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Sample records for late quaternary glaciation

  1. Quaternary glaciations in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosqvist, Gunhild

    Glaciers were active on the African mountains during several periods of the Quaternary. Evidence exists of three old glaciations (before 100 ka BP) on Kilimanjaro, and two on Mount Kenya and Ruwenzori. The Last Glaciation, which was synchronous with the last major glacial phase in temperate latitudes, affected Kilimanjaro, Mount Kenya, Ruwenzori, Nyandarua Range, Mount Elgon, the Ethiopian Highlands and several of the high mountains within and around the Sahara Desert. The ice disappeared from most of these areas during the Early Holocene, except from Kilimanjaro, Mount Kenya and Ruwenzori, where glaciers exist at the present day.

  2. Styles of glaciation on Kilimanjaro, Tanzania, in response to late Quaternary climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boston, Clare; Lovell, Harold; Mills, Stephanie; Cullen, Nicolas; Sirguey, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    The recognition of geomorphological evidence for more extensive ice masses in a number of areas near the equator provides a direct link to climate change in the tropics. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania consists of the highest elevations in Africa, and sets of moraines document that ice was significantly more extensive in the past. The most extensive moraines around Kibo, the highest peak, suggest that glaciers may have extended down to around 3800 m at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). A more recent set of moraines, at 4600-4800 m on the western side of the peak, document the maximum position that ice reached during the Little Ice Age (LIA). Both of these sets of moraines indicate significant recession has occurred throughout the late Quaternary, and particularly during the 20th century. Present-day ice is restricted to rapidly-receding glaciers and icefields on the uppermost flanks and summit of Kibo, between ~5000-5800 m. The area is therefore important for understanding the timing, magnitude and style of glacier response to changes in climate in the tropics in the late Quaternary. This research presents the results of new field and remotely-sensed mapping of moraines relating to the Late Pleistocene and LIA, providing greater detail on the glacial geomorphology of the area than in previous mapping. This allows an assessment of the styles of glaciation, and particularly the role of topography and aspect on influencing response to climate and patterns of glacier recession.

  3. Late Quaternary Glaciation and Postglacial Stratigraphy of the Northern Pacific Margin of Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrie, J. Vaughn; Conway, Kim W.

    1999-03-01

    Areas of southeastern Alaska and the Queen Charlotte Islands of the northwestern Pacific coast of North America were considered to be ice free during the late Wisconsinan glaciation and glacial refugia existed. However, a glacier extended from mainland North America to the shelfbreak in Dixon Entrance separating Alaska and the Queen Charlotte Islands. Glacial retreat to the east began sometime after 15,000 to 16,000 14C yr B.P. and ice had completely left Dixon Entrance by 13,500 to 13,000 14C yr B.P. A rapid sea-level regression occurred soon after deglaciation began, due to isostatic rebound, with relative sea level falling to approximately 150 m below present in central Dixon Entrance, decreasing the size of the inlet by about 30 percent by 12,400 14C yr B.P. The late Quaternary glacial and postglacial stratigraphic sequence is more than 100 m thick overlying older Pleistocene sediments and Tertiary bedrock. A late Wisconsinan diamicton is overlain by glaciomarine muds formed between approximately 14,400 and 13,000 14C yr B.P. Contemporaneous with the deposition of the glaciomarine muds an extensive outwash deposit formed off the northern coast of the Queen Charlotte Islands to a present depth of 150 m. During the sea-level lowstand and subsequent transgression, a reworked sand unit was deposited over much of the seafloor to depths greater than 450 m. The unit is exposed at the seafloor over much of the region, suggesting that seabed hydrodynamic energy levels were high after 13,000 14C yr B.P. and remain so today.

  4. Late Quaternary glaciation of the Upper Soca River Region (Southern Julian Alps, NW Slovenia)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bavec, Milos; Tulaczyk, Slawek M.; Mahan, Shannon; Stock, Gregory M.

    2004-01-01

    Extent of Late Quaternary glaciers in the Upper Soc??a River Region (Southern Julian Alps, SE Europe) has been analyzed using a combination of geological mapping, glaciological modeling, and sediment dating (radiocarbon, U/Th series and Infrared Stimulated Luminescence-IRSL). Field investigations focused mainly on relatively well preserved Quaternary sequences in the Bovec Basin, an intramontane basin located SW of the Mediterranean/Black Sea divide and surrounded by mountain peaks reaching from approximately 2100 up to 2587 m a.s.l. Within the Basin we recognized two Late Quaternary sedimentary assemblages, which consist of the same facies association of diamictons, laminated lacustrine deposits and sorted fluvial sediments. Radiocarbon dating of the upper part of the lake sediments sequence (between 12790??85 and 5885??60 14C years b.p.) indicates that the younger sedimentary assemblage was deposited during the last glacial maximum and through early Holocene (Marine Isotope Stage 21, MIS 2-1). Sediment ages obtained for the older assemblage with U/Th and IRSL techniques (between 154.74??22.88 and 129.93??7.90 ka b.p. for selected samples) have large errors but both methods yield results consistent with deposition during the penultimate glacial-interglacial transition (MIS 6-5). Based on analyses of field data combined with glaciological modeling, we argue that both sediment complexes formed due to high sediment productivity spurred by paraglacial conditions with glaciers present in the uplands around the Bovec Basin but not extending down to the basin floor. Our study shows that the extent and intensity of direct glacial sedimentation by Late Quaternary glaciers in the region was previously significantly overestimated. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chronology of late Quaternary glaciation and landform evolution in the upper Dhauliganga valley, (Trans Himalaya), Uttarakhand, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisht, Pinkey; Ali, S. Nawaz; Shukla, Anil D.; Negi, Sunil; Sundriyal, Y. P.; Yadava, M. G.; Juyal, Navin

    2015-12-01

    Detailed field mapping of glacial and paraglacial landforms supported by optical and radiocarbon dating is used to reconstruct the history of late Quaternary glaciation and landform evolution in the Trans Himalayan region of the upper Dhauliganga valley. The study identifies four events of glaciations with decreasing magnitude which are termed as Purvi Kamet Stage -Ia (PKS-Ia), PKS-Ib, PKS-II, PKS-III and PKS-IV respectively. The oldest PKS-Ia and Ib are assigned the Marine Isotopic Stgae-3 (MIS-3), the PKS-II to the Last Glacial Maximum (MIS-2), PKS-III dated to 7.9 ± 0.7 ka, and the PKS-IV is dated to 3.4 ± 0.3 ka and 1.9 ± 0.2 ka respectively. The largest valley glaciations viz. the (PKS-Ia) occurred during the strengthened summer monsoon corresponding to the MIS-3, following this, the recessional moraines (PKS-Ib) represent the gradual decline in summer monsoon towards the later part of MIS-3. The valley responded to the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), which is represented by the PKS-II moraine implying the influence of strengthened mid-latitude westerlies during the LGM. The post-LGM deglaciation was associated with the onset of summer monsoon and is represented by the deposition of four distinct outwash gravel terraces. The early Holocene PKS-III glaciation occurred around 7.9 ± 0.7 ka and broadly coincides with the early Holocene cooling event (8.2 ka). This was followed by the deposition of stratified scree deposits and the alluvial fan (between 5.5 ka and 3 ka) during the mid to late Holocene aridity. This was followed by marginal re-advancement of the valley glacier (viz. PKS-IV) during the late Holocene cool and moist climate. Although glaciers respond to a combination of temperature and precipitation changes, however during the Holocene it seems that temperature played a major role in driving the glaciation.

  6. Late Quaternary Glaciation of the Naches River Drainage Basin, Washington Cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffer, H. B.; Goss, L.; Shimer, G.; Carson, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Naches River drainage basin east of Mount Rainer includes tributary valleys of the Little Naches, American, Bumping, and Tieton rivers. An investigation of surface boulder frequency, weathering rind thicknesses, and soil development on moraines in these valleys identified two stages of Pleistocene glaciations in the American, Bumping, and Tieton drainages, followed by Neoglaciation. These stages include a more extensive early glaciation (Hayden Creek?), and the later Evans Creek Glaciation (25-15 ka). Thick forest cover, limited road cuts, and widespread post-glacial mass wasting hamper efforts to determine the maximum extent of glaciation. However, glacial striations at Chinook Pass, moraine complexes in the vicinity of Goose Egg Mountain, ice-transported boulders and striations on Pinegrass Ridge, and a boulder field possibly derived from an Evans Creek jökulhaup in the Tieton River valley, all point to extensive Pleistocene ice in the central tributaries of the Naches River. Lowest observed ice elevations in the Tieton (780 m), Bumping (850 m), and American (920 m) drainages increase towards the north, while glacial lengths decrease from 40 to 28 km. The Little Naches is the northernmost drainage in the study, but despite a maximum elevation (1810 m) that exceeds the floor of ice caps to the south, glacially-derived sediments are not evident and the surrounding peaks lack cirques. The absence of ice in the Little Naches drainage, along with the systematic northward change in glacial length and lowest observed ice elevations in the other drainages, are likely due to a precipitation shadow northeast of Mount Rainier. In contrast, the source of glacial ice in the Tieton drainage to the southeast was the Goat Rocks peaks. Ground-based study of neoglacial moraines and analysis of 112 years of topographic maps and satellite imagery point to rapid retreat of the remaining Goat Rocks glaciers following the Little Ice Age.

  7. Quaternary glaciations of the southern Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabassa, Jorge; Clapperton, Chalmers M.

    The southern Andes comprise the southernmost portion of the Andean Cordillera, beginning at the edge of the Puna Altiplano (lat.27°S) and ending at Isla de los Estados (lat.55°S). The late Cainozoic glacial record of these mountains spans the interval from the Late Miocene to the present and is one of the most complete to be found anywhere in the world. This has arisen for several reasons: (i) the conterminous mountain ice cap extended to the piedmont zone on both flanks of the range, where the sedimentary and morphological record has been well preserved; (ii) periodic volcanism, mainly from monogenetic fissure eruptions of basalt east of the range and from central tephra-producing cones along the mountain crest, has provided opportunity for the preservation and radiometric dating of interbedded glacial deposits; (iii) a tectonically-induced interval of stream incision in the Mid Pleistocene and simultaneous uplift has preserved glacial sediments on interfluves; (iv) in the Chilean lakes region west of the mountains, Late Quaternary glaciers terminated in a well-vegetated landscape, thus creating scope for radiocarbon dating of interbedded and incorporated organic materials; consequently, the last glaciation in the Llanquihue area of Chile is one of the best dated sequences in South America; thus the 'Llanquihue' Glaciation is proposed as the South American equivalent of the 'Wisconsin' and 'Weichsel' glaciations of North America and north west Europe respectively.

  8. Late Quaternary glaciation history of Isla de los Estados, southeasternmost South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Per; Hjort, Christian; Björck, Svante; Rabassa, Jorge; Ponce, Juan Federico

    2010-05-01

    Isla de los Estados is a mountainous island southeast of Tierra del Fuego, in southernmost South America. Its central and eastern parts have an alpine topography, transected by U-shaped valleys, small, partly over-deepened fjords, and a multitude of abandoned cirques, all associated with extensive former local glaciations. Traces of glacial erosion generally reach 400-450 m a.s.l., and above that trimline a distinct sharp-edged nunatak derived landscape is present. The westernmost part of the island has a lower, more subdued topography, reflecting its "softer" geology but possibly also over-running and erosion by mainland-derived ice streams. The present study concentrated on glacigenic sediment sequences exposed along coastal erosional cliffs. A combination of OSL and 14C datings show that these sediments mostly date from the latest (Wisconsinan/Weichselian) glacial cycle, i.e. from the last ca. 100 ka with the oldest (glaciolacustrine) deposits possibly as old as 90-80 ka. The upper parts of overlying tills, with associated lateral and terminal moraines from glaciers that expanded onto an eustatically exposed dry shelf north of the island, date from the last global glacial maximum (LGM). Radiocarbon ages of peat and lake sediments indicate that deglaciation began 17-16 cal ka BP.

  9. Modeling late Paleozoic glaciation

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, T.J.; Baum, S.K. )

    1992-06-01

    Late Paleozoic glaciation on Gondwana is associated with changes in geography, solar luminosity, and estimated CO{sub 2} levels. To assess the relative importance of these boundary conditions, the authors conducted a suite of climate model simulations for the periods before, during, and after peak mid-Carboniferous ({approximately}300 Ma) glaciation (340, 300, and 255 and 225 Ma, respectively). Orbital insolation values favorable for glaciation and interglaciation were used for each time interval. Results indicate that changes in geography cause significant changes in snow area, but the temporal trend is not consistent with the geologic record for glaciation. Combined CO{sub 2}-plus-geography changes yield the best agreement with observations. In addition, interglacial orbital configurations result in almost ice-free conditions for the glacial interval at 300 Ma, at a time of low CO{sub 2}. The large simulated glacial-interglacial snowline fluctuations for Permian-Carboniferous time may explain cyclothem fluctuations at these times. Overall, results support the importance of the CO{sub 2} paradigm, but also indicate that a fuller understanding of past climate change requires consideration of paleogeographic, luminosity, and orbital insolation changes.

  10. Late Quaternary glaciation history of northernmost Greenland - Evidence of shelf-based ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Nicolaj K.; Kjær, Kurt H.; Funder, Svend; Möller, Per; van der Meer, Jaap J. M.; Schomacker, Anders; Linge, Henriette; Darby, Dennis A.

    2010-12-01

    We present the mapping of glacial landforms and sediments from northernmost Greenland bordering 100 km of the Arctic Ocean coast. One of the most important discoveries is that glacial landforms, sediments, including till fabric measurements, striae and stoss-lee boulders suggest eastward ice-flow along the coastal plain. Volcanic erratic boulders document ice-transport from 80 to 100 km west of the study area. We argue that these findings are best explained by local outlet glaciers from the Greenland Ice Sheet and local ice caps that merged to form a shelf-based ice in the Arctic Ocean and possibly confirming an extensive ice shelf in the Lincoln Sea between Greenland and Ellesmere Island. It is speculated that the shelf-based ice was largely affected by the presence of thick multiyear sea ice in the Arctic Ocean that prevented it from breaking up and forced the outlet glaciers to flow eastwards. During the initial retreat the coastal area was dammed by the shelf-based ice and kame and glaciolacustrine sediments were deposited up to 50 m above the marine limit before the final deglaciation and marine transgression. The timing of the shelf-based ice is constrained on land by dating glaciolacustrine sediments with OSL and marine molluscs with radiocarbon and by re-evaluating IRD events in cores from the Fram Strait. Results show that the shelf-based ice started to build-up as early as 30 cal ka BP and reached a maximum during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The shelf-based ice began to retreat ca 16 ka to 10.3 cal ka BP before the final break-up, which took place ca 10.1 cal ka BP probably as a combined result of increased inflow of warm Atlantic water through the Fram Strait, a shallower halocline and higher summer temperatures, corresponding to orbital maximum solar insolation at this time. The existence of extensive shelf-based ice north of Greenland provides an important contribution to the understanding of the LGM glaciation history of the Arctic Ocean.

  11. Extensive Quaternary glaciations in eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeşilyurt, Serdar; Akçar, Naki; Doǧan, Uǧur; Yavuz, Vural; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Vockenhuber, Christof; Schlunegger, Fritz; Schlüchter, Christian

    2016-04-01

    During cold periods in the Quaternary, global ice volume increased and as a result valley glaciers advanced and the vice versa occurred during the warm periods. Quaternary glacier fluctuations had been also recorded in the Turkish mountains. Recently, the chronology of Late Quaternary advances in the northern and western Turkish mountains was reconstructed by surface exposure dating. However, these advances in the eastern Turkey are not dated yet. In this study, we investigated paleoglaciations in Kavuşşahap Mountains, which is located to the south of Lake Van in eastern Turkey. These mountains are one of the extensively glaciated areas in Turkey. Glacial activity is evidenced by more than 20 U-shaped valleys. For instance, one of the prominent and well-preserved glacial landscapes of Turkey is situated in the Narlıca valley system. Lateral and terminal moraines in the valley system indicate more than 10 glacial advances. To build their chronology, 39 erratic carbonaceous boulders were sampled for surface exposure dating with cosmogenic 36Cl. We also reconstructed the ice margin reconstruction of the Narlıca paleoglacier using the accumulation area ratio and area-altitude balance ratio approaches. We estimated an equilibrium line altitude (ELA) of ca. 2900 m above sea level based on the maximum ice extend, which implied ca. 800 m decrease in the ELA during the Late Quaternary in comparison to the lower bound of the modern ELA estimate. The first results of the surface exposure dating will be presented.

  12. Late-Quaternary glaciation and postglacial emergence, southern Eureka Sound, high-Arctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O Cofaigh, Colm Seamus

    Eureka Sound is the inter-island channel separating Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg islands, High Arctic Canada. This thesis reconstructs the glacial and sea level history of southern Eureka Sound through surficial geological mapping, studies of glacial sedimentology and geomorphology, surveying of raised marine shorelines, radiocarbon dating of marine shells and driftwood and surface exposure dating of erratics and bedrock. Granite dispersal trains, shelly till and ice-moulded bedrock record westerly-flow of warm-based, regional ice into Eureka Sound from a source on southeastern Ellesmere Island during the late Wisconsinan. Regional ice was coalescent with local ice domes over Raanes and northern Svendsen peninsulas. Marine limit (dating <=9.2 ka BP; <=9.9 ka cal BP) is inset into the dispersal trains and records early Holocene deglaciation of regional ice. Collectively these data indicate an extensive ice-cover in southern Eureka Sound during the Last Glacial Maximum. Ice-divides were located along the highlands of central Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg islands, from which ice converged on Eureka Sound, and subsequently flowed north and south along the channel. Deglaciation was characterised by a two-step retreat pattern, likely triggered by eustatic sea level rise and abrupt early Holocene warming. Initial break-up and radial retreat of ice in Eureka Sound and the larger fiords, preceded terrestrial stabilisation along coastlines and inner fiords. Location of deglacial depocentres was predominantly controlled by fiord bathymetry. Regionally, two-step deglaciation is reflected by prominent contrasts in glacial geomorphology between the inner and outer parts of many fiords. Glacial sedimentological and geomorphological evidence indicates spatial variation in basal thermal regime between retreating trunk glaciers. Holocene emergence of up to 150 m asl along southern Eureka Sound is recorded by raised marine deltas, beaches and washing limits. Emergence curves exhibit

  13. Climatic and topographic controls on the style and timing of Late Quaternary glaciation throughout Tibet and the Himalaya defined by 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide surface exposure dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, L.A.; Finkel, R.C.; Barnard, P.L.; Haizhou, Ma; Asahi, K.; Caffee, M.W.; Derbyshire, E.

    2005-01-01

    Temporal and spatial changes in glacier cover throughout the Late Quaternary in Tibet and the bordering mountains are poorly defined because of the inaccessibility and vastness of the region, and the lack of numerical dating. To help reconstruct the timing and extent of glaciation throughout Tibet and the bordering mountains, we use geomorphic mapping and 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) surface dating in study areas in southeastern (Gonga Shan), southern (Karola Pass) and central (Western Nyainqentanggulha Shan and Tanggula Shan) Tibet, and we compare these with recently determined numerical chronologies in other parts of the plateau and its borderlands. Each of the study regions receives its precipitation mainly during the south Asian summer monsoon when it falls as snow at high altitudes. Gonga Shan receives the most precipitation (>2000 mm a-1) while, near the margins of monsoon influence, the Karola Pass receives moderate amounts of precipitation (500-600 mm a-1) and, in the interior of the plateau, little precipitation falls on the western Nyainqentanggulha Shan (???300 mm a -1) and the Tanggula Shan (400-700 mm a-1). The higher precipitation values for the Tanggula Shan are due to strong orographic effects. In each region, at least three sets of moraines and associated landforms are preserved, providing evidence for multiple glaciations. The 10Be CRN surface exposure dating shows that the formation of moraines in Gonga Shan occurred during the early-mid Holocene, Neoglacial and Little Ice Age, on the Karola Pass during the Lateglacial, Early Holocene and Neoglacial, in the Nyainqentanggulha Shan date during the early part of the last glacial cycle, global Last Glacial Maximum and Lateglacial, and on the Tanggula Shan during the penultimate glacial cycle and the early part of the last glacial cycle. The oldest moraine succession in each of these regions varies from the early Holocene (Gonga Shan), Lateglacial (Karola Pass), early Last Glacial (western

  14. Quaternary glaciations in the Northern Hemisphere

    SciTech Connect

    Sibrava, V.; Bowen, D.Q.; Richmond, G.M.

    1987-01-01

    This volume presents the final report of Project 24 of the International Geological Correlation Programme. The publication is drawn from the contributions of leading individual scientist as well as from scientific research teams. It reflects the present state of knowledge of the Quaternary Glaciations in the Northern Hemisphere and their correlation in space and time, as well as providing a unique summary of climatic change.

  15. Late Quaternary Glaciations in the Central Peruvian Andes (10°-11°S) and Evidence for a Link to Heinrich Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Farber, D. L.; Finkel, R. C.; Rodbell, D. T.; Seltzer, G. O.

    2009-05-01

    Seven cosmogenic 10Be ages from a moraine in the Santuario Nacional Bosque de Piedras de Huayllay (BP) in the Western Cordillera of the central Peruvian Andes (10°59'S, 76°20'W, 4180-4200 masl) are consistent with 10Be ages on moraines in both the Eastern Cordillera (40-45 km to the east) and Nevado Jeulla Rajo (NJR) massif (10°00'S, 77°16'W) at the southern end of the Cordillera Blanca (150 km to the northwest). In the BP, 10Be ages are ~14-15 ka on four ignimbrite boulders, ~26 and ~20 ka on two quartz boulders, and ~45 ka on ignimbrite bedrock below the trimline in the valley wall. In the Eastern Cordillera bordering Lake Junin, the most extensive glaciations are >150 ka, but end moraines farther upvalley date to the local last glacial maximum (LLGM; 25-30 ka) and a late-glacial stillstand or readvance (14-18 ka). In NJR, 10Be ages indicate that the largest lateral moraines were deposited during similar intervals (27-32 ka and 14-18 ka). Avulsion of a glacial valley preserved an older, smaller pair of lateral moraines (56-65 ka) in NJR; correlative moraines were apparently not preserved in the Junin valleys. We have found no moraines in NJR that date to the global LGM (ca. 19-24 ka), but see some evidence for an advance ca. 40-48 ka. Outwash deposits (ca. 43-50 ka) located beyond the termini of NJR moraines are underlain by lodgement till that extends ca. 6 km across the Conococha Plain, suggesting that at least one older glaciation was far more extensive than any of the late Quaternary NJR advances dated by 10Be (ages calculated using CRONUS-Earth Online Calculator v. 2.2, Lal/Stone time-dependent scaling, and zero erosion). The timing of glacial advances in the central Peruvian Andes since 70 ka suggests a correlation to Heinrich events and associated southward shifts of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in the Atlantic Ocean. We propose that Peruvian glaciers typically expanded when southward migration of the ITCZ resulted in increased

  16. Chronology of Quaternary glaciations in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanahan, Timothy M.; Zreda, Marek

    2000-04-01

    A new glacial chronology for equatorial East Africa is developed using in situ cosmogenic 36Cl measured in 122 boulders from moraines on Mount Kenya and Kilimanjaro. The oldest deposits sampled on Kilimanjaro yield a limiting 36Cl age of >360 calendar kyr (all 36Cl ages are in calendar years, cal. kyr or cal. yr). On Mount Kenya, the oldest moraines give ages of 355-420 kyr (Liki I) and 255-285 kyr (Teleki). Given the uncertainty in our 36Cl ages, the Liki I moraine may correspond to either marine isotope stage 10 or 12, whereas the Teleki moraine correlates with stage 8. There is no evidence for stage 6 on either mountain. The Liki II moraines on Mt. Kenya and moraines of the Fourth Glaciation on Kilimanjaro give ages of 28±3 kyr and 20±1 kyr, respectively. They represent the last glacial maximum (LGM) and correlate with stage 2 of the marine isotope record. A series of smaller moraines above the LGM deposits record several readvances that occurred during the late glacial. On Mt. Kenya, these deposits date to 14.6±1.2 kyr (Liki IIA), 10.2±0.5 kyr (Liki III), 8.6±0.2 kyr (Liki IIIA) and ˜200 yr (Lewis); the corresponding deposits on Kilimanjaro have mean ages of 17.3±2.9 kyr (Fourth Glaciation-Saddle), 15.8±2.5 kyr (Little Glaciation-Saddle), and 13.8±2.3 kyr (Fourth Glaciation-Kibo). These data indicate that the climate of the tropics was extremely variable at the end of the last glacial cycle.

  17. Late Quaternary landscape evolution in the Kunlun Mountains and Qaidam Basin, Northern Tibet: A framework for examining the links between glaciation, lake level changes and alluvial fan formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, L.A.; Finkel, R.C.; Haizhou, M.; Barnard, P.L.

    2006-01-01

    The Qaidam Basin in Northern Tibet is one of the largest hyper-arid intermontane basins on Earth. Alluvial fans, pediment surfaces, shorelines and a thick succession of sediments within the basin, coupled with moraines and associated landforms in the adjacent high mountain catchments of the Kunlun Mountains, record a complex history of Late Quaternary paleoenvironmental change and landscape evolution. The region provides an ideal natural laboratory to examine the interaction between tectonics and climate within a continent-continent collision zone, and to quantify rates of landscape evolution as controlled by climate and the associated glacial and hydrological changes in hyper-arid and adjacent high-altitude environments. Geomorphic mapping, analysis of landforms and sediments, and terrestrial cosmogenic radionuclide surface exposure and optically stimulated luminescence dating serve to define the timing of formation of Late Quaternary landforms along the southern and northwestern margins of the Qaidam Basin, and in the Burhan Budai Shan of the Kunlun Mountains adjacent to the basin on the south. These dates provide a framework that suggests links between climatic amelioration, deglaciation, lake desiccation and alluvial fan evolution. At least three glacial advances are defined in the Burham Budai Shan of the Kunlun Mountains. On the northern side of this range these occurred in the penultimate glacial cycle or early in the last glacial cycle, during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM)/Lateglacial and during the Holocene. On the south side of the range, advances occurred during the penultimate glacial cycle, MIS-3, and possibly the LGM, Lateglacial or Holocene. Several distinct phases of alluvial fan sedimentation are likewise defined. Alluvial fans formed on the southern side of the Kunlun Mountains prior to 200 ka. Ice-contact alluvial fans formed during the penultimate glacial and during MIS-3. Extensive incised alluvial fans that form the main valley fills north of

  18. Late cainozoic glaciation in western tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colhoun, Eric A.; Fitzsimons, Sean J.

    Four major Quaternary glaciations, with associated interglaciations and interstadials, have been identified in Tasmania, for which some chronological cotrol is given by radiocarbon and amino-acid assays, pollen analysis and relative weathering characteristics. The glaciations are known as the Margaret, Henty, Moore and Linda. The Margaret Glaciations has two clear stadial intervals (Isotope Stages 4 and 2), separated by the Tullabardine Interstadial dated at ca. 50-25 ka BP. An interglaciation corresponding to Isotope Stage 5 (Pieman Interglaciation) is characterised by sediments containing a pollen assemblage of a temperate rain forest. Weathered glacial deposits lying beneath the Pieman sediments are inferred to be those of the Penultimate Glaciation; three stadial moraines are identified. A preceding interglaciation (Langdon) contains wood that yielded an amino-acid ratio equivalent to the age of marine Isotope Stage 7. The following Moore Glaciation had three stadial intervals, two of which are separated by a clear interstadial (Baxter) with organic sediments that have amino-acid 'ages' equivalent to Isotope Stage 10; the non-glacial sediments have a DRM of normal polarity and are inferred to be of Mid-Quaternary age. The oldest interglaciation (Regency) is identified from organic-rich sediments (pollen assemblage of a temperate rain forest) overlying intensely weathered glacial deposits that have a DRM with reversed polarity (i.e. > 730 ka). The Linda Glaciation is the most extensive of all in Tasmania; although dating is uncertain, it has been assigned tentatively to the Early Quaternary.

  19. Late Amazonian Glaciations in Utopia Planitia, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinski, G. R.; Capitan, R. D.; Kerrigan, M.; Barry, N.; Blain, S.

    2012-03-01

    We present evidence from western Utopia Planitia, including lineated valley fill and lobate debris aprons, for widespread glaciations over a large expanse of the northern plains and dichotomy boundary during Late Amazonian times.

  20. Radiocarbon dates of late quaternary mammals in the Archangelsk Region and their contribution to reconstructions of the last glaciation in Eastern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, D. V.; Markova, A. K.; van Kolfschoten, T.; van der Plicht, J.

    2012-06-01

    Twelve new AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) dates of large Quaternary mammal remains were reported: mammoth ( Mammuthus primigenius, bison ( Bison priscus), and musk ox ( Ovibos pallantis) found in the Archangelsk Region. The absolute age of the identified samples varies from 46 000 to 22 000 calibrated years ago. These data suggest that a substantial part of the Archangelsk Region was not covered by ice during the indicated time interval.

  1. A critical examination of evidence for a Quaternary glaciation in Mt. Laoshan, Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusky, Timothy; Guo, Liang; Xiang, Shibao; Guo, Xiaoyu; Xu, Xingyong

    2011-01-01

    Accurately determining how far south Quaternary glaciers existed in eastern China has important implications for understanding global Quaternary climate. In this study, we provide evidence for a colder paleoclimate in the late Pleistocene of the Laoshan range on the eastern Shandong Peninsula at 36°05'-36°19'N latitude, through documentation of erosional and depositional landforms that were possibly formed by glaciation. We integrate field observations documenting and mapping the existence of typical glacial cirques, glacial horns, moraines, arêtes, tarn lakes, and other paleoglacial features in Mt. Laoshan, with a detailed digital elevation model (DEM) created in an ArcGIS environment, merged with Landsat ETM + imagery to document the spatial relations of these features. Other features that may or may not be glacial in origin include large boulder fields (that could be moraines or debris avalanches), and potholes (that could have formed beneath glaciers or in river systems). Additionally, some features previously interpreted as glacial features are here re-interpreted as weathering-related phenomena. Although some of these features alone provide only weak to moderate evidence for glaciation, together the suite of indicators provides strong evidence for sea-level glaciation at 36°N in the late Pleistocene of eastern China. We further integrate the evidence of glaciation with the late Pleistocene paleogeography and climate, and suggest that the glaciers formed as a result of orographic effects from moist monsoonal breezes crossing a paleolake developed in North China then rising over Mt. Laoshan and dropping their moisture there, with a wide desert formed on the leeward side of the mountains.

  2. The position of the gulf stream during quaternary glaciations.

    PubMed

    Keffer, T; Martinson, D G; Corliss, B H

    1988-07-22

    Ocean general circulation theories predict that the position of the boundary between subtropical and subpolar gyres (and therefore the position of the Gulf Stream-North Atlantic Current system and the subpolar-subtropical front) is set by the line of zero "Ekman pumping," where there is no convergence or divergence of water in the directly wind-forced surface layer of the ocean. In the present-day North Atlantic Ocean this line runs southwest to northeast, from off the Carolinas to off Ireland. However, during the last ice age (18,000 years ago) the subpolar-subtropical boundary ran more zonally, directly toward Gibraltar. A numerical atmospheric general circulation model indicates that the field of Ekman pumping 18,000 years ago was modified by the presence of a continental ice cap more than 3 kilometers thick such that the line of zero Ekman pumping overlaid the paleogyre boundary. These results demonstrate that the presence of a thick continental ice sheet could have caused changes in sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic during Quaternary glaciations by altering wind patterns.

  3. The impact of the Quaternary glaciations on the Durmitor mountains (Montenegro) as understood from detailed geomorphological mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankl, Amaury; Annys, Klaas; Spalević, Velibor; Čurović, Milic; Borota, Dragan; Nyssen, Jan

    2014-05-01

    In the Balkans, few studies exist that highlight the impact of the Quaternary glaciations on the landscape. However, the impact of the Quaternary glaciations was important and the glacial imprint remains well preserved in the limestone massifs where karst hydrology prevails. This study presents a detailed geomorphological map at scale 1:10,000 that was prepared of the northeastern Durmitor mountains (2523 m a.s.l.) and the plateau Jezerska Površ (47 km², Dinaric Alps, Montenegro). Mapping occurred from an intensive fieldwork campaign and remote sensing analysis, and was finalized in a GIS environment. The basic components of the legend are (i) processes/genesis, (ii) materials, (iii) morphometry/morphography, (iv) hydrography, (v) vegetation and (vi) anthropogenic features, that are organized as a box-of-bricks type of legend (AGRG-system). The geomorphological setting of the area consists of Mesozoic limestones which were eroded physically by Quaternary glacial and periglacial activity and chemically during interglacials. Glacial deposits of three Middle to Late Pleistocene glacial phases exist on the plateau, only scarcely dissected by meltwater channels. In the mountains, Holocene glacier retreat left behind a series of well-preserved recessional moraines and a static glacier remains in the cirque head. The presented map serves as a valuable tool for Quaternary research in the Durmitor Mountains, and serves as an example on the interaction between glacial and karst processes. Keywords: Debeli Namet glacier, Dinaric Alps, Geographic Information System (GIS), Glacial landforms, Karst.

  4. Quaternary glaciations in the Verkhoyansk Mountains, Northeast Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauch, Georg; Lehmkuhl, Frank

    2010-07-01

    Geomorphological mapping revealed five terminal moraines in the central Verkhoyansk Mountains. The youngest terminal moraine (I) was formed at least 50 ka ago according to new IRSL (infrared optically stimulated luminescence) dates. Older terminal moraines in the western foreland of the mountains are much more extensive in size. Although the smallest of these older moraines, moraine II, has not been dated, moraine III is 80 to 90 ka, moraine IV is 100 to 120 ka, and the outermost moraine V was deposited around 135 ka. This glaciation history is comparable to that of the Barents and Kara ice sheet and partly to that of the Polar Ural Mountains regarding the timing of the glaciations. However, no glaciation occurred during the global last glacial maximum (MIS 2). Based on cirque orientation and different glacier extent on the eastern and western flanks of the Verkhoyansk Mountains, local glaciations are mainly controlled by moisture transport from the west across the Eurasian continent. Thus glaciations in the Verkhoyansk Mountains not only express local climate changes but also are strongly influenced by the extent of the Eurasian ice sheets.

  5. Widespread Antarctic glaciation during the Late Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Andrew; Riley, Teal R.; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Rittner, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Marine sedimentary rocks drilled on the southeastern margin of the South Orkney microcontinent in Antarctica (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 113 Site 696) were deposited between ∼36.5 Ma to 33.6 Ma, across the Eocene-Oligocene climate transition. The recovered rocks contain abundant grains exhibiting mechanical features diagnostic of iceberg-rafted debris. Sand provenance based on a multi-proxy approach that included petrographic analysis of over 275,000 grains, detrital zircon geochronology and apatite thermochronometry rule out local sources (Antarctic Peninsula or the South Orkney Islands) for the material. Instead the ice-transported grains show a clear provenance from the southern Weddell Sea region, extending from the Ellsworth-Whitmore Mountains of West Antarctica to the coastal region of Dronning Maud Land in East Antarctica. This study provides the first evidence for a continuity of widespread glacier calving along the coastline of the southern Weddell Sea embayment at least 2.5 million yrs before the prominent oxygen isotope event at 34-33.5 Ma that is considered to mark the onset of widespread glaciation of the Antarctic continent.

  6. Palaeoclimate: CO2 and late Palaeozoic glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Timothy S.

    2016-11-01

    Large glacial-interglacial fluctuations occurred during the late Palaeozoic. Geochemical and fossil data show these cycles were marked by coincident shifts in the carbon cycle and terrestrial biosphere.

  7. Geochronology of Quaternary glaciations from the tropical Cordillera Huayhuash, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Sarah R.; Farber, Daniel L.; Ramage, Joan M.; Rodbell, Donald T.; Finkel, Robert C.; Smith, Jacqueline A.; Mark, Bryan G.; Kassel, Christopher

    2009-12-01

    The Cordillera Huayhuash in the central Peruvian Andes (10.3°S, 76.9°W) is an ideal mountain range in which to study regional climate through variations in paleoglacier extents. The range trends nearly north-south with modern glaciers confined to peaks >4800 m a.s.l. Geomorphology and geochronology in the nearby Cordillera Blanca and Junin Plain reveal that the Peruvian Andes preserve a detailed record of tropical glaciation. Here, we use ASTER imagery, aerial photographs, and GPS to map and date glacial features in both the western and eastern drainages of the Cordillera Huayhuash. We have used in situ produced cosmogenic 10Be concentrations in quartz bearing erratics on moraine crests and ice-polished bedrock surfaces to develop an exposure age chronology for Pleistocene glaciation within the range. We have also collected sediment cores from moraine-dammed lakes and bogs to provide limiting 14C ages for glacial deposits. In contrast to the ranges to the north and south, most glacial features within the Cordillera Huayhuash are Lateglacial in age, however we have identified features with ages that span ˜0.2 to ˜38 ka with moraine sets marking the onset of glacier retreat at ˜0.3 ka, ˜9-10 ka, ˜13-14 ka, ˜20-22 ka, and >26 ka. The range displays a pronounced east-west variation in maximum down-valley distance from the headwall of moraine crests with considerably longer paleoglaciers in the eastern drainages. Importantly, Lateglacial paleoglaciers reached a terminal elevation of ˜4000 m a.s.l. on both sides of the Cordillera Huayhuash; suggesting that temperature may have been a dominant factor in controlling the maximum glacier extent. We suggest that valley morphology, specifically valley slope, strongly influences down-valley distance to the maximum glacier extent and potential for moraine preservation. While regionally there is an extensive record of older (>50 ka) advances to the north (Cordillera Blanca) and to the south (Junin region), the apparent

  8. Quaternary Glaciations in the Rio Mendoza Valley, Argentine Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espizua, Lydia E.

    1993-09-01

    In the Rio Mendoza valley, five Pleistocene drifts and one Holocene drift are distinguished by multiple relative-age criteria, including surface-rock weathering, development of rock varnish, moraine morphology, soil-profile development, and stratigraphic relationships. Several absolute ages suggest a preliminary chronology. During the oldest (Uspallata) glaciation, a system of valley glaciers flowed 110 km from the Andean drainage divide and 80 km from Cerro Aconcagua to terminate at 1850 m. Drift of this ice advance is older than a widespread tephra dated by fission-track at 360,000 ± 36,000 yr. During the Punta de Vacas advance, ice terminated at 2350 m, while during the subsequent Penitentes advance, the glacier system ended at 2500 m. A travertine layer overlying Penitentes Drift has U-series age of 24,200 ± 2000 yr B.P. The distribution of Horcones Drift, which is inferred to represent the last glacial maximum, delimits an independent ice stream that flowed 22 km down Horcones valley to 2750 m. A later readvance (Almacenes) reached 3250 m. Confluencia Drift is considered to be Neoglacial in age and extends downvalley to 3300 m. The moraine sequence is compared with those studied by Caviedes (1972) along Rio Aconcagua on the Chilean flank of the Andes.

  9. Northern Hemisphere Glaciation during the Globally Warm Early Late Pliocene

    PubMed Central

    De Schepper, Stijn; Groeneveld, Jeroen; Naafs, B. David A; Van Renterghem, Cédéric; Hennissen, Jan; Head, Martin J.; Louwye, Stephen; Fabian, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The early Late Pliocene (3.6 to ∼3.0 million years ago) is the last extended interval in Earth's history when atmospheric CO2 concentrations were comparable to today's and global climate was warmer. Yet a severe global glaciation during marine isotope stage (MIS) M2 interrupted this phase of global warmth ∼3.30 million years ago, and is seen as a premature attempt of the climate system to establish an ice-age world. Here we propose a conceptual model for the glaciation and deglaciation of MIS M2 based on geochemical and palynological records from five marine sediment cores along a Caribbean to eastern North Atlantic transect. Our records show that increased Pacific-to-Atlantic flow via the Central American Seaway weakened the North Atlantic Current and attendant northward heat transport prior to MIS M2. The consequent cooling of the northern high latitude oceans permitted expansion of the continental ice sheets during MIS M2, despite near-modern atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sea level drop during this glaciation halted the inflow of Pacific water to the Atlantic via the Central American Seaway, allowing the build-up of a Caribbean Warm Pool. Once this warm pool was large enough, the Gulf Stream–North Atlantic Current system was reinvigorated, leading to significant northward heat transport that terminated the glaciation. Before and after MIS M2, heat transport via the North Atlantic Current was crucial in maintaining warm climates comparable to those predicted for the end of this century. PMID:24349081

  10. Northern hemisphere glaciation during the globally warm early Late Pliocene.

    PubMed

    De Schepper, Stijn; Groeneveld, Jeroen; Naafs, B David A; Van Renterghem, Cédéric; Hennissen, Jan; Head, Martin J; Louwye, Stephen; Fabian, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The early Late Pliocene (3.6 to ∼3.0 million years ago) is the last extended interval in Earth's history when atmospheric CO2 concentrations were comparable to today's and global climate was warmer. Yet a severe global glaciation during marine isotope stage (MIS) M2 interrupted this phase of global warmth ∼3.30 million years ago, and is seen as a premature attempt of the climate system to establish an ice-age world. Here we propose a conceptual model for the glaciation and deglaciation of MIS M2 based on geochemical and palynological records from five marine sediment cores along a Caribbean to eastern North Atlantic transect. Our records show that increased Pacific-to-Atlantic flow via the Central American Seaway weakened the North Atlantic Current and attendant northward heat transport prior to MIS M2. The consequent cooling of the northern high latitude oceans permitted expansion of the continental ice sheets during MIS M2, despite near-modern atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sea level drop during this glaciation halted the inflow of Pacific water to the Atlantic via the Central American Seaway, allowing the build-up of a Caribbean Warm Pool. Once this warm pool was large enough, the Gulf Stream-North Atlantic Current system was reinvigorated, leading to significant northward heat transport that terminated the glaciation. Before and after MIS M2, heat transport via the North Atlantic Current was crucial in maintaining warm climates comparable to those predicted for the end of this century.

  11. Climate predictors of late quaternary extinctions.

    PubMed

    Nogués-Bravo, David; Ohlemüller, Ralf; Batra, Persaram; Araújo, Miguel B

    2010-08-01

    Between 50,000 and 3,000 years before present (BP) 65% of mammal genera weighing over 44 kg went extinct, together with a lower proportion of small mammals. Why species went extinct in such large numbers is hotly debated. One of the arguments proposes that climate changes underlie Late Quaternary extinctions, but global quantitative evidence for this hypothesis is still lacking. We test the potential role of global climate change on the extinction of mammals during the Late Quaternary. Our results suggest that continents with the highest climate footprint values, in other words, with climate changes of greater magnitudes during the Late Quaternary, witnessed more extinctions than continents with lower climate footprint values, with the exception of South America. Our results are consistent across species with different body masses, reinforcing the view that past climate changes contributed to global extinctions. Our model outputs, the climate change footprint dataset, provide a new research venue to test hypotheses about biodiversity dynamics during the Late Quaternary from the genetic to the species richness level.

  12. Late quaternary sequence stratigraphy, South Florida margin

    SciTech Connect

    Locker, S.D.; Hine, A.C.

    1995-12-01

    Late Quaternary sea-level change and the Florida Current have combined to produce a progradational shelf-slope margin along the western portion of the south Florida Platform facing the Straits of Florida. Analysis of high resolution seismic reflection profiles suggest at least eight 5th order late Quaternary sequences downlap onto the Pourtales Terrace at 250 m water depth. Along most of the south Florida margin, this Late Quaternary section is very thin, and only where significant accumulations occur can the stratigraphic patterns produced by sea-level change be clearly observed. Recognition of systems tracts and their boundaries from high-resolution seismic data is important for prediction of sedimentary facies and stratigraphic development of margins. Many south Florida seismic boundaries can be fit to the Exxon sequence stratigraphy model. Others appear to reflect the added effect of bottom-current erosion that complicates the signal produced by sea-level change. Overall, the sea-level signal appears to dominate the stratigraphic record, especially from the 2-dimensional perspective of dip-oriented seismic profiles. However, the 3-dimensional geometry of deposits are strongly influenced by along slope accumulation patterns controlled by the Florida Current. This study provides new insight on the importance of both geostrophic boundary currents and sea-level change in controlling stratigraphic development of a carbonate platform margin. Similar anomalously thick slope deposits in ancient sequences may indicate similar controls on accumulation and could lend to predictions of related paleo-platform configurations.

  13. North Atlantic deepwater temperature change during late pliocene and late quaternary climatic cycles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dwyer, Gary S.; Cronin, T. M.; Baker, P.A.; Raymo, M.E.; Buzas, Jeffrey S.; Correge, T.

    1995-01-01

    Variations in the ratio of magnesium to calcium (Mg/Ca) in fossil ostracodes from Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 607 in the deep North Atlantic show that the change in bottom water temperature during late Pliocene 41,000-year obliquity cycles averaged 1.5°C between 3.2 and 2.8 million years ago (Ma) and increased to 2.3°C between 2.8 and 2.3 Ma, coincidentally with the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation. During the last two 100,000-year glacial-to-interglacial climatic cycles of the Quaternary, bottom water temperatures changed by 4.5°C. These results show that glacial deepwater cooling has intensified since 3.2 Ma, most likely as the result of progressively diminished deep-water production in the North Atlantic and of the greater influence of Antarctic bottom water in the North Atlantic during glacial periods. The ostracode Mg/Ca data also allow the direct determination of the temperature component of the benthic foraminiferal oxygen isotope record from Site 607, as well as derivation of a hypothetical sea-level curve for the late Pliocene and late Quaternary. The effects of dissolution on the Mg/Ca ratios of ostracode shells appear to have been minimal.

  14. Late Pleistocene Glaciations in Zijovo Range, Montenegro; with 36Cl cosmogenic dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilyurt, S.; Petrovic, A. S.; Ivy-Ochs, S.; Vockenhuber, C.; Akçar, N.

    2016-12-01

    During cold periods of Pleistocene, the most part of Montenegro Mountains were glaciated. Recently, chronology of Late Quaternary advances in the northern Montenegro Mountains was reconstructed. However, glacier advances in the southeastern Montenegro Mountains remains undated. In this study we investigated paleoglaciations in Zijovo Range (2184 m) in order to reconstruct the chronology, and thus, the magnitude and frequency of glacier oscillations in south-eastern Montenegro during the Late Pleistocene. Zijovo Range is located in southeast of Montenegro on the Albania border, was covered by ice cap ca. 200 km2, and glacier tongues reaching down to ca. 800 m above modern sea level. Well-preserved glacial deposits are situated in the west part of the mountain. Lateral and terminal moraines of this part indicate several glacial advances. To build their chronology, 45 calcareous boulders in two valleys, Krzanja and Korita Kucka, were sampled for surface exposure dating with cosmogenic 36Cl. Krzanja valley is located on the western side of mountain and open to the west on the karst plateau. Lateral and terminal moraines of the valley end up ca. 1050 m. We collected 35 samples from the boulders on lateral and terminal moraine ridges of the valley. However, Korita Kucka valley is located on the southern part of the mountain, and glacial deposits are on the plateau ca. 1100 m. In this valley 10 samples were collected from the boulders on the terminal moraine ridges. First results will be then presented.

  15. Late Quaternary climate change shapes island biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Weigelt, Patrick; Steinbauer, Manuel Jonas; Cabral, Juliano Sarmento; Kreft, Holger

    2016-04-07

    Island biogeographical models consider islands either as geologically static with biodiversity resulting from ecologically neutral immigration-extinction dynamics, or as geologically dynamic with biodiversity resulting from immigration-speciation-extinction dynamics influenced by changes in island characteristics over millions of years. Present climate and spatial arrangement of islands, however, are rather exceptional compared to most of the Late Quaternary, which is characterized by recurrent cooler and drier glacial periods. These climatic oscillations over short geological timescales strongly affected sea levels and caused massive changes in island area, isolation and connectivity, orders of magnitude faster than the geological processes of island formation, subsidence and erosion considered in island theory. Consequences of these oscillations for present biodiversity remain unassessed. Here we analyse the effects of present and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) island area, isolation, elevation and climate on key components of angiosperm diversity on islands worldwide. We find that post-LGM changes in island characteristics, especially in area, have left a strong imprint on present diversity of endemic species. Specifically, the number and proportion of endemic species today is significantly higher on islands that were larger during the LGM. Native species richness, in turn, is mostly determined by present island characteristics. We conclude that an appreciation of Late Quaternary environmental change is essential to understand patterns of island endemism and its underlying evolutionary dynamics.

  16. Late Quaternary mammalian zoogeography of eastern Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, R. Lee; Livingston, Stephanie D.

    1983-11-01

    The late Quaternary mammalian zoogeographic history of eastern Washington as revealed by archaeological and paleontological research conforms to a set of past environmental conditions inferred from botanical data. During the relatively cool and moist late Pleistocene and early Holocene, Cervus cf. elaphus, Ovis canadensis, Vulpes vulpes, Martes americana, Alopex lagopus, and perhaps Rangifer sp., taxa with ecological preferences for mesic steppe habitats, were present in the now xeric Columbia Basin. As the climate became progressively warmer and drier during the late Pleistocene and early Holocene, Antilocapra americana, Onychomys leucogaster, Spermophilus townsendii, and Neotoma cinerea, taxa with ecological preferences for xeric steppe habitats, appear in the Columbia Basin. Bison sp. and Taxidea taxus may have been present in eastern Washington for the last 20,000 yr. Middle and late Holocene records for Oreamnos americanus, Spermophilus columbianus, S. townsendii, Lagurus curtatus, and Urocyon cinereoargenteus in central eastern Washington suggest fluctuations in the ranges of these taxa that conform to a middle Holocene period of less effective precipitation and a ca. 3500-yr-old period of more effective precipitation before essentially modern environmental conditions prevailed.

  17. Late Quaternary history of southern Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Colman, S.M.; Hobbs, C.H. III; Halka, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    More than 700 km of high-resolution, seismic-reflection profiles and sidescan-sonar images provide new information about the late Quaternary history of southern Chesapeake Bay. Sidescan-sonar images show that, excluding the nearshore zone, most of the bay bottom has a monotonously smooth surface, except that sand waves, ripples, and other bedforms occur in local areas affected by tidal currents. Seismic-reflection data show that the Quaternary stratigraphy of the southern part of the Bay is related primarily to the last cycle of sea-level change. The Quaternary section overlies an erosion surface cut deeply into gently seaward-dipping marine beds of Neogene age. Fluvial paleochannels, related to the last major low sea-level stand, are characterized by as much as 55 m of incision and by thin, irregular, terrace and channel-bottom deposits. Marine and estuarine deposits related to the Holocene transgression partially or fully bury the fluvial valleys and overlie the interfluves. A prominent feature of the Bay-mouth area is a wedge of sediment that has prograded into the Bay from the inner shelf. The common assumption--that the Chesapeake Bay is the drowned valley of the Pleistocene Susquehanna River--is only partially valid for the southern part of the Bay. The Bay mouth area, in general, is relatively young. The axial channel of the Bay is a modern tidal channel that is actively eroding Tertiary deposits and migrating toward the south and west; it is unrelated to older fluvial channels. Also, the positions of the modern axial channel and the last two fluvial paleochannels indicate long-term southward migration of the Bay mouth.

  18. Late Quaternary carbonate deposition at the bottom of the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Tracy D.; James, Noel P.; Bone, Yvonne; Malcolm, Isabelle; Bobak, Lindsey E.

    2014-05-01

    Carbonate sediments on polar shelves hold great potential for improving understanding of climate and oceanography in regions of the globe that are particularly sensitive to global change. Such deposits have, however, not received much attention from sedimentologists and thus remain poorly understood. This study investigates the distribution, composition, diagenesis, and stratigraphic context of Late Quaternary calcareous sediments recovered in 15 piston cores from the Ross Sea shelf, Antarctica. Results are used to develop a depositional model for carbonate deposition on glaciated, polar shelves. The utility of the deposits as analogs for the ancient record is explored. In the Ross Sea, carbonate-rich lithofacies, consisting of poorly sorted skeletal sand and gravel, are concentrated in the west and along the outer reaches of the continental shelf and upper slope. Analysis of fossil assemblages shows that deposits were produced by numerous low-diversity benthic communities dominated locally by stylasterine hydrocorals, barnacles, or bryozoans. Radiocarbon dating indicates that carbonate sedimentation was episodic, corresponding to times of reduced siliciclastic deposition. Most accumulation occurred during a time of glacial expansion in the lead-up to the Last Glacial Maximum. A more recent interval of carbonate accumulation postdates the early Holocene sea level rise and the establishment of the modern grounding line for the Ross Ice Shelf. When carbonate factories were inactive, fossil debris was subjected to infestation by bioeroders, dissolution, fragmentation, and physical reworking. This study reveals the episodic nature of carbonate deposition in polar settings and a reciprocal relationship with processes that deliver and redistribute siliciclastic debris. Carbonate production is most active during colder periods of the glacial-interglacial cycle, a potential new sedimentological paradigm for polar carbonate systems. Low accumulation rates and long residence

  19. Text and References To Accompany "Map Showing the Thickness and Character of Quaternary Sediments in the Glaciated United States East of the Rocky Mountains"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soller, David R.

    1992-01-01

    A 1:1,000,000-scale map of Quaternary deposits has been compiled for the glaciated area of the United States east of the Rocky Mountains (that is, the area covered by the Laurentide ice sheets). Parts of southern Ontario, areas beneath the Great Lakes, and parts of the submerged eastern seaboard are also included on the map. The map has three components that, together, provide the first regional three-dimensional view of these deposits. These map components are the surface distribution of Quaternary sediments, the total thickness of Quaternary sediments, and the distribution of significant buried Quaternary units. For many areas, this is the first map of Quaternary sediment thickness published at any scale. This report provides supporting information for the map, preliminary interpretations of sediment distribution, and the list of geologic sources used to generate the map. Within the mapped area, there is a particular need for three-dimensional geologic mapping to support decisions on water resources and land use. Approximately 40 percent of the U.S. population resides within the mapped area, which is less than one-quarter the size of the conterminous United States. This map is intended to supplement the more detailed mapping on which it is based and is designed to be a regional planning tool. Through the Pleistocene, large deposits of thick glacial sediment accumulated between certain late Wisconsinan glacial lobes, on bedrock topographic highs, whereas relatively thin deposits generally accumulated in the adjacent bedrock lowlands occupied by drainage and ice lobes. The lithology of the bedrock and its resistance to erosion in part controlled the patterns of ice lobation and the distribution of thick sediment. On a local scale, the spatial relation of these sediment masses to ice lobation has been suggested in places, and a regional correlation may have been assumed. This map provides the first comprehensive, regional view of glacial sediment thickness to permit

  20. (Model) Peatlands in late Quaternary interglacials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinen, Thomas; Brovkin, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands have accumulated a substantial amount of carbon, roughly 600 PgC, during the Holocene. Prior to the Holocene, there is relatively little direct evidence of peatlands, though coal deposits bear witness to a long history of peat-forming ecosystems going back to the Carboniferous. We therefore need to rely on models to investigate peatlands in times prior to the Holocene. We have developed a dynamical model of wetland extent and peat accumulation, integrated in the coupled climate carbon cycle model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER2-LPJ, in order to mechanistically model interglacial carbon cycle dynamics. This model consists of the climate model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER2 and the dynamic global vegetation model LPJ, which we have extended with modules to determine peatland extent and carbon accumulation. The model compares reasonably well to Holocene peat data. We have used this model to investigate the dynamics of atmospheric CO2 in the Holocene and two other late Quaternary interglacials, namely the Eemian, which is interesting due to its warmth, and Marine Isotope Stage 11 (MIS11), which is the longest interglacial during the last 500ka. We will also present model results of peatland extent and carbon accumulation for these interglacials. We will discuss model shortcomings and knowledge gaps currently preventing an application of the model to full glacial-interglacial cycles.

  1. Late Pliocene Greenland glaciation controlled by a decline in atmospheric CO2 levels.

    PubMed

    Lunt, Daniel J; Foster, Gavin L; Haywood, Alan M; Stone, Emma J

    2008-08-28

    It is thought that the Northern Hemisphere experienced only ephemeral glaciations from the Late Eocene to the Early Pliocene epochs (about 38 to 4 million years ago), and that the onset of extensive glaciations did not occur until about 3 million years ago. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this increase in Northern Hemisphere glaciation during the Late Pliocene. Here we use a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model and an ice-sheet model to assess the impact of the proposed driving mechanisms for glaciation and the influence of orbital variations on the development of the Greenland ice sheet in particular. We find that Greenland glaciation is mainly controlled by a decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide during the Late Pliocene. By contrast, our model results suggest that climatic shifts associated with the tectonically driven closure of the Panama seaway, with the termination of a permanent El Niño state or with tectonic uplift are not large enough to contribute significantly to the growth of the Greenland ice sheet; moreover, we find that none of these processes acted as a priming mechanism for glacial inception triggered by variations in the Earth's orbit.

  2. Late Quaternary paleolimnology of Walker Lake, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Platt, Bradbury J.; Forester, R.M.; Thompson, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    Diatoms, crustaceans, and pollen from sediment cores, in conjunction with dated shoreline tufas provide evidence for lake level and environmental fluctuations of Walker Lake in the late Quaternary. Large and rapid changes of lake chemistry and level apparently resulted from variations in the course and discharge of the Walker River. Paleolimnological evidence suggests that the basin contained a relatively deep and slightly saline to freshwater lake before ca. 30 000 years B.P. During the subsequent drawdown, the Walker River apparently shifted its course and flowed northward into the Carson Sink. As a result, Walker Lake shallowed and became saline. During the full glacial, cooler climates with more effective moisture supported a shallow brine lake in the basin even without the Walker River. As glacial climates waned after 15 000 years ago, Walker Lake became a playa. The Walker River returned to its basin 4700 years ago, filling it with fresh water in a few decades. Thereafter, salinity and depth increased as evaporation concentrated inflowing water, until by 3000 years ago Walker Lake was nearly 90 m deep, according to dated shoreline tufas. Lake levels fluctuated throughout this interval in response to variations in Sierra Nevada precipitation and local evaporation. A drought in the Sierras between 2400 and 2000 years ago reduced Walker Lake to a shallow, brine lake. Climate-controlled refilling of the lake beginning 2000 years ago required about one millennium to bring Walker lake near its historic level. Through time, lake basins in the complex Lake Lahontan system, fill and desiccate in response to climatic, tectonic and geomorphic events. Detailed, multidisciplinary paleolimnologic records from related subbasins are required to separate these processes before lake level history can be reliably used to interpret paleoclimatology. ?? 1989 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  3. Foraminiferal biostratigraphy of the shelf edge: a key to late Quaternary paleoenvironments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C. Wylie; Sidner, B.R.

    1976-01-01

    Foraminiferal assemblages in eight piston cores from West Flower Garden Bank at the edge of the Texas continental shelf contain a nearly complete record of late Quaternary paleoclimatic and geologic events. The faunas are divisible into three distinct successive biofacies on the basis of both planktonic and benthic foraminifers: the basal Inflata Facies accumulated in cool shallow waters during late Pleistocene glaciation; the middle Crassaformis Facies represents a deepening sea that had warming surface waters; the upper Cultrata Facies is characteristic of the Holocene outer-shelf environment. Sea level was at -73 m and -53 m at the end of deposition of the Inflata and Crassaformis Facies, respectively. The biostratigraphic events at West Flower Garden Bank can be accurately correlated with those recorded in the middle and inner shelf and in deep-sea cores. The sequence of late Quaternary sea level and paleotemperature changes in the northern Gulf of Mexico can thereby be reconstructed. Eventually, this knowledge can be integrated with similar data from the shelf edge in other parts of the world to help bridge the gap between the known Quaternary record of the deep sea and that of the continents. ?? 1976.

  4. Quaternary fluvial history of the Delaware River, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, USA: The effects of glaciation, glacioisostasy, and eustasy on a proglacial river system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanford, Scott D.; Witte, Ron W.; Braun, Duane D.; Ridge, John C.

    2016-07-01

    Fluvial, glacial, and estuarine deposits in the Delaware Valley record the response of the Delaware River to glaciation, sea-level change, and glacioisostasy during the Quaternary. Incision following an early Pleistocene glaciation created the present valley, which is inset into a Pliocene strath and fluvial plain. Middle and upper Pleistocene and Holocene deposits were laid down in this inset valley. Estuarine terraces in the lower valley and bayshore at + 20 m (probably Marine Isotope Stage [MIS] 11), + 8 m (MIS 5e), and + 3 m (MIS 5a or c), and a fluvial deposit that correlates to offshore MIS 3 marine deposits at - 20 m are at elevations consistent with glacioisostatic models. Successive incisions during lowstands in the middle and late Pleistocene lengthened, deepened, and narrowed the channel in the lower valley and shifted the channel westward in Delaware Bay. During MIS 2 glaciation, from 25 to 18 ka, the Delaware was diverted to the Hudson Shelf Valley by glacioisostatic tilting. Most glacial sediment was trapped in fluvial-lacustrine valley fills north of the terminal moraine. Incision of the valley fill was accomplished during the early stage of rebound, between 17 and 12 ka. Drainage to the Delaware shelf was restored between 15 and 13 ka as the forebulge collapsed. During incision, multiple postglacial terraces formed where the valley was perpendicular to rebound contours and so was steepened and elevated northward; and a single terrace formed where the valley paralleled the contours, and there was no differential elevation or steepening. About 65% of the original volume of MIS 2 glacial sediment remains in the main valley, and most of the eroded volume is in the channel in the lower valley beneath Holocene estuarine fill. Little glacial sediment reached the Delaware or Hudson shelf. Overbank deposition on the lower postglacial terrace and modern floodplain spans the Holocene. The volume of Holocene sediment in the estuary and bay yields a basinwide

  5. Diverse range dynamics and dispersal routes of plants on the Tibetan Plateau during the late Quaternary

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haibin; Wang, Zhaofeng; Liu, Linshan; Chen, Zhao; Qi, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Phylogeographical studies have suggested that several plant species on the Tibetan Plateau (TP) underwent recolonization during the Quaternary and may have had distinct range dynamics in response to the last glacial. To further test this hypothesis and locate the possible historical dispersal routes, we selected 20 plant species from different parts of the TP and modeled their geographical distributions over four time periods using species distribution models (SDMs). Furthermore, we applied the least-cost path method together with SDMs and shared haplotypes to estimate their historical dispersal corridors. We identified three general scenarios of species distribution change during the late Quaternary: the ‘contraction-expansion’ scenario for species in the northeastern TP, the ‘expansion-contraction’ scenario for species in the southeast and the ‘stable’ scenario for widespread species. During the Quaternary, we identified that these species were likely to recolonize along the low-elevation valleys, huge mountain ranges and flat plateau platform (e.g. the Yarlung Zangbo Valley and the Himalaya). We inferred that Quaternary cyclic glaciations along with the various topographic and climatic conditions of the TP could have resulted in the diverse patterns of range shift and dispersal of Tibetan plant species. Finally, we believe that this study would provide valuable insights for the conservation of alpine species under future climate change. PMID:28475607

  6. Middle and Late Pleistocene glaciations in the southwestern Pamir and their effects on topography [Topography of the SW Pamir shaped by middle-late Pleistocene glaciation

    DOE PAGES

    Stübner, Konstanze; Grin, Elena; Hidy, Alan J.; ...

    2017-03-27

    Glacial chronologies provide insight into the evolution of paleo-landscapes, paleoclimate, topography, and the erosion processes that shape mountain ranges. In the Pamir of Central Asia, glacial morphologies and deposits indicate extensive past glaciations, whose timing and extent remain poorly constrained. Geomorphic data and 15 new 10Be exposure ages from moraine boulders and roches moutonnées in the southwestern Pamir document multiple Pleistocene glacial stages. The oldest exposure ages, View the MathML source113 ± 10ka, underestimate the age of the earliest preserved glacial advance and imply that the modern relief of the southwestern Pamir (peaks at ~5000–6000 m a.s.l.; valleys at ~2000–3000more » m a.s.l.) already existed in the late Middle Pleistocene. Younger exposure ages (~40–80 ka, ~30 ka) complement the existing Central Asian glacial chronology and reflect successively less extensive Late Pleistocene glaciations. The topography of the Pamir and the glacial chronologies suggest that, in the Middle Pleistocene, an ice cap or ice field occupied the eastern Pamir high-altitude plateau, whereas westward flowing valley glaciers incised the southwestern Pamir. Since the Late Pleistocene deglaciation, the rivers of the southwestern Pamir adjusted to the glacially shaped landscape. As a result, localized rapid fluvial incision and drainage network reorganization reflect the transient nature of the deglaciated landscape.« less

  7. Late glacial 10Be ages for glacial landforms in the upper region of the Taibai glaciation in the Qinling Mountain range, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Liang; Chen, Yixin; Liu, Beibei; Harbor, Jonathan M.; Cui, Zhijiu; Liu, Rui; Liu, Xiao; Zhao, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Glacial landforms are well preserved on Taibai Mountain (3767 m), the main peak of the Qinling mountain range located south of the Loess Plateau and east of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. The timing and extent of Quaternary glaciation in the study area is important for reconstructing Quaternary environmental change however numerical ages for glaciation in this study area have not previously been well resolved. Using terrestrial in situ cosmogenic nuclides we dated four samples collected from two glacially eroded rock steps in the upper part of a valley near the main peak, in an area previously identified as having been occupied by ice during the Taibai glaciation. The 10Be results are all late glacial in age: 18.6 ± 1.1 ka, 16.9 ± 1.0 ka, 16.9 ± 1.1 ka and 15.1 ± 1.0 ka. The spatial pattern of ages in the valley suggests fast retreat, with horizontal and vertical retreat rates estimated to be on the order of 0.4 and 0.09 m a-1, respectively. A simple extrapolation of these retreat rates from the ages at the two sample sites suggests that the glacier retreat began during Last Glacial Maximum and that glaciers disappeared from the main peak by about 15 ka.

  8. Genetic and morphological consequences of Quaternary glaciations: A relic barbel lineage (Luciobarbus pallaryi, Cyprinidae) of Guir Basin (Algeria).

    PubMed

    Brahimi, Amina; Tarai, Nacer; Benhassane, Abdelkrim; Henrard, Arnaud; Libois, Roland

    2016-02-01

    Climatic variations during the Quaternary period had a considerable impact on landscapes and habitat fragmentation (rivers) in North Africa. These historical events can have significant consequences on the genetic structure of the populations. Indeed, geographically separated and genetically isolated populations tend to differentiate themselves through time, eventually becoming distinct lineages, allowing new species to emerge in later generations. The aim of the present study is to use genetic and morphological techniques to evaluate the major role of the Saalian glaciation (Middle Quaternary) in the establishment of the geographic space and in the evolution of the intraspecific genetic diversity, by tracing the demographic history of barbels belonging to the Luciobarbus pallaryi (Cyprinidae) species in the Guir Basin (Algeria). In this context, two populations, from two distinct and isolated sites, were studied. Analysis of the cytochrome b (cyt b) mitochondrial markers and of the "D-loop" control region has shown that the "upstream" and "downstream" Guir populations are genetically differentiated. The molecular analyses suggest that the upstream population was disconnected from this hydrographic system during the Saalian glaciation period of the Quaternary. Subsequently, it was isolated in the foggaras underground waters in the Great Western Erg, at approximately 320 000 years BP, creating, through a bottleneck effect, a new allopatric lineage referred to as "Adrar". Conversely, the high genetic diversity in the upstream Guir (Bechar) population suggests that the stock is globally in expansion. These barbels (n=52) were also examined with meristic, morphometric, osteological, and biological features. These data also reveal a complete discrimination between the two populations, with a remarkable and distinctive behavioural adaptation for the Adrar specimens: neoteny.

  9. Evidence for Late Ordovician glaciation of Al Kufrah Basin, Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Heron, Daniel Paul; Howard, James

    2010-09-01

    Fieldwork at the flanks of Al Kufrah Basin, Libya, reveals that Late Ordovician ice sheets were present in the eastern Sahara and that they extended northeastward toward Egypt. Evidence for grounded ice sheets is preserved at the both the southeastern (Jabal Azbah) and northern (Jabal az-Zalmah) basin margins. Characteristic soft-sediment deformation structures, including soft-sediment folds, small-scale faults and striated pavements indicate subglacial shearing and the formation of glacial erosion surfaces. These findings support the presence of a Late Ordovician ice margin in the eastern Sahara and add vital new constraints to reconstructions of the morphology of North African grounded ice sheets. Prior to our study, there existed two plausible models on ice sheet geometry. The first was that separate ice sheets - namely a north and west African ice sheet and an Arabian ice sheet - extended over this part of western North Gondwana. The second was that ice cover was continuous. The presence of a suite of subglacially-generated deformation structures adds considerable credence to the latter interpretation.

  10. Ice Age Earth: Late Quaternary geology and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    This book is a concise and readable account of the most important geologic records of the late Quaternary. It provides a synopsis of the major environmental changes that took place from approximately 13,000 to 7,000 years ago, highlighting the complexity and rapidity of past climate changes and the environmental responses they produced. The text is well illustrated, though some figures are rough and need more explanation. Also needed is a critical appraisal of the geochronology which places the paleoenvironmental records into the temporal domain. However, as a whole the book reaches its objective of summarizing the most important scientific findings about the nature of the late Quaternary climate changes.

  11. Multiple tropical Andean glaciations during a period of late Pliocene warmth

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Nicholas J.; Barendregt, René W.; Clague, John J.

    2017-01-01

    The extent and behaviour of glaciers during the mid-Piacenzian warm period illustrate the sensitivity of the cryosphere to atmospheric CO2 concentrations above pre-industrial levels. Knowledge of glaciation during this period is restricted to globally or regionally averaged records from marine sediments and to sparse terrestrial glacial deposits in mid-to-high latitudes. Here we expand the Pliocene glacial record to the tropics by reporting recurrent large-scale glaciation in the Bolivian Andes based on stratigraphic and paleomagnetic analysis of a 95-m sequence of glacial sediments underlying the 2.74-Ma Chijini Tuff. Paleosols and polarity reversals separate eight glacial diamictons, which we link to cold periods in the benthic oxygen isotope record. The glaciations appear to coincide with the earliest glacial activity at high northern latitudes and with events in Antarctica, including the strong M2 cold peak and terminal Pliocene climate deterioration. This concordance suggests inter-hemispheric climate linkages during the late Pliocene and requires that the Central Andes were at least as high in the late Pliocene as today. Our record fills a critical gap in knowledge of Earth systems during the globally warm mid-Piacenzian and suggests a possible driver of faunal migration preceding the large-scale biotic interchange in the Americas during the earliest Pleistocene. PMID:28169346

  12. Multiple tropical Andean glaciations during a period of late Pliocene warmth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Nicholas J.; Barendregt, René W.; Clague, John J.

    2017-02-01

    The extent and behaviour of glaciers during the mid-Piacenzian warm period illustrate the sensitivity of the cryosphere to atmospheric CO2 concentrations above pre-industrial levels. Knowledge of glaciation during this period is restricted to globally or regionally averaged records from marine sediments and to sparse terrestrial glacial deposits in mid-to-high latitudes. Here we expand the Pliocene glacial record to the tropics by reporting recurrent large-scale glaciation in the Bolivian Andes based on stratigraphic and paleomagnetic analysis of a 95-m sequence of glacial sediments underlying the 2.74-Ma Chijini Tuff. Paleosols and polarity reversals separate eight glacial diamictons, which we link to cold periods in the benthic oxygen isotope record. The glaciations appear to coincide with the earliest glacial activity at high northern latitudes and with events in Antarctica, including the strong M2 cold peak and terminal Pliocene climate deterioration. This concordance suggests inter-hemispheric climate linkages during the late Pliocene and requires that the Central Andes were at least as high in the late Pliocene as today. Our record fills a critical gap in knowledge of Earth systems during the globally warm mid-Piacenzian and suggests a possible driver of faunal migration preceding the large-scale biotic interchange in the Americas during the earliest Pleistocene.

  13. Late Quaternary temperature change velocity in Mesoamerica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa-Metrio, A.; Lozano, S.; Sosa-Nájera, S.; Bush, M. B.

    2013-05-01

    Quaternary climate has been highly variable, and yet few quantitative continental reconstructions are available for tropical areas. Quantitative records of temperature change during the Quaternary are especially relevant for putting modern climate change into a historic context. Within this perspective, two aspects are of singular relevance: i) Identifying and quantifying past climatic variability, and ii) Providing a means to estimate the seed at which climate change happened in the past. Here we show temperature reconstructions and temperature change velocity calculations for two locations in northern tropical America. Temperature reconstruction was based on two sedimentary records form Lake Chalco (30,000 years), central Mexican highlands, and Lake Petén-Itzá, Guatemalan lowlands (86,000 years). Temperature reconstruction was based on the analysis of fossil pollen on the light of pollen-temperature transfer functions. These functions were calibrated through an extensive survey of modern pollen samples covering an elevational gradient from 0 to 4,218 m asl. Derived temperature profiles show a parallel long-term trend and a similar cooling of approximately 5 oC during the Last Glacial Maximum in the lowlands and highlands of Mexico and Guatemala. Using a digital elevation model, we ere able to reconstruct the velocity at which isotherms displaced to produce the observed temperature anomalies. Spatial velocities of temperature change in the studied areas were at least four times slower than values reported for the last 50 years, but also at least twice as fast as those obtained from recent models. This study demonstrates that modern temperature change has no precedent within the last 86,000 years, but also that tropical climate has been more variable than it has been assumed to date.

  14. Late Quaternary evolution of Reedy Glacier, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Claire; Stone, John; Conway, Howard; Hall, Brenda; Bromley, Gordon

    2010-06-01

    Fresh deposits above the margins of Reedy Glacier show that maximum ice levels during the last glaciation were several hundred meters above present near the glacier mouth and converged to less than 60 m above the present-day surface at the head of the glacier. Exposure ages of samples from five sites along its margin show that Reedy Glacier and its tributaries thickened asynchronously between 17 and 7 kyr BP At the Quartz Hills, located midway along the glacier, maximum ice levels were reached during the period 17-14 kyr BP. Farther up-glacier the ice surface reached its maximum elevation more recently: 14.7-10.2 kyr BP at the Caloplaca Hills; 9.1-7.7 kyr BP at Mims Spur; and around 7 kyr BP at Hatcher Bluffs. We attribute this time-transgressive behavior to two different processes: At the glacier mouth, growth of grounded ice and subsequent deglaciation in the Ross Sea embayment caused a wave of thickening and then thinning to propagate up-glacier. During the Lateglacial and Holocene, increased snow accumulation on the East Antarctic Ice Sheet caused transient thickening at the head of the glacier. An important result of this work is that moraines deposited along Reedy Glacier during the last ice age cannot be correlated to reconstruct a single glacial maximum longitudinal profile. The profile steepened during deglaciation of the Ross Sea, thinning at the Quartz Hills after 13 kyr BP while thickening upstream. Near its confluence with Mercer Ice Stream, rapid thinning beginning prior to 7-8 kyr BP reduced the level of Reedy Glacier to close to its present level. Thinning over the past 1000 years has lowered the glacier by less than 20 m.

  15. Late Quaternary history of the Atacama Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Latorre, Claudio; Betancourt, Julio L.; Rech, Jason A.; Quade, Jay; Holmgren, Camille; Placzek, Christa; Maldonado, Antonio; Vuille, Mathias; Rylander, Kate A.; Smith, Mike; Hesse, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Of the major subtropical deserts found in the Southern Hemisphere, the Atacama Desert is the driest. Throughout the Quaternary, the most pervasive climatic influence on the desert has been millennial-scale changes in the frequency and seasonality of the scant rainfall, and associated shifts in plant and animal distributions with elevation along the eastern margin of the desert. Over the past six years, we have mapped modern vegetation gradients and developed a number of palaeoenvironmental records, including vegetation histories from fossil rodent middens, groundwater levels from wetland (spring) deposits, and lake levels from shoreline evidence, along a 1200-kilometre transect (16–26°S) in the Atacama Desert. A strength of this palaeoclimate transect has been the ability to apply the same methodologies across broad elevational, latitudinal, climatic, vegetation and hydrological gradients. We are using this transect to reconstruct the histories of key components of the South American tropical (summer) and extratropical (winter) rainfall belts, precisely at those elevations where average annual rainfall wanes to zero. The focus has been on the transition from sparse, shrubby vegetation (known as the prepuna) into absolute desert, an expansive hyperarid terrain that extends from just above the coastal fog zone (approximately 800 metres) to more than 3500 metres in the most arid sectors in the southern Atacama.

  16. Late Quaternary stratigraphic charcoal records from Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burney, David A.

    1987-09-01

    The classic view regarding the cause of the extinction of at least 17 species of large mammals, birds, and reptiles in Madagascar during the late Holocene implicates human use of fire to modify the environment. However, analysis of the charcoal stratigraphy of three sediment cores from Madagascar shows that late Pleistocene and early- to mid-Holocene sediments deposited prior to human settlement often contain more charcoal than postsettlement and modern sediments. This observation, which is confirmed by independent measurements from direct assay and palynological counting techniques, suggests that widely held but previously untested beliefs concerning the importance of anthropogenic fires in late Holocene environmental changes and megafaunal extinctions of Madagascar may be based on an overly simplified version of actual prehistoric conditions. Moderate to low charcoal values characterized only the late Holocene millennia immediately prior to the presumed time of arrival of the first settlers. Human settlement is probably indicated in the stratigraphy by the sharp rise in charcoal content observed beginning ca. 1500 yr B.P. Fire appears to be a significant natural component of prehuman environments in Madagascar, but some factor, probably climate, has modulated the extent of natural burning.

  17. The timing of Late Pleistocene glaciation at Mount Wilhelm, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Stephanie; Barrows, Timothy; Hope, Geoff; Pillans, Brad; Fifield, Keith

    2016-04-01

    The highlands of New Guinea were the most extensively glaciated area in the Asian tropical region during the Late Pleistocene. Evidence for glaciation is widespread on most of the mountain peaks above ~3500 m. Glacial landforms include both valley and ice cap forms, but the timing of glaciation remains constrained to only a few local areas. This paper focuses on Mount Wilhelm, which is situated in the central southern region of Papua New Guinea at 5.78°S and is the highest peak (4510 m a.s.l.) We focus on a south easterly valley (Pindaunde Valley) emanating from the peak, where large moraines indicate the maximum ice extent of a valley glacier ~5 km long. Within this extensive moraine complex, recessional moraines document the retreat of the glacier towards the summit region. In order to determine the timing of deglaciation, we collected samples for surface exposure dating using 36Cl and 10Be from diorite boulders positioned on moraine crests. The ages indicate that maximum ice extent was attained during the last glacial maximum (LGM) and that ice remained near its maximum extent until after 15 ka but persisted at higher elevations almost until the Holocene. These results are similar to those described from Mt Giluwe to the northwest of Mount Wilhelm, where an ice cap reached its maximum extent at the LGM and remained there for around 3-4,000 years. This indicates that full glacial conditions were only brief in this region of the tropics.

  18. Middle and Late Pleistocene glaciations in the southwestern Pamir and their effects on topography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stubner, Konstanze; Grin, Elena; Hidy, Alan J.; Schaller, Mirjam; Gold, Ryan D.; Ratschbacher, Lothar; Ehlers, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Glacial chronologies provide insight into the evolution of paleo-landscapes, paleoclimate, topography, and the erosion processes that shape mountain ranges. In the Pamir of Central Asia, glacial morphologies and deposits indicate extensive past glaciations, whose timing and extent remain poorly constrained. Geomorphic data and 15 new 10Be exposure ages from moraine boulders and roches moutonnées in the southwestern Pamir document multiple Pleistocene glacial stages. The oldest exposure ages, , underestimate the age of the earliest preserved glacial advance and imply that the modern relief of the southwestern Pamir (peaks at ∼5000–6000 m a.s.l.; valleys at ∼2000–3000 m a.s.l.) already existed in the late Middle Pleistocene. Younger exposure ages (∼40–80 ka, ∼30 ka) complement the existing Central Asian glacial chronology and reflect successively less extensive Late Pleistocene glaciations. The topography of the Pamir and the glacial chronologies suggest that, in the Middle Pleistocene, an ice cap or ice field occupied the eastern Pamir high-altitude plateau, whereas westward flowing valley glaciers incised the southwestern Pamir. Since the Late Pleistocene deglaciation, the rivers of the southwestern Pamir adjusted to the glacially shaped landscape. Localized rapid fluvial incision and drainage network reorganization reflect the transient nature of the deglaciated landscape.

  19. Influence of late Pleistocene glaciations on the hydrogeology of the continental shelf offshore Massachusetts, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Jacob; Person, Mark; Dugan, Brandon; Cohen, Denis; Lizarralde, Daniel; Gable, Carl

    2014-12-01

    Multiple late Pleistocene glaciations that extended onto the continental shelf offshore Massachusetts, USA, may have emplaced as much as 100 km3 of freshwater (salinity <5 ppt) in continental shelf sediments. To estimate the volume and extent of offshore freshwater, we developed a three-dimensional, variable-density model that couples fluid flow and heat and solute transport for the continental shelf offshore Massachusetts. The stratigraphy for our model is based on high-resolution, multichannel seismic data. The model incorporates the last 3 Ma of climate history by prescribing boundary conditions of sea level change and ice sheet extent and thickness. We incorporate new estimates of the maximum extent of a late Pleistocene ice sheet to near the shelf-slope break. Model results indicate that this late Pleistocene ice sheet was responsible for much of the emplaced freshwater. We predict that the current freshwater distribution may reach depths up to 500 meters below sea level and up to 30 km beyond Martha's Vineyard. The freshwater distribution is strongly dependent on the three-dimensional stratigraphy and ice sheet history. Our predictions improve our understanding of the distribution of offshore freshwater, a potential nonrenewable resource for coastal communities along recently glaciated margins.

  20. Mode transitions in Northern Hemisphere glaciation: co-evolution of millennial and orbital variability in Quaternary climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodell, David A.; Channell, James E. T.

    2016-09-01

    We present a 3.2 Myr record of stable isotopes and physical properties at IODP Site U1308 (reoccupation of DSDP Site 609) located within the ice-rafted detritus (IRD) belt of the North Atlantic. We compare the isotope and lithological proxies at Site U1308 with other North Atlantic records (e.g., sites 982, 607/U1313, and U1304) to reconstruct the history of orbital and millennial-scale climate variability during the Quaternary. The Site U1308 record documents a progressive increase in the intensity of Northern Hemisphere glacial-interglacial cycles during the late Pliocene and Quaternary, with mode transitions at ˜ 2.7, 1.5, 0.9, and 0.65 Ma. These transitions mark times of change in the growth and stability of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets. They also coincide with increases in vertical carbon isotope gradients between the intermediate and deep ocean, suggesting changes in deep carbon storage and atmospheric CO2. Orbital and millennial climate variability co-evolved during the Quaternary such that the trend towards larger and thicker ice sheets was accompanied by changes in the style, frequency, and intensity of millennial-scale variability. This co-evolution may be important for explaining the observed patterns of Quaternary climate change.

  1. Late Quaternary Eolian Deposition in Central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narcisi, Biancamaria

    2000-09-01

    Records of eolian quartz from two continuous sediment sequences drilled in Lagaccione and Lago di Vico volcanic lakes in central Italy contribute to the knowledge of eolian deposition in the central Mediterranean during the last 100,000 years. The chronology is based on 14C and 40Ar/39Ar dating and tephra analysis. Pollen data provide the paleoenvironmental framework and enable correlation between the cores. Eolian inputs were high during the steppe phases corresponding to oxygen isotope stages 4 and 2. Low inputs correspond to the forest phases of the last interglacial and the middle Holocene. Eolian inputs have increased in the late Holocene. Patterns of eolian deposition in central Italy resemble the Antarctic dust record from the Vostok ice core. The Italian patterns may also correspond with hydrological changes registered in North Africa. The main source of dust loading over the Mediterranean now, North Africa, may have played an important role in dust supply throughout the last climatic cycle.

  2. Providing favorable conditions to simulate the mid to late Pliocene glaciations (3.3-2.5 Ma)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, N.; Ramstein, G.; Dumas, C.; Ladant, J. B.; Contoux, C.

    2016-12-01

    This study is devoted to the understanding of the long term evolution of climate and cryosphere prior to, during and after the perennial Greenland glaciation (2.7 Ma). Major issues in this study are both to understand the onset and termination of the previous Greenland glaciation (MIS M2) which took place 600 Kyrs before the establishment of the perennial Greenland glaciation (2.7 Ma) and to simulate the evolution of the perennial Greenland glaciation (from 3.0 to 2.5 Ma.). Although it is established that the variation of the summer insolation at 65°N triggers these glaciations, the response of atmospheric CO2 concentration (pCO2) and other feedbacks as vegetation have been shown to be major players in the amplification and duration of these glaciations. We study the dynamics of climate and cryosphere in both cases with a fully coupled atmosphere ocean general circulation model (IPSL-CM5A) and ice-sheet model (GRISLI) to provide snapshot and transient behaviors of the climate cryosphere system. We show that, MIS M2 glaciation only lasted 50 Kyrs, whereas in the context of the late Pliocene (3.0 - 2.5 Ma), the onset of the perennial Greenland ice sheet lasted several orbital cycles. Indeed, the simulated scenarios of Greenland ice-sheet evolution differ from one another when using different pCO2 records. But the common feature remains, for all pCO2 reconstruction scenarios, that the onset of this glaciation is not an abrupt transition but spans over several astronomical cycles. More highly resolved pCO2 records are vital to confirm and to better understand the underlying mechanism for these glaciations in the late Pliocene.

  3. Ecological impacts of the late Quaternary megaherbivore extinctions.

    PubMed

    Gill, Jacquelyn L

    2014-03-01

    As a result of the late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions (50,000-10,000 before present (BP)), most continents today are depauperate of megaherbivores. These extinctions were time-transgressive, size- and taxonomically selective, and were caused by climate change, human hunting, or both. The surviving megaherbivores often act as ecological keystones, which was likely true in the past. In spite of this and extensive research on the causes of the Late Quaternary Extinctions, the long-term ecological consequences of the loss of the Pleistocene megafauna remained unknown until recently, due to difficulties in linking changes in flora and fauna in paleorecords. The quantification of Sporormiella and other dung fungi have recently allowed for explicit tests of the ecological consequences of megafaunal extirpations in the fossil pollen record. In this paper, I review the impacts of the loss of keystone megaherbivores on vegetation in several paleorecords. A growing number of studies support the hypothesis that the loss of the Pleistocene megafauna resulted in cascading effects on plant community composition, vegetation structure and ecosystem function, including increased fire activity, novel communities and shifts in biomes. Holocene biota thus exist outside the broader evolutionary context of the Cenozoic, and the Late Quaternary Extinctions represent a regime shift for surviving plant and animal species.

  4. Late Quaternary environments in Ruby Valley, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    Palynological data from sediment cores from the Ruby Marshes provide a record of environmental and climatic changes over the last 40,000 yr. The modern marsh waters are fresh, but no deeper than ???3 m. A shallow saline lake occupied this basin during the middle Wisconsin, followed by fresh and perhaps deep waters by 18,000 to 15,000 yr B.P. No sediments were recovered for the period between 15,000 and 11,000 yr B.P., possibly due to lake desiccation. By 10,800 yr B.P. a fresh-water lake was again present, and deeper-than-modern conditions lasted until 6800 yr B.P. The middle Holocene was characterized by very shallow water, and perhaps complete desiccation. The marsh system deepened after 4700 yr B.P., and fresh-water conditions persisted until modern times. Vegetation changes in Ruby Valley were more gradual than those seen in the paleolimno-logical record. Sagebrush steppe was more widespread than at present through the late Pleistocene and early Holocene, giving way somewhat to expanded shadscale vegetation between 8500 and 6800 yr B.P. Shadscale steppe contracted by 4000 yr B.P., but had greater than modern coverage until 1000 to 500 yr ago. Pinyon-juniper woodland was established in the southern Ruby Mountains by 4700 yr B.P. ?? 1992.

  5. Cosmogenic beryllium-10 and neon-21 dating of late Pleistocene glaciations in Nyalam, monsoonal Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Joerg M.; Oberholzer, Peter; Zhao, Zhizhong; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Wieler, Rainer; Baur, Heinrich; Kubik, Peter W.; Schlüchter, Christian

    2008-02-01

    We present cosmogenic 10Be and 21Ne chronologies from 21 erratic boulders on three moraine sequences in Nyalam county, monsoonal Himalayas, southern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. The surface exposure ages provide evidence for at least two distinct glacial advances during the late stage of the last glacial cycle and for one or more significantly older glaciations. The distribution of cosmogenic ages from the three ridges of the old moraine sequence is inconsistent with their stratigraphic order. Because exposure periods of the erratics prior to deposition on the moraine surface is shown to be small, the chronology-stratigraphy mismatch suggests that the cosmogenic ages do not date moraine deposition but most likely significant moraine ridge denudation and related boulder exhumation after initial deposition of the moraines during the penultimate glacial cycle or earlier. The surface exposure ages based on various currently accepted production rate scaling protocols yield age differences of up to 35% reflecting the poor knowledge of terrestrial cosmogenic production rates at low latitude/high altitude sites. Even within this conservative uncertainty range, our results do not yield evidence for late Pleistocene glaciations in monsoonal Tibet to be asynchronous to those in mid-latitudes on both hemispheres. There is an urgent need to improve the knowledge of terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide production rates and their scaling to low latitude regions to fully exploit the climate information archived in tropical moraine sequences.

  6. The Magnitude and Duration of Late Ordovician-Early Silurian Glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnegan, Seth; Bergmann, Kristin; Eiler, John M.; Jones, David S.; Fike, David A.; Eisenman, Ian; Hughes, Nigel C.; Tripati, Aradhna K.; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2011-02-01

    Understanding ancient climate changes is hampered by the inability to disentangle trends in ocean temperature from trends in continental ice volume. We used carbonate “clumped” isotope paleothermometry to constrain ocean temperatures, and thereby estimate ice volumes, through the Late Ordovician-Early Silurian glaciation. We find tropical ocean temperatures of 32° to 37°C except for short-lived cooling by ~5°C during the final Ordovician stage. Evidence for ice sheets spans much of the study interval, but the cooling pulse coincided with a glacial maximum during which ice volumes likely equaled or exceeded those of the last (Pleistocene) glacial maximum. This cooling also coincided with a large perturbation of the carbon cycle and the Late Ordovician mass extinction.

  7. Munroa argentina, a Grass of the South American Transition Zone, Survived the Andean Uplift, Aridification and Glaciations of the Quaternary.

    PubMed

    Amarilla, Leonardo D; Anton, Ana M; Chiapella, Jorge O; Manifesto, María M; Angulo, Diego F; Sosa, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The South American Transition Zone (SATZ) is a biogeographic area in which not only orogeny (Andes uplift) and climate events (aridification) since the mid-Miocene, but also Quaternary glaciation cycles had an important impact on the evolutionary history of the local flora. To study this effect, we selected Munroa argentina, an annual grass distributed in the biogeographic provinces of Puna, Prepuna and Monte. We collected 152 individuals from 20 localities throughout the species' range, ran genetic and demographic analyses, and applied ecological niche modeling. Phylogenetic and population genetic analyses based on cpDNA and AFLP data identified three phylogroups that correspond to the previously identified subregions within the SATZ. Molecular dating suggests that M. argentina has inhabited the SATZ since approximately 3.4 (4.2-1.2) Ma and paleomodels predict suitable climate in these areas during the Interglacial period and the Last Glacial Maximum. We conclude that the current distribution of M. argentina resulted from the fragmentation of its once continuous range and that climate oscillations promoted ecological differences that favored isolation by creating habitat discontinuity.

  8. Munroa argentina, a Grass of the South American Transition Zone, Survived the Andean Uplift, Aridification and Glaciations of the Quaternary

    PubMed Central

    Amarilla, Leonardo D.; Anton, Ana M.; Chiapella, Jorge O.; Manifesto, María M.; Angulo, Diego F.; Sosa, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The South American Transition Zone (SATZ) is a biogeographic area in which not only orogeny (Andes uplift) and climate events (aridification) since the mid-Miocene, but also Quaternary glaciation cycles had an important impact on the evolutionary history of the local flora. To study this effect, we selected Munroa argentina, an annual grass distributed in the biogeographic provinces of Puna, Prepuna and Monte. We collected 152 individuals from 20 localities throughout the species’ range, ran genetic and demographic analyses, and applied ecological niche modeling. Phylogenetic and population genetic analyses based on cpDNA and AFLP data identified three phylogroups that correspond to the previously identified subregions within the SATZ. Molecular dating suggests that M. argentina has inhabited the SATZ since approximately 3.4 (4.2–1.2) Ma and paleomodels predict suitable climate in these areas during the Interglacial period and the Last Glacial Maximum. We conclude that the current distribution of M. argentina resulted from the fragmentation of its once continuous range and that climate oscillations promoted ecological differences that favored isolation by creating habitat discontinuity. PMID:26110533

  9. Radiocarbon dates and late-Quaternary stratigraphy from Mamontova Gora, unglaciated central Yakutia, Siberia, U.S.S.R.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pewe, T.L.; Journaux, A.; Stuckenrath, R.

    1977-01-01

    A fine exposure of perennially frozen ice-rich silt and associated flora and vertebrate fauna of late-Quaternary age exists at Mamontova Gora along the Aldan River in central Yakutia, Siberia, U.S.S.R. The silt deposit caps a 50-m-high terrace and consists of three units. An upper layer 1-2 m thick overlies a 10-15-m-thick brownish to black silt layer. The lower silt layer is greenish to gray and about 15 m thick. All the silt is well sorted with 60% of the particles falling between 0.005 and 0.5 mm in diameter and is generally chemically and mineralogically homogeneous. The middle unit contains may extinct vertebrate mammal remains and ice wedges. The lower unit contains little vegetation and no ice wedges. The silt is widespread and exists as a loamy blanket on terraces at various elevations on both sides of the lower Aldan River. The origin of the silt blanket of late-Quaternary age in central Yakutia has long been controversial. Various hypotheses have been suggested, including lacustrine and alluvial, as well as frost-action origins. It is sometimes referred to as loess-like loam. Pe??we?? believes the silt at Mamontova Gora is loess, some of which has been retransported very short distances by water. The silt probably was blown from wide, braided, unvegetated flood plains of rivers draining nearby glaciers. The silt deposits are late Quaternary in age and probably associated with the Maximum glaciation (Samarov) and Sartan and Syryan glaciations of Wisconsinan age. On the basis of biostratigraphy, 10 radiocarbon dates, and their relation to the nearby glacial record, it is felt that the upper unit at Mamontova Gora is Holocene and the middle unit is Wisconsinan. The youngest date available from the middle unit at this particular location is 26,000 years. Dates greater than 56,000 years were obtained in the lower part of the middle unit. The lower unit is definitely beyond the range of radiocarbon dating and probably is older than the last interglacial. The

  10. Late Pleistocene Glaciation and Paleoclimate in the Rocky Mountains: Insights From GIS Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, E. M.

    2004-12-01

    Reconstruction of glaciological characteristics of Pleistocene glaciers is an important source of information on paleoclimate. Depression of equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) and mass balance modeling have be used to assess the magnitude and character of late Pleistocene-to-present climate change, particularly for alpine glaciers, which respond rapidly to climate. Application of GIS methods to such data facilitates analysis of regional patterns of climate change. GIS studies may also reveal spatial patterns in glaciological response to climate forcing. This presentation considers two applications of GIS to the study of the paleoglaciology and paleoclimate of the southern Rocky Mountains, looking first at late Pleistocene equilibrium-line depression in Colorado and second at magnitudes of climatic change necessary for glacier inception and growth in different ranges throughout the region. The few modern glaciers in Colorado are in topographically favored locations, out of equilibrium with regional climate. Theoretical modern ELAs, more closely related to regional climate, were determined using summer temperature and snow accumulation data from 74 SNOWTEL sites, modern altitudinal gradients of accumulation and temperature, and an empirical equation relating summer temperature to accumulation at equilibrium lines of modern glaciers. A theoretical modern ELA surface was constructed across the state. Late Pleistocene ELAs were determined by accumulation area ratio methods for 149 well-mapped late Pleistocene glaciers, and a paleo ELA surface was constructed. Comparison of the surfaces indicates that the magnitude of ELA depression varied significantly across the state, with a mean of ca 900m. The greatest depression (1000-1250m) occurred in the southern portion of the San Juan Mountains, likely reflecting increased Pleistocene southwesterly moisture flow. Greater than average ELA depression (900-1150m) also occurred in the northern mountains. Central ranges of the state

  11. An East Siberian ice shelf during the Late Pleistocene glaciations: Numerical reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colleoni, Florence; Kirchner, Nina; Niessen, Frank; Quiquet, Aurélien; Liakka, Johan

    2016-09-01

    A recent data campaign in the East Siberian Sea has revealed evidence of grounded and floating ice dynamics in regions of up to 1000 m water depth, and which are attributed to glaciations older than the Last Glacial Maximum (21 kyrs BP). The main hypothesis based on this evidence is that a small ice cap developed over Beringia and expanded over the East Siberian continental margin during some of the Late Pleistocene glaciations. Other similar evidence of ice dynamics that have been previously collected on the shallow continental shelves of the Arctic Ocean have been attributed to the penultimate glaciation, i.e. Marine Isotopes Stage 6 (≈140 kyrs BP). We use an ice sheet model, forced by two previously simulated MIS 6 glacial maximum climates, to carry out a series of sensitivity experiments testing the impact of dynamics and mass-balance related parameters on the geometry of the East Siberian ice cap and ice shelf. Results show that the ice cap developing over Beringia connects to the Eurasian ice sheet in all simulations and that its volume ranges between 6 and 14 m SLE, depending on the climate forcing. This ice cap generates an ice shelf of dimensions comparable with or larger than the present-day Ross ice shelf in West Antarctica. Although the ice shelf extent strongly depends on the ice flux through the grounding line, it is particularly sensitive to the choice of the calving and basal melting parameters. Finally, inhibiting a merging of the Beringia ice cap with the Eurasian ice sheet affects the expansion of the ice shelf only in the simulations where the ice cap fluxes are not large enough to compensate for the fluxes coming from the Eurasian ice sheet.

  12. Loess sedimentation in Tibet: provenance, processes, and link with Quaternary glaciations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Li, S.-H.; Muhs, D.R.; Li, B.

    2007-01-01

    Well-preserved loess deposits are found on the foothills of mountains along the middle reaches of the Yarlung Zangbo River in southern Tibet. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is used to determine loess ages by applying the single-aliquot regeneration technique. Geochemical, mineralogical, and granulometric measurements were carried out to allow a comparison between loess from Tibet and the Chinese Loess Plateau. Our results demonstrate that (i) the loess deposits have a basal age of 13-11 ka, suggesting they accumulated after the last deglaciation, (ii) loess in southern Tibet has a "glacial" origin, resulting from eolian sorting of glaciofluvial outwash deposits from braided river channels or alluvial fans by local near-surface winds, and (iii) the present loess in the interior of Tibet has accumulated since the last deglaciation when increased monsoonal circulation provided an increased vegetation cover that was sufficient for trapping eolian silt. The lack of full-glacial loess is either due to minimal vegetation cover or possibly due to the erosion of loess as glaciofluvial outwash during the beginning of each interglacial. Such processes would have been repeated during each glacial-interglacial cycle of the Quaternary. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Possible refugia in the Alexander Archipelago of southeastern Alaska during the late Wisconsin glaciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carrara, P.E.; Ager, T.A.; Baichtal, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    The interpretation of the extent of late Wisconsin glaciation in southeastern Alaska has varied between geologists and biologists. Maps and reports of the region prepared by geologists commonly indicated that late Wisconsin ice extended as a large uniform front west to the edge of the continental shelf. However, the distribution of plants and animals in the region has led many biologists to suggest that there may have been ice-free areas that served as refugia during the late Wisconsin. Based on analyses of aerial photographs, topographic maps, and bathymetric charts, in conjunction with a review of previous literature and reconnaissance fieldwork throughout the region, this study presents data supporting a limited ice extent in the Alexander Archipelago during the late Wisconsin and identifies possible ice-free areas that may have served as refugia. These areas include (1) the Fairweather Ground, (2) the Herbert Graves Island area, (3) the western coast of southern Baranof Island and adjacent continental shelf, (4) Coronation Island and the adjacent continental shelf, (5) the Warren Island area, (6) the continental shelf from west of Heceta Island to Forrester Island in the south, (7) parts of the west coast of southern Dall Island, and (8) lowland areas in southern Prince of Wales Island. The identification of these possible refugia has bearing on the recolonization of the Alexander Archipelago, as they could have served as centers of biotic dispersal upon regional deglaciation and as stepping stones for early humans with a maritime tradition entering the western hemisphere from Asia. ?? 2007 NRC Canada.

  14. Late-quaternary vegetational dynamics and community stability reconsidered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcourt, Paul A.; Delcourt, Hazel R.

    1983-03-01

    Defining the spatial and temporal limits of vegetational processes such as migration and invasion of established communities is a prerequisite to evaluating the degree of stability in plant communities through the late Quaternary. The interpretation of changes in boundaries of major vegetation types over the past 20,000 yr offers a complementary view to that provided by migration maps for particular plant taxa. North of approximately 43°N in eastern North America, continual vegetational disequilibrium has resulted from climatic change, soil development, and species migrations during postglacial times. Between 33° and 39°N, stable full-glacial vegetation was replaced by a relatively unstable vegetation during late-glacial climatic amelioration; stable interglacial vegetation developed there after about 9000 yr B.P. Late-Quaternary vegetation has been in dynamic equilibrium, with a relatively constant flora, south of 33°N on upland interfluves along the northern Gulf Coastal Plain, peninsular Florida, and west-central Mexico.

  15. Late quaternary environments, Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, S.A.; Short, S.K.; Waythomas, C.F.

    1996-01-01

    Late Quaternary pollen, plant macrofossils, and insect fossils were studied from sites along three rivers in the foothills north of the Alaska Range in Denali National Park and Preserve. The aim was to carry out a reconaissance of late Quaternary organic sediments in the region, emphasizing the mid-Wisconsin, or Boutellier interstadial interval. Samples of probable early- to mid-Boutellier age (ca. 60 000 to 40 000 B.P.) from Unit 2 at the Toklat High Bluffs site indicate open boreal woodland with dense alder shrub vegetation. Organic Unit 1 at the Foraker River Slump site indicates open taiga with shrubs of probable Boutellier age. Fossil evidence from the youngest horizon in this unit indicates graminoid tundra environments, marking the transition from interstadial to late Wisconsin glacial environments. Early Holocene samples from the Foraker exposures suggest birch shrub tundra; coniferous forest apparently became established only alter 6500 B.P. Local variations in forest composition at the Foraker and Sushana sites were probably the result of disturbances, such as fire.

  16. A model of late quaternary landscape development in the Delaware Valley, New Jersey and Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridge, J.C.; Evenson, E.B.; Sevon, W.D.

    1992-01-01

    In the Delaware Valley of New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania the late Quaternary history of colluviation, fluvial adjustment, and soil formation is based on the ages of pre-Wisconsinan soils and glacial deposits which are indicated by feld relationships and inferred from mid-latitude climate changes indicated by marine oxygen-isotope records. The area is divided into four terranes characterized by sandstone, gneiss, slate and carbonate rocks. Since the last pre-Wisconsinan glaciation (> 130 ka, inferred to be late Illinoian), each terrane responded differently to chemical and mechanical weathering. During the Sangamon interglacial stage (??? 130-75 ka) in situ weathering is inferred to have occurred at rates greater than transportation of material which resulted in the formation of deep, highly weathered soil and saprolite, and dissolution of carbonate rocks. Cold climatic conditions during the Wisconsinan, on the other hand, induced erosion of the landscape at rates faster than soil development. Upland erosion during the Wisconsinan removed pre-Wisconsinan soil and glacial sediment and bedrock to produce muddy to blocky colluvium, gre??zes lite??es, and alluvial fans on footslopes. Fluvial gravel and overlying colluvium in the Delaware Valley, both buried by late Wisconsinan outwash, are inferred to represent episodes of early and middle Wisconsinan (??? 75-25 ka) upland erosion and river aggradiation followed by river degradation and colluvium deposition. Early-middle Wisconsinan colluvium is more voluminous than later colluvium despite colder, possibly permafrost conditions during the late Wisconsinan ??? 25-10 ka). Extensive colluviation during the early and middle Wisconsinan resulted from a longer (50 kyr), generally cold interval of erosion with a greater availability of easily eroded pre-Wisconsinan surficial materials on uplands than during the late Wisconsinan. After recession of late Wisconsinan ice from its terminal position, soil formation and

  17. Late-Quaternary exhumation rates constrained by OSL thermochronometry at the Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duverger, Arnaud; King, Georgina; Valla, Pierre; Cox, Simon; Herman, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    The Southern Alps of New Zealand are often cited as the primary example of a mountain range that has reached exhumation and topographic steady state, especially on the West Coast where exhumation rates reach up to about 10 mm/yr. However, cyclic climatic changes, throughout the Quaternary period have meant that the Alps cycled between being completely glaciated and ice free. The impact that such glacial cycles may have had on the spatial variability of erosion rates remains poorly constrained. Here we use Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) as a very low temperature thermochronometer to constrain rock cooling histories at 10-100 kyr timescales on samples collected near the Franz Josef glacier. OSL-thermochronometry is based on the amount of electrons accumulated in the lattice defects of natural minerals such as quartz or feldspar, due to the competing effects of charge trapping due to the natural radioactivity within the rock and charge detrapping due to thermal loss during rock exhumation towards the surface. We collected 9 samples along the Waiho valley (crossing the Alpine Fault) and the Franz Josef glacier to quantify late-Quaternary exhumation rates and their potential spatial variations. Bedrock samples have been crushed to extract the light-safe rock interiors which have then been processed to isolate potassium-rich feldspars (K-feldspars). We used the Infra-Red Stimulated Luminescence at 50°C (IRSL50) protocol, including the measurement of the natural IRSL50 trapped charge population and the laboratory characterization of sample-specific thermal and athermal kinetic parameters. Once measured, the luminescence signal can be inverted into cooling histories. We also explored the potential of the recently developed multi-OSL-thermochronometer (King et al., accepted) to better constrain the cooling path. Our first OSL measurements show that samples are not in saturation and thus contain useful thermochronometric information over the last ~100 kyr. Inverse

  18. The NORWEGIAN-GREENLAND Sea Continental Margins: Morphology and Late Quaternary Sedimentary Processes and Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorren, Tore O.; Laberg, Jan Sverre; Blaume, Frank; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Kenyon, Neil H.; Mienert, Jürgen; Rumohr, Jan; Werner, Friedrich

    The continental margins surrounding the Norwegian-Greenland Sea are to a large degree shaped by processes during the late Quaternary. The paper gives an overview of the morphology and the processes responsible for the formation of three main groups of morphological features: slides, trough mouth fans and channels. Several large late Quaternary slides have been identified on the eastern Norwegian-Greenland Sea continental margin. The origin of the slides may be due to high sedimentation rates leading to a build-up of excess pore water pressure, perhaps with additional pressure caused by gas bubbles. Triggering might have been prompted by earthquakes or by decomposition of gas hydrates. Trough mouth fans (TMF) are fans at the mouths of transverse troughs on presently or formerly glaciated continental shelves. In the Norwegian-Greenland Sea, seven TMFs have been identified varying in area from 2700 km 2 to 215 000 km 2. The Trough Mouth Fans are depocentres of sediments which have accumulated in front of ice streams draining the large Northwest European ice sheets. The sediments deposited at the shelf break/upper slope by the ice stream were remobilized and transported downslope, mostly as debris flows. The Trough Mouth Fans hold the potential for giving information about the various ice streams feeding them with regard to velocity and ice discharge. Two large deep-sea channel systems have been observed along the Norwegian continental margin, the Lofoten Basin Channel and the Inbis Channel. Along the East Greenland margin, several channel systems have been identified. The deep-sea channels may have been formed by dense water originating from cooling, sea-ice formation and brine rejection close to the glacier margin or they may originate from small slides on the upper slope transforming into debris flows and turbidity currents.

  19. Reconstructing the pre-Quaternary landscape in Agnew-Lawlers area, Western Australia with emphasis on the Permo-Carboniferous glaciation and post-glacial weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Walid; Anand, Ravi R.

    2017-01-01

    redox reactions. The formation of smectite and ferruginous cements in this unit is attributed to weathering of ferromagnesian and opaque heavy minerals under oxic and slightly alkaline conditions. Mineralogical and geochemical changes dominated in the upper unit is related mainly to Post-Permian chemical weathering, where almost all rock-forming minerals are altered to kaolinite and alkali and alkaline earth elements are leached forming bleached white saprolitic diamictites. A change in clay minerals from kaolinite in the weathered Permo-Carboniferous succession to smectite in the overlying Cenozoic succession demarcates the unconformity and probably reflects a change to an arid climatic condition. Chemically, the Cenozoic succession shows a sharp increase in Ti/Al and La/Ce ratios and a decrease in Ce anomaly that remain constant in the Permo-Carboniferous section. These mineralogical and chemical variations through the Phanerozoic stratigraphic section can be used to follow the landscape and climatic evolution since the late Palaeozoic glaciation.

  20. Late Quaternary terrestrial vertebrate coprolites from New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Jamie R.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.

    2014-08-01

    Over the past decade, concerted efforts to find and study Late Quaternary terrestrial vertebrate coprolites in New Zealand have revealed new insights into the diets and ecologies of New Zealand's prehistoric birds. Here, we provide a broader review of the coprolites found in natural (non-archaeological) Late Quaternary deposits from New Zealand. We summarise the morphological diversity of the coprolites, and discuss the taphonomy of the sites in which they are found. Since the 1870s more than 2000 coprolites have been discovered from 30 localities, all restricted to the South Island. The distribution of coprolite localities appears to reflect the presence of geological and climatic factors that enhance the potential for coprolite preservation; coprolites require dry conditions for preservation, and have been found on the ground surface within drafting cave entrances and at shallow (<300 mm) depths beneath rock overhangs with a northerly aspect. We classify the coprolites into eleven morphotypes, each of which may represent a range of different bird and/or reptile species. A review of genetically identified specimens shows that coprolites of different bird species overlap in size and morphology, reinforcing the need for identifications to be based on ancient DNA analysis.

  1. Detailed view into the dynamics of the Late Miocene glaciation episode that accompanied terrestrial evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanova, A.; Herbert, T.; Lawrence, K. T.; Peterson, L.; Kelly, C. S.

    2015-12-01

    We focus on the period of ~ 9 - 5 Ma when an episode of notably cool temperatures corresponds to evidence of high latitude Northern Hemisphere glaciation and mid-latitude terrestrial evolution. Alkenone-based sea surface temperatures (SST) from six globally distributed sites: ODP Sites 907 and 982 in the North Atlantic, ODP Site 1088 in the South Atlantic and ODP Sites 883, 884 and 887 in the North Pacific, and the Monte dei Corvi marine section in the Mediterranean unequivocally establish a dramatic, Late Miocene cold episode that persisted over approximately 2.5 Myr. In this work we establish the timing and synchronization of temperature decrease as well as rebound at orbital timescales. All sites were notably warmer than their modern annual average at ~9 Ma and exhibit sustained cooling beginning at ~8 Ma. SSTs rebound close to ~5.9 Ma at most locations suggesting that the cooling trend that began in the Late Miocene slowed down or even reversed in some locations in the Pliocene. The newly reconstructed SSTs highlight the role of cooling and an increase in equator to pole temperature gradients in terrestrial evolution at this pivotal time.

  2. Evidence for two pulses of glaciation during the late Proterozoic in northern Utah and southeastern Idaho.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crittenden, M.D.; Christie-Blick, N.; Link, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    Over much of this area, the glacial deposits and associated rocks thicken westward and form the basal part of a miogeoclinal wedge that accumulated near the late Proterozoic and early Paleozoic continental margin. In the east, such deposits are thin and rest on Archean basement or rocks of Proterozoic Y age; in the west, they are part of thicker sequences in which deposition apparently continued without significant interruption from late Proterozoic into Cambrian time. Recent mapping shows that glacial episodes represented either by diamictite or by dropstones enclosed in fine-grained laminated beds are separated by as much as 1000m of non-glacial deposits, including black slate, alternating graywacke and siltstone, quartzite, and conglomerate. Using reasonable sedimentation rates for such deposits and by comparison with modern analogues, we infer that two episodes of glaciation, each probably consisting of multiple advances and retreats, were separated by a non-glacial interval of a few hundred thousand to a few million years' duration.-from Author

  3. Late Quaternary sediment fluxes from tropical watersheds [review article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Michael F.

    2003-11-01

    Inherited saprolite stores and continued weathering in Quaternary time juxtapose abundant clay and fresh rock in tropical landscapes. This influences sediment fluxes and affects the interpretation of sediment sequences derived from tropical watersheds. Detrital kaolinites derive from inherited saprolite sources as well as from soil clays and appear in delta and ocean sediments. These sediments appear to correspond with sub-Milankovitch, millennial-scale cycles of climate change, but may also record century-scale episodes of rapid warming (Dansgaard-Oeschger events). Destabilisation of sediment sources and increased sediment fluxes in the Late Quaternary followed millennia of climatic deterioration (cooling/aridity) and vegetation change and led to altered patterns of sedimentation during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Sediment yield from slopes increased 10× around the LGM, when rainfall was reduced by 30-60% and led to fan building and braided channels. Rainfall increased 40-80% from the LGM to the Early Holocene maximum and this led to channel cutting and major sediment fluxes to delta and ocean sinks. Vegetation recovery lagged the rapid warming by several millennia and was interrupted by (Younger Dryas) YD aridity, influencing slope and stream behaviour. Holocene sedimentation has been by both vertical and lateral accretion, increasing floodplain sediment stores.

  4. Global warming: Perspectives from the Late Quaternary paleomammal record

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.W. )

    1993-03-01

    Global warming at the end of the Pleistocene caused significant environmental changes that directly and indirectly effected biotic communities. The biotic response to this global warming event can provide insights into the processes that might be anticipated for future climatic changes. The megafauna extinction may have been the most dramatic alteration of mammalian communities at the end of the Pleistocene. Late Quaternary warming also altered regional diversity patterns for some small mammal guilds without extinction. Reductions in body size for both small and large mammal species were also consequences of these environmental fluctuations. Geographic shifts in the distributions of individual mammal species resulted in changes in species composition of mammalian communities. The individualistic response of biota to environmental fluctuations define some boundary conditions for modeling communities. Understanding these boundary conditions is mandatory in planning for the preservation of biodiversity in the future. Finally, it is essential to determine how global warming will alter seasonal patterns because it is apparent from the paleobiological record that not all Quaternary warming events have been the same.

  5. Late Pleistocene glaciation of the Mt Giluwe volcano, Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrows, T.T.; Hope, G.S.; Prentice, M.L.; Fifield, L.K.; Tims, S.G.

    2011-01-01

    The Mt Giluwe shield volcano was the largest area glaciated in Papua New Guinea during the Pleistocene. Despite minimal cooling of the sea surface during the last glacial maximum, glaciers reached elevations as low as 3200 m. To investigate changes in the extent of ice through time we have re-mapped evidence for glaciation on the southwest flank of Mt Giluwe. We find that an ice cap has formed on the flanks of the mountain on at least three, and probably four, separate occasions. To constrain the ages of these glaciations we present 39 new cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages complemented by new radiocarbon dates. Direct dating of the moraines identifies that the maximum extent of glaciation on the mountain was not during the last glacial maximum as previously thought. In conjunction with existing potassium/argon and radiocarbon dating, we recognise four distinct glacial periods between 293-306 ka (Gogon Glaciation), 136-158 ka (Mengane Glaciation), centred at 62 ka (Komia Glaciation) and from >20.3-11.5 ka (Tongo Glaciation). The temperature difference relative to the present during the Tongo Glaciation is likely to be of the order of at least 5 ??C which is a minimum difference for the previous glaciations. During the Tongo Glaciation, ice was briefly at its maximum for less than 1000 years, but stayed near maximum levels for nearly 4000 years, until about 15.4 ka. Over the next 4000 years there was more rapid retreat with ice free conditions by the early Holocene. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Late Pleistocene glaciation of the Mt Giluwe volcano, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, Timothy T.; Hope, Geoffrey S.; Prentice, Michael L.; Fifield, L. Keith; Tims, Stephen G.

    2011-09-01

    The Mt Giluwe shield volcano was the largest area glaciated in Papua New Guinea during the Pleistocene. Despite minimal cooling of the sea surface during the last glacial maximum, glaciers reached elevations as low as 3200 m. To investigate changes in the extent of ice through time we have re-mapped evidence for glaciation on the southwest flank of Mt Giluwe. We find that an ice cap has formed on the flanks of the mountain on at least three, and probably four, separate occasions. To constrain the ages of these glaciations we present 39 new cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages complemented by new radiocarbon dates. Direct dating of the moraines identifies that the maximum extent of glaciation on the mountain was not during the last glacial maximum as previously thought. In conjunction with existing potassium/argon and radiocarbon dating, we recognise four distinct glacial periods between 293-306 ka (Gogon Glaciation), 136-158 ka (Mengane Glaciation), centred at 62 ka (Komia Glaciation) and from >20.3-11.5 ka (Tongo Glaciation). The temperature difference relative to the present during the Tongo Glaciation is likely to be of the order of at least 5 °C which is a minimum difference for the previous glaciations. During the Tongo Glaciation, ice was briefly at its maximum for less than 1000 years, but stayed near maximum levels for nearly 4000 years, until about 15.4 ka. Over the next 4000 years there was more rapid retreat with ice free conditions by the early Holocene.

  7. Late Quaternary geomorphology and soils in Crater Flat, Yucca mountain area, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, F.F.; Bell, J.W.; Ramelli, A.R.; Dorn, R.I.; Ku, T.L.

    1995-04-01

    Crater Flat is an alluvium-filled structural basin on the west side of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which is under consideration for a high-level nuclear waste repository. North-trending, late Quaternary faults offset alluvium in Crater Flat both along the canyons of the western flanks of Yucca Mountain and out on the piedmont slope. We believe the initial lack of young offsets at Yucca Mountain was in part due to unrecognized late Quaternary stratigraphy. We hypothesize that alluviation in the Yucca Mountain region was more active during the late Quaternary than previously thought. Several techniques were tried to test this hypothesis. Results are compared with previous soils and surface-exposure dating studies, and correlated to stratigraphy of other late Quaternary units in the southern Nevada, Death Valley, and Mojave Desert areas, and provide new stratigraphic data relevant to understanding climatic-alluvial processes in the Basin and Range Province during the late Quaternary. 76 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Asynchronous extinction of late Quaternary sloths on continents and islands

    PubMed Central

    Steadman, David W.; Martin, Paul S.; MacPhee, Ross D. E.; Jull, A. J. T.; McDonald, H. Gregory; Woods, Charles A.; Iturralde-Vinent, Manuel; Hodgins, Gregory W. L.

    2005-01-01

    Whatever the cause, it is extraordinary that dozens of genera of large mammals became extinct during the late Quaternary throughout the Western Hemisphere, including 90% of the genera of the xenarthran suborder Phyllophaga (sloths). Radiocarbon dates directly on dung, bones, or other tissue of extinct sloths place their “last appearance” datum at ≈11,000 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP) or slightly less in North America, ≈10,500 yr BP in South America, and ≈4,400 yr BP on West Indian islands. This asynchronous situation is not compatible with glacial–interglacial climate change forcing these extinctions, especially given the great elevational, latitudinal, and longitudinal variation of the sloth-bearing continental sites. Instead, the chronology of last appearance of extinct sloths, whether on continents or islands, more closely tracks the first arrival of people. PMID:16085711

  9. Asynchronous extinction of late Quaternary sloths on continents and islands.

    PubMed

    Steadman, David W; Martin, Paul S; MacPhee, Ross D E; Jull, A J T; McDonald, H Gregory; Woods, Charles A; Iturralde-Vinent, Manuel; Hodgins, Gregory W L

    2005-08-16

    Whatever the cause, it is extraordinary that dozens of genera of large mammals became extinct during the late Quaternary throughout the Western Hemisphere, including 90% of the genera of the xenarthran suborder Phyllophaga (sloths). Radiocarbon dates directly on dung, bones, or other tissue of extinct sloths place their "last appearance" datum at approximately 11,000 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP) or slightly less in North America, approximately 10,500 yr BP in South America, and approximately 4,400 yr BP on West Indian islands. This asynchronous situation is not compatible with glacial-interglacial climate change forcing these extinctions, especially given the great elevational, latitudinal, and longitudinal variation of the sloth-bearing continental sites. Instead, the chronology of last appearance of extinct sloths, whether on continents or islands, more closely tracks the first arrival of people.

  10. Late Quaternary sea-level changes of the Persian Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokier, Stephen W.; Bateman, Mark D.; Larkin, Nigel R.; Rye, Philip; Stewart, John R.

    2015-07-01

    Late Quaternary reflooding of the Persian Gulf climaxed with the mid-Holocene highstand previously variously dated between 6 and 3.4 ka. Examination of the stratigraphic and paleoenvironmental context of a mid-Holocene whale beaching allows us to accurately constrain the timing of the transgressive, highstand and regressive phases of the mid- to late Holocene sea-level highstand in the Persian Gulf. Mid-Holocene transgression of the Gulf surpassed today's sea level by 7100-6890 cal yr BP, attaining a highstand of > 1 m above current sea level shortly after 5290-4570 cal yr BP before falling back to current levels by 1440-1170 cal yr BP. The cetacean beached into an intertidal hardground pond during the transgressive phase (5300-4960 cal yr BP) with continued transgression interring the skeleton in shallow-subtidal sediments. Subsequent relative sea-level fall produced a forced regression with consequent progradation of the coastal system. These new ages refine previously reported timings for the mid- to late Holocene sea-level highstand published for other regions. By so doing, they allow us to constrain the timing of this correlatable global eustatic event more accurately.

  11. Formation of Late Quaternary paleoshorelines in Crete, Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouslopoulou, Vasiliki; Begg, John; Nicol, Andrew; Oncken, Onno; Prior, Christine

    2015-12-01

    Paleoshorelines of Late Quaternary age in western Crete do not exclusively increase in age with rising altitude as is generally observed worldwide. At numerous sites, for example, Late-Holocene paleoshorelines decrease in age with increasing altitude while in other cases paleoshorelines at similar altitude vary in age by tens of thousands of years. We propose that the observed paleoshoreline altitude-age relationships can be accounted for by eustatic sea-level changes and tectonic rock uplift without requiring substantial errors on radiocarbon ages or tectonic subsidence, as has been previously proposed. To test this model we use a dataset consisting of altitude and age data for 71 individual paleoshorelines sampled from 21 sites distributed along the entire Cretan coastline. These data include radiocarbon ages of marine biota (40 new dates) within beachrock resting on paleoshorelines ranging up to 48 kyr BP in age and ≤20 m above present sea-level. We find that paleoshoreline formation reflects Late Holocene tectonic rock uplift in western Crete, preceded by eustatic sea-level rise and by >10 kyr BP rock uplift along the entire island. Our observations contravene existing models as they suggest that some paleoshorelines, and their associated lithified beachrock, survived passage through the wave-zone multiple times and formed throughout the sea-level cycle (i.e., preservation is not restricted to highstand deposits). These results may have application globally in regions where erosion-resistant carbonate beachrock mantles paleoshorelines.

  12. Late Frasnian-Famennian climates based on palynomorph analyses and the question of the Late Devonian glaciations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streel, Maurice; Caputo, Mário V.; Loboziak, Stanislas; Melo, José Henrique G.

    2000-11-01

    have alternated with less cold but wetter climates, thus giving rise to the development of mountain glaciers in high latitudes and explaining the jerking character of the global major marine regression. In high latitude regions, the development of an ice cap reaching sea level is only recorded by the end of the Latest Famennian, immediately below the DCB but, even if glacial evidences are not known at near the FFB, a short (0.1 Ma?) glaciation seems the best reasonable explanation of the major eustatic fall following the Kellwasser Event. The sudden growth and decay of a hypothetical Earliest Famennian ice sheet can be explained by the reduction and, later, increase in greenhouse capacity of the atmosphere. These changes in the atmospheric CO 2 might have provoked changes in the mode of ocean-atmosphere operation. It may also be partly controlled by a volcanic paroxysm and/or bolide impacts. The Hony microtektites represent the best known evidence of the impact of extraterrestrial bodies on Earth corresponding to the UKW, and they are immediately followed by a regression, suggested by the quantitative analysis of acritarch assemblages. In the paleo-tropical Late Famennian, a peat-forming vascular plant community occurs for the first time and makes possible quantitative palynology of autochthonous sediments allowing the recognition of different swamp and near-swamp characteristic miospores. The early Latest Famennian starts with a widespread transgression which could correspond to the melting phases of the hypothetical Late Famennian mountain glaciers. During the end-Famennian, the coastal lowland vegetation has a worldwide distribution from sub-polar to equatorial regions. The climate has become less cold in high latitudes but wetter than before probably because the midlatitude cyclonic activity allows sufficient polar transportation of moisture to form large snow cover. Extensive coastal glaciers developed in different Bolivian and Brazilian basins, well dated by

  13. Late Quaternary Glacier Retreat in the Mongolian Altai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, N. E.; Carson, R. J.; Wegmann, K. W.; Frankel, K. L.; Bayasgalan, A.; Dundon, K. M.; Ladig, K. L.; Leary, R. J.; Matzinger, G. R.; Seymour, A. M.

    2008-12-01

    The glaciated Mongolian Altai range preserves moraine complexes and other landforms from extensive late Pleistocene glaciations. We studied ancient and modern glacial features in six valleys draining into the Delüün Valley (47.905°N, 90.724°E) in Mongolia's far western Bayan-Ölgiy province. Moraines were assigned relative ages based on morphology and boulder frequency. For example, in the Altai Mountains along the Mongolia-China border west of the Delüün Valley, modern glaciers sit upvalley of Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) moraines that contain abundant large granitic erratic boulders and impound Chigertey Gol; in older, more rounded moraines about 8 km down-valley, most of the granitic boulders are weathered and wind-abraded down to ground level. We observed no evidence for glacial deposits older than LGM in valleys draining the western flank of the tectonically active Khukh Serkhyn Mountains along the east side of the Delüün Valley. Cosmogenic 10Be ages will help further establish the timing of moraine deposition. Recent changes in glaciers in the Khukh Serkhyn Mountains were identified using maps derived from 1963 aerial photographs and our own 2008 field observations. We used the toe-to-summit altitude method to establish the equilibrium-line elevation (ELA) of the mountain glaciers during the time each moraine complex was deposited. Between the LGM and 1963, the ELA rose from about 3200 m to at least 3700 m; currently the ELA is probably higher than 4000 m. Areal extent of the glaciers west of the Khukh Serkhyn drainage divide decreased from approximately 112 km2 during the LGM to about 7 km2 in 1963 to about 4 km2 today. This represents an order of magnitude increase in the mean loss rate of glacial area since 1963, compared to the mean loss rate since the LGM. If the present rate of loss continues, these glaciers will disappear by about 2075. The loss of mountain glaciers in the Mongolian Altai will reduce the availability of summer meltwater to local

  14. Ages and inferred causes of late Pleistocene glaciations on Mauna Kea, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, J.S.; Zreda, M.; Zweck, C.; Almasi, P.F.; Elmore, D.; Sharp, W.D.

    2008-01-01

    Glacial landforms on Mauna Kea, Hawai'i, show that the summit area of the volcano was covered intermittently by ice caps during the Late Pleistocene. Cosmogen 36Cl dating of terminal moraines and other glacial landforms indicates that the last two ice caps, called Older Makanaka and Younger Makanaka, retreated from their maximum positions approximately 23ka and 13ka, respectively. The margins and equilibrium line altitudes of these ice caps on the remote, tropical Pacific island were nearly identical, which would seem to imply the same mechanism for ice growth. But modelling of glacier mass balance, combined with palaeotemperature proxy data from the subtropical North Pacific, suggests that the causes of the two glacial expansions may have been different. Older Makanaka airatop Mauna Kea was likely wetter than today and cold, whereas Younger Makanaka times were slightly warmer but significantly wetter than the previous glaciation. The modelled increase in precipitation rates atop Mauna Kea during the Late Pleistocene is consistent with that near sea level inferred from pollen data, which suggests that the additional precipitation was due to more frequent and/ or intense tropical storms associated with eastward-moving cold fronts. These conditions were similar to modern La Ni??a (weak ENSO) conditions, but persisted for millennia rather than years. Increased precipitation rates and the resulting steeper temperature lapse rates created glacial conditions atop Mauna Kea in the absence of sufficient cooling at sea level, suggesting that if similar correlations existed elsewhere in the tropics, the precipitation-dependent lapse rates could reconcile the apparent difference between glacial-time cooling of the tropics at low and high altitudes. Copyright ?? 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Late Quaternary land-sea correlations, northern Labrador, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, P.; Josenhans, H.

    1985-01-01

    Late Quaternary glacial and postglacial units in the Torngat Mountains, northern Labrador, are correlated with units identified on the adjacent continental shelf. The late Wisconsinan Laurentide Ice Sheet drained through major valleys of the Torngat Mountains as outlet glaciers, depositing the Saglek Moraines. These are of regional extent and have been mapped from Saglek Fiord north to Noodleook Fiord. A C-14 date of 18,210 +/- 1900 BP on total organic matter (TOM) from lake sediment dammed by a segment of the Saglek Moraines is interpreted as a maximum date for deposition of the Saglek Moraine system because of possible contamination. Glacial sediments comprising the Saglek Moraines are correlated with upper till mapped in troughs and saddles on the continental shelf. Outlet glaciers depositing a late Wisconsinan unit flowed through Labrador fiords and onto the shelf at low basal shear stresses, particularly on the shelf where, although grounded, they were hydrostatically buoyed up and moved principally by sliding. A glaciomarine unit conformably overlies late Wisconsinan till on the shelf and on the land. This unit is a gravelly clayey silt, contains abundant foraminifera, and has up to 60% limestone in the pebble fraction. C-14 dates suggest deposition of this unit began ca. 10,000 BP on the shelf and 9000 BP on the land, an ended by 8000 BP. Limestone pebbles in this unit suggest a source in part from sediment-laden icebergs and pack-ice from the north. Marine deposition from ca. 8000-0 BP is characterize by basinal sedimentation.

  16. Mapping the late Quaternary evolution of the lower Mississippi Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugerud, R. A.; Simon, K. M.; James, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    The lower Mississippi Valley (LMV) extends from Cape Girardeau to Natchez and from Little Rock to Memphis. Extensive Quaternary terraces within the LMV have been considered to reflect downstream changes in base level (global sea level) and (or) upstream changes in water and sediment input because of glaciation. We suggest that the first-order control on terrace development was glacial-isostatic adjustment (GIA). Observed variation in heights of Quaternary alluvial surfaces at Memphis is 50 m (Rittenour et al., 2007). GIA modeling by Clark et al. (1994) predicted vertical displacement of as much as 130 m at Memphis over the last 18,000 years. ICE-5G models predict smaller displacement and reinforce the viability of GIA as the primary cause of LMV aggradation and incision. Existing analyses of LMV terraces are built on geomorphic maps by Saucier and colleagues (1974, 1994; Autin et al., 1991) that were interpreted from aerial photographs and inch-to-the-mile contour maps. Geomorphic mapping from high-resolution DEMs is more accurate, more rapid, and more reproducible than mapping from aerial photography and intermediate-resolution contours. Working from lidar DEMs (1-5 m XY resolution) and the 10 m National Elevation Dataset (NED) DEM largely derived from 1:24,000 scale contours, Haugerud is mapping the geomorphology of the LMV at ~1:500,000 scale. Goals are to explore the GIA-terrace hypothesis and improve the geomorphic and stratigraphic context for studies of New Madrid seismicity. Mapping leads to several observations: 1. The Holocene floodplain of the Mississippi River onlaps older surfaces. The river appears to be filling a hole created by collapse of the Laurentide forebulge. Continued filling of this accommodation space will, barring human intervention, enable the river to abandon its course through Thebes Gap in favor of a lower-elevation route through Oran Gap. 2. Within Holocene meander belts, younger levee crests are higher than older levee crests. The

  17. Effects of late quaternary climate change on Palearctic shrews.

    PubMed

    Prost, Stefan; Klietmann, Johannes; van Kolfschoten, Thijs; Guralnick, Robert P; Waltari, Eric; Vrieling, Klaas; Stiller, Mathias; Nagel, Doris; Rabeder, Gernot; Hofreiter, Michael; Sommer, Robert S

    2013-06-01

    The Late Quaternary was a time of rapid climatic oscillations and drastic environmental changes. In general, species can respond to such changes by behavioral accommodation, distributional shifts, ecophenotypic modifications (nongenetic), evolution (genetic) or ultimately face local extinction. How those responses manifested in the past is essential for properly predicting future ones especially as the current warm phase is further intensified by rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Here, we use ancient DNA (aDNA) and morphological features in combination with ecological niche modeling (ENM) to investigate genetic and nongenetic responses of Central European Palearctic shrews to past climatic change. We show that a giant form of shrew, previously described as an extinct Pleistocene Sorex species, represents a large ecomorph of the common shrew (Sorex araneus), which was replaced by populations from a different gene-pool and with different morphology after the Pleistocene Holocene transition. We also report the presence of the cold-adapted tundra shrew (S. tundrensis) in Central Europe. This species is currently restricted to Siberia and was hitherto unknown as an element of the Pleistocene fauna of Europe. Finally, we show that there is no clear correlation between climatic oscillations within the last 50 000 years and body size in shrews and conclude that a special nonanalogous situation with regard to biodiversity and food supply in the Late Glacial may have caused the observed large body size.

  18. Late Quaternary slip on the Santa Cruz Island fault, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pinter, N.; Lueddecke, S.B.; Keller, E.A.; Simmons, K.R.

    1998-01-01

    The style, timing, and pattern of slip on the Santa Cruz Island fault were investigated by trenching the fault and by analysis of offset late Quaternary landforms. A trench excavated across the fault at Christi Beach, on the western coast of the island, exposed deformation of latest Pleistocene to Holocene sediments and pre-Quaternary rocks, recording repeated large-magnitude rupture events. The most recent earthquake at this site occurred ca. 5 ka. Coastal terraces preserved on western Santa Cruz Island have been dated using the uranium-series technique and by extrapolation using terrace elevations and the eustatic record. Offset of terraces and other landforms indicates that the Santa Cruz Island fault is predominantly left lateral, having a horizontal slip rate of not more than 1.1 mm/yr and probably about 0.8 mm/yr. The fault also has a smaller reverse component, slipping at a rate of between 0.1 and 0.2 mm/yr. Combined with measurements of slip per event, this information suggests a long-term average recurrence interval of at least 2.7 k.y. and probably 4-5 k.y., and average earthquake magnitudes of Mw 7.2-7.5. Sense of slip, recurrence interval, and earthquake magnitudes calculated here for the Santa Cruz Island fault are very similar to recent results for other faults along the southern margin of the western Transverse Range, including the Malibu Coast fault, the Santa Monica fault, the Hollywood fault, and the Raymond fault, supporting the contention that these faults constitute a continuous and linked fault system, which is characterized by large but relatively infrequent earthquakes.

  19. Late Pliocene Glaciation of Southern Greenland and Ice/Ocean Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, M. H.; Carlson, A. E.; Stoner, J. S.; Hatfield, R. G.; Mathias, A.; Wolhowe, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    Greenland is home to the only persistent northern hemisphere ice-sheet, existing for much of the past 3.5 million years and yet likely to disappear if global temperatures rise another 2-3°C. The best analogue for the ice-sheet's current vulnerable state is likely near the time of its inception in the late Pliocene, when global surface temperatures are thought to have been 2-3°C higher than today. Although few proxy records exist for the pre-Quaternary, IODP Expedition 303 site U1307 captures the late-Pliocene warm period adjacent to the southern Greenland ice sheet. The sand fraction lithology in the Late Pliocene is dominated by well-sorted granitic material, likely sourced via runoff from the nascent southeastern ice sheet. Interpreted on a paleomagnetic reversal age model, this material shows 100 ka cyclicity between 3.6-3.1 Ma, with the exception of a period from 3.44-3.36 Ma. In that window, all lithologic evidence of material eroded from Greenland bedrock disappears. Poor carbonate preservation in conjunction with consistent silicious microfossil presence suggests benthic hypoxia driven by reduced regional deep-water ventilation, and may reflect a shutdown of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) through this interval. The appearance of glacial ice-rafted debris immediately prior supports the brief existence (<2 ka) of a marine-terminating ice margin at 3.45 Ma; freshwater input to the surface ocean associated with the disappearance of this larger ice sheet may have triggered changes in regional ocean circulation. Recovery from apparent benthic hypoxia begins at 3.36 Ma, accompanied by lithologic evidence for regrowth of the ice sheet. This episode of apparent AMOC shutdown provides insight on the feedbacks that exist between southern Greenlandic ice-sheet behavior and the AMOC.

  20. Late Quaternary paleoceanography of the Eurasian Basin, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, T. M.; Holtz, T. R.; Stein, R.; Spielhagen, R.; Fütterer, D.; Wollenburg, J.

    1995-04-01

    We reconstructed late Quaternary deep (3000-4100 m) and intermediate depth (1000-2500 m) paleoceanographic history of the Eurasian Basin, Arctic Ocean from ostracode assemblages in cores from the Lomonosov Ridge, Gakkel Ridge, Yermak Plateau, Morris Jesup Rise, and Amundsen and Makarov Basins obtained during the 1991 Polarstern cruise. Modern assemblages on ridges and plateaus between 1000 and 1500 m are characterized by abundant, relatively species-rich benthic ostracode assemblages, in part, reflecting the influence of high organic productivity and inflowing Atlantic water. In contrast, deep Arctic Eurasian basin assemblages have low abundance and low diversity and are dominated by Krithe and Cytheropteron reflecting faunal exchange with the Greenland Sea via the Fram Strait. Major faunal changes occurred in the Arctic during the last glacial/interglacial transition and the Holocene. Low-abundance, low-diversity assemblages from the Lomonosov and Gakkel Ridges in the Eurasian Basin from the last glacial period have modern analogs in cold, low-salinity, low-nutrient Greenland Sea deep water; glacial assemblages from the deep Nansen and Amundsen Basins have modern analogs in the deep Canada Basin. During Termination 1 at intermediate depths, diversity and abundance increased coincident with increased biogenic sediment, reflecting increased organic productivity, reduced sea-ice, and enhanced inflowing North Atlantic water. During deglaciation deep Nansen Basin assemblages were similar to those living today in the deep Greenland Sea, perhaps reflecting deepwater exchange via the Fram Strait. In the central Arctic, early Holocene faunas indicate weaker North Atlantic water inflow at middepths immediately following Termination 1, about 8500-7000 year B.P., followed by a period of strong Canada Basin water overflow across the Lomonosov Ridge into the Morris Jesup Rise area and central Arctic Ocean. Modern perennial sea-ice cover evolved over the last 4000-5000 years

  1. Marine and Terrestrial Evidence for Glaciation during the Pliocene - a Global Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Schepper, S.; Gibbard, P. L.; Salzmann, U.; Ehlers, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Pliocene climate is globally warm and characterized by high atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Nevertheless, considerable evidence for substantial glaciation events has been identified in both the Northern and Southern Hemisphere prior to the Quaternary. Evidence on land is fragmentary, but marine records of glaciation present a more complete history of Pliocene glaciation. A global compilation of glacial evidence (De Schepper et al. 2014) demonstrates that there are four large glaciation events in the Southern and/or Northern Hemisphere prior to the latest Pliocene intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation. Two global glacial events are identified in the early Pliocene, one around the early/late Pliocene transition, and one during the late Pliocene Marine Isotope Stage M2. ReferenceDe Schepper, S., Gibbard, P.L., Salzmann, U., Ehlers, J., 2014. A global synthesis of the marine and terrestrial evidence for glaciation during the Pliocene Epoch. Earth-Science Reviews 135, 83-102.

  2. Glaciation and deglaciation of the Libyan Desert: The Late Ordovician record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Heron, D. P.; Armstrong, H. A.; Wilson, C.; Howard, J. P.; Gindre, L.

    2010-01-01

    Detailed outcrop studies at the flanks of Al Kufrah Basin, Libya, reveal the nature of glacially-related sedimentation and post-depositional deformation styles produced in association with the Late Ordovician glaciation, during which ice sheets expanded northward over North Africa to deposit the Mamuniyat Formation. At the SE basin flank (Jabal Azbah), the Mamuniyat Formation is sand-dominated, and incises interfingering braidplain and shallow marine deposits of the Hawaz Formation. The glacially-related sediments include intercalations of mud-chip bearing tabular sandstones and intraformational conglomerates, which are interpreted as turbidite and debrite facies respectively. These record aggradation of an extensive sediment wedge in front of a stable former ice margin. An increase in mudstone content northward is accompanied by the occurrence of more evolved turbidites. A widespread surface, bearing streamlined NW-SE striking ridges and grooves, punctuates this succession. The structures on the surface are interpreted to have formed during a regional north-westward ice advance. Above, siltstones bearing Arthrophycus burrows, and Orthocone-bearing sandstones beneath tidal bars testify to glaciomarine conditions for deposition of the underflow deposits beneath. By contrast, the northern basin margin (Jabal az-Zalmah) is appreciably different in recording shallower water/paralic sedimentation styles and major glaciotectonic deformation features, although facies analysis also reveals northward deepening. Here, a siltstone wedging from 8 to 50 m toward the north was deposited (lower delta plain), succeeded by climbing ripple cross-laminated sandstones up to 60 m in thickness (distal through proximal delta mouth bar deposits) with occasional diamictite interbeds. These rocks are deformed by thrusts and > 50 m amplitude fault-propagation folds, the deformation locally sealed by a diamictite then overlain by conglomeratic lag during ultimate deglaciation. Integrating

  3. Comment on "Quaternary glaciations: from observations to theories" by D. Paillard [Quat. Sci. Rev. 107 (2015), 11-24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol'shakov, Vyacheslav A.; Kuzmin, Yaroslav V.

    2015-07-01

    In the invited review by Paillard (2015), comprehensive information about both theoretical and empirical studies of Pleistocene glaciations and their causes are presented. D. Paillard's review concludes that Milankovitch's (1930, 1941) theory cannot explain the 100,000 yr periodicity of glaciations within the last one million years, and that an additional factor must be responsible for global climate fluctuations. According to Paillard (2015), changes in the carbon dioxide (CO2) content of the atmosphere are responsible. This statement radically alters the conventional viewpoint about the leading role of orbital variations on global Pleistocene climate (e.g., Hays et al., 1976).

  4. Timing of late Pleistocene glaciation in Mongolia: Surface exposure dating reveals a differentiated pattern of glacial forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pötsch, Steffen; Rother, Henrik; Lorenz, Sebastian; Walther, Michael; Lehmkuhl, Frank

    2015-04-01

    of atmospheric circulation and its significance for controlling regional precipitation results in a more differentiated pattern of late Pleistocene glaciation in Mongolia than previously recognized. Compared to other glacial records from High Asia, the observed patterns of past glaciations in Mongolia show similar results (i.e. ice maxima during interstadial wet phases) compared to monsoon influenced regions in southern Central Asia and NE-Tibet, while major expansion during insolation minima (MIS-4 and MIS-2) are more in tune with glacier responses known from western Central Asia and Siberia.

  5. Late quaternary vegetation development in south-central Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gruger, E.

    1972-01-01

    Pollen and macrofossil evidence for the nature of the vegetation during glacial and interglacial periods in the regions south of the Wisconsinan ice margin is still very scarce. Modern opinions concerning these problems are therefore predominantly derived from geological evidence only or are extrapolated from pollen studies of late Wisconsinan deposits. Now for the first time pollen and macrofossil analyses are available from south-central Illinois covering the Holocene, the entire Wisconsinan, and most probably also Sangamonian and late Illinoian time. The cores studied came from three lakes, which originated as kettle holes in glacial drift of Illinoian age near Vandalia, Fayette County. The Wisconsinan ice sheet approached the sites from the the north to within about 60 km distance only. One of the profiles (Pittsburg Basin) probably reaches back to the late Illinoian (zone 1), which was characterized by forests with much Picea. Zone 2, most likely of Sangamonian age, represents a period of species-rich deciduous forests, which must have been similar to the ones that thrive today south and southeast of the prairie peninsula. During the entire Wisconsinan (14C dates ranging from 38,000 to 21,000 BP) thermophilous deciduous trees like Quercus, Carya, and Ulmus occurred in the region, although temporarily accompanied by tree genera with a more northerly modern distribution, such as Picea, which entered and then left south-central Illinois during the Woodfordian. Thus it is evident that arctic climatic conditions did not prevail in the lowlands of south-central Illinois (about 38??30??? lat) during the Wisconsinan, even at the time of the maximum glaciation, the Woodfordian. The Wisconsinan was, however, not a period of continuous forest. The pollen assemblages of zone 3 (Altonian) indicate prairie with stands of trees, and in zone 4 the relatively abundant Artemisia pollen indicates the existence of open vegetation and stands of deciduous trees, Picea, and Pinus

  6. Late Quaternary alluvial fan terraces: Langshan, Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiangli; Zhang, Xujiao; He, Zexin; Jia, Liyun; Ye, Peisheng; Zhao, Junxiang

    2017-06-01

    Alluvial fan terraces of the Langshan Range in the northwestern Hetao Basin of northern China records uplift on range-bounding faults and late Quaternary climate change. Alluvial fan profiles are segmented in the central part of the range front, which lack strath terraces that developed in the southwest (SW) and northeast (NE) parts. The stream channels in the central part have higher channel gradients and lower ratios of the valley floor width to valley height (V). Four episodes of alluvial fan terraces were upstream from the range-bounding fault, which formation ages were estimated as 116, 64, 35, and 10 ka BP according to optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating combined with previous 14C and OSL ages. The correlation between time of the terraces formation and climatic fluctuations recorded in a Guliya ice core reveals that alluvial fan aggradation was concentrated during the cold stages and that incision occurred during the succeeding cold-to-warm transitions. A majority of alluvial fan terraces developed in accelerated uplift since 64 ka, which indicates that tectonic uplift provided the driving force for continuous downcutting after climatic change triggered it. Geomorphic indices (channel gradient and V) distribution reconstructs the model of discrepant uplift in the Langshan Range with the fastest uplift rate in the central part, which is controlled by range-bounding faults.

  7. Possible Late Quaternary faulting in the Benton Hills, southeastern Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, J.R.; Hoffman, D. . Dept. of Natural Resources)

    1993-03-01

    Geologic mapping in the 1930's by Dan Stewart and Lyle McManamy identified numerous faults in the Thebes Gap area of the Benton Hills, including two post-late Quaternary faults (max. of 10 m displacement) along the southeastern escarpment. Recent geologic mapping (Richard Harrison, pers. comm.) suggests dextral strike-slip displacement on most of these faults; some deformation post-dates the Pliocene-Pleistocene Mounds gravel. Small historical earthquake epicenters have been recorded in the Benton Hills area. Review of these data and analysis of the geologic and structural relationships to small- and large-scale drainage and alluvial features suggest tectonic control of the southeastern escarpment of the Benton Hills. The authors propose the coincidence of geologic structures and landforms resembles tectonically active alluvial basin margins, with the Benton Hills southeastern margin representing a fault block uplift escarpment. Future seismic reflection, drilling and trenching studies are planned to determine if the escarpment is fault controlled and of recent origin.

  8. Patterns of late Quaternary shelf-margin sedimentation, southwest Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, J.R.; Berryhill, H.L.

    1986-09-01

    Late Quaternary extension of the continental shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico has been largely accomplished by deposition at the shelf margin during sea level lowstands. The distribution and geometry of facies suggest that delta progradation during sea level fall and lowstand is a principal process for shelf accretion. Along the shelf margin of southwest Louisiana, sets of deltaic deposits corresponding to the last two lowstands of sea level have been mapped from high-resolution seismic profiles. Individual deltas extend farther than 5000 m/sup 2/ and are more than 160 m thick. Diapirism has had a controlling effect on sedimentation patterns of the shelf-margin deltas throughout their depositional histories. Shelf-margin deltas have also been the loci for the transfer of large volumes of sediment from the shelf to the upper slope by mass transport, with buried submarine troughs formed by retrogressive shelf-edge failure in association with major streams acting as conduits for sediment movement. In southwest Louisiana, mass transport deposits follow depressions formed by salt diapirism rather than creating broad aprons on the slope.

  9. Late Quaternary environments, vegetation and agriculture in northern New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horrocks, M.; Nichol, S. L.; Augustinus, P. C.; Barber, I. G.

    2007-03-01

    A sedimentological and plant microfossil history of the Late Quaternary is preserved in two sediment cores from early Polynesian ditch systems on southern Aupouri Peninsula. The study places human activities into a geomorphological and ecological context and allows comparison of natural and anthropogenic effects on two different geological settings: a floodplain and a relatively closed peat swamp. The data fill part of the current gap in the environmental record from northern New Zealand, namely MIS 3 (57k-26k yr BP). There is evidence for an increase in fire frequency in the region after 40k 14C yr BP, suggesting a shift to drier (and cooler) conditions. Pollen records show that conifer-hardwood forest dominated by podocarps (especially Dacrydium) prevailed prior to Polynesian arrival and deforestation within the last millennium, with Fuscopsora insignificant throughout. Both cores show sections with gaps in deposition or preservation, possible flood-stripping of peat during the pre-Holocene and mechanical disturbance by early Polynesians. The identification of prehistoric starch grains and other microremains of introduced Colocasia esculenta (taro) in both cores supports indirect evidence that the ditch systems of far northern New Zealand were used for the extensive cultivation of this crop. Copyright

  10. CO2 Climate-Glaciation linkages During the Late Paleozoic Ice Age and the Earth's Penultimate Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanez, I. P.

    2007-12-01

    The Late Paleozoic Ice Age (LPIA) was the longest-lived (330 to 260 Myr) and most intense glaciation of the past half-billion years. Emerging high-latitude Southern Hemisphere records document a much more dynamic ice age - one defined by multiple short-lived (1 to 7 myr duration) icehouse periods punctuated by warmer periods of glacial minima. These major climate shifts throughout the LPIA and its demise at the close of the Early Permian provide the only 'vegetated-Earth' analogues of major climate change in an icehouse. As our climate system departs from the well-studied Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles, a 'deep-time' perspective of pCO2-climate- glaciation linkages during past icehouse-to-greenhouse transitions provides a unique perspective into what may be the Earth's most epic deglaciation. Here we apply the carbon isotopic compositions of soil-formed carbonates and fossil plant material (cuticle, coals, charcoals) from several terrestrial basins in North America to a soil CO2-diffusion model and Monte Carlo modeling to estimate atmospheric pCO2 for the LPIA and its transition to the ensuing Mesozoic greenhouse state. Best estimates of Late Paleozoic pCO2 indicate repeated shifts from present-day levels to values of up to 2500 to 3000 ppmv during periods of glacial minima and possibly fully deglaciated greenhouse states. To evaluate the nature of the CO2-climate relationship during these major climate transitions, we developed a time-equivalent record of paleotropical sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) using δ18O values from a global compilation of well-preserved latest Permo-Carboniferous tropical shallow-water brachiopods. The observed covariance between shifts in inferred paleotropical SSTs, pCO2 and high- latitude Gondwanan glaciation implies a strong CO2-climate-glaciation linkage that is consistent with the range predicted by Permian climate simulations for a change in radiative CO2-forcing from 1 to 8 fold present-day levels. This apparent CO2

  11. Holarctic phylogeography of the root vole (Microtus oeconomus): implications for late Quaternary biogeography of high latitudes.

    PubMed

    Brunhoff, C; Galbreath, K E; Fedorov, V B; Cook, J A; Jaarola, M

    2003-04-01

    A species-wide phylogeographical study of the root vole (Microtus oeconomus) was performed using the whole 1140 base pair mitochondrial (mt) cytochrome b gene. We examined 83 specimens from 52 localities resulting in 65 unique haplotypes. Our results demonstrate that the root vole is divided into four main mtDNA phylogenetic lineages that seem to have largely allopatric distributions. Net divergence estimates (2.0-3.5%) between phylogroups, as well as relatively high nucleotide diversity estimates within phylogroups, indicate that the distinct phylogeographical structure was initiated by historical events that predated the latest glaciation. European root voles are divided into a Northern and a Central mtDNA phylogroup. The mtDNA data in concert with fossil records imply that root voles remained north of the classical refugial areas in southern Europe during the last glacial period. The currently fragmented populations in central Europe belong to a single mtDNA phylogroup. The Central Asian and the North European lineages are separated by the Ural Mountains, a phylogeographical split also found in collared lemmings (Dicrostonyx) and the common vole (M. arvalis). The Beringian lineage occurs from eastern Russia through Alaska to northwestern Canada. This distribution is congruent with the traditional boundaries of the Beringian refugium and with phylogeographical work on other organisms. In conclusion, similarities between the phylogeographical patterns in the root vole and other rodents, such as Arctic and subarctic lemmings, as well as more temperate vole species, indicate that late Quaternary geological and climatic events played a strong role in structuring northern biotic communities.

  12. The late Quaternary history of lodgepole and jack pines

    Treesearch

    William B. Critchfield

    1985-01-01

    Lodgepole and jack pines (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex. Loud, and Pinus banksiana Lamb.), components of the North American boreal forest, have pioneering roles after major disturbances such as fire or glaciation. These species are closely related and hybridize in western Canada, but their fossil records and contemporary variation...

  13. Late Quaternary sackungen in the highest mountains of the Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pánek, Tomáš; Mentlík, Pavel; Engel, Zbyněk; Braucher, Règis; Zondervan, Albert

    2017-03-01

    Sackungen represents a common mode of deep-seated rock-slope failures in alpine landscapes, but proof of their temporal and causal relationship to extrinsic factors such as climatic changes, glacier retreat or seismic activity remains elusive. Based on the terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) dating of 18 sackung scarps supported by one radiocarbon-dated scarp, we reconstructed the post-glacial chronology of sackungen in the Tatra Mts. (central Europe, Slovakia and Poland), the highest part of the Carpathians. The obtained ages (∼15.7-4.3 ka) indicate that sackungen post-date the regional LGM and some of them originated soon after the glacier withdrawal from adjacent valleys. Furthermore, systematic decrease of scarp ages with their increasing altitude suggests a direct link between sackung origin and post-LGM glacier thinning. However, substantial lag (>5 ka) of some sackungen in respect to glacier retreat implies complex relationships between sackung onset and deglaciation where retreat of glaciers acted predominantly as a preparatory, not a triggering factor during the genesis of these slope deformations. They originated either as a consequence of stress relaxation within the rock mass lasting several ka or alternatively could be triggered by climatic processes or seismicity. Indeed, a significant part of sackung activity took place during predominantly warmer and more humid periods, with some dates coinciding with the Bølling-Allerød chronozone, but especially with the onset of the Holocene and the Holocene Climatic Optimum. Earthquake triggering is less probable, as the Tatra Mts. lack significant modern and historic seismic activity and there is no geomorphic evidence of fault offsets on the Late Quaternary landforms. In concert with other recent studies, we propose that large rock slope failures in high mountains seldom react immediately to glacier withdrawal, but could display temporal delay lasting up to several millennia.

  14. Late Quaternary geology of the Lower Central Plain, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinsakul, Sin

    2000-08-01

    The Lower Central Plain or Chao Phraya Plain, located in the upper Gulf of Thailand, has an average elevation of 2 m above the present mean sea level. It is a fault bounded basin developed in the Plio-Pleistocene epoch. Consequently, the basin has been filled with Quaternary sediment reaching a thickness of almost 2000 m, of which only the upper 300 m is known. The Pleistocene deposits of the Lower Central Plain represent a complex interplay of alluvial, fluvial and deltaic environments of the Chao Phraya River and its tributaries. The upper sequence of sand and stiff clay with iron-oxide concretions on the surface was deposited in a fluviatile environment subjected to a regressive period in the late Pleistocene. The term "Chao Phraya delta" is used to define the landform where the Chao Phraya River interacted with marine processes as the sea level changed during the Holocene transgression. These strata indicated that the Holocene sea reached its maximum height of 4 m above the present mean sea level around 6000 years B.P.; from then on sea level fluctuated until it reached its present level around 1500 years B.P. This complex sea level history has caused the progradation of tidal flat, and tide-dominated delta deposits, consisting of soft marine clay, that covered the Lower Central Plain to an average depth of 15 m in the Bangkok area. The soft marine clay or Bangkok clay is the most important unit in the stratigraphic sequence in terms of land subsidence in the Lower Central Plain. Evidence of coastal erosion is also considerable in the low tidal flat area on the west bank of the Chao Phraya River mouth and adjacent coast.

  15. Late Quaternary denudation, Death and Panamint Valleys, eastern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jayko, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    Late Quaternary denudation rates are constrained from alluvial fans and tributary watersheds in central Death and Panamint Valleys. Preliminary results suggest that the denudation rate is in part a function of the mean watershed elevation. Rainfall increases semi-logarithmically with higher elevation to about 2500 m where it becomes limited by the regional average maximum moisture content of the air mass. The fan volumes show a power-law relation to the watershed areas. The fan volumes ranged from about 250,000 to 4000 km3 and the watershed areas range from about 60,000 to 2000 km2. The upper limit of the denudation rates estimated from small Death Valley fans restricted to the east side of the basin along the Black Mountain frontal scarp range between about 0.03 to 0.18 mm/yr. The maximum is made by assuming most of the clastic accumulation in these fans followed the last highstand of Lake Manly around 24,000 yr which is the least conservative condition. The upper limit of the denudation rates from the Panamint fans range from 0.04 to 0.20 mm/yr assuming the accumulation mainly postdates OIS-4 ???60,000 yr or OIS-2 ???20,000 yr based on the presence or absence of inset shorelines from the last glacial-pluvial maximum. The greater denudation rate associated with the higher mean watershed elevations can mainly be attributed to the greater rainfall at higher elevation. Denudation rates are about a third or less of the Neogene dip-slip rates reported from nearby active faults consistent with relief increasing during dryer periods. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Late Quaternary Productivity Records from Coccolith Sr/Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, H. M.; Burke, A.; Mejia Ramirez, L. M.; Shimizu, N.; Ziveri, P. P. I.

    2014-12-01

    The Sr/Ca of coccoliths has been proposed as an indicator of productivity on the basis of correlation with export production in sediment traps and across upwelling productivity gradients, although the mechanism responsable for this relationship is not clear. For diverse oceanographic settings in the Late Quaternary, we compare coccolith Sr/Ca productivity records with those of other productivity indicators and proxies for mechanisms of productivity forcing. For the Somalia Basin in the Arabian Sea, coccolith Sr/Ca shows a large variation coherent with precessional forcing of wind strength as a mechanism for productivity regulation. During the glacial, the Sr/Ca peak is decoupled from productivity indicators based on organic C accumulation rate. For the Northern Bay of Bengal, coccolith Sr/Ca, Ba/Ti, and relative abundance of G. bulloides, all suggest greater productivity during the interglacial periods, consisted with Nd isotopic evidence for greater riverine nutrient inputs. In the Andaman Sea, coccolith Sr/Ca is highest during precessional maxima in the summer monsoon, consistent with proxies for chemical weathering in the Irawaddy rivershed. In the Eastern Mediterranean, coccolith Sr/Ca is on average low, and peaks during the E. Holocene interval characterized by deposition of sapropel S1. The peak in Sr/Ca however is comparable to the level maintained throughout the Holocene in the Western Mediterranean, where no sapropel occurs, implicating deepwater oxygen levels as a significant contributor to sapropel formation. Finally, on the Agulhas Bank, minima in coccolith Sr/Ca occur during obliquity minima which are periods of anomalous equatorward deposition of IRD in the Southern Ocean. Northward explansion of the westerly wind field during these cold intervals, block upwelling on the Agulhas Bank and result in low productivity.

  17. Late Pleistocene Magnitude Glacial Incursions of Southern Component Water to the Deep North Atlantic Resolved Using Nd Isotopes during the Intensification of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (3.3 to 2.4 Ma)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, D.; Bailey, I.; Wilson, P. A.; Foster, G. L.; Gutjahr, M.

    2014-12-01

    The ocean, through its ability to globally redistribute heat and partition carbon dioxide, is believed to play a key role in driving and amplifying climate change during Quaternary glaciations on orbital to millennial timescales. Relatively little is known, however, about changes in Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) associated with the Pliocene intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation (iNHG). To help fill this gap in our knowledge we present a new high resolution (~6 ka) record of the Nd isotope composition of the deep North Atlantic between ~3.3 and 2.4 Ma, measured on fish debris at IODP Site U1313 (3426 m, 41°N, 32.5°W). This record represents the first orbital-resolution record of variations in watermass mixing in this region for iNHG independent of changes in the carbon cycle and, in contrast to existing benthic foraminiferal δ13C records for this time interval, our Nd dataset contains evidence for late Pleistocene magnitude incursions of Southern Component Waters to the deep North Atlantic Ocean during key glacial periods through this time. We therefore infer an important role for AMOC variability in amplifying Quaternary glacial-interglacial cycles

  18. Late Quaternary rates of stream incision in Northeast Peloponnese, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karymbalis, Efthimios; Papanastassiou, Dimitrios; Gaki-Papanastassiou, Kalliopi; Ferentinou, Maria; Chalkias, Christos

    2016-09-01

    This study focuses on defining rates of fluvial incision for the last 580±5 kyr along valley systems of eight streams that drain the eastern part of the northern Peloponnese. The streams are developed on the uplifted block of the offshore-running Xylokastro normal fault, one of the main faults bounding the southern edge of the Gulf of Corinth half-graben, and have incised a set of ten uplifted marine terraces having an amphitheatric shape. These terraces range in age from 60±5 kyr to 580±5 kyr and have been mapped in detail and correlated with late Pleistocene oxygen-isotope stages of high sea-level stands by previous studies. The terraces were used in this paper as reference surfaces in order to define fluvial incision rates at the lower reaches of the studied streams. To evaluate incision rates, thirty-three topographic valley cross-sections were drawn using fieldwork measurements as well as using a highly accurate (2×2 cell size) Digital Elevation Model (DEM) at specific locations where streams cut down the inner edges of the marine terraces. For each cross-section the ratio of valley floor width to valley height (Vf) and long-term mean stream incision rates were estimated for the last 580±5 kyr, while rock uplift rates were estimated for the last 330±5 kyr. The geomorphic evolution of the valleys on the uplifted block of the Xylokastro fault has been mainly driven by the lithology of the bedrock, sea level fluctuations during the late Quaternary, and incision of the channels due to the tectonic uplift. Stream incision rates range from 0.10±0.1 mm/yr for the last 123±7 kyr to 1.14±0.1 mm/yr for the last 310±5 kyr and are gradually greater from east to west depending on the distance from the trace of the fault. Downcutting rates are comparable with the rock uplift rates, which range from 0.4±0.02 mm/yr to 1.49±0.12 mm/yr, over the last 330±5 kyr.

  19. Ice-free conditions on the queen charlotte islands, british columbia, at the height of late wisconsin glaciation.

    PubMed

    Warner, B G; Mathewes, R W; Clague, J J

    1982-11-12

    New radiocarbon dates and plant macrofossil data establish that parts of the Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia, were ice-free during and subsequent to the late Wisconsin glacial maximum on the Pacific coast of Canada. A paleoecological investigation of dated sediments at Cape Ball has indicated that a varied flora consisting of terrestrial and aquatic plants was present there about 16,000 years ago. This finding provides support for the existence of a heretofore questioned biotic refugium on the Queen Charlotte Islands during the last glaciation. These results shed new light on problems of glacial chronology, climatic change, biogeography, and archeology along the western margin of North America.

  20. The Late Eocene 187Os / 188Os excursion: Chemostratigraphy, cosmic dust flux and the Early Oligocene glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalai, Tarun K.; Ravizza, Gregory E.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.

    2006-01-01

    High resolution records (ca. 100 kyr) of Os isotope composition ( 187Os / 188Os) in bulk sediments from two tropical Pacific sites (ODP Sites 1218 and 1219) capture the complete Late Eocene 187Os / 188Os excursion and confirm that the Late Eocene 187Os / 188Os minimum, earlier reported by Ravizza and Peucker-Ehrenbrink [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 210 (2003) 151-165], is a global feature. Using the astronomically tuned age models available for these sites, it is suggested that the Late Eocene 187Os / 188Os minimum can be placed at 34.5 ± 0.1 Ma in the marine records. In addition, two other distinct features of the 187Os / 188Os excursion that are correlatable among sections are proposed as chemostratigraphic markers which can serve as age control points with a precision of ca. ± 0.1 Myr. We propose a speculative hypothesis that higher cosmic dust flux in the Late Eocene may have contributed to global cooling and Early Oligocene glaciation (Oi-1) by supplying bio-essential trace elements to the oceans and thereby resulting in higher ocean productivity, enhanced burial of organic carbon and draw down of atmospheric CO 2. To determine if the hypothesis that enhanced cosmic dust flux in the Late Eocene was a cause for the 187Os / 188Os excursion can be tested by using the paired bulk sediment and leachate Os isotope composition; 187Os / 188Os were also measured in sediment leachates. Results of analyses of leachates are inconsistent between the south Atlantic and the Pacific sites, and therefore do not yield a robust test of this hypothesis. Comparison of 187Os / 188Os records with high resolution benthic foraminiferal δ18O records across the Eocene-Oligocene transition suggests that 187Os flux to the oceans decreased during cooling and ice growth leading to the Oi-1 glaciation, whereas subsequent decay of ice-sheets and deglacial weathering drove seawater 187Os / 188Os to higher values. Although the precise timing and magnitude of these changes in weathering fluxes

  1. Vegetation ecotone dynamics in Southwest Alaska during the Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brubaker, Linda B.; Anderson, Patricia M.; Hu, Feng Sheng

    2001-01-01

    To examine Late Quaternary vegetation change across the modern vegetation gradient from continuous boreal forest (central Alaska) to Betula shrub tundra (Bristol Bay region), pollen records from Idavain and Snipe Lakes are described and compared to those of four other sites in southwest Alaska. Major features of the vegetation history at Idavain Lake include herb-dominated tundra (ca 14-12 ka BP), mixed herb/ Betula shrub tundra (ca 12-8 ka BP), and Alnus/Betula shrub tundra (8 ka BP to present). The Snipe Lake record reveals a brief period of herb tundra (>12 ka BP), Betula shrub tundra (ca 12-8.5 ka BP), and Picea forest mixed with Alnus/Betula shrub tundra (ca 8 ka BP to present). Comparisons with other pollen records indicate that southwest Alaska has been the location of major vegetation ecotones throughout the last 12 ka years. Northern areas have consistently been dominated by larger growth forms (shrubs or trees) than have southern areas. During the Betula period (12-8 ka BP), a dense Betula shrubland occupied central Alaska, changing to a mixed low- Betula shrub and herb tundra in the south. In the Alnus/Picea period (8 ka BP to present), Picea and Betula trees were more common to the north; Alnus and Betula shrubs more abundant to the south. Vegetation dynamics have been complex at individual sites and across the region. Each site shows both long- and short-term shifts in major taxa, but the magnitude of these changes varies across the transect. In addition, some pollen changes appear to be synchronous among sites (within the constraints of existing chronologies), whereas others are strikingly time transgressive across the region. Similar vegetation dynamics at all sites are: (1) long-term decreases in herb taxa during the Betula period, (2) short-term oscillations between Betula shrubs and herbs during the Betula period, and (3) major increase in Alnus shrubs ca 8 ka BP. Significant differences among sites include: (1) major expansion of Populus trees in

  2. Paleolatitudinal changes in vertical facies transitions recording late Paleozoic glaciations: a case study from eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, C. R.; Frank, T. D.; Shultis, A. I.

    2011-12-01

    Stratigraphic records of the complex and multi-phase late Paleozoic Ice Age (LPIA) have been examined over a 2000 km paleo-polar to paleo-mid latitude transect from Tasmania to Queensland, eastern Australia. In this presentation, we summarize changes in facies assemblages within glacial and nonglacial epochs and the transitions between them, within the coastal to shallow marine Permian succession. In the earliest Permian P1 glacial interval, facies represent proximal proglacial to locally glacial environments in Tasmania (TAS), and an array of mainly marine proglacial to glacimarine environments in New South Wales (NSW) and Queensland (QLD). A trend of more ice-proximal to less ice-proximal facies assemblages is evident from south to north. The end of P1 is represented both by abrupt flooding trends in some areas and by thicker intervals of more gradually fining-upward facies recording progressive deepening elsewhere. The onset of the Sakmarian/Artinskian P2 glacial interval is best-exposed in southern NSW, where an abrupt change to marine proglacial facies is accompanied by evidence for deepening, suggesting isostatic loading of the sedimentary surface. P2 glacial facies are more proximal in NSW than in QLD. Both P1 and P2 intervals preserve complex internal stratigraphy, in many cases recording multiple glacial-interglacial cycles. The close of P2 is again recorded in a variety of ways, with many sections showing a gradual fining-upward and decrease in indicators of glacial conditions. The Kungurian to Capitanian P3 and P4 glacial intervals are in general represented by less proximal facies than their predecessors, typically intervals of outsize clast-bearing mudrocks and sandstones. These in many areas show diffuse boundaries with the nonglacial facies that enclose them. Furthermore, no significant paleolatitudinal changes in the P3 and P4 facies assemblages are evident from TAS to QLD. The documented patterns support the view that the P1 glacial represents the

  3. Late Quaternary Megafaunal Extinctions in Northern Eurasia: Latest Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Anthony

    2010-05-01

    Anthony J. Stuart1 & Adrian M. Lister2 1 Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, UK. Email: tony.s@megafauna.org.uk 2 Department of Palaeontology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK. Email: a.lister@nhm.ac.uk. The global extinction of many spectacular species of megafauna (large terrestrial mammals, together with a few large reptiles and birds) within the last c. 50,000 years (Late Quaternary) has been attributed on the one hand to ‘overkill' by human hunters and on the other to environmental change. However, in spite of more than half a century of active interest and research the issue remains unresolved, largely because there are insufficient dated records of megafaunal species for most parts of the world. Northern Eurasia is an especially fruitful region in which to research megafaunal extinctions as it has a wealth of megafaunal material and crucially most extinctions occurred well within the range of radiocarbon dating. Our approach, in a series of projects over the last decade funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), involves amassing radiocarbon dates made directly on megafaunal material from across the entire region: a) by submitting a substantial number of samples (so far c. 500 dates) for AMS dating at Oxford (ORAU); b) obtaining AMS dates from colleagues working on aDNA projects; and c) carefully screening (‘auditing') dates from the literature. The dates (calibrated using OxCal) are plotted as time-sliced maps and as chronological/geographical charts. In our previous work we targeted a range of extinct species from Northern Eurasia: woolly mammoth, woolly rhinoceros, giant deer, cave bear (in collaboration with Martina Pacher), cave lion, and spotted hyaena (which survives today only in Sub-Saharan Africa). By this means we have established a reliable chronology for these extinctions which we are able to compare with the climatic, vegetational and

  4. Late Quaternary accretion and decline of syngenetic ice-rich permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterich, Sebastian; Strauss, Jens; Fuchs, Margret C.; Schirrmeister, Lutz

    2016-04-01

    The region of perennially frozen ground constitutes one quarter of the northern hemisphere landmass. Negative annual mean air temperatures and ground freezing periods exceeding ground thaw periods are the prerequisites for downward freezing of loose deposits and bedrock in non-glaciated regions. Hence, permafrost distribution and thickness on Earth are closely related to late Quaternary climate variations and ecosystem modifications. Generally, glacial stages are expected to promote permafrost accretion and ground ice formation in accumulating sediments, whereas interglacial stages lead to intense permafrost thaw and ground-ice melt. Deep freezing synchronous with ongoing sedimentation is termed as syngenetic while epigenetic freezing occurs in pre-existing deposits. Typical landforms of syngenetic permafrost are ice-wedge polygons of past tundra environments. Ice-rich silty and/or peaty deposits intersected by large ice wedges (up to several decameters in height and meters in with) build-up unique Ice Complex (IC) strata, which are aligned to mid- and late Pleistocene stadial and interstadial stages. The most prominent example for such formations is the Yedoma IC of MIS 3 interstadial age. Increasing air and ground temperatures during warm stages disturbed the thermal equilibrium at the upper permafrost boundary and subsequently led to permafrost thaw, ground-ice melt and surface subsidence. Typical permafrost degradation processes are thermokarst and thermo-erosion that result in large lake-filled basins (up to kilometers in diameter) and valley structures, respectively. The modern periglacial surface in Alaskan and East Siberian lowlands preserves Yedoma IC remnants in uplands and hills next to widely-distributed thermokarst basins since lateglacial and Holocene warming affected up to 70% of the original IC distribution on an area of more than 1,000,000 km2. The overarching climate-driven pattern of cold-stage IC permafrost accretion and warm-stage IC permafrost

  5. Late Quaternary dynamics of a South African floodplain wetland and the implications for assessing recent human impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tooth, S.; Rodnight, H.; McCarthy, T. S.; Duller, G. A. T.; Grundling, A. T.

    2009-05-01

    Knowledge of the long-term geomorphological dynamics of wetlands is limited, so currently there is an inadequate scientific basis for assessing anthropogenically induced changes and for developing conservation, remediation, and/or sustainable management guidelines for these fragile ecosystems. Along the upper Klip River, eastern South Africa, geomorphological and sedimentological investigations, geochronology, and remote sensing have been used to establish the late Quaternary dynamics of some internationally important floodplain wetlands, thus providing a reference condition against which to assess the extent of recent human impacts. Optically stimulated luminescence dating reveals that the wetlands have developed over at least the last 30 ky as a result of slow meander migration (< 0.2 m y - 1 ), irregular cutoff events, and infrequent avulsions (approximately one every 3-6 ky) that have occurred autogenically as a natural part of meander-belt development. Following European settlement in the Klip valley (late nineteenth century), however, modifications to local flora and fauna, as well as the initiation of local wetland drainage schemes, have had major impacts. In particular, proliferation of exotic willows and associated debris jams, and the artificial excavation of a 1.2-km-long channel section across the wetlands have initiated an ongoing avulsion that is characterised by failure (gradual abandonment) of the main channel and rapid incision of a headcutting channel. Compared to the pre-settlement condition, little change in lateral migration activity has occurred, but this avulsion provides a clear example of anthropogenically accelerated change, occurring only ~ 1 ky after the last natural avulsion and in a part of the wetlands where avulsions have not occurred previously. Subsequent human interventions have included installing weirs in an attempt to control the resulting erosion and promote reflooding, but ongoing maintenance has been required. In areas that

  6. New results on Late Quaternary stratigraphy of Manych depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurbanov, Redzhep; Yanina, Tamara; Borisova, Olga

    2017-04-01

    Cardium edule, Abra ovata) and Caspian (Didacna cristata) fauna. Above lies layer with clay deposits including shells of Didacna (Didacna hyrcana, D. cristata) which symbolized Hirkanian transgression of the Caspian Sea. Upwards through the precise borderline there is silty-loam deposits with shells of freshwater mollusks genus Viviparus, Valvata, Dreissena, Lymnaea. This kind of shells attests the period of freshwater Burtass lake. Burtass lacustrine deposits are overlayed by continental loam with an abundance of carbonates and visible gypsum nodulars. This layer is covered by aqueous loam with detritus and shell fragments. On the top of the section lies the subaerial origin silty layer. The preliminary scheme of the sequence of paleogeographic events in Pleistocene is complied. The beginning of Late Pleistocene is marked by the penetration of marine water deep within the Manych Depression during the Black Sea interglacial transgression (Karangat Trangression, MIS 5e). The character trait of marine water through this period is relatively high salinity (18-20 ‰), that favors the development of Black Sea mollusks. During the transition to the glacial epoch (MIS 5d-a) the marine waters oh Karangat bay had begun retreated back into the Black Sea basin. In the end of this stage there was a strait called Hirkanian, which had desalted brackish waters (8-10‰) of the Caspian sea. The marine epoch in the central part of the Manych depression changed to the durable lacustrine phase of development in the second half of Late Pleistocene (MIS 4-3), Burtass lake existed there. In the beginning of its existence it was flowing through (it so because of the major of fresh- and calmwater mollusks in the base of the layer). During the continental stage there was an active erosion damage of the burtass deposits. Through this period were formed specific landscape forms - extended ridges - which finally formed in the epoch of degradation of the last glaciation and Khvalynian water removing

  7. Structure and dynamics of ecosystems during the recent glaciations of the Quaternary in Medio-European and Mediterranean areas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrieu-Ponel, Valerie

    2010-05-01

    The ecological interpretation of pollen data from last glacial times in Western Europe remains difficult, probably because well preserved and continuous records are scarce and often analysed in low resolution (both chronologically and taxonomically). Moreover datings older than 40 ka are questionable. Another crucial point is the lack of modern ecosystems analogues, even at high latitude or high altitude. Lastly, the diversity of depositional environments (lacustrine, fluviatile, eolian) of glacial pollen archives contribute to blur the ecological and climatic signal. We present here the results of recent high time resolution analyses (pollen, geochemical markers) from the glacial section (OIS 4, 3 and 2) of the EC1 lacustrine sequence of Les Echets (foothill of the French Alps, alt. 267 m.). The biological and geochemical data testify to the strong climate instability during the last glaciation, marked with an alternance of 1) cold phases characterized by an arctico-boreal vegetation made of grasslands with Poaceae, Artemisia and various steppic herbs, 2) less cold phases, characterized by the return of open forests of taïga type, dominated by Pinus, Betula and Juniperus. The age model obtained from the glacial section of EC1 (Wolhfarth and al., 2008) enables to date the biological events recorded in this continental sequence, using a chronology independent of those acquired in marine or polar cores. The duration of these events is also estimated. This sketch needs of course to be discussed in the light of future new chronologies proposed for the same period from new continental lacustrine sequences. The comparison of pollen records of Les Echets with other european glacial sequences shows that during the "warmest" periods of the last glaciation (OIS3, Middle Würm), deciduous and sclerophyllous forest persisted in the Mediterranean regions.

  8. Late Quaternary activity of the Grote Brogel fault, NE Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanneste, Kris; Deckers, Jef; Van Noten, Koen; Schiltz, Marco; Lecocq, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The Grote Brogel fault (GBF) is a WNW-ESE striking normal fault that is part of the western border fault system of the Roer Valley Graben in NE Belgium. It is one of three faults branching NW-ward from the main border fault (Geleen fault) near Bree, but its orientation diverges 22° from the general NW-SE orientation of the graben, causing a wide left step. Unlike the Geleen fault, the surface expression of the GBF has not been investigated in detail so far. We studied the Quaternary activity of the GBF and its effects on the local hydrology based on a high-resolution LiDAR digital terrain model (DTM), and geophysical and geological surveying at two sites, combining Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), Cone Penetration Tests (CPTs) and boreholes. The GBF defines the northern edge of the Campine Plateau, an elevated area covered by the late Early to Middle Pleistocene Main Terrace of the Meuse River. Cumulative vertical offset since deposition of this terrace has resulted in a distinct 10-km-long fault scarp, the height of which decreases from 11 m near Bree in the east to less than 5 m near Grote Brogel in the west. The along-strike evolution of offset suggests that the GBF does not define an individual rupture segment, but is likely contiguous with the Geleen fault. DTM analysis indicates that scarps are only preserved in a few isolated places, and that the surface trace is rather complex, consisting of a series of short, relatively straight sections with strikes varying between 255° and 310°, arranged in a generally left-stepping pattern. At both investigated sites, ERT profiles clearly demonstrate the presence of fault splays in the shallow subsurface (< 50 m) underneath the identified scarps evidenced by a sudden increase in depth and thickness of a high-resistivity unit on top of a lower-resistivity unit. Boreholes and CPTs allow correlating the high-resistivity unit with the medium to coarse gravel-bearing sands of the Meuse Group, and the lower

  9. Reconstruction of the extent and variability of late Quaternary ice sheets and Arctic sea ice: Insights from new mineralogical and geochemical proxy records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, R. H.; Niessen, F.; Fahl, K.; Forwick, M.; Kudriavtseva, A.; Ponomarenko, E.; Prim, A. K.; Quatmann-Hense, A.; Spielhagen, R. F.; Zou, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean and surrounding continents are key areas within the Earth system and very sensitive to present and past climate change. In this context, the timing and extent of circum-Arctic ice sheets and its interaction with oceanic and sea-ice dynamics are major interest and focus of international research. New sediment cores recovered during the Polarstern Expeditions PS87 (Lomonosov Ridge/2014) and PS93.1 (Fram Strait/2015) together with several sediment cores available from previous Polarstern expeditions allow to carry out a detailed sedimentological and geochemical study that may help to unravel the changes in Arctic sea ice and circum-Arctic ice sheets during late Quaternary times. Our new data include biomarkers indicative for past sea-ice extent, phytoplankton productivity and terrigenous input as well as grain size, physical property, XRD and XRF data indicative for sources and pathways of terrigenous sediments (ice-rafted debris/IRD) related to glaciations in Eurasia, East Siberia, Canada and Greenland. Here, we present examples from selected sediment cores that give new insights into the timing and extent of sea ice and glaciations during MIS 6 to MIS 2. To highlight one example: SE-NW oriented, streamlined landforms have been mapped on top of the southern Lomonosov Ridge (LR) at water depths between 800 and 1000 m over long distances during Polarstern Expedition PS87, interpreted to be glacial lineations that formed beneath grounded ice sheets and ice streams. The orientations of the lineations identified are similar to those on the East Siberian continental margin, suggesting an East Siberian Chukchi Ice Sheet extended far to the north on LR during times of extreme Quaternary glaciations. Based on our new biomarker records from Core PS2757 (located on LR near 81°N) indicating a MIS 6 ice-edge situation with some open-water phytoplankton productivity, the glacial erosional event should have been older than MIS 6 (e.g., MIS 12?).

  10. Constraints on the duration and magnitude of Late Ordovician-Early Silurian glaciation and its relationship to the Late Ordovician mass extinction from carbonate ``clumped'' isotope paleothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnegan, S.; Bergmann, K. D.; Eiler, J.; Jones, D. S.; Fike, D. A.; Eisenman, I. L.; Hughes, N.; Tripati, A. K.; Fischer, W. W.

    2010-12-01

    The second most severe mass extinction in the Phanerozoic fossil record occurred near the end of the Ordovician Period (~443.7 Mya). Although this episode is thought to be linked to cooling and glaciation of the southern supercontinent of Gondwana, the precise nature of the relationship between extinction and climate change has been obscured by persistent uncertainties about the timing of glaciation, the magnitude of the Gondwanan ice sheet(s), and the impact of global cooling on tropical ocean temperatures. Here we use carbonate “clumped” isotope paleothermometry, in combination with classical oxygen isotope paleothermometry, to place new constraints on these variables. We used textural analysis (light and scanning electron microscopy) and trace element analysis to evaluate preservation quality in a large and taxonomically diverse suite of Late Ordovician and Early Silurian calcitic fossils from tropical paleolatitudes in Laurentia (U.S. midcontinent and Anticosti Island, Canada). Using the best-preserved material to reconstruct tropical near-surface ocean temperature (SST) trends, we find temperatures in the 33-37° C range throughout most of Late Ordovician-Early Silurian time. During the terminal Ordovician Hirnantian stage, however, a sharp ~5° C drop coincided with a major eustatic regression, a globally recognized positive carbon isotope excursion, and the main pulse of mass extinction. Controlling for temperature allows us to reconstruct trends in the isotopic composition of seawater. These indicate that glaciation was protracted, beginning before and continuing well after Hirnatian time, but reached a maximum in the Hirnantian with ice volumes equal to or exceeding those of the last Pleistocene glacial maximum. The coexistence of substantial continental ice sheets with very warm tropical SSTs throughout much of Late Ordovician-Early Silurian time implies that the meridional temperature gradient during this interval may have been steeper than during

  11. The ``Problem of the quaternary'' and the taxonomic rank of the late cenozoic in the international stratigraphic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubakov, V. A.

    2011-02-01

    An international scientific conflict has arisen around the International Stratigraphic Scale, the main document that regulates the rules of reading of geological records and, hence, concerns all Earth sciences. The matter of debate is the geological time scale of 2004, developed by the International Commission on Stratigraphy, where the Quaternary system was abandoned. This ICS decision triggered a protest among Quaternary geologists, members of INQUA, and became the subject of much controversy. This article provides a comprehensive analysis of the Quaternary problem and proposes a reasonable scientific solution that may be appropriate for both parties. The subject of Late Cenozoic geology is discussed: glaciations, human evolution, and recent deposits. In contrast to Charles Lyell's definition of the Plio-Pleistocene according to the percentage of modern mollusk species, it is defined here as a blanket formation, which is correlative to the topography and consists of mapped stratogens hosting fossils of modern biogeocenoses. Features of the description of the Plio-Pleistocene in terms of gravitational orbital tuning are considered. Four paleogeographic phases of modern environment evolution are recognized and ranked as stages: (1) The Messinian evolutionary explosion involved the appearance of many biogeocenoses and the bipedal walking of our extinct ancestors armed with sticks. It was a consequence of the Early Greenland (7.6 Ma BP) and Patagonian (6.7 Ma BP) hyperglaciations. (2) The Zanclean age is marked by climatic and hydrological but not evolutionary boundaries. (3) The appearance of the Villafranchian animal assemblage and Australopithecus, who used stones as weapon: 4.0-3.6 Ma BP. Orogeny and isolation of the Arctic Ocean changed the global climate dramatically. (4) The sexual revolution became the third evolutionary jump: the appearance of the first woman, "Eve", and the genus Homo with her: 1.9 Ma BP. According to the current view, the Plio

  12. Map of glacial limits and possible refugia in the southern Alexander Archipelago, Alaska, during the late Wisconsin glaciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carrara, Paul E.; Ager, Thomas A.; Baichtal, James F.; VanSistine, D. Paco

    2003-01-01

    During the late Wisconsin glaciation (circa 26,000-13,000 carbon-14 yr BP) the Cordilleran glacier complex formed vast ice fields and large glaciers along the crest of the Coast Mountains. As these glaciers flowed west to the Pacific Ocean, they were joined by local glaciers originating on the higher reaches of the Alexander Archipelago (Mann and Hamiltion, 1995). This extensive volume of ice was channeled into deep troughs (present-day fiords) that formed major outlet glaciers, such as the glaciers that occupied Chatham Strait and Dixon Entrance. In several places along the coast, deep glacially scoured submarine troughs indicate that glaciers reached to the edge of the continental shelf. For instance, the glacier that extended into the Dixon Entrance trough is known to have extended to the edge of the continental shelf. Its retreat began sometime after 16,000-15,000 carbon-14 yr BP (Barrie and Conway, 1999).

  13. Late Quaternary geomorphic history of a glacial landscape - new sedimentary and chronological data from the Cordillera de Cochabamba (Bolivia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, J.-H.; Preusser, F.; Zech, R.; Ilgner, J.; Veit, H.

    2009-04-01

    Throughout the Central Andes, glacial landscapes have long been used for the reconstruction of Late Quaternary glaciations and landscape evolution. Much work has focused on the Andes in Peru, Chile and the Bolivian Altiplano, whereas relatively little data has been published on glaciation history in the eastern Andean ranges and slopes. Even less is known with regard to the postglacial evolution of these glacial landscapes. In the Cordillera de Cochabamba (Bolivia), local maximum advances probably peaked around 20-25 ka BP and were followed by significant readvances between ~12-16 ka BP. This generally points to temperature controlled maximum glacial advances along the humid eastern slopes of the Central Andes, which is supported by glacier-climate-modelling studies. However, most studies include only marginal information with regard to the complex geomorphic and sedimentary situation in the Cordillera de Cochabamba. Furthermore, the chronological results are afflicted with several methodological uncertainties inherent to surface exposure dating and call for application of alternative, independent age dating methods. Therefore this study aims at i) documenting and interpreting the complex glacial geomorphology of the Huara Loma valley in the Cordillera de Cochabamba (Bolivia), ii) analyzing the involved units of glacial sediments, and iii) improving the chronological framework by applying optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and radiocarbon dating (14C). For this purpose, geomorphic mapping was combined with field documentation of sedimentary profiles. The involved sediments were subject to geochemical and mineralogical analysis in order to deduce information on their erosional and weathering histories. In addition, the interpretation of OSL ages from glacial and proglacial sediments integrated several methodological procedures with regard to sample preparation and statistical analysis of the measurements in order to increase the degree of confidence. These

  14. Late quaternary faulting along the Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault system, California and Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Brogan, G.E.; Kellogg, K.S.; Terhune, C.L.; Slemmons, D.B.

    1991-12-31

    The Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault system, in California and Nevada, has a variety of impressive late Quaternary neotectonic features that record a long history of recurrent earthquake-induced faulting. Although no neotectonic features of unequivocal historical age are known, paleoseismic features from multiple late Quaternary events of surface faulting are well developed throughout the length of the system. Comparison of scarp heights to amount of horizontal offset of stream channels and the relationships of both scarps and channels to the ages of different geomorphic surfaces demonstrate that Quaternary faulting along the northwest-trending Furnace Creek fault zone is predominantly right lateral, whereas that along the north-trending Death Valley fault zone is predominantly normal. These observations are compatible with tectonic models of Death Valley as a northwest- trending pull-apart basin.

  15. The influence of climate on species distribution over time and space during the late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, F.; Di Febbraro, M.; Melchionna, M.; Castiglione, S.; Saggese, F.; Serio, C.; Mondanaro, A.; Passaro, F.; Loy, A.; Raia, P.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the effect of climate on the composition of communities and its change over time and space is one of the major aims in ecology and paleoecology. Herein, we tackled on this issue by studying late Quaternary large mammal paleocommunities of Eurasia. The late Quaternary was a period of strong environmental instability, especially characterized by the occurrence of the last glacial maximum (LGM). We used community phylogenetics and joint species distribution models in order to understand the factors determining paleocommunity composition in the late Quaternary. Our results support the existence of strong climatic selection operating on the LGM fauna, both through the disappearance of warm-adapted species such as Elephas antiquus, Hippopothamus amphibious, and Stephanorhinus hemitoechus, and by setting the stage for the existence of a community characterized by cold-adapted large mammals. Patterns of abundance in the fossil record, co-occurrence between species pairs, and the extent of climatic forcing on faunal composition, differ between paleocommunities, but not between extinct and extant species, which is consistent with the idea that climate change, rather than the presence of humans, exerted a major effect on the survival of the late Quaternary megafauna.

  16. Late Quaternary seismic stratigraphy and structure of the western insular shelf margin of Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzlik, M.; Mann, P.; Abrams, L.; Grindlay, N.

    2005-12-01

    725 km of high-resolution seismic data were collected over the insular shelf of western Puerto Rico to better understand its late Quaternary depositional and structural history. Due to low tectonic uplift rates of onshore areas in this region, well dated late Quaternary sediments and corals have only been identified in a few scattered onland localities around Puerto Rico. Seismic data from the Rio Anasco delta area of western Puerto Rico reveals four main units with characteristic stratal reflection terminations that total about 25 m in thickness. Because of a lack of well information, age estimates of these late Quaternary units are based on correlations with sea level curves derived from dated coral samples from Puerto Rico, St. Croix, and Antigua. Units include: Unit 1 - a gently folded and faulted basal section correlated to the Oliogene-early Pliocene? carbonate shelf of Puerto Rico; deeper penetration, industry MCS lines show that these rocks are deformed in a broad EW-trenching arch; Unit 2 - chaotic channel fill deposits in incisions related to the lowstand equivalent of the Rio Anasco likely formed during the Last Glacial Maximum about 25-15 ka; Unit 3 - roughly stratified deposits onlapping the top of Unit 2; these are interpreted as an estuarine facies deposited during Holocene sea level transgression; Unit 4 - highly stratified deposits related to progradation of the Anasco delta during sea level rise. The base of unit 4 is a downlap surface interpreted as a maximum flooding surface likely formed about 6 ka. East-northeast-striking faults are observed breaking the younger late Quaternary units in three separate zones off the west coast of Puerto Rico. Onland continuations of these faults have not been identified likely due to cultural overprint of natural scarps on late Quaternary floodplains.

  17. Late Quaternary faulting along the Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault system, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brogan, George E.; Kellogg, Karl; Slemmons, D. Burton; Terhune, Christina L.

    1991-01-01

    The Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault system, in California and Nevada, has a variety of impressive late Quaternary neotectonic features that record a long history of recurrent earthquake-induced faulting. Although no neotectonic features of unequivocal historical age are known, paleoseismic features from multiple late Quaternary events of surface faulting are well developed throughout the length of the system. Comparison of scarp heights to amount of horizontal offset of stream channels and the relationships of both scarps and channels to the ages of different geomorphic surfaces demonstrate that Quaternary faulting along the northwest-trending Furnace Creek fault zone is predominantly right lateral, whereas that along the north-trending Death Valley fault zone is predominantly normal. These observations are compatible with tectonic models of Death Valley as a northwest-trending pull-apart basin. The largest late Quaternary scarps along the Furnace Creek fault zone, with vertical separation of late Pleistocene surfaces of as much as 64 m (meters), are in Fish Lake Valley. Despite the predominance of normal faulting along the Death Valley fault zone, vertical offset of late Pleistocene surfaces along the Death Valley fault zone apparently does not exceed about 15 m. Evidence for four to six separate late Holocene faulting events along the Furnace Creek fault zone and three or more late Holocene events along the Death Valley fault zone are indicated by rupturing of Q1B (about 200-2,000 years old) geomorphic surfaces. Probably the youngest neotectonic feature observed along the Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault system, possibly historic in age, is vegetation lineaments in southernmost Fish Lake Valley. Near-historic faulting in Death Valley, within several kilometers south of Furnace Creek Ranch, is represented by (1) a 2,000-year-old lake shoreline that is cut by sinuous scarps, and (2) a system of young scarps with free-faceted faces (representing several faulting

  18. Passive margin uplift around the North Atlantic region and its role in Northern Hemisphere late Cenozoic glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyles, Nicholas

    1996-02-01

    Tectonic-climatic models of late Cenozoic global cooling emphasize the importance of middle latitude uplifts (e.g., Tibetan Plateau and the American west) but ignore widespread tectonic events on the margins of the North Atlantic Ocean. Pleistocene glaciations, after 2.5 Ma, are characterized by circum North Atlantic continental ice sheets that formed by the coalescence of perennial snow fields on extensive plateau surfaces in eastern Canada, northwest Britain, and Scandinavia. Plateaus record Cenozoic uplift of peneplains in response to semisynchronous magmatic underplating and thermal buoyancy of rifted continental margins. High-standing plateaus are very sensitive to small reductions in summer temperature. As late Cenozoic climate cooling proceeded, driven by uplift in regions external to the North Atlantic region, elevated plateaus became sites for extensive snow fields and ultimately ice sheets. Circum-Atlantic uplift took place in the key latitudinal belt that is most sensitive to orbitally forced changes in solar irradiation; this, together with albedo effects from large snow fields, could have amplified the relatively weak Milankovitch signal.

  19. Fluvio-deltaic progradation in forced regressive deglacial succession: lessons from the Lake Saint-Jean (Québec, Canada, late Quaternary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutz, Alexis; Ghienne, Jean-François; Schuster, Mathieu; Roquin, Claude; Dietrich, Pierre; Bouchette, Frédéric; Cousineau, Pierre A.

    2015-04-01

    Deltas simultaneously respond to modifications in water discharge, sediment supply and base-level change. As a consequence, they provide accurate archive for deciphering environmental change through times. In this contribution, a Late Quaternary deglacial sequence is documented from Lake Saint-Jean basin (Québec, Canada) where sediments have recorded the Laurentide ice sheet (LIS) retreat accompanied by the invasion of marine waters (Laflamme Gulf) from ca. 12.9 cal. ky BP. Subsequently, fluvio-deltaic and then coastal prograding wedges emplaced following the base level fall induced by the glacio-isostatic rebound. The related succession, representing a transition from glacial to post-glacial periods within a previously glaciated area, was investigated through recent geological mapping, preserved landforms, facies analysis, and new optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) and radiocarbon (14C) dates. Three basin-scale geological sections are presented focusing on the architectures and facies of fluvio-deltaic progradations emplaced from 12.9 cal. ka BP to present-day in Lake Saint-Jean. Overlying the bedrock, isolated ice-contact fan deposits are capped by glacimarine muds. Above, fluvio-deltaic and coastal prograding systems were deposited following four major evolutions through time: (i) deltaic systems progressively increased in width, (ii) coastal influence on sedimentation increased, (iii) hydrographic drainage systems became more organised, and (iv) delta graded from steep (Gilbert delta) to low-angle foresets (mouth-bar delta). These evolutions in fluvio-deltaic systems are attributed to the modifications in water discharge, sediment supply and rate of base level fall driven by the deglaciation. The presented succession is considered as representative of the sedimentological signature of fluvial progradations in forced regressive deglacial sequences. Derived from the Lake Saint-Jean basin, this study provides new elements for the recognition and interpretation

  20. Behavior of Late Quaternary and historical faults in the western Basin and Range province

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.W. . Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Quaternary stratigraphic relations and exploratory trenching in zones of historical surface faulting in the western Basin and Range Province suggest that faults with historical surface ruptures have similar, and in some cases lower, long-term (late Quaternary) and short-term (Holocene) slip rates than other adjacent and regional non-historical Quaternary faults. In the 1954 Dixie Valley earthquake (M6.8) zone, the range-front and piedmont faults collectively record a late Quaternary (200 ka) slip rate on the order of 0.2 mm/yr and a Holocene (7--12 ka) slip rate of 0.5--0.8 mm/yr. The principal segment of the 1932 Cedar Mountain earthquake (M7.2) zone has an estimated latest Quaternary (25--35 ka) slip rate of 0.2--0.7 mm/yr and a Holocene (6--13 ka) slip rate of 0.3--0.7 mm/yr. The 1954 Rainbow Mountain earthquakes (M6.6 and M6.8) and 1954 Fairview Peak earthquake (M7.1) zones have late Quaternary slip rates that are lower (< 0.1 mm/yr), and although there are adjacent Holocene faults, neither zone shows surficial evidence of a previous Holocene event as do the first two zones. The 13 ka Lahontan shoreline at Rainbow Mountain is displaced only by the 1954 faulting, and the main segment of the Fairview Peak zone is overlain by a late Pleistocene (60--120 ka) alluvial fan which is offset by only the 1954 event. An important observation its that the central Nevada seismic belt is not unique based on slip rates. The greatest slip rates in the central and western Nevada region are associated with the Sierra Nevada frontal fault zone and the northern Walker Lane (Pyramid Lake) fault zone where Holocene slip rates are [>=] 1 mm/yr. Based on a comparison of Holocene and late Quaternary rates, many, but not all, historical and non-historical zones show evidence of temporal clustering.

  1. Late Quaternary environments and biogeography in the Great Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R. S.; Mead, J. I.

    1982-01-01

    Plant and animal remains found in packrat ( Neotoma spp.) middens and cave fill from the eastern and southern Great Basin region reveal the presence of subalpine conifers and boreal mammals at relatively low elevations during the Late Wisconsin. Limber pine ( Pinus flexilis) and bristlecone pine ( P. longaeva) were important in the late Pleistocene plant communities throughout this region. Spruce ( Picea cf. engelmannii) and common juniper ( Juniperus communis) were present in some of the more northerly localities, and Douglas fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii) and white fir ( Abies concolor) were present in southern and eastern localities. Single needle pinyon pine ( Pinus monophylla), common across this region today, was apparently not present north of the Sheep Range of southern Nevada during the Late Wisconsin. Pikas ( Ochotona cf. princeps), small boreal mammals present in only a few Great Basin mountain ranges today, were common throughout the region. Heather voles ( Phenacomys cf. intermedius) have been found in two cave fill deposits in Nevada, though they are unknown in the Great Basin today. Limber and bristlecone pines are generally restricted to rocky substrates in modern subalpine habitats in the Great Basin, and this may also have been the case when these plants grew at lower elevations during the Late Wisconsin. Subalpine conifers were present on the rock outcrops sampled by the packrat middens, but shrub communities, perhaps dominated by sagebrush ( Artemisia spp.), may have been present on alluvial valley-bottom substrates. Forested habitats would thus have been isolated habitat islands, as they are today. Boreal small mammals, including pikas and heather voles, were able to colonize the Great Basin mountain ranges during the late Pleistocene. We suggest that these mammals were able to survive in the intervening valley-bottoms under a cool-summer climatic regime, and that continuous forest or woodland corridors were not necessary for migration.

  2. Late quaternary sediments in Lake Zürich, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, G. S.; Giovanoli, F.; Eberli, G.; Finckh, P.; Finger, W.; He, Q.; Heim, C.; Hsü, K. J.; Kelts, K.; Peng, C.; Sidler, C.; Zhao, X.

    1983-12-01

    Lake Zürich occupies a glacially overdeepened perialpine trough in the northern Middlelands of Switzerland. A total of 154.4 m of Quaternary sediments and 47.3 m of Tertiary Molasse bedrock has been cored from the deepest part of the lake, some 10 km south of the city of Zürich. Some 16.8 m of gravels and sands directly overlying the bedrock include basal till and probably earliest subglacial fluvial and lacustrine deposits. These are overlain by 98.6 m of fine-grained, glacial-aged sediments comprising completely deformed proglacial and/or subglacial lacustrine muds, separated by four basal mud tills. The lack of interglacial sediments, fossils, and other datable material, and the presence of severe sediment deformation and unknown amounts of erosion prevent the establishment of an exact chronostratigraphy for sediments older than the upper mud till. Above it some 8.6 m of lacustrine muds were deposited, folded, faulted, and tilted during the final opening of the lake at about 17,500-17,000 years ago. Superimposed are 30.4 m of final Würm and post-glacial sediments comprising (from oldest): cyclic proglacial mud, thick-bedded and laminated mud, a complex transition zone, laminated carbonate, laminated marl, and diatom-calcite varves. These sediments reflect changing catchment and lacustrine conditions including: glacial proximity, catchment stability, lake inflow characteristics, thermal structure, chemistry, and bed stability. Average sedimentation rates ranged from 11 cm yr-1 immediately after glacier withdrawal, to as low as 0.4 mm yr-1 as the environment stabilized. The lack of coarse outwash deposits separating the fine-grained glaciolacustrine sediments from a corresponding underlying basal till suggests that deglaciation of the deep northern basin of Lake Zürich was by stagnation-zone retreat rather than by retreat of an active ice-front.

  3. Measuring Late Quaternary Ursid Diminution in the Midwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolverton, Steve; Lyman, R. Lee

    1998-05-01

    Paleobiologists generally agree that within the past 10,000 yr North American black bears ( Ursus americanus) have decreased in body and tooth size. Some researchers infer that diminution was gradual and continuous; thus, one might infer that a specimen is old if it is larger than an average-size modern bear. Ursid remains recovered in the 1950s from Lawson Cave, Missouri, that are larger than some modern bears have been reported to date to the late Pleistocene, but association with modern taxa, taphonomic considerations, and a radiocarbon date of 200 yr B.P. indicate that they are modern. Modern specimens from Lawson Cave and other parts of the American Midwest are relatively large compared to modern North American black bears from other areas, suggesting that many supposed late Pleistocene bears from the area might be modern also.

  4. Late Quaternary climates and environments of the Edwards Plateau, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomey, Rickard S.; Blum, Michael D.; Valastro, Salvatore

    1993-06-01

    Fossil vertebrate, pollen, and plant macrofossil data from the Edwards Plateau, Texas and throughout the southcentral United States permit reconstruction of regional changes in temperature and effective moisture. Full-glacial temperatures were significantly cooler than those of today, at least 6°C during the summer months, but by ca. 13,000 yrs B.P. summer temperatures were within 2-3°C of present values. There was more effective moisture during the full-glacial period than at any time since then. During the late-glacial, ca. 14,000-10,500 effective moisture first decreased then increased, while the early to middle Holocene was dominated by a protracted decrease in effective moisture. This long-term trend culminated in conditions that were drier than modern during the early part of the late Holocene from ca. 5000 to 2500 yr B.P. Conditions were more mesic than present from ca. 2500 and 1000 yr B.P., while the modern drought-prone climate has characterized the last 1000 years. Fossil vertebrates and the characteristics of cave fill sediments show that late Pleistocene and Holocene changes in temperature and moisture regimes were coupled with vegetation changes and a gradual degradation of upland soils. During the full- and late-glacial much of the upland landscape was covered by thick, deeply weathered reddish clay-rich soils and an open savanna vegetation with a mixed tall and short grass understory. Changes to Holocene climatic conditions promoted a diminished vegetation cover and initiated the gradual degradation of soil mantles, whereas minimum effective moisture during the earlier part of the late Holocene resulted in upland landscapes that were covered by a mixture of short grasses and scrub vegetation, and the near complete removal of the remaining soil mantle. Vegetation changes during the last 2500 years are poorly known, but the upland landscape has consisted of exposed bedrock with little soil cover. Comparison of empirical data and the results of

  5. Late Quaternary transgressive large dunes on the sediment-starved Adriatic shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Correggiari, A.; Field, M.E.; Trincardi, F.

    1996-01-01

    The Adriatic epicontinental basin is a low-gradient shelf where the late-Quaternary transgressive systems tract (TST) is composed of thin parasequences of backbarrier, shoreface and offshore deposits. The facies and internal architecture of the late-Quaternary TST in the Adriatic epicontinental basin changed consistently from early transgression to late transgression reflecting: (1) fluctuations in the balance between sediment supply and accommodation increase, and (2) a progressive intensification of the oceanographic regime, driven by the transgressive widening of the basin to as much as seven times its lowstand extent. One of the consequences of this trend is that high-energy marine bedforms such as sand ridges and sand waves characterize only areas that were flooded close to the end of the late-Quaternary sea-level rise, when the wind fetch was maximum and bigger waves and stronger storm currents could form. We studied the morphology, sediment composition and sequence-stratigraphical setting of a field of asymmetric bedforms (typically 3 m high and 600 m in wavelength) in 20-24 m water depth offshore the Venice Lagoon in the sediment-starved North Adriatic shelf. The sand that forms these large dunes derived from a drowned transgressive coastal deposit reworked by marine processes. Early cementation took place over most of the dune crests limiting their activity and preventing their destruction. Both the formation and deactivation of this field of sand dunes occurred over a short time interval close to the turn-around point that separates the late-Quaternary sea-level rise and the following highstand and reflect rapid changes in the oceanographic regime of the basin.

  6. Late Quaternary chronology of paleo-climatic changes in Caspian Sea region based on Lower Volga sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurbanov, Redzhep; Yanina, Tamara; Murray, Andrew; Svitoch, Alexander; Tkach, Nikolai

    2017-04-01

    Lower Volga is a unique region for understanding the history of the Caspian Sea in the Pleistocene, its correlation of paleogeographic events with glacial-interglacial rhythms of the East European Plain and the global and regional climate changes. The reason is representativeness of Quaternary sections, their completeness, presence of both marine and subaerial sediments, paleontological richness of the materials and available for study. The purpose of this work is to reconstruct the paleogeographic events in the Late Pleistocene of the Lower Volga region on the basis of summarizing the study results for the Srednyaya Akhtuba reference section. Located near city of Volgograd, at Khvaynian plain natural outcrop of Srednyaya Akhtuba section, reveals in a series of exposures a unique to the region series of marine Caspian continental deposits with four levels of buried soil horizons and loess. The results were obtained during 2015 and 2016 complex field research with application of lithological, paleopedological, paleontological, paleocryological, OSL-dating, paleomagnetic methods, that allowed more fundamental approach to the chronological assessment of individual horizons. The structure of the Srednyaya Akhtuba reference section reflects a number of paleogeographic stages of development of the study area. The oldest phase (layers 22-19) is not characterized by OSL dating or faunal material. Based on the sequence of dated layers, we assume its Middle Pleistocene age (MIS-6 stage), corresponding to Moscow stage of the Dnieper glaciation of the East European Plain and the final stage of Early Khazarian transgressive era of Caspian sea. The next stage (layers 18-14), represented by three horizons of paleosols, refers to the first half of the Late Pleistocene (MIS 5). Epoch of soil formation, based on the results the OSL-dating, can be referred to the warm sub-stages (MIS 5c and 5a), with unstable climatically transitional phase from Mikulino (Eemian) interglacial to the

  7. Late quaternary plant zonation and climate in southeastern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Betancourt, J.L.

    1984-01-31

    Plant macrofossils from packrat middens in two southeastern Utah caves outline development of modern plant zonation from the late Wisconsin. Allen Canyon Cave (2195 m) and Fishmouth Cave (1585 m) are located along a continuous gradient of outcropping Navajo Sandstone that extends from the Abajo Mountains south to the San Juan River. By holding the site constant, changes in the floral composition for a plot of less than one hectare can be observed, even if sporadically, over tens of millennia. At Allen Canyon Cave, Engelmann spruce-alpine fir forest was replaced by the present vegetation consisting of pinyon-juniper woodland on exposed ridgetops and cliffside stands of Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, and aspen. Xerophytic woodland plants such as pinyon, plains prickly pear, and narrowleaf yucca arrived sometime in the middle Holocene between 7200 and 3400 B.P. At Fishmouth Cave, Utah juniper in Holocene middens replaced blue spruce, limber pine, Douglas fir, and dwarf and Rocky Mountain junipers in late Wisconsin samples. Quantitative climatic estimates are derived for the late Wisconsin by applying vertical gradients for temperature and precipitation to the amount of vegetation depression. The Fishmouth Cave sequence indicates a minimum lowering of 850 m for blue spruce, limber pine, and dwarf juniper. A depression of at least 700 m for Engelmann spruce and alpine fir is suggested for the Allen Canyon locality. Use of conservatively low gradients for stations below 2080 m yields a 3-4 C cooling from present mean annual temperature and 35 to 60% more rainfall than today. Steeper gradients associated with more mountainous terrain suggest a 5 C lowering in temperature and up to 120% increase over modern precipitation. 81 references, 6 figures, 10 tables.

  8. Stratigraphical evidence of late Amazonian periglaciation and glaciation in the Astapus Colles region of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soare, Richard J.; Osinski, Gordon R.

    2009-07-01

    Recent modeling of the meteorological conditions during and following times of high obliquity suggests that an icy mantle could have been emplaced in western Utopia Planitia by atmospheric deposition during the late Amazonian period [Costard, F.M., Forget, F., Madeleine, J.B., Soare, R.J., Kargel, J.S., 2008. Lunar Planet. Sci. 39. Abstract 1274; Madeleine, B., Forget, F., Head, J.W., Levrard, B., Montmessin, F., 2007. Lunar Planet. Sci. 38. Abstract 1778]. Astapus Colles (ABa) is a late Amazonian geological unit - located in this hypothesized area of accumulation - that comprises an icy mantle tens of meters thick [Tanaka, K.L., Skinner, J.A., Hare, T.M., 2005. US Geol. Surv. Sci. Invest., Map 2888]. For the most part, this unit drapes the early Amazonian Vastitas Borealis interior unit (ABvi); to a lesser degree it overlies the early Amazonian Vastitas Borealis marginal unit (ABvm) and the early to late Hesperian UP plains unit HBu2 [Tanaka, K.L., Skinner, J.A., Hare, T.M., 2005. US Geol. Surv. Sci. Invest., Map 2888]. Landscapes possibly modified by late-Amazonian periglacial processes [Costard, F.M., Kargel, J.S., 1995. Icarus 114, 93-112; McBride, S.A., Allen, C.C., Bell, M.S., 2005. Lunar Planet. Sci. 36. Abstract 1090; Morgenstern, A., Hauber, E., Reiss, D., van Gasselt, S., Grosse, G., Schirrmeister, L., 2007. J. Geophys. Res. 112, doi:10.1029/2006JE002869. E06010; Seibert, N.M., Kargel, J.S., 2001. Geophys. Res. Lett. 28, 899-902; Soare, R.J., Kargel, J.S., Osinski, G.R., Costard, F., 2007. Icarus 191, 95-112; Soare, R.J., Osinski, G.R., Roehm, C.L., 2008. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 272, 382-393] and glacial processes [Milliken, R.E., Mustard, J.F., Goldsby, D.L., 2003. J. Geophys. Res. 108 (E6), doi:10.1029/2002JE002005. 5057; Mustard, J.F., Cooper, C.D., Rifkin, M.K., 2001. Nature 412, 411-414; Tanaka, K.L., Skinner, J.A., Hare, T.M., 2005. US Geol. Surv. Sci. Invest., Map 2888] have been reported within the region. Researchers have assumed that the

  9. Biotic response to late Quaternary rapid climate switches in Santa Barbara Basin: Ecological and evolutionary implications

    SciTech Connect

    Cannariato, K.G.; Kennett, J.P.; Behl, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Benthic foraminiferal assemblages from Santa Barbara Basin exhibit major faunal and ecological switches associated with late Quaternary millennial- to decadal-scale global climate oscillations. Repeated turnovers of entire faunas occurred rapidly (<40--400 yr) without extinction or speciation in conjunction with Dansgaard-Oeschger shifts in thermohaline circulation, ventilation, and climate, confirming evolutionary model predictions of Roy et al. Consistent faunal successions of dysoxic taxa during successive interstadials reflect the extreme sensitivity and adaptation of the benthic ecosystem to the rapid environmental changes that marked the late Quaternary and possibly other transitional intervals in the history of the Earth`s ocean-atmosphere-cryosphere system. These data support the hypothesis that broad segments of the biosphere are well adapted to rapid climate change.

  10. Late quaternary evolution of the Orinoco Delta, Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warne, A.G.; Guevara, E.H.; Aslan, A.

    2002-01-01

    The modern Orinoco Delta is the latest of a series of stacked deltas that have infilled the Eastern Venezuelan Basin (EVB) since the Oligocene. During the late Pleistocene sea-level lowstand (20,000 to 16,000 yrs BP), bedrock control points at the position of the present delta apex prevented the river channel from incising as deeply as many other major river systems. Shallow seismic data indicate that the late Pleistocene Orinoco incised into the present continental shelf, where it formed a braided-river complex that transported sediment to a series of shelf-edge deltas. As sea level rose from 16,000 to 9,500 yrs BP, the Orinoco shoreline shifted rapidly landward, causing shallow-marine waves and currents to form a widespread transgressive sand unit. Decelerating sea-level rise and a warmer, wetter climate during the early Holocene (9,500 to 6,000 yrs BP) induced delta development within the relatively quiet-water environment of the EVB embayment. Sea level approached its present stand in the middle Holocene (6,000 to 3,000 yrs BP), and the Orinoco coast prograded, broadening the delta plain and infilling the EVB embayment. Significant quantities of Amazon sediment began to be transported to the Orinoco coast by littoral currents. Continued progradation in the late Holocene caused the constriction at Boca de Serpientes to alter nearshore and shelf hydrodynamics and subdivide the submarine delta into two distinct areas: the Atlantic shelf and the Gulf of Paria. The increased influence of littoral currents along the coast promoted mudcape development. Because most of the water and sediment were transported across the delta plain through the Rio Grande distributary in the southern delta, much of the central and northwestern delta plain became sediment starved, promoting widespread accumulation of peat deposits. Human impacts on the delta are mostly associated with the Volca??n Dam on Can??o Manamo. However, human activities have had relatively little effect on the

  11. Late quaternary oceanographic conditions in the Western Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsepyan, E. A.; Ivanova, E. V.; Max, L.; Riethdorf, J.-R.; Nürnberg, D.; Tiedemann, R.

    2013-03-01

    The benthic and planktonic foraminiferal assemblages and the distribution of coarse grain-size factions were studied in the upper 4.5 m of the Core SO201-2-85KL (57°30.30' N, 170°24.79' E, water depth 968 m) retrieved from the Shirshov Ridge. This part of the core covers 7.5 to 50 kyr BP. The glacial period is established to be characterized by low surface water productivity, the wide distribution of sea ice and/or icebergs in this area, and a high oxygen concentration in the bottom layer. Enhanced productivity is inferred from the maximum abundance of planktonic foraminifers at the very beginning of the deglaciation. The late Bølling-Allerød interstadial and the early Holocene were marked by the further two-phase increase in the surface productivity and the weakened ventilation of the bottom water.

  12. Late quaternary geologic framework, north-central Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindinger, Jack G.; Penland, Shea; Williams, S. Jeffress; Brooks, Gregg R.; Suter, John R.; McBride, Randolph A.

    1991-01-01

    The geologic framework of the north-central Gulf of Mexico shelf is composed of multiple, stacked, delta systems. Shelf and nearshore sedimentary facies were deposited by deltaic progradation, followed by shoreface erosion and submergence. A variety of sedimentary facies has been identified, including prodelta, delta fringe, distributary, lagoonal, barrier island, and shelf sand sheet. This study is based on the interpretation and the synthesis of > 6,700 km of high-resolution seismic profiles, 75 grab samples, and 77 vibracores. The nearshore morphology, shallow stratigraphy, and sediment distribution of the eastern Louisiana shelf are the products of transgressive sedimentary processes reworking the abandoned St. Bernard delta complex. Relatively recent Mississippi delta lobe consists primarily of fine sand, silt, and clay. In the southern portion of the St. Bernard delta complex, asymmetrical sand ridges (>5 m relief) have formed as the result of marine reworking of distributary mouth-bar sands. Silty sediments from the modern Mississippi Birdsfoot delta onlap the St. Bernard delta complex along the southern edge. The distal margin of the St. Bernard complex is distinct and has a sharp contact on the north near the Mississippi Sound barrier island coastline and a late Wisconsinan delta to the south. The Chandeleur Islands and the barrier islands of Mississippi Sound have been formed by a combination of Holocene and Pleistocene fluvial processes, shoreface erosion, and ravinement of the exposed shelf. Sediments underlying the relatively thin Holocene sediment cover are relict fluvial sands, deposited during the late Wisconsinan lowstand. Subsequent relative sea-level rise allowed marine processes to rework and redistribute sediments that formed the nearshore fine-grained facies and the shelf sand sheet.

  13. Late Precambrian paradoxical glaciation and obliquity of the Earth - a discussion of dynamical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, M. A.; Le Mouël, J. L.; Lambeck, K.; Poirier, J. P.

    1999-12-01

    G.E. Williams' observations on Late Precambrian glaciogenic sequences pose some major challenges to the understanding of the dynamical evolution of the Earth's orbit and spin that have not yet been adequately addressed. In this paper, we investigate whether dissipative core-mantle coupling is an effective mechanism for reducing the obliquity by such a large amount as suggested by Williams [G.E. Williams, Earth Sci. Rev. 112 (1993) 1-45], and we examine the relationship between the obliquity and spin rate in the presence of such coupling. We show that this mechanism not only cannot explain the rapid and substantial decrease in obliquity, but also that such a decrease is in contradiction with existing paleorotation evidence for the same period, thus confirming the previous findings of Néron de Surgy and Laskar [O. Néron de Surgy, J. Laskar, Astron. Astrophys. 318 (1997) 975-989].

  14. Late Quaternary Stratigraphy, Glacial Limits, and Paleoenvironments of the Marresale Area, Western Yamal Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, Steven L.; Ingólfsson, Ólafur; Gataullin, Valery; Manley, William; Lokrantz, Hanna

    2002-05-01

    Stratigraphic records from coastal cliff sections near the Marresale Station on the Yamal Peninsula, Russia, yield new insight on ice-sheet dynamics and paleoenvironments for northern Eurasia. Field studies identify nine informal stratigraphic units from oldest to youngest (the Marresale formation, Labsuyakha sand, Kara diamicton, Varjakha peat and silt, Oleny sand, Baidarata sand, Betula horizon, Nenets peat, and Chum sand) that show a single glaciation and a varied terrestrial environment during the late Pleistocene. The Kara diamicton reflects regional glaciation and is associated with glaciotectonic deformation from the southwest of the underlying Labsuyakha sand and Marresale formation. Finite radiocarbon and luminescence ages of ca. 35,000 to 45,000 yr from Varjakha peat and silt that immediately overlies Kara diamicton place the glaciation >40,000 yr ago. Eolian and fluvial deposition ensued with concomitant cryogenesis between ca. 35,000 and 12,000 cal yr B.P. associated with the Oleny and the Baidarata sands. There is no geomorphic or stratigraphic evidence of coverage or proximity of the Yamal Peninsula to a Late Weichselian ice sheet. The Nenets peat accumulated over the Baidarata sand during much of the past 10,000 yr, with local additions of the eolian Chum sand starting ca. 1000 yr ago. A prominent Betula horizon at the base of the Nenets peat contains rooted birch trees ca. 10,000 to 9000 cal yr old and indicates a >200-km shift northward of the treeline from the present limits, corresponding to a 2° to 4°C summer warming across northern Eurasia.

  15. Late Quaternary uplift of northeastern Sicily: relation with the active normal faulting deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, Stefano; De Guidi, Giorgio

    2003-11-01

    The evaluation of the vertical displacement-rate of the Late Quaternary marine terraces along the Ionian coast of northeastern Sicily (southern Italy) has been adopted as a tool to reconstruct the Late Quaternary deformation affecting the aseismic area, intervening between the Calabrian arc and the eastern Sicily seismogenic regions. The methodology adopted, based on computer elaboration of the field data, provided the amount of the uplift recorded since 124 ka, partitioned in the time, with the resolution of the oxygen isotope timescale (OIT) stages. The main result of the analysis is the recognition of a recently deformed sector of the coast, corresponding to the area of underlap between the seismogenic faults of southern Calabria and eastern Sicily. The deformation path of the Late Quaternary shorelines is consistent with the occurrence of an active normal fault in the off-shore of the area. This tectonic feature, that crosses through a main crustal barrier, represents the link between the two sets of seismogenic faults that cut through the weakened sectors of the crust. The resulting picture clearly indicates the influence of crustal properties on the geometry of the active fault belt and on the distribution of the main seismic events along the active "Siculo-Calabrian Rift Zone".

  16. Soil-landscape development and late Quaternary environmental change in coastal Estremadura, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Michael; Haws, Jonathan; Benedetti, Michael; Bicho, Nuno

    2015-04-01

    This poster integrates soil-landscape analysis with archaeological survey and paleoenvironmental reconstruction. Soils in surface and buried contexts in Estremadura, Portugal, provide evidence of landscape stability and instability, relative age relationships between landforms, and general paleoenvironmental conditions during the late Quaternary. These factors provide insight into the distribution and condition of Paleolithic archaeological sites and help understand the record of human settlement in the region. Late Pleistocene and Holocene dunes extend inland approximately 10 km from coastal source regions. Surface soils in Holocene dunes under maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) forest exhibit A, E, C/Bh and A, C horizon sequences and classify as Quartzipsamments. Surface soils in late Pleistocene dunes exhibit A, E, Bh, Bhs, Bs horizon sequences and classify as Haplorthods. Both Pleistocene and Holocene dunes commonly bury a heavily weathered soil formed in calcareous sandstone. The boundary between underlying buried soils and overlying surface soils is characterized by a lag deposit of medium to coarse, moderately-rounded gravels, underlain immediately by subsurface Bt and Bss horizons. The lag deposit and absence of buried A horizons both indicate intense and/or prolonged surface erosion prior to burial by late Quaternary dunes. Soil-geomorphic relationships therefore suggest at least two distinct episodes of dune emplacement and subsequent landscape stability following an extensive episode late Pleistocene landscape instability and soil erosion. A conceptual model of soil-landscape evolution through the late Quaternary and Holocene results from the integration of soil profile data, proxy paleoenvironmental data, and the partial record of human settled as revealed in the archaeological record.

  17. Tectonic control on the Late Quaternary hydrography of the Upper Tiber Basin (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuti, Marco; Bonini, Marco; Moroni, Adriana

    2016-09-01

    We examine the intramontane Upper Tiber Basin in the Northern Apennines (central Italy), where sub-orthogonal fault systems forced river deviation and the abandonment of alluvial fans since the late Middle Pleistocene. Archaeological material, spanning the Middle Palaeolithic-Iron Age, was collected mostly from the surface of the Late Quaternary alluvial landforms and related deposits (MUP and HOL units). This information contributed to the partial dating of seven major stages of drainage development. Normal faults parallel and transverse to the basin trend were active at different times and conditioned the valley pattern of the Middle (MUP1-2)-Late (MUP3) Pleistocene Tiber, Singerna, Sovara and Tignana rivers, which still flow today into the basin. The MUP1 and the MUP3 fans were beheaded by the displacement of their feeder valleys along the basin-transverse Carmine and Montedoglio faults. In some cases, the former feeder rivers underwent stream piracy but their courses mostly deviated in response of the topographic gradient created by faulting, as well as through the incision of new valleys that exploited the lithological contrast along the fault lines. The MUP3 Tignana fan was abandoned mostly due to the activity of the basin-parallel, dip-slip Sansepolcro fault. Subsidence driven by the basin-parallel Anghiari and Sansepolcro fault systems also provided the accommodation space for the MUP3 and HOl1-2 Afra fans between Late Pleistocene and early-mid Holocene. This study exemplifies the interplay between longitudinal and transverse fault systems, and the Late Quaternary hydrographic evolution of an extensional basin settled in the axial zone of an active fold-and-thrust belt. Although the faulting has interacted with the forcing exerted by the Late Quaternary climate fluctuations on the basin drainage systems, the tectonic rates are sufficiently high to represent the prime controller on base-level change and drainage routing patterns.

  18. Stable isotopes in collagen and Late Quaternary carnivore palaeoecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocherens, Hervé

    2010-05-01

    Several taxa of large carnivores co-occurred during the late Pleistocene in the steppe-tundra ecosystem, such as wolf Canis lupus, cave lion Panthera leo spelaea, cave hyaena Crocuta crocuta spelaea, brown bear Ursus arctos and cave bear Ursus spelaeus and Ursus ingressus. This abundance of taxa belonging to the same guild raises questions about niche partitioning, especially in terms of dietary specialization and prey selection. Observations of the dietary ecology of the extant relatives of these late Pleistocene carnivores does not provide unambiguous answers as these populations live under very different environmental conditions where other potential prey species are present, but it appears that most of these modern large carnivores are relatively flexible in their prey selection. Palaeontological investigations dealing with faunal associations and activity marks on fossil bones also have their limitations, such as taphonomic biases (palimpsests rather than biological associations) and do not allow the quantification of consumption of various preys. In contrast, carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures of bone collagen depend directly on those of the average diet. Since different potential prey species occurring in the steppe-tundra exhibit consistent isotopic differences for these chemical elements, it is possible to relate the carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures measured in fossil carnivores with the preferential consumption of some prey species. Some amount of quantification can be provided using modified versions of mixing models developed for modern ecosystems. In addition, this isotopic approach is individual-based and it is therefore possible to investigate intra- and inter-population differences in prey selection, as well as possible chronological trends and differences linked to genetic differences by combining isotopic and ancient DNA studies on the same material. The isotopic approach has already shown that among the tested large carnivores, cave

  19. Origin of the late quaternary dune fields of northeastern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Stafford, T.W.; Cowherd, S.D.; Mahan, S.A.; Kihl, R.; Maat, P.B.; Bush, C.A.; Nehring, J.

    1996-01-01

    Stabilized eolian deposits, mostly parabolic dunes and sand sheets, cover much of the landscape of northeastern Colorado and adjacent parts of southwestern Nebraska in four geographically distinct dune fields. Stratigraphic and soil-geomorphic relations and accelerator radiocarbon dating indicate that at least three episodes of eolian sand movement occurred between 27 ka and 11 ka, possibly between 11 ka and 4 ka, and within the past 1.5 ka. Thus, eolian sand deposition took place under both glacial and interglacial climatic conditions. In the youngest episodes of eolian sand movement, Holocene parabolic dunes partially buried Pleistocene sand sheet deposits. Late Holocene sands in the Fort Morgan and Wray dune fields, to the south of the South Platte River, have trace element ratios that are indistinguishable from modern South Platte River sands, but different from Ogallala Formation bedrock, which has previously been cited as the main source of dune sand on the Great Plains. Sands in the Greeley dune field, to the north of the South Platte River, have trace element concentrations that indicate a probable Laramie Formation source. Measurements of parabolic dunes indicate paleowinds from the northwest in all dune fields, in good agreement with resultant drift directions calculated for nearby weather stations. Thus, paleowinds were probably not significantly different from present-day winds, and are consistent with a South Platte River source for the Fort Morgan and Wray dune fields, and a Laramie Formation source for the Greeley dune field. Sand accumulated downwind of the South Platte River to form the Fort Morgan dune field. In addition, sand was also transported farther downwind over the upland formed by the calcrete caprock of the Ogallala Formation, and deposited in die lee of the upland on the southeast side. Because of high wind energy, the upland itself served as a zone of sand transport, but little or no sand accumulation took place on this surface. These

  20. Accretion of the south Florida platform, late Quaternary development

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, C.W.

    1985-02-01

    Stratigraphic information from high-resolution seismic data obtained across the southwest Florida platform indicates that the modern shelf is a constructional platform with Pliocene(.)-Pleistocene and Holocene sediments resting on an eroded karstic Miocene platform. The Miocene surface dips away from the coastline with significant breaks in slope occurring at the center of the shelf and at the shelf edge. At the southwest corner of the platform, this surface crops out to form a terrace. This terrace lies along the west-facing continental slope of the Florida shelf and is progressively buried to the south by younger deposits - reefs and sediment - so that it has no surface expression in the Florida Straits. A paired reef complex rests on the thickest post-Miocene sediments that mark the edge of the modern shelf. The deepest reef forms a well-developed escarpment with its crest buried by approximately 15 m (50 ft) of sediment. The shallower reef is a low swale over most of its extent but developed into a large reef-spit complex (Howell Hook) in the central part of the study area. Within the Pliocene-Pleistocene and Holocene sediments, two stratigraphic units can be delineated: (1) a lower progradational unit of Pliocene-Pleistocene(.) age that can be traced under the shelf-edge reef and continuously onlaps the Miocene(.) surface, and (2) an upper unit of late Pleistocene-Holocene age which is composed of reef and pelagic sediment. 14 figures.

  1. Late Quaternary human settlement patterning in the Jebel Gharbi.

    PubMed

    Garcea, Elena A A; Giraudi, Carlo

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents the latest results of geoarchaeological research on the Upper Pleistocene sequence in the Jebel Gharbi (previously called Jebel Nafusah), a mountain range located in Tripolitania, northwestern Libya. Numerous archaeological sites are found adjacent to springs that formed as a consequence of tectonic activities. The springs originated when Upper Pleistocene earthquakes produced ground displacements that created water outlets, some of which are still active. Springs are spread all along the massif and at the foot of the mountains in Jebel Gharbi. We suggest that they offered attractive resources to populations coming from drier parts of North Africa or the near-by Sahara. The earliest sites associated with the springs include Aterian lithic techno-complexes that have been dated between 80,000 and 40,000 BP. Since then, these springs have attracted many populations, as documented here by settlements belonging to the Later Stone Age (Upper Palaeolithic), Iberomaurusian (Late Upper Palaeolithic or Epipalaeolithic), Neolithic, Roman period, and present time.

  2. Late Quaternary environmental change in the Bonneville basin, western USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madsen, D.B.; Rhode, D.; Grayson, D.K.; Broughton, J.M.; Livingston, S.D.; Hunt, J.; Quade, Jay; Schmitt, D.N.; Shaver, M. W.

    2001-01-01

    Excavation and analyses of small animal remains from stratified raptor deposits spanning the last 11.5 ka, together with collection and analysis of over 60 dated fossil woodrat midden samples spanning the last 50 ka, provide a detailed record of changing climate in the eastern Great Basin during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. Sagebrush steppe dominated the northern Bonneville basin during the Full Glacial, suggesting that conditions were cold and relatively dry, in contrast to the southern basin, which was also cold but moister. Limber pine woodlands dominated ???13-11.5 ka, indicating increased dryness and summer temperatures ???6-7??C cooler than present. This drying trend accelerated after ???11.5 ka causing Lake Bonneville to drop rapidly, eliminating 11 species of fish from the lake. From ???11.5-8.2 ka xerophytic sagebrush and shadscale scrub replaced more mesophilic shrubs in a step-wise fashion. A variety of small mammals and plants indicate the early Holocene was ???3??C cooler and moister than at present, not warmer as suggested by a number of climatic models. The diversity of plants and animals changed dramatically after 8.2 ka as many species disappeared from the record. Some of the upland species returned after ???4 ka and Great Salt Lake became fresh enough at ???3.4 and ???1.2 ka to support populations of Utah chub. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  3. Late Quaternary sedimentary features of Bear Lake, Utah and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smoot, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Bear Lake sediments were predominantly aragonite for most of the Holocene, reflecting a hydrologically closed lake fed by groundwater and small streams. During the late Pleistocene, the Bear River flowed into Bear Lake and the lake waters spilled back into the Bear River drainage. At that time, sediment deposition was dominated by siliciclastic sediment and calcite. Lake-level fluctuation during the Holocene and late Pleistocene produced three types of aragonite deposits in the central lake area that are differentiated primarily by grain size, sorting, and diatom assemblage. Lake-margin deposits during this period consisted of sandy deposits including well-developed shoreface deposits on margins adjacent to relatively steep gradient lake floors and thin, graded shell gravel on margins adjacent to very low gradient lake-floor areas. Throughout the period of aragonite deposition, episodic drops in lake level resulted in erosion of shallow-water deposits, which were redeposited into the deeper lake. These sediment-focusing episodes are recognized by mixing of different mineralogies and crystal habits and mixing of a range of diatom fauna into poorly sorted mud layers. Lake-level drops are also indicated by erosional gaps in the shallow-water records and the occurrence of shoreline deposits in areas now covered by as much as 30 m of water. Calcite precipitation occurred for a short interval of time during the Holocene in response to an influx of Bear River water ca. 8 ka. The Pleistocene sedimentary record of Bear Lake until ca. 18 ka is dominated by siliciclastic glacial fl our derived from glaciers in the Uinta Mountains. The Bear Lake deep-water siliciclastic deposits are thoroughly bioturbated, whereas shallow-water deposits transitional to deltas in the northern part of the basin are upward-coarsening sequences of laminated mud, silt, and sand. A major drop in lake level occurred ca. 18 ka, resulting in subaerial exposure of the lake floor in areas now covered by

  4. Late Quaternary paleosols and climate change in southern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Monger, H.C. . Agronomy Dept.); Cole, D.R. ); Gish, J.W. )

    1992-01-01

    A climate change toward more arid conditions in the southwest US has been postulated for a period around 7 ka. In southern NM, deposition of the youngest generation of alluvial fans surrounding arid mountains began around 7 ka based on radiocarbon dates of charcoal. The deposition of these fans has been interpreted as evidence for aridity because plant cover would have declined, thus making the landscape more susceptible to erosion and sedimentation. Isotopes of pedogenic calcite and pollen content in well-preserved paleosols associated with alluvial fans provide additional evidence for testing the aridity hypothesis. Buried paleosols, ranging from 23,070 [+-] 190 to 9,070 [+-] 70 yr BP, contain pedogenic calcite that is isotopically heavier in carbon than calcite in soils younger than 7 ka. The buried paleosols have a mean delta C-13 values of [minus]2.2 [+-] 0.8 [per thousand] (PDP). In contrast, soils younger than 7 ka have a man delta C-13 value of [minus]7.8 [+-] 1.3 [per thousand]. The higher delta C-13 values in buried paleosols may reflect the presence of abundant C[sub 4] grasses, similar to the present vegetation in the southern High Plains, which would have curtailed erosion. Pollen analysis reveals that buried paleosols contain more grass pollen than soils younger than 7 ka, which contain high proportions of desertscrub pollen taxa. delta O-18 values of pedogenic calcite are similar for the buried paleosols ([minus]5.2 [+-] 0.3 [per thousand] PDB) and soils younger than 7 ka ([minus]5.1 [+-] 0.6 [per thousand]). These values indicate a relatively constant mean annual temperature of approximately 14C, which prevailed throughout late Pleistocene and Holocene time.

  5. Reconstructing late Quaternary deep-water masses in the eastern Arctic Ocean using benthonic Ostracoda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, R. Ll; Whatley, R.C.; Cronin, T. M.; Dowsett, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of Ostracoda in three long cores from the deep eastern Arctic Ocean was studied to determine the palaeoceanographical history of the Eurasian Basin during the late Quaternary. The samples for this study were obtained from the Lomonosov Ridge, Morris Jesup Rise and Yermak Plateau during the Arctic 91 expedition. Ostracoda previously studied in coretops at the same sites as the present study have shown that individual species have a strong association with different water masses and bathymetry. Throughout the late Quaternary, cores exhibit ostracod-rich layers separated by barren intervals. On the basis of biostratigraphical, isotopic and palaeomagnetic data the fossiliferous levels are interpreted as representing interglacial stages. The twenty most significant species were selected for subsequent quantitative investigation using Cluster and Factor analyses, in order to determine similarity and variance between the assemblages. An additional statistical method employing Modern Analogues and the Squared Chord Distance dissimilarity coefficient was utilized to compare the present late Quaternary fossil samples with a modern Arctic database. The results reveal a major faunal division within the Arctic Ocean Deep Water (AODW). Highly abundant and diverse assemblages within the cores were found to group and have good analogues with the Recent bathyal depth (1000-2500 m) upper AODW assemblages. Conversely, assemblages with low abundance and diversity correlate well with abyssal depth (> 3000 m) lower AODW assemblages. The palaeoceanographical history is complicated by the influence of adjacent water masses such as Canada Basin Deep Water (CBDW), Greenland Sea Deep Water (GSDW) and most importantly, Arctic Intermediate Water (AIW), which all had an influence on the ostracod assemblages during the late Quaternary. An enhanced flow of warm saline AIW into the Eurasian Basin results in species-rich upper AODW assemblages having good analogues down to 2750 m

  6. Late Quaternary palaeoenvironmental change in the Australian drylands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimmons, Kathryn E.; Cohen, Timothy J.; Hesse, Paul P.; Jansen, John; Nanson, Gerald C.; May, Jan-Hendrik; Barrows, Timothy T.; Haberlah, David; Hilgers, Alexandra; Kelly, Tegan; Larsen, Joshua; Lomax, Johanna; Treble, Pauline

    2013-08-01

    -Holocene was, however, generally characterised by moderately humid conditions, demonstrated by lake level rise, source-bordering dune activity, and speleothem growth, persisting at different times across the continent. Increasingly arid conditions developed into the late Holocene, particularly in the central arid zone.

  7. Late Quaternary paleo-lake fluctuations in westernmost Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amidon, W. H.; Blard, P.; Avouac, J.; Schneider, T.

    2008-12-01

    paleo-precipitation from west to east across the study area. The exact age and potential synchronicity of the high stands is not established, but existing geochronology suggests they occurred either during a post-LGM recovery period (~16-14 kyr) or during the mid-Holocene optimum (~7-5.5 kyr). If the mapped high stands were synchronous and the west to east trend remains robust, it would suggest that the dominant moisture source was from enhanced westerlies and northwesterlies during the late glacial period and mid-Holocene optimum as predicted by some climate simulations [e.g. Bush et al., 2002]. Future work will include refining our water balance model to use an evaporation parameterization best suited for very cold climates and field work to determine the ages of shorelines and assess the synchronicity of the mapped high stands.

  8. Late Quaternary relative sea level in Southern California and Monterey Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Laura C.; Simms, Alexander R.

    2015-10-01

    Few records of late Quaternary relative sea level (RSL) are available for the Pacific coast of North America south of San Francisco Bay, a region where RSL data would be particularly useful for constraining vertical rates of tectonic motion. This paper provides the first regional, uplift-corrected late Quaternary RSL history for southern California derived from a compilation of 132 previously published and unpublished radiocarbon ages from nearshore, estuarine, and freshwater deposits in sediment cores from coastal southern California. We also provide a local, uplift-corrected RSL history for Monterey Bay, central California, generated from 48 radiocarbon ages from Elkhorn Slough and surrounding environments. Our resulting compilations show rapid sea-level rise from 15 ka which begins to decelerate to present mean sea level (PMSL) between 6 and 8 ka. Late Holocene (<4 ka) sea-level rise averaged 0.8 ± 0.3 mm a-1 in southern California and 1.3 ± 0.19 mm a-1 along Monterey Bay in central California. Both rates of late Holocene RSL rise calculated are lower than recent RSL rates from southern California (˜1.61 ± 0.34 to 2.4 ± 1.04 mm a-1) and Monterey Bay (1.49 ± 0.95 mm a-1), derived from uplift-corrected, 20th century tide gauge data. This new RSL data fills geographical gaps in relative sea-level histories, as well as provides important datums for local tectonic processes.

  9. Morphology of late Quaternary submarine landslides along the U.S. Atlantic continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twichell, D.C.; Chaytor, J.D.; ten Brink, U.S.; Buczkowski, B.

    2009-01-01

    The nearly complete coverage of the U.S. Atlantic continental slope and rise by multibeam bathymetry and backscatter imagery provides an opportunity to reevaluate the distribution of submarine landslides along the margin and reassess the controls on their formation. Landslides can be divided into two categories based on their source areas: those sourced in submarine canyons and those sourced on the open continental slope and rise. Landslide distribution is in part controlled by the Quaternary history of the margin. They cover 33% of the continental slope and rise of the glacially influenced New England margin, 16% of the sea floor offshore of the fluvially dominated Middle Atlantic margin, and 13% of the sea floor south of Cape Hatteras. The headwall scarps of open-slope sourced landslides occur mostly on the lower slope and upper rise while they occur mostly on the upper slope in the canyon-sourced ones. The deposits from both landslide categories are generally thin (mostly 20-40??m thick) and comprised primarily of Quaternary material, but the volumes of the open-slope sourced landslide deposits can be larger (1-392??km3) than the canyon-sourced ones (1-10??km3). The largest failures are located seaward of shelf-edge deltas along the southern New England margin and near salt domes that breach the sea floor south of Cape Hatteras. The spatial distribution of landslides indicates that earthquakes associated with rebound of the glaciated part of the margin or earthquakes associated with salt domes were probably the primary triggering mechanism although other processes may have pre-conditioned sediments for failure. The largest failures and those that have the potential to generate the largest tsunamis are the open-slope sourced landslides.

  10. Late Quaternary climate and landscape changes in Southern Africa based on integrative analyses of geoarchives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerkamp, K.; Voelkel, J.; Heine, K.; Bens, O.; Winkelbauer, J.

    2009-12-01

    Although it is clear that large, rapid temperature changes have occurred during the last glacial-interglacial cycle and the Holocene in Southern Africa, we have only limited, and often imprecise, knowledge of how the major moisture-bearing atmospheric circulation systems have reacted to these changes. Using slope deposits, soils and sediments as palaeoclimatic geoarchives we will overcome these constraints. The role of many geoarchives in the reconstruction of the Quaternary climate in Southern Africa remains controversial, since the palaeoclimate data are based on evidence from marine cores, lake sediments, speleothems and spring sinter, fluvial sediments, aeolian sands and dust, colluvium, and coastal sediments. To elucidate climate controls on Quaternary landscape evolution and to use these data for palaeoclimatic reconstructions, slope deposits, soils and sediments have been investigated. The project will employ state-of-the-art geoscience methodology to interpret the record of precipitation changes of the Late Quaternary, including the shifting of the summer and winter rain belts, the chronology of catastrophic floods, the wind intensity and direction, and the role climatic factors may have played for prehistoric cultures. High resolution Late Quaternary records are provided by analysing the interstratification of slope deposits and soils with fluvial, lacustrine and aeolian sediment sequences. Earlier research has shown that aeolian and fluvial processes were active at the same time in the southwestern Kalahari during the LGM, documented by sequences of alternate bedding of aeolian, colluvial and fluvial sediments. The interfingering of slope deposits with fluvial flood sediments (slackwater deposits) in Namib Desert valleys document extreme precipitation events in the upper highland catchments and rains at the same time in the desert itself.

  11. Late-Quaternary climatic change on the American North Pacific Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heusser, C. J.; Heusser, L. E.; Peteet, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The late Quaternary climate of the North Pacific, where according to modelling the solar radiation in the early Holocene at the time of the summer solstice is high and in the late Holocene is relatively low, is investigated. Quantitative temperature and precipitation estimates from southern Alaska are compared with estimates from western Washington and British Columbia. Data extending over more than 10,000 years show a broadly consistent pattern of climatic change in general agreement with predicted variations in solar radiation and their effect on atmospheric circulation and seasonal duration of pressure systems over the North Pacific Ocean. In the early Holocene, the subtropical North Pacific anticyclone annually regulated climate for a longer period at higher latitudes than at present, so that warmth and dryness increased in southern Alaska. The Aleutian low-pressure center intensified during the late Holocene, resulting in colder and more humid coastal climate and increased frequency of glacier growth in the cordillera.

  12. First cosmogenic geochronology from the Lesser Caucasus: Late Pleistocene glaciation and rock glacier development in the Karçal Valley, NE Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dede, Volkan; Çiçek, İhsan; Sarıkaya, Mehmet Akif; Çiner, Attila; Uncu, Levent

    2017-05-01

    Evidence of widespread alpine glaciations during the Late Pleistocene in mid-latitudes has long attracted attention of researchers. However, there were no studies that contain absolute ages in the Lesser Caucasus despite the fact that it is one of the major glaciated regions in Eurasia. Here, we present first cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure ages from the Karçal Mountains (41.24° N, 42.06° E, 3431 m a.s.l., above sea level) which is located in the most western part of the Lesser Caucasus in the northeastern Anatolia. In the Karçal Mountains, there are numerous valleys that have experienced significant glaciations since Late Pleistocene. We have investigated one of the largest valleys, the east-facing Karçal Valley, that hosts even a small (2926 m a.s.l.) recent glacier located at above 3000 m a.s.l. Fossil and recent rock glaciers along with lateral and recessional moraines exist in the valley. We conducted the study in two stages. First, we mapped the geomorphological units in the Karçal Valley in detail based on our field works and aerial photography. Later, we collected 10 rock samples from the fossil rock glacier and recessional moraines for cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating. The results outline a glacial chronology that is typical of the Last Glacial Maximum. Although the maximum extent and timing of the glaciation is not exactly known as lateral and terminal moraines were not suitable for sampling, recessional moraines indicate that the Karçal Valley palaeoglacier deglaciation started at least 19.9 ± 1.2 ka ago. Fossil rock glacier samples were dated to 15.7 ± 1.3 ka. These quantitative results are first in the Lesser Caucasus and compatible with previous ages obtained from other valleys in the nearby Eastern Black Sea region, Anatolian and some of the European Mountains.

  13. Late quaternary temporal and event classifications, Great Lakes region, North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, W.H.; Hansel, A.K.; Bettis, E. Arthur; Karrow, P.F.; Larson, G.J.; Lowell, T.V.; Schneider, Allan F.

    1997-01-01

    Several temporal and event classifications are used for the Quaternary glacial and interglacial record in the Great Lakes region of North America. Although based on contrasting principles, the classifications, as practiced, are similar to one another in most respects and they differ little from the classification proposed by Chamberlin a century ago. All are based on stratigraphic units having time-transgressive boundaries; thus the associated time spans and events are diachronous. Where application of geochronologic classification based on isochronous boundaries is not practical or useful, we advocate the use of diachronic principles to establish local and regional temporal and event classifications. Diachronic and event classifications based on such principles are proposed herein for the Great Lakes region. Well-established names, including Wisconsin, Sangamon, and Illinois, are used at the episode (or glaciation/interglaciation) rank without significant redefinition. The Hudson Episode (Interglaciation) is introduced for postglacial time, the current interglacial interval. The Wisconsin Episode is divided into the Ontario, Elgin, and Michigan Subepisodes in the eastern and northern parts of the Great Lakes region and into the Athens and Michigan Subepisodes in the southern and western parts of the Great Lakes region. ?? 1997 University of Washington.

  14. Late Quaternary rates of uplift and shortening at Baatar Hyarhan (Mongolian Altai) with optically stimulated luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, Edwin; Walker, Richard; Molor, Erdenebat; Fattahi, Morteza; Bayasgalan, Amgalan

    2009-04-01

    We investigate mountain building in the Altai range of western Mongolia, focusing on Baatar Hyarhan, a NW-trending massif bounded by active thrust faults. Our primary aims are to describe how thrusting has evolved over time, to calculate late Quaternary slip rates by dating offset alluvial markers with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and to compare these late Quaternary rates with measurements of deformation on decadal and geological timescales. Patterns of topography and drainage suggest that Baatar Hyarhan has grown in length and has propagated laterally from the SE towards the NW over time. On the NE side of the massif, the range-bounding Zereg fault appears active only along younger parts of Baatar Hyarhan; next to the oldest, SE part of the massif faulting has migrated into the adjacent Zereg Basin, where it has uplifted low, linear ridges of folded sediment, known locally as forebergs. On the SW side of the massif, only the range-bounding Tsetseg fault appears active. Using OSL, we establish ages of ~15, ~20 and ~85 kyr for alluvial deposits cut by these faults. These ages are close to those of alluvial markers in the separate Gobi Altai range, suggesting that periods of fan and terrace formation may correlate over wide tracts of Mongolia, presumably under the primary control of climate. Combining our OSL ages with offsets measured with differential GPS, we calculate Late Quaternary slip rates across forebergs in the Zereg Basin and across the range-bounding Zereg and Tsetseg faults. Uncertainties in fault dip (due to lack of clear fault exposures) and burial ages (due to incomplete resetting of the luminescence clock) mean that the exact slip rates are poorly constrained. Nevertheless, the vertical displacement rates we calculate across the Zereg and Tsetseg range-front faults-0.2-0.6 and 0.1-0.4 mm yr-1, respectively-are at the lower end of long-term (~5 Myr) estimates of 0.4-0.8 and 0.3-0.7 mm yr-1, respectively. Vertical rates of deformation may

  15. Late Quaternary incision and deposition in an active volcanic setting: The Volturno valley fill, southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorosi, Alessandro; Pacifico, Annamaria; Rossi, Veronica; Ruberti, Daniela

    2012-12-01

    Extensive illustration of depositional facies, ostracod and foraminiferal assemblages, and Late Quaternary stratigraphic architecture is offered for the first time from beneath the modern coastal plain of Volturno River, the longest river in southern Italy. Proximity to an active volcanic district, including quiescent Vesuvius Volcano, provides an easily identifiable stratigraphic marker (Campania Grey Tuff or CGT), up to 55 m thick, emplaced 39 ky cal BP by a large-volume explosive pyroclastic eruption. Identification of top CGT to a maximum depth of 30 m allows tracing out the shape of a 15-20 km wide Late Quaternary palaeovalley incised by Volturno River into the thick ignimbritic unit immediately after its deposition. A terraced palaeotopography of the valley flanks is reconstructed on the basis of core data. Above the basal fluvial deposits, the early Holocene transgressive facies consist of a suite of estuarine (freshwater to brackish) deposits. These are separated from overlying transgressive barrier sands by a distinctive wave ravinement surface. Upwards, a distinctive shallowing-upward succession of middle-late Holocene age is interpreted to reflect initiation and subsequent progradation of a wave-dominated delta system, with flanking strandplains, in response to reduced rate of sea-level rise. The turnaround from transgressive to highstand conditions is identified on the basis of subtle changes in the meiofauna. These enable tracking of the maximum flooding surface into its updip (lagoonal/estuarine) counterpart, thus highlighting the role of refined palaeontological criteria as a powerful tool for high-resolution sequence-stratigraphic studies.

  16. Seismic expression of Late Quaternary Banda submarine canyon and fan offshore northern Baja California

    SciTech Connect

    Legg, M.R.

    1987-05-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection profiles obtained throughout the inner California continental borderland offshore northwestern Baja California, Mexico, show the presence of numerous modern submarine canyons and associated fans. One set of these, the Banda submarine canyon/fan, is of relatively recent origin, as demonstrated by onlap of the basal fan sediments against an acoustically transparent, presumably hemipelagic deposit. Late Quaternary sedimentation rates inferred from isotopically dated piston core samples place the age of the postulated hemipelagic unit at approximately 650,000 years ago. The Banda submarine canyon heads within the Bahia Todos Santo and passes through a narrow gorge between Punta Banda and Islas Todos Santos. It is proposed that this submarine canyon and fan system formed entirely during late Quaternary time, following the breach of the Punta Banda ridge during a late Pleistocene high sea level stand. The presence of an ancient, buried channel exiting to the north out of Bahia Todos Santos probably marks the head of an earlier submarine canyon which acted as the conduit of clastic sediments from Valle Maneadero to the deep borderland basins. The now active Banda submarine canyon pirated the supply of terrigenous clastics from this older canyon. The active Agua Blanca fault zone cuts across the head of Banda submarine canyon, suggesting that tectonic movements may have played a role in the development of the Banda submarine canyon and fan system.

  17. Global late Quaternary megafauna extinctions linked to humans, not climate change.

    PubMed

    Sandom, Christopher; Faurby, Søren; Sandel, Brody; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2014-07-22

    The late Quaternary megafauna extinction was a severe global-scale event. Two factors, climate change and modern humans, have received broad support as the primary drivers, but their absolute and relative importance remains controversial. To date, focus has been on the extinction chronology of individual or small groups of species, specific geographical regions or macroscale studies at very coarse geographical and taxonomic resolution, limiting the possibility of adequately testing the proposed hypotheses. We present, to our knowledge, the first global analysis of this extinction based on comprehensive country-level data on the geographical distribution of all large mammal species (more than or equal to 10 kg) that have gone globally or continentally extinct between the beginning of the Last Interglacial at 132,000 years BP and the late Holocene 1000 years BP, testing the relative roles played by glacial-interglacial climate change and humans. We show that the severity of extinction is strongly tied to hominin palaeobiogeography, with at most a weak, Eurasia-specific link to climate change. This first species-level macroscale analysis at relatively high geographical resolution provides strong support for modern humans as the primary driver of the worldwide megafauna losses during the late Quaternary.

  18. Global late Quaternary megafauna extinctions linked to humans, not climate change

    PubMed Central

    Sandom, Christopher; Faurby, Søren; Sandel, Brody; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2014-01-01

    The late Quaternary megafauna extinction was a severe global-scale event. Two factors, climate change and modern humans, have received broad support as the primary drivers, but their absolute and relative importance remains controversial. To date, focus has been on the extinction chronology of individual or small groups of species, specific geographical regions or macroscale studies at very coarse geographical and taxonomic resolution, limiting the possibility of adequately testing the proposed hypotheses. We present, to our knowledge, the first global analysis of this extinction based on comprehensive country-level data on the geographical distribution of all large mammal species (more than or equal to 10 kg) that have gone globally or continentally extinct between the beginning of the Last Interglacial at 132 000 years BP and the late Holocene 1000 years BP, testing the relative roles played by glacial–interglacial climate change and humans. We show that the severity of extinction is strongly tied to hominin palaeobiogeography, with at most a weak, Eurasia-specific link to climate change. This first species-level macroscale analysis at relatively high geographical resolution provides strong support for modern humans as the primary driver of the worldwide megafauna losses during the late Quaternary. PMID:24898370

  19. Seismic stratigraphy and depositional history of late Quaternary deposits in the Yellow Sea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gwang-Soo; Yoo, Dong Geun; Bae, Sungho; Choul Kim, Dae; Yi, Hi-Il

    2016-04-01

    To identify the seismic stratigraphy and depositional history of late Quaternary deposits in the Yellow Sea, approximately 52,600 line-km of Chirp seismic profiles and 5,060 line-km of Sparker seismic profiles were analyzed. The Yellow Sea are correspond to three sedimentary environments: (1) a various scale sand ridges/waves and mud belt (the western inner-shelf of the Korean Peninsula), (2) recent- and paleo-channels, erosional and broad surface (the center of the Yellow Sea), and (3) prodelta mud patch (the eastern offshore of China). Based on the seismic stratigraphic analysis of seismic profiles, the late Quaternary deposits in the Yellow Sea are divided into five distinctive seismic units (units CY1~5), consisting of two depositional sequences that can be defined as erosional and disconformable strata. Each unit show different seismic facies and geometry, and is clearly separated by each bounding surface. The major depositional processes and sediment dispersal systems during the late Quaternary in the Yellow Sea are: (1) regressive estuarine/deltaic deposits (unit CY1), (2) transgressive incised channel fill (unit CY2), (3) transgressive sand sheet (unit CY3), (4) transgressive sand ridges (unit CY4), and (5) prodelta/recent mud (unit CY5). The depositional sequences follow the general concepts of sequence stratigraphy very well. Lower sequence (DI) correspond to the falling stage systems tract regarded as regressive estuarine or deltaic deposits (unit CY1), whereas upper sequence (DII) consists of a set of the transgressive (units CY2, CY3, and CY4) and highstand systems tract (unit CY5) formed since the last-glacial period.

  20. Late Quaternary Surface Rupture Along the Seattle Fault Zone Near Bellevue, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrod, B. L.

    2002-12-01

    Fault strands in the eastern part of the Seattle fault zone (SFZ) ruptured the ground surface at least two times in late Quaternary time. Previous paleoseismic evidence for late Holocene surface faulting along the SFZ focused on north-dipping thrust faults between Seattle and Bremerton. In contrast, several exposures along the SFZ east of Seattle show surface rupture on south-dipping thrust faults. At Factoria, about 12 km east of Seattle, a ravine crossing the fault zone exposes proglacial lake sediments thrust over younger outwash to the north. Locally, this fault may account for a south side up topographic scarp. At Vasa Park on the west shore of Lake Sammamish about 16 km east of Seattle, recent excavations at two sites (RipRap and Blackberry) exposed a W to NNW-striking fault zone. At the RipRap site, NNW-striking subvertical dip-slip faults form a contact between glacial till and Miocene bedrock, and appear to accommodate bedding-plane slip in the steeply dipping till. The vertical faults merge upward with or are truncated by SW-dipping thrust faults in the overlying bedrock. A radiocarbon age on charcoal immediately overlying bedrock-derived colluvium suggests that the last event occurred between ~16,000 and ~4500 years BP. At the Blackberry trench about 200 m east of the RipRap site, Miocene volcanic mudstone and Quaternary glacial deposits are thrust northward over late Quaternary glacial deposits and a Holocene forest soil. Stratigraphic relationships suggest at least 3 m of horizontal motion and 2m of vertical motion during the last earthquake. A radiocarbon age on charcoal at the top of the buried soil indicates that the last event postdates 11550+/-40 years BP. Pending radiocarbon analyses will help refine the age of the last event. Thrusts cut by a Pleistocene (?) stream channel eroded into the hanging wall suggest at least one earlier episode of faulting.

  1. Thermoluminescence and new 14C age estimates for late quaternary loesses in southwestern Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maat, P.B.; Johnson, W.C.

    1996-01-01

    Loess of late Quaternary age mantles most of Nebraska south of the Platte River Valley. At least five late Quaternary loesses are recognized: from oldest to youngest, one or more undifferentiated pre-lllinoian loesses, the Loveland Loess, the Gilman Canyon Loess, which exhibits a well developed soil and rests unconformably on the Sangamon soil, the Peoria Loess capped by the Brady soil, and the Bignell Loess, which is distributed discontinuously. Previous research shows that the Loveland Loess is Illinoian. the Gilman Canyon Loess and Peoria Loess are Wisconsin, and the Bignell Loess is Holocene. We present here the first thermoluminescence (TL) age estimates and new C ages for these late Quaternary loesses at two key sections in southwestern Nebraska, the Eustis ash pit and the Bignell Hill road cut. TL age estimates from all samples collected from Eustis ash pit and Bignell Hill were internally consistent. TL and C age estimates from these two sections generally agree and support previous age determinations. The TL age estimate on Loveland Loess indicates deposition at 163 ka. TL and radiocarbon age estimates indicate that Oilman Canyon Loess, believed to be deposited during the Farmdale interstade, first began to accumulate at about 40 ka: the lower part of the Gilman Canyon Loess is 36 ka at Eustis and the middle of the unit is 30 ka at Bignell Hill. The lower and upper parts of the Peoria Loess give age estimates of 24 ka and 17 ka, respectively. TL age estimates for deposition of the Bignell Loess are 9 ka near the base, in agreement with radiocarbon age estimates, and 6 ka immediately below the modern soil, substantiating its Holocene age. Comparisons of TL age estimates with ??18O and insolation curves which show loess deposition during interglacial and interstadial as well as glacial periods, indicate that loess deposition on the Great Plains can occur under a variety of climatic conditions.

  2. Fluvial responses to late Quaternary climate change in the Shiyang River drainage system, western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hongshan; Li, Zongmeng; Pan, Baotian; Liu, Fenliang; Liu, Xiaopeng

    2016-04-01

    As a drainage system located in arid western China, the Shiyang River, combined with considerable fluvial strata and landform information, provides an environmental context within which to investigate fluvial responses to late Quaternary climate change. Sedimentological analysis and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating enabled us to reconstruct the processes and fluvial styles of three sedimentary sequences of the Shagou and Hongshui rivers in the Shiyang drainage system. Our results present a variety of river behaviors during the late Quaternary in these areas. In the upstream Shiyang River, Zhangjiadazhuang (ZJDZ) profile of the Shagou was dominated by aggradation and a meandering channel pattern at 10.6-4.2 ka, while a noticeable channel incision occurred at ~ 4.2 ka followed by lateral channel migration. In the downstream Shiyang River, Datugou (DTG) profile of the Hongshui was an aggrading meandering river from 39.7 to 7.2 ka while channel incision occurred at 7.2 ka. Another downstream profile, Wudunwan (WDW) of the Hongshui was also characterized by aggradation from 22.4 to 4.8 ka; however, its channel pattern shifted from braided to meandering at ~ 13 ka. A discernable downcutting event occurred at ~ 4.8 ka, followed by three channel aggradation and incision episodes prior to 1.8 ka. The last 1.8 ka has been characterized by modern channel and floodplain development. The fluvial processes and styles investigated have a close correlation with late Quaternary climate change in the Shiyang River drainage. During cold phases, the WDW reach was dominated by aggradation with a braided channel pattern. During warm phases, the rivers that we investigated were also characterized by aggradation but with meandering channel patterns. Channel incision events and changes of fluvial style occurred mainly during climate transitions.

  3. Paleoclimatic forcing of magnetic susceptibility variations in Alaskan loess during the late Quaternary

    SciTech Connect

    Beget, J.E.; Stone, D.B.; Hawkins, D.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Visual matches and statistical tests suggest correlations between marine isotope curves, retrodictive solar insolation at lat 65{degree}N, and magnetic susceptibility profiles through late Quaternary age Alaskan loess sections. The susceptibility changes largely appear to reflect variability in magnetite content due to climatically controlled changes in wind intensity and competence. Magnetic susceptibility profiles through massive loess can provide stratigraphic context for intercalated paleosols and tephras. A prominent paleosol correlated with marine isotope stage 5 occurs several metres above the Old Crow ash in loess sections, indicating that this important tephra is older than suggested by thermoluminescence dates, and may have been deposited ca. 215 {plus minus}25 ka.

  4. Human Dispersals Along the African Rift Valley in the Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryon, C. A.; Faith, J. T.; Peppe, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Climate- and tectonic-driven environmental dynamics of the East African Rift System (EARS) during the Quaternary played an important role in the demographic history of early Homo sapiens, including expansions of modern humans across and out of Africa. Human forager population size, geographic range, and behaviors such as hunting strategies and residential mobility likely varied in response to changes in the local and regional environment. Throughout the Quaternary, floral and faunal change was linked at least in part to variations in moisture availability, temperature, and atmospheric CO2, which in addition to uplift and faulting, contributed to the expansion and contraction of a number of large lakes that served as biogeographic barriers to many taxa. This is particularly clear for the Lake Victoria basin, where biogeographic, geological, and paleontological evidence documents repeated expansion and contraction of the ranges of species in response to lake level and vegetation change. Across much of eastern Africa, the topography of the rift facilitated north-south dispersals, the timing of which may have depended in part on the expansion and contraction of the equatorial forest belt. Dispersal potential likely increased during the more arid periods of the late Quaternary, when the roles of lakes and forests as dispersal barriers was reduced and the extent of low net primary productivity dry grasslands increased, the latter requiring large home ranges for human foragers, conditions suitable for range expansions within H. sapiens.

  5. A Late-Glacial sedimentary sequence at KIlkeel, Northern Ireland: implications for the glaciation of the Irish Sea Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Jon; Roberson, Sam; Cooper, Mark

    2017-04-01

    of cross-trough stratified sandy gravels, with flame structures indicative of syn-depositional loading. The entire sequence is capped by loose interbedded sands and gravels (LA4) representing a Late-Glacial raised beach. Evidence of a marine terminating ice margin provides support for high relative sea levels in the north western sector of the Irish Sea during deglaciation. Forthcoming dates from shells with the rafted subaqueous fan deposits underlying LF2 provide the opportunity to constrain either: a) sea-level rise prior to the onset of Irish Sea Basin glaciation, or, b) Late-Glacial sea level rise following deglaciation of the Irish Sea and prior to the re-advance of local ice masses.

  6. Palaeoenvironmental dynamics inferred from late Quaternary permafrost deposits on Kurungnakh Island, Lena Delta, Northeast Siberia, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterich, Sebastian; Kuzmina, Svetlana; Andreev, Andrei A.; Kienast, Frank; Meyer, Hanno; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Kuznetsova, Tatyana; Sierralta, Melanie

    2008-08-01

    Late Quaternary palaeoenvironments of the Siberian Arctic were reconstructed by combining data from several fossil bioindicators (pollen, plant macro-fossils, ostracods, insects, and mammal bones) with sedimentological and cryolithological data from permafrost deposits. The record mirrors the environmental history of Beringia and covers glacial/interglacial and stadial/interstadial climate variations with a focus on the Middle Weichselian interstadial (50-32 kyr BP). The late Pleistocene to Holocene sequence on Kurungnakh Island reflects the development of periglacial landscapes under changing sedimentation regimes which were meandering fluvial during the Early Weichselian, colluvial or proluvial on gently inclined plaines during the Middle and Late Weichselian, and thermokarst-affected during the Holocene. Palaeoecological records indicate the existence of tundra-steppe vegetation under cold continental climate conditions during the Middle Weichselian interstadial. Due to sedimentation gaps in the sequence between 32 and 17 kyr BP and 17 and 8 kyr BP, the Late Weichselian stadial is incompletely represented in the studied outcrops. Nevertheless, by several palaeoecological indications arctic tundra-steppe vegetation under extremely cold-arid conditions prevailed during the late Pleistocene. The tundra-steppe disappeared completely due to lasting paludification during the Holocene. Initially subarctic shrub tundra formed, which later retreated in course of the late Holocene cooling.

  7. Glaciations in response to climate variations preconditioned by evolving topography.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Vivi Kathrine; Egholm, David Lundbek

    2013-01-10

    Landscapes modified by glacial erosion show a distinct distribution of surface area with elevation (hypsometry). In particular, the height of these regions is influenced by climatic gradients controlling the altitude where glacial and periglacial processes are the most active, and as a result, surface area is focused just below the snowline altitude. Yet the effect of this distinct glacial hypsometric signature on glacial extent and therefore on continued glacial erosion has not previously been examined. Here we show how this topographic configuration influences the climatic sensitivity of Alpine glaciers, and how the development of a glacial hypsometric distribution influences the intensity of glaciations on timescales of more than a few glacial cycles. We find that the relationship between variations in climate and the resulting variation in areal extent of glaciation changes drastically with the degree of glacial modification in the landscape. First, in landscapes with novel glaciations, a nearly linear relationship between climate and glacial area exists. Second, in previously glaciated landscapes with extensive area at a similar elevation, highly nonlinear and rapid glacial expansions occur with minimal climate forcing, once the snowline reaches the hypsometric maximum. Our results also show that erosion associated with glaciations before the mid-Pleistocene transition at around 950,000 years ago probably preconditioned the landscape--producing glacial landforms and hypsometric maxima--such that ongoing cooling led to a significant change in glacial extent and erosion, resulting in more extensive glaciations and valley deepening in the late Pleistocene epoch. We thus provide a mechanism that explains previous observations from exposure dating and low-temperature thermochronology in the European Alps, and suggest that there is a strong topographic control on the most recent Quaternary period glaciations.

  8. Landscape and climate on the northern Tibetan Plateau during the late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauch, G.; Schulte, P.; Ramisch, A.; Hartmann, K.; Hülle, D.; Lockot, G.; Diekmann, B.; Nottebaum, V.; Müller, C.; Wünnemann, B.; Yan, D.; Lehmkuhl, F.

    2017-06-01

    Palaeoclimate reconstruction on the northern Tibetan Plateau resulted in a large spectrum of different and partly divergent interpretations for the climate evolution during the late glacial and the Holocene. In some cases this is caused by incomplete understanding of the geomorphological processes influencing the different proxies used. To overcome these limitations and to enhance the understanding of the complex process interactions in a sensitive and highly dynamical environment a detailed analysis of different members of the sedimentary system at Lake Heihai on the northern Tibetan Plateau was conducted. Lake level variations during the late Pleistocene were influenced by sediment supply to an alluvial fan. This sediment surplus resulted in the temporary blocking of the outflow of Lake Heihai. High sediment supply presumably occurred during or shortly after large glaciations in the Kunlun Shan. The spatial distribution of aeolian sediments revealed a strong relationship to possible source areas. This resulted in a spatially heterogeneous distribution of the aeolian sediments. Furthermore, topographic effects have an important influence on the preservation of the sediments. Aeolian sediments deposited in sheltered positions might not be comparable with other archives with a similar grain size. Nevertheless, deposition of loess during the mid-Holocene indicates a shift to wetter climate conditions on the northern Tibetan Plateau. This might be caused by the intrusion of the East Asian Summer monsoon into the area. During the late Holocene, the Asian summer monsoon retreated and aeolian sediments were reactivated.

  9. Slope Deposits and (Paleo)Soils as Geoarchives to Reconstruct Late Quaternary Environments of Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerkamp, K.; Voelkel, J.; Heine, K.; Bens, O.

    2009-04-01

    Although it is clear that large, rapid temperature changes have occurred during the last glacial-interglacial cycle and the Holocene in southern Africa, we have only limited, and often imprecise, knowledge of how the major moisture-bearing atmospheric circulation systems have reacted to these changes. Using slope deposits and soils as palaeoclimatic geoarchives we will overcome these constraints. The role of many geoarchives in the reconstruction of the Quaternary climate in southern Africa remains controversial, since the paleoclimate data are based on evidence from marine cores, lake sediments, speleothems and spring sinter, fluvial sediments, aeolian sands and dust, colluvium, and coastal sediments. To elucidate climate controls on Quaternary landscape evolution and to use these data for palaeoclimatic reconstructions, thus far slope deposits and soils have been investigated. Climatic controls on these cycles are incompletely known. The availability of results from earlier fieldwork, micromorphology, Optical Stimulated Luminescence (OSL), 14C dating and stable carbon isotope analysis will permit a thorough assessment of slope deposits and soils in terms of their palaeoenvironmental potential. The knowledge of suitable areas and sites in different climatic zones of southern Africa where slope deposits and soils have already been found document the late Quaternary climatic history and even climatic anomalies (e.g. Younger Dryas period at Eksteenfontein, 8.2 ka event at Tsumkwe, 4 ka event in the Auob valley, Little Ice Age in the Namib Desert). The findings will show the late Quaternary history of precipitation fluctuations, of the shifting of the ITCZ (and the ABF - Agulhas-Benguela Front), of wind intensities and directions, and of extreme precipitation events. The project will employ state-of-the-art geoscience methodology to interpret the record of precipitation changes of the late Quaternary, including the shifting of the summer and winter rain belts, the

  10. Palynological evidence for a southward shift of the North Atlantic Current at ~2.6 Ma during the intensification of late Cenozoic Northern Hemisphere glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennissen, Jan A. I.; Head, Martin J.; De Schepper, Stijn; Groeneveld, Jeroen

    2014-06-01

    The position of the North Atlantic Current (NAC) during the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation (iNHG) has been evaluated using dinoflagellate cyst assemblages and foraminiferal geochemistry from a ~260 kyr interval straddling the base of the Quaternary System from two sites: eastern North Atlantic Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 610 in the path of the present NAC and central North Atlantic Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1313 in the subtropical gyre. Stable isotope and foraminiferal Mg/Ca analyses confirm cooling near the marine isotope stage (MIS) G7-G6 transition (2.74 Ma). However, a continued dominance of the dinoflagellate cyst Operculodinium centrocarpum sensu Wall and Dale (1966) indicates an active NAC in the eastern North Atlantic for a further 140 kyr. At MIS 104 (~2.60 Ma), a profound dinoflagellate cyst assemblage turnover indicates NAC shutdown in the eastern North Atlantic, implying elevated atmospheric pressure over the Arctic and a resulting shift in the westerlies that would have driven the NAC. These findings challenge recent suggestions that there was no significant southward shift of the NAC or the Arctic Front during iNHG, and reveal a fundamental climatic reorganization near the base of the Quaternary.

  11. Late Tertiary and Quaternary geology of the Tecopa basin, southeastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Hillhouse, J.W.

    1987-12-31

    Stratigraphic units in the Tecopa basin, located in southeastern California, provide a framework for interpreting Quaternary climatic change and tectonism along the present Amargosa River. During the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene, a climate that was appreciably wetter than today`s sustained a moderately deep lake in the Tecopa basin. Deposits associated with Lake Tecopa consists of lacustrine mudstone, conglomerate, volcanic ash, and shoreline accumulations of tufa. Age control within the lake deposits is provided by air-fall tephra that are correlated with two ash falls from the Yellowstone caldera and one from the Long Valley caldera. Lake Tecopa occupied a closed basin during the latter part, if not all, of its 2.5-million-year history. Sometime after 0.5 m.y. ago, the lake developed an outlet across Tertiary fanglomerates of the China Ranch Beds leading to the development of a deep canyon at the south end of the basin and establishing a hydrologic link between the northern Amargosa basins and Death Valley. After a period of rapid erosion, the remaining lake beds were covered by alluvial fans that coalesced to form a pediment in the central part of the basin. Holocene deposits consist of unconsolidated sand and gravel in the Amargosa River bed and its deeply incised tributaries, a small playa near Tecopa, alluvial fans without pavements, and small sand dunes. The pavement-capped fan remnants and the Holocene deposits are not faulted or tilted significantly, although basins to the west, such as Death Valley, were tectonically active during the Quaternary. Subsidence of the western basins strongly influenced late Quaternary rates of deposition and erosion in the Tecopa basin.

  12. Eolian sediment responses to late Quaternary climate changes: Temporal and spatial patterns in the Sahara

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swezey, C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a compilation of eolian-based records of late Quaternary climate changes in the Sahara. Although the data are relatively sparse, when viewed as a whole, they reveal a general pattern of widespread eolian sediment mobilization prior to 11,000 cal. years BP, eolian sediment stabilization from 11,000 to 5000 cal. years BP, and a return to widespread eolian sediment mobilization after 5000 cal. years BP. Furthermore, an eolian-based record from southern Tunisia reveals the existence of millennial-scale changes in eolian sediment behavior. These millennial-scale variations provide examples of eolian sediment responses to climate changes at a scale intermediate between seasonal and orbital ('Milankovitch') changes, and they are also coincident with abrupt atmospheric and oceanic changes. The general synchroneity of the eolian stratigraphic records and their coincidence with various oceanic and atmospheric changes suggest that global forcing mechanisms have influenced late Quaternary eolian sediment behavior in the Sahara. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  13. Geochemical evidence for the origin of late Quaternary loess in central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Loess is extensive in central Alaska, but there are uncertainties about its source and the direction of paleo-winds that deposited it. Both northerly and southerly winds have been inferred. The most likely sources of loess are the Tanana River (south), the Nenana River (southeast), and the Yukon River (north). Late Quaternary loess in central Alaska has immobile trace-element compositions (Cr/Sc, Th/Ta, Th/ Sc, Th/U, Eu/Eu*, GdN/YbN) that indicate derivation mostly from the Tanana River. However, other ratios (As/Sb, Zr/Hf, LaN/YbN) and quantitative modeling indicate that the Yukon River was also a source. During the last glacial period, there may have been a longer residence time of the Siberian and Canadian high-pressure cells, along with a strengthened Aleutian low-pressure cell. This would have generated regional-scale northeasterly winds and explains derivation of loess from the Yukon River. However, superim-posed upon this synoptic-scale circulation, there may have been strong, southerly katabatic winds from expanded glaciers on the northern flank of the Alaska Range. These winds could have provided eolian silt from the Tanana River. Yukon River and Tanana River sediments are highly calcareous, whereas Fairbanks-area loess is not. This suggests that carbonate leaching in loess kept ahead of sedimentation and that late Quaternary loess in central Alaska was deposited relatively slowly. ?? 2006 NRC Canada.

  14. Distinguishing allogenic from autogenic causes of bed elevation change in late Quaternary alluvial stratigraphic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, J. Michael

    2008-10-01

    Allogenic and autogenic mechanisms both cause changes in the bed elevation of rivers and thereby influence the characteristics of alluvial stratigraphic records (ASRs). Allogenic forcing mechanisms can be grouped into five categories whose relative influence varies with timescale: climate, tectonism, base level, land use/land cover and direct human modification of channels. Late Quaternary ASRs are influenced by the greatest range of allogenic forcing variables with climate among the most important. Autogenic mechanisms of bed elevation change are ubiquitous throughout fluvial systems and are always time-transgressive. Autogenic bed elevation change propagates through drainage networks at predictable rates and results in a time-space envelope within which its effects are capable of operating. ASRs that can be correlated over geographical areas large enough and time intervals small enough to exist outside this envelope most likely result from allogenic forcing. This formulation represents a quantitative and geographic set of threshold criteria for distinguishing between autogenic and allogenic mechanisms. Over late Quaternary timescales (10 2 to 10 5 years) in tectonically stable regions climate change is the dominant allogenic mechanism and, therefore, the first-order control on the morphology, sedimentology, pedologic characteristics and chronology of alluvial stratigraphic records that meet or exceed the threshold criteria for demonstrating allogenic causality.

  15. Estimates of late Quaternary mode and intermediate water silicic acid concentration in the Pacific Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Jonathon; Ellwood, Michael J.; Bostock, Helen; Neil, Helen

    2016-04-01

    The Southern Ocean plays a critical role in the exchange of carbon between the ocean and atmosphere over glacial-interglacial timescales. Hypotheses used to explain late Quaternary variations in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) implicate changes in the nutrient dynamics and circulation of the Southern Ocean. Here we present silicon isotope (δ30Si) records of late Quaternary sponges and diatoms from the NZ-sector of the Southern Ocean. Analysis of our sponge δ30Si records strongly suggests that the silicic acid concentration at mode and intermediate depths was higher during the LGM and the deglacial period compared to the present day. Our diatom δ30Si record suggests biological productivity near of the Polar Front was greater during the deglacial period, but not significantly different during the LGM compared to the present day. Taking our dataset in context with other regional paleoceanographic records, we interpret the predicted elevation in LGM and deglacial silicic acid concentration to reflect a shoaling of water masses during the LGM and 'leakage' of excess Southern Ocean dissolved silicon during the deglacial period.

  16. Reconnaissance study of late quaternary faulting along cerro GoDen fault zone, western Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mann, P.; Prentice, C.S.; Hippolyte, J.-C.; Grindlay, N.R.; Abrams, L.J.; Lao-Davila, D.

    2005-01-01

    The Cerro GoDen fault zone is associated with a curvilinear, continuous, and prominent topographic lineament in western Puerto Rico. The fault varies in strike from northwest to west. In its westernmost section, the fault is ???500 m south of an abrupt, curvilinear mountain front separating the 270- to 361-m-high La CaDena De San Francisco range from the Rio A??asco alluvial valley. The Quaternary fault of the A??asco Valley is in alignment with the bedrock fault mapped by D. McIntyre (1971) in the Central La Plata quadrangle sheet east of A??asco Valley. Previous workers have postulated that the Cerro GoDen fault zone continues southeast from the A??asco Valley and merges with the Great Southern Puerto Rico fault zone of south-central Puerto Rico. West of the A??asco Valley, the fault continues offshore into the Mona Passage (Caribbean Sea) where it is characterized by offsets of seafloor sediments estimated to be of late Quaternary age. Using both 1:18,500 scale air photographs taken in 1936 and 1:40,000 scale photographs taken by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1986, we iDentified geomorphic features suggestive of Quaternary fault movement in the A??asco Valley, including aligned and Deflected drainages, apparently offset terrace risers, and mountain-facing scarps. Many of these features suggest right-lateral displacement. Mapping of Paleogene bedrock units in the uplifted La CaDena range adjacent to the Cerro GoDen fault zone reveals the main tectonic events that have culminated in late Quaternary normal-oblique displacement across the Cerro GoDen fault. Cretaceous to Eocene rocks of the La CaDena range exhibit large folds with wavelengths of several kms. The orientation of folds and analysis of fault striations within the folds indicate that the folds formed by northeast-southwest shorTening in present-day geographic coordinates. The age of Deformation is well constrained as late Eocene-early Oligocene by an angular unconformity separating folDed, Deep

  17. Late Quaternary valley infill and dissection in the Indus River, western Tibetan Plateau margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blöthe, Jan H.; Munack, Henry; Korup, Oliver; Fülling, Alexander; Garzanti, Eduardo; Resentini, Alberto; Kubik, Peter W.

    2014-06-01

    The Indus, one of Earth's major rivers, drains large parts of the NW Himalaya and the Transhimalayan ranges that form part of the western Tibetan Plateau margin. In the western Himalayan syntaxis, where local topographic relief exceeds 7 km, the Indus has incised a steep bedrock gorge at rates of several mm yr-1. Upstream, however, the upper Indus and its tributaries alternate between bedrock gorges and broad alluvial flats flanked by the Ladakh and Zanskar ranges. We review the late Quaternary valley history in this region with a focus on the confluence of the Indus and Zanskar Rivers, where vast alluvial terrace staircases and lake sediments record major episodes of aggradation and incision. New absolute dating of high-level fluvial terrace remnants using cosmogenic 10Be, optically and infrared stimulated luminescence (OSL, IRSL) indicates at least two phases of late Quaternary valley infilling. These phases commenced before ˜200 ka and ˜50-20 ka, judging from terrace treads stranded >150 m and ˜30-40 m above modern river levels, respectively. Numerous stacks of lacustrine sediments that straddle the Indus River >200 km between the city of Leh and the confluence with the Shyok River share a distinct horizontal alignment. Constraints from IRSL samples of lacustrine sequences from the Leh-Spituk area reveal a protracted lake phase from >177 ka to 72 ka, locally accumulating >50-m thick deposits. In the absence of tectonic faulting, major lithological differences, and stream capture, we attribute the formation of this and other large lakes in the region to natural damming by large landslides, glaciers, and alluvial fans. The overall patchy landform age constraints from earlier studies can be reconciled by postulating a major deglacial control on sediment flux, valley infilling, and subsequent incision that has been modulated locally by backwater effects of natural damming. While comparison with Pleistocene monsoon proxies reveals no obvious correlation, a late

  18. The Late Quaternary tephrostratigraphy of annually laminated sediments from Meerfelder Maar, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Christine S.; Brauer, Achim; Martín-Puertas, Celia; Blockley, Simon P. E.; Smith, Victoria C.; Tomlinson, Emma L.

    2015-08-01

    The record of Late Quaternary environmental change within the sediments of Meerfelder Maar in the Eifel region of Germany is renowned for its high precision chronology, which is annually laminated throughout the Last Glacial to Interglacial transition (LGIT) and most of the Holocene. Two visible tephra layers are prominent within the floating varve chronology of Meerfelder Maar. An Early Holocene tephra layer, the Ulmener Maar Tephra (∼11,000 varve years BP), provides a tie-line of the Meerfelder Maar record to the varved Holocene record of nearby Lake Holzmaar. The Laacher See Tephra provides another prominent time marker for the late Allerød, ∼200 varve years before the transition into the Younger Dryas at 12,680 varve years BP. Further investigation has now shown that there are also 15 cryptotephra layers within the Meerfelder Maar LGIT-Holocene stratigraphy and these layers hold the potential to make direct comparisons between the Meerfelder Maar record and other palaeoenvironmental archives from across Europe and the North Atlantic. Most notable is the presence of the Vedde Ash, the most widespread Icelandic eruption known from the Late Quaternary, which occurred midway through the Younger Dryas. The Vedde Ash has also been found in the Greenland ice cores and can be used as an isochron around which the GICC05 and Meerfelder Maar annual chronologies can be compared. Near the base of the annual laminations in Meerfelder Maar a cryptotephra is found that correlates to the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff, erupted from Campi Flegrei in southern Italy, 1200 km away. This is the furthest north that the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff has been found, highlighting its importance in the construction of a European-wide tephrostratigraphic framework. The co-location of cryptotephra layers from Italian, Icelandic and Eifel volcanic sources, within such a precise chronological record, makes Meerfelder Maar one of the most important tephrostratotype records for continental Europe during

  19. Late Quaternary distribution dynamics and phylogeography of the red deer ( Cervus elaphus) in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, R. S.; Zachos, F. E.; Street, M.; Jöris, O.; Skog, A.; Benecke, N.

    2008-04-01

    Here we present spatial-temporal patterns for European late Quaternary red deer (Cervus elaphus), based on radiocarbon-supported evidence derived mainly from archaeological sites. This is followed by an overview of the recent phylogeography of this species using haplogroup studies of recent molecular data. The implications of the synthesis of palaeontological and genetic data are discussed and we propose that present day European red deer haplogroup distributions are best explained against the history of late Quaternary population contractions into and expansions from glacial refugia. Around 800 records of Cervus elaphus were assigned to the period covering the later part of the Last Glacial and the Early to Middle Holocene. Red deer becomes increasingly visible in faunal assemblages dated to late OIS-3 (<40.0 ka 14C BP). The species persisted throughout the LGM on the Iberian Peninsula, in adjacent regions of South-Western France (Gascony, Dordogne, Languedoc), on the Italian Peninsula, in the Balkans and Greece, and east of the Carpathians in Moldavia. We suggest that genetic exchange between the populations of the Balkans and the East of the Carpathians remained uninterrupted during the LGM. The expansion of red deer from its southern refugia into Central and Northern Europe begins rapidly at 12,500 14C BP. The expansion of red deer coincides with the sudden rise in temperature at the onset of Greenland Interstadial 1e and the dispersion of open birch woodland into the northern half of Europe. Radiocarbon supported records show a more or less universal distribution of Cervus elaphus across Europe following the Pleistocene/Holocene climatic change at 10.0 ka 14C BP for the first time. Molecular data and fossil record combined provide a clearer temporal and spatial pattern for the Lateglacial recolonisation process of the northern part of Europe.

  20. Late Quaternary Faulting along the San Juan de los Planes Fault Zone, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, M. M.; Coyan, J. A.; Arrowsmith, J.; Maloney, S. J.; Gutierrez, G.; Umhoefer, P. J.

    2007-12-01

    As a result of continued distributed deformation in the Gulf Extensional Province along an oblique-divergent plate margin, active normal faulting is well manifest in southeastern Baja California. By characterizing normal-fault related deformation along the San Juan de los Planes fault zone (SJPFZ) southwest of La Paz, Baja California Sur we contribute to understanding the patterns and rates of faulting along the southwest gulf-margin fault system. The geometry, history, and rate of faulting provide constraints on the relative significance of gulf-margin deformation as compared to axial system deformation. The SJPFZ is a major north-trending structure in the southern Baja margin along which we focused our field efforts. These investigations included: a detailed strip map of the active fault zone, including delineation of active scarp traces and geomorphic surfaces on the hanging wall and footwall; fault scarp profiles; analysis of bedrock structures to better understand how the pattern and rate of strain varied during the development of this fault zone; and a gravity survey across the San Juan de los Planes basin to determine basin geometry and fault behavior. The map covers a N-S swath from the Gulf of California in the north to San Antonio in the south, an area ~45km long and ~1-4km wide. Bedrock along the SJPFZ varies from Cretaceous Las Cruces Granite in the north to Cretaceous Buena Mujer Tonalite in the south and is scarred by shear zones and brittle faults. The active scarp-forming fault juxtaposes bedrock in the footwall against Late Quaternary sandstone-conglomerate. This ~20m wide zone is highly fractured bedrock infused with carbonate. The northern ~12km of the SJPFZ, trending 200°, preserves discontinuous scarps 1-2km long and 1-3m high in Quaternary units. The scarps are separated by stretches of bedrock embayed by hundreds of meters-wide tongues of Quaternary sandstone-conglomerate, implying low Quaternary slip rate. Further south, ~2 km north of the

  1. Late Quaternary Basin-Range faulting north of the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Knuepfer, P.L.K. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    In the decade since the Borah Peak earthquake, paleoseismic studies have elucidated details of the late Quaternary histories of the Lost River, Lemhi, and Beaverhead faults of eastern Idaho, which comprise part of the northward continuation of the Basin-Range province across the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). The faults are segmented but have temporally and/or spatially clustered paleoseismic activity. Each fault comprises five or six segments with distinct paleoseismic history, and maximum late Quaternary slip rates across the central segments of each fault are ca. 0.5 m/ka. However, the faults differ in their behavior. Portions of two segments of the Lost River fault ruptured during the 1983 earthquake, although the prior ruptures of those two segments appear to have been independent. The three central segments of the Lost River fault have had repeat times of around 6,000 years between the last two surface-rupture earthquakes, with the pre-1983 rupture 6,000--8,000 years ago on each; thus paleoseismic activity appears to be spatially clustered. The southernmost segment has a higher slip rate than the segment immediately to its north, countering arguments that slip on the northern Basin-Range faults decays south to the ESRP. Like the Lost River fault, the Lemhi fault comprises 5--6 fault segments with differing paleoseismic histories. The northern 4 segments appear to have ruptured independently during the late Quaternary, and the last ruptures of adjacent segments appear to have significantly different ages, [approximately]6,000--12,000 years ago. Some segments appear to have had relatively uniform uplift rates during the last 130 ka, whereas at least one segment shows a much higher frequency of surface-rupture events prior to around 30 ka. The southern part of the Lemhi fault displays a complicated paleoseismic history, with two or three ruptures of different parts of the fault closely spaced in the 15--25 ka interval and quiescence in the last 15--18 ka.

  2. Glacistore: Understanding Late Cenozoic Glaciation and Basin Processes for the Development of Secure Large Scale Offshore CO2 Storage (North Sea).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, H. A.; Barrio, M.; Akhurst, M.; Aagaard, P.; Alcalde, J.; Bauer, A.; Bradwell, T.; Cavanagh, A.; Faleide, J. I.; Furre, A. K.; Haszeldine, S.; Hjelstuen, B. O.; Holloway, S.; Johansen, H.; Johnson, G.; Kuerschner, W.; Mondol, N. H.; Querendez, E.; Ringrose, P. S.; Sejrup, H. P.; Stewart, M.; Stoddart, D.; Wilkinson, M.; Zalmstra, H.

    2014-12-01

    The sedimentary strata of the North Sea Basin (NSB) record the glacial and interglacial history of environmental change in the Northern Hemisphere, and are a proposed location for the engineered storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from power plant and industrial sources to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. These aspects interact in the geomechanical and fluid flow domain, as ice sheet dynamics change the properties of potential seal and reservoir rocks that are the prospective geological storage strata for much of Europe's captured CO2. The intensification of the global glacial-interglacial cycle at the onset of the Pleistocene (2.5-2.7 Ma) was a critical tipping-point in Earth's recent climate history. The increased severity of glaciations at the Plio-Pleistocene boundary triggered the first development of large-scale continental ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere. The central part of the NSB preserves a unique history of the depositional record spanning at least the last 3 Ma, which also forms the overburden and seal to the underlying CO2 reservoirs. There is good evidence that these ice sheets created strong feedback loops that subsequently affected the evolution of the Quaternary climate system through complex ocean-atmosphere-cryosphere linkages. Understanding NSB dynamics, including the role of fluids in controlling compaction, cementation, and diagenetic processes in shale-dominated basins, is essential for CO2 storage site characterisation to increase understanding and confidence in secure storage. An increased understanding of the overlying sequence will inform quantitative predictions of the performance of prospective CO2 storage sites in glaciated areas in Europe and worldwide; to include improved resolution of glacial cycles (depositional and chronological framework), characterise pore fluids, flow properties of glacial landforms within the sequence (e.g. tunnel valleys) and the geomechanical effects (quantify compaction, rock stiffness, strength

  3. Mapped plant macrofossil and pollen records of late Quaternary vegetation change in eastern North America

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, S.T.; Overpeck, J.T.; Webb, T. III ||

    1995-06-01

    We compiled a plant macrofossil database for 12 eastern North American tree and shrub taxa (Picea sp., P. glauca, P. mariana, Larix laricina, Abies balsamea, Tsuga canadensis, Pinus strobus, P. banksiana, P. resinosa, Betula papyrifera, B. alleghaniensis, B. Series Humiles) at 264 late Quaternary sites. Presence/absence maps for these taxa at 18,000, 15,000, 12,000, 9000, 6000, 3000, and 0 {sup 14}C yr B.P. show changes in geographic ranges of these species in response to climatic change. Comparison of the macrofossil maps with isopoll maps for corresponding taxa corroborates inferences from the pollen data, and reveals species-level patterns not apparent in the pollen maps.

  4. A protocol for subsampling Late Quaternary coprolites for multi-proxy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Jamie R.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.

    2016-04-01

    The study of Late Quaternary coprolites can provide unique insights into various aspects of the biology and ecology of extinct species and prehistoric humans. Coprolite studies are becoming increasingly multi-disciplinary, allowing a greater amount of information to be obtained from individual specimens. Subsampling is a critical part of multi-proxy coprolite analysis, yet no standardised subsampling protocols exist, and details of subsampling methods have rarely been reported in published studies. Here, we outline a procedure for the subsampling of coprolites for multi-proxy analysis. The method is designed to minimise the risk of sample contamination for sensitive analyses (e.g. ancient DNA, palynology), thereby maximising the robustness of interpretations made from the results. We also stress the need for voucher samples to be retained to ensure the repeatability of results and allow for further analytical methods to be applied to specimens in the future.

  5. Late Quaternary environments and prehistoric occupation in the lower White Nile valley, central Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Martin A. J.; Usai, Donatella; Salvatori, Sandro; Williams, Frances M.; Zerboni, Andrea; Maritan, Lara; Linseele, Veerle

    2015-12-01

    Despite the major contributions provided over fifty years ago by A.J. Arkell and J.D. Tothill to our understanding of late Quaternary environments and prehistoric occupation near the confluence of the Blue and White Nile in central Sudan, three key questions have remained unresolved since then. (a) Was the decline in Nile flood levels from early Holocene times onwards caused by a reduction in Nile discharge, or by channel incision, or both? (b) Was the regional climate wetter during times of high Nile floods and drier during times of low Nile floods? (c) Given the high degree of disturbance of Mesolithic and later prehistoric sites, is it possible to identify primary-context, stratified and undisturbed occupation? Drawing upon dated evidence from three sites to the east of and three to the west of the lower White Nile, we provide a qualified answer to the first question and documented affirmative answers to the second and third questions.

  6. Late Quaternary landscape evolution at Flat Laurel Gap, Blue Ridge Mountains, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, David S.

    1988-07-01

    Analysis of colluvial, fluvial, and bog sediments at Flat Laurel Gap (1500 m) in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina provides a record of late Quaternary landscape evolution. Thermoluminescence (TL) analysis provides the first absolute-age determinations available for presumed periglacial deposits in the southern Appalachian Mountains. The Pleistocene/Holocene transition, dated between 11,900 and 10,100 yr B.P., represents a period of climatic amelioration and a change from colluvial to alluvial processes. A TL date of 7400 ± 1000 yr B.P. for matrix within a block-stream indicates possible early Holocene reworking of Pleistocene periglacial colluvium. Organic sediment deposition in a bog that began about 3400 yr B.P. increased in rate from 0.02 to 0.09 cm/yr with the onset of logging and land clearance about 1880 A.D.

  7. Relationship between Antarctic sea ice and southwest African climate during the late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuut, Jan-Berend W.; Crosta, Xavier; van der Borg, Klaas; Schneider, Ralph

    2004-10-01

    Here we compare late Quaternary southwest African climate records from the west coast of southern Africa (published winter rainfall and trade wind intensity records from a core off the coast of Namibia) to records of Antarctic sea-ice extent. This comparison reveals coherent changes between Antarctic sea-ice extent and the southwest African winter rain region since 45 k.y. B.P., with enhanced winter rainfall and trade-wind vigor during periods of increased sea-ice presence. We propose an oceanic and atmospheric coupling between Antarctic sea ice and the winter rainfall zone of southwest Africa that may lead to increased desertification in the region if global warming persists.

  8. Climate change not to blame for late Quaternary megafauna extinctions in Australia.

    PubMed

    Saltré, Frédérik; Rodríguez-Rey, Marta; Brook, Barry W; Johnson, Christopher N; Turney, Chris S M; Alroy, John; Cooper, Alan; Beeton, Nicholas; Bird, Michael I; Fordham, Damien A; Gillespie, Richard; Herrando-Pérez, Salvador; Jacobs, Zenobia; Miller, Gifford H; Nogués-Bravo, David; Prideaux, Gavin J; Roberts, Richard G; Bradshaw, Corey J A

    2016-01-29

    Late Quaternary megafauna extinctions impoverished mammalian diversity worldwide. The causes of these extinctions in Australia are most controversial but essential to resolve, because this continent-wide event presaged similar losses that occurred thousands of years later on other continents. Here we apply a rigorous metadata analysis and new ensemble-hindcasting approach to 659 Australian megafauna fossil ages. When coupled with analysis of several high-resolution climate records, we show that megafaunal extinctions were broadly synchronous among genera and independent of climate aridity and variability in Australia over the last 120,000 years. Our results reject climate change as the primary driver of megafauna extinctions in the world's most controversial context, and instead estimate that the megafauna disappeared Australia-wide ∼13,500 years after human arrival, with shorter periods of coexistence in some regions. This is the first comprehensive approach to incorporate uncertainty in fossil ages, extinction timing and climatology, to quantify mechanisms of prehistorical extinctions.

  9. Late Quaternary in a South Atlantic estuarine system: Stratigraphic and paleontologic indicators of coastal evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliotta, Salvador; Ginsberg, Silvia S.; Spagnuolo, Jorge O.; Farinati, Ester; Giagante, Darío; Vecchi, Laura G.

    2013-08-01

    The decisive influence of Late Quaternary sea level changes on the geological evolution of the coastal plain and adjacent continental shelf around the world has long been recognized. Coastal environments evolve actively during transgressive-regressive cycles whose development depends on sea level and sediment supply variations. The interaction of these variables was key to the current morphological and sedimentological configuration of coastal regions. Particularly, the estuarine system of Bahía Blanca (Argentina) presents various types of deposits and marine fossil accumulations, such as paleochannels in the subbottom, sand-shell ridges and extensive layers with fossils in life position. These features are important geological indicators, because its analysis allows us to define different paleoenvironmental conditions that prevailed during the coastal evolutionary process.

  10. Simulation experiments with late quaternary carbon storage in mid-latitude forest communities

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A.M.; Tharp, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    The assumption was tested that forest biomass in communities on the modern landscape is equivalent to that in similar communities on the late-Quaternary landscape. Forest carbon storage dynamics during the past 16,000 years were derived from a mathematical model of forest processes and individual tree species behavior. Modern pollen and climate data sets provided pollen-climate transfer functions to generate model driving variables from fossil pollen records. Climate variables were estimated from fossil pollen stratigraphies in Tennessee, Ohio, and Michigan. Only simulated early postglacial warming produced the large carbon gains one would expect in mixed deciduous-coniferous forests from unglaciated regions. The simulated mid-Holocene warming generated little carbon storage response by temperate deciduous forests and large carbon gains in northern hardwood-conifer forests, unlike the linear relationship expected when equivalence is assumed between modern and prehistoric forests. Late-glacial, mid-latitude forests may have contained more biomass than would be expected from equivalent forests on the modern landscape. Simulations of alternate hypotheses to explain the enhanced late-glacial cannot distinguish effects of reduced seasonal temperature extremes from effects of changing species' temperature tolerances. 84 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  11. The late Quaternary decline and extinction of palms on oceanic Pacific islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prebble, M.; Dowe, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    Late Quaternary palaeoecological records of palm decline, extirpation and extinction are explored from the oceanic islands of the Pacific Ocean. Despite the severe reduction of faunal diversity coincidental with human colonisation of these previously uninhabited oceanic islands, relatively few plant extinctions have been recorded. At low taxonomic levels, recent faunal extinctions on oceanic islands are concentrated in larger bodied representatives of certain genera and families. Fossil and historic records of plant extinction show a similar trend with high representation of the palm family, Arecaceae. Late Holocene decline of palm pollen types is demonstrated from most islands where there are palaeoecological records including the Cook Islands, Fiji, French Polynesia, the Hawaiian Islands, the Juan Fernandez Islands and Rapanui. A strong correspondence between human impact and palm decline is measured from palynological proxies including increased concentrations of charcoal particles and pollen from cultivated plants and invasive weeds. Late Holocene extinctions or extirpations are recorded across all five of the Arecaceae subfamilies of the oceanic Pacific islands. These are most common for the genus Pritchardia but also many sedis fossil palm types were recorded representing groups lacking diagnostic morphological characters.

  12. Neotectonics of interior Alaska and the late Quaternary slip rate along the Denali fault system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeussler, Peter J.; Matmon, Ari; Schwartz, David P.; Seitz, Gordon G.

    2017-01-01

    The neotectonics of southern Alaska (USA) are characterized by a several hundred kilometers–wide zone of dextral transpressional that spans the Alaska Range. The Denali fault system is the largest active strike-slip fault system in interior Alaska, and it produced a Mw 7.9 earthquake in 2002. To evaluate the late Quaternary slip rate on the Denali fault system, we collected samples for cosmogenic surface exposure dating from surfaces offset by the fault system. This study includes data from 107 samples at 19 sites, including 7 sites we previously reported, as well as an estimated slip rate at another site. We utilize the interpreted surface ages to provide estimated slip rates. These new slip rate data confirm that the highest late Quaternary slip rate is ∼13 mm/yr on the central Denali fault near its intersection with the eastern Denali and the Totschunda faults, with decreasing slip rate both to the east and west. The slip rate decreases westward along the central and western parts of the Denali fault system to 5 mm/yr over a length of ∼575 km. An additional site on the eastern Denali fault near Kluane Lake, Yukon, implies a slip rate of ∼2 mm/yr, based on geological considerations. The Totschunda fault has a maximum slip rate of ∼9 mm/yr. The Denali fault system is transpressional and there are active thrust faults on both the north and south sides of it. We explore four geometric models for southern Alaska tectonics to explain the slip rates along the Denali fault system and the active fault geometries: rotation, indentation, extrusion, and a combination of the three. We conclude that all three end-member models have strengths and shortcomings, and a combination of rotation, indentation, and extrusion best explains the slip rate observations.

  13. Late Quaternary upwelling off tropical NW Africa: new micropalaeontological evidence from ODP Hole 658C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslett, Simon K.; Smart, Christopher W.

    2006-03-01

    Planktonic foraminifera and radiolaria have been analysed in a Late Quaternary (40-0 ka) sediment sequence from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 658C located under a coastal upwelling system near Cap Blanc, offshore northwest Africa, in order to document the palaeoceanographic history of the area. Temporal variations in species abundance and faunal assemblage analysis reveal a tripartite phased sequence of palaeoceanographic change through the Late Quaternary. Phase 1 spans 40-14.5 ka and is characterised by moderate upwelling, but Heinrich event 2 is distinguished as a brief episode of strengthened upwelling. Phase 2 begins with a change in a number of variables at ca. 14.5 ka and extends to ca. 5.5 ka. This phase is characterised by a general strengthening of upwelling, but may be subdivided into three minor phases including (a) the recognition of the Younger Dryas, marked by a temporary reduction in upwelling strength, followed by (b) an intensification of upwelling, and (c) upwelling and high productivity between 8 and 5.5 ka. This phase of upwelling corresponds with maximum Holocene cooling, possibly triggered by the collapse of the Laurentide ice sheet. Phase 3 extends from 5.5 to 0 ka and is characterised by weak upwelling and significant calcite dissolution. These phases are related to climatic events, particularly the African Humid Period (AHP), which is coincident with Phase 2. The AHP is characterised by increased precipitation, linked to an intensification of the African monsoon that enhances North East Trade Wind-driven coastal upwelling and is associated with the expansion of continental vegetation across North Africa.

  14. Micromorphological investigations of the Late Quaternary loess-paleosol sequences of the Kashmir Valley, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dar, Reyaz Ahmad; Chandra, Rakesh; Romshoo, Shakil Ahmad; Kowser, Nazia

    2015-11-01

    The loess-paleosol sequences of the Karewa Group preserve a valuable repository of the Late Quaternary climatic changes and the landscape evolution history of the Karewa Basin of Kashmir Valley in their lithological and pedogenic records. Three representative loess-paleosol sections at Shankerpora (SP), Khan Sahib (KS) and Pattan (PT) localities were chosen for detailed lithostratigraphic fieldwork and micromorphological observations of thin sections. Lithostratigraphic analysis revealed lateral and vertical variation in thickness and number of paleosol profiles from south-west to north-west of the Karewa Basin suggesting the availability of land-surface for periodic loess deposition. The SP section is marked by 6 (SP-S6, S7, S8, S9, S10, S12), KS section by 3 (KS-S2, S4, S5) and PT section by 2 (PT-S1, S3) thick mature paleosol profiles. Theses paleosols have well developed 'Ah' and 'Btk' horizons representing prolonged land-surface stability when pedogenic processes outpace loess deposition. On the other hand comparatively thin to thick paleosol profiles represent weak to moderate pedogenic maturity indicating short stratigraphic breaks with rapid loess deposition. Micromorphological observations of thin sections suggested that clay illuviation and CaCO3 accumulation have operated within the paleosol profiles. CaCO3 features are often associated with clay coatings suggesting decalcification of carbonates followed by clay illuviation. Pedogenic CaCO3 probably resulted from the precipitation of the soil solution near the average depth of wetting front. The pedogenic CaCO3, illuvial clay, mottles, iron manganese features, pedal microstructure and blocky aggregates reveal variation in the pedogenic maturity among and within the loess-paleosol sections. The morphological (both micro- and macro-morphological) attributes of loess-paleosols suggest variation of climatic conditions during the Late Quaternary period in the Karewa Basin of Kashmir Valley, India.

  15. Spatiotemporal patterns of tundra fires: late-Quaternary charcoal records from Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipman, M. L.; Hudspith, V.; Higuera, P. E.; Duffy, P. A.; Kelly, R.; Oswald, W. W.; Hu, F. S.

    2015-07-01

    Anthropogenic climate change has altered many ecosystem processes in the Arctic tundra and may have resulted in unprecedented fire activity. Evaluating the significance of recent fires requires knowledge from the paleofire record because observational data in the Arctic span only several decades, much shorter than the natural fire rotation in Arctic tundra regions. Here we report results of charcoal analysis on lake sediments from four Alaskan lakes to infer the broad spatial and temporal patterns of tundra-fire occurrence over the past 35 000 years. Background charcoal accumulation rates are low in all records (range is 0-0.05 pieces cm-2 yr-1), suggesting minimal biomass burning across our study areas. Charcoal peak analysis reveals that the mean fire-return interval (FRI; years between consecutive fire events) ranged from ca. 1650 to 6050 years at our sites, and that the most recent fire events occurred from ca. 880 to 7030 years ago, except for the CE 2007 Anaktuvuk River Fire. These mean FRI estimates are longer than the fire rotation periods estimated for the past 63 years in the areas surrounding three of the four study lakes. This result suggests that the frequency of tundra burning was higher over the recent past compared to the late Quaternary in some tundra regions. However, the ranges of FRI estimates from our paleofire records overlap with the expected values based on fire-rotation-period estimates from the observational fire data, and the differences are statistically insignificant. Together with previous tundra-fire reconstructions, these data suggest that the rate of tundra burning was spatially variable and that fires were extremely rare in our study areas throughout the late Quaternary. Given the rarity of tundra burning over multiple millennia in our study areas and the pronounced effects of fire on tundra ecosystem processes such as carbon cycling, dramatic tundra ecosystem changes are expected if anthropogenic climate change leads to more

  16. Spatiotemporal patterns of tundra fires: late-Quaternary charcoal records from Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipman, M. L.; Hudspith, V.; Higuera, P. E.; Duffy, P. A.; Kelly, R.; Oswald, W. W.; Hu, F. S.

    2015-02-01

    Anthropogenic climate change has altered many ecosystem processes in the Arctic tundra and may have resulted in unprecedented fire activity. Evaluating the significance of recent fires requires knowledge from the paleo-fire record because observational data in the Arctic span only several decades, much shorter than the natural fire rotation in Arctic tundra regions. Here we report results of charcoal analysis on lake sediments from four Alaskan lakes to infer the broad spatial and temporal patterns of tundra fire occurrence over the past 35 000 years. Background charcoal accumulation rates are low in all records (range = 0-0.05 pieces cm-2 year-1), suggesting minimal biomass burning across our study areas. Charcoal peak analysis reveals that the mean fire return interval (FRI; years between consecutive fire events) ranged from 1648 to 6045 years at our sites, and that the most recent fire events occurred from 882 to 7031 years ago, except for the CE 2007 Anaktuvuk River Fire. These mean FRI estimates are longer than the fire rotation periods estimated for the past 63 years in the areas surrounding three of the four study lakes. This result suggests that the frequency of tundra burning was higher over the recent past compared to the late Quaternary in some tundra regions. However, the ranges of FRI estimates from our paleo-fire records overlap with the expected values based on fire-rotation-period estimates from the observational fire data, and thus quantitative differences are not significant. Together with previous tundra-fire reconstructions, these data suggest that the rate of tundra burning was spatially variable and that fires were extremely rare in our study areas throughout the late Quaternary. Given the rarity of tundra burning over multiple millennia in our study areas and the pronounced effects of fire on tundra ecosystem processes such as carbon cycling, dramatic tundra ecosystem changes are expected if anthropogenic climate change leads to more frequent

  17. Stable isotopes reflect the ecological stability of two high-elevation mammals from the late Quaternary of Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Bryan S.; Emslie, Steven D.

    2012-05-01

    The vertebrate fossil record of Cement Creek Cave, Colorado, spans from > 45,000 yr ago to the present and represents the richest stratified series of high-elevation (> 2900 m) mammal remains known from the late Quaternary of North America. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope analyses of tooth enamel were used to assess potential ecological responses of two species found commonly throughout the cave, Yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris) and Bushy-tailed woodrats (Neotoma cinerea), to late Quaternary climate and environmental changes of the Southern Rocky Mountains. Results indicate that despite such perturbations, the dietary ecologies of both species were maintained across this period. Neither taxon shifted to consuming C4 taxa or different C3 functional groups; similarly, no significant shifts in surface water use were detected. Variations in enamel δ13C were observed, however, that represent the physiological responses of high-elevation plants to changing levels of late Quaternary atmospheric CO2. While our findings extend both the geographic and elevational record of this plant CO2 response, they simultaneously highlight the ecological stability of high-elevation M. flaviventris and N. cinerea during climate changes of late Quaternary magnitude.

  18. Radiocarbon dating late Quaternary loess deposits using small terrestrial gastropod shells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, Jeff S.; McGeehin, John P.; Muhs, Daniel R.; Bettis, E. Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Constraining the ages and mass accumulation rates of late Quaternary loess deposits is often difficult because of the paucity of organic material typically available for 14C dating and the inherent limitations of luminescence techniques. Radiocarbon dating of small terrestrial gastropod shells may provide an alternative to these methods as fossil shells are common in loess and contain ∼12% carbon by weight. Terrestrial gastropod assemblages in loess have been used extensively to reconstruct past environmental conditions but have been largely ignored for dating purposes. Here, we present the results of a multi-faceted approach to understanding the potential for using small terrestrial gastropod shells to date loess deposits in North America. First, we compare highly resolved 14C ages of well-preserved wood and gastropod shells (Succineidae) recovered from a Holocene loess section in Alaska. Radiocarbon ages derived from the shells are nearly identical to wood and plant macrofossil ages throughout the section, which suggests that the shells behaved as closed systems with respect to carbon for at least the last 10 ka (thousands of calibrated 14C years before present). Second, we apply 14C dating of gastropod shells to late Pleistocene loess deposits in the Great Plains using stratigraphy and independent chronologies for comparison. The new shell ages require less interpretation than humic acid radiocarbon ages that are commonly used in loess studies, provide additional stratigraphic coverage to previous dating efforts, and are in correct stratigraphic order more often than their luminescence counterparts. Third, we show that Succineidae shells recovered from historic loess in the Matanuska River Valley, Alaska captured the 20th century 14C bomb spike, which suggests that the shells can be used to date late Holocene and historic-aged loess. Finally, results from Nebraska and western Iowa suggest that, similar to other materials, shell ages approaching ∼40 ka should

  19. Late Quaternary Paleohydrology of the Madre de Dios River, southwestern Amazon Basin, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigsby, Catherine A.; Hemric, Erin M.; Baker, Paul A.

    2009-12-01

    Late Quaternary climatic and hydrologic variability triggered changes in fluvial deposition and erosion along the course of the Madre de Dios River, Peru, the largest tributary basin of the Madeira basin, itself the largest tributary basin of the Amazon. Three laterally extensive, Quaternary-age, terrace tracts are present within the Madre de Dios basin. Analysis of sedimentary facies, present in the modern cut banks and terraced sequences, along with radiocarbon dates on fossil wood and leaf material preserved in the terraced strata, allow reconstruction of the Late Quaternary depositional history of the sedimentary sequences, including determination of the approximate timing of aggradation and downcutting episodes and its relationship to the timing of past climate change in this portion of the Amazon basin and beyond. The Quaternary sediments underlying the terraces most often recorded deposition in a coarse-grained meandering fluvial system. The T3 terrace, the highest terrace, is underlain by the Miocene (?) Ipururi Formation, which is unconformably overlain by the late Miocene-Pleistocene (?) (> 48,000 cal yrs BP) Madre de Dios Formation, a multistory coarse-sandy to gravelly channel and point bar complex. The latter was downcut before 29,850 ± 100 cal yrs BP. This downcut landscape was infilled by meandering fluvial strata characterized by gravelly channel deposits in a sequence dominated by floodplain and lateral accretion deposits. These strata were in turn downcut to form the T2 terrace before 11,970 ± 100 cal yrs BP. A third episode of aggradation resulted in the deposition of a sand-dominated meandering channel complex that infilled the T2 valley and was subsequently downcut after 3780 ± 50 cal yrs BP. This most recent terrace is infilled by the modern fluvial sediment, which has been actively aggrading since at least 870 ± 50 cal yrs BP. Importantly, the Madre de Dios fluvial system actively aggraded between 30,000 and 25,000 cal yrs BP, (and likely

  20. The effects of the final stages of the Late Ordovician glaciation on marine palynomorphs (chitinozoans, acritarchs, leiospheres) in well Nl-2 (NE Algerian Sahara).

    PubMed

    Paris, F; Bourahrouh, A; Hérissé, A L.

    2000-12-01

    Palynomorph assemblages, especially chitinozoans and acritarchs, from the Upper Ordovician of well Nl-2 (north-east of the Algerian Sahara) are studied in order to precisely date the ultimate effects of the Late Ordovician glaciation and to document the impact of this major climatic stress on the diversity of the palynoplankton. References are made to stable isotope excursions and to global eustatic sea level variations in order to improve the local age determination. The Hassi el Hadjar Formation, i.e. glacio-marine diamictites, is interpreted as a transgressive event resulting from the melting of the northern Gondwana ice cap. It yields poorly preserved and moderately diverse chitinozoans of late Hirnantian age. Acritarchs are more abundant in the lower part of these "microconglomeratic clays", but display a low diversity and are badly preserved throughout the whole formation. Reworked individuals are recorded in both groups. The marine sediments of the M'Kratta Formation of latest Hirnantian age contain better preserved, more abundant and more diverse palynomorph assemblages, especially in the Upper Member. The composition of this palynoplankton indicates a fairly good faunal and phytoplankton recovery after the early Hirnantian climatic stress.The extinction of the Ordovician forms, and the appearance of Silurian type taxa occur only in the uppermost Hirnantian, i.e. following with a slight delay the glacial event. The overlying black shales of Wenlock age (lower part of the Oued Mehaiguène Formation) are indicative of marine anoxic environments. They yield a virtually exclusive, but enormous number of Tasmanacea. The very peculiar composition of this palynoplankton seems to be independent of the Late Ordovician glaciation and is most likely related to the factors that, later, generated and maintained anoxic conditions in this area.A new species of chitinozoan, Spinachitina oulebsiri sp. nov. from the latest Hirnantian M'Kratta Formation, is described and

  1. Late Pliocene to Late Quaternary Apparent Exposure Ages from Glacial Deposits in Ak-Shyrak, Central Kyrgyz Tian Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomdin, R.; Harbor, J.; Stroeven, A. P.; Petrakov, D. A.; Gribenski, N.; Heyman, J.; Ivanov, M.; Caffee, M. W.; Hättestrand, C.; Lifton, N. A.; Rogozhina, I.; Usubaliev, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Tian Shan in central Asia is one of the world's highest mountain ranges. The 2500 km-long WSW-ENE-trending arc of mountains extends from the western Kyrgyz Republic across northwestern China and almost to the border with Mongolia. Understanding the glacial history of this vast region is important because there is a general lack of paleoclimatic data from this highly continental location, at the confluence of major climate systems, and because glaciers are sensitive monitors of climate change. We examine the glacial history of the Ak-Shyrak massif and surrounding plateaus with average altitudes of ~3500 m a.s.l. To reconstruct the glacial history of this area we use a combined approach including geomorphological mapping, and cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating of erratic boulders on glacial landforms. We observe large site-specific scatter in our 10Be and 26Al exposure ages. Apparent minimum surface exposure ages range from ~2 ka to ~2.5 Ma, with early Quaternary- late Pliocene apparent exposure ages relating to some of the highest 10Be concentrations ever recorded for glacial deposits. Most dated boulders, however, fall in the apparent exposure age range of 100 ka to 300 ka. Consistent with previous results from the western and central Tian Shan, none of our boulders record a global last glacial maxima expansion of glaciers, and this contrasts to data from the eastern Kyrgyz Tian Shan. This spatial variation in glacier extent might be due to differences in paleoclimate. However, local physiographic conditions (e.g. altitude, slope, aspect) or external forcing factors other than climate (e.g., landslides) may cause local or regional differences in glacier response. We refrain from assigning mapped glacial advances to marine oxygen isotope stages because of the considerable age scatter. Finally we assess and discuss possible reasons for the observed age scatter and early Quaternary-late Pliocene apparent exposure ages in terms of prior and/or incomplete

  2. Evolution of the polar oceans: the late Quaternary palaeoceanography of the Northwest Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pienkowski, Anna; Furze, Mark; England, John; MacLean, Brian; Bennett, Robbie; Blasco, Steve; McNeely, Morgan

    2014-05-01

    The marine channels of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, collectively known as the "Northwest Passage" (= NWP), cover some 1.1 million km2 on the North American continental shelf and constitute one of two primary pathways for water and heat exchange between the Arctic and Atlantic oceans. Modern circulation is characterized by a net southeastward flow from the Arctic Ocean through Parry Channel (the main W-E axis of the NWP) towards Baffin Bay, with Arctic Ocean Surface Water primarily occupying the NWP channels. Data from recent and ongoing marine work* highlight a dynamic oceanographic environment since the last glaciation. A suite of five sediment records (piston and trigger weight cores) taken in a transect through Parry Channel provide important information on the long-term (deglacial to postglacial) environmental and oceanographic evolution of the region. The cores were studied by a multiproxy approach encompassing sedimentology, micropalaeontology, biogeochemistry, constrained by a chronological framework of 58 AMS radiocarbon dates. Our data suggest grounded glacial ice in the channels of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, rapid deglaciation, and a characteristic progression from ice-proximal to ice-distal conditions. Age model extrapolations place deglaciation at ~13.0-10.3 cal ka BP (location dependent). Noticeable biological activity is marked by the appearance of planktonic foraminifera (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma) at ~11.0 cal ka BP - an important signal given the absence of these organisms in the modern NWP. This likely marks the penetration of Atlantic-derived water (Arctic Intermediate Water) into the central NWP following deglaciation, likely facilitated by higher deglacial sea-levels permitting increased flow across inter-channel sills. Though the route of this Atlantic-derived water is currently being resolved, it may have penetrated from Baffin Bay in the East into the NWP, contrary to the modern circulation. Subsequent (~9.7-7.0 cal ka BP

  3. Catastrophic rock slope failures and late Quaternary developments in the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh Massif, Upper Indus basin, northern Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, Kenneth

    2009-06-01

    The Nanga Parbat-Haramosh Massif has some of the greatest relief on Earth and highest measured rates of uplift, denudation, and river incision in bedrock. Many studies have sought to understand how its morphology relates to geotectonic evolution and glaciations. However, few catastrophic rock slope failures had been recognised and many of their impacts had been attributed to other processes. Recently more than 150 of these landslides have been found within a 100-km radius of Nanga Parbat (8125 m). New discoveries are reported east, north and west of Nanga Parbat along the Indus streams. Most generated long-run-out rock avalanches that dammed the Indus or its tributaries, some impounding large lakes. They initiated episodes of intermontane sedimentation followed by trenching and removal of sediment. Valley-floor features record a complex interplay of impoundment and sedimentation episodes, superimposition of streams in pre-landslide valley floors, and exhumation of buried features. These findings depart from existing reconstructions of Quaternary events. A number of the rock-avalanche deposits were previously misinterpreted as tills or moraine and their associated lacustrine deposits attributed to glacial lakes. Features up to 1000 m above the Indus, formerly seen as tectonically raised terraces, are depositional features emplaced by landslides, or erosion terraces recording the trenching of valley fill in landslide-interrupted river reaches. Unquestionably, tectonics and glaciation have been important but decisive and misread formative events of the Holocene involve a post-glacial, landslide-fragmented fluvial system. The latter has kept valley developments in a chronic state of disequilibrium with respect to climatic and geotectonic controls. Accepted glacial chronologies are put in doubt, particularly the extent and timing of the last major glaciation. The pace and role processes in the Holocene have been seriously underestimated.

  4. Late Quaternary river channel migrations of the Kura River in Transcaucasia - tectonic versus climatic causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Suchodoletz, Hans; Gärtner, Andreas; Hoth, Silvan; Umlauft, Josefine; Godoladze, Tea; Faust, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    Large-scale river channel migrations either in the form of avulsions or combing, i.e. progressive lateral migrations, are global phenomena during the Late Quaternary. Such channel migrations were triggered by tectonics, climate change, human activity or a combination of those factors. River channel migrations have the potential to cause significant human and economic losses. Thus, a more thorough knowledge about underlying causes and process rates is essential. Furthermore, such studies will elucidate the sensitivity or robustness of rivers to different external and internal forcing-agents, i.e. they help to identify the dominant drivers of regional landscape evolution. The Caucasus region is part of the active collision zone between the Africa-Arabian and the Eurasian plates, and is characterized by high current tectonic activity. Furthermore, significant environmental changes took place during the Late Quaternary, i.e. the shrinking or even disappearance of glaciers in the Greater and Lesser Caucasus or fundamental changes of the vegetation cover varying between woodland and grassland-dominated vegetation. The Kura River is the main gaining stream of the Transcaucasian Depression located between the Greater Caucasus Mountains in the north and the Lesser Caucasus Mountains in the south, and receives several tributaries from both mountain ranges. This study focusses on the middle course of the Kura River in eastern Georgia, SE of the city of Tbilisi. Integration of fluvial geomorphology, geochronology, heavy mineral analyses and seismo-tectonic analyses demonstrates that this part of the Kura River underwent large-scale channel migrations up to >10 km during Late Pleistocene and Holocene. It is interpreted that these movements followed both tectonic and climatic triggers: Whereas SW-ward migrations were caused by tectonic uplift in and SW-directed advance of the Kura fold and thrust belt as part of the Greater Caucasus, NE-ward migrations occurred during cold

  5. Late Quaternary landscape evolution in the Great Karoo, South Africa: Processes and drivers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldknow, Chris; Hooke, Janet; Lang, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The Great Karoo spans the north-central part of South Africa at a major climatic boundary. The characteristics, sequences, spatial patterns and drivers of river response to Late Quaternary climate changes in this region remain unclear due to the fragmentary alluvial/colluvial stratigraphic record and the lack of dated palaeoclimatic archives. Dendritic gully networks incised into deep deposits (up to 6 m) of colluvium and alluvium in the upper Sundays River catchment expose a legacy of "cut and fill" features. In 1st order tributaries, these are predominantly discontinuous palaeochannels and flood-outs with localised palaeosols, whereas in 2nd & 3rd order tributaries there are: 1) incised palaeo-geomorphic surfaces, 2) semi-continuous inset terrace sequences, 3) buried palaeo-gully topography. Using a combination of field mapping, logging of sediment outcrops, soil micromorphological and grain size analysis, mineral magnetic measurements and radiometric dating (OSL & 14C), we derive a stratigraphic evolution model which demonstrates a) the number of phases of incision, aggradation and pedogenesis, b) the spatial and temporal extent of each phase and c) the drivers of alluviation and associated feedbacks. Our reconstruction of regional valley alluviation indicates four distinct terrace units of contrasting depositional age. The base of the succession reflects slow aggradation under periglacial conditions associated with the Last Glacial Maximum. Subsequent channel entrenchment, causing terrace abandonment (T1) occurred in the deglacial period when vegetation and rainfall were in anti-phase. Re-instatement of connectivity with deep upland colluvial stores resulted in the injection of a pulse of sediment to valley floors, triggering compartmentalised backfilling (aggradation of T2) which propagated upstream as far as the second order drainage lines. This backfilling restructured the local hydrology, which, in concert with enhanced summer-rainfall, contributed to a

  6. Geomorphological facies reconstruction of Late Quaternary alluvia by the application of fluvial architecture concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houben, Peter

    2007-04-01

    This paper investigates the methodical implications, the benefits, and the constraints of applying the fluvial architecture concept to Late Quaternary shallow-subsurface alluvial deposits. The focus is upon a typical small- to mesoscale valley floor of the temperate zone. The studied reach is part of the river Wetter catchment (517 km 2) in central Germany. A large number of studies on Late Quaternary terrestrial paleoenvironmental change of the temperate zone refer to such small- to mesoscale catchments, which are mostly occupied by mixed- to suspended-load rivers. As in many cases mostly coring-based evidence is available, the observation and measurement is limited to lithology and lithofacies boundaries; facies geometry must be inferred. Moreover, in those environments differences in lithofacies are obscured by a significantly reduced range of grain size distributions. An example of an ancient channel belt of Late Glacial to Holocene age serves to delineate the methodical practice and utility of the fluvial architecture approach. Field evidence is obtained from detailed cross-sectional surveys and comprises descriptions of lithofacies, structural, pedogenetical, biotic features, Munsell color, and total organic carbon magnetic volume susceptibility. Cross-sectional lithofacies information is represented by spatially attributed, scaled borehole logs. The example also accentuates the need for applying additional stratigraphical methods such as physical age determination, macrofossil analysis, and tephrological stratigraphy. These methods form the basis to discern stacked channel facies and derive a diachrony of channel forms. Thus, the adapted architecture approach provides a significant surplus of information on channel dimensions, ages, and channel-floodplain interconnectedness. Distinct fluvial landforms such as channels, levees, abandoned channels, swamps, and floodplain flats can be highlighted. A number of methodical constraints are discussed in detail, e

  7. The calculation of climatic indices for Late Quaternary faunal assemblages from South African sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thackeray, Francis

    2013-04-01

    The relative abundance of rodents and insectivores from several Late Quaternary sites in South Africa have been studied using multivariate analysis (notably factor analysis). The highest loadings on the first factor (F1) are obtained for taxa that are today found in warm subtropical environments, contrasting with taxa which have low F1 loadings and which are today distributed in more southerly latitudes and at high altitudes. The latter taxa with low loadings on F1 are able to tolerate cold conditions (and are relatively common in Terminal Pleistocene assemblages associated with Oxygen Isotope Stage 2). A summary statistic based on F1 (SSF1) is calculated and interpreted as a temperature index. The dated temperature indices for Boomplaas cave correlate well (r=0.95) with dated deuterium isotope ratios for a Vostok core in Antarctica. Similarly, a moisture index (SSF3) is calculated from factor analysis of the relative abundances of the same faunal assemblages. The results are assessed in terms of a non-linear pattern of variability in temperature and moisture indices calculated from pollen as well as mammalian microfauna. The changes in climate are likely to have influenced the distribution and abundance of human populations in the Late Pleistocene in southern Africa.

  8. Late Quaternary stratigraphy of the La Janda Basin (SW Spain) - first results and palaeoenvironmental significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höbig, Nicole; Santisteban, Juan; Mediavilla, Rosa; May, Simon Matthias; Klasen, Nicole; Brückner, Helmut; van't Hoff, Jasmijn; Reicherter, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    The La Janda basin in southern Spain is a near-shore geo-bio-archive comprising a variable Quaternary depositional history, with shallow marine, lacustrine, palustrine, and terrestrial strata. In the 1930s the lake was drained and is serving now as a huge agricultural area. The 33 m-core recovered in fall 2016 along with several shallower drill cores up to c. 15 m, reveals insights into a unique mixed terrestrial palaeo-environmental archive in Andalucia influenced by the Atlantic Ocean and hence the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) within the Gulf of Cádiz. The basin's evolution was influenced both by the postglacial marine transgression and by an active tectonic fault controlling most of the accommodation space by causing subsidence. Our long core was accompanied by further corings along an E-W striking transect in order to reveal also the relation of the influence of tectonic activity with sedimentary sequences. Multi-Sensor Core Logging has been completed. Results of sedimentological, geochemical and micropalaeontological analyses will be presented in the frame of the climate variations during the Late Pleistocene and the Holocene, along with a preliminary age-depth model based on radiocarbon (AMS-14C) and optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating techniques. Our investigations ultimately aim at providing valuable information on major Late Pleistocene to Holocene climatic and palaeo-environmental fluctuations in the southernmost part of the Iberian Peninsula.

  9. Vegetation and aquatic communities responses to late Quaternary climate change in central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano-Garcia, S.; Caballero, M.; Correa-Metrio, A.

    2013-05-01

    A significant amount of information regarding the glacial history of volcanoes, vegetation history and lakes evolution of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) is available. The TMVB is a volcanically active highland area, and during its geological history numerous lakes basins have been formed. Climate change has been a significant factor in promoting transformations of the landscape and changes in the vegetation and lake levels during the Quaternary. Paleoclimatic studies carried out in central Mexico have documented variations in temperature and humidity during the late Pleistocene. In order to explore the response of vegetation to late glacial climatic and geological change, multyproxy records of lacustrine sequences from a series of lakes in the western and central sections of the TMVB have been under analysis. Calculated ecological change and its associated rates (RoCs) for six sites that follow an altitudinal and longitudinal gradient of central Mexico offer information on vegetation and dynamics of the lakes in the area. Most of these records show high variability. Dry periods in Lakes Cuitzeo and Zacapu (the most western and lower locations) show high RoC and seem to coincide with Heinrich events (H4 and H5). Contrastingly, RoC in Chalco and Texcoco records (the eastern and higher locations) seem more variable. The observed patterns are most likely the result of the confluence of climate, geologic events, and human occupation, all of them interacting at different time scales and posing difficulties when interpreting fossil sequences from the area.

  10. Late Quaternary dietary shifts of the Cape grysbok ( Raphicerus melanotis) in southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faith, J. Tyler

    2011-01-01

    The Cape grysbok is endemic to southern Africa's Cape Floral Region where it selectively browses various species of dicotyledonous vegetation. Fossil evidence indicates that the grysbok persisted under glacial and interglacial conditions throughout the late Quaternary and inhabited a range of environments. This study employs mesowear analysis to reconstruct grysbok diets over time and in response to changing environments at Nelson Bay Cave, Die Kelders Cave 1, Klasies River Mouth, and Swartklip 1. Results indicate that the amount of grasses (monocots) versus leafy vegetation (dicots) included in the diet fluctuated over time and largely in agreement with changes in faunal community structure. The case for dietary flexibility is particularly clear at Nelson Bay Cave, where there is a significant trend from mixed feeding towards increased browsing from the late Pleistocene (~ 18,500 14C yr BP) through the Holocene. Dietary shifts at Nelson Bay Cave are consistent with the hypothesis that declining grassland productivity is responsible for the terminal Pleistocene extinction of several large ungulates in southern Africa. Furthermore, the short-term dietary shifts demonstrated here (100s to 1000s of years) provide an important caution against relying on taxonomic uniformitarianism when reconstructing the dietary preferences of fossil ungulates, both extant and extinct.

  11. Dynamics of Mediterranean late Quaternary fluvial activity: An example from the River Ebro (north Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria-Jáuregui, Ángel; González-Amuchástegui, María José; Mauz, Barbara; Lang, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Late Pleistocene and Holocene fluvial evolution of the upper River Ebro (Miranda basin, north Spain) is analysed using geomorphological, sedimentological, and optical dating techniques. Maximum regional crustal uplift of 0.98 m/ka approximately helped preserve a suite of terraces in the Miranda basin: 5 river terraces (T1-5) were identified and their formation attributed to MIS 6 (T1), MIS 5d (T2), MIS 4 (T3), MIS 2 (T4), MIS 1 (T5). Alluvium deposited in terraces T1, T2, T3, and T4 is well-sorted, clast-supported gravels; whereas the T5 deposit is exclusively composed of silt. Gravels were deposited during cold and dry periods when reduced vegetation cover on hillslopes increased sediment supply to the trunk river. Silt was deposited in overbank settings under warmer and wetter climate conditions when vegetation cover stabilised hillslopes and restricted sediment supply. It also resulted in lower peak discharge and reduced flow velocities over vegetated floodplains. The chronological sequence of terraces indicates that incision occurred during climatic transitions. We conclude that the upper River Ebro responded to fluctuations in sediment supply and discharge controlled by late Quaternary climate cycles.

  12. Late Quaternary evolution of channel and lobe complexes of Monterey Fan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fildani, A.; Normark, W.R.

    2004-01-01

    The modern Monterey submarine fan, one of the largest deep-water deposits off the western US, is composed of two major turbidite systems: the Neogene Lower Turbidite System (LTS) and the late Quaternary Upper Turbidite System (UTS). The areally extensive LTS is a distal deposit with low-relief, poorly defined channels, overbank, and lower-fan elements. The younger UTS comprises almost half of the total fan volume and was initiated in the late Pleistocene from canyons in the Monterey Bay area. Rapidly prograding high-relief, channel-levee complexes dominated deposition early in the UTS with periodic avulsion events. In the last few 100 ka, much of the sediment bypassed the northern fan as a result of allocyclic controls, and deposition is simultaneously occurring on a sandy lobe with low-relief channels and on an adjacent detached muddier lobe built from reconfinement of overbank flow from the northern high-relief channels. During the relatively short-lived UTS deposition, at least seven different channel types and two lobe types were formed. This study provides a significant reinterpretation of the depositional history of Monterey Fan by incorporating all available unpublished geophysical data. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Late Quaternary Biogeographic and Climatic Changes in Western North America: Evidence From Mapped Arrays of Packrat Midden Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, L. E.; Thompson, R. S.; Anderson, K. H.; Pelltier, R. T.

    2005-12-01

    The USGS/NOAA North American Packrat Midden Database is a standardized archive of published paleobotanical data derived from packrat middens in western North America. We use midden age, location, and species presence-absence data from this dataset to generate maps illustrating the past occurrence of important woody plant taxa in western North America during the late Quaternary. We explore late Quaternary changes in the distributions of selected plant taxa commonly found in packrat middens and presently associated with western desert ( Carnegiea gigantea), steppe ( Artemisia tridentata-type), woodland (pinyon pines), montane ( Pinus ponderosa), and subalpine ( Pinus flexilis) plant communities. We compare the current geographic and climatic distributions of these taxa with the present-day climates at sites where these taxa have been found in packrat midden macrofossil assemblages. These comparisons suggest that late Pleistocene climates in western North America were generally characterized by cooler-than-present summers and by much greater-than-present mean annual precipitation.

  14. Shoreline and Lacustrine Records of Late Quaternary Climate Change in the Chihuahuan Desert, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglia, P. J.; Fawcett, P. J.

    2001-12-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns of Quaternary moisture and temperature variability in northern Mexico are difficult to reconstruct given the paucity of continuous, long-term Quaternary climate records from the region. Preliminary shoreline age dates and a pair of lacustrine sediment cores from Laguna Fresnal in northern Chihuahua, Mexico, record climate-driven variations in both lake level and sedimentologic input. Reeves (1969) first described Laguna Fresnal as part of Pluvial Lake Palomas, a Pleistocene lake composed of 3 interconnected sub-basins: Laguna Guzman, Santa Maria, and Fresnal. Six AMS 14C age dates from previously unrecognized lake fauna on a beach ridge complex indicate a number of Holocene lakes as well. These preserved shorelines increase in age with distance and elevation from the playa surface and include early Holocene (8456\\pm97 14C yrs BP; 1225 m asl), middle Holocene (6180\\pm53, 6401\\pm58, and 6721\\pm68 14C yrs BP; 1200 m asl), and Little Ice Age (435\\pm39 14C yrs BP; 1175 m asl) lake stands. These ages correlate with beach ridge chronologies throughout the western US and northern Mexico. However, during the middle Holocene Laguna Fresnal exhibits a pronounced high stand while other records show a prolonged dry episode. Two 17 m-long cores from the basin center provide a continuous record of sedimentation during the late Quaternary. Several abrupt changes in lake level are indicated by mud cracks preserved as sharp, light gray lineations (487-548 cm and 975-1130 cm), sharply overlain by finely laminated silt and clay. Drying episodes are preserved in the basal section of the cores as several 0.5-2 cm-thick gypsum horizons, overlain by 3-5 cm-thick, carbon-poor (0.02-0.05% TOC), light gray silt. Five distinct zones of coupled, alternating relatively high and low average magnetic susceptibility (MS) and bulk density further reveals changes in lacustrine sedimentation. Peaks in MS generally correlate with peaks in bulk density, with the

  15. Characterizing Late Quaternary Paleochannel System Evolution on the East Texas Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speed, C.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Goff, J.; Swartz, J. M.; Fernandez, R.

    2016-12-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico continental shelf plays host to a variety of buried incised valley and paleochannel systems. The formation of these incisional features is due in part to Quaternary eustatic sea level oscillations, thought largely to represent fluctuations in global ice volume. However, a complex interplay exists between the role of climate, eustasy, and autogenic sedimentary processes in the formation and evolution of paleochannel systems throughout geologic time. These elaborate channel networks act not only as a conduit for sediment transport to the outer shelf and deep sea, but also as a location for sediment storage during subsequent transgressions. Understanding the timing of incision and the internal sedimentary architecture of buried channel systems provides insight into the formational processes of the paleochannel system and the role it played in sediment transport and storage. Over 300 kilometers of ultra-high-resolution (0.5-12 kHz) CHIRP sub-bottom profile and high-resolution (40-450 Hz) two-dimensional multichannel seismic (MCS) data were collected on the inner continental shelf south of Freeport, TX during the 2015 and 2016 University of Texas Institute for Geophysics Marine Geology and Geophysics summer field course(s). The survey focused on imaging the Late Quaternary formation and evolution of the incised valley and channel system associated with the paleo-Brazos River. CHIRP data provide decimeter-scale vertical resolution imaging the upper 15-50 meters of the subsurface, while high-resolution MCS data provide vertical resolution of 1-3 meters and penetration on the order of hundreds of meters. These complementary datasets allow for an integrated stratigraphic analysis of multiple generations of Pleistocene to Holocene-aged paleochannels and key comparisons of various channel-forming processes, sediment transport mechanisms, and storage potential on the northern Gulf of Mexico continental shelf.

  16. Late Quaternary alluviation and offset along the eastern Big Pine fault, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLong, S.B.; Minor, S.A.; Arnold, L.J.

    2007-01-01

    Determining late Quaternary offset rates on specific faults within active mountain belts is not only a key component of seismic hazard analysis, but sheds light on regional tectonic development over geologic timescales. Here we report an estimate of dip-slip rate on the eastern Big Pine oblique-reverse fault in the upper Cuyama Valley within the western Transverse Ranges of southern California, and its relation to local landscape development. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of sandy beds within coarse-grained alluvial deposits indicates that deposition of alluvium shed from the Pine Mountain massif occurred near the southern margin of the Cuyama structural basin at the elevation of the Cuyama River between 25 and 14??ka. This alluvial deposit has been offset ??? 10??m vertically by the eastern Big Pine fault, providing a latest Quaternary dip-slip rate estimate of ??? 0.9??m/ky based on a 50?? fault dip. Incision of the adjacent Cuyama River has exposed a section of older Cuyama River sediments beneath the Pine Mountain alluvium that accumulated between 45 and 30??ka on the down-thrown footwall block of the eastern Big Pine fault. Corroborative evidence for Holocene reverse-slip on the eastern Big Pine fault is ??? 1??m of incised bedrock that is characteristically exposed beneath 2-3.5??ka fill terraces in tributaries south of the fault. The eastern Big Pine fault in the Cuyama Valley area has no confirmed record of historic rupture; however, based on our results, we suggest the likelihood of multiple reverse-slip rupture events since 14??ka. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Late Quaternary paleoenvironmental records from the Chatanika River valley near Fairbanks (Alaska)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirrmeister, Lutz; Meyer, Hanno; Andreev, Andrei; Wetterich, Sebastian; Kienast, Frank; Bobrov, Anatoly; Fuchs, Margret; Sierralta, Melanie; Herzschuh, Ulrike

    2016-09-01

    Perennially-frozen deposits are considered as excellent paleoenvironmental archives similar to lacustrine, deep marine, and glacier records because of the long-term and good preservation of fossil records under stable permafrost conditions. A permafrost tunnel in the Vault Creek Valley (Chatanika River Valley, near Fairbanks) exposes a sequence of frozen deposits and ground ice that provides a comprehensive set of proxies to reconstruct the late Quaternary environmental history of Interior Alaska. The multi-proxy approach includes different dating techniques (radiocarbon-accelerator mass spectrometry [AMS 14C], optically stimulated luminescence [OSL], thorium/uranium radioisotope disequilibria [230Th/U]), as well as methods of sedimentology, paleoecology, hydrochemistry, and stable isotope geochemistry of ground ice. The studied sequence consists of 36-m-thick late Quaternary deposits above schistose bedrock. Main portions of the sequence accumulated during the early and middle Wisconsin periods. The lowermost unit A consists of about 9-m-thick ice-bonded fluvial gravels with sand and peat lenses. A late Sangamon (MIS 5a) age of unit A is assumed. Spruce forest with birch, larch, and some shrubby alder dominated the vegetation. High presence of Sphagnum spores and Cyperaceae pollen points to mires in the Vault Creek Valley. The overlying unit B consists of 10-m-thick alternating fluvial gravels, loess-like silt, and sand layers, penetrated by small ice wedges. OSL dates support a stadial early Wisconsin (MIS 4) age of unit B. Pollen and plant macrofossil data point to spruce forests with some birch interspersed with wetlands around the site. The following unit C is composed of 15-m-thick ice-rich loess-like and organic-rich silt with fossil bones and large ice wedges. Unit C formed during the interstadial mid-Wisconsin (MIS 3) and stadial late Wisconsin (MIS 2) as indicated by radiocarbon ages. Post-depositional slope processes significantly deformed both, ground

  18. Late Quaternary stratigraphy and geochronology of the western Killpecker Dunes, Wyoming, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mayer, J.H.; Mahan, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    New stratigraphic and geochronologic data from the Killpecker Dunes in southwestern Wyoming facilitate a more precise understanding of the dune field's history. Prior investigations suggested that evidence for late Pleistocene eolian activity in the dune field was lacking. However, luminescence ages from eolian sand of ???15,000 yr, as well as Folsom (12,950-11,950 cal yr B.P.) and Agate Basin (12,600-10,700 cal yr) artifacts overlying eolian sand, indicate the dune field existed at least during the latest Pleistocene, with initial eolian sedimentation probably occurring under a dry periglacial climate. The period between ???13,000 and 8900 cal yr B.P. was characterized by relatively slow eolian sedimentation concomitant with soil formation. Erosion occurred between ???8182 and 6600 cal yr B.P. on the upwind region of the dune field, followed by relative stability and soil formation between ???5900 and 2700 cal yr B.P. The first of at least two latest Holocene episodes of eolian sedimentation occurred between ???2000 and 1500 yr, followed by a brief (???500 yr) episode of soil formation; a second episode of sedimentation, occurring by at least ???700 yr, may coincide with a hypothesized Medieval warm period. Recent stabilization of the western Killpecker Dunes likely occurred during the Little Ice Age (???350-100 yr B.P.). The eolian chronology of the western Killpecker Dunes correlates reasonably well with those of other major dune fields in the Wyoming Basin, suggesting that dune field reactivation resulted primarily due to departures toward aridity during the late Quaternary. Similar to dune fields on the central Great Plains, dune fields in the Wyoming Basin have been active under a periglacial climate during the late Pleistocene, as well as under near-modern conditions during the latest Holocene. ?? 2003 University of Washington. All rights reserved.

  19. Seismic stratigraphy and depositional history of late Quaternary deposits at the eastern Yellow Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Dong-Geun; Lee, Gwang-Soo; Kim, Gil-Young; Chang, Se-Won; Kim, Kyoung-Jin

    2017-04-01

    The late Quaternary stratigraphy and sedimentation at the eastern Yellow Sea shelf was studied using a dense network of high-resolution, single-channel seismic reflection profiles and sediment data. The shelf sequence in this area consists of six seismic units formed since the LGM. During the LGM, the study area was completely exposed, resulting in subaerial erosion associated with paleo-channel incision by the Huanghe and Korean Rivers. As the shelf was flooded, the incised channels were backfilled fluvial or coastal sediments, forming incised channel-fill deposits (SU1). The paleo-river may have supplied abundant terrigenous sediments to the study area around the paleo-river mouth and adjacent area. These sediments were trapped within the paleo-estuary and formed SU2, regarded as an estuarine deposit. Two types of serial sand ridges (SU3 and SU5) which correspond to transgressive deposits developed. SU3 on the southern part, west of Jeju Island (80 110 m deep) is regarded as a moribund-type mainly formed during the early to middle stage of transgression. These are thought to have ceased growing and remobilizing. In contrast, SU5 (occurring 30 50 m deep off the Korean Peninsula) is generally regarded as active sand ridges deposited during the late stage of transgression and is partly modified by modern tidal currents. As the transgression continued, the near-surface sediments were reworked and redistributed by shelf erosion, resulting in a thin veneer of transgressive sands (SU4). The uppermost unit (SU6) formed the Heuksan Mud Belt (HMB), which is one of the most prominent mud deposits in the Yellow Sea. The lower part of the HMD corresponds to shelf-mud deposited during the late stage of transgression, whereas the upper part consists of a recent shelf-delta developed after the highstand sea level at about 7 ka BP.

  20. Stratigraphical and palynological appraisal of the Late Quaternary mangrove deposits of the west coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaran, K. P. N.; Nair, K. M.; Shindikar, Mahesh; Limaye, Ruta B.; Padmalal, D.

    2005-11-01

    The organic deposits derived from the mangrove swamps form reliable stratigraphic markers within the Late Quaternary sequence of Kerala-Konkan Basin. Three generations of such deposits have been identified. The older one is dated to around 43,000-40,000 14C yr B.P., with a few dates beyond the range of radiocarbon. The younger ones date from the Middle Holocene to latest Pleistocene (10,760-4540 14C yr B.P.) and the Late Holocene (<4000 14C yr B.P.). Pollen analyses confirm that the deposits are mostly derived from the mangrove vegetation. Peat accumulation during the period 40,000-28,000 14C yr B.P. can be correlated with the excess rainfall, 40-100% greater than modern values, of the Asian summer monsoon. The low occurrence of mangrove between 22,000 and 18,000 14C yr B.P. can be attributed to the prevailing aridity and/or reduced precipitation associated worldwide with Last Glacial Maximum, because exposure surfaces and ferruginous layers are commonly found in intervals representing this period. The high rainfall of 11,000-4000 14C yr B.P. is found to be the most significant as the mangrove reached an optimum growth around 11,000 14C yr B.P. but with periods of punctuated weaker monsoons. From the present and previous studies, it has been observed that after about 5000 or 4000 14C yr B.P., the monsoons became gradually reduced leading to drying up of many of the marginal marine mangrove ecosystems. A case study of Hadi profile provided an insight to the relevance of magnetic susceptibility (χ) to record the ecological shift in Late Holocene.

  1. Late Quaternary activity along the Longmen Shan thrust belt, eastern Tibet, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Wang, X.; Li, X.; Wei, Z.

    2016-12-01

    The Longmen Shan thrust belt defines a segment of the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau along its 500-km length. Active deformation along it was not well investigated due to the interactions of heavy rainfall, dense vegetation, relative rapid erosion, and high mountains. This 30-50 km wide thrust belt consists of several large nappes separated by a number of nearly parallel, NW-dipping thrust faults. Along the strike, this thrust belt is also separated into two segments, the northern and the southern Longmen Shan thrust belt.The northern segment has been identified as three major thrust faults, from west to east, the Wenchuan-Maoxian, The Yingxiu-Beichuan, and the Guan Xian-Jiangyou faults. Along the Wenchuan-Maoxian fault, layers of T1 and T2 terraces of the Minjiang river are not deformed and no fault scarps developed across the surfaces of these two terraces, but the T3 terrace was faulted by the fault, suggesting that this fault became inactive at some time between the formation of the T2 and T3 terraces. The fact that both the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault and the Guanxian-Jiangyou fault ruptured during the 2008 earthquake, demonstrates that they are Holocene active faults.The southern segment consists of the Gengda-Longdong, the Yanjing-Wulong, and the Dachuan-Shuangshi faults, respectively, from west to east, in accordance with above three faults along the strike. No fresh fault plane and new fault morphology observed, and vague trace showed in satellite image, indicate that the Gengda-Longdong fault is inactive in Late Quaternary. T2 terraces along the Xihe and Donghe rivers were not deformed and no fresh fault plane was observed on the Yanjing-Wulong fault, indicating that this fault became inactive at least since the formation of the T2 terrace. The Dachuan-Shuangshi fault was believed to be the main causative structure of the 2013 Lushan Ms 7.0 earthquake. Fault scarps on the young terraces and paleoearthquake studies along this fault show it is a Holocene

  2. Late Quaternary Paleoceanography, Productivity, and Sedimentation in the Western Tropical Pacific, Gulf of Papua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, M. A.; Peterson, L. C.; Droxler, A. W.; Dickens, G. R.; Opdyke, B. N.; Bentley, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    The Gulf of Papua (GoP) is a tropical mixed carbonate-siliciclastic system located at the northern limit of the Great Barrier Reef and the southern edge of Papua New Guinea where large volumes of terrigenous material are deposited in a region characterized by abundant neritic, pelagic, and benthic marine carbonate production. GoP sediments contain an important record of late Quaternary climate and oceanographic changes at the edge of the Western Pacific Warm Pool, in an area seasonally influenced by movement of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and the effects of the El Niño Southern Oscillation. The GoP is also the crossroads for a number of major water masses (e.g., Antarctic Intermediate Water, South Equatorial Current, New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent) that potentially play a role in glacial-interglacial and millennial scale climate variability as well as the transfer of high latitude climate signals to the low latitudes. A multiproxy approach is used to describe how changes in oceanography and climate influenced sedimentation in the GoP over the last several glacial-interglacial cycles. Carbon and oxygen isotope records from planktic (G. ruber) and benthic (C. wuellerstorfi) foraminifera are used to assess changes in nutrient concentrations, productivity, water column structure, and climate influences on the surface and deep waters. Elemental records measured with an X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) core scanner show high variability in both pelagic and neritic carbonate production (Ca/Fe and Sr/Ca) and productivity (e.g., Ba/Ti) between and within glacial- interglacial periods. High carbonate content and variability generally occur during the interglacial periods. However, MIS 6 also has relatively high levels of inferred carbonate production and productivity in contrast to low levels during MIS 2. Variations in elemental intensity ratios (e.g., Fe/Ti and Mn/Ti) can be used to infer changes in sediment source and/or the oxygen content of the water column and

  3. Late Quaternary sedimentation on the Leidy Creek fan, Nevada-California: Geomorphic responses to climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reheis, M.C.; Slate, J.L.; Throckmorton, C.K.; McGeehin, J.P.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Dengler, L.

    1996-01-01

    Well-dated surface and subsurface deposits in semiarid Fish Lake Valley, Nevada and California, demonstrate that alluvial-fan deposition is strongly associated with the warm dry climate of the last two interglacial intervals, and that fans were stable and (or) incised during the last glaciation. Fan deposition was probably triggered by a change from relatively moist to arid conditions causing a decrease in vegetation cover and increases in flash floods and sediment yield. We think that this scenario applies to most of the other valleys in the southern Basin and Range. Radiocarbon, tephra, and a few thermoluminescence and cosmogenic ages from outcrops throughout Fish Lake Valley and from cores on the Leidy Creek fan yield ages of > 100-50 ka and 11-0 ka for the last two periods of alluvial-fan deposition. Mapping, coring and shallow seismic profiling indicate that these periods were synchronous throughout the valley and on the proximal and distal parts of the fans. From 50 to 11 ka, fan deposition ceased, a soil formed on the older alluvium and the axial drainage became active as runoff and stream competence increased. Slow deposition due to sheet flow or aeolian processes locally continued during this interval, producing cumulic soil profiles. The soil was buried by debris-flow sediment beginning at about 11 ka, coincident with the onset of relatively dry and warm conditions in the region. However, ground-water discharge maintained a large freshwater marsh on the valley floor throughout the Holocene. Pulses of deposition during the Holocene are recorded in the marsh and fan deposits; some pulses coincided with periods of or transitions to warm, dry climate indicated by proxy climate records, whereas others may reflect local disturbances associated with volcanism and fires. Within the marsh deposits, much of the clastic material is probably desert loess. In addition, the deposition of coppice dunes within the fan deposits coincides with two dry periods during the

  4. Shifting sources and transport paths for the late Quaternary Escanaba Trough sediment fill (northeast Pacific)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zuffa, G.G.; De Rosa, R.; Normark, W.R.

    1997-01-01

    Escanaba Trough, which forms the southernmost part of the axial valley of the actively spreading Gorda Ridge, is filled with several hundred meters of sediment of presumed late Quaternary age. Surficial sediment samples from gravity cores, deeper samples (as much as 390 m) from Site 35 of the Deep Sea Drilling Program (Leg 5), and the acoustic character of the sediment fill observed on seismic-reflection profiles indicate that much of the sediment fill is of turbidite origin. Gross composition and heavy- mineral analyses of sand samples show that two distinct petrofacies comprise the sediment fill. The lower part of the fill was derived primarily from the Klamath River source of northern California while the younger fill, including the surficial sand beds, are from the Columbia River drainage much farther north. The Escanaba Trough sediment provides an opportunity to evaluate concepts for paleogeographic and paleotectonic reconstructions that are based on facies analysis and compositional and textural data for the volcanic components because both intrabasinal and extrabasinal sources are present as well as coeval (neovolcanic) and non coeval (paleovolcanic) sourcre This study of a modern basin shows, that although the sediment sources could be identified, it was useful to have some knowledge of the sediment pathway(s), the effects of diagenesis, and the possible effects of sediment sorting as a result of long transport distances from the source area for some components. Application of these same techniques to ancient deposits without benefit of the additional parameters will face limitations.

  5. Distinct phases of eustatic and tectonic forcing for late Quaternary landscape evolution in southwest Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouslopoulou, Vasiliki; Begg, John; Fülling, Alexander; Moraetis, Daniel; Partsinevelos, Panagiotis; Oncken, Onno

    2017-09-01

    The extent to which climate, eustasy and tectonics interact to shape the late Quaternary landscape is poorly known. Alluvial fans often provide useful indexes that allow the decoding of information recorded on complex coastal landscapes, such as those of the eastern Mediterranean. In this paper we analyse and date (using infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dating) a double alluvial fan system on southwest Crete, an island straddling the forearc of the Hellenic subduction margin, in order to constrain the timing and magnitude of its vertical deformation and discuss the factors contributing to its landscape evolution. The studied alluvial system is exceptional because each of its two juxtaposed fans records individual phases of alluvial and marine incision, thus providing unprecedented resolution in the formation and evolution of its landscape. Specifically, our analysis shows that the fan sequence at Domata developed during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 due to five distinct stages of marine transgressions and regressions and associated river incision, in response to sea-level fluctuations and tectonic uplift at averaged rates of ˜ 2.2 mm yr-1. Interestingly, comparison of our results with published tectonic uplift rates from western Crete shows that uplift during 20-50 kyr BP was minimal (or even negative). Thus, most of the uplift recorded at Domata must have occurred in the last 20 kyr. This implies that eustasy and tectonism impacted the landscape at Domata over mainly distinct time intervals (e.g. sequentially and not synchronously), with eustasy forming and tectonism preserving the coastal landforms.

  6. Late Quaternary climate variability in the Sahel: inferences from marine dust records offshore Senegal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuut, J. W.; Meyer, I.; Fischer, H.; Mollenhauer, G.; Mulitza, S.; Pittauerova, D.; Zabel, M.; Schulz, M.

    2008-12-01

    Societies and ecosystems in northern Africa are strongly affected by the availability of water. As a consequence, long-term absence of rainfall has very dear effects on the ecosystems, as was dramatically shown in the 70'ies and 80'ies of the 20th century. Recent high-resolution reconstructions of Sahel palaeoclimate allow for new insights into these drastic climate variations and to disentangle the effects of the different components of the climate system on African climate change. In this study we extend the instrumental record of climate variability using marine sediment cores that were retrieved off the coast of Senegal, northwest Africa. The sediment records contain continuous high-resolution records of dust sedimentation ranging from about 4,000 to about 57,000 years. A 210Pb age model for the youngest sediments allows for a matching of the proxy rainfall record with instrumental precipitation data. Specifically, variations in the grain-size distributions of the terrigenous sediment fraction, deconvolved with an end-member modelling algorithm (Weltje, 1997) are used to reconstruct rainfall variability on land throughout the late Quaternary.

  7. Vertical tectonics in northern Escanaba Trough as recorded by thick late Quaternary turbidites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, W.R.; Serra, F.

    2001-01-01

    Escanaba Trough, the southernmost segment of the Gorda Ridge, is filled by as much as 500 m of late Quaternary turbidite and hemipelagic sediment. Coring at Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 35 and Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 1037 and 1038 together with 4.5-kHz deep-tow and 3.5-kHz surface-ship seismic reflection profiles enable a distinct pattern of reflections to be mapped throughout Escanaba Trough in the upper part of this sediment fill. The uppermost 80 m of turbidite sediment, which includes at least 11 turbidity current events, were deposited in 3200 m. The turbidity currents were trapped upon entering Escanaba Trough, resulting in all of the sediment in suspension in the flows being deposited. The thickness of the turbidite layers reflects both the flow thickness and the vertical grain concentration within the flow that deposited the layer. Variations in the turbidite thickness with respect to water depth can be used to estimate the degree of relative vertical movement within the floor of Escanaba Trough. In the area of hydrothermal activity near ODP Site 1038, uplift of as much as 140 m has occurred over the past 8 kyr. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. A Mid-Late Quaternary loess-paleosol record in Simmons Farm in southern Illinois, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Hongfang; Lundstrom, C.C.; Zhang, Z.; Grimley, D.A.; Balsam, W.L.

    2009-01-01

    In unglaciated areas of the Mississippi Valley region, the typical full loess-paleosol succession contains the Modern Soil developed in Peoria Silt, weakly developed Farmdale Geosol developed in Roxana Silt, Sangamon Geosol developed in Loveland Silt, and Yarmouth Geosol developed in Crowley's Ridge Silt. Although a fifth loess called the Marianna Silt is reported at one area, the paleosol that separates the Crowley Ridge and Marianna Silts is not well defined. Previous thermoluminescence (TL) and optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) age chronology has suggested multiple phases of Sangamon Geosol developed in Loveland Silt, but clear morphological evidence of polygenetic Sangamon Geosol profiles have not been found. Recently, a thick loess-paleosol sequence has been studied in the middle Mississippi Valley in unglaciated southern Illinois, USA. Soil morphology and analytical results revealed five loesses and associated paleosol units. Two Sangamon Bt horizons were found separated by a thick ACtk horizon, interpreted to indicate two phases of Sangamon Geosol development. This well-preserved loess-paleosol succession provides one of the most complete mid-late Quaternary loess records in the middle Mississippi Valley to date, and is important for studying the stratigraphic framework and paleoclimate and environment changes. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Eolian additions to late Quaternary alpine soils, Indian Peaks Wilderness Area, Colorado Front Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Benedict, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Surface horizons of many alpine soils on Quaternary deposits in high-mountain settings are enriched in silt. The origin of these particles has been debated, particularly in the Rocky Mountain region of North America. The most common explanations are frost shattering of coarser particles and eolian additions from distant sources. We studied soil A horizons on alpine moraines of late-glacial (Satanta Peak) age in the Colorado Front Range. Surface horizons of soils on these moraines are enriched in silt and have a particle size distribution that resembles loess and dust deposits found elsewhere. The compositions of sand and silt fractions of the soils were compared to possible local source rocks, using immobile trace elements Ti, Nb, Zr, Ce, and Y. The sand fractions of soils have a wide range of trace element ratios, similar to the range of values in the local biotite gneiss bedrock. In contrast, silt fractions have narrower ranges of trace element ratios that do not overlap the range of these ratios in biotite gneiss. The particle size and geochemical results support an interpretation that silts in these soils are derived from airborne dust. Eolian silts were most likely derived from distant sources, such as the semiarid North Park and Middle Park basins to the west. We hypothesize that much of the eolian influx to soils of the Front Range occurred during an early to mid-Holocene warm period, when sediment availability in semiarid source basins was at a maximum.

  10. A fractal analysis of quaternary, Cenozoic-Mesozoic, and Late Pennsylvanian sea level changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsui, Albert T.; Rust, Kelly A.; Klein, George D.

    1993-01-01

    Sea level changes are related to both climatic variations and tectonic movements. The fractal dimensions of several sea level curves were compared to a modern climatic fractal dimension of 1.26 established for annual precipitation records. A similar fractal dimension (1.22) based on delta(O-18/O-16) in deep-sea sediments has been suggested to characterize climatic change during the past 2 m.y. Our analysis indicates that sea level changes over the past 150,000 to 250,000 years also exhibit comparable fractal dimensions. Sea level changes for periods longer than about 30 m.y. are found to produce fractal dimensions closer to unity and Missourian (Late Pennsylvanian) sea level changes yield a fractal dimension of 1.41. The fact that these sea level curves all possess fractal dimensions less than 1.5 indicates that sea level changes exhibit nonperiodic, long-run persistence. The different fractal dimensions calculated for the various time periods could be the result of a characteristic overprinting of the sediment recored by prevailing processes during deposition. For example, during the Quaternary, glacio-eustatic sea level changes correlate well with the present climatic signature. During the Missourian, however, mechanisms such as plate reorganization may have dominated, resulting in a significantly different fractal dimension.

  11. Species-specific responses of Late Quaternary megafauna to climate and humans

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzen, Eline D.; Nogués-Bravo, David; Orlando, Ludovic; Weinstock, Jaco; Binladen, Jonas; Marske, Katharine A.; Ugan, Andrew; Borregaard, Michael K.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Nielsen, Rasmus; Ho, Simon Y. W.; Goebel, Ted; Graf, Kelly E.; Byers, David; Stenderup, Jesper T.; Rasmussen, Morten; Campos, Paula F.; Leonard, Jennifer A.; Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Froese, Duane; Zazula, Grant; Stafford, Thomas W.; Aaris-Sørensen, Kim; Batra, Persaram; Haywood, Alan M.; Singarayer, Joy S.; Valdes, Paul J.; Boeskorov, Gennady; Burns, James A.; Davydov, Sergey P.; Haile, James; Jenkins, Dennis L.; Kosintsev, Pavel; Kuznetsova, Tatyana; Lai, Xulong; Martin, Larry D.; McDonald, H. Gregory; Mol, Dick; Meldgaard, Morten; Munch, Kasper; Stephan, Elisabeth; Sablin, Mikhail; Sommer, Robert S.; Sipko, Taras; Scott, Eric; Suchard, Marc A.; Tikhonov, Alexei; Willerslev, Rane; Wayne, Robert K.; Cooper, Alan; Hofreiter, Michael; Sher, Andrei; Shapiro, Beth; Rahbek, Carsten; Willerslev, Eske

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the roles of climate and humans in driving the dramatic extinctions of large-bodied mammals during the Late Quaternary remain contentious. We use ancient DNA, species distribution models and the human fossil record to elucidate how climate and humans shaped the demographic history of woolly rhinoceros, woolly mammoth, wild horse, reindeer, bison and musk ox. We show that climate has been a major driver of population change over the past 50,000 years. However, each species responds differently to the effects of climatic shifts, habitat redistribution and human encroachment. Although climate change alone can explain the extinction of some species, such as Eurasian musk ox and woolly rhinoceros, a combination of climatic and anthropogenic effects appears to be responsible for the extinction of others, including Eurasian steppe bison and wild horse. We find no genetic signature or any distinctive range dynamics distinguishing extinct from surviving species, underscoring the challenges associated with predicting future responses of extant mammals to climate and human-mediated habitat change. PMID:22048313

  12. Late quaternary history and uranium isotopic compositions of ground water discharge deposits, Crater Flat, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paces, James B.; Taylor, Emily M.; Bush, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Three carbonate-rich spring deposits are present near the southern end of Crater Flat, NV, approximately 18 km southwest of the potential high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain. We have analyzed five samples of carbonate-rich material from two of the deposits for U and Th isotopic compositions. Resulting U-series disequilibrium ages indicate that springs were active at 18 ?? 1, 30 ?? 3, 45 ?? 4 and >70 ka. These ages are consistent with a crude internal stratigraphy at one site. Identical ages for two samples at two separate sites suggest that springs were contemporaneous, at least in part, and were most likely part of the same hydrodynamic system. In addition, initial U isotopic compositions range from 2.8 to 3.8 and strongly suggest that ground water from the regional Tertiary-volcanic aquifer provided the source for these hydrogenic deposits. This interpretation, along with water level data from near-by wells suggest that the water table rose approximately 80 to 115 m above present levels during the late Quaternary and may have fluctuated repeatedly. Current data are insufficient to allow reconstruction of a detailed depositional history, however geochronological data are in good agreement with other paleoclimatic proxy records preserved throughout the region. Since these deposits are down gradient from the potential repository site, the possibility of higher ground water levels in the future dramatically shortens both vertical and lateral ground water pathways and reduces travel times of transported radionuclides to potential discharge sites.

  13. Episodic Late Quaternary slopewash deposition as recorded in colluvial aprons, Southeastern Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Paul R.; Mason, Joseph A.; Goble, Ronald J.

    2004-09-01

    Colluvial aprons found along fluvial terraces of the Laramie River and Sybille Creek in southeastern Wyoming are interpreted as late Quaternary slopewash deposits. Each apron studied contained multiple buried soils, interpreted to indicate that slopewash activity was episodic and short-lived, and was followed by relatively long periods of landscape stability and soil development. Apron deposits were described and subsequently correlated based on their internal stratigraphy and their relative degree of soil development. Optical dating was used to chronologically constrain periods of slopewash deposition, and based on 17 optical ages taken from five aprons, aggradation occurred at ˜65-56, 16.0, 12.9, 11.8, 8.1, 7.3, 5.0, and 1.7 ka. Several of these events correspond with climatic transitions such as the termination of Heinrich Event 1, the onset and termination of the Younger Dryas, and the 8.2 ka event, suggesting that apron aggradation was driven by changes in climatic regime. Although either increased aridity or a change in precipitation regime could result in increased erosion of terrace scarps, apron aggradation events do not correlate with regional records of aridity. Instead, periods of increased precipitation intensity and/or frequency that occur during climatic transitions most likely drive apron aggradation events.

  14. Modern and late Quaternary clay mineral distribution in the area of the SE Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Yvonne; Ehrmann, Werner; Schmiedl, Gerhard; Kuhnt, Tanja

    2009-05-01

    The present-day clay mineral distribution in the southeastern Levantine Sea and its borderlands reveals a complex pattern of different sources and distribution paths. Smectite dominates the suspended load of the Nile River and of rivers in the Near East. Illite sources are dust-bearing winds from the Sahara and southwestern Europe. Kaolinite is prevalent in rivers of the Sinai, in Egyptian wadis, and in Saharan dust. A high-resolution sediment core from the southeastern Levantine Sea spanning the last 27 ka shows that all these sources contributed during the late Quaternary and that the Nile River played a very important role in the supply of clay. Nile influence was reduced during the glacial period but was higher during the African Humid Period. In contrast to the sharp beginning and end of the African Humid Period recorded in West African records (15 and 5.5 ka), our data show a more transitional pattern and slightly lower Nile River discharge rates not starting until 4 ka. The similarity of the smectite concentrations with fluctuations in sea-surface temperatures of the tropical western Indian Ocean indicates a close relationship between the Indian Ocean climate system and the discharge of the Nile River.

  15. Two late quaternary pollen records from the upper Kolyma region, Soviet Northeast: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.M.; Brubaker, L.; Andreev, A.A.; Chernenky, B.I.; Federova, I.N.

    1992-03-01

    Pollen records from Sosednee and Elikchan Lakes provide the first continuous late Quaternary vegetation history for the upper Kolyma drainage of the Soviet Northeast. Full-glacial spectra at these sites are similar to those from Eastern Beringia, with high percentages of grass, sedge, and wormwood pollen indicative of herb tundra. In the Elikchan area at approximately 12,500 B.P., herb tundra was replaced by a stone pine-larch forest, perhaps similar to forests in the modern region. In contrast, the herb tundra near Sosednee Lake was succeeded by a birch-alder shrub tundra followed by a larch woodland. Stone pine increased in the region after larch and prior to 8600 B.P. A Holocene decline in stone pine, which is evident at Elikchan Lake, is less marked or absent at Sosednee Lake. The differences in these pollen records is somewhat surprising given the proximity of the two sites. Such differences indicate that numerous well-dated sites will be needed to describe the vegetation and climate histories of Western Beringia.

  16. Late Quaternary Floodplain History of the Brazos River in East-Central Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Michael R.; Nordt, Lee C.

    1995-05-01

    The floodplain along a 75-km segment of the Brazos River, traversing the Gulf Coastal Plain of Texas, has a complex late Quaternary history. From 18,000 to 8500 yr B.P., the Brazos River was a competent meandering stream that migrated from one side of the floodplain to the other, creating a thick layer of coarse-grained lateral accretion deposits. After 8500 yr B.P., the hydrologic regime of the Brazos River changed. The river became an underfit meandering stream that repeatedly became confined within narrow and unstable meander belts that would occasionally avulse. Avulsion occurred four times; first at 8100 yr B.P., then at 2500 yr B.P., again around 500 yr B.P., and finally around 300 yr B.P. The depositional regime on the floodplain also changed after 8500 yr B.P., with floodplain construction dominated by vertical accretion. Most vertical accretion occurred from 8100 to 4200 yr B.P. and from 2500 to 1250 yr B.P. Two major and three minor periods of soil formation are documented in the floodplain sequence. The two most developed soils formed from 4200 to 2500 yr B.P. and from around 1250 to 500 yr B.P. These changes on the floodplain appear to be the result not of a single factor, but of the complex interplay among changes in climate, sediment yield, and intrinsic floodplain variables over time.

  17. Paleomagnetic investigation of late Quaternary sediments of south San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hillhouse, John W.

    1977-01-01

    Paleomagnetic inclinations of the Late Quaternary sediments of South San Francisco Bay were determined from bore hole samples collected near Dumbarton Bridge. The sediments consist of estuarine muds and nonmarine sand deposits, floored by bedrock of the Mesozoic Franciscan Formation. - Beneath Dumbarton Bridge the entire sedimentary fill is normally polarized; therefore, the fill postdates the Brunhes-Matayama polarity reversal (700,000 y. B.P.). Magnetic time lines such as the Mono Lake excursion (24,000 y. B.P.) and the reversed Blake event (110,000 y B.P.) were not found in this bore hole. In addition to Holocene and modern deposits of San Francisco Bay, an older estuarine unit occurs in the stratigraphic section. The older unit was deposited during a period of high sea level, tentatively correlated with the Sangamon interglacial period. Because evidence of the Blake event is not present in the older estuarine unit, the proposed age of this unit could not be confirmed. Although the Holocene estuarine deposits of South San Francisco Bay carry stable remanent magnetization, a reliable record of geomagnetic secular variation could not be recovered because the water-saturated sdiment was deformed by drilling.

  18. A fractal analysis of quaternary, Cenozoic-Mesozoic, and Late Pennsylvanian sea level changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsui, Albert T.; Rust, Kelly A.; Klein, George D.

    1993-01-01

    Sea level changes are related to both climatic variations and tectonic movements. The fractal dimensions of several sea level curves were compared to a modern climatic fractal dimension of 1.26 established for annual precipitation records. A similar fractal dimension (1.22) based on delta(O-18/O-16) in deep-sea sediments has been suggested to characterize climatic change during the past 2 m.y. Our analysis indicates that sea level changes over the past 150,000 to 250,000 years also exhibit comparable fractal dimensions. Sea level changes for periods longer than about 30 m.y. are found to produce fractal dimensions closer to unity and Missourian (Late Pennsylvanian) sea level changes yield a fractal dimension of 1.41. The fact that these sea level curves all possess fractal dimensions less than 1.5 indicates that sea level changes exhibit nonperiodic, long-run persistence. The different fractal dimensions calculated for the various time periods could be the result of a characteristic overprinting of the sediment recored by prevailing processes during deposition. For example, during the Quaternary, glacio-eustatic sea level changes correlate well with the present climatic signature. During the Missourian, however, mechanisms such as plate reorganization may have dominated, resulting in a significantly different fractal dimension.

  19. Late Quaternary vegetation dynamics in a biodiversity hotspot, the Uluguru Mountains of Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, Jemma; Leng, Melanie J.; Marchant, Rob

    2009-07-01

    Late Quaternary vegetation history and environmental changes in a biodiverse tropical ecosystem are inferred from pollen, charcoal and carbon isotope evidence derived from a ˜ 48,000-yr sedimentary record from the Uluguru Mountains, a component of the Eastern Arc Mountains of Kenya and Tanzania. Results indicate that Eastern Arc forest composition has remained relatively stable during the past ˜ 48,000 yr. Long-term environmental stability of the Eastern Arc forests has been proposed as a mechanism for the accumulation and persistence of species during glacial periods, thus resulting in the diverse forests observed today. The pollen and isotope data presented here indicate some marked changes in abundance but no significant loss in moist forest taxa through the last glacial maximum, thereby providing support for the long-term environmental stability of the Eastern Arc. Anthropogenic activities, including burning and forest clearance, were found to play a moderate role in shaping the mosaic of forest patches and high-altitude grasslands that characterise the site today; however, this influence was tempered by the inaccessibility of the mountain.

  20. Late Quaternary strata and carbon burial records in the Yellow River delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guangming; Ye, Siyuan; Li, Guangxue; Ding, Xigui; Yuan, Hongming

    2015-06-01

    Sediment carbon sequestration plays an essential role in mitigating atmospheric CO2 increases and the subsequently global greenhouse effect. To clarify the late Quaternary strata and carbon burial records in Yellow River delta (YRD), detailed analysis of benthic foraminifera, total carbon (TC), organic carbon (Corg), sedimentary characteristics and moisture contents of sediments, was performed on core ZK3, 30.3 m in length and obtained from YRD in 2007. Eight depositional units (designated U1-U8 in ascending order) were identified. A comprehensive analysis method of historical geography and sedimentary geology was used to determine the precise depositional ages of the modern Yellow River delta (MYRD), from which pre-MYRD ages were deduced. The results indicates that the maximum burial rates of TC, inorganic carbon (IC) and Corg occurred in the delta front (U5), and the minimum in the shallow sea (U3). Remarkable high sedimentation rates in the MYRD are responsible for burial efficiency of carbon, with an average rate of Corg burial reaching 2087±251 g (m2 yr)-1, and that of IC reaching 13741±808 g (m2 yr)-1, which are much higher than those of other regions with high contents of Corg. Therefore, YRD has a significant burial efficiency for carbon sequestration.

  1. Response of surface water masses and circulation to Late Quaternary climate change east of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Philip P. E.; Carter, Lionel; Neil, Helen L.

    1998-02-01

    A series of cores from east of New Zealand have been examined to determine the paleoceanographic history of the late Quaternary in the SW Pacific using planktonic foraminiferal data. Distinct shifts of species can be seen between glacial and interglacial times especially south of Chatham Rise east of South Island. Foraminiferal fragmentation ratios and benthic/planktonic foraminiferal ratios both show increased dissolution during glacials, especially isotope stage 2 to the south of Chatham Rise. The present-day Subtropical Convergence appears to be tied to the Chatham Rise at 44°S, but during glacial times this rise separated cold water to the south from much warmer water to the north, with an associated strong thermal gradient across the rise. We estimate that this gradient could have presented as much as an 8°C temperature change across 4° of latitude during the maximum of the last ice age. There is only weak evidence of the Younger Dryas cool event, but there is a clear climatic optimum between 8 and 6.4 ka with temperatures 1°-2°C higher than the present day. The marine changes compare well with vegetational changes on both South and North Island.

  2. Tropical Rain Forest and Climate Dynamics of the Atlantic Lowland, Southern Brazil, during the Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behling, Hermann; Negrelle, Raquel R. B.

    2001-11-01

    Palynological analysis of a core from the Atlantic rain forest region in Brazil provides unprecedented insight into late Quaternary vegetational and climate dynamics within this southern tropical lowland. The 576-cm-long sediment core is from a former beach-ridge "valley," located 3 km inland from the Atlantic Ocean. Radio-carbon dates suggest that sediment deposition began prior to 35,000 14C yr B.P. Between ca. 37,500 and ca. 27,500 14C yr B.P. and during the last glacial maximum (LGM; ca. 27,500 to ca. 14,500 14C yr B.P.), the coastal rain forest was replaced by grassland and patches of cold-adapted forest. Tropical trees, such as Alchornea, Moraceae/Urticaceae, and Arecaceae, were almost completely absent during the LGM. Furthermore, their distributions were shifted at least 750 km further north, suggesting a cooling between 3°C and 7°C and a strengthening of Antarctic cold fronts during full-glacial times. A depauperate tropical rain forest developed as part of a successional sequence after ca. 12,300 14C yr B.P. There is no evidence that Araucaria trees occurred in the Atlantic lowland during glacial times. The rain forest was disturbed by marine incursions during the early Holocene period until ca. 6100 14C yr B.P., as indicated by the presence of microforaminifera. A closed Atlantic rain forest then developed at the study site.

  3. Identification of a late Quaternary alluvial-aeolian sedimentary sequence in the Sichuan Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jin-Liang; Ju, Jian-Ting; Chen, Feng; Hu, Zhao-Guo; Zhao, Xiang; Gao, Shao-Peng

    2016-03-01

    The late Quaternary sedimentary sequence in the northwestern part of the Sichuan Basin consists of five lithological units and with increasing depth include the: Chengdu Clay; Brown Clay; Red Clay; Sandy Silt; and basal Muddy Gravel. The genesis, provenance and age of the sediments, as well as the possible presence of hiatuses within this sequence are debated. Measurements of grain-size, magnetic susceptibility, quartz content, quartz δ18O values, element composition, and Sr-Nd isotopic concentrations of samples from a typical sedimentary sequence in the area provides new insights into the genesis and history of the sequence. The new data confirm that the sediments in study site are alluvial-aeolian in origin, with basal alluvial deposits overlain by aeolian deposits. Like the uppermost Chengdu Clay, the underlying Brown Clay and Red Clay are aeolian in origin. In contrast, the Silty Sand, like the basal Muddy Gravel, is an alluvial deposit and not an aeolian deposit as previously thought. Moreover, the succession of the aeolian deposits very likely contains two significant sedimentary hiatuses. Sedimentological analysis demonstrates that the source materials for the aeolian deposits in the northwestern part of the Sichuan Basin and those on the eastern Tibetan Plateau are different. Furthermore, the loess deposits on the eastern Tibetan Plateau are derived from heterogeneous local sources.

  4. Imprint of Late Quaternary Climate Change on the Mid-Atlantic Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavich, M.; Markewich, H.; Newell, W. L.; Litwin, R.; Smoot, J.; Brook, G.

    2009-12-01

    Recent geomorphic, lithostratigraphic, palynologic and chronostratigraphic investigations of the mid-Atlantic region show that much of the modern landscape flanking the Chesapeake Bay and the Potomac River is developed on late Quaternary sediments. These deposits, dated by OSL and 14C, include transgressive marine and estuarine sediments deposited between 120ka and 32ka, and parabolic dunes formed between 32ka and 15ka. The stacked estuarine units were deposited in a subsiding basin as eustatic sea level fell from +7m to -60m. The estuarine units contain pollen that provides evidence for millennial scale climate fluctuations. The dunes formed during the period of rapid expansion of the Laurentide Ice Sheet as sea level fell to -120m. Permafrost features such as frost wedges and periglacial “pots” formed during cold intervals associated with marine oxygen isotope stages 4 and 2. This periglacial climate, along with glacioisostatic adjustments to growth and decay of the Laurentide Ice Sheet, affected landscape processes at least as far south as the Potomac River valley. While many of these features were recognized in earlier mapping and stratigraphic investigations, OSL dating has greatly extended the range of available dates and significantly improved our understanding of the impacts of highly variable periglacial climate on this region.

  5. Late Quaternary Tephrostratigraphy of South-Central Chile (~ 38 - 40 °S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontijn, K.; Rawson, H. L.; Van Daele, M. E.; Moernaut, J.; Abarzúa, A. M.; Pyle, D. M.; Mather, T. A.; De Batist, M. A. O.; Moreno-Roa, H.; Naranjo, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The volcanoes of the Siete Lagos region ("Lake District") in South-Central Chile form part of the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andes and include some of the most active volcanoes in South America, i.e. Villarrica and Llaima. The Late Quaternary (~ last 15 ka) regional tephrostratigraphic record for this region is however still poorly developed. We combine detailed stratigraphic logging of terrestrial sections in the vicinity of Llaima, Sollipulli, Villarrica, Quetrupillan, Mocho-Choshuenco and Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcanoes with petrological, whole-rock and glass geochemical data, and 14C dating on charcoal entrained in volcanic deposits, and correlate the on-land sequences with tephra layers in existing 14C-dated lacustrine records of Laguna Las Ranas and Lagos Villarrica, Calafquén and Riñihue. The combined record includes previously described major eruptions, e.g. Llaima Pumice (Llaima) and Alpehue Pumice (Sollipulli), which help to constrain the relative timing of events. These correlations suggest that several widespread volcanic units are several hundreds to thousands of years older than previously thought. The record also includes newly described pumice-producing events, e.g. for the poorly studied Quetrupillan volcano, and provides new insights into the post-glacial eruptive frequency in the Southern Volcanic Zone. The newly updated stratigraphy with high-quality geochemical data also contributes to the regional tephrochronological framework which helps to significantly improve age models for lacustrine palaeoseismological and palaeoenvironmental archives.

  6. A rock-magnetic record from Lake Baikal, Siberia: Evidence for Late Quaternary climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, J.A.; King, J.W.; Colman, Steven M.; Kravchinsky, V.A.

    1994-01-01

    Rock-magnetic measurements of sediment cores from the Academician Ridge region of Lake Baikal, Siberia show variations related to Late Quaternary climate change. Based upon the well-dated last glacial-interglacial transition, variations in magnetic concentration and mineralogy are related to glacial-interglacial cycles using a conceptual model. Interglacial intervals are characterized by low magnetic concentrations and a composition that is dominated by low coercivity minerals. Glacial intervals are characterized by high magnetic concentrations and increased amounts of high coercivity minerals. The variation in magnetic concentration is consistent with dilution by diatom opal during the more productive interglacial periods. We also infer an increased contribution of eolian sediment during the colder, windier, and more arid glacial conditions when extensive loess deposits were formed throughout Europe and Asia. Eolian transport is inferred to deliver increased amounts of high coercivity minerals as staining on eolian grains during the glacial intervals. Variations in magnetic concentration and mineralogy of Lake Baikal sediment correlate to the SPECMAP marine oxygen-isotope record. The high degree of correlation between Baikal magnetic concentration/mineralogy and the SPECMAP oxygen-isotope record indicates that Lake Baikal sediment preserves a history of climate change in central Asia for the last 250 ka. This correlation provides a method of estimating the age of sediment beyond the range of the radiocarbon method. Future work must include providing better age control and additional climate proxy data, thereby strengthening the correlation of continental and marine climate records. ?? 1994.

  7. A chronology of alluvial fan response to Late Quaternary sea level and climate change, Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Richard J. J.; Candy, Ian; Skourtsos, Emmanuel

    2016-09-01

    To better understand how fluvial systems respond to late Quaternary climatic forcing OSL and U-series dating was applied to stratigraphically significant sedimentary units within a small (<6.5 km2) alluvial fan system (the Sphakia fan) in southwest Crete. The resultant chronology (comprising 32 OSL and U-series ages) makes Sphakia fan one of the best dated systems in the Mediterranean and suggests that Cretan fans responded to climate in two ways. First, during the transitions between Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5a/4 and MIS 2/1 Sphakia fan was characterised by significant entrenchment and distal shift in the zone of deposition. It is proposed that the phases of entrenchment were driven by sea level induced base level fall during MIS 5a/4 and landscape stabilisation during the onset of the current interglacial (MIS 2/1). Second, with the exception of these two entrenchment episodes fan alluviation occurred across the entire last interglacial/glacial cycle in all climatic settings i.e. interglacials, interstadials and stadials. It is likely that the topographic setting of the catchment supplying sediment to Sphakia fan maintained high sediment transfer rates during most climatic settings enabling fan aggradation to occur except during major climatic driven transitions i.e. major sea level fall and postglacial vegetation development.

  8. Late Quaternary loess in northeastern Colorado: Part I - Age and paleoclimatic significance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Kihl, R.; Been, J.; Mahan, S.A.; Cowherd, S.

    1999-01-01

    Loess in eastern Colorado covers an estimated 14000 km2, and is the westernmost part of the North American midcontinent loess province. Stratigraphic studies indicate there were two periods of loess deposition in eastern Colorado during late Quaternary time. The first period spanned ca. 20 000 to 12 000 14C yr B.P. (ca. 20-14 ka) and correlates reasonably well with the culmination and retreat of Pinedale glaciers in the Colorado Front Range during the last glacial maximum. The second period of loess deposition occurred between ca. 11 000 and 9000 14C yr B.P. This interval may be Holocene or may correlate with a hypothesized Younger Dryas glacial advance in the Colorado Front Range. Sedimentologic, mineralogic, and geochemical data indicate that as many as three sources could have supplied loess in eastern Colorado. These sources include glaciogenic silt (derived from the Colorado Front Range) and two bedrock sources, volcaniclastic silt from the White River Group, and clays from the Pierre Shale. The sediment sources imply a generally westerly paleowind during the last glacial maximum. New carbon isotope data, combined with published faunal data, indicate that the loess was probably deposited on a cool steppe, implying a last glacial maximum July temperature depression, relative to the present, of at least 5-6??C. Overall, loess deposition in eastern Colorado occurred mostly toward the end of the last glacial maximum, under cooler and drier conditions, with generally westerly winds from more than one source.

  9. Differential effects of temperature change and human impact on European Late Quaternary mammalian extinctions.

    PubMed

    Varela, Sara; Lima-Ribeiro, Matheus Souza; Diniz-Filho, José Alexandre Felizola; Storch, David

    2015-04-01

    Species that inhabited Europe during the Late Quaternary were impacted by temperature changes and early humans, resulting in the disappearance of half of the European large mammals. However, quantifying the relative importance that each factor had in the extinction risk of species has been challenging, mostly due to the spatio-temporal biases of fossil records, which complicate the calibration of realistic and accurate ecological niche modeling. Here, we overcome this problem by using ecotypes, and not real species, to run our models. We created 40 ecotypes with different temperature requirements (mean temperature from -20 °C to 25 °C and temperature range from 10 °C to 40 °C) and used them to quantify the effect of climate change and human impact. Our results show that cold-adapted ecotypes would have been highly affected by past temperature changes in Europe, whereas temperate and warm-adapted ecotypes would have been positively affected by temperature change. Human impact affected all ecotypes negatively, and temperate ecotypes suffered the greatest impacts. Based on these results, the extinction of cold-adapted species like Mammuthus primigenius may be related to temperature change, while the extinction of temperate species, like Crocuta crocuta, may be related to human impact. Our results suggest that temperature change and human impact affected different ecotypes in distinct ways, and that the interaction of both impacts may have shaped species extinctions in Europe. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. RESEARCH PAPERS : A magnetic investigation of a Late Quaternary loess/palaeosol record in Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chlachula, J.; Evans, M. E.; Rutter, N. W.

    1998-01-01

    A Late Quaternary loess/palaeosol sequence at Kurtak in the Yenisey River valley, southern Siberia, has been studied magnetically. The 34 m section (340 samples) exhibits variations in magnetic susceptibility which can be correlated with oxygen isotope stages 1-7. A detailed sampling of stage 5 (a further 209 samples) permits the identification of substages 5a-e. The susceptibility variations themselves are in the opposite sense to that found in the classic sections of the Chinese Loess Plateau, but are in agreement with the `wind-intensity' model which has been put forward to explain similar findings in loess sequences in Alaska. Published results for the susceptibility of magnetite imply volume fractions of ~0.2 per cent in glacial stages 2 and 4, dropping to ~0.05 per cent in stages 1, 3 and 5. These fluctuations match the aeolian flux variations observed in core V21-146 from the north Pacific. Even though the warmer intervals are characterized by lower susceptibilities, the observed frequency dependence of susceptibility indicates that new magnetic material is produced as a result of pedogenesis during interglacial and interstadial times.

  11. Species-specific responses of Late Quaternary megafauna to climate and humans.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Eline D; Nogués-Bravo, David; Orlando, Ludovic; Weinstock, Jaco; Binladen, Jonas; Marske, Katharine A; Ugan, Andrew; Borregaard, Michael K; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Nielsen, Rasmus; Ho, Simon Y W; Goebel, Ted; Graf, Kelly E; Byers, David; Stenderup, Jesper T; Rasmussen, Morten; Campos, Paula F; Leonard, Jennifer A; Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Froese, Duane; Zazula, Grant; Stafford, Thomas W; Aaris-Sørensen, Kim; Batra, Persaram; Haywood, Alan M; Singarayer, Joy S; Valdes, Paul J; Boeskorov, Gennady; Burns, James A; Davydov, Sergey P; Haile, James; Jenkins, Dennis L; Kosintsev, Pavel; Kuznetsova, Tatyana; Lai, Xulong; Martin, Larry D; McDonald, H Gregory; Mol, Dick; Meldgaard, Morten; Munch, Kasper; Stephan, Elisabeth; Sablin, Mikhail; Sommer, Robert S; Sipko, Taras; Scott, Eric; Suchard, Marc A; Tikhonov, Alexei; Willerslev, Rane; Wayne, Robert K; Cooper, Alan; Hofreiter, Michael; Sher, Andrei; Shapiro, Beth; Rahbek, Carsten; Willerslev, Eske

    2011-11-02

    Despite decades of research, the roles of climate and humans in driving the dramatic extinctions of large-bodied mammals during the Late Quaternary period remain contentious. Here we use ancient DNA, species distribution models and the human fossil record to elucidate how climate and humans shaped the demographic history of woolly rhinoceros, woolly mammoth, wild horse, reindeer, bison and musk ox. We show that climate has been a major driver of population change over the past 50,000 years. However, each species responds differently to the effects of climatic shifts, habitat redistribution and human encroachment. Although climate change alone can explain the extinction of some species, such as Eurasian musk ox and woolly rhinoceros, a combination of climatic and anthropogenic effects appears to be responsible for the extinction of others, including Eurasian steppe bison and wild horse. We find no genetic signature or any distinctive range dynamics distinguishing extinct from surviving species, emphasizing the challenges associated with predicting future responses of extant mammals to climate and human-mediated habitat change. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  12. Late Quaternary tectonic landforms and fluvial aggradation in the Saryu River valley: Central Kumaun Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothyari, Girish Ch.; Luirei, Khayingshing

    2016-09-01

    The present study has been carried out with special emphasis on the aggradational landforms to explain the spatial and temporal variability in phases of aggradation/incision in response to tectonic activity during the late Quaternary in the Saryu River valley in central Kumaun Himalaya. The valley has preserved cut-and-fill terraces with thick alluvial cover, debris flow terraces, and bedrock strath terraces that provide signatures of tectonic activity and climate. Morphostratigraphy of the terraces reveals that the oldest landforms preserved south of the Main Central Thrust, the fluvial modified debris flow terraces, were developed between 30 and 45 ka. The major phase of valley fill is dated between 14 and 22 ka. The youngest phase of aggradation is dated at early and mid-Holocene (9-3 ka). Following this, several phases of accelerated incision/erosion owing to an increase in uplift rate occurred, as evident from the strath terraces. Seven major phases of bedrock incision/uplift have been estimated during 44 ka (3.34 mm/year), 35 ka (1.84 mm/year), 15 ka (0.91 mm/year), 14 ka (0.83 mm/year), 9 ka (1.75 mm/year), 7 ka (5.38 mm/year), and around 3 ka (4.4 mm/year) from the strath terraces near major thrusts. We postulate that between 9 and 3 ka the terrain witnessed relatively enhanced surface uplift (2-5 mm/year).

  13. Sequence stratigraphy and composition of late quaternary shelf-margin deltas, Northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R.A.; Suter, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    High-resolution seismic profiles and foundation borings from the northwestern Gulf of Mexico record the physical attributes and depositional histories of several late Quaternary sequences that were deposited by wave-modified, river-dominated shelf-margin deltas during successive periods of lowered sea level. Each progressively younger deltaic sequence is thinner and exhibits a systematic decrease in the abundance and concentration of sand, which is attributed to a shift in the axes of trunk streams and greater structural influence through time. Our study shows that (1) contemporaneous structural deformation controlled the thickness of each sequence, the oblique directions of delta progradation, the axes of major fluvial channels, and the geometries of delta lobes at the shelf margin; (2) sedimentation was rapid in response to rapid eustatic fluctuations and structural influence; (3) boundaries of these high-frequency sequences are the correlative conformities of updip fluvial incision and coincide with downlap surfaces at the shelf margin; (4) the downlap surfaces are not true surfaces, but zones of parallel reflections that become progressively higher and younger in the direction of progradation; (5) the downlap zones are composed of marine muds that do not contain the high concentrations of shell debris expected in condensed sections; (6) possible paleosols capping the two oldest sequences are regressive surfaces of subaerial exposure that were preserved during transgressions; and (7) no incised valleys or submarine canyons breach the paleoshelf margin, even though incised drainages were present updip and sea level curves indicate several periods of rapid fall.

  14. Climate change not to blame for late Quaternary megafauna extinctions in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Saltré, Frédérik; Rodríguez-Rey, Marta; Brook, Barry W.; Johnson, Christopher N; Turney, Chris S. M.; Alroy, John; Cooper, Alan; Beeton, Nicholas; Bird, Michael I.; Fordham, Damien A.; Gillespie, Richard; Herrando-Pérez, Salvador; Jacobs, Zenobia; Miller, Gifford H.; Nogués-Bravo, David; Prideaux, Gavin J.; Roberts, Richard G.; Bradshaw, Corey J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Late Quaternary megafauna extinctions impoverished mammalian diversity worldwide. The causes of these extinctions in Australia are most controversial but essential to resolve, because this continent-wide event presaged similar losses that occurred thousands of years later on other continents. Here we apply a rigorous metadata analysis and new ensemble-hindcasting approach to 659 Australian megafauna fossil ages. When coupled with analysis of several high-resolution climate records, we show that megafaunal extinctions were broadly synchronous among genera and independent of climate aridity and variability in Australia over the last 120,000 years. Our results reject climate change as the primary driver of megafauna extinctions in the world's most controversial context, and instead estimate that the megafauna disappeared Australia-wide ∼13,500 years after human arrival, with shorter periods of coexistence in some regions. This is the first comprehensive approach to incorporate uncertainty in fossil ages, extinction timing and climatology, to quantify mechanisms of prehistorical extinctions. PMID:26821754

  15. Late Quaternary terrigenous sedimentary records from the Alpha Ridge, central Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.; Sun, Y.; Xiao, W.; Li, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Terrigenous components in three sediment cores from the Alpha Ridge, central Arctic Ocean, have been investigated to reconstruct late Quaternary variations in sedimentation, ice-rafted detritus (IRD) provenance, and related climate changes. Established by a combination of variations in Ca and Mn content, color cycles, >63 μm fractions, foraminiferal abundance, AMS14C dating and regional lithological correlation, the core stratigraphy extends back to estimated Marine Isotope Stage 13. IRD (>154 μm and 250 μm), fine sand fraction, mean and median grain sizes increased and decreased during the glacial/deglacial/stadial and interglacial/interstadial periods, respectively, providing evidence of rafting ice transport and IRD unloading to the Alpha Ridge seafloor. The IRD events with high Ca content during the glacial/deglacial/stadial periods point to the source from the Canadian Arctic Archipelago with vast carbonate rock outcrops, and they can be used as reliable stratigraphic markers due to their wide occurrence, likely indicating the collapses of ice sheets, possibly in response to abrupt climate changes. Clay and silt fractions occur consistently at high proportions except for high IRD intervals, suggesting a relatively stable supply of fine-grained sediment. This indicates that glacial-interglacial environmental changes had insignificant influence on the fine-grained sediment input from primarily sea ice transport over the central Arctic Ocean.

  16. Human impact on late Quaternary landscapes in the Central Spanish Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, F.; Raab, T. A.

    2011-12-01

    Like the Alps in Central Europe the Pyrenees in Southeast Europe are well known for their glacial history. Within the scope of the ongoing research project Post-LGM pedogenesis and geomorphodynamics in the Aragonese Pyrenees, Spain, funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), we are studying the landscapes in the Gallego valley and the Aragon valley formed during the late Quaternary period. The aim of this research is to describe and characterize the soil development since the retreat of the valley glaciers from the LGM-moraines which are supposed to have an age of up to 60 ka yrs. To these purposes soil profiles are excavated in sediments and landforms of different ages (LGM to Holocene) and different genesis (glacigenic, glacifluvial, fluvial, gravitational). The soil profiles are arranged as catenas and provide insight into the pedo-stratigraphy of moraines, fluvial terraces, glacis and alluvial fans. Our preliminary results show that besides geogenic process past human land use must be considered as a main trigger of landscape development during the late Holocene. Truncated soil profiles in the backslopes and the correlate sediments of soil erosion burying soil horizons in the footslopes clearly indicate one or even more periods of re-shaping the landforms after deglaciation. Considerable amounts of small charcoal and tile fragments in the translocated sediments hint to an anthropogenic agent. The disturbance in the soil profiles and sediments is visible in the field and by micromorphology. Although 14C and OSL datings on the base of the correlate sediments of soil erosion indicate at least one phase of erosion and redeposition at the end of the 17th century, the onset of afresh pedogenic processes in the correlate sediments of soil erosion indicate young soil formation.

  17. Did climatic seasonality control late Quaternary artiodactyl densities in western North America?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broughton, Jack M.; Byers, David A.; Bryson, Reid A.; Eckerle, William; Madsen, David B.

    2008-10-01

    We develop and test a hypothesis here that the seasonality of temperature and precipitation played a major role in determining the population densities of artiodactyls (e.g., Ovis canadensis, Odocoileus hemionus, and Antilocapra americana) across the terminal Pleistocene and Holocene of western North America. For much of this region, general circulation climate models and a range of paleoclimatic data suggest that seasonal extremes in temperature peaked during the terminal Pleistocene and early Holocene and that early and middle Holocene precipitation followed a winter-wet, summer-dry pattern—conditions known to depress artiodactyl densities. These trends are mirrored in a northern Bonneville Basin macrophysical climate simulation model from which we derive terminal Pleistocene and Holocene climatic values and three indices of climatic seasonality: (1) intra-annual temperature range, (2) summer precipitation intensity, and (3) winter precipitation intensity. These indices are arrayed against three detailed late Quaternary artiodactyl abundance records in the Bonneville Basin: a unique paleontological record of fecal pellet densities, and archaeological records of artiodactyl skeletal elements and large game hunting tools. Each of these artiodactyl abundance records shows significant correlations with the model-derived seasonality indices and suggests that artiodactyls occurred in low densities from the terminal Pleistocene through the middle Holocene—substantial increases occurred during equable, summer-wet periods of the late Holocene. Archaeological vertebrate records from across western North America show very similar temporal patterns in artiodactyl abundances suggesting that the trend and its climate-based causes may be a very general one. These conclusions have far-reaching implications not only for our understanding of ancient human hunting and land use patterns, but for the future management of artiodactyls under scenarios of global warming that also

  18. Morphology and Late Quaternary sedimentation in the Gulf of Oman Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchupi, Elazar; Swift, S. A.; Ross, D. A.

    The morphology of the Gulf of Oman Basin, a 3,400 m deep oceanic basin between Oman and southern Pakistan and southern Iran, ranges from a convergent margin (Makran margin) along the north side, a passive type (Oman margin) along the south side, translation types along the basin's west (Zendan Fault-Oman Line) and east (Murray Ridge) sides and a narrow continental rise and a wide abyssal plain in the centre of the basin. Sediment input into the basin during the Late Quaternary has been mainly from the north as a result of the uplift of the Coast Makran Mountains in the Late Miocene-Pliocene. Today most of this detritrus is deposited on the shelf and upper continental slope and perched basins behind the fold/fault ridges on the lower slope. The presence of fans and channels on the continental rise on the north side of the basin indicate, however, that continental derived debris was, and possibly is, being transported to the deep-sea by turbidity currents via gaps in the ridges on the lower slope. In addition to land derived terrigenous sediments, the basin deposits also contain biogenic (organic matter and calcium carbonate), eolian detritus and hydrates and authigenic carbonates from the tectonic dewatering of the Makran accretionary wedge. The eolian sediment is carried into the Gulf of Oman Basin from Arabia and the Mesopotamia Valley by the northwesterly Shamal winds. This type of detritus was particularly abundant during the glacial arid periods 21,000-20,000 and 11,000 (Younger Dryas) years ago when exposure of the Persian (Arabian) Gulf increased the area of dust entrainment and shifted the position of the source of the eolian sediments closer to the basin.

  19. Late Quaternary eolian and alluvial response to paleoclimate, Canyonlands, southeastern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reheis, M.C.; Reynolds, R.L.; Goldstein, H.; Roberts, H.M.; Yount, J.C.; Axford, Y.; Cummings, L.S.; Shearin, N.

    2005-01-01

    In upland areas of Canyonlands National Park, Utah, thin deposits and paleosols show late Quaternary episodes of eolian sedimentation, pedogenesis, and climate change. Interpretation of the stratigraphy and optically stimulated luminescence ages of eolian and nearby alluvial deposits, their pollen, and intercalated paleosols yields the following history: (1) Eolian deposition at ca. 46 ka, followed by several episodes of alluviation from some time before ca. 40 ka until after 16 ka (calibrated). (2) Eolian deposition from ca. 17 ka to 12 ka, interrupted by periods of pedogenesis, coinciding with late Pleistocene alluviation as local climate became warmer and wetter. (3) A wetter period from 12 to 8.5 ka corresponding to the peak of summer monsoon influence, during which soils formed relatively quickly by infiltration of eolian silt and clay, and trees and grasses were more abundant. (4) A drier period between ca. 8.5 and 6 ka during which sheetwash deposits accumulated and more desertlike vegetation was dominant; some dunes were reactivated at ca. 8 ka. (5) Episodic eolian and fluvial deposition during a wetter, cooler period that began at ca. 6 ka and ended by ca. 3-2 ka, followed by a shift to drier modern conditions; localized mobilization of dune sand has persisted to the present. These interpretations are similar to those of studies at the Chaco dune field, New Mexico, and the Tusayan dune field, Arizona, and are consistent with paleoclimate interpretations of pollen and packrat middens in the region. A period of rapid deposition and infiltration of eolian dust derived from distant igneous source terranes occurred between ca. 12 and 8 ka. Before ca. 17 ka, and apparently back to at least 45 ka, paleosols contain little or no such infiltrated dust. After ca. 8 ka, either the supply of dust was reduced or the more arid climate inhibited translocation of dust into the soils. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  20. Linking glacial melting to Late Quaternary sedimentation in climatically sensitive mountainous catchments of the Mount Chlemos compex, Kalavryta, southern Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Richard; Hughes, Philip

    2014-05-01

    local last glacial maximum and are coeval with the later part of the Tymphian stage in the Pindus range. Refs: Hughes, P.D., Woodward, J.C., Gibbard, P.L., Macklin, M.G., Gilmour, M.A. & Smith G.R. (2006) The glacial history of the Pindus Mountains, Greece. Journal of Geology 114, 413-434. Hughes, P.D., Woodward, J.C., van Calsteren, P.C. and Thomas, L.E. (2011) The Glacial History of The Dinaric Alps, Montenegro. Quaternary Science Reviews 30, 3393-3412. Woodward, J.C., Hamlin, R.H.B., Macklin, M.G., Hughes, P.D. & Lewin, J. (2008) Pleistocene catchment dynamics in the Mediterranean: glaciation, fluvial geomorphology and the slackwater sediment record. Geomorphology 101, 44-67.

  1. Stratigraphic evolution of the inner continental shelf in response to late Quaternary relative sea-level change, northwestern Gulf of Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhardt, W.A.; Belknap, D.F.; Kelley, J.T.

    1997-01-01

    Accumulations of deltaic and littoral sediments on the inner continental shelf of Maine, Gulf of Maine, preserve a record of postglacial sea-level changes and shoreline migrations. The depositional response of coastal environments to a cycle of regression, lowstand, and transgression was examined with seismic-reflection profiles, vibracores, and radiocarbon dates collected from sediments at the mouths of the Kennebec and Penobscot Rivers. Sequence-stratigraphie analysis of these data reveals two distinctly different successions of late Quaternary deposits that represent end members in an evolutionary model for this glaciated coast. Seaward of the Kennebec River, coarsegrained shorelines with foreset beds occur at depths of 20-60 m and outline the lobate margin of the Kennebec River paleodelta, a complex, rock-framed accumulation of glaciomarine and deltaic sediments capped by estuarine and marine deposits. Sand derived from this system today supports large barrier spits and extensive salt marshes. In contrast, the mouth of the Penobscot River is characterized by thick deposits of glaciomarine mud overlain by marine mud of Holocene age, including gas-charged zones that have locally evolved into fields of pockmarks. The distinct lack of sand and gravel seaward of the Penobscot River and its abundance seaward of the Kennebec River probably reflect differences in sediment sources and the physiography of the two watersheds. The contrasting stratigraphie framework of these systems demonstrates the importance of understanding local and regional differences in sediment supply, sea-level change, bedrock structure, and exposure to waves and tides in order to model river-mouth deposition on glaciated coasts. Evolution of shelf deposits was largely controlled by relative sea level, which locally fell from a highstand (+60 to +70 m at 14 ka) contemporary with deglaciation to a lowstand (-55 m at 10.8 ka). The sea-level lowering was accompanied by fluvial incision of older

  2. Seismic stratigraphy and late Quaternary shelf history, south-central Monterey Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chin, J.L.; Clifton, H.E.; Mullins, H.T.

    1988-01-01

    The south-central Monterey Bay shelf is a high-energy, wave-dominated, tectonically active coastal region on the central California continental margin. A prominent feature of this shelf is a sediment lobe off the mouth of the Salinas River that has surface expression. High-resolution seismic-reflection profiles reveal that an angular unconformity (Quaternary?) underlies the entire shelf and separates undeformed strata above it from deformed strata below it. The Salinas River lobe is a convex bulge on the shelf covering an area of approximately 72 km2 in water depths from 10 to 90 m. It reaches a maximum thickness of 35 m about 2.5 km seaward of the river mouth and thins in all directions away from this point. Adjacent shelf areas are characterized by only a thin (2 to 5 m thick) and uniform veneer of sediment. Acoustic stratigraphy of the lobe is complex and is characterized by at least three unconformity-bounded depositional sequences. Acoustically, these sequences are relatively well bedded. Acoustic foresets occur within the intermediate sequence and dip seaward at 0.7?? to 2.0??. Comparison with sedimentary sequences in uplifted onshore Pleistocene marine-terrace deposits of the Monterey Bay area, which were presumably formed in a similar setting under similar processes, suggests that a general interpretation can be formulated for seismic stratigraphic patterns. Depositional sequences are interpreted to represent shallowing-upwards progradational sequences of marine to nonmarine coastal deposits formed during interglacial highstands and/or during early stages of falling sea level. Acoustic foresets within the intermediate sequence are evidence of seaward progradation. Acoustic unconformities that separate depositional sequences are interpreted as having formed largely by shoreface planation and may be the only record of the intervening transgressions. The internal stratigraphy of the Salinas River lobe thus suggests that at least several late Quaternary

  3. Profiling of late Trias-early Quaternary surface in the Eskisehir basin using microtremors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tün, Muammer; Pekkan, Emrah; Özel, Oğuz

    2015-04-01

    Earthquakes in our country and in the world cause damage and collapse of engineering structures due to several reasons. Settlement areas are under the effect of strong and long-duration seismic vibrations due to resonance and focusing effects. In this study, we propose the first approximation for thickness of Quaternary sediment and late Trias topography for the Eskisehir basin in microtremor methods. The 3-D basin structures and site resonance frequencies in the Eskişehir Basin were investigated by geophysical measurements based on the 318 single station and 9 array sites microtremor methods situated on soft soil sediments and rock units within the study area. The microtremor data collection, processing, and interpretation of the H/V curves were carried out following the recommendations and guidelines of the SESAME consortium (Site EffectS assesment using AMbient Excitation) The signals recorded were analysed for horizontal to the vertical (H/V) spectral ratio using GEOPSY software. The H/V ratios were calculated for the frequency range 0.2 to 20 Hz, using 60 s as a time window length and removing time windows contaminated by transients. Almost of the HVSR curves on the alluvium deposits have a low-frequency peak at 0.6-0.8 Hz and a second peak at 4-10 Hz. We used the Spatial Autocorrelation (SPAC) method in Eskisehir Basin using broadband seismometers distributed in triangular arrays. We derive a power-law relationship that correlates the fundamental site resonance frequencies with the sedimentary cover thickness obtained from the seismic reflection data, borehole data and shear wave velocity data in the study area. We use this relationship to estimate bedrock depth and thickness of alluvial deposits in the Eskisehir basin. Our estimation of maximum basin depths is 650 m for the Muttalip. The thickness of quaternary sediment is 25 m for Eskisehir alluvium. The estimated thickness is used to plot digital elevation model and cross profiles correlating with

  4. Submarine slides during relative sea level rise: three late-Quaternary examples from the Central Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trincardi, F.; Asioli, A.; Canu, M.; Cattaneo, A.; Correggiari, A.

    2003-04-01

    Sea level lowering is commonly invoked as an important predisposing factor or potential trigger for sediment failure of unconsolidated sediment deposited during previous highstand conditions on continental shelves and slopes. However, studies from Quaternary continental margins increasingly document sediment failure during times of relative sea level rise and hint to a more complex relation between changing sea level and mass wasting. Three extensive mass-failure deposits originated during the late-Quaternary sea level rise on the eastern Tyrrhenian margin and Strait of Sicily. The deposits that failed had markedly different architectures: offshore Cape Licosa, a shelf-margin lowstand wedge failed along its basal downlap surface; in Paola slope basin and in Gela Basin, extensive failure on the upper slope involved a few-m-thick mud drape and older consolidated units. Regardless of their geometric differences, all three failures occurred close to melt-water pulses (mwp1A, 1B), based on the timing of the onset of the post-slide drapes. This evidence suggests that rapid drowning of unconsolidated sediment resulted in increased water load, and enhanced pore pressure played a role in favouring failure. This view is consistent with the evidence that, in all three areas, failure coincides also with a marked change in sedimentation style. Such change reflects a substantial landward shift of sediment entry points and decrease in sediment accumulation rates, both consistent with the draped stile of post-failure deposition. We speculate that failure occurred in response to the following combination of predisposing factors and triggers: 1) during the Last Glacial Maximum, rapid deposition on the upper slope resulted in the formation of potentially unstable sediment sections resting on well defined basal surfaces; 2) when sea level rise reached peak rates (mwp1A or mwp1B), hydrostatic load increased the pore pressure within the recently-deposited sediments; 3) this increase of

  5. Late Pleistocene glaciation and deglaciation in the Crestone Peaks area, Colorado Sangre de Cristo Mountains, USA - chronology and paleoclimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Eric M.; Laabs, Benjamin J. C.; Plummer, Mitchell A.; Kroner, Ryan K.; Brugger, Keith A.; Spiess, Vivian M.; Refsnider, Kurt A.; Xia, Yidong; Caffee, Marc W.

    2017-02-01

    Cosmogenic 10Be surface-exposure dating and numerical glacier modeling are used to reconstruct glacial chronology and climate in the Colorado Sangre de Cristo Mountains during the local last glacial maximum (LLGM) and the subsequent deglaciation. Twenty-two surface-exposure ages on moraine boulders and polished-bedrock outcrops in the Willow Creek valley and ten in two adjacent valleys indicate that glaciers were at or near their maxima from ∼21 ka until 17-16 ka, and then retreated rapidly, nearly deglaciating the Willow Creek valley entirely by ∼14 ka. Coupled energy/mass-balance and flow modeling of two of the glaciers indicates that, if changing ice extent was driven only by temperature and insolation changes, temperature depressions of 5.0 and 5.1 °C from modern conditions, with an uncertainty of approximately + 1.5 / - 1.0 °C, would have sustained the glaciers in mass-balance equilibrium at their LLGM extents. Doubling or halving of modern precipitation during the LLGM would have been associated with 2.7-3.0 °C and 6.9-7.0 °C temperature depression respectively. Approximately half of the subsequent LLGM-to-modern climate change was accomplished by ∼14 ka. If the rapid main phase of deglaciation between about 16 ka and 14 ka was driven solely by temperature and insolation changes, it would have been associated with a temperature rise of about 2.5 °C, at a mean rate of approximately 1.1 °C/ky. This new chronology of the last glaciation is generally consistent with others developed recently in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. The numerical modeling, however, suggests a lesser LLGM temperature depression from modern conditions than have most previous studies in Colorado.

  6. Siliceous microfossils as late Quaternary paleo-environmental indicators at Braamhoek wetland, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finné, M.; Norström, E.; Risberg, J.; Scott, L.

    2009-04-01

    phytolith indices (Iph and Ic) interpreted as indicators of climatic change, show periods of increased wetness and possibly minor temperature fluctuations during the late Quaternary. The fossil diatom record infer changes in past moisture conditions. Unlike the modern wetland, which is dominated by benthic and aerophilic diatoms, the late Pleistocene-early Holocene wetland favoured growth of planktonic species requiring deeper water. Abundance of planktonic diatoms suggests three main phases of greater water depth than today at c.13.6 ka, 11.3 ka and 10.4-10.0 ka. As part of a multi-proxy comparison, siliceous microfossil indications of past fluctuations in humidity in the Braamhoek wetland generally accord with the results from previous studies of pollen, charcoal fragments and stable isotopes in the same core.

  7. Late Quaternary vegetation history of Rough Canyon, south-central New Mexico, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Betancourt, J.L.; Rylander, Kate Aasen; Penalba, C.; McVickar, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    South-central New Mexico, USA, at the junction of the Rocky Mountains, High Plains and Chihuahuan Desert, is one of the better known regions in the late Quaternary of North America. Plant macrofossils and pollen from a packrat midden series in Rough Canyon, New Mexico allows refinement of plant distributions and paleoclimates in this transitional area since full glacial times. From 17 000 to 12 000 14C yr BP, Pinus edulis–Juniperus scopulorum woodlands dominated limestone substrates between 1800 and 1490 m, with Pseudotsugamenziesii and other mixed-conifer species restricted to shady, north-facing slopes. Juniperus deppeana, the dominant juniper today above 2000 m in southern New Mexico, is conspicuously absent from glacial middens and must have been displaced south of the US–Mexico border. The minimum climatic conditions for P. edulis–J. scopulorum woodlands are ca 20% wetter and 3.5–5°C cooler (July mean maximum temperatures) than the modern climate at Rough Canyon. Holocene warming/drying may have started as early as 12 000 14C yr BP with the extirpation of J. scopulorum from Rough Canyon, and was completed by at least 10 54014C yr BP. The record for arrivals of some desert species is confounded by traces of pollen and macrofossils in some of the glacial middens, which could signify either earliest occurrence or temporal mixing (contamination) of assemblages. AMS 14C dating can discriminate between early arrival and contamination in midden macrofossils but not in pollen. AMS dates show that Choisya dumosa, presently near its northern (cold) limits at Rough Canyon, endured late glacial winters, possibly as clonal populations. Some Larrea tridentata leaves and pollen occur in middens dominated by conifers and oaks no longer at the site; an AMS date of 3205 14C yr BP on Larrea leaves from one midden indicates contamination. Evidence for some macrofossil contamination, however, does not rule out the possibility that pollen of desert

  8. Late Cenozoic sea-level changes and the onset of glaciation: impact on continental slope progradation off eastern Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, D.J.W.; Normark, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    Late Cenozoic sedimentation from four varied sites on the continental slopes off southeastern Canada has been analysed using high-resolution airgun multichannel seismic profiles, supplemented with some single channel data. Biostratigraphic ties are available to exploratory wells at three of the sites. Uniform, slow accumulation of hemipelagic sediments was locally terminated by the late Miocene sea-level lowering, which is also reflected in changes in foraminiferan faunas on the continental shelf. Data are very limited for the early Pliocene but suggest a return to slow hemipelagic sedimentation. At the beginning of the late Pliocene, there was a change in sedimentation style marked by a several-fold increase in accumulation rates and cutting of slope valleys. This late Pliocene cutting of slope valleys corresponds to the onset of late Cenozoic growth of the Laurentian Fan and the initiation of turbidite sedimentation on the Sohm Abyssal Plain. Although it corresponds to a time of sea-level lowering, the contrast with the late Miocene lowstand indicates that there must also have been a change in sediment delivery to the coastline, perhaps as a result of increased rainfall or development of valley glaciers. High sedimentation rates continued into the early Pleistocene, but the extent of slope dissection by gullies increased. Gully-cutting episodes alternated with sediment-draping episodes. Throughout the southeastern Canadian continental margin, there was a change in sedimentation style in the middle Pleistocene that resulted from extensive ice sheets crossing the continental shelf and delivering coarse sediment directly to the continental slope. ?? 1989.

  9. Evidence for Early Pleistocene Glaciation obtained from borecores collected in East-Central Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barendregt, R. W.; Andriashek, L. D.; Jackson, L. E.

    2014-12-01

    Borecores collected from the east-central region of Alberta, Canada have recently been sub-sampled and studied for paleomagnetic remanence characteristics. A preliminary magnetostratigraphy has been established for sediments previously assumed to represent multiple continental (Laurentide) glaciations, but for which no geochronology was available for the pre-late Wisconsin units. Comprised primarily of tills and lesser thicknesses of interbedded glacio-lacustrine and outwash sediments, the record is extensive, reaching to thicknesses of 300 metres within buried valleys. Most of the sampled units are not accessible from outcrop, and their sedimentology and stratigraphy is derived from core data only. The lowermost tills are reversely magnetized in the majority of borecores sampled to date. These tills are underlain by Empress Formation sediments and/or Colorado Group shales, and overlain by normally magnetized sediments. Both tills contain substantial weathering horizons at their surface, suggesting that interglacial or nonglacial conditions persisted for some time after each period of till deposition. Whether these tills represent a single Early Pleistocene glaciation, or perhaps two, will require additional borecore measurements. This new record of Early Pleistocene glaciation(s) in east-central Alberta places the westernmost extent of earliest Laurentide ice some 300 km farther westward from its previously established limit in the Saskatoon to Regina region of the western Canadian prairies, but still well short of the all-time limit and elevation reached during the Late Wisconsin (Late Pleistocene) in the foothills of the Alberta and Montana Rocky Mountains. Key Words: East-Central Alberta glacial history, Early Pleistocene (Laurentide) glaciation, till magnetostratigraphy, Quaternary history of Western Canadian Prairies, continental glaciations of North America.

  10. Insight to forcing of late Quaternary climate change from aeolian dust archives in eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, H. A.; Marx, S.; Soderholm, J.; Denholm, J.; Petherick, L.

    2010-12-01

    The Australian continent is the largest source of dust in the Southern Hemisphere. Historical dust emissions records display inter-annual variability in response to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon and inter-decadal variability which has been linked to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). These reflect change in hydrometeorology of the continents two major dust source regions, the Murray-Darling Basin and the Lake Eyre Basin. The historical records do not allow longer term variability of ENSO and the PDO and their influence on Australia to be quantified. Importantly, sub-Milankovitch centennial to multi-millennial scale climate cycles and their impacts are not represented in the historical records. In this paper we present summary results from the analysis of two aeolain dust records spanning 7 ka and 45 ka. These were developed from ombrotrophic mire and lacustrine sediment cores collected from the Australian Alps and southeast Queensland. Both sites are located in the southeast Australian dust transport pathway and provide rare insight to forcings of climate variability and its impacts on eastern Australia through the late Quaternary. Age controls for the cores were established using 14C and 210Pb dating [McGowan et al. 2008, 2010]. The cores were sliced into 2 to 5 mm segments with a sub-sample of each segment combusted at 450°C for 12 hrs to destroy organic material and allow recovery of mineral dust. Geochemical fingerprinting of the < 90 µm fraction of the dust was used to determine provenance and to account for contamination by fluvial and/or colluvial sediments [Marx et al. 2005]. Analysis of the dust records, proxy for hydrometeorology, identified tropical ocean teleconnections, variability of solar irradiance and change in ocean deep water circulation as the principal causes of inter-decadal to centennial scale climate cycles and change. Predictions of future climate must consider these forcings so that in water scarce regions of

  11. Late Quaternary activity along the Ferrara thrust inferred from stratigraphic architecture and geophysical surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, Marco; Bignardi, Samuel; Caputo, Riccardo; Minarelli, Luca; Abu-Zeid, Nasser; Santarato, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    Since Late Miocene, the Emilia-Romagna portion of the Po Plain-Adriatic foredeep basin was progressively affected by compressional deformation, due to the northward propagation of the Apennines fold-and-thrust belt. The major tectonic structures within the basin have been recognised and are relatively well known, thanks to the widespread, even if outdated, seismic survey, performed after WW II, for hydrocarbon exploration. More recently, a large amount of surface and shallow-subsurface information has been provided by the CARG geological mapping project. The region therefore provides a valuable opportunity to discuss the genetic relationship between tectonic deformation, eustatic-paleoclimatic fluctuations, and depositional architecture. The activity of blind thrusts and fault-propagation folds induced repeated angular unconformities and impressive lateral variations in the Pliocene-Quaternary stratigraphy, causing thickness changes, from a few metres, close to the Apennines piedmont line, to more than 9 km, in fast subsiding depocenters (e.g. Lido di Savio). In the Ferrara region, the post-Miocene succession ranges from about 4 km, west of Sant'Agostino, to less than 200 m, on the Casaglia anticline, where Late Quaternary fluvial strata rest on Miocene marine marls, with an angular unconformity relationship. In this sector of the Po Plain, the tip-line of the northernmost thrust has been reconstructed north of the Po River (Occhiobello) and is associated with the growth of a large fold (Ferrara-Casaglia anticline), cross-cut by a complex splay of minor backthrusts and reverse faults. The thrust-anticline structure hosts an energy producing geothermal field, whose hydrogeological behaviour is largely influenced by the fracture pattern. The Apennines frontal thrust probably provided the seismic source for the earthquakes that severely damaged Ferrara, during the 1570 a.D. fall season, as documented by the structural damage still visible in many historic buildings (e

  12. Late Quaternary glacial relief evolution revealed by luminescence thermochronometry (Granite Range, Alaska)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valla, P.; Guralnik, B.; Lowick, S.; Champagnac, J.; Herman, F.; Jain, M.; Murray, A.

    2012-12-01

    Long-term exhumation and topographic evolution of mountain belts arise from complex coupling between tectonics, climate and surface processes. Glacial and periglacial processes are especially potent agents to reshape the alpine landscapes by valley carving and/or limiting topography. The recent development of luminescence thermochronometry (e.g., Herman et al., 2010) and its very low closure temperature (0-60°C) opens a new spatial and temporal "window" for the study of latest stages of rock exhumation and thus to address potential topographic relief changes during the late Quaternary. We apply this new method in the Wrangell-St Elias National Park (Alaska), an alpine landscape that exhibits typical glacial features (U-shaped valleys, cirques, moraines). This setting provides an exceptional opportunity to infer potential differences in relief evolution under a gradient of glacial forcing. The Granite Range presents a consistent and progressive eastward increase in the mean elevation, glacier activity, and topographic relief, while low-temperature thermochonometry data display rather homogeneous, yet largely scattered (apatite (U-Th)/He ages of ~15±7 Ma) throughout the massif (e.g., Spotila and Berger, 2010 and references therein). We sampled four elevation profiles over an 80-km East-West transect across the Granite Range (bounded by Tana River to the West and Chitina River to the North). Feldspar separates from 15 bedrock surface samples were dated using an IR-50 SAR protocol (e.g., Murray et al., 2000), and exhibit good internal reproducibility. Apparent ages vary from ~250 ka in the western part of the range, towards younger ages of ~30 ka in the east, thus supporting the notion of high rates of erosion correlated with intense glacial/periglacial activity. We then use a kinetic model to convert apparent ages in mean cooling histories, and couple it with Pecube model (Braun et al., 2012) to extract tectono-geomorphic scenarios. Our results reveal spatially

  13. Disappearance of the last lions and hyenas of Europe in the Late Quaternary - a chain reaction of large mammal prey migration, extinction and human antagonism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diedrich, Cajus G.

    2010-05-01

    , Harz Mountain Karst) such as humans (archaeology cf. Günther 1988) but there are also lacking radiocarbon dating series or new excavations. Humans must have been in antagonism to the large predators about their prey and also their Late Palaeolithic sanctuaries - the large caves especially in southern Europe, in which they left thousands of animal figurations mainly during the Gravettian to Late Magdalenian periods (e.g. Breuil 1952, Begouen and Clottes 1987, Chauvet et al. 1995). Therefore the extinction reason of the largest predators of the Late Quaternary seems to be a complex combination of climate change with resulting maximum glacier extension which finally caused a southern directed megafaunal migration and reduction of the available caves and habitat areas in general. Finally in those southern European regions a higher competition about larger caves as cave bear hibernation places, hyena den sites and human settlement/sanctuary sites must have happened. Therefore an active hunt onto lions and hyenas can not be excluded nor be proven well yet, even if there are finds of necklesses in Europe from Late Palaeolithic ages made of mainly carnivore teeth including rare lion and hyena teeth, which might have been only collected. The resettlement of the northern European region by humans and a reduced "reindeer fauna" and its main and largest predators such as wolves and wolverines after the maximum glacier extension in the middle Late Weichselian started not before the Late Magdalenian (Magdalénian V: e.g. Perick Caves, Martins Cave - Sauerland Karst; Rübeland Caves - Harz Mountain Karst, Teufelsbrücke stone arch - Thuringian Karst). Humans occupied at that post-maximum glaciation time many caves in the Sauerland Karst region and even at open air sites in the Münsterland Bay or central Germany (cf. Bosinski 1987, Günther 1988). Within this Late Magdalénian V-VI times in the record of ten thousands of bones from more then 100 sites no hyena or lion remains are

  14. Setting the Time Frame - Investigating Culture-Environment Interactions in the Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klasen, N.; Just, J.; Rethemeyer, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present a status update of luminescence age estimates of sediments from Ethiopia and the Iberian Peninsula that are related to human occupation and are currently being investigated in the interdisciplinary Collaborative Research Center "Our way to Europe - Culture-Environment Interaction and Human Mobility in the Late Quaternary" (CRC806). The aim of the project is to investigate the dispersal of anatomically modern humans from Africa to Europe, and a robust chronology is essential. In the CRC806, dating is provided by luminescence, palaeomagnetic and radiocarbon techniques. A key site of the CRC806 is Chew Bahir in Ethiopia. This lake basin is located in the source area of the emergence of anatomically modern humans. Radiocarbon, luminescence and palaeomagnetic dating have been used to develop an age-depth model for drill core sediments that date back to 115 ka over 42 m depth. The model is independent of palaeoclimatic proxy interpretation. On the Iberian Peninsula cave deposits have been dated with luminescence techniques and compared to radiocarbon ages wherever applicable. Recently, existing radiocarbon chronologies on the Iberian Peninsula have been revised in light of methodological developments. Robust luminescence dating is therefore especially important in this region, where the stratigraphy is difficult to constrain. We aim to improve the precision of luminescence age estimates by comparing different measurement techniques for equivalent dose and dose-rate determinations, and by using Bayesian statistics to develop age-depth models. Combining different chronological techniques has enabled the development of accurate and precise chronologies, which will allow a better understanding of the emergence of modern humans.

  15. Waxing and Waning of Forests: Late Quaternary Biogeography of Lake Malawi, Southeast Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivory, S.; Lézine, A. M.; Vincens, A.; Cohen, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    African ecosystems are at great risk due to climate and land-use change. Despite the status of several of these regions as biodiversity hotspots, long-standing ideas about African ecology and biogeography have been unable to be tested until now due to lack of sufficiently long records. Here, we present the first long, continuous terrestrial record of vegetation from Lake Malawi, East Africa which goes back to the early Late Quaternary, permitting us to investigate changes in physiognomy and forest composition over many transitions. In this record, we observe eight phases of forest expansion and collapse. Although diversity is much greater during forest phases, composition varies little from phase to phase. Very high abundances of afromontane taxa suggest frequent widespread colonization of the lowlands by modern high elevation trees. Although there are clear successional stages within each forest such that turnover is great within a single phase, among forest samples between phases, there is little dissimilarity. Each forest phase is interrupted by rapid decline of arboreal taxa and expansion of semi-arid grasslands or woodlands whose composition varies greatly from phase to phase. The variable composition of the more open phases, all occurring during arid periods, is likely dynamically linked to thresholds in regional hydrology associated with lake level and moisture recycling within the watershed. This vegetation is unlike any found at Malawi today, with assemblages suggesting strong Somali-Masai affinities. Furthermore, nearly all semi-arid assemblages contain small abundances of forest taxa typically growing in areas with wetter edaphic conditions, suggesting that moist lowland gallery forests were present but restricted to waterways during exceptionally arid times. The waxing and waning of forests throughout this interval has important implications for early human biogeography across Africa as well as disturbance regimes that are crucial for the maintenance of

  16. Deep-sea ostracode species diversity: Response to late Quaternary climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; DeMartino, D.M.; Dwyer, G.S.; Rodriguez-Lazaro, J.

    1999-01-01

    Late Quaternary ostracode assemblages from the North Atlantic Ocean were studied to establish the effect of climatic changes of the past 210,000 yr (marine oxygen isotope stages 7-1) on deep-sea benthic biodiversity and faunal composition. Two-hundred and twenty five samples from the Chain 82-24 Core 4PC (41??43'N, 32??51'W, 3427 m water depth) on the western Mid-Atlantic Ridge revealed high amplitude fluctuations in ostracode abundance and diversity coincident with orbital and suborbital scale climate oscillations measured by several paleoceanographic proxy records. During the past 210,000 yr, ostracode biodiversity as measured by species number (S) and the Shannon-Weaver index, H(S), oscillated from H(S) = 0.4 during glacial periods (marine isotope stages 6, 5d, 5b, 4, and 2) to H(S) = 1.1 during interglacial and interstadial periods (stages 7, 5e, 5c, 5a, 3 and 1). A total of 23 diversity peaks could be recognized. Eleven of these signify major periods of high diversity [H(S) > 0.8, S = 10-21] occurring every 15-20 ka. Twelve were minor peaks which may represent millennial-scale diversity oscillations. The composition of ostracode assemblages varies with Krithe-dominated assemblages characterizing glacial intervals, and Argilloecia-Cytheropteron characterizing deglacials, and trachyleberid genera (Poseidonamicus, Echinocythereis, Henryhowella, Oxycythereis) abundant during interglacials. Diversity and faunal composition changes can be matched to independent deep-sea paleoceanographic tracers such as benthic foraminiferal carbon isotopes, Krithe trace elements (Mg/Ca ratios), and to North Atlantic region climate records such as Greenland ice cores. When interpreted in light of ostracode species' ecology, these faunal and diversity patterns provide evidence that deep-sea benthic ecosystems experience significant reorganization in response to climate changes over orbital to millennial timescales.

  17. Late Quaternary stratigraphy and sedimentation patterns in the western Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Polyak, L.; Bischof, J.; Ortiz, J.D.; Darby, D.A.; Channell, J.E.T.; Xuan, C.; Kaufman, D.S.; Lovlie, R.; Schneider, D.A.; Eberl, D.D.; Adler, R.E.; Council, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Sediment cores from the western Arctic Ocean obtained on the 2005 HOTRAX and some earlier expeditions have been analyzed to develop a stratigraphic correlation from the Alaskan Chukchi margin to the Northwind and Mendeleev-Alpha ridges. The correlation was primarily based on terrigenous sediment composition that is not affected by diagenetic processes as strongly as the biogenic component, and paleomagnetic inclination records. Chronostratigraphic control was provided by 14C dating and amino-acid racemization ages, as well as correlation to earlier established Arctic Ocean stratigraphies. Distribution of sedimentary units across the western Arctic indicates that sedimentation rates decrease from tens of centimeters per kyr on the Alaskan margin to a few centimeters on the southern ends of Northwind and Mendeleev ridges and just a few millimeters on the ridges in the interior of the Amerasia basin. This sedimentation pattern suggests that Late Quaternary sediment transport and deposition, except for turbidites at the basin bottom, were generally controlled by ice concentration (and thus melt-out rate) and transportation distance from sources, with local variances related to subsurface currents. In the long term, most sediment was probably delivered to the core sites by icebergs during glacial periods, with a significant contribution from sea ice. During glacial maxima very fine-grained sediment was deposited with sedimentation rates greatly reduced away from the margins to a hiatus of several kyr duration as shown for the Last Glacial Maximum. This sedimentary environment was possibly related to a very solid ice cover and reduced melt-out over a large part of the western Arctic Ocean.

  18. Erosion and deposition on the eastern margin of the Bermuda Rise in the late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCave, I. N.; Hollister, C. D.; Laine, E. P.; Lonsdale, P. F.; Richardson, M. J.

    1982-05-01

    A near-bottom survey has been made on the Eastward Scarp (32°50'N, 57°30'W) of the Bermuda Rise, which rises 1150 m above the 5500-m deep Sohm Abyssal Plain in the western North Atlantic. The survey reveals evidence of erosion and deposition at present and in the late Quaternary by the deeper levels of the westward flowing Gulf Stream Return Flow. Four distinct regions of increasing bed gradient show increasing sediment smoothing and scour in the transition from plateau to abyssal plain. Bedforms observed are current crescents, crag and tail, triangular ripples, elongate mounds, transverse mud ripples, lineations, and furrows ranging from 10 to 1 m or less in depth, decreasing generally with bed gradient. Measured near-bottom current speeds are up to 20 cm s -1. Temperature structure on the lower, steep, slopes suggests that detachment of bottom mixed layers may occur there. Extensive net erosion appears to be confined to the lower steep slopes of the scarp. Reflection profiles (4 kHz) show that there has been erosion in areas thinly draped with recent sediments and in areas that show development of small scarps. The distribution of subsurface acoustic characteristics of the region corresponds broadly to the areas characterized by bed gradient and distinct sedimentation conditions. Subsurface hyperbolae, possibly caused by buried furrows, show furrow persistence through several tens of metres of deposition. Erosion occurs up to the top of the scarp during episodes of presumed stronger currents, which may correspond with intensified circulation during glacials.

  19. Late quaternary temperature record from buried soils of the North American Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordt, L.; Von Fischer, J.; Tieszen, L.

    2007-01-01

    We present the first comprehensive late Quaternary record of North American Great Plains temperature by assessing the behavior of the stable isotopic composition (??13C) of buried soils. After examining the relationship between the ??13C of topsoil organic matter and July temperature from 61 native prairies within a latitudinal range of 46??-38??N, we applied the resulting regression equation to 64 published ??13C values from buried soils of the same region to construct a temperature curve for the past 12 k.y. Estimated temperatures from 12 to 10 ka (1 k.y. = 1000 14C yr B.P.) fluctuated with a periodicity of ???1 k.y. with two cool excursions between -4.5 and -3.5 ??C and two warmer excursions between -1 and 0 ??C, relative to modern. Early Holocene temperatures from ca. 10-7.5 ka were -1.0 to -2.0 ??C before rising to +1.0 ??C in the middle Holocene between 6.0 and 4.5 ka. After a cool interlude from 4.2 to 2.6 ka, when temperatures dropped to slightly below modern, another warm interval ensued from 2.6 to 1 ka as temperatures increased to ???+0.5 ??C. A final decline in temperature to below modern occurred beginning ca. 0.5 ka. Cooler than present temperatures in the Great Plains indicate telecommunications with cool-water episodes in the Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic potentially governed by a combination of glacial meltwater pulses and low solar irradiance. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  20. Seismic cycles recorded in late Quaternary calcite veins: Geochronological, geochemical and microstructural evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, I. Tonguç; Feng, Yue-xing; Zhao, Jian-xin; Bolhar, Robert; Işik, Veysel; Baublys, Kim A.; Yago, Anya; Golding, Suzanne D.

    2011-02-01

    Southwest Turkey is seismically active as a result of the Hellenic subduction process in the Eastern Mediterranean. We conducted high-resolution micro-sampling, high-precision U-series dating and microchemical analysis on an extensional vein system in a tectonically active but non-hydrothermal area. U/Th age data and microscopic observations provide evidence of repeated fracturing of a previously sealed crack system followed by a new increment of veining. Repeated injection of veinlets suggests that the vein system was formed by the crack-seal mechanism. Four major U/Th age groups for the emplacement of the vein system fall between 23.9 ± 0.2 ka and 23.2 ± 0.4 ka, 21.7 ± 0.4 ka and 19.2 ± 0.2 ka, 17.3 ± 0.1 ka and 16.2 ± 0.3 ka, and at 11.8 ± 0.2 ka. Stable and Sr isotope geochemistry of the calcite vein samples indicates that surface water interacting with the soil cover was the major component of the groundwater system from which the extensional veins precipitated. Trace element and O isotope data of the vein system are interpreted to reflect carbonate precipitation associated with seismic cycles involving fluids with different trace element compositions and CO 2 contents. Initial carbonate precipitation during a single seismic cycle occurred from CO 2-dominated fluids that were degassed from the original CO 2-water mixture. This was followed consecutively by carbonate precipitation from the remaining water, which was relatively impure with higher trace element contents. Millimetre to submillimetre-scale U-series dating in conjunction with geochemistry of carbonate veins related to active tectonism offers an innovative means of constraining the absolute timing of late Quaternary seismic and inter-seismic events.

  1. Mineral magnetic characteristics of the late Quaternary coastal red sands of Bheemuni, East Coast (India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Priyeshu; Sangode, S. J.; Parmar, Nikita; Meshram, D. C.; Jadhav, Priyanka; Singhvi, A. K.

    2016-11-01

    The voluminous red sand deposits of Bheemuni in the east coast of India provide record of coastal land-sea interaction during the late Quaternary climatic and eustatic oscillations. Limited information on the origin and depositional environments of these red sands and their chronology is available. We studied two inland to coast cross profiles from Bheemuni red sand deposits using mineral magnetism, color characteristics and Citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (CBD) extractable pedogenic iron oxides over 23 horizons along with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) chronology at 6 horizons. The oldest exposed bed had an optical age of 48.9 ± 1.7 ka. Differential ages between the two parallel sections (SOS = 48.9 ± 1.7 to 12.1 ± 0.3 ka and IMD = 29.3 ± 3.5 ka) suggest laterally shifting fluvial sedimentation. Both the profiles show significant amount of antiferromagnetic oxide (hematite) along with ferrimagnetic (magnetite/maghemite) mineral composition. The granulometric (/domain-) sensitive parameters (χFD, χARM, SIRM/χLF and χARM/χLF) indicate variable concentration of superparamagnetic (SP) and single domain (SD) particles between the two profiles. The higher frequency dependent and pedogenic magnetic susceptibilities (χFD and χpedo) in the younger (IMD) profile suggest enhanced pedogenesis under a warm-wet climate post 29.3 ka and also during Holocene. A combination of hard isothermal remanent magnetization (HIRM) and redness rating (RR) index indicates distinct but variable concentration of a) crystalline and b) poorly crystalline (pigmentary) hematites in both the profiles. We consider that the former (#a) is derived from hinterland red soils and possibly due to post-depositional diagenesis, and the latter (#b) precipitated from the dissolved iron under fluvial regime imparting the unique red coloration to Bheemuni sands. Partial to complete alteration of ferromagnesian minerals due to pedogenesis in hinterlands under warm-wet climate was therefore the

  2. Interpreting the response of a dryland river system to Late Quaternary climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candy, I.; Black, S.; Sellwood, B. W.

    2004-12-01

    A U-series calcrete chronology has been constructed for three Late Quaternary terrace units, termed the D1, D2 and D3 terraces in age descending order, from the Rio Aguas river system of the Sorbas basin, southeast Spain. The D1 terrace formed between 30,300±4400 year BP and 12,140±360 year BP, correlating well with the Last Glacial Maximum when rates of sediment supply would have increased greatly, because of higher rates of weathering, reduced vegetation cover and weak soil development. The D2 terrace formed between 12,800±1100 year BP and 9,600±530 year BP, correlating well with the Younger Dryas event. The D3 terrace could only be poorly constrained to the early Holocene and no unequivocal cause could be assigned to this period of aggradation. The sedimentology and geomorphology of the D2 terrace suggests, however, that the aggradation of this unit was a response to diapirism/karstic processes occurring within the underlying Messinian gypsum strata and the subsequent damming of the Aguas system. Therefore, despite its coincident occurrence with the Younger Dryas, aggradation of the D2 terrace is unrelated to climate change. The style of this response, controlled predominantly by the characteristics of the underlying bedrock, makes correlating the terrace record of the Aguas with other systems in the Mediterranean unreliable. This study, therefore, highlights the problems of correlating fluvial sequences in regions of variable tectonics, climatic history and bedrock geology and emphasises the need to properly understand the main controls on individual fluvial systems before any attempt is made to correlate their depositional histories.

  3. Late Quaternary lacustrine paleoenvironments in the Cuenca de México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradbury, J. P.

    A late Quaternary paleolimnological history from the Mexican highlands has been obtained by diatom analysis of short cores and stratigraphic sections of lake and marsh sediments from the Cuenca de México, the large, endorheic, graben basin that holds Mexico City. The records, dated by radiocarbon and tephrochronologic methods, extend back to about 30 ka BP and document the presence of extensive, saline lakes in the basin until 25 ka BP. Thereafter, lake levels fell and marginal sites became shallow and fresh under the influence of surficial drainage and (especially) spring discharge. A shallow, saline lake existed 18 ka BP in Texcoco, the central and lowest basin in the system, reflecting moderately increased effective moisture at that time. By 16 ka BP, Lake Texcoco had become so shallow that diatoms were no longer preserved. However, marginal sites nourished by spring flow recorded changes in the local hydrologic balance resulting from increased infiltration at higher elevations. These changes appear to coincide with glacial advances between about 14 and 10 ka BP on the volcanic mountains surrounding the basin. Dry climates with reduced infiltration characterized the early Holocene, but by 5 ka BP a modest increase in precipitation established the modern climatic regime. These lacustrine records offer important insights for evaluating the paleoenvironmental history of the Cuenca de México based on other evidence. They confirm glaciological, stratigraphic and palynologic data that suggest dry climates and the absence of large pluvial lakes in the Cuenca de México during and after the full glacial, but document climates of significantly increased precipitation at least 10 ka prior to 18 ka BP.

  4. Geochronology of Quaternary glaciations in the Puruo Kangri, the largest ice field in the middle and low altitudes of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Chaolu

    2016-04-01

    Using 10Be surface exposure dating, optically stimulated luminescence dating (OSL),we show that the glacial advances occurred during marine isotope stages 12, 10, 8, 6, 4, 3, 2, as well as in the Younger Dryas, early and late Holocene, and the Little Ice Age.

  5. The transition on North America from the warm humid Pliocene to the glaciated Quaternary traced by eolian dust deposition at a benchmark North Atlantic Ocean drill site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, David C.; Bailey, Ian; Wilson, Paul A.; Beer, Christopher J.; Bolton, Clara T.; Friedrich, Oliver; Newsam, Cherry; Spencer, Megan R.; Gutjahr, Marcus; Foster, Gavin L.; Cooper, Matthew J.; Milton, J. Andrew

    2014-06-01

    We present Plio-Pleistocene records of sediment color, %CaCO3, foraminifer fragmentation, benthic carbon isotopes (δ13C) and radiogenic isotopes (Sr, Nd, Pb) of the terrigenous component from IODP Site U1313, a reoccupation of benchmark subtropical North Atlantic Ocean DSDP Site 607. We show that (inter)glacial cycles in sediment color and %CaCO3 pre-date major northern hemisphere glaciation and are unambiguously and consistently correlated to benthic oxygen isotopes back to 3.3 million years ago (Ma) and intermittently so probably back to the Miocene/Pliocene boundary. We show these lithological cycles to be driven by enhanced glacial fluxes of terrigenous material (eolian dust), not carbonate dissolution (the classic interpretation). Our radiogenic isotope data indicate a North American source for this dust (˜3.3-2.4 Ma) in keeping with the interpreted source of terrestrial plant wax-derived biomarkers deposited at Site U1313. Yet our data indicate a mid latitude provenance regardless of (inter)glacial state, a finding that is inconsistent with the biomarker-inferred importance of glaciogenic mechanisms of dust production and transport. Moreover, we find that the relation between the biomarker and lithogenic components of dust accumulation is distinctly non-linear. Both records show a jump in glacial rates of accumulation from Marine Isotope Stage, MIS, G6 (2.72 Ma) onwards but the amplitude of this signal is about 3-8 times greater for biomarkers than for dust and particularly extreme during MIS 100 (2.52 Ma). We conclude that North America shifted abruptly to a distinctly more arid glacial regime from MIS G6, but major shifts in glacial North American vegetation biomes and regional wind fields (exacerbated by the growth of a large Laurentide Ice Sheet during MIS 100) likely explain amplification of this signal in the biomarker records. Our findings are consistent with wetter-than-modern reconstructions of North American continental climate under the warm high

  6. Late Quaternary seismic stratigraphic framework and paleolimnology of Walker Lake, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friday, M.; Scholz, C. A.; Junium, C. K.

    2014-12-01

    Lake deposits can be used to assess past hydrological and atmospheric conditions and aid in understanding regional climate of the western Basin and Range. Walker Lake, Nevada has a maximum water depth of ~35 m and is situated in a half-graben basin that formed during late Cenozoic transtension, in the Walker Lane tectonic belt. Small-scale climatic variations are preserved in the sediments of this hydrologically closed lake basin. Ten Kullenberg sediment cores (~2 to ~10 m in length), and ~300 km of CHIRP seismic reflection data were collected in Walker Lake to assess late-Quaternary stratigraphic framework and paleoclimate history. Core 4A is one of the longest cores acquired (9.19 m) and contains the oldest recovered sediments. Analyses of total inorganic carbon, total organic carbon, carbon and nitrogen abundances, and carbon stable isotopes from core 4A yield a valuable multi-proxy paleoclimate record. This record documents changes in effective moisture in the eastern Sierra Nevada and western Basin and Range. Sediments range from laminated to massive mud with three tephra deposits 0.5 - 4 cm thick. Total percentage of calcium carbonate, ranging from 3 to 35%, shows oscillations we interpret to be millennial forcings. The average C/N ratio of core 4A is 7.71 (2.5 - 11.3 range), and the stable carbon isotope measurements range from -21.0 to -25.3‰, and average -23.8‰. At ~3.7 m depth a basin-wide angular unconformity is observed in the seismic data and is also reflected in the geochemical data. An estimated age of this surface, 2000-2500 ka, is consistent with previous interpretations of partial diversion of the Walker River into the Carson sink. A δ13Corganic excursion, -25 to -20.8‰, occurs at the depth of the unconformity. We interpret this to be a result of enhanced deposition of aquatic organic matter during the Walker Lake drawdown. From 3.7 to 7.5 m depth, the carbon and nitrogen abundances and isotopes are surprisingly consistent down core and may

  7. Coastal Marine Terraces Define Late Quaternary Fault Activity and Deformation Within Northern East Bay Hills, San Francisco Bay Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelson, K. I.

    2004-12-01

    Detailed mapping of uplifted marine platforms bordering the Carquinez Strait between Benicia and Pinole, California, provides data on the pattern and rate of late Quaternary deformation across the northern East Bay Hills. Field mapping, interpretation of early 20th-century topographic data, analysis of aerial photography, and compilation of onshore borehole data show the presence of remnants of three platforms, with back-edge elevations of about 4 m, 12 m, and 18 m. Based on U-series dates (Helley et al., 1993) and comparison of platform elevations to published sea-level curves, the 12-m-high and 18-m-high platforms correlate with substage 5e (ca. 120 ka) and stage 9 (ca. 330 ka) sea-level high stands, respectively. West of the Southhampton fault, longitudinal profiles of platform back-edges suggest that the East Bay Hills between Pinole and Vallejo have undergone block uplift at a rate of 0.05 +/- 0.01 m/ka without substantial tilting or warping. With uncertainty of <3 m, the 120 ka and 330 ka platforms are at the same elevations across the NW-striking Franklin fault. This west-vergent reverse fault previously was interpreted to have had late Pleistocene activity and to accommodate crustal shortening in the East Bay Hills. Our data indicate an absence of vertical displacement across the Franklin fault within at least the past 120ka and perhaps 330ka. In contrast, the stage 5e and 9 have up-on-the-east vertical displacement and gentle westward tilting across the N-striking Southhampton fault, with a late Pleistocene vertical slip rate of >0.02 m/ka. The northerly strike and prominent geomorphic expression of this potentially active fault differs from the Franklin fault. Our mapping of the Southhampton fault suggests that it accommodates dextral shear in the East Bay Hills, and is one of several left-stepping, en echelon N-striking faults (collectively, the "Contra Costa shear zone", CCSZ) in the East Bay Hills. Faults within this zone coincide with geomorphic

  8. Fault-scarp morphology and amount of surface offset on late-Quaternary surficial deposits, eastern escarpment of the central Sierra Nevada, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, M.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Faults scarps, formed on glacial deposits and an alluvial fan near the east-central Sierra Nevada mountain front by late-Quaternary movement on the Hilton Creek (HCF), Wheeler Crest (WCFZ) and Coyote Warp (CWFZ) fault zones, were profiled to determine the amount and to estimate the recency of fault offset. Areas studied include McGee (N--near Lake Crowley), Pine, Mount Tom, Basin Mountain, McGee (S--near Bishop), and Bishop Creek drainages. The profile data indicate that movement of the range-front faults (HCF and WCFZ), which is characterized by normal slip, has offset Tioga-age deposits 6.5-26 m. Offset of Tahoe-age moraines cannot be measured directly because the landforms are buried at the mountain-front by moraines from later glaciations. However, the amount of offset is estimated at 52--130 m, based on crest-height differences between Tahoe and Tioga moraines. The rates of slip are highest on the northern end of the HCF, at McGee (N) Creek; the higher slip rates in this latter area may be related to its close proximity to the Long Valley caldera, where tectonic processes are complex and considered closely related to ongoing magmatic activity. The preservation of bevels on the fault scarps in both HCF and WCFZ, combined with the amounts of surface offset on the late-Pleistocene moraines, and AMS C-14 dates for charcoal found in fault-scarp colluvium, indicate that large ground-rupturing events have occurred on these faults during the Holocene. In contrast to the mountain-front faults, faults in the CWFZ, on a broad warp that separates the WCFZ from range-front faults to the south of Bishop, do not cross Tioga moraines, implying that surface rupture has not occurred in the CWFZ for at least 15,000-25,000 years. The degraded morphology of the fault scarps on adjacent Tahoe and pre-Tahoe moraines, which have been offset between 10.5 and 30 m, attests to the lack of late-Pleistocene and Holocene fault activity in this latter area.

  9. Late Quaternary tectonics in the inner Northern Apennines (Siena Basin, southern Tuscany, Italy) and their seismotectonic implication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogi, Andrea; Capezzuoli, Enrico; Martini, Ivan; Picozzi, Matteo; Sandrelli, Fabio

    2014-05-01

    Defining the most recent Quaternary tectonics represents a challenging task for neotectonic, palaeoseismological and seismotectonic studies. This paper focuses on an integrated approach to reconstructing the latest Quaternary deformation affecting the northern part of the Siena Basin (inner Northern Apennines, i.e., southern Tuscany, Italy) near the town of Siena, and to discuss the seismological implications. Field work and structural and stratigraphic analyses, coupled with the interpretation of reflection seismic lines, have been combined to define the geometry, kinematics and age of mesoscopic to map-scale faults which have affected the mainly Quaternary continental and Pliocene marine deposits. The resulting dataset describes a tectonic setting characterized by coeval SW- and NW-trending transtensional and normal faults, respectively, dissecting alluvial sediments younger than 23.9 ± 0.23 ka. Seismic interpretation sheds light on the geometrical setting of the faults at deeper levels, down to 1-2 km, and provides support for the presence of a wide brittle shear zone defined by conjugated fault segments, locally giving rise to an asymmetrical negative flower-like structure. Faults and their damage zones have controlled (and still control) the discharge of gas vents (mainly CO2 and H2S) and hydrothermal circulation (which deposits travertine) since at least 23.216 ± 0.124 ka. The resulting complete data set provides support for our description of the Neogene-Quaternary tectonics which were active until the late Quaternary, providing additional information about the seismotectonic framework of an area characterized by low seismicity and generally low-magnitude earthquakes (M < 4), but having experienced significant seismic events over the last few centuries.

  10. Quaternary vertebrates from Greenland: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennike, Ole

    Remains of fishes, birds and mammals are rarely reported from Quaternary deposits in Greenland. The oldest remains come from Late Pliocene and Early Pleistocene deposits and comprise Atlantic cod, hare, rabbit and ringed seal. Interglacial and interstadial deposits have yielded remains of cod, little auk, collared lemming, ringed seal, reindeer and bowhead whale. Early and Mid-Holocene finds include capelin, polar cod, red fish, sculpin, three-spined stickleback, Lapland longspur, Arctic hare, collared lemming, wolf, walrus, ringed seal, reindeer and bowhead whale. It is considered unlikely that vertebrates could survive in Greenland during the peak of the last glaciation, but many species had probably already immigrated in the Early Holocene.

  11. Climatic, geomorphic, and archaeological implications of a late Quaternary alluvial chronology for the lower Salt River, Arizona, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huckleberry, Gary; Onken, Jill; Graves, William M.; Wegener, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Recent archaeological excavations along the lower Salt River, Arizona resulted in the unexpected discovery of buried late Pleistocene soils and cultural features dating 5800-7100 cal YBP (Early Archaic), the latter representing the earliest evidence of human activity in the lower Salt River floodplain thus far identified. Because the lower Salt River floodplain has been heavily impacted by recent agriculture and urbanization and contains few stratigraphic exposures, our understanding of the river's geological history is limited. Here we present a late Quaternary alluvial chronology for a segment of the lower Salt River based on 19 accelerator mass spectrometry 14C and four optically stimulated luminescence ages obtained during two previous geoarchaeological investigations. Deposits are organized into allostratigraphic units and reveal a buried late Pleistocene terrace inset into middle-to-late Pleistocene terrace deposits. Holocene terrace fill deposits unconformably cap the late Pleistocene terrace tread in the site area, and the lower portion of this fill contains the Early Archaic archaeological features. Channel entrenchment and widening ~ 900 cal YBP eroded much of the older terrace deposits, leaving only a remnant of fill containing the buried latest Pleistocene and middle-to-late Holocene deposits preserved in the site area. Subsequent overbank deposition and channel filling associated with a braided channel system resulted in the burial of the site by a thin layer of flood sediments. Our study confirms that the lower Salt River is a complex mosaic of late Quaternary alluvium formed through vertical and lateral accretion, with isolated patches of buried soils preserved through channel avulsion. Although channel avulsion is linked to changes in sediment load and discharge and may have climatic linkages, intrinsic geomorphic and local base level controls limit direct correlations of lower Salt River stratigraphy to other large rivers in the North American

  12. The null hypothesis: steady rates of erosion, weathering and sediment accumulation during Late Cenozoic mountain uplift and glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willenbring, J. K.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    At the largest time and space scales, the pace of erosion and chemical weathering is determined by tectonic uplift rates. Deviations from this equilibrium condition arise from the transient response of landscape denudation to climatic and tectonic perturbations, and may be long lived. We posit that the constraint of mass balance, however, makes it unlikely that such disequilibrium persists at the global scale over millions of years, as has been proposed for late Cenozoic erosion. To support this contention, we synthesize existing data for weathering fluxes, global sedimentation rates, sediment yields and tectonic motions. The records show a remarkable constancy in the pace of Earth-surface evolution over the last 10 million years. These findings provide strong support for the null hypothesis; that global rates of landscape change have remained constant over the last ten million years, despite global climate change and massive mountain building events. Two important implications are: (1) global climate change may not change global denudation rates, because the nature and sign of landscape responses are varied; and (2) tectonic and climatic perturbations are accommodated in the long term by changes in landscape form. This work undermines the hypothesis that increased weathering due to late Cenozoic mountain building or climate change was the primary agent for a decrease in global temperatures.

  13. Geochemical proxies for weathering and provenance of Late Quaternary alluvial core-sediments from NW India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ajit; Amir, Mohd; Paul, Debajyoti; Sinha, Rajiv

    2014-05-01

    The Indo-Gangetic alluvial plains are formed by sediment deposition in the foreland basin as a result of upliftment and subsequent erosion of the Himalaya. Earlier study (Sinha et al., 2013) has shown the subsurface existence of buried channel bodies beneath the Ghaggar plains in NW Indo-Gangetic plains. The mapped sand bodies follow trace of a paleochannel that begins at the mountain front near the exit of river Sutlej and extends to the northern margin of the Thar desert, suggesting existence of a large Himalayan-sourced river (Singh et al., 2011) in the past. The buried sand bodies hold potential records of erosion history over the Himalaya that could be used to assess climate-controlled erosion over the Himalaya. Geochemical variations in the sediments from two (~45m long) cores drilled below the trace of the paleochannel (upstream) near Sirhind, Punjab and two cores (GS-10 & 11) from downstream near Kalibangan, Rajasthan, are used in this study to understand the erosional pattern over the Himalaya during Late Quaternary. Down-core variations in chemical index of alteration (CIA=51-79) along with K2O/Na2O and Al2O3/(CaO+Na2O) ratios are consistent with the trends of SW summer monsoonal fluctuations during the Glacial-Interglacial periods indicating climate controlled weathering at the source; higher values during Interglacial and lower during Glacial periods with maximum value during the Holocene. Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of drill-cores sediments, 87Sr/86Sr (0.7314-0.7946), ɛNd (-23.2 to -14) are within the range of silicate rocks from the Higher and Lesser Himalaya. Significant down-core variations in 87Sr/86Sr and ɛNd are observed that reflect the mixing of varying proportions of the Higher and Lesser Himalayan sediments, the two dominant sources to the core sites. Sediments deposited during MIS-2 and MIS-4, cold and dry Glacial periods, show high 87Sr/86Sr and low ɛNd suggesting an enhanced contribution from the Lesser Himalayan rocks that are

  14. Sequence of pumiceous tephra layers and the late quaternary environmental record near mount st. Helens.

    PubMed

    Heusser, C J; Heusser, L E

    1980-11-28

    Tephra in lake beds within 40 kilometers of Mount St. Helens was deposited an average of once every 2,700 years over the past 35,000 years, for a total of 13 layers. Times of deposition span the period of the Fraser Glaciation and intervals before and after it, and include the series of climates prevailing when vegetation west of the Cascade Range shifted between a park-tundra type and the modern western hemlock forest.

  15. Optical dating of late Quaternary deposits preserved beneath the eastern English Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellett, C. L.; Mauz, B.; Hodgson, D. M.; Plater, A. J.; Lang, A.

    2012-04-01

    A stratigraphic model detailing the sequence and nature of processes responsible for sculpting the shallow continental shelf in the eastern English Channel has been developed through the interpretation of high resolution sub-bottom seismic records. The seafloor is an erosional unconformity and large sediment bodies are limited to palaeovalley infills and offshore extensions of present day coastal environments. In simplistic terms the stratigraphic model proposes fluvial incision and deposition during sea-level lowstand with periglacial processes operating on the sub-aerially exposed shelf under cold climate conditions. Subsequent sea-level rise triggers reworking of existing deposits and infilling of the palaeovalleys with shallow marine and coastal deposits that migrate in step with sea-level rise. The frequency and magnitude of sea-level changes during the late Quaternary lends to significant reworking of sediments during each glacial/interglacial cycle and remnants of previous cycles are rarely preserved. This study uses OSL dating to test the validity of the proposed stratigraphic model. Samples for OSL dating were taken from vibrocores tied to known seismic stratigraphic units representing fluvial, coastal and colluvial depositional environments. The single-aliquot-regenerative dose protocol was applied to 1 mm aliquots of fine quartz sand and individual aliquots were rejected following the criteria proposed by Wintle and Murray (2006). All samples exhibited low sensitivity and poor recycling ratios necessitating the rejection of up to 75% of all aliquots measured. A total of 40 to 60 aliquots were accepted per sample. For all samples regardless of depositional environment, normal equivalent dose (De) distributions were observed with overdispersion values typically <25% and weighted skewness values of ~0.2 advocating the application of the Central Age Model (CAM) to estimate Des. The OSL chronology places periglacial reworking of existing estuarine deposits at

  16. Late-Quaternary Speleothem Records from the Balkan Peninsula - Potential, Objectives and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, I.; McCoy, W. D.; Markovic, S.; Endlicher, W.

    2010-12-01

    Mid-latitude speleothems often contain detailed, high-resolution records of local and regional interglacial climate changes. Many speleothem records of Holocene (MIS 1) and Eemian (MIS 5e) climate evolution have been investigated, but there is very little work being done in the Balkan region, despite the fact that the area is very rich in limestone caves with speleothems. Situated at the interface between temperate-continental and Mediterranean climates, present-day climate on the Balkan Peninsula is determined by two major upper-level jet streams, the polarfront jet (PFJ) and the subtropical jet (STJ). On a seasonal scale, both features exert varying influence and determine frontogenesis processes, cyclonic activity and precipitation. On decadal to millennial time-scales, changes and fluctuations in the position and permanency of these atmospheric circulation features influence the isotope signature in rainfall and ultimately in cave drip waters and related speleothems. We are investigating speleothems from Serbia, Montenegro and Bosnia-Herzegovina to study Late Quaternary climatic changes and to learn how both synoptic-scale systems were linked during the Holocene and previous interglacial periods. By example of a stalagmite collected in Vernjikica Cave, Serbia (Carpatho-Balkans), the project's potential to address important aspects of paleoclimatic research in the Mediterranean realm is discussed. The first studied, fine-laminated calcite stalagmite is about 50 cm tall and extends conically from the base to the top, presenting at least two visible growth discontinuities. Four preliminary uranium-series ages (234U/230Th) constrain the general period of growth to MIS 5d to MIS 5b. Preliminary results suggest that the stable oxygen isotope profile obtained from the axial zone largely reflects the unaltered isotopic composition of the cave drip water. The observed shifts in the isotope records display long-term changing climate conditions from temperate warm and

  17. Late Quaternary climate stability and the origins and future of global grass endemism.

    PubMed

    Sandel, Brody; Monnet, Anne-Christine; Govaerts, Rafaël; Vorontsova, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Earth's climate is dynamic, with strong glacial-interglacial cycles through the Late Quaternary. These climate changes have had major consequences for the distributions of species through time, and may have produced historical legacies in modern ecological patterns. Unstable regions are expected to contain few endemic species, many species with strong dispersal abilities, and to be susceptible to the establishment of exotic species from relatively stable regions. We test these hypotheses with a global dataset of grass species distributions. We described global patterns of endemism, variation in the potential for rapid population spread, and exotic establishment in grasses. We then examined relationships of these response variables to a suite of predictor variables describing the mean, seasonality and spatial pattern of current climate and the temperature change velocity from the Last Glacial Maximum to the present. Grass endemism is strongly concentrated in regions with historically stable climates. It also depends on the spatial pattern of current climate, with many endemic species in areas with regionally unusual climates. There was no association between the proportion of annual species (representing potential population spread rates) and climate change velocity. Rather, the proportion of annual species depended very strongly on current temperature. Among relatively stable regions (<10 m year(-1)), increasing velocity decreased the proportion of species that were exotic, but this pattern reversed for higher-velocity regions (>10 m year(-1)). Exotic species were most likely to originate from relatively stable regions with climates similar to those found in their exotic range. Long-term climate stability has important influences on global endemism patterns, largely confirming previous work from other groups. Less well recognized is its role in generating patterns of exotic species establishment. This result provides an important historical context for the

  18. A Late Quaternary shortening rate for the frontal thrust of the Andean Precordillera north of Mendoza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, S.; Kuhlmann, J.; Hetzel, R.; Mingorance, F.; Ramos, V. A.

    2009-12-01

    Although large historical earthquakes occurred in the Andean back-arc region between 28° and 34°S - for instance Mendoza was destroyed by an earthquake of magnitude MS = 7.0 in 1861 - the slip rates of active faults remain unknown. We report a slip rate for the 50-km-long Las Penas thrust, which constitutes the frontal thrust of the Precordillera. In its southern part, a well preserved fluvial terrace along La Escondida Creek (Costa et al., 2000) is displaced vertically by 10.6 ± 0.7 m as documented by several fault scarp profiles. Apart from radiocarbon dating of plant remnants, three different approaches for 10Be exposure dating have been applied to constrain the age of the terrace. Amalgamated sandstone pebbles (corrected for an inherited 10Be component using similar pebbles from the active creek) and a depth profile obtained from four sand samples yield 10Be exposure ages of 12.2 ± 1.5 and 11.3 ± 2.0 kyr, respectively. Both ages are in excellent agreement with the 14C age of 12.61 ± 0.20 cal kyr BP. In contrast, 10Be ages of five sandstone boulders vary significantly and exceed the age of the terrace by 10 to 70 kyr, which demonstrates that the widely used assumption of a negligible inherited component is not valid here. The age of the river terrace combined with the vertical fault offset yields an uplift rate of ~0.8 mm/yr for the Las Penas thrust. Combined with the fault dip of 25°, we determine a Late Quaternary horizontal shortening rate of ~1.8 mm/yr, which is about 40% of the GPS derived shortening rate of 4.5 ± 1.7 mm/yr in the back-arc region of the Andes (Brooks et al., 2003). References Brooks, B.A., Bevis, M., Smalley, R., Kendrick, E., Manceda, R., Lauria, E., Maturana, R. & Araujo, M. (2003): Crustal motion in the Southern Andes (26° - 36°S): Do the Andes behave like a microplate? Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 4 (10), pp. 14, 1085, doi 10.1029/2003GC000505. Costa, C.H., Gardini, C.E., Diederix, H., Cortés, J.M. (2000): The Andean orogenic

  19. Sedimentology and paleohydrology of Late Quaternary lake deposits in the northern Namib Sand Sea, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teller, James T.; Rutter, Nat; Lancaster, N.

    The Namib Sand Sea is the largest active desert dunefield in southern Africa, and is comprised mainly of large north-south linear dunes. In the interdune areas of the northern Sand Sea eleven small areas of calcareous lacustrine sediment have been studied. These beds are typically less than a metre thick and are dominantly comprised of calcareous sandstones to mudstones and sandy limestones. The carbonates are mainly magnesian calcites (1-14% MgCO 3) with some protodolomite and aragonite. Calcified reed casts and fresh to brackish water gastropods, diatoms, and ostracods are present in some beds. δ18O values indicate a hot and dry climate. A number of enriched δ13C values may reflect high salinity, low organic populations, or carbonate recrystallization. These carbonate-rich lacustrine deposits are indicative of increased periods of moisture availability in this normally hyperarid region during the Late Quaternary. The origin of the water responsible for depositing these sediments may be: (1) ponding at the end point of the Tsondab River, which at one time extended farther west into the Sand Sea; (2) flooding into interdune corridors when water levels rose in rivers such as the Kuiseb; (3) groundwater seepage into depressions either through dunes that border rivers or from the underlying Tsondab Sandstone; and (4) increased rainfall. We do not believe that there is evidence to support a major increase in precipitation over the region. However, even a small increase in precipitation in the headwaters of valleys that drain toward the Sand Sea might: (1) generate enough additional runoff to extend the terminal point of rivers such as the Tsondab farther into the dunes; (2) cause lateral flooding from major valleys into interdune corridors; and (3) recharge aquifers. The sedimentary records at Narabeb, Ancient Tracks, and West Pan, which lie along the old course of the Tsondab River, favor a ponded river origin for them, whereas groundwater seepage is favored at

  20. Is late Quaternary climate change governed by self-sustained oscillations in atmospheric CO2?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallmann, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    A simple earth system model is developed to simulate global carbon and phosphorus cycling over the late Quaternary. It is focused on the geological cycling of C and P via continental weathering, volcanic and metamorphic degassing, hydrothermal processes and burial at the seabed. A simple ocean model is embedded in this geological model where the global ocean is represented by surface water, thermocline and deep water boxes. Concentrations of dissolved phosphorus, dissolved inorganic carbon, and total alkalinity are calculated for each box. The partial pressure of CO2 in the atmosphere (pCO2A) is determined by exchange processes with the surface ocean and the continents. It serves as key prognostic model variable and is assumed to govern surface temperatures and global sea-level. The model is formulated as autonomous system, in which the governing equations have no explicit time-dependence. For certain parameter values, the model does not converge towards a steady-state but develops stable self-sustained oscillations. These free oscillations feature pCO2A minima and maxima consistent with the ice-core record when vertical mixing in the ocean is allowed to vary in response to pCO2A-controlled temperature change. A stable 100-kyr cycle with a rapid transition from glacial to interglacial conditions is obtained when additional non-linear equations are applied to calculate deep ocean mixing, iron fertilization and the depth of organic matter degradation as function of pCO2A-controlled surface temperature. The δ13C value of carbon in the ocean/atmosphere system calculated in these model runs is consistent with the benthic δ13C record. However, the simulated 13C depletion in the glacial ocean is not driven by the decline in terrestrial carbon stocks but by sea-level change controlling the rates of organic carbon burial and weathering at continental margins. The pCO2A- and δ13C oscillations develop without any form of external Milankovitch forcing. They are induced and

  1. Late Neogene and Quaternary evolution of the northern Albemarle Embayment (mid-Atlantic continental margin, USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mallinson, D.; Riggs, S.; Thieler, E.R.; Culver, S.; Farrell, K.; Foster, D.S.; Corbett, D.R.; Horton, B.; Wehmiller, J. F.

    2005-01-01

    Seismic surveys in the eastern Albemarle Sound, adjacent tributaries and the inner continental shelf define the regional geologic framework and provide insight into the sedimentary evolution of the northern North Carolina coastal system. Litho- and chronostratigraphic data are derived from eight drill sites on the Outer Banks barrier islands, and the Mobil #1 well in eastern Albemarle Sound. Within the study area, parallel-bedded, gently dipping Miocene beds occur at 95 to > 160 m below sea level (m bsl), and are overlain by a southward-thickening Pliocene unit characterized by steeply inclined, southward-prograding beds. The lower Pliocene unit consists of three seismic sequences. The 55–60 m thick Quaternary section unconformably overlies the Pliocene unit, and consists of 18 seismic sequences exhibiting numerous incised channel-fill facies. Shallow stratigraphy (< 40 m bsl) is dominated by complex fill patterns within the incised paleo-Roanoke River valley. Radiocarbon and amino-acid racemization (AAR) ages indicate that the valley-fill is latest Pleistocene to Holocene in age. At least six distinct valley-fill units are identified in the seismic data. Cores in the valley-fill contain a 3–6 m thick basal fluvial channel deposit that is overlain by a 15 m thick unit of interlaminated muds and sands of brackish water origin that exhibit increasing marine influence upwards. Organic materials within the interlaminated deposits have ages of 13–11 cal. ka. The interlaminated deposits within the valley are overlain by several units that comprise shallow marine sediments (bay-mouth and shoreface environments) that consist of silty, fine- to medium-grained sands containing open neritic foraminifera, suggesting that this area lacked a fronting barrier island system and was an open embayment from ∼10 ka to ∼4.5 ka. Seismic data show that initial infilling of the paleo-Roanoke River valley occurred from the north and west during the late Pleistocene and early

  2. Origin, age, and paleoclimatic setting of the Late Quaternary deposits in Wadi Feiran, Sinai Peninsula: Geomorphologic, geochronologic, and isotopic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, A. Z. A.; Sultan, M.; Forman, S. L.; Krishnamurthy, R. V.

    2015-12-01

    There is considerable debate on the origin, age, and paleoclimatic setting of Late Quaternary deposits within the basement complex of the Sinai Peninsula. Our research in Wadi Feiran focused on documenting the sedimentology, stratigraphy, geochemistry and chronology of Late Quaternary deposits in the Feiran (lat. 28.706 N; long. 33.665; elevation: 715 to 772 m a.m.s.l) and Tarfa (lat. 28.692 N; long. 33.933 E; elevation: 1160 to 1244 m a.m.s.l) oases. Sequence stratigraphy, analysis of remote sensed images, and groundwater levels in these two areas indicate that the investigated deposits are structurally-controlled as they are found in areas with anomalously elevated groundwater levels and upstream from shear zone/wadi intersections. Sediments are largely arenaceous upstream and transition downstream to marly successions. We infer that these sediments were not deposited in lake settings because of the absence of shorelines and associated littoral, sublittoral and deeper water facies, and the presence of rhizoliths, secondary calcite veins and gastropods, all of which suggest deposition in a spring or wetland environment. A short hydrologic residence time and/or deposition in an open water system is supported by the lack of correlation (R = 0.08) between δ18O and δ13C values in carbonate deposits. Our findings are consistent with deposition of sediments by alluvial, fluvial and paludal processes under variable hydrologic conditions and higher water table conditions. Quartz extracts from these sediments yielded optically stimulated luminescence ages between ca. 27 and 11 ka and place these wetter conditions during the last glacial period and extend the "greening" of North Africa further eastward. Our findings are consistent with models which identify the wet periods in the Late Quaternary in the Sinai Peninsula and in North Africa as being glacial periods.

  3. Late Quaternary Advance and Retreat of an East Antarctic Ice Shelf System: Insights from Sedimentary Beryllium-10 Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guitard, M. E.; Shevenell, A.; Domack, E. W.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Yokoyama, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Observed retreat of Antarctica's marine-based glaciers and the presence of warm (~2°C) modified Circumpolar Deep Water on Antarctica's continental shelves imply ocean temperatures may influence Antarctic cryosphere stability. A paucity of information regarding Late Quaternary East Antarctic cryosphere-ocean interactions makes assessing the variability, timing, and style of deglacial retreat difficult. Marine sediments from Prydz Bay, East Antarctica contain hemipelagic siliceous mud and ooze units (SMO) alternating with glacial marine sediments. The record suggests Late Quaternary variability of local outlet glacier systems, including the Lambert Glacier/Amery Ice Shelf system that drains 15% of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. We present a refined radiocarbon chronology and beryllium-10 (10Be) record of Late Quaternary depositional history in Prydz Channel, seaward of the Amery Ice Shelf system, which provides insight into the timing and variability of this important outlet glacier system. We focus on three piston cores (NBP01-01, JPC 34, 35, 36; 750 m water depth) that contain alternating SMO and granulated units uninterrupted by glacial till; the record preserves a succession of glacial marine deposits that pre-date the Last Glacial Maximum. We utilize the ramped pyrolysis preparatory method to improve the bulk organic carbon 14C-based chronology for Prydz Channel. To determine if the SMO intervals reflect open water conditions or sub-ice shelf advection, we measured sedimentary 10Be concentrations. Because ice cover affects 10Be pathways through the water column, sedimentary concentrations should provide information on past depositional environments in Prydz Channel. In Prydz Channel sediments, 10Be concentrations are generally higher in SMO units and lower in glacial units, suggesting Late Quaternary fluctuations in the Amery Ice Shelf. Improved chronologic constraints indicate that these fluctuations occurred on millennial timescales during the Last Glacial

  4. Late Quaternary tectonic switching of siliciclastic provenance in the strike-slip-dominated foreland of the Western Carpathians; Upper Morava Basin, Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Aleš; Bábek, Ondřej; Kapusta, Jaroslav

    2017-06-01

    This study is focused on the lithology and provenance of late Quaternary fluvial deposits of the Upper Morava Basin a pull-apart basin situated at the contact of the Bohemian Massif and Western Carpathians. Late Cenozoic tectonic convergence between these two units caused differential subsidence along strike-slip faults of the Elbe-Odra zone, leading to a distinct horst-and-graben morphology of the Upper Morava Basin. The Pleistocene fluvial deposits are preserved in several terrace levels and partly buried under the present-day floodplain of the Morava River. This study is based on four cores (11-25 m deep) drilled in the floodplain of two major depocentres of the basin, the Lutín Graben, and the Upper Morava Basin sensu stricto. The drill cores were analysed for grain size, pebble- and heavy-mineral composition, chemical composition of detrital garnets, bulk magnetic susceptibility, sediment colour (visible-light spectral reflectance) and bulk element geochemistry. Age interpretations are based on eight optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) analyses. The Upper Pleistocene sediments were deposited in a gravelly braided to transitional braided-meandering river in both the Upper Morava Basin s.s. and the Lutín Graben (the oldest OSL age is 161.5 ka, corresponding to the late Saalian). Between the end of the Saalian and late Weichselian glaciations, the Morava River abandoned the Lutín Graben for the Upper Morava Basin s.s. where it flows up to the present day. The Pleistocene fluvial style contrasts with the present-day meandering to anastomosing fluvial style of the Morava River. The Pleistocene deposits were sourced from areas corresponding to the present-day Morava River catchment including crystalline units of the eastern Bohemian Massif and the Moravo-Silesian Carboniferous Basin. They also contain a considerable input from the Bohemian Cretaceous Basin. The composition of late Weichselian deposits from the Dub nad Moravou core (34.53 ± 3.42 ka and

  5. Late Quaternary vegetation and climate dynamics at the northern limit of the East Asian summer monsoon and its regional and global-scale controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leipe, Christian; Nakagawa, Takeshi; Gotanda, Katsuya; Müller, Stefanie; Tarasov, Pavel E.

    2015-05-01

    A late Quaternary pollen record from northern Sakhalin Island (51.34°N, 142.14°E, 15 m a.s.l.) spanning the last 43.7 ka was used to reconstruct regional climate dynamics and vegetation distribution by using the modern analogue technique (MAT). The long-term trends of the reconstructed mean annual temperature (TANN) and precipitation (PANN), and total tree cover are generally in line with key palaeoclimate records from the North Atlantic region and the Asian monsoon domain. TANN largely follows the fluctuations in solar summer insolation at 55°N. During Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3, TANN and PANN were on average 0.2 °C and 700 mm, respectively, thus very similar to late Holocene/modern conditions. Full glacial climate deterioration (TANN = -3.3 °C, PANN = 550 mm) was relatively weak as suggested by the MAT-inferred average climate parameters and tree cover densities. However, error ranges of the climate reconstructions during this interval are relatively large and the last glacial environments in northern Sakhalin could be much colder and drier than suggested by the weighted average values. An anti-phase relationship between mean temperature of the coldest (MTCO) and warmest (MTWA) month is documented during the last glacial period, i.e. MIS 2 and 3, suggesting more continental climate due to sea levels that were lower than present. Warmest and wettest climate conditions have prevailed since the end of the last glaciation with an optimum (TANN = 1.5 °C, PANN = 800 mm) in the middle Holocene interval (ca 8.7-5.2 cal. ka BP). This lags behind the solar insolation peak during the early Holocene. We propose that this is due to continuous Holocene sea level transgression and regional influence of the Tsushima Warm Current, which reached maximum intensity during the middle Holocene. Several short-term climate oscillations are suggested by our reconstruction results and correspond to Northern Hemisphere Heinrich and Dansgaard-Oeschger events, the B

  6. Late Quaternary glacial relief evolution and fracture-density control on erosion revealed by low-temperature thermochronometry and remote sensing (Granite Range, Alaska)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valla, Pierre; Champagnac, Jean-Daniel; Herman, Frédéric; Lowick, Sally; Guralnik, Benny; Shuster, David; Fellin, Giuditta

    2013-04-01

    Long-term erosion and topographic evolution of mountain belts arise from complex coupling between tectonics, climate and surface processes. The Granite Range (Wrangell-St Elias National Park, Alaska) presents an ideal setting to study such interactions. Its alpine landscape, preserving typical glacial features (U-shaped valleys, cirques), appears highly smoothed in the west, and progressively more rugged towards the east. In the field, this is evidenced by minor and only localized faulting of massive bedrock (granite and paragneiss) in the west, while the eastern part shows highly fractured bedrock (penetrative faults, fault gouges). Remote-sensing analysis confirms that fracture density is much higher towards east, and also reveals high post-glacial incision only in areas associated with high fracture density. To quantify our morphometric observations, we sampled four elevation profiles (~15 samples in total) over an 80-km East-West transect for low-temperature thermochrometry. Apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He dating provides ages between ~10 and 30 Ma, in agreement with published data, and shows apparent low long-term exhumation rates (~0.05-0.1 km/Ma). Preliminary 4He/3He thermochronometry data reveal a more complex exhumation history, with a significant increase since ~6-5 Ma which can be related to either onset of glaciations in Alaska or a major change in tectonic activity occurring at that period. Further data collected within the Granite Range will help to decipher the origin of this late-Miocene acceleration in exhumation. We also performed luminescence thermochronometry measured on feldspar separates from bedrock samples. Our results show a strong East-West gradient in samples saturation ratio. Apparent ages vary from ~250 ka in the western part of the range, towards younger ages of ~30 ka in the east. This pattern reveals spatially variable erosion rates during the late Quaternary associated with a major fracture-density control on erosion, and further supports the

  7. Re-assessment of the mid to late Quaternary glacial and environmental history of the Boco Plain, western Tasmania.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustinus, Paul; Fink, David; Fletcher, Michael-Shawn; Thomas, Ian

    2017-03-01

    The glacial geomorphology and drill core-based stratigraphy of the Boco Plain, western Tasmania, reveal a complex sequence of Quaternary glacial and non-glacial episodes. The upper part of the southern Boco Plain stratigraphy was previously dated by 14C and U-series on interbedded organics of MIS 1 to MIS 5 affinity. U-series dating of ferricretes associated with glacial diamictons from Boco Plain cores suggested that there were glacial advances broadly correlative with MIS 6, 8 and ≥10. However, terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (10Be and 26Al) exposure ages for the moraine sequence preserved on the wider Boco Plain area indicate that moraines previously attributed to MIS 6 and 8 advances were deposited during MIS 10 or earlier cold stages. There is no evidence for MIS 2, 4 or 6 affinity glacial advances onto the Boco Plain with ice of this age restricted to the West Coast Range. New palynological records from the Boco Plain core 6690 confirmed the late Quaternary ages of the upper part of the sequence, whilst extinct palynomorphs indicate a pre-Quaternary age for the glacial diamictons at the base of core Boco 4 and 10. Consequently, the mid-Pleistocene glacial sequence preserved in the Boco Plain is significantly older than previously envisaged, with the post MIS 10 to 12 geomorphology of the plain dominated by fluvial deltaic, swamp peat and lacustrine environments.

  8. Synchronous Late Quaternary slip rate variability on two strands of the San Jacinto fault, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, K. N.; Oskin, M.

    2007-12-01

    We present new results that show slip rates varied synchronously by a factor of two over the past 35 kyr along two parallel strands of the San Jacinto fault. Our results combine high-resolution LiDAR digital topography, field mapping and 10Be exposure-age dating from two of the most active strands of the southern San Jacinto fault: the Clark fault (CLF) and Coyote Creek fault (CCF). These faults form numerous NW-striking scarps that offset three generations of Quaternary alluvial fan surfaces, Q2b, Q3a, and Q3b. We dated alluvial fans along both the CCF and CLF using 10Be sampling methods adapted for available material and degradation of the surface. For younger surfaces with well-preserved bar and swale morphology, we used a new sampling method where 12 to 20 chips from quartz-bearing boulders lodged within a bar were amalgamated into a single sample. For older surfaces we either sampled individual meter-sized boulders or collected samples from a 2 m-deep depth profile. Surface ages are consistent between CCF and CLF sites: 40 ± 12 ka and 31 ± 6 ka for Q2b, 7.1 ± 1.6 ka and 4.6 ± 1.6 ka for Q3a, respectively. Samples from Q3b near the CLF yielded ages of 1.0 ± 0.2 ka and 2.1 ± 0.3 ka. CCF samples have not yet been corrected 10Be inheritance, thus we use the CLF ages to calculate preliminary slip rates. Late Pleistocene to present rates are CLF: 2.2 ± 0.5 mm/yr, CCF: 3.4 ± 0.9 mm/yr, and 5.6 ± 1.4 mm/yr combined. Mid-Holocene to present rates are CLF: 4.1 ± 1.5 mm/yr, CCF: 6.7 ± 2.8 mm/yr, and 10.9 ± 4.3 mm/yr combined. Latest Holocene CLF slip rate exceeds 3 mm/yr. The combined Late Pleistocene to present slip rate for the southern San Jacinto fault is less than one third the rate deduced from the onset of faulting ca. 1 Ma. Mid-Holocene to present slip rates for both the CLF and CCF are about double their ca. 35 kyr rates, but are less than the 16 - 20 mm/yr geodetic loading rates and the >16 mm/yr slip rate since 1 ka at Hog Lake. We conclude that (1

  9. Late Quaternary marine records from High Arctic Canada: problems, solutions, and multiproxy perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pienkowski, Anna; Furze, Mark; England, John; MacLean, Brian; von Prause, Markus; Blasco, Steve

    2013-04-01

    The Canadian Arctic Archipelago (= CAA) constitutes a significant geographic region within the Arctic Ocean Basin, influencing its oceanography, biology, ecology, and climate. Yet comparatively little is known about the long-term (post-Late Wisconsinan) environmental history of the marine channels of this region (the "Northwest Passage" = NWP). New marine data emerging from the central CAA extending back to regional deglaciation highlight the potential of multiproxy approaches in high-latitude settings. Five long (piston and trigger-weight) cores in an east-west transect through the NWP, investigated for sedimentological characteristics, microfossils (dinocysts, non-pollen palynomorphs, benthic and planktonic foraminifera, ostracods), and stable isotope ratios, show a dynamic late Quaternary environmental history. Our data suggest grounded glacial ice, rapid deglaciation, and a characteristic progression from ice-proximal to ice-distal conditions. Despite chronological complexities (scarcity of dateable materials, Portlandia Effect), age model extrapolations place deglaciation at ~11.0-10.3 cal ka BP (location dependent). Noticeable biological activity is marked by the appearance of planktonic foraminifera (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma) at ~10.0 cal ka BP. This signals the penetration of (Atlantic-derived) Arctic Intermediate Water (AIW) into the central NWP following deglaciation, likely facilitated by higher sea-levels permitting increased flow across inter-channel sills. Subsequent (~9.0-7.0 cal ka BP) ameliorated conditions (open-water season greater than present) marked by substantial diversification and abundance across all microfossil groups may correspond to a previously postulated "Holocene Thermal Optimum". After ~7.0 cal ka BP increased sea-ice and modern microfossil assemblages imply conditions similar to modern, likely due to the exclusion of AIW due to glacioisostatic shallowing combined with climate cooling. Remaining micropalaeontological challenges

  10. Comment on "Last glacial maximum cirque glaciation in Ireland and implications for reconstructions of the Irish ice sheet. Quaternary Science Reviews 141, 85-93"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Jasper

    2016-10-01

    Southwest Ireland is a critical location to examine the sensitivity of late Pleistocene glaciers to climate variability in the northeast Atlantic, because of its proximal location to Atlantic moisture sources and the presence of high mountains in the Macgillycuddy's Reeks range which acted as a focus for glacierization (Harrison et al., 2010). The extent of Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) glaciers in southwest Ireland and their link to the wider British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS), however, is under debate. Some models suggest that during the LGM the region was wholly inundated by ice from the larger BIIS (Warren, 1992; Sejrup et al., 2005), whereas others suggest north-flowing ice from the semi-independent Cork-Kerry Ice Cap (CKIC) was diverted around mountain peaks, resulting in exposed nunataks in the Macgillycuddy's Reeks (Anderson et al., 2001; Ballantyne et al., 2011). Cirque glaciers may also have been present on mountain slopes above this regional ice surface (Warren, 1979; Rea et al., 2004). More recently, investigations have focused on the extent and age of cirque glaciers in the Reeks, based on the mapped distribution of end moraines (Warren, 1979; Harrison et al., 2010), and on cosmogenic dates on boulders on these moraines (Harrison et al., 2010) and on associated scoured bedrock surfaces across the region (Ballantyne et al., 2011). The recent paper by Barth et al. (2016) contributes to this debate by providing nine cosmogenic 10Be ages on boulders from two moraines from one small (∼1.7 km2) and low (373 m elevation of the cirque floor) cirque basin at Alohart (52°00‧50″N, 9°40‧30″W) within the Reeks range. These dates are welcomed because they add to the lengthening list of age constraints on geomorphic activity in the region that spans the time period from the LGM to early Holocene.

  11. Late quaternary depositional systems and sea level change-Santa Monica and San Pedro Basins, California continental borderland

    SciTech Connect

    Nardin, T.R.

    1983-07-01

    A suite of seismic reflection data that provides different degrees of resolution and penetration was used to map the depositional systems that have developed in Santa Monica and San Pedro basins during the late Quaternary. Submarine fan growth, particularly at the mouths of Hueneme and Redondo Canyons, has been the dominant mode of basin filling. Mass movement processes, ranging from creep to large-scale catastrophic slumping, have been important locally. In general, large-scale fan growth fits Normark's model in which the suprafan is the primary locus of coarse sediment deposition. Smaller scale morphologic and depositional patterns on the Hueneme and Redondo fans (e.g., distributary channels and coarse sediment concentrations basinward of the inner suprafan) suggest that a significant amount of coarse sediment presently bypasses the suprafans, however. Long-distance coarse sediment transport was particularly pronounced during late Wisconsinan lowstand of sea level and resulted in progradation of lower mid-fan and lower fan deposits.

  12. Late Quaternary environmental changes and organic carbon density in the Hunshandake Sandy Land, eastern Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Zhu, B.; Wang, X.; Li, C.; Zhou, Z.; Chen, J.; Wang, X.; Yin, J.; Lu, Y.

    2008-03-01

    Knowledge about changes of regional carbon density during late Quaternary is of great significance for understanding regional and global carbon cycles. Taking the Hunshandake Sandy Land, located in eastern Inner Mongolia of China as an example, this paper aims to reconstruct Late Quaternary environmental changes, and then to discuss the fluctuations of organic carbon density and storage in the desert environment of northern China. The study area with a mean annual precipitation ca. 300 mm is characterized by the occurrence of fixed and semi-fixed sand dunes reaching a maximal height of 30 m. The research methods included field observations, examinations of grain sizes, as well as carbon and calcium carbonate contents of the sediment samples. The chronology is based on Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating and radiocarbon analyses. This work reveals that the organic carbon density in the surface layer of the Hunshandake Sandy Land changed between at least 2500 g/m 2 during the Holocene Climatic Optimum and 1500 g/m 2 when aeolian processes dominate. The dune construction was restricted by periglacial processes during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The Holocene Climatic Optimum, indicated by extensive formation of kastanozem soils, occurred between 5 ka and 3 ka in the study area. Although desertification might cause a 40% loss of total organic carbon storage within several dozen of years in the study area, a considerable amount of this carbon was re-deposited in the regions of downwind directions.

  13. Determinants of loss of mammal species during the Late Quaternary 'megafauna' extinctions: life history and ecology, but not body size.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C N

    2002-01-01

    Extinctions of megafauna species during the Late Quaternary dramatically reduced the global diversity of mammals. There is intense debate over the causes of these extinctions, especially regarding the extent to which humans were involved. Most previous analyses of this question have focused on chronologies of extinction and on the archaeological evidence for human-megafauna interaction. Here, I take an alternative approach: comparison of the biological traits of extinct species with those of survivors. I use this to demonstrate two general features of the selectivity of Late Quaternary mammal extinctions in Australia, Eurasia, the Americas and Madagascar. First, large size was not directly related to risk of extinction; rather, species with slow reproductive rates were at high risk regardless of their body size. This finding rejects the 'blitzkrieg' model of overkill, in which extinctions were completed during brief intervals of selective hunting of large-bodied prey. Second, species that survived despite having low reproductive rates typically occurred in closed habitats and many were arboreal or nocturnal. Such traits would have reduced their exposure to direct interaction with people. Therefore, although this analysis rejects blitzkrieg as a general scenario for the mammal megafauna extinctions, it is consistent with extinctions being due to interaction with human populations. PMID:12427315

  14. Idiosyncratic responses of evergreen broad-leaved forest constituents in China to the late Quaternary climate changes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Dengmei; Hu, Wan; Li, Bo; Morris, Ashley B.; Zheng, Min; Soltis, Douglas E.; Soltis, Pamela S.; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest (EBLF) is one of the most important vegetation types in China. Inferences from palaeo-biome reconstruction (PBR) and phylogeography regarding range shift history of EBLF during the late Quaternary are controversial and should be reconciled. We compared phylogeographic patterns of three EBLF constituents in China, Castanopsis tibetana, Machilus thunbergii and Schima superba. Contrary to a chorus of previous phylogeographic studies and the results of species distribution modelling (SDM) of this study (in situ survival during the LGM), the three species displayed three different phylogeographic patterns that conform to either an in situ survival model or an expansion-contraction model. These results are partially congruent with the inference of PBR that EBLF was absent to the north of 24° N at the LGM. This study suggests that the constituents of EBLF could have responded idiosyncratically to climate changes during the Late Quaternary. The community assemblages of EBLF could have been changing over time, resulting in no palaeo-analogs to modern-day EBLF, which may be the main reason responsible for the failure of PBR to detect the occurrence of EBLF north of 24° N at the LGM. PMID:27534981

  15. Coupling Genetic and Species Distribution Models to Examine the Response of the Hainan Partridge (Arborophila ardens) to Late Quaternary Climate

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jiang; Chen, De; Ye, Xinping; Li, Shouhsien; Liang, Wei; Zhang, Zhengwang; Li, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the historical dynamics of animal species is critical for accurate prediction of their response to climate changes. During the late Quaternary period, Southeast Asia had a larger land area than today due to lower sea levels, and its terrestrial landscape was covered by extensive forests and savanna. To date, however, the distribution fluctuation of vegetation and its impacts on genetic structure and demographic history of local animals during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are still disputed. In addition, the responses of animal species on Hainan Island, located in northern Southeast Asia, to climate changes during the LGM are poorly understood. Here, we combined phylogeographic analysis, paleoclimatic evidence, and species distribution models to examine the response of the flightless Hainan Partridge (Arborophila ardens) to climate change. We concluded that A. ardens survived through LGM climate changes, and its current distribution on Hainan Island was its in situ refuge. Range model results indicated that A. ardens once covered a much larger area than its current distribution. Demographic history described a relatively stable pattern during and following the LGM. In addition, weak population genetic structure suggests a role in promoting gene flow between populations with climate-induced elevation shifts. Human activities must be considered in conservation planning due to their impact on fragmented habitats. These first combined data for Hainan Partridge demonstrate the value of paired genetic and SDMs study. More related works that might deepen our understanding of the responses of the species in Southeast Asia to late Quaternary Climate are needed. PMID:23185599

  16. Diet and habitat of toxodont megaherbivores (Mammalia, Notoungulata) from the late Quaternary of South and Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFadden, Bruce J.

    2005-09-01

    The toxodont megaherbivores Toxodon and Mixotoxodon were endemic to South and Central America during the late Quaternary. Isotopic signatures of 47 toxodont teeth were analyzed to reconstruct diet and ancient habitat. Tooth enamel carbon isotope data from six regions of South and Central America indicate significant differences in toxodont diet and local vegetation during the late Quaternary. Toxodonts ranged ecologically from C 3 forest browsers in the Amazon (mean δ 13C = -13.4‰), to mixed C 3 grazers and/or browsers living either in C 3 grasslands, or mixed C 3 forested and grassland habitats in Honduras (mean δ 13C = -9.3‰), Buenos Aires province, Argentina (δ 13C = -8.7‰), and Bahia, Brazil (mean δ 13C = -8.6‰), to predominantly C 4 grazers in northern Argentina (δ 13C = -4.4‰), to specialized C 4 grazers in the Chaco of Bolivia (δ 13C = -0.1‰). Although these toxodonts had very high-crowned teeth classically interpreted for grazing, the isotopic data indicate that these megaherbivores had the evolutionary capacity to feed on a variety of dominant local vegetation. In the ancient Amazon region, carbon isotope data for the toxodonts indicate a C 3-based tropical rainforest habitat with no evidence for grasslands as would be predicted from the Neotropical forest refugia hypothesis.

  17. Late Quaternary sea-ice history of northern Fram Strait/Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Anne; Stein, Rüdiger; Fahl, Kirsten; Matthießen, Jens; Forwick, Matthias; O'Regan, Matt

    2016-04-01

    One of the main characteristics of the Arctic Ocean is its seasonal to perennial sea-ice cover. Variations of sea-ice conditions affect the Earth's albedo, primary production, rate of deep-water etc.. During the last decades, a drastic decrease in sea ice has been recorded, and the causes of which, i.e., natural vs. anthropogenic forcings, and their relevance within the global climate system, are subject of intense scientific and societal debate. In this context, records of past sea-ice conditions going beyond instrumental records are of major significance. These records may help to better understand the processes controlling natural sea-ice variability and to improve models for forecasts of future climatic conditions. During RV Polarstern Cruise PS92 in summer 2015, a 860 cm long sediment core (PS92/039-2) was recovered from the eastern flank of Yermak Plateau north of the Svalbard archipelago (Peeken, 2015). Based on a preliminary age model, this sediment core probably represents the time interval from MIS 6 to MIS 1. This core, located close to the modern summer ice edge, has been selected for reconstruction of past Arctic sea-ice variability based on specific biomarkers. In this context, we have determined the ice-algae-derived sea-ice proxy IP25 (Belt et al., 2007), in combination with other biomarkers indicative for open-water conditions (cf., Müller et al., 2009, 2011). Furthermore, organic carbon fluxes were differentiated using specific biomarkers indicative for marine primary production (brassicasterol, dinosterol) and terrigenous input (campesterol, β-sitosterol). In this poster, preliminary results of our organic-geochemical and sedimentological investigations are presented. Distinct fluctuations of these biomarkers indicate several major, partly abrupt changes in sea-ice cover in the Yermak Plateau area during the late Quaternary. These changes are probably linked to changes in the inflow of Atlantic Water along the western coastline of Svalbard into

  18. Amino acid racemization kinetic modeling and the late Quaternary paleoclimate of the North Carolina coastal plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehmiller, J. F.

    2004-12-01

    Amino acids extracted from Quaternary mollusks represent a preserved residue of the original biomineralization protein. The extent of racemization of these fossilized amino acids is often used as a stratigraphic or chronologic tool. With suitable calibration, racemization data can also be used to construct a history of temperature for the samples in question. Understanding diagenetic amino acid racemization (AAR) kinetics requires a combination of laboratory kinetic experimentation and testing of kinetic models with natural field samples that have independent chronostratigraphic control. These models must also incorporate information on the temperature dependence ("apparent" or "bulk" activation energy) as derived from either elevated temperature laboratory experiments or data from field samples with known ages and diagenetic temperatures. Over the past two decades, several well-calibrated datasets and a variety of kinetic models have become available: foraminifera results provide calibration for low temperature kinetics (e.g., Muller, 1984) and paired radiocarbon-AAR results provide calibration at higher surface temperatures (e.g., Miller et al., 1997). The most recent approaches to modeling of AAR kinetics include a molecular approach (Collins and Riley, 2000) that links racemization to polypeptide breakdown reactions and a transformation approach (Manley et al., 2000) that builds upon earlier "parabolic" (Mitterer and Kriausakul, 1989) or "non-linear" models (Wehmiller et al., 1988). The parabolic model, while useful over limited time or D/L ranges, has the disadvantage that it does not predict correct equilibrium D/L values. The other three models, if calibrated to a common value, predict consistent patterns of racemization that are in good agreement, and the molecular approach has been used to extrapolate foraminifera kinetics (Muller, 1984) to estimate ages and diagenetic temperatures of Pleistocene mollusks from North Carolina, predicting a late Pleistocene

  19. Paleoclimatic investigations during the late Quaternary using gravity core sediments of Lake Hovsgol in Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Daekyo; Shin, Seungwon; Park, Yong-Hee; Nam, Seung Il

    2010-05-01

    The Lake Hovsgol is located in northeast Eurasia which is a tectonic lake formed by rifting, and its thick bottom sediments record climatic change of the past. The lake is a suitable site to study a rapid Quaternary climate change. This study includes analysis of smear slides, particle size analysis, data of spectrophotometer and magnetic susceptibility, trace element analysis using XRF core scanner for HS-3, 5 gravity core sediments from the middle southern Lake Hovsgol. HS-3 core sediments were measured for TOC, and HS-5 core was scrutinized for species analysis of ostracods. HS-3 core was obtained at 160 m water depth, and is divided into three sedimentary units. Unit A of HS-3 is characterized by distinct lamination, high sand contents considerably decreasing towards the upper part, and the ostracods are rarely discovered at the upper part of Unit A. Unit B is characterized by weakly lamination, and some ostracods are observed in the lower part, but diatoms are observed in the upper part of Unit B. Also grain size is getting smaller toward the upper part. Unit C consists of fine diatomaceous ooze and contains abundant diatoms. Overall organic contents are high, and lamination with black-colored organic layer is observed in the lower part of Unit C. HS-5 core was obtained at 210 m water depth and is divided into two sedimentary units with faint boundary. Unit A of HS-5 is characterized by lamination and contains abundant diatoms and ostracods. At Unit B, grain size is getting smaller toward the upper part, and occurrence change of ostracods is observed in the upper part. Framboidal pyrite were formed during the diagenesis. Four species of ostracods are observed in the core sediments, i.e. Cytherissa lacustris, Limnocythere inopinate dominate in the lower part, and Candona lepnevae, Leucocythere sp dominates in the upper part. Carbon age dating results show that sediment unit B of HS-5 and unit C of HS-3 containing rare ostracods are similar in age. The reason of

  20. Glaciation in the Late Noachian Icy Highlands: Ice accumulation, distribution, flow rates, basal melting, and top-down melting rates and patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fastook, James L.; Head, James W.

    2015-02-01

    Geological evidence for extensive non-polar ice deposits of Amazonian age indicates that the current cold and dry climate of Mars has persisted for several billion years. The geological record and climate history of the Noachian, the earliest period of Mars history, is less certain, but abundant evidence for fluvial channels (valley networks) and lacustrine environments (open-basin lakes) has been interpreted to represent warm and wet conditions, including rainfall and runoff. Alternatively, recent atmospheric modeling results predict a "cold and icy" Late Noachian Mars in which moderate atmospheric pressure accompanied by a full water cycle produce an atmosphere where temperature declines with elevation following an adiabatic lapse rate, in contrast to the current situation on Mars, where temperature is almost completely determined by latitude. These results are formulated in the Late Noachian Icy Highlands (LNIH) model, in which these cold and icy conditions lead to the preferential deposition of snow and ice at high elevations, such as the southern uplands. What is the fate of this snow and ice and the nature of glaciation in such an environment? What are the prospects of melting of these deposits contributing to the observed fluvial and lacustrine deposits? To address these questions, we report on a glacial flow-modeling analysis using a Mars-adapted ice sheet model with LNIH climate conditions. The total surface/near-surface water inventory is poorly known for the Late Noachian, so we explore the LNIH model in a "supply-limited" scenario for a range of available water abundances and a range of Late Noachian geothermal fluxes. Our results predict that the Late Noachian icy highlands (above an equilibrium line altitude of approximately +1 km) were characterized by extensive ice sheets of the order of hundreds of meters thick. Due to extremely cold conditions, the ice-flow velocities in general were very low, less than a few mm/yr, and the regional ice

  1. Changes in Sediment Provenance to the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge from the late Eocene to the Early Oligocene; Northern Hemisphere Glaciation or Deep Water Circulation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scher, H. D.; Romans, B.; Moffett, Z. J.; Buckley, W. P.; Gibson, K.

    2013-12-01

    continents. There is not a long term trend nor prominent inflections in the fossil fish tooth ɛNd record that are associated with terrigenous ɛNd values so it does not appear likely that changes in sediment provenance were accompanied by a reorganization of deep water masses. Thus the preliminary results are cautiously interpreted as reflecting a sedimentological response to an overall increase in weathering/erosion of ancient continental crust, possibly on Greenland, over the investigated interval. In this context these results may reflect the emplacement of northern hemisphere ice sheets in the latest Eocene, preceded by prominent short-lived glacial events in the Eocene. The first short-lived event falls within polarity chron C17n.1n, which corresponds with the timing of a known Eocene glaciation on Antarctica and suggests that the greenhouse climate in the late Eocene supported a bipolar glacial event. We are currently generating a record of relative paleo-bottom current intensity from U1411 using the sortable silt proxy to further evaluate the role of bottom currents in terrigenous sediment provenance on the SENR.

  2. Phylogeographic heterogeneity of the brown macroalga Sargassum horneri (Fucaceae) in the northwestern Pacific in relation to late Pleistocene glaciation and tectonic configurations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zi-Min; Uwai, Shinya; Yu, Shen-Hui; Komatsu, Teruhisa; Ajisaka, Tetsuro; Duan, De-Lin

    2011-09-01

    Pleistocene glacial oscillations and associated tectonic processes are believed to have influenced the historical abundances and distribution of organisms in the Asia Northwest Pacific (ANP). Accumulating evidence indicates that factors shaping tempospatial population dynamics and distribution patterns of marine taxa vary with biogeographical latitude, pelagic behaviour and oceanographic regimes. To detect what kinds of historical and contemporary factors affected genetic connectivity, phylogeographic profiles of littoral macroalga Sargassum horneri in the ANP were analysed based on mitochondrial (Cox3) and chloroplast (rbcL) data sets. Five distinct clades were recovered. A strong signature of biogeographical structure was revealed (Φ(CT) = 0.487, P < 0.0001) derived from remarkable differentiation in clade distribution, as clade I is restricted to Chinese marginal seas (Yellow-Bohai Sea, East China Sea and South China Sea), whereas clades II-V are discontinuously scattered around the main Islands of Japan. Furthermore, two secondary contact regions were identified along the south Japan-Pacific coastline. This significant differentiation between the two basins may reflect historical glacial isolation in the northwestern Pacific, which is congruent with the estimates of clade divergence and demographic expansion during the late Quaternary low sea levels. Analysis of molecular variance and the population-pair statistic F(ST) also revealed significant genetic structural differences between Chinese marginal seas and the Japanese basin. This exceptional phylogeographic architecture in S. horneri, initially shaped by historical geographic isolation during the late Pleistocene ice age and physical biogeographical barriers, can be complicated by oceanographic regimes (ocean surface currents) and relocating behaviour such as oceanic drifting. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Late Neogene and Early Quaternary Paleoenvironmental and Paleoclimatic Conditions in Southwestern Europe: Isotopic Analyses on Mammalian Taxa

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, Laura; Koch, Paul L.; Hernández Fernández, Manuel; Fox, David L.; Domingo, M. Soledad; Alberdi, María Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Climatic and environmental shifts have had profound impacts on faunal and floral assemblages globally since the end of the Miocene. We explore the regional expression of these fluctuations in southwestern Europe by constructing long-term records (from ∼11.1 to 0.8 Ma, late Miocene–middle Pleistocene) of carbon and oxygen isotope variations in tooth enamel of different large herbivorous mammals from Spain. Isotopic differences among taxa illuminate differences in ecological niches. The δ13C values (relative to VPDB, mean −10.3±1.1‰; range −13.0 to −7.4‰) are consistent with consumption of C3 vegetation; C4 plants did not contribute significantly to the diets of the selected taxa. When averaged by time interval to examine secular trends, δ13C values increase at ∼9.5 Ma (MN9–MN10), probably related to the Middle Vallesian Crisis when there was a replacement of vegetation adapted to more humid conditions by vegetation adapted to drier and more seasonal conditions, and resulting in the disappearance of forested mammalian fauna. The mean δ13C value drops significantly at ∼4.2−3.7 Ma (MN14–MN15) during the Pliocene Warm Period, which brought more humid conditions to Europe, and returns to higher δ13C values from ∼2.6 Ma onwards (MN16), most likely reflecting more arid conditions as a consequence of the onset of the Northern Hemisphere glaciation. The most notable feature in oxygen isotope records (and mean annual temperature reconstructed from these records) is a gradual drop between MN13 and the middle Pleistocene (∼6.3−0.8 Ma) most likely due to cooling associated with Northern Hemisphere glaciation. PMID:23717470

  4. Micropaleontological Evidences of The Late Quaternary Oceanographic Changes In The South-west of The Okhotsk Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubenchshikova, N. V.; Kazarina, G. Kh.; Khusid, T. A.

    High resolution KOMEX 1998 core LV28-2-4 (4822.730 N 14622.217 E, 1265 m water depth) is processed for diatoms, planktonic and benthic foraminifera. Biopro- ductivity changes, surface and deep water circulation features are detailed for isotope stages 1-3 (last 35 kyr). The age model is based on previous magnetostratigraphy, oxy- gen isotope stratigraphy and tephrastratigraphy (Beibow et al, 2000). The most impor- tant transformation of planktonic and benthic foraminifera assemblages is associated with Termination 1 (12.5-8 Kyr). Two peaks of planktonic and benthic foraminifera abundances are treated as relating with maxima of bioproductivity during T1A and T1B events. The highest contribution of subpolar planktonic foraminifera species (up to 35%) implies rather high summer SST and/or intensive meltwater pulses. The dra- matic transformation of benthic foraminifera assemblages near 12.5 Kyr can be inter- preted as intrusion of low oxygen NPIW and/or local oxygen depletion due to high bioproductivity. During Holocene the deep water oxygenation is gradually increas- ing and reaching the level of Last Glaciation at ?2.5 Kyr. Increased bioproductivity is found as well for the end of isotope stage 3, for the end of Last Glaciation (?18-12.5 kyr) and for the Late Holocene (?4-1 kyr). Evolution of surface water (upper 200 m) is reconstructed for Holocene by means of diatoms assemblages of Sansetta (1981). The "dihotermal" structure of surface wa- ter was unstable due to strong vertical mixing as it is seen from dominating of "the Okhotsk slope assemblages". At the same time, periods of stratification reinforcement are traced by increase of concentration of "the Okhotsk Gyre assemblages". Since 4 kyr the increase of "the Okhotsk Basin Assemblages" implies inflow of warmer and salter water to the South-west of the Okhotsk Sea.

  5. Late Quaternary chronostratigraphic framework of terraces and alluvium along the lower Ohio River, southwestern Indiana and western Kentucky, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Counts, Ronald C.; Murari, Madhav K.; Owen, Lewis A.; Mahan, Shannon; Greenan, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The lower Ohio River valley is a terraced fluvial landscape that has been profoundly influenced by Quaternary climate change and glaciation. A modern Quaternary chronostratigraphic framework was developed for the lower Ohio River valley using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating and allostratigraphic mapping to gain insights into the nature of fluvial responses to glacial–interglacial/stadial–interstadial transitions and Holocene climate change. River deposits, T0 (youngest) to T7 (oldest), were mapped along a 75 km reach of the lower Ohio River and were dated using 46 OSL and 5 radiocarbon samples. The examination of cores combined with OSL and radiocarbon dating shows that fluvial sediments older than marine oxygen isotope stage (MIS) 2 are present only in the subsurface. Aggradation during MIS 6 (Illinoian glaciation) filled the valley to within ∼7 m of the modern floodplain, and by ∼114 ka (MIS 5e/Sangamon interglacial) the Ohio River had scoured the MIS 6 sediments to ∼22 m below the modern floodplain surface. There were no fluvial sediments in the valley with ages between MIS 5e and the middle of MIS 3. The MIS 3 ages (∼39 ka) and stratigraphic position of T5 deposits suggest the Ohio River aggraded 8–14 m during MIS 4 or MIS 3. Near the end of MIS 3, the Ohio River incised the mid Last Glacial (mid-Wisconsinan) deposits ∼10 m and began aggrading again by ∼30 ka. Aggradation continued into MIS 2, with maximum MIS 2 aggradation occurring before ∼21 ka, which is coincident with the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). As the Ohio River adjusted to changing fluxes in sediment load and discharge following the LGM, it formed a sequence of fill-cut terraces in the MIS 2 outwash that get progressively younger with decreasing elevation, ranging in age from ∼21 ka to ∼13 ka. From ∼14 ka to ∼13 ka the Ohio River rapidly incised ∼3 m to form a new terrace, and by ∼12 ka at the onset of the Holocene, the Ohio River

  6. Stratigraphic and sedimentologic response to Late Quaternary climate change and glacio-eustasy, Colorado River, Gulf Coastal Plain of Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, M.D. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes results of investigations of the Colorado River, Gulf Coastal Plain of Texas, which provides a detailed record of fluvial response to late Quaternary climatic change and glacio-eustatic sea level rise. Four allostratigraphic units of late Pleistocene through modern age are differentiated in the bedrock-confined lower Colorado valley on the Inner Coastal Plain. Here up to 10 meters of late Pleistocene sediments underlie a terrace at 17--20 meters above the present-day channel. Two distinct allostratigraphic units underlie an extensive Holocene terrace at 12--14 meters above the present-day channel. Allostratigraphic units and bounding disconformities correlate with climatic changes that have been identified from paleobiological data, and represent stratigraphic response to changes in the relationship between discharge and sediment supply. In addition, changes in sedimentary facies through time represents a response to changes in climate coupled with a protracted degradation of upland soil mantles. This degradation of soils altered the rate at which precipitation inputs were transferred to stream channels as runoff, which led to increases in the peakedness of flood hydrographs and changes in the relative importance of channel versus floodplain depositional environments. Increased flood stages during the late Holocene promoted the increasing importance of floodplain construction by vertical accretion, and late Holocene to modern allostratigraphic units contain thick vertical accretion facies. These same allostratigraphic units and component facies persist downvalley to the Outer Coastal Plain, but stratigraphic architecture changes as a result of the last glacio-eustatic cycle. Here late Holocene and modern sediments onlap and bury late Pleistocene and early to middle Holocene stratigraphic units that were emplaced during the last sea level lowstand and the transgression that followed.

  7. An improved atmosphere-surface model in Africa reveals the importance of vegetation and lakes in the Late Quaternary and Green Sahara periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrow, A.; Singarayer, J. S.; Valdes, P. J.; B. R. I. D. G. E

    2011-12-01

    Paleoclimate records from Late Quaternary Africa imply high amplitude variability between wet and dry conditions. In this work, we use asynchronously coupled atmosphere and land surface models to investigate the mechanisms and feedbacks responsible for Northern Africa moisture fluctuations and find that model simulations are altered dramatically by the inclusion of land surface effects. During the last de-glaciation large amplitude perturbations of the African climate occurred linked to orbitaly forced changes in monsoon strength. Furthermore during the Holocene an abrupt and widespread greening of the Sahara is recorded in numerous paleoclimate archives. This greening represents the largest anomaly in the atmosphere-biosphere system in the last 12,000 years but is consistently misrepresented by modeling studies. Northern African climates are thought to highly sensitive to land surface feedbacks and it has been suggested that better representation of the land surface may improve model simulations. We investigate how the role of surface feedbacks in the climate system change over a uniquely extensive suite of time slice simulations from the last glacial maximum to the present. The Hadley Centre's atmosphere-only GCM, HadAM3 is asynchronously coupled with the equilibrium vegetation model BIOME (Prentice et al 1992) and surface hydrology feedbacks are considered using the surface water scheme HYDRA (Coe 1998). Equilibrium time slices are run at 3000 year intervals from the pre-industrial to 24 kyr B.P. This enables us to dissect the relative importance of orbital, vegetation and hydrologic systems in controlling the climate of Northern Africa across a complete spectrum of de-glacial to present climates. Although over millennial and longer time scales African water balance is steered by orbital configuration we show that the system is also affected by fluxes working across the land surface-atmosphere interface. Changes in the land surface cover seen by a GCM have a

  8. Exceptionally well preserved late Quaternary plant and vertebrate fossils from a blue hole on Abaco, The Bahamas.

    PubMed

    Steadman, David W; Franz, Richard; Morgan, Gary S; Albury, Nancy A; Kakuk, Brian; Broad, Kenneth; Franz, Shelley E; Tinker, Keith; Pateman, Michael P; Lott, Terry A; Jarzen, David M; Dilcher, David L

    2007-12-11

    We report Quaternary vertebrate and plant fossils from Sawmill Sink, a "blue hole" (a water-filled sinkhole) on Great Abaco Island, The Bahamas. The fossils are well preserved because of deposition in anoxic salt water. Vertebrate fossils from peat on the talus cone are radiocarbon-dated from approximately 4,200 to 1,000 cal BP (Late Holocene). The peat produced skeletons of two extinct species (tortoise Chelonoidis undescribed sp. and Caracara Caracara creightoni) and two extant species no longer in The Bahamas (Cuban crocodile, Crocodylus rhombifer; and Cooper's or Gundlach's Hawk, Accipiter cooperii or Accipiter gundlachii). A different, inorganic bone deposit on a limestone ledge in Sawmill Sink is a Late Pleistocene owl roost that features lizards (one species), snakes (three species), birds (25 species), and bats (four species). The owl roost fauna includes Rallus undescribed sp. (extinct; the first Bahamian flightless rail) and four other locally extinct species of birds (Cooper's/Gundlach's Hawk, A. cooperii/gundlachii; flicker Colaptes sp.; Cave Swallow, Petrochelidon fulva; and Eastern Meadowlark, Sturnella magna) and mammals (Bahamian hutia, Geocapromys ingrahami; and a bat, Myotis sp.). The exquisitely preserved fossils from Sawmill Sink suggest a grassy pineland as the dominant plant community on Abaco in the Late Pleistocene, with a heavier component of coppice (tropical dry evergreen forest) in the Late Holocene. Important in its own right, this information also will help biologists and government planners to develop conservation programs in The Bahamas that consider long-term ecological and cultural processes.

  9. Climate warming and humans played different roles in triggering Late Quaternary extinctions in east and west Eurasia.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xinru; Zhang, Zhibin

    2017-03-29

    Climate change and humans are proposed as the two key drivers of total extinction of many large mammals in the Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene, but disentangling their relative roles remains challenging owing to a lack of quantitative evaluation of human impact and climate-driven distribution changes on the extinctions of these large mammals in a continuous temporal-spatial dimension. Here, our analyses showed that temperature change had significant effects on mammoth (genus Mammuthus), rhinoceros (Rhinocerotidae), horse (Equidae) and deer (Cervidae). Rapid global warming was the predominant factor driving the total extinction of mammoths and rhinos in frigid zones from the Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene. Humans showed significant, negative effects on extirpations of the four mammalian taxa, and were the predominant factor causing the extinction or major extirpations of rhinos and horses. Deer survived both rapid climate warming and extensive human impacts. Our study indicates that both the current rates of warming and range shifts of species are much faster than those from the Late Pleistocene to Holocene. Our results provide new insight into the extinction of Late Quaternary megafauna by demonstrating taxon-, period- and region-specific differences in extinction drivers of climate change and human disturbances, and some implications about the extinction risk of animals by recent and ongoing climate warming. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. Exceptionally well preserved late Quaternary plant and vertebrate fossils from a blue hole on Abaco, The Bahamas

    PubMed Central

    Steadman, David W.; Franz, Richard; Morgan, Gary S.; Albury, Nancy A.; Kakuk, Brian; Broad, Kenneth; Franz, Shelley E.; Tinker, Keith; Pateman, Michael P.; Lott, Terry A.; Jarzen, David M.; Dilcher, David L.

    2007-01-01

    We report Quaternary vertebrate and plant fossils from Sawmill Sink, a “blue hole” (a water-filled sinkhole) on Great Abaco Island, The Bahamas. The fossils are well preserved because of deposition in anoxic salt water. Vertebrate fossils from peat on the talus cone are radiocarbon-dated from ≈4,200 to 1,000 cal BP (Late Holocene). The peat produced skeletons of two extinct species (tortoise Chelonoidis undescribed sp. and Caracara Caracara creightoni) and two extant species no longer in The Bahamas (Cuban crocodile, Crocodylus rhombifer; and Cooper's or Gundlach's Hawk, Accipiter cooperii or Accipiter gundlachii). A different, inorganic bone deposit on a limestone ledge in Sawmill Sink is a Late Pleistocene owl roost that features lizards (one species), snakes (three species), birds (25 species), and bats (four species). The owl roost fauna includes Rallus undescribed sp. (extinct; the first Bahamian flightless rail) and four other locally extinct species of birds (Cooper's/Gundlach's Hawk, A. cooperii/gundlachii; flicker Colaptes sp.; Cave Swallow, Petrochelidon fulva; and Eastern Meadowlark, Sturnella magna) and mammals (Bahamian hutia, Geocapromys ingrahami; and a bat, Myotis sp.). The exquisitely preserved fossils from Sawmill Sink suggest a grassy pineland as the dominant plant community on Abaco in the Late Pleistocene, with a heavier component of coppice (tropical dry evergreen forest) in the Late Holocene. Important in its own right, this information also will help biologists and government planners to develop conservation programs in The Bahamas that consider long-term ecological and cultural processes. PMID:18077421

  11. The modern diatom spectra of Madagascar and diatom-inferred Late Quaternary climatic changes in northeastern and central Madagascar

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, N.E.

    1993-01-01

    A study was conducted to classify diatoms in modern sediment surface samples in freshwater sites into assemblages and to assess the historical changes in lake level changes and climatic conditions in Madagascar during the Late Quaternary. Analysis of taxonomic percentages of diatoms in recently deposited sediments from various sites shows that diatom communities in these sites can be grouped by means of cluster analysis into distinct assemblages, some of which show similarities to groupings found in East Africa. pH and conductivity appear to be important factors correlating with differences in diatom communities in these study sites. Trends in diatom assemblages in a sediment core taken from Lake Alaotra, supplemented by those in sediments of the paleolake Ampasambazimba, suggest that the late Pleistocene in northeastern Madagascar was arid, though aridity was probably not as constant or as severe as in many areas of eastern and northern Africa; the Holocene was a period of moderate but variable conditions, marked by a distinct dry episode ca 5000 yr B.P. and a drying trend toward the late Holocene. Changes in diatom assemblages in a sediment core from Lake Kavitaha in central Madagascar suggest changes in the surrounding environment during at least two periods in the late Holocene. These coincide with increases in charcoal influx and, around 700 yr B.P., with the intensification of agricultural activity in the area.

  12. A tale of two species: Extirpation and range expansion during the late Quaternary in an extreme environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Felisa A.; Crawford, Dolly L.; Harding, Larisa E.; Lease, Hilary M.; Murray, Ian W.; Raniszewski, Adrienne; Youberg, Kristin M.

    2009-02-01

    Death Valley, California is today the hottest hyperarid area in the western Hemisphere with temperatures of 57 °C (134 °F) recorded. During the late Quaternary, pluvial Lake Manly covered much of the Valley and contributed to a much more moderate climate. The abrupt draining of Lake Manly in the mid-Holocene and coincident dramatic shifts in temperature and aridity exerted substantial selection pressure on organisms living in this area. Our research investigates the adaptive response of Neotoma (woodrats) to temperature change over the late Quaternary along a steep elevational and environmental gradient. By combining fieldwork, examination of museum specimens, and collection of paleomiddens, our project reconstructs the divergent evolutionary histories of animals from the valley floor and nearby mountain gradients (- 84 to > 3400 m). We report on recent paleomidden work investigating a transition zone in the Grapevine Mountains (Amargosa Range) for two species of woodrats differing significantly in size and habitat preferences: N. lepida, the desert woodrat, and N. cinerea, the bushy-tailed woodrat. Here, at the limits of these species' thermal and ecological thresholds, we demonstrate dramatic fluctuations in the range boundaries over the Holocene as climate shifted. Moreover, we find fundamental differences in the adaptive response of these two species related to the elevation of the site and local microclimate. Results indicate that although N. cinerea are currently extirpated in this area, they were ubiquitous throughout the late Pleistocene and into the middle Holocene. They adapted to climate shifts over this period by phenotypic changes in body mass, as has been demonstrated for other areas within their range; during colder episodes they were larger, and during warmer intervals, animals were smaller. Their presence may have been tied into a much more widespread historical distribution of juniper ( Juniperus sp.); we document a downward displacement of

  13. Late Quaternary loess-like paleosols and pedocomplexes, geochemistry, provenance and source area weathering, Manasbal, Kashmir Valley, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babeesh, C.; Achyuthan, Hema; Jaiswal, Manoj Kumar; Lone, Aasif

    2017-05-01

    The late Quaternary loess and loess-like deposits in Kashmir Valley are natural archives that have preserved paleoclimate and paleoenvironmental records of the region. We present a loess-like paleosol located along the margin of the Manasbal Lake, Ganderbal, which was studied in detail for understanding the pedological processes and reconstructing the late Quaternary soil formation. In this paper we present loess-like paleosol formation of a nearly 10.6 m thick sequence exposed along the margin of Manasbal Lake, Ganderbal District, Srinagar, Kashmir. Geochemical and textural data of this loess-like sedimentary sequence fluctuate reflecting the varied depositional processes operating in the valley, differential intensity of weathering, and processes of pedogenesis. Weathering indices such as chemical index of alteration, chemical index of weathering, and plagioclase index of alteration reveal weak to moderate weathering of the parent material. Provenance discrimination diagrams of the present study disclose that the Manasbal loess-like paleosol sediments are derived from the mixed source rocks suggesting a variety of provenance with variable geological settings, which apparently have undergone weak to moderate recycling processes. The Manasbal paleosol horizons have been dated by the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) method to the marine isotope stages mid-MIS-3 (41.7 ± 8.0 ka) and late-MIS-2 (14.6 ± 3.8 ka). During the MIS-3 period, the climate was wetter, forming a strong AhBtk paleosol as inferred from the geochemical data. A steady increase in the CaCO3 content and C/N ratio in the paleosols from 6.50 m (MIS-3) indicates arid and drier climatic conditions. The area around Manasbal Lake incised because of climate change and neotectonic activity since post-14 ka.

  14. Influence of late Quaternary climate change on present patterns of genetic variation in valley oak, Quercus lobata Née.

    PubMed

    Gugger, Paul F; Ikegami, Makihiko; Sork, Victoria L

    2013-07-01

    Phylogeography and ecological niche models (ENMs) suggest that late Quaternary glacial cycles have played a prominent role in shaping present population genetic structure and diversity, but have not applied quantitative methods to dissect the relative contribution of past and present climate vs. other forces. We integrate multilocus phylogeography, climate-based ENMs and multivariate statistical approaches to infer the effects of late Quaternary climate change on contemporary genetic variation of valley oak (Quercus lobata Née). ENMs indicated that valley oak maintained a stable distribution with local migration from the last interglacial period (~120 ka) to the Last Glacial Maximum (~21 ka, LGM) to the present compared with large-scale range shifts for an eastern North American white oak (Quercus alba L.). Coast Range and Sierra Nevada foothill populations diverged in the late Pleistocene before the LGM [104 ka (28-1622)] and have occupied somewhat distinct climate niches, according to ENMs and coalescent analyses of divergence time. In accordance with neutral expectations for stable populations, nuclear microsatellite diversity positively correlated with niche stability from the LGM to present. Most strikingly, nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite variation significantly correlated with LGM climate, even after controlling for associations with geographic location and present climate using partial redundancy analyses. Variance partitioning showed that LGM climate uniquely explains a similar proportion of genetic variance as present climate (16% vs. 11-18%), and together, past and present climate explains more than geography (19%). Climate can influence local expansion-contraction dynamics, flowering phenology and thus gene flow, and/or impose selective pressures. These results highlight the lingering effect of past climate on genetic variation in species with stable distributions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Evolution and flooding history of the Sacramento River over the late Quaternary illustrated on pristine floodplains near Chico, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, M.; Aalto, R. E.; Singer, M. B.; Fuchs, M.

    2009-12-01

    Different river systems are often seen to respond individually to climate and environmental forcing during the late Quaternary, with a large number of prior studies investigating the unique history of various European rivers. In order to broaden our understanding of climate-induced late Quaternary morpho-dynamic change within a wider range of fluvial environments, more studies are needed from regions that differ substantially from Europe. The Sacramento River downstream of the city of Chico, California, features three different types of surface (palaeo) channel systems - meandering, braiding and anastomosing. This provides an excellent study region to investigate controls on channel and floodplain development by external (and internal) forcing over the Quaternary. This and the fact that two of these palaeochannel systems play a major role in flood and sediment conveyance make this area attractive for research on flooding and river/floodplain development. Furthermore, the climate and sea level forcing over the Quaternary are substantially different here from most European study areas, providing valuable new perspective. We present results from our investigation of a near-pristine fluvial environment along the largest river in California - the Llano Seco reach of the Sacramento River, between Chico and the downstream wetlands of Butte Sink. The Llano Seco Ranch has a unique ownership history that makes it the only remaining significant undisturbed floodplain along the Sacramento River, featuring more than 20,000 acres of superb habitat nourished by a natural geomorphic system. Despite its importance to science and society and the prior recognition of beautifully preserved Quaternary and Holocene channel systems, fluvial features in this area have not been rigorously dated. Furthermore, there have been no detailed studies of deep stratigraphic profiles afforded by the extensive, well preserved deposits of fluvial sediments and floodplain soils. Our research

  16. Quaternary glaciations: from observations to theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paillard, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Ice ages are known since the mid-nineteenth century. From the beginning, they have been at the center of theories of climate and climate change. Still, the mechanisms behind these large amplitude oscillations remain poorly understood. In order to position our current knowledge of glacial-interglacial cycles, it is useful to present how the notion of climate change appeared in the XIXth century with the discovery of glacial periods, and how the two main theories, the astronomical one and the geochemical one, emerged progressively both from sound physical principles but also from extravagant ideas. Major progresses in geochemistry in the XXth century led first to the firm evidence of an astronomical pacemaker of these cycles thanks to the accumulation of paleoceanographic data. Still, the Milankovitch's theory predicts an ice age cyclicity of about 41,000 years, while the major periodicity found in the records is 100,000 yr. Besides, ice cores from Antarctica proved unambiguously that the atmospheric carbon dioxide was lower during glacial periods. Even more importantly, during the last termination, the atmospheric pCO2 increases significantly by about 50 ppm, several millenia before any important change in continental ice volume. This fact, together with many other pieces of information, strongly suggests an active role of greenhouse gases in the ice age problem, at least during deglaciations. Since terminations are precisely at the heart of the 100-ka problem, we need to formulate a new synthesis of the astronomical and geochemical theories in order to unravel this almost two-century-old question of ice ages. The foundations of such a theory have already been put forward, and its predictions appear in surprisingly good agreement with many recent observations.

  17. Variations in Late Quaternary behavior along and among range-front faults of the Sierra Nevada, California

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, M.M. ); Gillespie, A.R. . Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Late Quaternary slip rates of the 11 or so recognized active range-front faults of the Sierra Nevada from Owens Lake northwestward to Carson Valley show enough variation with time and location that a proper understanding of slip behavior of these faults may require slip histories at many places for each. Late Quaternary traces of these normal faults vary in length from 13 to 45 km. Most faults trend more northerly than the [approximately]MW trend of the range front. The faults are separated by < 5 to > 20 km of apparently unfaulted terrain; many have echelon overlap. None of the faults has a significant component of strike slip, including those of Owens Valley. The largest late Quaternary slip rates (> 2 mm/yr) occur on the Hilton Creek fault at Long Valley and 20 km to the north on the Mono Lake fault. Slip rates > 1 mm/yr occur on at least one fault north of Mono Lake and in Round Valley, south of Long Valley. Farther south (Owens Valley) range-front faults have slip rates < 1 mm/yr and have notably discontinuous traces. Displacements of moraines across the Hilton Creek fault at 4 sites are compatible with slip rates that increase northward from the south end of the fault, but stay constant through time at a site. The slip rates are 0.1 to 0.4 mm/yr near the south end; 0.1 to 0.8 mm/yr at Hilton Lakes, 3 km to the northwest; 1.4 to 3 mm/yr at McGee Creek, 9 km farther northwest; and 1.1 to 2 mm/yr at Tobacco Flat, 5 km farther northwest in Long Valley and > 15 km from the north end of the fault. At McGee Creek, slip rate since 10--15 ka is 1.3--2.5 mm/yr; since 13--20 ka, 1.4--2.6 mm/yr; since 25--40 ka, 1.4--4.2 mm/yr, and since 65--140 ka, 1.1--3.5 mm/yr. The apparently uniform rate through time at McGee Creek (and also at Hilton Lakes and Tobacco Flat, but for fewer periods; the south end site is for only one period) is interesting, but not yet convincing, mainly because of uncertain dates.

  18. Micropaleontologic record of late Pliocene and Quaternary paleoenvironments in the northern Albemarle Embayment, North Carolina, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Culver, S.J.; Farrell, K.M.; Mallinson, D.J.; Horton, B.P.; Willard, D.A.; Thieler, E.R.; Riggs, S.R.; Snyder, S.W.; Wehmiller, J. F.; Bernhardt, C.E.; Hillier, C.

    2008-01-01

    Micropaleontological data provide a strong actualistic basis for detailed interpretations of Quaternary paleoenvironmental change. The 90??m-thick Quaternary record of the Albemarle Embayment in the mid-Atlantic coastal plain of the USA provides an excellent opportunity to use such an approach in a region where the details of Quaternary environmental change are poorly known. The foraminiferal record in nine cores from the northern Outer Banks, east of Albemarle Sound, North Carolina, indicates the deposition of subhorizontal, mostly open-marine early to late Pleistocene units unconformably upon a basement of late Pliocene reduced-oxygen, fine-grained, shelf-basin deposits. Pollen data record several warm-cool fluctuations within the early to mid-Pleistocene deposits. Diatom data indicate that some fresh and brackish-water units occur within the generally open-marine Pleistocene succession. A channel cut by the paleo-Roanoke River during the last glacial sea-level lowstand occurs in the northern part of the study area. Pollen indicates that the basal fluvial valley fill accumulated in cooler than modern climate conditions in the latest Pleistocene. Overlying silts and muds accumulated under cool climatic, estuarine conditions according to diatom and pollen data. Radiocarbon ages from the estuarine deposits indicate that the bulk of these sediments accumulated during the latest Pleistocene. The estuarine channel-fill deposits are overlain by Holocene open-marine sands deposited as the rising sea transgressed into the estuary approximately 8.5 to 9.0??kyr BP. Within the barrier island drill cores of this study, fully marine sedimentation occurred throughout the Holocene. However, immediately west of the present barrier island, mid- to late Holocene estuarine deposits underlie the modern Albemarle Sound. The islands that currently form a continuous barrier across the mouth of Albemarle Sound have a complex history of Holocene construction and destruction and large

  19. Late Quaternary stratigraphy, sedimentology, and geochemistry of an underfilled lake basin in the Puna (north-west Argentina)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGlue, Michael M.; Cohen, Andrew S.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Kowler, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Depositional models of ancient lakes in thin-skinned retroarc foreland basins rarely benefit from appropriate Quaternary analogues. To address this, we present new stratigraphic, sedimentological and geochemical analyses of four radiocarbon-dated sediment cores from the Pozuelos Basin (PB; northwest Argentina) that capture the evolution of this low-accommodation Puna basin over the past ca. 43 cal kyr. Strata from the PB are interpreted as accumulations of a highly variable, underfilled lake system represented by lake-plain/littoral, profundal, palustrine, saline lake and playa facies associations. The vertical stacking of facies is asymmetric, with transgressive and thin organic-rich highstand deposits underlying thicker, organic-poor regressive deposits. The major controls on depositional architecture and basin palaeogeography are tectonics and climate. Accommodation space was derived from piggyback basin-forming flexural subsidence and Miocene-Quaternary normal faulting associated with incorporation of the basin into the Andean hinterland. Sediment and water supply was modulated by variability in the South American summer monsoon, and perennial lake deposits correlate in time with several well-known late Pleistocene wet periods on the Altiplano/Puna plateau. Our results shed new light on lake expansion–contraction dynamics in the PB in particular and provide a deeper understanding of Puna basin lakes in general.

  20. Apparent late Quaternary fault slip rate increase in the southwestern Lower Rhine Graben, central Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, Ryan D.; Friedrich, Anke M.; Kubler, Simon; Salamon, Martin

    2017-01-01

    In regions of low strain, long earthquake recurrence intervals (104–106  yrs) and erosive processes limit preservation of Quaternary markers suitable for distinguishing whether faults slip at uniform or secularly varying rates. The Lower Rhine graben in the border region of Germany, The Netherlands, and Belgium provides a unique opportunity to explore Quaternary slip‐rate variations in a region of low strain using the basal (2.29±0.29  Ma) and surface (700±80  ka) contacts of the regionally extensive main terrace (“Hauptterrasse”), deposited by the Rhine and Maas Rivers. These surfaces are vertically offset 3–140 m and 0–68 m, respectively, across individual fault strands within a distributed network of northwest‐trending, slow‐slipping (<0.1  mm/yr) normal faults. In this investigation, we construct Quaternary slip histories for the southern Lower Rhine graben faults using new main terrace surface vertical offset measurements made from light detection and ranging (lidar)‐derived bare‐earth digital terrain models, which we synthesize with existing constraints on the offset basal contact of this fluvial deposit (n=91 collocated sites with displacement constraints). We find that >80% of the sites record an apparent increase in slip rate for the more recent interval from 700 ka to present, which corresponds to a period of increased uplift of the nearby Rhenish Massif and regional volcanism. However, the apparent increase in slip rate could result, in part, from erosion of the footwall surface below the main terrace, leading to an apparent displacement that is smaller than the total vertical offset since the start of the Quaternary. Prior work focused on characterization of these faults as seismic sources in the Lower Rhine graben has preferentially relied on the average fault‐slip rate constrained using the base of the main terrace. We suggest that average fault‐slip rates calculated using the ∼700  ka main terrace

  1. Ecosystem resilience to abrupt late Quaternary change in continental southern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Poppy; Mackay, Anson; Bezrukova, Elena; Shchetnikov, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Quaternary climate variability is dominated by long term orbital forcing along with abrupt sub-Milankovitch events on the scales of millennia to centuries, driven by internal feedback mechanisms, volcanic forcing and fluctuating solar activity. Although these are well documented in the North Atlantic region, their expression is poorly understood in Siberia, particularly in relation to abrupt climatic events. Siberia has the world's highest level of continentality offering an opportunity to study changes remote from oceanic influences and improving understanding of interactions between the Siberian High and other atmospheric systems including the Aleutian Low, Arctic oscillation and Icelandic Low1 and ENSO2. Understanding of palaeoenvironmental change in Siberia is essential due to the region's high sensitivity to climatic change, with warming rates considerably higher than the global average over the past 50 years3, triggering significant environmental changes, including permafrost degradation, shifts in the forest-steppe biome, increases in forest fires and warming of seasonally ice-covered lakes. Additionally, the region provides essential palaeoenvironmental context for early hominins, for example at globally important sites such as Denisova cave4, and megafauna extinctions5. This presentation outlines ongoing work at Lake Baunt, SE Siberia including: key quaternary climate forcings, the site and its regional context, the key methods and preliminary results. These include a dated record back to ˜30ka BP (based on multiple 14C dates and Bayesian age modelling), multiproxy indicators of palaeoproductivity (e.g. biogenic silica and diatom analyses) and lake mixing regimes (inferred from diatom analyses). Together these highlight several key Quaternary fluctuations potentially correlated to events recorded in Greenland Ice Cores (GS2, GS2.1, GI1, GS1), and these are considered against key Quaternary records including those from nearby Lake Baikal and Hulu Cave in

  2. Permafrost sequences on Kurungnakh Island, Lena Delta (NE Siberia, Russia) as key site of the late Quaternary environmental history of West Beringia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterich, S.; Kuzmina, S.; Andreev, A. A.; Kienast, F.; Meyer, H.; Schirrmeister, L.; Kuznetsova, T.; Sierralta, M.

    2009-04-01

    Late Quaternary permafrost sequences are widely distributed in the arctic lowlands of Siberia. Because the existence of permafrost has been sensitive to climate changes during the Quaternary past, such frozen deposits are regarded as an archive of palaeoenvironmental dynamics. Late Quaternary palaeoenvironments of the Siberian Arctic were reconstructed by combining data from several fossil bioindicators (pollen, plant macro-fossils, ostracods, insects, and mammal bones) with sedimentological and cryolithological data from permafrost deposits. The late Pleistocene to Holocene sequence on Kurungnakh Island (Lena Delta, NE Siberia) reflects the environmental history of West Beringia and covers glacial/interglacial and stadial/interstadial climate variations with a focus on the Middle Weichselian interstadial (50-32 kyr BP). The record mirrors the development of periglacial landscapes under changing sedimentation regimes which were meandering fluvial during the Early Weichselian, colluvial or proluvial on gently inclined plaines during the Middle and Late Weichselian, and thermokarst-affected during the Holocene. Palaeoecological records indicate the existence of tundra-steppe vegetation under cold continental climate conditions during the Middle Weichselian interstadial. Due to sedimentation gaps in the sequence between 32 and 17 kyr BP and 17 and 8 kyr BP, the Late Weichselian stadial is incompletely represented in the studied outcrops. Nevertheless, by several palaeoecological indications arctic tundra-steppe vegetation under extremely cold-arid conditions prevailed during the late Pleistocene. The tundra-steppe disappeared completely due to lasting paludification during the Holocene. Initially subarctic shrub tundra formed, which later retreated in course of the late Holocene cooling.

  3. From mud and grains to curves and concepts: Late Quaternary climatic history from Chew Bahir, southern Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foerster, V. E.; Junginger, A.; Asrat, A.; Lamb, H. F.; Gebru, T.; Wennrich, V.; Weber, M. E.; Rethemeyer, J.; Nowaczyk, N.; Frank, U.; Brown, M. C.; Trauth, M. H.; Schaebitz, F.

    2012-12-01

    Chew Bahir, a tectonically bound basin between the Main Ethiopian Rift and the Omo -Turkana basin, responded sensitively to past climatic fluctuations. Now a saline mudflat, its sediments contain an extensive archive of climatic and environmental history within the source region of anatomically modern humans. Here we present new Late Quaternary paleoclimatic data from six cores (9-18 m long) retrieved in a NW-SE transect across the basin. Multiproxy analysis, including geochemical, geophysical, biological, paleomagnetic and sedimentological analyses, combined with six AMS radiocarbon dates, has been applied to the cores. This reveals that Chew Bahir recorded climatic events at centennial to millennial resolution, including Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles and Heinrich events. The data correlate with both high-latitude and tropical climatic records. Chew Bahir therefore represents a key site from which to understand the timing and mechanisms of local, regional and global climatic events.

  4. Modeling global vegetation in the late Quaternary: What progress have we made and what are the priorities for the future?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Jed

    2017-04-01

    More than two decades ago, the development of the first global biogeography models led to an interest in simulating global land cover in the past. These models promised the possibility of creating a coherent picture of the Earth's vegetation that went beyond qualitative extrapolation of site-based observations, e.g., from paleoecological archives, and was not limited to areas with a high density of sites. Then as now, the goal of much work simulating past vegetation was to explore and understand the role of biogeophysical and biogeochemical feedbacks between the Earth's land surface and the climate system. Paleovegetation modeling for the late Quaternary has also influenced debates on the character of natural vegetation, conservation and ecological restoration goals, and the co-evolution of humans, civilizations, and the landscapes in which they live. The first simulations of global land cover in the past used equilibrium vegetation models, e.g., BIOME1, BIOME3, and BIOME4, and focused on well-known timeslices of interest in paleoclimate research, including the Last Glacial Maximum (21,000 BP) and the mid-Holocene (6,000 BP). Questions addressed included: quantification of the importance of terrestrial vegetation in the glacial carbon cycle, the role of changing vegetation cover on glacial inception, and the influence of biogeophysical feedbacks on the amplitude and spatial pattern of the mid-Holocene African Monsoon. In the intervening years, as both vegetation and climate models evolved and improved, the spatial resolution, number of periods studied, and the type of research questions addressed expanded greatly. Studies covered the dynamics of Arctic vegetation, wetland area, wetland methane emissions, and paleo-atmospheric chemistry, dust emissions and effects on paleoclimate, among others. A major recent advance in paleovegetation modeling for the late Quaternary has come with the development of Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs) that are capable of

  5. Pre-Wisconsinan mammals from Jamaica and models of late Quaternary extinction in the greater Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPhee, R. D. E.; Ford, Derek C.; McFarlane, Donald A.

    1989-01-01

    The vertebrate fauna recovered from indurated conglomerates at Wallingford Roadside Cave (central Jamaica) is shown to be in excess of 100,000 yr old according to uranium series and electron spin resonance dating. The Wallingford local fauna is therefore pre-Wisconsinan in age, and Roadside Cave is now the oldest radiometrically dated locality in the West Indies containing identifiable species of land mammals. In the absence of a good radiometric record for Quaternary paleontological sites in the Caribbean, there is no satisfactory basis for determining whether most extinct Antillean mammals died out in a "blitzkrieg"-like event immediately following initial human colonization in the mid-Holocene. Fossils of Clidomys (Heptaxodontidae, Caviomorpha), the giant Wallingford rodent, have never been found in situ in sediments of demonstrably Holocene age, and its extinction may antedate the middle Holocene. This is also a possibility for the primate Xenothrix mcgregori, although its remains have been found in loose cave earth. A major, climate-driven bout of terrestrial vertebrate extinction at about 14,000-12,000 yr B.P. has been hypothesized for the West Indies by G. Pregill and S. L. Olson ( Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics12, 75-98, 1981), but at present there is nothing to connect the disappearance of Clidomys with this event either. Quaternary extinctions in the Caribbean may prove to be of critical significance for evaluating the reality of New World blitzkrieg, but not until an effort is mounted to constrain them rigorously using modern radiometric approaches.

  6. Timing of glacier fluctuations and trigger mechanisms in eastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau during the late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, XianJiao; Lai, ZhongPing; Zhou, ShangZhe; Zeng, LanHua

    2014-05-01

    It is highly debated whether glacial advances on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) occurred as a response to temperature cooling, or whether they were forced by an increase in moisture brought by the intensive Indian summer monsoon. We here report a case study investigating this issue. Multiple moraine series in the Yingpu Valley, Queer Shan ranges of the Hengduan Mountains, and eastern QTP, provide an excellent archive for examining the timing and trigger mechanism of glacier fluctuations. Twenty-seven optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) samples of glacial sediments were collected from this valley. The quartz OSL ages show that the moraine series of Y-1, I, M and O were formed during the Late Holocene, Late Glacial, the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 (likely mid-MIS-3). The youngest Y-2 moraines probably formed during the Little Ice Age (LIA). The oldest H moraines formed before MIS-3. We found that glacial advances during the late Quaternary at the Yingpu Valley responded to cold stages or cold events rather than episodes of enhanced summer monsoon and moisture. As a result, glaciers in the monsoonal Hengduan Mountains were mainly triggered by changes in temperature. Millennial time scale temperature oscillations might have caused the multiple glacial advances.

  7. Late Quaternary molluscan assemblages from the coastal area of Bahía Bustamante (Patagonia, Argentina): Paleoecology and paleoenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Marina L.; Sirch, Yamila Negro; Richiano, Sebastián

    2005-10-01

    Variations in the composition, distribution, and diversity of molluscan assemblages from Patagonian marine terraces (MT) formed during the late Quaternary sea-level highstands and neotectonic events—between the late Pleistocene, mid-Holocene, and present—are discussed. Molluscs and associated macrofauna (balanids, brachiopods, polychaetes, bryozoans) from nine fossiliferous localities and three modern sites suggest paleoecological, paleobiogeographical, and paleoenvironmental implications for paleoclimatic interpretations of the coastal area of Bahia Bustamante-Caleta Malaspina (˜44.9 and 45.3°S) since marine oxygen isotope stage (MOIS) 7. Crepidula protea, Buccinanops paytensis, and Brachidontes rodriguezi are first recorded for the late Pleistocene MTIV (MOIS5-7); Nacella (Patinigera) deaurata, Epitonium magellanicum, B. paytensis, Aequipecten tehuelchus, and Clausinella gayi are recorded for the mid-Holocene MTVI (MOIS1) in the area. These molluscs currently live in the SW Atlantic, but Venericardia procera represents a northward migration and Tegula atra a faunal extinction in response to climate change. Overall, they indicate hard substrates, shallow waters, and truly marine conditions, similar to the modern littoral. With respect to temperature, the qualitative, quantitative, morphological, and distributional variations suggest slightly higher SST during the mid-Holocene (MTVI, MOIS1, hypsithermal), colder for MTV (MOIS5c?, 5a?), and warmer or similar for MTIV (MOIS5e, 7?).

  8. C 4 Plant Productivity and Climate-CO 2 Variations in South-Central Texas during the Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordt, Lee C.; Boutton, Thomas W.; Jacob, John S.; Mandel, Rolfe D.

    2002-09-01

    A continuous record of organic carbon δ 13C from a buried soil sequence in south-central Texas demonstrates: 1) strong coupling between marine and adjacent continental ecosystems in the late Pleistocene as a result of glacial meltwater entering the Gulf of Mexico and 2) ecosystem decoupling in the Holocene associated with a reduction of meltwater and a shift in global circulation patterns. In the late Pleistocene, reduction in C 4 plant productivity correlates with two well-documented glacial meltwater pulses (˜15,000 and 12,000 14C yr B.P.), indicating a cooler-than-present adjacent continental environment. Increased C 4 production between 11,000 and 10,000 14C yr B.P. suggests that the Younger Dryas was a warm interval responding to the diversion of glacial meltwater away from the Mississippi River. With waning meltwater flow, C 4 productivity generally increased throughout the Holocene, culminating in peak warm intervals at ˜5000 and 2000 14C yr B.P. Shifts in the abundances of C 3-C 4 plants through the late Quaternary show no correlation to ecophysiological responses to atmospheric CO 2 concentration.

  9. Late Quaternary high resolution sequence stratigraphy of an active rift, the Sperchios Basin, Greece: An analogue for subtle stratigraphic plays

    SciTech Connect

    Eliet, P.P. ); Gawthorpe, R.L. )

    1996-01-01

    The Sperchios Basin is an active asymmetric graben, bounded to the south by a major border fault system with major fault segments typically 20-30 km long. The basin is dominated by a major axial fluvio-deltaic system which enters the partially enclosed Maliakos Gulf to the east. Lateral sourced depositional systems within the basin comprise hanging-wall and footwall-derived alluvial fans and a narrow coastal plain along the footwall scarp bordering the Maliakos Gulf. High resolution seismic data from the Maliakos Gulf reveals three late Quaternary progradational parasequences sourced from axial and lateral depositional systems, with a regional late-Pleistocene transgressive surface dated at circa. 10 ka BP within the Maliakos Gulf. Differential subsidence of the late Pleistocene transgressive surface indicates marked variation in subsidence from 2.4 m ka[sup -1] at fault segment centers to 0.8 m ka[sup -1] at segment boundaries. The geometry and internal variability of each parasequence is controlled by the interplay of the local accommodation development and fluctuations in sediment supply and climatic conditions. The Sperchios Rift provides a modem analogue for subtle stratigraphic plays within ancient extensional basins. The study of controls on sediment source and transport patterns within active rifts has refined our appreciation of the controls on potential reservoir distribution and geometries.

  10. Late Quaternary high resolution sequence stratigraphy of an active rift, the Sperchios Basin, Greece: An analogue for subtle stratigraphic plays

    SciTech Connect

    Eliet, P.P.; Gawthorpe, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    The Sperchios Basin is an active asymmetric graben, bounded to the south by a major border fault system with major fault segments typically 20-30 km long. The basin is dominated by a major axial fluvio-deltaic system which enters the partially enclosed Maliakos Gulf to the east. Lateral sourced depositional systems within the basin comprise hanging-wall and footwall-derived alluvial fans and a narrow coastal plain along the footwall scarp bordering the Maliakos Gulf. High resolution seismic data from the Maliakos Gulf reveals three late Quaternary progradational parasequences sourced from axial and lateral depositional systems, with a regional late-Pleistocene transgressive surface dated at circa. 10 ka BP within the Maliakos Gulf. Differential subsidence of the late Pleistocene transgressive surface indicates marked variation in subsidence from 2.4 m ka{sup -1} at fault segment centers to 0.8 m ka{sup -1} at segment boundaries. The geometry and internal variability of each parasequence is controlled by the interplay of the local accommodation development and fluctuations in sediment supply and climatic conditions. The Sperchios Rift provides a modem analogue for subtle stratigraphic plays within ancient extensional basins. The study of controls on sediment source and transport patterns within active rifts has refined our appreciation of the controls on potential reservoir distribution and geometries.

  11. Erosion and deposition on the Pajarito Plateau, New Mexico, and implications for geomorphic responses to late Quaternary climatic changes

    SciTech Connect

    Reneau, S.L.; McDonald, E.V.; Gardner, J.N.; Longmire, P.A.; Kolbe, T.R.; Carney, J.S.; Watt, P.M.

    1996-04-01

    The Pajarito Plateau of northern New Mexico contains a rich and diverse record of late Quaternary landscape changes in a variety of geomorphic settings that include gently-sloping mesa tops, steep canyon walls, and canyon bottoms. A broad range of investigations during the past decade, motivated by environmental and seismic hazard concerns, have resulted in examination of the characteristics, stratigraphy, and age of sediments and soils at numerous locations throughout the Plateau. Geochronologic control is provided by >140 radiocarbon dates supplemented by soil characterization and tephrochronology. In this paper we first summarize some of the results of recent and ongoing work on late Quaternary deposits on the Pajarito Plateau, illustrating both the complexity of the geomorphic record and some common elements that have been observed in multiple locations. We then use these observations, in combination with other work in the Southwest, to make some inferences about the local geomorphic response to regional climatic changes. Because the geomorphic and paleoclimatic records are fragmentary, and because the relations between large scale climate changes and local variations in precipitation, vegetation, and geomorphic processes are not fully understood, many uncertainties exist concerning the response of the local landscape to past climatic fluctuations. In addition, variations in local landscape sensitivity related to prior erosional history and spatial variations in vegetation, and the localized nature of many storms, probably contribute to the complexity of the geomorphic record. Nevertheless, the work discussed in this paper suggests a strong relation between regional climatic changes and local geomorphic history, and provides a framework for considering relations between modem processes, the record of past landscape changes, and future erosion and deposition on the Plateau and in surrounding areas.

  12. Influence of late Quaternary climatic changes on geomorphic and pedogenic processes on a desert piedmont, Eastern Mojave Desert, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, S.G.; McFadden, L.D.; Dohrenwend, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating of late Quaternary deposits and shorelines of Lake Mojave and cation-ratio numerical age dating of stone pavements (Dorn, 1984) on the adjacent Soda Mountains piedmont provide age constraints for alluvial and eolian deposits. These deposits are associated with climatically controlled stands of Lake Mojave during the past 15,000 yr. Six alluvial fan units and three eolian stratigraphic units were assigned ages based on field relations with dated shorelines and piedmont surfaces, as well as on soil-geomorphic data. All but one of these stratigraphic units were deposited in response to time-transgressive climatic changes beginning approximately 10,000 yr ago. Increased eolian flux rates occurred in response to the lowering of Lake Mojave and a consequent increase in fine-sediment availability. Increased rates of deposition of eolian fines and associated salts influenced pedogenesis, stone-pavement development, and runoff-infiltration relations by (1) enhancing mechanical weathering of fan surfaces and hillslopes and (2) forming clay- and silt-rich surface horizons which decrease infiltration. Changes in alluvial-fan source areas from hillslopes to piedmonts during the Holocene reflect runoff reduction on hillslopes caused by colluvial mantle development and runoff enhancement on piedmonts caused by the development of less-permeable soils. Inferred increased in early to middle Holocene monsoonal activity resulted in high-magnitude paleo-sheetflood events on older fan pavements; this runoff triggered piedmont dissection which, in turn, caused increased sediment availability along channel walls. Thus, runoff-infiltration changes during the late Quaternary have occurred in response to eolian deposition of fines, pedogenesis, increased sheetflood activity in the Holocene, and vegetational changes which are related to many complicated linkages among climatic change, lake fluctuations, and eolian, hillslope, and alluvial-fan processes. ?? 1987.

  13. Clay minerals as proxies of the late Quaternary East Asian monsoon evolution in the South China Sea revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Li, X.; He, Z.; Colin, C.; Zhao, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Clay minerals have a significant role in sedimentation and paleoenvironment studies of the South China Sea. Many previous studies showed that the time series variation in late Quaternary clay mineral assemblages presents mostly glacial-interglacial cyclicity, and they were interpreted chemical weathering closely related to contemporaneous climatic changes of source areas. It is quite debatable whether clay minerals can directly indicate the East Asian monsoon evolution. To answer this question, we investigated sediment cores collected in various locations in the South China Sea during the MARCO POLO cruise in 2005, MD05-2904 (2066 m water depth, abbreviated w.d.) and MD05-2905 (1198 m w.d.) in the north, MD05-2901 (1254 m w.d.) and MD05-2899 (2393 m w.d.) in the west, and MD05-2895 (1982 m w.d.) in the south. Our results show that provenance supply and current transport directly control the clay mineralogical compositions in core and surface sediments, with various expression forms in different locations. In the north, the clay mineral assemblage indicates a relationship between surface current transport (for smectite) under the significant influence of the Kuroshio intrusion and deep water transport (for illite and chlorite). In the west, the East Asian monsoons forced surface currents and different clay-composition provenances affect the glacial-interglacial cyclicity of clay mineral variations. In the south, land-sea distribution variations controlled by the sea level change determine the sources of clay minerals. Our new studies suggest that the late Quaternary clay minerals in the South China Sea do not bear contemporaneous paleoclimatic features, and their implication for proxies of the East Asian monsoon evolution is realized through both the provenance supply and current transport processes.

  14. Lidar-Based Mapping of Late Quaternary Faulting Along the Grizzly Valley Fault, Walker Lane Seismic Belt, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchcock, C. S.; Hoirup, D. F.; Barry, G.; Pearce, J.; Glick, F.

    2012-12-01

    The Grizzly Valley fault (GVF) is located within the northern Walker Lane, a zone of right-lateral shear between the Sierra Nevada and the Basin and Range in Plumas County. The GVF extends southeasterly from near Mt. Ingalls along the eastern side of Lake Davis. It may partially connect with the Hot Creek fault within Sierra Valley and extend south to Loyalton with an overall approximate length of 50 km. Comparison of high-resolution topography developed from LiDAR data with published bedrock geologic mapping documents the presence of geomorphic features that provide information on fault activity of the GVF. Field mapping verified tectonically deformed and offset late Quaternary surfaces identified on bare-earth LiDAR imagery across the GVF within glacial deposits on the eastern margin of Lake Davis, and alluvial deposits in Sierra Valley. Along the GVF, conspicuous geomorphic and hydrologic features include scarps in alluvial surfaces, elongated depressions aligned with adjacent linear escarpments, truncated bedrock spurs, closed depressions, linear swales, right-lateral deflections of creeks and river courses, and shutter ridges, as well as springs and linear seeps consistent with right-lateral strike-slip faulting. The discontinuous nature of observed fault traces combined with the apparent down-to-the-west offset of alluvial surfaces at the southern and northern ends of the eastern margin of Lake Davis are consistent with a broad bend or step over in the fault. Scarp profiles of apparently faulted surfaces extracted from LiDAR data document vertical offsets of up to 14 m. Our study suggest that the GVF is an oblique, right-lateral fault that has been active in the late Quaternary. This study complements on-going investigations by DWR to assess the impact of seismic hazards on State Water Project infrastructure.

  15. Persistent Atlantic cold-water spells into the Mediterranean caused abrupt aridities in the late Quaternary Levant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, M.; Bartov, Y.; Enzel, Y.; Goldstein, S. L.; Torfstein, A.; Waldmann, N.

    2007-12-01

    The late Quaternary Levant paleohydrology and paleoclimate were recorded in the sedimentary and level history of lakes that occupied the tectonic depressions along the Dead Sea rift. The region was characterized by cold - wet climate conditions during glacials and warm-dry conditions during interglacials. This pattern was punctuated by abrupt arid events (< 200 y) that are correlated with intrusions of cold Atlantic-water into the east Mediterranean. Important examples are the abrupt falls of Lake Lisan during the Heinrich events, the catastrophic falls of Lake Lisan at the 14 and 11th millennium BP that were linked to "melt water pulses" MWP1-A and B. The Allerod fall marked the severest catastrophic aridity that prevailed in the late Quaternary Levant where the intruding cold waters enhanced the post-glacial warming - aridification trend. Subsequently, during the YD, the North Atlantic-cooling imposed a strong deviation from the post-Glacial warming-aridification trend of the Levant leading to enhanced-rain precipitation (return to the "glacial mode"). Bartov et al. (2003) proposed that the intruding cold water stopped the cyclonic uptake of vapor from the Mediterranean to the atmosphere, shutting the Levant rains. It seems that the YD cooling was associated with atmospheric changes, probably stronger effects of the Polar fronts and Westerlies that brought more rains to the Levant. Similar effects of cold seawater intrusions on the regional climate can be detected throughout the Holocene causing possibly the significant aridities of ca. 8.1, 3.5 and possibly the Medieval warming. The rapidity of the response of the regional hydrological systems to the global climate changes and the sensitivity of past human cultures to these changes (e.g. the collapse of the Natufian culture during the Allerod aridity) are certainly important lessons and alarming signals for our human society.

  16. Formation of plateau landscapes on glaciated continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egholm, David L.; Jansen, John D.; Brædstrup, Christian F.; Pedersen, Vivi K.; Andersen, Jane L.; Ugelvig, Sofie V.; Larsen, Nicolaj K.; Knudsen, Mads F.

    2017-08-01

    Low-relief plateaus separated by deeply incised fjords are hallmarks of glaciated, passive continental margins. Spectacular examples fringe the once ice-covered North Atlantic coasts of Greenland, Norway and Canada, but low-relief plateau landscapes also underlie present-day ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland. Dissected plateaus have long been viewed as the outcome of selective linear erosion by ice sheets that focus incision in glacial troughs, leaving the intervening landscapes essentially unaffected. According to this hypothesis, the plateaus are remnants of preglacial low-relief topography. However, here we use computational experiments to show that, like fjords, plateaus are emergent properties of long-term ice-sheet erosion. Ice sheets can either increase or decrease subglacial relief depending on the wavelength of the underlying topography, and plateau topography arises dynamically from evolving feedbacks between topography, ice dynamics and erosion over million-year timescales. This new mechanistic explanation for plateau formation opens the possibility of plateaus contributing significantly to accelerated sediment flux at the onset of the late Cenozoic glaciations, before becoming stable later in the Quaternary.

  17. Late Quaternary coseismic uplift events on the Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea, deduced from coral terrace data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Yoko; Chappell, John

    1996-03-01

    Up to six regressive terraces occur on the Holocene raised reef tract and up to 15 occur on late Pleistocene raised reef tracts along 40 km of coastline at Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea. We suggest that the regressive terraces represent repeated episodic uplift caused by great earthquakes. Ages of Holocene coseismic uplift events are established by radiocarbon dating; the late Pleistocene events are bracketed by U series ages of the raised reef tracts on which they occur. The mean recurrence interval of great earthquakes that caused the uplift events is 970 to 1165 years in the Holocene and probably the same in the late Pleistocene; the interval ranged from about 200 to 1900 years. The uplift rate increases parallel to the coast from northwest to southeast, and the amplitude of coseismic uplifts generally increases similarly, although some events produced uplift with little shore-parallel tilting. The mean amplitude of coseismic uplifts throughout the study area is ˜3 m in for both Holocene and late Pleistocene sequences. Large, late Quaternary landslides are numerous, and some probably were triggered by the great earthquakes that caused coseismic uplift. There appears to be no continuum between historical large earthquakes at Huon Peninsula of magnitudes >7 that produced no or only minor uplift, and the great earthquakes represented by meter-scale coseismic uplifts and very large landslides. Two tectonic subregions are recognized, which were uplifted together by some Holocene events but not by others. There is no surface trace of Holocene faulting between the subregions, and a buried fault is thought to separate them.

  18. The changing role of mammal life histories in Late Quaternary extinction vulnerability on continents and islands.

    PubMed

    Lyons, S Kathleen; Miller, Joshua H; Fraser, Danielle; Smith, Felisa A; Boyer, Alison; Lindsey, Emily; Mychajliw, Alexis M

    2016-06-01

    Understanding extinction drivers in a human-dominated world is necessary to preserve biodiversity. We provide an overview of Quaternary extinctions and compare mammalian extinction events on continents and islands after human arrival in system-specific prehistoric and historic contexts. We highlight the role of body size and life-history traits in these extinctions. We find a significant size-bias except for extinctions on small islands in historic times. Using phylogenetic regression and classification trees, we find that while life-history traits are poor predictors of historic extinctions, those associated with difficulty in responding quickly to perturbations, such as small litter size, are good predictors of prehistoric extinctions. Our results are consistent with the idea that prehistoric and historic extinctions form a single continuing event with the same likely primary driver, humans, but the diversity of impacts and affected faunas is much greater in historic extinctions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. Paleoenvironmental Reconstruction of Late Quaternary Insect Fossils, Halashazi Site, Altai Region, China.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianshu; Elias, Scott; Angus, Robert

    2017-04-01

    The Altai region northwest China, is located in the middle of arid central Asia and is therefore sensitive to climate change. However, there is a debate on the heat-moisture pattern (warm-dry pattern or cold-dry pattern) during the early Holocene in the Altai region, and a debate on the dominant atmospheric circulation (westerlies or monsoon) control for central Asian climate changes during the Holocene, and the mechanisms that cause the arid early Holocene in central Asia. Thus, the principal aim of the project is use the MCR method to produce quantified temperature and precipitation estimates, and a high-precision palaeoclimatic record for the Altai region, based on fossil beetle assemblages, to reveal the heat-moisture pattern and its mechanisms. This project will begin to fill in the blank of Quaternary beetle research in China. Using Quaternary beetles to reconstruct palaeoenvironments is a new research method for this region, and has never before been done in China, which will provide new evidence for the palaeoenvironmental study in this area. Furthermore, this project will contribute to the beetle faunal research in Eurasia. The sample site for this project - Halashazi Wetland (048°06'54"N, 088°21'48"E), is located at the crossroad of the Altai Mountains and the Dzungarian Basin, where two ecosystems meet. Thus the fossil beetle assemblages should show dramatic change in response to changes of climate. The sampled deposits are made up entirely of sedge peat. Two different profiles were sampled, with depths of 160 cm and 200 cm, respectively. Both profiles were sampled at 5 cm intervals, with approximately 2 kg of material in each unit. The results of the radiocarbon dating will be available in December 2016. Based on other previous studies, the bottom of the peat sediment is 11,500 cal yr BP, so project focuses on the Holocene period approximately from 10,000 cal yr BP. More than 80 species of Coleoptera from 55 genera, 22 families have been recognised so

  20. Magnitude of late Quaternary left-lateral displacements along the north edge of Tibet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltzer, Gilles; Tapponnier, Paul; Armijo, Rolando

    1989-01-01

    Images taken by the earth observation satellite SPOT of the Quaternary morphology at 18 sites on the 2000-kilometer-long Altyn Tagh fault at the north edge of Tibet demonstrate that it is outstandingly active. Long-term, left-lateral strike-slip offsets of stream channels, alluvial terrace edges, and glacial moraines along the fault cluster between 100 and 400 meters. The high elevation of the sites, mostly above 4000 meters in the periglacial zone, suggests that most offsets resulted from slip on the fault since the beginning of the Holocene. These data imply that slip rates are 2 to 3 centimeters per year along much of the fault length and support the hypothesis that the continuing penetration of India into Asia forces Tibet rapidly toward the east.

  1. Magnitude of late quaternary left-lateral displacements along the north edge of tibet.

    PubMed

    Peltzer, G; Tapponnier, P; Armijo, R

    1989-12-08

    Images taken by the earth observation satellite SPOT of the Quaternary morphology at 18 sites on the 2000-kilometer-long Altyn Tagh fault at the north edge of Tibet demonstrate that it is outstandingly active. Long-term, left-lateral strike-slip offsets of stream channels, alluvial terrace edges, and glacial moraines along the fault cluster between 100 and 400 meters. The high elevation of the sites, mostly above 4000 meters in the periglacial zone, suggests that most offsets resulted from slip on the fault since the beginning of the Holocene. These data imply that slip rates are 2 to 3 centimeters per year along much of the fault length and support the hypothesis that the continuing penetration of India into Asia forces Tibet rapidly toward the east.

  2. Environmental Magnetic Signature Of Late Quaternary Climate and Paleoceanography in the Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzman, E. S.; Lund, S.; Kirby, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    High latitude drilling during IODP expedition 323 in the Bering Sea provides a unique opportunity to study in detail the evolution of Quaternary paleoceanography, climate and glacial history of the Bering Sea gateway to the Arctic Ocean. Our study focuses on a 400 ky interval of Quaternary marine sediments cored along the Bering Slope. Samples for magnetic analysis were obtained from sites U1339, U1343, U1344, U1345, at depths of 1008-3484 m. Sediments in these cores are a mixture of siliclastic material, derived primarily from terrigeneous sources, and biogenic material. Detailed measurements of the variation in bulk magnetic properties including natural remanent magnetization (NRM), susceptibility, ARM, and IRM, have been used to monitor changes in concentration, composition and grainsize of the magnetic components. In addition, sediment grain size analysis was preformed on biogenic free aliquots at selected intervals. Our results indicate that the dramatic bimodal magnetic intensity signal that alternates between a strong and weak NRM and magnetic susceptibility is associated with relatively course and fine grain sizes repectively. This is the opposite to the pattern estimated by our initial IODP Ex. 323 reports. Current models propose that, as has been observed in the North Atlantic, high intensities are likely to be related to high contributions of terrigenous and glaciomarine sediments deposited during glacial periods and low intensities are likely to occur during interglacials when continental sediments become trapped on the on the shelf. Contrary to this hypothesis, however, we find compelling evidence for a substantial increase in terrigenous input during the interglacial periods and what appears to be a predominantly pelagic signal during the glacial periods. Comparison of our data with other proxy data including oxygen isotopes, NGR, GRA allows us to investigate the possible causal links between these changes and the environmental history of the North

  3. Late-Quaternary recharge determined from chloride in shallow groundwater in the central Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macfarlane, P.A.; Clark, J.F.; Davisson, M.L.; Hudson, G.B.; Whittemore, D.O.

    2000-01-01

    An extensive suite of isotopic and geochemical tracers in groundwater has been used to provide hydrologic assessments of the hierarchy of flow systems in aquifers underlying the central Great Plains (southeastern Colorado and western Kansas) of the United States and to determine the late Pleistocene and Holocene paleotemperature and paleorecharge record. Hydrogeologic and geochemical tracer data permit classification of the samples into late Holocene, late Pleistocene-early Holocene, and much older Pleistocene groups. Paleorecharge rates calculated from the Cl concentration in the samples show that recharge rates were at least twice the late Holocene rate during late Pleistocene-early Holocene time, which is consistent with their relative depletion in 16O and D. Noble gas (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) temperature calculations confirm that these older samples represent a recharge environment approximately 5??C cooler than late Holocene values. These results are consistent with the global climate models that show a trend toward a warmer, more arid climate during the Holocene. (C) 2000 University of Washington.

  4. Thresholds for Cenozoic bipolar glaciation.

    PubMed

    Deconto, Robert M; Pollard, David; Wilson, Paul A; Pälike, Heiko; Lear, Caroline H; Pagani, Mark

    2008-10-02

    The long-standing view of Earth's Cenozoic glacial history calls for the first continental-scale glaciation of Antarctica in the earliest Oligocene epoch ( approximately 33.6 million years ago), followed by the onset of northern-hemispheric glacial cycles in the late Pliocene epoch, about 31 million years later. The pivotal early Oligocene event is characterized by a rapid shift of 1.5 parts per thousand in deep-sea benthic oxygen-isotope values (Oi-1) within a few hundred thousand years, reflecting a combination of terrestrial ice growth and deep-sea cooling. The apparent absence of contemporaneous cooling in deep-sea Mg/Ca records, however, has been argued to reflect the growth of more ice than can be accommodated on Antarctica; this, combined with new evidence of continental cooling and ice-rafted debris in the Northern Hemisphere during this period, raises the possibility that Oi-1 represents a precursory bipolar glaciation. Here we test this hypothesis using an isotope-capable global climate/ice-sheet model that accommodates both the long-term decline of Cenozoic atmospheric CO(2) levels and the effects of orbital forcing. We show that the CO(2) threshold below which glaciation occurs in the Northern Hemisphere ( approximately 280 p.p.m.v.) is much lower than that for Antarctica ( approximately 750 p.p.m.v.). Therefore, the growth of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere immediately following Antarctic glaciation would have required rapid CO(2) drawdown within the Oi-1 timeframe, to levels lower than those estimated by geochemical proxies and carbon-cycle models. Instead of bipolar glaciation, we find that Oi-1 is best explained by Antarctic glaciation alone, combined with deep-sea cooling of up to 4 degrees C and Antarctic ice that is less isotopically depleted (-30 to -35 per thousand) than previously suggested. Proxy CO(2) estimates remain above our model's northern-hemispheric glaciation threshold of approximately 280 p.p.m.v. until approximately 25 Myr

  5. Processes of late Quaternary turbidity current flow and deposition on the Var deep sea fan, northwest Mediterranean sea

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, D. ); Savoye, B. )

    1993-09-01

    Late Quaternary sedimentation patterns on the Var deep-sea fan are known from high-resolution seismic boomer profiles (vertical resolution < 1 m), piston cores, SAR side-scan sonargraphs, and submersible dives. Foram biostratigraphy and radiocarbon dating provide chronologic control that is seismically correlated across the fan. Regional erosional events correspond to the isotopic state 2 and 6 glacial maxima. A widespread surface sand layer was deposited from the 1979 turbidity current, which broke two submarine cables. Numerical modeling constrains its character. A small slide on the upper prodelta developed into an accelerating turbidity current, which eroded sand from the Var canyon. The current was 30 m thick in the upper valley, expanding downflow to >120 m, where it spilled over the eastern Var sedimentary ridge at a velocity of 2.5 ms[sup [minus]1]. Other Holocene turbidity currents (with a 103-yr recurrence interval) were muddier and thicker, but also deposited sand on middle fan-valley levees and are inferred to have had a similar slide-related origin. Late Pleistocene turbidity currents deposited on the high Var sedimentary ridge. The presence of sediment waves and the cross-flow slope inferred from levee asymmetry indicate that some flow were hundreds of meters thick, with velocities of 0.35 ms[sup [minus]1]. Estimated times for deposition of thick levee mud beds are many days or weeks. Late Pleistocene flows therefore are interpreted to result from hyperpycnal flow of glacial outwash in the Var River. Variation in late Pleistocene-Holocene turbidite sedimentation thus is controlled more by changes in sediment supply than by sea level.

  6. Changes in Late Cretaceous-Quaternary Caribbean plate motion directions inferred from paleostress measurements from striated fault planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batbayar, K.; Mann, P.; Hippolyte, J.

    2013-12-01

    We compiled paleostress analyses from previous research works collected at 591 localities of striated fault planes in rocks ranging in age from Late Cretaceous to Quaternary in the circum-Caribbean and Mexico. The purpose of the study is to quantify a progressive clockwise rotation of the Caribbean plate during its Late Cretaceous to recent subduction of the Proto-Caribbean seaway. Paleostress analysis is based on the assumption that slickenside lineations indicate both the direction and sense of maximum resolved shear stress on that fault plane. We have plotted directions of maximum horizontal stress onto plate tectonic reconstructions of the circum-Caribbean plate boundaries and infer that these directions are proxies for paleo-plate motion directions of the Caribbean plate. Plotting these stress directions onto reconstructions provided a better visualization of the relation of stress directions to blocks at their time of Late Cretaceous to recent deformation. Older, more deformed rocks of Late Cretaceous to Eocene ages yield a greater scatter in derived paleostress directions as these rocks have steeper dips, more pervasive faulting, and were likely affected by large rotations as known from previous paleomagnetic studies of Caribbean plate margins. Despite more scatter in measurements from older rock units, four major events that affected the Caribbean plate and the Great Arc of the Caribbean (GAC) are recognizable from changing orientations of stress directions: 1) Late Cretaceous collision of the GAC with southern Mexico and Colombia is consistent with NE directions of maximum compression in rocks of this age range in southern Mexico and EW directions in Colombia as the GAC approached the Proto-Caribbean seaway; 2) Paleocene-Eocene collision of the GAC with the Bahamas platform in Cuba and Hispaniola and with the South American plate in Venezuela is consistent with CW rotations of stress directions in rocks of these ages in the northern Caribbean and CCW

  7. Buried soils of Late Quaternary moraines of the Wind River Mountains, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Dahms, D.E. . Geography Dept.)

    1992-01-01

    Buried soils occur on kettle floors of four Pinedale moraine catenas of the western Wind River Mountains of Wyoming. Radiocarbon ages from bulk samples of Ab horizons indicate the soils were buried during the mid-Holocene. Soils on kettle floors have silty A and Bw horizons that overlie buried A and B horizons that also formed in silt-rich sediments. Crests and backslope soils also have A and Bw horizons of sandy loam formed over 2BCb and 2Cb horizons of stony coarse loamy sand. Recent data show the silty textures of the A and B horizons are due to eolian silt and clay from the Green River Basin just west of the mountains. The buried soils appear to represent alternate periods of erosion and deposition on the moraines during the Holocene. The original soils developed on higher slopes of the moraines were eroded during the mid-Holocene and the 2BC and 2C horizons exposed at the surface. Eroded soil sediments were transported downslope onto the kettle floors. Following erosion, silt-rich eolian sediments accumulated on all surfaces and mixed with the BC and C horizons (the mixed loess of Shroba and Birkeland). The present surface soils developed within this silt-rich material. Stone lines often occur at the Bw-2BCb/2Cb boundary, and mark the depth to which the earlier soils were eroded. Thus, soil profiles at the four localities result from two periods of soil formation, interrupted by an interval of erosion during the mid-Holocene. Moraines of this study are adjacent to the Fremont Lake type area for the Pinedale glaciation of the Rocky Mountains. Buried soils in kettles of the moraines indicates the soil characteristics of the Pinedale type region are not necessarily due to continuous post-Pinedale development, but may result from more than one episode of soil formation.

  8. Regional variations in provenance and abundance of ice-rafted clasts in Arctic Ocean sediments: Implications for the configuration of late Quaternary oceanic and atmospheric circulation in the Arctic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, R.L.; Grantz, A.

    2001-01-01

    The composition and distribution of ice-rafted glacial erratics in late Quaternary sediments define the major current systems of the Arctic Ocean and identify two distinct continental sources for the erratics. In the southern Amerasia basin up to 70% of the erratics are dolostones and limestones (the Amerasia suite) that originated in the carbonate-rich Paleozoic terranes of the Canadian Arctic Islands. These clasts reached the Arctic Ocean in glaciers and were ice-rafted to the core sites in the clockwise Beaufort Gyre. The concentration of erratics decreases northward by 98% along the trend of the gyre from southeastern Canada basin to Makarov basin. The concentration of erratics then triples across the Makarov basin flank of Lomonosov Ridge and siltstone, sandstone and siliceous clasts become dominant in cores from the ridge and the Eurasia basin (the Eurasia suite). The bedrock source for the siltstone and sandstone clasts is uncertain, but bedrock distribution and the distribution of glaciation in northern Eurasia suggest the Taymyr Peninsula-Kara Sea regions. The pattern of clast distribution in the Arctic Ocean sediments and the sharp northward decrease in concentration of clasts of Canadian Arctic Island provenance in the Amerasia basin support the conclusion that the modem circulation pattern of the Arctic Ocean, with the Beaufort Gyre dominant in the Amerasia basin and the Transpolar drift dominant in the Eurasia basin, has controlled both sea-ice and glacial iceberg drift in the Arctic Ocean during interglacial intervals since at least the late Pleistocene. The abruptness of the change in both clast composition and concentration on the Makarov basin flank of Lomonosov Ridge also suggests that the boundary between the Beaufort Gyre and the Transpolar Drift has been relatively stable during interglacials since that time. Because the Beaufort Gyre is wind-driven our data, in conjunction with the westerly directed orientation of sand dunes that formed during

  9. Late Quaternary Sea-Ice Variability at the North Icelandic Shelf (Sub-Arctic): Reconstruction from Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, X.; Zhao, M.; Jiang, H.; Eiriksson, J.; Guo, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice, prevailing in the polar region and characterized by distinct seasonal and interannual variability, plays a pivotal role in Earth's climate system (Thomas and Dieckmann, 2010). In order to understand processes controlling the recent dramatic reduction in Arctic sea-ice cover, it is essential to determine temporal changes in sea-ice occurrence and its natural variability in the past. The North Icelandic shelf, bordering a marginal area of the Arctic Ocean, is located at the present-day boundary between the cold polar currents and warm Atlantic water masses, very sensitive to the changes in sea-ice cover, ice sheet and oceanic circulation patterns (Knudsen and Eiriksson, 2002). All these processes have been recorded in the marine shelf-sediment cores. We determined the concentrations of sea-ice diatom-derived biomarker "IP25" (monoene highly-branched isoprenoid with 25 carbon atom; Belt et al., 2007), phytoplankton-derived biomarkers (brassicasterol and dinosterol) and terrigenous biomarkers (campesterol and ß-sitosterol) in a sediment core from the North Icelandic shelf to reconstruct the Late Quaternary sea-ice conditions and related surface-water processes. The sea-ice cover reached its maximum during the cold period (i.e., Last Glacial Maximum and Younger dryas), while an open ocean environment existed during less severe periods (e.g. Bølling-Allerød and 8.2 ka event) in the study area. The biomarker records from this sediment core give insights into the variability in sea ice and circulation patterns as well as primary productivity in the Arctic marginal area during the Late Quaternary. References Belt, S.T., Massé, G., Rowland, S.J., Poulin, M., Michel, C., LeBlanc, B., 2007. A novel chemical fossil of palaeo sea ice: IP25. Org. Geochem. 38, 16-27. Knudsen, K.L. and Eiriksson, J., 2002. Application of tephrochronology to the timing and correlation of palaeoceanographic events recorded in Holocene and Late Glacial shelf sediments off North Iceland

  10. Late Quaternary herpetofauna of the Central Great Lakes region, U.S.A.: Zoogeographical and paleoecological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, J. Alan

    Late Quaternary herpetological records from the Central Great Lakes States of Michigan, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio allow for reflections on reinvasion of herpetological species into previously uninhabitable areas, as well as some comments on paleoclimate. Advances of the Wisconsinan Laurentide ice sheet obliterated herpetological habitat in all of Michigan as well as much of Illinois, Indiana and Ohio; it also restricted herpetological habitat in the southern parts of the three latter states. By about 15-14 ka BP a rich herpetofauna, similar to the one that occurs in the area today, and suggesting a moderate climate, occurred in southwestern Indiana. Turtle faunas in central Indiana (13-12 ka BP) and west-central Ohio (11-10 ka BP) suggest that warm summer climates existed in those areas at the time. On the other hand authentic reptile records are unknown from the Pleistocene of Michigan, and considering the pollen record, that state probably had a much colder climate during postglacial Late Wisconsinan times. A well-developed turtle fauna associated with temperate deciduous forest occurred in southern Michigan about 6 ka BP, and a rich herpetofauna, similar to the one that occurs in the area today, occurred in southwestern Indiana about 4 ka BP. This evidence suggests the possibility that the herpetological reinvasion of the Central Great Lakes region might have been nearly complete by Mid-Holocene times.

  11. Paleohydrology of Late Quaternary floods in the Atacama Desert and their paleoclimate implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo, Tatiana; Abad, Manuel; Larrondo, Lidisy

    2017-04-01

    The Quaternary fluvial succession in the Copiapó Valley (northern Chile) have not been deeply studied even though they record a large amount of palaeoenvironmental and paleoclimate information in an area of great interest as the Atacama Desert. The city of Copiapó is located at the confluence between Quebrada Paipote (the most important tributary of the middle course) and Copiapó River which has been dry during the last decades due to the surface and groundwater exploitation for agricultural and mining activity purposes upstream. Despite that, historical chronicles describe numerous flooding events in the city during the last 400 years due to snowmelt during the summer months or unusually intense rains during any time of the year. The most recent event occurred on March 25, 2015 when 70% of the city flooded and more than 2.2 million m3 of sediment accumulated, mostly coming from Quebrada Paipote. The sedimentological analysis of the lower fluvial terrace of the Copiapó River has allowed us to identify a fluvial system that abruptly changes upward to paleoflood and aeolian deposits. The latter constitute the top of the lower fluvial terraces on which the city of Copiapó is built. The fluvial facies are mainly formed by imbricated to massive conglomerates and poorly sorted pebble and cobble sized conglomerates with laminated sandstones that probably were deposited in a braided gravel-bed river. The overlying deposits are constituted by several levels of massive sandy siltstones and well sorted fine sands of aeolian origin that are interpreted as overbank flood events linked to flooding episodes that alternate with long episodes of eolian dunes and sand sheets development that buried almost the entire alluvial plain. This sharp change in the facies association record an abrupt climate change in the southern Atacama Desert during the recent Quaternary towards more arid conditions, with a dominance of floods and aeolian morphogenesis over the typical fluvial system

  12. Lidar and paleoseismic trenching reveal first documentation of late Quaternary onshore faulting in the forearc of southwestern British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morell, K. D.; Regalla, C.; Amos, C. B.; Bennett, S. E. K.; Leonard, L. J.; Graham, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    Two new paleoseismic trenches excavated across the Leech River fault, a 60-km-long fault in the forearc of the northern Cascadia subduction zone on Vancouver Island, confirm at least three surface-rupturing earthquakes have occurred in southwest British Columbia since the latest Quaternary. Analyses of high-resolution lidar-derived topography were used to identify the trench sites, where a 2-4 m-high, E-W-striking fault scarp offsets a latest Pleistocene colluvial surface. The western trench, excavated across one of several faulted debris flow channels incised into this surface, exposed schist of the Jurassic Leech River Complex in fault contact with latest Pleistocene loess and colluvium. The eastern trench, excavated across an adjacent interfluve, exposed latest Pleistocene till faulted against scarp-derived colluvium that post-dates the Last Glacial Maximum (< 15 ka). Colluvial wedge stratigraphy provide evidence for ≥ 3 large earthquakes since the latest Pleistocene, each with 1 m of vertical displacement. Restoration of surface displacement across the scarp suggests 6 m of dip-slip has occurred since development of the colluvial surface while only 4 m of displacement has occurred since channel incision, which further supports the occurrence of repeated surface-rupturing events within the past 15 ka. Our field mapping, aided by lidar-derived topography, indicates that this scarp is part of a steeply-dipping, 500 m-wide fault zone that is continuous for more than 30-50 km and likely accommodates regional transpression together with other active faults in western Washington (e.g., Devils Mountain fault). This study reinforces the need for lidar when conducting paleoseismic studies in this steep and densely vegetated terrain. These observations provide the first evidence of late Quaternary onshore faulting in the forearc of southwestern Canada and suggest the region is host to active structures that should be considered in seismic hazard assessments.

  13. Astronomically calibrated 40Ar/39Ar age for the Toba supereruption and global synchronization of late Quaternary records

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Michael; Roberts, Richard G.; Saidin, Mokhtar

    2012-01-01

    The Toba supereruption in Sumatra, ∼74 thousand years (ka) ago, was the largest terrestrial volcanic event of the Quaternary. Ash and sulfate aerosols were deposited in both hemispheres, forming a time-marker horizon that can be used to synchronize late Quaternary records globally. A precise numerical age for this event has proved elusive, with dating uncertainties larger than the millennial-scale climate cycles that characterized this period. We report an astronomically calibrated 40Ar/39Ar age of 73.88 ± 0.32 ka (1σ, full external errors) for sanidine crystals extracted from Toba deposits in the Lenggong Valley, Malaysia, 350 km from the eruption source and 6 km from an archaeological site with stone artifacts buried by ash. If these artifacts were made by Homo sapiens, as has been suggested, then our age indicates that modern humans had reached Southeast Asia by ∼74 ka ago. Our 40Ar/39Ar age is an order-of-magnitude more precise than previous estimates, resolving the timing of the eruption to the middle of the cold interval between Dansgaard–Oeschger events 20 and 19, when a peak in sulfate concentration occurred as registered by Greenland ice cores. This peak is followed by a ∼10 °C drop in the Greenland surface temperature over ∼150 y, revealing the possible climatic impact of the eruption. Our 40Ar/39Ar age also provides a high-precision calibration point for other ice, marine, and terrestrial archives containing Toba sulfates and ash, facilitating their global synchronization at unprecedented resolution for a critical period in Earth and human history beyond the range of 14C dating. PMID:23112159

  14. Astronomically calibrated 40Ar/39Ar age for the Toba supereruption and global synchronization of late Quaternary records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, Michael; Roberts, Richard G.; Saidin, Mokhtar

    2012-11-01

    The Toba supereruption in Sumatra, ∼74 thousand years (ka) ago, was the largest terrestrial volcanic event of the Quaternary. Ash and sulfate aerosols were deposited in both hemispheres, forming a time-marker horizon that can be used to synchronize late Quaternary records globally. A precise numerical age for this event has proved elusive, with dating uncertainties larger than the millennial-scale climate cycles that characterized this period. We report an astronomically calibrated 40Ar/39Ar age of 73.88 ± 0.32 ka (1σ, full external errors) for sanidine crystals extracted from Toba deposits in the Lenggong Valley, Malaysia, 350 km from the eruption source and 6 km from an archaeological site with stone artifacts buried by ash. If these artifacts were made by Homo sapiens, as has been suggested, then our age indicates that modern humans had reached Southeast Asia by ∼74 ka ago. Our 40Ar/39Ar age is an order-of-magnitude more precise than previous estimates, resolving the timing of the eruption to the middle of the cold interval between Dansgaard-Oeschger events 20 and 19, when a peak in sulfate concentration occurred as registered by Greenland ice cores. This peak is followed by a ∼10 °C drop in the Greenland surface temperature over ∼150 y, revealing the possible climatic impact of the eruption. Our 40Ar/39Ar age also provides a high-precision calibration point for other ice, marine, and terrestrial archives containing Toba sulfates and ash, facilitating their global synchronization at unprecedented resolution for a critical period in Earth and human history beyond the range of 14C dating.

  15. Rapid mantle-driven uplift along the Angolan margin in the late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, R. T.; Telfer, M.; Kahle, R. L.; Dee, M. W.; Kahle, B.; Schwenninger, J.-L.; Sloan, R. A.; Watts, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    Mantle flow can cause the Earth's surface to uplift and subside, but the rates and durations of these motions are, in general, poorly resolved due to the difficulties in making measurements of relatively small vertical movements (hundreds of metres) over sufficiently large distances (about 1,000 km). Here we examine the effect of mantle upwelling through a study of Quaternary uplift along the coast of Angola. Using both optically stimulated luminescence on sediment grains, and radiocarbon dating of fossil shells, we date a 25 m coastal terrace at about 45 thousand years old, when sea level was about 75 m lower than today, indicating a rapid uplift rate of 1.8-2.6 mm yr-1 that is an order of magnitude higher than previously obtained rates averaged over longer time periods. Automated extraction and correlation of coastal terrace remnants from digital topography uncovers a symmetrical uplift with diameter of more than 1,000 km. The wavelength and relatively short timescale of the uplift suggest that it is associated with a mantle process, possibly convective upwelling, and that the topography may be modulated by rapid short-lived pulses of mantle-derived uplift. Our study shows that stable continental regions far from the effects of glacial rebound may experience rapid vertical displacements of several millimetres per year.

  16. Microfaunal analysis of late Quaternary deposits of the northern Bering Sea.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDougall, K.

    1982-01-01

    Holocene microfaunal associations and distribution patterns define three inner-shelf (1-20m) biofacies in Norton Sound, northern Bering Sea. The Holocene facies relations are the basis for interpreting early Holocene and late Pleistocene environmental conditions in the NE Bering Sea area. Norton Sound cores provide evidence of two marine transgressions and a varying river input.-from Author

  17. Ochotona(Lagomorpha) from Late Quaternary Cave Deposits in Eastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Jim I.; Grady, Frederick

    1996-01-01

    Pikas ( Ochtona)—small gnawing mammals, related to rabbits—range today throughout parts of the Northern Hemisphere, but had a wider distribution during the Pleistocene. Nine caves from northeastern North America (a region not occupied by pikas today) have Pleistocene deposits containing remains of Ochotona.We examine 526 fossil specimens (ranging in age from approximately 850,000 to 8670 yr B.P.) from five of these caves. Two morphological forms of Ochotonalived in northeastern North America during the late Pleistocene—a large species (probably O. whartoni) and a small species (probably O. princeps). Ochotonaof glacial age are not necessarily indicative of talus slopes and mesic communities. O. princeps-like of the Irvingtonian of West Virginia were living with an amphibian-reptilian assemblage found in the area today, implying winters not much, if at all, colder than at present. Late glacial and postglacial change in climate south of the ice sheets in effect would have isolated Ochotonain eastern North America, where they were unable to retreat to the west or north. Whereas western pika had the option of moving up in elevation, into boreal islands, eastern forms became restricted to ever-diminishing habitats, culminating in extinction and extirpation. Radiocarbon ages imply that Ochotonalived in eastern North America during the late Pleistocene (late Rancholabrean) and into the earliest Holocene. We describe the youngest remains of Ochotonain eastern North America and the youngest for the extinct large form, O. whartoni.

  18. The Late Quaternary peat, vegetation and climate history of the Southern Oceanic Islands of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlone, M. S.

    2002-02-01

    Seven oceanic island groups (Chatham, Bounty, Snares, Antipodes, Auckland, Campbell and Macquarie) lie to the south and east of the southern New Zealand mainland between the Subtropical Convergence and the Antarctic Convergence. They are highly oceanic, experiencing moist, cool, cloudy and windy climates. Deep peat soils cover most of the islands, except for steep slopes and exposed high altitude sites. The three large island groups (Chatham, Auckland and Campbell) support forest and tall scrub in the lowlands, in the latter two grading with altitude through shrubland and grassland to upland tundra. Macrophyllous forbs create luxuriant herbfields in nutrient-rich coastal sites and also, as stunted forms, dominate upland tundra associations. The southernmost island, Macquarie has no woody species, and is covered with tussock grassland, herbfield and tundra. Vegetation cover is highly sensitive to soil saturation and exposure to the strong westerly winds of this region. Extensive oligotrophic bogs occur where drainage is poor and exposure high, and forest and tall scrub are abundant only in sheltered, well-drained lowland sites. Glacial cirque levels indicate mean annual temperatures fell by 5-6°C during the Last Glacial Maximum. A depression of 6-10°C in sea surface temperatures is suggested by deep-sea core analyses, but this seems incompatible with terrestrial evidence. Auckland and Campbell Islands were extensively glaciated, and grassland, herbfield and tundra landscapes prevailed. Glaciers retreated by 15,000 yr BP, and landscapes had stabilised and peat soils begun forming by 12,000 yr BP. By the beginning of the Holocene, oligotrophic bog, grassland and shrubland were dominant. Scrub and low forest spread slowly during the early Holocene in the Chatham, Auckland and Campbell Islands, inhibited by cloudy, moist climates, low insolation and wet soils. Maximum extent of forest and scrub occurred between 6000 and 2000 yr BP, most probably linked with a drying

  19. Developing the Late Quaternary Record of Pluvial Lake Clover, Northern Great Basin, U.S.A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laabs, B. J.; Munroe, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    occupied lower shorelines. Although preliminary, this finding is consistent with previous interpretations of the regional pattern of latest Pleistocene mountain glaciation in the region and the hypothesized regional air-flow patterns that accompanied highstands of Great Basin lakes. Chronological data for Lake Clover are forthcoming and will significantly aid in further interpreting the geomorphic record of the lake in a regional context.

  20. Late Quaternary Vegetation and Climate Changes in Central Texas Based on the Isotopic Composition of Organic Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordt, Lee C.; Boutton, Thomas W.; Hallmark, Charles T.; Waters, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis of organic carbon in alluvial deposits and soils of three streams in central Texas reveals significant shifts in the ratio of C 3 to C 4 plant biomass production during the past 15,000 yr. These temporal changes in vegetation appear to be in response to changes in climate. During the late Pleistocene, C 4 plants comprised only about 45 to 50% of the vegetative biomass in this area, suggesting that conditions were cooler and wetter than at any time during the past 15,000 yr. The time between 11,000 and 8000 yr B.P. is interpreted as transitional between late Pleistocene conditions and warmer and drier Holocene conditions based on a slight increase in the abundance of C 4 plant biomass. During the middle Holocene, between approximately 6000 and 5000 yr B.P., mixed C 3/C 4 plant communities were replaced almost completely by C 4-dominated communities, indicating prairie expansion and warmer and drier climatic conditions. By 4000 yr B.P., the abundance of C 4 plant biomass decreased to levels similar to the early Holocene transitional period, suggesting a return to cooler and wetter climatic conditions. No significant shift in the ratio of C 3 to C 4 productivity has occurred during the last 4000 yr, except for a slight increase in the abundance of C 4 plant biomass around 2000 yr B.P. The results of this investigation correlate well with other regional late Quaternary climatic interpretations for central and north Texas, the Southern Plains region, and with other portions of the Great Plains.

  1. Assessing Biological and Stratigraphic Determinants of Fossil Abundance: A Case Example from the Late Quaternary of Po Plain, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, Michal; Azzarone, Michele; Kusnerik, Kristopher; Dexter, Troy; Wittmer, Jacalyn; Scarponi, Daniele

    2017-04-01

    Absolute fossil abundance [AFA] can be defined as a relative concentration of identifiable fossils per unit of sediment. AFA, or "sediment shelliness", is controlled by the interplay between the rate of input of skeletal remains (biological productivity), pace of shell destruction (taphonomy), rate of sedimentation, and sediment compaction. Understanding the relative importance of those drivers can augment both stratigraphic and biological interpretations of the fossil record. Using 336 samples from a network of late Quaternary cores drilled in Po Plain (Italy), we examined the importance of those factors in controlling the stratigraphic distribution of fossils. All samples were vertically and volumetrically equivalent, each representing a 10 cm long interval of a core with a diameter of 7 cm ( 0.375 dm3 sediment per sample). Sample-level estimates of AFA (1) varied over 4 orders of magnitudes (from <4 to 44200 specimens per dm3 of sediment); (2) appeared invariant to core depth (rho=-0.04, p=0.72); (3) were statistically indistinguishable (chi-square=1.53, p=0.46) across systems tracts; and (4) did not vary substantially across facies (chi-square=6.04, p=0.20) representing a wide range of depositional and taphonomic settings. These outcomes indicate that compaction (which should increase downcore), sedimentation rates (which vary predictably across systems tracts), and pace of shell destruction (expected to differ across depositional settings) are unlikely to have played important role in controlling fossils density in the sampled cores. In contrast, samples with very high shell density (AFA > 4000 specimens per dm3) were characterized by exceedingly low evenness reflecting dominance by one super-abundant species (Berger-Parker index > 0.8 in all cases). These super-abundant species were limited to small r-selective mollusks capable of an explosive population growth: the marine corbulid bivalve Lentidium mediterraneum and the brackish hyrdobiid gastropod Ecrobia

  2. Mt. Chambers Creek alluvial fan - a recorder for Late Quaternary flow regime changes along the eastern Flinders Ranges (South Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Jan-Hendrik; Larsen, Joshua; Cohen, Timothy; Nanson, Gerald

    2010-05-01

    Climate is a primary control on Late Quaternary alluvial fan evolution and past hydrological changes should be sensitively recorded in alluvial fan stratigraphy. The Flinders Ranges (S Australia) are situated between tropical and extra-tropical (e.g. westerlies) elements of the atmospheric circulation. Numerous alluvial fans constitute the transition between the Flinders Ranges and the large salt lake system of Lake Frome to the east. Along the arid eastern margin of the Flinders Ranges, geomorphology and stratigraphy were investigated at Mt. Chambers Creek alluvial fan (31°S). The fan is connected to a ~380 km2 catchment via the Mt. Chambers gorge, which has incised into the uplifted range front. Upstream of the gorge, manifold exposures along valley fills provide evidence for a generally fining-upward sequence of fluvial gravels and (eolian?) silts, which are topped by thick layers of tufa that have subsequently incised. Downstream of the apex, the alluvial fan surface is characterized by relatively low slopes (~0.5° - 1.5°) and a complex pattern of desert pavements, overlain by several inactive feeder channels and/or floodouts. The modern channel drains into an active floodout approximately 13 km downstream of the fan apex, showing that significant quantities of coarse-grained sediment load do not currently reach the baselevel at Lake Frome. Mt. Chambers Creek has incised several meters into the fan body, exposing extensive outcrops of alluvial fan sediments and paleosols. Generally, the fan stratigraphy can be divided into six different units, each of them bounded by laterally continuous and mostly carbonaceous paleosol horizons. The lowermost four units are dominated by matrix- and clast supported gravels, indicating high-energy events such as hyperconcentrated and debris flows. Along the distal fan, the thickness of these units and grain size generally decreases, locally exposing a sequence of well-developed and buried desert pavements. In combination

  3. Coral reef complexes at an atypical windward platform margin: Late Quaternary, southeast Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lidz, B.H.

    2004-01-01

    Major coral reef complexes rim many modern and ancient carbonate platforms. Their role in margin evolution is not fully understood, particularly when they border a margin atypical of the classic model. Classic windward margins are steeply inclined. The windward margin of southeast Florida is distinct with a very low-gradient slope and a shelf edge ringed with 30-m-high Quaternary outlier reefs on a shallow upper-slope terrace. A newly developed synthesis of temporally well-constrained geologic events is used with surface and subsurface seismic-reflection contours to construct morphogenetic models of four discontinuous reef-complex sequences. The models show uneven subsurface topography, upward and landward buildups, and a previously unreported, rapid, Holocene progradation. The terms backstepped reef-complex margin, backfilled prograded margin, and coalesced reef-complex margin are proposed for sections exhibiting suitable signatures in the stratigraphic record. The models have significant implications for interpretation of ancient analogues. The Florida record chronicles four kinds of geologic events. (1) Thirteen transgressions high enough for marine deposition occurred between ca. 325 ka and the present. Six gave rise to stratigraphically successive coral reef complexes between ca. 185 and ca. 77.8 ka. The seventh reef ecosystem is Holocene. (2) Two primary coral reef architectures built the outer shelf and margin, producing respective ridge-and-swale and reef-and-trough geometries of very different scales. (3) Massive outlier reefs developed on an upper-slope terrace between ca. 106.5 and ca. 80 ka and are inferred to contain corals that would date to highstands at ca. 140 and 125 ka. (4) Sea level remained below elevation of the shelf between ca. 77.8 and ca. 9.6 ka. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  4. Late quaternary paleoseismology of the southern Steens fault zone, northern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Personius, S.F.; Crone, A.J.; Machette, M.N.; Mahan, S.A.; Kyung, J.B.; Cisneros, H.; Lidke, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    The 192-km-long Steens fault zone is the most prominent normal fault system in the northern Basin and Range province of western North America. We use trench mapping and radiometric dating to estimate displacements and timing of the last three surface-rupturing earthquakes (E1-E3) on the southern part of the fault south of Denio, Nevada. Coseismic displacements range from 1.1 to 2.2 ?? 0.5 m, and radiometric ages indicate earthquake times of 11.5 ?? 2.0 ka (E3), 6.1 ?? 0.5 ka (E2), and 4.6 ?? 1.0 ka (E1). These data yield recurrence intervals of 5.4 ?? 2.1 k.y. between E3 and E2, 1.5 ?? 1.1 k.y. between E2 and E1, and an elapsed time of 4.6 ?? 1.0 k.y. since E1. The recurrence data yield variable interval slip rates (between 0.2 ?? 0.22 and 1.5 ?? 2.3 mm/yr), but slip rates averaged over the past ???18 k.y. (0.24 ?? 0.06 mm/year) are similar to long-term (8.5-12.5 Ma) slip rates (0.2 ?? 0.1 mm /yr) measured a few kilometers to the north. We infer from the lack of significant topographic relief across the fault in Bog Hot Valley that the fault zone is propagating southward and may now be connected with a fault at the northwestern end of the Pine Forest Range. Displacements documented in the trench and a rupture length of 37 km indicate a history of three latest Quaternary earthquakes with magnitudes of M 6.6-7.1 on the southern part of the Steens fault zone.

  5. From incision to infill: What a Late Quaternary valley system records?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, V.; Asioli, A.; Trincardi, F.; Ceregato, A.; Rizzetto, F.; Taviani, M.

    2014-12-01

    Erosional sequence boundaries and incised valleys buried in modern continental shelves represent the response of alluvial and coastal systems to Quaternary sea level oscillations. The study of the processes leading to valley incision reveals, at both regional and global scales, the influence of tectonics and eustatism on the evolution of fluvial landforms in coastal plains, while the sedimentary infill of the valley may represents one of the best archives to investigate past environmental changes. Although the time registered in the stratigraphic record represents only a small portion of the geological history, informations about the processes governing the evolution of past landscapes can be quantified by looking to erosional surfaces, where much of the time is condensed. The Manfredonia Incised Valley (southern Adriatic Sea), is a very interesting case of valley as it formed during a single episode of incision related to the last glacial sea level fall and was completely filled during the post-glacial sea level rise. The inverse-funnel shape of the incision, and its confinement toward the mid-inner shelf reveal the impact of the step-wise sea level fall on preexisting coastal morphologies, in particular during the MIS5-4 and MIS3-2 transitions. The 45 m thick sedimentary succession filling the valley recorded the post-glacial sea level rise, as revealed by the upward transition from fluvial to shallow-marine deposits, and the impact of base level and high-frequency climate change on river to coastal systems. The upper 15 m of infill, in particular, consist of multiple bayhead delta progradations occurred synchronously to the formation of sapropel S1, and represent the very-shallow water equivalent of the cm-thick sapropel layers accumulated offshore in the deeper southern Adriatic basin.

  6. Late Quaternary fluctuations of biogenic component fluxes on the continental slope of the Ross Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccaroni, L.; Frank, M.; Frignani, M.; Langone, L.; Ravaioli, M.; Mangini, A.

    1998-11-01

    A sediment core, collected from the western part of the continental slope of the Ross Sea at 2380 m water depth, records events of the last two climatic cycles (250 kyr). A 230Th ex-based chronology was obtained and boundaries of the isotope stages were set assuming that biological productivity was enhanced during periods of less ice cover. Then, 230Th ex0, organic carbon, biogenic silica and biogenic Ba distributions were compared to the glacial-interglacial stage boundaries and corresponding ages of the δ 18O record of Martinson et al. [Martinson, D.G., Pisias, N.G., Hays, J.D., Imbrie, J., Moore, T.C., Jr., Shackleton, N.J, 1987. Age dating and the orbital theory of the ice ages: development of a high-resolution 0 to 300,000-year chronostratigraphy. Quaternary Research, 27: 1-29]. Sediment accumulation rates ranged between 1.2 cm kyr -1 in the isotope stage 6 and 3.8 cm kyr -1 during the Holocene. Variations in the concentrations and fluxes of organic carbon, biogenic Ba, biogenic silica and Mn gave information on palaeoclimate changes. Processes of sediment redistribution in the Ross Sea margin were enlightened from a comparison of the measured and expected fluxes of 230Th ex. Calculation of the focusing-corrected accumulation rates of biogenic Ba enabled us to evaluate the export palaeoproductivity. Corrected accumulation rates of biogenic components and calculated palaeoproductivities were low, compared to the Antarctic Polar Front in the Atlantic sector, throughout the last two climatic cycles. Glacial-interglacial changes of sea ice cover and ventilation of the Ross Sea were probably major causes of variations in biogenic particle flux and distribution of redox-sensitive elements within the sediment column.

  7. Fossil insect evidence for late Quaternary climatic change in the Big Bend region, Chihuahuan Desert, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Scott A.; Van Devender, Thomas R.

    1990-09-01

    A series of 50 packrat midden assemblages from the Big Bend region of the Chihuahuan Desert, ranging in age from >36,000 yr B.P. to recent, yielded abundant, diverse arthropod faunas. The mesic nature of regional Wisconsin age climates is substantiated by the fauna from 30,000-12,000 yr B.P., especially during the middle Wisconsin (30,000-20,000 yr B.P.). Late Wisconsin faunas contained grassland species which are confined today to cooler, moister regions. Following 12,000 yr B.P., most of these temperate species were replaced either by desert species or by more cosmopolitan taxa, marking the climatic shift from late Wisconsin to postglacial time. Insects indicative of more severe aridity are first recorded at about 6000 yr B.P., but some temperate species persisted until about 2500 yr B.P. After this, only desert dwellers are recorded.

  8. Late Pliocene and Quaternary Eurasian locust infestations in the Canary Archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meco, J.; Muhs, D.R.; Fontugne, M.; Ramos, A.J.; Lomoschitz, A.; Patterson, D.

    2011-01-01

    The Canary Archipelago has long been a sensitive location to record climate changes of the past. Interbedded with its basalt lavas are marine deposits from the principal Pleistocene interglacials, as well as aeolian sands with intercalated palaeosols. The palaeosols contain African dust and innumerable relict egg pods of a temperate-region locust (cf. Dociostaurus maroccanusThunberg 1815). New ecological and stratigraphical information reveals the geological history of locust plagues (or infestations) and their palaeoclimatic significance. Here, we show that the first arrival of the plagues to the Canary Islands from Africa took place near the end of the Pliocene, ca. 3Ma, and reappeared with immense strength during the middle Late Pleistocene preceding MIS (marine isotope stage) 11 (ca. 420ka), MIS 5.5 (ca. 125ka) and probably during other warm interglacials of the late Middle Pleistocene and the Late Pleistocene. During the Early Holocene, locust plagues may have coincided with a brief cool period in the current interglacial. Climatically, locust plagues on the Canaries are a link in the chain of full-glacial arid-cold climate (calcareous dunes), early interglacial arid-sub-humid climate (African dust inputs and locust plagues), peak interglacial warm-humid climate (marine deposits with Senegalese fauna), transitional arid-temperate climate (pedogenic calcretes), and again full-glacial arid-cold climate (calcareous dunes) oscillations. During the principal interglacials of the Pleistocene, the Canary Islands recorded the migrations of warm Senegalese marine faunas to the north, crossing latitudes in the Euro-African Atlantic. However, this northward marine faunal migration was preceded in the terrestrial realm by interglacial infestations of locusts. ??? Locust plagues, Canary Islands, Late Pliocene, Pleistocene, Holocene, palaeoclimatology. ?? 2010 The Authors, Lethaia ?? 2010 The Lethaia Foundation.

  9. Debates in the late Quaternary of central southern Africa: climate change, environmental variability or just plain poor data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. S.; Burrough, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Quaternary palaeoclimatic/environmental analyses in dryland regions are well-known for the limited range of proxy data sets available, resulting in debates about achieving robust reconstructions (e.g. Butzer 1984, Thomas 1986, Maslin and Christiansen 2007). In some regions, e.g. central southern Africa, this has resulted in reliance on geoproxies: the analysis and dating of depositional landforms and associated sediments. Despite significant advances in geoproxy interpretation and chronometric control, their efficacy remains contentious, not least because of apparent temporal contradictions in reconstructions of past drier and past more humid conditions. Consequently their use has been eschewed in favour of spatially extensive extrapolations from higher-resolution, but geographically-distant, data sets (e.g. Chase and Meadows 2008); an approach not without its own limitations (e.g. Gasse et al. 2008, Thomas and Burrough 2012, Thomas et al. 2012), given the variability in modern terrestrial conditions in dryland regions today. It is therefore highly appropriate to revisit the debates of Butzer (1984) and Thomas (1986) regarding data quality and data extrapolation, but to add in the very relevant characteristic of temporal and spatial environmental variability. Environmental and climatic variability at a range of temporal and spatial scales are significant traits of drylands in southern Africa and worldwide, impacting on ecosystem and geomorphic processes, and human behaviour. It can be hypothesised that while environmental variability has been an important trait of Late Quaternary environments and climate in southern Africa. It has rarely been considered as a viable environmental 'state' when proxy records are analysed and integrated, particularly in the case of spatially extensive geoproxies and in contexts where palaeoenvironment and palaeoclimate are used interchangeably. We present examples where debates over the nature of past changes and quality of datasets

  10. Late Quaternary landscape development at the margin of the Pomeranian phase (MIS 2) near Lake Wygonin (Northern Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Florian; Schneider, Anna; Nicolay, Alexander; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Kordowski, Jarosław; Noryskiewicz, Agnieszka M.; Tyszkowski, Sebastian; Raab, Alexandra; Raab, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In Central Europe, Late Quaternary landscapes experienced multiple phases of geomorphologic activity. In this study,we used a combined geomorphological, pedological, sedimentological and palynological approach to characterize landscape development after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) near Lake Wygonin in Northern Poland. The pedostratigraphical findings from soil pits and drillings were extrapolated using ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and electric resistivity tomography (ERT). During the Pomeranian phase, glacial and fluvioglacial processes dominated the landscape near Lake Wygonin. At the end of the glacial period, periglacial processes became relevant and caused the formation of ventifacts and coversands containing coated sand grains. At approximately 15,290-14,800 cal yr BP, a small pond formed in a kettle hole (profile BWI2). The lacustrine sediments lack eolian sand components and therefore indicate the decline of eolian processes during that time. The increase of Juniperus and rock-rose (Helianthemum) in the pollen diagram is a prominent marker of the Younger Dryas. At the end of the Younger Dryas, a partial reshaping of the landscape is indicated by abundant charcoal fragments in disturbed lake sediments. No geomorphologic activity since the beginning of the Holocene is documented in the terrestrial and wetland archives. The anthropogenic impact is reflected in the pollen diagram by the occurrence of rye pollen grains (Cerealia type, Secale cereale) and translocated soil sediments dated to 1560-1410 cal yr BP, proving agricultural use of the immediate vicinity. With the onset of land use, gully incision and the accumulation of colluvial fans reshaped the landscape locally. Since 540-460 cal yr BP, further gully incision in the steep forest tracks has been associated with the intensification of forestry. Outside of the gully catchments, the weakly podzolized Rubic Brunic Arenosols show no features of Holocene soil erosion. Reprinted from CATENA, Volume 124

  11. Calibrating Late Quaternary terrestrial climate signals: radiometrically dated pollen evidence from the southern Sierra Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Litwin, Ronald J.; Smoot, Joseph P.; Durika, Nancy J.; Smith, George I.

    1999-01-01

    We constructed a radiometrically calibrated proxy record of Late Pleistocene and Holocene climate change exceeding 230,000 yr duration, using pollen profiles from two cores taken through age-equivalent dry lakes - one core having greater age control (via 230Th alpha mass-spectrometry) and the other having greater stratigraphic completeness. The better dated of these two serial pollen records (Searles Lake) served as a reference section for improving the effective radiometric age control in a nearby and more complete pollen record (Owens Lake) because they: (1) are situated ~90 km apart in the same drainage system (on, and immediately leeward of, the eastern flank of the Sierra Nevada), and (2) preserved strikingly similar pollen profiles and concordant sequences of sedimentological changes. Pollen assemblages from both lakes are well preserved and diverse, and document serial changes in Late Pleistocene and Holocene plant zone distribution and composition in the westernmost Great Basin; they consist of taxa now inhabiting montane forest, woodland, steppe, and desert-scrub environments. The studied core intervals are interpreted here to be the terrestrial equivalent of marine δ18O stages 1 through 9; these pollen profiles now appear to be among the best radiometrically dated Late Pleistocene records of terrestrial climate change known.

  12. Late Quaternary stream piracy and strath terrace formation along the Belle Fourche and lower Cheyenne Rivers, South Dakota and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamm, John F.; Hendricks, Robert R.; Sawyer, J. Foster; Mahan, Shannon; Zaprowski, Brent J.; Geibel, Nicholas M.; Azzolini, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Stream piracy substantially affected the geomorphic evolution of the Missouri River watershed and drainages within, including the Little Missouri, Cheyenne, Belle Fourche, Bad, and White Rivers. The ancestral Cheyenne River eroded headward in an annular pattern around the eastern and southern Black Hills and pirated the headwaters of the ancestral Bad and White Rivers after ~ 660 ka. The headwaters of the ancestral Little Missouri River were pirated by the ancestral Belle Fourche River, a tributary to the Cheyenne River that currently drains much of the northern Black Hills. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating techniques were used to estimate the timing of this piracy event at ~ 22–21 ka. The geomorphic evolution of the Cheyenne and Belle Fourche Rivers is also expressed by regionally recognized strath terraces that include (from oldest to youngest) the Sturgis, Bear Butte, and Farmingdale terraces. Radiocarbon and OSL dates from fluvial deposits on these terraces indicate incision to the level of the Bear Butte terrace by ~ 63 ka, incision to the level of the Farmingdale terrace at ~ 40 ka, and incision to the level of the modern channel after ~ 12–9 ka. Similar dates of terrace incision have been reported for the Laramie and Wind River Ranges. Hypothesized causes of incision are the onset of colder climate during the middle Wisconsinan and the transition to the full-glacial climate of the late-Wisconsinan/Pinedale glaciation. Incision during the Holocene of the lower Cheyenne River is as much as ~ 80 m and is 3 to 4 times the magnitude of incision at ~ 63 ka and ~ 40 ka. The magnitude of incision during the Holocene might be due to a combined effect of three geomorphic processes acting in concert: glacial isostatic rebound in lower reaches (~ 40 m), a change from glacial to interglacial climate, and adjustments to increased watershed area resulting from piracy of the ancestral headwaters of the Little Missouri River.

  13. Late Quaternary stream piracy and strath terrace formation along the Belle Fourche and lower Cheyenne Rivers, South Dakota and Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamm, John F.; Hendricks, Robert R.; Sawyer, J. Foster; Mahan, Shannon A.; Zaprowski, Brent J.; Geibel, Nicholas M.; Azzolini, David C.

    2013-09-01

    Stream piracy substantially affected the geomorphic evolution of the Missouri River watershed and drainages within, including the Little Missouri, Cheyenne, Belle Fourche, Bad, and White Rivers. The ancestral Cheyenne River eroded headward in an annular pattern around the eastern and southern Black Hills and pirated the headwaters of the ancestral Bad and White Rivers after ~ 660 ka. The headwaters of the ancestral Little Missouri River were pirated by the ancestral Belle Fourche River, a tributary to the Cheyenne River that currently drains much of the northern Black Hills. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating techniques were used to estimate the timing of this piracy event at ~ 22-21 ka. The geomorphic evolution of the Cheyenne and Belle Fourche Rivers is also expressed by regionally recognized strath terraces that include (from oldest to youngest) the Sturgis, Bear Butte, and Farmingdale terraces. Radiocarbon and OSL dates from fluvial deposits on these terraces indicate incision to the level of the Bear Butte terrace by ~ 63 ka, incision to the level of the Farmingdale terrace at ~ 40 ka, and incision to the level of the modern channel after ~ 12-9 ka. Similar dates of terrace incision have been reported for the Laramie and Wind River Ranges. Hypothesized causes of incision are the onset of colder climate during the middle Wisconsinan and the transition to the full-glacial climate of the late-Wisconsinan/Pinedale glaciation. Incision during the Holocene of the lower Cheyenne River is as much as ~ 80 m and is 3 to 4 times the magnitude of incision at ~ 63 ka and ~ 40 ka. The magnitude of incision during the Holocene might be due to a combined effect of three geomorphic processes acting in concert: glacial isostatic rebound in lower reaches (~ 40 m), a change from glacial to interglacial climate, and adjustments to increased watershed area resulting from piracy of the ancestral headwaters of the Little Missouri River.

  14. Changes of the deep circulation and erosional inputs in the Labrador Sea over the late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippova, A.; Frank, M.; Kienast, M.; Hillarie-Marcel, C.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of Labrador Sea Water has been one of the main contributors to the Atlantic thermohaline circulation influences the strength of NADW formation. In addition, the Labrador Sea has received weathering inputs of highly variable strength and sources. A high resolution downcore record recovered from south of Greenland (core MD99-2227) together with surface sediment samples from western part of Labrador Sea provides detailed information on deep sea and surface water circulation and through the Latest Quaternary. Radiogenic Nd, Pb and Hf isotopes are used as proxies for changes in water mass mixing and weathering inputs. Nd isotope data produced by leaching early sedimentary ferromanganese coatings reflect seawater compositions and show a pronounced trend towards less radiogenic values from the LGM to 12 kyr and then became less radiogenic again through the Holocene, which was most likely either linked to enhanced erosional input in the course of the retreat of the Laurentide Ice sheet or indicates enhanced contributions of a highly unradiogenic water mass such as Labrador Sea Water or diminished contributions of radiogenic Denmark Strait Overflow water. A major change in isotopic composition at 12 kyr towards more radiogenic isotope compositions is also observed in the leached 208,207,206Pb/204Pb data. Most notably, there was a pronounced change in the Pb isotope compositions at 8 kyr as well, which is not reflected by Nd or Hf isotope data and which reflects a major change in source provenance of the weathering inputs, most likely linked to the 8.2 kyr event, during which glacially dammed lakes Agassiz and Ojibway rapidly drained into the North Atlantic. This interpretation will be compared to the evidence from the radiogenic isotope evolution of the detrital fraction and of the clays. In contrast, with time leached Hf isotope data appear to be too radiogenic for Labrador Seawater but also show a marked unradiogenic peak at 12 kyr pointing to a strong

  15. Late Quaternary Offset of Alluvial Fan Surfaces along the Central Sierra Madre Fault, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, A.; Burgette, R. J.; Scharer, K. M.; Midttun, N. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Sierra Madre fault (SMF) is an east-west trending reverse fault system along the southern flank of the San Gabriel Mountains near Los Angeles, California. The ~140 km long SMF is separated into four segments, we focus on the multi-stranded, ~60 km long Central Sierra Madre fault (CSMF; W118.3-W117.7) as it lacks a well-characterized long-term geologic slip rate. We combine 1-m lidar DEM with geologic and geomorphic mapping to correlate alluvial fan surfaces along strike and across the fault strands in order to derive fault slip rates that cross the CSMF. We have refined mapping on two sets of terraces described by Crook et al. (1987) and references therein: a flight of Q3 surfaces (after nomenclature of Crook et al., 1987; McFadden, 1982) in Arroyo Seco with distinct terraces ~30 m, ~40 m, ~50 m, and ~55 m above the modern stream and in Pickens Canyon divided a Q3 and Q2 surface, with heights that are ~35 m and ~25 m above the modern stream respectively. Relative degree of clast weathering and soil development is consistent with geomorphic relationships; for example, hues of 7.5 YR to 10 YR are typical of Q3, while hues of 10 YR to 2.5 Y are typical of Q2. A scarp in the Q3 surface at Arroyo Seco has a vertical offset of ~16 m and a scarp in the Q3 at Pickens Canyon has a vertical offset of ~14 m, while the Q2 surface is not faulted. Our Quaternary dating strategy is focused on dating suites of terraces offset along CSMF scarps in order to provide broader stratigraphic context for the cosmogenic radionuclide and luminescence dating. We will present (pending) cosmogenic radionuclide depth profiles from the Q3 surfaces. A better-constrained slip rate for the CSMF will improve earthquake hazard assessment for the Los Angeles area and help clarify the tectonic role of the SMF in the broader plate boundary system. Additionally, the fan chronology will provide information about the timing of alluvial fan aggradation and incision in the western Transverse Ranges.

  16. Late Quaternary environmental change along the temperate-tropical interface in southern Africa. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    As a relatively low-relief landscape stretching from the equator to the mid-latitudes, the African sector of the Southern Hemisphere provides an excellent opportunity to study long-term interactions between tropical, subtropical and temperate climate systems. This potential, however, has remained largely unrealised as funding has generally been focussed on the large lakes of Eastern Africa and the analysis of marine cores from the continental margin. The result is a spatially and temporally disjunct regional dataset, and the dominance of broad conceptual models to contextualise the limited available data and explain palaeoenvironmental dynamics. The dominant hypotheses to explain long-term climate change in southern Africa are: 1) changes in temperate systems result from expansions and contractions of Antarctic sea-ice that vary with trends in polar/global temperatures; 2) tropical change is primarily a function of shifts in the mean position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) as a result of orbitally-induced changes in direct insolation forcing, and/or as a response to Northern Hemisphere cooling. In both cases, some evidence exists to support these hypotheses, but the proxies and interpretations are not unambiguous, and in some cases the interpretations of the data have been primarily developed to conform to the dominant conceptual paradigm. This paper will discuss the interplay between temperate and tropical systems in southern Africa, and the implications for hemispheric and global climate dynamics. New data, particularly high-resolution records from fossilised rock hyrax middens (Chase et al., 2012, Quaternary Science Reviews; www.hyrax.univ-montp2.fr), is providing a robust framework into which lower resolution or more poorly understood proxies can better understood. Findings from a subcontinental-scale initiative funded by the European Research Council so far indicate that shifts of the Subtropical Front and the westerly storm tracks did bring