependent fashion which was antagonized by 5-HT1AR antagonist (WAY-100635), but produced no effect on the early-phase allodynia. However, other agonists or antagonists of 5-HT1BR (CP-93129, SB-224289) and 5-HT3R (m-CPBG, ondansetron) did not produce any anti- or pro-allodynic effect in both early- and late- phase allodynia. These results suggest that spinal 5-HT1A, but not 5-HT1B or 5-HT3 receptors mediate descending serotonergic inhibition on nociceptive processing of late-phase mechanical allodynia in carrageenan-induced inflammation.

  14. Presence of novel compound BCR-ABL mutations in late chronic and advanced phase imatinib sensitive CML patients indicates their possible role in CML progression.

    PubMed

    Akram, Afia Muhammad; Iqbal, Zafar; Akhtar, Tanveer; Khalid, Ahmed Mukhtar; Sabar, Muhammad Farooq; Qazi, Mahmood Hussain; Aziz, Zeba; Sajid, Nadia; Aleem, Aamer; Rasool, Mahmood; Asif, Muhammad; Aloraibi, Saleh; Aljamaan, Khaled; Iqbal, Mudassar

    2017-02-21

    BCR-ABL kinase domain (KD) mutations are well known for causing resistance against tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and disease progression in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In recent years, compound BCR-ABL mutations have emerged as a new threat to CML patients by causing higher degrees of resistance involving multiple TKIs, including ponatinib. However, there are limited reports about association of compound BCR-ABL mutations with disease progression in imatinib (IM) sensitive CML patients. Therefore, we investigated presence of ABL-KD mutations in chronic phase (n = 41), late chronic phase (n = 33) and accelerated phase (n = 16) imatinib responders. Direct sequencing analysis was employed for this purpose. Eleven patients (12.22%) in late-CP CML were detected having total 24 types of point mutations, out of which eight (72.72%) harbored compound mutated sites. SH2 contact site mutations were dominant in our study cohort, with E355G (3.33%) being the most prevalent. Five patients (45%) all having compound mutated sites, progressed to advanced phases of disease during follow up studies. Two novel silent mutations G208G and E292E/E were detected in combination with other mutants, indicating limited tolerance for BCR-ABL1 kinase domain for missense mutations. However, no patient in early CP of disease manifested mutated ABL-KD. Occurrence of mutations was found associated with elevated platelet count (p = 0.037) and patients of male sex (p = 0.049). The median overall survival and event free survival of CML patients (n = 90) was 6.98 and 5.8 years respectively. The compound missense mutations in BCR-ABL kinase domain responsible to elicit disease progression, drug resistance or disease relapse in CML, can be present in yet Imatinib sensitive patients. Disease progression observed here, emphasizes the need of ABL-KD mutation screening in late chronic phase CML patients for improved clinical management of disease.

  15. Three-Year Durability of Immune Responses Induced by HIV-DNA and HIV-Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara and Effect of a Late HIV-Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Boost in Tanzanian Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Joachim, Agricola; Munseri, Patricia J; Nilsson, Charlotta; Bakari, Muhammad; Aboud, Said; Lyamuya, Eligius F; Tecleab, Teghesti; Liakina, Valentina; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Robb, Merlin L; Earl, Patricia L; Moss, Bernard; Wahren, Britta; Mhalu, Fred; Ferrari, Guido; Sandstrom, Eric; Biberfeld, Gunnel

    2017-01-27

    We explored the duration of immune responses and the effect of a late third HIV-modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) boost in HIV-DNA primed and HIV-MVA boosted Tanzanian volunteers. Twenty volunteers who had previously received three HIV-DNA and two HIV-MVA immunizations were given a third HIV-MVA immunization 3 years after the second HIV-MVA boost. At the time of the third HIV-MVA, 90% of the vaccinees had antibodies to HIV-1 subtype C gp140 (median titer 200) and 85% to subtype B gp160 (median titer 100). The majority of vaccinees had detectable antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC)-mediating antibodies, 70% against CRF01_AE virus-infected cells (median titer 239) and 84% against CRF01_AE gp120-coated cells (median titer 499). A high proportion (74%) of vaccinees had IFN-γ ELISpot responses, 63% to Gag and 42% to Env, 3 years after the second HIV-MVA boost. After the third HIV-MVA, there was an increase in Env-binding antibodies and ADCC-mediating antibodies relative to the response seen at the time of the third HIV-MVA vaccination, p < .0001 and p < .05, respectively. The frequency of IFN-γ ELISpot responses increased to 95% against Gag or Env and 90% to both Gag and Env, p = .064 and p = .002, respectively. In conclusion, the HIV-DNA prime/HIV-MVA boost regimen elicited potent antibody and cellular immune responses with remarkable durability, and a third HIV-MVA immunization significantly boosted both antibody and cellular immune responses relative to the levels detected at the time of the third HIV-MVA, but not to higher levels than after the second HIV-MVA.

  16. Comparative Solar Wind Properties at 9AU between the maximum and late declining phases of the Solar Cycle and possible implications for the magnetospheric dynamics of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Went, D. R.; Jackman, C. M.; Forsyth, R. J.; Dougherty, M. K.; Crary, F. J.

    2009-04-01

    We compare and contrast the general plasma and magnetic field properties of the solar wind upstream of Saturn (8.5-9.5 AU) at solar maximum (Pioneer-11 encounter) and the late-declining (Cassini approach) phase of the solar cycle. In both cases we find a highly structured solar wind dominated by co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs), merged interaction regions (MIRs) and Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) that temporarily disrupt an otherwise clear two sector interplanetary magnetic field structure. Solar rotations generally contain two CIR compressions with embedded crossings of the heliospheric current sheet. There is no conclusive evidence for (persistent) departures from the Parker Spiral IMF model in this region of the heliosphere at either phase of the solar cycle, consistent with previous analyses (Thomas and Smith 1980, Jackman et al. 2008). However it is clear that average plasma properties vary significantly between the maximum and late declining phases of the cycle and there are a number of small but notable deviations. In particular, the average dynamic pressure of the solar wind varies by a factor of roughly two between solar maximum and solar minimum with potentially important consequences for the dynamics of Saturn's magnetosphere. These consequences should become apparent as Cassini enters its extended Equinox Mission which should encompass the rising phase and eventually maximum of Solar Cycle 24. They will be discussed and predictions will be made for future Cassini observations.

  17. International Society for Cellular Therapy perspective on immune functional assays for mesenchymal stromal cells as potency release criterion for advanced phase clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Galipeau, Jacques; Krampera, Mauro; Barrett, John; Dazzi, Francesco; Deans, Robert J.; Debruijn, Joost; Dominici, Massimo; Fibbe, Willem E.; Gee, Adrian P.; Gimble, Jeffery M.; Hematti, Peiman; Koh, Mickey B.C.; Leblanc, Katarina; Martin, Ivan; Mcniece, Ian K.; Mendicino, Michael; Oh, Steve; Ortiz, Luis; Phinney, Donald G.; Planat, Valerie; Shi, Yufang; Stroncek, David F.; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Weiss, Daniel J.; Sensebe, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as a pharmaceutical for ailments characterized by pathogenic autoimmune, alloimmune and inflammatory processes now cover the spectrum of early- to late-phase clinical trials in both industry and academic sponsored studies. There is a broad consensus that despite different tissue sourcing and varied culture expansion protocols, human MSC-like cell products likely share fundamental mechanisms of action mediating their anti-inflammatory and tissue repair functionalities. Identification of functional markers of potency and reduction to practice of standardized, easily deployable methods of measurements of such would benefit the field. This would satisfy both mechanistic research as well as development of release potency assays to meet Regulatory Authority requirements for conduct of advanced clinical studies and their eventual registration. In response to this unmet need, the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) addressed the issue at an international workshop in May 2015 as part of the 21st ISCT annual meeting in Las Vegas. The scope of the workshop was focused on discussing potency assays germane to immunomodulation by MSC-like products in clinical indications targeting immune disorders. We here provide consensus perspective arising from this forum. We propose that focused analysis of selected MSC markers robustly deployed by in vitro licensing and metricized with a matrix of assays should be responsive to requirements from Regulatory Authorities. Workshop participants identified three preferred analytic methods that could inform a matrix assay approach: quantitative RNA analysis of selected gene products; flow cytometry analysis of functionally relevant surface markers and protein-based assay of secretome. We also advocate that potency assays acceptable to the Regulatory Authorities be rendered publicly accessible in an “open-access” manner, such as through publication or database collection. PMID:26724220

  18. Innate immune-stimulatory activity of Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae is eliminated by phase separation using Triton X-114.

    PubMed

    Nozoe, Kohji; Sanui, Terukazu; Takeshita, Masaaki; Fukuda, Takao; Haraguchi, Akira; Aida, Yoshitomi; Nishimura, Fusanori

    2017-02-01

    Fimbriae are virulence factors of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). In this study, the action of fimbriae on neutrophil respiratory burst and cytokine production by mononuclear cells (MNC) were investigated. Native or denatured form of purified P. gingivalis fimbriae contained endotoxin at an equivalence of 1-3μglipopolysaccharides(LPS)/mg protein. The endotoxin could be reduced to the equivalent of 1ng-LPS/mg protein by phase separation using Triton X-114. Unfractionated fimbriae caused serum-dependent priming of neutrophils for enhanced respiratory burst, but both native and denatured forms of Triton X-114-fractionated fimbriae were not active at 100μg/mL. Unfractionated fimbriae induced serum-dependent production of IL-1β by MNC. Triton X-114-fractionated fimbriae (10μg/mL)-induced production of IL-1β, IL-8 or TNF-α was much lower than that induced by unfractionated fimbriae or 10ng/mL P. gingivalis-LPS preparation. Triton X-114-fractionated fimbriae immobilized on polystyrene tubes induced adhesion-stimulated superoxide release by LPS-primed neutrophils in a β2 integrin-dependent manner. P. gingivalis cells caused priming of neutrophils; however, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 antagonists did not affect this response. Thus, P. gingivalis fimbriae were ineffective in inducing innate immune response in leukocytes; however, they induced β2 integrin-mediated response by neutrophils. Immune-stimulatory components of P. gingivalis might be recognized by receptors other than TLR4.

  19. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-induced Protein 8-like 2 (TIPE2) is associated with immune phases of patients with chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yu-Chen; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Na; Sun, Yan-Yan; Wang, Kai

    2017-02-24

    Tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8-like 2 (TIPE2) is a newly negative immune regulator but its role in different immune phases of patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is unknown. We determined the mRNA levels of TIPE2, interleukin-6, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factors-α and interferon-γ in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 205 naïve treated CHB patients and 15 healthy controls by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. Intrahepatic TIPE2 protein was also determined using immunohistochemistry staining. The TIPE2 mRNA level in CHB patients was significantly higher than that in healthy controls. Moreover, the TIPE2 mRNA level in immune clearance (IC) phases was significantly higher than that in immune tolerance (IT) phase; whereas TIPE2 mRNA in HBeAg negative hepatitis (ENH) was obviously higher than low replication (LR) phase. Furthermore, the optional cut off values of 2.02 and 1.59 for TIPE2 mRNA level have strong power in identifying IC and ENH from IT and LR. In addition, intrahepatic TIPE2 protein was predominantly located in hepatocyte plasma and correlated with hepatic inflammatory and fibrosis. Multivariate analysis showed tumor necrosis factors-α, interferon-γ and HBV DNA load were independently correlated with TIPE2 level. In conclusion, TIPE2 might be associated to the immune clearance of patients with chronic hepatitis B.

  20. Solid-phase immune electron microscopy with human immunoglobulin M for serotyping of Norwalk-like viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, D C; Lightfoot, N F; Pether, J V

    1988-01-01

    A solid-phase immune electron microscopy method that uses protein A, goat anti-human immunoglobulin M (IgM), and human serum is described. Evaluation of the method with different immunoglobulin fractions showed that human IgM constituted the major virus capture antibody. The method appeared to distinguish between two Norwalk-like virus serotypes and demonstrated specific IgM responses to these serotypes in infected individuals. Further work is being carried out to define the relationship of these two serotypes to the previously described Norwalk agent (A. Z. Kapikian, R. G. Wyatt, R. Dolin, T. S. Thornhill, A. R. Kalica, and R. M. Chanock, J. Virol. 10:1075-1081, 1972), and four subsequent hospital outbreaks are being studied. PMID:2838506

  1. Bridging innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Paul, William E

    2011-12-09

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2011 to Jules Hoffmann, Bruce Beutler, and the late Ralph Steinman recognizes accomplishments in understanding and unifying the two strands of immunology, the evolutionarily ancient innate immune response and modern adaptive immunity.

  2. ACUTE PHASE DEATHS FROM MURINE POLYMICROBIAL SEPSIS ARE CHARACTERIZED BY INNATE IMMUNE SUPPRESSION RATHER THAN EXHAUSTION1

    PubMed Central

    Chiswick, Evan L.; Mella, Juan R.; Bernardo, John; Remick, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, a leading cause of death in the U.S., has poorly understood mechanisms of mortality. To address this, our model of Cecal Ligation and Puncture (CLP) induced sepsis stratifies mice as predicted to Live (Live-P) or Die (Die-P) based on plasma IL-6. Six hours post-CLP, both Live-P and Die-P groups have equivalent peritoneal bacterial colony forming units and recruitment of phagocytes. By 24hr, however, Die-P mice have increased bacterial burden, despite increased neutrophil recruitment, suggesting Die-P phagocytes have impaired bacterial killing. Peritoneal cells were used to study multiple bactericidal processes: bacterial killing, Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation, and phagocytosis. Total phagocytosis and intra-phagosomal processes were determined with triple-labeled E.coli, covalently labeled with ROS and pH sensitive probes, and an ROS/pH insensitive probe for normalization. While similar proportions of Live-P and Die-P phagocytes responded to exogenous stimuli, Die-P phagocytes showed marked deficits in all parameters measured, thus suggesting immunosuppression rather than exhaustion. This contradicts the prevailing sepsis paradigm that acute phase sepsis deaths (<5 days) result from excessive inflammation, whereas chronic phase deaths (>5 days) are characterized by insufficient inflammation and immunosuppression. These data suggest that suppression of cellular innate immunity in sepsis occurs within the first six hours. PMID:26371253

  3. A Scoping Analysis Of The Impact Of SiC Cladding On Late-Phase Accident Progression Involving Core–Concrete Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.

    2015-11-01

    The overall objective of the current work is to carry out a scoping analysis to determine the impact of ATF on late phase accident progression; in particular, the molten core-concrete interaction portion of the sequence that occurs after the core debris fails the reactor vessel and relocates into containment. This additional study augments previous work by including kinetic effects that govern chemical reaction rates during core-concrete interaction. The specific ATF considered as part of this study is SiC-clad UO2.

  4. Cellular immune response in intraventricular experimental neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Moura, Vania B L; Lima, Sarah B; Matos-Silva, Hidelberto; Vinaud, Marina C; Loyola, Patricia R A N; Lino, Ruy S

    2016-03-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is considered a neglected parasitic infection of the human central nervous system. Its pathogenesis is due to the host immune response, stage of evolution and location of the parasite. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in situ and systemic immune response through cytokines dosage (IL-4, IL-10, IL-17 and IFN-γ) as well as the local inflammatory response of the experimental NCC with Taenia crassiceps. The in situ and systemic cellular and inflammatory immune response were evaluated through the cytokines quantification at 7, 30, 60 and 90 days after inoculation and histopathological analysis. All cysticerci were found within the cerebral ventricles. There was a discrete intensity of inflammatory cells of mixed immune profile, polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells, at the beginning of the infection and predominance of mononuclear cells at the end. The systemic immune response showed a significant increase in all the analysed cytokines and predominance of the Th2 immune profile cytokines at the end of the infection. These results indicate that the location of the cysticerci may lead to ventriculomegaly. The acute phase of the infection showed a mixed Th1/Th17 profile accompanied by high levels of IL-10 while the late phase showed a Th2 immune profile.

  5. Is the great attractor really a great wall?. [late-time cosmological phase transition producing coherent velocity caused by relic domain wall repulsive effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Albert; Turner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the cosmological consequences of a late-time phase transition which produces light domain walls are discussed. The observed peculiar velocity field of the universe and the observed isotropy of the microwave backgroud radiation severely constrain the wall surface density in such as scenario: G(omega) less than about 0.0001 H0 (H0 is the present value of the Hubble parameter). The most interesting consequence of such a phase transition is the possibility that the local, coherent streaming motion of about 600 km/s reported by Dressler et al (1987) could be explained by the repulsive effect of a relic domain wall within the Hubble volume provided that G(omega)/H0 = 0.0001.

  6. A Hectochelle Radial Velocity Survey of Cep OB3b: An ONC like cluster at late gas dispersal phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnath, Nicole; Allen, Thomas; Prchlik, Jakub; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Megeath, Samuel Thomas; Pipher, Judith; Wolk, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Cep OB3b is a young (~3-5 Myr), late gas dispersal cluster of roughly 3000 members broken into two sub-clusters (Eastern and Western) at a distance of 700pc; it is a rare example of nearby cluster in the late stages of gas dispersal and appears to be a more evolved analog to the Orion Nebular Cluster. As part of an ongoing multi wavelength study, we focus on Hectochelle data from the MMT to measure the radial velocities of 499 stars. After removing binaries, outliers, and imposing a minimum R value to the cross correlation, we obtain radial velocities of 57 previously identified members, with an average error of 1.7 km/s. There is no observed variation in radial velocity across the cluster in right ascension or declination. The preferred mechanism for this type of kinematic evolution is that any initial kinematic structure from formation may have been erased and that minimal or no rotation is present in the cluster. However, the Eastern sub-cluster, containing the most massive star in the field, an O7 star, has a higher velocity dispersion than the Western sub-cluster, which contains several B stars. We will compare these results to CO maps of the residual gas in the cluster and discuss possible reasons for this difference. Finally, we will assess whether the cluster is bound or in a state of expansion.

  7. Aurora-A promotes the establishment of spindle assembly checkpoint by priming the Haspin-Aurora-B feedback loop in late G2 phase.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fazhi; Jiang, Ya; Lu, Lucy; Cao, Mimi; Qiao, Yulong; Liu, Xing; Liu, Dan; Van Dyke, Terry; Wang, Fangwei; Yao, Xuebiao; Guo, Jing; Yang, Zhenye

    2017-01-01

    Aurora-A kinase functions mainly in centrosome maturation, separation and spindle formation. It has also been found to be amplified or overexpressed in a range of solid tumors, which is linked with tumor progression and poor prognosis. Importantly, Aurora-A inhibitors are being studied in a number of ongoing clinical trials. However, whether and how Aurora-A has a role in the regulation of the mitotic checkpoint is controversial. Additionally, the function of nuclear-accumulated Aurora-A in late G2 phase is not clear. Here we show that knockout, inhibition or blockade of the nuclear entry of Aurora-A severely decreased the centromere localization of Aurora-B and the phosphorylation of histone H3 threonine 3 (H3T3-ph) mediated by the kinase Haspin in late G2 phase. We further reveal that nuclear-accumulated Aurora-A phosphorylates Haspin at multiple sites at its N-terminus and that this promotes H3T3-ph and the rapid recruitment to the centromere of the chromosomal passenger complex. In addition, Aurora-A facilitates the association of Aurora-B with their common substrates: Haspin and Plk1. Notably, these functions of Aurora-A are mostly independent of Plk1. Thus we demonstrate that, in late G2 and prophase, Aurora-A phosphorylates Haspin to trigger the Haspin-H3T3-ph-Aurora-B positive feedback loop that supports the timely establishment of the chromosomal passenger complex and the mitotic checkpoint before spindle assembly.

  8. Aurora-A promotes the establishment of spindle assembly checkpoint by priming the Haspin-Aurora-B feedback loop in late G2 phase

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fazhi; Jiang, Ya; Lu, Lucy; Cao, Mimi; Qiao, Yulong; Liu, Xing; Liu, Dan; Van Dyke, Terry; Wang, Fangwei; Yao, Xuebiao; Guo, Jing; Yang, Zhenye

    2017-01-01

    Aurora-A kinase functions mainly in centrosome maturation, separation and spindle formation. It has also been found to be amplified or overexpressed in a range of solid tumors, which is linked with tumor progression and poor prognosis. Importantly, Aurora-A inhibitors are being studied in a number of ongoing clinical trials. However, whether and how Aurora-A has a role in the regulation of the mitotic checkpoint is controversial. Additionally, the function of nuclear-accumulated Aurora-A in late G2 phase is not clear. Here we show that knockout, inhibition or blockade of the nuclear entry of Aurora-A severely decreased the centromere localization of Aurora-B and the phosphorylation of histone H3 threonine 3 (H3T3-ph) mediated by the kinase Haspin in late G2 phase. We further reveal that nuclear-accumulated Aurora-A phosphorylates Haspin at multiple sites at its N-terminus and that this promotes H3T3-ph and the rapid recruitment to the centromere of the chromosomal passenger complex. In addition, Aurora-A facilitates the association of Aurora-B with their common substrates: Haspin and Plk1. Notably, these functions of Aurora-A are mostly independent of Plk1. Thus we demonstrate that, in late G2 and prophase, Aurora-A phosphorylates Haspin to trigger the Haspin-H3T3-ph-Aurora-B positive feedback loop that supports the timely establishment of the chromosomal passenger complex and the mitotic checkpoint before spindle assembly. PMID:28101375

  9. Record of epicontinental platform evolution and volcanic activity during a major rifting phase: The Late Triassic Zamoranos Formation (Betic Cordillera, S Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-López, Alberto; Pérez-Valera, Fernando; Götz, Annette E.

    2012-03-01

    The study of the Late Triassic Zamoranos Formation and the comparison to coeval carbonate units provides new insights into the evolution and palaeogeography of carbonate platforms during major rifting phases in the Earth's history. The platform carbonates of the Zamoranos Formation record the last major transgression during the Triassic, and document the initial phase of the CAMP volcanism in the external Zone of the Betic Cordillera. New palynological data from the lower part of the Zamoranos Formation indicate a Middle Norian age. The entire succession is built up by limestones, dolomites, and ferruginous red detrital deposits with volcaniclastic breccias. The carbonates are interpreted as tidal and shallow marine sediments, deposited under arid conditions. The red detrital deposits appear in coastal environments in relation to a volcanic event, which triggered hydrothermal processes in these deposits and started the massive magmatic event associated with the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP). The Zamoranos Formation was also recognized in the SW part of the Valencia Triassic and is correlated to the Imón Formation (Iberian Ranges), to the Isábena Formation (Pyrenees) and to other carbonate units of the W Tethys realm (Aquitaine, Tunisian Atlas, West Carpathians). These units indicate that an extensive epicontinental platform developed during the Late Triassic.

  10. Effect of heat stress during late gestation on immune function and growth performance of calves: isolation of altered colostral and calf factors.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, A P A; Tao, S; Thompson, I M; Dahl, G E

    2014-10-01

    Calves born to cows exposed to heat stress during the dry period and fed their dams' colostrum have compromised passive and cell-mediated immunity compared with calves born to cows cooled during heat stress. However, it is unknown if this compromised immune response is caused by calf or colostrum intrinsic factors. Two studies were designed to elucidate the effects of colostrum from those innate to the calf. The objective of the first study was to evaluate the effect of maternal heat stress during the dry period on calf-specific factors related to immune response and growth performance. Cows were dried off 46 d before expected calving and randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatments: heat stress (HT; n=18) or cooling (CL; n=18). Cows of the CL group were housed with sprinklers, fans and shade, whereas cows of HT group had only shade. After calving, the cows were milked and their colostrum was frozen for the subsequent study. Colostrum from cows exposed to a thermoneutral environment during the dry period was pooled and stored frozen (-20 °C). Within 4h of birth, 3.8L of the pooled colostrum from thermoneutral cows was fed to calves born to both HT and CL cows. Day of birth was considered study d 0. All calves were exposed to the same management and weaned at d 49. Blood samples were collected before colostrum feeding, 24h after birth and twice weekly up to d 28. Total serum IgG concentrations were determined. Body weight was recorded at birth and at d 15, 30, 45, and 60. Relative to CL calves, HT calves were lighter at birth (38.3 vs. 43.1 kg), but no difference in weight gain was observed at d 60. Additionally, HT calves had lower apparent efficiency of IgG absorption (26.0 vs. 30.2%), but no differences were observed for total IgG concentration. The objective of the second study was to evaluate the isolated effect of the colostrum from HT cows on calf immune response and growth performance. The experimental design was identical to the first study, but all calves were

  11. The ontogeny of immunity in the honey bee, Apis mellifera L. following an immune challenge.

    PubMed

    Laughton, Alice M; Boots, Michael; Siva-Jothy, Michael T

    2011-07-01

    The honey bee, Apis mellifera, is an ideal system for investigating ontogenetic changes in the immune system, because it combines holometabolous development within a eusocial caste system. As adults, male and female bees are subject to differing selective pressures: worker bees (females) exhibit temporal polyethism, while the male drones invest in mating. They are further influenced by changes in the threat of pathogen infection at different life stages. We investigated the immune response of workers and drones at all developmental phases, from larvae through to late stage adults, assaying both a constitutive (phenoloxidase, PO activity) and induced (antimicrobial peptide, AMP) immune response. We found that larval bees have low levels of PO activity. Adult workers produced stronger immune responses than drones, and a greater plasticity in immune investment. Immune challenge resulted in lower levels of PO activity in adult workers, which may be due to the rapid utilisation and a subsequent failure to replenish the constitutive phenoloxidase. Both adult workers and drones responded to an immune challenge by producing higher titres of AMPs, suggesting that the cost of this response prohibits its constant maintenance. Both castes showed signs of senescence in immune investment in the AMP response. Different sexes and life stages therefore alter their immune system management based on the combined factors of disease risk and life history.

  12. Role of Occult and Post-acute Phase Replication in Protective Immunity Induced with a Novel Live Attenuated SIV Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Claire; Ferguson, Deborah; Tudor, Hannah; Mattiuzzo, Giada; Klaver, Bep; Page, Mark; Stebbings, Richard; Das, Atze T.; Berkhout, Ben; Almond, Neil; Cranage, Martin P.

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate the role of persisting virus replication during occult phase immunisation in the live attenuated SIV vaccine model, a novel SIVmac239Δnef variant (SIVrtTA) genetically engineered to replicate in the presence of doxycycline was evaluated for its ability to protect against wild-type SIVmac239. Indian rhesus macaques were vaccinated either with SIVrtTA or with SIVmac239Δnef. Doxycycline was withdrawn from 4 of 8 SIVrtTA vaccinates before challenge with wild-type virus. Unvaccinated challenge controls exhibited ~107 peak plasma viral RNA copies/ml persisting beyond the acute phase. Six vaccinates, four SIVmac239Δnef and two SIVrtTA vaccinates exhibited complete protection, defined by lack of wild-type viraemia post-challenge and virus-specific PCR analysis of tissues recovered post-mortem, whereas six SIVrtTA vaccinates were protected from high levels of viraemia. Critically, the complete protection in two SIVrtTA vaccinates was associated with enhanced SIVrtTA replication in the immediate post-acute vaccination period but was independent of doxycycline status at the time of challenge. Mutations were identified in the LTR promoter region and rtTA gene that do not affect doxycycline-control but were associated with enhanced post-acute phase replication in protected vaccinates. High frequencies of total circulating CD8+T effector memory cells and a higher total frequency of SIV-specific CD8+ mono and polyfunctional T cells on the day of wild-type challenge were associated with complete protection but these parameters were not predictive of outcome when assessed 130 days after challenge. Moreover, challenge virus-specific Nef CD8+ polyfunctional T cell responses and antigen were detected in tissues post mortem in completely-protected macaques indicating post-challenge control of infection. Within the parameters of the study design, on-going occult-phase replication may not be absolutely required for protective immunity. PMID:28002473

  13. Characterization and Palaeoecological Significance of Archaeological Charcoal Assemblages during Late and Post-Glacial Phases in Southern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Christine; Thiébault, Stéphanie

    1998-07-01

    Archaeological sites at Abeurador and Font-Juvénal have produced extensive charcoal-rich horizons. The results of the charcoal analysis, based on the identification of woody species from anatomical features, contribute to the elaboration of plain phases within the development of vegetation in southern France. They are presented here in a new diagram and are interpreted as four major vegetation phases from 11,000 14C yr B.P. to the recent past. In order to interpret the palaeoecological significance of the charcoal assemblages we have used multivariate analysis. The data base consists of 42 taxa and 48 archaeological levels. The division into four vegetation phases based on analytical interpretation is complemented by the more synthetic interpretation based on correspondence factor analysis (CFA). The results reveal the patterns of the vegetation history over the last 11 millennia, each being characterized by a key plant species.

  14. Pharmacological characterization of the late phase reduction in lung functions and correlations with microvascular leakage and lung edema in allergen-challenged Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Mauser, Peter J; House, Aileen; Jones, Howard; Correll, Craig; Boyce, Christopher; Chapman, Richard W

    2013-12-01

    Late phase airflow obstruction and reduction in forced vital capacity are characteristic features of human asthma. Airway microvascular leakage and lung edema are also present in the inflammatory phase of asthma, but the impact of this vascular response on lung functions has not been precisely defined. This study was designed to evaluate the role of increased lung microvascular leakage and edema on the late phase changes in forced vital capacity (FVC) and peak expiratory flow (PEF) in allergen-challenged Brown Norway rats using pharmacological inhibitors of the allergic inflammatory response. Rats were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin aerosol and forced expiratory lung functions (FVC, PEF) and wet and dry lung weights were measured 48 h after antigen challenge. Ovalbumin challenge reduced FVC (63% reduction) and PEF (33% reduction) and increased wet (65% increase) and dry (51% increase) lung weights. The antigen-induced reduction in FVC and PEF was completely inhibited by oral treatment with betamethasone and partially attenuated by inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism including indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor), 7-TM and MK-7246 (CRTH2 antagonists) and montelukast (CysLT1 receptor antagonist). Antagonists of histamine H1 receptors (mepyramine) and 5-HT receptors (methysergide) had no significant effects indicating that these pre-formed mast cell mediators were not involved. There was a highly significant (P < 0.005) correlation for the inhibition of FVC reduction and increase in wet and dry lung weights by these pharmacological agents. These results strongly support the hypothesis that lung microvascular leakage and the associated lung edema contribute to the reduction in forced expiratory lung functions in antigen-challenged Brown Norway rats and identify an important role for the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid metabolism in these responses.

  15. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of a novel immune-type receptor from Ictalurus punctatus and phasing by selenium anomalous dispersion methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrov, David A. Hernández Prada, José A.; Haire, Robert N.; Magis, Andrew T.; Bailey, Kate; Litman, Gary W.

    2007-12-01

    A highly diversified novel immune-type receptor from catfish, NITR10, was crystallized to reveal novel mechanisms of immune recognition. X-ray diffraction data from crystals of a novel immune-type receptor (NITR10 from the catfish Ictalurus punctatus) were collected to 1.65 Å resolution and reduced to the primitive hexagonal lattice. Native and selenomethionine derivatives of NITR10 crystallized under different conditions yielded P3{sub 1}21 crystals. SeMet NITR10 was phased to a correlation coefficient of 0.77 by SAD methods and experimental electron-density maps were calculated to 1.65 Å. Five NITR10 molecules are predicted to be present in the asymmetric unit based on the Matthews coefficient.

  16. Phase II study of concurrent selective lymph node late course accelerated hyper-fractionated radiotherapy and pemetrexed and cisplatin for locally advanced oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fu, C; Guo, L; Li, H; Huang, W; Gong, H; Sun, M; Wang, Z; Zhou, T; Liu, C

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical efficacy and toxicity of pemetrexed combined with low-dose cisplatin (CDDP) concurrent with late-course accelerated hyperfractionated (LCAF) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with inoperable locally advanced oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods: Patients with locally advanced ESCC (less than or equal to 75 years of age, clinical stages IIB–IVA and Karnofsky performance status ≥70) were enrolled into the study. A target group size of 22 was projected based on the estimation that 2-year overall survival (OS) would increase from 20% to 40%. Patients were treated with pemetrexed, low-dose CDDP and LCAF IMRT concurrently. The main objective of the study was for a 2-year OS, and the secondary objectives were progression-free survival (PFS), objective response, locoregional failure rate, and acute and late toxicities. Results: 25 patients were recruited from October 2008 to July 2011. The median OS was 21 months, with 2- and 5-year OS rates of 44% and 44%, respectively. The median PFS was 18.2 months. The objective response rate was 96% (24/25), with 11 complete responses and 13 partial responses. The locoregional failure rate was 16%. Grades 4 and 5 acute toxicity rates were 8% and 4%, respectively, while no Grade 3 or greater late toxicity was observed. Conclusion: The findings of this Phase II study indicated that the therapeutic regimen appears to achieve an excellent response rate and favourable survival for locally advanced ESCC. However, the severe acute side effects should be considered cautiously in further studies. Advances in knowledge: To our knowledge, this is the first study that introduced pemetrexed and low-dose CDDP combined with LCAF IMRT to treat locally advanced ESCC. The 5-year OS rate was as high as 44%, which was more favourable than other studies. PMID:24666012

  17. Late circadian phase in adults and children is correlated with use of high color temperature light at home at night.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Shigekazu; Lee, Sang-il; Kozaki, Tomoaki; Harada, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Light is the strongest synchronizer of human circadian rhythms, and exposure to residential light at night reportedly causes a delay of circadian rhythms. The present study was conducted to investigate the association between color temperature of light at home and circadian phase of salivary melatonin in adults and children. Twenty healthy children (mean age: 9.7 year) and 17 of their parents (mean age: 41.9 years) participated in the experiment. Circadian phase assessments were made with dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). There were large individual variations in DLMO both in adults and children. The average DLMO in adults and in children were 21:50 ± 1:12 and 20:55 ± 0:44, respectively. The average illuminance and color temperature of light at eye level were 139.6 ± 82.7 lx and 3862.0 ± 965.6 K, respectively. There were significant correlations between color temperature of light and DLMO in adults (r = 0.735, p < 0.01) and children (r = 0.479, p < 0.05), although no significant correlations were found between illuminance level and DLMO. The results suggest that high color temperature light at home might be a cause of the delay of circadian phase in adults and children.

  18. InCVAX - A novel strategy for treatment of late-stage, metastatic cancers through photoimmunotherapy induced tumor-specific immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feifan; Li, Xiaosong; Naylor, Mark F.; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Alleruzzo, Luciano; Raker, Joseph; Lam, Samuel S.K.; Du, Nan; Shi, Lei; Wang, Xiuli; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-01-01

    A novel, promising potential cancer vaccine strategy was proposed to use a two-injection procedure for solid tumors to prompt the immune system to identify and systemically eliminate the primary and metastatic cancers. The two-injection procedure consists of local photothermal application on a selected tumor intended to liberate whole cell tumor antigens, followed by a local injection of an immunoadjuvant that consists of a semi-synthetic functionalized glucosamine polymer, N-dihydro-galacto-chitosan (GC), which is intended to activate antigen presenting cells and facilitate an increased uptake of tumor antigens. This strategy is thus proposed as an in situ autologous cancer vaccine (inCVAX) that may activate antigen presenting cells and expose them to tumor antigens in situ, with the intention of inducing a systemic tumor specific T-cell response. Here, the development of inCVAX for the treatment of metastatic cancers in the past decades are systematically reviewed. The antitumor immune responses of local photothermal treatment and immunological stimulation with GC are also discussed. This treatment approach is also commonly referred to as laser immunotherapy (LIT). PMID:25633839

  19. Altered Phase-Relationship between Peripheral Oscillators and Environmental Time in Cry1 or Cry2 Deficient Mouse Models for Early and Late Chronotypes

    PubMed Central

    Destici, Eugin; Jacobs, Edwin H.; Tamanini, Filippo; Loos, Maarten; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Oklejewicz, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian circadian system is composed of a light-entrainable central clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the brain and peripheral clocks in virtually any other tissue. It allows the organism to optimally adjust metabolic, physiological and behavioral functions to the physiological needs it will have at specific time of the day. According to the resonance theory, such rhythms are only advantageous to an organism when in tune with the environment, which is illustrated by the adverse health effects originating from chronic circadian disruption by jetlag and shift work. Using short-period Cry1 and long-period Cry2 deficient mice as models for morningness and eveningness, respectively, we explored the effect of chronotype on the phase relationship between the central SCN clock and peripheral clocks in other organs. Whereas the behavioral activity patterns and circadian gene expression in the SCN of light-entrained Cry1-/- and Cry2-/- mice largely overlapped with that of wild type mice, expression of clock and clock controlled genes in liver, kidney, small intestine, and skin was shown to be markedly phase-advanced or phase-delayed, respectively. Likewise, circadian rhythms in urinary corticosterone were shown to display a significantly altered phase relationship similar to that of gene expression in peripheral tissues. We show that the daily dissonance between peripheral clocks and the environment did not affect the lifespan of Cry1-/- or Cry2-/- mice. Nonetheless, the phase-shifted peripheral clocks in light-entrained mice with morningness and eveningness-like phenotypes may have implications for personalized preventive and therapeutic (i.e. chronomodulation-based) health care for people with early and late chronotypes. PMID:24386234

  20. Effect of pollen-mediated oxidative stress on immediate hypersensitivity reactions and late-phase inflammation in allergic conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Bacsi, Attila; Dharajiya, Nilesh; Choudhury, Barun K.; Sur, Sanjiv; Boldogh, Istvan

    2011-01-01

    Background Allergic eye diseases are complex inflammatory conditions of the conjunctiva that are becoming increasingly prevalent and present an increasing economic burden because of direct and indirect health expenditures. Objective We sought to identify factors that may synergize with antigen-induced allergic inflammation and lead to allergic conjunctivitis. We used a murine model of allergic conjunctivitis to test the effect of oxidative stress generated by pollen oxidases using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced) or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced) (NAD[P]H) as an electron donor present in pollen grains. Methods Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by hydrated Ambrosia artemisiifolia pollen (short ragweed pollen; RWP) grains was determined by using 2′-7′-dihydro-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, nitroblue tetrazolium reduction, and Amplex Red assay. The RWP-induced changes in intracellular ROS levels were examined in A549 cells, human primary bronchial epithelial cells, and murine conjunctiva. Results Ragweed pollen grains contain NAD(P)H oxidase activity, which is diphenyleneiodonium-sensitive and quinacrine-sensitive and sodium azide-resistant. These NAD(P)H oxidases generate a superoxide anion that can be converted to H2O2 by pollen grain–associated superoxide dismutase. These diffusible oxygen radicals from pollen grains increase intracellular ROS levels in cultured epithelial cells and murine conjunctiva. Similar phenomena were observed in sensitized and naive mice, indicating that the RWP-induced oxidative stress in conjunctival epithelium is independent of adaptive immunity. Inactivation of NAD(P)H oxidase activity in RWP decreases the immediate-type hypersensitivity and inflammatory cell infiltration into the conjunctiva. Conclusion Our data suggest that ROS generated by NAD(P)H oxidases in pollen grains intensify immediate allergic reactions and recruitment of inflammatory cells in murine conjunctiva. PMID:16210058

  1. Differential expression of structural genes for the late phase of phytic acid biosynthesis in developing seeds of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Bhati, Kaushal Kumar; Aggarwal, Sipla; Sharma, Shivani; Mantri, Shrikant; Singh, Sudhir P; Bhalla, Sherry; Kaur, Jagdeep; Tiwari, Siddharth; Roy, Joy K; Tuli, Rakesh; Pandey, Ajay K

    2014-07-01

    In cereals, phytic acid (PA) or inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) is a well-known phosphate storage compound as well as major chelator of important micronutrients (iron, zinc, calcium, etc.). Genes involved in the late phases of PA biosynthesis pathway are known in crops like maize, soybeans and barley but none have been reported from wheat. Our in silico analysis identified six wheat genes that might be involved in the biosynthesis of inositol phosphates. Four of the genes were inositol tetraphosphate kinases (TaITPK1, TaITPK2, TaITPK3, and TaITPK4), and the other two genes encode for inositol triphosphate kinase (TaIPK2) and inositol pentakisphosphate kinase (TaIPK1). Additionally, we identified a homolog of Zmlpa-1, an ABCC subclass multidrug resistance-associated transporter protein (TaMRP3) that is putatively involved in PA transport. Analyses of the mRNA expression levels of these seven genes showed that they are differentially expressed during seed development, and that some are preferentially expressed in aleurone tissue. These results suggest selective roles during PA biosynthesis, and that both lipid-independent and -dependent pathways are active in developing wheat grains. TaIPK1 and TaMRP3 were able to complement the yeast ScΔipk1 and ScΔycf1 mutants, respectively, providing evidence that the wheat genes have the expected biochemical functions. This is the first comprehensive study of the wheat genes involved in the late phase of PA biosynthesis. Knowledge generated from these studies could be utilized to develop strategies for generating low phyate wheat.

  2. Enhancement of early- and late-phase insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity by the combination of repaglinide and metformin in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rudovich, N N; Leyck Dieken, M G; Rochlitz, H; Pfeiffer, A F H

    2004-07-01

    The effects of a combination of repaglinide and metformin on the insulin secretion pattern and insulin sensitivity were studied in a fixed-dose, open-label, placebo-controlled cross-over study. Eleven patients with T2 DM were allocated in random order to treatment with placebo or repaglinide (1 mg pre-meal 3 x/day) in combination with metformin (2550 mg/day) for one-week periods of each. At the end of each period a hyperglycaemic (HC) and a euglycaemic clamp (EC) were performed. Both early (0 - 10 min) and late (25 - 180 min) phases of insulin secretion were significantly increased during HC with repaglinide compared to placebo (263.3 +/- 133.1 vs. 443.6 +/- 138.5 pmol/l/10 min, p = 0.008 and 18 750.9 +/- 5936.4 vs. 34 508.65 +/- 9234.0 pmol/l/25 - 180 min; p = 0.008). The C-peptide concentrations under steady-state conditions were lower in EC with placebo than with repaglinide (p = 0.014). When euglycaemia was achieved in EC, the C-peptide concentrations decreased from hyperglycaemic to normoglycaemic values in the presence of repaglinide but remained higher than after placebo. The insulin sensitivity index (ISI) was increased by 35 % after 1 week of combination therapy with repaglinide plus metformin (1.11 +/- 0.03 x 10 (2) vs. 0.83 +/- 0.21 x 10 (2) mg x kg (-1) body weight x min (-1) x pmol (-1) x l, respectively; p = 0.033). Repaglinide increased early and late phases of insulin responses in HC, without markedly enhancing insulin secretion in euglycaemia. Repaglinide in combination with metformin produced a significant enhancement of ISI, suggesting a synergistic effect on insulin sensitivity.

  3. Oral immunization against porcine pleuropneumonia using the cubic phase of monoolein and purified toxins of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Bermudez, Jorge; Quintanar-Guerrero, David; Lara Puente, Horacio; Tórtora Perez, Jorge; Suárez Güemez, Francisco; Ciprián Carrasco, Abel; Mendoza Elvira, Susana

    2014-11-28

    The main goal of this work was to obtain an orally administered immunogen that would protect against infections by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. The Apx I, II and III toxins were obtained from the supernatants of cultures of serotypes 1 and 3 of A. pleuropneumoniae. The capacity of monoolein gel to trap and protect the Apx toxins, and the effect of their incorporation on the stability of the cubic phase were evaluated. The gel was capable of trapping a 400-μg/ml concentration of the antigen with no effects on its structure. Approximately 60% of the protein molecules were released from the gel within 4h. Four experimental groups were formed, each one with four pigs. All challenges were conducted in a nebulization chamber. Group A: Control (-) not vaccinated and not challenged; Group B: Control (+) not vaccinated but challenged; Group C: vaccinated twice intramuscularly with ToxCom (a commercial toxoid) at an interval of 15 days and then challenged; and Group D: vaccinated orally twice a week for 4 weeks with ToxOral (an oral toxoid) and challenged on day 28 of the experiment with a same dose of 2.0 × 10(4) UFC of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1 and 3. The lesions found in group B covered 27.7-43.1% of the lungs; the pigs in group C had lesions over 12.3-28%; and those in group D over 15.4-32.3%. No lesions were found in the Group A pigs. A. pleuropneumoniae induced macroscopic lesions characteristic of infection by and lesions microscopic detected by histopathology. The etiologic agent was recovered from the infected lungs, tonsils and spleen. The serotypes identified were 1 and 3. An indirect ELISA test identified the antibodies against the Apx toxins in the serum of the animals immunized orally.

  4. Early Rise of Blood T Follicular Helper Cell Subsets and Baseline Immunity as Predictors of Persisting Late Functional Antibody Responses to Vaccination in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Borgogni, Erica; Zedda, Luisanna; Cantisani, Rocco; Chiappini, Nico; Schiavetti, Francesca; Rosa, Domenico; Castellino, Flora; Montomoli, Emanuele; Bodinham, Caroline L.; Lewis, David J.; Medini, Duccio; Bertholet, Sylvie; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T follicular helper cells (TFH) have been identified as the T-cell subset specialized in providing help to B cells for optimal activation and production of high affinity antibody. We recently demonstrated that the expansion of peripheral blood influenza-specific CD4+IL-21+ICOS1+ T helper (TH) cells, three weeks after vaccination, associated with and predicted the rise of protective neutralizing antibodies to avian H5N1. In this study, healthy adults were vaccinated with plain seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIIV), MF59®-adjuvanted TIIV (ATIIV), or saline placebo. Frequencies of circulating CD4+ TFH1 ICOS+ TFH cells and H1N1-specific CD4+IL-21+ICOS+ CXCR5+ TFH and CXCR5- TH cell subsets were determined at various time points after vaccination and were then correlated with hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers. All three CD4+ T cell subsets expanded in response to TIIV and ATIIV, and peaked 7 days after vaccination. To demonstrate that these TFH cell subsets correlated with functional antibody titers, we defined an alternative endpoint metric, decorrelated HI (DHI), which removed any correlation between day 28/day 168 and day 0 HI titers, to control for the effect of preexisting immunity to influenza vaccine strains. The numbers of total circulating CD4+ TFH1 ICOS+ cells and of H1N1-specific CD4+IL-21+ICOS+ CXCR5+, measured at day 7, were significantly associated with day 28, and day 28 and 168 DHI titers, respectively. Altogether, our results show that CD4+ TFH subsets may represent valuable biomarkers of vaccine-induced long-term functional immunity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01771367 PMID:27336786

  5. The effect of cromolyn sodium and albuterol on early and late phase bronchoconstriction and airway leukocyte infiltration after allergen challenge of nonanesthetized guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Hutson, P A; Holgate, S T; Church, M K

    1988-11-01

    We describe the effects of the antiallergic drug cromolyn sodium and the beta 2-selective adrenoceptor agonist albuterol against early and late phase changes in specific airways conductance (sGaw) and leukocyte infiltration into the airways after allergen challenge of nonanesthetized guinea pigs. Inhalation of ovalbumin by sensitized guinea pigs induced three phases of airways obstruction: an early asthmatic response (EAR) peaking at 2 h, a late response (LAR) peaking at 17 h, and a further late response (LLAR) being observed at 72 h. The LAR was accompanied by a 13-fold rise in neutrophils and a four-fold rise in eosinophils recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at 17 h. By 72 h, the BAL content of neutrophils had returned to near normal, whereas eosinophil numbers had risen to 6.7-fold above baseline. Inhalation of an aerosolized solution of cromolyn, 10 mg/ml, 15 min before challenge inhibited both the EAR and LAR and the influx of neutrophils into the airways at 17 h but had no effect on eosinophil accumulation. Inhalation of cromolyn at 6 h, i.e., after the completion of the EAR, inhibited the LAR, the LLAR, and the rise in eosinophils at 72 h but did not reduce the influx of neutrophils at 17 h. Administration of cromolyn at both 15 min before and 6 h after challenge inhibited all changes in sGaw and reduced the accumulation of neutrophils at 17 h and the influx of eosinophils at 72 h. In contrast, inhalation of albuterol, 0.1 mg/ml, 15 min before allergen provocation blocked the EAR and the rise in BAL neutrophils at 17 h but did not inhibit the LAR. Inhalation of albuterol at 6 h partially reversed the LAR but had no effect on either the LLAR or cellular changes. Given at both times, albuterol inhibited the EAR and neutrophil accumulation at 17 h and partially reversed the LAR but produced no other effects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Yersinia pestis requires the 2-component regulatory system OmpR-EnvZ to resist innate immunity during the early and late stages of plague.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Angéline; Lemaître, Nadine; Titecat, Marie; Merchez, Maud; Deloison, Gaspard; Ricard, Isabelle; Pradel, Elizabeth; Marceau, Michaël; Sebbane, Florent

    2014-11-01

    Plague is transmitted by fleas or contaminated aerosols. To successfully produce disease, the causal agent (Yersinia pestis) must rapidly sense and respond to rapid variations in its environment. Here, we investigated the role of 2-component regulatory systems (2CSs) in plague because the latter are known to be key players in bacterial adaptation to environmental change. Along with the previously studied PhoP-PhoQ system, OmpR-EnvZ was the only one of Y. pestis' 23 other 2CSs required for production of bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic plague. In vitro, OmpR-EnvZ was needed to counter serum complement and leukocytes but was not required for the secretion of antiphagocyte exotoxins. In vivo, Y. pestis lacking OmpR-EnvZ did not induce an early immune response in the skin and was fully virulent in neutropenic mice. We conclude that, throughout the course of Y. pestis infection, OmpR-EnvZ is required to counter toxic effectors secreted by polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the tissues.

  7. Early versus Late-Phase Consolidation of Opiate Reward Memories Requires Distinct Molecular and Temporal Mechanisms in the Amygdala-Prefrontal Cortical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gholizadeh, Shervin; Sun, Ninglei; De Jaeger, Xavier; Bechard, Melanie; Coolen, Lique; Laviolette, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    The consolidation of newly acquired memories involves the temporal transition from a recent, less stable trace to a more permanent consolidated form. Opiates possess potent rewarding effects and produce powerful associative memories. The activation of these memories is associated with opiate abuse relapse phenomena and the persistence of compulsive opiate dependence. However, the neuronal, molecular and temporal mechanisms by which associative opiate reward memories are consolidated are not currently understood. We report that the consolidation of associative opiate reward memories involves a temporal and molecular switch between the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) (early consolidation phase) to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) (late consolidation phase). We demonstrate at the molecular, behavioral and neuronal levels that the consolidation of a recently acquired opiate reward memory involves an extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK)-dependent phosphorylation process within the BLA. In contrast, later-stage consolidation of a newly acquired memory is dependent upon a calcium-calmodulin-dependent (CaMKII), ERK-independent, mechanism in the mPFC, over a 12 hr temporal gradient. In addition, using in vivo multi-unit neuronal recordings in the mPFC, we report that protein synthesis within the BLA modulates the consolidation of opiate-reward memory in neuronal mPFC sub-populations, via the same temporal dynamic. PMID:23696837

  8. Experimental Investigation of Coolant Mixing in the RPV of PWR in the Late Phase of a SBLOCA Event

    SciTech Connect

    Kliem, Soren; Prasser, Horst-Michael; Suehnel, Tobias; Weiss, Frank-Peter; Hansen, Asmus

    2006-07-01

    Partial depletion of the primary circuit of a pressurized water reactor during a postulated small break loss of coolant accident can lead to interruption of one-phase flow natural circulation. In this case, the decay heat is removed from the core in the reflux-condenser mode. In this operation mode, slugs of lower borated water can accumulate in the cold legs. After refilling of the primary circuit, the natural circulation in the two loops not receiving emergency core cooling injection (ECC) re-establishes and the lower borated slugs are shifted towards the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Entering the core, the lower borated water causes a reactivity insertion. Mixing inside the RPV is an important phenomenon limiting the reactivity insertion and preventing a re-criticality. The mixing of these lower borated slugs with the ambient coolant in the RPV was investigated at the 1:5 scaled coolant mixing test facility ROCOM. Wire mesh sensors based on electrical conductivity measurement are used in ROCOM to measure in detail the spreading of a tracer solution in the facility. The mixing in the downcomer was observed with a sensor which spans a measuring grid of 64 azimuthal and 32 positions over the height. The resulting distribution of the boron concentration at the core inlet was measured with a sensor integrated into the lower core support plate providing one measurement position at the entry into each fuel assembly. The boundary conditions for the mixing experiment were taken from an experiment at the thermal-hydraulic test facility PKL operated by FANP Germany. The slugs, which have a lower density, accumulate in the upper part of the downcomer after shifting into the RPV. The ECC-water injected into the RPV falls almost straight down through the lower borated water and accelerates. On the outer sides of the ECC-streak, lower borated coolant admixes and flows together with the ECC-water downwards. This is the only mechanism of transporting the lower borated water

  9. Adenylyl cyclase subtype 1 is essential for late-phase long term potentiation and spatial propagation of synaptic responses in the anterior cingulate cortex of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; O'Den, Gerile; Song, Qian; Koga, Kohei; Zhang, Ming-Ming; Zhuo, Min

    2014-10-10

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is a key cellular mechanism for pathological pain in the central nervous system. LTP contains at least two different phases: early-phase LTP (E-LTP) and late-phase LTP (L-LTP). Among several major cortical areas, the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is a critical brain region for pain perception and its related emotional changes. Periphery tissue or nerve injuries cause LTP of excitatory synaptic transmission in the ACC. Our previous studies have demonstrated that genetic deletion of calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1) or pharmacological application of a selective AC1 inhibitor NB001 blocked E-LTP in the ACC. However, the effect of AC1 on L-LTP, which requires new protein synthesis and is important for the process of chronic pain, has not been investigated. Here we tested the effects of NB001 on the ACC L-LTP and found that bath application of NB001 (0.1 μM) totally blocked the induction of L-LTP and recruitment of cortical circuitry without affecting basal excitatory transmission. In contrast, gabapentin, a widely used analgesic drug for neuropathic pain, did not block the induction of L-LTP and circuitry recruitment even at a high concentration (100 μM). Gabapentin non-selectively decreased basal synaptic transmission. Our results provide strong evidence that the selective AC1 inhibitor NB001 can be used to inhibit pain-related cortical L-LTP without affecting basal synaptic transmission. It also provides basic mechanisms for possible side effects of gabapentin in the central nervous system and its ineffectiveness in some patients with neuropathic pain.

  10. Mouse embryos stressed by physiological levels of osmolarity become arrested in the late 2-cell stage before entry into M phase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Kooistra, Megan; Lee, Martin; Liu, Lin; Baltz, Jay M

    2011-10-01

    Preimplantation mouse embryos of many strains become arrested at the 2-cell stage if the osmolarity of culture medium that normally supports development to blastocysts is raised to approximately that of their normal physiological environment in the oviduct. Arrest can be prevented if molecules that serve as "organic osmolytes" are present in the medium, because organic osmolytes, principally glycine, are accumulated by embryos to provide intracellular osmotic support and regulate cell volume. Medium with an osmolarity of 310 mOsM induced arrest of approximately 80% of CF1 mouse embryos at the 2-cell stage, in contrast to the approximately 100% that progressed beyond the 2-cell stage at 250 or 301 mOsM with glycine. The nature of this arrest induced by physiological levels of osmolarity is unknown. Arrest was reversible by transfer to lower-osmolarity medium at any point during the 2-cell stage, but not after embryos would normally have progressed to the 4-cell stage. Cessation of development likely was not due to apoptosis, as shown by lack of external annexin V binding, detectable cytochrome c release from mitochondria, or nuclear DNA fragmentation. Two-cell embryos cultured at 310 mOsM progressed through the S phase, and zygotic genome activation markers were expressed. However, most embryos failed to initiate the M phase, as evidenced by intact nuclei with decondensed chromosomes, low M-phase promoting factor activity, and an inactive form of CDK1, although a few blastomeres were arrested in metaphase. Thus, embryos become arrested late in the G(2) stage of the second embryonic cell cycle when stressed by physiological osmolarity in the absence of organic osmolytes.

  11. Mouse Embryos Stressed by Physiological Levels of Osmolarity Become Arrested in the Late 2-Cell Stage Before Entry into M Phase1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Kooistra, Megan; Lee, Martin; Liu, Lin; Baltz, Jay M.

    2011-01-01

    Preimplantation mouse embryos of many strains become arrested at the 2-cell stage if the osmolarity of culture medium that normally supports development to blastocysts is raised to approximately that of their normal physiological environment in the oviduct. Arrest can be prevented if molecules that serve as “organic osmolytes” are present in the medium, because organic osmolytes, principally glycine, are accumulated by embryos to provide intracellular osmotic support and regulate cell volume. Medium with an osmolarity of 310 mOsM induced arrest of approximately 80% of CF1 mouse embryos at the 2-cell stage, in contrast to the approximately 100% that progressed beyond the 2-cell stage at 250 or 301 mOsM with glycine. The nature of this arrest induced by physiological levels of osmolarity is unknown. Arrest was reversible by transfer to lower-osmolarity medium at any point during the 2-cell stage, but not after embryos would normally have progressed to the 4-cell stage. Cessation of development likely was not due to apoptosis, as shown by lack of external annexin V binding, detectable cytochrome c release from mitochondria, or nuclear DNA fragmentation. Two-cell embryos cultured at 310 mOsM progressed through the S phase, and zygotic genome activation markers were expressed. However, most embryos failed to initiate the M phase, as evidenced by intact nuclei with decondensed chromosomes, low M-phase promoting factor activity, and an inactive form of CDK1, although a few blastomeres were arrested in metaphase. Thus, embryos become arrested late in the G2 stage of the second embryonic cell cycle when stressed by physiological osmolarity in the absence of organic osmolytes. PMID:21697513

  12. Transfusion of Plasma Collected at Late Phase after Preconditioning Reduces Myocardial Infarct Size Induced by Ischemia-reperfusion in Rats In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Zheng, Zhi-Nan; Cheung, Chi-Wai; Zuo, Zhi-Yi; Jin, San-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Background: Plasma transfusion is a common clinical practice. Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) protects organs against ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Whether preconditioned plasma (PP), collected at late phase after RIPC, could protect organs against IR injury in vivo is unknown. This study explored whether transfusion of PP could reduce myocardial infarct size (IS) after IR in rat in vivo. Methods: Eighty Lewis rats were randomized to eight groups (n = 10 for each group). Two groups of plasma donor rats donated plasma at 48 h after transient limb ischemia (PP) or control protocol (nonpreconditioned plasma [NPP]). Six groups of recipient rats received normal saline (NS; NS-IR 1, and NS-IR 24 groups), NPP (NPP-IR 1 and NPP-IR 24 groups), or PP (PP-IR 1 and PP-IR 24 groups) at one or 24 h before myocardial IR. Myocardial IR consisted of 30-min left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery occlusion and 180-min reperfusion. The area at risk (AAR) and infarct area were determined by double-staining with Evans blue and triphenyltetrazolium chloride. IS was calculated by infarct area divided by AAR. This was a 3 × 2 factorial design study, and factorial analysis was used to evaluate the data. If an interaction between the fluid and transfusion time existed, one-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was used to analyze the single effects of fluid type when the transfusion time was fixed. Results: IS in the NPP-IR 1 and PP-IR 1 groups was smaller than in the NS-IR 1 group (F = 6.838, P = 0.005; NPP-IR 1: 57 ± 8% vs. NS-IR1: 68 ± 6%, t = 2.843, P = 0.020; PP-IR 1: 56 ± 8% vs. NS-IR 1: 68 ± 6%, t = 3.102, P = 0.009), but no significant difference was detected between the NPP-IR 1 and PP-IR 1 groups (57 ± 8% vs. 56 ± 8%, t = 0.069, P = 1.000). IS in the NPP-IR 24 and PP-IR 24 groups was smaller than in the NS-IR 24 group (F = 24.796, P < 0.001; NPP-IR 24: 56% ± 7% vs. NS-IR 24: 68 ± 7%, t = 3.102, P = 0.026; PP-IR 24

  13. Screening probiotic candidates for a mixture of probiotics to enhance the growth performance, immunity, and disease resistance of Asian seabass, Lates calcarifer (Bloch), against Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsueh-Li; Shiu, Ya-Li; Chiu, Chiu-Shia; Huang, Shih-Ling; Liu, Chun-Hung

    2017-01-01

    Six bacteria, including, Lactobacillus casei M15, Lac. plantarum D8, Lac. pentosus BD6, Lac. fermentum LW2, Enterococcus faecium 10-10, and Bacillus subtilis E20, and one yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae P13 were selected as probiotics for Asian seabass, Lates calcarifer, by tracking the growth performance and disease resistance of fish against Aeromonas hydrophila in the first trial. The probiotic efficiency screening results showed that B. subtilis E20 and Lac. pentosus BD6, and S. cerevisiae P13 and Lac. fermentum LW2 respectively improved either the growth performance or disease resistance. Therefore, these four probiotics were then selected to prepare a probiotics mixture, and this was incorporated in equal proportions into diets for Asian seabass at levels of 0 (control), and 10(6) (MD6), 10(7) (MD7), 10(8) (MD8), and 10(9) (MD9) colony-forming units (cfu) (kg diet)(-1). A synergistic effect of the combined probiotics was investigated in this study, and the probiotics mixture was able to improve both the growth performance and health status of fish. After 56 days of feeding, fish fed the MD9 diet had a higher final weight and percentage of weight gain. In addition, protein contents in the dorsal muscle of fish fed the MD8 and MD9 diets were significantly higher compared to the control. For the pathogen challenge test, fish fed the MD7, MD8, and MD9 diets had significantly lower cumulative mortalities after A. hydrophila infection compared to those of fish fed the control and MD6 diets, which might have been due to increased respiratory bursts, decreased superoxide dismutase activity in leucocytes, and increased phagocytic activity. Therefore, we considered that the probiotics mixture could adequately provide probiotic efficiency for Asian seabass, and the diet containing 10(9) cfu (kg diet)(-1) probiotic mixture is recommended to improve the growth and health status of Asian seabass.

  14. Broad and potent cellular and humoral immune responses after a second late HIV-modified vaccinia virus ankara vaccination in HIV-DNA-primed and HIV-modified vaccinia virus Ankara-boosted Swedish vaccinees.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Charlotta; Godoy-Ramirez, Karina; Hejdeman, Bo; Bråve, Andreas; Gudmundsdotter, Lindvi; Hallengärd, David; Currier, Jeffrey R; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Hasselrot, Klara; Earl, Patricia L; Polonis, Victoria R; Marovich, Mary A; Robb, Merlin L; Sandström, Eric; Wahren, Britta; Biberfeld, Gunnel

    2014-03-01

    We have previously shown that an HIV vaccine regimen including three HIV-DNA immunizations and a single HIV-modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) boost was safe and highly immunogenic in Swedish volunteers. A median 38 months after the first HIV-MVA vaccination, 24 volunteers received 10(8) plaque-forming units of HIV-MVA. The vaccine was well tolerated. Two weeks after this HIV-MVA vaccination, 18 (82%) of 22 evaluable vaccinees were interferon (IFN)-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) reactive: 18 to Gag and 10 (45%) to Env. A median minimal epitope count of 4 to Gag or Env was found in a subset of 10 vaccinees. Intracellular cytokine staining revealed CD4(+) and/or CD8(+) T cell responses in 23 (95%) of 24 vaccinees, 19 to Gag and 19 to Env. The frequency of HIV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses was equally high (75%). A high proportion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses to Gag was polyfunctional with production of three or more cytokines (40% and 60%, respectively). Of the Env-specific CD4(+) T cells 40% were polyfunctional. Strong lymphoproliferative responses to Aldrithiol-2 (AT-2)-treated subtype A, B, C, and A_E virus were demonstrable in 21 (95%) of 22 vaccinees. All vaccinees developed binding antibodies to Env and Gag. Neutralizing antibodies were detected in a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based assay against subtype B and CRF01_AE viruses. The neutralizing antibody response rates were influenced by the vaccine dose and/or mode of delivery used at the previous HIV-MVA vaccination. Thus, a second late HIV-MVA boost induced strong and broad cellular immune responses and improved antibody responses. The data support further exploration of this vaccine concept.

  15. Human Folliculin Delays Cell Cycle Progression through Late S and G2/M-Phases: Effect of Phosphorylation and Tumor Associated Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Laviolette, Laura A.; Wilson, Jonas; Koller, Julia; Neil, Christopher; Hulick, Peter; Rejtar, Tomas; Karger, Barry; Teh, Bin Tean; Iliopoulos, Othon

    2013-01-01

    The Birt-Hogg-Dube disease occurs as a result of germline mutations in the human Folliculin gene (FLCN), and is characterized by clinical features including fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts and multifocal renal neoplasia. Clinical and genetic evidence suggest that FLCN acts as a tumor suppressor gene. The human cell line UOK257, derived from the renal cell carcinoma of a patient with a germline mutation in the FLCN gene, harbors a truncated version of the FLCN protein. Reconstitution of the wild type FLCN protein into UOK257 cells delays cell cycle progression, due to a slower progression through the late S and G2/M-phases. Similarly, Flcn–/– mouse embryonic fibroblasts progress more rapidly through the cell cycle than wild type controls (Flcnflox/flox). The reintroduction of tumor-associated FLCN mutants (FLCN ΔF157, FLCN 1–469 or FLCN K508R) fails to delay cell cycle progression in UOK257 cells. Additionally, FLCN phosphorylation (on Serines 62 and 73) fluctuates throughout the cell cycle and peaks during the G2/M phase in cells treated with nocodazole. In keeping with this observation, the reintroduction of a FLCN phosphomimetic mutant into the UOK257 cell line results in faster progression through the cell cycle compared to those expressing the wild type FLCN protein. These findings suggest that the tumor suppression function of FLCN may be linked to its impact on the cell cycle and that FLCN phosphorylation is important for this activity. Additionally, these observations describe a novel in vitro assay for testing the functional significance of FLCN mutations and/or genetic polymorphisms. PMID:23874397

  16. Developmental regulation of the late phase of long-term potentiation (L-LTP) and metaplasticity in hippocampal area CA1 of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Guan

    2012-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is a form of synaptic plasticity thought to underlie memory; thus knowing its developmental profile is fundamental to understanding function. Like memory, LTP has multiple phases with distinct timing and mechanisms. The late phase of LTP (L-LTP), lasting longer than 3 h, is protein synthesis dependent and involves changes in the structure and content of dendritic spines, the major sites of excitatory synapses. In previous work, tetanic stimulation first produced L-LTP at postnatal day 15 (P15) in area CA1 of rat hippocampus. Here we used a more robust induction paradigm involving theta-burst stimulation (TBS) in acute slices and found the developmental onset of L-LTP to be 3 days earlier at P12. In contrast, at P8–11, TBS only reversed the synaptic depression that occurs from test-pulse stimulation in developing (P8–15) hippocampus. A second bout of TBS delivered 30–180 min later produced L-LTP at P10–11 but not at P8–9 and enhanced L-LTP at P12–15. Both the developmental onset and the enhanced L-LTP produced by repeated bouts of TBS were blocked by the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist dl-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid. Thus the developmental onset age is P12 for L-LTP induced by the more robust and perhaps more naturalistic TBS induction paradigm. Metaplasticity produced by repeated bouts of TBS is developmentally regulated, advancing the capacity for L-LTP from P12 to P10, but not to younger ages. Together these findings provide a new basis from which to investigate mechanisms that regulate the developmental onset of this important form of synaptic plasticity. PMID:22114158

  17. Progesterone supplementation in the late follicular phase of an in-vitro fertilization cycle: a 'natural' way to time oocyte recovery?

    PubMed

    Howles, C M; Macnamee, M C; Edwards, R G

    1988-05-01

    Twenty-eight patients superovulated with clomiphene citrate (CC) and human menopausal gonadotrophin (HMG) were given a single injection of 25 mg progesterone (P group) 4 h prior to the ovulation-inducing injection of human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG). Plasma and urinary LH levels were significantly higher (P less than 0.05) in the P group immediately prior to HCG compared to controls. Plasma progesterone concentrations were also elevated (P less than 0.01) in the P group from the time of injection to oocyte recovery. The number of mature oocytes recovered was also higher (P less than 0.001; 59% versus 40% in controls) and the time interval between oocyte recovery and insemination was also shorter (P less than 0.01) in the P group. The pregnancy rate/replacement 15 days after oocyte recovery was 39% versus 23% in the P and control groups respectively. It was concluded that as more mature oocytes were recovered in the P group, progesterone supplementation in the late follicular phase may be beneficial for patients undergoing GIFT. This was borne out when the first two GIFT patients pretreated in this way became pregnant.

  18. Low-frequency stimulation induces a pathway-specific late phase of LTP in the amygdala that is mediated by PKA and dependent on protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan-You; Kandel, Eric R.

    2007-01-01

    Activity-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy are thought to be the key cellular mechanism for the formation and storage of both explicit and implicit memory. Different patterns of stimulation can elicit different changes in the efficiency on excitatory synaptic transmission. Here, we examined the synaptic changes in the amygdala of adult mice produced by low-frequency stimulation (1 Hz, 15 min, LFS). We first compared the synaptic changes induced by LFS in three different synaptic pathways of amygdala: cortical–lateral amygdala, thalamic–lateral amygdala, and lateral–basolateral amygdala pathways. We find that the plastic changes induced by LFS are different between synaptic pathways. Low-frequency stimulation selectively elicits a slow onset and protein synthesis-dependent late-phase LTP in the cortical–lateral amygdala pathway, but not in the thalamic–lateral or lateral–basolateral pathways. We next analyzed LTP induced by LFS in the cortical–lateral amygdala pathway and found that three PKA-coupling neurotransmitter receptors are involved: 5-HT4, Dopamine D1, and β-adrenergic receptors. Antagonists of these receptors block the LFS L-LTP, but the effects of agonists of these receptors are clearly different. These results indicate that the threshold for the induction of LFS L-LTP is different among these pathways and that the maintenance of LFS L-LTP requires a cross-talk among multiple neurotransmitters. PMID:17626908

  19. Use of solid-phase immune electron microscopy for classification of Norwalk-like viruses into six antigenic groups from 10 outbreaks of gastroenteritis in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, D; Ando, T; Humphrey, C D; Monroe, S S; Glass, R I

    1995-01-01

    Norwalk-like viruses observed in fecal specimens from 10 outbreaks of gastroenteritis investigated in the United States between 1987 and 1992 were analyzed by solid-phase immune electron microscopy. Outbreak virus strains were classified into six antigenic groups: the four types (UK1 to UK4) previously defined in the United Kingdom, Norwalk virus, and the Oklahoma agent that was newly defined in this study. The diversity of antigenic types demonstrated in these outbreaks was greater than previously recognized and will serve as a basis for characterization of these strains at the molecular level. PMID:7714218

  20. Boosting BCG-primed responses with a subunit Apa vaccine during the waning phase improves immunity and imparts protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Subhadra; Kannanganat, Sunil; Dobos, Karen M; Lucas, Megan; Spencer, John S; Amara, Rama Rao; Plikaytis, Bonnie B; Posey, James E; Sable, Suraj B

    2016-05-13

    Heterologous prime-boosting has emerged as a powerful vaccination approach against tuberculosis. However, optimal timing to boost BCG-immunity using subunit vaccines remains unclear in clinical trials. Here, we followed the adhesin Apa-specific T-cell responses in BCG-primed mice and investigated its BCG-booster potential. The Apa-specific T-cell response peaked 32-52 weeks after parenteral or mucosal BCG-priming but waned significantly by 78 weeks. A subunit-Apa-boost during the contraction-phase of BCG-response had a greater effect on the magnitude and functional quality of specific cellular and humoral responses compared to a boost at the peak of BCG-response. The cellular response increased following mucosal BCG-prime-Apa-subunit-boost strategy compared to Apa-subunit-prime-BCG-boost approach. However, parenteral BCG-prime-Apa-subunit-boost by a homologous route was the most effective strategy in-terms of enhancing specific T-cell responses during waning in the lung and spleen. Two Apa-boosters markedly improved waning BCG-immunity and significantly reduced Mycobacterium tuberculosis burdens post-challenge. Our results highlight the challenges of optimization of prime-boost regimens in mice where BCG drives persistent immune-activation and suggest that boosting with a heterologous vaccine may be ideal once the specific persisting effector responses are contracted. Our results have important implications for design of prime-boost regimens against tuberculosis in humans.

  1. Phase 1 studies of the safety and immunogenicity of electroporated HER2/CEA DNA vaccine followed by adenoviral boost immunization in patients with solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA electroporation has been demonstrated in preclinical models to be a promising strategy to improve cancer immunity, especially when combined with other genetic vaccines in heterologous prime-boost protocols. We report the results of 2 multicenter phase 1 trials involving adult cancer patients (n=33) with stage II-IV disease. Methods Patients were vaccinated with V930 alone, a DNA vaccine containing equal amounts of plasmids expressing the extracellular and trans-membrane domains of human HER2, and a plasmid expressing CEA fused to the B subunit of Escherichia coli heat labile toxin (Study 1), or a heterologous prime-boost vaccination approach with V930 followed by V932, a dicistronic adenovirus subtype-6 viral vector vaccine coding for the same antigens (Study 2). Results The use of the V930 vaccination with electroporation alone or in combination with V932 was well-tolerated without any serious adverse events. In both studies, the most common vaccine-related side effects were injection site reactions and arthralgias. No measurable cell-mediated immune response (CMI) to CEA or HER2 was detected in patients by ELISPOT; however, a significant increase of both cell-mediated immunity and antibody titer against the bacterial heat labile toxin were observed upon vaccination. Conclusion V930 vaccination alone or in combination with V932 was well tolerated without any vaccine-related serious adverse effects, and was able to induce measurable immune responses against bacterial antigen. However, the prime-boost strategy did not appear to augment any detectable CMI responses against either CEA or HER2. Trial registration Study 1 – ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00250419; Study 2 – ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00647114. PMID:23497415

  2. [Dynamic expression profile of HBsAg according to hepatic parenchyma cells' volume at different liver fibrosis stages in the immune clearance phase].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhe-bin; Cao, Hong; Liu, Ting; Wu, Ze-qian; Ke, Wei-min; Gao, Zhi-liang

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the dynamic expression profile of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) according to hepatic parenchyma cells' volume at different stages of liver fibrosis during the immune clearance phase. Eighty-nine patients with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in the immune clearance stage were recruited for study. Each patient's serum HBsAg levels were detected by electrochemiluminescence. The serum HBsAg levels were apportioned according to hepatic parenchyma cells' volume at liver fibrosis stages 1, 2, 3, and 4 and compared by ANOVA. The unapportioned serum HBsAg levels (IU/mL) at liver fibrosis stages 1 (227.2+/-237.7), 2 (211.0+/-131.4), 3(300.1+/-144.6), and 4 (278.7+/-148.8) were not significantly different (all comparisons, P range: 0.061 to 0.759). However, when the serum HBsAg levels were apportioned by the same hepatic parenchyma cells' volume at liver fibrosis stages 1 (343.9+/-359.8), 2 (336.4+/-209.5), 3 (508.7+/-245.1), and 4 (525.2+/-274.8), the levels were significantly different (all comparisons, F = 3.045 and P = 0.033; stage 1 vs. 3, P = 0.041; stage 1 vs. 4, P = 0.046; stage 2 vs. 3, P = 0.028; stage 2 vs. 4, P = 0.034). During the immune clearance phase of chronic hepatitis B, increased HBsAg expression is associated with increased hepatic parenchyma cells' volume and progressive liver fibrosis stage.

  3. Absence of the Yeast Hsp31 Chaperones of the DJ-1 Superfamily Perturbs Cytoplasmic Protein Quality Control in Late Growth Phase

    PubMed Central

    Amm, Ingo; Norell, Derrick; Wolf, Dieter H.

    2015-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae heat shock proteins Hsp31, Hsp32, Hsp33 and Hsp34 belong to the DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily which includes the human protein DJ-1 (PARK7) as the most prominent member. Mutations in the DJ-1 gene are directly linked to autosomal recessive, early-onset Parkinson’s disease. DJ-1 acts as an oxidative stress-induced chaperone preventing aggregation and fibrillation of α-synuclein, a critical factor in the development of the disease. In vivo assays in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the model substrate ΔssCPY*Leu2myc (ΔssCL*myc) as an aggregation-prone misfolded cytoplasmic protein revealed an influence of the Hsp31 chaperone family on the steady state level of this substrate. In contrast to the ubiquitin ligase of the N-end rule pathway Ubr1, which is known to be prominently involved in the degradation process of misfolded cytoplasmic proteins, the absence of the Hsp31 chaperone family does not impair the degradation of newly synthesized misfolded substrate. Also degradation of substrates with strong affinity to Ubr1 like those containing the type 1 N-degron arginine is not affected by the absence of the Hsp31 chaperone family. Epistasis analysis indicates that one function of the Hsp31 chaperone family resides in a pathway overlapping with the Ubr1-dependent degradation of misfolded cytoplasmic proteins. This pathway gains relevance in late growth phase under conditions of nutrient limitation. Additionally, the Hsp31 chaperones seem to be important for maintaining the cellular Ssa Hsp70 activity which is important for Ubr1-dependent degradation. PMID:26466368

  4. Evidence of Significant Energy Input in the Late Phase of a Solar Flare from NuSTAR X-Ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Säm; Hannah, Iain G.; Glesener, Lindsay; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Hudson, Hugh S.; White, Stephen M.; Smith, David M.; Marsh, Andrew J.; Wright, Paul J.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2017-01-01

    We present observations of the occulted active region AR 12222 during the third Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) solar campaign on 2014 December 11, with concurrent Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/AIA and FOXSI-2 sounding rocket observations. The active region produced a medium-size solar flare 1 day before the observations, at ∼18 UT on 2014 December 10, with the post-flare loops still visible at the time of NuSTAR observations. The time evolution of the source emission in the SDO/AIA 335 Å channel reveals the characteristics of an extreme-ultraviolet late-phase event, caused by the continuous formation of new post-flare loops that arch higher and higher in the solar corona. The spectral fitting of NuSTAR observations yields an isothermal source, with temperature 3.8–4.6 MK, emission measure (0.3–1.8) × 1046 cm‑3, and density estimated at (2.5–6.0) × 108 cm‑3. The observed AIA fluxes are consistent with the derived NuSTAR temperature range, favoring temperature values in the range of 4.0–4.3 MK. By examining the post-flare loops’ cooling times and energy content, we estimate that at least 12 sets of post-flare loops were formed and subsequently cooled between the onset of the flare and NuSTAR observations, with their total thermal energy content an order of magnitude larger than the energy content at flare peak time. This indicates that the standard approach of using only the flare peak time to derive the total thermal energy content of a flare can lead to a large underestimation of its value.

  5. A Two-Phase Case-Control Study of Autism Risk Among Children Born From the Late 1990s Through the Early 2000s in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Geier, David A.; Kern, Janet K.; Geier, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the hypothesis that the 1999 recommendation by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and US Public Health Service (PHS) to reduce exposure to mercury (Hg) from Thimerosal in US vaccines would be associated with a reduction in the long-term risk of being diagnosed with autism. Material/Methods A two-phase assessment utilizing a case (n=73) -control (n=11,783) study in the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) database (for hypothesis generating) and a more rigorous, independent matched case (n=40) -control (n=40) study (hypothesis testing) was undertaken. Results Analysis of the VAERS database using logistic regression revealed that the odds ratio (OR) for being an autism case in the VAERS database significantly decreased with a more recent year of vaccination in comparison to controls (OR=0.65) from 1998 to 2003. Sex-separated analyses revealed similar significant effects for males (OR=0.62) and females (OR=0.71). Analyses of the matched case-control data revealed, using the t-test statistic, that the mean date of birth among cases diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (2000.5±1.2) was significantly more in the past than in controls (2001.1±1.3). Logistic regression also revealed that the OR for being diagnosed with ASD significantly decreased with a more recent date of birth in comparison to controls (OR=0.67) from 1998–2003. Conclusions This study reveals that the risk of autism during from the late1990s to early 2000s in the US significantly decreased with reductions in Hg exposure from Thimerosal-containing childhood vaccines, but future studies should examine this phenomenon in other US populations. Vaccine programs have significantly reduced the morbidity and mortality associated with infectious disease, but Thimerosal should be removed from all vaccines.

  6. Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Immune System KidsHealth > For Teens > Immune System A A A ... could put us out of commission. What the Immune System Does The immune (pronounced: ih-MYOON) system, which ...

  7. First principles studies of the dependence of magnetism on the crystal phase in 4d and 5d late transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüger, E.; Osuch, K.

    2005-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of inducing ferromagnetic order in 4d and 5d late transition metals through crystal symmetry change. First principles, self-consistent density functional theory calculations, with spin-orbit coupling included, performed at 0 K show that ferromagnetism occurs in the bulk of Rh and Pd at the optimum lattice constant if Rh is in the bcc and Pd in the hcp/dhcp phase. The ferromagnetic order originates in the d-band occupancy of Rh or Pd which locates the Fermi energy at the top of the highest peak of the respective (paramagnetic) density of states induced by the bcc or hcp/dhcp structure. This peak in the density of states is caused by flat bands which lie at the surface of the respective Brillouin zone. For a bcc crystal these flat bands have the eg character and are positioned at the surface of the bcc Brillouin zone along the N-P line. The origin of the flatness of the bands was found to be the translation symmetry of the cubic lattice which causes the bands with the eg character to be narrow along the k-lines whose k-vector directions are furthest off the directions to which the orbitals of the eg symmetry point. Due to the d-band occupancy of Rh these flat bands lie in the paramagnetic state at the Fermi energy, whereas in the ferromagnetic state they exhibit the largest energetic split. This indicates that a smaller degree of orbital overlap narrows electronic bands enhancing the tendency of the system for ferromagnetic band split. For the hcp/dhcp structure the states contributing to the high density of para-magnetic states at the Fermi level of Pd lie in the vicinity of the M-L line of the hcp Brillouin zone boundary, which possesses a high number of symmetry (M and L) points. Moreover, the M-L line is aligned with the stacking sequence direction ([0001]) which is furthest off the densest-packed atomic chain direction of an hcp-crystal and, consequently, the weakest-bond direction in the crystal. This makes the narrow bands along

  8. Vaccine generated immunity targets an HPV16 E7 HLA-A2.1-restricted CD8(+) T cell epitope relocated to an early gene or a late gene of the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) genome in HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bounds, Callie E; Hu, Jiafen; Cladel, Nancy M; Balogh, Karla; Christensen, Neil D

    2011-02-01

    The newly established HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbit model has proven useful for testing the immunogenicity of well known and computer-predicted A2-restricted epitopes. In the current study we compared the protective immunity induced to a preferred HPV16 E7 A2-restricted epitope that has been relocated to positions within the CRPV E7 gene and the CRPV L2 gene. Epitope expression from both the E7 protein and the L2 protein resulted in increased protection against viral DNA challenge of the HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits as compared to control-vaccinated rabbit groups. These data indicate that proteins expressed at both early and late time points during a natural papillomavirus infection can be targeted by epitope-specific immunity and indicate this immunity is increased to early rather than late expressed proteins of papillomaviruses. This study also highlights the broad utility of the HLAA2.1 transgenic rabbit model for testing numerous immunological factors involved in vaccine generated protective immunity.

  9. A preliminary fMRI study of a novel self-paced written fluency task: observation of left-hemispheric activation, and increased frontal activation in late vs. early task phases

    PubMed Central

    Golestanirad, Laleh; Das, Sunit; Schweizer, Tom A.; Graham, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychological tests of verbal fluency are very widely used to characterize impaired cognitive function. For clinical neuroscience studies and potential medical applications, measuring the brain activity that underlies such tests with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is of significant interest—but a challenging proposition because overt speech can cause signal artifacts, which tend to worsen as the duration of speech tasks becomes longer. In a novel approach, we present the group brain activity of 12 subjects who performed a self-paced written version of phonemic fluency using fMRI-compatible tablet technology that recorded responses and provided task-related feedback on a projection screen display, over long-duration task blocks (60 s). As predicted, we observed robust activation in the left anterior inferior and medial frontal gyri, consistent with previously reported results of verbal fluency tasks which established the role of these areas in strategic word retrieval. In addition, the number of words produced in the late phase (last 30 s) of written phonemic fluency was significantly less (p < 0.05) than the number produced in the early phase (first 30 s). Activation during the late phase vs. the early phase was also assessed from the first 20 s and last 20 s of task performance, which eliminated the possibility that the sluggish hemodynamic response from the early phase would affect the activation estimates of the late phase. The last 20 s produced greater activation maps covering extended areas in bilateral precuneus, cuneus, middle temporal gyrus, insula, middle frontal gyrus and cingulate gyrus. Among these areas, greater activation was observed in the bilateral middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann area BA 9) and cingulate gyrus (BA 24, 32) likely as part of the initiation, maintenance, and shifting of attentional resources. Consistent with previous pertinent fMRI literature involving overt and covert verbal responses, these findings highlight

  10. Angiogenin is upregulated during the alloreactive immune response and has no effect on the T-cell expansion phase, whereas it affects the contraction phase by inhibiting CD4+ T-cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Sounidaki, Maria; Antoniadis, Nikolaos; Antoniadi, Georgia; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Under growth conditions, angiogenin is translocated into the nucleus, where it enhances ribosomal RNA transcription, facilitating increased protein synthesis and cellular proliferation. During stress conditions, angiogenin is sequestered in the cytoplasm, where it cleaves transfer RNA (tRNA) to produce tRNA-derived, stress-induced small RNAs (tiRNAs) that inhibit global protein synthesis, but increase the translation of anti-apoptotic factors. In the present study, the role of angiogenin in the human alloreactive immune response was evaluated using mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs) and neamine, an inhibitor of angiogenin nuclear translocation. In MLRs, angiogenin production was significantly (P<0.001) increased compared with resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The addition of neamine had no effect on cell proliferation, but did significantly (P<0.001) increase expression of Bcl-2-associated X protein and protein levels of activated caspase-3 in CD4+ T-cells isolated from the MLRs, indicating that angiogenin reduces apoptosis. In conclusion, angiogenin is upregulated during the alloreactive immune response, in which it does not affect the T-cell expansion phase, but inhibits the T-cell contraction phase by protecting against CD4+ T-cell apoptosis. PMID:27882181

  11. Participation of Women and Sex Analyses in Late-Phase Clinical Trials of New Molecular Entity Drugs and Biologics Approved by the FDA in 2007–2009

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Rita; Khanijow, Keshav; Umarjee, Sphoorti; Yu, Monica; Zhang, Lei; Parekh, Ameeta

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Biological sex differences may contribute to differential treatment outcomes for therapeutic products. This study tracks women's participation in late-phase clinical trials (LPCTs), where efficacy and safety of drugs and biologics are evaluated, of new molecular entity (NME) drugs and biologics approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2007–2009. Furthermore, presentations of sex-based analyses were assessed from the FDA reviews. Methods New drug applications (NDAs) and biologics license applications (BLAs) were accessed from the U.S. FDA database and evaluated for women's participation in LPCTs. Sex-based analyses for efficacy and safety contained in FDA reviews were surveyed. Ratios for women's LPCT participation (PROPORTION OF STUDY SUBJECTS) to their proportion in the disease population were calculated for each approved therapeutic product and grouped into therapeutic categories. Results Sex-specific (n=5) and pediatric (n=3) drug applications were excluded. Women's participation in LPCTs was 39%, 48%, and 42% in NDAs (n=50) and 49%, 62%, and 58% in BLAs (n=11) for 2007, 2008, and 2009, respectively. Sixty-four percent of NDAs and 91% of BLAs had participation to proportion ratios of ≥0.80. Seventy-four percent of NDA reviews and 64% of BLA reviews included safety and efficacy sex analysis. Ninety-six percent of NDA reviews and 100% of BLA reviews included efficacy sex analysis. Conclusion Women's participation in LPCTs averaged 43% for NDAs and 57% for BLAs in 2007–2009 and varied widely by indication. As a comparison, the 2001 U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) reported 52% of women's participation for drug clinical trials in1998–2000 and an FDA study reported 45% for BLAs approved from 1995 to 1999. This study showed that sex-analysis of both safety and efficacy in NDA has increased to 74% since the GAO report of 72%, while those for BLAs increased to 64% from 37% reported for therapeutic biologics

  12. The effects of phytase and root hydroalcoholic extract of Withania somnifera on productive performance and bone mineralisation of laying hens in the late phase of production.

    PubMed

    Tahmasbi, A M; Mirakzehi, M T; Hosseini, S J; Agah, M J; Fard, M Kazemi

    2012-01-01

    1. A 6-week study was conducted to investigate the effects of phytase and hydroalcoholic extract of Withania somnifera root (WS) on productive performance and bone mineralisation of laying hens in the late phase of production. 2. Diets were arranged factorially (3 × 2 × 2) and consisted of a positive control with adequate Ca (4·37%) and nonphytate P (NPP; 0·39%) and a negative control diet with Ca (4·06%) and NPP (0·36 %); three concentrations of Withania somnifera (0, 65 and 130 mg/kg diet); and two concentrations of microbial phytase (0 and 300 U/kg diet). 3. A total of 144 72-week-old Hy-Line W36 laying hens were randomly assigned to the 12 treatment groups. Each treatment was replicated 4 times (4 x 3 hens). Egg production and egg weight were recorded daily, while feed intake and egg quality traits were recorded every two weeks. Bone quality traits were evaluated at the end of experiment. 4. Withania somnifera supplementation increased egg production and lowered egg weight only in the second two weeks of the experiment. Addition of phytase significantly depressed specific gravity of the eggs for the entire experiment period. No dietary treatment effects were observed on egg shell thickness and yolk weight. 5. Withania somnifera at 130 mg/kg did not affect feed intake. The hens fed on the positive control diet had higher albumen weight than the negative control diet in the second two-week period. Supplementation of the positive control diet with 65 mg/kg Withania somnifera in the absence of phytase significantly improved shell weight compared with the negative control (5·779 vs. 5·273 g respectively). 6. Supplementing Withania somnifera significantly improved Ca and P retention in tibia bone. In addition, an increase in tibia bone P was observed with phytase supplementation. There were significant interactions between Withania somnifera content and phytase for tibia bone Ca and P. 7. The results of this experiment indicated that dietary

  13. Quasispecies tropism and compartmentalization in gut and peripheral blood during early and chronic phases of HIV-1 infection: possible correlation with immune activation markers.

    PubMed

    Rozera, G; Abbate, I; Vlassi, C; Giombini, E; Lionetti, R; Selleri, M; Zaccaro, P; Bartolini, B; Corpolongo, A; D'Offizi, G; Baiocchini, A; Del Nonno, F; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2014-03-01

    HIV quasispecies was analysed in plasma and proviral genomes hosted by duodenal mucosa and peripheral blood cells (PBMC) from patients with early or chronic infection, with respect to viral heterogeneity, tropism compartmentalization and extent of immune activation. Seventeen HIV-1-infected combined antiretroviral therapy naive patients were enrolled (11 early infection and six chronic infection). V3 and nef genomic regions were analysed by ultra-deep pyrosequencing. Sequences were used to infer co-receptor usage and to construct phylogenetic trees. As markers of immune activation, plasma sCD14 and soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor II (sTNFRII) levels were measured. Median diversity of HIV RNA was lower in patients with early infection versus chronic infection patients. Overall, direct correlation was observed between V3 diversity and X4 frequency; V3 diversity of HIV RNA was inversely correlated with CD4 T-cell count; median sCD14 and sTNFRII values were similar in early and chronic patients, but X4 frequency of HIV RNA was directly correlated with plasma sCD14. The proportion of patients harbouring X4 variants and median intra-patient X4 frequency of proviral genomes tended to be higher in chronic infection than early infection patients. More pronounced compartmentalization of proviral quasispecies in gut compared with PBMC samples was observed in patients with early infection compared with chronic patients. The loss of gut/PBMC compartmentalization in more advanced stages of HIV infection was confirmed by longitudinal observation. More studies are needed to understand the pathogenetic significance of early HIV quasispecies compartmentalization and progressive intermixing of viral variants in subsequent phases of the infection, as well as the role of immune activation in tropism switch.

  14. Focal Transient CNS Vessel Leak Provides a Tissue Niche for Sequential Immune Cell Accumulation during the Asymptomatic Phase of EAE Induction

    PubMed Central

    Barkauskas, Deborah S.; Dorand, R. Dixon; Myers, Jay T.; Evans, Teresa A.; Barkauskas, Kestutis J.; Askew, David; Purgert, Robert; Huang, Alex Y.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral immune cells are critical to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS) (Hendriks et al., 2005; Kasper and Shoemaker, 2010). However, the precise sequence of tissue events during the early asymptomatic induction phase of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) pathogenesis remains poorly defined. Due to the spatial-temporal constrains of traditional methods used to study this disease, most studies had been performed in the spine during peak clinical disease; thus the debate continues as to whether tissue changes such as vessel disruption represents a cause or a byproduct of EAE pathophysiology in the cortex. Here, we provide dynamic, high-resolution information on the evolving structural and cellular processes within the grey matter of the mouse cortex during the first 12 asymptomatic days of EAE induction. We observed that transient focal vessel disruptions precede microglia activation, followed by infiltration of and directed interaction between circulating dendritic cells and T cells. Histamine antagonist minimizes but not completely ameliorates blood vessel leak. Histamine H1 receptor blockade prevents early microglia function, resulting in subsequent reduction in immune cell accumulation, disease incidence and clinical severity. PMID:25708987

  15. Late results.

    PubMed

    Daly, B D

    1999-08-01

    Pneumonectomy is performed for a number of benign and malignant conditions. It is most commonly performed for lung cancer. Adjuvant and neoadjuvant protocols have increased the number of these operations being performed and the long-term results are improving. Pneumonectomy may also be performed for metastases to lung and for mesothelioma with encouraging results. Some bronchial adenomas require pneumonectomy. Treatment of resistant mycobacteria or the complications of tuberculosis frequently require pneumonectomy. Late bronchopleural fistulae, esophagopleural fistulae, and empyema may occur.

  16. Acute and Late Toxicity After Dose Escalation to 82 GyE Using Conformal Proton Radiation for Localized Prostate Cancer: Initial Report of American College of Radiology Phase II Study 03-12

    SciTech Connect

    Coen, John J.; Bae, Kyounghwa; Zietman, Anthony L.; Patel, Baldev; Shipley, William U.; Slater, Jerry D.; Rossi, Carl J.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Several randomized trials have shown a benefit of dose escalation to 78 to 79 Gy for men treated with external radiation for localized prostate cancer. Single-institution data suggest a benefit with even higher doses. American College of Radiology 03-12 is a Phase II trial testing the safety and efficacy of 82 GyE (Gray equivalent) delivered with conformal proton radiation. Methods and Materials: From 2003-2006, 85 men with localized prostate cancer were accrued to American College of Radiology 03-12. Eighty-four were eligible for analysis. They were treated with conformal proton radiation alone to a total dose of 82 GyE. The study was designed to test whether the rate of 18-month Grade 3+ late toxicity was greater than 10%. Results: The median follow-up was 31.6 months. Regarding treatment-related acute toxicity, there were 39 Grade 1 cases (46%), 19 Grade 2 cases (23%) and 2 Grade 3 cases (2%). Regarding genitourinary/gastrointestinal toxicity, there were 42 Grade 1 cases (50%), 12 Grade 2 cases (14%) and 1 Grade 3 case (1%). Regarding late toxicity, there were 28 Grade 1 cases (33%), 22 Grade 2 cases (26%), 6 Grade 3 cases (7%), and 1 Grade 4 case (1%). The late genitourinary/gastrointestinal rates were the same. The estimated rate of Grade 3+ late toxicity at 18 months was 6.08%. Conclusions: Although not free of late toxicity, 82 GyE at 2 GyE per fraction delivered with conformal proton radiation did not exceed the late morbidity target tested in this trial. There was sufficient morbidity, however, that this may be the maximal dose that can be delivered safely with this technique and fractionation.

  17. Remission and platelet responses with romiplostim in primary immune thrombocytopenia: final results from a phase 2 study.

    PubMed

    Newland, Adrian; Godeau, Bertrand; Priego, Victor; Viallard, Jean-Francois; López Fernández, María F; Orejudos, Amelia; Eisen, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    In anecdotal reports, some patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) maintained platelet counts after discontinuing romiplostim. Here, we examined rates of platelet response (≥50 × 10(9) /l), remission, splenectomy and adverse events in patients with primary ITP duration ≤6 months who were treated with romiplostim for ≤12 months. The starting dose of romiplostim was 1 μg/kg; concomitant and rescue treatments were permitted to maintain platelet counts. Patients with platelet counts ≥50 × 10(9) /l at the end of 12 months entered a dose taper in which the romiplostim dose was decreased as long as platelet counts were maintained. Remission (platelet count ≥50 × 10(9) /l for 24 consecutive weeks with no ITP treatments) was evaluated in patients once romiplostim was discontinued. Over the 12 months, a high response rate (>90%) was observed. Platelet response occurred quickly (median, ~2 weeks) and was observed for a cumulative median of 11 months. Remission was observed in 24 patients (32%); there were no significantly predictors of remission. Most (20/24) patients had remission start before the forced taper. No new safety signals were identified. Thus, in patients with early-stage ITP, romiplostim was well tolerated and induced rapid responses, with remission occurring in approximately one-third of patients (NCT01143038, Amgen 20080435).

  18. Immune Thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Immune Thrombocytopenia? Immune thrombocytopenia (THROM-bo-si-toe-PE-ne- ... from one person to another. Types of Immune Thrombocytopenia The two types of ITP are acute (temporary ...

  19. Differential regulation of C5a receptor 1 in innate immune cells during the allergic asthma effector phase

    PubMed Central

    Schmudde, Inken; Sun, Jing; Vollbrandt, Tillman; König, Peter; Köhl, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    C5a drives airway constriction and inflammation during the effector phase of allergic asthma, mainly through the activation of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1). Yet, C5aR1 expression on myeloid and lymphoid cells during the allergic effector phase is ill-defined. Recently, we generated and characterized a floxed green fluorescent protein (GFP)-C5aR1 knock-in mouse. Here, we used this reporter strain to monitor C5aR1 expression in airway, pulmonary and lymph node cells during the effector phase of OVA-driven allergic asthma. C5aR1 reporter and wildtype mice developed a similar allergic phenotype with comparable airway resistance, mucus production, eosinophilic/neutrophilic airway inflammation and Th2/Th17 cytokine production. During the allergic effector phase, C5aR1 expression increased in lung tissue eosinophils but decreased in airway and pulmonary macrophages as well as in pulmonary CD11b+ conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) and monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs). Surprisingly, expression in neutrophils was not affected. Of note, moDCs but not CD11b+ cDCs from mediastinal lymph nodes (mLN) expressed less C5aR1 than DCs residing in the lung after OVA challenge. Finally, neither CD103+ cDCs nor cells of the lymphoid lineage such as Th2 or Th17-differentiated CD4+ T cells, B cells or type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2) expressed C5aR1 under allergic conditions. Our findings demonstrate a complex regulation pattern of C5aR1 in the airways, lung tissue and mLN of mice, suggesting that the C5a/C5aR1 axis controls airway constriction and inflammation through activation of myeloid cells in all three compartments in an experimental model of allergic asthma. PMID:28231307

  20. Surficial Geologic Mapping Using Digital Techniques Reveals Late-Phase Basin Evolution and Role of Paleoclimate, Death Valley Junction 30' × 60' Quadrangle, California and Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slate, J.; Berry, M.; Menges, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    levels, abandoning and incising older alluvial units, thus preserving them on the footwall block of the fault. In tectonically inactive areas, streams continue to grade to the same level or aggrade, thus progressively burying older alluvial units. Therefore, map pattern of alluvial units is an important tool to evaluate late-phase basin evolution in the Basin and Range province. Determining the age of these alluvial units enables us to examine the role of paleoclimate during deposition. Six terrestrial cosmogenic-nuclide (TCN) 36Cl depth-profile dates of unit Qai fans along the west side of Death Valley range from about 40 ka to 100 ka (with a mean age of about 65 ka) and thus post-date the marine oxygen-isotope stage (MIS) 6 cycle of Pleistocene Lake Manly, but predate the lesser, MIS 2 successor. TCN 36Cl depth-profile dating establishes the age of a lacustrine bar complex at 30 m above sea level on the north side of Hanaupah Canyon to be 130 (+75/-39) ka and correlates with a deep lake at MIS 6. This bar predates units mapped as Qai and thus provides an important stratigraphic datum.

  1. Phase II, randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a polyclonal anti-Staphylococcus aureus capsular polysaccharide immune globulin in treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Mark E; Holley, H Preston; Lutz, Jon; Dicpinigaitis, Peter V; Woods, Christopher W; Levine, Donald P; Veney, Naomi; Fowler, Vance G

    2007-12-01

    New treatment modalities are needed for the treatment of infections due to multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus capsular polysaccharide immune globulin (Altastaph) is a polyclonal immune globulin preparation that is being developed as adjunctive therapy for persons with S. aureus infections complicated by bacteremia. In a phase II, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 40 subjects with documented S. aureus bacteremia received standard therapy plus either Altastaph at 200 mg/kg of body weight in each of two infusions 24 h apart or placebo. During the 42-day observation period, antibody pharmacokinetics and safety were the primary characteristics studied. Information regarding the resolution of bacteremia and fever was also analyzed. Anti-type-5 and anti-type-8 capsular antibody levels peaked after the second infusion at 550 mug/ml and 419 mug/ml, respectively, and remained above 100 mug/ml at day 28. A total of 316 adverse events were noted in 39 of 40 subjects. Infusion-related adverse events in Altastaph recipients were infrequent and similar to those among recipients of commercial intravenously administered immunoglobulin G products. Five of 21 (23%) subjects in the Altastaph group died, whereas 2 of 18 (11%) subjects in the placebo group died (P = 0.42). Compared to the control patients, the Altastaph recipients had a shorter median time to the resolution of fever (2 days and 7 days, respectively; P = 0.09) and a shorter length of hospital stay (9 days and 14 days, respectively; P = 0.03). However, these findings are exploratory, and there were few differences in the other variables measured. High levels of opsonizing antibodies were maintained for the initial 4 weeks. Although the study was not powered to show efficacy, these preliminary findings and safety profile suggest that Altastaph may be an effective adjunct to antibiotics and warrants further investigation (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00063089).

  2. Interaction of Host Nucleolin with Influenza A Virus Nucleoprotein in the Early Phase of Infection Limits the Late Viral Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepshikha; Broor, Shobha; Rajala, Maitreyi S.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus nucleoprotein, is a multifunctional RNA-binding protein, encoded by segment-5 of the negative sense RNA genome. It serves as a key connector between the virus and the host during virus replication. It continuously shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus interacting with various host cellular factors. In the current study, host proteins interacting with nucleoprotein of Influenza A virus of H1N1 2009 pandemic strain were identified by co-immunoprecipitation studies followed by MALDI-TOF/MS analysis. Here we report the host nucleolin, a major RNA-binding protein of the nucleolus as a novel interacting partner to influenza A virus nucleoprotein. We thus, explored the implications of this interaction in virus life cycle and our studies have shown that these two proteins interact early during infection in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Depletion of nucleolin in A549 cells by siRNA targeting endogenous nucleolin followed by influenza A virus infection, disrupted its interaction with viral nucleoprotein, resulting in increased expression of gene transcripts encoding late viral proteins; matrix (M1) and hemagglutinin (HA) in infected cells. On the contrary, over expression of nucleolin in cells transiently transfected with pEGFP-NCL construct followed by virus infection significantly reduced the late viral gene transcripts, and consequently the viral titer. Altered expression of late viral genes and titers following manipulation of host cellular nucleolin, proposes the functional importance of its interaction with nucleoprotein during influenza A virus infection. PMID:27711134

  3. Randomized controlled phase I/II study to investigate immune stimulatory effects by low dose radiotherapy in primarily operable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The efficiencies of T cell based immunotherapies are affected by insufficient migration and activation of tumor specific effector T cells in the tumor. Accumulating evidence exists on the ability of ionizing radiation to modify the tumor microenvironment and generate inflammation. The aim of this phase I/II clinical trial is to evaluate whether low dose single fraction radiotherapy can improve T cell associated antitumor immune response in patients with pancreatic cancer. Methods/Design This trial has been designed as an investigator initiated; prospective randomised, 4-armed, controlled Phase I/II trial. Patients who are candidates for resection of pancreatic cancer will be randomized into 4 arms. A total of 40 patients will be enrolled. The patients receive 0 Gy, 0.5 Gy, 2 Gy or 5 Gy radiation precisely targeted to their pancreatic carcinoma. Radiation will be delivered by external beam radiotherapy using a 6 MV Linac with IMRT technique 48 h prior to the surgical resection. The primary objective is the determination of an active local external beam radiation dose, leading to tumor infiltrating T cells as a surrogate parameter for antitumor activity. Secondary objectives include local tumor control and recurrence patterns, survival, radiogenic treatment toxicity and postoperative morbidity and mortality, as well as quality of life. Further, frequencies of tumor reactive T cells in blood and bone marrow as well as whole blood cell transcriptomics and plasma-proteomics will be correlated with clinical outcome. An interim analysis will be performed after the enrolment of 20 patients for safety reasons. The evaluation of the primary endpoint will start four weeks after the last patient's enrolment. Discussion This trial will answer the question whether a low dose radiotherapy localized to the pancreatic tumor only can increase the number of tumor infiltrating T cells and thus potentially enhance the antitumor immune response. The study will also

  4. The effects of a rhythm and music-based therapy program and therapeutic riding in late recovery phase following stroke: a study protocol for a three-armed randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stroke represents one of the most costly and long-term disabling conditions in adulthood worldwide and there is a need to determine the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs in the late phase after stroke. Limited scientific support exists for training incorporating rhythm and music as well as therapeutic riding and well-designed trials to determine the effectiveness of these treatment modalities are warranted. Methods/Design A single blinded three-armed randomized controlled trial is described with the aim to evaluate whether it is possible to improve the overall health status and functioning of individuals in the late phase of stroke (1-5 years after stroke) through a rhythm and music-based therapy program or therapeutic riding. About 120 individuals will be consecutively and randomly allocated to one of three groups: (T1) rhythm and music-based therapy program; (T2) therapeutic riding; or (T3) control group receiving the T1 training program a year later. Evaluation is conducted prior to and after the 12-week long intervention as well as three and six months later. The evaluation comprises a comprehensive functional and cognitive assessment (both qualitative and quantitative), and questionnaires. Based on the International classification of functioning, disability, and health (ICF), the outcome measures are classified into six comprehensive domains, with participation as the primary outcome measure assessed by the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS, version 2.0.). The secondary outcome measures are grouped within the following domains: body function, activity, environmental factors and personal factors. Life satisfaction and health related quality of life constitute an additional domain. Current status A total of 84 participants were randomised and have completed the intervention. Recruitment proceeds and follow-up is on-going, trial results are expected in early 2014. Discussion This study will ascertain whether any of the two intervention programs can

  5. Integrated Immune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarnece

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the program to replace several recent studies about astronaut immune systems with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling. The study will address lack of in-flight data to determine the inflight status of immune systems, physiological stress, viral immunity, to determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight, and to determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  6. Late Patient-Reported Toxicity After Preoperative Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Nonresectable Rectal Cancer: Results From a Randomized Phase III Study

    SciTech Connect

    Braendengen, Morten; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Bruheim, Kjersti; Cvancarova, Milada; Berglund, Ake; Glimelius, Bengt

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is superior to radiotherapy (RT) in locally advanced rectal cancer, but the survival gain is limited. Late toxicity is, therefore, important. The aim was to compare late bowel, urinary, and sexual functions after CRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 207) with nonresectable rectal cancer were randomized to preoperative CRT or RT (2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25 {+-} 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin). Extended surgery was often required. Self-reported late toxicity was scored according to the LENT SOMA criteria in a structured telephone interview and with questionnaires European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), and sexual function -vaginal changes questionnaire (SVQ). Results: Of the 105 patients alive in Norway and Sweden after 4 to 12 years of follow-up, 78 (74%) responded. More patients in the CRT group had received a stoma (73% vs. 52%, p = 0.09). Most patients without a stoma (7 of 12 in CRT group and 9 of 16 in RT group) had incontinence for liquid stools or gas. No stoma and good anal function were seen in 5 patients (11%) in the CRT group and in 11 (30%) in the RT group (p = 0.046). Of 44 patients in the CRT group, 12 (28%) had had bowel obstruction compared with 5 of 33 (15%) in the RT group (p = 0.27). One-quarter of the patients reported urinary incontinence. The majority of men had severe erectile dysfunction. Few women reported sexual activity during the previous month. However, the majority did not have concerns about their sex life. Conclusions: Fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction are frequent after combined treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. There was a clear tendency for the problems to be more common after CRT than after RT.

  7. Multi-Institutional Phase II Study of Proton Beam Therapy for Organ-Confined Prostate Cancer Focusing on the Incidence of Late Rectal Toxicities

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, Keiji; Ogino, Takashi; Onozawa, Masakatsu; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Fuji, Hiroshi; Murakami, Masao; Hishikawa, Yoshio

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Proton beam therapy (PBT) is theoretically an excellent modality for external beam radiotherapy, providing an ideal dose distribution. However, it is not clear whether PBT for prostate cancer can clinically control toxicities. The purpose of the present study was to estimate prospectively the incidence of late rectal toxicities after PBT for organ-confined prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: The major eligibility criteria included clinical Stage T1-T2N0M0; initial prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}20 ng/mL and Gleason score {<=}7; no hormonal therapy or hormonal therapy within 12 months before registration; and written informed consent. The primary endpoint was the incidence of late Grade 2 or greater rectal toxicity at 2 years. Three institutions in Japan participated in the present study after institutional review board approval from each. PBT was delivered to a total dose of 74 GyE in 37 fractions. The patients were prospectively followed up to collect the data on toxicities using the National Cancer Institute-Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0. Results: Between 2004 and 2007, 151 patients were enrolled in the present study. Of the 151 patients, 75, 49, 9, 17, and 1 had Stage T1c, T2a, T2b, T2c, and T3a, respectively. The Gleason score was 4, 5, 6, and 7 in 5, 15, 80 and 51 patients, respectively. The initial prostate-specific antigen level was <10 or 10-20 ng/mL in 102 and 49 patients, respectively, and 42 patients had received hormonal therapy and 109 had not. The median follow-up period was 43.4 months. Acute Grade 2 rectal and bladder toxicity temporarily developed in 0.7% and 12%, respectively. Of the 147 patients who had been followed up for >2 years, the incidence of late Grade 2 or greater rectal and bladder toxicity was 2.0% (95% confidence interval, 0-4.3%) and 4.1% (95% confidence interval, 0.9-7.3%) at 2 years, respectively. Conclusion: The results of the present prospective study have revealed a valuable piece of evidence that

  8. A Phase I Randomized Therapeutic MVA-B Vaccination Improves the Magnitude and Quality of the T Cell Immune Responses in HIV-1-Infected Subjects on HAART

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Carmen Elena; Perdiguero, Beatriz; García-Arriaza, Juan; Cepeda, Victoria; Sánchez-Sorzano, Carlos Óscar; Mothe, Beatriz; Jiménez, José Luis; Muñoz-Fernández, María Ángeles; Gatell, Jose M.; López Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Brander, Christian; García, Felipe; Esteban, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Trial Design Previous studies suggested that poxvirus-based vaccines might be instrumental in the therapeutic HIV field. A phase I clinical trial was conducted in HIV-1-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), with CD4 T cell counts above 450 cells/mm3 and undetectable viremia. Thirty participants were randomized (2:1) to receive either 3 intramuscular injections of MVA-B vaccine (coding for clade B HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens) or placebo, followed by interruption of HAART. Methods The magnitude, breadth, quality and phenotype of the HIV-1-specific T cell response were assayed by intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in 22 volunteers pre- and post-vaccination. Results MVA-B vaccine induced newly detected HIV-1-specific CD4 T cell responses and expanded pre-existing responses (mostly against Gag, Pol and Nef antigens) that were high in magnitude, broadly directed and showed an enhanced polyfunctionality with a T effector memory (TEM) phenotype, while maintaining the magnitude and quality of the pre-existing HIV-1-specific CD8 T cell responses. In addition, vaccination also triggered preferential CD8+ T cell polyfunctional responses to the MVA vector antigens that increase in magnitude after two and three booster doses. Conclusion MVA-B vaccination represents a feasible strategy to improve T cell responses in individuals with pre-existing HIV-1-specific immunity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01571466 PMID:26544853

  9. IL-12-dependent innate immunity arrests endothelial cells in G0-G1 phase by a p21(Cip1/Waf1)-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Napione, Lucia; Strasly, Marina; Meda, Claudia; Mitola, Stefania; Alvaro, Maria; Doronzo, Gabriella; Marchiò, Serena; Giraudo, Enrico; Primo, Luca; Arese, Marco; Bussolino, Federico

    2012-12-01

    Innate immunity may activate paracrine circuits able to entail vascular system in the onset and progression of several chronic degenerative diseases. In particular, interleukin (IL)-12 triggers a genetic program in lymphomononuclear cells characterized by the production of interferon-γ and specific chemokines resulting in an angiostatic activity. The aim of this study is to identify molecules involved in the regulation of cell cycle in endothelial cells co-cultured with IL-12-stimulated lymphomonuclear cells. By using a transwell mediated co-culture system we demonstrated that IL-12-stimulated lymphomonuclear cells induce an arrest of endothelial cells cycle in G1, which is mainly mediated by the up-regulation of p21(Cip1/Waf1), an inhibitor of cyclin kinases. This effect requires the activation of STAT1, PKCδ and p38 MAPK, while p53 is ineffective. In accordance, siRNA-dependent silencing of these molecules in endothelial cells inhibited the increase of p21(Cip1/Waf1) and the modification in cell cycle promoted by IL-12-stimulated lymphomonuclear cells. These results indicate that the angiostatic action of IL-12-stimulated lymphomononuclear cells may lie in the capability to arrest endothelial cells in G1 phase through a mechanisms mainly based on the specific up-regulation of p21(Cip1/Waf1) induced by the combined activity of STAT1, PKCδ and p38 MAPK.

  10. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) and 5 (mGluR5) regulate late phases of LTP and LTD in the hippocampal CA1 region in vitro.

    PubMed

    Neyman, Sergey; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2008-03-01

    The group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, mGluR1 and mGluR5, exhibit differences in their regulation of synaptic plasticity, suggesting that these receptors may subserve separate functional roles in information storage. In addition, although effects in vivo are consistently described, conflicting reports of the involvement of mGluRs in hippocampal synaptic plasticity in vitro exist. We therefore addressed the involvement of mGluR1 and mGluR5 in long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) in the hippocampal CA1 region of adult male rats in vitro. The mGluR1 antagonist (S)-(+)-alpha-amino-4-carboxy-2-methylbenzene-acetic acid (LY367385) impaired both induction and late phases of both LTP and LTD, when applied before high-frequency tetanization (HFT; 100 Hz) or low-frequency stimulation (LFS; 1 Hz), respectively. Application after either HFT or LFS had no effect. The mGluR5 antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP), when given before HFT, inhibited both the induction and late phases of LTP. When given after HFT, late LTP was inhibited. MPEP, given prior to LFS, impaired LTD induction, although stable LTD was still expressed. Application after LFS significantly impaired late phases of LTD. Activation of protein synthesis may comprise a key mechanism underlying the group I mGluR contribution to synaptic plasticity. The mGluR5 agonist (R,S)-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine (CHPG) converted short-term depression into LTD. Effects were prevented by application of the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin, suggesting that protein synthesis is triggered by group I mGluR activation to enable persistency of synaptic plasticity. Taken together, these data support the notion that both mGluR1 and mGluR5 are critically involved in bidirectional synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region and may enable functional differences in information encoding through LTP and LTD.

  11. Measurement of plasma human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and beta-hCG activities in the late luteal phase: evidence of the occurrence of spontaneous menstrual abortions in infertile women.

    PubMed

    Chartier, M; Roger, M; Barrat, J; Michelon, B

    1979-02-01

    Plasma luteinizing hormone (LH-human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and beta-hCG activities were measured during the late luteal phase in 321 cycles of 147 infertile women. In 71 cycles the hCG measurement permitted the diagnosis of pregnancy between the 10th and 14th days after the thermal nadir. The slope of the regression line derived from hCG levels during the first 22 days of pregnancy was significantly lower in pregnancies which aborted before the 60th day than in normal pregnancies (P less than 0.01). Among 72 cycles ended by apparently normal menses which exhibited an LH-hCG activity at least equal to 7 mIU of hCG/ml during the late luteal phase, the beta-hCG activity was measured in 49 cycles during which hCG had not been given. Significant beta-hCG activity (greater than or equal to 4 mIU of hCG/ml) was detected in 19 cases. This finding supports the assumption that secretory trophoblastic tissue had been present and that spontaneous menstrual abortions had occurred in these women.

  12. Immunization Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... and afford to pay for them. World Immunization Week The last week of April each year is marked by WHO and partners as World Immunization Week. It aims to accelerate action to increase awareness ...

  13. Lung irradiation increases mortality following influenza A virus challenge occurring late after exposure

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Casey M.; Johnston, Carl J.; Reed, Christina K.; Lawrence, B. Paige; Williams, Jacqueline P.; Finkelstein, Jacob N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Whole-body irradiated individuals are at increased risk of infection in the acute phase, whereas pulmonary complications are associated with late events. This study addressed whether irradiation-induced changes in the lung environment alter responses to a viral challenge delivered late after exposure, but prior to the appearance of late lung radiation injury. Methods and Materials C57BL/6 mice received either lung alone or combined lung + whole-body irradiation (0–15 Gy). At 10 weeks post-irradiation, animals were infected with 120 HAU influenza virus strain A/HKx31. Innate and adaptive immune cell recruitment was determined using flow cytometry. Cytokine and chemokine production and protein leakage into the lung following infection were assessed. Results Prior irradiation led to a dose-dependent failure to regain body weight post-infection, exacerbated mortality, but it did not affect virus-specific immune responses or virus clearance. Surviving irradiated animals displayed a persistent increase in total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and edema. Conclusions Lung irradiation increased susceptibility to death following infection with influenza virus and impaired the ability to complete recovery. This altered response does not appear due to a radiation effect on the immune response, but it may possibly be an effect on epithelial repair. PMID:23195776

  14. Different rates of DNA replication at early versus late S-phase sections: multiscale modeling of stochastic events related to DNA content/EdU (5-ethynyl-2'deoxyuridine) incorporation distributions.

    PubMed

    Li, Biao; Zhao, Hong; Rybak, Paulina; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Kimmel, Marek

    2014-09-01

    Mathematical modeling allows relating molecular events to single-cell characteristics assessed by multiparameter cytometry. In the present study we labeled newly synthesized DNA in A549 human lung carcinoma cells with 15-120 min pulses of EdU. All DNA was stained with DAPI and cellular fluorescence was measured by laser scanning cytometry. The frequency of cells in the ascending (left) side of the "horseshoe"-shaped EdU/DAPI bivariate distributions reports the rate of DNA replication at the time of entrance to S phase while their frequency in the descending (right) side is a marker of DNA replication rate at the time of transition from S to G2 phase. To understand the connection between molecular-scale events and scatterplot asymmetry, we developed a multiscale stochastic model, which simulates DNA replication and cell cycle progression of individual cells and produces in silico EdU/DAPI scatterplots. For each S-phase cell the time points at which replication origins are fired are modeled by a non-homogeneous Poisson Process (NHPP). Shifted gamma distributions are assumed for durations of cell cycle phases (G1, S and G2 M), Depending on the rate of DNA synthesis being an increasing or decreasing function, simulated EdU/DAPI bivariate graphs show predominance of cells in left (early-S) or right (late-S) side of the horseshoe distribution. Assuming NHPP rate estimated from independent experiments, simulated EdU/DAPI graphs are nearly indistinguishable from those experimentally observed. This finding proves consistency between the S-phase DNA-replication rate based on molecular-scale analyses, and cell population kinetics ascertained from EdU/DAPI scatterplots and demonstrates that DNA replication rate at entrance to S is relatively slow compared with its rather abrupt termination during S to G2 transition. Our approach opens a possibility of similar modeling to study the effect of anticancer drugs on DNA replication/cell cycle progression and also to quantify other

  15. Acute-phase protein α1-anti-trypsin: diverting injurious innate and adaptive immune responses from non-authentic threats

    PubMed Central

    Guttman, O; Baranovski, B M; Schuster, R; Kaner, Z; Freixo-Lima, G S; Bahar, N; Kalay, N; Mizrahi, M I; Brami, I; Ochayon, D E; Lewis, E C

    2015-01-01

    One would assume that the anti-inflammatory activity of α1-anti-trypsin (AAT) is the result of inhibiting neutrophil enzymes. However, AAT exhibits tolerogenic activities that are difficult to explain by serine-protease inhibition or by reduced inflammatory parameters. Targets outside the serine-protease family have been identified, supporting the notion that elastase inhibition, the only functional factory release criteria for clinical-grade AAT, is over-emphasized. Non-obvious developments in the understanding of AAT biology disqualify it from being a straightforward anti-inflammatory agent: AAT does not block dendritic cell activities, nor does it promote viral and tumour susceptibilities, stunt B lymphocyte responses or render treated patients susceptible to infections; accordingly, outcomes of elevated AAT do not overlap those attained by immunosuppression. Aside from the acute-phase response, AAT rises during the third trimester of pregnancy and also in advanced age. At the molecular level, AAT docks onto cholesterol-rich lipid-rafts and circulating lipid particles, directly binds interleukin (IL)-8, ADAM metallopeptidase domain 17 (ADAM17) and danger-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecules, and its activity is lost to smoke, high glucose levels and bacterial proteases, introducing a novel entity – ‘relative AAT deficiency’. Unlike immunosuppression, AAT appears to help the immune system to distinguish between desired responses against authentic threats, and unwanted responses fuelled by a positive feedback loop perpetuated by, and at the expense of, inflamed injured innocent bystander cells. With a remarkable clinical safety record, AAT treatment is currently tested in clinical trials for its potential benefit in a variety of categorically distinct pathologies that share at least one common driving force: cell injury. PMID:25351931

  16. Acute-phase protein α1-anti-trypsin: diverting injurious innate and adaptive immune responses from non-authentic threats.

    PubMed

    Guttman, O; Baranovski, B M; Schuster, R; Kaner, Z; Freixo-Lima, G S; Bahar, N; Kalay, N; Mizrahi, M I; Brami, I; Ochayon, D E; Lewis, E C

    2015-02-01

    One would assume that the anti-inflammatory activity of α1-anti-trypsin (AAT) is the result of inhibiting neutrophil enzymes. However, AAT exhibits tolerogenic activities that are difficult to explain by serine-protease inhibition or by reduced inflammatory parameters. Targets outside the serine-protease family have been identified, supporting the notion that elastase inhibition, the only functional factory release criteria for clinical-grade AAT, is over-emphasized. Non-obvious developments in the understanding of AAT biology disqualify it from being a straightforward anti-inflammatory agent: AAT does not block dendritic cell activities, nor does it promote viral and tumour susceptibilities, stunt B lymphocyte responses or render treated patients susceptible to infections; accordingly, outcomes of elevated AAT do not overlap those attained by immunosuppression. Aside from the acute-phase response, AAT rises during the third trimester of pregnancy and also in advanced age. At the molecular level, AAT docks onto cholesterol-rich lipid-rafts and circulating lipid particles, directly binds interleukin (IL)-8, ADAM metallopeptidase domain 17 (ADAM17) and danger-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecules, and its activity is lost to smoke, high glucose levels and bacterial proteases, introducing a novel entity - 'relative AAT deficiency'. Unlike immunosuppression, AAT appears to help the immune system to distinguish between desired responses against authentic threats, and unwanted responses fuelled by a positive feedback loop perpetuated by, and at the expense of, inflamed injured innocent bystander cells. With a remarkable clinical safety record, AAT treatment is currently tested in clinical trials for its potential benefit in a variety of categorically distinct pathologies that share at least one common driving force: cell injury.

  17. THERMAL EMISSION IN THE EARLY X-RAY AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: FOLLOWING THE PROMPT PHASE TO LATE TIMES

    SciTech Connect

    Friis, Mette; Watson, Darach E-mail: darach@dark-cosmology.dk

    2013-07-01

    Thermal radiation, peaking in soft X-rays, has now been detected in a handful of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows and has to date been interpreted as shock break-out of the GRB's progenitor star. We present a search for thermal emission in the early X-ray afterglows of a sample of Swift bursts selected by their brightness in X-rays at early times. We identify a clear thermal component in eight GRBs and track the evolution. We show that at least some of the emission must come from highly relativistic material since two show an apparent super-luminal expansion of the thermal component. Furthermore, we determine very large luminosities and high temperatures for many of the components-too high to originate in a supernova shock break-out. Instead, we suggest that the component may be modeled as late photospheric emission from the jet, linking it to the apparently thermal component observed in the prompt emission of some GRBs at gamma-ray and hard X-ray energies. By comparing the parameters from the prompt emission and the early afterglow emission, we find that the results are compatible with the interpretation that we are observing the prompt quasi-thermal emission component in soft X-rays at a later point in its evolution.

  18. Impacts of climate change on ground level gas-phase pollutants and aerosols in the Iberian Peninsula for the late XXI century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro; Montávez, Juan Pedro; Gómez-Navarro, Juan José; Jerez, Sonia; Lorente-Plazas, Raquel

    2012-08-01

    Climate change alone influences future air pollution levels through modifications of gas-phase chemistry, transport, removal, and natural emissions. Hence, the goal of this study is to determine at what extent concentrations of air pollutants respond to changes over the Iberian Peninsula under a climate change scenario. The methodology includes the use of the regional modeling system MM5 (regional climate model version)-CHIMERE for two nested domains covering Europe and the Iberian Peninsula. Two time slices driven by ECHO-G global circulation model covering from 1991 to 2010 and 2071 to 2100 under the SRES A2 scenario have been compared. Climate change influences the concentrations of both gas-phase pollutants and aerosols through changes in temperature, precipitation, mixing height, transport, humidity, and oxidant levels. The trends of variation of ozone (changes up to 5 ppb, +10% increase during summertime) and aerosols over southwestern Europe are influenced by the higher mean temperature modeled for the future climate (up to +5.4 K), since it favors the formation of secondary gas-phase products. It also enhances sulphates (+2 μg m-3) and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) (+2.5 μg m-3 under SRES A2 scenario) and contributes to the decomposition of ammonium nitrate, remaining in the gas phase. Further, the 17% percent decrease of precipitation modeled for 2071-2100 has a strong effect in the frequency of the washout and therefore in the levels of natural aerosols: the concentrations of aerosols decrease with increasing precipitation as wet deposition provides the main aerosol sink.

  19. The Changing World of Childhood Immunizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graville, Iris

    2010-01-01

    Theories and practices in early childhood education continually evolve, and the same is true in the health field. Such change is especially apparent in the area of childhood immunizations. Since vaccination to prevent smallpox was first started in the late 1700s, recommendations for which immunizations to give and when to give them have been…

  20. Linking Transcriptional Changes over Time in Stimulated Dendritic Cells to Identify Gene Networks Activated during the Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Ashwini; Kumagai, Yutaro; Liang, Kuo-ching; Suzuki, Yutaka; Nakai, Kenta

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune response is primarily mediated by the Toll-like receptors functioning through the MyD88-dependent and TRIF-dependent pathways. Despite being widely studied, it is not yet completely understood and systems-level analyses have been lacking. In this study, we identified a high-probability network of genes activated during the innate immune response using a novel approach to analyze time-course gene expression profiles of activated immune cells in combination with a large gene regulatory and protein-protein interaction network. We classified the immune response into three consecutive time-dependent stages and identified the most probable paths between genes showing a significant change in expression at each stage. The resultant network contained several novel and known regulators of the innate immune response, many of which did not show any observable change in expression at the sampled time points. The response network shows the dominance of genes from specific functional classes during different stages of the immune response. It also suggests a role for the protein phosphatase 2a catalytic subunit α in the regulation of the immunoproteasome during the late phase of the response. In order to clarify the differences between the MyD88-dependent and TRIF-dependent pathways in the innate immune response, time-course gene expression profiles from MyD88-knockout and TRIF-knockout dendritic cells were analyzed. Their response networks suggest the dominance of the MyD88-dependent pathway in the innate immune response, and an association of the circadian regulators and immunoproteasomal degradation with the TRIF-dependent pathway. The response network presented here provides the most probable associations between genes expressed in the early and the late phases of the innate immune response, while taking into account the intermediate regulators. We propose that the method described here can also be used in the identification of time-dependent gene sub

  1. Linking transcriptional changes over time in stimulated dendritic cells to identify gene networks activated during the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Patil, Ashwini; Kumagai, Yutaro; Liang, Kuo-Ching; Suzuki, Yutaka; Nakai, Kenta

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune response is primarily mediated by the Toll-like receptors functioning through the MyD88-dependent and TRIF-dependent pathways. Despite being widely studied, it is not yet completely understood and systems-level analyses have been lacking. In this study, we identified a high-probability network of genes activated during the innate immune response using a novel approach to analyze time-course gene expression profiles of activated immune cells in combination with a large gene regulatory and protein-protein interaction network. We classified the immune response into three consecutive time-dependent stages and identified the most probable paths between genes showing a significant change in expression at each stage. The resultant network contained several novel and known regulators of the innate immune response, many of which did not show any observable change in expression at the sampled time points. The response network shows the dominance of genes from specific functional classes during different stages of the immune response. It also suggests a role for the protein phosphatase 2a catalytic subunit α in the regulation of the immunoproteasome during the late phase of the response. In order to clarify the differences between the MyD88-dependent and TRIF-dependent pathways in the innate immune response, time-course gene expression profiles from MyD88-knockout and TRIF-knockout dendritic cells were analyzed. Their response networks suggest the dominance of the MyD88-dependent pathway in the innate immune response, and an association of the circadian regulators and immunoproteasomal degradation with the TRIF-dependent pathway. The response network presented here provides the most probable associations between genes expressed in the early and the late phases of the innate immune response, while taking into account the intermediate regulators. We propose that the method described here can also be used in the identification of time-dependent gene sub

  2. Waterlogging in late dormancy and the early growth phase affected root and leaf morphology in Betula pendula and Betula pubescens seedlings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ai-Fang; Roitto, Marja; Sutinen, Sirkka; Lehto, Tarja; Heinonen, Jaakko; Zhang, Gang; Repo, Tapani

    2016-01-01

    The warmer winters of the future will increase snow-melt frequency and rainfall, thereby increasing the risk of soil waterlogging and its effects on trees in winter and spring at northern latitudes. We studied the morphology of roots and leaves of 1-year-old silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) and pubescent birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.) seedlings exposed to waterlogging during dormancy or at the beginning of the growing season in a growth-chamber experiment. The experiment included 4-week dormancy (Weeks 1-4), a 4-week early growing season (Weeks 5-8) and a 4-week late growing season (Weeks 9-12). The treatments were: (i) no waterlogging, throughout the experiment ('NW'); (ii) 4-week waterlogging during dormancy (dormancy waterlogging 'DW'); (iii) 4-week waterlogging during the early growing season (growth waterlogging 'GW'); and (iv) 4-week DW followed by 4-week GW during the early growing season ('DWGW'). Dormancy waterlogging affected the roots of silver birch and GW the roots and leaf characteristics of both species. Leaf area was reduced in both species by GW and DWGW. In pubescent birch, temporarily increased formation of thin roots was seen in root systems of GW seedlings, which suggests an adaptive mechanism with respect to excess soil water. Additionally, the high density of non-glandular trichomes and their increase in DWGW leaves were considered possible morphological adaptations to excess water in the soil, as was the constant density of stem lenticels during stem-diameter growth. The higher density in glandular trichomes of DWGW silver birch suggests morphological acclimation in that species. The naturally low density of non-glandular trichomes, low density of stem lenticels in waterlogged seedlings and decrease in root growth seen in DWGW and DW silver birch seedlings explain, at least partly, why silver birch grows more poorly relative to pubescent birch in wet soils.

  3. Differential Expression of Toll-like Receptors in Dendritic Cells of Patients with Dengue during Early and Late Acute Phases of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Silvia; Hernández, Juan Carlos; Giraldo, Diana; Arboleda, Margarita; Rojas, Mauricio; Smit, Jolanda M.; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio

    2013-01-01

    Background Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) is observed in individuals that have pre-existing heterotypic dengue antibodies and is associated with increased viral load and high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines early in infection. Interestingly, a recent study showed that dengue virus infection in the presence of antibodies resulted in poor stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), thereby facilitating virus particle production, and also suggesting that TLRs may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated the expression levels of TLR2, 3, 4 and 9 and the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 by flow cytometry. This was evaluated in monocytes, in myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (mDCs and pDCs) from 30 dengue patients with different clinical outcomes and in 20 healthy controls. Increased expression of TLR3 and TLR9 in DCs of patients with dengue fever (DF) early in infection was detected. In DCs from patients with severe manifestations, poor stimulation of TLR3 and TLR9 was observed. In addition, we found a lower expression of TLR2 in patients with DF compared to DHF. Expression levels of TLR4 were not affected. Furthermore, the expression of CD80 and CD86 was altered in mDCs and CD86 in pDCs of severe dengue cases. We show that interferon alpha production decreased in the presence of dengue virus after stimulation of PBMCs with the TLR9 agonist (CpG A). This suggests that the virus can affect the interferon response through this signaling pathway. Conclusions/Significance These results show that during dengue disease progression, the expression profile of TLRs changes depending on the severity of the disease. Changes in TLRs expression could play a central role in DC activation, thereby influencing the innate immune response. PMID:23469297

  4. [Prognosis of dynamics and risk of exceeding permissible levels of 137Cs and 90Sr contents in fish in the Kiev Reservoir at the late phase of the Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Homutinin, Iu V; Kashparov, V A; Kuz'menko, A V; Pavliuchenko, V V

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of the radionuclide specific activity measurements made on 832 samples of fish in 2009-2011 and taking into account literature data, the parameters of the stochastic model have been derived to describe the 137Cs and 90Sr contents in typical commercial fish species in the Kiev Reservoir at the late phase of the Chernobyl accident, including: statistical variability, seasonal changes and monotonous long-term trends. At any fixed moment of the year the standard deviations of logarithms of the 137Cs and 90Sr specific activities in carnivorous and benthophage fish species do not reliably differ, making up at average 0.4. The maximum vari- ation of the 137Cs specific activity (a four-fold decrease from April to November) was observed in pike. The obtained values of the ecological half-life periods for 137Cs and 90Sr (1.3-14 years) in fish of the Kiev reservoir in 2002-2012 were significantly lower than both the radioactive decay periods and the estimates of the IAEA Chernobyl Forum. Based on the obtained model parameters, the dynamics of the 137Cs and 90Sr specific ac- tivities in main commercial fish of the Kiev reservoir has been described and the risk of exceeding the permis- sible levels of these radionuclides in fish at the late phase of the Chernobyl accident has been estimated. Now the risk of catching fish with the specific activities of 137Cs and 90Sr above the permissible levels (150 Bq/kg and 35 Bq/kg, respectively) does not exceed 10% (except perch in the spring spawning period that is banned for fishing in Ukraine). Corresponding risks for roach, white bream and rudd are less than 0.1%.

  5. Late Silurian plutons in Yucatan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, M. B.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1996-08-01

    U-Pb measurements of zircons from two composite plutons in the Maya Mountains of the Yucatan Block (Belize) give Late Silurian ages. Zircons from one of the five compositional phases of the Mountain Pine Ridge pluton yield an age of 418±3.6 Ma. A second compositional phase gives a minimum age of 404 Ma, and zircons from a third phase, although plagued with high common Pb, yield ages consistent with the other two. Zircons from one compositional phase of the Hummingbird-Mullins River pluton indicate an age of about 410-420 Ma. These data demonstrate that two of the three Maya Mountains plutons residing among the strata of the Late Pennsylvanian through Permian Santa Rosa Group are older than that sedimentation. Although the third pluton was not dated, both the similarity of sedimentary facies patterns adjacent to it to those adjacent to one of the plutons dated as Late Silurian and a published single Rb-Sr age of 428 ± 41 Ma suggest this third pluton also was emergent during Santa Rosa deposition. Thus the new U/Pb dates and other data suggest that all three Maya Mountains plutons pre-date Late Carboniferous sedimentation and that none intrude the Santa Rosa Group. Although very uniform ages of about 230 Ma amongst all plutons, derived from abundant earlier dating by the K-Ar system, led to the conclusion that intrusion mostly had occurred in the Late Triassic, the U-Pb ages (obtained from the same sites as the K-Ar dates) demonstrate that the K-Ar ages do not derive from a Late Triassic intrusive episode. The K-Ar dates probably are a signature of the rifting associated with Pangean breakup and formation of the Gulf of Mexico. In a reconstructed Pangea, the position of the Maya Mountains Late Silurian plutons suggests that the Late Silurian Acadian-Caledonian orogen of eastern North America extended through the region of the future Gulf of Mexico. Finally, the U-Pb ages of the Maya Mountains plutons are the same as those of a group of shocked zircons found in the

  6. Inhibition of the sodium-translocating NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase [Na+-NQR] decreases cholera toxin production in Vibrio cholerae O1 at the late exponential growth phase.

    PubMed

    Minato, Yusuke; Fassio, Sara R; Reddekopp, Rylan L; Häse, Claudia C

    2014-01-01

    Two virulence factors produced by Vibrio cholerae, cholera toxin (CT) and toxin-corregulated pilus (TCP), are indispensable for cholera infection. ToxT is the central regulatory protein involved in activation of CT and TCP expression. We previously reported that lack of a respiration-linked sodium-translocating NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR) significantly increases toxT transcription. In this study, we further characterized this link and found that Na(+)-NQR affects toxT expression only at the early-log growth phase, whereas lack of Na(+)-NQR decreases CT production after the mid-log growth phase. Such decreased CT production was independent of toxT and ctxB transcription. Supplementing a respiratory substrate, l-lactate, into the growth media restored CT production in the nqrA-F mutant, suggesting that decreased CT production in the Na(+)-NQR mutant is dependent on electron transport chain (ETC) activity. This notion was supported by the observations that two chemical inhibitors, a Na(+)-NQR specific inhibitor 2-n-Heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide (HQNO) and a succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) inhibitor, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA), strongly inhibited CT production in both classical and El Tor biotype strains of V. cholerae. Accordingly, we propose the main respiratory enzyme of V. cholerae, as a potential drug target to treat cholera because human mitochondria do not contain Na(+)-NQR orthologs.

  7. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  8. The formation and evolution of youthful gullies on Mars: Gullies as the late-stage phase of Mars’ most recent ice age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, James L.; Head, James W.

    2009-11-01

    Gullies are extremely young erosional/depositional systems on Mars that have been carved by an agent that was likely to have been comprised in part by liquid water [Malin, M.C., Edgett, K.S., 2000. Evidence for recent groundwater seepage and surface runoff on Mars. Science 288, 2330-2335; McEwen, A.S. et al., 2007. A closer look at water-related geologic activity on Mars. Science 317, 1706-1709]. The strong latitude and orientation dependencies that have been documented for gullies require (1) a volatile near the surface, and (2) that insolation is an important factor for forming gullies. These constraints have led to two categories of interpretations for the source of the volatiles: (1) liquid water at depth beneath the melting isotherm that erupts suddenly ("groundwater"), and (2) ice at the surface or within the uppermost layer of soil that melts during optimal insolation conditions ("surface/near-surface melting"). In this contribution we synthesize global, hemispheric, regional and local studies of gullies across Mars and outline the criteria that must be met by any successful explanation for the formation of gullies. We further document trends in both hemispheres that emphasize the importance of top-down melting of recent ice-rich deposits and the cold-trapping of atmospherically-derived H 2O frost/snow as important components in the formation of gullies. This provides context for the incorporation of high-resolution multi-spectral and hyper-spectral data from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter that show that (1) cold-trapping of seasonal H 2O frost occurs at the alcove/channel-level on contemporary Mars; (2) gullies are episodically active systems; (3) gullies preferentially form in the presence of deposits plausibly interpreted as remnants of the Late Amazonian emplacement of ice-rich material; and (4) gully channels frequently emanate from the crest of alcoves instead of the base, showing that alcove generation is not necessarily a product of undermining and

  9. Clinical, molecular and immune analysis of dabrafenib and trametinib in metastatic melanoma patients that progressed on BRAF inhibitor monotherapy: a phase II clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guo; McQuade, Jennifer L.; Panka, David J.; Hudgens, Courtney W.; Amin-Mansour, Ali; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Bahl, Samira; Jane-Valbuena, Judit; Wani, Khalida M.; Reuben, Alexandre; Creasy, Caitlyn A.; Jiang, Hong; Cooper, Zachary A.; Roszik, Jason; Bassett, Roland L.; Joon, Aron Y.; Simpson, Lauren M.; Mouton, Rosalind D.; Glitza, Isabella C.; Patel, Sapna P.; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Amaria, Rodabe N.; Diab, Adi; Hwu, Patrick; Lazar, Alexander J.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Garraway, Levi A.; Tetzlaff, Michael T.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Kim, Kevin B.; Davies, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Combined treatment with dabrafenib and trametinib (CombiDT) achieves clinical responses in only ~15% of BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi)-refractory metastatic melanoma patients, in contrast to the high activity observed in BRAFi-naïve patients. Identifying correlates of response and mechanisms of resistance in this population will facilitate clinical management and rational therapeutic development. Objective To determine correlates of benefit from CombiDT therapy in BRAFi-refractory metastatic melanoma patients. Design Single-center, single-arm prospective phase II study of CombiDT in patients with BRAFV600 metastatic melanoma resistant to BRAFi monotherapy conducted between September 2012 and October 2014. Setting University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Participants 28 patients were screened and 23 enrolled. Key eligibility criteria included: BRAFV600 metastatic melanoma, prior BRAFi monotherapy, measurable disease (RECIST 1.1), and accessible tumor for biopsy. Intervention Patients were treated with dabrafenib (150 mg twice daily) and trametinib (2 mg daily) continuously until disease progression or intolerance. All participants underwent a mandatory baseline biopsy, and optional biopsies were performed on-treatment and at progression. Whole-exome sequencing, RT-PCR for BRAF splicing, RNAseq and IHC were performed on tumor samples, and blood was analyzed for levels of circulating BRAFV600. Main outcome measures Primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR). Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were secondary clinical endpoints. Results Among evaluable patients, the confirmed ORR was 10%, disease control rate (DCR) was 45%, and median PFS was 13 weeks. Clinical benefit was associated with duration of prior BRAFi >6 months (DCR 73% vs. 11% for ≤6 months, p=0.02) and decrease in circulating BRAFV600 at day 8 of cycle 1 (DCR 75% vs. 18% for no decrease, p=0.015), but not by pre-treatment MAPK pathway mutations or activation. On

  10. The interplay of epigenetic therapy and immunity in locally recurrent or metastatic estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer: Correlative analysis of ENCORE 301, a randomized, placebo-controlled phase II trial of exemestane with or without entinostat

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Yusuke; Lee, Min-Jung; Lee, Sunmin; Tomita, Saori; Chumsri, Saranya; Cruickshank, Scott; Ordentlich, Peter; Trepel, Jane B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Entinostat, a class I-selective histone deacetylase inhibitor, has shown promising activity in ENCORE 301, a randomized, placebo-controlled, phase II trial of exemestane with or without entinostat in women with locally recurrent or metastatic estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer progressing on a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor. ENCORE 301 showed an 8.3-mo improvement in median overall survival among patients who received entinostat. We investigated the impact of entinostat on immune subsets with CD40, HLA-DR, and immune checkpoint receptor expression analyses in 34 patient blood samples from ENCORE 301. We found that entinostat significantly decreased granulocytic and monocytic MDSCs at cycle 1 day 15. MDSC CD40 was significantly downregulated by entinostat. A significant increase in HLA-DR expression on CD14+ monocytes by entinostat was observed. Entinostat did not impact T-cell subsets or T-cell immune checkpoint receptor expression. Our findings suggest that a significant interplay between this epigenetic regimen and host immune homeostatic mechanisms may impact therapeutic outcome. PMID:27999738

  11. Immune System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  12. Cryptococcal heat shock protein 70 homolog Ssa1 contributes to pulmonary expansion of Cryptococcus neoformans during the afferent phase of the immune response by promoting macrophage M2 polarization.

    PubMed

    Eastman, Alison J; He, Xiumiao; Qiu, Yafeng; Davis, Michael J; Vedula, Priya; Lyons, Daniel M; Park, Yoon-Dong; Hardison, Sarah E; Malachowski, Antoni N; Osterholzer, John J; Wormley, Floyd L; Williamson, Peter R; Olszewski, Michal A

    2015-06-15

    Numerous virulence factors expressed by Cryptococcus neoformans modulate host defenses by promoting nonprotective Th2-biased adaptive immune responses. Prior studies demonstrate that the heat shock protein 70 homolog, Ssa1, significantly contributes to serotype D C. neoformans virulence through the induction of laccase, a Th2-skewing and CNS tropic factor. In the present study, we sought to determine whether Ssa1 modulates host defenses in mice infected with a highly virulent serotype A strain of C. neoformans (H99). To investigate this, we assessed pulmonary fungal growth, CNS dissemination, and survival in mice infected with either H99, an SSA1-deleted H99 strain (Δssa1), and a complement strain with restored SSA1 expression (Δssa1::SSA1). Mice infected with the Δssa1 strain displayed substantial reductions in lung fungal burden during the innate phase (days 3 and 7) of the host response, whereas less pronounced reductions were observed during the adaptive phase (day 14) and mouse survival increased only by 5 d. Surprisingly, laccase activity assays revealed that Δssa1 was not laccase deficient, demonstrating that H99 does not require Ssa1 for laccase expression, which explains the CNS tropism we still observed in the Ssa1-deficient strain. Lastly, our immunophenotyping studies showed that Ssa1 directly promotes early M2 skewing of lung mononuclear phagocytes during the innate phase, but not the adaptive phase, of the immune response. We conclude that Ssa1's virulence mechanism in H99 is distinct and laccase-independent. Ssa1 directly interferes with early macrophage polarization, limiting innate control of C. neoformans, but ultimately has no effect on cryptococcal control by adaptive immunity.

  13. [Ultraviolet: a regulator of immunity].

    PubMed

    Komura, Kazuhiro

    2008-06-01

    Humans establish acquired immune systems during the growth, which can sufficiently eliminate pathogen avoiding immune responses to self, such as allergy and autoimmunity. An imbalance of the acquired immune system leads up to immune-mediated disorders. Ultraviolet (UV) exposure helps to establish the normal peripheral tolerance to contact allergen avoiding excessive immune responses. By contrast, UV develops kinds of autoimmune diseases on rare occasions, suggesting that abnormality in the process of UV-induced peripheral tolerance may induce these diseases. To elucidate the mechanism of UV-induced tolerance is possible to provide a new approach for the management of immune diseases. In the current review, focus is on the suggested players of UV-induced tolerance, blocking mechanisms on the elicitation phase of contact hypersensitivity, and the association between UV and autoimmunity. The major impact in basic immunology in this area is the discovery of cell surface marker of regulatory T cells. Therefore, we first discuss about the association of regulatory/suppressor T cells with UV-induced tolerance. Since the elicitation phase depends on cellular influx into the inflammatory sites, which is tightly regulated by adhesion molecules, we also focused on the role of adhesion molecules. Finally, this paper also includes statistical findings concerning the association between UV-radiation and the prevalence of a myositis specific autoantibody. Thus, UV is one of the nice regulators of an immune network and the knowledge of UV-mediated immune regulation will be translated into new therapeutic strategies to human immune-mediated disorders.

  14. Innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Revillard, Jean-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    For more than half a century immunological research has been almost exclusively orientated towards the acquired immune response and the mechanisms of immune tolerance. Major discoveries have enabled us to better understand the functioning of the specific immune system: the structure of antibody molecules, the genetic mechanisms leading to the molecular diversity of B (BCR) and T (TCR) lymphocyte antigen receptors, the biological function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules in the presentation of peptides to alpha/beta receptor bearing T lymphocytes, the processes of positive and negative selection of lymphocytes during the course of their differentiation. The major role of specific or acquired immunity has been shown by the rapidly lethal character of severe combined immune deficiency diseases and various alterations in the mechanisms of tolerance have been proposed to explain the chronic inflammatory illnesses which are considered to be auto-immune. Natural or innate immunity has been known since the first description of an inflammatory reaction attributed to Cornelius Celsus. It entered into the scientific era at the end of the 19th century with the discovery of phagocytes by Metchnikoff and of the properties of the complement system by Bordet [1] but due to the vastness of the field and its lack of clear definition, it failed to excite the interest of researchers. The discovery of cytokines and progress in knowledge of the mechanisms of the inflammatory reaction have certainly helped to banish preconceived ideas about natural immunity, which was wrongly labelled as non-specific. This has led to the proposition of a wider role for immune functions beyond the level of the cell or the organism [2] and to a better understanding of the importance of the immediate defence mechanisms and their role in the later orientation of the acquired response.

  15. Immune reconstitution complicated by CMV retinitis in a pediatric patient who underwent haploidentical CD34+-selected hematopoietic stem cell transplant for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Simone; Boaro, Maria Paola; Pillon, Marta; Calore, Elisabetta; Cermakova, Ivete; Perruccio, Katia; Mengoli, Carlo; Messina, Chiara

    2008-09-01

    We describe two episodes of CMV retinitis in a pediatric patient who underwent a CD34+ selected graft from his haploidentical father. Both recipient and donor were cytomegalovirus (CMV) seropositive. Both episodes occurred late post-grafting during a phase of complete immunological recovery with sufficient numbers of circulating CMV-specific clones. Antiviral treatment with foscarnet and ganciclovir was successful but prolonged treatment was required to prevent relapses. We hypothesize that this complication was more related to an immune reconstitution process than to an immune-deficient state post-grafting. We conclude that CMV retinitis is a late complication of HSCT that can occur despite satisfactory immune reconstitution. Usually, it is responsive to antiviral therapy. Dilated fundoscopic examination is essential both for examining patients with reduced visual acuity and for screening asymptomatic patients.

  16. Maternal Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Helen Y.; Englund, Janet A.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization has the potential to protect the pregnant woman, fetus, and infant from vaccine-preventable diseases. Maternal immunoglobulin G is actively transported across the placenta, providing passive immunity to the neonate and infant prior to the infant's ability to respond to vaccines. Currently inactivated influenza, tetanus toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccines are recommended during pregnancy. Several other vaccines have been studied in pregnancy and found to be safe and immunogenic and to provide antibody to infants. These include pneumococcus, group B Streptococcus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, and meningococcus vaccines. Other vaccines in development for potential maternal immunization include respiratory syncytial virus, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus vaccines. PMID:24799324

  17. Immune response

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The immune system includes specialized white blood cells, called lymphocytes that adapt themselves to fight specific foreign invaders. These cells develop into two groups in the bone marrow. From the bone ...

  18. Broad Blockade Antibody Responses in Human Volunteers after Immunization with a Multivalent Norovirus VLP Candidate Vaccine: Immunological Analyses from a Phase I Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lindesmith, Lisa C.; Ferris, Martin T.; Mullan, Clancy W.; Ferreira, Jennifer; Debbink, Kari; Swanstrom, Jesica; Richardson, Charles; Goodwin, Robert R.; Baehner, Frank; Mendelman, Paul M.; Bargatze, Robert F.; Baric, Ralph S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human noroviruses (NoVs) are the primary cause of acute gastroenteritis and are characterized by antigenic variation between genogroups and genotypes and antigenic drift of strains within the predominant GII.4 genotype. In the context of this diversity, an effective NoV vaccine must elicit broadly protective immunity. We used an antibody (Ab) binding blockade assay to measure the potential cross-strain protection provided by a multivalent NoV virus-like particle (VLP) candidate vaccine in human volunteers. Methods and Findings Sera from ten human volunteers immunized with a multivalent NoV VLP vaccine (genotypes GI.1/GII.4) were analyzed for IgG and Ab blockade of VLP interaction with carbohydrate ligand, a potential correlate of protective immunity to NoV infection and illness. Immunization resulted in rapid rises in IgG and blockade Ab titers against both vaccine components and additional VLPs representing diverse strains and genotypes not represented in the vaccine. Importantly, vaccination induced blockade Ab to two novel GII.4 strains not in circulation at the time of vaccination or sample collection. GII.4 cross-reactive blockade Ab titers were more potent than responses against non-GII.4 VLPs, suggesting that previous exposure history to this dominant circulating genotype may impact the vaccine Ab response. Further, antigenic cartography indicated that vaccination preferentially activated preexisting Ab responses to epitopes associated with GII.4.1997. Study interpretations may be limited by the relevance of the surrogate neutralization assay and the number of immunized participants evaluated. Conclusions Vaccination with a multivalent NoV VLP vaccine induces a broadly blocking Ab response to multiple epitopes within vaccine and non-vaccine NoV strains and to novel antigenic variants not yet circulating at the time of vaccination. These data reveal new information about complex NoV immune responses to both natural exposure and to vaccination, and

  19. Long-term effects of 60-Hz electric vs. magnetic fields on IL-1 and other immune parameters in sheep: Phase 4 study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hefeneider, S.H.; McCoy, S.L.; Hausman, F.A.

    1998-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the effect of exposure to long-term low-frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMF) from an environmental 500-kV transmission line on immune function in sheep. The primary hypothesis tested was that the reduction in IL-1 activity observed in two previous short-term studies (9 months) was due to exposure to EMF from this transmission line. The secondary hypothesis was that long-term exposure (27 months) would impact immune function and animal health. To characterize the components of the EMF environment responsible for the previously observed reduction in IL-1 activity, the experiment was designed not only to examine the effect of exposure to electric and magnetic fields, but also to examine the magnetic field component alone. This was done by constructing a third pen (MF) which was shielded with wire to effectively eliminate the electric field while not significantly affecting the magnitude of the magnetic field.

  20. Long-term effects of 60-Hz electric vs. magnetic fields on IL-1 and other immune parameters in sheep: Phase 5 study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hefeneider, S.H.; McCoy, S.L.; Hausman, F.A.

    1998-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the effect of exposure to long-term low-frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMF) from a 500-kV transmission line on immune function in sheep. The primary hypothesis was that the reduction in IL-1 activity observed in two previous short-term studies (9 months) was due to EMF exposure from this transmission line. The secondary hypothesis was that long-term exposure (27 months) would impact immune function and animal health. To characterize the components of EMF responsible for the previously observed reduction in IL-1 activity, the experiment was designed not only to examine the effect of exposure to electric and magnetic fields, but also to examine the magnetic field component alone.

  1. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ 2 Modulates Late-Pregnancy Homeostatic Metabolic Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Vivas, Yurena; Díez-Hochleitner, Monica; Izquierdo-Lahuerta, Adriana; Corrales, Patricia; Horrillo, Daniel; Velasco, Ismael; Martínez-García, Cristina; Campbell, Mark; Sevillano, Julio; Ricote, Mercedes; Ros, Manuel; Ramos, Maria Pilar; Medina-Gomez, Gema

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy requires adaptation of maternal energy metabolism, including expansion and functional modifications of adipose tissue. Insulin resistance (IR), predominantly during late gestation, is a physiological metabolic adaptation that serves to support the metabolic demands of fetal growth. The molecular mechanisms underlying these adaptations are not fully understood and may contribute to gestational diabetes mellitus. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) controls adipogenesis, glucose and lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity. The PPARγ2 isoform is mainly expressed in adipocytes and is thus likely to contribute to adipose tissue adaptation during late pregnancy. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of PPARγ2 to the metabolic adaptations occurring during the late phase of pregnancy in the context of IR. Using a model of late pregnancy in PPARγ2 knockout (KO) mice, we found that deletion of PPARγ2 exacerbated IR in association with lower serum adiponectin levels, increased body weight and enhanced lipid accumulation in the liver. Lack of PPARγ2 provoked changes in the distribution of fat mass and preferentially prevented expansion of the perigonadal depot while at the same time exacerbating inflammation. Pregnant PPARγ2KO mice presented adipose tissue depot-dependent decreased expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism. Collectively, these data indicate that PPARγ2 is essential in promoting healthy adipose tissue expansion and immune and metabolic functionality during pregnancy, contributing to the physiological adaptations that lead gestation to term. PMID:27782293

  2. Phase I trial of a cancer vaccine consisting of 20 mixed peptides in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer: dose-related immune boosting and suppression.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Masanori; Arai, Gaku; Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Naito, Seiji; Moriya, Fukuko; Suekane, Shigetaka; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Matsueda, Satoko; Sasada, Tetsuro; Yamada, Akira; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Itoh, Kyogo

    2015-04-01

    The heterogeneity expression of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) and variability of human T cell repertoire suggest that effective cancer vaccine requires induction of a wide breadth of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) specificities. This can be achieved with vaccines targeting multiple TAA. We evaluated the safety and immune dynamics of a cancer vaccine consisting of 20 mixed peptides (KRM-20) designed to induce CTLs against 12 different TAA in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Patients received each of three different randomly assigned doses of KRM-20 (6, 20, or 60 mg) once a week for 6 weeks. KRM-20 was applicable for patients with positive human leukocyte antigen (HLA) A2, A3, A11, A24, A26, A31 or A33 alleles, which cover the majority of the global population. To evaluate the minimum immunological effective dose (MIED), peptide-specific CTL and immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses, and immune suppressive subsets were evaluated during the vaccination. Total of 17 patients was enrolled. No serious adverse drug reactions were encountered. The MIED of KRM-20 in CTL or IgG response calculated by logistic regression model was set as 16 or 1.6 mg, respectively. The frequency of immune suppressive subsets was fewer in the 20 mg cohort than that in 6 or 60 mg cohort. Clinical responses determined by prostate-specific antigen levels were two partial responses (from the 20 mg cohort), five no changes and ten progressive diseases. Twenty milligrams of KRM-20 could be recommended for further studies because of the safety and ability to augment CTL activity.

  3. Molecular phenotyping of immune cells from young NOD mice reveals abnormal metabolic pathways in the early induction phase of autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Kakoola, Dorothy N; Lenchik, Nataliya I; Desiderio, Dominic M; Marshall, Dana R; Gerling, Ivan C

    2012-01-01

    Islet leukocytic infiltration (insulitis) is first obvious at around 4 weeks of age in the NOD mouse--a model for human type 1 diabetes (T1D). The molecular events that lead to insulitis and initiate autoimmune diabetes are poorly understood. Since TID is caused by numerous genes, we hypothesized that multiple molecular pathways are altered and interact to initiate this disease. We evaluated the molecular phenotype (mRNA and protein expression) and molecular networks of ex vivo unfractionated spleen leukocytes from 2 and 4 week-old NOD mice in comparison to two control strains. Analysis of the global gene expression profiles and hierarchical clustering revealed that the majority (~90%) of the differentially expressed genes in NOD mice were repressed. Furthermore, analysis using a modern suite of multiple bioinformatics approaches identified abnormal molecular pathways that can be divided broadly into 2 categories: metabolic pathways, which were predominant at 2 weeks, and immune response pathways, which were predominant at 4 weeks. Network analysis by Ingenuity pathway analysis identified key genes/molecules that may play a role in regulating these pathways. These included five that were common to both ages (TNF, HNF4A, IL15, Progesterone, and YWHAZ), and others that were unique to 2 weeks (e.g. MYC/MYCN, TGFB1, and IL2) and to 4 weeks (e.g. IFNG, beta-estradiol, p53, NFKB, AKT, PRKCA, IL12, and HLA-C). Based on the literature, genes that may play a role in regulating metabolic pathways at 2 weeks include Myc and HNF4A, and at 4 weeks, beta-estradiol, p53, Akt, HNF4A and AR. Our data suggest that abnormalities in regulation of metabolic pathways in the immune cells of young NOD mice lead to abnormalities in the immune response pathways and as such may play a role in the initiation of autoimmune diabetes. Thus, targeting metabolism may provide novel approaches to preventing and/or treating autoimmune diabetes.

  4. Plant Immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants are faced with defending themselves against a multitude of pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes, etc. Immunity is multi-layered and complex. Plants can induce defenses when they recognize small peptides, proteins or double-stranded RNA associated with pathogens. Recognitio...

  5. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Adults in Easy-to-read Formats ... previous immunizations. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Adults (19 Years and Older) by Age ...

  6. Immune System (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Immune System KidsHealth > For Parents > Immune System A A A ... can lead to illness and infection. About the Immune System The immune system is the body's defense against ...

  7. Safety and Immunogenicity of EBA-175 RII-NG Malaria Vaccine Administered Intramuscularly in Semi-Immune Adults: A Phase 1, Double-Blinded Placebo Controlled Dosage Escalation Study

    PubMed Central

    Koram, Kwadwo A.; Ocran, Josephine; Karikari, Yaa S.; Adu-Amankwah, Susan; Ntiri, Michael; Abuaku, Benjamin; Dodoo, Daniel; Gyan, Ben; Kronmann, Karl C.; Nkrumah, Francis

    2016-01-01

    The erythrocyte binding antigen region II (EBA-175 RII) is a Plasmodium falciparum ligand that mediates erythrocyte invasion and is considered an important malaria vaccine candidate. A phase Ia trial in malaria naïve adults living in the United States found the recombinant non-glycosylated vaccine antigen, EBA-175 RII-NG adjuvanted with aluminium phosphate to be safe, immunogenic and capable of inducing biologically active antibodies that can inhibit parasite growth in vitro. The aim of the current study was to assess the safety and immunogenicity of this vaccine in malaria exposed semi-immune healthy adults living in a malaria endemic country, Ghana. In this double-blinded, placebo controlled, dose escalation phase I trial, eighteen subjects per group received ascending dose concentrations (5 μg, 20 μg or 80 μg) of the vaccine intramuscularly at 0, 1 and 6 months, while 6 subjects received placebo (normal saline). The primary end point was the number of subjects experiencing Grade 3 systemic or local adverse events within 14 days post-vaccination. Serious adverse events were assessed throughout the study period. Blood samples for immunological analyses were collected at days 0, 14, 28, 42, 180 and 194. A total of 52 subjects received three doses of the vaccine in the respective groups. No serious adverse events were reported. The majority of all adverse events reported were mild to moderate in severity, with local pain and tenderness being the most common. All adverse events, irrespective of severity, resolved without any sequelae. Subjects who received any of the EBA-175 RII-NG doses had high immunoglobulin G levels which moderately inhibited P. falciparum growth in vitro, compared to those in the placebo group. In conclusion, the EBA-175 RII-NG vaccine was safe, well tolerated and immunogenic in malaria semi-immune Ghanaian adults. Its further development is recommended. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov. Identifier: NCT01026246 PMID:27644034

  8. Dynamics of Immune Cell Types Within the Macaque Corpus Luteum During the Menstrual Cycle: Role of Progesterone1

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Cecily V.; Xu, Fuhua; Molskness, Theodore A.; Stouffer, Richard L.; Hennebold, Jon D.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to characterize the immune cell types within the primate corpus luteum (CL). Luteal tissue was collected from rhesus females at discrete intervals during the luteal phase of the natural menstrual cycle. Dispersed cells were incubated with fluorescently labeled antibodies specific for the immune cell surface proteins CD11b (neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages), CD14 (monocytes/macrophages), CD16 (natural killer [NK] cells), CD20 (B-lymphocytes), and CD3epsilon (T-lymphocytes) for analysis by flow cytometry. Numbers of CD11b-positive (CD11b+) and CD14+ cells increased significantly 3 to 4 days after serum progesterone (P4) concentrations declined below 0.3 ng/ml. CD16+ cells were the most abundant immune cell type in CL during the mid and mid-late luteal phases and were 3-fold increased 3 to 4 days after serum P4 decreased to baseline levels. CD3epsilon+ cells tended to increase 3 to 4 days after P4 decline. To determine whether immune cells were upregulated by the loss of luteotropic (LH) support or through loss of LH-dependent steroid milieu, monkeys were assigned to 4 groups: control (no treatment), the GnRH antagonist Antide, Antide plus synthetic progestin (R5020), or Antide plus the estrogen receptor agonists diarylpropionitrile (DPN)/propyl-pyrazole-triol (PPT) during the mid-late luteal phase. Antide treatment increased the numbers of CD11b+ and CD14+ cells, whereas progestin, but not estrogen, replacement suppressed the numbers of CD11b+, CD14+, and CD16+ cells. Neither Antide nor steroid replacement altered numbers of CD3epsilon+ cells. These data suggest that increased numbers of innate immune cells in primate CL after P4 synthesis declines play a role in onset of structural regression of primate CL. PMID:26400401

  9. Quantitative single serum-dilution liquid phase competitive blocking ELISA for the assessment of herd immunity and expected protection against foot-and-mouth disease virus in vaccinated cattle.

    PubMed

    Robiolo, Blanca; La Torre, José; Duffy, Sergio; Leon, Emilio; Seki, Cristina; Torres, Adriana; Mattion, Nora

    2010-06-01

    A single serum-dilution liquid phase ELISA (slpELISA) was standardized to be used for serological evaluation of herd immunity against foot-and-mouth disease. The absorbance value at a dilution 1:64 of each serum sample was interpolated in a standard curve by plotting the antibody titers of six control sera determined by end point dilution liquid phase ELISA (lpELISA), against the absorbance values for the same control sera at 1:64 dilutions. A straight line was obtained by linear regression analysis (r>0.90) in the titer range of 1.40-2.40. The reliability of the antibody titers was confirmed by the simultaneous titration of 60 cattle sera by slpELISA and lpELISA, which showed an acceptable correlation (R(2)>0.87) for viral strains A24/Cruzeiro, A/Argentina/01, O1/Campos and C3/Indaial. Titers obtained by both methods were not significantly different (p>0.05), thus confirming that slpELISA could be used successfully to replace the conventional serial dilution ELISA for the assessment of protection status of cattle in epidemiological studies. In addition, this quantitative slpELISA provides an adequate method for monitoring the effectiveness of vaccination campaigns and is also suitable for the assessment of seroconversion of naive animals during early stages of infection.

  10. Integrated Circuit Immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sketoe, J. G.; Clark, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a DOD E3 program overview on integrated circuit immunity. The topics include: 1) EMI Immunity Testing; 2) Threshold Definition; 3) Bias Tee Function; 4) Bias Tee Calibration Set-Up; 5) EDM Test Figure; 6) EMI Immunity Levels; 7) NAND vs. and Gate Immunity; 8) TTL vs. LS Immunity Levels; 9) TP vs. OC Immunity Levels; 10) 7805 Volt Reg Immunity; and 11) Seventies Chip Set. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  11. A Comparative Phase I Study of Combination, Homologous Subtype-C DNA, MVA, and Env gp140 Protein/Adjuvant HIV Vaccines in Two Immunization Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Sarah; Quinn, Killian; Greenwood, Aldona; Cope, Alethea V.; McKay, Paul F.; Hayes, Peter J.; Kopycinski, Jakub T.; Gilmour, Jill; Miller, Aleisha N.; Geldmacher, Christof; Nadai, Yuka; Ahmed, Mohamed I. M.; Montefiori, David C.; Dally, Len; Bouliotis, George; Lewis, David J. M.; Tatoud, Roger; Wagner, Ralf; Esteban, Mariano; Shattock, Robin J.; McCormack, Sheena; Weber, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    . The approach did however affect other immune responses; neutralizing antibody responses, seen only to Tier 1 pseudoviruses, were poorer when the vaccines were combined and while T-cell responses were seen in >80% individuals in both groups and similarly CD4 and Env dominant, their breadth/polyfunctionality tended to be lower when the vaccines were combined, suggesting attenuation of immunogenicity and cautioning against this accelerated regimen. PMID:28275375

  12. Protocol for a phase III randomised trial of image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy for late small bowel toxicity reduction after postoperative adjuvant radiation in Ca cervix

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Misra, Shagun; Phurailatpam, Reena; Paul, Siji N; Kannan, Sadhna; Kerkar, Rajendra; Maheshwari, Amita; Shylasree, TS; Ghosh, Jaya; Gupta, Sudeep; Thomas, Biji; Singh, Shalini; Sharma, Sanjiv; Chilikuri, Srinivas; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2012-01-01

    Introduction External beam radiation followed by vaginal brachytherapy (±chemotherapy) leads to reduction in the risk of local recurrence and improves progression-free survival in patients with adverse risk factors following Wertheim's hysterectomy albeit at the risk of late bowel toxicity. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) results in reduction in bowel doses and has potential to reduce late morbidity, however, needs to be confirmed prospectively in a randomised trial. The present randomised trial tests reduction if any in late small bowel toxicity with the use of IMRT in postoperative setting. Methods and analysis Patients more than 18 years of age who need adjuvant (chemo) radiation will be eligible. Patients with residual pelvic or para-aortic nodal disease, history of multiple abdominal surgeries or any other medical bowel condition will be excluded. The trial will randomise patients into standard radiation or IMRT. The primary aim is to compare differences in late grades II–IV bowel toxicity between the two arms. The secondary aims of the study focus on evaluating correlation of dose–volume parameters and late toxicity and quality of life. The trial is planned as a multicentre randomised study. The trial is designed to detect a 13% difference in late grades II–IV bowel toxicity with an α of 0.05 and β of 0.80. A total of 240 patients will be required to demonstrate the aforesaid difference. Ethics and dissemination The trial is approved by institutional ethics review board and will be routinely monitored as per standard guidelines. The study results will be disseminated via peer reviewed scientific journals, conference presentations and submission to regulatory authorities. Registration The trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01279135). PMID:23242243

  13. A Synthetic Influenza Virus Vaccine Induces a Cellular Immune Response That Correlates with Reduction in Symptomatology and Virus Shedding in a Randomized Phase Ib Live-Virus Challenge in Humans.

    PubMed

    Pleguezuelos, Olga; Robinson, Stuart; Fernández, Ana; Stoloff, Gregory A; Mann, Alex; Gilbert, Anthony; Balaratnam, Ganesh; Wilkinson, Tom; Lambkin-Williams, Rob; Oxford, John; Caparrós-Wanderley, Wilson

    2015-07-01

    Current influenza vaccines elicit primarily antibody-based immunity. They require yearly revaccination and cannot be manufactured until the identification of the circulating viral strain(s). These issues remain to be addressed. Here we report a phase Ib trial of a vaccine candidate (FLU-v) eliciting cellular immunity. Thirty-two males seronegative for the challenge virus by hemagglutination inhibition assay participated in this single-center, randomized, double-blind study. Volunteers received one dose of either the adjuvant alone (placebo, n = 16) or FLU-v (500 μg) and the adjuvant (n = 16), both in saline. Twenty-one days later, FLU-v (n = 15) and placebo (n = 13) volunteers were challenged with influenza virus A/Wisconsin/67/2005 (H3N2) and monitored for 7 days. Safety, tolerability, and cellular responses were assessed pre- and postvaccination. Virus shedding and clinical signs were assessed postchallenge. FLU-v was safe and well tolerated. No difference in the prevaccination FLU-v-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ) response was seen between groups (average ± the standard error of the mean [SEM] for the placebo and FLU-v, respectively, 1.4-fold ± 0.2-fold and 1.6-fold ± 0.5-fold higher than the negative-control value). Nineteen days postvaccination, the FLU-v group, but not the placebo group, developed FLU-v-specific IFN-γ responses (8.2-fold ± 3.9-fold versus 1.3-fold ± 0.1-fold higher than the negative-control value [average ± SEM] for FLU-v versus the placebo [P = 0.0005]). FLU-v-specific cellular responses also correlated with reductions in both viral titers (P = 0.01) and symptom scores (P = 0.02) postchallenge. Increased cellular immunity specific to FLU-v correlates with reductions in both symptom scores and virus loads. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01226758 and at hra.nhs.uk under EudraCT no. 2009-014716-35.).

  14. Immune response phenotype of allergic versus clinically tolerant pigs in a neonatal swine model of allergy.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Julie; Rupa, Prithy; Garvie, Sarah; Wilkie, Bruce

    2013-07-15

    The prevalence of childhood food allergy and the duration of these allergies, particularly those considered to be transient, like egg and milk allergy, are increasing. The identification of allergic individuals using minimally invasive, non-anaphylaxis-threatening methods is therefore of increasing importance. In this experiment, correlates were sought of an allergic immune response (IR) phenotype in pigs. Using pigs pre-treated with heat-killed bacteria or bacterial components before allergic sensitization with the egg white protein ovomucoid (Ovm), differences were determined in IR phenotype of pigs in the categories treated-allergic, treated-tolerant, control-allergic (CA) and control-tolerant. Phenotype was established by measuring immunoglobulin (Ig)-associated antibody activity (AbA), cytokine profiles and the proportion of blood T-regulatory cells (T-regs) and observing late-phase allergen-specific skin tests (ST). Although 100% of pigs became sensitized to Ovm, only 33% of pigs had clinical signs of allergy after oral challenge with egg white. Pigs without clinical signs were classified as clinically tolerant. Sixty-seven percent of allergic pigs had a positive, late-phase ST classified as very strong or strong, while 84% of clinically tolerant pigs did not have late-phase ST. Treated-allergic pigs and CA pigs had greater total antibody IgG (H+L), IgE and IgG1 AbA than clinically tolerant pigs. Cytokine profiles of allergic pigs and the proportion of circulating T-regs, did not differ significantly between allergic and clinically tolerant pigs. Therefore, measurement of allergen-specific IgG, IgG1 and/or IgE activity and evaluation of late-phase ID ST may be useful in identifying allergic IR phenotypes in swine models of food allergy, which may be extended toward human use.

  15. Metabolic Cost of the Activation of Immune Response in the Fish-Eating Myotis (Myotis vivesi): The Effects of Inflammation and the Acute Phase Response.

    PubMed

    Otálora-Ardila, Aída; Herrera M, L Gerardo; Flores-Martínez, José Juan; Welch, Kenneth C

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and activation of the acute phase response (APR) are energetically demanding processes that protect against pathogens. Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are antigens commonly used to stimulate inflammation and the APR, respectively. We tested the hypothesis that the APR after an LPS challenge was energetically more costly than the inflammatory response after a PHA challenge in the fish-eating Myotis bat (Myotis vivesi). We measured resting metabolic rate (RMR) after bats were administered PHA and LPS. We also measured skin temperature (Tskin) after the LPS challenge and skin swelling after the PHA challenge. Injection of PHA elicited swelling that lasted for several days but changes in RMR and body mass were not significant. LPS injection produced a significant increase in Tskin and in RMR, and significant body mass loss. RMR after LPS injection increased by 140-185% and the total cost of the response was 6.50 kJ. Inflammation was an energetically low-cost process but the APR entailed a significant energetic investment. Examination of APR in other bats suggests that the way in which bats deal with infections might not be uniform.

  16. Metabolic Cost of the Activation of Immune Response in the Fish-Eating Myotis (Myotis vivesi): The Effects of Inflammation and the Acute Phase Response

    PubMed Central

    Otálora-Ardila, Aída; Herrera M., L. Gerardo; Flores-Martínez, José Juan; Welch, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and activation of the acute phase response (APR) are energetically demanding processes that protect against pathogens. Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are antigens commonly used to stimulate inflammation and the APR, respectively. We tested the hypothesis that the APR after an LPS challenge was energetically more costly than the inflammatory response after a PHA challenge in the fish-eating Myotis bat (Myotis vivesi). We measured resting metabolic rate (RMR) after bats were administered PHA and LPS. We also measured skin temperature (Tskin) after the LPS challenge and skin swelling after the PHA challenge. Injection of PHA elicited swelling that lasted for several days but changes in RMR and body mass were not significant. LPS injection produced a significant increase in Tskin and in RMR, and significant body mass loss. RMR after LPS injection increased by 140–185% and the total cost of the response was 6.50 kJ. Inflammation was an energetically low-cost process but the APR entailed a significant energetic investment. Examination of APR in other bats suggests that the way in which bats deal with infections might not be uniform. PMID:27792729

  17. Infrared Observations of Late Type Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    Substantive mass loss resulting in appreciable circumstellar dust envelopes is common in late-type stars. The evolutionary history and physical state of a cool star determine the chemistry within the outer stellar atmosphere mirrored by the molecular and particulate material present in the envelope. The observational consequences of this debris determined by moderate spectral resolution infrared spectrophotometry are reviewed. Significant information is provided by observations of the emergent energy flux of both the cool stellar photosphere and of the circumstellar dust envelope. The observation suggests that mass-loss occurs to some degree throughout late stellar evolutionary phases and that occasional periods of high mass loss are not uncommon.

  18. Differences in CD8 alpha alpha and cecal microbiome community during proliferation and late cytolytic phases of Marek's disease virus (MDV) infection are associated with genetic resistance to Marek's disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is growing awareness that microbes in the gut play an important role in the health and disease response of the host. In this study, using chicken and Marek's disease virus, an economically important pathogen, we correlate changes in immune cells with gut microbes and their function. We find th...

  19. Lateness to School Remediation Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ugwuegbulam, Charles N.; Ibrahim, Haj. Naheed

    2015-01-01

    Primary and secondary school in Nigeria encourage punctuality to school yet a good number of the learners came late to school. This is especially true in the case of day students. Learners who come late to school are usually punished in one way or the other yet the lateness to school phenomenon still persist. Lateness to school behaviour affects…

  20. Late Mitochondrial Acquisition, Really?

    PubMed Central

    Degli Esposti, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a timely critique of a recent Nature paper by Pittis and Gabaldón that has suggested a late origin of mitochondria in eukaryote evolution. It shows that the inferred ancestry of many mitochondrial proteins has been incorrectly assigned by Pittis and Gabaldón to bacteria other than the aerobic proteobacteria from which the ancestor of mitochondria originates, thereby questioning the validity of their suggestion that mitochondrial acquisition may be a late event in eukaryote evolution. The analysis and approach presented here may guide future studies to resolve the true ancestry of mitochondria. PMID:27289097

  1. Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Get ... date. See Disclaimer for additional details. Based on Immunization Schedule for Children 0 through 6 Years of ...

  2. Immune System Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System A A A How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! About KidsHealth ...

  3. Comparative Assessment of Cytokine Pattern in Early and Late Onset of Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Khaertynov, Kh. S.; Andreeva, A. A.; Satrutdinov, M. A.; Agafonova, E. A.

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a significant health issue associated with high mortality. Immune responses associated with neonatal sepsis, such as proinflammatory cytokine production, are believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of this disease. In the present study, serum levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL1-β, and IL-6 and the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 were evaluated for 25 subjects with neonatal sepsis. We observed that subjects with late onset of sepsis (LOS), as well as those with early onset of sepsis (EOS), had a substantial increase in serum TNF-α. In contrast to EOS, subjects with LOS demonstrated a significant increase in serum levels IL-6 and IL-10. Additionally, we observed a significant difference in cytokine profiles between acute and postacute cases of neonatal sepsis. For instance, the level of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6, was elevated in the acute phase, whereas the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10, became substantially upregulated during the postacute phase. Additionally, no correlation was observed between cytokine levels and CRP levels or lymphocyte counts. Thus, in contrast to CRP levels and lymphocyte counts, examination of the cytokine profile can provide valuable information when determining the most effective therapy for treating neonatal sepsis. This information may be useful to physicians when determining if anti-inflammatory or immune stimulatory therapy is warranted. PMID:28367457

  4. Phase I-II study of lenalidomide and alemtuzumab in refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL): effects on T cells and immune checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Winqvist, Maria; Mozaffari, Fariba; Palma, Marzia; Eketorp Sylvan, Sandra; Hansson, Lotta; Mellstedt, Håkan; Österborg, Anders; Lundin, Jeanette

    2017-01-01

    This phase I-II study explored safety, immunomodulatory and clinical effects of lenalidomide (weeks 1-16) and alemtuzumab (weeks 5-16) in 23 patients with refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Most patients had Rai stage III/IV disease and were heavily pretreated (median 4 prior therapies), and 61% had del(17p)/del(11q). Eleven of 19 evaluable patients (58%) responded, with a median response duration of 12 months (1-29+); time to progression was short in non-responders. Lenalidomide had a narrow therapeutic dose range, 2.5 mg/day was not efficient, and maximum tolerated dose was 5 mg/day. Grade 3-4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia occurred in 84 and 55%, 30% had febrile neutropenia, and CMV-reactivation requiring valganciclovir occurred in 30% of patients. The frequency of proliferating (Ki67(+)) CD8(+) T cells was increased at week 4, with further increase in both the CD4(+) and CD8(+) subsets (p < 0.01 and <0.05), which was accompanied by significant upregulation of HLA-DR after addition of alemtuzumab. Antigen-experienced cells increased at week 4 as the frequency of effector memory cells increased in the CD8(+) subset (p < 0.003), while effector cells decreased in both the CD8(+) and CD4(+) subsets (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.01). The Th1/Th2 balance was unchanged at week 4 but shifted toward a Th2 profile after combination therapy. At end of treatment, the frequency of Th17 and regulatory T cells was reduced (p < 0.01), naïve T cells decreased, and effector memory T cells increased (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01). Granzyme B(+) T cells increased at 30-week follow-up (p < 0.05). PD-1 expression was unaffected. In conclusion, low-dose lenalidomide and alemtuzumab induced major perturbations of T cells, including increased proliferative activity and cytotoxic potential.

  5. Stress, age, and immune function: toward a lifespan approach.

    PubMed

    Graham, Jennifer E; Christian, Lisa M; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K

    2006-08-01

    Both aging processes and psychological stress affect the immune system: Each can dysregulate immune function with a potentially substantial impact on physical health. Worse, the effects of stress and age are interactive. Psychological stress can both mimic and exacerbate the effects of aging, with older adults often showing greater immunological impairment to stress than younger adults. In addition, stressful experiences very early in life can alter the responsiveness of the nervous system and immune system. We review the unique impact of aging and stress on immune function, followed by evidence of interactions between age and stress. Further, we suggest that prenatal or early life stress may increase the likelihood of maladaptive immune responses to stress in late life. An understanding of the interactive effects of stress and age is critical to efforts to determine underlying mechanisms, clarify the directionality of effects, and develop effective interventions in early and late life.

  6. Stress, Age, and Immune Function: Toward a Lifespan Approach

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Jennifer E.; Christian, Lisa M.; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.

    2009-01-01

    Both aging processes and psychological stress affect the immune system: Each can dysregulate immune function with a potentially substantial impact on physical health. Worse, the effects of stress and age are interactive. Psychological stress can both mimic and exacerbate the effects of aging, with older adults often showing greater immunological impairment to stress than younger adults. In addition, stressful experiences very early in life can alter the responsiveness of the nervous system and immune system. We review the unique impact of aging and stress on immune function, followed by evidence of interactions between age and stress. Further, we suggest that prenatal or early life stress may increase the likelihood of maladaptive immune responses to stress in late life. An understanding of the interactive effects of stress and age is critical to efforts to determine underlying mechanisms, clarify the directionality of effects, and develop effective interventions in early and late life. PMID:16715331

  7. Homologous Boosting with Adenoviral Serotype 5 HIV Vaccine (rAd5) Vector Can Boost Antibody Responses despite Preexisting Vector-Specific Immunity in a Randomized Phase I Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, Uzma N.; Novik, Laura; Enama, Mary E.; Plummer, Sarah A.; Koup, Richard A.; Nason, Martha C.; Bailer, Robert T.; McDermott, Adrian B.; Roederer, Mario; Mascola, John R.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Graham, Barney S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Needle-free delivery improves the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines but is also associated with more local reactogenicity. Here we report the first comparison of Biojector and needle administration of a candidate rAd5 HIV vaccine. Methods Thirty-one adults, 18–55 years, 20 naive and 11 prior rAd5 vaccine recipients were randomized to receive single rAd5 vaccine via needle or Biojector IM injection at 1010 PU in a Phase I open label clinical trial. Solicited reactogenicity was collected for 5 days; clinical safety and immunogenicity follow-up was continued for 24 weeks. Results Overall, injections by either method were well tolerated. There were no serious adverse events. Frequency of any local reactogenicity was 16/16 (100%) for Biojector compared to 11/15 (73%) for needle injections. There was no difference in HIV Env-specific antibody response between Biojector and needle delivery. Env-specific antibody responses were more than 10-fold higher in subjects receiving a booster dose of rAd5 vaccine than after a single dose delivered by either method regardless of interval between prime and boost. Conclusions Biojector delivery did not improve antibody responses to the rAd5 vaccine compared to needle administration. Homologous boosting with rAd5 gene-based vectors can boost insert-specific antibody responses despite pre-existing vector-specific immunity. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00709605 NCT00709605 PMID:25264782

  8. Alcohol consumption and antitumor immunity: dynamic changes from activation to accelerated deterioration of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhu, Zhaohui; Zhang, Faya; Meadows, Gary G

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of how alcohol and its metabolites induce cancer have been studied extensively. However, the mechanisms whereby chronic alcohol consumption affects antitumor immunity and host survival have largely been unexplored. We studied the effects of chronic alcohol consumption on the immune system and antitumor immunity in mice inoculated with B16BL6 melanoma and found that alcohol consumption activates the immune system leading to an increase in the proportion of IFN-γ-producing NK, NKT, and T cells in mice not injected with tumors. One outcome associated with enhanced IFN-γ activation is inhibition of melanoma lung metastasis. However, the anti-metastatic effects do not translate into increased survival of mice bearing subcutaneous tumors. Continued growth of the subcutaneous tumors and alcohol consumption accelerates the deterioration of the immune system, which is reflected in the following: (1) inhibition in the expansion of memory CD8+ T cells, (2) accelerated decay of Th1 cytokine-producing cells, (3) increased myeloid-derived suppressor cells, (4) compromised circulation of B cells and T cells, and (5) increased NKT cells that exhibit an IL-4 dominant cytokine profile, which is inhibitory to antitumor immunity. Taken together, the dynamic effects of alcohol consumption on antitumor immunity are in two opposing phases: the first phase associated with immune stimulation is tumor inhibitory and the second phase resulting from the interaction between the effects of alcohol and the tumor leads to immune inhibition and resultant tumor progression.

  9. Immunization for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... nfid.org/#sthash.eZ72dCSP.dpuf Diseases & Vaccines Overview Immunization Schedules Talk to you doctor about your immunization ... years Immunization Schedule for Children, 7-18 years Immunization News July 8, 2016 HPV-related cancers on ...

  10. Late Babylonian Astrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, John M.

    The last five centuries BC saw the development of several new forms of astrology in Babylonia. Key to these new astrological techniques was the invention of the zodiac in about 400 BC. These new forms of astrology include personal horoscopes, astral medicine, and the exploitation of geometrical relationships between the position of heavenly bodies. Several Late Babylonian astrological doctrines were later adopted within Greek astrology.

  11. Epigenetic Control of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Busslinger, Meinrad; Tarakhovsky, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Immunity relies on the heterogeneity of immune cells and their ability to respond to pathogen challenges. In the adaptive immune system, lymphocytes display a highly diverse antigen receptor repertoire that matches the vast diversity of pathogens. In the innate immune system, the cell's heterogeneity and phenotypic plasticity enable flexible responses to changes in tissue homeostasis caused by infection or damage. The immune responses are calibrated by the graded activity of immune cells that can vary from yeast-like proliferation to lifetime dormancy. This article describes key epigenetic processes that contribute to the function of immune cells during health and disease. PMID:24890513

  12. Integrated Immune Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA's Integrated Immune Experiment. The objectives include: 1) Address significant lack of data regarding immune status during flight; 2) Replace several recent immune studies with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling; 3) Determine the in-flight status of immunity, physiological stress, viral immunity/reactivation; 4) Determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight; and 5) Determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  13. Understanding Herd Immunity.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, C J E; Ferrari, M; Graham, A L; Grenfell, B T

    2015-12-01

    Individual immunity is a powerful force affecting host health and pathogen evolution. Importantly, the effects of individual immunity also scale up to affect pathogen transmission dynamics and the success of vaccination campaigns for entire host populations. Population-scale immunity is often termed 'herd immunity'. Here we outline how individual immunity maps to population outcomes and discuss implications for control of infectious diseases. Particular immunological characteristics may be more or less likely to result in a population level signature of herd immunity; we detail this and also discuss other population-level outcomes that might emerge from individual-level immunity.

  14. Holographic dark energy and late cosmic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavón, Diego

    2007-06-01

    It has been persuasively argued that the number of effective degrees of freedom of a macroscopic system is proportional to its area rather than to its volume. This entails interesting consequences for cosmology. Here we present a model based on this 'holographic principle' that accounts for the present stage of accelerated expansion of the Universe and significantly alleviates the coincidence problem also for non-spatially flat cosmologies. Likewise, we comment on a recently proposed late transition to a fresh decelerated phase.

  15. Late veneer and late accretion to the terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasser, R.; Mojzsis, S. J.; Werner, S. C.; Matsumura, S.; Ida, S.

    2016-12-01

    It is generally accepted that silicate-metal ('rocky') planet formation relies on coagulation from a mixture of sub-Mars sized planetary embryos and (smaller) planetesimals that dynamically emerge from the evolving circum-solar disc in the first few million years of our Solar System. Once the planets have, for the most part, assembled after a giant impact phase, they continue to be bombarded by a multitude of planetesimals left over from accretion. Here we place limits on the mass and evolution of these planetesimals based on constraints from the highly siderophile element (HSE) budget of the Moon. Outcomes from a combination of N-body and Monte Carlo simulations of planet formation lead us to four key conclusions about the nature of this early epoch. First, matching the terrestrial to lunar HSE ratio requires either that the late veneer on Earth consisted of a single lunar-size impactor striking the Earth before 4.45 Ga, or that it originated from the impact that created the Moon. An added complication is that analysis of lunar samples indicates the Moon does not preserve convincing evidence for a late veneer like Earth. Second, the expected chondritic veneer component on Mars is 0.06 weight percent. Third, the flux of terrestrial impactors must have been low (≲10-6 M⊕ Myr-1) to avoid wholesale melting of Earth's crust after 4.4 Ga, and to simultaneously match the number of observed lunar basins. This conclusion leads to an Hadean eon which is more clement than assumed previously. Last, after the terrestrial planets had fully formed, the mass in remnant planetesimals was ∼10-3 M⊕, lower by at least an order of magnitude than most previous models suggest. Our dynamically and geochemically self-consistent scenario requires that future N-body simulations of rocky planet formation either directly incorporate collisional grinding or rely on pebble accretion.

  16. Immunization Milestones: A More Comprehensive Picture of Age-Appropriate Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Robison, Steve G.; Kurosky, Samantha K.; Young, Collette M.; Gallia, Charles A.; Arbor, Susan A.

    2010-01-01

    A challenge facing immunization registries is developing measures of childhood immunization coverage that contain more information for setting policy than present vaccine series up-to-date (UTD) rates. This study combined milestone analysis with provider encounter data to determine when children either do not receive indicated immunizations during medical encounters or fail to visit providers. Milestone analysis measures immunization status at key times between birth and age 2, when recommended immunizations first become late. The immunization status of a large population of children in the Oregon ALERT immunization registry and in the Oregon Health Plan was tracked across milestone ages. Findings indicate that the majority of children went back and forth with regard to having complete age-appropriate immunizations over time. We also found that immunization UTD rates when used alone are biased towards relating non-UTD status to a lack of visits to providers, instead of to provider visits on which recommended immunizations are not given. PMID:20508852

  17. Coping – Late Side Effects

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer treatment can cause late side effects that may not show up for months or years after treatment. These late effects may include heart and lung problems, bone loss, eye and hearing changes, lymphedema, and other problems

  18. Role of rice PPS in late vegetative and reproductive growth.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Itoh, Jun-Ichi; Nagato, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    The rice peter pan syndrome-1 (pps-1) mutant shows a prolonged juvenile phase and early flowering. Although the early vegetative phase and flowering time of pps-1 have been closely examined, the phenotypes in the late vegetative and reproductive phases are not yet well understood. In the ninth leaf blade of pps-1, the relative length of the midrib was comparable to the sixth leaf blade of wild-type. Moreover, pps-1 had a small inflorescence meristem and small panicles. These phenotypes indicate that in pps-1 the juvenile phase coexists with the late vegetative phase, resulting in small panicles. Gibberellin is known to promote the juvenile-adult phase transition. d18-k is dwarf and has a prolonged juvenile phase. Double mutant (d18-k pps-1) showed the same phenotype as the pps-1, indicating that PPS is upstream of GA biosynthetic genes.

  19. Vaccination to gain humoral immune memory

    PubMed Central

    Sarkander, Jana; Hojyo, Shintaro; Tokoyoda, Koji

    2016-01-01

    The concept of immune memory forms the biological basis for vaccination programs. Despite advancements in the field of immune memory and vaccination, most current vaccines are evaluated by magnitude of antigen-specific antibody titers in serum or mucosa after vaccination. It has been shown, however, that antibody-mediated humoral immune memory is established regardless of the magnitude and duration of immune reactions, suggesting that assessment of vaccine efficacy should be performed for several years after vaccination. This long-term investigation is disadvantageous for prevalent and pandemic infections. Long-lived memory plasma cells and memory helper T cells which contribute to humoral immune memory are generated in the bone marrow after migration of memory cell precursors through bloodstream. Thus, it may be a novel evaluation strategy to assess the precursors of memory cells in the blood in the early phase of the immune reaction(s). We here review recent advances on the generation and maintenance of immune memory cells involved in humoral immunity and introduce a current concept of direct and short-term assessment of humoral immune memory formation upon vaccination as a correlate of protection. PMID:28090322

  20. Organic Synthesis in the Late Stages of Stellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, S.

    2015-12-01

    Infrared and mm-wave observations have revealed a rapid and continuous synthesis of gas-phase and solid organic compounds in the late stages of stellar evolution. This process gives rise to an amorphous carbonaceous compound of mixed aromatic and aliphatic structure which is probably responsible for the unidentified infrared emission (UIE) bands that emerge during the PN phase.

  1. A Phase 3, Randomized, Double‐Blind, Placebo‐Controlled Study to Determine the Effect of Romiplostim on Health‐Related Quality of Life in Children with Primary Immune Thrombocytopenia and Associated Burden in Their Parents

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyan; Eisen, Melissa; Carpenter, Nancy; Crosby, Ross D.; Blanchette, Victor S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in children can negatively impact their health‐related quality of life (HRQoL) and impose a burden on their parents. This study sought to examine the effect of romiplostim on HRQoL and parental burden in children with primary ITP. Procedure This was a phase 3, randomized, double‐blind, placebo‐controlled study. Children aged <18 years with ITP ≥6 months were randomly assigned to receive romiplostim or placebo for 24 weeks. The Kids’ ITP Tool (KIT) was used to measure HRQoL and was administered to patients and/or their parents at baseline and weeks 8, 16, and 25. Mean KIT scores at each assessment and mean changes in KIT scores from baseline were calculated overall by treatment group and platelet response status. Psychometric properties of the KIT were evaluated and the minimally important difference (MID) was estimated for different KIT versions. Results Sixty‐two patients (42 romiplostim and 20 placebo) were enrolled. Changes in KIT scores by treatment group showed numerically greater and more often statistically significant improvements from baseline to each assessment for children receiving romiplostim versus placebo. Mixed‐effects analysis demonstrated statistically significantly greater reduction in parental burden from baseline in the romiplostim group versus placebo. Ranges for the MID were estimated as 9–13 points for the Child Self‐Report version and 11–13 points for the Parent Impact version. Conclusions The treatment with romiplostim may be associated with improved HRQoL in children with primary ITP and reduced burden to their parents. PMID:27037553

  2. A Phase I Study of Unimolecular Pentavalent (Globo-H-GM2-sTn-TF-Tn) Immunization of Patients with Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cancer in First Remission

    PubMed Central

    O’Cearbhaill, Roisin E.; Ragupathi, Govind; Zhu, Jianglong; Wan, Qian; Mironov, Svetlana; Yang, Guangbin; Spassova, Maria K.; Iasonos, Alexia; Kravetz, Sara; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Spriggs, David R.; Danishefsky, Samuel J.; Sabbatini, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a phase I study in ovarian cancer patients to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a synthetic unimolecular pentavalent carbohydrate vaccine (Globo-H, GM2, sTn, TF, and Tn) supported on a peptide backbone, conjugated to keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH), and mixed with immunological adjuvant QS-21. Twenty-four advanced-stage, poor-risk, first-remission ovarian cancer patients were enrolled from January 2011–Septermber 2013. Three dose levels were planned (25, 50, 100 mcg) with three cohorts of six patients each, with an additional 6-patient expansion cohort at the MTD. ELISA serologic IgM and IgG responses for each antigen was defined as positive response if antibody titers were ≥1:80 over the respective patient’s pre-vaccination serum. The study would be considered positive if at least four of 12 patients treated at the MTD showed immune responses for at least three of the five antigens. Twenty-four patients (median age, 54 years [range, 36–68]) were included in the safety analysis. Histology was high-grade serous in 22 patients (92%); 18 had stage III and six stage IV disease. The vaccine was well-tolerated at all doses, with no DLTs. At the highest treated dose, IgG and/or IgM responses were recorded against ≥3 antigens in 9/12 patients (75%), ≥4 in 7/12 (58%), and 5 in 3/12 (25%). With a median follow-up of 19 months (range, 2–39), 20 patients (83%) recurred and six (25%) died. The unimolecular pentavalent vaccine construct was shown to be safe and immunogenic. Such a construct greatly simplifies regulatory requirements and manufacturing, facilitates scalability, and provides adaptability. PMID:27110823

  3. Late Toxicity and Patient Self-Assessment of Breast Appearance/Satisfaction on RTOG 0319: A Phase 2 Trial of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy-Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Following Lumpectomy for Stages I and II Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chafe, Susan; Moughan, Jennifer; McCormick, Beryl; Wong, John; Pass, Helen; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Arthur, Douglas W.; Petersen, Ivy; White, Julia; Vicini, Frank A.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Late toxicities and cosmetic analyses of patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) on RTOG 0319 are presented. Methods and Materials: Patients with stages I to II breast cancer ≤3 cm, negative margins, and ≤3 positive nodes were eligible. Patients received three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT; 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily over 5 days). Toxicity and cosmesis were assessed by the patient (P), the radiation oncologist (RO), and the surgical oncologist (SO) at 3, 6, and 12 months from the completion of treatment and then annually. National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, was used to grade toxicity. Results: Fifty-two patients were evaluable. Median follow-up was 5.3 years (range, 1.7-6.4 years). Eighty-two percent of patients rated their cosmesis as good/excellent at 1 year, with rates of 64% at 3 years. At 3 years, 31 patients were satisfied with the treatment, 5 were not satisfied but would choose 3D-CRT again, and none would choose standard radiation therapy. The worst adverse event (AE) per patient reported as definitely, probably, or possibly related to radiation therapy was 36.5% grade 1, 50% grade 2, and 5.8% grade 3 events. Grade 3 AEs were all skin or musculoskeletal-related. Treatment-related factors were evaluated to potentially establish an association with observed toxicity. Surgical bed volume, target volume, the number of beams used, and the use of bolus were not associated with late cosmesis. Conclusions: Most patients enrolled in RTOG 0319 were satisfied with their treatment, and all would choose to have the 3D-CRT APBI again.

  4. Risk Factors and Prevention of Late Onset Sepsis in Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Downey, L Corbin; Smith, P Brian; Benjamin, Daniel K

    2010-01-01

    Late-onset sepsis in premature infants is a major cause of morbidity, mortality, and increased medical costs. Risk factors include low birth weight, low gestational age, previous antimicrobial exposure, poor hand hygiene, and central venous catheters. Methods studied to prevent late-onset sepsis include early feedings, immune globulin administration, prophylactic antimicrobial administration, and improved hand hygiene. In this review, we will outline the risk factors for development of late-onset sepsis and evidence supporting methods for prevention of late-onset sepsis in premature infants. PMID:20116186

  5. Expression of interferon-gamma (IFN-δ), IL-10, IL-12 and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) mRNA in synovial fluid cells from patients in the early and late phases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)

    PubMed Central

    BUCHT, A.; LARSSON, P.; WEISBROT, L.; THORNE, C.; PISA, P.; SMEDEGÅRD, G.; KEYSTONE, E C; GRÖNBERG, A.

    1996-01-01

    The expression of immunoregulatory cytokines was investigated in freshly isolated synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMC) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with RA, using a quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. IFN-γ, TGF-β, IL-10 and IL-12 (p40) transcripts were detected in SFMC of patients with early disease (<1 year duration) as well as in patients with long standing arthritis (>1 year). The expression of IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-12 mRNA was increased in SFMC compared with RA PBMC. In addition, the expression was higher in RA SFMC than in PBMC from healthy control individuals. Immunoassay analysis of the secreted IL-12 heterodimer demonstrated increased levels in RA SF compared with levels found in serum from RA patients and control individuals. High levels of TGF-β mRNA were found in SFMC, but a significantly decreased TGF-β/β2-microglobulin (β2-M) ratio was found compared with PBMC from both patients and control individuals. IL-4 mRNA could not be detected, either in SFMC or in PBMC. Cytokine expression in RA PBMC did not differ from control PBMC, with the exception of a decreased TGF-β/β2-M ratio in RA patients with early disease. Our findings of IFN-7 mRNA and IL-12, but undetectable levels of IL-4 mRNA, suggest that the synovitis is characterized by a type 1 immune response. The presence of TGF-β and IL-10 mRNA indicates that immunosuppressive cytokines may also operate in the inflamed joint, although their level of expression may not be sufficient for down-modulation of immune activation. PMID:8608632

  6. Remune. Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Lai, Derhsing; Jones, Taff

    2002-03-01

    The Immune Response Corp (IRC) is developing Remune, a potential HIV therapeutic vaccine. Remune is based on the Salk Immunogen, which is derived from an HIV isolate which has been inactivated by chemical depletion of glycoprotein 120 (gp120). Preliminary data suggested that Remune, in combination with antiviral drug therapy, results in undetectable levels of HIV. Phase III trials commenced in May 1997 and it was initially expected that registration filings would be made in 1999. However, following interim analysis of the 2500-patient, multicenter, double-blind, pivotal phase III study (study 806) in May 1999, an independent panel recommended concluding the clinical endpoint trial and IRC and licensee, Agouron, decided to pursue alternative regulatory strategies, including initiating two additional phase III surrogate marker trials. Despite this, Agouron gave IRC notice of termination of its continued development in July 2001. In August 2001, IRC informed Agouron that, due to the total number of endpoints to date falling short of that previously assumed by Agouron, it did not intend to continue Agouron's Study 202 of Remune. In July 2001, licensee Trinity Medical Group filed an NDA with the governing health authorities in Thailand for Remune. The Thai FDA certified Immune Response's Remune manufacturing facility as being in compliance with GMP standards, following an on site inspection by Thai officials in November 2001 that was performed as a requirement of Trinity's Thai NDA. As a result of this certification, Trinity expected that a "timely determination" could be made by the Thai FDA. Rhĵne-Poulenc Rorer discontinued its part in the development of Remune, with all manufacturing, marketing and distribution rights reverting to IRC. After Agouron returned rights to Remune in July 2001, IRC heldfull rights in the US, Europe and Japan, while collaborating with its partners Trinity Medical Group and Roemmers Laboratory in the Southeast Asian and Latin American

  7. Innate immune system cells in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Espinosa-Luna, Jose E; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Legorreta-Haquet, María V; Montoya-Díaz, Eduardo; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall characterized by innate and adaptive immune system involvement. A key component of atherosclerotic plaque inflammation is the persistence of different innate immune cell types including mast cells, neutrophils, natural killer cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. Several endogenous signals such as oxidized low-density lipoproteins, and exogenous signals such as lipopolysaccharides, trigger the activation of these cells. In particular, these signals orchestrate the early and late inflammatory responses through the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and contribute to plaque evolution through the formation of foam cells, among other events. In this review we discuss how innate immune system cells affect atherosclerosis pathogenesis.

  8. Imbalanced immune homeostasis in immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2016-04-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune bleeding disorder resulting from low platelet counts caused by inadequate production as well as increased destruction by autoimmune mechanisms. As with other autoimmune disorders, chronic ITP is characterized by perturbations of immune homeostasis with hyperactivated effector cells as well as defective regulatory arm of the adaptive immune system, which will be reviewed here. Interestingly, some ITP treatments are associated with restoring the regulatory imbalance, although it remains unclear whether the immune system is redirected to a state of tolerance once treatment is discontinued. Understanding the mechanisms that result in breakdown of immune homeostasis in ITP will help to identify novel pathways for restoring tolerance and inhibiting effector cell responses. This information can then be translated into developing therapies for averting autoimmunity not only in ITP but also many autoimmune disorders.

  9. Imbalanced immune homeostasis in immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2017-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune bleeding disorder resulting from low platelet counts caused by inadequate production as well as increased destruction by autoimmune mechanisms. As with other autoimmune disorders, chronic ITP is characterized by perturbations of immune homeostasis with hyperactivated effector cells as well as defective regulatory arm of the adaptive immune system, which will be reviewed here. Interestingly, some ITP treatments are associated with restoring the regulatory imbalance, although it remains unclear whether the immune system is redirected to a state of tolerance once treatment is discontinued. Understanding the mechanisms that result in breakdown of immune homeostasis in ITP will help to identify novel pathways for restoring tolerance and inhibiting effector cell responses. This information can then be translated into developing therapies for averting autoimmunity not only in ITP but also many autoimmune disorders. PMID:27312156

  10. Immune Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Saleem; Surendran, Naveen; Pichichero, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neonates have little immunological memory and a developing immune system, which increases their vulnerability to infectious agents. Recent advances in understanding of neonatal immunity indicate that both innate and adaptive responses are dependent on precursor frequency of lymphocytes, antigenic dose and mode of exposure. Studies in neonatal mouse models and human umbilical cord blood cells demonstrate the capability of neonatal immune cells to produce immune responses similar to adults in some aspects but not others. This review focuses mainly on the developmental and functional mechanisms of the human neonatal immune system. In particular, the mechanism of innate and adaptive immunity and the role of neutrophils, antigen presenting cells, differences in subclasses of T lymphocytes (Th1, Th2, Tregs) and B cells are discussed. In addition, we have included the recent developments in neonatal mouse immune system. Understanding neonatal immunity is essential to development of therapeutic vaccines to combat newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:25088080

  11. Aging changes in immunity

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004008.htm Aging changes in immunity To use the sharing features ... cells and antibodies that destroy these harmful substances. AGING CHANGES AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE IMMUNE SYSTEM ...

  12. Immunity to cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, A.E.; Mitchell, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains five sections, each containing several papers. The section titles are: Identification and Characterization of Tumor Antigens; Immune Responses to Tumor Antigens; Regulation of the Immune Response to Tumor Cells, Immunotherapy and Biomodulators, and Immunotherapy and Immunoprophylaxis.

  13. Immune System and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It ... t, to find and destroy them. If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be ...

  14. [Immune system and tumors].

    PubMed

    Terme, Magali; Tanchot, Corinne

    2017-02-01

    Despite having been much debated, it is now well established that the immune system plays an essential role in the fight against cancer. In this article, we will highlight the implication of the immune system in the control of tumor growth and describe the major components of the immune system involved in the antitumoral immune response. The immune system, while exerting pressure on tumor cells, also will play a pro-tumoral role by sculpting the immunogenicity of tumors cells as they develop. Finally, we will illustrate the numerous mechanisms of immune suppression that take place within the tumoral microenvironment which allow tumor cells to escape control from the immune system. The increasingly precise knowledge of the brakes to an effective antitumor immune response allows the development of immunotherapy strategies more and more innovating and promising of hope.

  15. Boosting with Subtype C CN54rgp140 Protein Adjuvanted with Glucopyranosyl Lipid Adjuvant after Priming with HIV-DNA and HIV-MVA Is Safe and Enhances Immune Responses: A Phase I Trial

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Sarah; Geldmacher, Christof; Munseri, Patricia J.; Aboud, Said; Missanga, Marco; Mann, Philipp; Wahren, Britta; Ferrari, Guido; Polonis, Victoria R.; Robb, Merlin L.; Weber, Jonathan; Tatoud, Roger; Maboko, Leonard; Hoelscher, Michael; Lyamuya, Eligius F.; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Sandström, Eric; Kroidl, Arne; Bakari, Muhammad; Nilsson, Charlotta; McCormack, Sheena

    2016-01-01

    Background A vaccine against HIV is widely considered the most effective and sustainable way of reducing new infections. We evaluated the safety and impact of boosting with subtype C CN54rgp140 envelope protein adjuvanted in glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant (GLA-AF) in Tanzanian volunteers previously given three immunizations with HIV-DNA followed by two immunizations with recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (HIV-MVA). Methods Forty volunteers (35 vaccinees and five placebo recipients) were given two CN54rgp140/GLA-AF immunizations 30–71 weeks after the last HIV-MVA vaccination. These immunizations were delivered intramuscularly four weeks apart. Results The vaccine was safe and well tolerated except for one episode of asymptomatic hypoglycaemia that was classified as severe adverse event. Two weeks after the second HIV-MVA vaccination 34 (97%) of the 35 previously vaccinated developed Env-specific binding antibodies, and 79% and 84% displayed IFN-γ ELISpot responses to Gag and Env, respectively. Binding antibodies to subtype C Env (included in HIV-DNA and protein boost), subtype B Env (included only in HIV-DNA) and CRF01_AE Env (included only in HIV-MVA) were significantly boosted by the CN54rgp140/GLA-AF immunizations. Functional antibodies detected using an infectious molecular clone virus/peripheral blood mononuclear cell neutralization assay, a pseudovirus/TZM-bl neutralization assay or by assays for antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) were not significantly boosted. In contrast, T-cell proliferative responses to subtype B MN antigen and IFN-γ ELISpot responses to Env peptides were significantly enhanced. Four volunteers not primed with HIV-DNA and HIV-MVA before the CN54rgp140/GLA-AF immunizations mounted an antibody response, while cell-mediated responses were rare. After the two Env subtype C protein immunizations, a trend towards higher median subtype C Env binding antibody titers was found in vaccinees who had received HIV-DNA and HIV

  16. Managing population immunity to reduce or eliminate the risks of circulation following the importation of polioviruses.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Kalkowska, Dominika A; Duintjer Tebbens, Radboud J

    2015-03-24

    Poliovirus importations into polio-free countries represent a major concern during the final phases of global eradication of wild polioviruses (WPVs). We extend dynamic transmission models to demonstrate the dynamics of population immunity out through 2020 for three countries that only used inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) for routine immunization: the US, Israel, and The Netherlands. For each country, we explore the vulnerability to re-established transmission following an importation for each poliovirus serotype, including the impact of immunization choices following the serotype 1 WPV importation that occurred in 2013 in Israel. As population immunity declines below the threshold required to prevent transmission, countries become at risk for re-established transmission. Although importations represent stochastic events that countries cannot fully control because people cross borders and polioviruses mainly cause asymptomatic infections, countries can ensure that any importations die out. Our results suggest that the general US population will remain above the threshold for transmission through 2020. In contrast, Israel became vulnerable to re-established transmission of importations of live polioviruses by the late 2000s. In Israel, the recent WPV importation and outbreak response use of bivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (bOPV) eliminated the vulnerability to an importation of poliovirus serotypes 1 and 3 for several years, but not serotype 2. The Netherlands experienced a serotype 1 WPV outbreak in 1992-1993 and became vulnerable to re-established transmission in religious communities with low vaccine acceptance around the year 2000, although the general population remains well-protected from widespread transmission. All countries should invest in active management of population immunity to avoid the potential circulation of imported live polioviruses. IPV-using countries may wish to consider prevention opportunities and/or ensure preparedness for response

  17. Circadian clock proteins and immunity.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Anne M; Bellet, Marina M; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2014-02-20

    Immune parameters change with time of day and disruption of circadian rhythms has been linked to inflammatory pathologies. A circadian-clock-controlled immune system might allow an organism to anticipate daily changes in activity and feeding and the associated risk of infection or tissue damage to the host. Responses to bacteria have been shown to vary depending on time of infection, with mice being more at risk of sepsis when challenged ahead of their activity phase. Studies highlight the extent to which the molecular clock, most notably the core clock proteins BMAL1, CLOCK, and REV-ERBα, control fundamental aspects of the immune response. Examples include the BMAL1:CLOCK heterodimer regulating toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) expression and repressing expression of the inflammatory monocyte chemokine ligand (CCL2) as well as REV-ERBα suppressing the induction of interleukin-6. Understanding the daily rhythm of the immune system could have implications for vaccinations and how we manage infectious and inflammatory diseases.

  18. Late miocene tidal deposits in the amazonian foreland basin.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, M E; Linna, A M; Santos, J C; Negri, F R

    1995-07-21

    Late Miocene tidal sediments of Acre, Brazilian Amazonia, were deposited in an embayment or interior seaway located in the sub-Andean zone. This late Tertiary embayment system may once have connected the Caribbean with the South Atlantic. The tidal coasts of the embayment-seaway have provided an avenue for the earliest waif (over water) dispersal phases of the great American biotic interchange in the late Miocene. The subsequent change from semimarine to terrestrial environments is of value in assessing the importance of earlier hypotheses on the evolution of the westem Amazonian landscape and gives insight into the formation of several observed biogeographic patterns, especially of aquatic biota.

  19. Late Miocene Tidal Deposits in the Amazonian Foreland Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasanen, Matti E.; Linna, Ari M.; Santos, Jose C. R.; Negri, Francisco R.

    1995-07-01

    Late Miocene tidal sediments of Acre, Brazilian Amazonia, were deposited in an embayment or interior seaway located in the sub-Andean zone. This late Tertiary embayment system may once have connected the Caribbean with the South Atlantic. The tidal coasts of the embayment-seaway have provided an avenue for the earliest waif (over water) dispersal phases of the great American biotic interchange in the late Miocene. The subsequent change from semimarine to terrestrial environments is of value in assessing the importance of earlier hypotheses on the evolution of the western Amazonian landscape and gives insight into the formation of several observed biogeographic patterns, especially of aquatic biota.

  20. Never too late.

    PubMed

    1996-11-01

    Motivated by the belief that education has been central to Japan's economic success, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) promotes universal access to quality basic education. In developing countries, school children rarely learn science through experiments. A new JICA training course, the Science Experiment in Primary Education, involved teacher trainers from Bangladesh, Myanmar, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. Physics, chemistry, biology, geology, and astronomy experiments that require simple, inexpensive materials were taught. Another JICA project in Satkhira, Bangladesh, sought to raise the economic status of women enrolled in a dressmaking program through a year-long evening literacy class at three sites. Elementary school diplomas (available with proof to a local teacher of basic literacy and minimal arithmetic skills) are required in Bangladesh to apply for nongovernmental organization-initiated vocational schools and loans to start businesses in areas such as dressmaking, agriculture, and livestock raising. By late 1993, the female literacy program had expanded to 18 villages.

  1. Your Child's Immunization Record

    MedlinePlus

    Your Child’s Immunization Record It’s important to keep up-to-date records of all your child’s immunizations, beginning at birth and continuing through ... receives a vaccination by filling in the date. Record of Immunizations Date Given: Where Given: Reaction: Hepatitis ...

  2. The Immune System Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work, Kirsten A.; Gibbs, Melissa A.; Friedman, Erich J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a card game that helps introductory biology students understand the basics of the immune response to pathogens. Students simulate the steps of the immune response with cards that represent the pathogens and the cells and molecules mobilized by the immune system. In the process, they learn the similarities and differences between the…

  3. Immune System Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System Print A A A How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! About KidsHealth ...

  4. Immune Disorder HSCT Protocol

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-01

    Immune Deficiency Disorders; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Hyper-IgM; DiGeorge Syndrome; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immune Deficiency; Immune Dysregulatory Disorders; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; IPEX; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  5. The use of an immunization information system to establish baseline childhood immunization rates and measure contract objectives.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Stephanie L; Maerz, Thomas R; Hurie, Marjorie B; Gabor, Gerald W; Flynn, John M; Davis, Jeffrey P

    2009-01-01

    Measuring progress toward national immunization objectives at the local level, although difficult, is becoming more feasible owing to statewide immunization information systems. This article describes how a state immunization program expanded the scope of immunization service contracts with local health departments (LHDs) to address the immunization rates among children living within their jurisdictions using the Wisconsin Immunization Registry (WIR) to measure achievement of population-based objectives. By contract year (CY) 2008, 99 percent of Wisconsin LHDs selected population-based contract objectives. In late 2008, the Wisconsin Immunization Program assessed all children at 24 months of age for completeness of the 4:3:1:3:3:1 (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis/poliovirus/measles-containing vaccine/Haemophilus influenzae type b/hepatitis B/varicella) series by county for each of four CYs, using the WIR. From CY 2005 to CY 2008, LHDs in 61 (86%) of the 71 counties demonstrated increased series completeness rates for the series, and the overall statewide series completeness increased from 58 percent to 64 percent. However, the increases we observed cannot be attributed solely to LHDs' acceptance of population-based objectives because controlling for other factors known to influence immunization coverage levels was outside the scope of this case study. We found the WIR to be a powerful tool that can measure immunization coverage among local populations independent of the immunization provider, assess improvement toward contract objectives, and target resources toward pockets of need.

  6. Leptin modulates the late fever response to LPS in diet-induced obese animals.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Joanna; Woodside, Barbara; Luheshi, Giamal N

    2014-11-01

    Leptin is an important modulator of both inflammation and energy homeostasis, making it a key interface between the inflammatory response to pathogenic stimuli and the energy status of the host. In previous studies we demonstrated that sickness responses to systemic immune challenge, including fever, are significantly exacerbated in diet induced obese animals. To investigate whether this exacerbation is functionally linked to the obesity associated increase in circulating levels of leptin, a species-specific leptin antiserum (LAS) was used to neutralize endogenous leptin in diet-induced obese adult male Wistar rats treated with a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (100μg/kg). LAS significantly reduced the magnitude of the later phases of the fever response, and attenuated the circulating levels of IL-6, IL-1ra and bioactivity of leptin in the obese animals. In addition, the antiserum significantly attenuated the hypothalamic expression of IL-1ß, IκBα, COX2, SOCS3 and IL-6 in both lean and obese rats 10h after the LPS injection and NF-IL6 in the hypothalamus of obese rats only. The relatively late rise in brain IL-6 suggested a role in mediating the extended fever response in obese animals and we tested this by neutralizing brain IL-6 using an IL6-AS injected intracerebroventricularly (4μl, icv). The IL6-AS significantly but transiently (between 9h and 12h post LPS) reduced the late fever response of obese rats. These results demonstrate that leptin plays an important part in modulating the late portion of the fever response to LPS, likely through the induction of hypothalamic IL-6 in obese animals.

  7. Kidney and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Gen

    2017-03-01

    Innate immune system is an important modulator of the inflammatory response during infection and tissue injury/repair. The kidney as a vital organ with high energy demand plays a key role in regulating the disease related metabolic process. Increasing research interest has focused on the immune pathogenesis of many kidney diseases. However, innate immune cells such as dendritic cells, macrophages, NK cells and a few innate lymphocytes, as well as the complement system are essential for renal immune homeostasis and ensure a coordinated balance between tissue injury and regeneration. The innate immune response provides the first line of host defense initiated by several classes of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as membrane-bound Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs), together with inflammasomes responsible for early innate immune response. Although the innate immune system is well studied, the research on the detailed relationship between innate immunity and kidney is still very limited. In this review, we will focus on the innate immune sensing system in renal immune homeostasis, as well as the corresponding pathogenesis of many kidney diseases. The pivotal roles of innate immunity in renal injury and regeneration with special emphasis on kidney disease related immunoregulatory mechanism are also discussed.

  8. Chapter 2: Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Turvey, Stuart E.; Broide, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed an explosion of interest in the innate immune system. Questions about how the innate immune system senses infection and empowers a protective immune response are being answered at the molecular level. These basic science discoveries are being translated into a more complete understanding of the central role innate immunity plays in the pathogenesis of many human infectious and inflammatory diseases. It is particularly exciting that we are already seeing a return on these scientific investments with the emergence of novel therapies to harness the power of the innate immune system. In this review we explore the defining characteristics of the innate immune system, and through more detailed examples, we highlight recent breakthroughs that have advanced our understanding of the role of innate immunity in human health and disease. PMID:19932920

  9. Late, Late-Onset Group B Streptococcus Cellulitis With Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Yokouchi, Yukako; Katsumori, Hiroshi; Koike, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) infection remains a leading cause of serious neonatal and early infantile infection. As the infection often presents with nonspecific symptoms, and is associated with underlying bacteremia, prompt investigation and treatment is required. We report a case of late, late-onset GBS infection with bacteremia in a 94-day-old boy experiencing cellulitis of the left hand. Although late-onset disease or late, late-onset disease has been reported to be common among infants with underlying conditions such as premature birth, immunocompromised status, trauma, or among those using medical devices, no such underlying medical condition predisposed this infant to invasive GBS infection. Recent reports including the present case underscore the risk of GBS infection among previously healthy infants beyond the neonatal period. Thus, clinicians should especially be aware of unusual presentations of GBS invasive disease with bacteremia.

  10. Measuring polio immunity to plan immunization activities.

    PubMed

    Voorman, Arend; Lyons, Hil M

    2016-11-21

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative is closer than ever to achieving a polio-free world. Immunization activities must still be carried out in non-endemic countries to maintain population immunity at levels which will stop poliovirus from spreading if it is re-introduced from still-infected areas. In areas where there is no active transmission of poliovirus, programs must rely on surrogate indicators of population immunity to determine the appropriate immunization activities, typically caregiver-reported vaccination history obtained from non-polio acute flaccid paralysis patients identified through polio surveillance. We used regression models to examine the relationship between polio vaccination campaigns and caregiver-reported polio vaccination history. We find that in many countries, vaccination campaigns have a surprisingly weak impact on these commonly used indicators. We conclude that alternative criteria and data, such as routine immunization indicators from vaccination records or household surveys, should be considered for planning polio vaccination campaigns, and that validation of such surrogate indicators is necessary if they are to be used as the basis for program planning and risk assessment. We recommend that the GPEI and similar organizations consider or continue devoting additional resources to rigorously study population immunity and campaign effectiveness in at-risk countries.

  11. [Prolactin as a modulator of antiparasitic immunity].

    PubMed

    Płociński, Przemysław; Dzitko, Katarzyna; Długońska, Henryka

    2007-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a polypeptide hormone of the pituitary origin, that expresses over 300 separate biological activities, including its involvement in the regulation of immune functions. The hormone's immune capacities are related, among others, to comitogenic activity, prevention of immune cell apoptosis, stimulation of interleukins and antibodies production. Prolactin acts as a potent positive modulator of immunity to some protozoan parasites. It is well established that the hormone stimulates IFN-gamma and many other TH1-type cytokines production during Toxoplasma gondii, Leishmania sp. and Acanthamoeba castellanii infections. Recent studies suggest that human prolactin may be a regulator of antiparasitic activity against Plasmodium falciparum. On the other hand pregnancy-associated hyperprolactinemia may have a relevant contribution to reactivation of latent infections caused by many helminthic parasites, like Ancylostoma sp. or Necator sp. It is possibly connected with the process of transmammary transmission of hookworm infection to breast-fed newborns. Moreover, an increase in endogenous circulating prolactin during late pregnancy and lactation in ewes infected with Haemonchus contortus, promotes the phenomenon of periparturient egg rise. High prolactin levels have also been seen in dairy cattle suffering from other trichostrongylids infections. In this article we have discussed the role of prolactin as an important regulator of immunity to parasites.

  12. Senecavirus A infection in market weight gilts, sows and neonates with subsequent protective immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The objectives of this study were to 1) characterize SVA infection in market weight pigs, late-gestation sows, and neonates and 2) examine protective immunity in late-gestation gilts Materials and Methods: For Part 1 of the study 15 gilts were inoculated with SVA, bled regularly for 2 we...

  13. Senecavirus A infection in sows, neonates, and market weight gilts with subsequent protective immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The objectives of this study were to 1) characterize SVA infection late-gestation sows, neonates, and market weight gilts and 2) examine protective immunity in late-gestation gilts Methods: For Part 1, 15 market weight gilts were inoculated with SVA, bled regularly, and clinical observat...

  14. How do plants achieve immunity? Defence without specialized immune cells.

    PubMed

    Spoel, Steven H; Dong, Xinnian

    2012-01-25

    Vertebrates have evolved a sophisticated adaptive immune system that relies on an almost infinite diversity of antigen receptors that are clonally expressed by specialized immune cells that roam the circulatory system. These immune cells provide vertebrates with extraordinary antigen-specific immune capacity and memory, while minimizing self-reactivity. Plants, however, lack specialized mobile immune cells. Instead, every plant cell is thought to be capable of launching an effective immune response. So how do plants achieve specific, self-tolerant immunity and establish immune memory? Recent developments point towards a multilayered plant innate immune system comprised of self-surveillance, systemic signalling and chromosomal changes that together establish effective immunity.

  15. Modeling late Paleozoic glaciation

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, T.J.; Baum, S.K. )

    1992-06-01

    Late Paleozoic glaciation on Gondwana is associated with changes in geography, solar luminosity, and estimated CO{sub 2} levels. To assess the relative importance of these boundary conditions, the authors conducted a suite of climate model simulations for the periods before, during, and after peak mid-Carboniferous ({approximately}300 Ma) glaciation (340, 300, and 255 and 225 Ma, respectively). Orbital insolation values favorable for glaciation and interglaciation were used for each time interval. Results indicate that changes in geography cause significant changes in snow area, but the temporal trend is not consistent with the geologic record for glaciation. Combined CO{sub 2}-plus-geography changes yield the best agreement with observations. In addition, interglacial orbital configurations result in almost ice-free conditions for the glacial interval at 300 Ma, at a time of low CO{sub 2}. The large simulated glacial-interglacial snowline fluctuations for Permian-Carboniferous time may explain cyclothem fluctuations at these times. Overall, results support the importance of the CO{sub 2} paradigm, but also indicate that a fuller understanding of past climate change requires consideration of paleogeographic, luminosity, and orbital insolation changes.

  16. Illusory Late Heavy Bombardments

    PubMed Central

    Boehnke, Patrick; Harrison, T. Mark

    2016-01-01

    The Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB), a hypothesized impact spike at ∼3.9 Ga, is one of the major scientific concepts to emerge from Apollo-era lunar exploration. A significant portion of the evidence for the existence of the LHB comes from histograms of 40Ar/39Ar “plateau” ages (i.e., regions selected on the basis of apparent isochroneity). However, due to lunar magmatism and overprinting from subsequent impact events, virtually all Apollo-era samples show evidence for 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum disturbances, leaving open the possibility that partial 40Ar* resetting could bias interpretation of bombardment histories due to plateaus yielding misleadingly young ages. We examine this possibility through a physical model of 40Ar* diffusion in Apollo samples and test the uniqueness of the impact histories obtained by inverting plateau age histograms. Our results show that plateau histograms tend to yield age peaks, even in those cases where the input impact curve did not contain such a spike, in part due to the episodic nature of lunar crust or parent body formation. Restated, monotonically declining impact histories yield apparent age peaks that could be misinterpreted as LHB-type events. We further conclude that the assignment of apparent 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages bears an undesirably high degree of subjectivity. When compounded by inappropriate interpretations of histograms constructed from plateau ages, interpretation of apparent, but illusory, impact spikes is likely. PMID:27621460

  17. Illusory Late Heavy Bombardments.

    PubMed

    Boehnke, Patrick; Harrison, T Mark

    2016-09-27

    The Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB), a hypothesized impact spike at ∼3.9 Ga, is one of the major scientific concepts to emerge from Apollo-era lunar exploration. A significant portion of the evidence for the existence of the LHB comes from histograms of (40)Ar/(39)Ar "plateau" ages (i.e., regions selected on the basis of apparent isochroneity). However, due to lunar magmatism and overprinting from subsequent impact events, virtually all Apollo-era samples show evidence for (40)Ar/(39)Ar age spectrum disturbances, leaving open the possibility that partial (40)Ar* resetting could bias interpretation of bombardment histories due to plateaus yielding misleadingly young ages. We examine this possibility through a physical model of (40)Ar* diffusion in Apollo samples and test the uniqueness of the impact histories obtained by inverting plateau age histograms. Our results show that plateau histograms tend to yield age peaks, even in those cases where the input impact curve did not contain such a spike, in part due to the episodic nature of lunar crust or parent body formation. Restated, monotonically declining impact histories yield apparent age peaks that could be misinterpreted as LHB-type events. We further conclude that the assignment of apparent (40)Ar/(39)Ar plateau ages bears an undesirably high degree of subjectivity. When compounded by inappropriate interpretations of histograms constructed from plateau ages, interpretation of apparent, but illusory, impact spikes is likely.

  18. Variola virus immune evasion proteins.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Lance R; Oehlberg, Katherine A; Reid, Jeremy J; Avci, Dilek; Rosengard, Ariella M

    2003-09-01

    Variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, encodes approximately 200 proteins. Over 80 of these proteins are located in the terminal regions of the genome, where proteins associated with host immune evasion are encoded. To date, only two variola proteins have been characterized. Both are located in the terminal regions and demonstrate immunoregulatory functions. One protein, the smallpox inhibitor of complement enzymes (SPICE), is homologous to a vaccinia virus virulence factor, the vaccinia virus complement-control protein (VCP), which has been found experimentally to be expressed early in the course of vaccinia infection. Both SPICE and VCP are similar in structure and function to the family of mammalian complement regulatory proteins, which function to prevent inadvertent injury to adjacent cells and tissues during complement activation. The second variola protein is the variola virus high-affinity secreted chemokine-binding protein type II (CKBP-II, CBP-II, vCCI), which binds CC-chemokine receptors. The vaccinia homologue of CKBP-II is secreted both early and late in infection. CKBP-II proteins are highly conserved among orthopoxviruses, sharing approximately 85% homology, but are absent in eukaryotes. This characteristic sets it apart from other known virulence factors in orthopoxviruses, which share sequence homology with known mammalian immune regulatory gene products. Future studies of additional variola proteins may help illuminate factors associated with its virulence, pathogenesis and strict human tropism. In addition, these studies may also assist in the development of targeted therapies for the treatment of both smallpox and human immune-related diseases.

  19. Managing the chronically late patient.

    PubMed

    Baum, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Every practice has patients who are chronically late. This wrecks havoc with your schedule and makes you less productive. Patients can be trained to respect your time and arrive in the office on time. This article discusses several approaches to managing the chronically late patient.

  20. How Ebola and Marburg Viruses Battle the Immune System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    adaptive immunity) • Late (fever, malaise, gastrointestinal distress, possible septicaemia, LPS?) B cell (?) CD8+ T cell Hepatocytes CD4+ T cell • High...specific antibodies; mitigation of virus-induced coagulation deficits using recombinant nematode anticoagulant protein c2; antisense compounds or small

  1. Immune Reconstitution after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ogonek, Justyna; Kralj Juric, Mateja; Ghimire, Sakhila; Varanasi, Pavankumar Reddy; Holler, Ernst; Greinix, Hildegard; Weissinger, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The timely reconstitution and regain of function of a donor-derived immune system is of utmost importance for the recovery and long-term survival of patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Of note, new developments such as umbilical cord blood or haploidentical grafts were associated with prolonged immunodeficiency due to delayed immune reconstitution, raising the need for better understanding and enhancing the process of immune reconstitution and finding strategies to further optimize these transplant procedures. Immune reconstitution post-HSCT occurs in several phases, innate immunity being the first to regain function. The slow T cell reconstitution is regarded as primarily responsible for deleterious infections with latent viruses or fungi, occurrence of graft-versus-host disease, and relapse. Here we aim to summarize the major steps of the adaptive immune reconstitution and will discuss the importance of immune balance in patients after HSCT. PMID:27909435

  2. Anxiety disorders in late life.

    PubMed Central

    Flint, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and treatment of anxiety disorders in late life. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Epidemiologic and comorbidity data are derived from well designed random-sample community surveys. There are virtually no controlled data specific to treatment of anxiety in the elderly. Guidelines for treating anxiety disorders in late life, therefore, must be extrapolated from results of randomized controlled trials conducted in younger patients. MAIN MESSAGE: Generalized anxiety disorder and agoraphobia account for most cases of anxiety disorder in late life. Late-onset generalized anxiety is usually associated with depressive illness and, in this situation, the primary pharmacologic treatment is antidepressant medication. Most elderly people with agoraphobia do not give a history of panic attacks; exposure therapy is the preferred treatment for agoraphobia without panic. CONCLUSIONS: Physicians need to make more use of antidepressant medication and behavioural therapy and less use of benzodiazepines in treating anxiety disorders in late life. PMID:10587775

  3. Invited review: heat stress effects during late gestation on dry cows and their calves.

    PubMed

    Tao, S; Dahl, G E

    2013-07-01

    In dairy cattle, late gestation is a critical period for fetal growth and physiological transition into the next lactation. Environmental factors, such as temperature and light, exert dramatic effects on the production, health, and well-being of animals during this period and after parturition. The aim of this review was to introduce effects of heat stress during late gestation on dairy cattle, and discuss the biological mechanisms that underlie the observed production and health responses in the dam and her fetus. Relative to cooled cows, cows that are heat stressed during late gestation have impaired mammary growth before parturition and decreased milk production in the subsequent lactation. In response to higher milk yield, cows cooled prepartum undergo a series of homeorhetic adaptations in early lactation to meet higher demand for milk synthesis compared with heat-stressed cows, but no direct effect of environmental heat stress on metabolism exists during the dry period. Prepartum cooling improves immune status of transition cows and evidence suggests that altered prolactin signaling in immune cells mediates the effects of heat stress on immune function. Late-gestation heat stress compromises placental development, which results in fetal hypoxia, malnutrition, and eventually fetal growth retardation. Maternal heat stress may also have carryover effects on the postnatal growth of offspring, but direct evidence is still lacking. Emerging evidence suggests that offspring from prepartum heat-stressed cows have compromised passive immunity and impaired cell-mediated immune function compared with those from cooled cows.

  4. Late-life attachment.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Mélanie; Rahioui, Hassan

    2017-03-01

    Old age is likely to cause a crisis in one's life because of the vulnerabilities it brings up, acting as stressful elements disrupting the elder's feeling of security. It leads to the activation of what is called his attachment system, consisting in attachment styles and interpersonal emotional regulation strategies. To recover a higher sense of safety, the elder would refer to his attachment figures, that is to say closed people paying attention to him, showing towards him availability and consideration. However older adults particularly see their tolerance threshold lowered, regarding an accumulation of losses (true or symbolic) and stressful events within their lifetime. In a psychological and organic exhaustion phenomenon, the risk is to wear out the interpersonal emotional regulation strategies. These are as much vulnerabilities that may increase psychiatric decompensation, including depression. To resolve the tension of this period and to found a necessary secure feeling, the elder will have to redesign the attachment links previously settled and proceed to adjustments to this new context. The need of relational closeness comes back in the elders' attachment behaviour, counting on attachment figures not only to help their loneliness or dependency, but essentially to support them in a narcissist and affective way. That is why attachment theory enlightens the late life period, such as the new challenges older adults have to face. Many studies recognize its value in understanding the transition to old age, but without proposing conceptualization. We aim first to focus on attachment conception to say how much it is relevant with elderly, and then to describe specific terms of attachment within this population in order to better understand those patients. To finish, we must think about new therapeutic proposals taking into consideration the attachment perspective for a better understanding of old age transition.

  5. Human immune system variation

    PubMed Central

    Brodin, Petter; Davis, Mark M.

    2017-01-01

    The human immune system is highly variable between individuals but relatively stable over time within a given person. Recent conceptual and technological advances have enabled systems immunology analyses, which reveal the composition of immune cells and proteins in populations of healthy individuals. The range of variation and some specific influences that shape an individual’s immune system is now becoming clearer. Human immune systems vary as a consequence of heritable and non-heritable influences, but symbiotic and pathogenic microbes and other non-heritable influences explain most of this variation. Understanding when and how such influences shape the human immune system is key for defining metrics of immunological health and understanding the risk of immune-mediated and infectious diseases. PMID:27916977

  6. Immune Regulation of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Disis, Mary L.

    2010-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immune system cells play a major role in regulating the growth of cancer. Although it is commonly thought that an immune response localized to the tumor will inhibit cancer growth, it is clear that some types of inflammation induced in a tumor may also lead to cancer proliferation, invasion, and dissemination. Recent evidence suggests, however, that some patients with cancer can mount an antitumor immune response that has the potential to control or eliminate cancer. Indeed, a so-called “immune response” signature has been described in malignancy that is associated with improved outcomes in several tumor types. Moreover, the presence of specific subsets of T cells, which have the capability to penetrate tumor stroma and infiltrate deep into the parenchyma, identifies patients with an improved prognosis. Immune-based therapies have the potential to modulate the tumor microenvironment by eliciting immune system cells that will initiate acute inflammation that leads to tissue destruction. PMID:20516428

  7. Immunizations: vaccinations in general.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Catherine C

    2015-06-01

    The childhood immunization schedule is complex and nuanced. Although serious adverse reactions to immunizations are uncommon, clinicians must be well-versed in these reactions as well as the contraindications and precautions to each vaccine. • Conjugate vaccine technology links polysaccharide antigens to carrier proteins, triggering T-cell-dependent immunity to polysaccharides, thereby strengthening immune memory. • On the basis of some research evidence and consensus, live vaccines are generally contraindicated in immunocompromised patients and in pregnancy. Most live vaccines can be administered to household contacts of immunocompromised patients. • On the basis of some research and consensus, modified administration of meningococcal, pneumococcal, and less commonly, other vaccines may be indicated to protect immunocompromised patients. • On the basis of disease epidemiology and consensus, international travelers should be up-to-date with all routine immunizations; depending on destination, additional vaccines or immune globulin may be required.

  8. Neural circuitry and immunity.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Valentin A; Tracey, Kevin J

    2015-12-01

    Research during the last decade has significantly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms at the interface between the nervous system and the immune system. Insight into bidirectional neuro-immune communication has characterized the nervous system as an important partner of the immune system in the regulation of inflammation. Neuronal pathways, including the vagus nerve-based inflammatory reflex, are physiological regulators of immune function and inflammation. In parallel, neuronal function is altered in conditions characterized by immune dysregulation and inflammation. Here, we review these regulatory mechanisms and describe the neural circuitry modulating immunity. Understanding these mechanisms reveals possibilities to use targeted neuromodulation as a therapeutic approach for inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. These findings and current clinical exploration of neuromodulation in the treatment of inflammatory diseases define the emerging field of Bioelectronic Medicine.

  9. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity.

  10. ACUTE PHASE IMMUNE GENE PROFILING OF SPLEEN AND PEYER’S PATCH IN NAÏVE AND VACCINATED CHICKENS FOLLOWING AVIAN INFLUENZA A (H5N1) VIRUS INFECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we applied functional genomics tools to investigate the early immunological response of chickens to highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza virus (AIV). Infection with HPAIV usually results in the rapid death of poultry. The aim of this study was to identify host immune genes which a...

  11. Innate Immunity in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, David E.; Siddique, Sana S.; Weinstock, Joel V.

    2014-01-01

    Cells can innately recognize generic products of viruses, bacteria, fungi, or injured tissue by engagement of pattern recognition receptors. Innate immune cells rapidly respond to this engagement in order to control commensals, thwart pathogens and/or prompt repair. Insufficient or excessive activation of the innate immune response results in disease. This review focuses on pattern recognition receptors and cells of the innate immune system important for intestinal function. Our improving knowledge pertaining to this important aspect of our immune response is opening potential important new therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of disease. PMID:24632348

  12. Improving immunization strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallos, Lazaros K.; Liljeros, Fredrik; Argyrakis, Panos; Bunde, Armin; Havlin, Shlomo

    2007-04-01

    We introduce an immunization method where the percentage of required vaccinations for immunity are close to the optimal value of a targeted immunization scheme of highest degree nodes. Our strategy retains the advantage of being purely local, without the need for knowledge on the global network structure or identification of the highest degree nodes. The method consists of selecting a random node and asking for a neighbor that has more links than himself or more than a given threshold and immunizing him. We compare this method to other efficient strategies on three real social networks and on a scale-free network model and find it to be significantly more effective.

  13. Immune Evasion by Epstein-Barr Virus.

    PubMed

    Ressing, Maaike E; van Gent, Michiel; Gram, Anna M; Hooykaas, Marjolein J G; Piersma, Sytse J; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Bar virus (EBV) is widespread within the human population with over 90% of adults being infected. In response to primary EBV infection, the host mounts an antiviral immune response comprising both innate and adaptive effector functions. Although the immune system can control EBV infection to a large extent, the virus is not cleared. Instead, EBV establishes a latent infection in B lymphocytes characterized by limited viral gene expression. For the production of new viral progeny, EBV reactivates from these latently infected cells. During the productive phase of infection, a repertoire of over 80 EBV gene products is expressed, presenting a vast number of viral antigens to the primed immune system. In particular the EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ memory T lymphocytes can respond within hours, potentially destroying the virus-producing cells before viral replication is completed and viral particles have been released. Preceding the adaptive immune response, potent innate immune mechanisms provide a first line of defense during primary and recurrent infections. In spite of this broad range of antiviral immune effector mechanisms, EBV persists for life and continues to replicate. Studies performed over the past decades have revealed a wide array of viral gene products interfering with both innate and adaptive immunity. These include EBV-encoded proteins as well as small noncoding RNAs with immune-evasive properties. The current review presents an overview of the evasion strategies that are employed by EBV to facilitate immune escape during latency and productive infection. These evasion mechanisms may also compromise the elimination of EBV-transformed cells, and thus contribute to malignancies associated with EBV infection.

  14. [Psychoneuroimmunology--regulation of immunity at the systemic level].

    PubMed

    Boranić, Milivoj; Sabioncello, Ante; Gabrilovac, Jelka

    2008-01-01

    Innate and acquired immune reactions are controlled by their intrinsic regulatory mechanisms, ie. by an array of cytokines that mediate communication among cells of the immune system itself and with other cells and tissues, e. g. in areas of inflammation. In addition, the immune system is also subjected to systemic regulation by the vegetative and endocrine systems since immune cells express receptors for neurotransmitters and hormones. Neuroendocrine signals may enhance or suppress the immune reaction, accelerate or slow it, but do not affect specificity. Various stressful factors, including the psychosocial ones, affect immunity. In turn, cytokines generated by the immune system influence hormonal secretion and central nervous system, producing specific behavioral changes (the "sickness behavior") accompanying infectious and inflammatory diseases. That includes somnolence, loss of apetite, depression or anxiety and decrease of cognitive abilities, attention and memory. Local immune systems in skin and mucosa are also subjected to systemic neuroendocrine regulation and possess intrinsic neuroregulatory networks as well. These mechanisms render skin and respiratory and digestive tracts responsive to various forms of stress. Examples are neurodermitis, asthma and ulcerative colitis. In children, the immune and the neuroendocrine systems are still developing, particularly in fetal, neonatal and early infant periods, and exposure to stressful experiences at that time may result in late consequences in the form of deficient immunity or greater risks for allergic or autoimmune reactions. Recognition of the participation of neuroendocrine mechanisms in regulation of immunity helps us understand alterations and disturbances of immune reactions under the influence of stressful factors but so far has not produced reliable therapeutic implications. Psychosocial interventions involving the child and its family may be useful.

  15. Neurodevelopmental delay among children under the age of three years at immunization clinics in Lagos State, Nigeria - Preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Bakare, Muideen O; Bello-Mojeed, Mashudat A; Munir, Kerim M; Ogun, Oluwayemi C; Eaton, Julian

    2016-04-29

    Late diagnosis and interventions characterize childhood neurodevelopmental disorders in Sub-Saharan Africa. This has negatively impacted on the prognosis of the children with neurodevelopmental disorders. This study examined the prevalence and pattern of neurodevelopmental delays among children under the age of 3 years attending immunization clinics in Lagos State, Nigeria and also affords opportunity of early follow-up and interventions, which had been documented to improve prognosis. The study involved two stage assessments; which consisted of first phase screening of the children for neurodevelopmental delays in immunization clinics at primary healthcare centers Lagos State, Nigeria and second phase which consists of definitive clinical evaluation and follow-up interventions for children screened positive for neurodevelopmental delays. Twenty seven (0.9%) of a total of 3,011 children under the age of 3 years were screened positive for neurodevelopmental delays and subsequently undergoing clinical evaluation and follow-up interventions. Preliminary working diagnoses among these children include cerebral palsy, autism spectrum disorder trait, nutritional deficiency, Down syndrome and Non-specific neurodevelopmental delay with co-morbid seizure disorder accounting for 33.3%, 14.8%, 18.5%, 7.4% and 25.9% respectively. This is a preliminary report that would be followed up with information on medium and long term intervention phase.

  16. [The liver and the immune system].

    PubMed

    Jakab, Lajos

    2015-07-26

    The liver is known to be the metabolic centre of the organism and is under the control of the central nervous system. It has a peculiar tissue structure and its anatomic localisation defines it as part of the immune system having an individual role in the defence of the organism. The determinant of its particular tissue build-up is the sinusoid system. In addition to hepatocytes, one cell row "endothelium", stellate cells close to the external surface, Kupffer cells tightly to its inner surface, as well as dendritic cells and other cell types (T and B lymphocytes, natural killer and natural killer T-cells, mast cells, granulocytes) are present. The multitudes and variety of cells make it possible to carry out the tasks according to the assignment of the organism. The liver is a member of the immune system having immune cells largely in an activated state. Its principal tasks are the assurance of the peripheral immune tolerance of the organism with the help of the haemopoetic cells and transforming growth factor-β. The liver takes part in the determination of the manner of the non-specific immune response of the organism. In addition to acute phase reaction of the organism, the liver has a role in the adaptive/specific immune response. These functions include retardation of the T and B lymphocytes and the defence against harmful pathogens. With the collaboration of transforming growth factor-β, immunoglobulins and their subclasses are inhibited just as the response of the T lymphocytes. The only exception is the undisturbed immunoglobulin A production. Particularly important is the intensive participation of the liver in the acute phase reaction of the organism, which is organised and guided by the coordinated functions of the cortico-hypothalamo-hypophysis-adrenal axis. Beside cellular elements, hormones, adhesion molecules, chemokines and cytokines are also involved in the cooperation with the organs. Acute phase reactants play a central role in these processes

  17. Signaling through RIG-I and type I interferon receptor: Immune activation by Newcastle disease virus in man versus immune evasion by Ebola virus (Review).

    PubMed

    Schirrmacher, Volker

    2015-07-01

    In this review, two types of RNA viruses are compared with regard to the type I interferon (IFN) response in order to obtain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of immune activation or evasion. Upon human infection, both viruses exert either beneficial or detrimental effects. The Newcastle disease virus (NDV), is a type strain for avian paramyxoviruses, while the Ebola virus (EBOV), is a virus affecting primates. During evolution, both viruses specifically adapted to their respective hosts, acquiring sophisticated viral escape mechanisms. Two types of receptors play an important role in the life cycle of these two viruses: cytoplasmic retinoic acid‑inducible gene I (RIG‑I) and membrane expressed type I IFN receptor (IFNAR). In mouse and human cells, NDV is a strong inducer of the type I IFN response. The early phase of this is initiated by signaling through RIG‑I and the late response by signaling through IFNAR. EBOV does not induce type I IFN responses in humans as it has viral proteins that specifically and strongly interfere with RIG‑I and IFNAR signaling, as well as immune activation. In this review, we discuss whether the beneficial effects of one virus can be exploited in the fight against the detrimental effects of the other.

  18. Preexisting antitumor immunity augments the antitumor effects of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingbing; Feng, Dongdong; Yu, Lynda X; Tsung, Kangla; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2013-06-01

    Efficacy of cancer chemotherapy is generally believed to be the result of direct drug killing of tumor cells. However, increased tumor cell killing does not always lead to improved efficacy. Herein, we demonstrate that the status of antitumor immunity at the time of chemotherapy treatment is a critical factor affecting the therapeutic outcome in that tumor-bearing mice that possess preexisting antitumor immunity respond to chemotherapy much better than those that do not. Enhancing antitumor immunity before or at the time of chemotherapy-induced antigen release increases subsequent response to chemotherapy significantly. By in vitro and in vivo measurements of antitumor immunity, we found a close correlation between the intensity of antitumor immunity activated by chemotherapy and the efficacy of treatment. Immune intervention with interleukin-12 during the early phase of chemotherapy-induced immune activation greatly amplifies the antitumor response, often resulting in complete tumor eradication not only at the chemo-treated local site, but also systemically. These findings provide additional evidence for an immune-mediated antitumor response to chemotherapy. Further, our results show that timely immune modification of chemotherapy-activated antitumor immunity can result in enhanced antitumor-immune response and complete tumor eradication.

  19. Innate Immune Responses in ALV-J Infected Chicks and Chickens with Hemangioma In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Min; Dai, Manman; Xie, Tingting; Li, Zhenhui; Shi, Meiqing; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) infection can cause tumors and immunosuppression. Since the precise mechanism of the innate immune response induced by ALV-J is unknown, we investigated the antiviral innate immune responses induced by ALV-J in chicks and chickens that had developed tumors. Spleen levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10, IL-1β, and interferon-β (IFN-β) were not significantly different between the infected chick groups and the control groups from 1 day post hatch to 7 days post hatch. However, IL-6, IL-1β, and IFN-β protein levels in the three clinical samples with hemangiomas were dramatically increased compared to the healthy samples. In addition, the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 increased sharply in two of three clinical samples. We also found a more than 20-fold up-regulation of ISG12-1 mRNA at 1 day post infection (d.p.i.) and a twofold up-regulation of ZC3HAV1 mRNA at 4 d.p.i. However, there were no statistical differences in ISG12-1 and ZC3HAV1 mRNA expression levels in the tumorigenesis phase. ALV-J infection induced a significant increase of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR-7) at 1 d.p.i. and dramatically increased the mRNA levels of melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) in the tumorigenesis phase. Moreover, the protein levels of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) were decreased in chickens with tumors. These results suggest that ALV-J was primarily recognized by chicken TLR7 and MDA5 at early and late in vivo infection stages, respectively. ALV-J strain SCAU-HN06 did not induce any significant antiviral innate immune response in 1 week old chicks. However, interferon-stimulated genes were not induced normally during the late phase of ALV-J infection due to a reduction of IRF1 and STAT1 expression. PMID:27252695

  20. Innate Immune Responses in ALV-J Infected Chicks and Chickens with Hemangioma In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Feng, Min; Dai, Manman; Xie, Tingting; Li, Zhenhui; Shi, Meiqing; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) infection can cause tumors and immunosuppression. Since the precise mechanism of the innate immune response induced by ALV-J is unknown, we investigated the antiviral innate immune responses induced by ALV-J in chicks and chickens that had developed tumors. Spleen levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10, IL-1β, and interferon-β (IFN-β) were not significantly different between the infected chick groups and the control groups from 1 day post hatch to 7 days post hatch. However, IL-6, IL-1β, and IFN-β protein levels in the three clinical samples with hemangiomas were dramatically increased compared to the healthy samples. In addition, the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 increased sharply in two of three clinical samples. We also found a more than 20-fold up-regulation of ISG12-1 mRNA at 1 day post infection (d.p.i.) and a twofold up-regulation of ZC3HAV1 mRNA at 4 d.p.i. However, there were no statistical differences in ISG12-1 and ZC3HAV1 mRNA expression levels in the tumorigenesis phase. ALV-J infection induced a significant increase of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR-7) at 1 d.p.i. and dramatically increased the mRNA levels of melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) in the tumorigenesis phase. Moreover, the protein levels of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) were decreased in chickens with tumors. These results suggest that ALV-J was primarily recognized by chicken TLR7 and MDA5 at early and late in vivo infection stages, respectively. ALV-J strain SCAU-HN06 did not induce any significant antiviral innate immune response in 1 week old chicks. However, interferon-stimulated genes were not induced normally during the late phase of ALV-J infection due to a reduction of IRF1 and STAT1 expression.

  1. Late Blooming or Language Problem?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Late Blooming or Language Problem? Parents are smart. They listen to their ... or not their child is developing speech and language at a normal rate. If parents think that ...

  2. Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000627.htm Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy To use the sharing ... JavaScript. One out of 10 women will have vaginal bleeding during their 3rd trimester. At times, it ...

  3. Immunizations. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobo, Nichole; Garrett, Jennifer; Teskey, Carmen; Duncan, Kay; Strasser, Kathy; Burrows-Mezu, Alicia L.

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that immunizations are essential to primary prevention of disease from infancy through adulthood. Promotion of immunizations by the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is central to the public health focus of school nursing practice…

  4. Coping and Immune Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    immunization, and a single session of inescapable shock. The results are superimposable on thoce shown in Figure 1. The fact that we can obtain our...effect with a single session of shock following a single immunization with KLH makes exploration of factors such as antigen-stress timing much simpler. We

  5. Immune interventions in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ying; Liu, Qiang; Anrather, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory and immune responses in the brain can shape the clinical presentation and outcome of stroke. Approaches for effective management of acute stroke are sparse and many measures for brain protection fail, but our ability to modulate the immune system and modify the disease progression of multiple sclerosis is increasing. As a result, immune interventions are currently being explored as therapeutic interventions in acute stroke. In this Review, we compare the immunological features of acute stroke with those of multiple sclerosis, identify unique immunological features of stroke, and consider the evidence for immune interventions. In acute stroke, microglia activation and cell death products trigger an inflammatory cascade that damages vessels and the parenchyma within minutes to hours of the ischaemia or haemorrhage. Immune interventions that restrict brain inflammation, vascular permeability and tissue oedema must be administered rapidly to reduce acute immune-mediated destruction and to avoid subsequent immunosuppression. Preliminary results suggest that the use of drugs that modify disease in multiple sclerosis might accomplish these goals in ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. Further elucidation of the immune mechanisms involved in stroke is likely to lead to successful immune interventions. PMID:26303850

  6. Innate immunity and adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Akira, Shizuo

    2011-01-01

    Innate immunity was for a long time considered to be non-specific because the major function of this system is to digest pathogens and present antigens to the cells involved in acquired immunity. However, recent studies have shown that innate immunity is not non-specific, but is instead sufficiently specific to discriminate self from pathogens through evolutionarily conserved receptors, designated Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Indeed, innate immunity has a crucial role in early host defence against invading pathogens. Furthermore, TLRs were found to act as adjuvant receptors that create a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity, and to have important roles in the induction of adaptive immunity. This paradigm shift is now changing our thinking on the pathogenesis and treatment of infectious, immune and allergic diseases, as well as cancers. Besides TLRs, recent findings have revealed the presence of a cytosolic detector system for invading pathogens. I will review the mechanisms of pathogen recognition by TLRs and cytoplasmic receptors, and then discuss the roles of these receptors in the development of adaptive immunity in response to viral infection. PMID:21893536

  7. HETEROLOGOUS IMMUNITY BETWEEN VIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Raymond M.; Che, Jenny; Brehm, Michael A.; Selin, Liisa K.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Immune memory responses to previously encountered pathogens can sometimes alter the immune response to and the course of infection of an unrelated pathogen by a process known as heterologous immunity. This response can lead to enhanced or diminished protective immunity and altered immunopathology. Here we discuss the nature of T-cell cross-reactivity and describe matrices of epitopes from different viruses eliciting cross-reactive CD8+ T-cell responses. We examine the parameters of heterologous immunity mediated by these cross-reactive T cells during viral infections in mice and humans. We show that heterologous immunity can disrupt T-cell memory pools, alter the complexity of the T-cell repertoire, change patterns of T-cell immunodominance, lead to the selection of viral epitope-escape variants, alter the pathogenesis of viral infections, and, by virtue of the private specificity of T-cell repertoires within individuals, contribute to dramatic variations in viral disease. We propose that heterologous immunity is an important factor in resistance to and variations of human viral infections and that issues of heterologous immunity should be considered in the design of vaccines. PMID:20536568

  8. Immunizations: Active vs. Passive

    MedlinePlus

    ... a certain type of wild animal bites a child. Passive immunizations for hepatitis A (gamma globulin) may be helpful ... A is common. They are typically given before children or adults leave on their ... active vaccination is preferable. Keep in mind that passive immunizations ...

  9. Immunity and Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupin, Henri; Guerin, Nicole

    1990-01-01

    The three articles in this issue of a periodical focussed on various aspects of the life and health of children in the tropics concern: (1) immune defenses; (2) interactions between nutrition disorders and infection; and (3) immunity and vaccination. The science of immunology has progressed rapidly in recent years. A brief review of present…

  10. Swine immune system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Probably no area of veterinary medicine has seen a greater explosion in knowledge then the immune system and its implications in disease and vaccination. In this chapter on the Swine Immune System for the 10th Edition of Diseases of Swine we expand on the information provided in past editions by in...

  11. The genetics of immunity.

    PubMed

    Lazzaro, Brian P; Schneider, David S

    2014-06-17

    In this commentary, Brian P. Lazzaro and David S. Schneider examine the topic of the Genetics of Immunity as explored in this month's issues of GENETICS and G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics. These inaugural articles are part of a joint Genetics of Immunity collection (ongoing) in the GSA journals.

  12. Immune System 101

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infectious Diseases - The Immune System Related Topics on AIDS.gov CD4 Count Viral Load Cancer Opportunistic Infections ... Immune Response (video) Last revised: 08/22/2011 AIDS.gov HIV/AIDS Basics • Federal Resources • Using New ...

  13. Behavioral Immunity in Insects

    PubMed Central

    de Roode, Jacobus C.; Lefèvre, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Parasites can dramatically reduce the fitness of their hosts, and natural selection should favor defense mechanisms that can protect hosts against disease. Much work has focused on understanding genetic and physiological immunity against parasites, but hosts can also use behaviors to avoid infection, reduce parasite growth or alleviate disease symptoms. It is increasingly recognized that such behaviors are common in insects, providing strong protection against parasites and parasitoids. We review the current evidence for behavioral immunity in insects, present a framework for investigating such behavior, and emphasize that behavioral immunity may act through indirect rather than direct fitness benefits. We also discuss the implications for host-parasite co-evolution, local adaptation, and the evolution of non-behavioral physiological immune systems. Finally, we argue that the study of behavioral immunity in insects has much to offer for investigations in vertebrates, in which this topic has traditionally been studied. PMID:26466629

  14. Neural circuitry and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Valentin A.; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Research during the last decade has significantly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms at the interface between the nervous system and the immune system. Insight into bidirectional neuroimmune communication has characterized the nervous system as an important partner of the immune system in the regulation of inflammation. Neuronal pathways, including the vagus nerve-based inflammatory reflex are physiological regulators of immune function and inflammation. In parallel, neuronal function is altered in conditions characterized by immune dysregulation and inflammation. Here, we review these regulatory mechanisms and describe the neural circuitry modulating immunity. Understanding these mechanisms reveals possibilities to use targeted neuromodulation as a therapeutic approach for inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. These findings and current clinical exploration of neuromodulation in the treatment of inflammatory diseases defines the emerging field of Bioelectronic Medicine. PMID:26512000

  15. Pertussis immunization: an update

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Lon G

    1997-01-01

    A segment of chiropractic has historically opposed the practice of immunization. This opposition has been based on historical and philosophical precedent, but with little support from the scientific literature. Pertussis immunization has successfully controlled a disease with a prior history of high childhood morbidity. An evaluation of the literature fails to find supporting evidence that whole-cell pertussis vaccine causes SIDS, asthma, or encephalopathy. Countries who discontinued pertussis immunization experienced a return of the disease, and in every case pertussis immunization has been reinstated. The recent successful clinical trials and subsequent approval of an acellular pertussis vaccine should reduce the local reactions and discomfort sometimes experienced with the whole-cell product. In view of the considerable scientific evidence for the desirability and efficacy of pertussis immunization, chiropractic should encourage patient participation in this worthwhile public health service.

  16. Cytokines in Drosophila immunity.

    PubMed

    Vanha-Aho, Leena-Maija; Valanne, Susanna; Rämet, Mika

    2016-02-01

    Cytokines are a large and diverse group of small proteins that can affect many biological processes, but most commonly cytokines are known as mediators of the immune response. In the event of an infection, cytokines are produced in response to an immune stimulus, and they function as key regulators of the immune response. Cytokines come in many shapes and sizes, and although they vary greatly in structure, their functions have been well conserved in evolution. The immune signaling pathways that respond to cytokines are remarkably conserved from fly to man. Therefore, Drosophila melanogaster, provides an excellent platform for studying the biology and function of cytokines. In this review, we will describe the cytokines and cytokine-like molecules found in the fly and discuss their roles in host immunity.

  17. Transplantation Immunity. Contemporary Views.

    PubMed

    Zaretskaya, Yuliya M.

    1999-12-01

    "Transplantation immunity in Cyclosporin era" is a special chapter in science under name transplantation immunity. Nowadays, practically all the organs can be grafted: kidney, heart, lung, liver, pancreas both as organ, and as islet cells, bone marrow from relative and unrelative donors. The broad spectrum of grafted organs gave one more surprising peculiarity of transplantation immunity: it operates with different strength after transplantation of various organs. If the decreasing gradient of transplantation immunity could be composed, then it appeared to be approximately in the following order: bone marrow - skin - kidney - heart - lung. The most complicated operating activity of transplantation immunity is occurring after bone marrow transplantation, especially from unrelative donor, because in bone marrow transplantation immunological process develops in both directions. Therefore now, bone marrow is the only organ (tissue), when the complete compatibility between donor and recipient is required after its transplantation; especially in cases with unrelative donors.

  18. Late effects from hadron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Blakely, Eleanor A.; Chang, Polly Y.

    2004-06-01

    Successful cancer patient survival and local tumor control from hadron radiotherapy warrant a discussion of potential secondary late effects from the radiation. The study of late-appearing clinical effects from particle beams of protons, carbon, or heavier ions is a relatively new field with few data. However, new clinical information is available from pioneer hadron radiotherapy programs in the USA, Japan, Germany and Switzerland. This paper will review available data on late tissue effects from particle radiation exposures, and discuss its importance to the future of hadron therapy. Potential late radiation effects are associated with irradiated normal tissue volumes at risk that in many cases can be reduced with hadron therapy. However, normal tissues present within hadron treatment volumes can demonstrate enhanced responses compared to conventional modes of therapy. Late endpoints of concern include induction of secondary cancers, cataract, fibrosis, neurodegeneration, vascular damage, and immunological, endocrine and hereditary effects. Low-dose tissue effects at tumor margins need further study, and there is need for more acute molecular studies underlying late effects of hadron therapy.

  19. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in DNA immunized mink challenged with wild-type canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Line; Søgaard, Mette; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Jensen, Trine Hammer; Jensen, Tove Dannemann; Aasted, Bent; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete

    2009-07-30

    The aim of the study was to investigate the different phases of the immune response after DNA immunization with the hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein genes from canine distemper virus (CDV). Although attenuated live CDV vaccines have effectively reduced the incidence of disease, canine distemper is still a problem worldwide. The broad host range of CDV creates a constant viral reservoir among wildlife animals. Our results demonstrated early humoral and cell-mediated immune responses (IFN-gamma) in DNA vaccinated mink compared to mock-vaccinated mink after challenge with a Danish wild-type CDV. The DNA vaccine-induced immunity protected the natural host against disease development.

  20. Recommended Immunizations for Adults 50+

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Health Screenings and Immunizations Recommended Immunizations For Adults 50+ The content in this section ... out more, visit How Vaccines Prevent Disease . Vaccines, Vaccinations, and Immunizations Understanding the difference between vaccines, vaccinations, ...

  1. Cancer Metastases: Early Dissemination and Late Recurrences

    PubMed Central

    Friberg, Sten; Nyström, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Metastatic cells from a primary tumor can occur before the primary cancer is detected. Metastatic cells can also remain in the patient for many years after removal of the primary tumor without proliferating. These dormant malignant cells can awaken and cause recurrent disease decades after the primary treatment. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical evidence for early dissemination and late recurrences in human malignant tumors. We used the following definitions: dormancy of cells may be defined as a nonproliferating state or an arrest in the cell cycle that results in a prolonged G0 phase. If one accepts the term “late metastases” to indicate a period exceeding 10 years from the removal of the primary tumor, then the two malignancies in which this occurs most frequently are cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). METHODS PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched with the keywords “metastases,” “early dissemination,” “late recurrences,” “inadvertently transmitted cancer,” “tumor growth rate,” “dormancy,” “circulating tumor cells,” and “transplantation of cancer.” RESULTS Several case reports of early dissemination and late recurrences of various types of malignancies were found. Analyses of the growth rates of several malignant tumors in the original host indicated that the majority of cancers had metastasized years before they were detected. CMM, RCC, and malignant glioblastoma were the three most common malignancies resulting from an organ transplantation. CMM and RCC were also the two most common malignancies that showed dormancy. In several cases of transplanted CMM and RCC, the donor did not have any known malignancy or had had the malignancy removed so long ago that the donor was regarded as cured. CONCLUSION (1) Metastases can frequently exist prior to the detection of the primary tumor. (2) Metastatic cells may reside in organs in the original host that are not

  2. Transcriptional Profiling of the Immune Response to Marburg Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Judy; Caballero, Ignacio S.; Garamszegi, Sara; Malhotra, Shikha; Lin, Kenny; Hensley, Lisa; Goff, Arthur J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Marburg virus is a genetically simple RNA virus that causes a severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. The mechanism of pathogenesis of the infection is not well understood, but it is well accepted that pathogenesis is appreciably driven by a hyperactive immune response. To better understand the overall response to Marburg virus challenge, we undertook a transcriptomic analysis of immune cells circulating in the blood following aerosol exposure of rhesus macaques to a lethal dose of Marburg virus. Using two-color microarrays, we analyzed the transcriptomes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells that were collected throughout the course of infection from 1 to 9 days postexposure, representing the full course of the infection. The response followed a 3-stage induction (early infection, 1 to 3 days postexposure; midinfection, 5 days postexposure; late infection, 7 to 9 days postexposure) that was led by a robust innate immune response. The host response to aerosolized Marburg virus was evident at 1 day postexposure. Analysis of cytokine transcripts that were overexpressed during infection indicated that previously unanalyzed cytokines are likely induced in response to exposure to Marburg virus and further suggested that the early immune response is skewed toward a Th2 response that would hamper the development of an effective antiviral immune response early in disease. Late infection events included the upregulation of coagulation-associated factors. These findings demonstrate very early host responses to Marburg virus infection and provide a rich data set for identification of factors expressed throughout the course of infection that can be investigated as markers of infection and targets for therapy. IMPORTANCE Marburg virus causes a severe infection that is associated with high mortality and hemorrhage. The disease is associated with an immune response that contributes to the lethality of the disease. In this study, we investigated how the

  3. Immunity to Francisella

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Siobhán C.; Elkins, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, studies on the intracellular pathogen Francisella tularensis have greatly intensified, generating a wealth of new information on the interaction of this organism with the immune system. Here we review the basic elements of the innate and adaptive immune responses that contribute to protective immunity against Francisella species, with special emphasis on new data that has emerged in the last 5 years. Most studies have utilized the mouse model of infection, although there has been an expansion of work on human cells and other new animal models. In mice, basic immune parameters that operate in defense against other intracellular pathogen infections, such as interferon gamma, TNF-α, and reactive nitrogen intermediates, are central for control of Francisella infection. However, new important immune mediators have been revealed, including IL-17A, Toll-like receptor 2, and the inflammasome. Further, a variety of cell types in addition to macrophages are now recognized to support Francisella growth, including epithelial cells and dendritic cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are clearly important for control of primary infection and vaccine-induced protection, but new T cell subpopulations and the mechanisms employed by T cells are only beginning to be defined. A significant role for B cells and specific antibodies has been established, although their contribution varies greatly between bacterial strains of lower and higher virulence. Overall, recent data profile a pathogen that is adept at subverting host immune responses, but susceptible to many elements of the immune system's antimicrobial arsenal. PMID:21687418

  4. Immunity in urogenital protozoa.

    PubMed

    Malla, N; Goyal, K; Dhanda, R S; Yadav, M

    2014-09-01

    Innate and adaptive immunity play a significant role in urogenital infections. Innate immunity is provided by the epithelial cells and mucus lining along with acidic pH, which forms a strong physical barrier against the pathogens in female reproductive tract. Cells of innate immune system, antimicrobial peptides, cytokines, chemokines and adaptive immunity in the reproductive tract are evolved during infection, and a pro-inflammatory response is generated to fight against the invading pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis, a primary urogenital protozoa, the etiological agent of human trichomoniasis, a curable sexually transmitted infection. The involvement of the urogenital tract by other protozoal infections such as P. falciparum, Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Toxoplasma, Entamoeba histolytica and Acanthamoeba infection is rarely reported. Trichomonas induce pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive responses in infected subjects. Multifactorial pathogenic mechanisms including parasite adherence, cysteine proteases, lipophosphoglycan, free radical, cytokine generation and Toll-like receptors appear to interplay with the induction of local and systemic immune responses that ultimately determine the outcome of the infection. However, the involvement of urogenital pathogen-specific immune mechanisms and effect of normal local resident flora on the outcome (symptomatic vs. asymptomatic) of infection are poorly understood. Moreover, immune interactions in trichomoniasis subjects co-infected with bacterial and viral pathogens need to be elucidated.

  5. Immunizations for foreign travel.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of preparing travelers for destinations throughout the world is providing them with immunizations. Before administering any vaccines, however, a careful health and immunization history and travel itinerary should be obtained in order to determine vaccine indications and contraindications. There are three categories of immunizations for foreign travel. The first category includes immunizations which are routinely recommended whether or not the individual is traveling. Many travelers are due for primary vaccination or boosting against tetanus-diphtheria, measles-mumps-rubella, pneumococcal pneumonia, and influenza, for example, and the pre-travel visit is an ideal time to administer these. The second category are immunizations which might be required by a country as a condition for entry; these are yellow fever and cholera. The final category contains immunizations which are recommended because there is a risk of acquiring a particular disease during travel. Typhoid fever, meningococcal disease, rabies, and hepatitis are some examples. Travelers who are pregnant or who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus require special consideration. Provision of appropriate immunizations for foreign travel is an important aspect of preventing illness in travelers. PMID:1337807

  6. The immune system in human milk and the developing infant.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Armond S

    2007-12-01

    The concept of the immune system in human milk emerged in the 1970s from clinical and laboratory observations made between the late 18th through the mid-20th centuries. The discovery of living leukocytes in human milk in 1970 was the final link to the chain of evidence that culminated in the concept. The concept was later expanded to include not only antimicrobial but also anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory agents. These agents evolved to compensate for developmental delays in the immune system during infancy. Indeed, that explains the defense by human milk against common infectious diseases in infancy, necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants, and immune-mediated disorders such as Crohn's disease in later childhood. These diverse evolutionary outcomes underscore the superiority of human milk for the nutrition of human infants. Finally, other components of the immune system in human milk and their fate and functions in the developing infant may well be discovered in the near future.

  7. Epitope-Specific Evolution of Human B Cell Responses to Borrelia burgdorferi VlsE Protein from Early to Late Stages of Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Jacek, Elzbieta; Tang, Kevin S; Komorowski, Lars; Ajamian, Mary; Probst, Christian; Stevenson, Brian; Wormser, Gary P; Marques, Adriana R; Alaedini, Armin

    2016-02-01

    Most immunogenic proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, are known or expected to contain multiple B cell epitopes. However, the kinetics of the development of human B cell responses toward the various epitopes of individual proteins during the course of Lyme disease has not been examined. Using the highly immunogenic VlsE as a model Ag, we investigated the evolution of humoral immune responses toward its immunodominant sequences in 90 patients with a range of early to late manifestations of Lyme disease. The results demonstrate the existence of asynchronous, independently developing, Ab responses against the two major immunogenic regions of the VlsE molecule in the human host. Despite their strong immunogenicity, the target epitopes were inaccessible to Abs on intact spirochetes, suggesting a lack of direct immunoprotective effect. These observations document the association of immune reactivity toward specific VlsE sequences with different phases of Lyme disease, demonstrating the potential use of detailed epitope mapping of Ags for staging of the infection, and offer insights regarding the pathogen's possible immune evasion mechanisms.

  8. The downstream regulatory sequence of the adenovirus type 2 major late promoter is functionally redundant.

    PubMed Central

    Li, X C; Huang, W L; Flint, S J

    1992-01-01

    Mutagenesis of promoter sequences and oligonucleotide competition assays have been used to demonstrate the late-phase-specific stimulation of the adenovirus type 2 major late promoter is mediated by functionally redundant elements located between positions +75 and +125. These octamer motif-related sequences are recognized by multiple factors. Images PMID:1501301

  9. Systemic activation of the immune system in HIV infection: The role of the immune complexes (hypothesis).

    PubMed

    Korolevskaya, Larisa B; Shmagel, Konstantin V; Shmagel, Nadezhda G; Saidakova, Evgeniya V

    2016-03-01

    Currently, immune activation is proven to be the basis for the HIV infection pathogenesis and a strong predictor of the disease progression. Among the causes of systemic immune activation the virus and its products, related infectious agents, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and regulatory CD4+ T cells' decrease are considered. Recently microbial translocation (bacterial products yield into the bloodstream as a result of the gastrointestinal tract mucosal barrier integrity damage) became the most popular hypothesis. Previously, we have found an association between immune complexes present in the bloodstream of HIV infected patients and the T cell activation. On this basis, we propose a significantly modified hypothesis of immune activation in HIV infection. It is based on the immune complexes' participation in the immunocompetent cells' activation. Immune complexes are continuously formed in the chronic phase of the infection. Together with TLR-ligands (viral antigens, bacterial products coming from the damaged gut) present in the bloodstream they interact with macrophages. As a result macrophages are transformed into the type II activated forms. These macrophages block IL-12 production and start synthesizing IL-10. High level of this cytokine slows down the development of the full-scale Th1-response. The anti-viral reactions are shifted towards the serogenesis. Newly synthesized antibodies' binding to viral antigens leads to continuous formation of the immune complexes capable of interacting with antigen-presenting cells.

  10. Immune adjuvants in early life: targeting the innate immune system to overcome impaired adaptive response.

    PubMed

    de Brito, Cyro Alves; Goldoni, Adriana Letícia; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2009-09-01

    The neonatal phase is a transitory period characterized by an absence of memory cells, favoring a slow adaptive response prone to tolerance effects and the development of Th2-type responses. However, when appropriately stimulated, neonates may achieve an immune response comparable with adult counterparts. One strategy to stimulate the immunological response of neonates or children in early infancy has been to explore natural or synthetic ligands of cell receptors to stimulate innate immunity. The use of adjuvants for activating different cell receptors may be the key to enhancing neonatal adaptive immunity. This review highlights recent advances in the emerging field of molecular adjuvants of innate immune response and their implications for the development of immunotherapies, with particular focus on the neonatal period.

  11. Analysing immune cell migration.

    PubMed

    Beltman, Joost B; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J

    2009-11-01

    The visualization of the dynamic behaviour of and interactions between immune cells using time-lapse video microscopy has an important role in modern immunology. To draw robust conclusions, quantification of such cell migration is required. However, imaging experiments are associated with various artefacts that can affect the estimated positions of the immune cells under analysis, which form the basis of any subsequent analysis. Here, we describe potential artefacts that could affect the interpretation of data sets on immune cell migration. We propose how these errors can be recognized and corrected, and suggest ways to prevent the data analysis itself leading to biased results.

  12. Efficacy of immune sera from human immunoglobulin transgenic mice immunized with a peptide mimotope of Cryptococcus neoformans glucuronoxylomannan.

    PubMed

    Maitta, Robert W; Datta, Kausik; Pirofski, Liise-Anne

    2004-09-28

    The efficacy of antibody mediated immunity against Cryptococcus neoformans has not been established experimentally for human antibodies. Our group has previously shown that immunization with a conjugate consisting of a peptide mimotope of the C. neoformans capsular polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), P13, and diphtheria toxoid (P13-DT) prolonged survival of transgenic mice with human immunoglobulin loci, XenoMouse mice, which were challenged with a lethal dose of C. neoformans. In the study reported herein, we determined the efficacy of human antibodies in the sera of immunized XenoMouse mice against C. neoformans in passive transfer experiments in naïve BALB/c mice. Survival studies were performed with sera from XenoMouse mice expressing human IgG2/kappa (G2/k mice) or IgG4/kappa (G4/k mice) that had been immunized with P13-tetanus toxoid (TT)/Alhydrogel with or without CpG, and G2/k mice that had been immunized with P13-DT/Alhydrogel/CpG or Alhydrogel/CpG, obtained on day 7 (early sera) and days 30 or 35-59 (late sera) after primary immunization. Compared to mice receiving sera from G2/k-PBS-treated mice, the survival of naïve mice was prolonged by both early and late sera from G2/k-P13-DT/Alhydrogel/CpG-immunized mice, but only late sera from G2/k-P13-TT/Alhydrogel/CpG-immunized mice. Late, but not early sera from G2/k-Alhydrogel/CpG-immunized mice also prolonged survival. For all sera, prolongation of survival was associated with GXM-specific serum IgM. Sera from G2/k mice that received P13-TT without CpG, and all groups of G4/k mice had low to undetectable levels of antibody to GXM and were not protective. Our findings suggest that GXM-specific human IgM may be a functional mediator of protection against C. neoformans.

  13. Immunity to Polyomavirus BK Infection: Immune Monitoring to Regulate the Balance between Risk of BKV Nephropathy and Induction of Alloimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Cioni, Michela; Basso, Sabrina; Gagliardone, Chiara; Potenza, Leonardo; Verrina, Enrico; Luppi, Mario; Zecca, Marco; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Ginevri, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Polyomavirus BK-associated nephropathy (PyVAN) is the main infectious cause of allograft damage after kidney transplantation. A number of studies revealed an association between the presence of BKV-specific cellular immunity and BK viral clearance, with patients failing to recover specific T cells progressing to PyVAN. Evolution to allograft dysfunction can be prevented by restoration of BKV-specific immunity through a stepwise reduction of maintenance immunosuppressive drugs. Prospective monitoring of BK viral load and specific immunity, together with B-cell alloimmune surveillance, may allow a targeted modification/reduction of immunosuppression, with the aim of obtaining viral clearance while preventing graft injury due to deposition of de novo donor-specific HLA antibodies and late/chronic antibody-mediated allograft injury. Innovative, immune-based therapies may further contribute to BKV infection prevention and control. PMID:24000288

  14. Late Onset Combined Immunodeficiency Presenting with Recurrent Pneumocystis jiroveci Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Baraboutis, Ioannis G.; Karnesis, Lazaros

    2014-01-01

    Late onset combined immunodeficiency (LOCID) is a recently described variant of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), involving adult patients presenting with opportunistic infections and/or low CD4+ lymphocyte counts. A 36-year-old male with unremarkable past medical history presented with fever, respiratory failure, and lymphocytopenia. He was found to have Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PJP), subsequently complicated by recurrent hospital-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia and immune reconstitution phenomena, attributed to restoration of immunoglobulin levels. Clinicians should be aware of LOCID, which could be confused with HIV infection/AIDS or idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia. In the English bibliography there is only one case report, where PJP was the initial presentation of CVID (that case would probably be classified as LOCID). Phenomena of immune reconstitution are described in various settings, including primary immunodeficiency, manifesting as temporary clinical and radiologic deterioration and leading to misperceptions of therapeutic failure and/or presence of alternative/additional diagnoses. PMID:24799913

  15. Chronology for the Aegean Late Bronze Age 1700-1400 B.C.

    PubMed

    Manning, Sturt W; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Kutschera, Walter; Higham, Thomas; Kromer, Bernd; Steier, Peter; Wild, Eva M

    2006-04-28

    Radiocarbon (carbon-14) data from the Aegean Bronze Age 1700-1400 B.C. show that the Santorini (Thera) eruption must have occurred in the late 17th century B.C. By using carbon-14 dates from the surrounding region, cultural phases, and Bayesian statistical analysis, we established a chronology for the initial Aegean Late Bronze Age cultural phases (Late Minoan IA, IB, and II). This chronology contrasts with conventional archaeological dates and cultural synthesis: stretching out the Late Minoan IA, IB, and II phases by approximately 100 years and requiring reassessment of standard interpretations of associations between the Egyptian and Near Eastern historical dates and phases and those in the Aegean and Cyprus in the mid-second millennium B.C.

  16. Malaria infection of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae activates immune-responsive genes during critical transition stages of the parasite life cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Dimopoulos, G; Seeley, D; Wolf, A; Kafatos, F C

    1998-01-01

    Six gene markers have been used to map the progress of the innate immune response of the mosquito vector, Anopheles gambiae, upon infection by the malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei. In addition to four previously reported genes, the set of markers included NOS (a nitric oxide synthase gene fragment) and ICHIT (a gene encoding two putative chitin-binding domains separated by a polythreonine-rich mucin region). In the midgut, a robust response occurs at 24 h post-infection, at a time when malaria ookinetes traverse the midgut epithelium, but subsides at later phases of malaria development. In contrast, the salivary glands show no significant response at 24 h, but are activated in a prolonged late phase when sporozoites are released from the midgut into the haemolymph and invade the glands, between 10 and 25 days after blood feeding. Furthermore, the abdomen of the mosquito minus the midgut shows significant activation of immune markers, with complex kinetics that are distinct from those of both midgut and salivary glands. The parasite evidently elicits immune responses in multiple tissues of the mosquito, two of which are epithelia that the parasite must traverse to complete its development. The mechanisms of these responses and their significance for malaria transmission are discussed. PMID:9799221

  17. The Epstein-Barr Virus Glycoprotein gp150 Forms an Immune-Evasive Glycan Shield at the Surface of Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gram, Anna M.; Oosenbrug, Timo; Lindenbergh, Marthe F. S.; Büll, Christian; Comvalius, Anouskha; Dickson, Kathryn J. I.; Wiegant, Joop; Vrolijk, Hans; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Wolterbeek, Ron; Adema, Gosse J.; Griffioen, Marieke; Heemskerk, Mirjam H. M.; Tscharke, David C.; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M.; Ressing, Maaike E.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity plays a key role in host control of viral infection. This is exemplified by life-threatening reactivations of e.g. herpesviruses in individuals with impaired T-cell and/or iNKT cell responses. To allow lifelong persistence and virus production in the face of primed immunity, herpesviruses exploit immune evasion strategies. These include a reduction in viral antigen expression during latency and a number of escape mechanisms that target antigen presentation pathways. Given the plethora of foreign antigens expressed in virus-producing cells, herpesviruses are conceivably most vulnerable to elimination by cell-mediated immunity during the replicative phase of infection. Here, we show that a prototypic herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), encodes a novel, broadly acting immunoevasin, gp150, that is expressed during the late phase of viral replication. In particular, EBV gp150 inhibits antigen presentation by HLA class I, HLA class II, and the non-classical, lipid-presenting CD1d molecules. The mechanism of gp150-mediated T-cell escape does not depend on degradation of the antigen-presenting molecules nor does it require gp150’s cytoplasmic tail. Through its abundant glycosylation, gp150 creates a shield that impedes surface presentation of antigen. This is an unprecedented immune evasion mechanism for herpesviruses. In view of its likely broader target range, gp150 could additionally have an impact beyond escape of T cell activation. Importantly, B cells infected with a gp150-null mutant EBV displayed rescued levels of surface antigen presentation by HLA class I, HLA class II, and CD1d, supporting an important role for iNKT cells next to classical T cells in fighting EBV infection. At the same time, our results indicate that EBV gp150 prolongs the timespan for producing viral offspring at the most vulnerable stage of the viral life cycle. PMID:27077376

  18. Immune System (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... teens. Environmental allergies (to dust mites, for example), seasonal allergies (such as hay fever), drug allergies (reactions to ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Definition: ... Allergies Activity: Immune System Word! Autoimmunity HIV and AIDS ...

  19. Equine immunity to parasites.

    PubMed

    Klei, T R

    2000-04-01

    Helminths are among the most significant parasites of horses in developed countries. This article examines immune responses against helminth parasites and the implications that immunologic investigations have on vaccine development, improvement of diagnostic procedures, and disease eradication.

  20. Antiviral immunity in crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haipeng; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul

    2009-08-01

    Viral diseases of shrimp have caused negative effects on the economy in several countries in Asia, South America and America, where they have numerous shrimp culture industries. The studies on the immunity of shrimp and other crustaceans have mainly focused on general aspects of immunity and as a consequence little is known about the antiviral responses in crustaceans. The aim of this review is to update recent knowledge of innate immunity against viral infections in crustaceans. Several antiviral molecules have been isolated and characterized recently from decapods. Characterization and identification of these molecules might provide a promising strategy for protection and treatment of these viral diseases. In addition dsRNA-induced antiviral immunity is also included.

  1. Immunization Against Infectious Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortimer, Edward A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The success of present and future immunization programs is endangered by public and physician complacency and by complex legal and ethical problems related to informed consent and responsibility for rare, vaccine-related injury. (BB)

  2. Immunization Against Rabies

    PubMed Central

    McWilliam, R. S.; Penistan, J. L.

    1967-01-01

    The methods used for both pre-exposure and post-exposure immunization against rabies were studied. In pre-exposure immunization duck embryo vaccine should be used. In post-exposure immunization either duck embryo or Semple-type vaccine appears to be effective in stimulating antibody production. Both vaccines may cause neurological sequelae. A dose of vaccine should be given 20-50 days after completion of the primary course of vaccination. Immune serum should be used in all severe exposures especially of the head and neck, and in individuals in whom the commencement of vaccination has been unduly delayed. In individuals who have been previously vaccinated reinforcing doses have been found to be effective even as long as 20 years after the primary vaccination. A tissue culture vaccine has been developed and is about to undergo field trials. PMID:6066820

  3. Antiviral immunity in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangchun; Robert, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    Although a variety of virus species can infect amphibians, diseases caused by ranaviruses ([RVs]; Iridoviridae) have become prominent, and are a major concern for biodiversity, agriculture and international trade. The relatively recent and rapid increase in prevalence of RV infections, the wide range of host species infected by RVs, the variability in host resistance among population of the same species and among different developmental stages, all suggest an important involvement of the amphibian immune system. Nevertheless, the roles of the immune system in the etiology of viral diseases in amphibians are still poorly investigated. We review here the current knowledge of antiviral immunity in amphibians, focusing on model species such as the frog Xenopus and the salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum), and on recent progress in generating tools to better understand how host immune defenses control RV infections, pathogenicity, and transmission.

  4. Exercise and immunity

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007165.htm Exercise and immunity To use the sharing features on ... take a daily walk or follow a simple exercise routine a few times a week. Exercise helps ...

  5. FastStats: Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Immunization Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Percent of children 19-35 months old receiving vaccinations for: Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis (4+ doses DTP, DT, ...

  6. Your Child's Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) Hib vaccine Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine Influenza vaccine Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR) ... to Shots Who Needs a Flu Shot? Immunizations HPV Vaccine 5 Tips for Surviving Shots The Flu Vaccine ...

  7. Immune responses to metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Herberman, R.B.; Wiltrout, R.H.; Gorelik, E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present the changes in the immune system in tumor-bearing hosts that may influence the development of progression of metastases. Included are mononuclear cell infiltration of metastases; alterations in natural resistance mediated by natural killer cells and macrophages; development of specific immunity mediated by T-lymphocytes or antibodies; modulation of tumor-associated antigen expression; and the down-regulation of the immune response to the tumor by several suppressor mechanisms; the augmentation of the immune response and its potential for therapeutic application; includes the prophylaxis of metastases formation by NK cells; the therapy of metastases by augmentation NK-, macrophage-, or T-lymphocyte-mediated responses by biological response modifiers; and the transfer of anticancer activity by cytoxic T-lymphocytes or immunoconjugates of monoclonal antibodies with specificity for tumors.

  8. Immune Gamma Globulin Therapeutic Indications in Immune Deficiency and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Luanna; Wu, Eveline Y; Tarrant, Teresa K

    2016-07-01

    Immune gamma globulin (IgG) has a long history in the treatment of both primary immune deficiency and autoimmune disorders. Disease indications continue to expand and new-generation products increase the versatility of delivery. This review encompasses a historical perspective as well as current and future implications of human immune globulin for the treatment of immune-mediated illness.

  9. The immune system

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    All organisms are connected in a complex web of relationships. Although many of these are benign, not all are, and everything alive devotes significant resources to identifying and neutralizing threats from other species. From bacteria through to primates, the presence of some kind of effective immune system has gone hand in hand with evolutionary success. This article focuses on mammalian immunity, the challenges that it faces, the mechanisms by which these are addressed, and the consequences that arise when it malfunctions. PMID:27784777

  10. Immune Therapy for Sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter M

    2017-01-01

    Absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) recovery rapidly occurring at 14 days after start of chemotherapy for osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma is a good prognostic factor. Conversely, lymphopenia is associated with significantly decreased sarcoma survival. Clearly, the immune system can contribute towards better survival from sarcoma. This chapter will describe treatment and host factors that influence immune function and how effective local control and systemic interventions of sarcoma therapy can cause inflammation and/or immune suppression but are currently the standard of care. Preclinical and clinical efforts to enhance immune function against sarcoma will be reviewed. Interventions to enhance immune function against sarcoma have included regional therapy (surgery, cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation, electroporation, and radiotherapy), cytokines, macrophage activators (mifamurtide), vaccines, natural killer (NK) cells, T cell receptor (TCR) and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, and efforts to decrease inflammation. The latter is particularly important because of new knowledge about factors influencing expression of checkpoint inhibitory molecules, PD1 and CTLA-4, in the tumor microenvironment. Since these molecules can now be blocked using anti-PD1 and anti-CTLA-4 antibodies, how to translate this knowledge into more effective immune therapies in the future as well as how to augment effectiveness of current interventions (e.g., radiotherapy) is a challenge. Barriers to implementing this knowledge include cost of agents that release immune checkpoint blockade and coordination of cost-effective outpatient sarcoma treatment. Information on how to research clinical trial eligibility criteria and how to access current immune therapy trials against sarcoma are shared, too.

  11. Auto-immune disease.

    PubMed

    Panayi, G S

    1976-02-01

    Auto-immune disease may result from the interaction of the genetic load of the individual, modification of self-tissue antigens by environmental agents such as virus or drugs and abnormalities of the immunological system itself such as the loss of controlling or suppressor T cells with age. In the majority of people the outcome is tolerance, maintenance of normal tissue architecture and function. In the unfortunate few the outcome is auto-immune disease, that is, failure to recognize "self".

  12. Late Afternoon at Taruntius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-08-01

    Moon? A 400 x 400 km 2 area surrounding this crater is shown in the right panel of PR Photo 19c/02 ; it has been reproduced from a photo mosaique with 500-metre resolution based on exposures made in 1994 by NASA's "Clementine" spacecraft in lunar orbit [3]. Taruntius , Cameron and other craters in this area are identified in the diagram at the lower left. The area covered by the Clementine photo is outlined on a photo of the entire Moon (upper left), obtained at nearly the same phase as when the NACO image was made [4]. This area around Taruntius was imaged in 1994 by the NASA Clementine spacecraft when it mapped the entire lunar surface at 125-250 metres per pixel. The data led to the first complete map of the mineralogy (rock types) of the Moon. The Clementine image shown here ( PR Photo 19c/02 ) helps to identify the small area depicted by NACO. It is part of the Clementine Basemap Mosaic and has been observed with the onboard Ultraviolet/Visible camera through an optical filter centred at 750 nm [3]. It covers a field-of-view of about 400 x 400 km 2 , with a nominal resolution of about 500 metres. Many craters are well visible, including Taruntius with Cameron on the upper left sector of the multiple rim. Testing the NAOS-CONICA instrument This splendid VLT image is a by-product of the ongoing, thorough testing of the NAOS-CONICA (NACO) Adaptive Optics facility , recently installed at the 8.2-m YEPUN telescope, the fourth unit of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the ESO Paranal Observatory. This major astronomical instrument has already delivered other impressive views of the Universe, cf. ESO PR 25/01 and ESO PR Photos 04a-c/02. Normally, NACO functions by "locking" on a point-like guide star, correcting the image smearing caused in the turbulent terrestrial atmophere by measuring the deformation of the recorded image of that star. However, in the morning of April 30, 2002, shortly before sunrise, the astronomers and engineers working with NACO decided to do a

  13. Complicated grief in late life

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Complicated grief (CG) is a syndrome that affects 10% to 20% of grievers regardless of age, although proportionally more will face the death of loved ones in late life, CG is characterized by preoccupying and disabling symptoms that can persist for decades such as an inability to accept the death, intense yearning or avoidance, frequent reveries, deep sadness, crying, somatic distress, social withdrawal, and suicidal ideation. This syndrome is distinct from major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, but CG maybe comorbid with each. This communication will focus on the impact of CG in late life (over age 60) and will include a case vignette for illustrating complicated grief therapy. PMID:22754292

  14. Late-Notice HIE Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Provide a response to MOWG action item 1410-01: Analyze close approaches which have required mission team action on short notice. Determine why the approaches were identified later in the process than most other events. Method: Performed an analysis to determine whether there is any correlation between late notice event identification and space weather, sparse tracking, or high drag objects, which would allow preventive action to be taken Examined specific late notice events identified by missions as problematic to try to identify root cause and attempt to relate them to the correlation analysis.

  15. Inborn Errors in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lionakis, M.S.; Hajishengallis, G.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the study of genetic defects arising from inborn errors in immunity has resulted in the discovery of new genes involved in the function of the immune system and in the elucidation of the roles of known genes whose importance was previously unappreciated. With the recent explosion in the field of genomics and the increasing number of genetic defects identified, the study of naturally occurring mutations has become a powerful tool for gaining mechanistic insight into the functions of the human immune system. In this concise perspective, we discuss emerging evidence that inborn errors in immunity constitute real-life models that are indispensable both for the in-depth understanding of human biology and for obtaining critical insights into common diseases, such as those affecting oral health. In the field of oral mucosal immunity, through the study of patients with select gene disruptions, the interleukin-17 (IL-17) pathway has emerged as a critical element in oral immune surveillance and susceptibility to inflammatory disease, with disruptions in the IL-17 axis now strongly linked to mucosal fungal susceptibility, whereas overactivation of the same pathways is linked to inflammatory periodontitis. PMID:25900229

  16. Military Healthcare Battlefield Immunity.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J C

    2012-12-01

    The combatant soldier on the battlefield remains protected from any claim in negligence by the doctrine of combat immunity for any negligent act or omission they may make when fighting. In other words, the combatant soldier does not owe a fellow soldier a duty of care on the battlefield, as the duty of care is non-justiciable. However, the non-combatant Military Healthcare Professional, although sometimes operating in the same hostile circumstances as the fighting soldier, is unlikely to benefit from combat immunity for any clinical negligence on the battlefield. This is because they continue to owe their patient a duty of care, although this has not been tested in the courts. This paper considers if any military healthcare professional could ever benefit from combat immunity, which is unlikely due to their non-combatant status. Instead, this paper suggests that a modified form of immunity; namely, Military Healthcare Battlefield Immunity could be a new, unique and viable doctrine, however, this could only be granted in rare circumstances and to a much lesser degree than combat immunity.

  17. Immune restoration disease after antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    French, Martyn A; Price, Patricia; Stone, Shelley F

    2004-08-20

    Suppression of HIV replication by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) often restores protective pathogen-specific immune responses, but in some patients the restored immune response is immunopathological and causes disease [immune restoration disease (IRD)]. Infections by mycobacteria, cryptococci, herpesviruses, hepatitis B and C virus, and JC virus are the most common pathogens associated with infectious IRD. Sarcoid IRD and autoimmune IRD occur less commonly. Infectious IRD presenting during the first 3 months of therapy appears to reflect an immune response against an active (often quiescent) infection by opportunistic pathogens whereas late IRD may result from an immune response against the antigens of non-viable pathogens. Data on the immunopathogenesis of IRD is limited but it suggests that immunopathogenic mechanisms are determined by the pathogen. For example, mycobacterial IRD is associated with delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to mycobacterial antigens whereas there is evidence of a CD8 T-cell response in herpesvirus IRD. Furthermore, the association of different cytokine gene polymorphisms with mycobacterial or herpesvirus IRD provides evidence of different pathogenic mechanisms as well as indicating a genetic susceptibility to IRD. Differentiation of IRD from an opportunistic infection is important because IRD indicates a successful, albeit undesirable, effect of HAART. It is also important to differentiate IRD from drug toxicity to avoid unnecessary cessation of HAART. The management of IRD often requires the use of anti-microbial and/or anti-inflammatory therapy. Investigation of strategies to prevent IRD is a priority, particularly in developing countries, and requires the development of risk assessment methods and diagnostic criteria.

  18. Calculated late time spectra of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Axelrod, T.S.

    1987-10-30

    We consider here the nebular phase spectra of supernovae whose late time luminosity is provided by the radioactive decay of /sup 56/Ni and /sup 56/Co synthesized in the explosion. A broad variety of supernovae are known or suspected to fall in this category. This includes all SNIa and SNIb, and at least some SNII, in particular SN1987a. At sufficiently late times the expanding supernova becomes basically nebular in character due to its decreasing optical depth. The spectra produced during this stage contain information on the density and abundance structure of the entire supernova, as opposed to spectra near maximum light which are affected only by the outermost layers. A numerical model for nebular spectrum formation is therefore potentially very valuable for answering currently outstanding questions about the post-explosion supernova structure. As an example, we can hope to determine the degree of mixing which occurs between the layers of the ''onion-skin'' abundance structure predicted by current one dimensional explosion calculations. In the sections which follow, such a numerical model is briefly described and then applied to SN1972e, a typical SNIa, SN1985f, an SNIb, and finally to SN1987a. In the case of SN1987a predicted spectra are presented for the wavelength range from 1 to 100 microns at a time 300 days after explosion. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  19. A cognitive computational model inspired by the immune system response.

    PubMed

    Abdo Abd Al-Hady, Mohamed; Badr, Amr Ahmed; Mostafa, Mostafa Abd Al-Azim

    2014-01-01

    The immune system has a cognitive ability to differentiate between healthy and unhealthy cells. The immune system response (ISR) is stimulated by a disorder in the temporary fuzzy state that is oscillating between the healthy and unhealthy states. However, modeling the immune system is an enormous challenge; the paper introduces an extensive summary of how the immune system response functions, as an overview of a complex topic, to present the immune system as a cognitive intelligent agent. The homogeneity and perfection of the natural immune system have been always standing out as the sought-after model we attempted to imitate while building our proposed model of cognitive architecture. The paper divides the ISR into four logical phases: setting a computational architectural diagram for each phase, proceeding from functional perspectives (input, process, and output), and their consequences. The proposed architecture components are defined by matching biological operations with computational functions and hence with the framework of the paper. On the other hand, the architecture focuses on the interoperability of main theoretical immunological perspectives (classic, cognitive, and danger theory), as related to computer science terminologies. The paper presents a descriptive model of immune system, to figure out the nature of response, deemed to be intrinsic for building a hybrid computational model based on a cognitive intelligent agent perspective and inspired by the natural biology. To that end, this paper highlights the ISR phases as applied to a case study on hepatitis C virus, meanwhile illustrating our proposed architecture perspective.

  20. Migration of a Late Cretaceous fish.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Scott J; Erickson, J Mark; Holland, F D

    2003-05-01

    Late Cretaceous sediments from the Western Interior of North America yield exceptionally well preserved fossils that serve as proxies for the rapidly changing climate preceding the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary (about 67-65 Myr ago). Here we reconstruct the ontogenetic history of a Maastrichtian-age fish, Vorhisia vulpes, by using the carbon, oxygen and strontium isotope ratios of four aragonite otoliths collected from the Fox Hills Formation of South Dakota. Individuals of V. vulpes spawned in brackish water (about 70-80% seawater) and during their first year migrated to open marine waters of the Western Interior Seaway, where they remained for 3 years before returning to the estuary, presumably to spawn and die. The mean delta(18)O from the marine growth phase of V. vulpes yields a seawater temperature of 18 degrees C, which is consistent with leaf physiognomy and general-circulation-model temperature estimates for the Western Interior during the latest Maastrichtian.

  1. Impact vaporization: Late time phenomena from experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.; Gault, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    While simple airflow produced by the outward movement of the ejecta curtain can be scaled to large dimensions, the interaction between an impact-vaporized component and the ejecta curtain is more complicated. The goal of these experiments was to examine such interaction in a real system involving crater growth, ejection of material, two phased mixtures of gas and dust, and strong pressure gradients. The results will be complemented by theoretical studies at laboratory scales in order to separate the various parameters for planetary scale processes. These experiments prompt, however, the following conclusions that may have relevance at broader scales. First, under near vacuum or low atmospheric pressures, an expanding vapor cloud scours the surrounding surface in advance of arriving ejecta. Second, the effect of early-time vaporization is relatively unimportant at late-times. Third, the overpressure created within the crater cavity by significant vaporization results in increased cratering efficiency and larger aspect ratios.

  2. Adaptive immunity in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Shuai, Zongwen; Leung, Miranda WY; He, Xiaosong; Zhang, Weici; Yang, Guoxiang; Leung, Patrick SC; Eric Gershwin, M

    2016-01-01

    The anatomical architecture of the human liver and the diversity of its immune components endow the liver with its physiological function of immune competence. Adaptive immunity is a major arm of the immune system that is organized in a highly specialized and systematic manner, thus providing long-lasting protection with immunological memory. Adaptive immunity consists of humoral immunity and cellular immunity. Cellular immunity is known to have a crucial role in controlling infection, cancer and autoimmune disorders in the liver. In this article, we will focus on hepatic virus infections, hepatocellular carcinoma and autoimmune disorders as examples to illustrate the current understanding of the contribution of T cells to cellular immunity in these maladies. Cellular immune suppression is primarily responsible for chronic viral infections and cancer. However, an uncontrolled auto-reactive immune response accounts for autoimmunity. Consequently, these immune abnormalities are ascribed to the quantitative and functional changes in adaptive immune cells and their subsets, innate immunocytes, chemokines, cytokines and various surface receptors on immune cells. A greater understanding of the complex orchestration of the hepatic adaptive immune regulators during homeostasis and immune competence are much needed to identify relevant targets for clinical intervention to treat immunological disorders in the liver. PMID:26996069

  3. Search for correlates of resistance to virulent challenge in mice immunized with Coxiella burnetii.

    PubMed

    Kazár, J; El-Najdawi, E; Brezina, R; Schramek, S

    1977-09-01

    Mice immunized with live phase I or phase II Coxiella burnetii, with killed phase I or phase II organisms or with trichloroacetic acid (TCAE) or phenol (PE) extracts were resistant to intraperitoneal infection with phase I C. burnetii irrespective of whether or not they displayed phase I antibody response at the time of virulent challenge. Increased phagocytosis of purified phase I organisms by blood leukocytes or peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) was noticed only in mice with phase I agglutinating antibodies in their sera or peritoneal washings. Passive transfer of resistance was made possible only by sera containing phase I agglutinating antibodies. Adoptive transfer of immunity by spleen cells, but not by PEC, was achieved providing that these cells were taken from mice immunized with live phase I C. burnetii.

  4. Early and Late Retirement Exits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brougham, Ruby R.; Walsh, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The current study proposes that personal need fulfillment (relatedness, generativity, identity, growth, and finances) predicts early and late retirement intentions. The personal needs of 160 full-time older employees were measured by personal goals, job satisfactions, job characteristics, and intrinsic motivation. Results suggest that the personal…

  5. Spiroplasma infection causes either early or late male killing in Drosophila, depending on maternal host age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Daisuke; Anbutsu, Hisashi; Shimada, Masakazu; Fukatsu, Takema

    2007-04-01

    Symbiont-induced male-killing phenotypes have been found in a variety of insects. Conventionally, these phenotypes have been divided into two categories according to the timing of action: early male killing at embryonic stages and late male killing at late larval stages. In Drosophila species, endosymbiotic bacteria of the genus Spiroplasma have been known to cause early male killing. Here, we report that a spiroplasma strain normally causing early male killing also induces late male killing depending on the maternal host age: male-specific mortality of larvae and pupae was more frequently observed in the offspring of young females. As the lowest spiroplasma density and occasional male production were also associated with newly emerged females, we proposed the density-dependent hypothesis for the expression of early and late male-killing phenotypes. Our finding suggested that (1) early and late male-killing phenotypes can be caused by the same symbiont and probably by the same mechanism; (2) late male killing may occur as an attenuated expression of early male killing; (3) expression of early and late male-killing phenotypes may be dependent on the symbiont density, and thus, could potentially be affected by the host immunity and regulation; and (4) early male killing and late male killing could be alternative strategies adopted by microbial reproductive manipulators.

  6. Clinical features of late cytomegalovirus infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Asano-Mori, Yuki; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Oshima, Kumi; Kako, Shinichi; Shinohara, Akihito; Nakasone, Hideki; Sato, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Takuro; Hosoya, Noriko; Izutsu, Koji; Asai, Takashi; Hangaishi, Akira; Motokura, Toru; Chiba, Shigeru; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2008-04-01

    Late cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease beyond day 100 after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become an increasing problem after the introduction of preemptive ganciclovir (GCV) administration. To clarify the risk factors and outcome for late CMV reactivation and disease, we retrospectively analyzed the records of 101 Japanese adult patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT between 1998 and 2005 at our hospital. Fifty-one developed late positive CMV antigenemia, with a cumulative incidence of 53%. Recipient CMV seropositivity, the use of alemtuzumab, chronic GVHD, and high-dose steroids were significantly associated with late positive antigenemia. Eight patients developed late CMV disease, with a cumulative incidence of 8%, including retinitis and gastrointestinal disease. None progressed to a fatal disease. The use of alemtuzumab was identified as an independent significant risk factor for late CMV disease, although it was not associated with increased non-relapse mortality. Among the 51 patients with late positive antigenemia, 28 had consistently less than three positive cells, 25 of whom showed negative conversion without antiviral agents. In conclusion, late CMV antigenemia appeared to develop frequently, especially in patients with profound immune suppression; however, a fatal outcome could be prevented by optimal preemptive therapy. Low-level antigenemia may not require antiviral treatments.

  7. On orbital circulation in late-type close binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassoul, Jean-Louis

    1995-05-01

    In a coeval sample of late-type binary stars, all close binaries with periods shorter than a cutoff period have circular orbits, whereas close binaries with larger periods display eccentric orbits. The observed cutoff periods are found to increase monotonically with the evolutionary age of the sample. The three theories based on the tidal-torque mechanism are quite ineffective during the main-sequence lifetime of a late-type binary, being operative during the pre-main-sequence contraction phase only. On the contrary, the observed distribution of cutoff periods with age is consistent with the hydrodynamical mechanism, since it is the only one that meets the test of absolute calibration for late-type binaries evolving on the main sequence - i.e., given plausible values for the Reynolds number in the surface layers, the theoretical circularization time does not exceed the sample age at cutoff period. However, because this mechanism may not be equally efficient during a contraction phase, it is pointed out that the tidal-torque mechanism can be responsible for orbital circularization during the pre-main-sequence phase - the hydrodynamical mechanism being fully responsible for orbital circularization during the main-sequence phase. Such a solution, which has been hitherto ignored, is quite a plausible one since the two competing mechanisms are not mutually exclusive - each one being operative for different values of the parameters.

  8. The discontinuity theory of immunity

    PubMed Central

    Pradeu, Thomas; Vivier, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Some biological systems detect the rate of change in a stimulus rather than the stimulus itself only. We suggest that the immune system works in this way. According to the discontinuity theory of immunity, the immune system responds to sudden changes in antigenic stimulation and is rendered tolerant by slow or continuous stimulation. This basic principle, which is supported by recent data on immune checkpoints in viral infections, cancers, and allergies, can be seen as a unifying framework for diverse immune responses.

  9. Plant immunity to necrotrophs.

    PubMed

    Mengiste, Tesfaye

    2012-01-01

    Plants inhabit environments crowded with infectious microbes that pose constant threats to their survival. Necrotrophic pathogens are notorious for their aggressive and wide-ranging virulence strategies that promote host cell death and acquire nutrients for growth and reproduction from dead cells. This lifestyle constitutes the axis of their pathogenesis and virulence strategies and marks contrasting immune responses to biotrophic pathogens. The diversity of virulence strategies in necrotrophic species corresponds to multifaceted host immune response mechanisms. When effective, the plant immune system disarms the infectious necrotroph of its pathogenic arsenal or attenuates its effect, restricting further ingress and disease symptom development. Simply inherited resistance traits confer protection against host-specific necrotrophs (HSNs), whereas resistance to broad host-range necrotrophs (BHNs) is complex. Components of host genetic networks, as well as the molecular and cellular processes that mediate host immune responses to necrotrophs, are being identified. In this review, recent advances in our understanding of plant immune responses to necrotrophs and comparison with responses to biotrophic pathogens are summarized, highlighting common and contrasting mechanisms.

  10. Adaptive Immunity to Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Akash; Wüthrich, Marcel; Deepe, George; Klein, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening fungal infections have risen sharply in recent years, owing to the advances and intensity of medical care that may blunt immunity in patients. This emerging crisis has created the growing need to clarify immune defense mechanisms against fungi with the ultimate goal of therapeutic intervention. We describe recent insights in understanding the mammalian immune defenses that are deployed against pathogenic fungi. We focus on adaptive immunity to the major medically important fungi and emphasize three elements that coordinate the response: (1) dendritic cells and subsets that are mobilized against fungi in various anatomical compartments; (2) fungal molecular patterns and their corresponding receptors that signal responses and shape the differentiation of T-cell subsets and B cells; and, ultimately (3) the effector and regulatory mechanisms that eliminate these invaders while constraining collateral damage to vital tissue. These insights create a foundation for the development of new, immune-based strategies for prevention or enhanced clearance of systemic fungal diseases. PMID:25377140

  11. Filoviral immune evasion mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ramanan, Parameshwaran; Shabman, Reed S; Brown, Craig S; Amarasinghe, Gaya K; Basler, Christopher F; Leung, Daisy W

    2011-09-01

    The Filoviridae family of viruses, which includes the genera Ebolavirus (EBOV) and Marburgvirus (MARV), causes severe and often times lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans. Filoviral infections are associated with ineffective innate antiviral responses as a result of virally encoded immune antagonists, which render the host incapable of mounting effective innate or adaptive immune responses. The Type I interferon (IFN) response is critical for establishing an antiviral state in the host cell and subsequent activation of the adaptive immune responses. Several filoviral encoded components target Type I IFN responses, and this innate immune suppression is important for viral replication and pathogenesis. For example, EBOV VP35 inhibits the phosphorylation of IRF-3/7 by the TBK-1/IKKε kinases in addition to sequestering viral RNA from detection by RIG-I like receptors. MARV VP40 inhibits STAT1/2 phosphorylation by inhibiting the JAK family kinases. EBOV VP24 inhibits nuclear translocation of activated STAT1 by karyopherin-α. The examples also represent distinct mechanisms utilized by filoviral proteins in order to counter immune responses, which results in limited IFN-α/β production and downstream signaling.

  12. Immunity to fish rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non-virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  13. Aging, immunity, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Fulop, Tamas; Larbi, Anis; Kotb, Rami; de Angelis, Flavia; Pawelec, Graham

    2011-06-01

    Age is the most important risk factor for tumorigenesis. More than 60% of new cancers and more than 70% of cancer deaths occur in elderly subjects >65 years. The immune system plays an important role in the battle of the host against cancer development. Deleterious alterations occur to the immune response with aging, termed immunosenescence. It is tempting to speculate that this waning immune response contributes to the higher incidence of cancer, but robust data on this important topic are few and far between. This review is devoted to discussing state of the art knowledge on the relationship between immunosenescence and cancer. Emerging understanding of the aging process at the molecular level is viewed from the perspective of this increased tumorigenesis. We also consider some of the most recent means to intervene in the modulation of immunosenescence to increase the ability of the immune system to fight against tumors. Future research will unravel new aspects of the immune response against tumors which will be modulable to decrease the burden of cancer in elderly individuals.

  14. Immunization of preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Gagneur, Arnaud; Pinquier, Didier; Quach, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinations of premature infants are often delayed despite being at an increased risk of contracting vaccine preventable diseases. This article reviews the current knowledge on the immune response to widely used vaccines, on the protection derived from routine immunization and on vaccine safety and tolerability in a population of preterm infants. Available data evaluating the immune response of preterm infants support early immunization without correction for gestational age. For a number of antigens, the antibody response to initial doses of vaccines may be lower than that of term infants, but protective concentrations are often achieved and memory successfully induced. Vaccines are immunogenic, safe and well tolerated in preterm infants. Preterm infants should be vaccinated using the same schedules as those usually recommended for full-term infants, with the exception of the hepatitis B vaccine, where additional doses should be administered in infants receiving the first dose during the first days of life if they weighed less than 2000 g because of a documented reduced immune response. PMID:26291883

  15. Imprime PGG-Mediated Anti-Cancer Immune Activation Requires Immune Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiaohong; Ottoson, Nadine R.; Walsh, Richard M.; Gorden, Keith B; Harrison, Ben; Maimonis, Peter J.; Leonardo, Steven M.; Ertelt, Kathleen E.; Danielson, Michael E.; Michel, Kyle S.; Nelson, Mariana; Graff, Jeremy R.; Patchen, Myra L.; Bose, Nandita

    2016-01-01

    Imprime PGG (Imprime), an intravenously-administered, soluble β-glucan, has shown compelling efficacy in multiple phase 2 clinical trials with tumor targeting or anti-angiogenic antibodies. Mechanistically, Imprime acts as pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) directly activating innate immune effector cells, triggering a coordinated anti-cancer immune response. Herein, using whole blood from healthy human subjects, we show that Imprime-induced anti-cancer functionality is dependent on immune complex formation with naturally-occurring, anti-β glucan antibodies (ABA). The formation of Imprime-ABA complexes activates complement, primarily via the classical complement pathway, and is opsonized by iC3b. Immune complex binding depends upon Complement Receptor 3 and Fcg Receptor IIa, eliciting phenotypic activation of, and enhanced chemokine production by, neutrophils and monocytes, enabling these effector cells to kill antibody-opsonized tumor cells via the generation of reactive oxygen species and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis. Importantly, these innate immune cell changes were not evident in subjects with low ABA levels but could be rescued with exogenous ABA supplementation. Together, these data indicate that pre-existing ABA are essential for Imprime-mediated anti-cancer immune activation and suggest that pre-treatment ABA levels may provide a plausible patient selection biomarker to delineate patients most likely to benefit from Imprime-based therapy. PMID:27812183

  16. Vascular health late after Kawasaki disease: implications for accelerated atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD), an acute vasculitis that primarily affects young children, is the most common acquired paediatric cardiovascular disease in developed countries. While sequelae of arterial inflammation in the acute phase of KD are well documented, its late effects on vascular health are increasingly unveiled. Late vascular dysfunction is characterized by structural alterations and functional impairment in term of arterial stiffening and endothelial dysfunction and shown to involve both coronary and systemic arteries. Further evidence suggests that continuous low grade inflammation and ongoing active remodeling of coronary arterial lesions occur late after acute illness and may play a role in structural and functional alterations of the arteries. Potential importance of genetic modulation on vascular health late after KD is implicated by associations between mannose binding lectin and inflammatory gene polymorphisms with severity of peripheral arterial stiffening and carotid intima-media thickening. The changes in cholesterol and lipoproteins levels late after KD further appear similar to those proposed to be atherogenic. While data on adverse vascular health are less controversial in patients with persistent or regressed coronary arterial aneurysms, data appear conflicting in individuals with no coronary arterial involvements or only transient coronary ectasia. Notwithstanding, concerns have been raised with regard to predisposition of KD in childhood to accelerated atherosclerosis in adulthood. Until further evidence-based data are available, however, it remains important to assess and monitor cardiovascular risk factors and to promote cardiovascular health in children with a history of KD in the long term. PMID:25550701

  17. TSLP and immune homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hanabuchi, Shino; Watanabe, Norihiko; Liu, Yong-Jun

    2012-03-01

    In an immune system, dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) as well as powerful sensors of danger signals. When DCs receive signals from infection and tissue stress, they immediately activate and instruct the initiation of appropriate immune responses to T cells. However, it has remained unclear how the tissue microenvironment in a steady state shapes the function of DCs. Recent many works on thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), an epithelial cell-derived cytokine that has the strong ability to activate DCs, provide evidence that TSLP mediates crosstalk between epithelial cells and DCs, involving in DC-mediated immune homeostasis. Here, we review recent progress made on how TSLP expressed within the thymus and peripheral lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues regulates DC-mediated T-cell development in the thymus and T-cell homeostasis in the periphery.

  18. Telomeres and immune competency.

    PubMed

    Weng, Nan-ping

    2012-08-01

    Telomeres are essential for the integrity of chromosomes and for cellular replication. Attrition of telomeres occurs during DNA replication owing to the inability of conventional DNA polymerase to replicate chromosomal termini and the insufficient compensation for telomere loss by telomerase, an enzyme that synthesizes telomeric DNA. A number of genetic defects have been described in humans and in animal models that cause accelerated telomere attrition, in turn leading to severe phenotypes of hematopoietic and other proliferating cells. Telomere length, most frequently measured as an average value in heterogeneous peripheral blood leukocyte populations in humans, has been associated with a wide range of health conditions and diseases of immune and non-immune cells. Here, I review recent studies of telomere length dynamics with particular relevance to immune function.

  19. Immunizations, immunology, and autism.

    PubMed

    Chez, Michael G; Chin, Kathleen; Hung, Paul C

    2004-09-01

    Public fears of rising rates of children being diagnosed with autistic spectrum disorders has led to a fear that immunizations, specifically the measles-mumps-varicella vaccine (MMR), may trigger autism. This article reviews theories of immunization as a risk factor for autism, including thimerosal exposure. We also review theories of autoimmunity as a predisposing genetic risk in autistic patients. We summarize from multiple population-based studies and extensive review committee reports that neither immunization nor thimerosal exposure has been conclusively linked to autism. Current treatments for autoimmunity in autism are reviewed and summarized as being only anecdotally effective, with no controlled studies to conclusively determine effectiveness. The goal of this article is to allow child neurologists to effectively counsel parents of autistic patients about vaccination risks and treatment options in presumed cases of autoimmune dysfunction.

  20. Immune Therapies for Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Navid, Fariba; Armstrong, Michael; Barfield, Raymond C.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, a solid tumor arising from developing cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is the most common extracranial tumor in children. The prognosis for high-risk neuroblastoma remains poor with conventional treatment, and new approaches are therefore being explored to treat this disease. One such alternative therapy that holds promise is immune therapy. We review here the recent advances in 4 types of immune therapy – cytokine, vaccine, antibody, and cellular therapy – to treat neuroblastoma. We present preclinical research and clinical trials on several promising candidates such as IL-12, dendritic cell vaccines, anti-GD2 antibodies, and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. An optimal treatment plan for neuroblastoma will most likely involve multimodal approaches and combinations of immune therapies. PMID:19342881

  1. Acupuncture and immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Kwang; Bae, Hyunsu

    2010-10-28

    Acupuncture is probably the most popular alternative therapy practiced in the United States, Europe and many Asian countries. It has been applied clinically for more than 5 thousand years according to the ancient oriental medical theory. A great deal of acupuncture research has been achieved, with particular efforts toward understanding the pain control effects. In addition to the analgesic effect of acupuncture, an increasing number of studies have demonstrated that acupuncture treatment can control autonomic nerve system functions such as blood pressure regulation, sphincter Oddi relaxation, and immune modulation. Although only a limited number of controlled studies have assessed the efficacy of acupuncture, increasing clinical evidences support that EA treatment is effective for various immunological diseases including allergic disorders, infections, autoimmune diseases and immunodifficiency-syndromes. This review will address the mechanism of acupuncture in modulating various immune responses and the relationship between acupuncture mediated immune regulation and neurological involvement.

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease related innate immunity and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuan; Chen, Zhonge

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic nonspecific intestinal inflammatory disease, including ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Its pathogenesis remains not yet clear. Current researchers believe that after environmental factors act on individuals with genetic susceptibility, an abnormal intestinal immune response is launched under stimulation of intestinal flora. However, previous studies only focused on adaptive immunity in the pathogenesis of IBD. Currently, roles of innate immune response in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation have also drawn much attention. In this study, IBD related innate immunity and adaptive immunity were explained, especially the immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of IBD.

  3. Phases and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Moshe

    2014-09-01

    In discussing phase transitions, the first thing that we have to do is to define a phase. This is a concept from thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, where a phase is defined as a homogeneous system. As a simple example, let us consider instant coffee. This consists of coffee powder dissolved in water, and after stirring it we have a homogeneous mixture, i.e., a single phase. If we add to a cup of coffee a spoonful of sugar and stir it well, we still have a single phase -- sweet coffee. However, if we add ten spoonfuls of sugar, then the contents of the cup will no longer be homogeneous, but rather a mixture of two homogeneous systems or phases, sweet liquid coffee on top and coffee-flavored wet sugar at the bottom...

  4. Endogenous egg immune defenses in the yellow mealworm beetle (Tenebrio molitor).

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Chris G C; Gallagher, Joe D; Evison, Sophie E F; Heckel, David G; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Vogel, Heiko

    2017-05-01

    In order to survive microbe encounters, insects rely on both physical barriers as well as local and systemic immune responses. Most research focusses on adult or larval defenses however, whereas insect eggs are also in need of protection. Lately, the defense of eggs against microbes has received an increasing amount of attention, be it through endogenous egg defenses, trans-generational immune priming (TGIP) or parental investment. Here we studied the endogenous immune response in eggs and adults of Tenebrio molitor. We show that many immune genes are induced in both adults and eggs. Furthermore, we show that eggs reach comparable levels of immune gene expression as adults. These findings show that the eggs of Tenebrio are capable of an impressive endogenous immune response, and indicate that such inducible egg defenses are likely common in insects.

  5. Quercetin, Inflammation and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Yao, Jiaying; Han, Chunyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Chaudhry, Maria Tabassum; Wang, Shengnan; Liu, Hongnan; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    In vitro and some animal models have shown that quercetin, a polyphenol derived from plants, has a wide range of biological actions including anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities; as well as attenuating lipid peroxidation, platelet aggregation and capillary permeability. This review focuses on the physicochemical properties, dietary sources, absorption, bioavailability and metabolism of quercetin, especially main effects of quercetin on inflammation and immune function. According to the results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, good perspectives have been opened for quercetin. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to better characterize the mechanisms of action underlying the beneficial effects of quercetin on inflammation and immunity. PMID:26999194

  6. Quercetin, Inflammation and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Yao, Jiaying; Han, Chunyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Chaudhry, Maria Tabassum; Wang, Shengnan; Liu, Hongnan; Yin, Yulong

    2016-03-15

    In vitro and some animal models have shown that quercetin, a polyphenol derived from plants, has a wide range of biological actions including anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities; as well as attenuating lipid peroxidation, platelet aggregation and capillary permeability. This review focuses on the physicochemical properties, dietary sources, absorption, bioavailability and metabolism of quercetin, especially main effects of quercetin on inflammation and immune function. According to the results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, good perspectives have been opened for quercetin. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to better characterize the mechanisms of action underlying the beneficial effects of quercetin on inflammation and immunity.

  7. Vaccines and Immunization Practice.

    PubMed

    Hogue, Michael D; Meador, Anna E

    2016-03-01

    Vaccines are among most cost-effective public health strategies. Despite effective vaccines for many bacterial and viral illnesses, tens of thousands of adults and hundreds of children die each year in the United States from vaccine-preventable diseases. Underutilization of vaccines requires rethinking the approach to incorporating vaccines into practice. Arguably, immunizations could be a part all health care encounters. Shared responsibility is paramount if deaths are to be reduced. This article reviews the available vaccines in the US market, as well as practice recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.

  8. Exercise boosts immune response.

    PubMed

    Sander, Ruth

    2012-06-29

    Ageing is associated with a decline in normal functioning of the immune system described as 'immunosenescence'. This contributes to poorer vaccine response and increased incidence of infection and malignancy seen in older people. Regular exercise can enhance vaccination response, increase T-cells and boost the function of the natural killer cells in the immune system. Exercise also lowers levels of the inflammatory cytokines that cause the 'inflamm-ageing' that is thought to play a role in conditions including cardiovascular disease; type 2 diabetes; Alzheimer's disease; osteoporosis and some cancers.

  9. Mammalian glycosylation in immunity.

    PubMed

    Marth, Jamey D; Grewal, Prabhjit K

    2008-11-01

    Glycosylation produces a diverse and abundant repertoire of glycans, which are collectively known as the glycome. Glycans are one of the four fundamental macromolecular components of all cells, and are highly regulated in the immune system. Their diversity reflects their multiple biological functions that encompass ligands for proteinaceous receptors known as lectins. Since the discovery that selectins and their glycan ligands are important for the regulation of leukocyte trafficking, it has been shown that additional features of the vertebrate immune system are also controlled by endogenous cellular glycosylation. This Review focuses on the emerging immunological roles of the mammalian glycome.

  10. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    1974. 5. Frame, J. D. Surveillance of Lassa Fever amohg missionaries stationed in West Africa . Bull. WVHO 52: 593-59a, 1975 6. Monath, T.- P. Lassa ...A883 049 COLUMBIA UNIV NEW YORK DIV OF TROPIAL MEDIC.NE F/S 6/5 LASSA FEVER IMMUNE PLASMA U) AUG 79 J D FRAME DAMD17-79-C-9024 UNCLASSIFIED...NL’mmmEmmEmmEE.inuuuuwi LLVIL j~~AD’ LEVEL REPORT NO. 1I 0) LASSA FEVER IMMUNE PLASMA Annual Summary Report John 0. Frame, M.D. i Division of Tropical

  11. Information encryption in phase space.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Xu, Xiaobin; Wu, Quanying; Sheridan, John T; Situ, Guohai

    2015-03-15

    In this Letter, we propose an information encryption technique based on the theory of phase-space optics. We show that encoding the plaintext in phase space provides a higher level of security: first, the key-space is significantly enlarged. Second, it is immune to various known-plaintext (cyphertext) attacks to which the double-random phase encryption (DRPE) is vulnerable. Third, the bilinearity of phase-space distributions offers additional security. Theoretical analysis and numerical calculation results show that the proposed technique has significantly different responses to errors added to the cypheretext and the two phase keys in comparison to the classical DRPE.

  12. The impact of immune disturbances on the failure of antituberculosis treatment

    PubMed Central

    LESNIC, EVELINA; GHINDA, SERGHEI; POP, CARMEN MONICA

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, with an evolution and treatment outcome determined by the interaction between the mycobacterial and human genotypes. Various deficiencies of innate immune response starting from the first encounter of M. tuberculosis with lung cells endanger host infection control due to decreased triggering of cellular immune resistance and disturbed humoral immunity. Disturbed cell mediated immunity, known as the basic immune response in tuberculous infection, contributes to the deficient generation of central necrosis granuloma, consequently being responsible for severe clinical aspects and low final outcome. The tuberculosis patient’s immune assessment is important before treatment initiation, for establishing the risk reduction measures and increasing success rate. Material and methods The immune study was conducted on 54 new pulmonary tuberculosis cases with treatment failure, 34 new pulmonary tuberculosis cases that successfully ended the treatment and 50 healthy group individuals. Immune assays performed were: blastic transformation of lymphocytes induced by different antigens, quantitatitve assessment of cellular immunity through CD4+ T cell and CD8+ T cell phenotyping, humoral immunity - through immunoglobulin isotyping, innate resistance – through phagocyte activity of neutrophils, the titter of anti-tuberculosis antibodies and the serum level of circulating immune complexes. Investigations were performed at the onset the treatment and at the end of intensive phase of the standard anti-tuberculosis treatment. Results Immune disturbances evidenced in patients with treatment failure were: important deficiencies of cellular immunity, hyperactivity of humoral immunity and deficiencies of innate immunity. High predictive value for treatment failure showed the indices: deficiency of T lymphocytes count (OR=62.5) and T helper count (OR=12.5), high level of circulating

  13. Late colonization of Easter Island.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Terry L; Lipo, Carl P

    2006-03-17

    Easter Island (Rapa Nui) provides a model of human-induced environmental degradation. A reliable chronology is central to understanding the cultural, ecological, and demographic processes involved. Radiocarbon dates for the earliest stratigraphic layers at Anakena, Easter Island, and analysis of previous radiocarbon dates imply that the island was colonized late, about 1200 A.D. Substantial ecological impacts and major cultural investments in monumental architecture and statuary thus began soon after initial settlement.

  14. Monomelic amyotrophy with late progression.

    PubMed

    Rowin, J; Meriggioli, M N; Cochran, E J

    2001-04-01

    Monomelic amyotrophy is a sporadic juvenile-onset disease that presents with gradual onset of weakness and atrophy in the hand muscles unilaterally. Generally, this disease is considered a 'benign' and non-progressive motor neuron disease, which stabilizes within five years of onset. We discuss a case that illustrates that monomelic amyotrophy may rarely exhibit late clinical progression to the lower extremities after a prolonged period of disease stability.

  15. Rapid Assay of Cellular Immunity in Q Fever.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-10-01

    mediated immune responses of adults to vaccination, challenge with Rickettsia rickettsii , or both. Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.;46:105-115 DuPont, H.T., Thirion, X... rickettsia Coxiella burnetti. C. bumetti is a strict intracellular pathogen belonging to the family Rickettsiae . It is found in many parts of the world... rickettsia was related in part to the cellular immune response (Dumler et al, 1992; Holland, et al. 1993). B. Phase I Technical Objectives and Technical

  16. The late-M dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessell, M. S.

    1991-02-01

    Far-red spectra and VRIJHK photometry have been obtained for a sample of late-M dwarfs selected on the basis of large reduced red magnitudes from the LHS Catalog. Half of the stars in the three faintest 1 mag bins are late-M stars, the other red stars are metallic-hydride subdwarfs. Relations between various colors for the late-M dwarfs are investigated. Of all the colors I - K most reliably correlates with spectral type. FeH bands near 9900 A are clearly seen in the spectra of all dwarf stars later than M5. Two stars cooler than VB10, and similar in temperature to LHS2924 have been identified; both have H-alpha in emission and appear variable in magnitude and R - I color; one is a flare star. The other stars are of earlier spectral type and resemble W359 and VB8. The observed MI, I - K main sequence is in good agreement with the IG theoretical main sequence of Stringfellow, and the faintest stars could be about 0.09 solar mass red dwarfs or lower mass brown dwarfs.

  17. Faunal Remains From Late Helladic Lerna (Argolid, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, David S.

    Recent analysis of preserved fauna from the 1952-58 excavations at Lerna stored in Argos and Stockholm allows us to reexamine the fauna published in 1969 by the late Prof. Nils-Gustaf Gejvall as the first of the Lerna final report volumes. The present detailed study combines the revised phasing, detailed context information, and fuller analysis of the preserved samples including butchery and burning data.

  18. Barriers to childhood immunization: findings from a needs assessment study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Kohli, Vandana; King, Dixie

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the current status of immunization among 0-3 year old children in Bakersfield and identifies barriers that prevent families from immunizing their children. A survey research design using a stratified sampling method was employed to collect data from 207 randomly selected English and Spanish speaking households having at least one child between the ages of 0-3 in Bakersfield. The findings reveal that 49% of the parents had no shot cards regarding children's immunization status. However, a significant majority of them immunized their children despite having no records. The most commonly reported consumer related barrier for late immunization was having a sick child followed by lack of parental memory and fear of side effects. The major provider-related barriers included lack of an opening for an appointment with the health care provider, limited clinic hours, and long lines in clinics. Lack of transportation was the single most systemic barrier. These findings suggest that reminder calls, increased transportation, weekend clinics and better rapport with parents can improve the immunization rates in ethnically diverse rural communities.

  19. Ontogenetic immune challenges shape adult personality in mallard ducks.

    PubMed

    Butler, Michael W; Toomey, Matthew B; McGraw, Kevin J; Rowe, Melissah

    2012-01-22

    Consistent individual differences in behaviour are widespread in animals, but the proximate mechanisms driving these differences remain largely unresolved. Parasitism and immune challenges are hypothesized to shape the expression of animal personality traits, but few studies have examined the influence of neonatal immune status on the development of adult personality. We examined how non-pathogenic immune challenges, administered at different stages of development, affected two common measures of personality, activity and exploratory behaviour, as well as colour-dependent novel object exploration in adult male mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). We found that individuals that were immune-challenged during the middle (immediately following the completion of somatic growth) and late (during the acquisition of nuptial plumage) stages of development were more active in novel environments as adults relative to developmentally unchallenged birds or those challenged at an earlier developmental time point. Additionally, individuals challenged during the middle stage of development preferred orange and avoided red objects more than those that were not immune-challenged during development. Our results demonstrate that, in accordance with our predictions, early-life immune system perturbations alter the expression of personality traits later in life, emphasizing the role that developmental plasticity plays in shaping adult personality, and lending support to recent theoretical models that suggest that parasite pressure may play an important role in animal personality development.

  20. Vaccination uptake by vaccine-hesitant parents attending a specialist immunization clinic in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Thomas A; McMinn, Alissa; Crawford, Nigel; Leask, Julie; Danchin, Margie

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine hesitancy (VH) is an issue of global concern. The quality of communication between healthcare providers and parents can influence parental immunization acceptance. We aimed to describe immunization uptake following specialist immunization clinic (SIC) consultation for Australian children of VH parents as a cohort, and according to pre-clinic parental position on immunization. At a single tertiary pediatric SIC (RCH, Melbourne) a retrospective descriptive study classified VH families according to 3 proposed parental positions on immunization at initial clinic attendance. Immunization status at follow up was ascertained via the Australian Children's Immunization Register and National HPV Program Register and compared between groups. Of the VH cohort, 13/38 (34%) families were classified as hesitant, 21 (55%) as late/selective vaccinators and 4 (11%) as vaccine refusers. Mean follow up post-SIC attendance was 14.5 months. For the overall VH cohort, the majority chose selective immunization (42%) following SIC consultation. When analyzed by pre-clinic parental position on immunization, there was a trend for hesitant families to proceed with full immunization, selective families to continue selective immunization and refusing families to remain unimmunised (p < 0.0001). The most commonly omitted vaccines were hepatitis B (66%) and Haemophilus influenzae type B (55%), followed by the meningococcal C conjugate vaccine (53%) and measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (53%). Immunization outcome appears to correlate with pre-clinic parental position on immunization for the majority of families attending a SIC in Australia, with selective immunization the most common outcome. Tailored communication approaches based on parental position on immunization may optimise clinic resources and engagement of families, but require prospective research evaluation. PMID:26366978

  1. Vaccination uptake by vaccine-hesitant parents attending a specialist immunization clinic in Australia.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Thomas A; McMinn, Alissa; Crawford, Nigel; Leask, Julie; Danchin, Margie

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine hesitancy (VH) is an issue of global concern. The quality of communication between healthcare providers and parents can influence parental immunization acceptance. We aimed to describe immunization uptake following specialist immunization clinic (SIC) consultation for Australian children of VH parents as a cohort, and according to pre-clinic parental position on immunization. At a single tertiary pediatric SIC (RCH, Melbourne) a retrospective descriptive study classified VH families according to 3 proposed parental positions on immunization at initial clinic attendance. Immunization status at follow up was ascertained via the Australian Children's Immunization Register and National HPV Program Register and compared between groups. Of the VH cohort, 13/38 (34%) families were classified as hesitant, 21 (55%) as late/selective vaccinators and 4 (11%) as vaccine refusers. Mean follow up post-SIC attendance was 14.5 months. For the overall VH cohort, the majority chose selective immunization (42%) following SIC consultation. When analyzed by pre-clinic parental position on immunization, there was a trend for hesitant families to proceed with full immunization, selective families to continue selective immunization and refusing families to remain unimmunised (p < 0.0001). The most commonly omitted vaccines were hepatitis B (66%) and Haemophilus influenzae type B (55%), followed by the meningococcal C conjugate vaccine (53%) and measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (53%). Immunization outcome appears to correlate with pre-clinic parental position on immunization for the majority of families attending a SIC in Australia, with selective immunization the most common outcome. Tailored communication approaches based on parental position on immunization may optimise clinic resources and engagement of families, but require prospective research evaluation.

  2. Bed rest and immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Aviles, Hernan; Butel, Janet S.; Shearer, William T.; Niesel, David; Pandya, Utpal; Allen, Christopher; Ochs, Hans D.; Blancher, Antoine; Abbal, Michel

    2007-02-01

    Space flight has been shown to result in altered immune responses. The current study was designed to investigate this possibility by using the bed rest model of some space flight conditions. A large number of women are included as subjects in the study. The hypothesis being tested is: 60 days head-down tilt bed rest of humans will affect the immune system and resistance to infection. Blood, urine and saliva samples will be obtained from bed rest subjects prior to, at intervals during, and after completion of 60 days of head-down tilt bed rest. Leukocyte blastogenesis, cytokine production and virus reactivation will be assessed. The ability of the subjects to respond appropriately to immunization with the neoantigen bacteriophage φX-174 will also be determined. Bed rest is being carried out at MEDES, Toulouse France, and the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX. The studies to be carried out in France will also allow assessment of the effects of muscle/bone exercise and nutritional countermeasures on the immune system in addition to the effects of bed rest.

  3. Increasing Immunization Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toole, Kimberly; Perry, Cynthia S.

    2004-01-01

    School nurses often have the responsibility to ensure that students meet all immunization requirements for school entry and school attendance. In large inner-city school districts, many obstacles exist which make this task daunting and often result in lengthy absences and exclusions for students. It is critical that school nurses find creative and…

  4. Neurologic complications of immunizations.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, S L; Snead, O C

    1986-12-01

    Although there does appear to be at least a temporal relationship between pertussis immunization and serious acute neurologic illness, data to suggest that children with stable preexisting neurologic disease or positive family history of neurologic disease are at increased risk for complications of pertussis immunizations are inconclusive. Furthermore, there are no firm statistical data concerning the incidence of pertussis vaccine-related encephalopathy. Rather, the literature on pertussis vaccine complications is replete with anecdotal reports and retrospective studies with a number of questionable conclusions drawn from this inadequate data base. Unfortunately, these conclusions have been sensationalized and exploited with litigious fervor to the point that the practice of pertussis immunization is being questioned in the United States. A number of points should be reiterated: pertussis is a dangerous and deadly disease, as seen in the epidemic in Great Britain; pertussis immunization is effective in protecting against the disease; and there is no conclusive proof that the incidence of complications from pertussis vaccination of children with seizure disorders or other preexisting stable neurologic abnormalities is higher, because appropriate studies have not been done to define such a risk. We would do well to keep these facts in mind in order to avoid a disaster similar to the pertussis epidemic in Great Britain. Pertussis vaccination should be given to all children except those with allergic hypersensitivity, a progressive neurologic disorder, or an adverse reaction to a previous pertussis dose.

  5. Lipids and immune function.

    PubMed

    Vitale, J J; Broitman, S A

    1981-09-01

    There is in vitro and in vivo evidence to suggest that dietary lipids play a role in modulating immune function. A review of the current literature on the interrelationships among dietary lipids, blood cholesterol levels, immunosuppression, and tumorigenesis makes for a very strong argument that (a) immunosuppression may be causally related to lymphoproliferative disorders, as well as to tumorigenesis and (b) diets high in polyunsaturated fat, relative to diets high in saturated fat, are more immunosuppressive and are better promotors of tumorigenesis. The effects of dietary fat on immune function seem to be mediated though its component parts, the unsaturated fatty acids, specially linoleic, linolenic, and arachidonic. It is not clear how these components affect immune function. Several studies suggest that one effect is mediated by altering the lipid component of the cell membrane and thus its fluidity; the more fluid the membrane, the less responsive it is. Thus, fluidity of both immune cells and those to be destroyed or protected may be affected. The effects of saturated as well as unsaturated fatty acids may be mediated by modulating serum lipoprotein levels, prostaglandin metabolism, and cholesterol concentrations and metabolism.

  6. Photodynamic immune modulation (PIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, John R.; Hunt, David W. C.; Simkin, Guillermo O.; Ratkay, Leslie G.; Chan, Agnes H.; Lui, Harvey; Levy, Julia G.

    1999-09-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is accepted for treatment of superficial and lumen-occluding tumors in regions accessible to activating light and is now known to be effective in closure of choroidal neovasculature in Age Related Macular Degeneration. PDT utilizes light absorbing drugs (photosensitizers) that generate the localized formation of reactive oxygen species after light exposure. In a number of systems, PDT has immunomodulatory effects; Photodynamic Immune Modulation (PIM). Using low- intensity photodynamic regimens applied over a large body surface area, progression of mouse autoimmune disease could be inhibited. Further, this treatment strongly inhibited the immunologically- medicated contact hypersensitivity response to topically applied chemical haptens. Immune modulation appears to result from selective targeting of activated T lymphocytes and reduction in immunostimulation by antigen presenting cells. Psoriasis, an immune-mediated skin condition, exhibits heightened epidermal cell proliferation, epidermal layer thickening and plaque formation at different body sites. In a recent clinical trial, approximately one-third of patients with psoriasis and arthritis symptoms (psoriatic arthritis) displayed a significant clinical improvement in several psoriasis-related parameters after four weekly whole-body PIM treatments with verteporfin. The safety profile was favorable. The capacity of PIM to influence other human immune disorders including rheumatoid arthritis is under extensive evaluation.

  7. Immunity to brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Skendros, P; Boura, P

    2013-04-01

    Resistance to intracellular bacterial pathogens such as Brucella spp. relies on cell-mediated immunity, which involves activation of the bactericidal mechanisms of antigen-presenting cells (macrophages and dendritic cells) and the subsequent expansion of antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell clones. Brucella antigens induce the production of T helper type 1 (Th1) cytokines, and an adequate Th1 immune response is critical for the clearance of Brucella infection. Studies on experimental and human brucellosis indicate that interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) is the principal cytokine active against Brucella infection. On the other hand, Brucella has evolutionarily developed diverse evasion strategies to avoid the host's innate and adaptive immunity in order to establish an intracellular niche for long-term parasitism. Disturbances of the Thl response and anergy have been described in patients with chronic brucellosis, and are associated with poor outcome. Accordingly, chronic brucellosis represents a challenge for the study of immune mechanisms against Brucella and the development of novel therapeutic or vaccination approaches.

  8. Auto immune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    van Gerven, Nicole Mf; de Boer, Ynto S; Mulder, Chris Jj; van Nieuwkerk, Carin Mj; Bouma, Gerd

    2016-05-21

    To provide an update of the latest trends in epidemiology, clinical course, diagnostics, complications and treatment of auto immune hepatitis (AIH). A search of the MEDLINE database was performed using the search terms: "auto immune hepatitis", "clinical presentation", "symptoms", "signs", "diagnosis", "auto antibodies", "laboratory values", "serology", "histopathology", "histology", "genetics", "HLA genes", "non-HLA genes", "environment", "epidemiology", "prevalence", "incidence", "demographics", "complications", "HCC", "PBC", "PSC", "corticosteroid", "therapy", "treatment", "alternative treatment". English-language full-text articles and abstracts were considered. Articles included reviews, meta-analysis, prospective retrospective studies. No publication date restrictions were applied. AIH is an immune meditated progressive inflammatory liver disease that predominantly affects middle-aged females but may affect people of all ages. The clinical spectrum of AIH is wide, ranging from absent or mild symptoms to fulminant hepatic failure. The aetiology of AIH is still unknown, but is believed to occur as the consequence of an aberrant immune response towards an un-known trigger in a genetically susceptible host. In the absence of a gold standard, diagnosis is based on the combination of clinical, biochemical and histopathological criteria. Immunosuppressive treatment has been the cornerstone of treatment since the earliest description of the disease in 1950 by Waldenström. Such treatment is often successful at inducing remission and generally leads to normal life expectancy. Nevertheless, there remain significant areas of unmet aetiological a clinical needs including fundamental insight in disease pathogenesis, optimal therapy, duration of treatment and treatment alternatives in those patients unresponsive to standard treatment regimens.

  9. Where is ELSA? The early to late shift in aging.

    PubMed

    Dew, Ilana T Z; Buchler, Norbou; Dobbins, Ian G; Cabeza, Roberto

    2012-11-01

    Studies of cognitive and neural aging have recently provided evidence of a shift from an early- to late-onset cognitive control strategy, linked with temporally extended activity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). It has been uncertain, however, whether this age-related shift is unique to PFC and executive control tasks or whether the functional location might vary depending on the particular cognitive processes that are altered. The present study tested whether an early-to-late shift in aging (ELSA) might emerge in the medial temporal lobes (MTL) during a protracted context memory task comprising both anticipatory cue (retrieval preparation) and retrieval probe (retrieval completion) phases. First, we found reduced MTL activity in older adults during the early retrieval preparation phase coupled with increased MTL activity during the late retrieval completion phase. Second, we found that functional connectivity between MTL and PFC regions was higher during retrieval preparation in young adults but higher during retrieval completion in older adults, suggesting an important interactive relationship between the ELSA pattern in MTL and PFC. Taken together, these results critically suggest that aging results in temporally lagged activity even in regions not typically associated with cognitive control, such as the MTL.

  10. Information about the Late Effects of Polio

    MedlinePlus

    ... not included. Contact info@post-polio.org. Remember POLIO? Polio (poliomyelitis or infantile paralysis) triggers memories of ... Have you heard about the LATE EFFECTS OF POLIO? In the late 1970s, survivors of polio reported ...

  11. Effects of Space Radiation on Humoral and Cellular Immunity in Rhesus Monkeys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    About 10% were antinuclear antibodies that are associated with renal disease, especially systemic lupus erythematosus (Schwartz, 1986). ASSAY OF T...possible late effects of ionizing radiations on parameters associated with B-cell and T-cell functions. Antibody -mediated immune (AMI) functior was...study were as follows: 1. To assess the possible effects of radiation on antibody - mediated immune (AMI) function by measuring immunoglobulin (Ig

  12. Increasing immunization coverage.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Lawrence D; Curry, Edward S; Harlor, Allen D; Laughlin, James J; Leeds, Andrea J; Lessin, Herschel R; Rodgers, Chadwick T; Granado-Villar, Deise C; Brown, Jeffrey M; Cotton, William H; Gaines, Beverly Marie Madry; Gambon, Thresia B; Gitterman, Benjamin A; Gorski, Peter A; Kraft, Colleen A; Marino, Ronald Vincent; Paz-Soldan, Gonzalo J; Zind, Barbara

    2010-06-01

    In 1977, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued a statement calling for universal immunization of all children for whom vaccines are not contraindicated. In 1995, the policy statement "Implementation of the Immunization Policy" was published by the American Academy of Pediatrics, followed in 2003 with publication of the first version of this statement, "Increasing Immunization Coverage." Since 2003, there have continued to be improvements in immunization coverage, with progress toward meeting the goals set forth in Healthy People 2010. Data from the 2007 National Immunization Survey showed that 90% of children 19 to 35 months of age have received recommended doses of each of the following vaccines: inactivated poliovirus (IPV), measles-mumps-rubella (MMR), varicella-zoster virus (VZB), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). For diphtheria and tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine, 84.5% have received the recommended 4 doses by 35 months of age. Nevertheless, the Healthy People 2010 goal of at least 80% coverage for the full series (at least 4 doses of DTaP, 3 doses of IPV, 1 dose of MMR, 3 doses of Hib, 3 doses of HBV, and 1 dose of varicella-zoster virus vaccine) has not yet been met, and immunization coverage of adolescents continues to lag behind the goals set forth in Healthy People 2010. Despite these encouraging data, a vast number of new challenges that threaten continued success toward the goal of universal immunization coverage have emerged. These challenges include an increase in new vaccines and new vaccine combinations as well as a significant number of vaccines currently under development; a dramatic increase in the acquisition cost of vaccines, coupled with a lack of adequate payment to practitioners to buy and administer vaccines; unanticipated manufacturing and delivery problems that have caused significant shortages of various vaccine products; and the rise of a public antivaccination movement that uses the

  13. Maternal immune transfer in mollusc.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingling; Yue, Feng; Song, Xiaorui; Song, Linsheng

    2015-02-01

    Maternal immunity refers to the immunity transferred from mother to offspring via egg, playing an important role in protecting the offspring at early life stages and contributing a trans-generational effect on offspring's phenotype. Because fertilization is external in most of the molluscs, oocytes and early embryos are directly exposed to pathogens in the seawater, and thus maternal immunity could provide a better protection before full maturation of their immunological systems. Several innate immune factors including pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) like lectins, and immune effectors like lysozyme, lipopolysaccharide binding protein/bacterial permeability-increasing proteins (LBP/BPI) and antioxidant enzymes have been identified as maternally derived immune factors in mollusc eggs. Among these immune factors, some maternally derived lectins and antibacterial factors have been proved to endue mollusc eggs with effective defense ability against pathogen infection, while the roles of other factors still remain untested. The physiological condition of mollusc broodstock has a profound effect on their offspring fitness. Many other factors such as nutrients, pathogens, environment conditions and pollutants could exert considerable influence on the maternal transfer of immunity. The parent molluscs which have encountered an immune stimulation endow their offspring with a trans-generational immune capability to protect them against infections effectively. The knowledge on maternal transfer of immunity and the trans-generational immune effect could provide us with an ideal management strategy of mollusc broodstock to improve the immunity of offspring and to establish a disease-resistant family for a long-term improvement of cultured stocks.

  14. Evolutionary responses of innate Immunity to adaptive immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Innate immunity is present in all metazoans, whereas the evolutionarily more novel adaptive immunity is limited to jawed fishes and their descendants (gnathostomes). We observe that the organisms that possess adaptive immunity lack diversity in their innate pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), rais...

  15. FGLamide Allatostatin genes in Arthropoda: introns early or late?

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Francisco; Bendena, William G; Chang, Belinda S W; Tobe, Stephen S

    2009-07-01

    FGLamide allatostatins are invertebrate neuropeptides which inhibit juvenile hormone biosynthesis in Dictyoptera and related orders and also show myomodulatory activity. The FGLamide allatostatin (AST) gene structure in Dictyoptera is intronless within the ORF, whereas in 9 species of Diptera, the FGLamide AST ORF has one intron. To investigate the evolutionary history of AST intron structure, (intron early versus intron late hypothesis), all available Arthropoda FGLamide AST gene sequences were examined from genome databases with reference to intron presence and position/phase. Three types of FGLamide AST ORF organization were found: intronless in I. scapularis and P. humanus corporis; one intron in D. pulex, A. pisum, A. mellifera and five Drosophila sp.; two introns in N. vitripennis, B. mori strains, A. aegypti, A. gambiae and C. quinquefasciatus. The literature suggests that for the majority of genes examined, most introns exist between codons (phase 0) which may reflect an ancient function of introns to separate protein modules. 60% of the FGLamide AST ORFs introns were between the first and second base within a codon (phase 1), 28% were between the second and third nucleotides within a codon (phase two) and 12% were phase 0. As would be required for correct intron splicing consensus sequence, 84% of introns were in codons starting with guanine. The positioning of introns was a maximum of 9 codons from a dibasic cleavage site. Our results suggest that the introns in the analyzed species support the intron late model.

  16. Late blight – Is resistance futile?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article will provide an overview of late blight resistance research that has been done within the USDA/ARS and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The article is meant to be an informative look at the history of late blight resistance and the ability of the late blight pathogen to overcome res...

  17. Innate immune memory in plants.

    PubMed

    Reimer-Michalski, Eva-Maria; Conrath, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    The plant innate immune system comprises local and systemic immune responses. Systemic plant immunity develops after foliar infection by microbial pathogens, upon root colonization by certain microbes, or in response to physical injury. The systemic plant immune response to localized foliar infection is associated with elevated levels of pattern-recognition receptors, accumulation of dormant signaling enzymes, and alterations in chromatin state. Together, these systemic responses provide a memory to the initial infection by priming the remote leaves for enhanced defense and immunity to reinfection. The plant innate immune system thus builds immunological memory by utilizing mechanisms and components that are similar to those employed in the trained innate immune response of jawed vertebrates. Therefore, there seems to be conservation, or convergence, in the evolution of innate immune memory in plants and vertebrates.

  18. Overview of the Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the bone marrow is the precursor to innate immune cells—neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils, mast cells, monocytes, ... common lymphoid progenitor and share features of both innate and adaptive immune cells, as they provide immediate ...

  19. Sensitivity of the late positive potentials evoked by emotional pictures to neuroticism during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Zhou, Renlai; Wang, Qingguo; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Yanfeng

    2013-10-11

    The present event-related potentials (ERPs) study set out to investigate the effect of neuroticism on emotion evaluation during the menstrual cycle, with high and low neuroticism females viewing and evaluating valence and arousal of emotional pictures in the menstruation, late follicular and luteal phases. Behavioral results revealed no group or phase effect. ERPs data showed modulations of the menstrual cycle and neuroticism on the late positive potential (LPP), with the larger LPP (300-1000 ms post-stimulus) during the late follicular phase than that during the luteal phase and larger LPP (1000-3000 ms post-stimulus) in the high neuroticism group than that in the low neuroticism group. Furthermore, significant positive correlations between the LPP amplitudes and valence and arousal evaluations were observed mainly in the high neuroticism group. The present study provides electrophysiological evidences that the LPP evoked by emotional pictures are modulated both by the menstrual cycle and neuroticism.

  20. miRNA-124 in Immune System and Immune Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhen; Wang, Peng-Yuan; Su, Ding-Feng; Liu, Xia

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, miR-124 has emerged as a critical modulator of immunity and inflammation. Here, we summarize studies on the function and mechanism of miR-124 in the immune system and immunity-related diseases. They indicated that miR-124 exerts a crucial role in the development of immune system, regulation of immune responses, and inflammatory disorders. It is evident that miR-124 may serve as an informative diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target in the future. PMID:27757114

  1. Adaptive immune resistance: How cancer protects from immune attack

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immune resistance is a process where the cancer changes its phenotype in response to a cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory immune response, thereby evading it. This adaptive process is triggered by the specific recognition of cancer cells by T cells, which leads to the production of immune-activating cytokines. Cancers then hijack mechanisms developed to limit inflammatory and immune responses and protect themselves from the T cell attack. Inhibiting adaptive immune resistance is the mechanistic basis of responses to PD-1 or PD-L1 blocking antibodies, and may be of relevance for the development of other cancer immunotherapy strategies. PMID:26272491

  2. Influenza virus vaccine live intranasal--MedImmune vaccines: CAIV-T, influenza vaccine live intranasal.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    (now Wyeth Vaccines) had begun a phase II bridging study with a refrigerator-stable liquid formulation of FluMist in the Southern Hemisphere. The randomised single-blind trial is being conducted together with Aviron (now MedImmune Vaccines) and is intended to demonstrate clinical equivalence between frozen and liquid FluMist. At the time of the announcement, more than 500 children aged 1-3 years had been enrolled to receive either frozen or liquid FluMist. The final study population is approximately 1300. If clinical equivalence of the two forms of FluMist is demonstrated in this study, MedImmune Vaccines will be able to use data from trials of frozen FluMist in licence applications for international markets. Aviron submitted a Biologics Licence Application (BLA) to the US FDA in July 1998. The FDA rejected this application on the grounds of a lack of data on manufacturing, validation and stability. In June 1999, Aviron announced that it had completed a bridging study on FluMist designed to provide some of the manufacturing data required by the US FDA on FluMist prepared at one of two manufacturing sites. Preliminary analysis indicated that the results had met the company's objectives. The primary endpoint of the study was to demonstrate that the batch of FluMist blended and filled at Packaging Coordinators, Inc. in Philadelphia had similar immunogenicity for all three 1997-98 influenza strains as the vaccine used in earlier clinical trials, which was manufactured by Medeva Pharma (now Evans Vaccines, a subsidiary of PowderJect Pharmaceuticals) in England. The secondary endpoint was to show that these lots of FluMist had similar safety and tolerability profiles. Aviron then submitted a BLA in October 2000. However, in late July 2001, an FDA advisory committee declined to recommend approval of the vaccine, citing concerns with safety. Aviron subsequently received a Complete Response Letter from the FDA requesting additional clinical and manufacturing data. Aviron stated

  3. The identification of immune genes in the milk transcriptome of the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii)

    PubMed Central

    Hewavisenti, Rehana V.; Morris, Katrina M.; O’Meally, Denis; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Papenfuss, Anthony T.

    2016-01-01

    Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) pouch young, like other marsupials, are born underdeveloped and immunologically naïve, and are unable to mount an adaptive immune response. The mother’s milk provides nutrients for growth and development as well as providing passive immunity. To better understand immune response in this endangered species, we set out to characterise the genes involved in passive immunity by sequencing and annotating the transcriptome of a devil milk sample collected during mid-lactation. At mid-lactation we expect the young to have heightened immune responses, as they have emerged from the pouch, encountering new pathogens. A total of 233,660 transcripts were identified, including approximately 17,827 unique protein-coding genes and 846 immune genes. The most highly expressed transcripts were dominated by milk protein genes such as those encoding early lactation protein, late lactation proteins, α-lactalbumin, α-casein and β-casein. There were numerous highly expressed immune genes including lysozyme, whey acidic protein, ferritin and major histocompatibility complex I and II. Genes encoding immunoglobulins, antimicrobial peptides, chemokines and immune cell receptors were also identified. The array of immune genes identified in this study reflects the importance of the milk in providing immune protection to Tasmanian devil young and provides the first insight into Tasmanian devil milk. PMID:26793426

  4. The identification of immune genes in the milk transcriptome of the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).

    PubMed

    Hewavisenti, Rehana V; Morris, Katrina M; O'Meally, Denis; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Belov, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) pouch young, like other marsupials, are born underdeveloped and immunologically naïve, and are unable to mount an adaptive immune response. The mother's milk provides nutrients for growth and development as well as providing passive immunity. To better understand immune response in this endangered species, we set out to characterise the genes involved in passive immunity by sequencing and annotating the transcriptome of a devil milk sample collected during mid-lactation. At mid-lactation we expect the young to have heightened immune responses, as they have emerged from the pouch, encountering new pathogens. A total of 233,660 transcripts were identified, including approximately 17,827 unique protein-coding genes and 846 immune genes. The most highly expressed transcripts were dominated by milk protein genes such as those encoding early lactation protein, late lactation proteins, α-lactalbumin, α-casein and β-casein. There were numerous highly expressed immune genes including lysozyme, whey acidic protein, ferritin and major histocompatibility complex I and II. Genes encoding immunoglobulins, antimicrobial peptides, chemokines and immune cell receptors were also identified. The array of immune genes identified in this study reflects the importance of the milk in providing immune protection to Tasmanian devil young and provides the first insight into Tasmanian devil milk.

  5. The role of immune system exhaustion on cancer cell escape and anti-tumor immune induction after irradiation.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Fernando; Domingues, Cátia; Rodrigues-Santos, Paulo; Abrantes, Ana Margarida; Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Estrela, Jéssica; Encarnação, João; Pires, Ana Salomé; Laranjo, Mafalda; Alves, Vera; Teixo, Ricardo; Sarmento, Ana Bela; Botelho, Maria Filomena; Rosa, Manuel Santos

    2016-04-01

    Immune surveillance seems to represent an effective tumor suppressor mechanism. However, some cancer cells survive and become variants, being poorly immunogenic and able to enter a steady-state phase. These cells become functionally dormant or remain hidden clinically throughout. Neoplastic cells seem to be able to instruct immune cells to undergo changes promoting malignancy. Radiotherapy may act as a trigger of the immune response. After radiotherapy a sequence of reactions occurs, starting in the damage of oncogenic cells by multiple mechanisms, leading to the immune system positive feedback against the tumor. The link between radiotherapy and the immune system is evident. T cells, macrophages, Natural Killer cells and other immune cells seem to have a key role in controlling the tumor. T cells may be dysfunctional and remain in a state of T cell exhaustion, nonetheless, they often retain a high potential for successful defense against cancer, being able to be mobilized to become highly functional. The lack of clinical trials on a large scale makes data a little robust, in spite of promising information, there are still many variables in the studies relating to radiation and immune system. The clarification of the mechanisms underlying immune response to radiation exposure may contribute to treatment improvement, gain of life quality and span of patients.

  6. Soft coincidence in late acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Campo, Sergio del; Herrera, Ramon; Pavon, Diego

    2005-06-15

    We study the coincidence problem of late cosmic acceleration by assuming that the present ratio between dark matter and dark energy is a slowly varying function of the scale factor. As the dark energy component we consider two different candidates, first a quintessence scalar field, and then a tachyon field. In either case analytical solutions for the scale factor, the field, and the potential are derived. Both models show a good fit to the recent magnitude-redshift supernovae data. However, the likelihood contours disfavor the tachyon field model as it seems to prefer a excessively high value for the matter component.

  7. Early and Late Extensive Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease (cGVHD) In Children Is Characterized By Different Th1/Th2 Cytokine Profiles: Findings Of The Children’s Oncology Group Study (COG), ASCT0031

    PubMed Central

    Rozmus, Jacob; Schultz, Kirk R.; Wynne, Kristin; Kariminia, Amina; Satyanarayana, Preeti; Krailo, Mark; Grupp, Stephan A.; Gilman, Andrew L.; Goldman, Frederick D.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) are numerous, including skewing of Th1/Th2 cytokine expression. cGVHD has biological differences between early and late onset cGVHD. To test whether different Th1/Th2 cytokines are associated with early or late onset cGVHD, peripheral blood was collected from 63 children enrolled on the Children’s Oncology Group phase III trial ASCT0031 evaluating hydroxychloroquine therapy for newly diagnosed extensive cGVHD. mRNA expression of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and interleukins 2, 4 and 10(IL-2, IL-4 and IL-10) from stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells was evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). We found that early onset cGVHD (n=33) was characterized by decreased expression of IFN-γ and IL-2 mRNA after non-specific PMA-Ionomycin stimulation. In contrast, late onset cGVHD (n=11) was characterized by decreased expression of IL-4 and IL-2 mRNA after anti-CD3 stimulation of T cells. Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed that IFN-γ production could determine the absence of early cGVHD (AUC=0.77) and IL-4 (AUC=0.89) and IL-2 (AUC=0.84) the absence of late cGVHD. We did not find any correlation between cytokine expression and a specific immune cell subset. We also showed an increased expression of Foxp3 mRNA in early onset cGVHD and late controls. The different time-dependent cytokine profiles in newly-diagnosed cGVHD suggests that mechanisms underlying cGVHD are temporally regulated. While larger validation studies are needed our data suggests cytokine profiles could potentially be used as biomarkers for the diagnosis of cGVHD. PMID:21669298

  8. Immunization strategies against henipaviruses.

    PubMed

    Broder, Christopher C; Geisbert, Thomas W; Xu, Kai; Nikolov, Dimitar B; Wang, Lin-Fa; Middleton, Deborah; Pallister, Jackie; Bossart, Katharine N

    2012-01-01

    Hendra virus and Nipah virus are recently discovered and closely related emerging viruses that now comprise the genus henipavirus within the sub-family Paramyxoviridae and are distinguished by their broad species tropism and in addition to bats can infect and cause fatal disease in a wide variety of mammalian hosts including humans. The high mortality associated with human and animal henipavirus infections has highlighted the importance and necessity of developing effective immunization strategies. The development of suitable animal models of henipavirus infection and pathogenesis has been critical for testing the efficacy of potential therapeutic approaches. Several henipavirus challenge models have been used and recent successes in both active and passive immunization strategies against henipaviruses have been reported which have all targeted the viral envelope glycoproteins.

  9. Epigenetics meets immune checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Covre, Alessia; Coral, Sandra; Di Giacomo, Anna Maria; Taverna, Pietro; Azab, Mohammad; Maio, Michele

    2015-06-01

    Epigenetic alterations play a pivotal role in cancer development and progression. Pharmacologic reversion of such alterations is feasible, and second generation "epigenetic drugs" are in development and have been demonstrated to possess significant immunomodulatory properties. This knowledge, together with the availability of new and highly effective immunotherapeutic agents including immune checkpoint(s) blocking monoclonal antibodies, allows us to plan for highly innovative proof-of-principle combination studies that will likely open the path to more effective anticancer therapies.

  10. Single Nutrients and Immunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    control group, cot- vitamin C deficiencies, humoral immune re- ton- topped marmosets fed a large dietary ex- sponses do not differ appreciably from...vac- duction of interferon. They commented (61) cine (75). that "the literature in this field is bedeviled The long-term feeding of cotton- topped by...repletion: a marked numbers were also found in the lungs. sub- rebound to higher serum lgG values then maxillary glands, and lymph nodes (310). occurred over

  11. Research in Plague Immunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-01

    Purified Antigen of Brucella melitensis Prior to Injection of Rev. I Vaccine or with Both Injected Concomitantly. J. Infect. Dis. September 1976 issue...with observa- tion on the structure of the-bacterial cells and its relationships to infection and immunity, J. Immunol. 72:282-298, 1954. Chen, T. H...a vaccine prepared with killed virulent whole organisms. J. Immunol. 87:64-71, 1961. Chen, T.H. The antigenic structure of Pasteurella pestis and its

  12. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    the period 246 Lassa Fever