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Sample records for late quaternary marine

  1. Elevated Marine Deposits in Bermuda Record a Late Quaternary Megatsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtry, G. M.; Tappin, D. R.; Sedwick, P. N.; Wilkinson, I. P.; Fietzke, J.; Sellwood, B. W.

    2006-12-01

    Deposits of coral-bearing, marine shell conglomerate exposed at elevations higher than 20 m above present- day mean sea level (MSL) in Bermuda and the Bahamas have previously been interpreted as relict intertidal deposits formed during marine isotope stage (MIS) 11, ca. 360-420 ka before present. On the strength of this evidence, a sea level highstand more than 20 m higher than present-day MSL was inferred for the MIS 11 interglacial, despite a lack of clear supporting evidence in the oxygen-isotope records of deep-sea sediment cores. We have critically re-examined the elevated marine deposits in Bermuda, and find their geological setting, sedimentary relations, and microfaunal assemblages to be inconsistent with intertidal deposition over an extended period. Rather, these deposits, which comprise a graded and poorly sorted mixture of reef, lagoon and shoreline sediments, appear to have been carried tens of meters inside karst caves, presumably by large waves, at some time earlier than ca. 310-360 ka before present (MIS 9-11). Unlike earlier work, e.g. Hearty (1997) who found evidence for large waves impacting the Bahamas but could not distinguish between the competing mechanisms of a large storm or a tsunami, we have clear evidence that points to a tsunami as source, and by analysis of the deposit microfaunal diversity, an indication of the direction of the past waves, in this case from the east-southeast. We hypothesize that these deposits are the result of a large tsunami during the mid-Pleistocene, in which Bermuda was impacted by a wave set that carried sediments from the surrounding reef platform and nearshore waters over the eolianite atoll. Likely causes for such a megatsunami are the flank collapse of an Atlantic island volcano, such as the roughly synchronous Julan or Orotava submarine landslides in the Canary Islands, or a giant submarine landslide on the Atlantic continental margin.

  2. Palynological evidence for late Quaternary climate and marine primary productivity changes along the California margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospelova, Vera; Price, Andrea M.; Pedersen, Thomas F.

    2015-07-01

    A high-resolution sedimentary record of dinoflagellate cysts from Ocean Drilling Program Hole 1017E (off Point Conception, California margin) reflects how marine primary productivity has changed in response to major shifts in climate and ocean circulation along the California margin over the past 42 kyr. Throughout the studied sequence, dinoflagellate cyst assemblages are dominated by upwelling-related taxa, signifying the continued presence of coastal upwelling on the margin during the late Quaternary. The cyst record suggests that marine primary productivity was enhanced during the Holocene and Bølling, and to a lesser extent, during the late glacial and most Dansgaard-Oeschger events, while an apparent reduction in primary productivity can be seen during the Younger Dryas. The best analogue technique, based on a modern dinoflagellate cyst assemblage database from the northeast Pacific, was used for quantitative reconstruction of past sea surface conditions. It points to dynamic changes in annual marine primary productivity (~235-331 g C m-2 yr-1) and sea surface temperature (~10.1-12.6°C in winter; ~13.1-14.3°C in summer), while sea surface salinity appears to be confined to a narrower range (~32.9-33.4 in summer). Our results also indicate noticeable climate variability during the Holocene in this region.

  3. The late Quaternary environmental evolution of the Northwest Passage: a marine perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pienkowski, A. J.; England, J.; Furze, M. F. A.; MacLean, B.; Vilks, G.; Blasco, S.

    2012-04-01

    Although the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) is characterised by an extensive network of marine channels ("the Northwest Passage"), the wealth of our knowledge of late Quaternary environments has been primarily derived from coastal sediments now isostatically uplifted above modern sea-level. Here we present direct marine data from three long (piston and trigger weight) sediment cores from the central Northwest Passage (Lancaster Sound/Barrow Strait: core 86027-154; southeastern Barrow Strait: 86027-144; western Barrow Strait: 9722-004), investigated in a multiproxy approach for sedimentological characteristics, microfossils (dinocysts, non-pollen palynomorphs, benthic and planktonic foraminifera, ostracods), and stable isotope ratios. All cores extend to the end of the last regional glaciation, bottoming out on diamicton. Our data suggest grounded glacial ice in Barrow Strait, followed by rapid deglaciation, with a progression from ice-proximal to ice-distal conditions interrupted by an interval of pervasive landfast sea-ice. Although the timing of deglaciation is difficult to determine due to the absence of dateable materials at the diamicton/glaciomarine transition and chronological complexities such as the Portlandia Effect, age-depth model extrapolations suggest deglaciation at ~10.8 cal ka BP. Noticeable biological activity commences in the early Holocene, a prominent signal of planktonic foraminifera (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma) appearing at ~10.5 cal ka BP. This marks the penetration of deep (Atlantic-derived) Arctic Intermediate Water (AIW) into the archipelago following deglaciation, likely facilitated by higher sea-level permitting increased flow across inter-channel sills. Postglacial amelioration (open-water season greater than present) is subsequently recorded at ~10.0-7.0 cal ka BP, potentially corresponding to a regional "Holocene Thermal Optimum". The exclusion of AIW due to glacio-isostatic shallowing, coupled with a generally cooling climate

  4. Physical data of soil profiles formed on late Quaternary marine terraces near Santa Cruz, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munster, Jennie; Harden, Jennifer W.

    2002-01-01

    The marine terraces in and around Santa Cruz, California, represent a set of well-preserved terraces formed as a product of geology, sea level, and climate. A marine terrace begins as a wave cut platform. Eustatic sea level changes, seacliff erosion, and tectonic uplift work together to generate marine terraces. "When a wave-cut platform is raised (due to tectonic activity) above sea level and cliffed by wave action it becomes a marine terrace" (Bradley, 1957, p. 424). During glacial periods, eustatic sea level is estimated to have dropped by 150 meters (Fairbanks, 1989). Cliff retreat measured from aerial photographs between 1930 and 1980 vary from 0.0 to 0.2 m yr–1 (Best and Griggs, 1991). Estimates of uplift rates along the Santa Cruz coastline vary from 0.10 to 0.48 m kyr–1 (Bradley and Griggs, 1976; Weber and others, 1999). Uplift mechanisms include coseismic uplift associated both with a reverse component of slip on the steeply SW dipping Loma Prieta fault in the restraining bend of the San Andreas Fault and a small component of reverse slip on the steeply SE dipping San Gregorio fault (Anderson and Menking 1994). Previous work studying physical properties on these terraces include Pinney and others (in press) and Aniku (1986) and Bowman and Estrada (1980). Sedimentary deposits of the marine terraces are a mixture of terrestrial and marine sediments but generally consist of a sheet of marine deposits overlying the old platform and a wedge of nonmarine deposits banked against the old sea cliff (Bradley, 1957). Bedrock underlying the terraces in the Santa Cruz area is generally either Santa Margarita Sandstone or Santa Cruz Mudstone. The Santa Margarita Sandstone represents an upper Miocene, transgressive, tidally dominated marine-shelf deposit with crossbedded sets of sand and gravel and horizontally stratified and bioturbated invertebrate-fossils beds (Phillips, 1990). The siliceous Santa Cruz Mudstone, of late Miocene age, conformably overlies the Santa

  5. Physical data of soil profiles formed on late Quaternary marine terraces near Santa Cruz, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munster, Jennie; Harden, Jennifer W.

    2002-01-01

    The marine terraces in and around Santa Cruz, California, represent a set of well-preserved terraces formed as a product of geology, sea level, and climate. A marine terrace begins as a wave cut platform. Eustatic sea level changes, seacliff erosion, and tectonic uplift work together to generate marine terraces. "When a wave-cut platform is raised (due to tectonic activity) above sea level and cliffed by wave action it becomes a marine terrace" (Bradley, 1957, p. 424). During glacial periods, eustatic sea level is estimated to have dropped by 150 meters (Fairbanks, 1989). Cliff retreat measured from aerial photographs between 1930 and 1980 vary from 0.0 to 0.2 m yr–1 (Best and Griggs, 1991). Estimates of uplift rates along the Santa Cruz coastline vary from 0.10 to 0.48 m kyr–1 (Bradley and Griggs, 1976; Weber and others, 1999). Uplift mechanisms include coseismic uplift associated both with a reverse component of slip on the steeply SW dipping Loma Prieta fault in the restraining bend of the San Andreas Fault and a small component of reverse slip on the steeply SE dipping San Gregorio fault (Anderson and Menking 1994). Previous work studying physical properties on these terraces include Pinney and others (in press) and Aniku (1986) and Bowman and Estrada (1980). Sedimentary deposits of the marine terraces are a mixture of terrestrial and marine sediments but generally consist of a sheet of marine deposits overlying the old platform and a wedge of nonmarine deposits banked against the old sea cliff (Bradley, 1957). Bedrock underlying the terraces in the Santa Cruz area is generally either Santa Margarita Sandstone or Santa Cruz Mudstone. The Santa Margarita Sandstone represents an upper Miocene, transgressive, tidally dominated marine-shelf deposit with crossbedded sets of sand and gravel and horizontally stratified and bioturbated invertebrate-fossils beds (Phillips, 1990). The siliceous Santa Cruz Mudstone, of late Miocene age, conformably overlies the Santa

  6. Reevaluation of the temperature/ice volume proportionality of the O-18 records of Late Quaternary marine carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Aharon, P.

    1985-01-01

    Documentation of O-18 variations imprinted on Late Quaternary marine carbonates leads to the inference that temporal and spatial redistribution of O-18/O-16 isotopes occurred episodically between the ocean and the expanded polar ice caps. If O-18 data of deep sea benthic foraminifera are simple recorders of ocean chemistry changes, then the ice volumes they reflect must agree with the paleosea levels from raised corals reefs. Discrepancies between the O-18 and sea level events were previously ascribed to inherent deficiencies in either one (or both) of the ice volume records. Here the author presents an objective test to evaluate the glacio-eustatic assumption of sea levels on the one hand, and the temperature constancy assumption of the tropical surface waters and of the deep ocean on the other. The analysis entails paired O-18/sea levels in the context of raised coral reefs in new Guinea and paired O-18/O-18 from coral reefs and benthic foraminifera representing interstadial culmination events during isotope stages 5 and 3. The results indicate that the ice volume effect accounts fully for the observed O-18 changes in tropical surface waters during isotope stage 5 but only for 40% during isotope stage 3. The O-18 records of the deep ocean overestimate the ice volumes by 0.5 per thousand during all stages except the interglacials.

  7. Late Quaternary Multiproxy Paleoclimate Record From a Marine Core Offshore SE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Toledo, M. B.; Barreto, C. F.; Ramos, R. P.; Freitas, A. S.; Crud, M. B.; Souza, R.; Souza, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    Even though accurate comparisons between marine and continental paleoclimate records play a major role in understanding the effects and also measuring the timing of global climate changes, this task poses many challenges due mainly to differences in chronology, sampling resolution, and intrinsic aspects of each proxy record. The simplest way to work around these problems is to conduct several different analyses on the same samples. In order to integrate both the continental and marine paleoenvironment and paleoclimate records, we used a multi-proxy approach on a 20-meter-long sediment core from offshore (1400m depth) SE Brazil. Analyses of pollen and spores, to assess vegetation changes, and microcharcoal, to assess frequency of paleofires (representing a continent signal), as well as planktonic forams, dinoflagellate cysts, diatoms, and marine palynomorphs (representing a marine signal), were carried out on the same samples. The integrated age model, based on biostratigraphic boundaries (planktonic forams), AMS radiocarbon dates, and stable isotopes in forams, provided ages between 600-135,000 years BP (top and bottom of the core), suggesting that we have a complete interglacial-glacial-interglacial cycle (MIS5e-MIS1). The effects of major climate states (i.e. glacial x interglacial) seem to have been recorded by the studied microfossil groups, which is evidenced by well marked changes in the assemblages throughout the record (e.g. increase in abundance of cold-adapted taxa during glacial time, and increased abundance of warm-adapted taxa during interglacial times). The pollen record, however, does not show such dramatic changes as the other microfossil groups do. These apparently small fluctuations in the pollen data could be due to a few reasons, such as, higher resiliency of regional vegetation, influence of relative sea-level variations, and the geographical amplitude of the pollen record (i.e. the effective vegetation area that is recorded by the pollen

  8. Nearshore morphology and late Quaternary geologic framework of the northern Monterey Bay Marine Sanctuary, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anima, R.J.; Eittreim, S.L.; Edwards, B.D.; Stevenson, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    A combination of side-scanning sonar and high-resolution seismic reflection data image seafloor bedrock exposures and erosional features across the nearshore shelf. Sediment-filled troughs incise the inner shelf rock exposures and tie directly to modern coastal streams. The resulting bedrock geometry can be related to its resistance to erosion. Comparison of the depth of the transgressive erosional surface to recently developed sea level curves suggests a period of slow sea level rise during the early stages of post-interglacial marine transgression. The slow rise of sea level suggests an erosional episode that limited the preservation of buried paleo-channels beyond 70 m water depth. Seafloor features suggest that localized faulting in the area may have influenced the morphology of bedrock exposures and the coastline. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The late Quaternary environmental evolution of marine Arctic Canada: Barrow Strait to Lancaster Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieńkowski, Anna J.; England, John H.; Furze, Mark F. A.; MacLean, Brian; Blasco, Steve

    2014-05-01

    A marine sediment core from the east-central Canadian Arctic Archipelago (Core 86027-154; 74° 22.01‧N 89° 51.26‧W; 329 m water depth), studied by a multiproxy approach [lithostratigraphy, biogeochemistry, micropalaeontology (dinoflagellate cysts, other non-pollen palynomorphs, benthic and planktonic foraminifera, ostracods)], and encompassing 14 AMS 14C dates, provides valuable insights into regional deglacial to Holocene palaeoenvironments. Six palaeoenvironmental zones are recognized, based on prominent changes in the litho- and biostratigraphy. The waterlain diamicton of Zone I records immediate deglaciation, being derived from lift-off and calving of previously grounded glacial ice. Though deglacial timing is complicated by the sparsity of dating materials and the Portlandia Effect, age-depth model extrapolation places deglaciation at 11.54 cal ka BP. Zone II (11.5-11.0 cal ka BP) represents a distinct progression from initially ice-proximal to increasingly ice-distal conditions, interrupted by an interval of pervasive sea-ice (11.4-11.2 cal ka BP). Noteworthy biological activity commences in Zone III (11.0-9.7 cal ka BP) with a prominent signal of planktonic foraminifera (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma). This likely signifies penetration of deeper, Atlantic-derived water through the central Canadian Arctic Archipelago upon deglaciation, facilitated by the greater, glacioisostatically-induced water depths (+80 m), and implies separation of Laurentide and Innuitian ice sheets by ˜11.0 cal ka BP. Zone IV (9.7-7.2 cal ka BP) records ameliorated, biologically favourable conditions with reduced seasonal sea-ice accompanied by high microfossil species diversity and the presence of subpolar taxa. Zone V (7.2-6.5 cal ka BP) signals the exclusion of Atlantic-derived water, concomitant with increasing sea-ice, simultaneously representing the termination of the dynamic deglacial to early Holocene environments (zones I-IV). Conditions similar to modern typified by

  10. Late Quaternary Biosiliceous Laminated Marine Sediments From Antarctica: Seasonality During a Period of Rapid Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, J.; Stickley, C. E.; Maddison, E. J.; Leventer, A.; Brachfeld, S.; Domack, E. W.; Dunbar, R. B.; Manley, P. L.; McClennen, C.

    2004-12-01

    The Antarctic ice sheet plays a key role in global oceanic and atmosphere systems. One of the most dynamic regions of the continent is the Antarctic Peninsula (AP) where ecological and cryospheric systems respond rapidly to climate change, such as the last deglaciation ( ˜12-13 kyr BP). Here, deglacial laminated diatom-rich marine sediments are well known, e.g., Palmer Deep (64° S 64° W; ODP Hole 1098A) comprising a distinctive 3 m thick sequence of deglacial `couplet' laminations. The East Antarctic margin (EAM), however, has received less attention than the West Antarctic margin (WAM) in palaeoceanographic studies yet its role in deep ocean circulation and, therefore, the global ocean system is significant. Recent sediment cores recovered from EAM sites during NSF Polar Programs-funded cruise NBP0101 in February and March 2001 (e.g. Mertz Drift \\{66° S 143° E\\}, Svenner Channel \\{69° S 77° E\\} in Prydz Bay, Nielsen Basin \\{67° S 66° E\\} and Iceberg Alley \\{67° S 63° E\\}), reveal that a similar sedimentary facies was deposited along the EAM, in similar geomorphological settings to Palmer Deep, during the same timeframe. These rich sediment archives reveal clues about circum-Antarctic palaeoceanographic change during the last deglaciation, a time of both high silica flux and rapid climate change. Microfabrics and diatom assemblages from scanning electron microscope backscattered and secondary electron imagery analysis of coeval deglacial varves from Palmer Deep (WAM), Mertz-Ninnis Trough and Iceberg Alley (EAM) are presented and compared. The varves from these localities are characterised by laminae to thin beds of orange-brown diatom ooze up to ˜8cm thick alternating with blue-grey diatom-bearing terrigenous sediments up to ˜4cm thick. The orange-brown oozes are dominated by resting spores and vegetative valves of Hyalochaete Chaetoceros spp., resulting from spring sedimentation associated with stratified surface waters promoting exceptionally

  11. Developing a robust tephrochronological framework for Late Quaternary marine records in the Southern Adriatic Sea: new data from core station SA03-11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, I. P.; Trincardi, F.; Lowe, J. J.; Bourne, A. J.; MacLeod, A.; Abbott, P. M.; Andersen, N.; Asioli, A.; Blockley, S. P. E.; Lane, C. S.; Oh, Y. A.; Satow, C. S.; Staff, R. A.; Wulf, S.

    2015-06-01

    Tephra layers are assuming an increasingly important role in the dating and correlation of Late Quaternary marine sequences. Here we demonstrate their potential by reporting a new study of the sediment sequence of marine core SA03-11, recovered from the Southern Adriatic Sea, which spans the last c. 39 ka. A total of 28 discrete tephra layers are reported from this sequence, 10 of which are visible in the core and a further 18 are non-visible cryptotephra layers. These have been analysed using more than 1400 WDS-EPMA measurements of glass chemistry and results have been compared with published chemical measurements obtained from relevant proximal and distal sites which preserve eruptive material dating to within the same time interval. The data show that a high proportion of the layers originate from the Campi Flegrei volcanic field but more distinctive layers are sourced from Vesuvius, the Aeolian Islands and Vulcano, and these provide key marker horizons. The results show that the sequence extends in time to the Campanian Ignimbrite at the base, that a number of the layers have robust age estimates that permit a better constrained age-depth model to be constructed for the sequence, and that the potential exists for importing terrestrially-based age estimates into marine contexts, thereby circumventing problems of incorporating reservoir uncertainties associated with marine radiocarbon dates. The WDS-EPMA dataset generated here also provides important new data that constrain key Late Quaternary tephra layers in the central Mediterranean region.

  12. Late Quaternary change in the North American (Mexican) Monsoon: variability in terrestrial and marine records and possible mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, S. E.; Barron, J. A.; Roy, P.; Davies, S.

    2013-05-01

    The Late Quaternary history of the North American (or Mexican) monsoon (NAM) remains poorly understood, with continuing debates about the relative importance of insolation forcing, the role of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS), the expression of warm (D-O) and cold (H) events in the North Atlantic and the influence of the Pacific. To date, more information has been available from the southern and northern margins of the NAM region than from its tropical and subtropical core. This is significant because to the south of the NAM region, the direct effect of ITCZ location is likely to be stronger and any potential influence of the LIS weaker, and to the north, there is an important change in present day precipitation seasonality (from summer to winter), an opposite response to forcings such as ENSO/PDO and AMO and probably a stronger influence of the LIS. As a result, the interpretation of speleothem records from New Mexico (e.g. Asmerom et al., 2010) and Arizona (e.g. Wagner et al., 2010), in the southwestern USA and marine records such as Cariaco (Peterson and Haug, 2006) and lake records such as Peten Iztá (Hodell et al., 2008) may not be applicable to the tropical NAM core. Here we present results from two lacustrine sequences in Mexico (Sayula 20oN; Babicora 29oN) and a marine core record from the central part of the Gulf of California (27oN) all extending back at least through MIS3 (ca. 60 kyr BP). Although lacking the chronological precision of the speleothem sequences, these multiproxy records preserve evidence of centennial and millennial scale variability. MIS3 is marked by generally wetter conditions in the lake basins and warmer SSTs in the marine record, particularly during D/O events, which can be attributed to a stronger monsoon as well northward displacement of the ITCZ. This contrasts with the standard interpretation of the speleothem sequences where D/O events are dry. In contrast, H events are usually drier/cooler (weaker NAM, reduced summer

  13. Late Quaternary history of southern Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Colman, S.M.; Hobbs, C.H. III; Halka, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    More than 700 km of high-resolution, seismic-reflection profiles and sidescan-sonar images provide new information about the late Quaternary history of southern Chesapeake Bay. Sidescan-sonar images show that, excluding the nearshore zone, most of the bay bottom has a monotonously smooth surface, except that sand waves, ripples, and other bedforms occur in local areas affected by tidal currents. Seismic-reflection data show that the Quaternary stratigraphy of the southern part of the Bay is related primarily to the last cycle of sea-level change. The Quaternary section overlies an erosion surface cut deeply into gently seaward-dipping marine beds of Neogene age. Fluvial paleochannels, related to the last major low sea-level stand, are characterized by as much as 55 m of incision and by thin, irregular, terrace and channel-bottom deposits. Marine and estuarine deposits related to the Holocene transgression partially or fully bury the fluvial valleys and overlie the interfluves. A prominent feature of the Bay-mouth area is a wedge of sediment that has prograded into the Bay from the inner shelf. The common assumption--that the Chesapeake Bay is the drowned valley of the Pleistocene Susquehanna River--is only partially valid for the southern part of the Bay. The Bay mouth area, in general, is relatively young. The axial channel of the Bay is a modern tidal channel that is actively eroding Tertiary deposits and migrating toward the south and west; it is unrelated to older fluvial channels. Also, the positions of the modern axial channel and the last two fluvial paleochannels indicate long-term southward migration of the Bay mouth.

  14. Episodic intraplate deformation of stable continental margins: evidence from Late Neogene and Quaternary marine terraces, Cape Liptrap, Southeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Thomas; Webb, John; Pezzia, Claudia; Amborn, Terri; Tunnell, Robert; Flanagan, Sarah; Merritts, Dorothy; Marshall, Jeffrey; Fabel, Derek; Cupper, Matthew L.

    2009-01-01

    The Waratah Fault is a northeast trending, high angle, reverse fault in the Late Paleozoic Lachlan Fold Belt at Cape Liptrap on the Southeastern Australian Coast. It is susceptible to reactivation in the modern intraplate stress field in Southeast Australia and exhibits Late Pliocene to Late Pleistocene reactivation. Radiocarbon, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), and cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) dating of marine terraces on Cape Liptrap are used to constrain rates of displacement across the reactivated Waratah Fault. Six marine terraces, numbered Qt 6-Tt 1 (youngest to oldest), are well developed at Cape Liptrap with altitudes ranging from ˜1.5 m to ˜170 m amsl, respectively. On the lowest terrace, Qt 6, barnacles in wave-cut notches ˜1.5 m amsl, yielded a radiocarbon age of 6090-5880 Cal BP, and reflect the local mid-Holocene sea level highstand. Qt 5 yielded four OSL ages from scattered locations around the cape ranging from ˜80 ka to ˜130 ka. It formed during the Last Interglacial sea level highstand (MIS 5e) at ˜125 ka. Inner edge elevations (approximate paleo high tide line) for Qt 5 occur at distinctly different elevations on opposite sides of the Waratah Fault. Offsets of the inner edges across the fault range from 1.3 m to 5.1 m with displacement rates ranging from 0.01 mm/a to 0.04 mm/a. The most extensive terrace, Tt 4, yielded four Early Pleistocene cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) ages: two apparent burial ages of 0.858 Ma ± 0.16 Ma and 1.25 Ma ± 0.265 Ma, and two apparent exposure ages of 1.071 Ma ± 0.071 Ma ( 10Be) and 0.798 Ma ± 0.066 Ma ( 26Al). Allowing for muonic production effects from insufficient burial depths, the depth corrected CRN burial ages are 1.8 Ma ± 0.56 Ma and 2.52 Ma ± 0.88 Ma, or Late Pliocene. A Late Pliocene age is our preferred age. Offsets of Tt 4 across the Waratah Fault range from a minimum of ˜20 m for terrace surface treads to a maximum of ˜70 m for terrace bedrock straths. Calculated displacement rates

  15. Paleosol architecture of a late Quaternary basin-margin sequence and its implications for high-resolution, non-marine sequence stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorosi, Alessandro; Bruno, Luigi; Rossi, Veronica; Severi, Paolo; Hajdas, Irka

    2014-01-01

    Paleosol stratigraphy, a technique commonly applied in basin-margin settings to depict cyclic alluvial architecture on time scales of 10-100 ky, can be consistent with regional accommodation trends at even higher temporal resolution (1-10 ky), having strong implications for the sequence stratigraphy of late Quaternary, non-marine deposits. Three closely-spaced late Pleistocene paleosols (P1-P3), dating back approximately to 42-39, 35-31, and 29-26 cal kyr BP, respectively, form prominent stratigraphic markers across a lithologically homogeneous interfluve succession in the subsurface of Bologna, close to the Apenninic foothills. These paleosols are weakly developed (Inceptisols) and can be tracked continuously for 6 km across the triangle-shaped interchannel zone between two gravel/sand-filled channel systems (Reno and Savena rivers). In particular, the thickest paleosol (P3) is a distinctive stiff horizon that can be traced into laterally extensive, erosional-based fluvial bodies. We infer the correlation between (P3) soil development (and channel downcutting) and the final stage of the stepwise Late Pleistocene sea-level fall that culminated at the marine isotope stage 3/2 transition around 29 cal kyr BP (low accommodation systems tract). A fourth laterally extensive Inceptisol, encompassing the Pleistocene-Holocene boundary (PH), represents the major phase of soil development since the Last Glacial Maximum and is inferred to be related to channel entrenchment at the onset of the Younger Dryas. With the exception of the Iron Age-Roman paleosol, which reflects a predominantly anthropogenic control, the Holocene paleosols are laterally discontinuous and invariably more immature (Entisols) than their Pleistocene counterparts. This trend of decreasing paleosol development (and correlatability) upsection is interpreted to reflect increasing (transgressive-equivalent) accommodation during sea-level rise, thus confirming the possible extension of models used to

  16. Late Quaternary continental and marine sediments of northeastern Buenos Aires province (Argentina): Fossil content and paleoenvironmental interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fucks, Enrique; Aguirre, Marina; Deschamps, Cecilia M.

    2005-10-01

    Abundant invertebrate and vertebrate fossil remains that exhibit excellent preservation and were collected from deposits of both continental and marine origins at Pilar (Buenos Aires, Argentina) add paleoenvironmental data from the northeastern Buenos Aires province area linked to sea-level oscillations and climate variability since approximately 120 ka BP (marine oxygen isotope stage [MOIS] 5e). Two new fossiliferous localities discovered in the Luján River Valley allow for detailed geological studies and new dating of molluscan shells and bones. The studies suggest salinity changes during the Last Interglacial (8 m above m.s.l., min. 14C>40 ka) and the mid-Holocene transgression (5 m above m.s.l., 7-3 14C ka BP) compared with the modern pattern along the adjacent littoral (Río de la Plata). The marine sequences represent the innermost boundary of the sea-level transgression in that area and contain a biogenic record (bivalves, gastropods, forams, ostracods) that indicates marginal marine environments (higher salinity than at present). Vertebrates and molluscs from the continental sequence suggest a freshwater habitat in which remains of marine fish must be allochthonous, probably incorporated by postmortem fluvial transport to the final depositional environment.

  17. (Model) Peatlands in late Quaternary interglacials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinen, Thomas; Brovkin, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands have accumulated a substantial amount of carbon, roughly 600 PgC, during the Holocene. Prior to the Holocene, there is relatively little direct evidence of peatlands, though coal deposits bear witness to a long history of peat-forming ecosystems going back to the Carboniferous. We therefore need to rely on models to investigate peatlands in times prior to the Holocene. We have developed a dynamical model of wetland extent and peat accumulation, integrated in the coupled climate carbon cycle model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER2-LPJ, in order to mechanistically model interglacial carbon cycle dynamics. This model consists of the climate model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER2 and the dynamic global vegetation model LPJ, which we have extended with modules to determine peatland extent and carbon accumulation. The model compares reasonably well to Holocene peat data. We have used this model to investigate the dynamics of atmospheric CO2 in the Holocene and two other late Quaternary interglacials, namely the Eemian, which is interesting due to its warmth, and Marine Isotope Stage 11 (MIS11), which is the longest interglacial during the last 500ka. We will also present model results of peatland extent and carbon accumulation for these interglacials. We will discuss model shortcomings and knowledge gaps currently preventing an application of the model to full glacial-interglacial cycles.

  18. Late Quaternary uplift rate inferred from marine terraces, Muroto Peninsula, southwest Japan: Forearc deformation in an oblique subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsu'ura, Tabito

    2015-04-01

    Tectonic uplift rates across the Muroto Peninsula, in the southwest Japan forearc (the overriding plate in the southwest Japan oblique subduction zone), were estimated by mapping the elevations of the inner edges of marine terrace surfaces. The uplift rates inferred from marine terraces M1 and M2, which were correlated by tephrochronology with marine isotope stages (MIS) 5e and 5c, respectively, include some vertical offset by local faults but generally decrease northwestward from 1.2-1.6 m ky- 1 on Cape Muroto to 0.3-0.7 m ky- 1 in the Kochi Plain. The vertical deformation of the Muroto Peninsula since MIS 5e and 5c was interpreted as a combination of regional uplift and folding related to the arc-normal offshore Muroto-Misaki fault. A regional uplift rate of 0.46 m ky- 1 was estimated from terraces on the Muroto Peninsula, and the residual deformation of these terraces was attributed to fault-related folding. A mass-balance calculation yielded a shortening rate of 0.71-0.77 m ky- 1 for the Muroto Peninsula, with the Muroto-Misaki fault accounting for 0.60-0.71 m ky- 1, but these rates may be overestimated by as much as 10% given variations of several meters in the elevation difference between the buried shoreline angles and terrace inner edges in the study area. A thrust fault model with flat (5-10° dip) and ramp (60° dip) components is proposed to explain the shortening rate and uplift rate of the Muroto-Misaki fault since MIS 5e. Bedrock deformation also indicates that the northern extension of this fault corresponds to the older Muroto Flexure.

  19. Marine record of late quaternary glacial-interglacial fluctuations in the Ross Sea and evidence for rapid, episodic sea level change due to marine ice sheet collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John B.

    1991-01-01

    Some of the questions to be addressed by SeaRISE include: (1) what was the configuration of the West Antarctic ice sheet during the last glacial maximum; (2) What is its configuration during a glacial minimum; and (3) has it, or any marine ice sheet, undergone episodic rapid mass wasting. These questions are addressed in terms of what is known about the history of the marine ice sheet, specifically in Ross Sea, and what further studies are required to resolve these problems. A second question concerns the extent to which disintegration of marine ice sheets may result in rises in sea level that are episodic in nature and extremely rapid, as suggested by several glaciologists. Evidence that rapid, episodic sea level changes have occurred during the Holocene is also reviewed.

  20. Late Quaternary climate change shapes island biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Weigelt, Patrick; Steinbauer, Manuel Jonas; Cabral, Juliano Sarmento; Kreft, Holger

    2016-04-01

    Island biogeographical models consider islands either as geologically static with biodiversity resulting from ecologically neutral immigration-extinction dynamics, or as geologically dynamic with biodiversity resulting from immigration-speciation-extinction dynamics influenced by changes in island characteristics over millions of years. Present climate and spatial arrangement of islands, however, are rather exceptional compared to most of the Late Quaternary, which is characterized by recurrent cooler and drier glacial periods. These climatic oscillations over short geological timescales strongly affected sea levels and caused massive changes in island area, isolation and connectivity, orders of magnitude faster than the geological processes of island formation, subsidence and erosion considered in island theory. Consequences of these oscillations for present biodiversity remain unassessed. Here we analyse the effects of present and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) island area, isolation, elevation and climate on key components of angiosperm diversity on islands worldwide. We find that post-LGM changes in island characteristics, especially in area, have left a strong imprint on present diversity of endemic species. Specifically, the number and proportion of endemic species today is significantly higher on islands that were larger during the LGM. Native species richness, in turn, is mostly determined by present island characteristics. We conclude that an appreciation of Late Quaternary environmental change is essential to understand patterns of island endemism and its underlying evolutionary dynamics. PMID:27027291

  1. Late Quaternary climate change shapes island biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Weigelt, Patrick; Steinbauer, Manuel Jonas; Cabral, Juliano Sarmento; Kreft, Holger

    2016-04-01

    Island biogeographical models consider islands either as geologically static with biodiversity resulting from ecologically neutral immigration-extinction dynamics, or as geologically dynamic with biodiversity resulting from immigration-speciation-extinction dynamics influenced by changes in island characteristics over millions of years. Present climate and spatial arrangement of islands, however, are rather exceptional compared to most of the Late Quaternary, which is characterized by recurrent cooler and drier glacial periods. These climatic oscillations over short geological timescales strongly affected sea levels and caused massive changes in island area, isolation and connectivity, orders of magnitude faster than the geological processes of island formation, subsidence and erosion considered in island theory. Consequences of these oscillations for present biodiversity remain unassessed. Here we analyse the effects of present and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) island area, isolation, elevation and climate on key components of angiosperm diversity on islands worldwide. We find that post-LGM changes in island characteristics, especially in area, have left a strong imprint on present diversity of endemic species. Specifically, the number and proportion of endemic species today is significantly higher on islands that were larger during the LGM. Native species richness, in turn, is mostly determined by present island characteristics. We conclude that an appreciation of Late Quaternary environmental change is essential to understand patterns of island endemism and its underlying evolutionary dynamics.

  2. Late Quaternary mammalian zoogeography of eastern Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, R. Lee; Livingston, Stephanie D.

    1983-11-01

    The late Quaternary mammalian zoogeographic history of eastern Washington as revealed by archaeological and paleontological research conforms to a set of past environmental conditions inferred from botanical data. During the relatively cool and moist late Pleistocene and early Holocene, Cervus cf. elaphus, Ovis canadensis, Vulpes vulpes, Martes americana, Alopex lagopus, and perhaps Rangifer sp., taxa with ecological preferences for mesic steppe habitats, were present in the now xeric Columbia Basin. As the climate became progressively warmer and drier during the late Pleistocene and early Holocene, Antilocapra americana, Onychomys leucogaster, Spermophilus townsendii, and Neotoma cinerea, taxa with ecological preferences for xeric steppe habitats, appear in the Columbia Basin. Bison sp. and Taxidea taxus may have been present in eastern Washington for the last 20,000 yr. Middle and late Holocene records for Oreamnos americanus, Spermophilus columbianus, S. townsendii, Lagurus curtatus, and Urocyon cinereoargenteus in central eastern Washington suggest fluctuations in the ranges of these taxa that conform to a middle Holocene period of less effective precipitation and a ca. 3500-yr-old period of more effective precipitation before essentially modern environmental conditions prevailed.

  3. Late Quaternary fire regimes of Australasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, S. D.; Harrison, S. P.; Bartlein, P. J.; Daniau, A.-L.; Stevenson, J.; Brownlie, K. C.; Buckman, S.; Cupper, M.; Luly, J.; Black, M.; Colhoun, E.; D'Costa, D.; Dodson, J.; Haberle, S.; Hope, G. S.; Kershaw, P.; Kenyon, C.; McKenzie, M.; Williams, N.

    2011-01-01

    We have compiled 223 sedimentary charcoal records from Australasia in order to examine the temporal and spatial variability of fire regimes during the Late Quaternary. While some of these records cover more than a full glacial cycle, here we focus on the last 70,000 years when the number of individual records in the compilation allows more robust conclusions. On orbital time scales, fire in Australasia predominantly reflects climate, with colder periods characterized by less and warmer intervals by more biomass burning. The composite record for the region also shows considerable millennial-scale variability during the last glacial interval (73.5-14.7 ka). Within the limits of the dating uncertainties of individual records, the variability shown by the composite charcoal record is more similar to the form, number and timing of Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles as observed in Greenland ice cores than to the variability expressed in the Antarctic ice-core record. The composite charcoal record suggests increased biomass burning in the Australasian region during Greenland Interstadials and reduced burning during Greenland Stadials. Millennial-scale variability is characteristic of the composite record of the sub-tropical high pressure belt during the past 21 ka, but the tropics show a somewhat simpler pattern of variability with major peaks in biomass burning around 15 ka and 8 ka. There is no distinct change in fire regime corresponding to the arrival of humans in Australia at 50 ± 10 ka and no correlation between archaeological evidence of increased human activity during the past 40 ka and the history of biomass burning. However, changes in biomass burning in the last 200 years may have been exacerbated or influenced by humans.

  4. Formation of Late Quaternary paleoshorelines in Crete, Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouslopoulou, Vasiliki; Begg, John; Nicol, Andrew; Oncken, Onno; Prior, Christine

    2015-12-01

    Paleoshorelines of Late Quaternary age in western Crete do not exclusively increase in age with rising altitude as is generally observed worldwide. At numerous sites, for example, Late-Holocene paleoshorelines decrease in age with increasing altitude while in other cases paleoshorelines at similar altitude vary in age by tens of thousands of years. We propose that the observed paleoshoreline altitude-age relationships can be accounted for by eustatic sea-level changes and tectonic rock uplift without requiring substantial errors on radiocarbon ages or tectonic subsidence, as has been previously proposed. To test this model we use a dataset consisting of altitude and age data for 71 individual paleoshorelines sampled from 21 sites distributed along the entire Cretan coastline. These data include radiocarbon ages of marine biota (40 new dates) within beachrock resting on paleoshorelines ranging up to 48 kyr BP in age and ≤20 m above present sea-level. We find that paleoshoreline formation reflects Late Holocene tectonic rock uplift in western Crete, preceded by eustatic sea-level rise and by >10 kyr BP rock uplift along the entire island. Our observations contravene existing models as they suggest that some paleoshorelines, and their associated lithified beachrock, survived passage through the wave-zone multiple times and formed throughout the sea-level cycle (i.e., preservation is not restricted to highstand deposits). These results may have application globally in regions where erosion-resistant carbonate beachrock mantles paleoshorelines.

  5. Late Quaternary land-sea correlations, northern Labrador, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, P.; Josenhans, H.

    1985-01-01

    Late Quaternary glacial and postglacial units in the Torngat Mountains, northern Labrador, are correlated with units identified on the adjacent continental shelf. The late Wisconsinan Laurentide Ice Sheet drained through major valleys of the Torngat Mountains as outlet glaciers, depositing the Saglek Moraines. These are of regional extent and have been mapped from Saglek Fiord north to Noodleook Fiord. A C-14 date of 18,210 +/- 1900 BP on total organic matter (TOM) from lake sediment dammed by a segment of the Saglek Moraines is interpreted as a maximum date for deposition of the Saglek Moraine system because of possible contamination. Glacial sediments comprising the Saglek Moraines are correlated with upper till mapped in troughs and saddles on the continental shelf. Outlet glaciers depositing a late Wisconsinan unit flowed through Labrador fiords and onto the shelf at low basal shear stresses, particularly on the shelf where, although grounded, they were hydrostatically buoyed up and moved principally by sliding. A glaciomarine unit conformably overlies late Wisconsinan till on the shelf and on the land. This unit is a gravelly clayey silt, contains abundant foraminifera, and has up to 60% limestone in the pebble fraction. C-14 dates suggest deposition of this unit began ca. 10,000 BP on the shelf and 9000 BP on the land, an ended by 8000 BP. Limestone pebbles in this unit suggest a source in part from sediment-laden icebergs and pack-ice from the north. Marine deposition from ca. 8000-0 BP is characterize by basinal sedimentation.

  6. Reply to Discussion: a critique of Possible waterways between the Marmara Sea and the Black Sea in the late Quaternary: evidence from ostracod and foraminifer assemblages in lakes İznik and Sapanca, Turkey, Geo-Marine Letters, 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazik, Atike; Meriç, Engin; Avşar, Niyazi

    2012-06-01

    In their discussion of our 2011 paper dealing with possible waterways between the Marmara Sea and the Black Sea in the "late" Quaternary, based on data from ostracod and foraminifer assemblages in lakes İznik and Sapanca, Turkey, Yaltırak et al. (Geo-Mar Lett 32:267-274, 2012) essentially reject the idea of any links whatsoever, be they between the Marmara Sea and the lakes İznik and Sapanca, or further to the Black Sea via the valley of the Sakarya River. The evidence they provide in support of their view, however, is essentially circumstantial, in part conjectural, and also inconclusive considering the findings in favour of linkage between the Marmara Sea and the lakes at the very least, while the proposed connection with the Sakarya River valley remains speculative because of the lack of unambiguous data. On the other hand, Yaltırak et al. (Geo-Mar Lett 32:267-274, 2012) do raise valid points of concern which deserve careful future investigation, the most important being the possibility of sample contamination from dumped marine sediment used for construction purposes along some parts of the shore of Lake İznik. We agree that a concerted multidisciplinary effort is required to address the many unresolved issues in connection with the potential waterways proposed by us and others before us.

  7. Ice Age Earth: Late Quaternary geology and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    This book is a concise and readable account of the most important geologic records of the late Quaternary. It provides a synopsis of the major environmental changes that took place from approximately 13,000 to 7,000 years ago, highlighting the complexity and rapidity of past climate changes and the environmental responses they produced. The text is well illustrated, though some figures are rough and need more explanation. Also needed is a critical appraisal of the geochronology which places the paleoenvironmental records into the temporal domain. However, as a whole the book reaches its objective of summarizing the most important scientific findings about the nature of the late Quaternary climate changes.

  8. Spatial Response of Mammals to Late Quaternary Environmental Fluctuations

    PubMed

    Graham; Lundelius; Graham; Schroeder; Toomey; Anderson; Barnosky; Burns; Churcher; Grayson; Guthrie; Harington; Jefferson; Martin; McDonald; Morlan; Semken; Webb; Werdelin; Wilson

    1996-06-14

    Analyses of fossil mammal faunas from 2945 localities in the United States demonstrate that the geographic ranges of individual species shifted at different times, in different directions, and at different rates in response to late Quaternary environmental fluctuations. The geographic pattern of faunal provinces was similar for the late Pleistocene and late Holocene, but differing environmental gradients resulted in dissimilar species composition for these biogeographic regions. Modern community patterns emerged only in the last few thousand years, and many late Pleistocene communities do not have modern analogs. Faunal heterogeneity was greater in the late Pleistocene.

  9. Late Quaternary history of the Atacama Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Latorre, Claudio; Betancourt, Julio L.; Rech, Jason A.; Quade, Jay; Holmgren, Camille; Placzek, Christa; Maldonado, Antonio; Vuille, Mathias; Rylander, Kate A.; Smith, Mike; Hesse, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Of the major subtropical deserts found in the Southern Hemisphere, the Atacama Desert is the driest. Throughout the Quaternary, the most pervasive climatic influence on the desert has been millennial-scale changes in the frequency and seasonality of the scant rainfall, and associated shifts in plant and animal distributions with elevation along the eastern margin of the desert. Over the past six years, we have mapped modern vegetation gradients and developed a number of palaeoenvironmental records, including vegetation histories from fossil rodent middens, groundwater levels from wetland (spring) deposits, and lake levels from shoreline evidence, along a 1200-kilometre transect (16–26°S) in the Atacama Desert. A strength of this palaeoclimate transect has been the ability to apply the same methodologies across broad elevational, latitudinal, climatic, vegetation and hydrological gradients. We are using this transect to reconstruct the histories of key components of the South American tropical (summer) and extratropical (winter) rainfall belts, precisely at those elevations where average annual rainfall wanes to zero. The focus has been on the transition from sparse, shrubby vegetation (known as the prepuna) into absolute desert, an expansive hyperarid terrain that extends from just above the coastal fog zone (approximately 800 metres) to more than 3500 metres in the most arid sectors in the southern Atacama.

  10. Paleoclimatic forcing of magnetic susceptibility variations in Alaskan loess during the late Quaternary

    SciTech Connect

    Beget, J.E.; Stone, D.B.; Hawkins, D.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Visual matches and statistical tests suggest correlations between marine isotope curves, retrodictive solar insolation at lat 65{degree}N, and magnetic susceptibility profiles through late Quaternary age Alaskan loess sections. The susceptibility changes largely appear to reflect variability in magnetite content due to climatically controlled changes in wind intensity and competence. Magnetic susceptibility profiles through massive loess can provide stratigraphic context for intercalated paleosols and tephras. A prominent paleosol correlated with marine isotope stage 5 occurs several metres above the Old Crow ash in loess sections, indicating that this important tephra is older than suggested by thermoluminescence dates, and may have been deposited ca. 215 {plus minus}25 ka.

  11. Late Quaternary rates of stream incision in Northeast Peloponnese, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karymbalis, Efthimios; Papanastassiou, Dimitrios; Gaki-Papanastassiou, Kalliopi; Ferentinou, Maria; Chalkias, Christos

    2016-09-01

    This study focuses on defining rates of fluvial incision for the last 580±5 kyr along valley systems of eight streams that drain the eastern part of the northern Peloponnese. The streams are developed on the uplifted block of the offshore-running Xylokastro normal fault, one of the main faults bounding the southern edge of the Gulf of Corinth half-graben, and have incised a set of ten uplifted marine terraces having an amphitheatric shape. These terraces range in age from 60±5 kyr to 580±5 kyr and have been mapped in detail and correlated with late Pleistocene oxygen-isotope stages of high sea-level stands by previous studies. The terraces were used in this paper as reference surfaces in order to define fluvial incision rates at the lower reaches of the studied streams. To evaluate incision rates, thirty-three topographic valley cross-sections were drawn using fieldwork measurements as well as using a highly accurate (2×2 cell size) Digital Elevation Model (DEM) at specific locations where streams cut down the inner edges of the marine terraces. For each cross-section the ratio of valley floor width to valley height (Vf) and long-term mean stream incision rates were estimated for the last 580±5 kyr, while rock uplift rates were estimated for the last 330±5 kyr. The geomorphic evolution of the valleys on the uplifted block of the Xylokastro fault has been mainly driven by the lithology of the bedrock, sea level fluctuations during the late Quaternary, and incision of the channels due to the tectonic uplift. Stream incision rates range from 0.10±0.1 mm/yr for the last 123±7 kyr to 1.14±0.1 mm/yr for the last 310±5 kyr and are gradually greater from east to west depending on the distance from the trace of the fault. Downcutting rates are comparable with the rock uplift rates, which range from 0.4±0.02 mm/yr to 1.49±0.12 mm/yr, over the last 330±5 kyr.

  12. Late Quaternary transgressive large dunes on the sediment-starved Adriatic shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Correggiari, A.; Field, M.E.; Trincardi, F.

    1996-01-01

    The Adriatic epicontinental basin is a low-gradient shelf where the late-Quaternary transgressive systems tract (TST) is composed of thin parasequences of backbarrier, shoreface and offshore deposits. The facies and internal architecture of the late-Quaternary TST in the Adriatic epicontinental basin changed consistently from early transgression to late transgression reflecting: (1) fluctuations in the balance between sediment supply and accommodation increase, and (2) a progressive intensification of the oceanographic regime, driven by the transgressive widening of the basin to as much as seven times its lowstand extent. One of the consequences of this trend is that high-energy marine bedforms such as sand ridges and sand waves characterize only areas that were flooded close to the end of the late-Quaternary sea-level rise, when the wind fetch was maximum and bigger waves and stronger storm currents could form. We studied the morphology, sediment composition and sequence-stratigraphical setting of a field of asymmetric bedforms (typically 3 m high and 600 m in wavelength) in 20-24 m water depth offshore the Venice Lagoon in the sediment-starved North Adriatic shelf. The sand that forms these large dunes derived from a drowned transgressive coastal deposit reworked by marine processes. Early cementation took place over most of the dune crests limiting their activity and preventing their destruction. Both the formation and deactivation of this field of sand dunes occurred over a short time interval close to the turn-around point that separates the late-Quaternary sea-level rise and the following highstand and reflect rapid changes in the oceanographic regime of the basin.

  13. Late Quaternary environments in Ruby Valley, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    Palynological data from sediment cores from the Ruby Marshes provide a record of environmental and climatic changes over the last 40,000 yr. The modern marsh waters are fresh, but no deeper than ???3 m. A shallow saline lake occupied this basin during the middle Wisconsin, followed by fresh and perhaps deep waters by 18,000 to 15,000 yr B.P. No sediments were recovered for the period between 15,000 and 11,000 yr B.P., possibly due to lake desiccation. By 10,800 yr B.P. a fresh-water lake was again present, and deeper-than-modern conditions lasted until 6800 yr B.P. The middle Holocene was characterized by very shallow water, and perhaps complete desiccation. The marsh system deepened after 4700 yr B.P., and fresh-water conditions persisted until modern times. Vegetation changes in Ruby Valley were more gradual than those seen in the paleolimno-logical record. Sagebrush steppe was more widespread than at present through the late Pleistocene and early Holocene, giving way somewhat to expanded shadscale vegetation between 8500 and 6800 yr B.P. Shadscale steppe contracted by 4000 yr B.P., but had greater than modern coverage until 1000 to 500 yr ago. Pinyon-juniper woodland was established in the southern Ruby Mountains by 4700 yr B.P. ?? 1992.

  14. Late quaternary environments, Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, S.A.; Short, S.K.; Waythomas, C.F.

    1996-01-01

    Late Quaternary pollen, plant macrofossils, and insect fossils were studied from sites along three rivers in the foothills north of the Alaska Range in Denali National Park and Preserve. The aim was to carry out a reconaissance of late Quaternary organic sediments in the region, emphasizing the mid-Wisconsin, or Boutellier interstadial interval. Samples of probable early- to mid-Boutellier age (ca. 60 000 to 40 000 B.P.) from Unit 2 at the Toklat High Bluffs site indicate open boreal woodland with dense alder shrub vegetation. Organic Unit 1 at the Foraker River Slump site indicates open taiga with shrubs of probable Boutellier age. Fossil evidence from the youngest horizon in this unit indicates graminoid tundra environments, marking the transition from interstadial to late Wisconsin glacial environments. Early Holocene samples from the Foraker exposures suggest birch shrub tundra; coniferous forest apparently became established only alter 6500 B.P. Local variations in forest composition at the Foraker and Sushana sites were probably the result of disturbances, such as fire.

  15. Precise timing and rate of massive late Quaternary soil denudation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, M. Jennifer; Stern, Libby A.; Banner, Jay L.; Mack, Lawrence E.; Stafford, Thomas W., Jr.; Toomey, Rickard S., III

    2003-10-01

    Strontium isotopes are a unique tool to study soil-erosion dynamics. Changes in Sr isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) provide a record of late Quaternary landscape denudation of the Edwards Plateau of central Texas, United States. The use of Sr isotopes as a tracer for soil erosion is based on the observation that, in central Texas, the 87Sr/86Sr ratio of soil correlates with soil thickness. Plants and animals express the 87Sr/86Sr ratio of exchangeable Sr in the soil. Therefore, we use changes in Sr isotope ratios through a well-dated stratigraphic sequence of fossil plants and animals in Hall's Cave, Kerr County, Texas, as a proxy for temporal changes in soil thickness. By using this record we are able to characterize late Quaternary climate-driven soil-erosion dynamics on the Edwards Plateau. We find that continuous erosion removed at least 180 cm of soil at a constant minimum rate of 11 cm/k.y.; this continuous phase of erosion ended ca. 5 ka. The Sr isotope record of soil erosion is consistent with late Quaternary environmental change in central Texas that has been independently modeled by using local and regional climate records. However, the rate of this climate-driven soil-erosion event was an order of magnitude slower than recent soil erosion caused by human land use. These results link erosion to century- to millennial-scale climate change and are cautionary evidence that even greater landscape degradation may result from coincident climatic variability and anthropogenic influences.

  16. Late Quaternary glaciation of the Upper Soca River Region (Southern Julian Alps, NW Slovenia)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bavec, Milos; Tulaczyk, Slawek M.; Mahan, Shannon; Stock, Gregory M.

    2004-01-01

    Extent of Late Quaternary glaciers in the Upper Soc??a River Region (Southern Julian Alps, SE Europe) has been analyzed using a combination of geological mapping, glaciological modeling, and sediment dating (radiocarbon, U/Th series and Infrared Stimulated Luminescence-IRSL). Field investigations focused mainly on relatively well preserved Quaternary sequences in the Bovec Basin, an intramontane basin located SW of the Mediterranean/Black Sea divide and surrounded by mountain peaks reaching from approximately 2100 up to 2587 m a.s.l. Within the Basin we recognized two Late Quaternary sedimentary assemblages, which consist of the same facies association of diamictons, laminated lacustrine deposits and sorted fluvial sediments. Radiocarbon dating of the upper part of the lake sediments sequence (between 12790??85 and 5885??60 14C years b.p.) indicates that the younger sedimentary assemblage was deposited during the last glacial maximum and through early Holocene (Marine Isotope Stage 21, MIS 2-1). Sediment ages obtained for the older assemblage with U/Th and IRSL techniques (between 154.74??22.88 and 129.93??7.90 ka b.p. for selected samples) have large errors but both methods yield results consistent with deposition during the penultimate glacial-interglacial transition (MIS 6-5). Based on analyses of field data combined with glaciological modeling, we argue that both sediment complexes formed due to high sediment productivity spurred by paraglacial conditions with glaciers present in the uplands around the Bovec Basin but not extending down to the basin floor. Our study shows that the extent and intensity of direct glacial sedimentation by Late Quaternary glaciers in the region was previously significantly overestimated. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Late Quaternary terrestrial vertebrate coprolites from New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Jamie R.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.

    2014-08-01

    Over the past decade, concerted efforts to find and study Late Quaternary terrestrial vertebrate coprolites in New Zealand have revealed new insights into the diets and ecologies of New Zealand's prehistoric birds. Here, we provide a broader review of the coprolites found in natural (non-archaeological) Late Quaternary deposits from New Zealand. We summarise the morphological diversity of the coprolites, and discuss the taphonomy of the sites in which they are found. Since the 1870s more than 2000 coprolites have been discovered from 30 localities, all restricted to the South Island. The distribution of coprolite localities appears to reflect the presence of geological and climatic factors that enhance the potential for coprolite preservation; coprolites require dry conditions for preservation, and have been found on the ground surface within drafting cave entrances and at shallow (<300 mm) depths beneath rock overhangs with a northerly aspect. We classify the coprolites into eleven morphotypes, each of which may represent a range of different bird and/or reptile species. A review of genetically identified specimens shows that coprolites of different bird species overlap in size and morphology, reinforcing the need for identifications to be based on ancient DNA analysis.

  18. Late Neogene marine Ostracoda from Tjornes, Iceland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.

    1991-01-01

    On the western side of the Tjornes Peninsula in northern Iceland exposures of fossiliferous marine sediments, basalts, and glacial tills record the climatic history of this region of the North Atlantic Ocean. Seventy-five marine ostracode species were recovered from the Pliocene Tjornes sediments and Quaternary sediments known as the Breidavik beds. New species Bensonocythere eirikssoni, Robertsonites williamsi, Hemicythere rekaensis, Thaerocythere mayburyae, Thaerocythere whatleyi, Leptocythere tjornesensis, Tetracytherura bardarsoni, and Cytheromorpha einarssoni are described. -from Author

  19. Global warming: Perspectives from the Late Quaternary paleomammal record

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.W. )

    1993-03-01

    Global warming at the end of the Pleistocene caused significant environmental changes that directly and indirectly effected biotic communities. The biotic response to this global warming event can provide insights into the processes that might be anticipated for future climatic changes. The megafauna extinction may have been the most dramatic alteration of mammalian communities at the end of the Pleistocene. Late Quaternary warming also altered regional diversity patterns for some small mammal guilds without extinction. Reductions in body size for both small and large mammal species were also consequences of these environmental fluctuations. Geographic shifts in the distributions of individual mammal species resulted in changes in species composition of mammalian communities. The individualistic response of biota to environmental fluctuations define some boundary conditions for modeling communities. Understanding these boundary conditions is mandatory in planning for the preservation of biodiversity in the future. Finally, it is essential to determine how global warming will alter seasonal patterns because it is apparent from the paleobiological record that not all Quaternary warming events have been the same.

  20. Asynchronous extinction of late Quaternary sloths on continents and islands

    PubMed Central

    Steadman, David W.; Martin, Paul S.; MacPhee, Ross D. E.; Jull, A. J. T.; McDonald, H. Gregory; Woods, Charles A.; Iturralde-Vinent, Manuel; Hodgins, Gregory W. L.

    2005-01-01

    Whatever the cause, it is extraordinary that dozens of genera of large mammals became extinct during the late Quaternary throughout the Western Hemisphere, including 90% of the genera of the xenarthran suborder Phyllophaga (sloths). Radiocarbon dates directly on dung, bones, or other tissue of extinct sloths place their “last appearance” datum at ≈11,000 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP) or slightly less in North America, ≈10,500 yr BP in South America, and ≈4,400 yr BP on West Indian islands. This asynchronous situation is not compatible with glacial–interglacial climate change forcing these extinctions, especially given the great elevational, latitudinal, and longitudinal variation of the sloth-bearing continental sites. Instead, the chronology of last appearance of extinct sloths, whether on continents or islands, more closely tracks the first arrival of people. PMID:16085711

  1. Asynchronous extinction of late Quaternary sloths on continents and islands.

    PubMed

    Steadman, David W; Martin, Paul S; MacPhee, Ross D E; Jull, A J T; McDonald, H Gregory; Woods, Charles A; Iturralde-Vinent, Manuel; Hodgins, Gregory W L

    2005-08-16

    Whatever the cause, it is extraordinary that dozens of genera of large mammals became extinct during the late Quaternary throughout the Western Hemisphere, including 90% of the genera of the xenarthran suborder Phyllophaga (sloths). Radiocarbon dates directly on dung, bones, or other tissue of extinct sloths place their "last appearance" datum at approximately 11,000 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP) or slightly less in North America, approximately 10,500 yr BP in South America, and approximately 4,400 yr BP on West Indian islands. This asynchronous situation is not compatible with glacial-interglacial climate change forcing these extinctions, especially given the great elevational, latitudinal, and longitudinal variation of the sloth-bearing continental sites. Instead, the chronology of last appearance of extinct sloths, whether on continents or islands, more closely tracks the first arrival of people.

  2. Late Quaternary folding of coral reef terraces, Barbados

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Frederick W.; Mann, Paul

    1991-02-01

    Uplifted late Ouaternary coral reefs on the island of Barbados record folding of the emergent crest of the Lesser Antilles accretionary prism (Barbados Ridge complex) since ca. 1 Ma. Three northeast striking folds are defined by systematic changes in altitudes in the crest of First High Cliff, a mostly constructional reef terrace about 125 ka, and Second High Cliff, a partially erosional reef terrace about 500 ka. The folds have wavelengths of 6 to 8 km and fold axes extend about 10 km. The largest anticline rises to the northeast, where it has been breached by erosion exposing highly deformed Eocene to lower Miocene rocks of the Scotland District. Uplift rates based on heights of the last interglacial First High Cliff range from 0.07 to 0.44 mm/yr. Quaternary folding on Barbados indicates that the crest of the accretionary prism continues to be an active fold belt undergoing northwestsoutheast shortening.

  3. Late Quaternary sea-level changes of the Persian Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokier, Stephen W.; Bateman, Mark D.; Larkin, Nigel R.; Rye, Philip; Stewart, John R.

    2015-07-01

    Late Quaternary reflooding of the Persian Gulf climaxed with the mid-Holocene highstand previously variously dated between 6 and 3.4 ka. Examination of the stratigraphic and paleoenvironmental context of a mid-Holocene whale beaching allows us to accurately constrain the timing of the transgressive, highstand and regressive phases of the mid- to late Holocene sea-level highstand in the Persian Gulf. Mid-Holocene transgression of the Gulf surpassed today's sea level by 7100-6890 cal yr BP, attaining a highstand of > 1 m above current sea level shortly after 5290-4570 cal yr BP before falling back to current levels by 1440-1170 cal yr BP. The cetacean beached into an intertidal hardground pond during the transgressive phase (5300-4960 cal yr BP) with continued transgression interring the skeleton in shallow-subtidal sediments. Subsequent relative sea-level fall produced a forced regression with consequent progradation of the coastal system. These new ages refine previously reported timings for the mid- to late Holocene sea-level highstand published for other regions. By so doing, they allow us to constrain the timing of this correlatable global eustatic event more accurately.

  4. Late Quaternary shelf-margin deltas, northwest Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, J.R.; Berryhill, H.L. Jr.

    1985-12-01

    Interpretations of 35,000 km (21,900 mi) of single-channel, high-resolution, seismic profiles traversing the continental shelf and upper continental slope of the northwest Gulf of Mexico indicate the existence of five late Wisconsinan shelf margin deltas, including the Rio Grande and Mississippi deltas. The deltas were recognized by geomorphic pattern, high-angle clinoform seismic reflections, and associated with buried river systems. Isopach patterns show that the deltas range in size up to 5000 km/sup 2/ (1900 mi/sup 2/) and reach thicknesses of over 180 m (590 ft). The deposits are elongate parallel with depositional strike, indicating subsidence of the shelf margin as a whole. Internal reflection patterns show the deltas to be fluvially dominated. Multilobate structure resulted from both short-term eustatic sea level fluctuations and delta switching. The late Quaternary shelf-margin deltas provide models for analogous deposits in the ancient record. They are primary indicators of the position of ancient shelf margins, and are important for predicting sand occurrence in that environment as well as farther downslope. As exploration moves to the shelf edge and beyond, instability hazards posed by late Wisconsin deltas, as well as older deposits, must be understood and dealt with. 20 figures.

  5. Late quaternary shelf-margin deltas, northwest Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, J.R.; Berryhill, H.L.

    1985-01-01

    Interpretations of 35,000 km (21,900 mi) of single-channel, high-resolution, seismic profiles traversing the continental shelf and upper continental slope of the northwest Gulf of Mexico indicate the existence of five late Wisconsinan shelf margin deltas, including the Rio Grande and Mississippi deltas. The deltas were recognized by geomorphic pattern, high-angle clinoform seismic reflections, and association with buried river systems. Isopach patterns show that the deltas range in size up to 5,000 km/sup 2/ (1,900 mi/sup 2/) and reach thicknesses of over 180 m (590 ft). The deposits are elongate parallel with depositional strike, indicating subsidence of the shelf margin as a whole. Internal reflection patterns show the deltas to be fluvially dominated. Multilobate structure resulted from both short-term eustatic sea level fluctuations and delta switching. The late Quaternary shelf-margin deltas provide models for analogous deposits in the ancient record. They are primary indicators of the position of ancient shelf margins, and are important for predicting sand occurrence in that environment as well as farther downslope. As exploration moves to the shelf edge and beyond, instability hazards posed by late Wisconsinan deltas, as well as older deposits, must be understood and dealt with.

  6. Late Quaternary geomorphology and soils in Crater Flat, Yucca mountain area, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, F.F.; Bell, J.W.; Ramelli, A.R.; Dorn, R.I.; Ku, T.L.

    1995-04-01

    Crater Flat is an alluvium-filled structural basin on the west side of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which is under consideration for a high-level nuclear waste repository. North-trending, late Quaternary faults offset alluvium in Crater Flat both along the canyons of the western flanks of Yucca Mountain and out on the piedmont slope. We believe the initial lack of young offsets at Yucca Mountain was in part due to unrecognized late Quaternary stratigraphy. We hypothesize that alluviation in the Yucca Mountain region was more active during the late Quaternary than previously thought. Several techniques were tried to test this hypothesis. Results are compared with previous soils and surface-exposure dating studies, and correlated to stratigraphy of other late Quaternary units in the southern Nevada, Death Valley, and Mojave Desert areas, and provide new stratigraphic data relevant to understanding climatic-alluvial processes in the Basin and Range Province during the late Quaternary. 76 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Effects of late quaternary climate change on Palearctic shrews.

    PubMed

    Prost, Stefan; Klietmann, Johannes; van Kolfschoten, Thijs; Guralnick, Robert P; Waltari, Eric; Vrieling, Klaas; Stiller, Mathias; Nagel, Doris; Rabeder, Gernot; Hofreiter, Michael; Sommer, Robert S

    2013-06-01

    The Late Quaternary was a time of rapid climatic oscillations and drastic environmental changes. In general, species can respond to such changes by behavioral accommodation, distributional shifts, ecophenotypic modifications (nongenetic), evolution (genetic) or ultimately face local extinction. How those responses manifested in the past is essential for properly predicting future ones especially as the current warm phase is further intensified by rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Here, we use ancient DNA (aDNA) and morphological features in combination with ecological niche modeling (ENM) to investigate genetic and nongenetic responses of Central European Palearctic shrews to past climatic change. We show that a giant form of shrew, previously described as an extinct Pleistocene Sorex species, represents a large ecomorph of the common shrew (Sorex araneus), which was replaced by populations from a different gene-pool and with different morphology after the Pleistocene Holocene transition. We also report the presence of the cold-adapted tundra shrew (S. tundrensis) in Central Europe. This species is currently restricted to Siberia and was hitherto unknown as an element of the Pleistocene fauna of Europe. Finally, we show that there is no clear correlation between climatic oscillations within the last 50 000 years and body size in shrews and conclude that a special nonanalogous situation with regard to biodiversity and food supply in the Late Glacial may have caused the observed large body size. PMID:23505017

  8. Epiguruk: a late Quaternary environmental record from northwestern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, T.D.; Ashley, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    Epiguruk, a prominent bluff along the Kobuk River in northwestern Alaska, exposes a rich depositional record of Quaternary eolian and fluvial sand, with associated loess, paleosols, and periglacial features. Three major complexes of alluvial and eolian deposits are separated by two conspicuous organic-rich paleosols which formed during cool-moist interstadial intervals. Sediments between the two paleosols include eolian, channel, and floodplain deposits that formed during alluviation of the Kobuk River to a height of about 12m above the present level. The youngest depositional complex, which overlies the upper paleosol, is divisible into late Wisconsinan and Holocene components and into fluvial-channel, flood-plain, eolian-dune, sand-sheet, loess, and pond facies. Eolian sand from the active Kobuk sand sea overloaded the river during late Wisconsinan time, causing it to alluviate to about 13m above its modern level. The Holocene record reflects erosion and deposition by a small southern Tributary to the Kobuk River, downcutting by the Kobuk River toward its modern level, and subsequent erosion across a meander belt nearly 8km wide. 66 radiocarbon ages, many from rooted shrubs, provide a firm chronology for the past 35 k.y. at Epiguruk. -from Authors

  9. Late Quaternary carbonate deposition at the bottom of the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Tracy D.; James, Noel P.; Bone, Yvonne; Malcolm, Isabelle; Bobak, Lindsey E.

    2014-05-01

    Carbonate sediments on polar shelves hold great potential for improving understanding of climate and oceanography in regions of the globe that are particularly sensitive to global change. Such deposits have, however, not received much attention from sedimentologists and thus remain poorly understood. This study investigates the distribution, composition, diagenesis, and stratigraphic context of Late Quaternary calcareous sediments recovered in 15 piston cores from the Ross Sea shelf, Antarctica. Results are used to develop a depositional model for carbonate deposition on glaciated, polar shelves. The utility of the deposits as analogs for the ancient record is explored. In the Ross Sea, carbonate-rich lithofacies, consisting of poorly sorted skeletal sand and gravel, are concentrated in the west and along the outer reaches of the continental shelf and upper slope. Analysis of fossil assemblages shows that deposits were produced by numerous low-diversity benthic communities dominated locally by stylasterine hydrocorals, barnacles, or bryozoans. Radiocarbon dating indicates that carbonate sedimentation was episodic, corresponding to times of reduced siliciclastic deposition. Most accumulation occurred during a time of glacial expansion in the lead-up to the Last Glacial Maximum. A more recent interval of carbonate accumulation postdates the early Holocene sea level rise and the establishment of the modern grounding line for the Ross Ice Shelf. When carbonate factories were inactive, fossil debris was subjected to infestation by bioeroders, dissolution, fragmentation, and physical reworking. This study reveals the episodic nature of carbonate deposition in polar settings and a reciprocal relationship with processes that deliver and redistribute siliciclastic debris. Carbonate production is most active during colder periods of the glacial-interglacial cycle, a potential new sedimentological paradigm for polar carbonate systems. Low accumulation rates and long residence

  10. Ecostratigraphic datums and sequence stratigraphy: Application to the marine Quaternary

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.E. ); Neff, E. ); Johnson, G.W. ); Krantz, D. )

    1991-03-01

    The marine Quaternary is characterized by few evolutionary appearances and extinctions of planktonic foraminifera. Because climatic fluctuations are a fundamental characteristic of Pleistocene, however, better stratigraphic resolution of the marine Quaternary can be gained by the establishment of biozones based on climatically controlled foraminiferal assemblages. Utilizing relative abundances of the warm-water Globorotalia menardii complex and temperature-water G. inflata, supplemented by left- and right-coiling varieties of G. truncatulinoides, the authors have subdivided the prezone-W Pleistocene of the tropical Atlantic (Core V16-205), Caribbean Sea (DSDP Core 502B), and northeast Gulf of Mexico (ODP Core 625B, Eureka Core E67-135) into 17 subzones, each with an average duration of {approximately}100,000 yrs. The subzones appear to reflect water mass shifts and disjunct species distributions resulting from expansion and contraction of northern hemisphere ice sheets. Hence, subzonal boundaries should also reflect change in eustatic sea level and sequence boundaries. Indeed, graphic correlation of the subzones, along with biostratigraphic markers and paleomagnetic and oxygen isotope datums, reveals changes in sediment accumulation rate (especially on the continental slope) and missing section, as well as intervals of deformation (core breaks) that affect the occurrence of subzonal boundaries and biostratigraphic markers.

  11. The late Quaternary tephrostratigraphical record of the San Gregorio Magno basin (southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munno, R.; Petrosino, P.

    2007-03-01

    Twenty-one primary pyroclastic layers were found embedded in the lacustrine sediments of the San Gregorio Magno basin (Southern Apennines). These sand-sized layers were characterised by a noticeable juvenile fragments content and by a sharp basal contact with the underlying clay and silt sediments. The tephra layers have been correlated with terrestrial counterparts from well-known eruptive events of the Campanian volcanic area, or with reference layers from deep sea sediment cores and from the Monticchio maar sequence. The investigation of the San Gregorio Magno tephra layers made it possible to deduce that lacustrine sedimentation at San Gregorio Magno basin began before 170k yr BP and lasted at least until the emplacement of the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff, which occurred about 15k yr BP. The tephrochronology allowed determination of the varying sedimentation rate that occurred in the basin. Correlation of the lacustrine record with marine sequences has allowed development of a late Quaternary tephrostratotype for southern Italy. Copyright

  12. Late Quaternary environments, vegetation and agriculture in northern New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horrocks, M.; Nichol, S. L.; Augustinus, P. C.; Barber, I. G.

    2007-03-01

    A sedimentological and plant microfossil history of the Late Quaternary is preserved in two sediment cores from early Polynesian ditch systems on southern Aupouri Peninsula. The study places human activities into a geomorphological and ecological context and allows comparison of natural and anthropogenic effects on two different geological settings: a floodplain and a relatively closed peat swamp. The data fill part of the current gap in the environmental record from northern New Zealand, namely MIS 3 (57k-26k yr BP). There is evidence for an increase in fire frequency in the region after 40k 14C yr BP, suggesting a shift to drier (and cooler) conditions. Pollen records show that conifer-hardwood forest dominated by podocarps (especially Dacrydium) prevailed prior to Polynesian arrival and deforestation within the last millennium, with Fuscopsora insignificant throughout. Both cores show sections with gaps in deposition or preservation, possible flood-stripping of peat during the pre-Holocene and mechanical disturbance by early Polynesians. The identification of prehistoric starch grains and other microremains of introduced Colocasia esculenta (taro) in both cores supports indirect evidence that the ditch systems of far northern New Zealand were used for the extensive cultivation of this crop. Copyright

  13. Possible Late Quaternary faulting in the Benton Hills, southeastern Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, J.R.; Hoffman, D. . Dept. of Natural Resources)

    1993-03-01

    Geologic mapping in the 1930's by Dan Stewart and Lyle McManamy identified numerous faults in the Thebes Gap area of the Benton Hills, including two post-late Quaternary faults (max. of 10 m displacement) along the southeastern escarpment. Recent geologic mapping (Richard Harrison, pers. comm.) suggests dextral strike-slip displacement on most of these faults; some deformation post-dates the Pliocene-Pleistocene Mounds gravel. Small historical earthquake epicenters have been recorded in the Benton Hills area. Review of these data and analysis of the geologic and structural relationships to small- and large-scale drainage and alluvial features suggest tectonic control of the southeastern escarpment of the Benton Hills. The authors propose the coincidence of geologic structures and landforms resembles tectonically active alluvial basin margins, with the Benton Hills southeastern margin representing a fault block uplift escarpment. Future seismic reflection, drilling and trenching studies are planned to determine if the escarpment is fault controlled and of recent origin.

  14. Reconnaissance study of late quaternary faulting along cerro GoDen fault zone, western Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mann, P.; Prentice, C.S.; Hippolyte, J.-C.; Grindlay, N.R.; Abrams, L.J.; Lao-Davila, D.

    2005-01-01

    The Cerro GoDen fault zone is associated with a curvilinear, continuous, and prominent topographic lineament in western Puerto Rico. The fault varies in strike from northwest to west. In its westernmost section, the fault is ???500 m south of an abrupt, curvilinear mountain front separating the 270- to 361-m-high La CaDena De San Francisco range from the Rio A??asco alluvial valley. The Quaternary fault of the A??asco Valley is in alignment with the bedrock fault mapped by D. McIntyre (1971) in the Central La Plata quadrangle sheet east of A??asco Valley. Previous workers have postulated that the Cerro GoDen fault zone continues southeast from the A??asco Valley and merges with the Great Southern Puerto Rico fault zone of south-central Puerto Rico. West of the A??asco Valley, the fault continues offshore into the Mona Passage (Caribbean Sea) where it is characterized by offsets of seafloor sediments estimated to be of late Quaternary age. Using both 1:18,500 scale air photographs taken in 1936 and 1:40,000 scale photographs taken by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1986, we iDentified geomorphic features suggestive of Quaternary fault movement in the A??asco Valley, including aligned and Deflected drainages, apparently offset terrace risers, and mountain-facing scarps. Many of these features suggest right-lateral displacement. Mapping of Paleogene bedrock units in the uplifted La CaDena range adjacent to the Cerro GoDen fault zone reveals the main tectonic events that have culminated in late Quaternary normal-oblique displacement across the Cerro GoDen fault. Cretaceous to Eocene rocks of the La CaDena range exhibit large folds with wavelengths of several kms. The orientation of folds and analysis of fault striations within the folds indicate that the folds formed by northeast-southwest shorTening in present-day geographic coordinates. The age of Deformation is well constrained as late Eocene-early Oligocene by an angular unconformity separating folDed, Deep-marine

  15. Slope Deposits and (Paleo)Soils as Geoarchives to Reconstruct Late Quaternary Environments of Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerkamp, K.; Voelkel, J.; Heine, K.; Bens, O.

    2009-04-01

    Although it is clear that large, rapid temperature changes have occurred during the last glacial-interglacial cycle and the Holocene in southern Africa, we have only limited, and often imprecise, knowledge of how the major moisture-bearing atmospheric circulation systems have reacted to these changes. Using slope deposits and soils as palaeoclimatic geoarchives we will overcome these constraints. The role of many geoarchives in the reconstruction of the Quaternary climate in southern Africa remains controversial, since the paleoclimate data are based on evidence from marine cores, lake sediments, speleothems and spring sinter, fluvial sediments, aeolian sands and dust, colluvium, and coastal sediments. To elucidate climate controls on Quaternary landscape evolution and to use these data for palaeoclimatic reconstructions, thus far slope deposits and soils have been investigated. Climatic controls on these cycles are incompletely known. The availability of results from earlier fieldwork, micromorphology, Optical Stimulated Luminescence (OSL), 14C dating and stable carbon isotope analysis will permit a thorough assessment of slope deposits and soils in terms of their palaeoenvironmental potential. The knowledge of suitable areas and sites in different climatic zones of southern Africa where slope deposits and soils have already been found document the late Quaternary climatic history and even climatic anomalies (e.g. Younger Dryas period at Eksteenfontein, 8.2 ka event at Tsumkwe, 4 ka event in the Auob valley, Little Ice Age in the Namib Desert). The findings will show the late Quaternary history of precipitation fluctuations, of the shifting of the ITCZ (and the ABF - Agulhas-Benguela Front), of wind intensities and directions, and of extreme precipitation events. The project will employ state-of-the-art geoscience methodology to interpret the record of precipitation changes of the late Quaternary, including the shifting of the summer and winter rain belts, the

  16. A model of late quaternary landscape development in the Delaware Valley, New Jersey and Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridge, John C.; Evenson, Edward B.; Sevon, William D.

    1992-03-01

    In the Delaware Valley of New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania the late Quaternary history of colluviation, fluvial adjustment, and soil formation is based on the ages of pre-Wisconsinan soils and glacial deposits which are indicated by feld relationships and inferred from mid-latitude climate changes indicated by marine oxygen-isotope records. The area is divided into four terranes characterized by sandstone, gneiss, slate and carbonate rocks. Since the last pre-Wisconsinan glaciation (> 130 ka, inferred to be late Illinoian), each terrane responded differently to chemical and mechanical weathering. During the Sangamon interglacial stage (˜ 130-75 ka) in situ weathering is inferred to have occurred at rates greater than transportation of material which resulted in the formation of deep, highly weathered soil and saprolite, and dissolution of carbonate rocks. Cold climatic conditions during the Wisconsinan, on the other hand, induced erosion of the landscape at rates faster than soil development. Upland erosion during the Wisconsinan removed pre-Wisconsinan soil and glacial sediment and bedrock to produce muddy to blocky colluvium, grézes litées, and alluvial fans on footslopes. Fluvial gravel and overlying colluvium in the Delaware Valley, both buried by late Wisconsinan outwash, are inferred to represent episodes of early and middle Wisconsinan (˜ 75-25 ka) upland erosion and river aggradiation followed by river degradation and colluvium deposition. Early-middle Wisconsinan colluvium is more voluminous than later colluvium despite colder, possibly permafrost conditions during the late Wisconsinan ˜ 25-10 ka). Extensive colluviation during the early and middle Wisconsinan resulted from a longer (50 kyr), generally cold interval of erosion with a greater availability of easily eroded pre-Wisconsinan surficial materials on uplands than during the late Wisconsinan. After recession of late Wisconsinan ice from its terminal position, soil formation and landscape

  17. A model of late quaternary landscape development in the Delaware Valley, New Jersey and Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridge, J.C.; Evenson, E.B.; Sevon, W.D.

    1992-01-01

    In the Delaware Valley of New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania the late Quaternary history of colluviation, fluvial adjustment, and soil formation is based on the ages of pre-Wisconsinan soils and glacial deposits which are indicated by feld relationships and inferred from mid-latitude climate changes indicated by marine oxygen-isotope records. The area is divided into four terranes characterized by sandstone, gneiss, slate and carbonate rocks. Since the last pre-Wisconsinan glaciation (> 130 ka, inferred to be late Illinoian), each terrane responded differently to chemical and mechanical weathering. During the Sangamon interglacial stage (??? 130-75 ka) in situ weathering is inferred to have occurred at rates greater than transportation of material which resulted in the formation of deep, highly weathered soil and saprolite, and dissolution of carbonate rocks. Cold climatic conditions during the Wisconsinan, on the other hand, induced erosion of the landscape at rates faster than soil development. Upland erosion during the Wisconsinan removed pre-Wisconsinan soil and glacial sediment and bedrock to produce muddy to blocky colluvium, gre??zes lite??es, and alluvial fans on footslopes. Fluvial gravel and overlying colluvium in the Delaware Valley, both buried by late Wisconsinan outwash, are inferred to represent episodes of early and middle Wisconsinan (??? 75-25 ka) upland erosion and river aggradiation followed by river degradation and colluvium deposition. Early-middle Wisconsinan colluvium is more voluminous than later colluvium despite colder, possibly permafrost conditions during the late Wisconsinan ??? 25-10 ka). Extensive colluviation during the early and middle Wisconsinan resulted from a longer (50 kyr), generally cold interval of erosion with a greater availability of easily eroded pre-Wisconsinan surficial materials on uplands than during the late Wisconsinan. After recession of late Wisconsinan ice from its terminal position, soil formation and

  18. Distribution of the Late-Quaternary deformation in Northwestern Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassallo, R.; Mugnier, J.-L.; Vignon, V.; Malik, M. A.; Jayangondaperumal, R.; Srivastava, P.; Jouanne, F.; Carcaillet, J.

    2015-02-01

    Three main Cenozoic thrusts at the front of Northwestern Himalaya have accommodated most of the India-Eurasia convergence across the belt over the last million years and produced the present relief. Their recent tectonic activity is poorly known because of the long period of inaccessibility of the Jammu and Kashmir state, and because the latest and only large earthquake recorded in the region occurred in 1555 AD. We show where the deformation is localized during the Late-Quaternary, and determine shortening rates across the structures by analyzing the geometry and chronology of geomorphic markers. The Main Boundary Thrust in this region ceased moving at least ∼30 ka ago. On the contrary, the more external Medlicott-Wadia Thrust and Main Frontal Thrust, both merging at depth on the sub-flat detachment of the Main Himalayan Thrust, exhibit hectometric-scale deformations accumulated during the last thousands of years. The total shortening rate absorbed by these faults over the last 14-24 ka is between 13.2 and 27.2 mm/yr (11.2 ± 3.8 and 9.0 ± 3.2 mm /yr, respectively). Part of this deformation may be associated to the geometry of the Chenab reentrant, which could generate an extra oblique component. However, the lower bound of our shortening rates is consistent with previously determined geodetic rates. Active deformation on these structures follows an in-sequence/out-of-sequence pattern, with breaking of both ramps being possible for earthquakes triggered on the main detachment.

  19. Late Quaternary denudation, Death and Panamint Valleys, eastern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jayko, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    Late Quaternary denudation rates are constrained from alluvial fans and tributary watersheds in central Death and Panamint Valleys. Preliminary results suggest that the denudation rate is in part a function of the mean watershed elevation. Rainfall increases semi-logarithmically with higher elevation to about 2500 m where it becomes limited by the regional average maximum moisture content of the air mass. The fan volumes show a power-law relation to the watershed areas. The fan volumes ranged from about 250,000 to 4000 km3 and the watershed areas range from about 60,000 to 2000 km2. The upper limit of the denudation rates estimated from small Death Valley fans restricted to the east side of the basin along the Black Mountain frontal scarp range between about 0.03 to 0.18 mm/yr. The maximum is made by assuming most of the clastic accumulation in these fans followed the last highstand of Lake Manly around 24,000 yr which is the least conservative condition. The upper limit of the denudation rates from the Panamint fans range from 0.04 to 0.20 mm/yr assuming the accumulation mainly postdates OIS-4 ???60,000 yr or OIS-2 ???20,000 yr based on the presence or absence of inset shorelines from the last glacial-pluvial maximum. The greater denudation rate associated with the higher mean watershed elevations can mainly be attributed to the greater rainfall at higher elevation. Denudation rates are about a third or less of the Neogene dip-slip rates reported from nearby active faults consistent with relief increasing during dryer periods. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Late Quaternary Productivity Records from Coccolith Sr/Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, H. M.; Burke, A.; Mejia Ramirez, L. M.; Shimizu, N.; Ziveri, P. P. I.

    2014-12-01

    The Sr/Ca of coccoliths has been proposed as an indicator of productivity on the basis of correlation with export production in sediment traps and across upwelling productivity gradients, although the mechanism responsable for this relationship is not clear. For diverse oceanographic settings in the Late Quaternary, we compare coccolith Sr/Ca productivity records with those of other productivity indicators and proxies for mechanisms of productivity forcing. For the Somalia Basin in the Arabian Sea, coccolith Sr/Ca shows a large variation coherent with precessional forcing of wind strength as a mechanism for productivity regulation. During the glacial, the Sr/Ca peak is decoupled from productivity indicators based on organic C accumulation rate. For the Northern Bay of Bengal, coccolith Sr/Ca, Ba/Ti, and relative abundance of G. bulloides, all suggest greater productivity during the interglacial periods, consisted with Nd isotopic evidence for greater riverine nutrient inputs. In the Andaman Sea, coccolith Sr/Ca is highest during precessional maxima in the summer monsoon, consistent with proxies for chemical weathering in the Irawaddy rivershed. In the Eastern Mediterranean, coccolith Sr/Ca is on average low, and peaks during the E. Holocene interval characterized by deposition of sapropel S1. The peak in Sr/Ca however is comparable to the level maintained throughout the Holocene in the Western Mediterranean, where no sapropel occurs, implicating deepwater oxygen levels as a significant contributor to sapropel formation. Finally, on the Agulhas Bank, minima in coccolith Sr/Ca occur during obliquity minima which are periods of anomalous equatorward deposition of IRD in the Southern Ocean. Northward explansion of the westerly wind field during these cold intervals, block upwelling on the Agulhas Bank and result in low productivity.

  1. A rock-magnetic record from Lake Baikal, Siberia: Evidence for Late Quaternary climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, J.A.; King, J.W.; Colman, Steven M.; Kravchinsky, V.A.

    1994-01-01

    Rock-magnetic measurements of sediment cores from the Academician Ridge region of Lake Baikal, Siberia show variations related to Late Quaternary climate change. Based upon the well-dated last glacial-interglacial transition, variations in magnetic concentration and mineralogy are related to glacial-interglacial cycles using a conceptual model. Interglacial intervals are characterized by low magnetic concentrations and a composition that is dominated by low coercivity minerals. Glacial intervals are characterized by high magnetic concentrations and increased amounts of high coercivity minerals. The variation in magnetic concentration is consistent with dilution by diatom opal during the more productive interglacial periods. We also infer an increased contribution of eolian sediment during the colder, windier, and more arid glacial conditions when extensive loess deposits were formed throughout Europe and Asia. Eolian transport is inferred to deliver increased amounts of high coercivity minerals as staining on eolian grains during the glacial intervals. Variations in magnetic concentration and mineralogy of Lake Baikal sediment correlate to the SPECMAP marine oxygen-isotope record. The high degree of correlation between Baikal magnetic concentration/mineralogy and the SPECMAP oxygen-isotope record indicates that Lake Baikal sediment preserves a history of climate change in central Asia for the last 250 ka. This correlation provides a method of estimating the age of sediment beyond the range of the radiocarbon method. Future work must include providing better age control and additional climate proxy data, thereby strengthening the correlation of continental and marine climate records. ?? 1994.

  2. Late quaternary evolution of the Orinoco Delta, Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warne, A.G.; Guevara, E.H.; Aslan, A.

    2002-01-01

    The modern Orinoco Delta is the latest of a series of stacked deltas that have infilled the Eastern Venezuelan Basin (EVB) since the Oligocene. During the late Pleistocene sea-level lowstand (20,000 to 16,000 yrs BP), bedrock control points at the position of the present delta apex prevented the river channel from incising as deeply as many other major river systems. Shallow seismic data indicate that the late Pleistocene Orinoco incised into the present continental shelf, where it formed a braided-river complex that transported sediment to a series of shelf-edge deltas. As sea level rose from 16,000 to 9,500 yrs BP, the Orinoco shoreline shifted rapidly landward, causing shallow-marine waves and currents to form a widespread transgressive sand unit. Decelerating sea-level rise and a warmer, wetter climate during the early Holocene (9,500 to 6,000 yrs BP) induced delta development within the relatively quiet-water environment of the EVB embayment. Sea level approached its present stand in the middle Holocene (6,000 to 3,000 yrs BP), and the Orinoco coast prograded, broadening the delta plain and infilling the EVB embayment. Significant quantities of Amazon sediment began to be transported to the Orinoco coast by littoral currents. Continued progradation in the late Holocene caused the constriction at Boca de Serpientes to alter nearshore and shelf hydrodynamics and subdivide the submarine delta into two distinct areas: the Atlantic shelf and the Gulf of Paria. The increased influence of littoral currents along the coast promoted mudcape development. Because most of the water and sediment were transported across the delta plain through the Rio Grande distributary in the southern delta, much of the central and northwestern delta plain became sediment starved, promoting widespread accumulation of peat deposits. Human impacts on the delta are mostly associated with the Volca??n Dam on Can??o Manamo. However, human activities have had relatively little effect on the

  3. Late Quaternary Megafaunal Extinctions in Northern Eurasia: Latest Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Anthony

    2010-05-01

    Anthony J. Stuart1 & Adrian M. Lister2 1 Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, UK. Email: tony.s@megafauna.org.uk 2 Department of Palaeontology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK. Email: a.lister@nhm.ac.uk. The global extinction of many spectacular species of megafauna (large terrestrial mammals, together with a few large reptiles and birds) within the last c. 50,000 years (Late Quaternary) has been attributed on the one hand to ‘overkill' by human hunters and on the other to environmental change. However, in spite of more than half a century of active interest and research the issue remains unresolved, largely because there are insufficient dated records of megafaunal species for most parts of the world. Northern Eurasia is an especially fruitful region in which to research megafaunal extinctions as it has a wealth of megafaunal material and crucially most extinctions occurred well within the range of radiocarbon dating. Our approach, in a series of projects over the last decade funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), involves amassing radiocarbon dates made directly on megafaunal material from across the entire region: a) by submitting a substantial number of samples (so far c. 500 dates) for AMS dating at Oxford (ORAU); b) obtaining AMS dates from colleagues working on aDNA projects; and c) carefully screening (‘auditing') dates from the literature. The dates (calibrated using OxCal) are plotted as time-sliced maps and as chronological/geographical charts. In our previous work we targeted a range of extinct species from Northern Eurasia: woolly mammoth, woolly rhinoceros, giant deer, cave bear (in collaboration with Martina Pacher), cave lion, and spotted hyaena (which survives today only in Sub-Saharan Africa). By this means we have established a reliable chronology for these extinctions which we are able to compare with the climatic, vegetational and

  4. Micropaleontologic record of late Pliocene and Quaternary paleoenvironments in the northern Albemarle Embayment, North Carolina, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Culver, S.J.; Farrell, K.M.; Mallinson, D.J.; Horton, B.P.; Willard, D.A.; Thieler, E.R.; Riggs, S.R.; Snyder, S.W.; Wehmiller, J. F.; Bernhardt, C.E.; Hillier, C.

    2008-01-01

    Micropaleontological data provide a strong actualistic basis for detailed interpretations of Quaternary paleoenvironmental change. The 90??m-thick Quaternary record of the Albemarle Embayment in the mid-Atlantic coastal plain of the USA provides an excellent opportunity to use such an approach in a region where the details of Quaternary environmental change are poorly known. The foraminiferal record in nine cores from the northern Outer Banks, east of Albemarle Sound, North Carolina, indicates the deposition of subhorizontal, mostly open-marine early to late Pleistocene units unconformably upon a basement of late Pliocene reduced-oxygen, fine-grained, shelf-basin deposits. Pollen data record several warm-cool fluctuations within the early to mid-Pleistocene deposits. Diatom data indicate that some fresh and brackish-water units occur within the generally open-marine Pleistocene succession. A channel cut by the paleo-Roanoke River during the last glacial sea-level lowstand occurs in the northern part of the study area. Pollen indicates that the basal fluvial valley fill accumulated in cooler than modern climate conditions in the latest Pleistocene. Overlying silts and muds accumulated under cool climatic, estuarine conditions according to diatom and pollen data. Radiocarbon ages from the estuarine deposits indicate that the bulk of these sediments accumulated during the latest Pleistocene. The estuarine channel-fill deposits are overlain by Holocene open-marine sands deposited as the rising sea transgressed into the estuary approximately 8.5 to 9.0??kyr BP. Within the barrier island drill cores of this study, fully marine sedimentation occurred throughout the Holocene. However, immediately west of the present barrier island, mid- to late Holocene estuarine deposits underlie the modern Albemarle Sound. The islands that currently form a continuous barrier across the mouth of Albemarle Sound have a complex history of Holocene construction and destruction and large

  5. Paleoclimatic Comparisons Between Three Late Quaternary Amazonian Lacustrine Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordeiro, R. C.; Martins, G. S.; Fontes, D.; Turcq, B.; Sifeddine, A.; Seoane, J. S.; Conceição, M. G.; Barbosa, M.; Rodrigues, R. A.; Moreira, L.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years many records made in the cores of ice has shown significant changes in temperature associated with changes in atmospheric composition. The most notable changes occur between the glacials and interglacials cycles. Climatic changes in tropical areas during the global climatic changes is highly debatable. Even today, there are many controversies about the extent of the occurrence of dry weather in the Amazon during glacial periods. In the region of São Gabriel da Cachoeira, polynic diagram of Lagoa da Pata showed that vegetation remained with elements of forest trees, with replacement of elements of cold weather during the last glacial. In Carajás were observed substitution forest to savannah, during the last glacial. We present here a comparison of organic and inorganic geochemical sediment record of tree distinct Amazonian sectors: Morro dos Seis Lagos (AM) is located at 0°17‧9.68″ N and 66°40‧36.18″ W (Lagoa da Pata, LPT V core position) located in the forested upper Rio Negro basin in humid climate area (~3000 mm/yr), Carajás Region at 5°50‧ to 6°35‧ S and 49°30‧ to 52°00‧ situated 800 m high in lateritic crust in south eastern Amazonia (1800mm/yr) and São Benedito Region (PA) at 9°7'0.87"S and 56°16'0.00"W (Lago do Saci, Sac01/05 core position) in south Amazonia with a mean precipitation as Carajás around 1800 mm/yr. A comparison of these records reveals important changes in the environmental history of the Amazonian hydrological regime during the late Quaternary. The results of geochemical analyses reveal three hydrological and climatic regimes from 50,000 cal yr BP until the present. The first phase, between 50,000 until ~25,000 cal yr BP, was characterized by relatively high lake level as suggested by high organic carbon values in Lagoa da Pata and Carajás principally in the beginning of the period. In Saci Lake in the beginning of the record (35,500 cal yr BP) high values of TOC were observed relatively to last

  6. Variable Quaternary chemical weathering fluxes and imbalances in marine geochemical budgets.

    PubMed

    Vance, Derek; Teagle, Damon A H; Foster, Gavin L

    2009-03-26

    Rivers are the dominant source of many elements and isotopes to the ocean. But this input from the continents is not balanced by the loss of the elements and isotopes through hydrothermal and sedimentary exchange with the oceanic crust, or by temporal changes in the marine inventory for elements that are demonstrably not in steady state. To resolve the problem of the observed imbalance in marine geochemical budgets, attention has been focused on uncertainties in the hydrothermal and sedimentary fluxes. In recent Earth history, temporally dynamic chemical weathering fluxes from the continents are an inevitable consequence of periodic glaciations. Chemical weathering rates on modern Earth are likely to remain far from equilibrium owing to the physical production of finely ground material at glacial terminations that acts as a fertile substrate for chemical weathering. Here we explore the implications of temporal changes in the riverine chemical weathering flux for oceanic geochemical budgets. We contend that the riverine flux obtained from observations of modern rivers is broadly accurate, but not representative of timescales appropriate for elements with oceanic residence longer than Quaternary glacial-interglacial cycles. We suggest that the pulse of rapid chemical weathering initiated at the last deglaciation has not yet decayed away and that weathering rates remain about two to three times the average for an entire late Quaternary glacial cycle. Taking into account the effect of the suggested non-steady-state process on the silicate weathering flux helps to reconcile the modelled marine strontium isotope budget with available data. Overall, we conclude that consideration of the temporal variability in riverine fluxes largely ameliorates long-standing problems with chemical and isotopic mass balances in the ocean.

  7. Seismic stratigraphy and late Quaternary shelf history, south-central Monterey Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chin, J.L.; Clifton, H.E.; Mullins, H.T.

    1988-01-01

    The south-central Monterey Bay shelf is a high-energy, wave-dominated, tectonically active coastal region on the central California continental margin. A prominent feature of this shelf is a sediment lobe off the mouth of the Salinas River that has surface expression. High-resolution seismic-reflection profiles reveal that an angular unconformity (Quaternary?) underlies the entire shelf and separates undeformed strata above it from deformed strata below it. The Salinas River lobe is a convex bulge on the shelf covering an area of approximately 72 km2 in water depths from 10 to 90 m. It reaches a maximum thickness of 35 m about 2.5 km seaward of the river mouth and thins in all directions away from this point. Adjacent shelf areas are characterized by only a thin (2 to 5 m thick) and uniform veneer of sediment. Acoustic stratigraphy of the lobe is complex and is characterized by at least three unconformity-bounded depositional sequences. Acoustically, these sequences are relatively well bedded. Acoustic foresets occur within the intermediate sequence and dip seaward at 0.7?? to 2.0??. Comparison with sedimentary sequences in uplifted onshore Pleistocene marine-terrace deposits of the Monterey Bay area, which were presumably formed in a similar setting under similar processes, suggests that a general interpretation can be formulated for seismic stratigraphic patterns. Depositional sequences are interpreted to represent shallowing-upwards progradational sequences of marine to nonmarine coastal deposits formed during interglacial highstands and/or during early stages of falling sea level. Acoustic foresets within the intermediate sequence are evidence of seaward progradation. Acoustic unconformities that separate depositional sequences are interpreted as having formed largely by shoreface planation and may be the only record of the intervening transgressions. The internal stratigraphy of the Salinas River lobe thus suggests that at least several late Quaternary

  8. Stratigraphical and palynological appraisal of the Late Quaternary mangrove deposits of the west coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaran, K. P. N.; Nair, K. M.; Shindikar, Mahesh; Limaye, Ruta B.; Padmalal, D.

    2005-11-01

    The organic deposits derived from the mangrove swamps form reliable stratigraphic markers within the Late Quaternary sequence of Kerala-Konkan Basin. Three generations of such deposits have been identified. The older one is dated to around 43,000-40,000 14C yr B.P., with a few dates beyond the range of radiocarbon. The younger ones date from the Middle Holocene to latest Pleistocene (10,760-4540 14C yr B.P.) and the Late Holocene (<4000 14C yr B.P.). Pollen analyses confirm that the deposits are mostly derived from the mangrove vegetation. Peat accumulation during the period 40,000-28,000 14C yr B.P. can be correlated with the excess rainfall, 40-100% greater than modern values, of the Asian summer monsoon. The low occurrence of mangrove between 22,000 and 18,000 14C yr B.P. can be attributed to the prevailing aridity and/or reduced precipitation associated worldwide with Last Glacial Maximum, because exposure surfaces and ferruginous layers are commonly found in intervals representing this period. The high rainfall of 11,000-4000 14C yr B.P. is found to be the most significant as the mangrove reached an optimum growth around 11,000 14C yr B.P. but with periods of punctuated weaker monsoons. From the present and previous studies, it has been observed that after about 5000 or 4000 14C yr B.P., the monsoons became gradually reduced leading to drying up of many of the marginal marine mangrove ecosystems. A case study of Hadi profile provided an insight to the relevance of magnetic susceptibility (χ) to record the ecological shift in Late Holocene.

  9. Late Quaternary tectonics in the inner Northern Apennines (Siena Basin, southern Tuscany, Italy) and their seismotectonic implication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogi, Andrea; Capezzuoli, Enrico; Martini, Ivan; Picozzi, Matteo; Sandrelli, Fabio

    2014-05-01

    Defining the most recent Quaternary tectonics represents a challenging task for neotectonic, palaeoseismological and seismotectonic studies. This paper focuses on an integrated approach to reconstructing the latest Quaternary deformation affecting the northern part of the Siena Basin (inner Northern Apennines, i.e., southern Tuscany, Italy) near the town of Siena, and to discuss the seismological implications. Field work and structural and stratigraphic analyses, coupled with the interpretation of reflection seismic lines, have been combined to define the geometry, kinematics and age of mesoscopic to map-scale faults which have affected the mainly Quaternary continental and Pliocene marine deposits. The resulting dataset describes a tectonic setting characterized by coeval SW- and NW-trending transtensional and normal faults, respectively, dissecting alluvial sediments younger than 23.9 ± 0.23 ka. Seismic interpretation sheds light on the geometrical setting of the faults at deeper levels, down to 1-2 km, and provides support for the presence of a wide brittle shear zone defined by conjugated fault segments, locally giving rise to an asymmetrical negative flower-like structure. Faults and their damage zones have controlled (and still control) the discharge of gas vents (mainly CO2 and H2S) and hydrothermal circulation (which deposits travertine) since at least 23.216 ± 0.124 ka. The resulting complete data set provides support for our description of the Neogene-Quaternary tectonics which were active until the late Quaternary, providing additional information about the seismotectonic framework of an area characterized by low seismicity and generally low-magnitude earthquakes (M < 4), but having experienced significant seismic events over the last few centuries.

  10. Tropical Rain Forest and Climate Dynamics of the Atlantic Lowland, Southern Brazil, during the Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behling, Hermann; Negrelle, Raquel R. B.

    2001-11-01

    Palynological analysis of a core from the Atlantic rain forest region in Brazil provides unprecedented insight into late Quaternary vegetational and climate dynamics within this southern tropical lowland. The 576-cm-long sediment core is from a former beach-ridge "valley," located 3 km inland from the Atlantic Ocean. Radio-carbon dates suggest that sediment deposition began prior to 35,000 14C yr B.P. Between ca. 37,500 and ca. 27,500 14C yr B.P. and during the last glacial maximum (LGM; ca. 27,500 to ca. 14,500 14C yr B.P.), the coastal rain forest was replaced by grassland and patches of cold-adapted forest. Tropical trees, such as Alchornea, Moraceae/Urticaceae, and Arecaceae, were almost completely absent during the LGM. Furthermore, their distributions were shifted at least 750 km further north, suggesting a cooling between 3°C and 7°C and a strengthening of Antarctic cold fronts during full-glacial times. A depauperate tropical rain forest developed as part of a successional sequence after ca. 12,300 14C yr B.P. There is no evidence that Araucaria trees occurred in the Atlantic lowland during glacial times. The rain forest was disturbed by marine incursions during the early Holocene period until ca. 6100 14C yr B.P., as indicated by the presence of microforaminifera. A closed Atlantic rain forest then developed at the study site.

  11. A chronology of alluvial fan response to Late Quaternary sea level and climate change, Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Richard J. J.; Candy, Ian; Skourtsos, Emmanuel

    2016-09-01

    To better understand how fluvial systems respond to late Quaternary climatic forcing OSL and U-series dating was applied to stratigraphically significant sedimentary units within a small (<6.5 km2) alluvial fan system (the Sphakia fan) in southwest Crete. The resultant chronology (comprising 32 OSL and U-series ages) makes Sphakia fan one of the best dated systems in the Mediterranean and suggests that Cretan fans responded to climate in two ways. First, during the transitions between Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5a/4 and MIS 2/1 Sphakia fan was characterised by significant entrenchment and distal shift in the zone of deposition. It is proposed that the phases of entrenchment were driven by sea level induced base level fall during MIS 5a/4 and landscape stabilisation during the onset of the current interglacial (MIS 2/1). Second, with the exception of these two entrenchment episodes fan alluviation occurred across the entire last interglacial/glacial cycle in all climatic settings i.e. interglacials, interstadials and stadials. It is likely that the topographic setting of the catchment supplying sediment to Sphakia fan maintained high sediment transfer rates during most climatic settings enabling fan aggradation to occur except during major climatic driven transitions i.e. major sea level fall and postglacial vegetation development.

  12. Sequence stratigraphy and composition of late quaternary shelf-margin deltas, Northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R.A.; Suter, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    High-resolution seismic profiles and foundation borings from the northwestern Gulf of Mexico record the physical attributes and depositional histories of several late Quaternary sequences that were deposited by wave-modified, river-dominated shelf-margin deltas during successive periods of lowered sea level. Each progressively younger deltaic sequence is thinner and exhibits a systematic decrease in the abundance and concentration of sand, which is attributed to a shift in the axes of trunk streams and greater structural influence through time. Our study shows that (1) contemporaneous structural deformation controlled the thickness of each sequence, the oblique directions of delta progradation, the axes of major fluvial channels, and the geometries of delta lobes at the shelf margin; (2) sedimentation was rapid in response to rapid eustatic fluctuations and structural influence; (3) boundaries of these high-frequency sequences are the correlative conformities of updip fluvial incision and coincide with downlap surfaces at the shelf margin; (4) the downlap surfaces are not true surfaces, but zones of parallel reflections that become progressively higher and younger in the direction of progradation; (5) the downlap zones are composed of marine muds that do not contain the high concentrations of shell debris expected in condensed sections; (6) possible paleosols capping the two oldest sequences are regressive surfaces of subaerial exposure that were preserved during transgressions; and (7) no incised valleys or submarine canyons breach the paleoshelf margin, even though incised drainages were present updip and sea level curves indicate several periods of rapid fall.

  13. Late quaternary evolution of Ashtamudi-Sasthamkotta lake systems of Kerala, south west India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, K. M.; Padmalal, D.; Kumaran, K. P. N.; Sreeja, R.; Limaye, Ruta B.; Srinivas, Reji

    2010-03-01

    Sedimentological and palynological analysis of two borehole samples collected from the confluence of Kallada River with the Ashtamudi lake in the south west coast of India have been addressed while ascertaining the late quaternary evolution. Of the two borehole samples, the one collected from Pangod (9°03'N-76°42'E) reveals a fining upward sequence with medium to coarse sand (3.05 m) at base, organic carbon rich, silt and fine sand dominated sediments (2 m) at the middle and yellowish brown, muddy sediments (3.2 m) at the top. The middle layer embeds a suite of partly carbonized, sub-fossil logs of wet evergreen to semi-evergreen vegetation. The palynoflora of this layer reveals that the depositional site is within the tidal limit and deposition occurred under high precipitation and atmospheric humidity. The similarity in 14C dates of a wood at 5 m bgl (7490 ± 90 yrs BP) and the embedding sediments (7480 ± 80 yrs BP) indicate quick burial of the riparian vegetation. The West Kallada borehole (9°30'N-76°37'E) reveals Middle to Late Holocene sequence of clayey silt (6250 ± 110 yrs BP-3880 ± 80 yrs BP) and sand resting unconformably over greyish white, clayey sand with pebbles and granules derived from laterite provenance. Palynological analysis shows that the Holocene sedimentation took place under marine/nearly marine environment and later changed to brackish water and finally to freshwater environment. Marine transgression ˜6000 yrs BP coupled with heavy rainfall in the hinterlands was responsible for faster sedimentation in the region. The heavy mineral contents, especially opaques, garnet and sillimanite in the sediment samples of the study area as well as the bathymetric configuration of the Ashtamudi, Sasthamkotta and Chelupola lakes reiterate the fact that these lakes have been evolved from an embayment consequent to incomplete/partial silting up during Early to Middle Holocene higher sea levels and also under high rainfall of the Holocene climatic

  14. Deep-sea ostracode species diversity: Response to late Quaternary climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; DeMartino, D.M.; Dwyer, G.S.; Rodriguez-Lazaro, J.

    1999-01-01

    Late Quaternary ostracode assemblages from the North Atlantic Ocean were studied to establish the effect of climatic changes of the past 210,000 yr (marine oxygen isotope stages 7-1) on deep-sea benthic biodiversity and faunal composition. Two-hundred and twenty five samples from the Chain 82-24 Core 4PC (41??43'N, 32??51'W, 3427 m water depth) on the western Mid-Atlantic Ridge revealed high amplitude fluctuations in ostracode abundance and diversity coincident with orbital and suborbital scale climate oscillations measured by several paleoceanographic proxy records. During the past 210,000 yr, ostracode biodiversity as measured by species number (S) and the Shannon-Weaver index, H(S), oscillated from H(S) = 0.4 during glacial periods (marine isotope stages 6, 5d, 5b, 4, and 2) to H(S) = 1.1 during interglacial and interstadial periods (stages 7, 5e, 5c, 5a, 3 and 1). A total of 23 diversity peaks could be recognized. Eleven of these signify major periods of high diversity [H(S) > 0.8, S = 10-21] occurring every 15-20 ka. Twelve were minor peaks which may represent millennial-scale diversity oscillations. The composition of ostracode assemblages varies with Krithe-dominated assemblages characterizing glacial intervals, and Argilloecia-Cytheropteron characterizing deglacials, and trachyleberid genera (Poseidonamicus, Echinocythereis, Henryhowella, Oxycythereis) abundant during interglacials. Diversity and faunal composition changes can be matched to independent deep-sea paleoceanographic tracers such as benthic foraminiferal carbon isotopes, Krithe trace elements (Mg/Ca ratios), and to North Atlantic region climate records such as Greenland ice cores. When interpreted in light of ostracode species' ecology, these faunal and diversity patterns provide evidence that deep-sea benthic ecosystems experience significant reorganization in response to climate changes over orbital to millennial timescales.

  15. The influence of climate on species distribution over time and space during the late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, F.; Di Febbraro, M.; Melchionna, M.; Castiglione, S.; Saggese, F.; Serio, C.; Mondanaro, A.; Passaro, F.; Loy, A.; Raia, P.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the effect of climate on the composition of communities and its change over time and space is one of the major aims in ecology and paleoecology. Herein, we tackled on this issue by studying late Quaternary large mammal paleocommunities of Eurasia. The late Quaternary was a period of strong environmental instability, especially characterized by the occurrence of the last glacial maximum (LGM). We used community phylogenetics and joint species distribution models in order to understand the factors determining paleocommunity composition in the late Quaternary. Our results support the existence of strong climatic selection operating on the LGM fauna, both through the disappearance of warm-adapted species such as Elephas antiquus, Hippopothamus amphibious, and Stephanorhinus hemitoechus, and by setting the stage for the existence of a community characterized by cold-adapted large mammals. Patterns of abundance in the fossil record, co-occurrence between species pairs, and the extent of climatic forcing on faunal composition, differ between paleocommunities, but not between extinct and extant species, which is consistent with the idea that climate change, rather than the presence of humans, exerted a major effect on the survival of the late Quaternary megafauna.

  16. Late Quaternary paleoenvironmental records from the Chatanika River valley near Fairbanks (Alaska)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirrmeister, Lutz; Meyer, Hanno; Andreev, Andrei; Wetterich, Sebastian; Kienast, Frank; Bobrov, Anatoly; Fuchs, Margret; Sierralta, Melanie; Herzschuh, Ulrike

    2016-09-01

    Perennially-frozen deposits are considered as excellent paleoenvironmental archives similar to lacustrine, deep marine, and glacier records because of the long-term and good preservation of fossil records under stable permafrost conditions. A permafrost tunnel in the Vault Creek Valley (Chatanika River Valley, near Fairbanks) exposes a sequence of frozen deposits and ground ice that provides a comprehensive set of proxies to reconstruct the late Quaternary environmental history of Interior Alaska. The multi-proxy approach includes different dating techniques (radiocarbon-accelerator mass spectrometry [AMS 14C], optically stimulated luminescence [OSL], thorium/uranium radioisotope disequilibria [230Th/U]), as well as methods of sedimentology, paleoecology, hydrochemistry, and stable isotope geochemistry of ground ice. The studied sequence consists of 36-m-thick late Quaternary deposits above schistose bedrock. Main portions of the sequence accumulated during the early and middle Wisconsin periods. The lowermost unit A consists of about 9-m-thick ice-bonded fluvial gravels with sand and peat lenses. A late Sangamon (MIS 5a) age of unit A is assumed. Spruce forest with birch, larch, and some shrubby alder dominated the vegetation. High presence of Sphagnum spores and Cyperaceae pollen points to mires in the Vault Creek Valley. The overlying unit B consists of 10-m-thick alternating fluvial gravels, loess-like silt, and sand layers, penetrated by small ice wedges. OSL dates support a stadial early Wisconsin (MIS 4) age of unit B. Pollen and plant macrofossil data point to spruce forests with some birch interspersed with wetlands around the site. The following unit C is composed of 15-m-thick ice-rich loess-like and organic-rich silt with fossil bones and large ice wedges. Unit C formed during the interstadial mid-Wisconsin (MIS 3) and stadial late Wisconsin (MIS 2) as indicated by radiocarbon ages. Post-depositional slope processes significantly deformed both, ground

  17. Chronology of late Quaternary glaciation in the Pindar valley, Alaknanda basin, Central Himalaya (India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Rameshwar; Nawaz Ali, S.; Agarwal, K. K.; Rastogi, Saurabh Kumar; Krishna, Kalyan; Srivastava, Pradeep

    2013-04-01

    Palaeoglacial reconstruction based on geomorphological mapping in the Pindari glacier valley, Alaknanda basin (Central Himalaya), has revealed five glacial stages with decreasing magnitude. The oldest and most extensive stage-I glaciation deposited sediments at ˜2200 masl (Khati village). The stage-II glaciation was around 7 km long and luminescence dated to 25 ± 2 ka, and has deposits at 3200 masl (Phurkia village). Stage-III glaciation is represented by degraded linear moraine ridges and is dated to 6 ± 1 ka and its remnants can be found around 3850 masl. A sharp crested crescentic moraine extending from around 3650 masl to 3900 masl is attributed to stage-IV glaciation and is dated to 3 ± 1 ka. Following this, there appears to have been a gradual recession in Pindari glacier as indicated by four sharp crested unconsolidated moraines (stage-V) on the valley floor which abuts the stage-IV moraine. We suggest that the stage-I glaciation occurred during the cool and wet Marine Isotopic Stage 3/4 (MIS-3/4), stage-II glaciations began with the onset of MIS-2, whereas the stage-III and IV glaciations occurred during the mid-to late Holocene (MIS-1). We speculate that the first sharp crested unconsolidated moraines around 3600 masl correspond to the later phase of the Little Ice Age (LIA). Historical data suggests that the remaining three ridges represent Pindari glacier snout positions at 1906, 1958 and 1965. We argue that the late Quaternary glaciations in the Pindar valley were modulated by changing insolation and summer monsoon intensity including the LIA, whereas the 20th century recessional trends can be attributed to post-LIA warming.

  18. Stable isotope records of Late Quaternary climate and hydrology from Mediterranean lakes: the ISOMED synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, N.; Jones, M. D.; Benkaddour, A.; Eastwood, W. J.; Filippi, M. L.; Frogley, M. R.; Lamb, H. F.; Leng, M. J.; Reed, J. M.; Stein, M.; Stevens, L.; Valero-Garcés, B.; Zanchetta, G.

    2008-12-01

    Lake isotope records can be used to assess the spatial coherency of Late Quaternary climate change across the circum-Mediterranean region. We place modern and palaeo-data within a simple conceptual lake response model to show that the isotope hydrology of most Mediterranean lakes has been influenced strongly by water balance, even in those systems that are chemically dilute (i.e. freshwater). δ18O data on biogenic and endogenic carbonates from 24 lake basins are used to reconstruct multi-millennial-scale trends since the LGM. While it is difficult to make direct comparisons between lake records in terms of single climatic parameters, coherent regional isotopic trends can be identified. During glacial times Mediterranean lakes deposited carbonates isotopically heavier in δ18O compared to the Holocene, partly due to source area effects. Isotopic enrichment was most marked during intervals corresponding to the H1 and Younger Dryas events, confirming that Late Pleistocene cold stages in the North Atlantic region were marked by aridity around much of the Mediterranean. Almost all Mediterranean lake records shifted to more depleted isotopic values during the Last Glacial-Interglacial Transition (LGIT). This shift is the reverse of the trend which characterised the same transition in lakes from northern and central Europe, and suggests that temperature changes were not an important direct driver of Mediterranean lake isotopic records over glacial-interglacial timescales. In the early Holocene, many lakes in the eastern part of the region were more depleted isotopically than in recent millennia. This corresponds with marine sapropel formation, both chronologically and geographically, and implies that increases in local rainfall contributed significantly to the creation of a freshwater lid and anoxia in the East Mediterranean Sea. In contrast, no such pattern is currently apparent from lake isotope records from the West Mediterranean, suggesting a possible NW-SE contrast

  19. Discussion: a critique of Possible waterways between the Marmara Sea and the Black Sea in the late Quaternary: evidence from ostracod and foraminifer assemblages in lakes İznik and Sapanca, Turkey, Geo-Marine Letters, 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaltırak, Cenk; Ülgen, Umut B.; Zabcı, Cengiz; Franz, Sven Oliver; Ön, Sena Akçer; Sakınç, Mehmet; Çağatay, M. Namık; Alpar, Bedri; Öztürk, Kurultay; Tunoğlu, Cemal; Ünlü, Selma

    2012-06-01

    The identification of past connection routes between the Black Sea and the Sea of Marmara, other than the traditional one through to the Bosphorus Strait, would be of considerable interest to the international scientific community. Nazik et al. (Geo-Mar Lett 31:75-86 (2011) doi:10.1007/s00367-010-0216-9) suggest the possibility of two alternative waterway connections via lakes Sapanca and İznik. Their Black Sea to Sea of Marmara multi-connection hypothesis, which is based on undated marine fossils collected in both lakes from surficial grab samples, conflicts with many earlier studies. In this contribution, the hypothesis and the underlying data are discussed in the light of previous tectonic, sedimentological and limnological findings showing that it is impossible to have had marine connections through lakes Sapanca and İznik during the last 11.5 ka. Global sea-level trends and tectonic uplift rates would accommodate a connection between the Sea of Marmara and Lake İznik in the middle Pleistocene. Uplift rates for the northern block of the North Anatolian Fault, when compared with the global sea-level curve, clearly indicate that there cannot have been a connection through the İzmit Gulf-Lake Sapanca-Sakarya Valley for at least the past 500 ka. Moreover, borehole sediments along the western shores of Lake Sapanca, which reach down to the bedrock, do not contain any marine fossils.

  20. Late Quaternary seismic stratigraphy and structure of the western insular shelf margin of Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzlik, M.; Mann, P.; Abrams, L.; Grindlay, N.

    2005-12-01

    725 km of high-resolution seismic data were collected over the insular shelf of western Puerto Rico to better understand its late Quaternary depositional and structural history. Due to low tectonic uplift rates of onshore areas in this region, well dated late Quaternary sediments and corals have only been identified in a few scattered onland localities around Puerto Rico. Seismic data from the Rio Anasco delta area of western Puerto Rico reveals four main units with characteristic stratal reflection terminations that total about 25 m in thickness. Because of a lack of well information, age estimates of these late Quaternary units are based on correlations with sea level curves derived from dated coral samples from Puerto Rico, St. Croix, and Antigua. Units include: Unit 1 - a gently folded and faulted basal section correlated to the Oliogene-early Pliocene? carbonate shelf of Puerto Rico; deeper penetration, industry MCS lines show that these rocks are deformed in a broad EW-trenching arch; Unit 2 - chaotic channel fill deposits in incisions related to the lowstand equivalent of the Rio Anasco likely formed during the Last Glacial Maximum about 25-15 ka; Unit 3 - roughly stratified deposits onlapping the top of Unit 2; these are interpreted as an estuarine facies deposited during Holocene sea level transgression; Unit 4 - highly stratified deposits related to progradation of the Anasco delta during sea level rise. The base of unit 4 is a downlap surface interpreted as a maximum flooding surface likely formed about 6 ka. East-northeast-striking faults are observed breaking the younger late Quaternary units in three separate zones off the west coast of Puerto Rico. Onland continuations of these faults have not been identified likely due to cultural overprint of natural scarps on late Quaternary floodplains.

  1. Late Quaternary stratigraphy of the eastern Gulf of Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Bacchus, T.S. . Oceanography Dept.); Belknap, D.F. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    Five distinct seismic facies describe the glacial, glacial-marine and postglacial sediments in the eastern Gulf of Maine. Regional cross-sections clearly document differences in the glacial-marine and postglacial stratigraphy between basins south of Truxton Swell, and Jordan basin to its north. Till occurs throughout the region as a thin veneer within basins, but thickens significantly over the ridges and swells separating basins. The ubiquitous presence of till suggests grounded ice occupied this area some time in the recent past. Ice-proximal glacial-marine (PGM) facies sediments of varying thickness mantle the entire area, occurring as a draped unit over pre-existing topography. Transitional glacial-marine (TGM) facies also occur as a draped unit, but they show onlap onto basin margins. Sediments of the TGM facies are restricted to areas south of Truxton Swell. Ice-distal glacial-marine (DGM) facies sediments also mantle the entire area, but they occur primarily as a ponded, infilling unit. The nature and distribution of these glacial-marine facies within the eastern Gulf of Maine documents changes in the environment of deposition during deglaciation. In the authors model PGM facies sediments are considered to represent settling through the water column of coarse material from the base of an ice shelf. TGM facies sediments indicate retreat of this ice margin coupled with calving of large icebergs with significant amounts of coarse debris, DGM facies sediments indicate further retreat of the ice margin and a lessening of the influence of icebergs. Stepwise ice-margin retreat from south to north through a series of grounding lines and associated pinning points is evident by these time transgressive sedimentary facies that can be correlated across the region.

  2. Late Quaternary faulting and historic seismicity in the western Lake Mead area, Nevada, Arizona and California

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.W.; O'Connel, D.R. )

    1993-04-01

    As part of a regional seismic hazard study for Reclamation dams on the northern lower Colorado River, the age and distribution of known and suspected late Quaternary faults were investigated and historic seismicity was analyzed for the western Lake Mead area. Late Quaternary faults in the area consist of the Mead Slope, Black Hills, Frenchman Mountain, and California Wash faults. Geologic mapping and scarp profiles indicate that of these late Quaternary faults, the Black Hills fault displays evidence for the youngest (probably mid-Holocene) surface faulting. No information about the ages of older events was obtained for any of the faults; however, the ages of the most recent surface-rupturing events for individual faults suggest recurrence intervals of tens of thousands of years for specific faults and regional recurrence rates of several thousand years for M[sub 3] [>=] 6 1/2 events. Since 1936 when Hoover Dam was completed and the initial filling of Lake Mead began, the Boulder Basin area, the largest and deepest part of Lake Mead, has experienced abundant seismic activity that includes some of the largest historic earthquakes in southern Nevada (at least 21 M 4 events and one M 5). Based on earthquake locations from early networks (1937--1950) and those from temporary networks operating in 1975--1976 and 1988, earthquakes are clearly associated with the northeast-striking Mead Slope and Black Hills faults; one of the few associations of seismicity with late Quaternary faults in the Basin and Range. However, earthquakes also appear to be associated with the Fortification fault, a north-striking fault with no evidence of Quaternary surface faulting. Focal mechanisms for some of the 1975--1976 and 1988 events (all events M [<=] 3) suggest active strike-slip/oblique-slip motion on north-striking faults and normal/oblique-slip motion on northeast-striking structures.

  3. Late Quaternary environments and biogeography in the Great Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R. S.; Mead, J. I.

    1982-01-01

    Plant and animal remains found in packrat ( Neotoma spp.) middens and cave fill from the eastern and southern Great Basin region reveal the presence of subalpine conifers and boreal mammals at relatively low elevations during the Late Wisconsin. Limber pine ( Pinus flexilis) and bristlecone pine ( P. longaeva) were important in the late Pleistocene plant communities throughout this region. Spruce ( Picea cf. engelmannii) and common juniper ( Juniperus communis) were present in some of the more northerly localities, and Douglas fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii) and white fir ( Abies concolor) were present in southern and eastern localities. Single needle pinyon pine ( Pinus monophylla), common across this region today, was apparently not present north of the Sheep Range of southern Nevada during the Late Wisconsin. Pikas ( Ochotona cf. princeps), small boreal mammals present in only a few Great Basin mountain ranges today, were common throughout the region. Heather voles ( Phenacomys cf. intermedius) have been found in two cave fill deposits in Nevada, though they are unknown in the Great Basin today. Limber and bristlecone pines are generally restricted to rocky substrates in modern subalpine habitats in the Great Basin, and this may also have been the case when these plants grew at lower elevations during the Late Wisconsin. Subalpine conifers were present on the rock outcrops sampled by the packrat middens, but shrub communities, perhaps dominated by sagebrush ( Artemisia spp.), may have been present on alluvial valley-bottom substrates. Forested habitats would thus have been isolated habitat islands, as they are today. Boreal small mammals, including pikas and heather voles, were able to colonize the Great Basin mountain ranges during the late Pleistocene. We suggest that these mammals were able to survive in the intervening valley-bottoms under a cool-summer climatic regime, and that continuous forest or woodland corridors were not necessary for migration.

  4. Measuring Late Quaternary Ursid Diminution in the Midwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolverton, Steve; Lyman, R. Lee

    1998-05-01

    Paleobiologists generally agree that within the past 10,000 yr North American black bears ( Ursus americanus) have decreased in body and tooth size. Some researchers infer that diminution was gradual and continuous; thus, one might infer that a specimen is old if it is larger than an average-size modern bear. Ursid remains recovered in the 1950s from Lawson Cave, Missouri, that are larger than some modern bears have been reported to date to the late Pleistocene, but association with modern taxa, taphonomic considerations, and a radiocarbon date of 200 yr B.P. indicate that they are modern. Modern specimens from Lawson Cave and other parts of the American Midwest are relatively large compared to modern North American black bears from other areas, suggesting that many supposed late Pleistocene bears from the area might be modern also.

  5. Mapping the late Quaternary evolution of the lower Mississippi Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugerud, R. A.; Simon, K. M.; James, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    The lower Mississippi Valley (LMV) extends from Cape Girardeau to Natchez and from Little Rock to Memphis. Extensive Quaternary terraces within the LMV have been considered to reflect downstream changes in base level (global sea level) and (or) upstream changes in water and sediment input because of glaciation. We suggest that the first-order control on terrace development was glacial-isostatic adjustment (GIA). Observed variation in heights of Quaternary alluvial surfaces at Memphis is 50 m (Rittenour et al., 2007). GIA modeling by Clark et al. (1994) predicted vertical displacement of as much as 130 m at Memphis over the last 18,000 years. ICE-5G models predict smaller displacement and reinforce the viability of GIA as the primary cause of LMV aggradation and incision. Existing analyses of LMV terraces are built on geomorphic maps by Saucier and colleagues (1974, 1994; Autin et al., 1991) that were interpreted from aerial photographs and inch-to-the-mile contour maps. Geomorphic mapping from high-resolution DEMs is more accurate, more rapid, and more reproducible than mapping from aerial photography and intermediate-resolution contours. Working from lidar DEMs (1-5 m XY resolution) and the 10 m National Elevation Dataset (NED) DEM largely derived from 1:24,000 scale contours, Haugerud is mapping the geomorphology of the LMV at ~1:500,000 scale. Goals are to explore the GIA-terrace hypothesis and improve the geomorphic and stratigraphic context for studies of New Madrid seismicity. Mapping leads to several observations: 1. The Holocene floodplain of the Mississippi River onlaps older surfaces. The river appears to be filling a hole created by collapse of the Laurentide forebulge. Continued filling of this accommodation space will, barring human intervention, enable the river to abandon its course through Thebes Gap in favor of a lower-elevation route through Oran Gap. 2. Within Holocene meander belts, younger levee crests are higher than older levee crests. The

  6. Late Quaternary depositional history of the Albemarle Embayment, NC

    SciTech Connect

    Riggs, S.R.; Klingman, C.R.; Wyrick, R.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The depositional history of Albemarle Embayment documents deep fluvial incisement by the Roanoke River system during glacial episodes and subsequent infilling by fluvial-estuarine-barrier island sediment sequences during interglacial transgressions. Unraveling the Holocene time slice will help reconstruct complex Quaternary records of multiple incisement and backfilling. A network of drill holes, vibracores, and seismic data suggest a four-phase infill history over the last 12,000 years. (1) Lower Roanoke River: (a) Bedload-charged, braided fluvial systems deposited basal sequences of sand and gravel prior to [approximately]5,000 BP. (b) Aggradational, swamp-forest floodplains developed [approximately]5,000 BP and bound the modern incised channels characterized by minimal bedload sedimentation. (2) Albemarle sound: (a) In the central basin, the basal channel sand sequence is overlain by an open estuarine, highly interlaminated sand and mud sequence that accumulated between [approximately]12,000 BP and [approximately]2,000 BP. (b) Depositional patterns within this unit suggest multiple oscillations of Holocene sea level that caused channel reincisement and subsequent backfilling. (c) Present estuarine marsh sedimentation began in protected coastal areas [approximately]5,000 BP. (3) Outer banks: (a) Barrier islands first influenced sedimentation in the area after [approximately]5,000 BP producing a semi-enclosed Albemarle Sound. (b) Deposition within the central basin shifted to uniform organic-rich muds that grade eastward into overwash and inlet sands. (4) Modern man: (a) colonial development within the drainage basins in the early 1700's AD produced a wedge of orange mud in inner Albemarle Sound. (b) Dam construction in the 1950's terminated orange mud deposition and the central basin reverted to organic-rich mud sedimentation.

  7. Late quaternary plant zonation and climate in southeastern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Betancourt, J.L.

    1984-01-31

    Plant macrofossils from packrat middens in two southeastern Utah caves outline development of modern plant zonation from the late Wisconsin. Allen Canyon Cave (2195 m) and Fishmouth Cave (1585 m) are located along a continuous gradient of outcropping Navajo Sandstone that extends from the Abajo Mountains south to the San Juan River. By holding the site constant, changes in the floral composition for a plot of less than one hectare can be observed, even if sporadically, over tens of millennia. At Allen Canyon Cave, Engelmann spruce-alpine fir forest was replaced by the present vegetation consisting of pinyon-juniper woodland on exposed ridgetops and cliffside stands of Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, and aspen. Xerophytic woodland plants such as pinyon, plains prickly pear, and narrowleaf yucca arrived sometime in the middle Holocene between 7200 and 3400 B.P. At Fishmouth Cave, Utah juniper in Holocene middens replaced blue spruce, limber pine, Douglas fir, and dwarf and Rocky Mountain junipers in late Wisconsin samples. Quantitative climatic estimates are derived for the late Wisconsin by applying vertical gradients for temperature and precipitation to the amount of vegetation depression. The Fishmouth Cave sequence indicates a minimum lowering of 850 m for blue spruce, limber pine, and dwarf juniper. A depression of at least 700 m for Engelmann spruce and alpine fir is suggested for the Allen Canyon locality. Use of conservatively low gradients for stations below 2080 m yields a 3-4 C cooling from present mean annual temperature and 35 to 60% more rainfall than today. Steeper gradients associated with more mountainous terrain suggest a 5 C lowering in temperature and up to 120% increase over modern precipitation. 81 references, 6 figures, 10 tables.

  8. Synthesis of Late Cretaceous-Quaternary tectonic, sedimentary and magmatic processes and basin formation related to episodic subduction-collision in the easternmost Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Alastair; Kinnaird, Timothy; McCay, Gillian; Palamakumbura, Romesh; Taslı, Kemal

    2015-04-01

    Mesozoic oceanic crust of the easternmost Mediterranean has experienced northwards subduction during Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic, either continuously or discontinuously based on kinematic evidence. Much of the existing information on sedimentation within the easternmost Mediterranean oceanic basin comes from the non-emplaced continental margins of the Levant and North Africa. In addition, sedimentary basins related to plate convergence are recorded along the northern margin of the Southern Neotethyan ocean, mainly in the Kyrenia Range of northern Cyprus and its extension into the Misis Mountains of southern Turkey, coupled with the adjacent submerged areas. In a setting of only incipient continental collision such as the easternmost Mediterranean the sedimentary basins would be expected to remain entirely submarine. In contrast, the Kyrenia Range has been strongly uplifted and subaerially exposed during Late Pliocene-Quaternary time. This allows the recognition of a number of discrete phases of sedimentary basin formation: 1. Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian): silicic volcanism to create a subaqueous volcaniclastic apron; 2. Maastrichtian-Paleocene: pelagic carbonate deposition interspersed with proximal gravity flows and within-plate type alkaline volcanics; 3. Early Eocene: large-scale sedimentary melange (olistostrome) emplacement; 4. Late Eocene-Late Miocene: terrigenous gravity-flow deposition in a deep-water fault dissected 'fore arc' setting. Initial, Late Eocene non-marine coarse clastic alluvial fan deposition was succeeded by Oligocene-Miocene deep-marine siliciclastic gravity flow deposits, fining and shallowing upwards during the Late Miocene; 5. Messinian: localised precipitation of evaporites in small fault-controlled basins; 6. Pliocene: shallow-marine siliciclastic-carbonate deposition in a shelf-depth, overall regressive setting; 7. Latest Pliocene to mid-Pleistocene: gravitational accumulation of coarse talus along a strongly uplifting

  9. The strength and characteristics of interglacials in the late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, N.; Wolff, E. W.

    2009-04-01

    Analysis of the EPICA Dome C ice core has provided high resolution records of climate variability over the last 800ka and reveal, for example, variations in the duration, 'shape' and strength of interglacial and glacial periods during this time. This variability is also seen in other palaeoclimate records such as foraminiferal ^18O records; however no synthesis of available 800ka ice, marine and terrestrial records has yet been made to compare and contrast interglacial and glacial characteristics. Records of ^D, CO2, CH4, temperature and Ca flux from EDC, globally distributed high resolution benthic & planktonic ^18O records, loess records from the Chinese Loess Plateau, Lake Baikal biosilica and the Tenaghi Philippon pollen record have been selected for their length, resolution, continuity and spatial distribution. Marine records have been aligned with the LR04 stack using the graphic alignment program Match to enable comparison with ice core records on the EDC3 timescale, as the differences between these two age models have already been evaluated. Terrestrial records are evaluated on their existing published age models. Variations in age model construction, orbital tuning of age models and graphic alignment of the records mean it is not possible to address phasing (and duration) in this study. A suite of characteristics from these records, including average and peak values of interglacial and glacial intensity & termination magnitude, are being compared to discover what the similarities and differences can suggest about the character and mechanisms of long term climate change over the last 800ka. Termination magnitude is defined as simply the difference between peak (average) interglacial and glacial values. Rampfit was used to objectively estimate average glacial and interglacial values, and the beginning and end of the glacial-interglacial transition and uncertainties for these parameters. We are thus able to derive spatial patterns of the strength and

  10. The strength and characteristics of late Quaternary interglacials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Nicola; Wolff, Eric

    2010-05-01

    Analysis of the EPICA Dome C ice core has provided high resolution records of climate variability over the last 800ka and reveal, for example, variations in the duration, ‘shape' and strength of interglacial and glacial periods during this time. This variability is also seen in other palaeoclimate records such as foraminiferal δ18O records; however no synthesis of available 800ka ice, marine and terrestrial records has yet been made to compare and contrast interglacial and glacial characteristics. Records of δD, CO2, CH4, temperature and Ca flux from EDC, globally distributed high resolution benthic & planktonic δ18O records, loess records from the Chinese Loess Plateau, Lake Baikal biosilica and the Tenaghi Philippon pollen record have been selected for their length, resolution, continuity and spatial distribution. Marine records have been aligned with the LR04 stack using the graphic alignment program Match to enable comparison with ice core records on the EDC3 timescale, as the differences between these two age models have already been evaluated. Terrestrial records are evaluated on their existing published age models. Variations in age model construction, orbital tuning of age models and graphic alignment of the records mean it is not possible to address phasing (and duration) in this study. A suite of characteristics from these records, including average and peak values of interglacial and glacial intensity & termination magnitude, are being compared to discover what the similarities and differences can suggest about the character and mechanisms of long term climate change over the last 800ka. Termination magnitude is defined as simply the difference between peak (average) interglacial and glacial values. Rampfit was used to objectively estimate average glacial and interglacial values, and the beginning and end of the glacial-interglacial transition and uncertainties for these parameters. We are thus able to derive spatial patterns of the strength and

  11. Biotic response to late Quaternary rapid climate switches in Santa Barbara Basin: Ecological and evolutionary implications

    SciTech Connect

    Cannariato, K.G.; Kennett, J.P.; Behl, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Benthic foraminiferal assemblages from Santa Barbara Basin exhibit major faunal and ecological switches associated with late Quaternary millennial- to decadal-scale global climate oscillations. Repeated turnovers of entire faunas occurred rapidly (<40--400 yr) without extinction or speciation in conjunction with Dansgaard-Oeschger shifts in thermohaline circulation, ventilation, and climate, confirming evolutionary model predictions of Roy et al. Consistent faunal successions of dysoxic taxa during successive interstadials reflect the extreme sensitivity and adaptation of the benthic ecosystem to the rapid environmental changes that marked the late Quaternary and possibly other transitional intervals in the history of the Earth`s ocean-atmosphere-cryosphere system. These data support the hypothesis that broad segments of the biosphere are well adapted to rapid climate change.

  12. Stable isotopes in collagen and Late Quaternary carnivore palaeoecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocherens, Hervé

    2010-05-01

    Several taxa of large carnivores co-occurred during the late Pleistocene in the steppe-tundra ecosystem, such as wolf Canis lupus, cave lion Panthera leo spelaea, cave hyaena Crocuta crocuta spelaea, brown bear Ursus arctos and cave bear Ursus spelaeus and Ursus ingressus. This abundance of taxa belonging to the same guild raises questions about niche partitioning, especially in terms of dietary specialization and prey selection. Observations of the dietary ecology of the extant relatives of these late Pleistocene carnivores does not provide unambiguous answers as these populations live under very different environmental conditions where other potential prey species are present, but it appears that most of these modern large carnivores are relatively flexible in their prey selection. Palaeontological investigations dealing with faunal associations and activity marks on fossil bones also have their limitations, such as taphonomic biases (palimpsests rather than biological associations) and do not allow the quantification of consumption of various preys. In contrast, carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures of bone collagen depend directly on those of the average diet. Since different potential prey species occurring in the steppe-tundra exhibit consistent isotopic differences for these chemical elements, it is possible to relate the carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures measured in fossil carnivores with the preferential consumption of some prey species. Some amount of quantification can be provided using modified versions of mixing models developed for modern ecosystems. In addition, this isotopic approach is individual-based and it is therefore possible to investigate intra- and inter-population differences in prey selection, as well as possible chronological trends and differences linked to genetic differences by combining isotopic and ancient DNA studies on the same material. The isotopic approach has already shown that among the tested large carnivores, cave

  13. Origin of the late quaternary dune fields of northeastern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Stafford, T.W.; Cowherd, S.D.; Mahan, S.A.; Kihl, R.; Maat, P.B.; Bush, C.A.; Nehring, J.

    1996-01-01

    Stabilized eolian deposits, mostly parabolic dunes and sand sheets, cover much of the landscape of northeastern Colorado and adjacent parts of southwestern Nebraska in four geographically distinct dune fields. Stratigraphic and soil-geomorphic relations and accelerator radiocarbon dating indicate that at least three episodes of eolian sand movement occurred between 27 ka and 11 ka, possibly between 11 ka and 4 ka, and within the past 1.5 ka. Thus, eolian sand deposition took place under both glacial and interglacial climatic conditions. In the youngest episodes of eolian sand movement, Holocene parabolic dunes partially buried Pleistocene sand sheet deposits. Late Holocene sands in the Fort Morgan and Wray dune fields, to the south of the South Platte River, have trace element ratios that are indistinguishable from modern South Platte River sands, but different from Ogallala Formation bedrock, which has previously been cited as the main source of dune sand on the Great Plains. Sands in the Greeley dune field, to the north of the South Platte River, have trace element concentrations that indicate a probable Laramie Formation source. Measurements of parabolic dunes indicate paleowinds from the northwest in all dune fields, in good agreement with resultant drift directions calculated for nearby weather stations. Thus, paleowinds were probably not significantly different from present-day winds, and are consistent with a South Platte River source for the Fort Morgan and Wray dune fields, and a Laramie Formation source for the Greeley dune field. Sand accumulated downwind of the South Platte River to form the Fort Morgan dune field. In addition, sand was also transported farther downwind over the upland formed by the calcrete caprock of the Ogallala Formation, and deposited in die lee of the upland on the southeast side. Because of high wind energy, the upland itself served as a zone of sand transport, but little or no sand accumulation took place on this surface. These

  14. Foraminiferal biostratigraphy of the shelf edge: a key to late Quaternary paleoenvironments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C. Wylie; Sidner, B.R.

    1976-01-01

    Foraminiferal assemblages in eight piston cores from West Flower Garden Bank at the edge of the Texas continental shelf contain a nearly complete record of late Quaternary paleoclimatic and geologic events. The faunas are divisible into three distinct successive biofacies on the basis of both planktonic and benthic foraminifers: the basal Inflata Facies accumulated in cool shallow waters during late Pleistocene glaciation; the middle Crassaformis Facies represents a deepening sea that had warming surface waters; the upper Cultrata Facies is characteristic of the Holocene outer-shelf environment. Sea level was at -73 m and -53 m at the end of deposition of the Inflata and Crassaformis Facies, respectively. The biostratigraphic events at West Flower Garden Bank can be accurately correlated with those recorded in the middle and inner shelf and in deep-sea cores. The sequence of late Quaternary sea level and paleotemperature changes in the northern Gulf of Mexico can thereby be reconstructed. Eventually, this knowledge can be integrated with similar data from the shelf edge in other parts of the world to help bridge the gap between the known Quaternary record of the deep sea and that of the continents. ?? 1976.

  15. Tectonic control on the Late Quaternary hydrography of the Upper Tiber Basin (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuti, Marco; Bonini, Marco; Moroni, Adriana

    2016-09-01

    We examine the intramontane Upper Tiber Basin in the Northern Apennines (central Italy), where sub-orthogonal fault systems forced river deviation and the abandonment of alluvial fans since the late Middle Pleistocene. Archaeological material, spanning the Middle Palaeolithic-Iron Age, was collected mostly from the surface of the Late Quaternary alluvial landforms and related deposits (MUP and HOL units). This information contributed to the partial dating of seven major stages of drainage development. Normal faults parallel and transverse to the basin trend were active at different times and conditioned the valley pattern of the Middle (MUP1-2)-Late (MUP3) Pleistocene Tiber, Singerna, Sovara and Tignana rivers, which still flow today into the basin. The MUP1 and the MUP3 fans were beheaded by the displacement of their feeder valleys along the basin-transverse Carmine and Montedoglio faults. In some cases, the former feeder rivers underwent stream piracy but their courses mostly deviated in response of the topographic gradient created by faulting, as well as through the incision of new valleys that exploited the lithological contrast along the fault lines. The MUP3 Tignana fan was abandoned mostly due to the activity of the basin-parallel, dip-slip Sansepolcro fault. Subsidence driven by the basin-parallel Anghiari and Sansepolcro fault systems also provided the accommodation space for the MUP3 and HOl1-2 Afra fans between Late Pleistocene and early-mid Holocene. This study exemplifies the interplay between longitudinal and transverse fault systems, and the Late Quaternary hydrographic evolution of an extensional basin settled in the axial zone of an active fold-and-thrust belt. Although the faulting has interacted with the forcing exerted by the Late Quaternary climate fluctuations on the basin drainage systems, the tectonic rates are sufficiently high to represent the prime controller on base-level change and drainage routing patterns.

  16. Soil-landscape development and late Quaternary environmental change in coastal Estremadura, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Michael; Haws, Jonathan; Benedetti, Michael; Bicho, Nuno

    2015-04-01

    This poster integrates soil-landscape analysis with archaeological survey and paleoenvironmental reconstruction. Soils in surface and buried contexts in Estremadura, Portugal, provide evidence of landscape stability and instability, relative age relationships between landforms, and general paleoenvironmental conditions during the late Quaternary. These factors provide insight into the distribution and condition of Paleolithic archaeological sites and help understand the record of human settlement in the region. Late Pleistocene and Holocene dunes extend inland approximately 10 km from coastal source regions. Surface soils in Holocene dunes under maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) forest exhibit A, E, C/Bh and A, C horizon sequences and classify as Quartzipsamments. Surface soils in late Pleistocene dunes exhibit A, E, Bh, Bhs, Bs horizon sequences and classify as Haplorthods. Both Pleistocene and Holocene dunes commonly bury a heavily weathered soil formed in calcareous sandstone. The boundary between underlying buried soils and overlying surface soils is characterized by a lag deposit of medium to coarse, moderately-rounded gravels, underlain immediately by subsurface Bt and Bss horizons. The lag deposit and absence of buried A horizons both indicate intense and/or prolonged surface erosion prior to burial by late Quaternary dunes. Soil-geomorphic relationships therefore suggest at least two distinct episodes of dune emplacement and subsequent landscape stability following an extensive episode late Pleistocene landscape instability and soil erosion. A conceptual model of soil-landscape evolution through the late Quaternary and Holocene results from the integration of soil profile data, proxy paleoenvironmental data, and the partial record of human settled as revealed in the archaeological record.

  17. Late Quaternary environmental change in the Bonneville basin, western USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madsen, D.B.; Rhode, D.; Grayson, D.K.; Broughton, J.M.; Livingston, S.D.; Hunt, J.; Quade, Jay; Schmitt, D.N.; Shaver, M. W.

    2001-01-01

    Excavation and analyses of small animal remains from stratified raptor deposits spanning the last 11.5 ka, together with collection and analysis of over 60 dated fossil woodrat midden samples spanning the last 50 ka, provide a detailed record of changing climate in the eastern Great Basin during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. Sagebrush steppe dominated the northern Bonneville basin during the Full Glacial, suggesting that conditions were cold and relatively dry, in contrast to the southern basin, which was also cold but moister. Limber pine woodlands dominated ???13-11.5 ka, indicating increased dryness and summer temperatures ???6-7??C cooler than present. This drying trend accelerated after ???11.5 ka causing Lake Bonneville to drop rapidly, eliminating 11 species of fish from the lake. From ???11.5-8.2 ka xerophytic sagebrush and shadscale scrub replaced more mesophilic shrubs in a step-wise fashion. A variety of small mammals and plants indicate the early Holocene was ???3??C cooler and moister than at present, not warmer as suggested by a number of climatic models. The diversity of plants and animals changed dramatically after 8.2 ka as many species disappeared from the record. Some of the upland species returned after ???4 ka and Great Salt Lake became fresh enough at ???3.4 and ???1.2 ka to support populations of Utah chub. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  18. Magnetic fabrics indicating Late Quaternary seismicity in the Himalayan foothills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayangondaperumal, R.; Dubey, Ashok Kumar; Senthil Kumar, B.; Wesnousky, S. G.; Sangode, S. J.

    2010-10-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) study was performed on soft sediment samples from a trenched fault zone across the Himalayan frontal thrust (HFT), western Himalaya. AMS orientation of K min axes in the trench sediments is consistent with lateral shortening revealed by geometry of deformed regional structures and recent earthquakes. Well-defined vertical magnetic foliation parallel to the flexure cleavage in which a vertical magnetic lineation is developed, high anisotropy, and triaxial ellipsoids suggest large overprinting of earthquake-related fabrics. The AMS data suggest a gradual variation from layer parallel shortening (LPS) at a distance from the fault trace to a simple shear fabric close to the fault trace. An abrupt change in the shortening direction ( K min) from NE-SW to E-W suggests a juxtaposition of pre-existing layer parallel shortening fabric, and bending-related flexure associated with an earthquake. Hence the orientation pattern of magnetic susceptibility axes helps in identifying co-seismic structures in Late Holocene surface sediments.

  19. Late Quaternary human settlement patterning in the Jebel Gharbi.

    PubMed

    Garcea, Elena A A; Giraudi, Carlo

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents the latest results of geoarchaeological research on the Upper Pleistocene sequence in the Jebel Gharbi (previously called Jebel Nafusah), a mountain range located in Tripolitania, northwestern Libya. Numerous archaeological sites are found adjacent to springs that formed as a consequence of tectonic activities. The springs originated when Upper Pleistocene earthquakes produced ground displacements that created water outlets, some of which are still active. Springs are spread all along the massif and at the foot of the mountains in Jebel Gharbi. We suggest that they offered attractive resources to populations coming from drier parts of North Africa or the near-by Sahara. The earliest sites associated with the springs include Aterian lithic techno-complexes that have been dated between 80,000 and 40,000 BP. Since then, these springs have attracted many populations, as documented here by settlements belonging to the Later Stone Age (Upper Palaeolithic), Iberomaurusian (Late Upper Palaeolithic or Epipalaeolithic), Neolithic, Roman period, and present time.

  20. Late Quaternary dynamics of southern Africa's winter rainfall zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Brian M.; Meadows, Michael E.

    2007-10-01

    Variations in the nature and extent of southern Africa's winter rainfall zone (WRZ) have the potential to provide important information concerning the nature of long-term climate change at both regional and hemispheric scales. Positioned at the interface between tropical and temperate systems, southern Africa's climate is influenced by shifts in the Intertropical Convergence Zone, the westerlies, and the development and position of continental and oceanic anticyclones. Over the last glacial-interglacial cycle substantial changes in the amount and seasonality of precipitation across the subcontinent have been linked to the relative dominance of these systems. Central to this discussion has been the extent to which the region's glacial climates would have been affected by expansions of Antarctic sea-ice, equatorward migrations of the westerlies, more frequent/intense winter storms and an expanded WRZ. This paper reviews the developing body of evidence pertaining to shifts in the WRZ, and the evolution of ideas that have been presented to explain the patterns observed. Dividing the region into three separate axes, along the western and southern margins of the continent and across the interior into the Karoo and the Kalahari, a range of evidence from both terrestrial sites and marine cores is considered, and potential expansions of the WRZ expansions are explored. Despite the limitations of many of the region's proxy records, a coherent pattern has begun to develop of a significantly expanded WRZ during phases of the last glacial period, with the best-documented being between 32-17 ka. While more detailed inferences will require the recovery and analysis of longer and better-dated records, this synthesis provides a new baseline for further research in this key region.

  1. Late Neogene and Quaternary evolution of the northern Albemarle Embayment (mid-Atlantic continental margin, USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mallinson, D.; Riggs, S.; Thieler, E.R.; Culver, S.; Farrell, K.; Foster, D.S.; Corbett, D.R.; Horton, B.; Wehmiller, J. F.

    2005-01-01

    Seismic surveys in the eastern Albemarle Sound, adjacent tributaries and the inner continental shelf define the regional geologic framework and provide insight into the sedimentary evolution of the northern North Carolina coastal system. Litho- and chronostratigraphic data are derived from eight drill sites on the Outer Banks barrier islands, and the Mobil #1 well in eastern Albemarle Sound. Within the study area, parallel-bedded, gently dipping Miocene beds occur at 95 to > 160 m below sea level (m bsl), and are overlain by a southward-thickening Pliocene unit characterized by steeply inclined, southward-prograding beds. The lower Pliocene unit consists of three seismic sequences. The 55-60 m thick Quaternary section unconformably overlies the Pliocene unit, and consists of 18 seismic sequences exhibiting numerous incised channel-fill facies. Shallow stratigraphy (< 40 m bsl) is dominated by complex fill patterns within the incised paleo-Roanoke River valley. Radiocarbon and amino-acid racemization (AAR) ages indicate that the valley-fill is latest Pleistocene to Holocene in age. At least six distinct valley-fill units are identified in the seismic data. Cores in the valley-fill contain a 3-6 m thick basal fluvial channel deposit that is overlain by a 15 m thick unit of interlaminated muds and sands of brackish water origin that exhibit increasing marine influence upwards. Organic materials within the interlaminated deposits have ages of 13-11 cal. ka. The interlaminated deposits within the valley are overlain by several units that comprise shallow marine sediments (bay-mouth and shoreface environments) that consist of silty, fine- to medium-grained sands containing open neritic foraminifera, suggesting that this area lacked a fronting barrier island system and was an open embayment from ???10 ka to ???4.5 ka. Seismic data show that initial infilling of the paleo-Roanoke River valley occurred from the north and west during the late Pleistocene and early Holocene

  2. Late Quaternary sedimentary features of Bear Lake, Utah and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smoot, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Bear Lake sediments were predominantly aragonite for most of the Holocene, reflecting a hydrologically closed lake fed by groundwater and small streams. During the late Pleistocene, the Bear River flowed into Bear Lake and the lake waters spilled back into the Bear River drainage. At that time, sediment deposition was dominated by siliciclastic sediment and calcite. Lake-level fluctuation during the Holocene and late Pleistocene produced three types of aragonite deposits in the central lake area that are differentiated primarily by grain size, sorting, and diatom assemblage. Lake-margin deposits during this period consisted of sandy deposits including well-developed shoreface deposits on margins adjacent to relatively steep gradient lake floors and thin, graded shell gravel on margins adjacent to very low gradient lake-floor areas. Throughout the period of aragonite deposition, episodic drops in lake level resulted in erosion of shallow-water deposits, which were redeposited into the deeper lake. These sediment-focusing episodes are recognized by mixing of different mineralogies and crystal habits and mixing of a range of diatom fauna into poorly sorted mud layers. Lake-level drops are also indicated by erosional gaps in the shallow-water records and the occurrence of shoreline deposits in areas now covered by as much as 30 m of water. Calcite precipitation occurred for a short interval of time during the Holocene in response to an influx of Bear River water ca. 8 ka. The Pleistocene sedimentary record of Bear Lake until ca. 18 ka is dominated by siliciclastic glacial fl our derived from glaciers in the Uinta Mountains. The Bear Lake deep-water siliciclastic deposits are thoroughly bioturbated, whereas shallow-water deposits transitional to deltas in the northern part of the basin are upward-coarsening sequences of laminated mud, silt, and sand. A major drop in lake level occurred ca. 18 ka, resulting in subaerial exposure of the lake floor in areas now covered by

  3. Late Quaternary paleosols and climate change in southern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Monger, H.C. . Agronomy Dept.); Cole, D.R. ); Gish, J.W. )

    1992-01-01

    A climate change toward more arid conditions in the southwest US has been postulated for a period around 7 ka. In southern NM, deposition of the youngest generation of alluvial fans surrounding arid mountains began around 7 ka based on radiocarbon dates of charcoal. The deposition of these fans has been interpreted as evidence for aridity because plant cover would have declined, thus making the landscape more susceptible to erosion and sedimentation. Isotopes of pedogenic calcite and pollen content in well-preserved paleosols associated with alluvial fans provide additional evidence for testing the aridity hypothesis. Buried paleosols, ranging from 23,070 [+-] 190 to 9,070 [+-] 70 yr BP, contain pedogenic calcite that is isotopically heavier in carbon than calcite in soils younger than 7 ka. The buried paleosols have a mean delta C-13 values of [minus]2.2 [+-] 0.8 [per thousand] (PDP). In contrast, soils younger than 7 ka have a man delta C-13 value of [minus]7.8 [+-] 1.3 [per thousand]. The higher delta C-13 values in buried paleosols may reflect the presence of abundant C[sub 4] grasses, similar to the present vegetation in the southern High Plains, which would have curtailed erosion. Pollen analysis reveals that buried paleosols contain more grass pollen than soils younger than 7 ka, which contain high proportions of desertscrub pollen taxa. delta O-18 values of pedogenic calcite are similar for the buried paleosols ([minus]5.2 [+-] 0.3 [per thousand] PDB) and soils younger than 7 ka ([minus]5.1 [+-] 0.6 [per thousand]). These values indicate a relatively constant mean annual temperature of approximately 14C, which prevailed throughout late Pleistocene and Holocene time.

  4. Quantitative estimates of Asian dust input to the western Philippine Sea in the mid-late Quaternary and its potential significance for paleoenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhaokai; Li, Tiegang; Clift, Peter D.; Lim, Dhongil; Wan, Shiming; Chen, Hongjin; Tang, Zheng; Jiang, Fuqing; Xiong, Zhifang

    2015-09-01

    We present a new high-resolution multiproxy data set of Sr-Nd isotopes, rare earth element, soluble iron, and total organic carbon data from International Marine Global Change Study Core MD06-3047 located in the western Philippine Sea. We integrate our new data with published clay mineralogy, rare earth element chemistry, thermocline depth, and δ13C differences between benthic and planktonic foraminifera, in order to quantitatively constrain Asian dust input to the basin. We explore the relationship between Philippine Sea and high-latitude Pacific eolian fluxes, as well as its significance for marine productivity and atmospheric CO2 during the mid-late Quaternary. Three different indices indicate that Asian dust contributes between ˜15% and ˜50% to the detrital fraction of the sediments. Eolian dust flux in Core MD06-3047 is similar to that in the polar southern Pacific sediment. Coherent changes for most dust flux maximum/minimum indicate that dust generation in interhemispheric source areas might have a common response to climatic variation over the mid-late Quaternary. Furthermore, we note relatively good coherence between Asian dust input, soluble iron concentration, local marine productivity, and even global atmospheric CO2 concentration over the entire study interval. This suggests that dust-borne iron fertilization of marine phytoplankton might have been a periodic process operating at glacial/interglacial time scales over the past 700 ka. We suggest that strengthening of the biological pump in the Philippine Sea, and elsewhere in the tropical western Pacific during the mid-late Quaternary glacial periods may contribute to the lowering of atmospheric CO2 concentrations during ice ages.

  5. Reconstructing late Quaternary deep-water masses in the eastern Arctic Ocean using benthonic Ostracoda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, R. Ll; Whatley, R.C.; Cronin, T. M.; Dowsett, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of Ostracoda in three long cores from the deep eastern Arctic Ocean was studied to determine the palaeoceanographical history of the Eurasian Basin during the late Quaternary. The samples for this study were obtained from the Lomonosov Ridge, Morris Jesup Rise and Yermak Plateau during the Arctic 91 expedition. Ostracoda previously studied in coretops at the same sites as the present study have shown that individual species have a strong association with different water masses and bathymetry. Throughout the late Quaternary, cores exhibit ostracod-rich layers separated by barren intervals. On the basis of biostratigraphical, isotopic and palaeomagnetic data the fossiliferous levels are interpreted as representing interglacial stages. The twenty most significant species were selected for subsequent quantitative investigation using Cluster and Factor analyses, in order to determine similarity and variance between the assemblages. An additional statistical method employing Modern Analogues and the Squared Chord Distance dissimilarity coefficient was utilized to compare the present late Quaternary fossil samples with a modern Arctic database. The results reveal a major faunal division within the Arctic Ocean Deep Water (AODW). Highly abundant and diverse assemblages within the cores were found to group and have good analogues with the Recent bathyal depth (1000-2500 m) upper AODW assemblages. Conversely, assemblages with low abundance and diversity correlate well with abyssal depth (> 3000 m) lower AODW assemblages. The palaeoceanographical history is complicated by the influence of adjacent water masses such as Canada Basin Deep Water (CBDW), Greenland Sea Deep Water (GSDW) and most importantly, Arctic Intermediate Water (AIW), which all had an influence on the ostracod assemblages during the late Quaternary. An enhanced flow of warm saline AIW into the Eurasian Basin results in species-rich upper AODW assemblages having good analogues down to 2750 m

  6. Late Quaternary activity along the Ferrara thrust inferred from stratigraphic architecture and geophysical surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, Marco; Bignardi, Samuel; Caputo, Riccardo; Minarelli, Luca; Abu-Zeid, Nasser; Santarato, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    Since Late Miocene, the Emilia-Romagna portion of the Po Plain-Adriatic foredeep basin was progressively affected by compressional deformation, due to the northward propagation of the Apennines fold-and-thrust belt. The major tectonic structures within the basin have been recognised and are relatively well known, thanks to the widespread, even if outdated, seismic survey, performed after WW II, for hydrocarbon exploration. More recently, a large amount of surface and shallow-subsurface information has been provided by the CARG geological mapping project. The region therefore provides a valuable opportunity to discuss the genetic relationship between tectonic deformation, eustatic-paleoclimatic fluctuations, and depositional architecture. The activity of blind thrusts and fault-propagation folds induced repeated angular unconformities and impressive lateral variations in the Pliocene-Quaternary stratigraphy, causing thickness changes, from a few metres, close to the Apennines piedmont line, to more than 9 km, in fast subsiding depocenters (e.g. Lido di Savio). In the Ferrara region, the post-Miocene succession ranges from about 4 km, west of Sant'Agostino, to less than 200 m, on the Casaglia anticline, where Late Quaternary fluvial strata rest on Miocene marine marls, with an angular unconformity relationship. In this sector of the Po Plain, the tip-line of the northernmost thrust has been reconstructed north of the Po River (Occhiobello) and is associated with the growth of a large fold (Ferrara-Casaglia anticline), cross-cut by a complex splay of minor backthrusts and reverse faults. The thrust-anticline structure hosts an energy producing geothermal field, whose hydrogeological behaviour is largely influenced by the fracture pattern. The Apennines frontal thrust probably provided the seismic source for the earthquakes that severely damaged Ferrara, during the 1570 a.D. fall season, as documented by the structural damage still visible in many historic buildings (e

  7. Late Quaternary palaeoenvironmental reconstruction from Lake Ohrid using stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Jack H.; Leng, Melanie J.; Francke, Alexander; Vogel, Hendrik; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Wagner, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    Lake Ohrid is a large, deep lake located on the Balkan Peninsula at the border between Macedonia and Albania, and is considered the oldest extant lake in Europe. An International Continental scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) deep drilling campaign was carried out in 2013 as part of the interdisciplinary Scientific Collaboration On Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid (SCOPSCO) project. Over 1500 m of sediment were recovered from six coring locations at the main target site in the central basin, where the maximum drill depth reached 569 m below the lake floor. Initial results indicate continuous lacustrine conditions over the past >1.2 Ma (Wagner et al., 2014). Here, we present oxygen and carbon isotope data (δ18O and δ13C) from carbonate from the upper 248 m of the SCOPSCO succession, which covers the last 640 ka, spanning marine isotope stages 15-1, according to an age model based on tephra and orbital tuning (Francke et al., 2015). Modern monitoring data show Lake Ohrid to be an evaporative system, where variations in δ18O of endogenic carbonate are primarily a function of changes in water balance, and δ13C largely reflects fluctuations in the amount of soil-derived CO2 and organic matter recycling. Our results indicate a trend from wetter to drier conditions through the Holocene, which is consistent with regional and hemispheric processes related to changes in insolation and progressive aridification. Over the last 640 ka, relatively stable climate conditions are inferred before ca. 450 ka, a transition to a wetter climate between ca. 400-250 ka, and a trend to drier climate after ca. 250 ka. Higher frequency, multi-millennial-scale oscillations observed during warm stages are most likely associated with regional climate change as a function of orbital forcing. This record is one of the most extensive and highly-resolved continental isotope records available, and emphasises the potential of Lake Ohrid as a valuable archive of long-term palaeoclimate and

  8. Rock varnish microlamination dating of late Quaternary geomorphic features in the drylands of western USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tanzhuo; Broecker, Wallace S.

    2008-01-01

    Varnish microlamination (VML) dating is a correlative age determination technique that can be used to date and correlate various geomorphic features in deserts. In this study, we establish a generalized late Quaternary (i.e., 0-300 ka) varnish layering sequence for the drylands of western USA and tentatively correlate it with the SPECMAP oxygen isotope record. We then use this climatically correlated varnish layering sequence as a correlative dating tool to determine surface exposure ages for late Quaternary geomorphic features in the study region. VML dating of alluvial fan deposits in Death Valley of eastern California indicates that, during the mid to late Pleistocene, 5-15 ky long aggradation events occurred during either wet or dry climatic periods and that major climate shifts between glacial and interglacial conditions may be the pacemaker for alteration of major episodes of fan aggradation. During the Holocene interglacial time, however, 0.5-1 ky long brief episodes of fan deposition may be linked to short periods of relatively wet climate. VML dating of alluvial desert pavements in Death Valley and the Mojave Desert reveals that pavements can be developed rapidly (< 10 ky) during the Holocene (and probably late Pleistocene) in the arid lowlands (< 800 m msl) of these regions; but once formed, they may survive for 74-85 ky or even longer without being significantly disturbed by geomorphic processes operative at the pavement surface. Data from this study also support the currently accepted, "being born at the surface" model of desert pavement formation. VML dating of colluvial boulder deposits on the west slope of Yucca Mountain, southern Nevada, yields a minimum age of 46 ka for the emplacement of these deposits on the slope, suggesting that they were probably formed during the early phase of the last glaciation or before. These results, combined with those from our previous studies, demonstrate that VML dating has great potential to yield numerical age

  9. Late-Quaternary climatic change on the American North Pacific Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heusser, C. J.; Heusser, L. E.; Peteet, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The late Quaternary climate of the North Pacific, where according to modelling the solar radiation in the early Holocene at the time of the summer solstice is high and in the late Holocene is relatively low, is investigated. Quantitative temperature and precipitation estimates from southern Alaska are compared with estimates from western Washington and British Columbia. Data extending over more than 10,000 years show a broadly consistent pattern of climatic change in general agreement with predicted variations in solar radiation and their effect on atmospheric circulation and seasonal duration of pressure systems over the North Pacific Ocean. In the early Holocene, the subtropical North Pacific anticyclone annually regulated climate for a longer period at higher latitudes than at present, so that warmth and dryness increased in southern Alaska. The Aleutian low-pressure center intensified during the late Holocene, resulting in colder and more humid coastal climate and increased frequency of glacier growth in the cordillera.

  10. Sr-Isotope record of Quaternary marine terraces on the California coast and off Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludwig, K. R.; Muhs, D.R.; Simmons, K.R.; Moore, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    Strontium-isotopic ratios of dated corals have been obtained from submerged reefs formed during Quaternary glacial periods off the Hawaiian islands. These data, combined with data from deep-sea sediments, tightly constrain the secular variation of marine 87Sr 86Sr for the past 800,000 yr. Although long-term trends are apparent, no significant (>0.02???), rapid (<100,000 yr) excursions in 87Sr 86Sr were resolved nor did we observe any samples with 87Sr 86Sr greater than that of modern seawater. Strontium in mollusks from elevated marine terraces formed during interglacial periods on the southern California coast show resolvable and consistent variations in 87Sr 86Sr which, when compared to the trend of Quaternary marine 87Sr 86Sr, can be used to infer uplift rates and define approximate ages for the higher terraces. The Sr-isotope age estimates indicate that uplift rates vary among crustal blocks and were not necessarily constant with time. No contrast in Sr-isotopic ratios between similar-age Hawaiian and California fossils was observed, confirming that any change in marine 87Sr 86Sr from glacial to interglacial periods must be small. A realistic appraisal of the potential of Sr-isotope stratigraphy for chronometric applications in the Quaternary suggests that the technique will be limited to relatively coarse distinctions in age. ?? 1992.

  11. Is late Quaternary climate change governed by self-sustained oscillations in atmospheric CO2?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallmann, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    A simple earth system model is developed to simulate global carbon and phosphorus cycling over the late Quaternary. It is focused on the geological cycling of C and P via continental weathering, volcanic and metamorphic degassing, hydrothermal processes and burial at the seabed. A simple ocean model is embedded in this geological model where the global ocean is represented by surface water, thermocline and deep water boxes. Concentrations of dissolved phosphorus, dissolved inorganic carbon, and total alkalinity are calculated for each box. The partial pressure of CO2 in the atmosphere (pCO2A) is determined by exchange processes with the surface ocean and the continents. It serves as key prognostic model variable and is assumed to govern surface temperatures and global sea-level. The model is formulated as autonomous system, in which the governing equations have no explicit time-dependence. For certain parameter values, the model does not converge towards a steady-state but develops stable self-sustained oscillations. These free oscillations feature pCO2A minima and maxima consistent with the ice-core record when vertical mixing in the ocean is allowed to vary in response to pCO2A-controlled temperature change. A stable 100-kyr cycle with a rapid transition from glacial to interglacial conditions is obtained when additional non-linear equations are applied to calculate deep ocean mixing, iron fertilization and the depth of organic matter degradation as function of pCO2A-controlled surface temperature. The δ13C value of carbon in the ocean/atmosphere system calculated in these model runs is consistent with the benthic δ13C record. However, the simulated 13C depletion in the glacial ocean is not driven by the decline in terrestrial carbon stocks but by sea-level change controlling the rates of organic carbon burial and weathering at continental margins. The pCO2A- and δ13C oscillations develop without any form of external Milankovitch forcing. They are induced and

  12. Late Quaternary Sea-Ice Variability at the North Icelandic Shelf (Sub-Arctic): Reconstruction from Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, X.; Zhao, M.; Jiang, H.; Eiriksson, J.; Guo, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice, prevailing in the polar region and characterized by distinct seasonal and interannual variability, plays a pivotal role in Earth's climate system (Thomas and Dieckmann, 2010). In order to understand processes controlling the recent dramatic reduction in Arctic sea-ice cover, it is essential to determine temporal changes in sea-ice occurrence and its natural variability in the past. The North Icelandic shelf, bordering a marginal area of the Arctic Ocean, is located at the present-day boundary between the cold polar currents and warm Atlantic water masses, very sensitive to the changes in sea-ice cover, ice sheet and oceanic circulation patterns (Knudsen and Eiriksson, 2002). All these processes have been recorded in the marine shelf-sediment cores. We determined the concentrations of sea-ice diatom-derived biomarker "IP25" (monoene highly-branched isoprenoid with 25 carbon atom; Belt et al., 2007), phytoplankton-derived biomarkers (brassicasterol and dinosterol) and terrigenous biomarkers (campesterol and ß-sitosterol) in a sediment core from the North Icelandic shelf to reconstruct the Late Quaternary sea-ice conditions and related surface-water processes. The sea-ice cover reached its maximum during the cold period (i.e., Last Glacial Maximum and Younger dryas), while an open ocean environment existed during less severe periods (e.g. Bølling-Allerød and 8.2 ka event) in the study area. The biomarker records from this sediment core give insights into the variability in sea ice and circulation patterns as well as primary productivity in the Arctic marginal area during the Late Quaternary. References Belt, S.T., Massé, G., Rowland, S.J., Poulin, M., Michel, C., LeBlanc, B., 2007. A novel chemical fossil of palaeo sea ice: IP25. Org. Geochem. 38, 16-27. Knudsen, K.L. and Eiriksson, J., 2002. Application of tephrochronology to the timing and correlation of palaeoceanographic events recorded in Holocene and Late Glacial shelf sediments off North Iceland

  13. High-resolution sequence stratigraphy from piezocone tests: an example from the Late Quaternary deposits of the southeastern Po Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorosi, Alessandro; Marchi, Nazaria

    1999-10-01

    basis for the identification of the three major key surfaces within the Late Quaternary 4th-order depositional sequence. (1) The transgressive surface (TS), marking the boundary between the locally pedogenized, stiff Pleistocene alluvial clays and the overlying Holocene transgressive paralic deposits, has a distinctive pore-pressure response, with very low u values, and is characterized by a sharp downward increase in fs, which is paralleled by a moderate increase in qt. (2) The ravinement surface (RS), corresponding to the boundary between fine-grained back-barrier deposits and the overlying transgressive barrier sands, is invariably marked by a sharp upward increase in qt (and decrease in FR). (3) The maximum flooding surface (MFS), which is not clearly recognizable on the sole basis of core data, is identified within shallow-marine (prodelta) clays in combination with minor peaks of qt, which have been interpreted to reflect a laterally extensive fossil lag, with transition in proximal areas to sand (shell-rich?) layers. Simplicity, speed, and comparatively low costs of CPTU tests imply that an extensive use of this method, when used in conjunction with core programs, can be a very attractive alternative to economically less convenient methods for the geological mapping of alluvial/coastal plain areas consisting of non-gravel deposits.

  14. Global late Quaternary megafauna extinctions linked to humans, not climate change

    PubMed Central

    Sandom, Christopher; Faurby, Søren; Sandel, Brody; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2014-01-01

    The late Quaternary megafauna extinction was a severe global-scale event. Two factors, climate change and modern humans, have received broad support as the primary drivers, but their absolute and relative importance remains controversial. To date, focus has been on the extinction chronology of individual or small groups of species, specific geographical regions or macroscale studies at very coarse geographical and taxonomic resolution, limiting the possibility of adequately testing the proposed hypotheses. We present, to our knowledge, the first global analysis of this extinction based on comprehensive country-level data on the geographical distribution of all large mammal species (more than or equal to 10 kg) that have gone globally or continentally extinct between the beginning of the Last Interglacial at 132 000 years BP and the late Holocene 1000 years BP, testing the relative roles played by glacial–interglacial climate change and humans. We show that the severity of extinction is strongly tied to hominin palaeobiogeography, with at most a weak, Eurasia-specific link to climate change. This first species-level macroscale analysis at relatively high geographical resolution provides strong support for modern humans as the primary driver of the worldwide megafauna losses during the late Quaternary. PMID:24898370

  15. Styles of glaciation on Kilimanjaro, Tanzania, in response to late Quaternary climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boston, Clare; Lovell, Harold; Mills, Stephanie; Cullen, Nicolas; Sirguey, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    The recognition of geomorphological evidence for more extensive ice masses in a number of areas near the equator provides a direct link to climate change in the tropics. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania consists of the highest elevations in Africa, and sets of moraines document that ice was significantly more extensive in the past. The most extensive moraines around Kibo, the highest peak, suggest that glaciers may have extended down to around 3800 m at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). A more recent set of moraines, at 4600-4800 m on the western side of the peak, document the maximum position that ice reached during the Little Ice Age (LIA). Both of these sets of moraines indicate significant recession has occurred throughout the late Quaternary, and particularly during the 20th century. Present-day ice is restricted to rapidly-receding glaciers and icefields on the uppermost flanks and summit of Kibo, between ~5000-5800 m. The area is therefore important for understanding the timing, magnitude and style of glacier response to changes in climate in the tropics in the late Quaternary. This research presents the results of new field and remotely-sensed mapping of moraines relating to the Late Pleistocene and LIA, providing greater detail on the glacial geomorphology of the area than in previous mapping. This allows an assessment of the styles of glaciation, and particularly the role of topography and aspect on influencing response to climate and patterns of glacier recession.

  16. Seismic expression of Late Quaternary Banda submarine canyon and fan offshore northern Baja California

    SciTech Connect

    Legg, M.R.

    1987-05-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection profiles obtained throughout the inner California continental borderland offshore northwestern Baja California, Mexico, show the presence of numerous modern submarine canyons and associated fans. One set of these, the Banda submarine canyon/fan, is of relatively recent origin, as demonstrated by onlap of the basal fan sediments against an acoustically transparent, presumably hemipelagic deposit. Late Quaternary sedimentation rates inferred from isotopically dated piston core samples place the age of the postulated hemipelagic unit at approximately 650,000 years ago. The Banda submarine canyon heads within the Bahia Todos Santo and passes through a narrow gorge between Punta Banda and Islas Todos Santos. It is proposed that this submarine canyon and fan system formed entirely during late Quaternary time, following the breach of the Punta Banda ridge during a late Pleistocene high sea level stand. The presence of an ancient, buried channel exiting to the north out of Bahia Todos Santos probably marks the head of an earlier submarine canyon which acted as the conduit of clastic sediments from Valle Maneadero to the deep borderland basins. The now active Banda submarine canyon pirated the supply of terrigenous clastics from this older canyon. The active Agua Blanca fault zone cuts across the head of Banda submarine canyon, suggesting that tectonic movements may have played a role in the development of the Banda submarine canyon and fan system.

  17. Global late Quaternary megafauna extinctions linked to humans, not climate change.

    PubMed

    Sandom, Christopher; Faurby, Søren; Sandel, Brody; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2014-07-22

    The late Quaternary megafauna extinction was a severe global-scale event. Two factors, climate change and modern humans, have received broad support as the primary drivers, but their absolute and relative importance remains controversial. To date, focus has been on the extinction chronology of individual or small groups of species, specific geographical regions or macroscale studies at very coarse geographical and taxonomic resolution, limiting the possibility of adequately testing the proposed hypotheses. We present, to our knowledge, the first global analysis of this extinction based on comprehensive country-level data on the geographical distribution of all large mammal species (more than or equal to 10 kg) that have gone globally or continentally extinct between the beginning of the Last Interglacial at 132,000 years BP and the late Holocene 1000 years BP, testing the relative roles played by glacial-interglacial climate change and humans. We show that the severity of extinction is strongly tied to hominin palaeobiogeography, with at most a weak, Eurasia-specific link to climate change. This first species-level macroscale analysis at relatively high geographical resolution provides strong support for modern humans as the primary driver of the worldwide megafauna losses during the late Quaternary.

  18. Seismic stratigraphy and depositional history of late Quaternary deposits in the Yellow Sea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gwang-Soo; Yoo, Dong Geun; Bae, Sungho; Choul Kim, Dae; Yi, Hi-Il

    2016-04-01

    To identify the seismic stratigraphy and depositional history of late Quaternary deposits in the Yellow Sea, approximately 52,600 line-km of Chirp seismic profiles and 5,060 line-km of Sparker seismic profiles were analyzed. The Yellow Sea are correspond to three sedimentary environments: (1) a various scale sand ridges/waves and mud belt (the western inner-shelf of the Korean Peninsula), (2) recent- and paleo-channels, erosional and broad surface (the center of the Yellow Sea), and (3) prodelta mud patch (the eastern offshore of China). Based on the seismic stratigraphic analysis of seismic profiles, the late Quaternary deposits in the Yellow Sea are divided into five distinctive seismic units (units CY1~5), consisting of two depositional sequences that can be defined as erosional and disconformable strata. Each unit show different seismic facies and geometry, and is clearly separated by each bounding surface. The major depositional processes and sediment dispersal systems during the late Quaternary in the Yellow Sea are: (1) regressive estuarine/deltaic deposits (unit CY1), (2) transgressive incised channel fill (unit CY2), (3) transgressive sand sheet (unit CY3), (4) transgressive sand ridges (unit CY4), and (5) prodelta/recent mud (unit CY5). The depositional sequences follow the general concepts of sequence stratigraphy very well. Lower sequence (DI) correspond to the falling stage systems tract regarded as regressive estuarine or deltaic deposits (unit CY1), whereas upper sequence (DII) consists of a set of the transgressive (units CY2, CY3, and CY4) and highstand systems tract (unit CY5) formed since the last-glacial period.

  19. Fluvial responses to late Quaternary climate change in the Shiyang River drainage system, western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hongshan; Li, Zongmeng; Pan, Baotian; Liu, Fenliang; Liu, Xiaopeng

    2016-04-01

    As a drainage system located in arid western China, the Shiyang River, combined with considerable fluvial strata and landform information, provides an environmental context within which to investigate fluvial responses to late Quaternary climate change. Sedimentological analysis and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating enabled us to reconstruct the processes and fluvial styles of three sedimentary sequences of the Shagou and Hongshui rivers in the Shiyang drainage system. Our results present a variety of river behaviors during the late Quaternary in these areas. In the upstream Shiyang River, Zhangjiadazhuang (ZJDZ) profile of the Shagou was dominated by aggradation and a meandering channel pattern at 10.6-4.2 ka, while a noticeable channel incision occurred at ~ 4.2 ka followed by lateral channel migration. In the downstream Shiyang River, Datugou (DTG) profile of the Hongshui was an aggrading meandering river from 39.7 to 7.2 ka while channel incision occurred at 7.2 ka. Another downstream profile, Wudunwan (WDW) of the Hongshui was also characterized by aggradation from 22.4 to 4.8 ka; however, its channel pattern shifted from braided to meandering at ~ 13 ka. A discernable downcutting event occurred at ~ 4.8 ka, followed by three channel aggradation and incision episodes prior to 1.8 ka. The last 1.8 ka has been characterized by modern channel and floodplain development. The fluvial processes and styles investigated have a close correlation with late Quaternary climate change in the Shiyang River drainage. During cold phases, the WDW reach was dominated by aggradation with a braided channel pattern. During warm phases, the rivers that we investigated were also characterized by aggradation but with meandering channel patterns. Channel incision events and changes of fluvial style occurred mainly during climate transitions.

  20. Thermoluminescence and new 14C age estimates for late quaternary loesses in southwestern Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maat, P.B.; Johnson, W.C.

    1996-01-01

    Loess of late Quaternary age mantles most of Nebraska south of the Platte River Valley. At least five late Quaternary loesses are recognized: from oldest to youngest, one or more undifferentiated pre-lllinoian loesses, the Loveland Loess, the Gilman Canyon Loess, which exhibits a well developed soil and rests unconformably on the Sangamon soil, the Peoria Loess capped by the Brady soil, and the Bignell Loess, which is distributed discontinuously. Previous research shows that the Loveland Loess is Illinoian. the Gilman Canyon Loess and Peoria Loess are Wisconsin, and the Bignell Loess is Holocene. We present here the first thermoluminescence (TL) age estimates and new C ages for these late Quaternary loesses at two key sections in southwestern Nebraska, the Eustis ash pit and the Bignell Hill road cut. TL age estimates from all samples collected from Eustis ash pit and Bignell Hill were internally consistent. TL and C age estimates from these two sections generally agree and support previous age determinations. The TL age estimate on Loveland Loess indicates deposition at 163 ka. TL and radiocarbon age estimates indicate that Oilman Canyon Loess, believed to be deposited during the Farmdale interstade, first began to accumulate at about 40 ka: the lower part of the Gilman Canyon Loess is 36 ka at Eustis and the middle of the unit is 30 ka at Bignell Hill. The lower and upper parts of the Peoria Loess give age estimates of 24 ka and 17 ka, respectively. TL age estimates for deposition of the Bignell Loess are 9 ka near the base, in agreement with radiocarbon age estimates, and 6 ka immediately below the modern soil, substantiating its Holocene age. Comparisons of TL age estimates with ??18O and insolation curves which show loess deposition during interglacial and interstadial as well as glacial periods, indicate that loess deposition on the Great Plains can occur under a variety of climatic conditions.

  1. Human Dispersals Along the African Rift Valley in the Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryon, C. A.; Faith, J. T.; Peppe, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Climate- and tectonic-driven environmental dynamics of the East African Rift System (EARS) during the Quaternary played an important role in the demographic history of early Homo sapiens, including expansions of modern humans across and out of Africa. Human forager population size, geographic range, and behaviors such as hunting strategies and residential mobility likely varied in response to changes in the local and regional environment. Throughout the Quaternary, floral and faunal change was linked at least in part to variations in moisture availability, temperature, and atmospheric CO2, which in addition to uplift and faulting, contributed to the expansion and contraction of a number of large lakes that served as biogeographic barriers to many taxa. This is particularly clear for the Lake Victoria basin, where biogeographic, geological, and paleontological evidence documents repeated expansion and contraction of the ranges of species in response to lake level and vegetation change. Across much of eastern Africa, the topography of the rift facilitated north-south dispersals, the timing of which may have depended in part on the expansion and contraction of the equatorial forest belt. Dispersal potential likely increased during the more arid periods of the late Quaternary, when the roles of lakes and forests as dispersal barriers was reduced and the extent of low net primary productivity dry grasslands increased, the latter requiring large home ranges for human foragers, conditions suitable for range expansions within H. sapiens.

  2. Quaternary forest and climate history of Hokkaido, Japan, from marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Yaeko

    Pollen data from Quaternary marine sediments deposited in central Hokkaido, northern Japan provide insight into northeast Asian vegetation and climatic changes over the last few million years. During the Early Pleistocene, coniferous forest, dominated by Picea and Cryptomeria japonica, and taiga composed of Larix and Picea developed under cool/wet and cold/dry climates, respectively. Strong climatic contrasts are inferred from Late Pleistocene interglacial and glacial pollen assemblages which precede the last glacial cycle. In the former, cool temperate broad-leaf forest, mainly composed of Fagus, reflects a warmer and wetter climate than now. In the latter, taiga similar to that now found in northern Sakhalin apparently flourished in Hokkaido. The composition of pollen assemblages correlated with Oxygen Isotope Stage 5, changed from cool temperate forest of Quercus, Ulmus and Juglans (Substage 5e), to Picea-Larix taiga (Substage 5d), cool temperate forest of Quercus and Ulmus (Substage 5c) and Picea-Abies forest (Substage 5b). Compared with present conditions, climate during Stage 5 in northern Japan apparently fluctuated from warmer/wetter to colder/drier. Taiga composed of Picea, Pinus and Larix indicating colder/dry conditions during Stage 4, was replaced by Picea-Abies forest and Picea-Larix taiga in Stage 3, suggesting relatively cool and cold/dry environments. Taiga and mixed forest with taiga and cool temperate components characterize Stage 2. Holocene forests with Juglans-Betula and Quercus-Juglans were succeeded by Picea and Abies during the early Holocene warm interval ˜7000 BP. Subsequently, Quercus-Ulmus and Abies-Alnus assemblages reflect climatic deterioration. 'Pan-mixed' forest has been developed in Hokkaido since 2000 BP.

  3. Tectonic and eustatic controls of late quaternary shelf sedimentation along the Central California (Santa Cruz) continental margin: high-resolution seismic stratigraphic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, Henry T.; Nagel, David K.; Dominguez, Laura L.

    1985-07-01

    A high-resolution "uniboom", seismic stratigraphic investigation of a portion of the central California continental shelf has demonstrated that depositional patterns and sequences are controlled largely by an interplay of glacioeustatic sea-level fluctuations superimposed on local tectonics. Wrench tectonics, associated with active right-lateral shear along the San Gregorio fault zone, and the Pigeon Point Basement High control the location, distribution and overall geometry of depositional sequences via en echelon folding and differential subsidence. Areas of relatively thick and thin late Quaternary sediments conform in large part with structures produced during wrenching. Glacioeustatic sea-level oscillations have also shaped depositional patterns and sequences. Correlation of our seismic stratigraphic data with a southern California continental margin sea-level curve, suggests that during the last glacial maximum, approximately 18,000 yrs ago, a relative lowstand resulted in the erosion of a distinct unconformity upon which late Quaternary sediments have accumulated. A rapid rise of sea level to a relative stillstand, approximately 12,000 yrs ago, produced a concave-up, marine terrace profile across the mid-shelf, that has since been infilled with as much as 22 m of Holocene clastic sediments. A relative drop of sea level, approximately 11,000 yrs ago, allowed sediments to build seaward as a series of prograding clinoforms that form the basal sequences of the late Quaternary sediment fill. The succeeding Holocene transgression partially eroded the top of this earlier regressive sequence, and has now established a typical, wave-graded shelf along which sediments fine in a seaward direction to water depths of 90-100 m. At greater shelf water depths, surface sediments coarsen and appear to be relicts of previous relative sea-level lowstands. The presence of now submerged and buried marine terraces along both the central and southern California continental margins

  4. Genetic footprints of demographic expansion in North America, but not Amazonia, during the Late Quaternary

    PubMed Central

    Lessa, Enrique P.; Cook, Joseph A.; Patton, James L.

    2003-01-01

    The biotic consequences of climate change have attracted considerable attention. In particular, the “refugial debate” centers on the possible retraction of habitats to limited areas that may have served as refuges for many associated species, especially during glaciations of the Quaternary. One prediction of such scenarios is that populations must have experienced substantial growth accompanying climatic amelioration and the occupation of newly expanded habitats. We used coalescence theory to examine the genetic evidence, or lack thereof, for late Pleistocene refugia of boreal North American and tropical Amazonian mammals. We found substantial and concordant evidence of demographic expansion in North American mammals, particularly at higher latitudes. In contrast, small mammals from western Amazonia appear to have experienced limited or no demographic expansion after the Late Pleistocene. Thus, demographic responses to climate change can be tracked genetically and appear to vary substantially across the latitudinal gradient of biotic diversity. PMID:12913123

  5. Late Tertiary and Quaternary geology of the Tecopa basin, southeastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Hillhouse, J.W.

    1987-12-31

    Stratigraphic units in the Tecopa basin, located in southeastern California, provide a framework for interpreting Quaternary climatic change and tectonism along the present Amargosa River. During the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene, a climate that was appreciably wetter than today`s sustained a moderately deep lake in the Tecopa basin. Deposits associated with Lake Tecopa consists of lacustrine mudstone, conglomerate, volcanic ash, and shoreline accumulations of tufa. Age control within the lake deposits is provided by air-fall tephra that are correlated with two ash falls from the Yellowstone caldera and one from the Long Valley caldera. Lake Tecopa occupied a closed basin during the latter part, if not all, of its 2.5-million-year history. Sometime after 0.5 m.y. ago, the lake developed an outlet across Tertiary fanglomerates of the China Ranch Beds leading to the development of a deep canyon at the south end of the basin and establishing a hydrologic link between the northern Amargosa basins and Death Valley. After a period of rapid erosion, the remaining lake beds were covered by alluvial fans that coalesced to form a pediment in the central part of the basin. Holocene deposits consist of unconsolidated sand and gravel in the Amargosa River bed and its deeply incised tributaries, a small playa near Tecopa, alluvial fans without pavements, and small sand dunes. The pavement-capped fan remnants and the Holocene deposits are not faulted or tilted significantly, although basins to the west, such as Death Valley, were tectonically active during the Quaternary. Subsidence of the western basins strongly influenced late Quaternary rates of deposition and erosion in the Tecopa basin.

  6. Estimates of late Quaternary mode and intermediate water silicic acid concentration in the Pacific Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Jonathon; Ellwood, Michael J.; Bostock, Helen; Neil, Helen

    2016-04-01

    The Southern Ocean plays a critical role in the exchange of carbon between the ocean and atmosphere over glacial-interglacial timescales. Hypotheses used to explain late Quaternary variations in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) implicate changes in the nutrient dynamics and circulation of the Southern Ocean. Here we present silicon isotope (δ30Si) records of late Quaternary sponges and diatoms from the NZ-sector of the Southern Ocean. Analysis of our sponge δ30Si records strongly suggests that the silicic acid concentration at mode and intermediate depths was higher during the LGM and the deglacial period compared to the present day. Our diatom δ30Si record suggests biological productivity near of the Polar Front was greater during the deglacial period, but not significantly different during the LGM compared to the present day. Taking our dataset in context with other regional paleoceanographic records, we interpret the predicted elevation in LGM and deglacial silicic acid concentration to reflect a shoaling of water masses during the LGM and 'leakage' of excess Southern Ocean dissolved silicon during the deglacial period.

  7. Paleoclimatic, paleovegetational and provenance change in the Ganga Plain during the late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Shailesh; Sanyal, Prasanta; Bera, Melinda K.; Dash, Jitendra K.; Balakrishnan, Srinivasan

    2013-08-01

    Present study aims at reconstructing the paleomonsoonal rainfall, paleovegetation and provenance change during the late Quaternary. Towards this, Bhognipur core, collected from the southern Ganga Plain, have been sampled for soil carbonate (SC) and soil. The δ 18O values of SC ( δ 18OSC) range from -7.6 to -4.9‰. The variations in δ 18OSC values suggest that during the late Quaternary, the monsoon intensified during MIS 3 and MIS 1 and the maximum lowering of rainfall intensity is observed during MIS 2. The δ 13C value of SC ( δ 13CSC), organic matter dispersed in the soil ( δ 13CSOM) and occluded in the carbonate nodules ( δ 13CNOM) ranges from -4.1 to +1.4‰, -25.6 to -16.3‰, and -27.7 to -25.0‰, respectively, implies mixed C3-C4 vegetation over the Ganga Plain. Variations in δ 13CSOM and δ 13CNOM values at same depth imply preservation problem of pristine organic matter signature. Therefore, it is important to assess the preservation of residual organic matter before using it for paleovegetational reconstruction. The monsoon-vegetation relationship indicates that relative abundances of C3-C4 vegetation were mainly driven by variations in monsoonal rainfall intensity. Using 87Sr/86Sr in SC, we show that the Himalayan river was supplying sediments in the southern part of the Ganga Plain during MIS 3.

  8. Geochemical evidence for the origin of late Quaternary loess in central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Loess is extensive in central Alaska, but there are uncertainties about its source and the direction of paleo-winds that deposited it. Both northerly and southerly winds have been inferred. The most likely sources of loess are the Tanana River (south), the Nenana River (southeast), and the Yukon River (north). Late Quaternary loess in central Alaska has immobile trace-element compositions (Cr/Sc, Th/Ta, Th/ Sc, Th/U, Eu/Eu*, GdN/YbN) that indicate derivation mostly from the Tanana River. However, other ratios (As/Sb, Zr/Hf, LaN/YbN) and quantitative modeling indicate that the Yukon River was also a source. During the last glacial period, there may have been a longer residence time of the Siberian and Canadian high-pressure cells, along with a strengthened Aleutian low-pressure cell. This would have generated regional-scale northeasterly winds and explains derivation of loess from the Yukon River. However, superim-posed upon this synoptic-scale circulation, there may have been strong, southerly katabatic winds from expanded glaciers on the northern flank of the Alaska Range. These winds could have provided eolian silt from the Tanana River. Yukon River and Tanana River sediments are highly calcareous, whereas Fairbanks-area loess is not. This suggests that carbonate leaching in loess kept ahead of sedimentation and that late Quaternary loess in central Alaska was deposited relatively slowly. ?? 2006 NRC Canada.

  9. Eolian sediment responses to late Quaternary climate changes: Temporal and spatial patterns in the Sahara

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swezey, C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a compilation of eolian-based records of late Quaternary climate changes in the Sahara. Although the data are relatively sparse, when viewed as a whole, they reveal a general pattern of widespread eolian sediment mobilization prior to 11,000 cal. years BP, eolian sediment stabilization from 11,000 to 5000 cal. years BP, and a return to widespread eolian sediment mobilization after 5000 cal. years BP. Furthermore, an eolian-based record from southern Tunisia reveals the existence of millennial-scale changes in eolian sediment behavior. These millennial-scale variations provide examples of eolian sediment responses to climate changes at a scale intermediate between seasonal and orbital ('Milankovitch') changes, and they are also coincident with abrupt atmospheric and oceanic changes. The general synchroneity of the eolian stratigraphic records and their coincidence with various oceanic and atmospheric changes suggest that global forcing mechanisms have influenced late Quaternary eolian sediment behavior in the Sahara. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  10. Astronomically calibrated 40Ar/39Ar age for the Toba supereruption and global synchronization of late Quaternary records

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Michael; Roberts, Richard G.; Saidin, Mokhtar

    2012-01-01

    The Toba supereruption in Sumatra, ∼74 thousand years (ka) ago, was the largest terrestrial volcanic event of the Quaternary. Ash and sulfate aerosols were deposited in both hemispheres, forming a time-marker horizon that can be used to synchronize late Quaternary records globally. A precise numerical age for this event has proved elusive, with dating uncertainties larger than the millennial-scale climate cycles that characterized this period. We report an astronomically calibrated 40Ar/39Ar age of 73.88 ± 0.32 ka (1σ, full external errors) for sanidine crystals extracted from Toba deposits in the Lenggong Valley, Malaysia, 350 km from the eruption source and 6 km from an archaeological site with stone artifacts buried by ash. If these artifacts were made by Homo sapiens, as has been suggested, then our age indicates that modern humans had reached Southeast Asia by ∼74 ka ago. Our 40Ar/39Ar age is an order-of-magnitude more precise than previous estimates, resolving the timing of the eruption to the middle of the cold interval between Dansgaard–Oeschger events 20 and 19, when a peak in sulfate concentration occurred as registered by Greenland ice cores. This peak is followed by a ∼10 °C drop in the Greenland surface temperature over ∼150 y, revealing the possible climatic impact of the eruption. Our 40Ar/39Ar age also provides a high-precision calibration point for other ice, marine, and terrestrial archives containing Toba sulfates and ash, facilitating their global synchronization at unprecedented resolution for a critical period in Earth and human history beyond the range of 14C dating. PMID:23112159

  11. Astronomically calibrated 40Ar/39Ar age for the Toba supereruption and global synchronization of late Quaternary records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, Michael; Roberts, Richard G.; Saidin, Mokhtar

    2012-11-01

    The Toba supereruption in Sumatra, ∼74 thousand years (ka) ago, was the largest terrestrial volcanic event of the Quaternary. Ash and sulfate aerosols were deposited in both hemispheres, forming a time-marker horizon that can be used to synchronize late Quaternary records globally. A precise numerical age for this event has proved elusive, with dating uncertainties larger than the millennial-scale climate cycles that characterized this period. We report an astronomically calibrated 40Ar/39Ar age of 73.88 ± 0.32 ka (1σ, full external errors) for sanidine crystals extracted from Toba deposits in the Lenggong Valley, Malaysia, 350 km from the eruption source and 6 km from an archaeological site with stone artifacts buried by ash. If these artifacts were made by Homo sapiens, as has been suggested, then our age indicates that modern humans had reached Southeast Asia by ∼74 ka ago. Our 40Ar/39Ar age is an order-of-magnitude more precise than previous estimates, resolving the timing of the eruption to the middle of the cold interval between Dansgaard-Oeschger events 20 and 19, when a peak in sulfate concentration occurred as registered by Greenland ice cores. This peak is followed by a ∼10 °C drop in the Greenland surface temperature over ∼150 y, revealing the possible climatic impact of the eruption. Our 40Ar/39Ar age also provides a high-precision calibration point for other ice, marine, and terrestrial archives containing Toba sulfates and ash, facilitating their global synchronization at unprecedented resolution for a critical period in Earth and human history beyond the range of 14C dating.

  12. Astronomically calibrated 40Ar/39Ar age for the Toba supereruption and global synchronization of late Quaternary records.

    PubMed

    Storey, Michael; Roberts, Richard G; Saidin, Mokhtar

    2012-11-13

    The Toba supereruption in Sumatra, ∼74 thousand years (ka) ago, was the largest terrestrial volcanic event of the Quaternary. Ash and sulfate aerosols were deposited in both hemispheres, forming a time-marker horizon that can be used to synchronize late Quaternary records globally. A precise numerical age for this event has proved elusive, with dating uncertainties larger than the millennial-scale climate cycles that characterized this period. We report an astronomically calibrated (40)Ar/(39)Ar age of 73.88 ± 0.32 ka (1σ, full external errors) for sanidine crystals extracted from Toba deposits in the Lenggong Valley, Malaysia, 350 km from the eruption source and 6 km from an archaeological site with stone artifacts buried by ash. If these artifacts were made by Homo sapiens, as has been suggested, then our age indicates that modern humans had reached Southeast Asia by ∼74 ka ago. Our (40)Ar/(39)Ar age is an order-of-magnitude more precise than previous estimates, resolving the timing of the eruption to the middle of the cold interval between Dansgaard-Oeschger events 20 and 19, when a peak in sulfate concentration occurred as registered by Greenland ice cores. This peak is followed by a ∼10 °C drop in the Greenland surface temperature over ∼150 y, revealing the possible climatic impact of the eruption. Our (40)Ar/(39)Ar age also provides a high-precision calibration point for other ice, marine, and terrestrial archives containing Toba sulfates and ash, facilitating their global synchronization at unprecedented resolution for a critical period in Earth and human history beyond the range of (14)C dating. PMID:23112159

  13. A late Wisconsinan marine incursion into Cape Cod Bay, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldale, Robert N.

    1988-11-01

    Reinterpretation of seismic-reflection data from Cape Cod Bay has produced a revised late Wisconsinan history. Acoustically laminated deposits, originally inferred to be glaciolacustrine, are shown to be glaciomarine by tracing them to glaciomarine mud in Stellwagen Basin, north of Cape Cod Bay. A late Wisconsinan marine deposit of nonglacial origin overlies the glaciomarine deposits in Cape Cod Bay. Both deposits indicate that the crust was isostatically depressed below the late Wisconsinan eustatic sea level and that deglaciation and marine submergence occurred simultaneously. Valleys cut into the marine deposits, both glacial and nonglacial, indicate that a low sea-level stand, the result of isostatic rebound, occurred shortly after the marine incursion. A transgressive uncomformity and marine deposits, both mostly of Holocene age, overlie the late Wisconsinan deposits. The marine incursion, regression, and Holocene transgression represent the northward passage of an isostatically induced peripheral bulge following deglaciation. In turn, the bulge, a response to crustal loading and unloading, indicates thick glacier ice in the terminal zone and lends support to arguments for a maximum Laurentide ice model. Evidence for a late Wisconsinan marine incursion, regression, and the passage of a peripheral bulge should be sought in the other bays and sounds of the New England terminal zone.

  14. A late Wisconsinan marine incursion into Cape Cod Bay, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oldale, R.N.

    1988-01-01

    Reinterpretation of seismic-reflection data from Cape Cod Bay has produced a revised late Wisconsinan history. Acoustically laminated deposits, originally inferred to be glaciolacustrine, are shown to be glaciomarine by tracing them to glaciomarine mud in Stellwagen Basin, north of Cape Cod Bay. A late Wisconsinan marine deposit of nonglacial origin overlies the glaciomarine deposits in Cape Cod Bay. Both deposits indicate that the crust was isostatically depressed below the late Wisconsinan eustatic sea level and that deglaciation and marine submergence occurred simultaneously. Valleys cut into the marine deposits, both glacial and nonglacial, indicate that a low sea-level stand, the result of isostatic rebound, occurred shortly after the marine incursion. A transgressive uncomformity and marine deposits, both mostly of Holocene age, overlie the late Wisconsinan deposits. The marine incursion, regression, and Holocene transgression represent the northward passage of an isostatically induced peripheral bulge following deglaciation. In turn, the bulge, a response to crustal loading and unloading, indicates thick glacier ice in the terminal zone and lends support to arguments for a maximum Laurentide ice model. Evidence for a late Wisconsinan marine incursion, regression, and the passage of a peripheral bulge should be sought in the other bays and sounds of the New England terminal zone. ?? 1988.

  15. Late-Quaternary exhumation rates constrained by OSL thermochronometry at the Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duverger, Arnaud; King, Georgina; Valla, Pierre; Cox, Simon; Herman, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    The Southern Alps of New Zealand are often cited as the primary example of a mountain range that has reached exhumation and topographic steady state, especially on the West Coast where exhumation rates reach up to about 10 mm/yr. However, cyclic climatic changes, throughout the Quaternary period have meant that the Alps cycled between being completely glaciated and ice free. The impact that such glacial cycles may have had on the spatial variability of erosion rates remains poorly constrained. Here we use Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) as a very low temperature thermochronometer to constrain rock cooling histories at 10-100 kyr timescales on samples collected near the Franz Josef glacier. OSL-thermochronometry is based on the amount of electrons accumulated in the lattice defects of natural minerals such as quartz or feldspar, due to the competing effects of charge trapping due to the natural radioactivity within the rock and charge detrapping due to thermal loss during rock exhumation towards the surface. We collected 9 samples along the Waiho valley (crossing the Alpine Fault) and the Franz Josef glacier to quantify late-Quaternary exhumation rates and their potential spatial variations. Bedrock samples have been crushed to extract the light-safe rock interiors which have then been processed to isolate potassium-rich feldspars (K-feldspars). We used the Infra-Red Stimulated Luminescence at 50°C (IRSL50) protocol, including the measurement of the natural IRSL50 trapped charge population and the laboratory characterization of sample-specific thermal and athermal kinetic parameters. Once measured, the luminescence signal can be inverted into cooling histories. We also explored the potential of the recently developed multi-OSL-thermochronometer (King et al., accepted) to better constrain the cooling path. Our first OSL measurements show that samples are not in saturation and thus contain useful thermochronometric information over the last ~100 kyr. Inverse

  16. Late Quaternary valley infill and dissection in the Indus River, western Tibetan Plateau margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blöthe, Jan H.; Munack, Henry; Korup, Oliver; Fülling, Alexander; Garzanti, Eduardo; Resentini, Alberto; Kubik, Peter W.

    2014-06-01

    The Indus, one of Earth's major rivers, drains large parts of the NW Himalaya and the Transhimalayan ranges that form part of the western Tibetan Plateau margin. In the western Himalayan syntaxis, where local topographic relief exceeds 7 km, the Indus has incised a steep bedrock gorge at rates of several mm yr-1. Upstream, however, the upper Indus and its tributaries alternate between bedrock gorges and broad alluvial flats flanked by the Ladakh and Zanskar ranges. We review the late Quaternary valley history in this region with a focus on the confluence of the Indus and Zanskar Rivers, where vast alluvial terrace staircases and lake sediments record major episodes of aggradation and incision. New absolute dating of high-level fluvial terrace remnants using cosmogenic 10Be, optically and infrared stimulated luminescence (OSL, IRSL) indicates at least two phases of late Quaternary valley infilling. These phases commenced before ˜200 ka and ˜50-20 ka, judging from terrace treads stranded >150 m and ˜30-40 m above modern river levels, respectively. Numerous stacks of lacustrine sediments that straddle the Indus River >200 km between the city of Leh and the confluence with the Shyok River share a distinct horizontal alignment. Constraints from IRSL samples of lacustrine sequences from the Leh-Spituk area reveal a protracted lake phase from >177 ka to 72 ka, locally accumulating >50-m thick deposits. In the absence of tectonic faulting, major lithological differences, and stream capture, we attribute the formation of this and other large lakes in the region to natural damming by large landslides, glaciers, and alluvial fans. The overall patchy landform age constraints from earlier studies can be reconciled by postulating a major deglacial control on sediment flux, valley infilling, and subsequent incision that has been modulated locally by backwater effects of natural damming. While comparison with Pleistocene monsoon proxies reveals no obvious correlation, a late

  17. Eustatic and tectonic controls on Quaternary Ras Leona marine terraces (Strait of Gibraltar, northern Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kadiri, Khalil; de Galdeano, Carlos Sanz; Pedrera, Antonio; Chalouan, Ahmed; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Julià, Ramón; Akil, Mustafa; Hlila, Rachid; Ahmamou, Mfedal

    2010-09-01

    Well-preserved Quaternary staircased marine terraces appear on Ras Leona limestone relief. This is a peculiar sector of the Betic-Rif Cordillera, lying in the four-way junction between the Atlantic and the Mediterranean, and Europe and Africa. The age and altitude correlation of the Ras Leona terraces with travertine-covered lateral equivalent terraces fashioned in the neighbouring Beni Younech area, and comparison with those along the Moroccan Atlantic coasts, would suggest that the Ras Leona terraces were mainly formed by eustatic factors. The importance of the eustasy is supported by further comparisons with Spanish and Moroccan Mediterranean terraces and with different marine terraces developed on passive-margin coasts around the world. A tectonic event occurred mainly during the period between the formation of the Maarifian and the Ouljian terraces (i.e., between 370 and 150 ka). The moderate Quaternary tectonic uplift deduced from the marine terraces and its comparison with uplifted marine terraces developed in active subduction setting disagrees with the model of an active eastwards subduction below the Gibraltar tectonic arc.

  18. Late Quaternary distribution dynamics and phylogeography of the red deer ( Cervus elaphus) in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, R. S.; Zachos, F. E.; Street, M.; Jöris, O.; Skog, A.; Benecke, N.

    2008-04-01

    Here we present spatial-temporal patterns for European late Quaternary red deer (Cervus elaphus), based on radiocarbon-supported evidence derived mainly from archaeological sites. This is followed by an overview of the recent phylogeography of this species using haplogroup studies of recent molecular data. The implications of the synthesis of palaeontological and genetic data are discussed and we propose that present day European red deer haplogroup distributions are best explained against the history of late Quaternary population contractions into and expansions from glacial refugia. Around 800 records of Cervus elaphus were assigned to the period covering the later part of the Last Glacial and the Early to Middle Holocene. Red deer becomes increasingly visible in faunal assemblages dated to late OIS-3 (<40.0 ka 14C BP). The species persisted throughout the LGM on the Iberian Peninsula, in adjacent regions of South-Western France (Gascony, Dordogne, Languedoc), on the Italian Peninsula, in the Balkans and Greece, and east of the Carpathians in Moldavia. We suggest that genetic exchange between the populations of the Balkans and the East of the Carpathians remained uninterrupted during the LGM. The expansion of red deer from its southern refugia into Central and Northern Europe begins rapidly at 12,500 14C BP. The expansion of red deer coincides with the sudden rise in temperature at the onset of Greenland Interstadial 1e and the dispersion of open birch woodland into the northern half of Europe. Radiocarbon supported records show a more or less universal distribution of Cervus elaphus across Europe following the Pleistocene/Holocene climatic change at 10.0 ka 14C BP for the first time. Molecular data and fossil record combined provide a clearer temporal and spatial pattern for the Lateglacial recolonisation process of the northern part of Europe.

  19. The Late Quaternary tephrostratigraphy of annually laminated sediments from Meerfelder Maar, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Christine S.; Brauer, Achim; Martín-Puertas, Celia; Blockley, Simon P. E.; Smith, Victoria C.; Tomlinson, Emma L.

    2015-08-01

    The record of Late Quaternary environmental change within the sediments of Meerfelder Maar in the Eifel region of Germany is renowned for its high precision chronology, which is annually laminated throughout the Last Glacial to Interglacial transition (LGIT) and most of the Holocene. Two visible tephra layers are prominent within the floating varve chronology of Meerfelder Maar. An Early Holocene tephra layer, the Ulmener Maar Tephra (∼11,000 varve years BP), provides a tie-line of the Meerfelder Maar record to the varved Holocene record of nearby Lake Holzmaar. The Laacher See Tephra provides another prominent time marker for the late Allerød, ∼200 varve years before the transition into the Younger Dryas at 12,680 varve years BP. Further investigation has now shown that there are also 15 cryptotephra layers within the Meerfelder Maar LGIT-Holocene stratigraphy and these layers hold the potential to make direct comparisons between the Meerfelder Maar record and other palaeoenvironmental archives from across Europe and the North Atlantic. Most notable is the presence of the Vedde Ash, the most widespread Icelandic eruption known from the Late Quaternary, which occurred midway through the Younger Dryas. The Vedde Ash has also been found in the Greenland ice cores and can be used as an isochron around which the GICC05 and Meerfelder Maar annual chronologies can be compared. Near the base of the annual laminations in Meerfelder Maar a cryptotephra is found that correlates to the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff, erupted from Campi Flegrei in southern Italy, 1200 km away. This is the furthest north that the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff has been found, highlighting its importance in the construction of a European-wide tephrostratigraphic framework. The co-location of cryptotephra layers from Italian, Icelandic and Eifel volcanic sources, within such a precise chronological record, makes Meerfelder Maar one of the most important tephrostratotype records for continental Europe

  20. The Late Quaternary tephrostratigraphy of annually laminated sediments from Meerfelder Maar, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Christine S.; Brauer, Achim; Martín-Puertas, Celia; Blockley, Simon P. E.; Smith, Victoria C.; Tomlinson, Emma L.

    2015-08-01

    The record of Late Quaternary environmental change within the sediments of Meerfelder Maar in the Eifel region of Germany is renowned for its high precision chronology, which is annually laminated throughout the Last Glacial to Interglacial transition (LGIT) and most of the Holocene. Two visible tephra layers are prominent within the floating varve chronology of Meerfelder Maar. An Early Holocene tephra layer, the Ulmener Maar Tephra (˜11,000 varve years BP), provides a tie-line of the Meerfelder Maar record to the varved Holocene record of nearby Lake Holzmaar. The Laacher See Tephra provides another prominent time marker for the late Allerød, ˜200 varve years before the transition into the Younger Dryas at 12,680 varve years BP. Further investigation has now shown that there are also 15 cryptotephra layers within the Meerfelder Maar LGIT-Holocene stratigraphy and these layers hold the potential to make direct comparisons between the Meerfelder Maar record and other palaeoenvironmental archives from across Europe and the North Atlantic. Most notable is the presence of the Vedde Ash, the most widespread Icelandic eruption known from the Late Quaternary, which occurred midway through the Younger Dryas. The Vedde Ash has also been found in the Greenland ice cores and can be used as an isochron around which the GICC05 and Meerfelder Maar annual chronologies can be compared. Near the base of the annual laminations in Meerfelder Maar a cryptotephra is found that correlates to the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff, erupted from Campi Flegrei in southern Italy, 1200 km away. This is the furthest north that the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff has been found, highlighting its importance in the construction of a European-wide tephrostratigraphic framework. The co-location of cryptotephra layers from Italian, Icelandic and Eifel volcanic sources, within such a precise chronological record, makes Meerfelder Maar one of the most important tephrostratotype records for continental Europe during

  1. Late Quaternary Faulting along the San Juan de los Planes Fault Zone, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, M. M.; Coyan, J. A.; Arrowsmith, J.; Maloney, S. J.; Gutierrez, G.; Umhoefer, P. J.

    2007-12-01

    As a result of continued distributed deformation in the Gulf Extensional Province along an oblique-divergent plate margin, active normal faulting is well manifest in southeastern Baja California. By characterizing normal-fault related deformation along the San Juan de los Planes fault zone (SJPFZ) southwest of La Paz, Baja California Sur we contribute to understanding the patterns and rates of faulting along the southwest gulf-margin fault system. The geometry, history, and rate of faulting provide constraints on the relative significance of gulf-margin deformation as compared to axial system deformation. The SJPFZ is a major north-trending structure in the southern Baja margin along which we focused our field efforts. These investigations included: a detailed strip map of the active fault zone, including delineation of active scarp traces and geomorphic surfaces on the hanging wall and footwall; fault scarp profiles; analysis of bedrock structures to better understand how the pattern and rate of strain varied during the development of this fault zone; and a gravity survey across the San Juan de los Planes basin to determine basin geometry and fault behavior. The map covers a N-S swath from the Gulf of California in the north to San Antonio in the south, an area ~45km long and ~1-4km wide. Bedrock along the SJPFZ varies from Cretaceous Las Cruces Granite in the north to Cretaceous Buena Mujer Tonalite in the south and is scarred by shear zones and brittle faults. The active scarp-forming fault juxtaposes bedrock in the footwall against Late Quaternary sandstone-conglomerate. This ~20m wide zone is highly fractured bedrock infused with carbonate. The northern ~12km of the SJPFZ, trending 200°, preserves discontinuous scarps 1-2km long and 1-3m high in Quaternary units. The scarps are separated by stretches of bedrock embayed by hundreds of meters-wide tongues of Quaternary sandstone-conglomerate, implying low Quaternary slip rate. Further south, ~2 km north of the

  2. Late Pliocene and Quaternary Eurasian locust infestations in the Canary Archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meco, J.; Muhs, D.R.; Fontugne, M.; Ramos, A.J.; Lomoschitz, A.; Patterson, D.

    2011-01-01

    The Canary Archipelago has long been a sensitive location to record climate changes of the past. Interbedded with its basalt lavas are marine deposits from the principal Pleistocene interglacials, as well as aeolian sands with intercalated palaeosols. The palaeosols contain African dust and innumerable relict egg pods of a temperate-region locust (cf. Dociostaurus maroccanusThunberg 1815). New ecological and stratigraphical information reveals the geological history of locust plagues (or infestations) and their palaeoclimatic significance. Here, we show that the first arrival of the plagues to the Canary Islands from Africa took place near the end of the Pliocene, ca. 3Ma, and reappeared with immense strength during the middle Late Pleistocene preceding MIS (marine isotope stage) 11 (ca. 420ka), MIS 5.5 (ca. 125ka) and probably during other warm interglacials of the late Middle Pleistocene and the Late Pleistocene. During the Early Holocene, locust plagues may have coincided with a brief cool period in the current interglacial. Climatically, locust plagues on the Canaries are a link in the chain of full-glacial arid-cold climate (calcareous dunes), early interglacial arid-sub-humid climate (African dust inputs and locust plagues), peak interglacial warm-humid climate (marine deposits with Senegalese fauna), transitional arid-temperate climate (pedogenic calcretes), and again full-glacial arid-cold climate (calcareous dunes) oscillations. During the principal interglacials of the Pleistocene, the Canary Islands recorded the migrations of warm Senegalese marine faunas to the north, crossing latitudes in the Euro-African Atlantic. However, this northward marine faunal migration was preceded in the terrestrial realm by interglacial infestations of locusts. ??? Locust plagues, Canary Islands, Late Pliocene, Pleistocene, Holocene, palaeoclimatology. ?? 2010 The Authors, Lethaia ?? 2010 The Lethaia Foundation.

  3. Late Quaternary sea-ice history of northern Fram Strait/Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Anne; Stein, Rüdiger; Fahl, Kirsten; Matthießen, Jens; Forwick, Matthias; O'Regan, Matt

    2016-04-01

    One of the main characteristics of the Arctic Ocean is its seasonal to perennial sea-ice cover. Variations of sea-ice conditions affect the Earth's albedo, primary production, rate of deep-water etc.. During the last decades, a drastic decrease in sea ice has been recorded, and the causes of which, i.e., natural vs. anthropogenic forcings, and their relevance within the global climate system, are subject of intense scientific and societal debate. In this context, records of past sea-ice conditions going beyond instrumental records are of major significance. These records may help to better understand the processes controlling natural sea-ice variability and to improve models for forecasts of future climatic conditions. During RV Polarstern Cruise PS92 in summer 2015, a 860 cm long sediment core (PS92/039-2) was recovered from the eastern flank of Yermak Plateau north of the Svalbard archipelago (Peeken, 2015). Based on a preliminary age model, this sediment core probably represents the time interval from MIS 6 to MIS 1. This core, located close to the modern summer ice edge, has been selected for reconstruction of past Arctic sea-ice variability based on specific biomarkers. In this context, we have determined the ice-algae-derived sea-ice proxy IP25 (Belt et al., 2007), in combination with other biomarkers indicative for open-water conditions (cf., Müller et al., 2009, 2011). Furthermore, organic carbon fluxes were differentiated using specific biomarkers indicative for marine primary production (brassicasterol, dinosterol) and terrigenous input (campesterol, β-sitosterol). In this poster, preliminary results of our organic-geochemical and sedimentological investigations are presented. Distinct fluctuations of these biomarkers indicate several major, partly abrupt changes in sea-ice cover in the Yermak Plateau area during the late Quaternary. These changes are probably linked to changes in the inflow of Atlantic Water along the western coastline of Svalbard into

  4. Landscape evolution of the Ulan Buh Desert in northern China during the late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fahu; Li, Guoqiang; Zhao, Hui; Jin, Ming; Chen, Xuemei; Fan, Yuxin; Liu, Xiaokang; Wu, Duo; Madsen, David

    2014-05-01

    The evolution of arid environments in northern China was a major environmental change during the Quaternary. Here we present the dating and environmental proxy results from a 35 m long core (A-WL10ZK-1) collected from the Ulan Buh Desert (UBD), along with supplemental data from four other cores. The UBD is one of the main desert dune fields in China and our results indicate the UBD has undergone complex evolution during the late Quaternary. Most of the present UBD was covered by a Jilantai-Hetao Mega-paleolake lasting until ~ 90 ka ago. A sandy desert environment prevailed throughout the UBD during the last glacial period and early Holocene. A wetland environment characterized by the formation of numerous interdunal ponds in the northern UBD occurred at ~ 8-7 ka, although a dune field persisted in the southern UBD. The modern UBD landscape formed after these wetlands dried up. During the last 2000 years, eolian sand from the Badain Jaran Desert has invaded the northern UBD, while farming and overgrazing resulted in the formation of the eastern UBD. We suggest that the formation of UBD landforms is related to the disintegration of the megalake Jilantai-Hetao and to summer monsoon changes during the last glaciation and Holocene.

  5. Late quaternary dynamics in the Madeira River basin, southern Amazonia (Brazil), as revealed by paleomorphological analysis.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Ericson H; Rossetti, Dilce F

    2015-03-01

    Ancient drainage systems are being increasingly documented in the Amazon basin and their characterization is crucial for reconstructing fluvial evolution in this area. Fluvial morphologies, including elongate belts, are well preserved along the Madeira River. Digital Elevation Model from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission favored the detection of these features even where they are covered by dense rainforest. These paleomorphologies are attributed to the shifting position of past tributaries of the Madeira River through avulsions. These radial paleodrainage networks produced fan-shaped morphologies that resemble distributary megafans. Distinguishing avulsive tributary systems from distributary megafans in the sedimentary record is challenging. Madeira´s paleodrainage reveals the superposition of tributary channels formed by multiple avulsions within a given time period, rather than downstream bifurcation of coexisting channels. Channel avulsion in this Amazonian area during the late Quaternary is related to tectonics due to features as: (i) straight lineaments coincident with fault directions; (ii) northeastward tilting of the terrain with Quaternary strata; and (iii) several drainage anomalies, including frequent orthogonal drainage inflections. These characteristics altogether lead to propose that the radial paleodrainage present at the Madeira River margin results from successive avulsions of tributary channels over time due to tectonics.

  6. Mapped plant macrofossil and pollen records of late Quaternary vegetation change in eastern North America

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, S.T.; Overpeck, J.T.; Webb, T. III ||

    1995-06-01

    We compiled a plant macrofossil database for 12 eastern North American tree and shrub taxa (Picea sp., P. glauca, P. mariana, Larix laricina, Abies balsamea, Tsuga canadensis, Pinus strobus, P. banksiana, P. resinosa, Betula papyrifera, B. alleghaniensis, B. Series Humiles) at 264 late Quaternary sites. Presence/absence maps for these taxa at 18,000, 15,000, 12,000, 9000, 6000, 3000, and 0 {sup 14}C yr B.P. show changes in geographic ranges of these species in response to climatic change. Comparison of the macrofossil maps with isopoll maps for corresponding taxa corroborates inferences from the pollen data, and reveals species-level patterns not apparent in the pollen maps.

  7. Climate change not to blame for late Quaternary megafauna extinctions in Australia.

    PubMed

    Saltré, Frédérik; Rodríguez-Rey, Marta; Brook, Barry W; Johnson, Christopher N; Turney, Chris S M; Alroy, John; Cooper, Alan; Beeton, Nicholas; Bird, Michael I; Fordham, Damien A; Gillespie, Richard; Herrando-Pérez, Salvador; Jacobs, Zenobia; Miller, Gifford H; Nogués-Bravo, David; Prideaux, Gavin J; Roberts, Richard G; Bradshaw, Corey J A

    2016-01-29

    Late Quaternary megafauna extinctions impoverished mammalian diversity worldwide. The causes of these extinctions in Australia are most controversial but essential to resolve, because this continent-wide event presaged similar losses that occurred thousands of years later on other continents. Here we apply a rigorous metadata analysis and new ensemble-hindcasting approach to 659 Australian megafauna fossil ages. When coupled with analysis of several high-resolution climate records, we show that megafaunal extinctions were broadly synchronous among genera and independent of climate aridity and variability in Australia over the last 120,000 years. Our results reject climate change as the primary driver of megafauna extinctions in the world's most controversial context, and instead estimate that the megafauna disappeared Australia-wide ∼13,500 years after human arrival, with shorter periods of coexistence in some regions. This is the first comprehensive approach to incorporate uncertainty in fossil ages, extinction timing and climatology, to quantify mechanisms of prehistorical extinctions.

  8. Response to comment on "No late Quaternary strike-slip motion along the northern Karakoram fault"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Alexander C.; Owen, Lewis A.; Chen, Jie; Schoenbohm, Lindsay M.; Hedrick, Kathryn A.; Blisniuk, Kimberly; Sharp, Warren D.; Imrecke, Daniel B.; Li, Wenqiao; Yuan, Zhaode; Caffee, Marc W.; Mertz-Kraus, Regina

    2016-06-01

    In their comment on "No late Quaternary strike-slip motion along the northern Karakoram fault", while Chevalier et al. (2016) do not dispute any of the results or interpretations regarding our observations along the main strand of the northern Karakoram fault, they make several arguments as to why they interpret the Kongur Shan Extensional System (KES) to be kinematically linked to the Karakoram fault. These arguments center around how an "active" fault is defined, how slip on segments of the KES may be compatible with dextral shear related to continuation of the Karakoram fault, and suggestions as to how the two fault systems might still be connected. While we appreciate that there are still uncertainties in the regional geology, we address these comments and show that their arguments are inconsistent with all available data, known geologic relationships, and basic kinematics.

  9. Late Quaternary fine silt deposits of Jammu, NW Himalaya: Genesis and climatic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganjoo, Rajinder K.; Kumar, Vinod

    2012-02-01

    The fine silt deposits of Jammu (J & K State, India) stretch all along the Siwalik foothills from Jammu to the Potwar Plateau in Pakistan. The post-Siwalik deposits, first discussed by de Terra and Paterson (1939), are attributed to wind action. The deposits termed as `Potwar loessic silt' comprising sandy silt are essentially of late Quaternary age (75-18 ka) and are re-looked herein from the point of view of genesis and climatic significance. The sorting, skewness and kurtosis parameters of fine silts of Jammu suggest fluvial environment of the deposits wherein the water budget fluctuated. The weak pedogenesis of fine silts at certain intervals corroborate to periods of less or no sedimentation. The bivariant plot studies further suggest fluvial environment of deposition for the fine silt at Jammu, with regular fluctuations in the budget of river water that was perhaps in consonance with oscillations in the climate of the region.

  10. A protocol for subsampling Late Quaternary coprolites for multi-proxy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Jamie R.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.

    2016-04-01

    The study of Late Quaternary coprolites can provide unique insights into various aspects of the biology and ecology of extinct species and prehistoric humans. Coprolite studies are becoming increasingly multi-disciplinary, allowing a greater amount of information to be obtained from individual specimens. Subsampling is a critical part of multi-proxy coprolite analysis, yet no standardised subsampling protocols exist, and details of subsampling methods have rarely been reported in published studies. Here, we outline a procedure for the subsampling of coprolites for multi-proxy analysis. The method is designed to minimise the risk of sample contamination for sensitive analyses (e.g. ancient DNA, palynology), thereby maximising the robustness of interpretations made from the results. We also stress the need for voucher samples to be retained to ensure the repeatability of results and allow for further analytical methods to be applied to specimens in the future.

  11. The late Quaternary decline and extinction of palms on oceanic Pacific islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prebble, M.; Dowe, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    Late Quaternary palaeoecological records of palm decline, extirpation and extinction are explored from the oceanic islands of the Pacific Ocean. Despite the severe reduction of faunal diversity coincidental with human colonisation of these previously uninhabited oceanic islands, relatively few plant extinctions have been recorded. At low taxonomic levels, recent faunal extinctions on oceanic islands are concentrated in larger bodied representatives of certain genera and families. Fossil and historic records of plant extinction show a similar trend with high representation of the palm family, Arecaceae. Late Holocene decline of palm pollen types is demonstrated from most islands where there are palaeoecological records including the Cook Islands, Fiji, French Polynesia, the Hawaiian Islands, the Juan Fernandez Islands and Rapanui. A strong correspondence between human impact and palm decline is measured from palynological proxies including increased concentrations of charcoal particles and pollen from cultivated plants and invasive weeds. Late Holocene extinctions or extirpations are recorded across all five of the Arecaceae subfamilies of the oceanic Pacific islands. These are most common for the genus Pritchardia but also many sedis fossil palm types were recorded representing groups lacking diagnostic morphological characters.

  12. Simulation experiments with late quaternary carbon storage in mid-latitude forest communities

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A.M.; Tharp, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    The assumption was tested that forest biomass in communities on the modern landscape is equivalent to that in similar communities on the late-Quaternary landscape. Forest carbon storage dynamics during the past 16,000 years were derived from a mathematical model of forest processes and individual tree species behavior. Modern pollen and climate data sets provided pollen-climate transfer functions to generate model driving variables from fossil pollen records. Climate variables were estimated from fossil pollen stratigraphies in Tennessee, Ohio, and Michigan. Only simulated early postglacial warming produced the large carbon gains one would expect in mixed deciduous-coniferous forests from unglaciated regions. The simulated mid-Holocene warming generated little carbon storage response by temperate deciduous forests and large carbon gains in northern hardwood-conifer forests, unlike the linear relationship expected when equivalence is assumed between modern and prehistoric forests. Late-glacial, mid-latitude forests may have contained more biomass than would be expected from equivalent forests on the modern landscape. Simulations of alternate hypotheses to explain the enhanced late-glacial cannot distinguish effects of reduced seasonal temperature extremes from effects of changing species' temperature tolerances. 84 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Micromorphological investigations of the Late Quaternary loess-paleosol sequences of the Kashmir Valley, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dar, Reyaz Ahmad; Chandra, Rakesh; Romshoo, Shakil Ahmad; Kowser, Nazia

    2015-11-01

    The loess-paleosol sequences of the Karewa Group preserve a valuable repository of the Late Quaternary climatic changes and the landscape evolution history of the Karewa Basin of Kashmir Valley in their lithological and pedogenic records. Three representative loess-paleosol sections at Shankerpora (SP), Khan Sahib (KS) and Pattan (PT) localities were chosen for detailed lithostratigraphic fieldwork and micromorphological observations of thin sections. Lithostratigraphic analysis revealed lateral and vertical variation in thickness and number of paleosol profiles from south-west to north-west of the Karewa Basin suggesting the availability of land-surface for periodic loess deposition. The SP section is marked by 6 (SP-S6, S7, S8, S9, S10, S12), KS section by 3 (KS-S2, S4, S5) and PT section by 2 (PT-S1, S3) thick mature paleosol profiles. Theses paleosols have well developed 'Ah' and 'Btk' horizons representing prolonged land-surface stability when pedogenic processes outpace loess deposition. On the other hand comparatively thin to thick paleosol profiles represent weak to moderate pedogenic maturity indicating short stratigraphic breaks with rapid loess deposition. Micromorphological observations of thin sections suggested that clay illuviation and CaCO3 accumulation have operated within the paleosol profiles. CaCO3 features are often associated with clay coatings suggesting decalcification of carbonates followed by clay illuviation. Pedogenic CaCO3 probably resulted from the precipitation of the soil solution near the average depth of wetting front. The pedogenic CaCO3, illuvial clay, mottles, iron manganese features, pedal microstructure and blocky aggregates reveal variation in the pedogenic maturity among and within the loess-paleosol sections. The morphological (both micro- and macro-morphological) attributes of loess-paleosols suggest variation of climatic conditions during the Late Quaternary period in the Karewa Basin of Kashmir Valley, India.

  14. Delineation of Late Quaternary depositional sequences by high-resolution seismic stratigraphy, Louisiana continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, J.R.; Berryhill, H.L. Jr.; Penland, S.

    1987-05-01

    Interpretations of over 20,000 line km of single-channel, high-resolution seismic reflection profiles, coupled with nearshore vibracores and logs of industrial platform borings, provide the data base for determining the history and stratigraphy of late Quaternary sea level fluctuations on the Louisiana continental shelf. Regional unconformities, formed by subaerial exposure of the shelf during glacio-eustatic sea level withdrawals and modified by shoreface erosion during ensuing transgression, serve as markers to identify the boundaries of depositional sequences. Unconformities are recognizable on seismic profiles by high-amplitude reflectors as well as discordant relationships between reflectors. Within the upper Quaternary section, six depositional sequences have been recognized. Five of these are related to glacio-eustatic sea level fluctuations, involving sea level fall close to, or beyond, the margin of the continental shelf. Three of these fluctuations culminated in the deposition of shelf margin delta sequences. Extensive fluvial channeling characterizes the regressive phase of these sequences. Transgressive phases are marked by infilling of fluvial channels, flood-plain aggradation, truncation, or deposition of sand sheets, depending upon sediment supply and rate of sea level rise. Sequences 4 and 5 are correlated with the late Wisconsinan glacial stage and Holocene transgression. The upper portion of sequence 5 consists of an early Holocene Mississippi delta complex. Abandonment and transgression of this delta are responsible for the formation of sequence 6. Although these deposits cover a smaller area, this demonstrates that deltaic processes can produce sequences similar to those driven by glacially controlled sea level changes.

  15. Radiocarbon dating late Quaternary loess deposits using small terrestrial gastropod shells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, Jeff S.; McGeehin, John P.; Muhs, Daniel R.; Bettis, E. Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Constraining the ages and mass accumulation rates of late Quaternary loess deposits is often difficult because of the paucity of organic material typically available for 14C dating and the inherent limitations of luminescence techniques. Radiocarbon dating of small terrestrial gastropod shells may provide an alternative to these methods as fossil shells are common in loess and contain ∼12% carbon by weight. Terrestrial gastropod assemblages in loess have been used extensively to reconstruct past environmental conditions but have been largely ignored for dating purposes. Here, we present the results of a multi-faceted approach to understanding the potential for using small terrestrial gastropod shells to date loess deposits in North America. First, we compare highly resolved 14C ages of well-preserved wood and gastropod shells (Succineidae) recovered from a Holocene loess section in Alaska. Radiocarbon ages derived from the shells are nearly identical to wood and plant macrofossil ages throughout the section, which suggests that the shells behaved as closed systems with respect to carbon for at least the last 10 ka (thousands of calibrated 14C years before present). Second, we apply 14C dating of gastropod shells to late Pleistocene loess deposits in the Great Plains using stratigraphy and independent chronologies for comparison. The new shell ages require less interpretation than humic acid radiocarbon ages that are commonly used in loess studies, provide additional stratigraphic coverage to previous dating efforts, and are in correct stratigraphic order more often than their luminescence counterparts. Third, we show that Succineidae shells recovered from historic loess in the Matanuska River Valley, Alaska captured the 20th century 14C bomb spike, which suggests that the shells can be used to date late Holocene and historic-aged loess. Finally, results from Nebraska and western Iowa suggest that, similar to other materials, shell ages approaching ∼40 ka should

  16. Dinoflagellate cysts as indicators of millennial scale climatic and oceanographic variability in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (Mexico) during the Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Andrea M.; Mertens, Kenneth N.; Pospelova, *Vera; Pedersen, Thomas F.; Ganeshram, Raja S.

    2015-04-01

    A high-resolution record of organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst production in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (Mexico) reveals a complex paleoceanographic history over the last ~40 ka. Guaymas Basin is an excellent location to perform high resolution studies of changes in Late Quaternary climate and paleo-productivity because it is characterized by high primary productivity, high sedimentation rates, and low oxygen bottom waters. These factors contribute to the deposition and preservation of laminated sediments throughout large portions of core MD02-2515. This is one of the first studies in the Northeast Pacific to document dinoflagellate cyst production at a centennial to millennial scale throughout the Late Quaternary. Based on the cyst assemblages three major dinoflagellate cyst zones were established, and roughly correspond to Marine Isotope Stages 1 to 3. The most dominant dinoflagellate cyst taxa found throughout the core were Brigantedinium spp. and Operculodinium centrocarpum. Dansgaard-Oeschger event 8 is observed in the dinoflagellate cyst record, and is characterized by an increase in warm water taxa such as Spiniferites pachydermus. Other intervals of interest are the Younger Dryas where cooler sea-surface conditions are not recorded, and the Holocene which is characterized by the consistent presence of warm water species Stelladinium reidii, Tuberculodinidum vancampoae, Bitectatodinium spongium and an increase in Quinquecuspis concreta. Changes in cyst assemblages, concentrations and species diversity, along with geochemical data reflect major orbital to millennial-scale climatic and oceanographic changes. Keywords: Dansgaard-Oeschger events; dinoflagellate cyst; Gulf of California; late Quaternary climate change; upwelling; Younger Dryas.

  17. Late Quaternary landscape evolution in the Great Karoo, South Africa: Processes and drivers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldknow, Chris; Hooke, Janet; Lang, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The Great Karoo spans the north-central part of South Africa at a major climatic boundary. The characteristics, sequences, spatial patterns and drivers of river response to Late Quaternary climate changes in this region remain unclear due to the fragmentary alluvial/colluvial stratigraphic record and the lack of dated palaeoclimatic archives. Dendritic gully networks incised into deep deposits (up to 6 m) of colluvium and alluvium in the upper Sundays River catchment expose a legacy of "cut and fill" features. In 1st order tributaries, these are predominantly discontinuous palaeochannels and flood-outs with localised palaeosols, whereas in 2nd & 3rd order tributaries there are: 1) incised palaeo-geomorphic surfaces, 2) semi-continuous inset terrace sequences, 3) buried palaeo-gully topography. Using a combination of field mapping, logging of sediment outcrops, soil micromorphological and grain size analysis, mineral magnetic measurements and radiometric dating (OSL & 14C), we derive a stratigraphic evolution model which demonstrates a) the number of phases of incision, aggradation and pedogenesis, b) the spatial and temporal extent of each phase and c) the drivers of alluviation and associated feedbacks. Our reconstruction of regional valley alluviation indicates four distinct terrace units of contrasting depositional age. The base of the succession reflects slow aggradation under periglacial conditions associated with the Last Glacial Maximum. Subsequent channel entrenchment, causing terrace abandonment (T1) occurred in the deglacial period when vegetation and rainfall were in anti-phase. Re-instatement of connectivity with deep upland colluvial stores resulted in the injection of a pulse of sediment to valley floors, triggering compartmentalised backfilling (aggradation of T2) which propagated upstream as far as the second order drainage lines. This backfilling restructured the local hydrology, which, in concert with enhanced summer-rainfall, contributed to a

  18. Dynamics of Mediterranean late Quaternary fluvial activity: An example from the River Ebro (north Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria-Jáuregui, Ángel; González-Amuchástegui, María José; Mauz, Barbara; Lang, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Late Pleistocene and Holocene fluvial evolution of the upper River Ebro (Miranda basin, north Spain) is analysed using geomorphological, sedimentological, and optical dating techniques. Maximum regional crustal uplift of 0.98 m/ka approximately helped preserve a suite of terraces in the Miranda basin: 5 river terraces (T1-5) were identified and their formation attributed to MIS 6 (T1), MIS 5d (T2), MIS 4 (T3), MIS 2 (T4), MIS 1 (T5). Alluvium deposited in terraces T1, T2, T3, and T4 is well-sorted, clast-supported gravels; whereas the T5 deposit is exclusively composed of silt. Gravels were deposited during cold and dry periods when reduced vegetation cover on hillslopes increased sediment supply to the trunk river. Silt was deposited in overbank settings under warmer and wetter climate conditions when vegetation cover stabilised hillslopes and restricted sediment supply. It also resulted in lower peak discharge and reduced flow velocities over vegetated floodplains. The chronological sequence of terraces indicates that incision occurred during climatic transitions. We conclude that the upper River Ebro responded to fluctuations in sediment supply and discharge controlled by late Quaternary climate cycles.

  19. Environmental and Archaeological Implications of a Late Quaternary Palynological Sequence, Poyang Lake, Southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qinhua; Piperno, Dolores R.

    1999-09-01

    Paleoecological data from Poyang Lake, southern China, indicate that significant natural and human-induced vegetational changes have occurred during the Late Quaternary in the Middle Yangtze River valley, the likely location of rice (Oryza sativa L.) domestication. During the late Pleistocene (from ca. 12,830 to ca. 10,500 yr B.P.), the climate was cooler and drier than today's. The subtropical, mixed deciduous-evergreen broad-leaved forest which constitutes the modern, potential vegetation was reduced and herbaceous vegetative cover expanded. A hiatus in sedimentation occurred in Poyang Lake, beginning sometime after ca. 10,500 yr B.P. and lasting until the middle Holocene (ca. 4000 yr B.P.). At ca. 4000 yr B.P., the regional vegetation was a diverse, broad-leaved forest dominated by many of the same arboreal elements (e.g., Quercus, Castanopsis, Liquidambar) that grow in the area today. A significant reduction of arboreal pollen and an increase of herbaceous pollen at ca. 2000 yr B.P. probably reflect human influence on the vegetation and the expansion of intensive rice agriculture into the dryland forests near the river valleys.

  20. Late Quaternary dietary shifts of the Cape grysbok ( Raphicerus melanotis) in southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faith, J. Tyler

    2011-01-01

    The Cape grysbok is endemic to southern Africa's Cape Floral Region where it selectively browses various species of dicotyledonous vegetation. Fossil evidence indicates that the grysbok persisted under glacial and interglacial conditions throughout the late Quaternary and inhabited a range of environments. This study employs mesowear analysis to reconstruct grysbok diets over time and in response to changing environments at Nelson Bay Cave, Die Kelders Cave 1, Klasies River Mouth, and Swartklip 1. Results indicate that the amount of grasses (monocots) versus leafy vegetation (dicots) included in the diet fluctuated over time and largely in agreement with changes in faunal community structure. The case for dietary flexibility is particularly clear at Nelson Bay Cave, where there is a significant trend from mixed feeding towards increased browsing from the late Pleistocene (~ 18,500 14C yr BP) through the Holocene. Dietary shifts at Nelson Bay Cave are consistent with the hypothesis that declining grassland productivity is responsible for the terminal Pleistocene extinction of several large ungulates in southern Africa. Furthermore, the short-term dietary shifts demonstrated here (100s to 1000s of years) provide an important caution against relying on taxonomic uniformitarianism when reconstructing the dietary preferences of fossil ungulates, both extant and extinct.

  1. The calculation of climatic indices for Late Quaternary faunal assemblages from South African sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thackeray, Francis

    2013-04-01

    The relative abundance of rodents and insectivores from several Late Quaternary sites in South Africa have been studied using multivariate analysis (notably factor analysis). The highest loadings on the first factor (F1) are obtained for taxa that are today found in warm subtropical environments, contrasting with taxa which have low F1 loadings and which are today distributed in more southerly latitudes and at high altitudes. The latter taxa with low loadings on F1 are able to tolerate cold conditions (and are relatively common in Terminal Pleistocene assemblages associated with Oxygen Isotope Stage 2). A summary statistic based on F1 (SSF1) is calculated and interpreted as a temperature index. The dated temperature indices for Boomplaas cave correlate well (r=0.95) with dated deuterium isotope ratios for a Vostok core in Antarctica. Similarly, a moisture index (SSF3) is calculated from factor analysis of the relative abundances of the same faunal assemblages. The results are assessed in terms of a non-linear pattern of variability in temperature and moisture indices calculated from pollen as well as mammalian microfauna. The changes in climate are likely to have influenced the distribution and abundance of human populations in the Late Pleistocene in southern Africa.

  2. Late Quaternary evolution of channel and lobe complexes of Monterey Fan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fildani, A.; Normark, W.R.

    2004-01-01

    The modern Monterey submarine fan, one of the largest deep-water deposits off the western US, is composed of two major turbidite systems: the Neogene Lower Turbidite System (LTS) and the late Quaternary Upper Turbidite System (UTS). The areally extensive LTS is a distal deposit with low-relief, poorly defined channels, overbank, and lower-fan elements. The younger UTS comprises almost half of the total fan volume and was initiated in the late Pleistocene from canyons in the Monterey Bay area. Rapidly prograding high-relief, channel-levee complexes dominated deposition early in the UTS with periodic avulsion events. In the last few 100 ka, much of the sediment bypassed the northern fan as a result of allocyclic controls, and deposition is simultaneously occurring on a sandy lobe with low-relief channels and on an adjacent detached muddier lobe built from reconfinement of overbank flow from the northern high-relief channels. During the relatively short-lived UTS deposition, at least seven different channel types and two lobe types were formed. This study provides a significant reinterpretation of the depositional history of Monterey Fan by incorporating all available unpublished geophysical data. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthesis of Late Cretaceous-Quaternary tectonic, sedimentary and magmatic processes and basin formation related to episodic subduction-collision in the easternmost Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Alastair; Kinnaird, Timothy; McCay, Gillian; Palamakumbura, Romesh; Taslı, Kemal

    2015-04-01

    Mesozoic oceanic crust of the easternmost Mediterranean has experienced northwards subduction during Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic, either continuously or discontinuously based on kinematic evidence. Much of the existing information on sedimentation within the easternmost Mediterranean oceanic basin comes from the non-emplaced continental margins of the Levant and North Africa. In addition, sedimentary basins related to plate convergence are recorded along the northern margin of the Southern Neotethyan ocean, mainly in the Kyrenia Range of northern Cyprus and its extension into the Misis Mountains of southern Turkey, coupled with the adjacent submerged areas. In a setting of only incipient continental collision such as the easternmost Mediterranean the sedimentary basins would be expected to remain entirely submarine. In contrast, the Kyrenia Range has been strongly uplifted and subaerially exposed during Late Pliocene-Quaternary time. This allows the recognition of a number of discrete phases of sedimentary basin formation: 1. Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian): silicic volcanism to create a subaqueous volcaniclastic apron; 2. Maastrichtian-Paleocene: pelagic carbonate deposition interspersed with proximal gravity flows and within-plate type alkaline volcanics; 3. Early Eocene: large-scale sedimentary melange (olistostrome) emplacement; 4. Late Eocene-Late Miocene: terrigenous gravity-flow deposition in a deep-water fault dissected 'fore arc' setting. Initial, Late Eocene non-marine coarse clastic alluvial fan deposition was succeeded by Oligocene-Miocene deep-marine siliciclastic gravity flow deposits, fining and shallowing upwards during the Late Miocene; 5. Messinian: localised precipitation of evaporites in small fault-controlled basins; 6. Pliocene: shallow-marine siliciclastic-carbonate deposition in a shelf-depth, overall regressive setting; 7. Latest Pliocene to mid-Pleistocene: gravitational accumulation of coarse talus along a strongly uplifting

  4. Late Quaternary Biogeographic and Climatic Changes in Western North America: Evidence From Mapped Arrays of Packrat Midden Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, L. E.; Thompson, R. S.; Anderson, K. H.; Pelltier, R. T.

    2005-12-01

    The USGS/NOAA North American Packrat Midden Database is a standardized archive of published paleobotanical data derived from packrat middens in western North America. We use midden age, location, and species presence-absence data from this dataset to generate maps illustrating the past occurrence of important woody plant taxa in western North America during the late Quaternary. We explore late Quaternary changes in the distributions of selected plant taxa commonly found in packrat middens and presently associated with western desert ( Carnegiea gigantea), steppe ( Artemisia tridentata-type), woodland (pinyon pines), montane ( Pinus ponderosa), and subalpine ( Pinus flexilis) plant communities. We compare the current geographic and climatic distributions of these taxa with the present-day climates at sites where these taxa have been found in packrat midden macrofossil assemblages. These comparisons suggest that late Pleistocene climates in western North America were generally characterized by cooler-than-present summers and by much greater-than-present mean annual precipitation.

  5. Late Quaternary alluviation and offset along the eastern Big Pine fault, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLong, S.B.; Minor, S.A.; Arnold, L.J.

    2007-01-01

    Determining late Quaternary offset rates on specific faults within active mountain belts is not only a key component of seismic hazard analysis, but sheds light on regional tectonic development over geologic timescales. Here we report an estimate of dip-slip rate on the eastern Big Pine oblique-reverse fault in the upper Cuyama Valley within the western Transverse Ranges of southern California, and its relation to local landscape development. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of sandy beds within coarse-grained alluvial deposits indicates that deposition of alluvium shed from the Pine Mountain massif occurred near the southern margin of the Cuyama structural basin at the elevation of the Cuyama River between 25 and 14??ka. This alluvial deposit has been offset ??? 10??m vertically by the eastern Big Pine fault, providing a latest Quaternary dip-slip rate estimate of ??? 0.9??m/ky based on a 50?? fault dip. Incision of the adjacent Cuyama River has exposed a section of older Cuyama River sediments beneath the Pine Mountain alluvium that accumulated between 45 and 30??ka on the down-thrown footwall block of the eastern Big Pine fault. Corroborative evidence for Holocene reverse-slip on the eastern Big Pine fault is ??? 1??m of incised bedrock that is characteristically exposed beneath 2-3.5??ka fill terraces in tributaries south of the fault. The eastern Big Pine fault in the Cuyama Valley area has no confirmed record of historic rupture; however, based on our results, we suggest the likelihood of multiple reverse-slip rupture events since 14??ka. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Late Neogene marine incursions and the ancestral Gulf of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDougall, K.

    2008-01-01

    The late Neogene section in the Salton Trough, California, and along the lower Colorado River in Arizona is composed of marine units bracketed by nonmarine units. Microfossils from the marine deposits indicate that a marine incursion inundated the Salton Trough during the late Miocene. Water depths increased rapidly in the Miocene and eventually flooded the region now occupied by the Colorado River as far north as Parker, Arizona. Marine conditions were restricted in the Pliocene as the Colorado River filled the Salton Trough with sediments and the Gulf of California assumed its present configuration. Microfossils from the early part of this incursion include a diverse assemblage of benthic foraminifers (Amphistegina gibbosa, Uvigerina peregrina, Cassidulina delicata, and Bolivina interjuncta), planktic foraminifers (Globigerinoides obliquus, G. extremus, and Globigerina nepenthes), and calcareous nannoplankton (Discoaster brouweri, Discoaster aff. Discoaster surculus, Sphenolithus abies, and S. neoabies), whereas microfossils in the final phase contain a less diverse assemblage of benthic foraminifers that are diagnostic of marginal shallow-marine conditions (Ammonia, Elphidium, Bolivina, Cibicides, and Quinqueloculina). Evidence of an earlier middle Miocene marine incursion comes from reworked microfossils found near Split Mountain Gorge in the Fish Creek Gypsum (Sphenolithus moriformis) and near San Gorgonio Pass (Cyclicargolithus floridanus and Sphenolithus heteromorphus and planktic foraminifers). The middle Miocene incursion may also be represented by the older marine sedimentary rocks encountered in the subsurface near Yuma, Arizona, where rare middle Miocene planktic foraminifers are found. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  7. Sedimentary development and correlation of Late Quaternary terraces in the Kyrenia Range, northern Cyprus, using a combination of sedimentology and optical luminescence data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palamakumbura, Romesh N.; Robertson, Alastair H. F.; Kinnaird, Tim C.; Sanderson, David C. W.

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the younger of a series of Quaternary terraces along the flanks of the Kyrenia Range in northern Cyprus, specifically the Kyrenia (Girne) and the Koupia terraces. The Kyrenia (Girne) terrace is tentatively correlated with oxygen isotope stage 5 (125 Ka), and the Koupia terrace with oxygen isotope stage 3 (<50 Ka). Along the northern flank of the range, the Kyrenia (Girne) terrace deposits (5-20 m above modern sea level) typically begin with a basal lag conglomerate and then pass upwards into shallow-marine calcarenites and then into variable aeolianites, paleosols and fluvial deposits (up to 20 m thick). In contrast, the Koupia terrace (<2 m above modern sea level) consists of aeolianites and shallow-marine calcarenites (up to 8 m thick). The equivalent deposits along the southern flank of the range are entirely non-marine fluvial mud, sands and conglomerates. The marine to continental terrace systems can be tentatively correlated based on mapping, height above modern sea level and sedimentary facies. However, variable preservation and patchy exposure require such correlations to be independently tested. To achieve this, a portable optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) reader was used to determine the luminescence characteristics of the two terrace systems. Luminescence profiles show major differences in luminescence characteristics between the two terrace depositional systems, which can be related to sedimentary processes, provenance and age. These features allow sections in different areas to be effectively correlated. Individual sections show luminescence properties that are generally consistent with an expected up-sequence decrease in age. However, the younger Koupia terrace deposits show higher luminescence intensities compared with the older Kyrenia (Girne) terrace deposits. This can be explained by multiple phases of reworking of the Kyrenia (Girne) terrace deposits, which changed the luminescence characteristics of the sediment. The

  8. Late Quaternary stratigraphy and geochronology of the western Killpecker Dunes, Wyoming, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mayer, J.H.; Mahan, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    New stratigraphic and geochronologic data from the Killpecker Dunes in southwestern Wyoming facilitate a more precise understanding of the dune field's history. Prior investigations suggested that evidence for late Pleistocene eolian activity in the dune field was lacking. However, luminescence ages from eolian sand of ???15,000 yr, as well as Folsom (12,950-11,950 cal yr B.P.) and Agate Basin (12,600-10,700 cal yr) artifacts overlying eolian sand, indicate the dune field existed at least during the latest Pleistocene, with initial eolian sedimentation probably occurring under a dry periglacial climate. The period between ???13,000 and 8900 cal yr B.P. was characterized by relatively slow eolian sedimentation concomitant with soil formation. Erosion occurred between ???8182 and 6600 cal yr B.P. on the upwind region of the dune field, followed by relative stability and soil formation between ???5900 and 2700 cal yr B.P. The first of at least two latest Holocene episodes of eolian sedimentation occurred between ???2000 and 1500 yr, followed by a brief (???500 yr) episode of soil formation; a second episode of sedimentation, occurring by at least ???700 yr, may coincide with a hypothesized Medieval warm period. Recent stabilization of the western Killpecker Dunes likely occurred during the Little Ice Age (???350-100 yr B.P.). The eolian chronology of the western Killpecker Dunes correlates reasonably well with those of other major dune fields in the Wyoming Basin, suggesting that dune field reactivation resulted primarily due to departures toward aridity during the late Quaternary. Similar to dune fields on the central Great Plains, dune fields in the Wyoming Basin have been active under a periglacial climate during the late Pleistocene, as well as under near-modern conditions during the latest Holocene. ?? 2003 University of Washington. All rights reserved.

  9. Lake sediments documented late Quaternary humid pulses in the Gobi Desert of southern Mongolia: Vegetation, hydrologic and paleoglaciation inferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kaifeng; Lehmkuhl, Frank; Schlütz, Frank; Diekmann, Bernhard; Mischke, Steffen; Grunert, Jörg; Murad, Waheed; Nottebaum, Veit; Stauch, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Considerable efforts have been devoted to decipher the late Quaternary moisture and thermal history of the arid central Asia. However, an array of paramount aspects has inhibited our complete understanding of the broad pattern and underlying mechanisms: (i) Biased or even contradictory conclusions may be achieved due to the interpretations of different proxies. (ii) Most of the works poured attention into Holocene period, only few records can extend back to earlier marine isotope stages. (iii) Substantial spatial heterogeneity is noteworthy in the area. Exceeding amounts of studies were carried out in Lake Baikal catchments, northern and western Mongolia, while only two works were hitherto conducted in southern Mongolia. (iv) It remains elusive with respect to how and to what extent have East Asian Summer Monsoon and Westerlies affected the thermal and moisture signals in this spectacular arid region. To address this set of issues, two parallel cores (ONW I, 6.00 m; ONW II, 13.36 m) were retrieved from Orog Nuur, Gobi Desert of southern Mongolia. An array of multidisciplinary investigations involving geomorphologic mapping, radiocarbon dating, geochemical and biotic studies (i.e., palynological and ostracod valve analyses) provide a comprehensive data set for inferences of hydrological perturbations, vegetation development and phases of glacier expansions over the last ~50 ka. Orog Nuur catchment depicted a broadly vulnerable ecosystem that was dominated by Artemisia steppe community in the late Pleistocene, and Chenopodiaceae desert steppe in the Holocene. In addition, the Termination I is ideally documented in a complete suite of geochemical, palynological, and ostracod signatures. In general, the thermal and moisture history in the Gobi Desert were as follows: (i) MIS3 had a relatively warm temperature and sufficient moisture supply in particular between ~40 ka and ~26 ka; (ii) The MIS2 was subject to cold temperature and moisture deficit, which was interrupted

  10. Late Quaternary environmental change in the African sector of Southern Hemisphere mid-latitudes: trends and teleconnections. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    At the northern boundary of the Southern Hemisphere westerly wind belt, and the northern limit of the related frontal systems, SW African environments are particularly sensitive to variations in mid-latitude oceanic and atmospheric circulation systems. It has long been postulated that during relatively cold periods of the late Quaternary, SW Africa - if not much of southern Africa - has experienced an increase in the precipitation linked to phenomena related to an equatorward shift/expansion of the westerly storm track (for review see Chase and Meadows, 2007, Earth-Science Reviews). However, a reliable chain of evidence to support this hypothesis has been elusive, and studies from both the data and modelling communities have yet to resolve the debate. This paper will present the state-of the-art in our understanding of how environments in SW Africa have changed during the course of the last glacial-interglacial cycle. New evidence from both the marine and terrestrial realms, particularly in the form of high resolution stable isotope and pollen records obtained from fossilised rock hyrax middens (Chase et al., 2012, Quaternary Science Reviews; www.hyrax.univ-montp2.fr), is providing a detailed, and coherent, but complex picture of climate dynamics and forcing mechanisms along the northern boundary of westerly influence. While records from the continental interior remain rare, and thus the degree to which an expansion of the westerlies may have influenced southern Africa as a whole remains to be adequately resolved, sites from the SW continental margin do appear to indicate that shifts of the oceanic Subtropical Front and westerly storm track strongly affect the amount of precipitation the region receives. The dynamics of this system, however, do not operate in isolation, and conditions north of the Subtropical Front are very sensitive to variations in the position and intensity of the South Atlantic Anticyclone, which appears to be most responsive to changes in

  11. Late Quaternary denudation of the Alps, valley and lake fillings and modern river loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinderer, Matthias

    Erosional denudation of the Alps and their role as sediment source underwent major changes throughout the Quaternary, by repeated glaciation and deglaciation. The sediment fluxes of 16 major Alpine drainage basins were quantified by determining the sediment volumes which have been trapped in valleys and lake basins. These became sedimentologically closed after the last glacier retreat around 17 000 cal. BP. The sediment volumes distributed over their provenance areas yield mean mechanical denudation rates between 250 to 1060 mm ka -1. In contrast, modern denudation rates, derived from river loads and delta surveys, range from 30 to 360 mm ka -1. Relief, such as mean elevation and slope, turned out to be the primary control of both modern and Late Glacial mechanical denudation. Rock types seem to be responsible for some scatter of the data, but their role is masked by other factors. Modern denudation rates increase with higher proportions of bare rocks and glaciated area, but decrease with forest cover. An area-weighted extrapolation of the studied drainage basins to the entire Alps on the basis of major morphotectonic zones yields a mean denudation rate of 620 mm ka -1 over the last 17 000 years. This rate clearly exceeds the modern rate of 125 mm ka -1. Lake sediments and palaeoclimatic reconstructions confirm that the sediment yield of the Alps reached a maximum during deglaciation when large masses of unconsolidated materials were available, vegetation was scarse, and transport capacities were high. During the early Holocene sediment yield declined to a minimum before some climate deterioration and human activities again accelerated erosional processes. Assuming a denudation rate in the early Holocene half of the modern one, the Late Glacial denudation rates must have been in the order of 1100 to 2900 mm ka -1. Consequently, denudation rates during a glacial/interglacial cycle probably varied by a factor of 14, which lies well within the range of other studies

  12. Raised marine sequences of Lanzarote and Fuerteventura revisited—a reappraisal of relative sea-level changes and vertical movements in the eastern Canary Islands during the Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zazo, Cari; Goy, José Luis; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Gillot, Pierre-Yves; Soler, Vicente; González, José Ángel; Dabrio, Cristino J.; Ghaleb, Bassam

    2002-10-01

    Systematic mapping and morphosedimentary analysis of Fuerteventura and Lanzarote Islands supported by laboratory techniques (U-series mostly by TIMS, 14C analysis and allo-isoleucine measurements on biogenic carbonates from raised marine deposits, paleomagnetic and a few K/Ar measurements on volcanic formations related to marine deposits) provide a basis for constraining the age of Late Cainozoic marine units. The most complete sequences of raised marine terraces are found at similar elevations in both islands. They include up to 12 marine terraces (Episodes) at elevations between 0 m and 70 m above mean sea level (asl). At least six terraces should be of Quaternary age, and more recent than 1.2 Myr. Throughout the whole marine sequence with the exception of the Holocene terrace, the warm fauna assemblage is characterized by the presence of Ostrea virleti, Nerita emiliana, and Strombus ( S. cf. coronatus-S. cf. bubonius). However, there is a major change, highlighted by the disappearance of the first two species, below the 8-10 m terrace, that could possibly correspond to MIS 11. K-Ar measurements allow an estimate for mean uplift rate of 1.7 cm/ka during the last million years. The present elevation of the Last Interglacial deposits (about 1 and 2 m asl) shows discontinuous vertical movements with possibly a reverse trend since MIS 9 in eastern Canary Islands.

  13. Late Quaternary development of the Croatan Beach Ridge Complex, Bogue Sound, Bogue Banks, NC, USA and implications for coastal evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Kelly B.; Mallinson, David J.; Culver, Stephen J.

    2016-06-01

    Foraminiferal, sedimentological, geophysical, and geochronologic data were utilized to elucidate the late Quaternary geologic development of the Croatan Beach Ridge Complex (CBRC), Bogue Sound, and Bogue Banks, North Carolina, USA. The CBRC is a relict beach ridge feature located on the mainland. It is separated from the modern barrier island, Bogue Banks, by Bogue Sound. Seventeen cores along shore-normal and shore-parallel transects provided material for sedimentologic and foraminiferal analysis and resulted in the recognition of seven depositional facies representing a variety of coastal depositional environments. Chronologic and depositional facies data suggest the CBRC was initiated during MIS 5a and rapid southward progradation produced a cape structure. Eolian reactivation of the upper sand of the CBRC occurred during the last glacial maximum (∼18 ka). The age of flood tide delta deposits in Bogue Sound suggests that the Holocene barrier island, Bogue Banks, had formed by ∼6 ka. Shoreface ravinement resulted in a shoreface landward of the present shoreline by ∼3.5 ka. Seaward and westward spit progradation of Bogue Banks began ∼1.7 ka and continued to ∼1.3 ka. Normal marine salinity conditions were present in Bogue Sound ∼1.1 ka, suggesting removal of at least the narrowest parts of the barrier island, coeval with a previously documented segmentation of the southern Outer Banks barrier islands. Previous work has linked this segmentation to climate warming and increased tropical storm activity during the Medieval Climate Anomaly. This study illustrates the complex response of this coastal system to Pleistocene and Holocene sea-level and climate change over two major sea-level cycles. In particular, the regional geomorphology during MIS5a and the Holocene sea-level highstand differ significantly and this, in large part, was controlled by the antecedent geologic framework, resulted in the contrasting more localized coastal geomorphic response.

  14. Late quaternary sea level changes of Gabes coastal plain and shelf: Identification of the MIS 5c and MIS 5a onshore highstands, southern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gzam, Maher; Mejdoub, Noureddine El; Jedoui, Younes

    2016-02-01

    The continental shelf of the Gulf of Gabes is outlined, during the MIS 5c and MIS 5a onshore highstands, by the genesis of forced regressive beach ridges situated respectively at -19 m b.s.l/100 ka and -8 m b.s.l/80 ka. This area, considered as a stable domain since at least the last 130 ka (Bouaziz et al. 2003), is a particular zone for the reconstruction of the late quaternary sea-level changes in the region. Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data and field observations are highlighted to deduce interaction between hydrodynamic factors and antecedent topography. Variations in geomorphology were attributed to geological inheritance. Petrography and sedimentary facies of the submerged coastal ridges reveal that the palaeocoastal morphology was more agitated than today and the fluvial discharges are consistent. Actual morphologic trend deduced from different environment coasts (sandy coasts, sea cliffs and tidal flat) is marked by accumulation of marine sands and progradation.

  15. Salt lake Laguna de Fuente de Piedra (S-Spain) as Late Quaternary palaeoenvironmental archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höbig, Nicole; Melles, Martin; Reicherter, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    This study deals with Late Quaternary palaeoenvironmental variability in Iberia reconstructed from terrestrial archives. In southern Iberia, endorheic basins of the Betic Cordilleras are relatively common and contain salt or fresh-water lakes due to subsurface dissolution of Triassic evaporites. Such precipitation or ground-water fed lakes (called Lagunas in Spanish) are vulnerable to changes in hydrology, climate or anthropogenic modifications. The largest Spanish salt lake, Laguna de Fuente de Piedra (Antequera region, S-Spain), has been investigated and serves as a palaeoenvironmental archive for the Late Pleistocene to Holocene time interval. Several sediment cores taken during drilling campaigns in 2012 and 2013 have revealed sedimentary sequences (up to 14 m length) along the shoreline. A multi-proxy study, including sedimentology, geochemistry and physical properties (magnetic susceptibility) has been performed on the cores. The sedimentary history is highly variable: several decimetre thick silty variegated clay deposits, laminated evaporites, and even few-centimetre thick massive gypsum crystals (i.e., selenites). XRF analysis was focussed on valuable palaeoclimatic proxies (e.g., S, Zr, Ti, and element ratios) to identify the composition and provenance of the sediments and to delineate palaeoenvironmental conditions. First age control has been realized by AMS-radiocarbon dating. The records start with approximately 2-3 m Holocene deposits and reach back to the middle of MIS 3 (GS-3). The sequences contain changes in sedimentation rates as well as colour changes, which can be summarized as brownish-beige deposits at the top and more greenish-grey deposits below as well as highly variegated lamination and selenites below ca. 6 m depth. The Younger Dryas, Bølling/Allerød, and the so-called Mystery Interval/Last Glacial Maximum have presumably been identified in the sediment cores and aligned to other climate records. In general, the cores of the Laguna de

  16. Shifting sources and transport paths for the late Quaternary Escanaba Trough sediment fill (northeast Pacific)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zuffa, G.G.; De Rosa, R.; Normark, W.R.

    1997-01-01

    Escanaba Trough, which forms the southernmost part of the axial valley of the actively spreading Gorda Ridge, is filled with several hundred meters of sediment of presumed late Quaternary age. Surficial sediment samples from gravity cores, deeper samples (as much as 390 m) from Site 35 of the Deep Sea Drilling Program (Leg 5), and the acoustic character of the sediment fill observed on seismic-reflection profiles indicate that much of the sediment fill is of turbidite origin. Gross composition and heavy- mineral analyses of sand samples show that two distinct petrofacies comprise the sediment fill. The lower part of the fill was derived primarily from the Klamath River source of northern California while the younger fill, including the surficial sand beds, are from the Columbia River drainage much farther north. The Escanaba Trough sediment provides an opportunity to evaluate concepts for paleogeographic and paleotectonic reconstructions that are based on facies analysis and compositional and textural data for the volcanic components because both intrabasinal and extrabasinal sources are present as well as coeval (neovolcanic) and non coeval (paleovolcanic) sourcre This study of a modern basin shows, that although the sediment sources could be identified, it was useful to have some knowledge of the sediment pathway(s), the effects of diagenesis, and the possible effects of sediment sorting as a result of long transport distances from the source area for some components. Application of these same techniques to ancient deposits without benefit of the additional parameters will face limitations.

  17. Species-specific responses of Late Quaternary megafauna to climate and humans.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Eline D; Nogués-Bravo, David; Orlando, Ludovic; Weinstock, Jaco; Binladen, Jonas; Marske, Katharine A; Ugan, Andrew; Borregaard, Michael K; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Nielsen, Rasmus; Ho, Simon Y W; Goebel, Ted; Graf, Kelly E; Byers, David; Stenderup, Jesper T; Rasmussen, Morten; Campos, Paula F; Leonard, Jennifer A; Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Froese, Duane; Zazula, Grant; Stafford, Thomas W; Aaris-Sørensen, Kim; Batra, Persaram; Haywood, Alan M; Singarayer, Joy S; Valdes, Paul J; Boeskorov, Gennady; Burns, James A; Davydov, Sergey P; Haile, James; Jenkins, Dennis L; Kosintsev, Pavel; Kuznetsova, Tatyana; Lai, Xulong; Martin, Larry D; McDonald, H Gregory; Mol, Dick; Meldgaard, Morten; Munch, Kasper; Stephan, Elisabeth; Sablin, Mikhail; Sommer, Robert S; Sipko, Taras; Scott, Eric; Suchard, Marc A; Tikhonov, Alexei; Willerslev, Rane; Wayne, Robert K; Cooper, Alan; Hofreiter, Michael; Sher, Andrei; Shapiro, Beth; Rahbek, Carsten; Willerslev, Eske

    2011-11-02

    Despite decades of research, the roles of climate and humans in driving the dramatic extinctions of large-bodied mammals during the Late Quaternary period remain contentious. Here we use ancient DNA, species distribution models and the human fossil record to elucidate how climate and humans shaped the demographic history of woolly rhinoceros, woolly mammoth, wild horse, reindeer, bison and musk ox. We show that climate has been a major driver of population change over the past 50,000 years. However, each species responds differently to the effects of climatic shifts, habitat redistribution and human encroachment. Although climate change alone can explain the extinction of some species, such as Eurasian musk ox and woolly rhinoceros, a combination of climatic and anthropogenic effects appears to be responsible for the extinction of others, including Eurasian steppe bison and wild horse. We find no genetic signature or any distinctive range dynamics distinguishing extinct from surviving species, emphasizing the challenges associated with predicting future responses of extant mammals to climate and human-mediated habitat change.

  18. Two late quaternary pollen records from the upper Kolyma region, Soviet Northeast: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.M.; Brubaker, L.; Andreev, A.A.; Chernenky, B.I.; Federova, I.N.

    1992-03-01

    Pollen records from Sosednee and Elikchan Lakes provide the first continuous late Quaternary vegetation history for the upper Kolyma drainage of the Soviet Northeast. Full-glacial spectra at these sites are similar to those from Eastern Beringia, with high percentages of grass, sedge, and wormwood pollen indicative of herb tundra. In the Elikchan area at approximately 12,500 B.P., herb tundra was replaced by a stone pine-larch forest, perhaps similar to forests in the modern region. In contrast, the herb tundra near Sosednee Lake was succeeded by a birch-alder shrub tundra followed by a larch woodland. Stone pine increased in the region after larch and prior to 8600 B.P. A Holocene decline in stone pine, which is evident at Elikchan Lake, is less marked or absent at Sosednee Lake. The differences in these pollen records is somewhat surprising given the proximity of the two sites. Such differences indicate that numerous well-dated sites will be needed to describe the vegetation and climate histories of Western Beringia.

  19. A Mid-Late Quaternary loess-paleosol record in Simmons Farm in southern Illinois, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Lundstrom, Craig C.; Zhang, Zhaofeng; Grimley, David A.; Balsam, William L.

    2009-01-01

    In unglaciated areas of the Mississippi Valley region, the typical full loess-paleosol succession contains the Modern Soil developed in Peoria Silt, weakly developed Farmdale Geosol developed in Roxana Silt, Sangamon Geosol developed in Loveland Silt, and Yarmouth Geosol developed in Crowley's Ridge Silt. Although a fifth loess called the Marianna Silt is reported at one area, the paleosol that separates the Crowley Ridge and Marianna Silts is not well defined. Previous thermoluminescence (TL) and optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) age chronology has suggested multiple phases of Sangamon Geosol developed in Loveland Silt, but clear morphological evidence of polygenetic Sangamon Geosol profiles have not been found. Recently, a thick loess-paleosol sequence has been studied in the middle Mississippi Valley in unglaciated southern Illinois, USA. Soil morphology and analytical results revealed five loesses and associated paleosol units. Two Sangamon Bt horizons were found separated by a thick ACtk horizon, interpreted to indicate two phases of Sangamon Geosol development. This well-preserved loess-paleosol succession provides one of the most complete mid-late Quaternary loess records in the middle Mississippi Valley to date, and is important for studying the stratigraphic framework and paleoclimate and environment changes.

  20. Late Quaternary tectonic landforms and fluvial aggradation in the Saryu River valley: Central Kumaun Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothyari, Girish Ch.; Luirei, Khayingshing

    2016-09-01

    The present study has been carried out with special emphasis on the aggradational landforms to explain the spatial and temporal variability in phases of aggradation/incision in response to tectonic activity during the late Quaternary in the Saryu River valley in central Kumaun Himalaya. The valley has preserved cut-and-fill terraces with thick alluvial cover, debris flow terraces, and bedrock strath terraces that provide signatures of tectonic activity and climate. Morphostratigraphy of the terraces reveals that the oldest landforms preserved south of the Main Central Thrust, the fluvial modified debris flow terraces, were developed between 30 and 45 ka. The major phase of valley fill is dated between 14 and 22 ka. The youngest phase of aggradation is dated at early and mid-Holocene (9-3 ka). Following this, several phases of accelerated incision/erosion owing to an increase in uplift rate occurred, as evident from the strath terraces. Seven major phases of bedrock incision/uplift have been estimated during 44 ka (3.34 mm/year), 35 ka (1.84 mm/year), 15 ka (0.91 mm/year), 14 ka (0.83 mm/year), 9 ka (1.75 mm/year), 7 ka (5.38 mm/year), and around 3 ka (4.4 mm/year) from the strath terraces near major thrusts. We postulate that between 9 and 3 ka the terrain witnessed relatively enhanced surface uplift (2-5 mm/year).

  1. Late Quaternary loess in northeastern Colorado: Part I - Age and paleoclimatic significance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Kihl, R.; Been, J.; Mahan, S.A.; Cowherd, S.

    1999-01-01

    Loess in eastern Colorado covers an estimated 14000 km2, and is the westernmost part of the North American midcontinent loess province. Stratigraphic studies indicate there were two periods of loess deposition in eastern Colorado during late Quaternary time. The first period spanned ca. 20 000 to 12 000 14C yr B.P. (ca. 20-14 ka) and correlates reasonably well with the culmination and retreat of Pinedale glaciers in the Colorado Front Range during the last glacial maximum. The second period of loess deposition occurred between ca. 11 000 and 9000 14C yr B.P. This interval may be Holocene or may correlate with a hypothesized Younger Dryas glacial advance in the Colorado Front Range. Sedimentologic, mineralogic, and geochemical data indicate that as many as three sources could have supplied loess in eastern Colorado. These sources include glaciogenic silt (derived from the Colorado Front Range) and two bedrock sources, volcaniclastic silt from the White River Group, and clays from the Pierre Shale. The sediment sources imply a generally westerly paleowind during the last glacial maximum. New carbon isotope data, combined with published faunal data, indicate that the loess was probably deposited on a cool steppe, implying a last glacial maximum July temperature depression, relative to the present, of at least 5-6??C. Overall, loess deposition in eastern Colorado occurred mostly toward the end of the last glacial maximum, under cooler and drier conditions, with generally westerly winds from more than one source.

  2. Species-specific responses of Late Quaternary megafauna to climate and humans.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Eline D; Nogués-Bravo, David; Orlando, Ludovic; Weinstock, Jaco; Binladen, Jonas; Marske, Katharine A; Ugan, Andrew; Borregaard, Michael K; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Nielsen, Rasmus; Ho, Simon Y W; Goebel, Ted; Graf, Kelly E; Byers, David; Stenderup, Jesper T; Rasmussen, Morten; Campos, Paula F; Leonard, Jennifer A; Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Froese, Duane; Zazula, Grant; Stafford, Thomas W; Aaris-Sørensen, Kim; Batra, Persaram; Haywood, Alan M; Singarayer, Joy S; Valdes, Paul J; Boeskorov, Gennady; Burns, James A; Davydov, Sergey P; Haile, James; Jenkins, Dennis L; Kosintsev, Pavel; Kuznetsova, Tatyana; Lai, Xulong; Martin, Larry D; McDonald, H Gregory; Mol, Dick; Meldgaard, Morten; Munch, Kasper; Stephan, Elisabeth; Sablin, Mikhail; Sommer, Robert S; Sipko, Taras; Scott, Eric; Suchard, Marc A; Tikhonov, Alexei; Willerslev, Rane; Wayne, Robert K; Cooper, Alan; Hofreiter, Michael; Sher, Andrei; Shapiro, Beth; Rahbek, Carsten; Willerslev, Eske

    2011-11-17

    Despite decades of research, the roles of climate and humans in driving the dramatic extinctions of large-bodied mammals during the Late Quaternary period remain contentious. Here we use ancient DNA, species distribution models and the human fossil record to elucidate how climate and humans shaped the demographic history of woolly rhinoceros, woolly mammoth, wild horse, reindeer, bison and musk ox. We show that climate has been a major driver of population change over the past 50,000 years. However, each species responds differently to the effects of climatic shifts, habitat redistribution and human encroachment. Although climate change alone can explain the extinction of some species, such as Eurasian musk ox and woolly rhinoceros, a combination of climatic and anthropogenic effects appears to be responsible for the extinction of others, including Eurasian steppe bison and wild horse. We find no genetic signature or any distinctive range dynamics distinguishing extinct from surviving species, emphasizing the challenges associated with predicting future responses of extant mammals to climate and human-mediated habitat change. PMID:22048313

  3. Enhanced insights into late Quaternary African hydroclimate dynamics using a water-isotope enabled climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singarayer, Joy; Holloway, Max

    2016-04-01

    The climate of intertropical Africa is strongly governed by the dynamics of the tropical rainbelt, which is often associated with the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). On millennial time-scales the primary drivers of variation in the rainbelt include orbital configuration changes to insolation seasonality and high-latitude forcing (e.g. Heinrich events). The spatial pattern of precipitation variability in tropical and subtropical Africa over the late Quaternary is complex and has long been debated. Stable water isotopes from inland lakes and off-shore ocean core records have provided longitudinal records, variously interpreted as changes to precipitation intensity or changes to moisture source location due to atmospheric circulation changes (or a combination of several factors). In this preliminary study we have used a global climate model, HadCM3, in which water isotopes are interactively coupled to produce snapshots at 1000-year intervals covering the last deglaciation (21kyr to pre-industrial). In conjunction with a comparison to available palaeodata, this enables us to better elucidate the connections between precipitation and other climate factors with changes to the water isotope signature, as well as how this varies regionally and through time.

  4. A high-resolution geochemical record of Late Quaternary paleohydrological conditions from Chihuahuan Desert, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiroz-Jiménez, J.; Roy, P.

    2013-05-01

    Paleolake Babicora is located at 29°N in the northern Mexico and sediments deposited in the basin provide useful information about the late Quaternary paleohydrological conditions of Chihuahuan Desert. The proxy-records of productivity, pluvial discharge into the basin, lake water salinity and aeolian activity in surroundings of the basin over the last 80 cal ka BP were reconstructed by analyzing the concentrations of total organic carbon, carbonates, C/N, Ti, Sr and Zr/Al in a 976 cm long sediment core. During 80-58 cal ka BP, the pluvial discharge was higher and the water column was characterized by lower salinity (wet conditions). Terrestrial vegetation had higher influence on the organic carbon deposited between 71 and 53 cal ka BP. We record paleohydrological instability with millennial-scale fluctuations in the last 40 cal ka BP. Arid conditions possibly reached its maximum at ca. 40 cal ka BP, characterized with a hiatus in sedimentation related to aeolian activity. Comparison between the paleohydrological record from Babicora and variability of winter precipitation from southwest USA suggest that the runoff into Babicora was controlled by summer season precipitation. The periods of more pluvial discharge were contemporary to the north Atlantic interstadials and vice versa.

  5. A fractal analysis of quaternary, Cenozoic-Mesozoic, and Late Pennsylvanian sea level changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsui, Albert T.; Rust, Kelly A.; Klein, George D.

    1993-01-01

    Sea level changes are related to both climatic variations and tectonic movements. The fractal dimensions of several sea level curves were compared to a modern climatic fractal dimension of 1.26 established for annual precipitation records. A similar fractal dimension (1.22) based on delta(O-18/O-16) in deep-sea sediments has been suggested to characterize climatic change during the past 2 m.y. Our analysis indicates that sea level changes over the past 150,000 to 250,000 years also exhibit comparable fractal dimensions. Sea level changes for periods longer than about 30 m.y. are found to produce fractal dimensions closer to unity and Missourian (Late Pennsylvanian) sea level changes yield a fractal dimension of 1.41. The fact that these sea level curves all possess fractal dimensions less than 1.5 indicates that sea level changes exhibit nonperiodic, long-run persistence. The different fractal dimensions calculated for the various time periods could be the result of a characteristic overprinting of the sediment recored by prevailing processes during deposition. For example, during the Quaternary, glacio-eustatic sea level changes correlate well with the present climatic signature. During the Missourian, however, mechanisms such as plate reorganization may have dominated, resulting in a significantly different fractal dimension.

  6. Climate change not to blame for late Quaternary megafauna extinctions in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Saltré, Frédérik; Rodríguez-Rey, Marta; Brook, Barry W.; Johnson, Christopher N; Turney, Chris S. M.; Alroy, John; Cooper, Alan; Beeton, Nicholas; Bird, Michael I.; Fordham, Damien A.; Gillespie, Richard; Herrando-Pérez, Salvador; Jacobs, Zenobia; Miller, Gifford H.; Nogués-Bravo, David; Prideaux, Gavin J.; Roberts, Richard G.; Bradshaw, Corey J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Late Quaternary megafauna extinctions impoverished mammalian diversity worldwide. The causes of these extinctions in Australia are most controversial but essential to resolve, because this continent-wide event presaged similar losses that occurred thousands of years later on other continents. Here we apply a rigorous metadata analysis and new ensemble-hindcasting approach to 659 Australian megafauna fossil ages. When coupled with analysis of several high-resolution climate records, we show that megafaunal extinctions were broadly synchronous among genera and independent of climate aridity and variability in Australia over the last 120,000 years. Our results reject climate change as the primary driver of megafauna extinctions in the world's most controversial context, and instead estimate that the megafauna disappeared Australia-wide ∼13,500 years after human arrival, with shorter periods of coexistence in some regions. This is the first comprehensive approach to incorporate uncertainty in fossil ages, extinction timing and climatology, to quantify mechanisms of prehistorical extinctions. PMID:26821754

  7. Characteristics and formation of rain forest soils derived from late Quaternary basaltic rocks in Leyte, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarrete, Ian A.; Tsutsuki, Kiyoshi; Asio, Victor B.; Kondo, Renzo

    2009-09-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the physical, chemical, and mineralogical characteristics of rain forest soils derived from late Quaternary basaltic rocks in Leyte, Philippines. Four sites along a catena were selected at an elevation of 75-112 m above sea level with an average annual rainfall of 3,000 mm and an average temperature of 28°C. Results indicate that the soils are deep, clayey, and reddish in color, which is indicative of the advanced stage of soil development. They also posses excellent physical condition (friable and highly porous) although they are plastic and sticky when wet as is usual for clayey soils. In terms of chemical characteristics, the soils are acidic with low CEC values and generally low in organic matter and nutrient contents. The clay mineralogy of the soils is dominated by halloysite and kaolinite with minor amounts of goethite and hematite, and they also have generally high dithionite-extractable Fe contents confirming the advanced stage of their development. The soils in the more stable slope positions (PL-1, PL-2, and PL-4) have generally similar characteristics and appeared more developed than the one in the less stable position (PL-3). The most important pedogenic processes that formed the soils appear to be weathering, loss of bases and acidification, desilification, ferrugination, clay formation and translocation, and structure formation. The nature of the parent rock and climatic conditions prevailing in the area as well as slope position appear to have dominant effects on the development of the soils.

  8. Climate change not to blame for late Quaternary megafauna extinctions in Australia.

    PubMed

    Saltré, Frédérik; Rodríguez-Rey, Marta; Brook, Barry W; Johnson, Christopher N; Turney, Chris S M; Alroy, John; Cooper, Alan; Beeton, Nicholas; Bird, Michael I; Fordham, Damien A; Gillespie, Richard; Herrando-Pérez, Salvador; Jacobs, Zenobia; Miller, Gifford H; Nogués-Bravo, David; Prideaux, Gavin J; Roberts, Richard G; Bradshaw, Corey J A

    2016-01-01

    Late Quaternary megafauna extinctions impoverished mammalian diversity worldwide. The causes of these extinctions in Australia are most controversial but essential to resolve, because this continent-wide event presaged similar losses that occurred thousands of years later on other continents. Here we apply a rigorous metadata analysis and new ensemble-hindcasting approach to 659 Australian megafauna fossil ages. When coupled with analysis of several high-resolution climate records, we show that megafaunal extinctions were broadly synchronous among genera and independent of climate aridity and variability in Australia over the last 120,000 years. Our results reject climate change as the primary driver of megafauna extinctions in the world's most controversial context, and instead estimate that the megafauna disappeared Australia-wide ∼13,500 years after human arrival, with shorter periods of coexistence in some regions. This is the first comprehensive approach to incorporate uncertainty in fossil ages, extinction timing and climatology, to quantify mechanisms of prehistorical extinctions. PMID:26821754

  9. Identification of a late Quaternary alluvial-aeolian sedimentary sequence in the Sichuan Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jin-Liang; Ju, Jian-Ting; Chen, Feng; Hu, Zhao-Guo; Zhao, Xiang; Gao, Shao-Peng

    2016-03-01

    The late Quaternary sedimentary sequence in the northwestern part of the Sichuan Basin consists of five lithological units and with increasing depth include the: Chengdu Clay; Brown Clay; Red Clay; Sandy Silt; and basal Muddy Gravel. The genesis, provenance and age of the sediments, as well as the possible presence of hiatuses within this sequence are debated. Measurements of grain-size, magnetic susceptibility, quartz content, quartz δ18O values, element composition, and Sr-Nd isotopic concentrations of samples from a typical sedimentary sequence in the area provides new insights into the genesis and history of the sequence. The new data confirm that the sediments in study site are alluvial-aeolian in origin, with basal alluvial deposits overlain by aeolian deposits. Like the uppermost Chengdu Clay, the underlying Brown Clay and Red Clay are aeolian in origin. In contrast, the Silty Sand, like the basal Muddy Gravel, is an alluvial deposit and not an aeolian deposit as previously thought. Moreover, the succession of the aeolian deposits very likely contains two significant sedimentary hiatuses. Sedimentological analysis demonstrates that the source materials for the aeolian deposits in the northwestern part of the Sichuan Basin and those on the eastern Tibetan Plateau are different. Furthermore, the loess deposits on the eastern Tibetan Plateau are derived from heterogeneous local sources.

  10. A Mid-Late Quaternary loess-paleosol record in Simmons Farm in southern Illinois, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Hongfang; Lundstrom, C.C.; Zhang, Z.; Grimley, D.A.; Balsam, W.L.

    2009-01-01

    In unglaciated areas of the Mississippi Valley region, the typical full loess-paleosol succession contains the Modern Soil developed in Peoria Silt, weakly developed Farmdale Geosol developed in Roxana Silt, Sangamon Geosol developed in Loveland Silt, and Yarmouth Geosol developed in Crowley's Ridge Silt. Although a fifth loess called the Marianna Silt is reported at one area, the paleosol that separates the Crowley Ridge and Marianna Silts is not well defined. Previous thermoluminescence (TL) and optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) age chronology has suggested multiple phases of Sangamon Geosol developed in Loveland Silt, but clear morphological evidence of polygenetic Sangamon Geosol profiles have not been found. Recently, a thick loess-paleosol sequence has been studied in the middle Mississippi Valley in unglaciated southern Illinois, USA. Soil morphology and analytical results revealed five loesses and associated paleosol units. Two Sangamon Bt horizons were found separated by a thick ACtk horizon, interpreted to indicate two phases of Sangamon Geosol development. This well-preserved loess-paleosol succession provides one of the most complete mid-late Quaternary loess records in the middle Mississippi Valley to date, and is important for studying the stratigraphic framework and paleoclimate and environment changes. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Eolian additions to late Quaternary alpine soils, Indian Peaks Wilderness Area, Colorado Front Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Benedict, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Surface horizons of many alpine soils on Quaternary deposits in high-mountain settings are enriched in silt. The origin of these particles has been debated, particularly in the Rocky Mountain region of North America. The most common explanations are frost shattering of coarser particles and eolian additions from distant sources. We studied soil A horizons on alpine moraines of late-glacial (Satanta Peak) age in the Colorado Front Range. Surface horizons of soils on these moraines are enriched in silt and have a particle size distribution that resembles loess and dust deposits found elsewhere. The compositions of sand and silt fractions of the soils were compared to possible local source rocks, using immobile trace elements Ti, Nb, Zr, Ce, and Y. The sand fractions of soils have a wide range of trace element ratios, similar to the range of values in the local biotite gneiss bedrock. In contrast, silt fractions have narrower ranges of trace element ratios that do not overlap the range of these ratios in biotite gneiss. The particle size and geochemical results support an interpretation that silts in these soils are derived from airborne dust. Eolian silts were most likely derived from distant sources, such as the semiarid North Park and Middle Park basins to the west. We hypothesize that much of the eolian influx to soils of the Front Range occurred during an early to mid-Holocene warm period, when sediment availability in semiarid source basins was at a maximum.

  12. Late Quaternary history of the coastal Wahiba Sands, Sultanate of Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preusser, Frank; Radies, Dirk; Driehorst, Frauke; Matter, Albert

    2005-05-01

    Continental sediments and geomorphological features of the coastal Wahiba Sands, Sultanate of Oman, reflect environmental variability in southeastern Arabia during the late Quaternary. Weakly cemented dune sands, interdune deposits and coastal sediments were dated by luminescence methods to establish an absolute chronology of changes in sedimentary dynamics. The dating results confirm previous assumptions that during times of low global sea level sand was transported by southerly winds from the exposed shelf onto the Arabian Peninsula. Two prominent phases of sand accumulation in the coastal area took place just before and after the last glacial maximum (LGM). A final significant period of dune consolidation is recognised during the early Holocene. However, no major consolidation of dunes appears to have occurred during the LGM and the Younger Dryas. In the northern part of the Wahiba Sands, these two periods are characterised by substantial sand deposition. This discrepancy is explained by the lack of conservation potential for dunes in the coastal area, probably caused by a low groundwater table due to low sea level and decreased precipitation. While the times of aeolian activity reflect arid to hyper-arid conditions, lacustrine and pedogenically altered interdune deposits indicate wetter conditions than today caused by increased monsoonal circulation during the Holocene climatic optimum. Copyright

  13. Human impact on late Quaternary landscapes in the Central Spanish Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, F.; Raab, T. A.

    2011-12-01

    Like the Alps in Central Europe the Pyrenees in Southeast Europe are well known for their glacial history. Within the scope of the ongoing research project Post-LGM pedogenesis and geomorphodynamics in the Aragonese Pyrenees, Spain, funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), we are studying the landscapes in the Gallego valley and the Aragon valley formed during the late Quaternary period. The aim of this research is to describe and characterize the soil development since the retreat of the valley glaciers from the LGM-moraines which are supposed to have an age of up to 60 ka yrs. To these purposes soil profiles are excavated in sediments and landforms of different ages (LGM to Holocene) and different genesis (glacigenic, glacifluvial, fluvial, gravitational). The soil profiles are arranged as catenas and provide insight into the pedo-stratigraphy of moraines, fluvial terraces, glacis and alluvial fans. Our preliminary results show that besides geogenic process past human land use must be considered as a main trigger of landscape development during the late Holocene. Truncated soil profiles in the backslopes and the correlate sediments of soil erosion burying soil horizons in the footslopes clearly indicate one or even more periods of re-shaping the landforms after deglaciation. Considerable amounts of small charcoal and tile fragments in the translocated sediments hint to an anthropogenic agent. The disturbance in the soil profiles and sediments is visible in the field and by micromorphology. Although 14C and OSL datings on the base of the correlate sediments of soil erosion indicate at least one phase of erosion and redeposition at the end of the 17th century, the onset of afresh pedogenic processes in the correlate sediments of soil erosion indicate young soil formation.

  14. Morphology and Late Quaternary sedimentation in the Gulf of Oman Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchupi, Elazar; Swift, S. A.; Ross, D. A.

    The morphology of the Gulf of Oman Basin, a 3,400 m deep oceanic basin between Oman and southern Pakistan and southern Iran, ranges from a convergent margin (Makran margin) along the north side, a passive type (Oman margin) along the south side, translation types along the basin's west (Zendan Fault-Oman Line) and east (Murray Ridge) sides and a narrow continental rise and a wide abyssal plain in the centre of the basin. Sediment input into the basin during the Late Quaternary has been mainly from the north as a result of the uplift of the Coast Makran Mountains in the Late Miocene-Pliocene. Today most of this detritrus is deposited on the shelf and upper continental slope and perched basins behind the fold/fault ridges on the lower slope. The presence of fans and channels on the continental rise on the north side of the basin indicate, however, that continental derived debris was, and possibly is, being transported to the deep-sea by turbidity currents via gaps in the ridges on the lower slope. In addition to land derived terrigenous sediments, the basin deposits also contain biogenic (organic matter and calcium carbonate), eolian detritus and hydrates and authigenic carbonates from the tectonic dewatering of the Makran accretionary wedge. The eolian sediment is carried into the Gulf of Oman Basin from Arabia and the Mesopotamia Valley by the northwesterly Shamal winds. This type of detritus was particularly abundant during the glacial arid periods 21,000-20,000 and 11,000 (Younger Dryas) years ago when exposure of the Persian (Arabian) Gulf increased the area of dust entrainment and shifted the position of the source of the eolian sediments closer to the basin.

  15. Late Quaternary eolian and alluvial response to paleoclimate, Canyonlands, southeastern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reheis, M.C.; Reynolds, R.L.; Goldstein, H.; Roberts, H.M.; Yount, J.C.; Axford, Y.; Cummings, L.S.; Shearin, N.

    2005-01-01

    In upland areas of Canyonlands National Park, Utah, thin deposits and paleosols show late Quaternary episodes of eolian sedimentation, pedogenesis, and climate change. Interpretation of the stratigraphy and optically stimulated luminescence ages of eolian and nearby alluvial deposits, their pollen, and intercalated paleosols yields the following history: (1) Eolian deposition at ca. 46 ka, followed by several episodes of alluviation from some time before ca. 40 ka until after 16 ka (calibrated). (2) Eolian deposition from ca. 17 ka to 12 ka, interrupted by periods of pedogenesis, coinciding with late Pleistocene alluviation as local climate became warmer and wetter. (3) A wetter period from 12 to 8.5 ka corresponding to the peak of summer monsoon influence, during which soils formed relatively quickly by infiltration of eolian silt and clay, and trees and grasses were more abundant. (4) A drier period between ca. 8.5 and 6 ka during which sheetwash deposits accumulated and more desertlike vegetation was dominant; some dunes were reactivated at ca. 8 ka. (5) Episodic eolian and fluvial deposition during a wetter, cooler period that began at ca. 6 ka and ended by ca. 3-2 ka, followed by a shift to drier modern conditions; localized mobilization of dune sand has persisted to the present. These interpretations are similar to those of studies at the Chaco dune field, New Mexico, and the Tusayan dune field, Arizona, and are consistent with paleoclimate interpretations of pollen and packrat middens in the region. A period of rapid deposition and infiltration of eolian dust derived from distant igneous source terranes occurred between ca. 12 and 8 ka. Before ca. 17 ka, and apparently back to at least 45 ka, paleosols contain little or no such infiltrated dust. After ca. 8 ka, either the supply of dust was reduced or the more arid climate inhibited translocation of dust into the soils. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  16. Montane climate and vegetation dynamics in easternmost Beringia during the Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeicz, J. M.; MacDonald, G. M.

    2001-01-01

    New and published palynological data are used to investigate the Quaternary vegetation history of high-elevation sites in the Mackenzie Mountains of easternmost Beringia (Northwest Territories, Canada). During some previous interglacials, sites that are presently treeless supported spruce forest, indicating conditions were warmer than present and possibly warmer than at any time in the Holocene. No information is available on vegetation in unglaciated portions of the Mountains during the Last Glacial Maximum, but in the Lateglacial (ca 12,000-10,000 14C yr BP), a shrub- and herb-dominated vegetation, characterized in the pollen record by Artemisia, Betula, Salix, gramnoids and herbs, grew at all elevations, and extended in a continuous corridor southwards to Alberta. Populus balsamifera probably grew up to and above present treeline between about 11,000 and 9000 yr BP. The late Pleistocene vegetation of the Mackenzie Mountains contrasts with the rest of eastern and central Beringia, which supported a Betula-dominated shrub tundra by 12,000 yr BP. Betula shrub tundra expanded at all elevations in the mountains by 10,000 yr BP, followed by the expansion of Picea glauca and Picea mariana forest at ca 8000 yr BP. There is evidence for limited elevational shifts in treeline during the Holocene. Picea population densities in the forest-tundra were probably greater than at present in the early and mid-Holocene. Vegetation changes in the Mackenzie Mountains during this time are consistent with increased summer insolation and temperatures during the early to mid-Holocene. Higher resolution analysis (decadal to century scale) of small lake basins at treeline in this region also provide evidence for a late Holocene increase in forest-tundra density and/or a treeline rise centered on 3000 yr BP. Slight warming at this time has been noted at sites in the southern Rocky Mountains, and provides evidence for century-scale climatic fluctuations superimposed on the longer

  17. Patterns and processes of Late Quaternary environmental change in a montane region of southwestern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrión, José S.

    2002-10-01

    This paper examines the Late Quaternary (c. 20,300-<505 cal yr BP) environmental history of Siles, a lake situated at 1320 m in the Segura mountains of southern Spain, with the goal of establishing the mechanisms exerting control on vegetation change. Palaeoecological indicators include pollen, microcharcoal, spores of terrestrial plants, fungi, and non-siliceous algae, and other microfossils. The Siles sequence is shown to be sensitive to climatic change, although the control exerted by climate on vegetation is ultimately shaped by disturbances and species interactions, determining the occurrence of century-scale lags and threshold responses. Biotically induced changes of vegetation are also shown at the intrazonal level of variation. The new sequence is placed in the context of two previous records to postulate a picture of Holocene environmental change for the Segura region. The existence of mid-elevation glacial refugia for a number of temperate and Mediterranean trees is shown. A mid-Holocene phase (c. 7500-5200 cal yr BP) emerges regionally as the time of maximum forest development and highest lake levels. The early Holocene occurs as a generally dry, pyrophytic period of pine forests, with grassland scrub in high altitudes, and the late Holocene as a period of protracted vegetation sensitivity, with return to development of pine forests, spread of xerophytic communities, and increased fire activity, under the context of dry spells, localized anthropogenic disturbance, and shallowing and desiccation of lakes. Several events described here correlate with established times of abrupt transitions in the climates of northern Europe, the Mediterranean basin, north Africa, and the Sahel.

  18. Reconnaissance photogeologic map of Late Tertiary and Quaternary faults in Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrenwend, J.C.; Moring, B.C. )

    1993-04-01

    The Great Basin is composed on an irregular mosaic of neotectonic domains wherein the densities and orientations of young (late Tertiary and Quaternary) faults differ significantly from one domain to the next. Within areas underlain by late Tertiary volcanic rocks, mean densities and trends of young faulting differ conspicuously from areas underlain by other rock types. Mean trends in these volcanic areas are largely confined to two narrow ranges and mean densities narrow ranges and mean densities are relatively high. Elsewhere within the Walker Lane belt, young faulting is widely variable; mean trends range between east-northeast and north-northwest, and mean densities vary from 0.00 to 0.52 km/km[sup 2]. In contrast, young faulting in the central part of the state appears to be much more uniform. Other general characteristics of young faulting within Nevada include: (1) a predominance of dip-slip faulting (the more conspicuous areas of young strike-slip faulting are confined to portions of the Walker Lane belt); (2) a strong spatial association between young faulting and major range fronts, (3) a general concentration of these longer, more continuous young faults in the central part of the state; (4) a conspicuous concentration of young faulting within the area of the north-central Nevada seismic belt; (5) segmentation of the loner fault systems; and (6) a wide variability in intrabasin faulting ranging from small isolated fault scarps and lineaments to clusters of scarps and lineaments as much as 30 km long and 10 km wide.

  19. Century scale climatic rhythms in the equatorial Indian Ocean during the late Quaternary: Faunal and geochemical proxies from the Maldivian Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, S.; Gupta, A. K.

    2012-04-01

    The equatorial Indian Ocean is swept by the Indian Ocean equatorial westerlies (IEW) which are strong during monsoon transitions in April-May and October-November, driving Eastward Equatorial Current (EEC) in the upper ocean. This study is based on the biogenic sediments from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 716A, recovered beneath the narrow equatorial track (7 Degree North to 7 Degree South) along which the IEW prevail. We analyzed 300 Kyr record of benthic and planktic foraminifera, pteropods combined with stable isotope values measured on planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber from 451 core samples to understand paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic changes in the equatorial Indian Ocean during the late Quaternary (~450 - 150 Kyrs). Factor and cluster analyses of the 53 highest-ranked benthic foraminiferal species enabled to identify five biofacies, indicating varied nature of deep-sea environments during the late Quaternary, with a major shift across the middle Brunhes epoch (across Marine Isotope Stage 9 and 8). Biofacies Robulus nicobarensis - Trifarina reussi (Rn-Tr), Uvigerina porrecta - Reussella simplex (Upo-Rs) and Cymbaloporetta squammosa - Bolivinita sp. (Cs-Bsp) document high organic flux with low oxygen paleoenvironment dominating before the mid-Brunhes event, similar to Globigerina bulloides population, while benthic foraminiferal biofacies Hoeglundina elegans - Miliolinella subrotunda (He-Ms) and Uvigerina peregrina - Quinqueloculina seminulum (Upe-Qs) record high seasonality in food supply with well-oxygenated deep water after ~300 Kyr. These changes are also visible in planktic foraminifera and pteropod record. In the present day, the strength of the IEW is inversely related to the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD). The IEW weakened across MIS 9/8 during which time the IOD strengthened, causing heavy rains and floods over the equatorial East Africa and deficient rainfall over Australasia. The proxy response changed from low to high frequency cycles

  20. Profiling of late Trias-early Quaternary surface in the Eskisehir basin using microtremors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tün, Muammer; Pekkan, Emrah; Özel, Oğuz

    2015-04-01

    Earthquakes in our country and in the world cause damage and collapse of engineering structures due to several reasons. Settlement areas are under the effect of strong and long-duration seismic vibrations due to resonance and focusing effects. In this study, we propose the first approximation for thickness of Quaternary sediment and late Trias topography for the Eskisehir basin in microtremor methods. The 3-D basin structures and site resonance frequencies in the Eskişehir Basin were investigated by geophysical measurements based on the 318 single station and 9 array sites microtremor methods situated on soft soil sediments and rock units within the study area. The microtremor data collection, processing, and interpretation of the H/V curves were carried out following the recommendations and guidelines of the SESAME consortium (Site EffectS assesment using AMbient Excitation) The signals recorded were analysed for horizontal to the vertical (H/V) spectral ratio using GEOPSY software. The H/V ratios were calculated for the frequency range 0.2 to 20 Hz, using 60 s as a time window length and removing time windows contaminated by transients. Almost of the HVSR curves on the alluvium deposits have a low-frequency peak at 0.6-0.8 Hz and a second peak at 4-10 Hz. We used the Spatial Autocorrelation (SPAC) method in Eskisehir Basin using broadband seismometers distributed in triangular arrays. We derive a power-law relationship that correlates the fundamental site resonance frequencies with the sedimentary cover thickness obtained from the seismic reflection data, borehole data and shear wave velocity data in the study area. We use this relationship to estimate bedrock depth and thickness of alluvial deposits in the Eskisehir basin. Our estimation of maximum basin depths is 650 m for the Muttalip. The thickness of quaternary sediment is 25 m for Eskisehir alluvium. The estimated thickness is used to plot digital elevation model and cross profiles correlating with

  1. Calibrating Late Quaternary terrestrial climate signals: radiometrically dated pollen evidence from the southern Sierra Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Litwin, Ronald J.; Smoot, Joseph P.; Durika, Nancy J.; Smith, George I.

    1999-01-01

    We constructed a radiometrically calibrated proxy record of Late Pleistocene and Holocene climate change exceeding 230,000 yr duration, using pollen profiles from two cores taken through age-equivalent dry lakes - one core having greater age control (via 230Th alpha mass-spectrometry) and the other having greater stratigraphic completeness. The better dated of these two serial pollen records (Searles Lake) served as a reference section for improving the effective radiometric age control in a nearby and more complete pollen record (Owens Lake) because they: (1) are situated ~90 km apart in the same drainage system (on, and immediately leeward of, the eastern flank of the Sierra Nevada), and (2) preserved strikingly similar pollen profiles and concordant sequences of sedimentological changes. Pollen assemblages from both lakes are well preserved and diverse, and document serial changes in Late Pleistocene and Holocene plant zone distribution and composition in the westernmost Great Basin; they consist of taxa now inhabiting montane forest, woodland, steppe, and desert-scrub environments. The studied core intervals are interpreted here to be the terrestrial equivalent of marine δ18O stages 1 through 9; these pollen profiles now appear to be among the best radiometrically dated Late Pleistocene records of terrestrial climate change known.

  2. Late Quaternary accretion and decline of syngenetic ice-rich permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterich, Sebastian; Strauss, Jens; Fuchs, Margret C.; Schirrmeister, Lutz

    2016-04-01

    The region of perennially frozen ground constitutes one quarter of the northern hemisphere landmass. Negative annual mean air temperatures and ground freezing periods exceeding ground thaw periods are the prerequisites for downward freezing of loose deposits and bedrock in non-glaciated regions. Hence, permafrost distribution and thickness on Earth are closely related to late Quaternary climate variations and ecosystem modifications. Generally, glacial stages are expected to promote permafrost accretion and ground ice formation in accumulating sediments, whereas interglacial stages lead to intense permafrost thaw and ground-ice melt. Deep freezing synchronous with ongoing sedimentation is termed as syngenetic while epigenetic freezing occurs in pre-existing deposits. Typical landforms of syngenetic permafrost are ice-wedge polygons of past tundra environments. Ice-rich silty and/or peaty deposits intersected by large ice wedges (up to several decameters in height and meters in with) build-up unique Ice Complex (IC) strata, which are aligned to mid- and late Pleistocene stadial and interstadial stages. The most prominent example for such formations is the Yedoma IC of MIS 3 interstadial age. Increasing air and ground temperatures during warm stages disturbed the thermal equilibrium at the upper permafrost boundary and subsequently led to permafrost thaw, ground-ice melt and surface subsidence. Typical permafrost degradation processes are thermokarst and thermo-erosion that result in large lake-filled basins (up to kilometers in diameter) and valley structures, respectively. The modern periglacial surface in Alaskan and East Siberian lowlands preserves Yedoma IC remnants in uplands and hills next to widely-distributed thermokarst basins since lateglacial and Holocene warming affected up to 70% of the original IC distribution on an area of more than 1,000,000 km2. The overarching climate-driven pattern of cold-stage IC permafrost accretion and warm-stage IC permafrost

  3. Late Quaternary vegetation history of Rough Canyon, south-central New Mexico, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Betancourt, J.L.; Aasen, Rylander K.; Penalba, C.; McVickar, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    South-central New Mexico, USA, at the junction of the Rocky Mountains, High Plains and Chihuahuan Desert, is one of the better known regions in the late Quaternary of North America. Plant macrofossils and pollen from a packrat midden series in Rough Canyon, New Mexico allows refinement of plant distributions and paleoclimates in this transitional area since full glacial times. From 17000 to 12000 14C yr BP, Pinus edulis-Juniperus scopulorum woodlands dominated limestone substrates between 1800 and 1490 m, with Pseudotsuga menziesii and other mixed-conifer species restricted to shady, north-facing slopes. Juniperus deppeana, the dominant juniper today above 2000 m in southern New Mexico, is conspicuously absent from glacial middens and must have been displaced south of the US-Mexico border. The minimum climatic conditions for P. edulis-J. scopulorum woodlands are ca 20% wetter and 3.5-5??C cooler (July mean maximum temperatures) than the modern climate at Rough Canyon. Holocene warming/drying may have started as early as 12000 14C yr BP with the extirpation of J. scopulorum from Rough Canyon, and was completed by at least 10540 14C yr BP. The record for arrivals of some desert species is confounded by traces of pollen and macrofossils in some of the glacial middens, which could signify either earliest occurrence or temporal mixing (contamination) of assemblages. AMS 14C dating can discriminate between early arrival and contamination in midden macrofossils but not in pollen. AMS dates show that Choisya dumosa, presently near its northern (cold) limits at Rough Canyon, endured late glacial winters, possibly as clonal populations. Some Larrea tridentata leaves and pollen occur in middens dominated by conifers and oaks no longer at the site; an AMS date of 3205 14C yr BP on Larrea leaves from one midden indicates contamination. Evidence for some macrofossil contamination, however, does not rule out the possibility that pollen of desert elements (e.g. Larrea, Prosopis

  4. Late Acheulean hominins at the Marine Isotope Stage 6/5e transition in north-central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslam, Michael; Roberts, Richard G.; Shipton, Ceri; Pal, J. N.; Fenwick, Jacqueline L.; Ditchfield, Peter; Boivin, Nicole; Dubey, A. K.; Gupta, M. C.; Petraglia, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Single-grain optically stimulated luminescence dating was applied to Late Quaternary sediments at two sites in the Middle Son Valley, Madhya Pradesh, India. Designated Bamburi 1 and Patpara, these sites contain Late Acheulean stone tool assemblages, which we associate with non-modern hominins. Age determinations of 140-120 ka place the formation of these sites at around the Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 6-5 transition, placing them among the youngest Acheulean sites in the world. We present here the geochronology and sedimentological setting of these sites, and consider potential implications of Late Pleistocene archaic habitation in north-central India for the initial dispersal of modern humans across South Asia.

  5. Fluvio-deltaic progradation in forced regressive deglacial succession: lessons from the Lake Saint-Jean (Québec, Canada, late Quaternary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutz, Alexis; Ghienne, Jean-François; Schuster, Mathieu; Roquin, Claude; Dietrich, Pierre; Bouchette, Frédéric; Cousineau, Pierre A.

    2015-04-01

    Deltas simultaneously respond to modifications in water discharge, sediment supply and base-level change. As a consequence, they provide accurate archive for deciphering environmental change through times. In this contribution, a Late Quaternary deglacial sequence is documented from Lake Saint-Jean basin (Québec, Canada) where sediments have recorded the Laurentide ice sheet (LIS) retreat accompanied by the invasion of marine waters (Laflamme Gulf) from ca. 12.9 cal. ky BP. Subsequently, fluvio-deltaic and then coastal prograding wedges emplaced following the base level fall induced by the glacio-isostatic rebound. The related succession, representing a transition from glacial to post-glacial periods within a previously glaciated area, was investigated through recent geological mapping, preserved landforms, facies analysis, and new optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) and radiocarbon (14C) dates. Three basin-scale geological sections are presented focusing on the architectures and facies of fluvio-deltaic progradations emplaced from 12.9 cal. ka BP to present-day in Lake Saint-Jean. Overlying the bedrock, isolated ice-contact fan deposits are capped by glacimarine muds. Above, fluvio-deltaic and coastal prograding systems were deposited following four major evolutions through time: (i) deltaic systems progressively increased in width, (ii) coastal influence on sedimentation increased, (iii) hydrographic drainage systems became more organised, and (iv) delta graded from steep (Gilbert delta) to low-angle foresets (mouth-bar delta). These evolutions in fluvio-deltaic systems are attributed to the modifications in water discharge, sediment supply and rate of base level fall driven by the deglaciation. The presented succession is considered as representative of the sedimentological signature of fluvial progradations in forced regressive deglacial sequences. Derived from the Lake Saint-Jean basin, this study provides new elements for the recognition and interpretation

  6. Coral reef complexes at an atypical windward platform margin: Late Quaternary, southeast Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lidz, B.H.

    2004-01-01

    Major coral reef complexes rim many modern and ancient carbonate platforms. Their role in margin evolution is not fully understood, particularly when they border a margin atypical of the classic model. Classic windward margins are steeply inclined. The windward margin of southeast Florida is distinct with a very low-gradient slope and a shelf edge ringed with 30-m-high Quaternary outlier reefs on a shallow upper-slope terrace. A newly developed synthesis of temporally well-constrained geologic events is used with surface and subsurface seismic-reflection contours to construct morphogenetic models of four discontinuous reef-complex sequences. The models show uneven subsurface topography, upward and landward buildups, and a previously unreported, rapid, Holocene progradation. The terms backstepped reef-complex margin, backfilled prograded margin, and coalesced reef-complex margin are proposed for sections exhibiting suitable signatures in the stratigraphic record. The models have significant implications for interpretation of ancient analogues. The Florida record chronicles four kinds of geologic events. (1) Thirteen transgressions high enough for marine deposition occurred between ca. 325 ka and the present. Six gave rise to stratigraphically successive coral reef complexes between ca. 185 and ca. 77.8 ka. The seventh reef ecosystem is Holocene. (2) Two primary coral reef architectures built the outer shelf and margin, producing respective ridge-and-swale and reef-and-trough geometries of very different scales. (3) Massive outlier reefs developed on an upper-slope terrace between ca. 106.5 and ca. 80 ka and are inferred to contain corals that would date to highstands at ca. 140 and 125 ka. (4) Sea level remained below elevation of the shelf between ca. 77.8 and ca. 9.6 ka. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  7. Late Quaternary stratigraphic and tectonic evolution of the northeastern Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isler, Ekrem Bursin

    The late Quaternary--Recent stratigraphic and tectonic evolution of the NE Aegean Sea, between the Islands of Bozcaada and Lesbos and the Biga Peninsula, is examined using ˜1600 km of seismic reflection and side scan profiles and six cores collected during cruises in 1998, 2000, 2002, and 2003. Detailed examination of the seismic reflection profiles showed that several vertically stacked depositional sequences developed within three NE-SW trending basins. These depositional sequences exhibit oblique- to complex oblique-sigmoid internal seismic reflection configuration and are separated from one another by shelf-crossing unconformities. The chronology of the depositional sequences is constrained by seven radiocarbon and two U/Th dates on in situ shell samples extracted from five cores. Sedimentation rates calculated by using these dates range between 19 cm/kyr and 30 cm/kyr. The ages and the stacked architecture of the depositional sequences, together with the correlations with the oxygen isotopic stages and global sea-level curve reveal that these seaward-prograded delta sequences were developed in a sufficiently rapidly subsiding shelf environment during successive global eustatic sea-level falls associated with late Quaternary glaciations. The progradation of the depositional sequences decelerated and eventually halted shortly after the subsequent major transgressions during which the shelf-crossing unconformities were generated. The terrigenous materials transported throughout the development of the depositional sequences originated from the Tuzla, Karamenderes, and Dumbek rivers draining the Biga Peninsula. Seismic reflection profiles showed no evidence for a major E--W-trending fault system, suggesting that the western continuation of the central strand of the North Anatolian Transform Fault does not exit into the Aegean Sea at Ezine. Detailed mapping of the seismic data showed that two major faults, A1 and beta8, constitute the main fault system in the study

  8. Mineral magnetic characteristics of the late Quaternary coastal red sands of Bheemuni, East Coast (India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Priyeshu; Sangode, S. J.; Parmar, Nikita; Meshram, D. C.; Jadhav, Priyanka; Singhvi, A. K.

    2016-11-01

    The voluminous red sand deposits of Bheemuni in the east coast of India provide record of coastal land-sea interaction during the late Quaternary climatic and eustatic oscillations. Limited information on the origin and depositional environments of these red sands and their chronology is available. We studied two inland to coast cross profiles from Bheemuni red sand deposits using mineral magnetism, color characteristics and Citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (CBD) extractable pedogenic iron oxides over 23 horizons along with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) chronology at 6 horizons. The oldest exposed bed had an optical age of 48.9 ± 1.7 ka. Differential ages between the two parallel sections (SOS = 48.9 ± 1.7 to 12.1 ± 0.3 ka and IMD = 29.3 ± 3.5 ka) suggest laterally shifting fluvial sedimentation. Both the profiles show significant amount of antiferromagnetic oxide (hematite) along with ferrimagnetic (magnetite/maghemite) mineral composition. The granulometric (/domain-) sensitive parameters (χFD, χARM, SIRM/χLF and χARM/χLF) indicate variable concentration of superparamagnetic (SP) and single domain (SD) particles between the two profiles. The higher frequency dependent and pedogenic magnetic susceptibilities (χFD and χpedo) in the younger (IMD) profile suggest enhanced pedogenesis under a warm-wet climate post 29.3 ka and also during Holocene. A combination of hard isothermal remanent magnetization (HIRM) and redness rating (RR) index indicates distinct but variable concentration of a) crystalline and b) poorly crystalline (pigmentary) hematites in both the profiles. We consider that the former (#a) is derived from hinterland red soils and possibly due to post-depositional diagenesis, and the latter (#b) precipitated from the dissolved iron under fluvial regime imparting the unique red coloration to Bheemuni sands. Partial to complete alteration of ferromagnesian minerals due to pedogenesis in hinterlands under warm-wet climate was therefore the

  9. Holarctic phylogeography of the root vole (Microtus oeconomus): implications for late Quaternary biogeography of high latitudes.

    PubMed

    Brunhoff, C; Galbreath, K E; Fedorov, V B; Cook, J A; Jaarola, M

    2003-04-01

    A species-wide phylogeographical study of the root vole (Microtus oeconomus) was performed using the whole 1140 base pair mitochondrial (mt) cytochrome b gene. We examined 83 specimens from 52 localities resulting in 65 unique haplotypes. Our results demonstrate that the root vole is divided into four main mtDNA phylogenetic lineages that seem to have largely allopatric distributions. Net divergence estimates (2.0-3.5%) between phylogroups, as well as relatively high nucleotide diversity estimates within phylogroups, indicate that the distinct phylogeographical structure was initiated by historical events that predated the latest glaciation. European root voles are divided into a Northern and a Central mtDNA phylogroup. The mtDNA data in concert with fossil records imply that root voles remained north of the classical refugial areas in southern Europe during the last glacial period. The currently fragmented populations in central Europe belong to a single mtDNA phylogroup. The Central Asian and the North European lineages are separated by the Ural Mountains, a phylogeographical split also found in collared lemmings (Dicrostonyx) and the common vole (M. arvalis). The Beringian lineage occurs from eastern Russia through Alaska to northwestern Canada. This distribution is congruent with the traditional boundaries of the Beringian refugium and with phylogeographical work on other organisms. In conclusion, similarities between the phylogeographical patterns in the root vole and other rodents, such as Arctic and subarctic lemmings, as well as more temperate vole species, indicate that late Quaternary geological and climatic events played a strong role in structuring northern biotic communities.

  10. Late Quaternary sapropel sediments in the eastern Mediterranean Sea: Faunal variations and chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muerdter, David R.; Kennett, James P.; Thunell, Robert C.

    1984-05-01

    Distinctive planktonic foraminiferal assemblages which characterize particular late Quaternary sapropel layers in deep basin sediments from the eastern Mediterranean Sea have been identified using cluster analysis. Three distinct clusters allow for identification and intercore correlation of the nine sapropels deposited during the last 250,000 yr. Cluster 1, representing sapropel layers S1 and S9, exhibits low abundances of Neogloboquadrina dutertrei and high abundances of Globigerinoides ruber; Cluster 2, which groups S3, S5, and S7, contains high abundances of G. ruber, N. dutertrei, and Globigerina bulloides, and Cluster 3, which includes samples from S4, S6, and S8, is marked by extremely abundant N. dutertrei and G. bulloides, and rare G. ruber. Analysis of sedimentation rates in 14 cores reveals the following approximate ages for the sapropel layers: S2 = 52,000 yr B.P.; S3 = 81,000-78,000 yr B.P.; S4 = 100,000-98,000 yr B.P.; and S5 = 125,000-116,000 yr B.P. As previously suggested, sedimentation rates on the Mediterranean Ridge were determined to be relatively constant during the last 127,000 yr. In contrast, basin sedimentation rates have fluctuated markedly from lower rates during interglacial stage 5 to higher rates during the last glacial episode. These glacial/interglacial differences are most pronounced in the northern Ionian Basin, because of increased terrigenous sediment deposition during glacial episodes. Unusually high biogenic sedimentation rates occurred in an arc south of Crete during the deposition of sapropel S5, probably due to higher productivity in this region.

  11. Late quaternary temperature record from buried soils of the North American Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordt, L.; Von Fischer, J.; Tieszen, L.

    2007-01-01

    We present the first comprehensive late Quaternary record of North American Great Plains temperature by assessing the behavior of the stable isotopic composition (??13C) of buried soils. After examining the relationship between the ??13C of topsoil organic matter and July temperature from 61 native prairies within a latitudinal range of 46??-38??N, we applied the resulting regression equation to 64 published ??13C values from buried soils of the same region to construct a temperature curve for the past 12 k.y. Estimated temperatures from 12 to 10 ka (1 k.y. = 1000 14C yr B.P.) fluctuated with a periodicity of ???1 k.y. with two cool excursions between -4.5 and -3.5 ??C and two warmer excursions between -1 and 0 ??C, relative to modern. Early Holocene temperatures from ca. 10-7.5 ka were -1.0 to -2.0 ??C before rising to +1.0 ??C in the middle Holocene between 6.0 and 4.5 ka. After a cool interlude from 4.2 to 2.6 ka, when temperatures dropped to slightly below modern, another warm interval ensued from 2.6 to 1 ka as temperatures increased to ???+0.5 ??C. A final decline in temperature to below modern occurred beginning ca. 0.5 ka. Cooler than present temperatures in the Great Plains indicate telecommunications with cool-water episodes in the Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic potentially governed by a combination of glacial meltwater pulses and low solar irradiance. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  12. Waxing and Waning of Forests: Late Quaternary Biogeography of Lake Malawi, Southeast Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivory, S.; Lézine, A. M.; Vincens, A.; Cohen, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    African ecosystems are at great risk due to climate and land-use change. Despite the status of several of these regions as biodiversity hotspots, long-standing ideas about African ecology and biogeography have been unable to be tested until now due to lack of sufficiently long records. Here, we present the first long, continuous terrestrial record of vegetation from Lake Malawi, East Africa which goes back to the early Late Quaternary, permitting us to investigate changes in physiognomy and forest composition over many transitions. In this record, we observe eight phases of forest expansion and collapse. Although diversity is much greater during forest phases, composition varies little from phase to phase. Very high abundances of afromontane taxa suggest frequent widespread colonization of the lowlands by modern high elevation trees. Although there are clear successional stages within each forest such that turnover is great within a single phase, among forest samples between phases, there is little dissimilarity. Each forest phase is interrupted by rapid decline of arboreal taxa and expansion of semi-arid grasslands or woodlands whose composition varies greatly from phase to phase. The variable composition of the more open phases, all occurring during arid periods, is likely dynamically linked to thresholds in regional hydrology associated with lake level and moisture recycling within the watershed. This vegetation is unlike any found at Malawi today, with assemblages suggesting strong Somali-Masai affinities. Furthermore, nearly all semi-arid assemblages contain small abundances of forest taxa typically growing in areas with wetter edaphic conditions, suggesting that moist lowland gallery forests were present but restricted to waterways during exceptionally arid times. The waxing and waning of forests throughout this interval has important implications for early human biogeography across Africa as well as disturbance regimes that are crucial for the maintenance of

  13. Setting the Time Frame - Investigating Culture-Environment Interactions in the Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klasen, N.; Just, J.; Rethemeyer, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present a status update of luminescence age estimates of sediments from Ethiopia and the Iberian Peninsula that are related to human occupation and are currently being investigated in the interdisciplinary Collaborative Research Center "Our way to Europe - Culture-Environment Interaction and Human Mobility in the Late Quaternary" (CRC806). The aim of the project is to investigate the dispersal of anatomically modern humans from Africa to Europe, and a robust chronology is essential. In the CRC806, dating is provided by luminescence, palaeomagnetic and radiocarbon techniques. A key site of the CRC806 is Chew Bahir in Ethiopia. This lake basin is located in the source area of the emergence of anatomically modern humans. Radiocarbon, luminescence and palaeomagnetic dating have been used to develop an age-depth model for drill core sediments that date back to 115 ka over 42 m depth. The model is independent of palaeoclimatic proxy interpretation. On the Iberian Peninsula cave deposits have been dated with luminescence techniques and compared to radiocarbon ages wherever applicable. Recently, existing radiocarbon chronologies on the Iberian Peninsula have been revised in light of methodological developments. Robust luminescence dating is therefore especially important in this region, where the stratigraphy is difficult to constrain. We aim to improve the precision of luminescence age estimates by comparing different measurement techniques for equivalent dose and dose-rate determinations, and by using Bayesian statistics to develop age-depth models. Combining different chronological techniques has enabled the development of accurate and precise chronologies, which will allow a better understanding of the emergence of modern humans.

  14. Late Quaternary Morphological Changes of the Waipaoa River Outer Shelf and Upper Slope, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. P.; Sumners, B.; Alexander, C.; Orpin, A.; Gerber, T.; Pratson, L.

    2006-12-01

    The outer shelf and slope seaward of the Waipaoa River, New Zealand has experienced considerable morphological change in the late Quaternary. The complexion of the margin has evolved as a result of sedimentation affected by sea level, oceanographic, and tectonic forcings. Integration of seismic, core and multibeam data indicate that the modern seabed morphology along a 30-km stretch of the margin can be categorized as 3 distinct regions: 1) east of Ariel Anticline the shelf edge is scalloped-shaped and steep, with a thin blanket of Holocene mud (generally <5 m); 2) immediately seaward of the Waipaoa River mouth, two shelf-indenting but small canyons with distinct gully patterns are found, and moderately think (<15 m) Holocene sediments are seen in the vicinity; and, 3) east of Lachlan Anticline where a larger canyon incises the shelf, gullying is smoothed by a Holocene mud fill (0- >15 m thick). These intra-system morphological differences are thought to reflect the complex and continual evolution of the margin. Seismic and multibeam evidence suggests a paleo-river channel incised across the Ariel Anticline and supplied a considerable volume of sediment to the low-stand coastline, in the northern portion of the study area. This delta apparently experienced a failure, producing an expansive debris field in the adjacent slope basin and the distinct scalloped-shaped shelf-edge morphology. With sea-level rise, shelf sediment storage has been enhanced, but off-shelf transport has been maintained throughout the Holocene. The pattern of sediment accumulation suggests sediment escaping through Poverty Gap is being advected southward into Lachlan Canyon. As a result the erosional gully morphology that was created during the low-stand, which is still evident to the north, is subsequently being overlain.

  15. Holarctic phylogeography of the root vole (Microtus oeconomus): implications for late Quaternary biogeography of high latitudes.

    PubMed

    Brunhoff, C; Galbreath, K E; Fedorov, V B; Cook, J A; Jaarola, M

    2003-04-01

    A species-wide phylogeographical study of the root vole (Microtus oeconomus) was performed using the whole 1140 base pair mitochondrial (mt) cytochrome b gene. We examined 83 specimens from 52 localities resulting in 65 unique haplotypes. Our results demonstrate that the root vole is divided into four main mtDNA phylogenetic lineages that seem to have largely allopatric distributions. Net divergence estimates (2.0-3.5%) between phylogroups, as well as relatively high nucleotide diversity estimates within phylogroups, indicate that the distinct phylogeographical structure was initiated by historical events that predated the latest glaciation. European root voles are divided into a Northern and a Central mtDNA phylogroup. The mtDNA data in concert with fossil records imply that root voles remained north of the classical refugial areas in southern Europe during the last glacial period. The currently fragmented populations in central Europe belong to a single mtDNA phylogroup. The Central Asian and the North European lineages are separated by the Ural Mountains, a phylogeographical split also found in collared lemmings (Dicrostonyx) and the common vole (M. arvalis). The Beringian lineage occurs from eastern Russia through Alaska to northwestern Canada. This distribution is congruent with the traditional boundaries of the Beringian refugium and with phylogeographical work on other organisms. In conclusion, similarities between the phylogeographical patterns in the root vole and other rodents, such as Arctic and subarctic lemmings, as well as more temperate vole species, indicate that late Quaternary geological and climatic events played a strong role in structuring northern biotic communities. PMID:12753215

  16. Late Quaternary stratigraphy and sedimentation patterns in the western Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Polyak, L.; Bischof, J.; Ortiz, J.D.; Darby, D.A.; Channell, J.E.T.; Xuan, C.; Kaufman, D.S.; Lovlie, R.; Schneider, D.A.; Eberl, D.D.; Adler, R.E.; Council, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Sediment cores from the western Arctic Ocean obtained on the 2005 HOTRAX and some earlier expeditions have been analyzed to develop a stratigraphic correlation from the Alaskan Chukchi margin to the Northwind and Mendeleev-Alpha ridges. The correlation was primarily based on terrigenous sediment composition that is not affected by diagenetic processes as strongly as the biogenic component, and paleomagnetic inclination records. Chronostratigraphic control was provided by 14C dating and amino-acid racemization ages, as well as correlation to earlier established Arctic Ocean stratigraphies. Distribution of sedimentary units across the western Arctic indicates that sedimentation rates decrease from tens of centimeters per kyr on the Alaskan margin to a few centimeters on the southern ends of Northwind and Mendeleev ridges and just a few millimeters on the ridges in the interior of the Amerasia basin. This sedimentation pattern suggests that Late Quaternary sediment transport and deposition, except for turbidites at the basin bottom, were generally controlled by ice concentration (and thus melt-out rate) and transportation distance from sources, with local variances related to subsurface currents. In the long term, most sediment was probably delivered to the core sites by icebergs during glacial periods, with a significant contribution from sea ice. During glacial maxima very fine-grained sediment was deposited with sedimentation rates greatly reduced away from the margins to a hiatus of several kyr duration as shown for the Last Glacial Maximum. This sedimentary environment was possibly related to a very solid ice cover and reduced melt-out over a large part of the western Arctic Ocean.

  17. Erosion and deposition on the eastern margin of the Bermuda Rise in the late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCave, I. N.; Hollister, C. D.; Laine, E. P.; Lonsdale, P. F.; Richardson, M. J.

    1982-05-01

    A near-bottom survey has been made on the Eastward Scarp (32°50'N, 57°30'W) of the Bermuda Rise, which rises 1150 m above the 5500-m deep Sohm Abyssal Plain in the western North Atlantic. The survey reveals evidence of erosion and deposition at present and in the late Quaternary by the deeper levels of the westward flowing Gulf Stream Return Flow. Four distinct regions of increasing bed gradient show increasing sediment smoothing and scour in the transition from plateau to abyssal plain. Bedforms observed are current crescents, crag and tail, triangular ripples, elongate mounds, transverse mud ripples, lineations, and furrows ranging from 10 to 1 m or less in depth, decreasing generally with bed gradient. Measured near-bottom current speeds are up to 20 cm s -1. Temperature structure on the lower, steep, slopes suggests that detachment of bottom mixed layers may occur there. Extensive net erosion appears to be confined to the lower steep slopes of the scarp. Reflection profiles (4 kHz) show that there has been erosion in areas thinly draped with recent sediments and in areas that show development of small scarps. The distribution of subsurface acoustic characteristics of the region corresponds broadly to the areas characterized by bed gradient and distinct sedimentation conditions. Subsurface hyperbolae, possibly caused by buried furrows, show furrow persistence through several tens of metres of deposition. Erosion occurs up to the top of the scarp during episodes of presumed stronger currents, which may correspond with intensified circulation during glacials.

  18. Late Quaternary Arc-parallel Extension of the Kongur Extensional System (KES), Chinese Pamir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Schoenbohm, Lindsay M.; Yuan, Zhaode; Li, Wenqiao; Li, Tao; Owen, Lewis A.; Sobel, Edward R.; Hedrick, Kate

    2015-04-01

    Active deformation in the Chinese Pamir plateau is dominated by east-west extension along the active Kongur extensional system (KES). The KES lies along the northeastern margin of the Pamir at the western end of the Himalayan-Tibetan orogenic belt, and is part of a regional fault system which accommodates east-west extension in the hanging wall of the active Main Pamir Thrust (MPT). Previous work has shown that the MPT has been active since at least the Late Oligocene and accommodates northward motion of the Pamir salient over the Tarim and Tajik basins. It has been proposed that North-directed thrusting along the Main Pamir thrust has been interpreted to be related to east-west extension in the northern Pamir by either extensional collapse of over-thickened crust, or radial thrusting, or oroclinal bending along the Main Pamir Thrust. Alternatively, the east-west extension is related to northward propagation of the right-slip Karakoram fault. A newer model relates the extension to gravitational collapse of the Pamir into the Tadjik depression. Clearly the precise driver remains poorly understood. To better understand the nature of extension in the Pamir and to test the existing models, late Quaternary slip rate along the KES need to be defined using geomorphic mapping, geodetic surveying, Be-10 surface exposure and depth profile dating to quantify rates of fault slip using multiple landforms as strain markers such as offset outwash terraces, lateral moraines, and landslides at five sites, to identify spatial patterns in deformation rates. The preliminary results show that the overall extension direction is subhorizontal, is oriented E-W, and occurs at a high rate of about 7 mm/yr along the Muji and Qimugan faults to the north and deceased to about 1 mm/yr at Kuzigan to the south near Tashkurgan town, which matches the pattern of GPS data. A regional compilation from this study and existing data shows that recent extension along the KES is arc-parallel extension

  19. Climatic, geomorphic, and archaeological implications of a late Quaternary alluvial chronology for the lower Salt River, Arizona, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huckleberry, Gary; Onken, Jill; Graves, William M.; Wegener, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Recent archaeological excavations along the lower Salt River, Arizona resulted in the unexpected discovery of buried late Pleistocene soils and cultural features dating 5800-7100 cal YBP (Early Archaic), the latter representing the earliest evidence of human activity in the lower Salt River floodplain thus far identified. Because the lower Salt River floodplain has been heavily impacted by recent agriculture and urbanization and contains few stratigraphic exposures, our understanding of the river's geological history is limited. Here we present a late Quaternary alluvial chronology for a segment of the lower Salt River based on 19 accelerator mass spectrometry 14C and four optically stimulated luminescence ages obtained during two previous geoarchaeological investigations. Deposits are organized into allostratigraphic units and reveal a buried late Pleistocene terrace inset into middle-to-late Pleistocene terrace deposits. Holocene terrace fill deposits unconformably cap the late Pleistocene terrace tread in the site area, and the lower portion of this fill contains the Early Archaic archaeological features. Channel entrenchment and widening ~ 900 cal YBP eroded much of the older terrace deposits, leaving only a remnant of fill containing the buried latest Pleistocene and middle-to-late Holocene deposits preserved in the site area. Subsequent overbank deposition and channel filling associated with a braided channel system resulted in the burial of the site by a thin layer of flood sediments. Our study confirms that the lower Salt River is a complex mosaic of late Quaternary alluvium formed through vertical and lateral accretion, with isolated patches of buried soils preserved through channel avulsion. Although channel avulsion is linked to changes in sediment load and discharge and may have climatic linkages, intrinsic geomorphic and local base level controls limit direct correlations of lower Salt River stratigraphy to other large rivers in the North American

  20. Geochemical proxies for weathering and provenance of Late Quaternary alluvial core-sediments from NW India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ajit; Amir, Mohd; Paul, Debajyoti; Sinha, Rajiv

    2014-05-01

    The Indo-Gangetic alluvial plains are formed by sediment deposition in the foreland basin as a result of upliftment and subsequent erosion of the Himalaya. Earlier study (Sinha et al., 2013) has shown the subsurface existence of buried channel bodies beneath the Ghaggar plains in NW Indo-Gangetic plains. The mapped sand bodies follow trace of a paleochannel that begins at the mountain front near the exit of river Sutlej and extends to the northern margin of the Thar desert, suggesting existence of a large Himalayan-sourced river (Singh et al., 2011) in the past. The buried sand bodies hold potential records of erosion history over the Himalaya that could be used to assess climate-controlled erosion over the Himalaya. Geochemical variations in the sediments from two (~45m long) cores drilled below the trace of the paleochannel (upstream) near Sirhind, Punjab and two cores (GS-10 & 11) from downstream near Kalibangan, Rajasthan, are used in this study to understand the erosional pattern over the Himalaya during Late Quaternary. Down-core variations in chemical index of alteration (CIA=51-79) along with K2O/Na2O and Al2O3/(CaO+Na2O) ratios are consistent with the trends of SW summer monsoonal fluctuations during the Glacial-Interglacial periods indicating climate controlled weathering at the source; higher values during Interglacial and lower during Glacial periods with maximum value during the Holocene. Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of drill-cores sediments, 87Sr/86Sr (0.7314-0.7946), ɛNd (-23.2 to -14) are within the range of silicate rocks from the Higher and Lesser Himalaya. Significant down-core variations in 87Sr/86Sr and ɛNd are observed that reflect the mixing of varying proportions of the Higher and Lesser Himalayan sediments, the two dominant sources to the core sites. Sediments deposited during MIS-2 and MIS-4, cold and dry Glacial periods, show high 87Sr/86Sr and low ɛNd suggesting an enhanced contribution from the Lesser Himalayan rocks that are

  1. Sedimentary architecture and chronostratigraphy of a late Quaternary incised-valley fill: A case study of the late Middle and Late Pleistocene Rhine system in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, J.; Busschers, F. S.; Stouthamer, E.; Bosch, J. H. A.; Van den Berg, M. W.; Wallinga, J.; Versendaal, A. J.; Bunnik, F. P. M.; Middelkoop, H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the sedimentary architecture, chronostratigraphy and palaeogeography of the late Middle and Late Pleistocene (Marine Isotope Stage/MIS 6-2) incised Rhine-valley fill in the central Netherlands based on six geological transects, luminescence dating, biostratigraphical data and a 3D geological model. The incised-valley fill consists of a ca. 50 m thick and 10-20 km wide sand-dominated succession and includes a well-developed sequence dating from the Last Interglacial: known as the Eemian in northwest Europe. The lower part of the valley fill contains coarse-grained fluvio-glacial and fluvial Rhine sediments that were deposited under Late Saalian (MIS 6) cold-climatic periglacial conditions and during the transition into the warm Eemian interglacial (MIS 5e-d). This unit is overlain by fine-grained fresh-water flood-basin deposits, which are transgressed by a fine-grained estuarine unit that formed during marine high-stand. This ca. 10 m thick sequence reflects gradual drowning of the Eemian interglacial fluvial Rhine system and transformation into an estuary due to relative sea-level rise. The chronological data suggests a delay in timing of regional Eemian interglacial transgression and sea-level high-stand of several thousand years, when compared to eustatic sea-level. As a result of this glacio-isostatic controlled delay, formation of the interglacial lower deltaic system took only place for a relative short period of time: progradation was therefore limited. During the cooler Weichselian Early Glacial period (MIS 5d-a) deposition of deltaic sediments continued and extensive westward progradation of the Rhine system occurred. Major parts of the Eemian and Weichselian Early Glacial deposits were eroded and buried as a result of sea-level lowering and climate cooling during the early Middle Weichselian (MIS 4-3). Near complete sedimentary preservation occurred along the margins of the incised valley allowing the detailed reconstruction presented

  2. First High-Resolution Record of Late Quaternary Environmental Changes in the Amundsen Sea, West Antarctica, Revealed by Multi-proxy Analysis of Drift Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horrocks, J.; Ó Cofaigh, C.; Lloyd, J. M.; Hillenbrand, C. D.; Kuhn, G.; Smith, J.; Ehrmann, W. U.; Esper, O.

    2015-12-01

    The Amundsen Sea sector of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) is experiencing rapid mass loss and there is a pressing need to place the contemporary ice-sheet changes into a longer term context. The continental rise in this region is characterised by large sediment mounds that are shaped by westward flowing bottom currents and that resemble contouritic drifts existing offshore from the Antarctic Peninsula. Similar to the Antarctic Peninsula drifts, marine sediment cores from the poorly studied sediment mounds in the Amundsen Sea have the potential to provide reliable records of dynamical ice-sheet behaviour in West Antarctica and palaeoceanographic changes in the Southern Ocean during the Late Quaternary that can be reconstructed from their terrestrial, biogenic and authigenic components. Here we use multi-proxy data from three sediment cores recovered from two of the Amundsen Sea mounds to present the first high-resolution study of environmental changes on this part of the West Antarctic continental margin over the glacial-interglacial cycles of the Late Quaternary. Age constraints for the records are derived from biostratigraphy, AMS 14C dates and lithostratigraphy. We focus on the investigation of processes for drift formation, thereby using grain size and sortable silt data to reconstruct changes in bottom current speed and to identify episodes of current winnowing. Data on geochemical and mineralogical sediment composition and physical properties are used to infer both changes in terrigenous sediment supply in response to the advance and retreat of the WAIS across the Amundsen Sea shelf and changes in biological productivity that are mainly controlled by the duration of annual sea-ice coverage. We compare our data sets from the Amundsen Sea mounds to those from the well-studied Antarctic Peninsula drifts, thereby highlighting similarities and discrepancies in depositional processes and climatically-driven environmental changes.

  3. Late Quaternary climatic and oceanographic changes in the Northeast Pacific as recorded by dinoflagellate cysts from Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Andrea M.; Mertens, Kenneth N.; Pospelova, Vera; Pedersen, Thomas F.; Ganeshram, Raja S.

    2013-01-01

    A high-resolution record of organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst production in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (Mexico) reveals a complex paleoceanographic history over the last ~40 ka. Guaymas Basin is an excellent location to perform high resolution studies of changes in late Quaternary climate and paleo-productivity because it is characterized by high primary productivity, high sedimentation rates, and low oxygen bottom waters. These factors contribute to the deposition and preservation of laminated sediments throughout large portions of the core MD02-2515. In this study, we document dinoflagellate cyst production at a centennial to millennial scale throughout the late Quaternary. Based on the cyst assemblages, three dinoflagellate cyst zones were established and roughly correspond to Marine Isotope Stages (MISs) 1 to 3. MISs 1 and 3 are dominated by cysts of heterotrophic dinoflagellates, whereas MIS 2 is characterized by enhanced variability and a greater proportion of cysts produced by autotrophic taxa. The most dominant dinoflagellate cyst taxa found throughout the core were Brigantedinium spp. and Operculodinium centrocarpum. Dansgaard-Oeschger event 8 is observed in the dinoflagellate cyst record where it is characterized by an increase in warm taxa, such as Spiniferites pachydermus. Other intervals of interest are the Younger Dryas where warmer conditions are recorded and the Holocene which is characterized by the consistent presence of tropical species Stelladinium reidii, Tuberculodinidum vancampoae, Bitectatodinium spongium, and an increase in Quinquecuspis concreta. Changes in cyst assemblages, concentrations, and species diversity, along with geochemical data reflect major orbital to millennial-scale climatic and oceanographic changes.

  4. Late Quaternary palaeoecological and palaeoclimatological reconstruction in the Gutaiului Mountains, northwest Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feurdean, Angelica; Bennike, Ole

    2004-12-01

    Macrofossil, pollen, lithostratigraphy, mineral magnetic measurements (SIRM and magnetic susceptibility), loss-on-ignition, and AMS radiocarbon dating on sediments from two former crater lakes, situated at moderate altitudes in the Gutaiului Mountains of northwest Romania, allow reconstruction of Late Quaternary climate and environment. Shrubs and herbs with steppe and montane affinities along with stands of Betula and Pinus, colonised the surroundings of the sites prior to 14 700 cal. yr BP and the inferred climatic conditions were cold and dry. The gradual transition to open Pinus-Betula forests, slightly higher lake water temperatures, and higher lake productivity, indicate more stable environmental conditions between 14 700 and 14 100 cal. yr BP. This development was interrupted by cooler and drier climatic conditions between 14 100 and 13 800 cal. yr BP, as inferred from a reduction of open forests to patches, or stands, of Pinus, Betula, Larix, Salix and Populus. The expansion of a denser boreal forest, dominated by Picea, but including Pinus, Larix, Betula, Salix, and Ulmus started at 13 800 cal. yr BP, although the forest density seems to have been reduced between 13400 and 13200cal.yrBP. Air temperature and moisture availability gradually increased, but a change towards drier conditions is seen at 13400cal.yrBP. A distinct decrease in temperature and humidity between 12900 and 11500cal.yrBP led to a return of open vegetation, with patches of Betula, Larix, Salix, Pinus and Alnus and individuals of Picea. Macrofossils and pollen of aquatic plants indicate rising lake water temperatures and increased aquatic productivity already by ca. 11800cal.yrBP, 300 years earlier than documented by the terrestrial plant communities. At the onset of the Holocene, 11500cal.yrBP, forests dominated by Betula, Pinus and Larix expanded and were followed by dense Ulmus forests with Picea, Betula and Pinus at 11250cal.yrBP. Larix pollen was not found, but macrofossil evidence

  5. Coastal tectonics on the eastern margin of the Pacific Rim: late Quaternary sea-level history and uplift rates, Channel Islands National Park, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Simmons, Kathleen R.; Schumann, R. Randall; Groves, Lindsey T.; DeVogel, Stephen B.; Minor, Scott A.; Laurel, DeAnna

    2014-12-01

    The Pacific Rim is a region where tectonic processes play a significant role in coastal landscape evolution. Coastal California, on the eastern margin of the Pacific Rim, is very active tectonically and geomorphic expressions of this include uplifted marine terraces. There have been, however, conflicting estimates of the rate of late Quaternary uplift of marine terraces in coastal California, particularly for the northern Channel Islands. In the present study, the terraces on San Miguel Island and Santa Rosa Island were mapped and new age estimates were generated using uranium-series dating of fossil corals and amino acid geochronology of fossil mollusks. Results indicate that the 2nd terrace on both islands is ˜120 ka and the 1st terrace on Santa Rosa Island is ˜80 ka. These ages correspond to two global high-sea stands of the Last Interglacial complex, marine isotope stages (MIS) 5.5 and 5.1, respectively. The age estimates indicate that San Miguel Island and Santa Rosa Island have been tectonically uplifted at rates of 0.12-0.20 m/ka in the late Quaternary, similar to uplift rates inferred from previous studies on neighboring Santa Cruz Island. The newly estimated uplift rates for the northern Channel Islands are, however, an order of magnitude lower than a recent study that generated uplift rates from an offshore terrace dating to the Last Glacial period. The differences between the estimated uplift rates in the present study and the offshore study are explained by the magnitude of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) effects that were not known at the time of the earlier study. Set in the larger context of northeastern Pacific Rim tectonics, Channel Islands uplift rates are higher than those coastal localities on the margin of the East Pacific Rise spreading center, but slightly lower than those of most localities adjacent to the Cascadia subduction zone. The uplift rates reported here for the northern Channel Islands are similar to those reported for most

  6. Coastal tectonics on the eastern margin of the Pacific Rim: Late Quaternary sea-level history and uplift rates, Channel Islands National Park, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Simmons, Kathleen R.; Schumann, R. Randall; Groves, Lindsey T.; DeVogel, Stephen B.; Minor, Scott A.; Laurel, Deanna

    2014-01-01

    The Pacific Rim is a region where tectonic processes play a significant role in coastal landscape evolution. Coastal California, on the eastern margin of the Pacific Rm, is very active tectonically and geomorphic expressions of this include uplifted marine terraces. There have been, however, conflicting estimates of the rate of late Quaternary uplift of marine terraces in coastal California, particularly for the orthern Channel Islands. In the present study, the terraces on San Miguel Island and Santa Rosa Island were mapped and new age estimates were generated using uranium-series dating of fossil corals and amino acid geochronology of fossil mollusks. Results indicate that the 2nd terrace on both islands is ~120 ka and the 1st terrace on Santa Rosa Island is ~80 ka. These ages correspond to two global high-sea stands of the Last Interglacial complex, marine isotope stages (MIS) 5.5 and 51, respectively. The age estimates indicate that San Miguel Island and Santa Rosa Island have been tectonically uplifted at rates of 0.12e0.20 m/ka in the late Quaternary, similar to uplift rates inferred from previous studies on neighboring San Cruz Island. The newly estimated uplift rates for the northern Channel Islands are, however, an order of magnitude lower than a recent study that generated uplift rates from an offshore terrace dating to the Last Glacial period. The differences between the estimated uplift rates in the present study and the offshore study are explained by the magnitude of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) effects that were not known at the time of the earlier study. Set in the larger context of northeastern Pacific Rim tectonics, Channel Islands uplift rates are higher than those coastal localities on the margin of the East Pacific Rise spreading center, but slightly lower than those of most localities adjacent to the Cascadia subduction zone. The uplift rates reported here for the northern Channel Islands are similar to those reported for most other

  7. A Late Quaternary shortening rate for the frontal thrust of the Andean Precordillera north of Mendoza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, S.; Kuhlmann, J.; Hetzel, R.; Mingorance, F.; Ramos, V. A.

    2009-12-01

    Although large historical earthquakes occurred in the Andean back-arc region between 28° and 34°S - for instance Mendoza was destroyed by an earthquake of magnitude MS = 7.0 in 1861 - the slip rates of active faults remain unknown. We report a slip rate for the 50-km-long Las Penas thrust, which constitutes the frontal thrust of the Precordillera. In its southern part, a well preserved fluvial terrace along La Escondida Creek (Costa et al., 2000) is displaced vertically by 10.6 ± 0.7 m as documented by several fault scarp profiles. Apart from radiocarbon dating of plant remnants, three different approaches for 10Be exposure dating have been applied to constrain the age of the terrace. Amalgamated sandstone pebbles (corrected for an inherited 10Be component using similar pebbles from the active creek) and a depth profile obtained from four sand samples yield 10Be exposure ages of 12.2 ± 1.5 and 11.3 ± 2.0 kyr, respectively. Both ages are in excellent agreement with the 14C age of 12.61 ± 0.20 cal kyr BP. In contrast, 10Be ages of five sandstone boulders vary significantly and exceed the age of the terrace by 10 to 70 kyr, which demonstrates that the widely used assumption of a negligible inherited component is not valid here. The age of the river terrace combined with the vertical fault offset yields an uplift rate of ~0.8 mm/yr for the Las Penas thrust. Combined with the fault dip of 25°, we determine a Late Quaternary horizontal shortening rate of ~1.8 mm/yr, which is about 40% of the GPS derived shortening rate of 4.5 ± 1.7 mm/yr in the back-arc region of the Andes (Brooks et al., 2003). References Brooks, B.A., Bevis, M., Smalley, R., Kendrick, E., Manceda, R., Lauria, E., Maturana, R. & Araujo, M. (2003): Crustal motion in the Southern Andes (26° - 36°S): Do the Andes behave like a microplate? Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 4 (10), pp. 14, 1085, doi 10.1029/2003GC000505. Costa, C.H., Gardini, C.E., Diederix, H., Cortés, J.M. (2000): The Andean orogenic

  8. Modern Climate Analogues of Late-Quaternary Paleoclimates for the Western United States.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mock, Cary Jeffrey

    This study examined spatial variations of modern and late-Quaternary climates for the western United States. Synoptic climatological analyses of the modern record identified the predominate climatic controls that normally produce the principal modes of spatial climatic variability. They also provided a modern standard to assess past climates. Maps of the month-to-month changes in 500 mb heights, sea-level pressure, temperature, and precipitation illustrated how different climatic controls govern the annual cycle of climatic response. The patterns of precipitation ratios, precipitation bar graphs, and the seasonal precipitation maximum provided additional insight into how different climatic controls influence spatial climatic variations. Synoptic-scale patterns from general circulation model (GCM) simulations or from analyses of climatic indices were used as the basis for finding modern climate analogues for 18 ka and 9 ka. Composite anomaly maps of atmospheric circulation, precipitation, and temperature were compared with effective moisture maps compiled from proxy data to infer how the patterns, which were evident from the proxy data, were generated. The analyses of the modern synoptic climatology indicate that smaller-scale climatic controls must be considered along with larger-scale ones in order to explain patterns of spatial climate heterogeneity. Climatic extremes indicate that changes in the spatial patterns of precipitation seasonality are the exception rather than the rule, reflecting the strong influence of smaller-scale controls. Modern climate analogues for both 18 ka and 9 ka clearly depict the dry Northwest/wet Southwest contrast that is suggested by GCM simulations and paleoclimatic evidence. 18 ka analogues also show the importance of smaller-scale climatic controls in explaining spatial climatic variation in the Northwest and northern Great Plains. 9 ka analogues provide climatological explanations for patterns of spatial heterogeneity over several

  9. Th/U dating of marine and continental mollusk shell, and travertine samples in quaternary deposits in Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semghouli, S.; Choukri, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Jahjouh, E.; Chouak, A.; Ben Mohammadi, A.; Latiris, M.; Reyss, J.-L.; Plaziat, J. L.

    2001-06-01

    Th/U measurements by alpha spectrometry have been carried out on samples of quaternary deposits in Morocco Ages yielded by marine samples allow identification of two high sea levels: (1) Last Interglacial ˜133 ka (ii) Harounien sea level ˜266 ka. The scatter of ages around 133 and 266 ka has been discussed and corrected. For continental samples, the ages allowed identification of humid episodes during which these samples have been deposited.

  10. Origin, age, and paleoclimatic setting of the Late Quaternary deposits in Wadi Feiran, Sinai Peninsula: Geomorphologic, geochronologic, and isotopic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, A. Z. A.; Sultan, M.; Forman, S. L.; Krishnamurthy, R. V.

    2015-12-01

    There is considerable debate on the origin, age, and paleoclimatic setting of Late Quaternary deposits within the basement complex of the Sinai Peninsula. Our research in Wadi Feiran focused on documenting the sedimentology, stratigraphy, geochemistry and chronology of Late Quaternary deposits in the Feiran (lat. 28.706 N; long. 33.665; elevation: 715 to 772 m a.m.s.l) and Tarfa (lat. 28.692 N; long. 33.933 E; elevation: 1160 to 1244 m a.m.s.l) oases. Sequence stratigraphy, analysis of remote sensed images, and groundwater levels in these two areas indicate that the investigated deposits are structurally-controlled as they are found in areas with anomalously elevated groundwater levels and upstream from shear zone/wadi intersections. Sediments are largely arenaceous upstream and transition downstream to marly successions. We infer that these sediments were not deposited in lake settings because of the absence of shorelines and associated littoral, sublittoral and deeper water facies, and the presence of rhizoliths, secondary calcite veins and gastropods, all of which suggest deposition in a spring or wetland environment. A short hydrologic residence time and/or deposition in an open water system is supported by the lack of correlation (R = 0.08) between δ18O and δ13C values in carbonate deposits. Our findings are consistent with deposition of sediments by alluvial, fluvial and paludal processes under variable hydrologic conditions and higher water table conditions. Quartz extracts from these sediments yielded optically stimulated luminescence ages between ca. 27 and 11 ka and place these wetter conditions during the last glacial period and extend the "greening" of North Africa further eastward. Our findings are consistent with models which identify the wet periods in the Late Quaternary in the Sinai Peninsula and in North Africa as being glacial periods.

  11. Late Quaternary sea-level history and the antiquity of mammoths (Mammuthus exilis and Mammuthus columbi), Channel Islands National Park, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Simmons, Kathleen R.; Groves, Lindsey T.; McGeehin, John P.; Randall Schumann, R.; Agenbroad, Larry D.

    2015-05-01

    Fossils of Columbian mammoths (Mammuthus columbi) and pygmy mammoths (Mammuthus exilis) have been reported from Channel Islands National Park, California. Most date to the last glacial period (Marine Isotope Stage [MIS] 2), but a tusk of M. exilis (or immature M. columbi) was found in the lowest marine terrace of Santa Rosa Island. Uranium-series dating of corals yielded ages from 83.8 ± 0.6 ka to 78.6 ± 0.5 ka, correlating the terrace with MIS 5.1, a time of relatively high sea level. Mammoths likely immigrated to the islands by swimming during the glacial periods MIS 6 (~ 150 ka) or MIS 8 (~ 250 ka), when sea level was low and the island-mainland distance was minimal, as during MIS 2. Earliest mammoth immigration to the islands likely occurred late enough in the Quaternary that uplift of the islands and the mainland decreased the swimming distance to a range that could be accomplished by mammoths. Results challenge the hypothesis that climate change, vegetation change, and decreased land area from sea-level rise were the causes of mammoth extinction at the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary on the Channel Islands. Pre-MIS 2 mammoth populations would have experienced similar or even more dramatic changes at the MIS 6/5.5 transition.

  12. Late Quaternary sea-level history and the antiquity of mammoths (Mammuthus exilis and Mammuthus columbi), Channel Islands NationalPark, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Simmons, Kathleen R.; Groves, Lindsey T.; McGeehin, John P.; Schumann, R. Randall; Agenbroad, Larry D.

    2015-01-01

    Fossils of Columbian mammoths (Mammuthus columbi) and pygmy mammoths (Mammuthus exilis) have been reported from Channel Islands National Park, California. Most date to the last glacial period (Marine Isotope Stage [MIS] 2), but a tusk of M. exilis (or immature M. columbi) was found in the lowest marine terrace of Santa Rosa Island. Uranium-series dating of corals yielded ages from 83.8 ± 0.6 ka to 78.6 ± 0.5 ka, correlating the terrace with MIS 5.1, a time of relatively high sea level. Mammoths likely immigrated to the islands by swimming during the glacial periods MIS 6 (~ 150 ka) or MIS 8 (~ 250 ka), when sea level was low and the island–mainland distance was minimal, as during MIS 2. Earliest mammoth immigration to the islands likely occurred late enough in the Quaternary that uplift of the islands and the mainland decreased the swimming distance to a range that could be accomplished by mammoths. Results challenge the hypothesis that climate change, vegetation change, and decreased land area from sea-level rise were the causes of mammoth extinction at the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary on the Channel Islands. Pre-MIS 2 mammoth populations would have experienced similar or even more dramatic changes at the MIS 6/5.5 transition.

  13. Accelerating late Quaternary uplift of the New Georgia Island Group (Solomon island arc) in response to subduction of the recently active Woodlark spreading center and Coleman seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Paul; Taylor, Frederick W.; Lagoe, Martin B.; Quarles, Andrew; Burr, G.

    1998-10-01

    The New Georgia Island Group of the Solomon Islands is one of four places where an active or recently active spreading ridge has subducted beneath an island arc. We have used coral reef terraces, paleobathymetry of Neogene sedimentary rocks, and existing marine geophysical data to constrain patterns of regional Quaternary deformation related to subduction of the recently active Woodlark spreading center and its overlying Coleman seamount. These combined data indicate the following vertical tectonic history for the central part of the New Georgia Island Group: (1) subsidence of the forearc region (Tetepare and Rendova Islands) to water depths of ˜1500 m and deposition of marine turbidites until after 270 ka; (2) late Quaternary uplift of the forearc to sea level and erosion of an unconformity; (3) subsidence of the forearc to ˜500 m BSL and deposition of bathyal sediments; and (4) uplift of the forearc above sea level with Holocene uplift rates up to at least 7.5 mm/yr on Tetepare and 5 mm/yr on Rendova. In the northeastern part of the New Georgia Island Group, our combined data indicate a slightly different tectonic history characterized by lower-amplitude vertical motions and a more recent change from subsidence to uplift. Barrier reefs formed around New Georgia and Vangunu Islands as they subsided >300 m. By 50-100 ka, subsidence was replaced by uplift that accelerated to Holocene rates of ˜1 mm/yr on the volcanic arc compared with rates up to ˜7.5 mm/yr in the forearc area of Tetepare and Rendova. Uplift mechanisms, such as thermal effects due to subduction of spreading ridges, tectonic erosion, or underplating of deeply subducted bathymetric features, are not likely to function on the 270-ka period that these uplift events have occurred in the New Georgia Island Group. A more likely uplift mechanism for the post-270-ka accelerating uplift of the forearc and volcanic arc of the New Georgia Island Group is progressive impingement of the Coleman seamount or

  14. Radiocarbon dates and late-Quaternary stratigraphy from Mamontova Gora, unglaciated central Yakutia, Siberia, U.S.S.R.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pewe, T.L.; Journaux, A.; Stuckenrath, R.

    1977-01-01

    A fine exposure of perennially frozen ice-rich silt and associated flora and vertebrate fauna of late-Quaternary age exists at Mamontova Gora along the Aldan River in central Yakutia, Siberia, U.S.S.R. The silt deposit caps a 50-m-high terrace and consists of three units. An upper layer 1-2 m thick overlies a 10-15-m-thick brownish to black silt layer. The lower silt layer is greenish to gray and about 15 m thick. All the silt is well sorted with 60% of the particles falling between 0.005 and 0.5 mm in diameter and is generally chemically and mineralogically homogeneous. The middle unit contains may extinct vertebrate mammal remains and ice wedges. The lower unit contains little vegetation and no ice wedges. The silt is widespread and exists as a loamy blanket on terraces at various elevations on both sides of the lower Aldan River. The origin of the silt blanket of late-Quaternary age in central Yakutia has long been controversial. Various hypotheses have been suggested, including lacustrine and alluvial, as well as frost-action origins. It is sometimes referred to as loess-like loam. Pe??we?? believes the silt at Mamontova Gora is loess, some of which has been retransported very short distances by water. The silt probably was blown from wide, braided, unvegetated flood plains of rivers draining nearby glaciers. The silt deposits are late Quaternary in age and probably associated with the Maximum glaciation (Samarov) and Sartan and Syryan glaciations of Wisconsinan age. On the basis of biostratigraphy, 10 radiocarbon dates, and their relation to the nearby glacial record, it is felt that the upper unit at Mamontova Gora is Holocene and the middle unit is Wisconsinan. The youngest date available from the middle unit at this particular location is 26,000 years. Dates greater than 56,000 years were obtained in the lower part of the middle unit. The lower unit is definitely beyond the range of radiocarbon dating and probably is older than the last interglacial. The

  15. Synchronous Late Quaternary slip rate variability on two strands of the San Jacinto fault, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, K. N.; Oskin, M.

    2007-12-01

    We present new results that show slip rates varied synchronously by a factor of two over the past 35 kyr along two parallel strands of the San Jacinto fault. Our results combine high-resolution LiDAR digital topography, field mapping and 10Be exposure-age dating from two of the most active strands of the southern San Jacinto fault: the Clark fault (CLF) and Coyote Creek fault (CCF). These faults form numerous NW-striking scarps that offset three generations of Quaternary alluvial fan surfaces, Q2b, Q3a, and Q3b. We dated alluvial fans along both the CCF and CLF using 10Be sampling methods adapted for available material and degradation of the surface. For younger surfaces with well-preserved bar and swale morphology, we used a new sampling method where 12 to 20 chips from quartz-bearing boulders lodged within a bar were amalgamated into a single sample. For older surfaces we either sampled individual meter-sized boulders or collected samples from a 2 m-deep depth profile. Surface ages are consistent between CCF and CLF sites: 40 ± 12 ka and 31 ± 6 ka for Q2b, 7.1 ± 1.6 ka and 4.6 ± 1.6 ka for Q3a, respectively. Samples from Q3b near the CLF yielded ages of 1.0 ± 0.2 ka and 2.1 ± 0.3 ka. CCF samples have not yet been corrected 10Be inheritance, thus we use the CLF ages to calculate preliminary slip rates. Late Pleistocene to present rates are CLF: 2.2 ± 0.5 mm/yr, CCF: 3.4 ± 0.9 mm/yr, and 5.6 ± 1.4 mm/yr combined. Mid-Holocene to present rates are CLF: 4.1 ± 1.5 mm/yr, CCF: 6.7 ± 2.8 mm/yr, and 10.9 ± 4.3 mm/yr combined. Latest Holocene CLF slip rate exceeds 3 mm/yr. The combined Late Pleistocene to present slip rate for the southern San Jacinto fault is less than one third the rate deduced from the onset of faulting ca. 1 Ma. Mid-Holocene to present slip rates for both the CLF and CCF are about double their ca. 35 kyr rates, but are less than the 16 - 20 mm/yr geodetic loading rates and the >16 mm/yr slip rate since 1 ka at Hog Lake. We conclude that (1

  16. Late Quaternary climate change record from two long sediment cores from Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheshire, Heather; Thurow, Jürgen; Nederbragt, Alexandra J.

    2005-07-01

    Modern Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California, Mexico) is a region of high diatom productivity where exceptional preservation factors maintain biannually alternating sediment deposition as annual varves. New sediment cores from Guaymas Basin (MD02-2512 and MD02-2515) present the opportunity to construct climate records from below the last glacial period. A low-resolution age model has been constructed from oxygen isotope analysis, correlation with other dated short piston cores from Guaymas Basin and an estimate of sedimentation rate. MD02-2512 from eastern Guaymas Basin has an age range from the Holocene to late marine isotope stage 6 (MIS 6); MD02-2515 from western Guaymas Basin has an age range from 8000 to 40 000 yr. Shipboard analyses of colour reflectance, magnetic susceptibility and sediment density are combined with continuous X-ray fluorescence scans to reconstruct a picture of glacial climate in the Gulf of California. Eastern Guaymas Basin is affected by glacial sea level fall, which results in a drastic change in productivity rates and sediment type. The laminated record of MIS 5 allows comparison with the Holocene, showing a similarity of sedimentation patterns during deglaciation and a series of very rapid variations just prior to the last glaciation. In western Guaymas Basin there are a series of Younger Dryas-like events during the glacial, typified by low productivity and high terrigenous input. Long-term climate and productivity changes appear to be caused by the southward displacement of the Subtropical High pressure zone. Copyright

  17. River terrace sequences: templates for Quaternary geochronology and marine-terrestrial correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridgland, David; Maddy, Darrel; Bates, Martin

    2004-02-01

    Fluvial sequences, particularly terrace staircases, represent archives of Quaternary palaeoclimatic fluctuation and can serve as stratigraphical frameworks for geochronology and for correlation with other depositional environments, in particular, the global marine oxygen isotope record. Fluvial lithostratigraphical frameworks also provide contexts for records, from fossils and artefacts, of faunal evolution and human occupation; conversely, both records can be means of relative dating of riverine sequences.Three fluvial sequences are examined as case studies. First is the Severn-Avon system in the English Midlands, which has biostratgraphical evidence and an amino acid geochronology, together with marker inputs from three different glaciations. The Somme sequence of northern France, famous for its Palaeolithic artefact assemblages, again has biostratigraphy and an amino acid geochronology and has also been dated with reference to overlying loess/palaeosols sequences. The fluvial terraces of the River Arun, the final case study, lack dating evidence but are interspersed within the Sussex raised beach staircase. Although various lines of evidence suggest that the rivers discussed have formed terraces in response to climatic fluctuation, an intriguing difference is that interglacial sediments occur at the bases of terrace formations in the Severn-Avon, whereas in the Somme they occur at the tops of sequences, beneath loessic overburden. Copyright

  18. Late Miocene extensional tectonics in the evolution of the eastern Betics and Neogene-Quaternary basins, an example from the Sorbas basin (SE Spain).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaconia, Flavio; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Martínez-Martínez, José Miguel; Azañón, José Miguel

    2013-04-01

    conglomerates in the footwall to silts and basin marls in the main depocentre. Finally, in the Tortonian sediments two main angular unconformities were recognized probably associated with two extensional pulses in the wider context of the late Miocene extension that affected most of the western Mediterranean region. The first unconformity occurred at approx. 10 Ma between early Tortonian continental conglomerates and the Tortonian marine Chozas formation, meanwhile the second one between the Chozas and Turre formations at approx. 8 Ma. These extensional pulses are supported by fission-track and U-He data available in the area that indicate ages approx. 12 Ma for zircon and 7-9 Ma for apatite grains and U-He corresponding with two exhumation events. Extensional tectonics represented the main control process in the origin and evolution of Neogene-Quaternary basins of the eastern Betics that were later inverted by the current NW-SE convergence between Africa and Europe. Many strike-slip faults interpreted as transcurrent in origin in the eastern Betics represent extensional transfer faults or folded extensional detachments produced during the middle to late Miocene extensional regime.

  19. Late Quaternary delta evolution on an uplifted coastal area (Wadi Haida Sultanate of Oman, Arabian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quraishi, K. Al; Balushi, N. Al; Roepert, A.; Rupprechter, M.; Hoffmann, G.

    2012-04-01

    The Sultanate of Oman is situated in the Northeastern part of the Arabian Peninsula. The coastal morphology allows delineating areas of subsidence and uplift. The study area is located on the eastern shoreline facing the Indian Ocean. The coast is characterized by 6-7 wave cut terraces which are situated up to 400 m above present sea level. Whereas the higher - and therefore older - terraces are mainly erosional, the lower ones are depositional in style. We aim at quantifying the differential land movement along the coast (Rupprechter et al. 2012, Hoffmann et al. 2012 ). The study presented here aims at revealing the processes that resulted in the formation of the depositional terraces. Relevant processes are: (a) ongoing land uplift; (b) sea-level oscillations; (c) faulting. Historic evidence gave rise to the speculation of recent earthquake activity: the city of Qalhat, situated 7 km south of the study site was probably destroyed by an earthquake at the end of the 15th century (Musson 2009). The delta under investigation here formed at the mouth of the 15 km long Wadi Haida that drains the adjacent Selma Plateau (up to 2000 m high). The apex is situated 1.6 km from the present shoreline and the delta is some 2 km across. The delta sediments make up the lowermost terrace and are exposed along a cliff section. In the central part the cliff is 12 m high and cliff heights are lower to the North and South, reflecting the convex shape of the delta. The Quaternary delta deposits were deposited on top of an Eocene limestone. This formation is only observed in the northern part of the study area. In the southern part the formation is located below beach level, due to normal faulting. The lowermost unit related to the delta formation is a mudstone with in-situ coral reefs. The maximum thickness observed is 3 m. The coral reefs are capped by a 1.5 m thick layer of unconsolidated gravel. The sorting is very poor, individual boulders are up to 70 cm in diameter and angular

  20. Late quaternary depositional systems and sea level change-Santa Monica and San Pedro Basins, California continental borderland

    SciTech Connect

    Nardin, T.R.

    1983-07-01

    A suite of seismic reflection data that provides different degrees of resolution and penetration was used to map the depositional systems that have developed in Santa Monica and San Pedro basins during the late Quaternary. Submarine fan growth, particularly at the mouths of Hueneme and Redondo Canyons, has been the dominant mode of basin filling. Mass movement processes, ranging from creep to large-scale catastrophic slumping, have been important locally. In general, large-scale fan growth fits Normark's model in which the suprafan is the primary locus of coarse sediment deposition. Smaller scale morphologic and depositional patterns on the Hueneme and Redondo fans (e.g., distributary channels and coarse sediment concentrations basinward of the inner suprafan) suggest that a significant amount of coarse sediment presently bypasses the suprafans, however. Long-distance coarse sediment transport was particularly pronounced during late Wisconsinan lowstand of sea level and resulted in progradation of lower mid-fan and lower fan deposits.

  1. Idiosyncratic responses of evergreen broad-leaved forest constituents in China to the late Quaternary climate changes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Dengmei; Hu, Wan; Li, Bo; Morris, Ashley B.; Zheng, Min; Soltis, Douglas E.; Soltis, Pamela S.; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest (EBLF) is one of the most important vegetation types in China. Inferences from palaeo-biome reconstruction (PBR) and phylogeography regarding range shift history of EBLF during the late Quaternary are controversial and should be reconciled. We compared phylogeographic patterns of three EBLF constituents in China, Castanopsis tibetana, Machilus thunbergii and Schima superba. Contrary to a chorus of previous phylogeographic studies and the results of species distribution modelling (SDM) of this study (in situ survival during the LGM), the three species displayed three different phylogeographic patterns that conform to either an in situ survival model or an expansion-contraction model. These results are partially congruent with the inference of PBR that EBLF was absent to the north of 24° N at the LGM. This study suggests that the constituents of EBLF could have responded idiosyncratically to climate changes during the Late Quaternary. The community assemblages of EBLF could have been changing over time, resulting in no palaeo-analogs to modern-day EBLF, which may be the main reason responsible for the failure of PBR to detect the occurrence of EBLF north of 24° N at the LGM. PMID:27534981

  2. Late Quaternary tectonic activity and crustal shortening rate of the Bogda mountain area, eastern Tian Shan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chuanyong; Wu, Guodong; Shen, Jun; Dai, Xunye; Chen, Jianbo; Song, Heping

    2016-04-01

    The Bogda mountain range is the highest range among the northern Tian Shan mountains. Based on geologic and geomorphologic field surveys, trench excavation and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating, we targeted the active Fukang fault along the Bogda mountain range and identified the late Quaternary deformation characteristics of this area. We found that the Fukang fault dislocated different geomorphic surfaces of the northern Bogda piedmont. The vertical fault displacement corresponds to the topographic relief of the Bogda over long time scales. Since the late Quaternary, the crustal shortening rate was estimated to be 0.90 ± 0.20 mm/yr, which is less than that of the western segment of the northern Tian Shan. We interpret the Bogda fold and thrust belt to be a thick-skinned structure, since a high angle thrust fault bounds the Bogda mountain range and the foreland basin. The deformation characteristics of this region have been dominated by vertical uplift, and the component of propagation toward the basin has been very limited. This tectonic deformation is evidenced as vertical growth. Although the deformation rate is small, the uplift amplitude is very significant in this region.

  3. Coupling Genetic and Species Distribution Models to Examine the Response of the Hainan Partridge (Arborophila ardens) to Late Quaternary Climate

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jiang; Chen, De; Ye, Xinping; Li, Shouhsien; Liang, Wei; Zhang, Zhengwang; Li, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the historical dynamics of animal species is critical for accurate prediction of their response to climate changes. During the late Quaternary period, Southeast Asia had a larger land area than today due to lower sea levels, and its terrestrial landscape was covered by extensive forests and savanna. To date, however, the distribution fluctuation of vegetation and its impacts on genetic structure and demographic history of local animals during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are still disputed. In addition, the responses of animal species on Hainan Island, located in northern Southeast Asia, to climate changes during the LGM are poorly understood. Here, we combined phylogeographic analysis, paleoclimatic evidence, and species distribution models to examine the response of the flightless Hainan Partridge (Arborophila ardens) to climate change. We concluded that A. ardens survived through LGM climate changes, and its current distribution on Hainan Island was its in situ refuge. Range model results indicated that A. ardens once covered a much larger area than its current distribution. Demographic history described a relatively stable pattern during and following the LGM. In addition, weak population genetic structure suggests a role in promoting gene flow between populations with climate-induced elevation shifts. Human activities must be considered in conservation planning due to their impact on fragmented habitats. These first combined data for Hainan Partridge demonstrate the value of paired genetic and SDMs study. More related works that might deepen our understanding of the responses of the species in Southeast Asia to late Quaternary Climate are needed. PMID:23185599

  4. Determinants of loss of mammal species during the Late Quaternary 'megafauna' extinctions: life history and ecology, but not body size.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C N

    2002-01-01

    Extinctions of megafauna species during the Late Quaternary dramatically reduced the global diversity of mammals. There is intense debate over the causes of these extinctions, especially regarding the extent to which humans were involved. Most previous analyses of this question have focused on chronologies of extinction and on the archaeological evidence for human-megafauna interaction. Here, I take an alternative approach: comparison of the biological traits of extinct species with those of survivors. I use this to demonstrate two general features of the selectivity of Late Quaternary mammal extinctions in Australia, Eurasia, the Americas and Madagascar. First, large size was not directly related to risk of extinction; rather, species with slow reproductive rates were at high risk regardless of their body size. This finding rejects the 'blitzkrieg' model of overkill, in which extinctions were completed during brief intervals of selective hunting of large-bodied prey. Second, species that survived despite having low reproductive rates typically occurred in closed habitats and many were arboreal or nocturnal. Such traits would have reduced their exposure to direct interaction with people. Therefore, although this analysis rejects blitzkrieg as a general scenario for the mammal megafauna extinctions, it is consistent with extinctions being due to interaction with human populations. PMID:12427315

  5. Coupling genetic and species distribution models to examine the response of the Hainan Partridge (Arborophila ardens) to late quaternary climate.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jiang; Chen, De; Ye, Xinping; Li, Shouhsien; Liang, Wei; Zhang, Zhengwang; Li, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the historical dynamics of animal species is critical for accurate prediction of their response to climate changes. During the late Quaternary period, Southeast Asia had a larger land area than today due to lower sea levels, and its terrestrial landscape was covered by extensive forests and savanna. To date, however, the distribution fluctuation of vegetation and its impacts on genetic structure and demographic history of local animals during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are still disputed. In addition, the responses of animal species on Hainan Island, located in northern Southeast Asia, to climate changes during the LGM are poorly understood. Here, we combined phylogeographic analysis, paleoclimatic evidence, and species distribution models to examine the response of the flightless Hainan Partridge (Arborophila ardens) to climate change. We concluded that A. ardens survived through LGM climate changes, and its current distribution on Hainan Island was its in situ refuge. Range model results indicated that A. ardens once covered a much larger area than its current distribution. Demographic history described a relatively stable pattern during and following the LGM. In addition, weak population genetic structure suggests a role in promoting gene flow between populations with climate-induced elevation shifts. Human activities must be considered in conservation planning due to their impact on fragmented habitats. These first combined data for Hainan Partridge demonstrate the value of paired genetic and SDMs study. More related works that might deepen our understanding of the responses of the species in Southeast Asia to late Quaternary Climate are needed.

  6. Late Quaternary intensified monsoon phases control landscape evolution in the northwest Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookhagen, Bodo; Thiede, Rasmus C.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2005-02-01

    The intensity of the Asian summer-monsoon circulation varies over decadal to millennial time scales and is reflected in changes in surface processes, terrestrial environments, and marine sediment records. However, the mechanisms of long-lived (2 5 k.y.) intensified monsoon phases, the related changes in precipitation distribution, and their effect on landscape evolution and sedimentation rates are not yet well understood. The arid high-elevation sectors of the orogen correspond to a climatically sensitive zone that currently receives rain only during abnormal (i.e., strengthened) monsoon seasons. Analogous to present-day rainfall anomalies, enhanced precipitation during an intensified monsoon phase is expected to have penetrated far into these geomorphic threshold regions where hillslopes are close to the angle of failure. We associate landslide triggering during intensified monsoon phases with enhanced precipitation, discharge, and sediment flux leading to an increase in pore-water pressure, lateral scouring of rivers, and oversteepening of hillslopes, eventually resulting in failure of slopes and exceptionally large mass movements. Here we use lacustrine deposits related to spatially and temporally clustered large landslides (>0.5 km3) in the Sutlej Valley region of the northwest Himalaya to calculate sedimentation rates and to infer rainfall patterns during late Pleistocene (29 24 ka) and Holocene (10 4 ka) intensified monsoon phases. Compared to present-day sediment-flux measurements, a fivefold increase in sediment-transport rates recorded by sediments in landslide-dammed lakes characterized these episodes of high climatic variability. These changes thus emphasize the pronounced imprint of millennial-scale climate change on surface processes and landscape evolution.

  7. North American Pika ( Ochotona princeps) as a Late Quaternary Biogeographic Indicator Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, David J.

    1993-05-01

    Reevaluation of Quaternary sites of fossil pika ( Ochotona) lends no support for the inference that Nearctic pikas were not restricted to rocky habitat. The saxicolous nature of all widespread, isolated populations of extant Nearctic pikas and their closest Palearctic sister taxa support consideration of O. princeps, and perhaps all Nearctic Quaternary Ochotona , as indicators of cool, mesic, rocky situations. As indicators of rocky microhabitat, fossil remains of O. princeps do not require that the entire region was cool and mesic, but only that suitable rocky microhabitat existed in the vicinity. Use of fossil pika dung alone as indicative of pikas in the immediate community is suspect, as the small, round, and buoyant pellets may be transported downslope by hydraulic flushing of talus habitat. Current local elevational lower limits ( E) of appropriate habitat for paleoecological reconstruction at extralimital fossil sites are predicted by the equation: E(m) = 14087 - (56.6)°N - (82.9)°W.

  8. Late Quaternary hydrological and ecological changes in the hyperarid core of the northern Atacama Desert (~ 21°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayo, Eugenia M.; Latorre, Claudio; Jordan, Teresa E.; Nester, Peter L.; Estay, Sergio A.; Ojeda, Karla F.; Santoro, Calogero M.

    2012-07-01

    The hyperarid core of the Atacama Desert possesses important reserves of "fossil" or ancient groundwater, yet the extent and timing of past hydrologic change during the late Quaternary is largely unknown. In situ and/or short-distance transported leaf-litter deposits abound along relict fluvial terraces inserted within four dry and unvegetated valleys that drain into the endorheic basin of Pampa del Tamarugal (PDT, 21°S, 900-1000 m), one of the largest and economically important aquifers in northern Chile. Our exceptional archive offers the opportunity to evaluate the response of low-elevation desert ecological and hydrological systems to late Quaternary climate variability. Three repeated expansions of riparian/wetland ecosystems, and perennial rivers occurred along the southernmost PDT basin between 17.6-14.2 ka, 12.1-11.4 ka and from 1.01-0.71 ka. Both early and late archaic archaeological artefact are present in clear association with our fossil riparian/wetland assemblages, which suggests that these palaeoenvironmental changes facilitated past human occupations in the hyperarid core of the Atacama Desert. Using modern analogues, we estimate that these ecological and hydrological changes were triggered by a threefold increase in rainfall along the headwaters of what are presently inactive canyons. Comparisons with other regional palaeoclimatic records from the central Andes indicate that these changes were synchronous with the widespread pluvial stages now termed the Central Andean Pluvial Event (CAPE— 17.5-14.2 ka and 13.8-9.7 ka). In addition, we summarize new evidence for perennial runoff, riparian ecosystems and a major human settlement during the latest Holocene. Our findings clearly show that local hydrological changes in the PDT were coupled with precipitation variability in the adjacent eastern highlands during the late Quaternary. The long-term dynamics of low-elevation desert ecological and hydrological systems are likely driven by changes in

  9. Late Quaternary hydrology in North Africa and the Near East (Hans Oeschger Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasse, Françoise

    2010-05-01

    from Arabia(9) and inferred from lake archives and nearshore marine cores for the Sahara coincide with Marine Isotopic Stages 9, 7, 5.5 and 5.3. Stable isotope and vegetation data indicate that there, precipitation is of tropical origin as a result of an intensified monsoon and a northward migration of the Intertropical Convergence zone. These regional patterns are discussed in the light of general climatic models: roles of orbital forcing, extent/decrease of the northern ice sheet and marine ice, atmospheric content in greenhouse gases, large-scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation and related latitudinal shifts of major climatic belts. At a shorter time-scale, several abrupt changes can also be related to climatic events in high northern latitudes. Pronounced dry spells in the Lisan basin are correlated with Heinrich events(5). The Younger Dryas (YD) and the 8.2 ka events often coincide with arid intervals. During the Holocene, the best-resolved records suggest close relationships between solar activity, northern high-latitude temperature and rainfall intensity. The rapid Mid-Late Holocene aridification leading to modern climates affected both the temperate and subtropical domains. Its mechanisms have been intensively debated. To-date, the best explanations derive from a transient simulation of the North Africa aridification using a general circulation ocean-atmosphere-terrestrial ecosystem model(10); it suggests that the vegetation collapse in southern Sahara is driven by a gradual monsoonal climate response to orbital forcing, increased climate variability and precipitation threshold, rather than a positive vegetation feedback as previously suggested. Long and short-term hydrological changes have obviously induced adjustments or migrations of human societies. For exemple, in the Levant, the YD drought placed the sedentary hunter-gatherers Natufians under severe stress that they circumvented by two strategies : (i) people were forced to switch from a passive

  10. Age estimates and uplift rates for Late Pleistocene marine terraces: Southern Oregon portion of the Cascadia Forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Kelsey, Harvey M.; Miller, Gifford H.; Kennedy, George L.; Whelan, Joseph F.; McInelly, Galan W.

    1990-05-01

    Marine terraces are prominent landforms along the southern Oregon coast, which forms part of the forearc region of the Cascadia subduction zone. Interest in the Cascadia subduction zone has increased because recent investigations have suggested that slip along plates at certain types of convergent margins is characteristically accompanied by large earthquakes. In addition, other investigations have suggested that convergent margins can be broadly classified by the magnitude of their uplift rates. With these hypotheses in mind, we generated new uranium series, amino acid, and stable isotope data for southern Oregon marine terrace fossils. These data, along with terrace elevations and two alternative estimates of sea level at the time of terrace formation, allow us to determine terrace ages and uplift rates. Uranium series analysis of fossil coral yields an age of 83±5 ka for the Whisky Run terrace at Coquille Point in Bandon, Oregon. A combination of amino acid and oxygen isotope data suggest ages of about 80 and 105 ka for the lowest two terraces at Cape Blanco. These ages indicate uplift rates of 0.45-1.05 and 0.81-1.49 m/kyr for Coquille Point and Cape Blanco, respectively. Late Quaternary uplift rates of marine terraces yield information about deformation in the overriding plate, but it is unclear if such data vary systematically with convergent margin type. In order to assess the utility of the southern Oregon uplift rates for predicting the behavior of the Cascadia subduction zone, we compared late Quaternary uplift rates derived from terrace data from subduction zones around the world. On the basis of this comparison the southern Oregon rates of vertical deformation are not unusually high or low. Furthermore, late Quaternary uplift rates show little relationship to the type of convergent margin. These observations suggest that local structures may play a large role in uplift rate variability. In addition, while the type of convergent margin may place an

  11. Exceptionally well preserved late Quaternary plant and vertebrate fossils from a blue hole on Abaco, The Bahamas.

    PubMed

    Steadman, David W; Franz, Richard; Morgan, Gary S; Albury, Nancy A; Kakuk, Brian; Broad, Kenneth; Franz, Shelley E; Tinker, Keith; Pateman, Michael P; Lott, Terry A; Jarzen, David M; Dilcher, David L

    2007-12-11

    We report Quaternary vertebrate and plant fossils from Sawmill Sink, a "blue hole" (a water-filled sinkhole) on Great Abaco Island, The Bahamas. The fossils are well preserved because of deposition in anoxic salt water. Vertebrate fossils from peat on the talus cone are radiocarbon-dated from approximately 4,200 to 1,000 cal BP (Late Holocene). The peat produced skeletons of two extinct species (tortoise Chelonoidis undescribed sp. and Caracara Caracara creightoni) and two extant species no longer in The Bahamas (Cuban crocodile, Crocodylus rhombifer; and Cooper's or Gundlach's Hawk, Accipiter cooperii or Accipiter gundlachii). A different, inorganic bone deposit on a limestone ledge in Sawmill Sink is a Late Pleistocene owl roost that features lizards (one species), snakes (three species), birds (25 species), and bats (four species). The owl roost fauna includes Rallus undescribed sp. (extinct; the first Bahamian flightless rail) and four other locally extinct species of birds (Cooper's/Gundlach's Hawk, A. cooperii/gundlachii; flicker Colaptes sp.; Cave Swallow, Petrochelidon fulva; and Eastern Meadowlark, Sturnella magna) and mammals (Bahamian hutia, Geocapromys ingrahami; and a bat, Myotis sp.). The exquisitely preserved fossils from Sawmill Sink suggest a grassy pineland as the dominant plant community on Abaco in the Late Pleistocene, with a heavier component of coppice (tropical dry evergreen forest) in the Late Holocene. Important in its own right, this information also will help biologists and government planners to develop conservation programs in The Bahamas that consider long-term ecological and cultural processes. PMID:18077421

  12. The modern diatom spectra of Madagascar and diatom-inferred Late Quaternary climatic changes in northeastern and central Madagascar

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, N.E.

    1993-01-01

    A study was conducted to classify diatoms in modern sediment surface samples in freshwater sites into assemblages and to assess the historical changes in lake level changes and climatic conditions in Madagascar during the Late Quaternary. Analysis of taxonomic percentages of diatoms in recently deposited sediments from various sites shows that diatom communities in these sites can be grouped by means of cluster analysis into distinct assemblages, some of which show similarities to groupings found in East Africa. pH and conductivity appear to be important factors correlating with differences in diatom communities in these study sites. Trends in diatom assemblages in a sediment core taken from Lake Alaotra, supplemented by those in sediments of the paleolake Ampasambazimba, suggest that the late Pleistocene in northeastern Madagascar was arid, though aridity was probably not as constant or as severe as in many areas of eastern and northern Africa; the Holocene was a period of moderate but variable conditions, marked by a distinct dry episode ca 5000 yr B.P. and a drying trend toward the late Holocene. Changes in diatom assemblages in a sediment core from Lake Kavitaha in central Madagascar suggest changes in the surrounding environment during at least two periods in the late Holocene. These coincide with increases in charcoal influx and, around 700 yr B.P., with the intensification of agricultural activity in the area.

  13. Exceptionally well preserved late Quaternary plant and vertebrate fossils from a blue hole on Abaco, The Bahamas

    PubMed Central

    Steadman, David W.; Franz, Richard; Morgan, Gary S.; Albury, Nancy A.; Kakuk, Brian; Broad, Kenneth; Franz, Shelley E.; Tinker, Keith; Pateman, Michael P.; Lott, Terry A.; Jarzen, David M.; Dilcher, David L.

    2007-01-01

    We report Quaternary vertebrate and plant fossils from Sawmill Sink, a “blue hole” (a water-filled sinkhole) on Great Abaco Island, The Bahamas. The fossils are well preserved because of deposition in anoxic salt water. Vertebrate fossils from peat on the talus cone are radiocarbon-dated from ≈4,200 to 1,000 cal BP (Late Holocene). The peat produced skeletons of two extinct species (tortoise Chelonoidis undescribed sp. and Caracara Caracara creightoni) and two extant species no longer in The Bahamas (Cuban crocodile, Crocodylus rhombifer; and Cooper's or Gundlach's Hawk, Accipiter cooperii or Accipiter gundlachii). A different, inorganic bone deposit on a limestone ledge in Sawmill Sink is a Late Pleistocene owl roost that features lizards (one species), snakes (three species), birds (25 species), and bats (four species). The owl roost fauna includes Rallus undescribed sp. (extinct; the first Bahamian flightless rail) and four other locally extinct species of birds (Cooper's/Gundlach's Hawk, A. cooperii/gundlachii; flicker Colaptes sp.; Cave Swallow, Petrochelidon fulva; and Eastern Meadowlark, Sturnella magna) and mammals (Bahamian hutia, Geocapromys ingrahami; and a bat, Myotis sp.). The exquisitely preserved fossils from Sawmill Sink suggest a grassy pineland as the dominant plant community on Abaco in the Late Pleistocene, with a heavier component of coppice (tropical dry evergreen forest) in the Late Holocene. Important in its own right, this information also will help biologists and government planners to develop conservation programs in The Bahamas that consider long-term ecological and cultural processes. PMID:18077421

  14. Influence of late Quaternary climate change on present patterns of genetic variation in valley oak, Quercus lobata Née.

    PubMed

    Gugger, Paul F; Ikegami, Makihiko; Sork, Victoria L

    2013-07-01

    Phylogeography and ecological niche models (ENMs) suggest that late Quaternary glacial cycles have played a prominent role in shaping present population genetic structure and diversity, but have not applied quantitative methods to dissect the relative contribution of past and present climate vs. other forces. We integrate multilocus phylogeography, climate-based ENMs and multivariate statistical approaches to infer the effects of late Quaternary climate change on contemporary genetic variation of valley oak (Quercus lobata Née). ENMs indicated that valley oak maintained a stable distribution with local migration from the last interglacial period (~120 ka) to the Last Glacial Maximum (~21 ka, LGM) to the present compared with large-scale range shifts for an eastern North American white oak (Quercus alba L.). Coast Range and Sierra Nevada foothill populations diverged in the late Pleistocene before the LGM [104 ka (28-1622)] and have occupied somewhat distinct climate niches, according to ENMs and coalescent analyses of divergence time. In accordance with neutral expectations for stable populations, nuclear microsatellite diversity positively correlated with niche stability from the LGM to present. Most strikingly, nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite variation significantly correlated with LGM climate, even after controlling for associations with geographic location and present climate using partial redundancy analyses. Variance partitioning showed that LGM climate uniquely explains a similar proportion of genetic variance as present climate (16% vs. 11-18%), and together, past and present climate explains more than geography (19%). Climate can influence local expansion-contraction dynamics, flowering phenology and thus gene flow, and/or impose selective pressures. These results highlight the lingering effect of past climate on genetic variation in species with stable distributions.

  15. A tale of two species: Extirpation and range expansion during the late Quaternary in an extreme environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Felisa A.; Crawford, Dolly L.; Harding, Larisa E.; Lease, Hilary M.; Murray, Ian W.; Raniszewski, Adrienne; Youberg, Kristin M.

    2009-02-01

    Death Valley, California is today the hottest hyperarid area in the western Hemisphere with temperatures of 57 °C (134 °F) recorded. During the late Quaternary, pluvial Lake Manly covered much of the Valley and contributed to a much more moderate climate. The abrupt draining of Lake Manly in the mid-Holocene and coincident dramatic shifts in temperature and aridity exerted substantial selection pressure on organisms living in this area. Our research investigates the adaptive response of Neotoma (woodrats) to temperature change over the late Quaternary along a steep elevational and environmental gradient. By combining fieldwork, examination of museum specimens, and collection of paleomiddens, our project reconstructs the divergent evolutionary histories of animals from the valley floor and nearby mountain gradients (- 84 to > 3400 m). We report on recent paleomidden work investigating a transition zone in the Grapevine Mountains (Amargosa Range) for two species of woodrats differing significantly in size and habitat preferences: N. lepida, the desert woodrat, and N. cinerea, the bushy-tailed woodrat. Here, at the limits of these species' thermal and ecological thresholds, we demonstrate dramatic fluctuations in the range boundaries over the Holocene as climate shifted. Moreover, we find fundamental differences in the adaptive response of these two species related to the elevation of the site and local microclimate. Results indicate that although N. cinerea are currently extirpated in this area, they were ubiquitous throughout the late Pleistocene and into the middle Holocene. They adapted to climate shifts over this period by phenotypic changes in body mass, as has been demonstrated for other areas within their range; during colder episodes they were larger, and during warmer intervals, animals were smaller. Their presence may have been tied into a much more widespread historical distribution of juniper ( Juniperus sp.); we document a downward displacement of

  16. Variations in Late Quaternary behavior along and among range-front faults of the Sierra Nevada, California

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, M.M. ); Gillespie, A.R. . Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Late Quaternary slip rates of the 11 or so recognized active range-front faults of the Sierra Nevada from Owens Lake northwestward to Carson Valley show enough variation with time and location that a proper understanding of slip behavior of these faults may require slip histories at many places for each. Late Quaternary traces of these normal faults vary in length from 13 to 45 km. Most faults trend more northerly than the [approximately]MW trend of the range front. The faults are separated by < 5 to > 20 km of apparently unfaulted terrain; many have echelon overlap. None of the faults has a significant component of strike slip, including those of Owens Valley. The largest late Quaternary slip rates (> 2 mm/yr) occur on the Hilton Creek fault at Long Valley and 20 km to the north on the Mono Lake fault. Slip rates > 1 mm/yr occur on at least one fault north of Mono Lake and in Round Valley, south of Long Valley. Farther south (Owens Valley) range-front faults have slip rates < 1 mm/yr and have notably discontinuous traces. Displacements of moraines across the Hilton Creek fault at 4 sites are compatible with slip rates that increase northward from the south end of the fault, but stay constant through time at a site. The slip rates are 0.1 to 0.4 mm/yr near the south end; 0.1 to 0.8 mm/yr at Hilton Lakes, 3 km to the northwest; 1.4 to 3 mm/yr at McGee Creek, 9 km farther northwest; and 1.1 to 2 mm/yr at Tobacco Flat, 5 km farther northwest in Long Valley and > 15 km from the north end of the fault. At McGee Creek, slip rate since 10--15 ka is 1.3--2.5 mm/yr; since 13--20 ka, 1.4--2.6 mm/yr; since 25--40 ka, 1.4--4.2 mm/yr, and since 65--140 ka, 1.1--3.5 mm/yr. The apparently uniform rate through time at McGee Creek (and also at Hilton Lakes and Tobacco Flat, but for fewer periods; the south end site is for only one period) is interesting, but not yet convincing, mainly because of uncertain dates.

  17. Late Quaternary sediment deposition of core MA01 in the Mendeleev Ridge, the western Arctic Ocean: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwang-Kyu; Kim, Sunghan; Khim, Boo-Keun; Xiao, Wenshen; Wang, Rujian

    2014-05-01

    Late Quaternary deep marine sediments in the Arctic Ocean are characterized by brown layers intercalated with yellowish to olive gray layers (Poore et al., 1999; Polyak et al., 2004). Previous studies reported that the brown and gray layers were deposited during interglacial (or interstadial) and glacial (or stadial) periods, respectively. A 5.5-m long gravity core MA01 was obtained from the Mendeleev Ridge in the western Arctic Ocean by R/V Xue Long during scientific cruise CHINARE-V. Age (~450 ka) of core MA01 was tentatively estimated by correlation of brown layers with an adjacent core HLY0503-8JPC (Adler et al., 2009). A total of 22 brown layers characterized by low L* and b*, high Mn concentration, and abundant foraminifera were identified. Corresponding gray layers are characterized by high L* and b*, low Mn concentration, and few foraminiferal tests. Foraminifera abundance peaks are not well correlated to CaCO3 peaks which occurred with the coarse-grained (>0.063 mm) fractions (i.e., IRD) both in brown and gray layers. IRDs are transported presumably by sea ice for the deposition of brown layers and by iceberg for the deposition of gray layers (Polyak et al., 2004). A strong correlation coefficient (r2=0.89) between TOC content and C/N ratio indicates that the major source of organic matter is terrestrial. The good correlations of CaCO3 content to TOC (r2=0.56) and C/N ratio (r2=0.69) imply that IRDs contain detrital CaCO3 which mainly originated from the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. In addition, high kaolinite/chlorite (K/C) ratios mostly correspond to CaCO3 peaks, which suggests that the fine-grained particles in the Mendeleev Ridge are transported from the north coast Alaska and Canada where Mesozoic and Cenozoic strata are widely distributed. Thus, the Beaufort Gyre, the predominant surface current in the western Arctic Ocean, played an important role in the sediment delivery to the Mendeleev Ridge. It is worthy of note that the TOC and CaCO3 peaks are

  18. Late Quaternary Spring-Fed Deposits of the Grand Canyon and Their Implication for Deep Lava-Dammed Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Darrell S.; O'Brien, Gary; Mead, Jim I.; Bright, Jordon; Umhoefer, Paul

    2002-11-01

    One of the most intriguing episodes in the Quaternary evolution of the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River, Arizona, was the development of vast lakes that are thought to have backed up behind lava erupted into the gorge. Stratigraphic evidence for these deep lava-dammed lakes is expectedly sparse. Possible lacustrine deposits at six areas in the eastern canyon yielded no compelling evidence for sediment deposited in a deep lake. At two of the sites the sediment was associated with late Quaternary spring-fed pools and marshes. Water-lain silt and sand at lower Havasu Creek was deposited ˜3000 cal yr ago. The deposit contains an ostracode assemblage similar to that living in the modern travertine-dammed pools adjacent to the outcrop. The second deposit, at Lees Ferry, formed in a spring-fed marsh ˜43,000 cal yr ago, as determined by 14C and amino acid geochronology. It contains abundant ostracode and mollusk fossils, the richest assemblages reported from the Grand Canyon to date. Our interpretation of these sediments as spring-fed deposits, and their relative youth, provides an alternative to the conventional view that deposits like these were formed in deep lava-dammed lakes that filled the Grand Canyon.

  19. Late Quaternary stratigraphy, sedimentology, and geochemistry of an underfilled lake basin in the Puna (north-west Argentina)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGlue, Michael M.; Cohen, Andrew S.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Kowler, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Depositional models of ancient lakes in thin-skinned retroarc foreland basins rarely benefit from appropriate Quaternary analogues. To address this, we present new stratigraphic, sedimentological and geochemical analyses of four radiocarbon-dated sediment cores from the Pozuelos Basin (PB; northwest Argentina) that capture the evolution of this low-accommodation Puna basin over the past ca. 43 cal kyr. Strata from the PB are interpreted as accumulations of a highly variable, underfilled lake system represented by lake-plain/littoral, profundal, palustrine, saline lake and playa facies associations. The vertical stacking of facies is asymmetric, with transgressive and thin organic-rich highstand deposits underlying thicker, organic-poor regressive deposits. The major controls on depositional architecture and basin palaeogeography are tectonics and climate. Accommodation space was derived from piggyback basin-forming flexural subsidence and Miocene-Quaternary normal faulting associated with incorporation of the basin into the Andean hinterland. Sediment and water supply was modulated by variability in the South American summer monsoon, and perennial lake deposits correlate in time with several well-known late Pleistocene wet periods on the Altiplano/Puna plateau. Our results shed new light on lake expansion–contraction dynamics in the PB in particular and provide a deeper understanding of Puna basin lakes in general.

  20. The occurrence and fission-track ages of late neogene and quaternary volcanic sediments, Siwalik group, Northern Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, G.D.; Zeitler, P.; Naeser, C.W.; Johnson, N.M.; Summers, D.M.; Frost, C.D.; Opdyke, N.D.; Tahirkheli, R.A.K.

    1982-01-01

    Volcanic sediments, now mostly bentonites and bentonitic mudstones, occur throughout the Late Neogene and Quaternary Siwalik Group of northern Pakistan. A number of these deposits have been dated by the fission-track method, utilizing zircon phenocrysts from these deposits, and provide the chronometric constraints upon which a paleomagnetic stratigraphy is developed for the Siwalik Group. Notable in the occurrence of these altered tuff horizons is an apparent mode in their stratigraphic development from approximately 3.0 to 1.5 m.y. B.P. which coincides with the period of activity of the Dacht-e-Nawar volcanic complex of east-central Afghanistan. Fission-track ages of certain tuffs for critical areas of northern Pakistan are reported herein. ?? 1982.

  1. The ``Problem of the quaternary'' and the taxonomic rank of the late cenozoic in the international stratigraphic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubakov, V. A.

    2011-02-01

    An international scientific conflict has arisen around the International Stratigraphic Scale, the main document that regulates the rules of reading of geological records and, hence, concerns all Earth sciences. The matter of debate is the geological time scale of 2004, developed by the International Commission on Stratigraphy, where the Quaternary system was abandoned. This ICS decision triggered a protest among Quaternary geologists, members of INQUA, and became the subject of much controversy. This article provides a comprehensive analysis of the Quaternary problem and proposes a reasonable scientific solution that may be appropriate for both parties. The subject of Late Cenozoic geology is discussed: glaciations, human evolution, and recent deposits. In contrast to Charles Lyell's definition of the Plio-Pleistocene according to the percentage of modern mollusk species, it is defined here as a blanket formation, which is correlative to the topography and consists of mapped stratogens hosting fossils of modern biogeocenoses. Features of the description of the Plio-Pleistocene in terms of gravitational orbital tuning are considered. Four paleogeographic phases of modern environment evolution are recognized and ranked as stages: (1) The Messinian evolutionary explosion involved the appearance of many biogeocenoses and the bipedal walking of our extinct ancestors armed with sticks. It was a consequence of the Early Greenland (7.6 Ma BP) and Patagonian (6.7 Ma BP) hyperglaciations. (2) The Zanclean age is marked by climatic and hydrological but not evolutionary boundaries. (3) The appearance of the Villafranchian animal assemblage and Australopithecus, who used stones as weapon: 4.0-3.6 Ma BP. Orogeny and isolation of the Arctic Ocean changed the global climate dramatically. (4) The sexual revolution became the third evolutionary jump: the appearance of the first woman, "Eve", and the genus Homo with her: 1.9 Ma BP. According to the current view, the Plio

  2. Late Quaternary stratigraphy and depositional history of the Long Island Sound basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, Ralph S.; Stone, Janet R.

    1991-01-01

    Where quiet waters prevail, marine mud generally less than 15 m thick blankets the older deposits of the Basin. Elsewhere, especially in eastern LIS, tidal currents are actively reworking and transporting glacial and postglacial deposits.

  3. Late Quaternary high resolution sequence stratigraphy of an active rift, the Sperchios Basin, Greece: An analogue for subtle stratigraphic plays

    SciTech Connect

    Eliet, P.P.; Gawthorpe, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    The Sperchios Basin is an active asymmetric graben, bounded to the south by a major border fault system with major fault segments typically 20-30 km long. The basin is dominated by a major axial fluvio-deltaic system which enters the partially enclosed Maliakos Gulf to the east. Lateral sourced depositional systems within the basin comprise hanging-wall and footwall-derived alluvial fans and a narrow coastal plain along the footwall scarp bordering the Maliakos Gulf. High resolution seismic data from the Maliakos Gulf reveals three late Quaternary progradational parasequences sourced from axial and lateral depositional systems, with a regional late-Pleistocene transgressive surface dated at circa. 10 ka BP within the Maliakos Gulf. Differential subsidence of the late Pleistocene transgressive surface indicates marked variation in subsidence from 2.4 m ka{sup -1} at fault segment centers to 0.8 m ka{sup -1} at segment boundaries. The geometry and internal variability of each parasequence is controlled by the interplay of the local accommodation development and fluctuations in sediment supply and climatic conditions. The Sperchios Rift provides a modem analogue for subtle stratigraphic plays within ancient extensional basins. The study of controls on sediment source and transport patterns within active rifts has refined our appreciation of the controls on potential reservoir distribution and geometries.

  4. Late Quaternary high resolution sequence stratigraphy of an active rift, the Sperchios Basin, Greece: An analogue for subtle stratigraphic plays

    SciTech Connect

    Eliet, P.P. ); Gawthorpe, R.L. )

    1996-01-01

    The Sperchios Basin is an active asymmetric graben, bounded to the south by a major border fault system with major fault segments typically 20-30 km long. The basin is dominated by a major axial fluvio-deltaic system which enters the partially enclosed Maliakos Gulf to the east. Lateral sourced depositional systems within the basin comprise hanging-wall and footwall-derived alluvial fans and a narrow coastal plain along the footwall scarp bordering the Maliakos Gulf. High resolution seismic data from the Maliakos Gulf reveals three late Quaternary progradational parasequences sourced from axial and lateral depositional systems, with a regional late-Pleistocene transgressive surface dated at circa. 10 ka BP within the Maliakos Gulf. Differential subsidence of the late Pleistocene transgressive surface indicates marked variation in subsidence from 2.4 m ka[sup -1] at fault segment centers to 0.8 m ka[sup -1] at segment boundaries. The geometry and internal variability of each parasequence is controlled by the interplay of the local accommodation development and fluctuations in sediment supply and climatic conditions. The Sperchios Rift provides a modem analogue for subtle stratigraphic plays within ancient extensional basins. The study of controls on sediment source and transport patterns within active rifts has refined our appreciation of the controls on potential reservoir distribution and geometries.

  5. Lidar-Based Mapping of Late Quaternary Faulting Along the Grizzly Valley Fault, Walker Lane Seismic Belt, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchcock, C. S.; Hoirup, D. F.; Barry, G.; Pearce, J.; Glick, F.

    2012-12-01

    The Grizzly Valley fault (GVF) is located within the northern Walker Lane, a zone of right-lateral shear between the Sierra Nevada and the Basin and Range in Plumas County. The GVF extends southeasterly from near Mt. Ingalls along the eastern side of Lake Davis. It may partially connect with the Hot Creek fault within Sierra Valley and extend south to Loyalton with an overall approximate length of 50 km. Comparison of high-resolution topography developed from LiDAR data with published bedrock geologic mapping documents the presence of geomorphic features that provide information on fault activity of the GVF. Field mapping verified tectonically deformed and offset late Quaternary surfaces identified on bare-earth LiDAR imagery across the GVF within glacial deposits on the eastern margin of Lake Davis, and alluvial deposits in Sierra Valley. Along the GVF, conspicuous geomorphic and hydrologic features include scarps in alluvial surfaces, elongated depressions aligned with adjacent linear escarpments, truncated bedrock spurs, closed depressions, linear swales, right-lateral deflections of creeks and river courses, and shutter ridges, as well as springs and linear seeps consistent with right-lateral strike-slip faulting. The discontinuous nature of observed fault traces combined with the apparent down-to-the-west offset of alluvial surfaces at the southern and northern ends of the eastern margin of Lake Davis are consistent with a broad bend or step over in the fault. Scarp profiles of apparently faulted surfaces extracted from LiDAR data document vertical offsets of up to 14 m. Our study suggest that the GVF is an oblique, right-lateral fault that has been active in the late Quaternary. This study complements on-going investigations by DWR to assess the impact of seismic hazards on State Water Project infrastructure.

  6. Erosion and deposition on the Pajarito Plateau, New Mexico, and implications for geomorphic responses to late Quaternary climatic changes

    SciTech Connect

    Reneau, S.L.; McDonald, E.V.; Gardner, J.N.; Longmire, P.A.; Kolbe, T.R.; Carney, J.S.; Watt, P.M.

    1996-04-01

    The Pajarito Plateau of northern New Mexico contains a rich and diverse record of late Quaternary landscape changes in a variety of geomorphic settings that include gently-sloping mesa tops, steep canyon walls, and canyon bottoms. A broad range of investigations during the past decade, motivated by environmental and seismic hazard concerns, have resulted in examination of the characteristics, stratigraphy, and age of sediments and soils at numerous locations throughout the Plateau. Geochronologic control is provided by >140 radiocarbon dates supplemented by soil characterization and tephrochronology. In this paper we first summarize some of the results of recent and ongoing work on late Quaternary deposits on the Pajarito Plateau, illustrating both the complexity of the geomorphic record and some common elements that have been observed in multiple locations. We then use these observations, in combination with other work in the Southwest, to make some inferences about the local geomorphic response to regional climatic changes. Because the geomorphic and paleoclimatic records are fragmentary, and because the relations between large scale climate changes and local variations in precipitation, vegetation, and geomorphic processes are not fully understood, many uncertainties exist concerning the response of the local landscape to past climatic fluctuations. In addition, variations in local landscape sensitivity related to prior erosional history and spatial variations in vegetation, and the localized nature of many storms, probably contribute to the complexity of the geomorphic record. Nevertheless, the work discussed in this paper suggests a strong relation between regional climatic changes and local geomorphic history, and provides a framework for considering relations between modem processes, the record of past landscape changes, and future erosion and deposition on the Plateau and in surrounding areas.

  7. Influence of late Quaternary climatic changes on geomorphic and pedogenic processes on a desert piedmont, Eastern Mojave Desert, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, S.G.; McFadden, L.D.; Dohrenwend, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating of late Quaternary deposits and shorelines of Lake Mojave and cation-ratio numerical age dating of stone pavements (Dorn, 1984) on the adjacent Soda Mountains piedmont provide age constraints for alluvial and eolian deposits. These deposits are associated with climatically controlled stands of Lake Mojave during the past 15,000 yr. Six alluvial fan units and three eolian stratigraphic units were assigned ages based on field relations with dated shorelines and piedmont surfaces, as well as on soil-geomorphic data. All but one of these stratigraphic units were deposited in response to time-transgressive climatic changes beginning approximately 10,000 yr ago. Increased eolian flux rates occurred in response to the lowering of Lake Mojave and a consequent increase in fine-sediment availability. Increased rates of deposition of eolian fines and associated salts influenced pedogenesis, stone-pavement development, and runoff-infiltration relations by (1) enhancing mechanical weathering of fan surfaces and hillslopes and (2) forming clay- and silt-rich surface horizons which decrease infiltration. Changes in alluvial-fan source areas from hillslopes to piedmonts during the Holocene reflect runoff reduction on hillslopes caused by colluvial mantle development and runoff enhancement on piedmonts caused by the development of less-permeable soils. Inferred increased in early to middle Holocene monsoonal activity resulted in high-magnitude paleo-sheetflood events on older fan pavements; this runoff triggered piedmont dissection which, in turn, caused increased sediment availability along channel walls. Thus, runoff-infiltration changes during the late Quaternary have occurred in response to eolian deposition of fines, pedogenesis, increased sheetflood activity in the Holocene, and vegetational changes which are related to many complicated linkages among climatic change, lake fluctuations, and eolian, hillslope, and alluvial-fan processes. ?? 1987.

  8. Late Quaternary Deformation Along the Wairarapa Fault, North Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schermer, E. R.; Little, T. A.

    2006-12-01

    The Wairarapa fault, one of the largest active faults in the hanging wall of the Hikurangi subduction margin, New Zealand, averaged 16m dextral slip during the M >8.1 1855 earthquake. Previous workers inferred that uplift of 2.7m at the coast, observed by a surveyor in 1855, occurred on the southern continuation of the Wairarapa fault, the Wharekauhau (WH) thrust. New mapping, stratigraphic, and paloseismologic results from the WH thrust suggest the pattern of surface rupture in 1855 and earlier earthquakes was significantly different than previously inferred, requiring a more complex model for seismic hazard and tectonic evolution of the region. Detailed mapping indicates that the coastal segment of the WH thrust did not rupture the surface in 1855. The thrust, a major range-bounding fault, emplaces Mesozoic graywacke over ~80-100 ka last- interglacial marine, and lacustrine rocks, and in part coeval to younger alluvial gravels. Fault activity is indicated by facies and thickness changes. This older sequence is tilted and overlapped unconformably by a silt layer and much less deformed alluvial fan gravels that range in age from >22ka to <9 ka. These younger gravels were deposited in a valley incised across the fault scarp, in-filled this topography, and show no evidence of syn-depositional deformation. New 14C ages record a period of fault inactivity from 14 - 9 ka (calib yrs BP). The abandoned, overlapping fan surface is slightly deformed across the fault (15 m of folding- related throw). We infer that the thrust has propagated eastward in the subsurface, uplifting the abandoned WH fault, an inference that is supported by the pattern of Holocene incision. The only recent faulting consists of subvertical en echelon segments that have undergone minor dip-slip and dextral slip. A trench excavated across the fault scarp in late Holocene gravels suggests that the only fault along the trace of the WH thrust that broke within 3 m of the surface in 1855 was a minor

  9. Late Quaternary glaciations in Far NE Russia; combining moraines, topography and chronology to assess regional and global glaciation synchrony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Iestyn D.; Clark, Chris D.

    2012-10-01

    During various periods of Late Quaternary glaciation, small ice-sheets, -caps, -fields and valley glaciers, occupied the mountains and uplands of Far NE Russia (including the Verkhoyansk, Suntar-Khayata, and Chersky Mountains; the Kolyma-Anyuy and Koryak Highlands; and much of the Kamchatka and Chukchi Peninsulas). Here, the margins of former glaciers across this region are constrained through the comprehensive mapping of moraines from remote sensing data (Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite images; ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM2); and Viewfinder Panorama DEM data). A total of 8414 moraines are mapped, and this record is integrated with a series of published age-estimates (n = 25), considered to chronologically-constrain former ice-margin positions. Geomorphological and chronological data are compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) to produce 'best estimate' reconstructions of ice extent during the global Last Glacial Maximum (gLGM) and, to a lesser degree, during earlier phases of glaciation. The data reveal that much of Far NE Russia (˜1,092,427 km2) preserves a glaciated landscape (i.e. is bounded by moraines), but there is no evidence of former ice masses having extended more than 270 km beyond mountain centres (suggesting that, during the Late Quaternary, the region has not been occupied by extensive ice sheets). During the gLGM, specifically, glaciers occupied ˜253,000 km2, and rarely extended more than 50 km in length. During earlier (pre-gLGM) periods, glaciers were more extensive, though the timing of former glaciation, and the maximum Quaternary extent, appears to have been asynchronous across the region, and out-of-phase with ice-extent maxima elsewhere in the Northern Hemisphere. This glacial history is partly explained through consideration of climatic-forcing (particularly moisture-availability, solar insolation and albedo), though topographic-controls upon the former extent and dynamics of glaciers are also considered, as are

  10. Glaciomarine sedimentation and bottom current activity on the north-western and northern continental margins of Svalbard during the late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Teena; Noormets, Riko; Rasmussen, Tine L.

    2016-04-01

    Palaeo-bottom current strength of the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC) and the influence of the Svalbard-Barents Sea Ice Sheet (SBIS) on the depositional environment along the northern Svalbard margins are poorly known. Two gravity cores from the southern Yermak Plateau and the upper slope north of Nordaustlandet, covering marine isotope stage (MIS) 1 to MIS 5, are investigated. Five lithofacies, based on grain size distribution, silt/clay ratio, content and mean of sortable silt (SS), are distinguished to characterise the contourite-dominated sedimentary environments. In addition, depositional environments are described using total organic carbon (TOC), total sulphur (TS) and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) contents of sediments. Facies A, containing coarse SS, suggests strong bottom current activity and good bottom water ventilation conditions as inferred from low TOC content. This facies was deposited during the glacial periods MIS 4, MIS 2 and during the late Holocene. Facies B is dominated by fine SS indicating weak bottom current and poor ventilation (cf. high TOC content of 1.2-1.6%), and correlates with the MIS 4/3 and MIS 2/1 transition periods. With an equal amount of clay and sand, fine SS and high content of TOC, facies C indicates reduced bottom current strength for intervals with sediment supply from proximal sources such as icebergs, sea ice or meltwater discharge. This facies was deposited during the last glacial maximum. Facies D represents mass-flow deposits on the northern Svalbard margin attributed to the SBIS advance at or near the shelf edge. Facies E sediments indicating moderate bottom current strength were deposited during MIS 5 and MIS 3, and during parts of MIS 2. This first late Quaternary proxy record of the WSC flow and sedimentation history from the northern Svalbard margin suggests that the oceanographic conditions and ice sheet processes have exerted first-order control on sediment properties.

  11. Magnitude of late quaternary left-lateral displacements along the north edge of tibet.

    PubMed

    Peltzer, G; Tapponnier, P; Armijo, R

    1989-12-01

    Images taken by the earth observation satellite SPOT of the Quaternary morphology at 18 sites on the 2000-kilometer-long Altyn Tagh fault at the north edge of Tibet demonstrate that it is outstandingly active. Long-term, left-lateral strike-slip offsets of stream channels, alluvial terrace edges, and glacial moraines along the fault cluster between 100 and 400 meters. The high elevation of the sites, mostly above 4000 meters in the periglacial zone, suggests that most offsets resulted from slip on the fault since the beginning of the Holocene. These data imply that slip rates are 2 to 3 centimeters per year along much of the fault length and support the hypothesis that the continuing penetration of India into Asia forces Tibet rapidly toward the east.

  12. Magnitude of late quaternary left-lateral displacements along the north edge of tibet.

    PubMed

    Peltzer, G; Tapponnier, P; Armijo, R

    1989-12-01

    Images taken by the earth observation satellite SPOT of the Quaternary morphology at 18 sites on the 2000-kilometer-long Altyn Tagh fault at the north edge of Tibet demonstrate that it is outstandingly active. Long-term, left-lateral strike-slip offsets of stream channels, alluvial terrace edges, and glacial moraines along the fault cluster between 100 and 400 meters. The high elevation of the sites, mostly above 4000 meters in the periglacial zone, suggests that most offsets resulted from slip on the fault since the beginning of the Holocene. These data imply that slip rates are 2 to 3 centimeters per year along much of the fault length and support the hypothesis that the continuing penetration of India into Asia forces Tibet rapidly toward the east. PMID:17832223

  13. Magnitude of late Quaternary left-lateral displacements along the north edge of Tibet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltzer, Gilles; Tapponnier, Paul; Armijo, Rolando

    1989-01-01

    Images taken by the earth observation satellite SPOT of the Quaternary morphology at 18 sites on the 2000-kilometer-long Altyn Tagh fault at the north edge of Tibet demonstrate that it is outstandingly active. Long-term, left-lateral strike-slip offsets of stream channels, alluvial terrace edges, and glacial moraines along the fault cluster between 100 and 400 meters. The high elevation of the sites, mostly above 4000 meters in the periglacial zone, suggests that most offsets resulted from slip on the fault since the beginning of the Holocene. These data imply that slip rates are 2 to 3 centimeters per year along much of the fault length and support the hypothesis that the continuing penetration of India into Asia forces Tibet rapidly toward the east.

  14. The changing role of mammal life histories in Late Quaternary extinction vulnerability on continents and islands.

    PubMed

    Lyons, S Kathleen; Miller, Joshua H; Fraser, Danielle; Smith, Felisa A; Boyer, Alison; Lindsey, Emily; Mychajliw, Alexis M

    2016-06-01

    Understanding extinction drivers in a human-dominated world is necessary to preserve biodiversity. We provide an overview of Quaternary extinctions and compare mammalian extinction events on continents and islands after human arrival in system-specific prehistoric and historic contexts. We highlight the role of body size and life-history traits in these extinctions. We find a significant size-bias except for extinctions on small islands in historic times. Using phylogenetic regression and classification trees, we find that while life-history traits are poor predictors of historic extinctions, those associated with difficulty in responding quickly to perturbations, such as small litter size, are good predictors of prehistoric extinctions. Our results are consistent with the idea that prehistoric and historic extinctions form a single continuing event with the same likely primary driver, humans, but the diversity of impacts and affected faunas is much greater in historic extinctions. PMID:27330176

  15. The changing role of mammal life histories in Late Quaternary extinction vulnerability on continents and islands.

    PubMed

    Lyons, S Kathleen; Miller, Joshua H; Fraser, Danielle; Smith, Felisa A; Boyer, Alison; Lindsey, Emily; Mychajliw, Alexis M

    2016-06-01

    Understanding extinction drivers in a human-dominated world is necessary to preserve biodiversity. We provide an overview of Quaternary extinctions and compare mammalian extinction events on continents and islands after human arrival in system-specific prehistoric and historic contexts. We highlight the role of body size and life-history traits in these extinctions. We find a significant size-bias except for extinctions on small islands in historic times. Using phylogenetic regression and classification trees, we find that while life-history traits are poor predictors of historic extinctions, those associated with difficulty in responding quickly to perturbations, such as small litter size, are good predictors of prehistoric extinctions. Our results are consistent with the idea that prehistoric and historic extinctions form a single continuing event with the same likely primary driver, humans, but the diversity of impacts and affected faunas is much greater in historic extinctions.

  16. Morphology of late Quaternary submarine landslides along the U.S. Atlantic continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twichell, D.C.; Chaytor, J.D.; ten Brink, U.S.; Buczkowski, B.

    2009-01-01

    The nearly complete coverage of the U.S. Atlantic continental slope and rise by multibeam bathymetry and backscatter imagery provides an opportunity to reevaluate the distribution of submarine landslides along the margin and reassess the controls on their formation. Landslides can be divided into two categories based on their source areas: those sourced in submarine canyons and those sourced on the open continental slope and rise. Landslide distribution is in part controlled by the Quaternary history of the margin. They cover 33% of the continental slope and rise of the glacially influenced New England margin, 16% of the sea floor offshore of the fluvially dominated Middle Atlantic margin, and 13% of the sea floor south of Cape Hatteras. The headwall scarps of open-slope sourced landslides occur mostly on the lower slope and upper rise while they occur mostly on the upper slope in the canyon-sourced ones. The deposits from both landslide categories are generally thin (mostly 20-40??m thick) and comprised primarily of Quaternary material, but the volumes of the open-slope sourced landslide deposits can be larger (1-392??km3) than the canyon-sourced ones (1-10??km3). The largest failures are located seaward of shelf-edge deltas along the southern New England margin and near salt domes that breach the sea floor south of Cape Hatteras. The spatial distribution of landslides indicates that earthquakes associated with rebound of the glaciated part of the margin or earthquakes associated with salt domes were probably the primary triggering mechanism although other processes may have pre-conditioned sediments for failure. The largest failures and those that have the potential to generate the largest tsunamis are the open-slope sourced landslides.

  17. Late-Quaternary recharge determined from chloride in shallow groundwater in the central Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macfarlane, P.A.; Clark, J.F.; Davisson, M.L.; Hudson, G.B.; Whittemore, D.O.

    2000-01-01

    An extensive suite of isotopic and geochemical tracers in groundwater has been used to provide hydrologic assessments of the hierarchy of flow systems in aquifers underlying the central Great Plains (southeastern Colorado and western Kansas) of the United States and to determine the late Pleistocene and Holocene paleotemperature and paleorecharge record. Hydrogeologic and geochemical tracer data permit classification of the samples into late Holocene, late Pleistocene-early Holocene, and much older Pleistocene groups. Paleorecharge rates calculated from the Cl concentration in the samples show that recharge rates were at least twice the late Holocene rate during late Pleistocene-early Holocene time, which is consistent with their relative depletion in 16O and D. Noble gas (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) temperature calculations confirm that these older samples represent a recharge environment approximately 5??C cooler than late Holocene values. These results are consistent with the global climate models that show a trend toward a warmer, more arid climate during the Holocene. (C) 2000 University of Washington.

  18. Processes of late Quaternary turbidity current flow and deposition on the Var deep sea fan, northwest Mediterranean sea

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, D. ); Savoye, B. )

    1993-09-01

    Late Quaternary sedimentation patterns on the Var deep-sea fan are known from high-resolution seismic boomer profiles (vertical resolution < 1 m), piston cores, SAR side-scan sonargraphs, and submersible dives. Foram biostratigraphy and radiocarbon dating provide chronologic control that is seismically correlated across the fan. Regional erosional events correspond to the isotopic state 2 and 6 glacial maxima. A widespread surface sand layer was deposited from the 1979 turbidity current, which broke two submarine cables. Numerical modeling constrains its character. A small slide on the upper prodelta developed into an accelerating turbidity current, which eroded sand from the Var canyon. The current was 30 m thick in the upper valley, expanding downflow to >120 m, where it spilled over the eastern Var sedimentary ridge at a velocity of 2.5 ms[sup [minus]1]. Other Holocene turbidity currents (with a 103-yr recurrence interval) were muddier and thicker, but also deposited sand on middle fan-valley levees and are inferred to have had a similar slide-related origin. Late Pleistocene turbidity currents deposited on the high Var sedimentary ridge. The presence of sediment waves and the cross-flow slope inferred from levee asymmetry indicate that some flow were hundreds of meters thick, with velocities of 0.35 ms[sup [minus]1]. Estimated times for deposition of thick levee mud beds are many days or weeks. Late Pleistocene flows therefore are interpreted to result from hyperpycnal flow of glacial outwash in the Var River. Variation in late Pleistocene-Holocene turbidite sedimentation thus is controlled more by changes in sediment supply than by sea level.

  19. Changes in Late Cretaceous-Quaternary Caribbean plate motion directions inferred from paleostress measurements from striated fault planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batbayar, K.; Mann, P.; Hippolyte, J.

    2013-12-01

    We compiled paleostress analyses from previous research works collected at 591 localities of striated fault planes in rocks ranging in age from Late Cretaceous to Quaternary in the circum-Caribbean and Mexico. The purpose of the study is to quantify a progressive clockwise rotation of the Caribbean plate during its Late Cretaceous to recent subduction of the Proto-Caribbean seaway. Paleostress analysis is based on the assumption that slickenside lineations indicate both the direction and sense of maximum resolved shear stress on that fault plane. We have plotted directions of maximum horizontal stress onto plate tectonic reconstructions of the circum-Caribbean plate boundaries and infer that these directions are proxies for paleo-plate motion directions of the Caribbean plate. Plotting these stress directions onto reconstructions provided a better visualization of the relation of stress directions to blocks at their time of Late Cretaceous to recent deformation. Older, more deformed rocks of Late Cretaceous to Eocene ages yield a greater scatter in derived paleostress directions as these rocks have steeper dips, more pervasive faulting, and were likely affected by large rotations as known from previous paleomagnetic studies of Caribbean plate margins. Despite more scatter in measurements from older rock units, four major events that affected the Caribbean plate and the Great Arc of the Caribbean (GAC) are recognizable from changing orientations of stress directions: 1) Late Cretaceous collision of the GAC with southern Mexico and Colombia is consistent with NE directions of maximum compression in rocks of this age range in southern Mexico and EW directions in Colombia as the GAC approached the Proto-Caribbean seaway; 2) Paleocene-Eocene collision of the GAC with the Bahamas platform in Cuba and Hispaniola and with the South American plate in Venezuela is consistent with CW rotations of stress directions in rocks of these ages in the northern Caribbean and CCW

  20. Sedimentologic and Stratigraphic Aspects of Late Quaternary (<14 cal. ka?) Valley Fill (Paleo-Roanoke River) Beneath the Barrier Islands of the Outer Banks, North Carolina, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, K. M.; Brooks, R. W.

    2002-12-01

    Provided here is a preliminary interpretation of the late Pleistocene (<14 cal. ka) facies succession that infilled the paleo-Roanoke River valley, and its transition into the overlying barrier island complex beneath the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Previous work (e.g. Riggs and others, 1992) reported that the Albemarle Embayment of eastern N.C. is underlain by a series of Pleistocene paleovalley complexes and provided hypotheses to test regarding valley distribution, sea level changes, and the ages of facies and sequences generated in response to coastal evolution. This report provides stratigraphic and sedimentologic criteria to support collaborative interpretations of eight cores acquired by a coastal geology cooperative research program on the Outer Banks to test these hypotheses. In cores OBX-02, 03, and 05, the late Quaternary (<14 cal. ka) fill is about 41 m thick. Here it erosionally overlies a bioturbated marine shelf deposit (OBX-2, 3, 5) that Wehmiller (personal communication) correlated (at OBX-05, depth -41 m) with the early/middle Pleistocene aminozone, AZ-4 (see Riggs and others, 1992). Above this, the late Quaternary fill (in cores OBX-02, 03, 05, 06) includes a succession of four facies units: 1) a basal sandy gravel (<6 m), 2) a dark gray complexly interbedded mud and gravel (<9 m), 3) bioturbated muddy sand (<15 m), and 4) an upward fining sand, with a basal gravel (<15 m). (Dimensional aspects of these units remain undefined until integration with GPR and seismic profiles). Six radiocarbon dates (from Thieler, personal communication) on samples from unit 2 (OBX-05: from -32.3, -33.6 and -35 m; OBX-02: from -27.7, -33.0, and -33.0 m) fall within the range 10 to 14 cal. ka. These were deposited during the Younger Dryas (Mallinson and others, Thieler, personal communications). Stratigraphic relations suggest that unit 1, although not dated, was deposited at the onset of this phase of global cooling. Unit 1, interpreted as fluvial thalweg and

  1. Late Quaternary environmental changes in the Taklamakan Desert, western China, inferred from OSL-dated lacustrine and aeolian deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoping; Preusser, Frank; Radtke, Ulrich

    2006-05-01

    Sediment records from the Tarim Basin of western China are of great importance for understanding Late Quaternary climatic variability in Central Asia. A chronology of aeolian and lacustrine deposits from the centre and southern margin of the Taklamakan Desert, central Tarim Basin, has been established using optical dating methods. Distinct variations in humidity during the last 40,000 a in this extremely arid inland basin have been identified. Lacustrine sediments were deposited in the centre of the Taklamakan during two periods of wetter than present day conditions at around 2000 and 30,000 a ago. Another humid period is recorded between 40,000 and 30,000 a ago. Aeolian processes, the development of large migrating dune fields dominated during periods of more arid conditions. Sand wedges at the southern margin of the Taklamakan are dated at ca 40,000 a and ca 18,000 a, and imply a significant temperature decrease in that area. Sedimentological evidence for a late Holocene humid period are consistent with records in ancient Chinese literature. Wetter environmental conditions in the past within the Taklamakan, as indicated by the presence of lacustrine deposits, are also supported by data from adjacent regions. It is assumed that changes of global westerlies and of the mobile polar high triggered the fluctuations of precipitation in the study area. However, variations in temperature in the Taklamakan Desert are presumed to be mainly controlled by the intensity of the winter monsoon.

  2. Within-taxon morphological diversity in late-Quaternary Neotoma as a paleoenvironmental indicator, Bonneville Basin, Northwestern Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, R. Lee; O'Brien, Michael J.

    2005-05-01

    Ecological data indicate that as the amount of precipitation in an arid areas increases, so too does mammalian taxonomic richness. This correspondence has been found in two late-Quaternary mammalian faunas from Utah, one from Homestead Cave in the Bonneville Basin. We use the remains of two species of woodrat ( Neotoma cinerea and Neotoma lepida) from Homestead Cave to test the hypothesis that as the amount of precipitation in an arid area increases, so too does morphological diversity within individual mammalian taxa. Morphological diversity is measured as corrected coefficients of variation and as richness of size classes of mandibular alveolar lengths. Coefficients of variation for N. cinerea are few and coincide with moisture history if temporally successive small samples are lumped together. More abundant coefficients of variation for N. lepida coincide only loosely with moisture history, likely because such coefficients measure dispersion but not necessarily other aspects of variation. Richness of size classes of N. lepida is high during the early and late Holocene when moisture was high, and lowest during the middle Holocene when climate was most arid.

  3. Late Quaternary Deformation along the North Wuitaishan Fault of the Shanxi Graben System: Active Intracontinental Rifting in North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corley, J.; Cochran, W. J.; Hinrichs, N.; Ding, R.; Zhang, S.; Gomez, F.

    2012-12-01

    The Shanxi rift system in north China is an intracontinental rift zone which has been active since the late Tertiary. and has produced many destructive earthquakes in recorded history. This area is of particular interest for earthquake research because of the high seismicity levels in an intraplate setting. The Shanxi rift system is composed of NNE-oriented en-echelon half-graben basins controlled by normal faults. This study focuses on the north Wutaishan fault, which bounds the Wutai Mountains and the Xingding basin, located in the northern part of the Shanxi rift system. Quaternary tectonism is investigated using remotely-sensed imagery for mapping of large tectonically-influenced landforms, field investigations for ground truth, and structural analyses. Initial neotectonic mapping utilized stereoscopic Corona satellite imagery to differentiate between fluvial and agricultural terraces; Cartosat-based DEMs were used to correct altitude measurements of terrace heights and to analyze streams and other landforms for morphometric analysis. Fluvial terraces are used to reconstruct paleo-stream profiles of the Yangyan River and nearby tributaries to determine mountain uplift rates inferred from fluvial incision, basin extension rates, and possible warping of the footwall basin block. Field work provided ground truth for fluvial terrace altitude, type of terrace, and thicknesses of alluvial and loess deposits. Another aspect of the study involves development of structural cross-section to relate fault slip to regional tectonic strain. Fault kinematic analysis of micro-fault features found in bedrock were used to assess the Quaternary stress field. Results of this study have implications in the understanding of earthquake recurrence intervals and basin evolution in the Shanxi rift system and more generally, can improve the understanding of spatial and temporal variations of seismic events in intraplate settings.

  4. Ochotona(Lagomorpha) from Late Quaternary Cave Deposits in Eastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Jim I.; Grady, Frederick

    1996-01-01

    Pikas ( Ochtona)—small gnawing mammals, related to rabbits—range today throughout parts of the Northern Hemisphere, but had a wider distribution during the Pleistocene. Nine caves from northeastern North America (a region not occupied by pikas today) have Pleistocene deposits containing remains of Ochotona.We examine 526 fossil specimens (ranging in age from approximately 850,000 to 8670 yr B.P.) from five of these caves. Two morphological forms of Ochotonalived in northeastern North America during the late Pleistocene—a large species (probably O. whartoni) and a small species (probably O. princeps). Ochotonaof glacial age are not necessarily indicative of talus slopes and mesic communities. O. princeps-like of the Irvingtonian of West Virginia were living with an amphibian-reptilian assemblage found in the area today, implying winters not much, if at all, colder than at present. Late glacial and postglacial change in climate south of the ice sheets in effect would have isolated Ochotonain eastern North America, where they were unable to retreat to the west or north. Whereas western pika had the option of moving up in elevation, into boreal islands, eastern forms became restricted to ever-diminishing habitats, culminating in extinction and extirpation. Radiocarbon ages imply that Ochotonalived in eastern North America during the late Pleistocene (late Rancholabrean) and into the earliest Holocene. We describe the youngest remains of Ochotonain eastern North America and the youngest for the extinct large form, O. whartoni.

  5. Late Quaternary fluvial terraces near the Daocheng Ice Cap, eastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liubing; Zhou, Shangzhe

    2014-05-01

    The timing of terrace formation relative to the glacial-interglacial cycle and what factors control that timing, such as changes in climate and/or uplift, are controversial. Here we present a study of the terraces along the Yazheku River using electron spin resonance (ESR) dating and analysis of the sedimentary characteristics in order to establish the timing of terrace formation and to assess the forcing mechanisms that have been proposed. The Yazheku River flows in glacial trough leading from the Haizi Shan, on the eastern Tibetan Plateau. The range was uplifted during the Quaternary and repeatedly glaciated by ice caps. The four highest major terraces (T5, T4, T3, and T2) are the result of both climatic and tectonic influences. Strath terraces T5-T2 were created during Haizi Shan glacial expansions during MIS 16, 12, 6 and 3-4, respectively. The major aggradation phases of the four terraces occurred during the deglaciations at the ends of MIS 16, 12, 6, and 2. Down-cutting, which led to the generation of the four terraces, immediately followed the deposition of the T5-T2 gravel units. These incisions occurred during the transitions between MIS 16-15, MIS 12-11, MIS 6-5, and MIS 2-1.

  6. Applying DEM-SRTM for reconstructing a late Quaternary paleodrainage in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Ericson H.; Rossetti, Dilce F.; Valeriano, Márcio M.

    2010-08-01

    Remote sensing is a particularly invaluable tool that has helped the detection of paleomorphologies produced by river dislocation in a variety of landscapes, which has contributed in reconstructing the geological evolution of many fluvial systems. This technique might provide useful information to discuss the evolution of large fluvial systems, in special those located in areas of difficult access where the acquisition of field data is difficult. Application of remote sensing for paleodrainage characterization in densely vegetated tropical areas is scarce in the literature. This work records processing of the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) derived from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), which succeeded in revealing an ancient drainage complex of the Madeira River, one of the main Amazonas tributaries, where other remote sensing products failed the detection. Analysis of this paleodrainage and of its modern counterpart within the geological framework available for this region leads to propose that activity along pre-existent faults during the latest Quaternary would have promoted the southeastward dislocation of a nearly 200 km long segment of the Madeira River. During this process, an impressive paleodrainage network was left behind, which was only able to be detected using the DEM-SRTM. Application of this technique might be of great help to the detection of paleodrainage morphologies in densely vegetated areas similar to the Amazonas lowland. The dynamics of channel migration in this and many other large scale tropical river systems might benefit from the investigation based on data derived from DEM-SRTM.

  7. A new contribution to the Late Quaternary tephrostratigraphy of the Mediterranean: Aegean Sea core LC21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satow, C.; Tomlinson, E. L.; Grant, K. M.; Albert, P. G.; Smith, V. C.; Manning, C. J.; Ottolini, L.; Wulf, S.; Rohling, E. J.; Lowe, J. J.; Blockley, S. P. E.; Menzies, M. A.

    2015-06-01

    Tephra layers preserved in marine sediments can contribute to the reconstruction of volcanic histories and potentially act as stratigraphic isochrons to link together environmental records. Recent developments in the detection of volcanic ash (tephra) at levels where none is macroscopically visible (so-called 'crypto-tephra') have greatly enhanced the potential of tephrostratigraphy for synchronising environmental and archaeological records by expanding the areas over which tephras are found. In this paper, crypto-tephra extraction techniques allow the recovery of 8 non-visible tephra layers to add to the 9 visible layers in a marine sediment core (LC21) from the SE Aegean Sea to form the longest, single core record of volcanic activity in the Aegean Sea. Using a novel, shard-specific methodology, sources of the tephra shards are identified on the basis of their major and trace element single-shard geochemistry, by comparison with geochemical data from proximal Mediterranean volcanic stratigraphies. The results indicate that the tephra layers are derived from 14 or 15 separate eruptions in the last ca 161 ka BP: 9 from Santorini; 2 or 3 from Kos, Yali, or Nisyros; 2 from the Campanian province; and one from Pantelleria. The attributions of these tephra layers indicate that 1) inter-Plinian eruptions from Santorini may have produced regionally significant tephra deposits, 2) marine tephrostratigraphies can provide unique and invaluable data to eruptive histories for island volcanoes, and 3) tephra from both Pantelleria and Campania may be used to correlate marine records from the Aegean Sea to those from the Tyrrhenian, Adriatic and Ionian Seas.

  8. Late Quaternary Paleoclimates of Turkey From Glacial Records and Their Link to the Climate Change of the Past Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarikaya, M.; Zreda, M.; Ciner, A.

    2008-12-01

    Glaciers are not among the first things usually associated with Turkey. But glaciers do exist in several high mountains of Turkey, and glacial-geological evidence show that much bigger glaciers existed in Turkish mountains in the past, providing information on paleoclimate. Mount Ağri (5137 m) (also known as Mt.Ararat), in the Eastern Anatolia, has a large ice cap with several outlet glaciers. Mount Cilo (4135 m), in the Southeastern Turkey, has active glaciers up to 1.5 km long. Kaçkar Mountains (3932 m), on the Black Sea coast, have about 1 km long glacier. Mount Erciyes (3917 m) is the westernmost mountain that has a glacier today. Recent cosmogenic 10Be and 36Cl dating of glacial deposits and modeling of glacier flow on the mountains of Turkey reveal Late Quaternary paleoclimate of the region. Late Glacial Maximum glaciers were the most extensive ones in the last 22 ka (thousands years) and they developed in cold (6- 11.5°C colder than today) and wet (up to 2 times) climates. Late Glacial (14.1 ± 1.3 ka ago) climate was colder by 5 to 8°C based on 50% wetter and 25% drier conditions, respectively. Early Holocene moraines (range from 10.2 ± 0.2 ka to 8.6 ± 0.3 ka ago) in the central Turkey show that glaciers were extraordinarily large and climate was up to twice as wet as today. Glaciers present in Turkish mountains today may be remnants from the last advance (possibly the Little Ice Age) and their length change since the beginning of the century reveals a constant retreat under a warming rate of 0.9-1.2°C per century, consistent with the global warming trend.

  9. Late quaternary paleoseismology of the southern Steens fault zone, northern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Personius, S.F.; Crone, A.J.; Machette, M.N.; Mahan, S.A.; Kyung, J.B.; Cisneros, H.; Lidke, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    The 192-km-long Steens fault zone is the most prominent normal fault system in the northern Basin and Range province of western North America. We use trench mapping and radiometric dating to estimate displacements and timing of the last three surface-rupturing earthquakes (E1-E3) on the southern part of the fault south of Denio, Nevada. Coseismic displacements range from 1.1 to 2.2 ?? 0.5 m, and radiometric ages indicate earthquake times of 11.5 ?? 2.0 ka (E3), 6.1 ?? 0.5 ka (E2), and 4.6 ?? 1.0 ka (E1). These data yield recurrence intervals of 5.4 ?? 2.1 k.y. between E3 and E2, 1.5 ?? 1.1 k.y. between E2 and E1, and an elapsed time of 4.6 ?? 1.0 k.y. since E1. The recurrence data yield variable interval slip rates (between 0.2 ?? 0.22 and 1.5 ?? 2.3 mm/yr), but slip rates averaged over the past ???18 k.y. (0.24 ?? 0.06 mm/year) are similar to long-term (8.5-12.5 Ma) slip rates (0.2 ?? 0.1 mm /yr) measured a few kilometers to the north. We infer from the lack of significant topographic relief across the fault in Bog Hot Valley that the fault zone is propagating southward and may now be connected with a fault at the northwestern end of the Pine Forest Range. Displacements documented in the trench and a rupture length of 37 km indicate a history of three latest Quaternary earthquakes with magnitudes of M 6.6-7.1 on the southern part of the Steens fault zone.

  10. Recurrent late Quaternary surface faulting along the southern Mohawk Valley fault zone, NE California

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, T.L.; Hemphill-Haley, M.A. ); Page, W.D. )

    1993-04-01

    The Mohawk Valley fault zone comprises NW- to NNW-striking, normal and strike-slip( ) faults that form the western edge of the Plumas province, a diffuse transitional zone between the Basin and Range and the northern Sierra Nevada. The authors detailed evaluation of the southern part of the fault zone reveals evidence for recurrent late Pleistocene to possibly Holocene, moderate to large surface-faulting events. The southern Mohawk fault zone is a complex, 6-km-wide zone of faults and related features that extends from near the crest of the Sierra Nevada to the middle of southern Sierra Valley. The fault zone has two distinct and generally parallel subzones, 3 km apart, that are delineated by markedly different geomorphic characteristics and apparently different styles of faulting. Paleoseismic activity of the western subzone was evaluated in two trenches: one across a fault antithetic to the main range-bounding fault, and the other across a splay fault delineated by a 3.7-m-high scarp in alluvium. Stratigraphic relations, soil development, and radiocarbon dates indicate that at least four mid- to late-Pleistocene surface-faulting events, having single-event displacements in excess of 1.6 to 2.6 m, occurred along the splay fault prior to 12 ka. The antithetic fault has evidence of three late Pleistocene events that may correspond to event documented on the splay fault, and a Holocene event that is inferred from youthful scarplets and small closed depressions.

  11. Late Quaternary Variations of Atmospheric Nitrous Oxide Reconstructed from Polar Ice Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilt, A.; Baumgartner, M.; Blunier, T.; Schwander, J.; Spahni, R.; Fischer, H.; Stocker, T. F.

    2009-12-01

    Air extracted from polar ice cores offers the unique possibility to reconstruct the past composition of Earth’s atmosphere, and thus to study natural changes in biogeochemical cycles. Here, we present records of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) measured along the EPICA Dome C, EPICA Dronning Maud Land, Talos Dome and NGRIP ice cores. These records allow for the reconstruction of the N2O concentration during the interglacials of the last 800,000 years, while for most glacial time intervals an atmospheric record is missing due to insitu production of N2O in the ice. N2O which has both terrestrial and marine sources, varies in concert with Antarctic temperature during all interglacials back to Marine Isotope Stage 19. However, in contrast to carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), N2O does not show lower concentrations in response to the lower temperature recorded for the interglacials between 800,000 and 440,000 years before present compared to the interglacials of the last 440,000 years. Also, N2O remains substantially longer at interglacial levels than CH4 at the end of most interglacials. On millennial time scales, N2O shows variations in concert with CH4 throughout the last 800,000 years. We suggest that these millennial-scale variations have been driven by a similar mechanism as the Dansgaard/Oeschger events known from the last glacial. We further establish a N2O composite record which covers, without gaps, more than one glacial-interglacial cycle, i.e. it reaches back to the beginning of the penultimate interglacial (Marine Isotope Stage 5.5) about 140,000 years ago. This composite record reveals substantial N2O variations in response to all Dansgaard/Oeschger events of the last glacial, and a N2O concentration of about 200 parts per billion by volume during the Last Glacial Maximum.

  12. Late Quaternary landscape development at the margin of the Pomeranian phase (MIS 2) near Lake Wygonin (Northern Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Florian; Schneider, Anna; Nicolay, Alexander; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Kordowski, Jarosław; Noryskiewicz, Agnieszka M.; Tyszkowski, Sebastian; Raab, Alexandra; Raab, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In Central Europe, Late Quaternary landscapes experienced multiple phases of geomorphologic activity. In this study,we used a combined geomorphological, pedological, sedimentological and palynological approach to characterize landscape development after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) near Lake Wygonin in Northern Poland. The pedostratigraphical findings from soil pits and drillings were extrapolated using ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and electric resistivity tomography (ERT). During the Pomeranian phase, glacial and fluvioglacial processes dominated the landscape near Lake Wygonin. At the end of the glacial period, periglacial processes became relevant and caused the formation of ventifacts and coversands containing coated sand grains. At approximately 15,290-14,800 cal yr BP, a small pond formed in a kettle hole (profile BWI2). The lacustrine sediments lack eolian sand components and therefore indicate the decline of eolian processes during that time. The increase of Juniperus and rock-rose (Helianthemum) in the pollen diagram is a prominent marker of the Younger Dryas. At the end of the Younger Dryas, a partial reshaping of the landscape is indicated by abundant charcoal fragments in disturbed lake sediments. No geomorphologic activity since the beginning of the Holocene is documented in the terrestrial and wetland archives. The anthropogenic impact is reflected in the pollen diagram by the occurrence of rye pollen grains (Cerealia type, Secale cereale) and translocated soil sediments dated to 1560-1410 cal yr BP, proving agricultural use of the immediate vicinity. With the onset of land use, gully incision and the accumulation of colluvial fans reshaped the landscape locally. Since 540-460 cal yr BP, further gully incision in the steep forest tracks has been associated with the intensification of forestry. Outside of the gully catchments, the weakly podzolized Rubic Brunic Arenosols show no features of Holocene soil erosion. Reprinted from CATENA, Volume 124

  13. Debates in the late Quaternary of central southern Africa: climate change, environmental variability or just plain poor data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. S.; Burrough, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Quaternary palaeoclimatic/environmental analyses in dryland regions are well-known for the limited range of proxy data sets available, resulting in debates about achieving robust reconstructions (e.g. Butzer 1984, Thomas 1986, Maslin and Christiansen 2007). In some regions, e.g. central southern Africa, this has resulted in reliance on geoproxies: the analysis and dating of depositional landforms and associated sediments. Despite significant advances in geoproxy interpretation and chronometric control, their efficacy remains contentious, not least because of apparent temporal contradictions in reconstructions of past drier and past more humid conditions. Consequently their use has been eschewed in favour of spatially extensive extrapolations from higher-resolution, but geographically-distant, data sets (e.g. Chase and Meadows 2008); an approach not without its own limitations (e.g. Gasse et al. 2008, Thomas and Burrough 2012, Thomas et al. 2012), given the variability in modern terrestrial conditions in dryland regions today. It is therefore highly appropriate to revisit the debates of Butzer (1984) and Thomas (1986) regarding data quality and data extrapolation, but to add in the very relevant characteristic of temporal and spatial environmental variability. Environmental and climatic variability at a range of temporal and spatial scales are significant traits of drylands in southern Africa and worldwide, impacting on ecosystem and geomorphic processes, and human behaviour. It can be hypothesised that while environmental variability has been an important trait of Late Quaternary environments and climate in southern Africa. It has rarely been considered as a viable environmental 'state' when proxy records are analysed and integrated, particularly in the case of spatially extensive geoproxies and in contexts where palaeoenvironment and palaeoclimate are used interchangeably. We present examples where debates over the nature of past changes and quality of datasets

  14. Detrital fission-track-compositional signature of an orogenic chain-hinterland basin system: The case of the late Neogene Quaternary Valdelsa basin (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balestrieri, M. L.; Benvenuti, M.; Tangocci, F.

    2013-05-01

    Detrital thermochronological data collected in syn-tectonic basin deposits are a promising tool for deciphering time and processes of the evolution of orogenic belts. Our study deals with the Valdelsa basin, one of the wider basins of central Tuscany, Italy. The Valdelsa basin is located at the rear of the Northern Apennines, a collisional orogen whose late Neogene Quaternary development is alternatively attributed to extensional and compressional regimes. These contrasting interpretations mostly rely on different reconstructions of the tectono-sedimentary evolution of several basins formed at the rear of the chain since the late Tortonian. Here, we explore the detrital thermochronological-compositional signature of tectonic and surface processes during the Valdelsa basin development. For this aim, detrital apatite fission-track analysis of 21 sand samples from the latest Messinian Gelasian fluvial to shallow marine basin deposits, has been accompanied by a clast composition analysis of 7 representative outcrops of the conglomerate facies. The grain-age distributions of the sediment samples are generally characterized by two distinct components, one younger peak (P1) varying between 5.5 ± 2.8 and 9.5 ± 1.0 Ma and one older peak (P2) varying from 15.0 ± 8.0 to 41.0 ± 10 Ma. By comparison with some bedrock ages obtained from the E-NE basin shoulder, we attributed the P2 peak to the Ligurian Units and the P1 peak to the Macigno Formation (Tuscan Units). These units are arranged one upon the other in the complex nappe pile forming the Northern Apennines orogen. While the gravel composition indicates a predominant feeding from the Ligurian units all along the sedimentary succession with a subordinate occurrence of Macigno pebbles slightly increasing upsection, the P1 peak is present even in the oldest collected sandy sediments. The early P1 occurrence reveals that the Macigno was exposed in the E-NE basin shoulder since at least the latest Messinian-early Zanclean

  15. Morphology, acoustic characteristics, and Late Quaternary growth of conception Fan, Santa Barbara basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, S.M.C.

    1986-04-01

    A radial borderland-basin fan in the western half of the Santa Barbara basin, the Conception Fan, shows characteristics of a debris slope. More than 3000 mi of closely spaced (3.5 kHz) high-resolution profiles, 270 gravity cores, and 8 borings were used to map channel and fan morphology, and channel, levee, and lobe acoustic facies. Two major unconformities are recognized on the seismic profiles. The upper unconformity represents the 10-k.y.B.P. horizon. The lower unconformity is the erosional surface of the late Wisconsinan lowstand of sea level, 18-26 k.y.B.P. Eustasy and tectonism produced two pulses of deposition, each from a different point source, during the Flandrian transgression. Prior to the late Pleistocene, the Conception Fan was fed by one major canyon/channel system, above the western part of the fan. During the late Pleistocene, two small submarine canyons were cut into the slope 7 mi east. Four major channels, smaller than the western channel system, were incised into the fan surface, indicating the eustatic decrease in sediment input. The fault-controlled western canyon (Sacate) fed all but the eastern channel. Faulting and slumping on the slope cut the eastern canyon (Gaviota) and formed the eastern channel. Numerous slope gullies influenced eastern canyon and channel development. Holocene currents rounding Point Conception have winnowed fine sediments in the western channel region, resulting in hummocky topography and the scoured appearance of the channel. Hemipelagic deposition dominates the lower-middle and lower fan of the eastern part of the fan. The western part of the fan seems to be receiving slope-like deposits over the relict fan surface.

  16. Vegetation and climate variability in tropical and subtropical South America during the late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behling, H.

    2013-05-01

    Detailed palynological studies from different ecosystems in tropical and subtropical South America reflect interesting vegetation and climate dynamics, in particular during glacial and late glacial times. Records from ecosystems such as the Amazon rainforest, savanna, Caatinga, Atlantic rainforest, Araucaria forest and grasslands provide interesting insight of past climate variability. The influence of events such as Dansgaard-Oeschger, Heinnrich stadials, changes in the thermohaline circulation (THC) will be discussed. In particular the Younger Dryas (YD) period shows at different places distinct vegetational changes, revealing unexpected past climatic conditions.

  17. Spatial and temporal patterns of late Quaternary eolian deposition, eastern Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madole, R.F.

    1995-01-01

    Three sand units are recognized on the basis of bedforms, topographic expression, and soil development. Preliminary age limits for the three units, based on 26 numerical ages, are 22.5-9 ka, 8-1 ka, and 1.0-0.15 ka. The middle unit is the product of multiple episodes of eolian activity that are not yet accurately dated. Loess is widespread but thin (generally < 2.4 m). Three units - middle Pleistocene, late Pleistocene, and Holocene - are recognized on the basis of differences in soil-profile development and stratigraphic position. -from Author

  18. Changes of the deep circulation and erosional inputs in the Labrador Sea over the late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippova, A.; Frank, M.; Kienast, M.; Hillarie-Marcel, C.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of Labrador Sea Water has been one of the main contributors to the Atlantic thermohaline circulation influences the strength of NADW formation. In addition, the Labrador Sea has received weathering inputs of highly variable strength and sources. A high resolution downcore record recovered from south of Greenland (core MD99-2227) together with surface sediment samples from western part of Labrador Sea provides detailed information on deep sea and surface water circulation and through the Latest Quaternary. Radiogenic Nd, Pb and Hf isotopes are used as proxies for changes in water mass mixing and weathering inputs. Nd isotope data produced by leaching early sedimentary ferromanganese coatings reflect seawater compositions and show a pronounced trend towards less radiogenic values from the LGM to 12 kyr and then became less radiogenic again through the Holocene, which was most likely either linked to enhanced erosional input in the course of the retreat of the Laurentide Ice sheet or indicates enhanced contributions of a highly unradiogenic water mass such as Labrador Sea Water or diminished contributions of radiogenic Denmark Strait Overflow water. A major change in isotopic composition at 12 kyr towards more radiogenic isotope compositions is also observed in the leached 208,207,206Pb/204Pb data. Most notably, there was a pronounced change in the Pb isotope compositions at 8 kyr as well, which is not reflected by Nd or Hf isotope data and which reflects a major change in source provenance of the weathering inputs, most likely linked to the 8.2 kyr event, during which glacially dammed lakes Agassiz and Ojibway rapidly drained into the North Atlantic. This interpretation will be compared to the evidence from the radiogenic isotope evolution of the detrital fraction and of the clays. In contrast, with time leached Hf isotope data appear to be too radiogenic for Labrador Seawater but also show a marked unradiogenic peak at 12 kyr pointing to a strong

  19. Detrital cave sediments record Late Quaternary hydrologic and climatic variability in northwestern Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Tyler S.; van Hengstum, Peter J.; Horgan, Meghan C.; Donnelly, Jeffrey P.; Reibenspies, Joseph H.

    2016-04-01

    of enhanced limestone dissolution and cave formation (speleogenesis) during lower paleo water levels. Further work is still required to (a) determine whether precipitation of the ferromanganese deposits is inorganically or biologically mediated, (b) temporally constrain the emplacement history of the primary sedimentary styles, and (c) determine the full geographic extent of these sedimentary signals. However, these preliminary observations suggest that sedimentation in the inland underwater caves of northwestern Florida is related to Quaternary-scale hydrographic variability in the Apalachicola River drainage basin in response to broader ocean and atmospheric forcing.

  20. Late Quaternary Offset of Alluvial Fan Surfaces along the Central Sierra Madre Fault, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, A.; Burgette, R. J.; Scharer, K. M.; Midttun, N. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Sierra Madre fault (SMF) is an east-west trending reverse fault system along the southern flank of the San Gabriel Mountains near Los Angeles, California. The ~140 km long SMF is separated into four segments, we focus on the multi-stranded, ~60 km long Central Sierra Madre fault (CSMF; W118.3-W117.7) as it lacks a well-characterized long-term geologic slip rate. We combine 1-m lidar DEM with geologic and geomorphic mapping to correlate alluvial fan surfaces along strike and across the fault strands in order to derive fault slip rates that cross the CSMF. We have refined mapping on two sets of terraces described by Crook et al. (1987) and references therein: a flight of Q3 surfaces (after nomenclature of Crook et al., 1987; McFadden, 1982) in Arroyo Seco with distinct terraces ~30 m, ~40 m, ~50 m, and ~55 m above the modern stream and in Pickens Canyon divided a Q3 and Q2 surface, with heights that are ~35 m and ~25 m above the modern stream respectively. Relative degree of clast weathering and soil development is consistent with geomorphic relationships; for example, hues of 7.5 YR to 10 YR are typical of Q3, while hues of 10 YR to 2.5 Y are typical of Q2. A scarp in the Q3 surface at Arroyo Seco has a vertical offset of ~16 m and a scarp in the Q3 at Pickens Canyon has a vertical offset of ~14 m, while the Q2 surface is not faulted. Our Quaternary dating strategy is focused on dating suites of terraces offset along CSMF scarps in order to provide broader stratigraphic context for the cosmogenic radionuclide and luminescence dating. We will present (pending) cosmogenic radionuclide depth profiles from the Q3 surfaces. A better-constrained slip rate for the CSMF will improve earthquake hazard assessment for the Los Angeles area and help clarify the tectonic role of the SMF in the broader plate boundary system. Additionally, the fan chronology will provide information about the timing of alluvial fan aggradation and incision in the western Transverse Ranges.

  1. A late Quaternary multiple paleovalley system from the Adriatic coastal plain (Biferno River, Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorosi, Alessandro; Bracone, Vito; Campo, Bruno; D'Amico, Carmine; Rossi, Veronica; Rosskopf, Carmen M.

    2016-02-01

    A buried paleovalley system, up to 2 km wide and exceeding 50 m in relief, made up of multiple cross-cutting depressions incised into the Lower Pleistocene bedrock, is reported from the central Adriatic coastal plain at the mouth of Biferno River. Through a multi-proxy approach that included geomorphological, stratigraphic, sedimentological and paleontological (benthic foraminifers, ostracods and molluscs) investigations, the facies architecture of distinct, superposed valley fills is reconstructed and their relative chronology established along a transverse profile with extremely high data density (average borehole spacing 75 m). Regional tectonic uplift appears as the major controlling factor of initial (Middle Pleistocene) river down-cutting and paleovalley formation. In contrast, glacio-eustatic fluctuations drove fluvial-system response over the last 120 ky, when valley incision was primarily induced by the last glacial base-level lowering and climatic forcing. A fragmented record of coastal and shallow-marine deposits is available for the lower paleovalley fill, which is penetrated by a limited borehole dataset. Multiple erosion phases probably related to the post-MIS 5e sea-level fall are reconstructed from the upper paleovalley fill, where a buried fluvial terrace succession is identified a few tens of meters below the ground surface. The flat surfaces of two buried fluvial terraces suggest longer-term, stepped relative sea-level fall, and are correlated with fluvial incisions that took place possibly at the MIS 5/4 transition and at the MIS 3/2 transition, respectively. A laterally extensive gravel body developed on the valley floor during the Last Glacial Maximum. During the ensuing latest Pleistocene-early Holocene sea-level rise the Biferno paleovalley was transformed into an estuary. Upstream from the maximum shoreline ingression, the vertical succession of well-drained floodplain, poorly-drained floodplain, and swamp deposits evidences increasing

  2. Late Quaternary paleoclimate of western Alaska inferred from fossil chironomids and its relation to vegetation histories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurek, Joshua; Cwynar, Les C.; Ager, Thomas A.; Abbott, Mark B.; Edwards, Mary E.

    2009-01-01

    Fossil Chironomidae assemblages (with a few Chaoboridae and Ceratopogonidae) from Zagoskin and Burial Lakes in western Alaska provide quantitative reconstructions of mean July air temperatures for periods of the late-middle Wisconsin (~39,000-34,000 cal yr B.P.) to the present. Inferred temperatures are compared with previously analyzed pollen data from each site summarized here by indirect ordination. Paleotemperature trends reveal substantial differences in the timing of climatic warming following the late Wisconsin at each site, although chronological uncertainty exists. Zagoskin Lake shows early warming beginning at about 21,000 cal yr B.P., whereas warming at Burial Lake begins ~4000 years later. Summer climates during the last glacial maximum (LGM) were on average ~3.5C° below the modern temperatures at each site. Major shifts in vegetation occurred from ~19,000 to 10,000 cal yr B.P. at Zagoskin Lake and from ~17,000 to 10,000 cal yr B.P. at Burial Lake. Vegetation shifts followed climatic warming, when temperatures neared modern values. Both sites provide evidence of an early postglacial thermal maximum at ~12,300 cal yr B.P. These chironomid records, combined with other insect-based climatic reconstructions from Beringia, indicate that during the LGM: (1) greater continentality likely influenced regions adjacent to the Bering Land Bridge and (2) summer climates were, at times, not dominated by severe cold.

  3. The Late Quaternary biogeographic histories of some Great Basin mammals (western USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, Donald K.

    2006-11-01

    The Great Basin of arid western North America provides one of the most detailed late Pleistocene and Holocene mammal records available for any part of the world, though the record is by far strongest for small mammals. Of the 35 genera of now-extinct North American Pleistocene mammals, 19 are known to have occurred in the Great Basin, a list that is likely to be complete or nearly so. Of these 19, seven can be shown to have survived beyond 12,000 radiocarbon years ago, a proportion similar to that for North America as a whole. Horses, camels, mammoth, and helmeted musk-oxen appear to have been the most abundant of these genera. Pygmy rabbits ( Brachylagus idahoensis), yellow-bellied marmots ( Marmota flaviventris), and bushy-tailed woodrats ( Neotoma cinerea) declined in abundance at the end of the Pleistocene, at about the same time as populations south of their current arid western distributional boundary were extirpated. Subsequent declines occurred during the hot/dry middle Holocene. Pygmy rabbits also declined as modern pinyon-juniper woodlands developed across the Great Basin. The Snake Range of eastern Nevada has seen the late Pleistocene or Holocene extinction of both northern pocket gophers ( Thomomys talpoides) and pikas ( Ochotona princeps). Coupled with the rarity of yellow-bellied marmots here, these histories make the Snake Range a biogeographic oddity. These and other Great Basin mammal histories provide significant insights into the possible responses of Great Basin small mammals to global warming.

  4. Lake Michigan's late Quaternary limnological and climate history from ostracode, oxygen isotope, and magnetic susptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forester, Richard M.; Colman, Steven M.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Keigwin, Loyd D.

    1994-01-01

    The limnology of Lake Michigan has changed dramatically since the late Pleistocene in response to the expansion and contraction of continental glaciers, to differential isostatic rebound, and to climate change. The lake sediment's stratigraphic trends, magnetic susceptibility, δ18O, and ostracode species abundance ratios provide criteria to identify the lake's response to glacial ice and to differential isostatic rebound. The latter phenomena dominate the lake's late Pleistocene and early Holocene history. The lake's hydrological budget provides the primary linkage between the lake and climate, particularly effective moisture. Dissolved salts were stored in the lake's water column when the lake's output shifted toward evaporation, but were flushed when output shifted toward outflow. The lake's salt storage history may be interpreted from some ostracode, δ18O, and magnetic susceptibility records found in sediment cores. Climate change influenced the entire lake's limnological history, but became the primary limnological driver from about the middle-Holocene to the present. The complex limnological history of Lake Michigan resulted in substantial changes in the ostracode species assemblages; from about 12,000 ka to about 5,500 ka, five ostracode intervals can be identified. These ostracode intervals provide a within-lake biostratigraphy and a stratigraphic reference for reconstruction of the paleoenvironmental dynamics of the lake.

  5. Late Quaternary Climate and Vegetation of the Sudanian Zone of Northeast Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzmann, Ulrich; Hoelzmann, Philipp; Morczinek, Irena

    2002-07-01

    The Lake Tilla crater lake in northeastern Nigeria (10°23'N, 12°08'E) provides a ca. 17,000 14C yr multiproxy record of the environmental history of a Sudanian savanna in West Africa. Evaluation of pollen, diatoms, and sedimentary geochemistry from cores suggests that dry climatic conditions prevailed throughout the late Pleistocene. Before the onset of the Holocene, the slow rise in lake levels was interrupted by a distinct dry event between ca. 10,900 and 10,500 14C yr B.P., which may coincide with the Younger Dryas episode. The onset of the Holocene is marked by an abrupt increase in lake levels and a subsequent spread of Guinean and Sudanian tree taxa into the open grass savanna that predominated throughout the Late Pleistocene. The dominance of the mountain olive Olea hochstetteri suggests cool climatic conditions prior to ca. 8600 14C yr B.P. The early to mid-Holocene humid period culminated between ca. 8500 and 7000 14C yr B.P. with the establishment of a dense Guinean savanna during high lake levels. Frequent fires were important in promoting the open character of the vegetation. The palynological and palaeolimnological data demonstrate that the humid period terminated after ca. 7000 14C yr B.P. in a gradual decline of the precipitation/evaporation ratio and was not interrupted by abrupt climatic events. The aridification trend intensified after ca. 3800 14C yr B.P. and continued until the present.

  6. Late Tertiary and Quaternary landscape development in the western Grand Canyon and western Arizona strip

    SciTech Connect

    Billingsley, G.H. ); Wenrich, K.J. . Federal Center); Blackerby, B. )

    1993-04-01

    New geologic mapping of the western Grand Canyon and the Arizona Strip region, northwest Arizona, reveals young fault scarps on all faults, horsts, and graben structures. Tectonic activity here was previously thought to be at least Miocene age and older. New K-Ar age data for basalt flows in this region provide a basis for determining the age of surficial deposits in relation to elevated structural landforms. The basalts range in age from middle Miocene to late Pleistocene (17 Ma to 0.14 Ma). The Miocene basalts are found in the western Grand Canyon area and are progressively younger in a northeast direction onto the Shivwits and Uinkaret Plateaus, a distance of about 100 km. The older basalts are generally petrographically and chemically distinct from younger basalts. Those younger than one million years have less olivine and are chemically more iron- and titanium-rich suggesting they are from less primitive magmas. Basalt flows in this region older than 1 million years, are cut by faults showing equal displacement of the underlying strata and the flows. Basalt flows younger than 1 million years show offsets as much as 12 to 100 m, less than two-thirds the offset of underlying strata, implying that most tectonic activity occurred within the last 1 to 2 million years. Late Pliocene and Pleistocene faulting has extensively modified the landscape by elevated parts of the terrain resulting in young surficial deposits in lowland areas and rejuvenation of drainages in upthrown fault blocks.

  7. Origin of late Quaternary dune fields on the Southern High Plains of Texas and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Holliday, V.T.

    2001-01-01

    Mostly stabilized late Holocene eolian sands on the Southern High Plains of the United States were studied to determine their origins and to assess whether present dune stability depends more strongly on sediment supply, sediment availability, or transport limitations. Geomorphic, sedimentological, and geochemical trends indicate that late Holocene dunes formed under westerly paleowinds, broadly similar to those of today. Mineralogical and geochemical data indicate that the most likely source for the sands is not the Pecos River valley, but the Pleistocene Blackwater Draw Formation, an older, extensive eolian deposit in the region. These observations suggest that new sand is supplied whenever vegetation cover is diminished to the extent that the Blackwater Draw Formation can be eroded, in agreement with modern observations of wind erosion in the region. We conclude, therefore, that Southern High Plains dunes are stabilized primarily due to a vegetation cover. The dunes are thus sediment-availability limited. This conclusion is consistent with the observation that, in the warmest, driest part of the region (where vegetation cover is minimal), dunes are currently active over a large area. Geochemical data indicate that Southern High Plains dunes are the most mineralogically mature (quartz rich) sands yet studied in the Great Plains, which suggests a long history of eolian activity, either in the dune fields or during deposition of the Blackwater Draw Formation.

  8. Late Quaternary evolution of channel and lobe complexes of Monterey Fan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fildani, Andrea; Normark, William R.

    2004-01-01

    The modern Monterey submarine fan, one of the largest deep-water deposits off the western US, is composed of two major turbidite systems: the Neogene Lower Turbidite System (LTS) and the late Quarternary Upper Turbidite System (UTS). The areally extensive LTS is a distal deposit with low-relief, poorly defined channels, overbank, and lower-fan elements. The younger UTS comprises almost half of the total fan volume and was initiated in the late Pleistocene from canyons in the Monterey Bay area. Rapidly prograding high-relief, channel-levee complexes dominated deposition early in the UTS with periodic avulsion events. In the last few 100 ka, much of the sediment bypassed the northern fan as a result of allocyclic controls, and deposition is simultaneously occuring on a sandy lobe with low-relief channels and on an adjacent detached muddier lobe built from reconfinement of overbank flow from the northern high-relief channels. During the relatively short-lived UTS deposition, at least seven different channel types and two lobe types were formed. This study provides a significant reinterpretation of the depositional history of Monterey Fan by incorporating all available unpublished geophysical data.

  9. Late quaternary regional geoarchaeology of Southeast Alaska Karst: A progress report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, E.J.; Heaton, T.H.; Fifield, T.E.; Hamilton, T.D.; Putnam, D.E.; Grady, F.

    1997-01-01

    Karst systems, sea caves, and rock shelters within the coastal temperate rain forest of Alaska's Alexander Archipelago preserve important records of regional archaeology, sea level history, glacial and climatic history, and vertebrate paleontology. Two 14C AMS dates on human bone discovered in a remote cave (49-PET-408) on Prince of Wales Island document the oldest reliably dated human in Alaska to ca. 9800 B.P. A series of 14C AMS dates from cave deposits span the past 40,000 years and provide the first evidence of Pleistocene faunas from the northwest coast of North America. Other discoveries include sea caves and marine beach deposits elevated above modern sea level, extensive solution caves, and mammalian remains of species previously undocumented within the region. Records of human activity, including cave art, artifacts, and habitation sites may provide new insights into the early human colonization of the Americas. ??1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. A preliminary investigation of siliceous microfossil succession in late quaternary sediments from Lake Baikal, Siberia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julius, M. L.; Stoermer, E. F.; Colman, S. M.; Moore, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Siliceous microfossil assemblage succession was analyzed in a 100 m sediment core from Lake Baikal, Siberia. The core was recovered from the lake's central basin at a water depth of 365 m. Microfossil abundance varied greatly within the intervals sampled, ranging from samples devoid of siliceous microfossils to samples with up to 3.49 x 1011 microfossils g-1 sediment. Fluctuations in abundance appear to reflect trends in the marine δ18O record, with peak microfossil levels generally representing climate optima. Microfossil taxa present in sampled intervals changed considerably with core depth. Within each sample a small number of endemic diatom species dominated the assemblage. Changes in dominant endemic taxa between sampled intervals ranged from extirpation of some taxa, to shifts in quantitative abundance. Differences in microfossil composition and the association of variations in abundance with climate fluctuations suggest rapid speciation in response to major climatic excursions.

  11. Age estimates and uplift rates for late Pleistocene marine terraces: Southern Oregon portion of the Cascadia forearc

    SciTech Connect

    Muhs, D.R.; Whelan, J.F. ); Kelsey, H.M.; McInelly, G.W. ); Miller, G.H. ); Kennedy, G.L. )

    1990-05-10

    Interest in the Cascadia subduction zone has increased because recent investigations have suggested that slip along plates at certain types of convergent margins is characteristically accompanied by large earthquakes. In addition, other investigations have suggested that convergent margins can be broadly classified by the magnitude of their uplift rates. The authors generated new uranium series, amino acid, and stable isotope data for southern Oregon marine terrace fossils. These data, along with terrace elevations and two alternative estimates of sea level at the time of terrace formation, allow one to determine terrace ages and uplift rates. Uranium series analysis of fossil coral yields an age of 83 {plus minus} 5 ka for the Whisky Run terrace at Coquille Point in Bandon, Oregon. A combination of amino acid and oxygen isotope data suggest ages of about 80 and 105 ka for the lowest two terraces at Cape Blanco. These ages indicate uplift rates of 0.45-1.05 and 0.81-1.49 m/kyr for Coquille Point and Cape Blanco, respectively. In order to assess the utility of the southern Oregon uplift rates for predicting the behavior of the Cascadia subduction zone, the authors compared late Quaternary uplift rates derived from terrace data from subduction zones around the world. On the basis of this comparison the southern Oregon rates of vertical deformation are not usually high or low. Furthermore, late Quaternary uplift rates show little relationship to the type of convergent margin. In the case of the southern Oregon coast, variability in uplift rate probably reflects local structures in the overriding plate, and the rate of uplift cannot be used as a simple index of the potential for great earthquakes along the southern Cascadia subduction zone.

  12. Climate-Induced Dynamics of Periglacial Landscapes in NE Siberia: The Western Edge of Beringia During the Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, G.; Schirrmeister, L.; Siegert, C.; Meyer, H.; Andreev, A. A.; Kunitsky, V. V.; Derevyagin, A. Y.; Hubberten, H.

    2006-12-01

    Periglacial landscape dynamics have direct impacts on energy and matter cycles as well as ecosystems in large parts of the Arctic. Over the last decade, modern processes and past environments of periglacial landscapes in the Laptev Sea coastal lowlands were intensively studied within Russian and joint German- Russian research projects. A variety of palaeo-environmental records exists now for assessing the Late Quaternary dynamics of permafrost-dominated landscapes of this westernmost edge of Beringia. The main focus of this presentation is on the spatial and temporal dimensions of regional landscape changes in the Laptev Sea region induced by climatic change, especially by Holocene climate warming. For this purpose, we combine a variety of palaeo-environmental studies with remote sensing, terrain modelling, and GIS-based analyses of the modern landscape composition. We assess the landscape dynamics at the study site level and then draw conclusions for the whole region. Due to the low global sea level during the Late Weichselian cold stage, the Laptev Sea lowlands extended far on the shelf forming part of the unique continental environment of Western Beringia. The special periglacial environmental conditions of this period are recorded in frozen sediment sequences with palaeo-proxies ranging from lithology, ground ice, plant and animal fossils, to geomorphology. The Late Weichselian depositional environment there was characterized by ice-rich permafrost deposits (so-called Yedoma or Ice Complex formation) with up to 75 wt% absolute ice content. The Yedoma accumulated in lowland plains with polygonal tundra surrounding bedrock hills and mountain ridges. Additionally, the tundra plains were segmented by large river systems depositing fluvial sandy sediments. Major environmental changes affecting hydrology, geocryology, accumulation, and ecosystems in the region took place during the climate warming at the Late-Glacial Holocene transition. Within a short period in the

  13. Late Quaternary Glacial Chronology in the Cordillera de Talamanca, Costa Rica, Investigated Using Cosmogenic Cl-36 Surface Exposure Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Potter, R.; Horn, S.; Orvis, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    The role of the tropics in past and future climate change has garnered significant attention in recent decades, but debate still exists over climate linkages between the tropics and the middle and high latitudes. Glaciers in tropical mountains are highly sensitive indicators of climate, and glacial landforms left behind by past glacier fluctuations provide key evidence of paleoclimate trends and their forcing mechanisms. We investigated late Quaternary glacial chronology from two glaciated valleys on the Chirripó massif in the Cordillera de Talamanca, Costa Rica. Previous studies in this highland have constrained the most recent deglaciation to 12.4-9.7 ka cal BP based on radiocarbon dates on basal sediments of glacial lakes within the cirque at the head of the Morrenas Valley. However, no studies have been conducted to constrain the ages of the moraines located down valley. We dated the formation ages of these moraines in the Morrenas and Talari valleys using cosmogenic Cl-36 surface exposure dating. Our results indicate a major glacial event ~21-18 ka, broadly synchronous with the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Glaciers during this period advanced 3.2-3.4 km down valley on both sides of the Chirripó massif. Our ages also suggest periods of glacial retreat or standstills ~18-10 ka before complete deglaciation of this highland ~10 ka. These results provide insight into the timing and extent of glacial events in this tropical highland that is of critical importance for reconstructing regional and global climate patterns.

  14. Response of bushy-tailed woodrats (Neotoma cinerea) to late Quaternary climatic change in the Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, F.A.; Betancourt, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    Temperature profoundly influences the physiology and life history characteristics of organisms, particularly in terms of body size. Because so many critical parameters scale with body mass, long-term temperature fluctuations can have dramatic impacts. We examined the response of a small mammalian herbivore, the bushy-tailed woodrat (Neotoma cinerea), to temperature change from 20 000 yr BP to present, at five sites within the Colorado Plateau. Our investigations focused on the relationship between temperature, plant composition and abundance, and woodrat size. Body size was estimated by measuring fossil fecal pellets, a technique validated in earlier work. We found significant and highly covariable patterns in body mass over the five locations, suggesting that responses to temperature fluctuations during the late Quaternary have been very similar. Although woodrat mass and the occurrence of several plant species in the fossil record were significantly correlated, in virtually all instances changes in woodrat size preceded changes in vegetational composition. These results may be due to the greater sensitivity of woodrats to temperature, or to the shorter generation times of woodrats as compared to most plants. An alternative hypothesis is that winter temperatures increased before summer ones. Woodrats are highly sensitive to warmer winters, whereas little response would be expected from forest/woodland plants growing at their lower limits. Our work suggests that woodrat size is a precise paleothermometer, yielding information about temperature variation over relatively short-term temporal and regional scales.

  15. Variable impact of late-Quaternary megafaunal extinction in causing ecological state shifts in North and South America.

    PubMed

    Barnosky, Anthony D; Lindsey, Emily L; Villavicencio, Natalia A; Bostelmann, Enrique; Hadly, Elizabeth A; Wanket, James; Marshall, Charles R

    2016-01-26

    Loss of megafauna, an aspect of defaunation, can precipitate many ecological changes over short time scales. We examine whether megafauna loss can also explain features of lasting ecological state shifts that occurred as the Pleistocene gave way to the Holocene. We compare ecological impacts of late-Quaternary megafauna extinction in five American regions: southwestern Patagonia, the Pampas, northeastern United States, northwestern United States, and Beringia. We find that major ecological state shifts were consistent with expectations of defaunation in North American sites but not in South American ones. The differential responses highlight two factors necessary for defaunation to trigger lasting ecological state shifts discernable in the fossil record: (i) lost megafauna need to have been effective ecosystem engineers, like proboscideans; and (ii) historical contingencies must have provided the ecosystem with plant species likely to respond to megafaunal loss. These findings help in identifying modern ecosystems that are most at risk for disappearing should current pressures on the ecosystems' large animals continue and highlight the critical role of both individual species ecologies and ecosystem context in predicting the lasting impacts of defaunation currently underway. PMID:26504219

  16. Late Quaternary environmental and landscape dynamics revealed by a pingo sequence on the northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterich, Sebastian; Grosse, Guido; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Andreev, Andrei A.; Bobrov, Anatoly A.; Kienast, Frank; Bigelow, Nancy H.; Edwards, Mary E.

    2012-04-01

    A terrestrial sediment sequence exposed in an eroding pingo provides insights into the late-Quaternary environmental history of the northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska. We have obtained the first radiocarbon-dated evidence for a mid-Wisconsin thermokarst lake, demonstrating that complex landscape dynamics involving cyclic permafrost aggradation and thermokarst lake formation occurred over stadial-interstadial as well as glacial-interglacial time periods. High values of Picea pollen and the presence of Larix pollen in sediments dated to 50-40 ka BP strongly suggest the presence of forest or woodland early in MIS 3; the trees grew within a vegetation matrix dominated by grass and sedge, and there is indirect evidence of grazing animals. Thus the interstadial ecosystem was different in structure and composition from the Holocene or from the preceding Last Interglacial period. An early Holocene warm period is indicated by renewed thermokarst lake formation and a range of fossil taxa. Multiple extralimital plant taxa suggest mean July temperatures above modern values. The local presence of spruce during the early Holocene warm interval is evident from a radiocarbon-dated spruce macrofossil remain and indicates significant range extension far beyond the modern tree line. The first direct evidence of spruce in Northwest Alaska during the early Holocene has implications for the presence of forest refugia in Central Beringia and previously assumed routes and timing of post-glacial forest expansion in Alaska.

  17. Radiocarbon dating of individual lignin phenols: a new approach for establishing chronology of late quaternary lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Hou, Juzhi; Huang, Yongsong; Brodsky, Corynn; Alexandre, Marcelo R; McNichol, Ann P; King, John W; Hu, Feng Sheng; Shen, Ji

    2010-09-01

    The reliability of chronology is a prerequisite for meaningful paleoclimate reconstructions from sedimentary archives. The conventional approach of radiocarbon dating bulk organic carbon in lake sediments is often hampered by the old carbon effect, i.e., the assimilation of ancient dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) derived from carbonate bedrocks or other sources. Therefore, radiocarbon dating is ideally performed on organic compounds derived from land plants that use atmospheric CO(2) and rapidly delivered to sediments. We demonstrate that lignin phenols isolated from lake sediments using reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) can serve as effective (14)C dating materials for establishing chronology during the late Quaternary. We developed a procedure to purify lignin phenols, building upon a published method. By isolating lignin from standard wood reference substances, we show that our method yields pure lignin phenols and consistent ages as the consensus ages and that our procedure does not introduce radiocarbon contamination. We further demonstrate that lignin phenol ages are compatible with varve counted and macrofossil dated sediment horizons in Steel Lake and Fayetteville Green Lake. Applying the new method to lake sediment cores from Lake Qinghai demonstrates that lignin phenol ages in Lake Qinghai are consistently younger than bulk total organic carbon (TOC) ages which are contaminated by old carbon effect. We also show that the age offset between lignin and bulk organic carbon differs at different Lake Qinghai sedimentary horizons, suggesting a variable hard water effect at different times and that a uniform age correction throughout the core is inappropriate.

  18. Variable impact of late-Quaternary megafaunal extinction in causing ecological state shifts in North and South America

    PubMed Central

    Barnosky, Anthony D.; Lindsey, Emily L.; Villavicencio, Natalia A.; Bostelmann, Enrique; Hadly, Elizabeth A.; Wanket, James; Marshall, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    Loss of megafauna, an aspect of defaunation, can precipitate many ecological changes over short time scales. We examine whether megafauna loss can also explain features of lasting ecological state shifts that occurred as the Pleistocene gave way to the Holocene. We compare ecological impacts of late-Quaternary megafauna extinction in five American regions: southwestern Patagonia, the Pampas, northeastern United States, northwestern United States, and Beringia. We find that major ecological state shifts were consistent with expectations of defaunation in North American sites but not in South American ones. The differential responses highlight two factors necessary for defaunation to trigger lasting ecological state shifts discernable in the fossil record: (i) lost megafauna need to have been effective ecosystem engineers, like proboscideans; and (ii) historical contingencies must have provided the ecosystem with plant species likely to respond to megafaunal loss. These findings help in identifying modern ecosystems that are most at risk for disappearing should current pressures on the ecosystems’ large animals continue and highlight the critical role of both individual species ecologies and ecosystem context in predicting the lasting impacts of defaunation currently underway. PMID:26504219

  19. Variable impact of late-Quaternary megafaunal extinction in causing ecological state shifts in North and South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnosky, Anthony D.; Lindsey, Emily L.; Villavicencio, Natalia A.; Bostelmann, Enrique; Hadly, Elizabeth A.; Wanket, James; Marshall, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    Loss of megafauna, an aspect of defaunation, can precipitate many ecological changes over short time scales. We examine whether megafauna loss can also explain features of lasting ecological state shifts that occurred as the Pleistocene gave way to the Holocene. We compare ecological impacts of late-Quaternary megafauna extinction in five American regions: southwestern Patagonia, the Pampas, northeastern United States, northwestern United States, and Beringia. We find that major ecological state shifts were consistent with expectations of defaunation in North American sites but not in South American ones. The differential responses highlight two factors necessary for defaunation to trigger lasting ecological state shifts discernable in the fossil record: (i) lost megafauna need to have been effective ecosystem engineers, like proboscideans; and (ii) historical contingencies must have provided the ecosystem with plant species likely to respond to megafaunal loss. These findings help in identifying modern ecosystems that are most at risk for disappearing should current pressures on the ecosystems' large animals continue and highlight the critical role of both individual species ecologies and ecosystem context in predicting the lasting impacts of defaunation currently underway.

  20. Late Quaternary East Asian monsoon evolution deduced from elemental XRF scanning data in the western South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Z.; Liu, Z.; Li, J.; Xie, X.

    2010-12-01

    The East Asian monsoon system dominates seasonal patterns of precipitation and runoff and causes monsoon-induced upwelling off middle Vietnam in the western South China Sea. Our investigation is to decipher the evolution of the East Asian monsoon variations during late Quaternary by analyzing high-resolution elemental XRF scanning data from Core MD05-2899 (13°47.66'N, 112°10.89'E, water depth 2393 m), which is located in the western South China Sea upwelling region. Oxygen isotope results indicate that the 38.86 m long core spans over the last 533 ka. The elemental XRF scanning data present clear glacial-interglacial variations for most of elements. We choose K, Ti, and Zr as proxies of terrigenous input, and Ca and Ba as indicators of nutrient and sea surface productivity. Generally, coherent downcore variations in K/Ti, Zr/Ti, Ba/Ti and Ca/Ti ratios indicate obvious glacial-interglacial cyclicity. The highest element ratios occur during interglacial maxima, indicating that both terrigenous input and sea surface productivity increased when the enhanced East Asia summer monsoon causes intensified precipitation, runoff, and upwelling. In contrast, during the glacials the element ratios decreased when the East Asian summer monsoon was weakened. In addition, the Ba/Ti ratio along with the carbonate mass accumulation rate present much higher values in MIS 3 and 9, reflecting the stronger East Asian summer monsoon activity.

  1. Variable impact of late-Quaternary megafaunal extinction in causing ecological state shifts in North and South America.

    PubMed

    Barnosky, Anthony D; Lindsey, Emily L; Villavicencio, Natalia A; Bostelmann, Enrique; Hadly, Elizabeth A; Wanket, James; Marshall, Charles R

    2016-01-26

    Loss of megafauna, an aspect of defaunation, can precipitate many ecological changes over short time scales. We examine whether megafauna loss can also explain features of lasting ecological state shifts that occurred as the Pleistocene gave way to the Holocene. We compare ecological impacts of late-Quaternary megafauna extinction in five American regions: southwestern Patagonia, the Pampas, northeastern United States, northwestern United States, and Beringia. We find that major ecological state shifts were consistent with expectations of defaunation in North American sites but not in South American ones. The differential responses highlight two factors necessary for defaunation to trigger lasting ecological state shifts discernable in the fossil record: (i) lost megafauna need to have been effective ecosystem engineers, like proboscideans; and (ii) historical contingencies must have provided the ecosystem with plant species likely to respond to megafaunal loss. These findings help in identifying modern ecosystems that are most at risk for disappearing should current pressures on the ecosystems' large animals continue and highlight the critical role of both individual species ecologies and ecosystem context in predicting the lasting impacts of defaunation currently underway.

  2. Land-ocean linkages over orbital and millennial timescales recorded in Late Quaternary sediments of the Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, Ryuji; Irino, Tomohisa; Koizumi, Itaru

    1999-04-01

    Late Quaternary sediments of the Japan Sea are characterized by centimeter- to meter-scale alternations of dark and light layers which are synchronous basinwide. High-resolution analyses of the sediments from Ocean Drilling Program site 797 reveal that deposition of the meter-scale alternations reflect variations in paleoceanographic conditions which were closely associated with glacio-eustatic sea level changes through the modulation of the volume and character of the influx to the sea through the Tsushima Strait. The centimeter- to decimeter-scale alternations reflect millennial-scale variations which are possibly associated with Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) cycles, with each dark layer appearing to correspond to an interstadial. This variability is attributed to the development of a humid climate in central to eastern Asia and the consequent increase in discharge from the Huanghe and Changjiang Rivers during interstadials. This caused expansion of the East China Sea coastal water (ECSCW), which penetrated more strongly into the Japan Sea. The increased influence of the lower-salinity, nutrient-enriched ECSCW reduced deep water ventilation and enhanced the surface productivity, leading to the development of anoxic bottom waters and deposition of the dark layers. Thus the centimeter- to decimeter-scale alternations of the dark and light layers record wet and dry cycles in central to eastern Asia possibly associated with D-O cycles.

  3. Response of Bushy-Tailed Woodrats ( Neotoma cinerea) to Late Quaternary Climatic Change in the Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Felisa A.; Betancourt, Julio L.

    1998-07-01

    Temperature profoundly influences the physiology and life history characteristics of organisms, particularly in terms of body size. Because so many critical parameters scale with body mass, long-term temperature fluctuations can have dramatic impacts. We examined the response of a small mammalian herbivore, the bushy-tailed woodrat ( Neotoma cinerea), to temperature change from 20,000 yr B.P. to present, at five sites within the Colorado Plateau. Our investigations focused on the relationship between temperature, plant composition and abundance, and woodrat size. Body size was estimated by measuring fossil fecal pellets, a technique validated in earlier work. We found significant and highly covariable patterns in body mass over the five locations, suggesting that responses to temperature fluctuations during the late Quaternary have been very similar. Although woodrat mass and the occurrence of several plant species in the fossil record weresignificantly correlated, in virtually all instances changes in woodrat size preceded changes in vegetational composition. These results may be due to the greater sensitivity of woodrats to temperature, or to the shorter generation times of woodrats as compared to most plants. An alternative hypothesis is that winter temperatures increased before summer ones. Woodrats are highly sensitive to warmer winters, whereas little response would be expected from forest/woodland plants growing at their lower limits. Our work suggests that woodrat size is a precise paleothermometer, yielding information about temperature variation over relatively short-term temporal and regional scales.

  4. Response of surface processes to climatic change in the dunefields and Loess Plateau of North China during the late Quaternary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, H.; Mason, J.A.; Stevens, T.; Zhou, Y.; Yi, S.; Miao, X.

    2011-01-01

    This paper draws on recent optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating to evaluate the long-held assumption that dust accumulation rates in the Loess Plateau and the extent of active aeolian sand in the dunefields to the north have varied together over time, because both are controlled by the strength of the Asian monsoons and also possibly because the dunefields are proximal loess sources. The results show there is little evidence that high rates of loess accumulation coincided with well-dated episodes of extensive dune activity in the Mu Us, Otindag, and Horqin dunefields, at 11-8ka and 1-0ka. Explanations for the apparent lack of coupling include local variation in the trapping of dust and post-depositional preservation of the loess and dune sediments, in response to varying local environmental conditions. In addition, a substantial portion of the loess may be transported directly from source areas where dust emission has somewhat different climatic and geomorphic controls than aeolian sand activity within the dunefields. The results of this study cast doubt on the use of loess accumulation rate as a palaeoclimatic proxy at millennial timescale. The dunefield and loess stratigraphic records are interpreted as primarily recording changes in effective moisture at a local scale, but the timing of late Quaternary dune activity, along with a variety of other evidence, indicates that moisture changes in many of the drylands of northern China may not be in phase with precipitation in core regions of the Asian monsoons. ?? 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Assessment of Late Quaternary strain partitioning in the Afar Triple Junction: Dobe and Hanle grabens, Ethiopia and Djibouti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polun, S. G.; Stockman, M. B.; Hickcox, K.; Horrell, D.; Tesfaye, S.; Gomez, F. G.

    2015-12-01

    As the only subaerial exposure of a ridge - ridge - ridge triple junction, the Afar region of Ethiopia and Djibouti offers a rare opportunity to assess strain partitioning within this type of triple junction. Here, the plate boundaries do not link discretely, but rather the East African rift meets the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden rifts in a zone of diffuse normal faulting characterized by a lack of magmatic activity, referred to as the central Afar. An initial assessment of Late Quaternary strain partitioning is based on faulted landforms in the Dobe - Hanle graben system in Ethiopia and Djibouti. These two extensional basins are connected by an imbricated accommodation zone. Several fault scarps occur within terraces formed during the last highstand of Lake Dobe, around 5 ka - they provide a means of calibrating a numerical model of fault scarp degradation. Additional timing constraints will be provided by pending exposure ages. The spreading rates of both grabens are equivalent, however in Dobe graben, extension is partitioned 2:1 between northern, south dipping faults and the southern, north dipping fault. Extension in Hanle graben is primarily focused on the north dipping Hanle fault. On the north margin of Dobe graben, the boundary fault bifurcates, where the basin-bordering fault displays a significantly higher modeled uplift rate than the more distal fault, suggesting a basinward propagation of faulting. On the southern Dobe fault, surveyed fault scarps have ages ranging from 30 - 5 ka with uplift rates of 0.71, 0.47, and 0.68 mm/yr, suggesting no secular variation in slip rates from the late Plestocene through the Holocene. These rates are converted into horizontal stretching estimates, which are compared with regional strain estimated from velocities of relatively sparse GPS data.

  6. Late Quaternary history of the Vakinankaratra volcanic field (central Madagascar): insights from luminescence dating of phreatomagmatic eruption deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufer, Daniel; Preusser, Frank; Schreurs, Guido; Gnos, Edwin; Berger, Alfons

    2014-05-01

    The Quaternary Vakinankaratra volcanic field in the central Madagascar highlands consists of scoria cones, lava flows, tuff rings, and maars. These volcanic landforms are the result of processes triggered by intracontinental rifting and overlie Precambrian basement or Neogene volcanic rocks. Infrared-stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dating was applied to 13 samples taken from phreatomagmatic eruption deposits in the Antsirabe-Betafo region with the aim of constraining the chronology of the volcanic activity. Establishing such a chronology is important for evaluating volcanic hazards in this densely populated area. Stratigraphic correlations of eruption deposits and IRSL ages suggest at least five phreatomagmatic eruption events in Late Pleistocene times. In the Lake Andraikiba region, two such eruption layers can be clearly distinguished. The older one yields ages between 109 ± 15 and 90 ± 11 ka and is possibly related to an eruption at the Amboniloha volcanic complex to the north. The younger one gives ages between 58 ± 4 and 47 ± 7 ka and is clearly related to the phreatomagmatic eruption that formed Lake Andraikiba. IRSL ages of a similar eruption deposit directly overlying basement laterite in the vicinity of the Fizinana and Ampasamihaiky volcanic complexes yield coherent ages of 68 ± 7 and 65 ± 8 ka. These ages provide the upper age limit for the subsequently developed Iavoko, Antsifotra, and Fizinana scoria cones and their associated lava flows. Two phreatomagmatic deposits, identified near Lake Tritrivakely, yield the youngest IRSL ages in the region, with respective ages of 32 ± 3 and 19 ± 2 ka. The reported K-feldspar IRSL ages are the first recorded numerical ages of phreatomagmatic eruption deposits in Madagascar, and our results confirm the huge potential of this dating approach for reconstructing the volcanic activity of Late Pleistocene to Holocene volcanic provinces.

  7. Variable rates of late Quaternary strike slip on the San Jacinto fault zone, southern California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, R.V.

    1981-01-01

    3 strike slip displacements of strata with known approximate ages have been measured at 2 locations on the San Jacinto fault zone. Minimum horizontal offset between 5.7 and 8.6km in no more than 0.73Myr NE of Anza indicates 8-12 mm/yr average slip rate since late Pleistocene time. Horizontal slip of 1.7m has been calculated for the youngest sediment of Lake Cahuilla since its deposition 271- 510 yr BP. The corresponding slip rate is 2.8-5.0 mm/yr. Right lateral offset of 10.9m measured on a buried stream channel older than 5060 yr BP but younger than 6820 yr BP yields average slip rates for the intermediate time periods, 400 to 6000 yr BP of 1-2 mm/yr. The rates of slip suggest a relatively quiescent period from about 4000 BC to about 1600 AD.-from Author

  8. Great Basin semi-arid woodland dynamics during the late quaternary

    SciTech Connect

    Wigand, P.E.; Hemphill, M.L.; Sharpe, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    Semi-arid woodlands have dominated the middle elevations of Great Basin mountain ranges during the Holocene where subalpine woodlands prevailed during the Pleistocene. Ancient woodrat middens, and in a few cases pollen records indicate in the late Pleistocene and early Holocene woodland history lowered elevation of subalpine woodland species. After a middle Holocene retrenchment at elevations in excess of 500 meters above today, Juniper-dominated semi-arid woodland reached its late Holocene maximum areal extent during the Neoglacial (2 to 4 ka). These records, along with others indicate contracting semi-arid woodland after the Neoglacial about 1.9 ka. Desert shrub community expansion coupled with increased precariousness of wetland areas in the southern Great Basin between 1.9 and 1.5 ka coincide with shrinking wet-lands in the west-central and northern Great Basin. Coincident greater grass abundance in northern Great Basin sagebrush steppe, reaching its maximum between 1.5 and 1.2 ka, corresponds to dramatic increases in bison remains in the archaeological sites of the northern Intermontane West. Pollen and woodrat midden records indicate that this drought ended about 1.5 ka. Succeeding ameliorating conditions resulted in the sudden northward and downward expansion of pinon into areas that had been dominated by juniper during the Neoglacial. Maximum areal extent of pinon dominated semi-arid woodland in west-central Nevada was centered at 1.2 ka. This followed by 100 years the shift in dominance from juniper to pinon in southern Nevada semi-arid woodlands. Great Basin woodlands suffered from renewed severe droughts between .5 to .6 ka. Effectively wetter conditions during the {open_quotes}Little Ice Age{close_quotes} resulted in re-expansion of semi-arid woodland. Activities related to European settlement in the Great Basin have modified prehistoric factors or imposed new ones that are affecting woodland response to climate.

  9. Late Quaternary vegetation development and disturbance dynamics from a peatland on Mount Gorongosa, central Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWethy, David B.; Neumann, Frank H.; Steinbruch, Franziska; Ryan, Casey M.; Valsecchi, Verushka

    2016-04-01

    Few long-term climate and environmental records are available for southeast Africa where millennial scale shifts in the north-south position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and changes in Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures interact with local controls (e.g., fire, hydrology) to influence vegetation and ecosystem dynamics. Reconstruction of late-Pleistocene - Holocene environmental change from peat sediments obtained from Mount Gorongosa, central Mozambique, provides insight into vegetation, climate and disturbance interactions over the past c. 27 kyr. During the late Pleistocene, cool and wet climatic conditions supported Podocarpus forest and Ericaceae-heathland until drier conditions led to grassland expansion and a hiatus in peat deposition between c. 22.5 and 7.2 cal kBP. Increased temperatures and fire activity since c. 7.2 cal kBP led to further expansion of grasslands. Continued warming helped maintain grasslands and fostered a diverse mix of Podocarpus forest with a large number of subtropical trees and miombo woodland taxa (especially Brachystegia spp.) until regional land-use associated with the rise of Iron Age activity promoted an increase of disturbance related taxa over the last 1-2 millennia. Recent migration of people onto the Mount Gorongosa massif in the last fifty years are linked to an increase in fire activity that is unprecedented in the 27 kyr record, resulting in shifts in vegetation composition and structure. This long-term record of environmental change from central Mozambique highlights complex interaction between overlapping climatic influences and documents important vegetation transitions linked to millennial scale climatic controls, disturbance processes and more recent land-use change from a region where few records exist.

  10. Late Quaternary Stratigraphy, Glacial Limits, and Paleoenvironments of the Marresale Area, Western Yamal Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, Steven L.; Ingólfsson, Ólafur; Gataullin, Valery; Manley, William; Lokrantz, Hanna

    2002-05-01

    Stratigraphic records from coastal cliff sections near the Marresale Station on the Yamal Peninsula, Russia, yield new insight on ice-sheet dynamics and paleoenvironments for northern Eurasia. Field studies identify nine informal stratigraphic units from oldest to youngest (the Marresale formation, Labsuyakha sand, Kara diamicton, Varjakha peat and silt, Oleny sand, Baidarata sand, Betula horizon, Nenets peat, and Chum sand) that show a single glaciation and a varied terrestrial environment during the late Pleistocene. The Kara diamicton reflects regional glaciation and is associated with glaciotectonic deformation from the southwest of the underlying Labsuyakha sand and Marresale formation. Finite radiocarbon and luminescence ages of ca. 35,000 to 45,000 yr from Varjakha peat and silt that immediately overlies Kara diamicton place the glaciation >40,000 yr ago. Eolian and fluvial deposition ensued with concomitant cryogenesis between ca. 35,000 and 12,000 cal yr B.P. associated with the Oleny and the Baidarata sands. There is no geomorphic or stratigraphic evidence of coverage or proximity of the Yamal Peninsula to a Late Weichselian ice sheet. The Nenets peat accumulated over the Baidarata sand during much of the past 10,000 yr, with local additions of the eolian Chum sand starting ca. 1000 yr ago. A prominent Betula horizon at the base of the Nenets peat contains rooted birch trees ca. 10,000 to 9000 cal yr old and indicates a >200-km shift northward of the treeline from the present limits, corresponding to a 2° to 4°C summer warming across northern Eurasia.

  11. The role of tectonics and climate in the late Quaternary evolution of a northern Amazonian River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremon, Édipo Henrique; Rossetti, Dilce de Fátima; Sawakuchi, André de Oliveira; Cohen, Marcelo Cancela Lisboa

    2016-10-01

    The Amazon basin has most of the largest rivers of the world. However, works focusing the geological evolution of the trunk river or its tributaries have been only partly approached. The Branco River constitutes one of the main northern Amazonian tributaries. A previous work proposed that, before flowing southward into the Negro-Amazon Rivers, the Branco River had a southwest to northeast course into the Caribbean Sea. The present work aimed to establish if the proposed change in the course of this river is supported by morphological and sedimentological data. Other goals were to discuss the factors influencing river development and establish its evolution over time within the chronological framework provided by radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminescence dating. The work considered the entire course of the Branco River downstream of the Precambrian Guiana Shield, where the river presumably did not exist in ancient times. The river valley is incised into fluvial sedimentary units displaying ages between 100 and 250 ky old, which record active and abandoned channels, crevasse splay/levees, and point bars. The sedimentary deposits in the valley include two alluvial plain units as old as 18.7 ky and which intersects a Late Pleistocene residual megafan. These characteristics suggest that a long segment of the Branco River was established only a few thousand years ago. Together with several structural anomalies, these data are consistent with a mega-capture at the middle reach of this river due to tectonic reactivation in the Late Pleistocene. This integrated approach can be applied to other Amazonian tributaries to unravel how and when the Amazonian drainage basin became established.

  12. Isotopic evidence for the diversity of late Quaternary loess in Nebraska: Glaciogenic and nonglaciogenic sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, John N.; Muhs, Daniel R.; Bettis, E. Arthur; Johnson, William C.; Fanning, C. Mark; Benton, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    Pb isotope compositions of detrital K-feldspars and U-Pb ages of detrital zircons are used as indicators for determining the sources of Peoria Loess deposited during the last glacial period (late Wisconsin, ca. 25–14 ka) in Nebraska and western Iowa. Our new data indicate that only loess adjacent to the Platte River has Pb isotopic characteristics suggesting derivation from this river. Most Peoria Loess in central Nebraska (up to 20 m thick) is non-glaciogenic, on the basis of Pb isotope ratios in K-feldspars and the presence of 34-Ma detrital zircons. These isotopic characteristics suggest derivation primarily from the Oligocene White River Group in southern South Dakota, western Nebraska, southeastern Wyoming, and northeastern Colorado. The occurrence of 10–25 Ma detrital zircons suggests additional minor contributions of silt from the Oligocene-Miocene Arikaree Group and Miocene Ogallala Group. Isotopic data from detrital K-feldspar and zircon grains from Peoria Loess deposits in eastern Nebraska and western Iowa suggest that the immediate source of this loess was alluvium of the Missouri River. We conclude that this silt probably is of glaciogenic origin, primarily derived from outwash from the western margin of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Identification of the White River Group as the main provenance of Peoria Loess of central Nebraska and the Missouri River valley as the immediate source of western Iowa Peoria Loess indicates that paleowind directions during the late Wisconsin were primarily from the northwest and west, in agreement with earlier studies of particle size and loess thickness variation. In addition, the results are in agreement with recent simulations of non-glaciogenic dust sources from linked climate-vegetation modeling, suggesting dry, windy, and minimally vegetated areas in parts of the Great Plains during the last glacial period.

  13. Late Quaternary MIS 6-8 shoreline features of pluvial Owens Lake, Owens Valley, eastern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jayko, A.S.; Bacon, S.N.

    2008-01-01

    The chronologic history of pluvial Owens Lake along the eastern Sierra Nevada in Owens Valley, California, has previously been reported for the interval of time from ca. 25 calibrated ka to the present. However, the age, distribution, and paleoclimatic context of higher-elevation shoreline features have not been formally documented. We describe the location and characteristics of wave-formed erosional and depositional features, as well as fluvial strath terraces that grade into an older shoreline of pluvial Owens Lake. These pluvial-lacustrine features are described between the Olancha area to the south and Poverty Hills area to the north, and they appear to be vertically deformed -20 ?? 4 m across the active oblique-dextral Owens Valley fault zone. They occur at elevations from 1176 to 1182 m along the lower flanks of the Inyo Mountains and Coso Range east of the fault zone to as high as -1204 m west of the fault zone. This relict shoreline, referred to as the 1180 m shoreline, lies -20-40 m higher than the previously documented Last Glacial Maximum shoreline at -1160 m, which occupied the valley during marine isotope stage 2 (MIS 2). Crosscutting relations of wave-formed platforms, notches, and sandy beach deposits, as well as strath terraces on lava flows of the Big Pine volcanic field, bracket the age of the 1180 m shoreline to the time interval between ca. 340 ?? 60 ka and ca. 130 ?? 50 ka. This interval includes marine oxygen isotope stages 8-6 (MIS 8-6), corresponding to 260-240 ka and 185-130 ka, respectively. An additional age estimate for this shoreline is provided by a cosmogenic 36Cl model age of ca. 160 ?? 32 ka on reefal tufa at ???1170 m elevation from the southeastern margin of the valley. This 36Cl model age corroborates the constraining ages based on dated lava flows and refines the lake age to the MIS 6 interval. Documentation of this larger pluvial Owens Lake offers insight to the hydrologic balance along the east side of the southern Sierra

  14. Pedosedimentary development of part of a Late Quaternary loess-palaeosol sequence in northwest Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Rob A.; King, Matthew; Toms, Philip; Derbyshire, Edward; Sayago, José Manuel; Collantes, Miriam M.

    2004-09-01

    The field properties, magnetic susceptibility, particle size, calcium carbonate content, soil micromorphology and optical luminescence ages of the upper 6.1 m and lowermost 4.7 m of the 45 m loess-palaeosol sequence at El Lambedero in the Tafí del Valle region of Tucumán Province (Sierras Pampeanas, northwest Argentina) have been used to set up a partial stratigraphy and chronology, as well as a basic pedosedimentary model of loess accumulation, palaeosol development, reworking and erosion for the site. The minimum ages derived from the basal part of the section suggest that loess began to accumulate some time before 165 ka. A thick and well-developed pedocomplex in the upper profile is correlated with at least the latter part of marine isotope stage (MIS) 5, whereas the overlying palaeosol may be attributable to pedogenic activity during MIS 3. The absence of material younger than 33 ka close to the surface of this rounded spur landform is probably the result of either non-deposition or erosional stripping in response to climatic change, or episodic uplift in this seismically active region. Copyright

  15. Late Quaternary Activity and Seismogenic Potential of the Gonave microplate: South Coast Fault Zone of Southern Jamaica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, B.; Mann, P.; Prentice, C.; King, W.; Wiggins-Grandison, M.; Demets, C.; Tikoff, B.

    2008-12-01

    of the fault. Further work, including geodetic surveys and fault trenching, will better constrain the amount of late Quaternary motion on the SCFZ.

  16. Late quaternary slip-rate variations along the Warm Springs Valley fault system, northern Walker Lane, California-Nevada border

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, Ryan; dePolo, Craig; Briggs, Richard W.; Crone, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which faults exhibit temporally varying slip rates has important consequences for models of fault mechanics and probabilistic seismic hazard. Here, we explore the temporal behavior of the dextral‐slip Warm Springs Valley fault system, which is part of a network of closely spaced (10–20 km) faults in the northern Walker Lane (California–Nevada border). We develop a late Quaternary slip record for the fault using Quaternary mapping and high‐resolution topographic data from airborne Light Distance and Ranging (LiDAR). The faulted Fort Sage alluvial fan (40.06° N, 119.99° W) is dextrally displaced 98+42/-43 m, and we estimate the age of the alluvial fan to be 41.4+10.0/-4.8 to 55.7±9.2  ka, based on a terrestrial cosmogenic 10Be depth profile and 36Cl analyses on basalt boulders, respectively. The displacement and age constraints for the fan yield a slip rate of 1.8 +0.8/-0.8 mm/yr to 2.4 +1.2/-1.1 mm/yr (2σ) along the northern Warm Springs Valley fault system for the past 41.4–55.7 ka. In contrast to this longer‐term slip rate, shorelines associated with the Sehoo highstand of Lake Lahontan (~15.8  ka) adjacent to the Fort Sage fan are dextrally faulted at most 3 m, which limits a maximum post‐15.8 ka slip rate to 0.2  mm/yr. These relations indicate that the post‐Lahontan slip rate on the fault is only about one‐tenth the longer‐term (41–56 ka) average slip rate. This apparent slip‐rate variation may be related to co‐dependent interaction with the nearby Honey Lake fault system, which shows evidence of an accelerated period of mid‐Holocene earthquakes.

  17. Identifying the pollen of an extinct spruce species in the Late Quaternary sediments of the Tunica Hills region, south-eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luke Mander,; Jacklyn Rodriguez,; Pietra G. Mueller,; Jackson, Stephen T.; Surangi W. Punyasena,

    2014-01-01

    Late Quaternary fluvial deposits in the Tunica Hills region of Louisiana and Mississippi are rich in spruce macrofossils of the extinct species Picea critchfieldii, the one recognized plant extinction of the Late Quaternary. However, the morphology of P. critchfieldii pollen is unknown, presenting a barrier to the interpretation of pollen spectra from the last glacial of North America. To address this issue, we undertook a morphometric study of Picea pollen from Tunica Hills. Morphometric data, together with qualitative observations of pollen morphology using Apotome fluorescence microscopy, indicate that Picea pollen from Tunica Hills is morphologically distinct from the pollen of P. glauca, P. mariana and P. rubens. Measurements of grain length, corpus width and corpus height indicate that Picea pollen from Tunica Hills is larger than the pollen of P. mariana and P. rubens, and is slightly larger than P. glauca pollen. We argue that the morphologically distinctive Tunica Hills Picea pollen was probably produced by the extinct spruce species P. critchfieldii. These morphological differences could be used to identify P. critchfieldii in existing and newly collected pollen records, which would refine its paleoecologic and biogeographic history and clarify the nature and timing of its extinction in the Late Quaternary.

  18. Age determination of late Pleistocene marine transgression in western Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szabo, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    Dating molluscs from sediments representing the Kotzebuan marine transgression in Alaska yields an average uranium-series age of 104,000 ?? 22,000 yrs B.P. This and other selected Pleistocene marine deposits of western Alaska are tentatively correlated with radiometrically dated units of eastern Baffin Island, Arctic Canada. ?? 1982.

  19. Late quaternary vegetation of southern Isla Grande de Chiloñ, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagran, Carolina

    1988-05-01

    Late-glacial-Holocene forest history of southern Isla Chiloé (latitude 43°10' S) was reconstructed on the basis of pollen analysis in three profiles (Laguna Soledad, Laguna Chaiguata, Puerto Carmen). Prior to 12,500 yr B.P. pollen records are dominated by plant taxa characteristic of open habitats (Zone I). From 12,500 yr B.P. to the present, tree species predominate in the pollen records (Zones II-V). Between 12,500 and 9500 yr B.P. ombrophyllous taxa ( Nothofagus, Podocarpus nubigena. Myrtaceae, Fitzroya/Pilgerodendron, and Drimys) are frequent in all pollen diagrams, suggesting a wetter and colder climate than the present. Between 9000 and 5500 yr B.P. Valdivian forest elements, such as Nothofagus dombeyi type, Weinmannia, and Eucryphia/Caldcluvia, dominate, indicating a period of drier and warmer climate. From 5500 yr B.P. onward, the expansion of mixed North Patagonian-Subantarctic forest elements and the increased frequence of Tepualia suggest increased rainfall and temperatures oscillating around the modern values. The change from open to forest vegetation (ca. 12,500 yr B.P.) probably represents the most pronounced climatic change in the record and can be interpreted as the glacial-postglacial transition in the study area.

  20. Out of America: ancient DNA evidence for a new world origin of late quaternary woolly mammoths.

    PubMed

    Debruyne, Regis; Chu, Genevieve; King, Christine E; Bos, Kirsti; Kuch, Melanie; Schwarz, Carsten; Szpak, Paul; Gröcke, Darren R; Matheus, Paul; Zazula, Grant; Guthrie, Dale; Froese, Duane; Buigues, Bernard; de Marliave, Christian; Flemming, Clare; Poinar, Debi; Fisher, Daniel; Southon, John; Tikhonov, Alexei N; MacPhee, Ross D E; Poinar, Hendrik N

    2008-09-01

    Although the iconic mammoth of the Late Pleistocene, the woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius), has traditionally been regarded as the end point of a single anagenetically evolving lineage, recent paleontological and molecular studies have shown that successive allopatric speciation events must have occurred within Pleistocene Mammuthus in Asia, with subsequent expansion and hybridization between nominal taxa [1, 2]. However, the role of North American mammoth populations in these events has not been adequately explored from an ancient-DNA standpoint. To undertake this task, we analyzed mtDNA from a large data set consisting of mammoth samples from across Holarctica (n = 160) and representing most of radiocarbon time. Our evidence shows that, during the terminal Pleistocene, haplotypes originating in and characteristic of New World populations replaced or succeeded those endemic to Asia and western Beringia. Also, during the Last Glacial Maximum, mammoth populations do not appear to have suffered an overall decline in diversity, despite differing responses on either side of the Bering land bridge. In summary, the "Out-of-America" hypothesis holds that the dispersal of North American woolly mammoths into other parts of Holarctica created major phylogeographic structuring within Mammuthus primigenius populations, shaping the last phase of their evolutionary history before their demise.

  1. Late Quaternary history of the southwestern St. Lawrence Lowlands and adjacent Adirondack Highlands

    SciTech Connect

    Pair, D.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The reconstruction of Late Wisconsinan ice retreat, proglacial lakes, and Champlain Sea history from the northwest Adirondack slope and adjacent St. Lawrence Lowlands is critical to the synthesis of a regional picture of deglacial events in the eastern Great Lakes region. Unfortunately, these same areas are well known for their limited exposures, landforms covered by thick forest, large tracts of land inaccessible to detailed field mapping, and the overall paucity of glacial materials preserved on upland surfaces. Despite these limitations, a model which utilizes multiple and field-truthed evidence has been used to designate areas where ice border deposits indicate a substantial recessional position. It employs the following criteria in this analysis: sedimentology and morphostratigraphy of morainal landform segments and related sediments; orientation and continuity of ice border drainage channels; and the relationship of ice borders and drainage systems to well documented local and regional water bodies which accompanied ice retreat. The results of this approach have provided a unique regional picture of deglaciation. Despite the inherent limitations of working in upland areas to reconstruct glacial events, detailed morphostratigraphic correlations based on multiple lines of evidence can yield important information. The positions of five former ice borders have been reconstructed from the available data. These ice margins correspond closely with those documented previously by others adjoining areas. This type of study, utilizing multiple and field-truthed lines of evidence, constitutes a tangible step towards understanding the nature and history of ice retreat along this portion of the Laurentide Ice Sheet.

  2. Out of America: ancient DNA evidence for a new world origin of late quaternary woolly mammoths.

    PubMed

    Debruyne, Regis; Chu, Genevieve; King, Christine E; Bos, Kirsti; Kuch, Melanie; Schwarz, Carsten; Szpak, Paul; Gröcke, Darren R; Matheus, Paul; Zazula, Grant; Guthrie, Dale; Froese, Duane; Buigues, Bernard; de Marliave, Christian; Flemming, Clare; Poinar, Debi; Fisher, Daniel; Southon, John; Tikhonov, Alexei N; MacPhee, Ross D E; Poinar, Hendrik N

    2008-09-01

    Although the iconic mammoth of the Late Pleistocene, the woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius), has traditionally been regarded as the end point of a single anagenetically evolving lineage, recent paleontological and molecular studies have shown that successive allopatric speciation events must have occurred within Pleistocene Mammuthus in Asia, with subsequent expansion and hybridization between nominal taxa [1, 2]. However, the role of North American mammoth populations in these events has not been adequately explored from an ancient-DNA standpoint. To undertake this task, we analyzed mtDNA from a large data set consisting of mammoth samples from across Holarctica (n = 160) and representing most of radiocarbon time. Our evidence shows that, during the terminal Pleistocene, haplotypes originating in and characteristic of New World populations replaced or succeeded those endemic to Asia and western Beringia. Also, during the Last Glacial Maximum, mammoth populations do not appear to have suffered an overall decline in diversity, despite differing responses on either side of the Bering land bridge. In summary, the "Out-of-America" hypothesis holds that the dispersal of North American woolly mammoths into other parts of Holarctica created major phylogeographic structuring within Mammuthus primigenius populations, shaping the last phase of their evolutionary history before their demise. PMID:18771918

  3. Plant Functional Variability in Response to Late-Quaternary Climate Change Recorded in Ancient Packrat Middens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmgren, C. A.; Potts, D. L.

    2006-12-01

    Responses of plant functional traits to environmental variability are of enduring interest because they constrain organism performance and ecosystem function. However, most inferences regarding plant functional trait response to climatic variability have been limited to the modern period. To better understand plant functional response to long-term climate variability and how adjustments in leaf morphology may contribute to patterns of species establishment, persistence, or extirpation, we measured specific leaf area (SLA) from macrofossils preserved in ancient packrat middens collected along the Arizona/New Mexico border, USA. Our record spanned more than 32,000 years and included six woodland and Chihuahuan Desert species: Berberis cf. haematocarpa, Juniperus cf. coahuilensis, Juniperus osteosperma, Larrea tridentata, Prosopis glandulosa and Parthenium incanum. We predicted that regional climatic warming and drying since the late Pleistocene would result in intraspecific decreases in SLA. As predicted, SLA was positively correlated with midden age for three of the six species (L. tridentata, J. osteosperma, B. cf. haematocarpa). SLA was also negatively correlated with December (L. tridentata, J. cf. coahuilensis) or June (B. cf. haematocarpa, J. osteosperma) insolation. A unique record of vegetation community dynamics, plant macrofossils preserved in packrat middens also represent a rich and largely untapped source of information on long-term trends in species functional response to environmental change.

  4. Thermoluminescence and excess 226Ra decay dating of late Quaternary fluvial sands, East Alligator River, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Andrew; Wohl, Ellen; East, Jon

    1992-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dating was applied to seven samples of siliceous fluvial sands from the East Alligator River of Northern Australia, giving ages ranging from modern to 6000 yr B.P. Two methods of estimating the equivalent dose (ED), total bleach and regenerative, were applied to the 90- to 125-μm quartz fraction of the samples in order to determine the reliability and internal consistency of the technique. High-resolution γ and α spectroscopy were used to measure radionuclide contents; these measurements revealed an excess 226Ra activity compared with 230Th. This excess decreased with depth, and was used directly to derive mean sedimentation rates, and thus sediment ages. Both this method and one 14C date confirmed the validity of the TL values, which increased systematically with depth and were consistent with site stratigraphy. TL was of limited use in the dating of these late Holocene deposits because of age uncertainties of 500 to 1600 yr, resulting from a significant residual ED. This residual probably resulted from incomplete bleaching during reworking upstream of the sampling site. For Pleistocene deposits, the residual ED will be less significant because of higher total EDs, and TL dates will be correspondingly more accurate.

  5. Late Quaternary stratigraphy and luminescence geochronology of the northeastern Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahan, S.A.; Miller, D.M.; Menges, C.M.; Yount, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The chronology of the Holocene and late Pleistocene deposits of the northeastern Mojave Desert have been largely obtained using radiocarbon ages. Our study refines and extends this framework using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) to date deposits from Valjean Valley, Silurian Lake Playa, Red Pass, and California Valley. Of particular interest are eolian fine silts incorporated in ground-water discharge (GWD) deposits bracketed at 185-140 and 20-50 ka. Alluvial fan deposits proved amenable for OSL by dating both eolian sand lenses and reworked eolian sand in a matrix of gravel that occurs within the fan stratigraphy. Lacustrine sand in spits and bars also yielded acceptable OSL ages. These OSL ages fill gaps in the geochronology of desert deposits, which can provide data relevant to understanding the responses of several depositional systems to regional changes in climate. This study identifies the most promising deposits for future luminescence dating and suggests that for several regions of the Mojave Desert, sediments from previously undated landforms can be more accurately placed within correct geologic map units.

  6. Drainage lineaments in late Quaternary sediments, Ascension and East Baton Rouge Parishes, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Birdseye, R.U.; Christians, G.L.; Olson, J.L.

    1988-09-01

    Analysis of conventional aerial photographs, NHAP imagery, and topographic maps covering Ascension and East Baton Rouge Parishes in southeastern Louisiana reveals fine-textured parallel sets of drainage lineaments and numerous fluvial anomalies. Linear physiographic features include stream channels, natural levees, stream valleys, rectangular drainage patterns, and terrace scarps. Late Pleistocene and Holocene surfaces are involved, but only small drainages are affected and no such control is exerted on the Mississippi river. Most lineaments show preferred northeast and northwest trends. Orientations of mapped joint systems are similar to lineament orientations, which suggests that trends of physiographic lineaments are controlled by underlying structure. Several surface faults are mapped in the northern portion of the region, all of which strike essentially east-west. Salt domes are located in the subsurface to the south; however, they have no geomorphic expression and do not seem to be associated with the lineaments. Therefore, joints rather than faults or salt diapirs are a likely structural control. Joints may provide paths of weakness along which surface drainage might develop preferentially. Thus, joints probably exert an important control on the geomorphology of the region. The joint pattern appears to be related to the local distribution of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic strata, and may result from regional subsidence due to the thick accumulation of deltaic sediments. Conclusive subsurface data are currently unavailable, and shallow seismic surveys in the future may strengthen the case for an interpretation of structural control of drainage.

  7. Multiple ash layers in late Quaternary sediments from the Central Indian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascarenhas-Pereira, M. B. L.; Nagender Nath, B.; Iyer, S. D.; Borole, D. V.; Parthiban, G.; Jijin, R.; Khedekar, V.

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated three sediment cores collected from water depths > 5000 m along the transect 76°30‧E in close proximity to a fracture zone in the Central Indian Basin (CIB). The cores yielded five volcanic horizons of which four have visual and dispersed shards. Rhyolitic glass shards of bubble wall, platy, angular and blocky types were retrieved from various stratigraphic horizons in the cores. The abundance of glass shards, composition of bulk sediments, and 230Thexcess ages of the host sediments were used to distinguish the volcanic horizons. Of the four volcanic horizons, three are now newly reported and correspond to ages of ~ 85, 107-109 and 142-146 ka while the fourth horizon is of 70-75 ka. By using trace element ratios and Cr and Nb-based normative calculations, cryptotephra has been identified for the first time from the CIB sediment. The cryptotephra forms the fifth ash horizon and is of ~ 34 ka. A comparison with the published data on volcanic tephra in and around the Indian Ocean indicate the shard rich horizon (SRH) of 70-75 ka to resemble the Younger Toba Tuffs (YTT), while the other volcanic horizons that were deposited during different time periods do not correlate with any known marine or terrestrial records. These tephra layers have produced a tephrostratigraphic framework across the tectonically and volcanically complex regions of the CIB. Due to the lack of terrestrial equivalents of these tephra, it is hypothesized that the newly found volcanic horizons may have been derived from submarine volcanic eruptions. Multiple layers of submarine volcaniclastic deposits found at water depths as great as 5300 m reaffirm the growing belief that submarine phreatomagmatic eruptions are much more common in the intraplate region of the Indian Ocean than previously reported.

  8. Increased rates of large‐magnitude explosive eruptions in Japan in the late Neogene and Quaternary

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, R. S. J.; Wallace, L. M.; Engwell, S. L.; Scourse, E. M.; Barnard, N. H.; Kandlbauer, J.; Brown, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tephra layers in marine sediment cores from scientific ocean drilling largely record high‐magnitude silicic explosive eruptions in the Japan arc for up to the last 20 million years. Analysis of the thickness variation with distance of 180 tephra layers from a global data set suggests that the majority of the visible tephra layers used in this study are the products of caldera‐forming eruptions with magnitude (M) > 6, considering their distances at the respective drilling sites to their likely volcanic sources. Frequency of visible tephra layers in cores indicates a marked increase in rates of large magnitude explosive eruptions at ∼8 Ma, 6–4 Ma, and further increase after ∼2 Ma. These changes are attributed to major changes in tectonic plate interactions. Lower rates of large magnitude explosive volcanism in the Miocene are related to a strike‐slip‐dominated boundary (and temporary cessation or deceleration of subduction) between the Philippine Sea Plate and southwest Japan, combined with the possibility that much of the arc in northern Japan was submerged beneath sea level partly due to previous tectonic extension of northern Honshu related to formation of the Sea of Japan. Changes in plate motions and subduction dynamics during the ∼8 Ma to present period led to (1) increased arc‐normal subduction in southwest Japan (and resumption of arc volcanism) and (2) shift from extension to compression of the upper plate in northeast Japan, leading to uplift, crustal thickening and favorable conditions for accumulation of the large volumes of silicic magma needed for explosive caldera‐forming eruptions.

  9. Increased rates of large-magnitude explosive eruptions in Japan in the late Neogene and Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahony, S. H.; Sparks, R. S. J.; Wallace, L. M.; Engwell, S. L.; Scourse, E. M.; Barnard, N. H.; Kandlbauer, J.; Brown, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    Tephra layers in marine sediment cores from scientific ocean drilling largely record high-magnitude silicic explosive eruptions in the Japan arc for up to the last 20 million years. Analysis of the thickness variation with distance of 180 tephra layers from a global data set suggests that the majority of the visible tephra layers used in this study are the products of caldera-forming eruptions with magnitude (M) > 6, considering their distances at the respective drilling sites to their likely volcanic sources. Frequency of visible tephra layers in cores indicates a marked increase in rates of large magnitude explosive eruptions at ˜8 Ma, 6-4 Ma, and further increase after ˜2 Ma. These changes are attributed to major changes in tectonic plate interactions. Lower rates of large magnitude explosive volcanism in the Miocene are related to a strike-slip-dominated boundary (and temporary cessation or deceleration of subduction) between the Philippine Sea Plate and southwest Japan, combined with the possibility that much of the arc in northern Japan was submerged beneath sea level partly due to previous tectonic extension of northern Honshu related to formation of the Sea of Japan. Changes in plate motions and subduction dynamics during the ˜8 Ma to present period led to (1) increased arc-normal subduction in southwest Japan (and resumption of arc volcanism) and (2) shift from extension to compression of the upper plate in northeast Japan, leading to uplift, crustal thickening and favorable conditions for accumulation of the large volumes of silicic magma needed for explosive caldera-forming eruptions.

  10. Increased rates of large‐magnitude explosive eruptions in Japan in the late Neogene and Quaternary

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, R. S. J.; Wallace, L. M.; Engwell, S. L.; Scourse, E. M.; Barnard, N. H.; Kandlbauer, J.; Brown, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tephra layers in marine sediment cores from scientific ocean drilling largely record high‐magnitude silicic explosive eruptions in the Japan arc for up to the last 20 million years. Analysis of the thickness variation with distance of 180 tephra layers from a global data set suggests that the majority of the visible tephra layers used in this study are the products of caldera‐forming eruptions with magnitude (M) > 6, considering their distances at the respective drilling sites to their likely volcanic sources. Frequency of visible tephra layers in cores indicates a marked increase in rates of large magnitude explosive eruptions at ∼8 Ma, 6–4 Ma, and further increase after ∼2 Ma. These changes are attributed to major changes in tectonic plate interactions. Lower rates of large magnitude explosive volcanism in the Miocene are related to a strike‐slip‐dominated boundary (and temporary cessation or deceleration of subduction) between the Philippine Sea Plate and southwest Japan, combined with the possibility that much of the arc in northern Japan was submerged beneath sea level partly due to previous tectonic extension of northern Honshu related to formation of the Sea of Japan. Changes in plate motions and subduction dynamics during the ∼8 Ma to present period led to (1) increased arc‐normal subduction in southwest Japan (and resumption of arc volcanism) and (2) shift from extension to compression of the upper plate in northeast Japan, leading to uplift, crustal thickening and favorable conditions for accumulation of the large volumes of silicic magma needed for explosive caldera‐forming eruptions. PMID:27656115

  11. Late Quaternary eolian dust in surficial deposits of a Colorado Plateau grassland: Controls on distribution and ecologic effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, R.L.; Reheis, M.C.; Neff, J.C.; Goldstein, H.; Yount, J.

    2006-01-01

    in these surficial deposits during the late Quaternary are important to modern ecosystem dynamics because some plants today utilize nutrients deposited as long ago as about 12-15 ky and because variations in fine-grained (silt) sediment, including eolian dust, influence soil-moisture capacity.

  12. Late Quaternary slip rate of the frontal thrust of the Qilian Shan , NE Tibetan plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagnac, J.-D.; Molnar, P.; Yuan, D.-Y.; Ge, W.-P.; Zheng, W.-J.

    2009-04-01

    The Qilian Shan, with peak elevations >5500 m, seems to have been built largely during late Miocene time (e.g. Tapponnier et al., 2001) and continues to be seismically active (Hetzel et al., 2004), having produced the very large the Gulang earthquake in 1927 (M=8.0) (e.g., Zheng et al., 2005). Associated deformation is partitioned into thrust faulting on planes dipping south-southwest and north-northeast and large sinistral strike-slip faults oriented WSW-ENE to WNW-ESE, as well as second order dextral faults oriented NNW-SSW. The thickened crust of the Qilian Shan seems to be due to reverse faulting in a region that seems to have grown east-northeastward as the Altyn Tagh fault extended eastward (e.g. Burchfiel et al., 1989). We constrain the slip rate of a frontal thrust of the Qilian Shan over millennial time scale by cosmogenic (10Be) exposure age dating of terraces offset by the reverse fault, combined with structural investigations, satellite imagery, topographic profiling, and exposure dating. We surveyed two terrace levels, and from each we took 6-7 samples in profiles dug to depths of two meters. These allowed us to constrain inheritance (equivalent to ~0-2 ka, for each) and to determine precise ages of abandonment of the terraces: 29.9 ± 7.8 kyrs for the upper terrace and 16.3 ± 4.4 kyrs for the lower one. Topographic profiles 4 km in length, with a determination of probable burial of the footwall by sediments, yield offsets of the surfaces of 96.4 ± 4.4 m and 40.1 ± 2.8 m.The average vertical rate is 2.8 ± 1.3 mm/yr, with a horizontal slip rate of ~2.5 ± 2.0 mm/yr. The vertical and horizontal rates determined by this study contrast with slower rates determined farther north by Hetzel et al. (2004) on a similar thrust fault. Our results are consistent with GPS constraints, which show a NNE shortening direction across the Qilian Shan at a rate of 5.5 ± 1.8 mm/yr (Zhang et al., 2004). Slip on the studied thrust fault over millennial timescale account

  13. The late Quaternary extinction and future resurrection of birds on Pacific islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steadman, David W.; Martin, Paul S.

    2003-04-01

    People have lived on tropical Pacific islands over the past 30,000 years (Bismarcks, Solomons) or 3000 to 1000 years (the rest of Oceania). Their activities have led to the loss of many thousands of populations and as many as 2000 species of birds that probably otherwise would exist today. This extinction event is documented by avian fossils from archaeological (cultural) and paleontological (noncultural) sites from nearly 70 islands in 19 island groups. Extinction of birds in Oceania rivals the late Pleistocene loss of large mammals in North America as the best substantiated rapid extinction episode in the vertebrate fossil record. Some avian extinctions in Oceania occurred within a century or less after human arrival, while others required millennia or even tens of millennia. Any of these time frames is rapid in an evolutionary or geochronological sense. Inter-island differences in the speed and extent of extinction can be explained by variation in abiotic (A), biotic (B), and cultural (C) factors. Levels of extinction on large, near islands can be comparable to those on small, remote islands when C factors (such as high human population density and introduction of invasive plants and animals) override A factors (such as large land area or little isolation) or B factors (such as rich indigenous floras and faunas). An innovative, proactive conservation strategy is needed not only to prevent further extinctions of birds in Oceania, but also to restart evolution of some of the lineages that have suffered the most loss, such as flightless rails. This strategy should focus on islands with ABC traits that retard rather than enhance extinction.

  14. Late Quaternary sedimentation on the Leidy Creek fan, Nevada-California: Geomorphic responses to climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reheis, M.C.; Slate, J.L.; Throckmorton, C.K.; McGeehin, J.P.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Dengler, L.

    1996-01-01

    late Holocene.

  15. Late-Quaternary Exhumation of Namche Barwa Constrained Using Low-temperature Multi-OSL-thermochronometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, G. E.; Herman, F.

    2015-12-01

    Exhumation rates >5 mm a-1 have been reported for Namche Barwa, making it one of the most rapidly exhuming places on earth. The driver of such high exhumation rates has been highly debated, and two principle hypotheses have evolved: first the aneurysm model (Zeitler et al., 2001) which proposes that a weakening of the crust coupled with extremely active surface processes causes a spatially stationary locus of exhumation. Secondly a northward plunging antiform that is progressively migrating north-eastward (Seward and Burg, 2008) may instead explain the concentration of extremely low cooling ages and rapid exhumation. Distinguishing the effects of tectonic and surface processes, as well as climate is complex, especially given that most existing thermochronometric systems are unable to resolve late-stage cooling histories. Here we present multi-OSL-thermochronometry which comprises a series of different systems with closure temperature ranging from 30 to 70 oC. We have applied this new technique to a suite of samples from the Namche Barwa massif and are able to resolve cooling histories over 0.1 Ma timescales. Our data indicate propagation of a knick-point along the Parlung river, which can be explained by progressive north-eastward migration of a northward plunging antiform. We suggest therefore that river incision does not feedback onto tectonics, as proposed by the aneurysm model. References Seward, D., Burg, J-P., 2008. Growth of the Namche Barwa Syntaxis and associated evolution of the Tsangpo Gorge: Constraints from structural and thermochronological data. Tectonophysics 451, 282-289. Zeitler, P.K., Meltzer, A.S., Koons, P.O., et al., 2001. Erosion, Himalayan Geodynamics, and the Geomorphology of Metamorphism. GSA Today 11, 4-9.

  16. Late Quaternary deglacial history of the Mérida Andes, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stansell, Nathan D.; Abbott, Mark B.; Polissar, Pratigya J.; Wolfe, Alexander P.; Bezada, Maximiliano; Rull, Valentí

    2005-10-01

    Radiocarbon-dated sediment cores from seven lakes and two bogs spanning the Cordillera de Mérida in the Venezuelan Andes were used to identify and date the regional history of late Pleistocene and Holocene glacial activity. Coring sites were selected at different elevations across a pronounced rain shadow from southeast (wet) to northwest (dry). Sediment lithostratigraphy and magnetic susceptibility, in conjunction with AMS radiocarbon dates on macrofossils and charcoal, were used to constrain deglaciation. The local expression of the Last Glacial Maximum occurred between 22 750 and 19 960 cal. yr BP. On the wetter southeastern side of the Cordillera de Mérida, glaciers had significantly retreated by 15 700 cal. yr BP, followed by several minor glacial advances and retreats between 14 850 and 13 830 cal. yr BP. At least one major glacial readvance occurred between 13 830 and 10 000 cal. yrBP in the wetter southeastern sector of the region. The drier northwest side of the Cordillera de Mérida records initial glacial retreat by 14240cal.yrBP. Multiple sites on both sides of the Mérida Andes record a further phase of extensive deglaciation approximately 10000cal.yrBP. However, the north-northwest facing Mucubají catchment remained partially glaciated until ca. 6000cal.yrBP. Deglacial ages from the Venezuelan Andes are consistently younger than those reported from the Southern Hemisphere Andes, suggesting an inter-hemispheric deglacial lag in the northern tropics of the order of two thousand years.

  17. Late Quaternary Climate Forcing of Rapid Sedimentation and Erosion Processes in the NW Himalaya (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookhagen, B.; Scherler, D.; Strecker, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    The intensity of the Asian summer-monsoon circulation varies over decadal to millennial time scales and is reflected in changes in surface processes, terrestrial environments, and marine sediment records. The impact of climatic forcing on the landscape’s response and associated erosion processes varies, depending on magnitude and size of the climatic events, as well as on the tectonic and geomorphologic preconditioning of the landscape. Here, we present new surface-exposure ages combined with previously published data to quantify erosion and process rates and their changes through the time. The NW Himalaya is located at the end of the monsoonal conveyer belt that transports moisture from the Bay of Bengal to the Sutlej Valley and farther west. Along the Himalaya, orographic barriers force out rainfall with peak amounts located consistently at a 3-km-radius relief of ~1 km. The tail and northward end of the rainfall distribution decays rapidly with only little or no moisture reaching the southern Tibetan Plateau. However, during a generally stronger monsoon circulation in the early Holocene called the Intensified Monsoon Phase rainfall reached the today arid regions of the northern Himalaya and southern Tibetan Plateau as documented in numerous terrestrial sediment archives. During this time period in the NW Himalaya, the presently arid, high-elevation areas have been impacted by flooding and heavy landsliding ultimately leading to a significant increase in sediment-flux rates. Some of the sediment material has been derived from glaciers. We show that the transiently-stored sediments in these valleys have been rapidly removed during the early Holocene at the onset of the Intensified Monsoon Phase. The limiting factor for sediment removal and transport on millennial timescales are large bedrock landslides that impounded the river network and formed intramontane basins lasting for several thousands of years. We suggest a feedback process between sediment removal and

  18. Late Quaternary deformation history of the volcanic edifice of Panarea, Aeolian Arc, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchi, F.; Tranne, C. A.; Calanchi, N.; Rossi, P. L.

    2007-01-01

    A series of raised palaeoshorelines is documented along the emergent coastal slopes of Panarea and surrounding islets at elevations of 115 (palaeoshoreline Ia) and 100 m a.s.l. (Ib), 62.5 m (II), 35 m (III), 12 m (IV), 10-12 (Va) and 5 m (Vb). According to stratigraphic constraints and cross-cutting relationships, these palaeoshorelines are correlated with discrete high sea-level stillstands during marine oxygen-isotope stages (MIS) 5e, 5c, 5a and 3. Coastal elevation changes suggest the occurrence of a long-term, sustained uplift trend of the volcanic edifice since the last interglacial (last 124 ka). The uplift rates are not constant but display a progressive deceleration from maximum values of 1.5-1.58 m/ka, in the period between 124 and 100 ka, down to the lowest values of 0.66-0.69 m/ka, which tend to be constant starting from 81 ka BP. The long-term deformation pattern of Panarea suggests that a transitory, volcano-related component of uplift interplayed with the regional tectonic component affecting the sub-volcanic basement, which has undergone a persistent and widespread uplift since the mid-Pleistocene. The volcano-related component of uplift, prevailing between 124 and 100-81 ka, is interpreted as the result of visco-elastic deformation mechanisms which characterize the progressive re-equilibration of the shallow magmatic system following the incoming quiescence of the volcanic edifice. The long-term uplift values at Panarea are higher than in the main portion of the western-central Aeolian Arc, where a mean uplift rate of 0.34 m/ka was estimated since the last interglacial (last 124 ka). Such a pattern of deformation on a regional scale may be a response to active deformation processes connected with the southeastward rollback of the subducting Ionian slab which is still active only in correspondence with the eastern sector of the Aeolian Arc (including Panarea). In the short-term, a localized submergence trend has been documented at the nearby islet of

  19. Late Quaternary Depositional History and Anthropogenic Impacts of Western Long Island Sound, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, C. M.; Cormier, M.; Marchese, P.; Zheng, Y.; Stewart, G.; Acosta, V.; Bowman, A.; Cortes, A.; Leon, L.; Rosa, M.; Semple, D.; Thaker, N.; Vargas, W.; Williams, L.

    2006-12-01

    In June 2006, we surveyed the seafloor of western Long Island Sound with the R/V HUGH SHARP and collected multibeam bathymetry, chirp subbottom profiling, side-scan sonar imagery, and sediment samples (25 gravity cores, 11 multicores, and 10 grabs). In addition, 36 CTD hydrocast stations measured O, pH, alkalinity, trace metals, nutrients, Polonium-210, Lead-210, Thorium-234, organic carbon, and pigments. Continuous weather measurements, and water column properties using both CTD casts and a towed Scanfish were also carried out. Biological sampling included benthic grabs and plankton nets. The National Science Foundation under the "Opportunities to Enhance Diversity in the Geosciences" Program funded this one-week survey. Nine students from underrepresented groups in the geosciences and five P.I.'s participated in the field program. The major scientific objectives were to study the deglaciation of the Laurentide Ice Sheet and Holocene transgression of sea level to document age, sedimentation processes, and climate, and the impact of anthropogenic activities in the sediments, biota, and waters of the estuary. A deep (35 m) and narrow (< 1km) channel incised into bedrock characterizes the East River section of western Long Island Sound. In contrast, thick sedimentary deposits characterize the eastern part of the study area, 20 to 45 km east of New York City. Subbottom penetration reached in some instances 40 m, but is limited to less than 5 m where sediments are gas-charged. Four seismic sequences are imaged in the chirp records that we interpret to span the Last Glacial Maximum to Present: strong irregular erosional surfaces beneath parallel seismic reflectors are interpreted as glacial erosional surface and/or moraines, and as Glacial lake Connecticut sediments ~25 m thick, respectively. A thin veneer (<1 m) of acoustically transparent sediment is interpreted as recent deposits. It overlays a roughly 15 m thick unit interpreted as Holocene transgressive marine

  20. Late Quaternary Biomass Changes from 13C Measurements in a Highland Peatbog from Equatorial Africa (Burundi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aucour, Anne-Marie; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Bonnefille, Raymonde

    1994-03-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios of total organic matter were measured in two cores collected from the Kashiru peatbog in Burundi, Equatorial Africa. The record, which spans at least the last 40,000 yr, documents the C 3-C 4 biomass balance in the organic sediment. Among the major modern peat formers, most plants are C 3 species and are characterized by δ 13C values of -25.5 ± 2.3% (vs PDB). The C 4 plants, which are characterized by higher δ 13C values (-11.3 ± 0.7%) belong to the Gramineae ( Miscanthidium sp.) and Cyperaceae families ( Cyperus latifolius, C. papyrus, Pycreus nigricans). In the fossil record, δ 13C values of total organic matter vary between -28 and -15% in response to the relative fluxes of C 3 and C 4 plants. Before 30,000 yr B.P., low δ 13C values (-23.5 ± 1.1%) match high arboreal pollen contents. From 30,000 to 15,000 yr B.P., higher δ 13C values (-17.6 ± 1.1%) correspond to a significant increase in percentages of grass pollen. During this episode, a short and sharp shift toward lighter carbon isotopic compositions at 21,000 yr B.P. is synchronous with higher input of arboreal pollen. From 15,000 to 12,000 yr B.P., the 13C content decreases (δ 13C = -22.9 ± 1.4%). This shift, which cannot be explained by an increase in the arboreal vegetation, could be explained by the spreading of C 3 Gramineae or C 3 Cyperaceae. The interval from 12,000 to 7000 yr B.P. is poorly documented in these cores due to much lower organic matter accumulation. Low δ 13C values (δ 13C = -25.2 ± 1.3%) are observed from 7000 to 5000 yr B.P., when the pollen data show development of C 3 mountain forest. The Late Holocene is characterized by a mixed C 3-C 4 organic matter accumulation (δ 13C = -20.9 ± 1.6%). This study depicts a change in the dominant photosynthetic pathway among the herbaceous components, notably at the glacial-interglacial transition, when C 3 plants were favored by increased water supply and/or higher atmospheric CO 2 concentration.

  1. Isotopic and geochemical signatures of Late Quaternary sediments in the Fram Strait area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccali, J.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Carignan, J.; Reisberg, L. C.

    2010-12-01

    Arctic freshwater/sea-ice export through Fram Strait contributes to the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and acts as a trigger or feedback mechanism in the climate/ocean system. Here, geochemical and isotopic analyses of cores raised along a transect through the Strait are used to document changes in sediment sources and sea-ice transport since the LGM. Radiogenic isotope and elemental data in leachable fractions vs residues are used as proxies for water mass vs sediment source signatures, respectively. Unequivocal linkage between leachates and water-mass properties are illustrated by the anthropogenic-lead overprint in leachates from core-top sediments. Below this polluted layer, leachates and residues from late Holocene sediments carry distinct geochemical signatures E and W of the Strait. Eastward, below the North Atlantic Water (NAW) mass flowing northward, Th/Zr and Th/Pb concentration ratios ranging 0.040-0.041 and 0.85-0.90, respectively, label GIN seas and western Spitzbergen sediment-sources. Westward, below outflowing Arctic waters and sea-ice routes, these ratios range 0.032-0.035 and 0.72-0.75, respectively, and label NE Greenland and Arctic sediment sources. Pb-isotopes exhibit a similar pattern with sediment carrying a mixed Variscan-Pan-African signature below the NAW route, and a mixture of less radiogenic sources in sediments deposited below the outflowing Arctic waters and sea-ice route. Back in time, divergent trends in some radiogenic isotope values are recorded westward, below the outflowing Arctic waters and sea-ice route. Whereas isotopic properties of residues suggest sedimentary supplies originating from the Canadian Arctic and/or the NW Greenland margin, lead data from leachates bear an "Arctic Ocean" signature illustrating variable relative contributions from the Russian vs Canadian ice-margins and/or rivers. During deglacial times, a significant change in sedimentary supplies is recorded at ~ 14 ka along with some

  2. Subsurface stratigraphy and geochemistry of late Quaternary evaporites, Searles Lake, California, with a section on radiocarbon ages of stratigraphic units

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, George I.; Stuiver, Minze

    1979-01-01

    Searles Lake is a dry salt pan, about 100 km 2 in area, that lies on the floor of Searles Valley, in the desert of southeast California. Several salt bodies of late Quaternary age lie beneath the surface, mostly composed of sodium and potassium carbonate, sulfate, chloride, and borate minerals. Mud layers separate the salt bodies, which contain interstitial brine that is the source of large quantities of industrial chemicals. The value of annual production from the deposit exceeds $30 million; total production to date exceeds $1 billion. The salts and muds were deposited during Pleistocene and Holocene times by a series of large lakes (200 m maximum depth, 1,000 km 2 maximum area) that fluctuated in size in response to climatic change. Salts were deposited during major dry (interpluvial) episodes, muds during wet (pluvial) episodes that correlate with glacial advances in other parts of North America and the world. Data based on cores from the deposit are used in this paper to establish the stratigraphy of the deposit, the chemical and mineral compositions of successive units, and the total quantities of components contained by them. These parameters are then used to determine the geochemical evolution of the sedimentary layers. The results provide a refined basis for reconstructing the limnology of Searles Lake and the regional climate during late Quaternary time. Six main stratigraphic units were distinguished and informally named earlier on the basis of their dominant composition: Unit Typical thickness 14C age, uncorrected (in meters) (years B.P.) Overburden Mud 7 0 to >3,500 Upper Salt 15 >3,500 to 10,500 Parting Mud 4 10,500 to 24,000 Lower Salt 12 24,000 to 32,500 Bottom Mud 30 32,500 to 130,000 Mixed Layer 200+ > 130,000 (The age of 130,000 years for the Mixed Layer is based on extrapolated sedimentation rates.) The Lower Salt is subdivided into seven salt units (S-l to S-7) and six mud units (M-2 to M-7), the Mixed Layer into six units (A to F). For each

  3. High precision thorium-230 ages of corals and the timing of sea level fluctuations in the late Quaternary

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Mass spectrometric techniques for the measurement of {sup 230}Th and {sup 234}U have been developed. These techniques have made it possible to reduce the analytical errors in {sup 230}Th dating of corals using very small samples (10{sup 7} to 10{sup 10} atoms). The time range over which useful data on corals can now be obtained ranges from 15 to 500,000 years. For young corals, this approach may be preferable to {sup 14}C dating. The precision with which the age of a coral can not be determined makes it possible to determine the timing of sea level fluctuations in the late Quaternary. Analyses of a number of corals that grew during the last interglacial period yield ages of 122 to 130 ky. The ages coincide with or slightly postdate the summer solar insolation high at 65{degree}N latitude, which occurred 128 ky ago. This supports the idea that changes in Pleistocene climate can be the result of orbital forcing. Coral ages may allow us to resolve the ages of individual coseismic uplift events and thereby date prehistoric earthquakes. This possibility has been examined at two localities, northwest Santo Island and north Malekula Island, Vanuatu. The {sup 230}Th growth dates of the surfaces of adjacent emerged coral heads, collected from the same elevation on northwest Santo Island, were, within analytical error, identical (A.D. 1866 {plus minus} 4 and A.D. 1864 {plus minus} 4). This indicates that the corals died at the same time and is consistent with the idea that they were killed by coseismic uplift. Similar adjacent coral heads on north Malekula Island yielded {sup 230}Th growth dates of A.D. 1729 {plus minus} 3 and A.D. 1718 {plus minus} 5. The ages are similar but analytically distinguishable. The difference may be due to erosion of the outer, younger, portion of the latter coral head.

  4. Faulted terrace risers place new constraints on the late Quaternary slip rate for the central Altyn Tagh fault, northwest Tibet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, R.D.; Cowgill, E.; Arrowsmith, J.R.; Chen, X.; Sharp, W.D.; Cooper, K.M.; Wang, X.-F.

    2011-01-01

    The active, left-lateral Altyn Tagh fault defines the northwestern margin of the Tibetan Plateau in western China. To clarify late Quaternary temporal and spatial variations in slip rate along the central portion of this fault system (85??-90??E), we have more than doubled the number of dated offset markers along the central Altyn Tagh fault. In particular, we determined offset-age relations for seven left-laterally faulted terrace risers at three sites (Kelutelage, Yukuang, and Keke Qiapu) spanning a 140-km-long fault reach by integrating surficial geologic mapping, topographic surveys (total station and tripod-light detection and ranging [T-LiDAR]), and geochronology (radiocarbon dating of organic samples, 230Th/U dating of pedogenic carbonate coatings on buried clasts, and terrestrial cosmogenic radionuclide exposure age dating applied to quartz-rich gravels). At Kelutelage, which is the westernmost site (37.72??N, 86.67??E), two faulted terrace risers are offset 58 ?? 3 m and 48 ?? 4 m, and formed at 6.2-6.1 ka and 5.9-3.7 ka, respectively. At the Yukuang site (38.00??N, 87.87??E), four faulted terrace risers are offset 92 ?? 12 m, 68 ?? 6 m, 55 ?? 13 m, and 59 ?? 9 m and formed at 24.2-9.5 ka, 6.4-5.0 ka, 5.1-3.9 ka, and 24.2-6.4 ka, respectively. At the easternmost site, Keke Qiapu (38.08??N, 88.12??E), a faulted terrace riser is offset 33 ?? 6 m and has an age of 17.1-2.2 ka. The displacement-age relationships derived from these markers can be satisfied by an approximately uniform slip rate of 8-12 mm/yr. However, additional analysis is required to test how much temporal variability in slip rate is permitted by this data set. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  5. Late quaternary vegetation and climatic history of the Long Valley area, west-central Idaho, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doerner, J.P.; Carrara, P.E.

    2001-01-01

    Paleoenvironmental data, including pollen and sediment analyses, radiocarbon ages, and tephra identifications of a core recovered from a fen, provide a ca. 16,500 14C yr B.P. record of late Quaternary vegetation and climate change in the Long Valley area of west-central Idaho. The fen was deglaciated prior to ca. 16,500 14C yr B.P., after which the pollen rain was dominated by Artemisia, suggesting that a cold, dry climate prevailed until ca. 12,200 14C yr B.P. From ca. 12,200 to 9750 14C yr B.P. temperatures gradually increased and a cool, moist climate similar to the present prevailed. During this period a closed spruce-pine forest surrounded the fen. This cool, moist climate was briefly interrupted by a dry and/or cold interval between ca. 10,800 and 10,400 14C yr B.P. that may be related to the Younger Dryas climatic oscillation. From ca. 9750 to 3200 14C yr B.P. the regional climate was significantly warmer and drier than at present and an open pine forest dominated the area around the fen. Maximum aridity occurred after the deposition of the Mazama tephra (ca. 6730 14C yr B.P). After 3200 14C yr B.P. regional cooling brought cool, moist conditions to the area; the establishment of the modern montane forest around the fen and present-day cool and moist climate began at ca. 2000 14C yr B.P. ?? 2001 University of Washington.

  6. Aminostratigraphy and faunal correlations of late Quaternary marine terraces, Pacific Coast, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, G.L.; Lajoie, K.R.; Wehmiller, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    Recent studies using the extent of racemization of amino acids to date fossil mollusc shells in the Arctic1, the British Isles2 and on the Atlantic3,4 and Pacific5-13 coasts of North America have relied mainly on theoretical kinetic models of racemization. Ages generated in this fashion are highly model dependent and require estimates of integrated long-term diagenetic temperatures. We present here an alternative, empirical approach to aminostratigraphy in which we plot amino acid enantiomeric ratios versus latitude (for localities along the Pacific coast of the United States), and generate isochronal correlations by connecting data points of geographically proximal localities that have similar D:L ratios and zoogeographic aspect. Isochrons are calibrated at a few localities by independent radiometric dates. The diagenetic temperature effect on racemization is reflected in the slope of the isochrons, but the need to quantify temperature is eliminated. ?? 1982 Nature Publishing Group.

  7. Late Quaternary chronostratigraphic framework of terraces and alluvium along the lower Ohio River, southwestern Indiana and western Kentucky, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Counts, Ronald C.; Murari, Madhav K.; Owen, Lewis A.; Mahan, Shannon; Greenan, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The lower Ohio River valley is a terraced fluvial landscape that has been profoundly influenced by Quaternary climate change and glaciation. A modern Quaternary chronostratigraphic framework was developed for the lower Ohio River valley using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating and allostratigraphic mapping to gain insights into the nature of fluvial responses to glacial–interglacial/stadial–interstadial transitions and Holocene climate change. River deposits, T0 (youngest) to T7 (oldest), were mapped along a 75 km reach of the lower Ohio River and were dated using 46 OSL and 5 radiocarbon samples. The examination of cores combined with OSL and radiocarbon dating shows that fluvial sediments older than marine oxygen isotope stage (MIS) 2 are present only in the subsurface. Aggradation during MIS 6 (Illinoian glaciation) filled the valley to within ∼7 m of the modern floodplain, and by ∼114 ka (MIS 5e/Sangamon interglacial) the Ohio River had scoured the MIS 6 sediments to ∼22 m below the modern floodplain surface. There were no fluvial sediments in the valley with ages between MIS 5e and the middle of MIS 3. The MIS 3 ages (∼39 ka) and stratigraphic position of T5 deposits suggest the Ohio River aggraded 8–14 m during MIS 4 or MIS 3. Near the end of MIS 3, the Ohio River incised the mid Last Glacial (mid-Wisconsinan) deposits ∼10 m and began aggrading again by ∼30 ka. Aggradation continued into MIS 2, with maximum MIS 2 aggradation occurring before ∼21 ka, which is coincident with the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). As the Ohio River adjusted to changing fluxes in sediment load and discharge following the LGM, it formed a sequence of fill-cut terraces in the MIS 2 outwash that get progressively younger with decreasing elevation, ranging in age from ∼21 ka to ∼13 ka. From ∼14 ka to ∼13 ka the Ohio River rapidly incised ∼3 m to form a new terrace, and by ∼12 ka at the onset of the Holocene, the Ohio River

  8. Episodic speleothem deposition in Ireland during the late Quaternary; implications for Greenland ice core chronology and British-Irish Ice Sheet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, Frank; Fankhauser, Adelheid

    2016-04-01

    In shallow caves, episodes of speleothem deposition during the late Quaternary, constrained by U-series dates, provide unequivocal evidence for periods of climate amelioration (presence of liquid water, elevated soil pCO2). U-series data for speleothems from several cave systems in Ireland (Crag, Ballynamintra and Marble Arch) provide clear evidence for episodic speleothem deposition, ranging in age from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 7 to the Last Glacial Termination. Speleothem deposition and non-depositional phases within these caves are particularly sensitive to regional-scale climatic conditions, reflecting Ireland's mid-latitudinal, Atlantic margin location. Currently, the earliest dated speleothems from the region are sparsely preserved and thin MIS 7 and MIS 5 flowstones from Ballynamintra and Crag caves respectively. Relatively short-lived depositional phases also occurred at Crag cave during MIS4 and MIS3 and are coeval with the Greenland Interstadials (GI), supporting the recently modified GICC05 Greenland ice core chronology (Buizert et al., 2015), and new providing evidence for synchronous or nearly-synchronous climate amelioration in the N. hemisphere mid- and high-latitudes during the GI events. On the other hand, there is strong evidence that conditions at Crag cave site during stadials and the Heinrich stadials were not conducive to speleothem deposition. Episodes of non-deposition occur synchronously in several speleothems from Crag cave, providing independent constraints on the timing of Heinrich stadials HS-6 to HS-2. The new data also provide independent new insights into the behaviour of the British Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) during MIS2. In this regard, the presence of a short depositional pulse at 23.35 ± 0.1 ka at Crag cave coincides precisely with the weak and short-lived GI2.2 event within MIS 2, suggesting a dynamic BIIS margin. Simple conductive thermal models for the propagation of surface air temperatures through the limestone karst

  9. High-resolution paleoenvironmental records during the late Quaternary from the marginal seas of East Asia: the intrusion of open-ocean current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, G. S.; Kim, S. P.; Choi, H. S.

    2012-04-01

    Four long mud-dominated sediment cores (35m-long YSDP 103, 32m-long SSDP 102, 72m-long SSDP103 and 52m-long SSDP 105) were recovered in the continental shelves of Korea and were examined through the analysis of AMS 14C dating, lithology, organic geochemistry and stable isotopes to reconstruct the paleoenvironmental histories during the late Quaternary. These drill cores acquired from the thick Holocene mud deposits allow us to obtain high-resolution paleoenvironmental records concerning the intrusion of open-ocean warm currents triggered by the last deglacial sea-level rise. Various organic geochemical results (TOC, C/N, C/S, HI, δ13Corg) of core YSDP 103, taken from the southeastern Yellow Sea, showed that terrigenous organic matters were significantly dominant in the southeastern Yellow Sea between 16,600 and 4,300 cal. yr BP probably due to the influence of freshwater derived from an adjacent river and then the dominance of organic matter origin changed to marine type affected by surface primary productivity after 4,300 cal. yr BP. These results may indicate that the marine environment of the southeastern Yellow Sea changed from brackish to a modern-type shelf environment since 4,300 cal. yr BP, implying the intrusion of the open-ocean current. The δ18O values of benthic foraminifer Cibicides lobatulus, however, showed that variation changed from high-amplitude to low-amplitude fluctuations at around 3,500 cal. yr. The time discrepancy of 800 years between organic geochemical proxies and stable isotope proxies is interpreted to reflect that a modern-type shelf environment was not fully developed in the southeastern Yellow Sea until 3,500 cal. yr BP, even though the open-ocean current (Yellow Sea Warm Current) began to flow into the Yellow Sea at 4,300 cal. Yr. BP. The results of core SSDP 102 collected in the Korean Strait reveal that the area experienced 4 stages of environmental change during the last 13,900 cal. yr BP. Occurrence of well-rounded, oxidized

  10. A 200,000-year record of late Quaternary Aeolian sedimentation on the Southern High Plains and nearby Pecos River Valley, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, J.; Stokes, S.

    2011-03-01

    Presently stabilized Southern High Plains (SHP) dune systems have been repeatedly re-activated during the past 200,000 years, providing an archive of environmental and related climatic change for the late Quaternary. Our data set of 38 optically dated samples from four different localities identifies eolian activity from late-middle Pleistocene to the historic period. Oldest eolian sediments are from the Blackwater Draw Formation and indicate accretion during late-middle to late Pleistocene. Younger sediments dating from the later Pleistocene through the Holocene are found in the Muleshoe, Lea-Yoakum, Mescalero, and Monahans dunes that overlie the Blackwater Draw Formation. Muleshoe dunes accreted during the Late Pleistocene between 31 ± 3 and 27 ± 2 ka, while Holocene deposition transpired 7.5 ± 0.4, 4.0 ± 0.7 ka through 3.6 ± 0.4 ka, and between 1.3 ± 0.2 and 1.1 ± 0.1 ka. A period of dune building for Lea-Yoakum dune sediments occurred during the late Pleistocene (48 ± 5 ka), and the later Holocene (3.6 ± 0.4 ka). Mescalero and Monahans dunes were accreting during the later Pleistocene between 29 ± 3 and 22 ± 2 ka followed by a sequence of eolian sand deposited ca. 15 ka. Holocene eolian sedimentation for the Mescalero and Monahans dunes occurred 7.5 ± 0.8, 5.1 ± 0.5, 4.3 ± 0.4, and 2.0 ± 0.3 ka. Historic eolian deposition is identifiable in the dune chronology with multiple optical age estimates overlapping established drought events recorded ca. 1890, 1910, 1920, and during the 1930's when the North American "Dust Bowl" transpired. These Quaternary eolian deposits mantling the Southern High Plains are an important component of the surficial material of the region and provide a rich archive of past climatic change.

  11. Large-scale avulsion of the late Quaternary Sutlej river in the NW Indo-Gangetic foreland basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ajit; Gupta, Sanjeev; Sinha, Rajiv; Carter, Andrew; Thomsen, Kristina J.; Mark, Darren F.; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter; Mason, Philippa J.; Murray, Andrew S.; Jain, Mayank; Paul, Debajyoti

    2015-04-01

    River avulsions are important processes in the spatial evolution of river systems in tectonically active sedimentary basins as they govern large-scale patterns of sediment routing. However, the pattern and timing of avulsions in large river systems are poorly documented and not well understood. Here we document late Quaternary paleo-river channel changes in the Indo-Gangetic basin of northwest India. Using a combination of satellite remote sensing and detailed sediment coring, we analyse the large-scale planform geometry, and detailed sedimentary and stratigraphic nature of a major fluvial sedimentary deposit in the shallow subsurface. This sediment body records aggradation of multiple fluvial channel fills. Satellite remote sensing analysis indicates the trace of the buried channel complex and demonstrates that it exists in region of the Himalayan foreland where no major rivers are currently present. Thus it records the former drainage pathway of a major river, which has since been diverted. We use optically stimulated luminescence dating techniques to develop an age model for the stratigraphic succession and hence constrain the timing of river channel existence and diversion. Provenance analysis based on U-Pb dating of detrital zircons and detrital mica Ar-Ar ages indicate sediment sources in the Higher Himalayan Crystalline and Lesser Himalayan Crystalline Series indicating that this paleo-river channel system formed a major perennial river derived from the main body of the Himalaya. Specifically we are able to fingerprint bedrock sources in the catchment of the present-day Sutlej river indicating that the paleo-fluvial system represents the former course of the Sutlej river prior to a major nodal avulsion to its present day course. Our results indicate that on geologically relatively short time-scales, we observe dramatic along strike shifts in the location of major Himalayan rivers. Our sediment records when combined with high-resolution dating and

  12. Late Quaternary pollen data collection and application in land-cover reconstruction for East Asia and Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xianyong; Tian, Fang; Ni, Jian; Herzschuh, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    The various climatic systems and vegetation zones in the East Asia cause the numerous open questions concerning the evolution of the Asian Monsoon and vegetation change on various time-scales. Fossil pollen is one of the most spatially extensive terrestrial palaeoenvironmental proxies during the late Quaternary, and the multi-record fossil pollen synthesis is a potential solution for the open questions in palaeoecology and palaeoclimatology. We collected and selected 274 pollen records from eastern continental Asia (70°135°E and 18°55°N). After pollen percentage recalculations, taxonomic homogenization, age-depth model revision, and pollen abundance linear interpolation, a taxonomically harmonized and temporally standardized fossil pollen dataset established at a 500-year resolution covering the last 22 ka. In addition, we also established a modern pollen dataset including 2626 modern pollen data from China and Mongolia. We used the calibration-set based on modern pollen and satellite-based Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) observations of woody cover, to reconstruct woody cover for the 274 fossil pollen records. The spatial range of forest has not noticeably changed in eastern continental Asia during the last 22 ka, although woody cover has, especially at the margin of the eastern Tibetan Plateau and in the forest-steppe transition area of north-central China. Vegetation was sparse during the LGM in the present forested regions, but woody cover increased markedly at the beginning of the Bølling/Allerød period (B/A; ca. 14.5 ka BP) and again at the beginning of the Holocene (ca. 11.5 ka BP), and is related to the enhanced strength of the East Asian Summer Monsoon. Forest flourished in the mid-Holocene (ca. 8 ka BP) possibly due to favourable climatic conditions. In contrast, cover was stable in southern China (high cover) and arid central Asia (very low cover) throughout the investigated period. Forest cover increased in the north

  13. CO2 outburst events in relation to seismicity: Constraints from microscale geochronology, geochemistry of late Quaternary vein carbonates, SW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünal-İmer, Ezgi; Uysal, I. Tonguç; Zhao, Jian-Xin; Işık, Veysel; Shulmeister, James; İmer, Ali; Feng, Yue-Xing

    2016-08-01

    calcite veins. Vein calcite formed in fault-induced fractures offers insights into structural features, genetic characterisation of the parental fluids, and late Quaternary degassing of subsurface CO2 accumulations.

  14. Late Quaternary Sedimentary Records of Core MA01 in the Mendeleev Ridge, the Western Arctic Ocean: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, K.; Kim, S.; Khim, B. K.; Wang, R.; Mei, J.; Xiao, W.; Polyak, L. V.

    2014-12-01

    Late Quaternary deep sea sediments in the Arctic Ocean are characterized by brown layers intercalated with yellowish to olive gray layers. It has been known that the brown and gray layers were deposited during interglacial (or interstadial) and glacial (or stadial) periods, respectively. A 5.5-m long gravity core MA01 was obtained from the Mendeleev Ridge in the western Arctic Ocean by R/V Xue Long during scientific cruise CHINARE-V. Age (~1.0 Ma) of core MA01 was tentatively decided by correlation of sediment color cycles, XRF Mn and Ca cycles, and geomagnetic inclinations with core HLY0503-8JPC (Adler et al., 2009) and core HLY0503-06JPC(Cronin et al., 2013) that were also collected from the Mendeleev Ridge area. A total of 23 brown layers are characterized by low L* and b*, high Mn concentration, and abundant foraminifera. In contrast, gray layers are characterized by high L* and b*, low Mn concentration, and few foraminiferal tests. Foraminifera abundance peaks are not well correlated to CaCO3 peaks which are accompanied with the coarse-grained (>63 μm) fractions (i.e., IRD) both in brown and gray layers. A strong positive correlation coefficient (r2=0.89) between TOC content and C/N ratio indicates that the major source of organic matter is terrestrial. The good correlations of CaCO3 content to TOC (r2=0.56) and C/N ratio (r2=0.69) imply that IRDs contain detrital CaCO3 fraction which mainly originated from the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. In addition, high kaolinite/chlorite (K/C) ratios mostly correspond to CaCO3 peaks, also suggesting that the fine-grained particles in the Mendeleev Ridge were transported from the northern coasts of the Alaska and Canada. Thus, the Beaufort Gyre, the predominant surface current in the western Arctic Ocean, has played an important role in the sediment delivery to the Mendeleev Ridge. It is worthy of note that TOC and CaCO3 peaks are obviously distinct in the upper part of core MA01, whereas these peaks are reduced in the

  15. Late Quaternary geomorphic history of a glacial landscape - new sedimentary and chronological data from the Cordillera de Cochabamba (Bolivia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, J.-H.; Preusser, F.; Zech, R.; Ilgner, J.; Veit, H.

    2009-04-01

    Throughout the Central Andes, glacial landscapes have long been used for the reconstruction of Late Quaternary glaciations and landscape evolution. Much work has focused on the Andes in Peru, Chile and the Bolivian Altiplano, whereas relatively little data has been published on glaciation history in the eastern Andean ranges and slopes. Even less is known with regard to the postglacial evolution of these glacial landscapes. In the Cordillera de Cochabamba (Bolivia), local maximum advances probably peaked around 20-25 ka BP and were followed by significant readvances between ~12-16 ka BP. This generally points to temperature controlled maximum glacial advances along the humid eastern slopes of the Central Andes, which is supported by glacier-climate-modelling studies. However, most studies include only marginal information with regard to the complex geomorphic and sedimentary situation in the Cordillera de Cochabamba. Furthermore, the chronological results are afflicted with several methodological uncertainties inherent to surface exposure dating and call for application of alternative, independent age dating methods. Therefore this study aims at i) documenting and interpreting the complex glacial geomorphology of the Huara Loma valley in the Cordillera de Cochabamba (Bolivia), ii) analyzing the involved units of glacial sediments, and iii) improving the chronological framework by applying optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and radiocarbon dating (14C). For this purpose, geomorphic mapping was combined with field documentation of sedimentary profiles. The involved sediments were subject to geochemical and mineralogical analysis in order to deduce information on their erosional and weathering histories. In addition, the interpretation of OSL ages from glacial and proglacial sediments integrated several methodological procedures with regard to sample preparation and statistical analysis of the measurements in order to increase the degree of confidence. These

  16. Evaluating the timing of late Quaternary geomorphodynamics and soil formation: a review of geochronological data from northeastern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappler, Christoph; Kaiser, Knut; Küster, Mathias; Fülling, Alexander; Bens, Oliver; Raab, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive review of late Quaternary terrestrial stratigraphical records from northeastern Germany requires the collection, evaluation and statistical processing of preferably all geochronological data from paleosols and corresponding sediments available so far. Therefore, a database has been established, comprising a multitude of published and unpublished age data. The database regionally covers the entire Weichselian glacial belt ('young morainic' area) and the immediately adjacent Saalian glacial belt ('old morainic' area) of northeastern Germany. The collected ages comprise a time interval of the last c. 50,000 years. More specifically we pursue the following aspects: (1) identification of the spatiotemporal pattern of dated records and their stratigraphical context; (2) dating of certain types of buried paleosols, corresponding sediments and reconstruction of the environmental conditions during soil formation; (3) timing and identification of specific geomorphic processes (triggered by e.g. climate change or land use) which led to burial of former surfaces. We have collected a total of c. 450 radiocarbon datings (AMS, conventional) and c. 400 luminescence datings (OSL, IRSL, TL) from a total of c. 200 sites. Each date is characterised by specific dating attributes (age with standard error, reliability, lab number, dated material) and by further information (e.g. coordinates, stratigraphy, references). Most of the radiocarbon and luminescence data were collected in the 1990s to 2010s. Among the radiocarbon dates charcoal (53 %) and peat (19 %) dominate the dated materials. Holocene ages prevail with a majority within the last 5000 years. Most dated paleosols are developed from peat (Histosols) as well as from glacial and aeolian sands (Arenosols, Podzols). Most luminescence dates come from aeolian (84 %) and colluvial sands (11 %), which are scattered over the whole Lateglacial-Holocene and the Holocene period, respectively. Furthermore, the collected ages

  17. The rio caliente ignimbrite: Analysis of a compound intraplinian ignimbrite from a major late quaternary Mexican eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. V.

    1981-06-01

    The Rio Caliente ignimbrite is a multi-flow unit or compound ignimbrite formed during a major late Quaternary explosive rhyolitic eruption of La Primavera volcano, Mexico. The eruption sequence of the ignimbrite is complex and it occurs between lower and upper plinian air-fall deposits. It is, therefore, an intraplinian ignimbrite. Air-fall layers, pyroclastic surge, mudflow and fluviatile reworked pumice deposits also occur interbedded between ignimbrite flow units. A chaotic near-vent facies of the ignimbrite includes co-ignimbrite lag breccias segregated from proximal pumice flows. The facies locates a central vent but one which could not have been associated with a well defined edifice. Many of the lithics in the exposed lag breccias and near-vent facies of the ignimbrite appear to be fragments of welded Rio Caliente ignimbrite, and indicate considerable vent widening, or migration, during the eruption. Nearer vent the ignimbrite is thickest and composed of the largest number of flow units. Here it is welded and is a simple cooling unit. Evidence suggests that it was only the larger thicker pumice flows that escaped to the outer parts of the sheet. Detailed analysis of four flow units indicates that the pumice flows were generally poorly expanded, less mobile flows which would be produced by collapse of low eruption columns. The analogy of a compound ignimbrite with a compound lava flow is, therefore, good — a compound lava flow forms instead of a simple one when the volumetric discharge rate (or intensity) is low, and in explosive eruptions this predicts lower eruption column heights. A corollary is that the ignimbrite has a high aspect ratio. The complex eruption sequence shows the reinstatement of plinian activity several times during the eruption after column collapse occurred. This, together with erosional breaks and evidence that solidified fragments of already welded ignimbrite were re-ejected, all suggest the eruption lasted a relatively significant

  18. Integrating Conjugative Elements as Vectors of Antibiotic, Mercury, and Quaternary Ammonium Compound Resistance in Marine Aquaculture Environments

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Blanco, Arturo; Lemos, Manuel L.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of SXT/R391-related integrating conjugative elements (ICEs) in bacterial strains isolated from fish obtained from marine aquaculture environments in 2001 to 2010 in the northwestern Iberian Peninsula was studied. ICEs were detected in 12 strains taxonomically related to Vibrio scophthalmi (3 strains), Vibrio splendidus (5 strains), Vibrio alginolyticus (1 strain), Shewanella haliotis (1 strain), and Enterovibrio nigricans (2 strains), broadening the known host range able to harbor SXT/R391-like ICEs. Variable DNA regions, which confer element-specific properties to ICEs of this family, were characterized. One of the ICEs encoded antibiotic resistance functions in variable region III, consisting of a tetracycline resistance locus. Interestingly, hot spot 4 included genes providing resistance to rifampin (ICEVspPor2 and ICEValPor1) and quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) (ICEEniSpa1), and variable region IV included a mercury resistance operon (ICEVspSpa1 and ICEEniSpa1). The S exclusion group was more represented than the R exclusion group, accounting for two-thirds of the total ICEs. Mating experiments allowed ICE mobilization to Escherichia coli strains, showing the corresponding transconjugants' rifampin, mercury, and QAC resistance. These results show the first evidence of ICEs providing rifampin and QAC resistances, suggesting that these mobile genetic elements contribute to the dissemination of antimicrobial, heavy metal, and QAC resistance determinants in aquaculture environments. PMID:22314526

  19. Reconciling late Quaternary transgressions in the Bohai Sea, China to the global sea level changes, and new linkage of sedimentary records to three astronomical rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Liang

    2013-04-01

    noticeable feature of these coastal sediment variations is the little internal similarity between records compared with high similarity with external forcing indicating that the coastal sediments in the south Bohai Sea integrate different influences from various environmental factors: (1) the grain-size variation represents Asian monsoon intensity which was dominated by both solar insolation (major) and global ice volume (minor) forcing; (2) the magnetic susceptibility indicates river incision processes which were sensitive to orbital tilt with influence from solar insolation; (3) the vegetation coverage responded to global ice volume coupled obliquity changes; and that (4) neither external nor internal factors could dominate the paleoenvironmental evolution on orbital timescales in an independent way, and they are both integrated in a complex pattern. Therefore, combining all of these results, we report those great similarities between regional and global sea-level patterns and the nonlinear interaction and the complex response to driving processes in a coastal evolution. However, all of these studies only used the upper part of cores within marine strata, and the rest containing lacustrine sediment is still in process. Sediment grain size, magnetic susceptibility, color reflectance were finished, and the magnetostratigraphic, environmental magnetism and element analysis are ongoing. More results about high-/low-latitude interaction and relative sea level will be released in three years, and anyone who has interests in cooperation will be welcome (Email: yi.liang82@gmail.com). References Chappell, J., Omura, A., Esat, T., McCulloch, M., Pandolfi, J., Ota, Y., Pillans, B., 1996. Reconciliation of late Quaternary sea levels derived from coral terraces at Huon Peninsula with deep sea oxygen isotope records. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 141, 227-236. Cheng, H., Edwards, R.L., Broecker, W.S., Denton, G.H., Kong, X., Wang, Y., Zhang, R., Wang, X., 2009. Ice Age

  20. Disappearance of the last lions and hyenas of Europe in the Late Quaternary - a chain reaction of large mammal prey migration, extinction and human antagonism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diedrich, Cajus G.

    2010-05-01

    In the Eemian to Early/Middle Weichselian (Late Pleistocene), when the Scandinavian and Alpine Glaciers were still small, and northern Germany under mammoth steppe to taiga palaoenvironment conditions, Late Quaternary steppe lions were well distributed in northern to central Germany, whereas generally all over Central Europe bones and rarely articulated skeletons were found less at open air but mainly at cave sites (Diedrich 2007a, 2008a-b, 2009a-b, 2010a-c, k, in review a-b; Diedrich and Rathgeber in review). A similar distribution, but more dense, is reported for the Late Quaternary Ice Age spotted hyenas (Diedrich 2005, 2006, 2007b-c, 2008a, c, 2010f-j, in review c-d, Diedrich and Žák 2006). The last lions of northern Europe were thought to have reached into the final Magdalénan (cf. Musil 1980). This can be not concluded with a restudy of the bone material from the Late Magdalenian (V-VI) Teufelsbrücke stone arch site near Saalfeld (Thuringia, Central Germany) and many other Magdalenian stations (open air and caves) in northern to central Germany (Münsterland Bay, Sauerland Karst, Harz Mountain Karst, Thuringian Karst). None of those sites yield remains of final Upper Pleistocene spotted hyenas or steppe lion bones anymore, nor in the few preserved Late Magdalenian mobile art can those be recognized in those regions. The last lion remains seem to reach into the Aurignacian or possibly into the Early Gravettian (early Late Weichselian) documented especially at the cave bear den, hyena den and overlapping Neandertalian to Modern human camp site Balve Cave (Sauerland Karst, cf. archaeology in Günther 1964) where still a mammoth fauna is documented for that time (Diedrich 2010a). The last and by archaeological layers dated hyena remains were also found in the Balve Cave and are from the Late Middle Palaeolithic cave site reaching a maximum Aurignacian age documenting an overlapping of hyena den and human camp site use (Diedrich 2010a, b). In northern Germany

  1. Late Quaternary geology of small basaltic volcanic centers, SW USA: Disparity among dating methods and implications for volcanic and geomorphic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, S.; McFadden, L.; Perry, F.; Forman, S.; Crowe, B.; Pothis, J.; Olinger, C.

    1992-12-31

    Evaluation of volcanic hazards near the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain provides the impetus for a series of detailed field and geochronologic studies of selected small late Quaternary basaltic scoria cones and lava flows in Nevada and California. Two of the most significant results of these studies are: the presence of chronostratigraphic units which indicate multiple eruptions with significant intervals of no activity between events (polycyclic volcanism); and a marked difference between conventional, numerical ages derived from K-Ar and Ar-40/Ar-39 methods and numerical, calibrated, and relative ages derived from thermoluminescence, cosmogenic He-3, the degree of soil development, and geomorphology of these volcanic landforms. Soil-bounded unconformities and buried stone pavements define the boundaries of chronostratigraphic units within these small volume basaltic centers. Volcanic centers displaying this type of stratigraphy may appear morphological simple but cannot be considered mongenetic. Recent studies by Perry and Crowe demonstrate that geochemical variations within a single basaltic volcanic center in NV are consistent with several magma batches forming a complex polycyclic volcano. The K-Ar and Ar-40/Ar-39 ages are 1--2 orders of magnitude older than either TL or cosmogenic He-3 and appear to have insufficient precision to constrain the ages of chronostratigraphic units within polycyclic volcanoes. In contrast, preliminary data indicate the TL and cosmogenic He-3 dating methods have the ability to resolve the late Quaternary volcanic stratigraphy, and results from these dating methods are consistent with the degree of soil development and geomorphic modification of the volcanic units. K-Ar and Ar-40/Ar-39 dates from these small basaltic volcanic centers have been used to calibrate new Quaternary dating methods, e.g. rock varnish, which in turn have been used to interpret landscape evolution in the SW US.

  2. The geomorphology of Patagonian ice dammed lake basins: Insights from remote sensing of a modern lake and reconstruction of a Late Quaternary lake drainage event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorndycraft, Varyl

    2016-04-01

    The geomorphology of ice dammed lake basins can be complex due to geomorphic responses to multiple base level changes from repeated filling and emptying, as well as the potential for catastrophic drainage events. Refining landscape models of Quaternary ice dammed palaeolake systems has the potential to improve our understanding of glacier and meltwater dynamics during deglaciation phases. In this poster two case studies are presented to shed light on the range of geomorphic processes exhibited within ice dammed lake basins. Using Google Earth Pro and repeat LANDSAT imagery the geomorphology resulting from multiple base level changes of an ice dammed lake of the Viedma Glacier (Southern Patagonia Icefield) is presented. The LANDSAT imagery shows transgressive lake phases inundating already formed delta and terrace surfaces, whilst the high resolution Google Earth Pro images reveal a complex suite of incised terrace levels developed on the valley floor following lake drainage events. Secondly, the impact of catastrophic drainage of the Late Pleistocene Palaeolake Cochrane (Northern Patagonia Icefield) is investigated through geomorphological mapping. Here an outburst flood and rapid lowering of the lake has led to large scale eddy scouring of glacio-lacustrine sediments, with scarp slopes of ca. 30-40 m in height, and the formation of boulder bars during the final stages of lake fall. The implications of the mapping for interpretations of Late Quaternary palaeolake sediment-landform assemblages and rates of landscape change are discussed.

  3. Pliocene to Quaternary Central American tephrostratigraphy based on marine Tephras from ODP and DSDP sites - first comprehensive study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strehlow, K.; Kutterolf, S.; Freundt, A.; Kwasnitschka, T.

    2010-12-01

    The Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA) is, and has been, one of the most active volcanic regions and generated numerous Plinian eruptions along his 1200 km extension. The best preserved archive of this volcanism can be found as ash layers in the marine sediments downwind from the volcanic sources on the Pacific floor. Numerous ash layers up to 8 Mio old, which occur in ODP and DSDP cores of Legs 66, 67, and 202, originated in Central America and southern Mexico. The cores lie across the ash distribution areas expected from dominant wind directions as identified by mapped fallout deposits. We have chosen 145 ash layers of all three Legs for first detailed analysis of these sites to built up a data base for upcoming IODP cruise 334: Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project. The ash layers commonly have sharp contacts at the bottom and diffuse transitions to terrigenous and pelagic sediments at the top. Ash layer thickness ranges from 0.5 to 60 cm with typical grain sizes from medium silt to coarse sand. The mineral assemblages are typical for arc volcanism (plagioclase, pyroxene, hornblende, and olivine). The most evolved tephras also contain biotite. Electron microprobe analyses of 1300 glass shards yield compositions ranging from basaltic andesite to rhyolite and trachyte. Felsic ashes can be divided into seven compositional groups by means of silica and potassium contents. Correlations between marine ashes and on-land tephras are constrained by petrographical and stratigraphical criteria, major element geochemistry of glasses and minerals, and trace element data from LA-ICP-MS analyses. Due to limited exposure on land, such correlations with individual tephras are only possible for deposits of late Pleistocene to Holocene age. Older ash layers, however, can be correlated with regional arc segments making use of systematic along-arc variations of trace-element characteristics (Zr/Nb, Ba/La, Ce/Yb, La/Yb and Ba/Zr) of the arc rocks. Results show that source areas of the

  4. Linking glacial melting to Late Quaternary sedimentation in climatically sensitive mountainous catchments of the Mount Chlemos compex, Kalavryta, southern Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Richard; Hughes, Philip

    2014-05-01

    Compared to the mountainous areas of northern Greece (e.g. Woodward et al., 2008), the influence of deglaciation cycles on sedimentation in mountainous catchments in southern Greece remains poorly understood due to the poor preservation of small moraines and limited opportunities to date glacial and fluvial sediment dynamics fluvial sediments (Pope, unpublished data). Nevertheless, intriguing new insight into links between glacial cycles and sediment transfer/deposition phases in upland catchments have emerged by applying multiple dating techniques to well-preserved multiple generations of moraines and extensive glacio-fluvial fan systems on Mount Chelmos (2355 m a.s.l.). U-series dating of calcites within proximal fan sediments constrain the earliest phase of glacio-fluvial sedimentation to 490 (±21.0)(ka (MIS 12), while OSL dating of fine sands constrains the deposition of extensive medial glacio-fluvial gravels in (valley we walked down through trees) to between 250.99 (±20.67) and 160.82 (±11.08) ka. By comparison, cosmogenic dating of moraine boulders indicates that three generations of well-preserved moraines in the highest cirque areas date to 31-23 ka, 17-16 ka and 12-11.5 ka. OSL dating also provides ages of 18 and 17 (±11.08) for an extensive glacio-fluvial terrace in a major valley draining the southern flanksof Mount Chelmos. The initial Mount Chelmos geochronology suggests that the earliest and middle phases of glacio-fluvial sedimentation are coincident with the Middle Pleistocene glacial stages stages recorded in the Pindus range (Hughes et al, 2006). These include the Skamnellian (MIS 12) and the Vlasian (MIS 6) Stages as well as other cold stage between these (e.g. MIS 8).Evidence of glacio-fluvial outwash in MIS 8 is interesting since evidence for this in the moraine records has remained elusive although is suggested further north in the Balkans (Hughes et al., 2011). The valley moraines and glacio-fluvial terraces (late MIS 2) post-date the

  5. Quaternary marine terraces and maximum tectonic uplift rate of the Peruvian coast at 15. 5/sup 0/S latitude

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.T.; Bloom, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    Numerous and well preserved marine terraces near San Juan de Marcona, Peru are a result of tectonic uplift related to subduction of the Nazca Plate, combined with Quaternary sea level fluctuations. A flight of 10 terraces from modern sea level up to 310 m has been sampled and surveyed along two transects. The lowest terrace surface is covered with cobble beach ridges and is truncated by a modern sea cliff 29 m above sea level. It may be the continuation of an abrasion platform with a well developed shoreline angle at 41 m. The extreme aridity of the Peruvian coastal desert is responsible for the preservation and lack of alteration of the terrace deposits. All landforms and sedimentary facies of the modern surf zone are still recognizable on the terraces. Abundant and well preserved mollusk shells, all of which are nearshore or surf zone species, can be found on most of the terraces. Uncorrected radiocarbon ages of pelecypods in growth position on the lowest terrace were >40,000 year B.P. If this lowest terrace is older than 40,000 yr. B.P. then its next most likely time of formation was during the 62,000 year B.P. interstadial event. By this hypothesis, a wide and well developed terrace at 148 m would have been formed during the 125,000 year B.P. interglacial high sea level, and the average uplift rate would have been 1.2 m/1000 year. This uplift rate is the maximum that can be assumed for this section of the Peruvian coast, because if the terraces are even older, the uplift rate must have been less.

  6. Disappearance of the last lions and hyenas of Europe in the Late Quaternary - a chain reaction of large mammal prey migration, extinction and human antagonism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diedrich, Cajus G.

    2010-05-01

    In the Eemian to Early/Middle Weichselian (Late Pleistocene), when the Scandinavian and Alpine Glaciers were still small, and northern Germany under mammoth steppe to taiga palaoenvironment conditions, Late Quaternary steppe lions were well distributed in northern to central Germany, whereas generally all over Central Europe bones and rarely articulated skeletons were found less at open air but mainly at cave sites (Diedrich 2007a, 2008a-b, 2009a-b, 2010a-c, k, in review a-b; Diedrich and Rathgeber in review). A similar distribution, but more dense, is reported for the Late Quaternary Ice Age spotted hyenas (Diedrich 2005, 2006, 2007b-c, 2008a, c, 2010f-j, in review c-d, Diedrich and Žák 2006). The last lions of northern Europe were thought to have reached into the final Magdalénan (cf. Musil 1980). This can be not concluded with a restudy of the bone material from the Late Magdalenian (V-VI) Teufelsbrücke stone arch site near Saalfeld (Thuringia, Central Germany) and many other Magdalenian stations (open air and caves) in northern to central Germany (Münsterland Bay, Sauerland Karst, Harz Mountain Karst, Thuringian Karst). None of those sites yield remains of final Upper Pleistocene spotted hyenas or steppe lion bones anymore, nor in the few preserved Late Magdalenian mobile art can those be recognized in those regions. The last lion remains seem to reach into the Aurignacian or possibly into the Early Gravettian (early Late Weichselian) documented especially at the cave bear den, hyena den and overlapping Neandertalian to Modern human camp site Balve Cave (Sauerland Karst, cf. archaeology in Günther 1964) where still a mammoth fauna is documented for that time (Diedrich 2010a). The last and by archaeological layers dated hyena remains were also found in the Balve Cave and are from the Late Middle Palaeolithic cave site reaching a maximum Aurignacian age documenting an overlapping of hyena den and human camp site use (Diedrich 2010a, b). In northern Germany

  7. Late Quaternary changes in bat palaeobiodiversity and palaeobiogeography under climatic and anthropogenic pressure: new insights from Marie-Galante, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoetzel, Emmanuelle; Royer, Aurélien; Cochard, David; Lenoble, Arnaud

    2016-07-01

    Data on Lesser Antillean Late Quaternary fossil bat assemblages remains limited, leading to their general exclusion from studies focusing on Caribbean bat palaeobiodiversity and palaeobiogeography. Additionally, the role of climatic versus human pressure driving changes in faunal communities remains poorly understood. Here we describe a fossil bat assemblage from Blanchard Cave on Marie-Galante in the Lesser Antilles, which produced numerous bat remains from a well-dated, stratified context. Our study reveals the occurrence of at least 12 bat species during the Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene on Marie-Galante, whereas only eight species are currently known on the island. Among these 12 species, six are extirpated and one is extinct. Faunal changes within the Blanchard sequence indicate variations in Pleistocene bat species representation in the Lesser Antilles to have been influenced by climatic conditions, with "northern species" (Greater Antilles) favored during glacial conditions and "southern species" (southern Lesser Antilles) during interglacial events. However, few species disappeared at the end of the Late Pleistocene, with most of the extinction/extirpation events occurring during the Holocene. This pattern suggests human activities in the Lesser Antilles to have played a major role in bat turnover during the late Holocene.

  8. Late Paleocene Arctic Ocean shallow-marine temperatures from mollusc stable isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bice, Karen L.; Arthur, Michael A.; Marincovich, Louie, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Late Paleocene high-latitude (80°N) Arctic Ocean shallow-marine temperatures are estimated from molluscan δ18O time series. Sampling of individual growth increments of two specimens of the bivalve Camptochlamys alaskensis provides a high-resolution record of shell stable isotope composition. The heavy carbon isotopic values of the specimens support a late Paleocene age for the youngest marine beds of the Prince Creek Formation exposed near Ocean Point, Alaska. The oxygen isotopic composition of regional freshwater runoff is estimated from the mean δ18O value of two freshwater bivalves collected from approximately coeval fluviatile beds. Over a 30 – 34‰ range of salinity, values assumed to represent the tolerance of C. alaskensis, the mean annual shallow-marine temperature recorded by these individuals is between 11° and 22°C. These values could represent maximum estimates of the mean annual temperature because of a possible warm-month bias imposed on the average δ18O value by slowing or cessation of growth in winter months. The amplitude of the molluscan δ18O time series probably records most of the seasonality in shallow-marine temperature. The annual temperature range indicated is approximately 6°C, suggesting very moderate high-latitude marine temperature seasonality during the late Paleocene. On the basis of analogy with modern Chlamys species, C. alaskensis probably inhabited water depths of 30–50 m. The seasonal temperature range derived from δ18O is therefore likely to be damped relative to the full range of annual sea surface temperatures. High-resolution sampling of molluscan shell material across inferred growth bands represents an important proxy record of seasonality of marine and freshwater conditions applicable at any latitude. If applied to other regions and time periods, the approach used here would contribute substantially to the paleoclimate record of seasonality.

  9. Spotted hyena and steppe lion predation behaviours on cave bears of Europe - ?Late Quaternary cave bear extinction as result of predator stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diedrich, Cajus G.

    2010-05-01

    Cave bears hibernated in caves all over Eurasia (e.g. Rabeder et al., 2000) including alpine regions using mainly larger caves for this purpose. Late Quaternary spotted hyenas Crocuta crocuta spelaea instead occupied mainly areas close to the cave entrances as their dens (Diedrich and Žák 2006, Diedrich 2010). The largest predator, the steppe lion Panthera leo spelaea was only a sporadic cave dweller (Diedrich 2007b, 2009b). His presence and its remains from caves all over Europe can be recently explained best as result of imported carcasses after killing by their largest antagonists, the Late Quaternary spotted hyenas. In some cases the kill might have happened in the hyena den cave itself during the theft of prey remains by lions (Diedrich 2009a). Another reason of their remains in caves of Europe is the hunting onto the herbivorous cave bears, especially during hibernation times, when megafauna prey was less available in the open environments (Diedrich 2009c). These lion remains from caves of Europe, nearly all of which were from adult animals, provide evidence of active predation by lions onto cave bears even in medium high alpine regions (Diedrich 2009b, in review). Lion skeletons in European cave bear dens were therefore often found amongst originally articulated cave bear skeletons or scattered cave bear remains and even close to their hibernation nests (Diedrich et al. 2009c, in review). Not only lions fed on cave bears documented mainly by the large quantities of chewed, punctured and crushed cave bear long-bones; even damaged skulls reveal that hyenas scavenged primarily on cave bear carcasses which were mainly responsible for the destruction of their carcasses and bones (Diedrich 2005, 2009d). Predation and scavenging on cave bears by the two largest Late Quaternary predators C. c. spelaea and P. l. spelaea explains well the large quantity of fragmented cave bear bones over all European caves in low to medium high mountainous elevations, whereas in

  10. Spotted hyena and steppe lion predation behaviours on cave bears of Europe - ?Late Quaternary cave bear extinction as result of predator stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diedrich, Cajus G.

    2010-05-01

    Cave bears hibernated in caves all over Eurasia (e.g. Rabeder et al., 2000) including alpine regions using mainly larger caves for this purpose. Late Quaternary spotted hyenas Crocuta crocuta spelaea instead occupied mainly areas close to the cave entrances as their dens (Diedrich and Žák 2006, Diedrich 2010). The largest predator, the steppe lion Panthera leo spelaea was only a sporadic cave dweller (Diedrich 2007b, 2009b). His presence and its remains from caves all over Europe can be recently explained best as result of imported carcasses after killing by their largest antagonists, the Late Quaternary spotted hyenas. In some cases the kill might have happened in the hyena den cave itself during the theft of prey remains by lions (Diedrich 2009a). Another reason of their remains in caves of Europe is the hunting onto the herbivorous cave bears, especially during hibernation times, when megafauna prey was less available in the open environments (Diedrich 2009c). These lion remains from caves of Europe, nearly all of which were from adult animals, provide evidence of active predation by lions onto cave bears even in medium high alpine regions (Diedrich 2009b, in review). Lion skeletons in European cave bear dens were therefore often found amongst originally articulated cave bear skeletons or scattered cave bear remains and even close to their hibernation nests (Diedrich et al. 2009c, in review). Not only lions fed on cave bears documented mainly by the large quantities of chewed, punctured and crushed cave bear long-bones; even damaged skulls reveal that hyenas scavenged primarily on cave bear carcasses which were mainly responsible for the destruction of their carcasses and bones (Diedrich 2005, 2009d). Predation and scavenging on cave bears by the two largest Late Quaternary predators C. c. spelaea and P. l. spelaea explains well the large quantity of fragmented cave bear bones over all European caves in low to medium high mountainous elevations, whereas in

  11. Moderate rates of late Quaternary slip along the northwestern margin of the Basin and Range Province, Surprise Valley fault, northeastern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Personius, Stephen F.; Crone, Anthony J.; Machette, Michael N.; Mahan, Shannon; Lidke, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The 86-km-long Surprise Valley normal fault forms part of the active northwestern margin of the Basin and Range province in northeastern California. We use trench mapping and radiocarbon, luminescence, and tephra dating to estimate displacements and timing of the past five surface-rupturing earthquakes on the central part of the fault near Cedarville. A Bayesian OxCal analysis of timing constraints indicates earthquake times of 18.2 ± 2.6, 10.9 ± 3.2, 8.5 ± 0.5, 5.8 ± 1.5, and 1.2 ± 0.1 ka. These data yield recurrence intervals of 7.3 ± 4.1, 2.5 ± 3.2, 2.7 ± 1.6, and 4.5 ± 1.5 ka and an elapsed time of 1.2 ± 0.1 ka since the latest surface-rupturing earthquake. Our best estimate of latest Quaternary vertical slip rate is 0.6 ?? 0.1 mm/a. This late Quaternary rate is remarkably similar to long-term (8-14 Ma) minimum vertical slip rates (>0.4-0.5 ± 0.3 mm/a) calculated from recently acquired seismic reflection and chronologic and structural data in Surprise Valley and the adjacent Warner Mountains. However, our slip rate yields estimates of extension that are lower than recent campaign GPS determinations by factors of 1.5-4 unless the fault has an unusually shallow (30°-35°) dip as suggested by recently acquired seismic reflection data. Coseismic displacements of 2-4.5 ± 1 m documented in the trench and probable rupture lengths of 53-65 km indicate a history of latest Quaternary earthquakes of M 6.8-7.3 on the central part of the. Surprise Valley fault.

  12. Late Quaternary slip rate of the Owl Lake fault and maximum age of the latest event on the easternmost Garlock fault, S. California

    SciTech Connect

    McGill, S.F. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The Owl Lake fault is an active, left-lateral oblique-slip fault in the southwestern Basin and Range province. It intersects the left-lateral Garlock fault in the Quail Mountains and extends about 19 km northeastern toward southern Death Valley. The eastern wall of a channel incised into Late Tertiary or Quaternary fanglomerate north of the fault and into Late Quaternary alluvial fan deposits south of the fault has been offset at least 43 meters left-laterally. This slip estimate is a minimum because of possible erosion of the channel wall upstream from (north of) the fault. If the upstream channel prior to offset was of comparable width to the modern channel, the offset is no more than about 80 m. Organic matter entombed beneath rock varnish on two boulders on the alluvial fan surface into which the channel incised has conventional radiocarbon ages of 29,470 [+-] 270 and 30,820 [+-] 280 years B.P. Abandonment of the fan surface was probably caused by incision of the offset channel, so the channel wall probably has a similar age. This suggests a preliminary left-lateral slip rate of about 1--3 mm/yr for the Owl Lake fault. Fault scarp heights suggest relative uplift of the northwestern side of the fault by at least 1--2 meters and possibly more since deposition of the Late Quaternary fan. At a site in the Avawatz Mountains, within 2 km of the eastern end of the Garlock fault (Leach Lake strand), a terrace riser has been offset 2.7 [+-] 0.6 m left-laterally and 0.2 m south-side-up. This offset probably occurred during the most recent large earthquake on this part of the fault. Organic matter beneath varnish on two cobbles on the upper terrace has conventional radiocarbon ages of 1,583 [+-] 90 and 1,656 [+-] 88 years B.P. This suggests the most recent slip event occurred after a date of A.D. 150--590. This is significantly older than the maximum age (AD 1490) of the most recent slip event on the central Garlock fault in Searles Valley.

  13. Dating of the late Quaternary volcanic events using Uranium-series technique on travertine deposit: A case study in Ihlara, Central Anatolia Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Volkan; Tonguç Uysal, İ.; Ünal-İmer, Ezgi

    2016-04-01

    Dating of late Quaternary volcanism is crucial to understanding of the recent mechanism of crustal deformation and future volcanic explosivity risk of the region. However, radiometric dating of volcanic products has been a major challenge because of high methodological error rate. In most cases, there are difficulties on discrimination of the volcanic lava flow relations in the field. Furthermore, there would be unrecorded and unpreserved volcanoclastic layers by depositional and erosional processes. We present a new method that allows precise dating of late Quaternary volcanic events (in the time range of 0-500,000 years before present) using the Uranium-series technique on travertine mass, which is thought to be controlled by the young volcanism. Since the high pressure CO2 in the spring waters are mobilized during crustal strain cycles and the carbonates are precipitated in the fissures act as conduit for hot springs, thus, travertine deposits provide important information about crustal deformation. In this study we studied Ihlara fissure ridge travertines in the Central Anatolia Volcanic Province. This region is surrounded by many eruption centers (i.e. Hasandaǧı, Acıgöl and Göllüdaǧı) known as the late Quaternary and their widespread volcanoclastic products. Recent studies have suggested at least 11 events at around Acıgöl Caldera for the last 180 ka and 2 events at Hasandaǧı Stratovolcano for the last 30 ka. Active travertine masses around Ihlara deposited from hotwaters, which rise up through deep-penetrated fissures in volcanoclastic products of surrounding volcanoes. Analyses of the joint systems indicate that these vein structures are controlled by the crustal deformation due to young volcanism in the vicinity. Thus, the geological history of Ihlara travertine mass is regarded as a record of surrounding young volcanism. We dated 9 samples from 5 ridge-type travertine masses around Ihlara region. The age distribution indicates that the crustal

  14. Size variation in Tachyoryctes splendens (East African mole-rat) and its implications for late Quaternary temperature change in equatorial East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faith, J. Tyler; Patterson, David B.; Blegen, Nick; O'Neill, Chris J.; Marean, Curtis W.; Peppe, Daniel J.; Tryon, Christian A.

    2016-05-01

    This study develops a new proxy for Quaternary temperature change in tropical Africa through analysis of size variation in East African mole-rat (Tachyoryctes splendens). In modern mole-rats, mandibular alveolar length is unrelated to annual precipitation, precipitation seasonality, temperature seasonality, or primary productivity. However, it is inversely correlated with mean annual temperature, in agreement with Bergmann's rule. This relationship is observed at temperatures below ˜17.3 °C, but not at higher temperatures. We apply these observations to late Quaternary mole-rats from Wakondo (˜100 ka) and Kisaaka (˜50 ka) in the Lake Victoria region and Enkapune ya Muto (EYM; ˜7.2-3.2 ka) in Kenya's central rift. The Lake Victoria mole-rats are larger than expected for populations from warm climates typical of the area today, implying cooler temperatures in the past. The magnitude of temperature decline needed to drive the size shift is substantial (˜4-6 °C), similar in magnitude to the degree of change between the Last Glacial Maximum and Holocene, but is consistent with regional temperature records and with scenarios linking equatorial African temperature to northern hemisphere summer insolation. Size changes through time at EYM indicate that rising temperatures during the middle Holocene accompanied and potentially contributed to a decline in Lake Naivasha and expansion of grassland vegetation.

  15. Size variation in Tachyoryctes splendens (East African mole-rat) and its implications for late Quaternary temperature change in equatorial East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faith, J. Tyler; Patterson, David B.; Blegen, Nick; O'Neill, Chris J.; Marean, Curtis W.; Peppe, Daniel J.; Tryon, Christian A.

    2016-05-01

    This study develops a new proxy for Quaternary temperature change in tropical Africa through analysis of size variation in East African mole-rat (Tachyoryctes splendens). In modern mole-rats, mandibular alveolar length is unrelated to annual precipitation, precipitation seasonality, temperature seasonality, or primary productivity. However, it is inversely correlated with mean annual temperature, in agreement with Bergmann's rule. This relationship is observed at temperatures below ∼17.3 °C, but not at higher temperatures. We apply these observations to late Quaternary mole-rats from Wakondo (∼100 ka) and Kisaaka (∼50 ka) in the Lake Victoria region and Enkapune ya Muto (EYM; ∼7.2-3.2 ka) in Kenya's central rift. The Lake Victoria mole-rats are larger than expected for populations from warm climates typical of the area today, implying cooler temperatures in the past. The magnitude of temperature decline needed to drive the size shift is substantial (∼4-6 °C), similar in magnitude to the degree of change between the Last Glacial Maximum and Holocene, but is consistent with regional temperature records and with scenarios linking equatorial African temperature to northern hemisphere summer insolation. Size changes through time at EYM indicate that rising temperatures during the middle Holocene accompanied and potentially contributed to a decline in Lake Naivasha and expansion of grassland vegetation.

  16. Combining the least cost path method with population genetic data and species distribution models to identify landscape connectivity during the late Quaternary in Himalayan hemlock.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haibin; Zhang, Yili; Liu, Linshan; Qi, Wei; Li, Shicheng; Hu, Zhongjun

    2015-12-01

    Himalayan hemlock (Tsuga dumosa) experienced a recolonization event during the Quaternary period; however, the specific dispersal routes are remain unknown. Recently, the least cost path (LCP) calculation coupled with population genetic data and species distribution models has been applied to reveal the landscape connectivity. In this study, we utilized the categorical LCP method, combining species distribution of three periods (the last interglacial, the last glacial maximum, and the current period) and locality with shared chloroplast, mitochondrial, and nuclear haplotypes, to identify the possible dispersal routes of T. dumosa in the late Quaternary. Then, both a coalescent estimate of migration rates among regional groups and establishment of genetic divergence pattern were conducted. After those analyses, we found that the species generally migrated along the southern slope of Himalaya across time periods and genomic makers, and higher degree of dispersal was in the present and mtDNA haplotype. Furthermore, the direction of range shifts and strong level of gene flow also imply the existence of Himalayan dispersal path, and low area of genetic divergence pattern suggests that there are not any obvious barriers against the dispersal pathway. Above all, we inferred that a dispersal route along the Himalaya Mountains could exist, which is an important supplement for the evolutionary history of T. dumosa. Finally, we believed that this integrative genetic and geospatial method would bring new implications for the evolutionary process and conservation priority of species in the Tibetan Plateau.

  17. Functional diversity of marine ecosystems after the Late Permian mass extinction event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, William J.; Twitchett, Richard J.

    2014-03-01

    The Late Permian mass extinction event about 252 million years ago was the most severe biotic crisis of the past 500 million years and occurred during an episode of global warming. The loss of around two-thirds of marine genera is thought to have had substantial ecological effects, but the overall impacts on the functioning of marine ecosystems and the pattern of marine recovery are uncertain. Here we analyse the fossil occurrences of all known benthic marine invertebrate genera from the Permian and Triassic periods, and assign each to a functional group based on their inferred lifestyle. We show that despite the selective extinction of 62-74% of these genera, all but one functional group persisted through the crisis, indicating that there was no significant loss of functional diversity at the global scale. In addition, only one new mode of life originated in the extinction aftermath. We suggest that Early Triassic marine ecosystems were not as ecologically depauperate as widely assumed. Functional diversity was, however, reduced in particular regions and habitats, such as tropical reefs; at these smaller scales, recovery varied spatially and temporally, probably driven by migration of surviving groups. We find that marine ecosystems did not return to their pre-extinction state, and by the Middle Triassic greater functional evenness is recorded, resulting from the radiation of previously subordinate groups such as motile, epifaunal grazers.

  18. Late quaternary distribution of the Cycladophora davisiana radiolarian species: Reflection of possible ventilation of the North Pacific intermediate water during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matul, A. G.; Abelmann, A.; Gersonde, R.; Nürnberg, D.; Tiedemann, R.; Kruglikova, S. B.

    2015-02-01

    A comparison of micropaleontological data on the distribution of the Cycladophora davisiana radiolarian species in the surface sediment layer and the Late Quaternary sediments from the Subarctic Pacific and Far East marginal seas allowed conclusions concerning the possible conditions and occurrence of intermediate waters during the last glacial maximum. We used the modern data on the C. davisiana species, which is a micro-paleontological indicator of the cold oxygen-rich upper intermediate water mass, which is now forming only in the Sea of Okhotsk. The high amount of C. davisiana in sediments of the last glacial maximum may point to the possible formation and expansion of the ventilated intermediate water in the most part of the Subarctic paleo-Pacific: the Bering Sea, the Sea of Okhotsk, within the NW Gyre, and in the Gulf of Alaska.

  19. Paleomagnetic and paleoenvironmental implications of magnetofossil occurrences in late Miocene marine sediments from the Guadalquivir Basin, SW Spain

    PubMed Central

    Larrasoaña, Juan C.; Liu, Qingsong; Hu, Pengxiang; Roberts, Andrew P.; Mata, Pilar; Civis, Jorge; Sierro, Francisco J.; Pérez-Asensio, José N.

    2014-01-01

    Although recent studies have revealed more widespread occurrences of magnetofossils in pre-Quaternary sediments than have been previously reported, their significance for paleomagnetic and paleoenvironmental studies is not fully understood. We present a paleo- and rock-magnetic study of late Miocene marine sediments recovered from the Guadalquivir Basin (SW Spain). Well-defined paleomagnetic directions provide a robust magnetostratigraphic chronology for the two studied sediment cores. Rock magnetic results indicate the dominance of intact magnetosome chains throughout the studied sediments. These results provide a link between the highest-quality paleomagnetic directions and higher magnetofossil abundances. We interpret that bacterial magnetite formed in the surface sediment mixed layer and that these magnetic particles gave rise to a paleomagnetic signal in the same way as detrital grains. They, therefore, carry a magnetization that is essentially identical to a post-depositional remanent magnetization, which we term a bio-depositional remanent magnetization. Some studied polarity reversals record paleomagnetic directions with an apparent 60–70 kyr recording delay. Magnetofossils in these cases are interpreted to carry a biogeochemical remanent magnetization that is locked in at greater depth in the sediment column. A sharp decrease in magnetofossil abundance toward the middle of the studied boreholes coincides broadly with a major rise in sediment accumulation rates near the onset of the Messinian salinity crisis (MSC), an event caused by interruption of the connection between the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. This correlation appears to have resulted from dilution of magnetofossils by enhanced terrigenous inputs that were driven, in turn, by sedimentary changes triggered in the basin at the onset of the MSC. Our results highlight the importance of magnetofossils as carriers of high-quality paleomagnetic and paleoenvironmental signals even in

  20. Lake level and watershed vegetation changes from C and N isotopic analysis of lacustrine organic matter: Implications for late Quaternary hydroclimate variability in Interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, S.; Finney, B. P.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding climate controls over lake level and watershed vegetation changes throughout the Holocene is important to determine how future hydroclimates will affect freshwater and terrestrial systems. This study seeks to provide a detailed record of late Quaternary climate variability for interior Alaska by quantifying lake level and vegetation changes via C and N isotopic compositions of lacustrine organic matter. C and N stable isotopes are important paleoclimate proxies from lake sediments that identify general plant types growing in and around lakes at the time of deposition. At Little Harding Lake (N 64.409207, W 146.902278), low lake levels are inferred around 12,285 cal yr BP, a time when sediment organic matter is characterized by enriched δ13C and low C/N ratios, carbonate deposition occurred, and herb vegetation dominated the landscape. Concentration dependent mixing models suggest that terrestrial organic matter contributed 51% to lake sediments during this time. An intensified Aleutian Low during the latter half of the Younger Dryas may have created cold, dry conditions in the Alaskan interior. Lake level fluctuated and began to rise after 11,400 cal yr BP as moisture delivery increased to the Alaskan interior and birch expanded in the region. Rising lake level and C3 plant expansion are documented by depleted δ13C, higher C/N ratios, and a 30% increase in terrestrial organic matter contribution to Little Harding Lake. Further increases in lake level until 8,400 cal yr BP correlate with expansion of poplar, spruce and alder and higher organic matter accumulation rates. C3 tree expansion and increasing lake levels into the middle Holocene may be attributed to greater summer precipitation in the interior as the result of an increased East Asian trough to the west accompanied by ridging over Alaska. Comparisons with other regional records will be assessed to determine likely patterns of past atmospheric circulation that may explain late Quaternary lake

  1. Late Quaternary depositional architecture of Po and Tevere river deltas (Italy) and worldwide comparison with coeval deltaic successions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorosi, Alessandro; Milli, Salvatore

    2001-11-01

    Po and Tevere rivers form two of the most important deltas of the whole Mediterranean area. Detailed investigations have been carried out in the last decade beneath the present delta plains of these two river systems using borehole data correlation. With the aid of radiocarbon dates and other dating methods (pollens, archaeology) a detailed sequence stratigraphic framework has been constructed in both areas, especially for the last glacial-interglacial cycle. Regional subsidence, combined with short-term sea-level fluctuations of relatively high amplitude, played a fundamental role in creating/subtracting accommodation during the long phase of falling sea level, which followed the Tyrrhenian (substage 5e) transgressive event. A discontinuous record of this phase is present in the subsurface of the Po Plain, whereas poor or no preservation has been detected in the Tevere area. Progradational lowstand wedges accumulated during the last glacial maximum mostly in the central part of the basins, far from the present deltas, and are lacking in the study areas, where a hiatal surface is invariably recorded below the transgressive deposits. Glacioeustasy exerted a major control on sedimentation in both areas during the latest Pleistocene-Holocene sea-level rise. Infilling of fluvial valleys and rapid landward migration of barrier-lagoon systems, in the context of wave-dominated estuaries, characterized the transgressive phase in both Po and Tevere systems. In-place drowning and transgressive submergence mechanisms of barrier migration were effective predominantly between 13.5 and 9 ka BP. In contrast, shoreface retreat was dominant in the late transgressive phase. The maximum flooding surface (MFS) can be traced physically from continental to marine deposits, and has similar characteristics in the Po and Tevere river systems, being marked by peat layers or lagoonal deposits at landward locations and by distinctive lithological characteristics and micro- and macrofossils

  2. Subsurface geology of the late Tertiary and Quaternary water-bearing deposits of the southern part of the San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croft, M.G.

    1972-01-01

    The study area, which includes about 5,000 square miles of the southern part of the San Joaquin Valley, is a broad structural trough of mostly interior drainage. The Sierra Nevada on the east is composed of consolidated igneous and metamorphic rocks of pre-Tertiary age. The surface of these rocks slopes 4?-6? southwestward from the foothills and underlies the valley. The Coast Ranges on the west consist mostly of complexly folded and faulted consolidated marine and nonmarine sedimentary rocks of Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary age, which dip eastward and overlie the basement complex. Unconsolidated deposits, of late Pliocene to Holocene age, blanket the underlying consolidated rocks in the valley and are the source of most of the fresh ground water. The unconsolidated deposits, the subject of this report, are divided into informal stratigraphic units on the basis of source of sediment, environment of deposition, and texture. Flood-basin, lacustrine, and marsh deposits are fine grained and underlie the valley trough. They range in age from late Pliocene to Holocene. These deposits, consisting of nearly impermeable gypsiferous fine sand, silt, and clay, are more than 3,000 feet thick beneath parts of Tulare Lake bed. In other parts of the trough, flood-basin, lacustrine, and marsh deposits branch into clayey or silty clay tongues designated by the letter symbols A to F. Three of these tongues, the E, C, and A clays, lie beneath large areas of the southern part of the valley. The E clay includes the Corcoran Clay Member of the Tulare Formation, the most extensive hydrologic confining layer in the valley. The E clay underlies about 3,500 square miles of bottom land and western slopes. The beds generally are dark-greenish-gray mostly diatomaceous silty clay of Pleistocene age. Marginally, the unit bifurcates into an upper and a lower stratum that contains thin beds of moderately yellowish-brown silt and sand. The E clay is warped into broad, gentle northwesterly

  3. Molecular signals for late Tertiary/early Quaternary range splits of an Eurasian steppe plant: Clausia aprica (Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Franzke, A; Hurka, H; Janssen, D; Neuffer, B; Friesen, N; Markov, M; Mummenhoff, K

    2004-09-01

    Several vegetation belts stretch continuously from Europe to Asia, taiga and steppe being most prominent. Numerous plant species within these belts share a conspicuous distribution area, which is longitudinally contracted or disrupted approximately along longitude 70 degrees E. To date no hypothesis for this intriguing distribution pattern has been put forward. We detected molecular footprints in the contemporary genetic composition in nuclear DNA (ITS1, ITS2) and chloroplast DNA (trnL-trnF spacer region) of the steppe element Clausia aprica (Brassicaceae) providing evidence for a severe longitudinal range split and genetic differentiation east of the Ural Mountains about 1 million years ago caused by Quaternary climatic oscillations. Clausia aprica provides the first phylogeographical analysis on the intraspecific evolution of an Eurasian steppe plant.

  4. Molecular signals for late Tertiary/early Quaternary range splits of an Eurasian steppe plant: Clausia aprica (Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Franzke, A; Hurka, H; Janssen, D; Neuffer, B; Friesen, N; Markov, M; Mummenhoff, K

    2004-09-01

    Several vegetation belts stretch continuously from Europe to Asia, taiga and steppe being most prominent. Numerous plant species within these belts share a conspicuous distribution area, which is longitudinally contracted or disrupted approximately along longitude 70 degrees E. To date no hypothesis for this intriguing distribution pattern has been put forward. We detected molecular footprints in the contemporary genetic composition in nuclear DNA (ITS1, ITS2) and chloroplast DNA (trnL-trnF spacer region) of the steppe element Clausia aprica (Brassicaceae) providing evidence for a severe longitudinal range split and genetic differentiation east of the Ural Mountains about 1 million years ago caused by Quaternary climatic oscillations. Clausia aprica provides the first phylogeographical analysis on the intraspecific evolution of an Eurasian steppe plant. PMID:15315689

  5. Differential insect and mammalian response to Late Quaternary climate change in the Rocky Mountain region of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Scott A.

    2015-07-01

    Of the 200 beetle species identified from Rocky Mountain Late Pleistocene insect faunal assemblages, 23% are no longer resident in this region. None of the 200 species is extinct. In contrast to this, only 8% of 73 identified mammal species from Rocky Mountain Late Pleistocene assemblages are no longer resident in the Rockies, and 12 species are now extinct. Since both groups of organisms are highly mobile, it would appear that their responses to the large-scale fluctuations of climate associated with the last 125,000 years have been considerably different. Most strikingly contrasting with the insects, there are no mammals in the Rocky Mountain Late Pleistocene fossil record that are found exclusively today in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) region. The PNW does have a distinctive modern mammalian fauna, but only one of these, Keen's Myotis, has a fossil record outside the PNW region, in the eastern and central United States. No modern PNW vertebrate species have been found in any Rocky Mountain fossil assemblages. Based on these data, it appears that there has been little or no mammalian faunal exchange between the PNW region and the Rocky Mountains during the Late Pleistocene or Holocene. This is in stark contrast to the fossil beetle record, where PNW species are a substantial component in many faunas, right through to the Late Holocene.

  6. Late Quaternary cave bears and brown bears in Europe: implications for distribution, chronology, and extinction based on a multidisciplinary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacher, Martina

    2010-05-01

    Cave bear remains are one of the most numerous fossils found in European caves. Despite their frequency of occurrence, many aspects of cave bear palaeontology still remain poorly understood. New methodological approaches and ongoing studies led to controversial results and discussion about its taxonomy, palaeoecology, and final extinction. Are we dealing with one single or several species of cave bears? Was cave bear exclusively vegetarian or after all more omnivorous? Did he go extinct before or after the Late Glacial Maximum? Was cave bear restricted to Europe or did he also occur in Asia? Late Pleistocene brown bears, on the other hand, are often rare and little is known about the possible co-occurrence of cave and brown bears during the Late Pleistocene. Based on direct radiocarbon dates the distribution pattern of both, cave and brown bears is reconstructed during the Late Pleistocene in Europe. In addition, the reasons for the achieved pattern will be tested leading to the main question - why did cave bear become extinct while brown bears survived until today? To answer this question palaeobiological data of Late Pleistocene cave and brown bears will be tested against results from isotope analyses, while aDNA data may contribute to the question of distinct local population or even species of bears. The current state of evidence will be presented and on the basis of resulting pattern implications for further multi-disciplinary studies will be discussed.

  7. Width of late Quaternary deformation of the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden strike-slip fault zone in Haiti and the Jamaica Passage and implications for accumulated stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, P.; Bachhuber, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    The devastating Haiti earthquake of January 12, 2010, is now known to have occurred on multiple rupture planes with most of the seismic energy release along a north-dipping thrust fault located from 0.5 to 15 km north of the main late Quaternary trace of the EPGFZ. Two alternative views of this rupture are that this north-dipping thrust is unrelated to the main trace of the fault - which showed no rupture during the event - or this north-dipping thrust is part of its larger, subsurface “flower zone” of deformation poorly understood because we have no seismic reflection images crossing the EGPFZ in epicentral area of the 2010 earthquake. The significance of distinguishing these two views of fault behavior relates to whether centuries of accumulated stress were not released on the main trace of the EPGFZ (first model) or whether some accumulated stress was released on the low-angle thrust as part of a broad and linked “flower zone” of deformation parallel to the EPGFZ (second model). In this talk we review observations on the width of the EPGFZ deformation to support the latter view that the EPGFZ is in fact a broad zone of deformation commensurate with its tectonic role as a major, active plate boundary fault. Three areas of broad late Quaternary tectonic deformation varying from transpressional to transtensional in structural style are examined using DEM, imagery, surface geologic maps, and aftershock locations. The Cul-de-Sac basin of Haiti is the xx-km-wide, fault bounded alluvial plain upon which the city of Port-au-Prince was constructed in the early 18th century. Merged DEM and geologic map data from the Cul-de-Sac plain show that an en echelon array of large, open folds deforming uplifted and deeply dissected Plio-Pleistocene fans can be traced 3 to 7 km north of the main trace of the EPGFZ. Map studies show that west-northwest-striking, sub-parallel reverse-oblique/strike-slip faults can be mapped transecting the folds at distances of 3 to 5 km north

  8. Age assessment and implications of late Quaternary periglacial and paraglacial landforms on Muckish Mountain, northwest Ireland, based on Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Peter; Matthews, John A.

    2016-10-01

    Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD) was applied to a variety of late Quaternary periglacial and paraglacial landforms composed of coarse rock debris on Muckish Mountain, northwest Ireland. Landform ages were determined using a linear high-precision age-calibration curve, derived from young and old control surfaces of known age on the same rock type. The SHD ages represent maximum estimates of the time elapsed since the boulders stabilised and the landforms became inactive. Most ages are also minimum estimates for the start of landform development because older boulders are buried beneath the sampled surface boulders. Ages and 95% confidence intervals obtained for blockfield, boulder lobes and talus indicate these features were likely active during several of the early Holocene cold events evidenced in Greenland ice cores and North Atlantic sediment records. Activity ceased at different times ~ 9-7 ka BP. These landforms are the first indication of a geomorphological response to early Holocene cooling in the oceanic mountains of Ireland. Late Holocene ages, obtained for rock-slope failure run-out debris and debris cone boulders, overlap with shifts to cooler and/or wetter conditions, including the Little Ice Age. Geomorphological impacts associated with these changes in climate have not previously been recorded in the Irish uplands. The SHD results indicate that previously implied timings for the stabilisation of some accumulations of coarse rock debris on mountain slopes are in need of revision.

  9. Late Quaternary sediment-accumulation rates within the inner basins of the California Continental Borderland in support of geologic hazard evaluation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, W.R.; McGann, M.; Sliter, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    An evaluation of the geologic hazards of the inner California Borderland requires determination of the timing for faulting and mass-movement episodes during the Holocene. Our effort focused on basin slopes and turbidite systems on the basin floors for the area between Santa Barbara and San Diego, California. Dating condensed sections on slopes adjacent to fault zones provides better control on fault history where high-resolution, seismic-reflection data can be used to correlate sediment between the core site and the fault zones. This study reports and interprets 147 radiocarbon dates from 43 U.S. Geological Survey piston cores as well as 11 dates from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1015 on the floor of Santa Monica Basin. One hundred nineteen dates from 39 of the piston cores have not previously been published. Core locations were selected for hazard evaluation, but despite the nonuniform distribution of sample locations, the dates obtained for the late Quaternary deposits are useful for documenting changes in sediment-accumulation rates during the past 30 ka. Cores from basins receiving substantial sediment from rivers, i.e., Santa Monica Basin and the Gulf of Santa Catalina, show a decrease in sediment supply during the middle Holocene, but during the late Holocene after sea level had reached the current highstand condition, rates then increased partly in response to an increase in El Ni??o-Southern Oscillation events during the past 3.5 ka. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  10. Inferences about winter temperatures and summer rains from the late Quaternary record of C4 perennial grasses and C3 desert shrubs in the northern Chihuahuan Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmgren, Camille A.; Norris, Jodi; Betancourt, Julio L.

    2007-01-01

    Late Quaternary histories of two North American desert biomes—C4 grasslands and C3 shrublands—are poorly known despite their sensitivity and potential value in reconstructing summer rains and winter temperatures. Plant macrofossil assemblages from packrat midden series in the northern Chihuahuan Desert show that C4 grasses and annuals typical of desert grassland persisted near their present northern limits throughout the last glacial-interglacial cycle. By contrast, key C3 desert shrubs appeared somewhat abruptly after 5000cal.yrBP. Bioclimatic envelopes for select C4 and C3 species are mapped to interpret the glacial-interglacial persistence of desert grassland and the mid-to-late Holocene expansion of desert shrublands. The envelopes suggest relatively warm Pleistocene temperatures with moist summers allowed for persistence of C4 grasses, whereas winters were probably too cold (or too wet) for C3 desert shrubs. Contrary to climate model results, core processes associated with the North American Monsoon and moisture transport to the northern Chihuahuan Desert remained intact throughout the last glacial-interglacial cycle. Mid-latitude effects, however, truncated midsummer (July-August) moisture transport north of 35° N. The sudden expansion of desert shrublands after 5000cal.yrBP may be a threshold response to warmer winters associated with increasing boreal winter insolation, and enhanced El Niño-Southern Oscillation variability.

  11. A stacked Late Quaternary fluvio-periglacial sequence from the Axe valley, southern England with implications for landscape evolution and Palaeolithic archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, A. G.; Basell, L. S.; Toms, P. S.

    2015-05-01

    The current model of mid-latitude late Quaternary terrace sequences, is that they are uplift-driven but climatically controlled terrace staircases, relating to both regional-scale crustal and tectonic factors, and palaeohydrological variations forced by quasi-cyclic climatic conditions in the 100 K world (post Mid Pleistocene Transition). This model appears to hold for the majority of the river valleys draining into the English Channel which exhibit 8-15 terrace levels over approximately 60-100 m of altitudinal elevation. However, one valley, the Axe, has only one major morphological terrace and has long-been regarded as anomalous. This paper uses both conventional and novel stratigraphical methods (digital granulometry and terrestrial laser scanning) to show that this terrace is a stacked sedimentary sequence of 20-30 m thickness with a quasi-continuous (i.e. with hiatuses) pulsed, record of fluvial and periglacial sedimentation over at least the last 300-400 K yrs as determined principally by OSL dating of the upper two thirds of the sequence. Since uplift has been regional, there is no evidence of anomalous neotectonics, and climatic history must be comparable to the adjacent catchments (both of which have staircase sequences) a catchment-specific mechanism is required. The Axe is the only valley in North West Europe incised entirely into the near-horizontally bedded chert (crypto-crystalline quartz) and sand-rich Lower Cretaceous rocks creating a buried valley. Mapping of the valley slopes has identified many large landslide scars associated with past and present springs. It is proposed that these are thaw-slump scars and represent large hill-slope failures caused by Vauclausian water pressures and hydraulic fracturing of the chert during rapid permafrost melting. A simple 1D model of this thermokarstic process is used to explore this mechanism, and it is proposed that the resultant anomalously high input of chert and sand into the valley during terminations

  12. Deciphering late Quaternary land snail shell δ18O and δ13C from Franchthi Cave (Argolid, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonese, André C.; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Perlès, Catherine; Drysdale, Russell N.; Manganelli, Giuseppe; Baneschi, Ilaria; Dotsika, Elissavet; Valladas, Hélène

    2013-07-01

    This paper investigates the stable isotopic composition from late Pleistocene-Holocene (~ 13 to ~ 10.5 cal ka BP) shells of the land snail Helix figulina, from Franchthi Cave (Greece). It explores the palaeoclimatic and palaeoenvironmental implications of the isotope palaeoecology of archaeological shells at the time of human occupation of the cave. Modern shells from around the cave were also analysed and their isotopic signatures compared with those of the archaeological shells. The carbon isotope composition of modern shells depicts the consumption of C3 vegetation. Shell oxygen isotopic values are consistent with other Mediterranean snail shells from coastal areas. Combining empirical linear regression and an evaporative model, the δ18Os suggest that modern snails in the study area are active during periods of higher relative humidity and lower rainfall δ18O, probably at night. Late glacial and early Holocene δ18Os show lower values compared to modern ones. Early Holocene δ18Os values likely track enhanced moisture and isotopic changes in the precipitation source. By contrast, lower late glacial δ18O could reflect lower temperatures and δ18Op, compared to the present day. Shell carbon isotope values indicate the presence of C3 vegetation as main source of carbon to late glacial and early Holocene snails.

  13. Amino acid chronostratigraphy of late Quaternary coral reefs: Huon Peninsula, New Guinea, and the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearty, Paul J.; Aharon, Paul

    1988-07-01

    D-alloisoleucine/L-isoleucine (D/L) ratios were measured in Tridacna gigas (the giant clam) whose ages were calibrated against radiometrically dated coral reef terraces from New Guinea and storm ridges on coral islands from the Great Barrier Reef. The results of 52 samples show several distinct intervals encompassing a fast epimerization phase at a rate of 0.077/ka for the first 8 ka, a transitional interval for the next 60 ka during which epimerization evolves at the rate of 0.006/ka, and the final phase between 60 and 185 ka when D/L ratios attain quasi-equilibrium (˜1.30) at an average rate of 0.003/ka. The demonstrated relation between the D/L ratios and the radiometric ages is useful for estimating ages of undated or insufficiently dated terraces. A comparison of the "New Guinea curve" and other less completely dated curves from elsewhere demonstrates the effect of sedimentary temperature on the rate of epimerization through time. Refinements of the D/L reaction among coral reef terraces, coupled with a better definition of the kinetic model presented here, would improve our knowledge of the temperature history and the chrono-stratigraphy of Quaternary coral reefs.

  14. Late Quaternary incision rates in the southern French Alps from river longitudinal profiles inversion: climatic forcing and internal adjustments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Carole; Cassol, Davide; Rolland, Yann; Saillard, Marianne

    2016-04-01

    Southern French Alps, and especially the external crystalline massifs, show evidences of rapid river incision featured by deeply incised gorges and widespread active landslides. The onset of rapid incision is not precisely dated, but cosmogenic nuclide dating of river polished profiles evidences rapid incision (of the order of 2-3 mm.yr-1) since 20 ka. These data suggest that it may be related to temperature and runoff increase due to glacier melting after le last glacial maximum (LGM). In this study, we use river longitudinal profiles from tributaries of the Tinée River, in the Argentera-Mercantour crystalline massif, to determine recent incision rate (IR) variations through time with the inversion method of Goren et al. (2014). Overall, the background IR is of approximately 5 mm.yr-1, in agreement with recent IR estimates from cosmogenic nuclide dating in the Tinée River. Incision rate histories of all tributaries show periodic pulses of large IR that could be correlated to quaternary interglacials and interstadials, based on the comparison with global temperature curves. However, some tributaries show very large IR in the Holocene period, whereas others show a recent (post 10 ka) IR decrease. We suggest that local internal adjustments, possibly in relation with meander migration of the main stem, are responsible for these different behaviors.

  15. A Late Pleistocene transgression in Thailand: A marine molluscan fauna from Ban Praksa (Samut Prakan Province)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negri, Mauro Pietro

    2012-01-01

    A Late Pleistocene molluscan fauna sampled at Ban Praksa, near the Chao Phraya River mouth (Lower Central Plain of Bangkok, Thailand) is herein analyzed and paleoecologically characterized, revealing a shallow infralittoral, coarse/hard-bottomed environment. The comparison of the Ban Praksa association with several coeval ones recovered from Phra Pradaeng Formation seems to be evidence of a 10,000 year hiatus between two separate groups of marine faunas, possibly belonging to different interstadial transgressive peaks that occurred during the long-term sea-level regression following the Last Interglacial.

  16. 10Be and U-series dating of late Quaternary landforms along the southern San Jacinto fault: Implications for temporal slip rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blisniuk, K.; Oskin, M. E.; Fletcher, K.; Sharp, W. D.; Rockwell, T. K.

    2009-12-01

    Robust age control on faulted landforms with well-constrained offsets is essential to documenting the heterogeneous behavior of a fault zone over time. However, showing late Quaternary temporal slip rate variation is often challenging due to the difficultly of obtaining reliable ages for Quaternary deposits. Exposure ages from cosmogenic isotopes can be significantly affected by surface processes, and U-series dating of pedogenic carbonate provides only minimum ages because carbonate accumulation occurs after deposition. Fortunately, the controlling factors for the resulting age uncertainties of each method are relatively independent from each other, so a combination of cosmogenic isotope and U-series dating may significantly improve the reliability of landform dating and yield more robust slip rate estimates. We present preliminary results of this dual-dating approach at 4 sites along the southern San Jacinto fault zone in California: 2 sites along the Coyote Creek fault, and 2 sites along the Clark fault. These results show age agreement between the two dating methods. Along the southern Clark fault, a 10Be depth profile model age of 34.5 ±6.6 ka and a U-series age of 33.2 ±1.1 ka were obtained for an offset Q2b fan surface, and a Q3b surface yielded a weighted mean 10Be surface exposure age of 5.9 ±1.5 ka, similar to an U-series age of 6.3 ±0.4 ka. Along the northern Coyote Creek fault, preliminary data indicate a 10Be surface exposure age of 11.3 ±3.4 ka and a U-series age of 11.7 ±1.8 ka for an offset Q3a surface, and a 10Be surface exposure age of 6.9 ±1.0 ka and a U-series age of 7.8 ± 0.9 ka for an offset Q3b surface. The remarkable consistency among ages from the two dating methods suggest that: (1) U-series ages of pedogenic carbonate clast rinds closely approach depositional ages of the host alluvium; (2) erosion may be negligible at the sampled sites; and (3) inherited 10Be has been accurately quantified (via depth profile) for the late

  17. Late Quaternary vegetation changes around Lake Rutundu, Mount Kenya, East Africa: evidence from grass cuticles, pollen and stable carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooller, M. J.; Swain, D. L.; Ficken, K. J.; Agnew, A. D. Q.; Street-Perrott, F. A.; Eglinton, G.

    2003-01-01

    Woody, subalpine shrubs and grasses currently surround Lake Rutundu, Mount Kenya. Multiple proxies, including carbon isotopes, pollen and grass cuticles, from a 755-cm-long core were used to reconstruct the vegetation over the past 38 300 calendar years. Stable carbon-isotope ratios of total organic carbon and terrestrial biomarkers from the lake sediments imply that the proportion of terrestrial plants using the C4 photosynthetic pathway was greater during the Late Pleistocene than in the Holocene. Pollen data show that grasses were a major constituent of the vegetation throughout the Late Pleistocene and Holocene. The proportion of grass pollen relative to the pollen from other plants was greatest at the last glacial maximum (LGM). Grass cuticles confirm evidence that C4 grass taxa were present at the LGM and that the majority followed the cold-tolerant NADP-MEC4 subpathway.

  18. Late Quaternary Uplift Rates and Geomorphology of the Santa Fe Springs and West Coyote Folds, Los Angeles Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundermann, S. T.; Mueller, K. J.

    2001-12-01

    We mapped Quaternary aquifers with water wells and 5 m DEM's from IFSAR to define rates of folding along the Puente Hills blind thrust system. A cross section across Santa Fe Springs along Carfax Ave suggests 100 and 165 m of uplift of the 330 ka Gage and 650 ka Lynwood aquifers, yielding uplift rates of 0.2 mm/yr between 330-650 ka and 0.27 mm/yr beween 0-330 ka. For a 27° thrust, this yields a slip rate of 0.44 - 0.59 mm/yr. Surface folding is discernable across the Santa Fe Springs segment in the DEM, to a point 4 km west of the San Gabriel River. Aquifers correlated with reflectors in a USGS seismic profile along Carfax suggests lower relief for the Lynwood (85 m) and the Gage (59 m). We suggest the 1 km-long USGS profile images only part of the fold limb and that additional structural relief is accommodated further north, as defined by our subsurface mapping. Correlation of a shallow reflector in the seismic profile with the 15-20 ka Gaspur aquifer suggests Holocene uplift of 1.0 mm/yr. A similar analysis undertaken for the Coyote fold near Trojan Ave. suggests 85 and 229 m of uplift for the Gage and Lynwood, yielding uplift rates of 0.26 mm/yr between 0-330 ka and 0.45 mm/yr between 330-650 ka. Correlation of the Gage with a reflector on another USGS seismic profile along Trojan suggests equivalent uplift (86 m), indicating the profile images the entire width of the Coyote forelimb at this site.

  19. Late Quaternary evolution of the La Cantera Fault System (Central Precordillera, Argentina): A morphotectonic and paleoseismic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perucca, Laura; Rothis, Martín; Bezerra, Francisco Hilario; Vargas, Nicolás; Lima, Jean

    2015-10-01

    The La Cantera Fault System (LCFS) is the most active Quaternary structure in the Central Precordillera of San Juan, in central-western Argentina; the system extends for 47 km along the intermountain valley that separates the Sierra de La Cantera and La Invernada, north of the San Juan River. The average fault trend is 20°; it dips at angles varying between 15° and 30° W in the northern section, to approximately 40° W in the central section, and up to 60° W in the southern section. The fault affects Holocene to recent alluvium deposits in the western piedmont of the Sierra de La Cantera and is defined by a series of landforms found in compressive tectonic environments, including simple and compound counterslope fault scarps, staircased alluvial terraces, sag ponds, flexural scarps, aligned springs, broom-shaped drainage patterns, river diversions, beheaded channels, changes in incision depths, sinuosity and a river gradient along channels. Trench investigations indicated that at least three events occurred in the past 1.1-10.1 ky. The topographic profiles of the selected channels and interfluves cutting across the northern and central trace of the fault were analyzed using a Stonex Vector GPS differential system to establish the relationship between the topography and slope of the rivers. This morphometric analysis of scarps indicates that active tectonics have played an essential role in controlling the drainage pattern in the piedmont, leading the rivers to adjust to these slope variations. Based on the analyzed geomorphologic, stratigraphic and structural characteristics, the LCFS is considered to be a relevant seismogenic source in the intraplate portion of southern South America, with a recurrence interval of at least 2000 ± 500 years for moderate magnitude earthquakes during the last 11,000 years.

  20. The evolution of a thermokarst-lake landscape: Late Quaternary permafrost degradation and stabilization in interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Mary; Grosse, Guido; Jones, Benjamin M.; McDowell, Patricia

    2016-07-01

    Thermokarst processes characterize a variety of ice-rich permafrost terrains and often lead to lake formation. The long-term evolution of thermokarst landscapes and the stability and longevity of lakes depend upon climate, vegetation and ground conditions, including the volume of excess ground ice and its distribution. The current lake status of thermokarst-lake landscapes and their future trajectories under climate warming are better understood in the light of their long-term development. We studied the lake-rich southern marginal upland of the Yukon Flats (northern interior Alaska) using dated lake-sediment cores, observations of river-cut exposures, and remotely-sensed data. The region features thick (up to 40 m) Quaternary deposits (mainly loess) that contain massive ground ice. Two of three studied lakes formed ~ 11,000-12,000 cal yr BP through inferred thermokarst processes, and fire may have played a role in initiating thermokarst development. From ~ 9000 cal yr BP, all lakes exhibited steady sedimentation, and pollen stratigraphies are consistent with regional patterns. The current lake expansion rates are low (0 to < 7 cm yr- 1 shoreline retreat) compared with other regions (~ 30 cm yr- 1 or more). This thermokarst lake-rich region does not show evidence of extensive landscape lowering by lake drainage, nor of multiple lake generations within a basin. However, LiDAR images reveal linear "corrugations" (> 5 m amplitude), deep thermo-erosional gullies, and features resembling lake drainage channels, suggesting that highly dynamic surface processes have previously shaped the landscape. Evidently, widespread early Holocene permafrost degradation and thermokarst lake initiation were followed by lake longevity and landscape stabilization, the latter possibly related to establishment of dense forest cover. Partial or complete drainage of three lakes in 2013 reveals that there is some contemporary landscape dynamism. Holocene landscape evolution in the study area

  1. Interplay between down-slope and along-slope sedimentary processes during the late Quaternary along the Capo Vaticano margin (southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martorelli, Eleonora; Bosman, Alessandro; Casalbore, Daniele; Falcini, Federico

    2016-04-01

    Late Quaternary along-slope and down-slope sedimentary processes and structures in the upper slope-shelf sector of the Calabro-Tyrrhenian continental margin off Capo Vaticano have been investigated using very high-resolution single-channel seismic profiles and multibeam bathymetric data. The results show that a competition among along-slope bottom currents-vs down-slope mass-wasting mostly contributed in shaping the seafloor and controlling deposition of sedimentary units during the Late Quaternary. Along-slope processes mostly formed elongated drifts located on the upper continental slope and outer shelf, between -90 and -300 m. The contourite deposits and associated erosive elements indicate the presence of a northwestward geostrophic flow that can be related to the modified-LIW issued by the Messina Strait. According to the proposed stratigraphic reconstruction it is likely that the activity of bottom-currents off Capo Vaticano was intensified around the LGM period and during the post-glacial sea-level rise, whereas they were less intense during the Holocene. Gravity-driven down-slope processes formed mass-transport deposits and turbidite systems with erosive channels, locally indenting the present-day shelf. Several slide events affected the upper 10-20 m of the stratigraphic record, dismantling considerable volume of contourite sediment. High-resolution seismic profiles indicate that failure processes appear to be dominated by translational sliding with glide plains mainly developed within contourite deposits. The most striking feature is the Capo Vaticano slide complex, which displays a large spatial coverage (area of about 18 km2) and is composed by several intersecting slide scars and overlapping deposits; these characteristics are peculiar for the Tyrrhenian continental margins, where slide events developed in open-slope areas are usually less complex and smaller in size. The presence of high-amplitude reflectors within contourite deposits (representing

  2. The Sand Seas of northern China: Important sinks and sources of global sediment fluxes and their changing roles during different climate conditions of Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.

    2014-12-01

    Although the occurrence of aeolian sands in sedimentary sequences has been widely used as indicators of desert formation or proxies of desert climate, one should be aware that accumulation of aeolian sands does occur along river channels, in lake shores not necessarily associated with arid environment. Our ongoing geomorphological and paleoenvironmental studies in the deserts of northern China reconfirm that formation of sand seas is dependent on not only erodibility (arising from bare surface due to aridity) and wind power but more importantly sand availability related to sediment cycles under interactions between fluvial, lacustrine and aeolian processes. Here we present our ongoing geomorphological and paleoclimatic research on the Late Quaternary landscape and climatic changes in the Taklamkan Desert of northwestern China, the largest sand sea of China in arid zone, and in the Hunshandake Sandy Land at the east part of the Asian mid-latitude desert belt under semiarid climate. We find out that the occurrence of tall sand dunes in the over 300,000 km2 large Taklamakan Sand Sea is closely related to the sites of intensive fluvial sedimentation and convergence zone of surface winds. In the case of Hunshandake, the dunes (although much smaller) mainly occur along the shorelines of the former lake basins, and sediment sources are generally limited because of open hydrological systems in the south and east portions of this desert. The sedimentological and geomorphological records suggest that the climate has changed between arid and less-arid conditions in both of these deserts during Late Quaternary. Under wetter conditions the Taklamakan acts as an important sink of sediments brought by rivers with headwaters in the Tibetan Plateau and Tianshan, while under more arid conditions it acts as an important global sediment source whose dust is transported not only to East Asia and Pacific but also to Greenland ice via westerlies. The Hunshandake has the same pattern of

  3. The last interglacial period at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and an estimate of late Quaternary tectonic uplift rate in a strike-slip regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweig, E. S.; Muhs, D. R.; Simmons, K. R.; Halley, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Guantanamo Bay, Cuba is an area dominated by a strike-slip tectonic regime and is therefore expected to have very low Quaternary uplift rates. We tested this hypothesis by study of an unusually well preserved emergent reef terrace around the bay. Up to 12 m of unaltered, growth-position reef corals are exposed at about 40 sections examined around ˜40 km of coastline. Maximum reef elevations in the protected, inner part of the bay are ˜11-12 m, whereas outer-coast shoreline angles of wave-cut benches are as high as ˜14 m. Fifty uranium-series analyses of unrecrystallized corals from six localities yield ages ranging from ˜134 ka to ˜115 ka, when adjusted for small biases due to slightly elevated initial 234U/238U values. Thus, ages of corals correlate this reef to the peak of the last interglacial period, marine isotope stage (MIS) 5.5. Previously, we dated the Key Largo Limestone to the same high-sea stand in the tectonically stable Florida Keys. Estimates of paleo-sea level during MIS 5.5 in the Florida Keys are ~6.6 to 8.3 m above present. Assuming a similar paleo-sea level in Cuba, this yields a long-term tectonic uplift rate of 0.04-0.06 m/ka over the past ~120 ka. This estimate supports the hypothesis that the tectonic uplift rate should be low in this strike-slip regime. Nevertheless, on the southeast coast of Cuba, east of our study area, we have observed flights of multiple marine terraces, suggesting either (1) a higher uplift rate or (2) an unusually well-preserved record of pre-MIS 5.5 terraces not observed at Guantanamo Bay.

  4. Reconstruction of paleoceanographic changes in the western Arctic Ocean duing the late Quaternary: Results from RV Araon and RV Polarstern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, S.; Kim, S.; Schreck, M.; Lee, B.; Niessen, F.; Stein, R. H.; Matthiessen, J. J.; Mackensen, A.

    2013-12-01

    The recent warming Arctic has fundamental effects on various scales as global (albedo, sea level, thermohaline circulation), hemispheric (mid-latitude weather/climate), and local (sedimentary, hydrographic, and cryospheric conditions). The extent and thickness of Arctic sea ice have dramatically reduced due to the amplified response of the Arctic Ocean to rapid global warming. The rapid melting of Arctic sea ice allowed us to enhance the research activities in the western Arctic using ice-breaking research vessels to unravel the present and past climate and oceanographic changes in seasonally ice-free open water conditions. Paleoclimate/paleoceanographic records estimated from the western Arctic sediments are crucial factors to understand the past and present oceanographic and environmental changes and thus it could be used as the base data sets for a reliable prediction of future climate changes on global scales. Within this context, KOPRI recently initiated a new research program (K-Polar) for understanding recent environmental changes and reconstructing glacial history and paleoceanographic changes in the western Arctic using ice-breaker ';R.V. ARAON'. The Pacific sector of the Arctic Ocean is particularly pronounced area with rapid and large extent reduction of the Arctic sea ice and relatively low SSS (comparing to Atlantic sector) due to sea-ice melting along with continental runoff. K-Polar program aims to: acquire shallow seismic data and retrieve long undisturbed sediment cores from the Chukchi Borderland-the Mendeleev Ridge-East Siberian continental margin using the ';R.V. ARAON', and establish a reliable stratigraphy of key sediment cores; then to reconstruct glacial history and high-resolution paleoceanographic changes in the western Arctic during the Quaternary glacial-interglacial cycles based on precise stratigraphic data and climate-driven multiple proxies. In summary, we will introduce current preliminary results estimated from sediment cores taken

  5. The Late Miocene Quaternary Antofalla volcanic complex, southern Puna, NW Argentina: Protracted history, diverse petrology, and economic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Jeremy P.; Ullrich, Thomas; Kerrich, Robert

    2006-04-01

    The Antofalla volcanic complex (AVC) is located on the southern Puna plateau of NW Argentina, ˜100 km east of the main axis of the Cordillera Occidental volcanic arc. It lies on the NW-SE Archibarca lineament, one of several transverse structures that cut across the Andes from Chile, and divert arc magmatism in SE-trending fingers across the Puna. 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of volcanic products from the AVC reveals a protracted magmatic history from 10.9 to ≤ 1.6 Ma. Initial volcanism was characterized by eruption of voluminous rhyolitic ignimbrites, deposited directly onto exposed crystalline basement and supracrustal sedimentary rocks. These rhyolites record significant geochemical evidence for crustal contamination, or derivation by crustal melting, which decreases upwards through the pyroclastic sequence. They were followed by extrusion of potassic lavas of the shoshonite-latite-trachydacite suite from 10.1 to 9.5 Ma. Subsequent magmatism (9.1-1.6 Ma) was of basaltic andesite-andesite-dacite composition, with localized, smaller volume, dacitic and rhyolitic ignimbrites. Monogenetic basaltic andesite cinder cones and lava flows were erupted in the Quaternary in response to a change to transtensional tectonics in the Puna. The volcanic sequence is interpreted to record the early development of a lower crustal MASH zone at ˜11 Ma, where mantle-derived arc magmas interacted extensively with felsic lower crustal rocks to produce evolved shoshonitic compositions, and crustal melts that erupted to form rhyolitic ignimbrites (common at this time throughout the Puna). After establishment of a steady-state MASH zone by ˜9 Ma, subsequent basaltic andesite-andesite magmas show less evidence of felsic crustal contamination, and may have developed largely by interaction with previous ultramafic-mafic fractionates of early magmas in the lower crust. More felsic dacitic magmas appear to have evolved largely by fractional crystallization from basaltic andesites and andesites, with

  6. The evolution of a thermokarst-lake landscape: Late Quaternary permafrost degradation and stabilization in interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Mary E.; Grosse, Guido; Jones, Benjamin M.; McDowell, Patricia F.

    2016-01-01

    Thermokarst processes characterize a variety of ice-rich permafrost terrains and often lead to lake formation. The long-term evolution of thermokarst landscapes and the stability and longevity of lakes depend upon climate, vegetation and ground conditions, including the volume of excess ground ice and its distribution. The current lake status of thermokarst-lake landscapes and their future trajectories under climate warming are better understood in the light of their long-term development. We studied the lake-rich southern marginal upland of the Yukon Flats (northern interior Alaska) using dated lake-sediment cores, observations of river-cut exposures, and remotely-sensed data. The region features thick (up to 40 m) Quaternary deposits (mainly loess) that contain massive ground ice. Two of three studied lakes formed ~ 11,000–12,000 cal yr BP through inferred thermokarst processes, and fire may have played a role in initiating thermokarst development. From ~ 9000 cal yr BP, all lakes exhibited steady sedimentation, and pollen stratigraphies are consistent with regional patterns. The current lake expansion rates are low (0 to < 7 cm yr− 1 shoreline retreat) compared with other regions (~ 30 cm yr− 1 or more). This thermokarst lake-rich region does not show evidence of extensive landscape lowering by lake drainage, nor of multiple lake generations within a basin. However, LiDAR images reveal linear “corrugations” (> 5 m amplitude), deep thermo-erosional gullies, and features resembling lake drainage channels, suggesting that highly dynamic surface processes have previously shaped the landscape. Evidently, widespread early Holocene permafrost degradation and thermokarst lake initiation were followed by lake longevity and landscape stabilization, the latter possibly related to establishment of dense forest cover. Partial or complete drainage of three lakes in 2013 reveals that there is some contemporary landscape dynamism. Holocene landscape

  7. Late Quaternary reef growth history of Les Saintes submarine plateau: a key to constrain active faulting kinematics in Guadeloupe (FWI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, F.; Feuillet, N.; Deplus, C.; Cabioch, G.; Tapponnier, P.; LeBrun, J.; Bazin, S.; Beauducel, F.; Boudon, G.; Le Friant, A.; De Min, L.; Melezan, D.

    2012-12-01

    The damaging November 21 2004 earthquake (Mw 6.3) occurred on a large normal fault system offshore Les Saintes archipelago in Guadeloupe. To better constrain the seismic hazard related to this fault system, new data were acquired in 2009 and 2010 during the GWADASEIS and BATHYSAINTES cruises. Digital Elevation Models (DEM), with a horizontal resolution of 2.5 m, were calculated with the bathymetric data acquired at shallow depth on Les Saintes insular shelf. Together with seismic reflection profiles, this data makes it possible to identify and map the fault system and to understand its kinematics with respect to the plateau formation. The 15km wide, -45m deep drowned plateau of Les Saintes is composed of four coral terraces, down to 110 m bsl, piled-up on the Upper Pliocene to Quaternary Les Saintes volcanic centres. The shallowest terrace corresponds to a drowned Holocene reef system. Reef typical features, as double barriers, pinnacles, spurs and grooves, are well identified in the bathymetry. Seismic reflection profiles indicate that the Holocene terrace overlays Pleistocene ones. Geophysical data and reef growth modeling tend to show that the reef plateau has formed under subsidence conditions (~0.35 mm/yr) since Ionian ages, recording the main sea level highstands, before being drowned during the last sea level rise, around 11ka BP. The four terraces are crosscut by several NW-SE striking normal faults, which have scarps up to 8m. They offset them, the older, the more, inducing syntectonic sedimentation. The fault system extends from the northern plateau's edge to Les Saintes channel, toward Dominica, constituting the eastern side of Les Saintes graben. In the channel, the Roseau Fault, responsible for the 2004 earthquake, bounds the graben western side. The new data confirms its extent to the north, as the fault offsets the plateau's western cliff by several tens of meter, counter-slope like, dipping under Les Saintes islands and inducing a high seismic

  8. Climates during Late Quaternary glacier advances: glacier-climate modeling in the Yingpu Valley, eastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangke

    2014-10-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) featured a major cooling of Earth's climate, after which the climate evolved in the largest reconfiguration of the past 100 ka. Despite its significance, full understanding of the climate history during and since the LGM is still lacking on the eastern Tibetan Plateau. Recent improvements in understanding glacial extents and chronologies in the Yingpu Valley, eastern Tibetan Plateau present an opportunity to estimate the glacial climatic conditions during and since the LGM. Using a relatively new glacier-climate model, this study reconstructs glacier advances in the Yingpu Valley and quantifies the related climate conditions during the LGM, Lateglacial, and Late Holocene glacial stages. The model results show that the Yingpu Valley contained ice volumes of ˜1.65 km3, 1.03 km3, and 0.29 km3 with equilibrium line altitude (ELA) lowering values of ˜500 m, ˜410 m, and ˜150 m in the three successive glacial stages, respectively. By examining other independent paleoclimatic reconstructions, it is concluded that the temperature decreased by 4.0-5.9 °C, 3.4-3.7 °C, 0.3-0.6 °C with the precipitation amounts being 40-80%, 80-100%, and 100-110% of modern values during the LGM, Lateglacial, and Late Holocene glacial stages, respectively. The climate estimates for the three glacial stages are generally in agreement with other climatic proxy records on the Tibetan Plateau and atmospheric circulation modeling results.

  9. Late Quaternary loess in northeastern Colorado: Part II - Pb isotopic evidence for the variability of loess sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, J.N.; Muhs, D.R.; Sauer, R.R.; Fanning, C.M.

    1999-01-01

    A new application of the Pb isotopic tracer technique has been used to determine the relative importance of different silt sources for late Wisconsin loess in the central Great Plains of eastern Colorado. Samples of the Peoria Loess collected throughout the study area contain K-feldspar derived from two isotopically and genetically distinct sources: (1) glaciogenic material from Early and Middle Proterozoic crystalline rocks of the Colorado province, and (2) volcaniclastic material from the Tertiary White River Group exposed on the northern Great Plains. Pb isotopic compositions of K-feldspar in loess from two dated vertical sections (at Beecher Island and Last Chance, Colorado) vary systematically, implying climatic control of source availability. We propose a model whereby relatively cold conditions promoted the advance of Front Range valley glaciers discharging relatively little glaciogenic silt, but strong winds caused eolian erosion of White River Group silt due to a decrease in vegetation cover. During warmer periods, valley glaciers receded and discharged abundant glaciogenic silt, while surfaces underlain by the White River Group were stabilized by vegetation. Isotopic data from eastern Colorado loess sections record two warm-cold-warm cycles during late Wisconsin time between about 21 000 and 11 000 radiocarbon yr B.P., similar to results from other studies in the United States and Greenland.

  10. Influence of Late Quaternary depositional environments on the structure of nannofossil assemblages in the Titanic area (northwestern Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrenko, O. B.

    2012-02-01

    The nannofosssil assemblages have been analyzed in five cores taken from the Titanic area of the northwestern Atlantic (˜41°-42° N, ˜47°-50° W, water depths >3500 m) during cruises 41 and 43 of the R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh in 1998 and 2000. They correlate the host sediments with the upper Pleistocene-Holocene Emiliania huxleyi zone. The changes in the structure of the nannofossil assemblages and the lithological characteristics such as the content of biogenic CaCO3, the abundance of ice-rafted debris, and the grain-size composition were used for the high-resolution stratigraphy of sections with defining marine isotopic stages 1-3 of the last 24 kyr. A characteristic feature of the nannofossil assemblages from this area is their enrichment with the cold-resistant species Coccolthus pelagicus during the warm climatic stages and the lack of allochthonous coccolitophorid remains.

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