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Sample records for late-stage gambiense human

  1. Treatment options for second-stage gambiense human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Eperon, Gilles; Balasegaram, Manica; Potet, Julien; Mowbray, Charles; Valverde, Olaf; Chappuis, François

    2014-11-01

    Treatment of second-stage gambiense human African trypanosomiasis relied on toxic arsenic-based derivatives for over 50 years. The availability and subsequent use of eflornithine, initially in monotherapy and more recently in combination with nifurtimox (NECT), has drastically improved the prognosis of treated patients. However, NECT logistic and nursing requirements remain obstacles to its deployment and use in peripheral health structures in rural sub-Saharan Africa. Two oral compounds, fexinidazole and SCYX-7158, are currently in clinical development. The main scope of this article is to discuss the potential impact of new oral therapies to improve diagnosis-treatment algorithms and patients' access to treatment, and to contribute to reach the objectives of the recently launched gambiense human African trypanosomiasis elimination program.

  2. Treatment options for second-stage gambiense human African trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Eperon, Gilles; Balasegaram, Manica; Potet, Julien; Mowbray, Charles; Valverde, Olaf; Chappuis, François

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of second-stage gambiense human African trypanosomiasis relied on toxic arsenic-based derivatives for over 50 years. The availability and subsequent use of eflornithine, initially in monotherapy and more recently in combination with nifurtimox (NECT), has drastically improved the prognosis of treated patients. However, NECT logistic and nursing requirements remain obstacles to its deployment and use in peripheral health structures in rural sub-Saharan Africa. Two oral compounds, fexinidazole and SCYX-7158, are currently in clinical development. The main scope of this article is to discuss the potential impact of new oral therapies to improve diagnosis-treatment algorithms and patients’ access to treatment, and to contribute to reach the objectives of the recently launched gambiense human African trypanosomiasis elimination program. PMID:25204360

  3. The journey towards elimination of gambiense human African trypanosomiasis: not far, nor easy.

    PubMed

    Franco, J R; Simarro, P P; Diarra, A; Ruiz-Postigo, J A; Jannin, J G

    2014-05-01

    Considering the epidemic situation of gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) at the end of the twentieth century, the World Health Organization (WHO) and partners strengthened disease control and surveillance. Over the last 15 years, the activities implemented through the National Control Programmes have brought gambiense HAT under control and now its elimination is deemed as an achievable goal. In 2012, WHO targeted gambiense HAT for elimination as a public health problem by 2020. The final goal will be the sustainable disease elimination by 2030, defined as the interruption of the transmission of gambiense HAT. The elimination is considered feasible, because of the epidemiological vulnerability of the disease, the current state of control, the availability of strategies and tools and international commitment and political will. Integration of activities in the health system is needed to ensure the sustainability of the elimination. The development of user-friendly diagnostic and treatment tools will facilitate the integration process. Adequate funding is needed to implement activities, but also to support research that will make the elimination sustainable. A long-term commitment by donors is needed and ownership of the process by endemic countries is critical.

  4. Molecular evidence of a Trypanosoma brucei gambiense sylvatic cycle in the human african trypanosomiasis foci of Equatorial Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Cordon-Obras, Carlos; Rodriguez, Yasmin Fermin; Fernandez-Martinez, Amalia; Cano, Jorge; Ndong-Mabale, Nicolas; Ncogo-Ada, Policarpo; Ndongo-Asumu, Pedro; Aparicio, Pilar; Navarro, Miguel; Benito, Agustin; Bart, Jean-Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Gambiense trypanosomiasis is considered an anthroponotic disease. Consequently, control programs are generally aimed at stopping transmission of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (T. b. gambiense) by detecting and treating human cases. However, the persistence of numerous foci despite efforts to eliminate this disease questions this strategy as unique tool to pursue the eradication. The role of animals as a reservoir of T. b. gambiense is still controversial, but could partly explain maintenance of the infection at hypo-endemic levels. In the present study, we evaluated the presence of T. b. gambiense in wild animals in Equatorial Guinea. The infection rate ranged from 0.8% in the insular focus of Luba to more than 12% in Mbini, a focus with a constant trickle of human cases. The parasite was detected in a wide range of animal species including four species never described previously as putative reservoirs. Our study comes to reinforce the hypothesis that animals may play a role in the persistence of T. b. gambiense transmission, being particularly relevant in low transmission settings. Under these conditions the integration of sustained vector control and medical interventions should be considered to achieve the elimination of gambiense trypanosomiasis. PMID:26257727

  5. Gambiense human african trypanosomiasis and immunological memory: effect on phenotypic lymphocyte profiles and humoral immunity.

    PubMed

    Lejon, Veerle; Mumba Ngoyi, Dieudonné; Kestens, Luc; Boel, Luc; Barbé, Barbara; Kande Betu, Victor; van Griensven, Johan; Bottieau, Emmanuel; Muyembe Tamfum, Jean-Jacques; Jacobs, Jan; Büscher, Philippe

    2014-03-01

    In mice, experimental infection with Trypanosoma brucei causes decreased bone marrow B-cell development, abolished splenic B-cell maturation and loss of antibody mediated protection including vaccine induced memory responses. Nothing is known about this phenomenon in human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), but if occurring, it would imply the need of revaccination of HAT patients after therapy and abolish hope for a HAT vaccine. The effect of gambiense HAT on peripheral blood memory T- and B-cells and on innate and vaccine induced antibody levels was examined. The percentage of memory B- and T-cells was quantified in peripheral blood, prospectively collected in DR Congo from 117 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infected HAT patients before and six months after treatment and 117 controls at the same time points. Antibodies against carbohydrate antigens on red blood cells and against measles were quantified. Before treatment, significantly higher percentages of memory B-cells, mainly T-independent memory B-cells, were observed in HAT patients compared to controls (CD20+CD27+IgM+, 13.0% versus 2.0%, p<0.001). The percentage of memory T-cells, mainly early effector/memory T-cells, was higher in HAT (CD3+CD45RO+CD27+, 19.4% versus 16.7%, p = 0.003). After treatment, the percentage of memory T-cells normalized, the percentage of memory B-cells did not. The median anti-red blood cell carbohydrate IgM level was one titer lower in HAT patients than in controls (p<0.004), and partially normalized after treatment. Anti-measles antibody concentrations were lower in HAT patients than in controls (medians of 1500 versus 2250 mIU/ml, p = 0.02), and remained so after treatment, but were above the cut-off level assumed to provide protection in 94.8% of HAT patients, before and after treatment (versus 98.3% of controls, p = 0.3). Although functionality of the B-cells was not verified, the results suggest that immunity was conserved in T.b. gambiense infected HAT patients and

  6. Dynamic cyclic compression modulates the chondrogenic phenotype in human chondrocytes from late stage osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Diao, Hua Jia; Fung, Hon Sing; Yeung, Pan; Lam, K L; Yan, Chun Hoi; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2017-02-16

    Human osteoarthritic chondrocytes (hOACs) are characterized by their "dedifferentiated" and catabolic phenotype and lack the ability for restoring their inherent functions by themselves. Here we investigated whether extrinsically supplemented mechanical signal via compression loading would affect the phenotype of hOACs. Specifically, we applied cyclic compression loading on cultured hOACs-collagen constructs and measured the expression of the major chondrogenic factors, cell-matrix interaction molecules and matrix degradation enzymes. Dynamic compression loading stimulates the expression and nuclear localization of sox9 in hOACs and reduces the catabolic events via downregulated expression of collagenases. These results contribute to better understanding towards mechanoregulation of hOACs.

  7. Embryonic hematopoietic stem cells and interstitial Cajal cells in the hindgut of late stage human embryos: evidence and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Ilie, C A; Rusu, M C; Didilescu, A C; Motoc, A G M; Mogoantă, L

    2015-07-01

    There have been few studies on human embryos describing a specific pattern of hindgut colonization by hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and interstitial Cajal cells (ICCs). We aimed to study CD34, CD45 and CD117/c-kit expression in late stage human embryos, to attain observational data that could be related to studies on the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM)-derived HSCs, and data on hindgut ICCs. Antibodies were also applied to identify alpha-smooth muscle actin and neurofilaments. Six human embryos of 48-56 days were used. In the 48 day embryo, the hindgut was sporadically populated by c-kit+ ICCs, but, in all other embryos, a layer of myenteric ICCs had been established. Intraneural c-kit+ cells were found in pelvic nerves and vagal trunks, suggesting that the theory of Ramon y Cajal assuming that ICCs may be primitive neurons may not be so invalid. Also in the 48 day embryo, c-kit+/CD45+ perivascular cells were found along the pelvic neurovascular axes, suggesting that not only liver, but also other organs could be seeded with HSCs from the AGM region. CD45+ cells with dendritic morphologies were found in all hindgut layers, including the epithelium. This last evidence is suggestive of an AGM contribution to the tissue resident macrophages and could be related to processes of sprouting angiogenesis which, in turn, have been found to be guided by filopodia of endothelial tip cells. Further studies on human embryonic and fetal material should be performed to attempt to clarify whether the hindgut colonization with HSCs is a transitory or definitive process.

  8. Evaluation of the micro-CATT, CATT/Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, and LATEX/T b gambiense methods for serodiagnosis and surveillance of human African trypanosomiasis in West and Central Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Truc, Philippe; Lejon, Veerle; Magnus, Eddy; Jamonneau, Vincent; Nangouma, Auguste; Verloo, Didier; Penchenier, Laurent; Büscher, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the performance of serological tests using dried blood on filter-papers (micro-card agglutination test for trypanosomiasis (micro-CATT)) performed under field and laboratory conditions and using whole blood ((CATT/T.b. gambiense) (wb-CATT) and latex agglutination (LATEX/T.b. gambiense) (wb-LATEX)) for the serodiagnosis and surveillance of human African trypanosomiasis in West and Central Africa. METHODS: We evaluated the micro-CATT, wb-CATT and wb-LATEX methods in Côte d'Ivoire and the Central African Republic by screening 940 people. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each serological test; only patients with the confirmed presence of trypanosomes in the blood or lymph aspirate were considered true positives. Positive and negative predictive values were also calculated. FINDINGS: Each of the tests showed a lower sensitivity in the Central African Republic than in Côte d'Ivoire. CONCLUSION: The results confirmed the efficiency of the classic wb-CATT to detect sleeping sickness patients. The micro-CATT method can be used for human African trypanosomiasis surveillance if the test is performed on the same day as the blood collection, or if samples are stored at 4 degrees C. Otherwise, micro-CATT can be used when absolute sensitivity is not required. wb-LATEX should only be used for high-specificity screening. PMID:12481210

  9. Pharmacokinetics, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense efficacy, and time of drug action of DB829, a preclinical candidate for treatment of second-stage human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Wenzler, Tanja; Yang, Sihyung; Braissant, Olivier; Boykin, David W; Brun, Reto; Wang, Michael Zhuo

    2013-11-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, also called sleeping sickness), a neglected tropical disease endemic to sub-Saharan Africa, is caused by the parasites Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. brucei rhodesiense. Current drugs against this disease have significant limitations, including toxicity, increasing resistance, and/or a complicated parenteral treatment regimen. DB829 is a novel aza-diamidine that demonstrated excellent efficacy in mice infected with T. b. rhodesiense or T. b. brucei parasites. The current study examined the pharmacokinetics, in vitro and in vivo activity against T. b. gambiense, and time of drug action of DB829 in comparison to pentamidine. DB829 showed outstanding in vivo efficacy in mice infected with parasites of T. b. gambiense strains, despite having higher in vitro 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) than against T. b. rhodesiense strain STIB900. A single dose of DB829 administered intraperitoneally (5 mg/kg of body weight) cured all mice infected with different T. b. gambiense strains. No cross-resistance was observed between DB829 and pentamidine in T. b. gambiense strains isolated from melarsoprol-refractory patients. Compared to pentamidine, DB829 showed a greater systemic exposure when administered intraperitoneally, partially contributing to its improved efficacy. Isothermal microcalorimetry and in vivo time-to-kill studies revealed that DB829 is a slower-acting trypanocidal compound than pentamidine. A single dose of DB829 (20 mg/kg) administered intraperitoneally clears parasites from mouse blood within 2 to 5 days. In summary, DB829 is a promising preclinical candidate for the treatment of first- and second-stage HAT caused by both Trypanosoma brucei subspecies.

  10. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Spliced Leader RNA Is a More Specific Marker for Cure of Human African Trypanosomiasis Than T. b. gambiense DNA.

    PubMed

    Ilboudo, Hamidou; Camara, Oumou; Ravel, Sophie; Bucheton, Bruno; Lejon, Veerle; Camara, Mamadou; Kaboré, Jacques; Jamonneau, Vincent; Deborggraeve, Stijn

    2015-12-15

    To assess the efficacy of treatment for human African trypanosomiasis, accurate tests that can discriminate relapse from cure are needed. We report the first data that the spliced leader (SL) RNA is a more specific marker for cure of human African trypanosomiasis than parasite DNA. In blood samples obtained from 61 patients in whom human African trypanosomiasis was cured, SL RNA detection had specificities of 98.4%-100%, while DNA detection had a specificity of only 77%. Data from our proof-of-concept study show that SL RNA detection has high potential as a test of cure.

  11. Acute paretic syndrome in juvenile White Leghorn chickens resembles late stages of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies in humans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sudden limb paresis is a common problem in White Leghorn flocks, affecting about 1% of the chicken population before achievement of sexual maturity. Previously, a similar clinical syndrome has been reported as being caused by inflammatory demyelination of peripheral nerve fibres. Here, we investigated in detail the immunopathology of this paretic syndrome and its possible resemblance to human neuropathies. Methods Neurologically affected chickens and control animals from one single flock underwent clinical and neuropathological examination. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) alterations were characterised using standard morphological techniques, including nerve fibre teasing and transmission electron microscopy. Infiltrating cells were phenotyped immunohistologically and quantified by flow cytometry. The cytokine expression pattern was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). These investigations were accomplished by MHC genotyping and a PCR screen for Marek's disease virus (MDV). Results Spontaneous paresis of White Leghorns is caused by cell-mediated, inflammatory demyelination affecting multiple cranial and spinal nerves and nerve roots with a proximodistal tapering. Clinical manifestation coincides with the employment of humoral immune mechanisms, enrolling plasma cell recruitment, deposition of myelin-bound IgG and antibody-dependent macrophageal myelin-stripping. Disease development was significantly linked to a 539 bp microsatellite in MHC locus LEI0258. An aetiological role for MDV was excluded. Conclusions The paretic phase of avian inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis immunobiologically resembles the late-acute disease stages of human acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and is characterised by a Th1-to-Th2 shift. PMID:20109187

  12. Clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness).

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Peter Ge

    2013-02-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, is caused by infection with parasites of the genus Trypanosoma, transmitted by the tsetse fly. The disease has two forms, Trypanosoma brucei (T b) rhodesiense and T b gambiense; and is almost always fatal if untreated. Despite a recent reduction in the number of reported cases, patients with African trypanosomiasis continue to present major challenges to clinicians. Because treatment for CNS-stage disease can be very toxic, diagnostic staging to distinguish early-stage from late-stage disease when the CNS in invaded is crucial but remains problematic. Melarsoprol is the only available treatment for late-stage T b rhodesiense infection, but can be lethal to 5% of patients owing to post-treatment reactive encephalopathy. Eflornithine combined with nifurtimox is the first-line treatment for late-stage T b gambiense. New drugs are in the pipeline for treatment of CNS human African trypanosomiasis, giving rise to cautious optimism.

  13. Development of drug resistance in Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. Treatment of human African trypanosomiasis with natural products (Review).

    PubMed

    Gehrig, Stefanie; Efferth, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis is an infectious disease which has resulted in the deaths of thousands of people in Sub-Saharan Africa. Two subspecies of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei are the causative agents of the infection, whereby T. b. gambiense leads to chronic development of the disease and T. b. rhodesiense establishes an acute form, which is fatal within months or even weeks. Current chemotherapy treatment is complex, since special drugs have to be used for the different development stages of the disease, as well as for the parasite concerned. Melarsoprol is the only approved drug for effectively treating both subspecies of human African trypanosomiasis in its advanced stage, however, the drug's potency is constrained due to an unacceptable side effect: encephalopathy, which develops in one out of every 20 patients who are treated with the drug. In addition to the deleterious treatment with melarsoprol, the number of drug-resistant strains of T. brucei supp. increases. Mechanisms of drug resistance have been elucidated and involve decreased drug import through the loss of the purine transporter P2 as well as enhanced drug export, mediated by a multidrug resistance-associated protein called TbMRPA. Thereby, the medical treatment with the available chemotherapeutics becomes exceedingly difficult. A promising strategy for research into new drugs and moreover, to overcome drug resistance, are compounds derived from natural sources. This study provides an overview of the recently discovered small molecules with trypanocidal activity against T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense. In addition, former promising compounds are touched upon.

  14. Systemic Therapies for Late-stage Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Peter W.; Friedlander, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Late-stage melanoma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Classic treatment methods relied on cytotoxic chemotherapy, which is limited by low response rates and significant adverse effects. Recent advances in immunogenetics have led to the advent of important new systemictreatments.Thisarticle reviews the latest therapy options for advanced melanoma. PMID:27847547

  15. A Mixed Methods Study of a Health Worker Training Intervention to Increase Syndromic Referral for Gambiense Human African Trypanosomiasis in South Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Jennifer J.; Surur, Elizeous I.; Checchi, Francesco; Ahmad, Fayaz; Ackom, Franklin Kweku; Whitty, Christopher J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Active screening by mobile teams is considered the most effective method for detecting gambiense-type human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) but constrained funding in many post-conflict countries limits this approach. Non-specialist health care workers (HCWs) in peripheral health facilities could be trained to identify potential cases for testing based on symptoms. We tested a training intervention for HCWs in peripheral facilities in Nimule, South Sudan to increase knowledge of HAT symptomatology and the rate of syndromic referrals to a central screening and treatment centre. Methodology/Principal Findings We trained 108 HCWs from 61/74 of the public, private and military peripheral health facilities in the county during six one-day workshops and assessed behaviour change using quantitative and qualitative methods. In four months prior to training, only 2/562 people passively screened for HAT were referred from a peripheral HCW (0 cases detected) compared to 13/352 (2 cases detected) in the four months after, a 6.5-fold increase in the referral rate observed by the hospital. Modest increases in absolute referrals received, however, concealed higher levels of referral activity in the periphery. HCWs in 71.4% of facilities followed-up had made referrals, incorporating new and pre-existing ideas about HAT case detection into referral practice. HCW knowledge scores of HAT symptoms improved across all demographic sub-groups. Of 71 HAT referrals made, two-thirds were from new referrers. Only 11 patients completed the referral, largely because of difficulties patients in remote areas faced accessing transportation. Conclusions/Significance The training increased knowledge and this led to more widespread appropriate HAT referrals from a low base. Many referrals were not completed, however. Increasing access to screening and/or diagnostic tests in the periphery will be needed for greater impact on case-detection in this context. These data suggest it may be

  16. Genomic location of the human RNA polymerase II general machinery: evidence for a role of TFIIF and Rpb7 at both early and late stages of transcription.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, Marilena; Jeronimo, Célia; Forget, Diane; Bouchard, Annie; Bergeron, Dominique; Côte, Pierre; Poirier, Guy G; Greenblatt, Jack; Coulombe, Benoit

    2008-01-01

    The functions ascribed to the mammalian GTFs (general transcription factors) during the various stages of the RNAPII (RNA polymerase II) transcription reaction are based largely on in vitro studies. To gain insight as to the functions of the GTFs in living cells, we have analysed the genomic location of several human GTF and RNAPII subunits carrying a TAP (tandem-affinity purification) tag. ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) experiments using anti-tag beads (TAP-ChIP) allowed the systematic localization of the tagged factors. Enrichment of regions located close to the TIS (transcriptional initiation site) versus further downstream TRs (transcribed regions) of nine human genes, selected for the minimal divergence of their alternative TIS, were analysed by QPCR (quantitative PCR). We show that, in contrast with reports using the yeast system, human TFIIF (transcription factor IIF) associates both with regions proximal to the TIS and with further downstream TRs, indicating an in vivo function in elongation for this GTF. Unexpectedly, we found that the Rpb7 subunit of RNAPII, known to be required only for the initiation phase of transcription, remains associated with the polymerase during early elongation. Moreover, ChIP experiments conducted under stress conditions suggest that Rpb7 is involved in the stabilization of transcribing polymerase molecules, from initiation to late elongation stages. Together, our results provide for the first time a general picture of GTF function during the RNAPII transcription reaction in live mammalian cells and show that TFIIF and Rpb7 are involved in both early and late transcriptional stages.

  17. Epitope-Specific Evolution of Human B Cell Responses to Borrelia burgdorferi VlsE Protein from Early to Late Stages of Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Jacek, Elzbieta; Tang, Kevin S; Komorowski, Lars; Ajamian, Mary; Probst, Christian; Stevenson, Brian; Wormser, Gary P; Marques, Adriana R; Alaedini, Armin

    2016-02-01

    Most immunogenic proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, are known or expected to contain multiple B cell epitopes. However, the kinetics of the development of human B cell responses toward the various epitopes of individual proteins during the course of Lyme disease has not been examined. Using the highly immunogenic VlsE as a model Ag, we investigated the evolution of humoral immune responses toward its immunodominant sequences in 90 patients with a range of early to late manifestations of Lyme disease. The results demonstrate the existence of asynchronous, independently developing, Ab responses against the two major immunogenic regions of the VlsE molecule in the human host. Despite their strong immunogenicity, the target epitopes were inaccessible to Abs on intact spirochetes, suggesting a lack of direct immunoprotective effect. These observations document the association of immune reactivity toward specific VlsE sequences with different phases of Lyme disease, demonstrating the potential use of detailed epitope mapping of Ags for staging of the infection, and offer insights regarding the pathogen's possible immune evasion mechanisms.

  18. Eflornithine is safer than melarsoprol for the treatment of second-stage Trypanosoma brucei gambiense human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Chappuis, François; Udayraj, Nitya; Stietenroth, Kai; Meussen, Ann; Bovier, Patrick A

    2005-09-01

    Patients with second-stage human African trypanosomiasis treated with eflornithine (n = 251) in 2003 in Kiri, southern Sudan, had an adjusted relative risk of death of 0.2 and experienced significantly fewer cutaneous and neurological adverse effects than did patients who were treated with melarsoprol in 2001 and 2002 (n = 708).

  19. The Autophagic Process Occurs in Human Bone Metastasis and Implicates Molecular Mechanisms Differently Affected by Rab5a in the Early and Late Stages

    PubMed Central

    Maroni, Paola; Bendinelli, Paola; Resnati, Massimo; Matteucci, Emanuela; Milan, Enrico; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy favours metastatic growth through fuelling energy and nutrients and resistance to anoikis, typical of disseminated-tumour cells. The autophagic process, mediated by a unique organelle, the autophagosome, which fuses with lysosomes, is divided into three steps. Several stages, especially early omegasome formation and isolation-membrane initiation, remain controversial; molecular mechanisms involve the small-GTPase Rab5a, which regulates vesicle traffic for autophagosome formation. We examined Rab5a involvement in the function of key members of ubiquitin-conjugation systems, Atg7 and LC3-lipidated, interacting with the scaffold-protein p62. Immunohistochemistry of Rab5a was performed in human specimens of bone metastasis and pair-matched breast carcinoma; the autophagic-molecular mechanisms affected by Rab5a were evaluated in human 1833 bone metastatic cells, derived from breast-carcinoma MDA-MB231 cells. To clarify the role of Rab5a, 1833 cells were transfected transiently with Rab5a-dominant negative, and/or stably with the short-hairpin RNA Atg7, were exposed to two inhibitors of autolysosome function, and LC3II and p62 expression was measured. We showed basal autophagy in bone-metastatic cells and the pivotal role of Rab5a together with Beclin 1 between the early stages, elongation of isolation membrane/closed autophagosome mediated by Atg7, and the late-degradative stages. This regulatory network might occur in bone-metastasis and in high-grade dysplastic lesions, preceding invasive-breast carcinoma and conferring phenotypic characteristics for dissemination. PMID:27023526

  20. Late-stage sinking of plutons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glazner, A.F.; Miller, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    Many granodiorite to diorite plutons in the Great Basin of western North America are surrounded by rim monoclines or anticlines that suggest relative downward movement of the plutons while wall rocks were hot and ductile. We propose that such plutons rise to a level of approximately neutral buoyancy and then founder as their densities increase ??? 40% during crystallization. Late-stage sinking of intermediate to mafic plutons should be common when wall rocks are rich in weak, low-density minerals such as quartz and calcite. Structures related to sinking will overprint those related to initial pluton emplacement and may be mistaken for regional tectonic structures.

  1. Nutraceutical use in late-stage cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Jay; Brown, Vondina; Ellis, Jane; Logothetis, Britt; Weber, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Access to a wealth of information on the internet has led many cancer patients to use complementary methods as an adjunct to traditional therapy for cancer, with, and more often, without informing their primary caregiver. Of the common complementary modalities, the use of dietary supplements appears to be highly prevalent in patients in active treatment for cancer, and later in cancer survivors. Emerging research suggests that some plant-based agents may, indeed, impact late-stage cancer, influencing molecular processes corrupted by tumor cells to evade detection, expand clonally, and invade surrounding tissues. The intent of this article is to review some of the current science underpinning the use of nutraceuticals in the latter stages of cancer. PMID:20714787

  2. The Natural Progression of Gambiense Sleeping Sickness: What Is the Evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Checchi, Francesco; Filipe, João A. N.; Barrett, Michael P.; Chandramohan, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, sleeping sickness) is widely assumed to be 100% pathogenic and fatal. However, reports to the contrary exist, and human trypano-tolerance has been postulated. Furthermore, there is uncertainty about the actual duration of both stage 1 and stage 2 infection, particularly with respect to how long a patient remains infectious. Understanding such basic parameters of HAT infection is essential for optimising control strategies based on case detection. We considered the potential existence and relevance of human trypano-tolerance, and explored the duration of infectiousness, through a review of published evidence on the natural progression of gambiense HAT in the absence of treatment, and biological considerations. Published reports indicate that most gambiense HAT cases are fatal if untreated. Self-resolving and asymptomatic chronic infections probably constitute a minority if they do indeed exist. Chronic carriage, however, deserves further study, as it could seed renewed epidemics after control programmes cease. PMID:19104656

  3. Innate Nuclear Sensor IFI16 Translocates into the Cytoplasm during the Early Stage of In Vitro Human Cytomegalovirus Infection and Is Entrapped in the Egressing Virions during the Late Stage

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Oste, Valentina; Gatti, Deborah; Gugliesi, Francesca; De Andrea, Marco; Bawadekar, Mandar; Lo Cigno, Irene; Biolatti, Matteo; Vallino, Marta; Marschall, Manfred; Gariglio, Marisa

    2014-01-01

    defense mechanisms. Our findings describe that during early stages of infection, IFI16 successfully recognizes HCMV DNA. However, in late stages HCMV mislocalizes IFI16 into the cytoplasmic viral assembly complex and finally entraps the protein into mature virions. We clarify here the mechanisms HCMV relies to overcome intracellular viral restriction, which provides new insights about the relevance of DNA sensors during HCMV infection. PMID:24696486

  4. Wild fauna as a probable animal reservoir for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Njiokou, F; Laveissière, C; Simo, G; Nkinin, S; Grébaut, P; Cuny, G; Herder, S

    2006-03-01

    In order to study the existence of a wild animal reservoir for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in South Cameroon, blood was collected from wild animals in three human African trypanosomiasis foci and from a nonendemic control area. The 1142 wild animals sampled belonged to 36 different species pertaining to eight orders (407 primates, 347 artiodactyls, 265 rodents, 54 pangolins, 53 carnivores, 11 saurians and crocodilians, and five hyraxes). QBC and KIVI tests detected trypanosomes on 1.7% (13/762) and 18.4% (43/234) of animals examined, respectively. Using specific primers, T. brucei non-gambiense group 1 DNA was detected on 56 animals (4.9%). This infection rate was 5.3% in the endemic zone and 3.8% in the control zone. Of the 832 animals of the endemic zone, PCR revealed T. b. gambiense group 1 DNA in 18 (2.2%). These hosts included two rodents, two artiodactyls, two carnivores and two primates. T. b. gambiense group 1 was absent from animals from the nonendemic zone. A decrease in the prevalence of T. b. gambiense group 1 was observed in wild animals from the Bipindi sleeping sickness focus after a medical survey and vector control in this area. The epidemiological implications of these findings remain to be determined with further investigations.

  5. Late Stage Infection in Sleeping Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Acker, Sven; Frey, Claudia; Meinert, Monika; Schönfeld, Caroline; Lazarus, Michael; Urade, Yoshihiro; Kubata, Bruno Kilunga; Duszenko, Michael

    2012-01-01

    At the turn of the 19th century, trypanosomes were identified as the causative agent of sleeping sickness and their presence within the cerebrospinal fluid of late stage sleeping sickness patients was described. However, no definitive proof of how the parasites reach the brain has been presented so far. Analyzing electron micrographs prepared from rodent brains more than 20 days after infection, we present here conclusive evidence that the parasites first enter the brain via the choroid plexus from where they penetrate the epithelial cell layer to reach the ventricular system. Adversely, no trypanosomes were observed within the parenchyma outside blood vessels. We also show that brain infection depends on the formation of long slender trypanosomes and that the cerebrospinal fluid as well as the stroma of the choroid plexus is a hostile environment for the survival of trypanosomes, which enter the pial space including the Virchow-Robin space via the subarachnoid space to escape degradation. Our data suggest that trypanosomes do not intend to colonize the brain but reside near or within the glia limitans, from where they can re-populate blood vessels and disrupt the sleep wake cycles. PMID:22496723

  6. Late stage infection in sleeping sickness.

    PubMed

    Wolburg, Hartwig; Mogk, Stefan; Acker, Sven; Frey, Claudia; Meinert, Monika; Schönfeld, Caroline; Lazarus, Michael; Urade, Yoshihiro; Kubata, Bruno Kilunga; Duszenko, Michael

    2012-01-01

    At the turn of the 19(th) century, trypanosomes were identified as the causative agent of sleeping sickness and their presence within the cerebrospinal fluid of late stage sleeping sickness patients was described. However, no definitive proof of how the parasites reach the brain has been presented so far. Analyzing electron micrographs prepared from rodent brains more than 20 days after infection, we present here conclusive evidence that the parasites first enter the brain via the choroid plexus from where they penetrate the epithelial cell layer to reach the ventricular system. Adversely, no trypanosomes were observed within the parenchyma outside blood vessels. We also show that brain infection depends on the formation of long slender trypanosomes and that the cerebrospinal fluid as well as the stroma of the choroid plexus is a hostile environment for the survival of trypanosomes, which enter the pial space including the Virchow-Robin space via the subarachnoid space to escape degradation. Our data suggest that trypanosomes do not intend to colonize the brain but reside near or within the glia limitans, from where they can re-populate blood vessels and disrupt the sleep wake cycles.

  7. A Primate APOL1 Variant That Kills Trypanosoma brucei gambiense

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Anneli; Capewell, Paul; Clucas, Caroline; Veitch, Nicola; Weir, William; Thomson, Russell; Raper, Jayne; MacLeod, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Humans are protected against infection from most African trypanosomes by lipoprotein complexes present in serum that contain the trypanolytic pore-forming protein, Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1). The human-infective trypanosomes, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in East Africa and T. b. gambiense in West Africa have separately evolved mechanisms that allow them to resist APOL1-mediated lysis and cause human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, in man. Recently, APOL1 variants were identified from a subset of Old World monkeys, that are able to lyse East African T. b. rhodesiense, by virtue of C-terminal polymorphisms in the APOL1 protein that hinder that parasite’s resistance mechanism. Such variants have been proposed as candidates for developing therapeutic alternatives to the unsatisfactory anti-trypanosomal drugs currently in use. Here we demonstrate the in vitro lytic ability of serum and purified recombinant protein of an APOL1 ortholog from the West African Guinea baboon (Papio papio), which is able to lyse examples of all sub-species of T. brucei including T. b. gambiense group 1 parasites, the most common agent of human African trypanosomiasis. The identification of a variant of APOL1 with trypanolytic ability for both human-infective T. brucei sub-species could be a candidate for universal APOL1-based therapeutic strategies, targeted against all pathogenic African trypanosomes. PMID:27494254

  8. The psychosocial impact of late-stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Calne, Susan M

    2003-12-01

    The late stage of Parkinson's disease (PD) can be protracted with inexorable changes in physical and mental health, loss of autonomy and self-esteem, altered relationships, and social isolation. Severely affected patients (Hoehn & Yahr stage 4-5) present a challenge to nurses who care for them; addressing their needs takes time and patience. Changes in mental status have profound implications for the welfare of the late-stage PD patient as well as of the caregiver(s). Depression and dementia in patients with PD are two factors that interfere with the ability to deliver effective care in late-stage PD as they lead to loss of initiative and cooperation. Primary caregivers often have their own medical problems, with limited stamina and support; relationships may change, leading to sadness or conflict. Nurses can be powerful advocates for the physical and mental health of both the patient with late-stage Parkinson's disease and the primary caregiver.

  9. Late-Stage Fluorination: From Fundamentals to Application

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this brief account, we review work from our lab with a focus on late-stage introduction of fluorine and fluorinated functional groups into small molecules. We attempt to highlight practical developments, which we believe may have potential for industrial applications, and critically reflect on developments that may not yet meet the bar for practical use. PMID:25838756

  10. Radiologic features of lumbar spine in ochronosis in late stages.

    PubMed

    Bayindir, Petek; Yilmaz Ovali, Gülgün; Pabuşçu, Yüksel; Temiz, Cüneyt; Duruoz, Tuncay

    2006-07-01

    Ochronosis is a rare hereditary disorder of tyrosine metabolism. Severe degenerative arthritis and spondylosis occur in the later stages of this disease. Radiologic examinations may reveal changes considered almost pathognomonic for ochronosis. We present the radiologic features of the lumbar spine in two ochronotic patients who were diagnosed after radiologic examinations in the late stages of the disease.

  11. Organic Synthesis in the Late Stages of Stellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, S.

    2015-12-01

    Infrared and mm-wave observations have revealed a rapid and continuous synthesis of gas-phase and solid organic compounds in the late stages of stellar evolution. This process gives rise to an amorphous carbonaceous compound of mixed aromatic and aliphatic structure which is probably responsible for the unidentified infrared emission (UIE) bands that emerge during the PN phase.

  12. MIF Is Necessary for Late-Stage Melanoma Patient MDSC Immune Suppression and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yaddanapudi, Kavitha; Rendon, Beatriz E; Lamont, Gwyneth; Kim, Eun Jung; Al Rayyan, Numan; Richie, Jamaal; Albeituni, Sabrin; Waigel, Sabine; Wise, Ashley; Mitchell, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Highly aggressive cancers "entrain" innate and adaptive immune cells to suppress antitumor lymphocyte responses. Circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) constitute the bulk of monocytic immunosuppressive activity in late-stage melanoma patients. Previous studies revealed that monocyte-derived macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is necessary for the immunosuppressive function of tumor-associated macrophages and MDSCs in mouse models of melanoma. In the current study, we sought to determine whether MIF contributes to human melanoma MDSC induction and T-cell immunosuppression using melanoma patient-derived MDSCs and an ex vivo coculture model of human melanoma-induced MDSC. We now report that circulating MDSCs isolated from late-stage melanoma patients are reliant upon MIF for suppression of antigen-independent T-cell activation and that MIF is necessary for maximal reactive oxygen species generation in these cells. Moreover, inhibition of MIF results in a functional reversion from immunosuppressive MDSC to an immunostimulatory dendritic cell (DC)-like phenotype that is at least partly due to reductions in MDSC prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). These findings indicate that monocyte-derived MIF is centrally involved in human monocytic MDSC induction/immunosuppressive function and that therapeutic targeting of MIF may provide a novel means of inducing antitumor DC responses in late-stage melanoma patients.

  13. MIF is necessary for late-stage melanoma patient MDSC immune suppression and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yaddanapudi, Kavitha; Rendon, Beatriz E.; Lamont, Gwyneth; Kim, Eun Jung; Al Rayyan, Numan; Richie, Jamaal; Albeituni, Sabrin; Waigel, Sabine; Wise, Ashley; Mitchell, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Highly aggressive cancers “entrain” innate and adaptive immune cells to suppress anti-tumor lymphocyte responses. Circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) constitute the bulk of monocytic immunosuppressive activity in late stage melanoma patients. Previous studies revealed that monocyte-derived macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is necessary for the immune suppressive function of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and MDSCs in mouse models of melanoma. In the current study we sought to determine whether MIF contributes to human melanoma MDSC induction and T-cell immunosuppression using melanoma patient-derived MDSCs and an ex vivo co-culture model of human melanoma-induced MDSC. We now report that circulating MDSCs isolated from late stage melanoma patients are reliant upon MIF for suppression of antigen-independent T-cell activation and that MIF is necessary for maximal reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in these cells. Moreover, inhibition of MIF results in a functional reversion from immune suppressive MDSC to an immunostimulatory dendritic cell (DC)-like phenotype that is at least partly due to reductions in MDSC prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). These findings indicate that monocyte-derived MIF is centrally involved in human monocytic MDSC induction/immune suppressive function and that therapeutic targeting of MIF may provide a novel means of inducing anti-tumor DC responses in late stage melanoma patients. PMID:26603621

  14. In vitro lysis of the bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense by stearylamine-bearing liposomes.

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, H; Yoshihara, E; Kaneda, Y; Nakae, T

    1988-01-01

    Cytolytic activity of liposomes consisting of stearylamine and phosphatidylcholine (SA/PC-liposomes) was examined in vitro against the bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. More than 99% of the cells (2 X 10(6)/ml) were killed within 30 min by treatment with 15 mol% SA/PC-liposomes (100 microM total lipids). As few as 1.2 X 10(12) liposomes per ml (equivalent to 2 nM liposome) showed trypanocidal activity. Fluorescence microscopy of cells treated with the dansylated SA/PC-liposomes suggested that the liposomes bound to and accumulated on the cell surface, eventually damaging the plasma membrane. SA/PC-liposomes showed no significant hemolysis when incubated with human and mouse erythrocytes under conditions that killed greater than 99.9% of the T. b. gambiense trypomastigotes. Human leukocytes were also shown to be less susceptible to SA/PC-liposomes than T. b. gambiense. These results may point to a new direction in strategy for therapy of African trypanosomiasis. Images PMID:3056249

  15. Late-stage formation of carbon-fluorine bonds.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Michael G; Ritter, Tobias

    2014-06-01

    In this account, we review work from our lab on the development of methods for carbon-fluorine bond formation, with an emphasis on late-stage fluorination of functionalized small molecules and synthesis of (18) F-labeled molecules for potential use as tracers in positron emission tomography (PET). We attempt to highlight reactions that we feel are of particular practical relevance, as well as areas of research where there is still significant room for advancement.

  16. Mineralogical variation of the late stage mare basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xunyu; Wu, Yunzhao; Ouyang, Ziyuan; Bugiolacchi, Roberto; Chen, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Cai, Wei; Xu, Aoao; Tang, Zesheng

    2016-10-01

    The last major phases of lunar volcanism occurred mainly in Oceanus Procellarum and Mare Imbrium and produced spectrally unique medium- and high-titanium basalts. The composition and distribution of these basalts provide a record of the late stage thermal evolution of the Moon. To study the spectral and mineralogical variations of the late stage mare basalts, 31 distinct units were mapped employing a range of remote sensing data. Their inferred mineralogical characteristics were studied by analyzing the spectral features of small, fresh craters derived from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) data. The strongest olivine spectral signatures were found around Lichtenberg crater, while the units with the lowest olivine/pyroxene ratio occurred mainly in the southern Kepler crater and some local areas. In Oceanus Procellarum, the olivine/pyroxene ratio decreases progressively from the Lichtenberg crater to the southern units. The northern and southern units within Mare Imbrium have higher olivine/pyroxene ratios than the central ones. The inferred abundance of olivine appears to vary stratigraphically, with the younger flows being more olivine rich. However, the stratigraphically younger units around Euler crater in Mare Imbrium, which present as dark red hues in the integrated band depth image of M3, were found to have lower olivine/pyroxene ratios than the units around Lichtenberg crater (shown as light red hues) in Oceanus Procellarum. It could be interpreted that the late stage mare basalts around Lichtenberg crater originated from a more olivine-rich source than those around Euler crater.

  17. Late-stage clinical development in lower urogenital targets: sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Usman

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, late-stage clinical drug development that primarily focuses on urogenital targets has centered around four areas of medical need (both unmet need and aiming to improve on existing therapies). These include male sexual dysfunction (MSD), female sexual dysfunction (FSD), prostatic pathology (neoplastic, pre-neoplasitic, and non-neoplastic), and improvement in lower urinary tract symptoms. Despite the regulatory approval of compounds to treat erectile dysfunction (ED), benign prostatic hyperplasia, a number of treatments for overactive bladder, and stress urinary incontinence, there remains a deficiency in addressing a number of conditions that arise out of pathophysiological dysfunction resulting in lower urogenital tract sexual conditions. In terms of late-stage clinical development, significant progress has most recently been made in MSD development, especially in understanding further a common and complex sexual dysfunction – that of premature ejaculation. The search also continues for compounds that improve ED in terms of better efficacy and superior safety profile compared to the currently marketed phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors. Whilst there are no approved medications to treat the subtypes of FSD, there has been significant progress in attempting to better understand how to appropriately assess treatment benefit in clinical trial settings for this difficult to diagnose and treat condition. This review will focus on late-stage human clinical development pertaining to MSD and FSD. PMID:16465180

  18. High prevalence of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense group 1 in pigs from the Fontem sleeping sickness focus in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Simo, G; Asonganyi, T; Nkinin, S W; Njiokou, F; Herder, S

    2006-06-30

    To understand the importance of domestic pigs in the epidemiology of human trypanosomiasis, PCR was used to identify trypanosome populations in 133 pigs from the Fontem sleeping sickness focus of Cameroon. The results from this study show that 73.7% (98/133) of pigs from the Fontem area carry at least one trypanosome species. Trypanosoma vivax, T. brucei s.l. and T. congolense forest were found in 34.6% (46/133), 40.0% (53/133) and 46.0% (61/133) of the pigs respectively. T. simiae and T. congolense savannah were not identified in these animals. The use of repeated DNA sequences detected T. b. gambiense group 1 in 14.8% (15/101) of the pigs. Such pigs can be possible reservoir hosts for T. b. gambiense group 1 and contribute to the maintenance of the disease in the area. Mixed infections were revealed in 35.3% (47/133) of the pigs. Furthermore, we observed that under natural conditions, 52.4% (11/21) of the pigs from the Fontem focus carry mixed infections with T. b. gambiense group 1. No significant difference was observed between the percentage of T. b. gambiense group 1 single and mixed infections, and between the prevalence of this trypanosome in pigs from villages with and without sleeping sickness patients.

  19. Functionalized Metallated Cavitands via Imidation and Late-Stage Elaboration

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanchuan

    2015-01-01

    Efficient methods for the preparation of functionalized metallated cavitands are described. Functional groups can be either introduced by an imidation of metal-oxo complexes or by a late-stage elaboration of the imido ligands. By using diversified iminophosphorane (PPh3=NR) reagents, π-conjugated pyrene, redox active ferrocene and polymerizable norbornene moieties were successfully introduced. Furthermore, the iodo and alkynyl groups on the imido ligands are capable of undergoing efficient Sonogashira cross-coupling and copper-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition reactions, thereby providing facile access to complex architectures containing metallated cavitands. PMID:26962300

  20. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense adaptation to different mammalian sera is associated with VSG expression site plasticity.

    PubMed

    Cordon-Obras, Carlos; Cano, Jorge; González-Pacanowska, Dolores; Benito, Agustin; Navarro, Miguel; Bart, Jean-Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infection is widely considered an anthroponosis, although it has also been found in wild and domestic animals. Thus, fauna could act as reservoir, constraining the elimination of the parasite in hypo-endemic foci. To better understand the possible maintenance of T. b. gambiense in local fauna and investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation, we generated adapted cells lines (ACLs) by in vitro culture of the parasites in different mammalian sera. Using specific antibodies against the Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs) we found that serum ACLs exhibited different VSG variants when maintained in pig, goat or human sera. Although newly detected VSGs were independent of the sera used, the consistent appearance of different VSGs suggested remodelling of the co-transcribed genes at the telomeric Expression Site (VSG-ES). Thus, Expression Site Associated Genes (ESAGs) sequences were analysed to investigate possible polymorphism selection. ESAGs 6 and 7 genotypes, encoding the transferrin receptor (TfR), expressed in different ACLs were characterised. In addition, we quantified the ESAG6/7 mRNA levels and analysed transferrin (Tf) uptake. Interestingly, the best growth occurred in pig and human serum ACLs, which consistently exhibited a predominant ESAG7 genotype and higher Tf uptake than those obtained in calf and goat sera. We also detected an apparent selection of specific ESAG3 genotypes in the pig and human serum ACLs, suggesting that other ESAGs could be involved in the host adaptation processes. Altogether, these results suggest a model whereby VSG-ES remodelling allows the parasite to express a specific set of ESAGs to provide selective advantages in different hosts. Finally, pig serum ACLs display phenotypic adaptation parameters closely related to human serum ACLs but distinct to parasites grown in calf and goat sera. These results suggest a better suitability of swine to maintain T. b. gambiense infection supporting

  1. Patellar tendinopathy: late-stage results from surgical treatment☆

    PubMed Central

    Cenni, Marcos Henrique Frauendorf; Silva, Thiago Daniel Macedo; do Nascimento, Bruno Fajardo; de Andrade, Rodrigo Cristiano; Júnior, Lúcio Flávio Biondi Pinheiro; Nicolai, Oscar Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the late-stage results from surgical treatment of patellar tendinopathy (PT), using the Visa score (Victorian Institute of Sport Tendon Study Group) and the Verheyden method. Methods This was a retrospective study in which the postoperative results from 12 patients (14 knees) who were operated between July 2002 and February 2011 were evaluated. The patients included in the study presented patellar tendinopathy that was refractory to conservative treatment, without any other concomitant lesions. Patients who were not properly followed up during the postoperative period were excluded. Results Using the Verheyden method, nine patients were considered to have very good results, two had good results and one had poor results. In relation to Visa, the mean was 92.4 points and only two patients had scores less than 70 points (66 and 55 points). Conclusion When surgical treatment for patellar tendinopathy is correctly indicated, it has good long-term results. PMID:26535202

  2. [Ethical and legal issues in late stage of dementia].

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Lia

    2008-01-01

    As we enter the 21st century, growth of the elderly population, the costs of care, and the advances of medical science and technology will continue to have an impact on the patient-physician relationship. Transformation of the health care system will also raise ethical issues inherent to changing roles. The special nature of Alzheimer's patients and the natural course of their disease require special care on the part of physicians to meet the ethical challenges and establish medical goals, in conjunction with their patients and their families. In spite of these rapid advances in biomedical sciences, were not sufficiently developed in the most fitness answers, regarding special moral and ethical attitudes, which must be taken into account, in particular when we try to understand the experience of people with dementia. This article explores emerging issues in relation to awareness in dementia and its impact on legal and ethical matters. The different approaches and principles demonstrated in relation to ethical issues are discussed, with an exploration of the concepts of mental capacity, testamentary capacity, power of attorney, court of protection, advance directives, decision making, participation in research and treatment, informed consent and older people driving. The tensions that exist between the imperatives of doing no harm and of maintaining autonomy in addressing legal and ethical issues are highlighted. The review emphasizes the importance of considering competency and awareness as being multi-faceted, to be understood in the context of social interaction, trying to deal with the challenge of protecting, but not overprotecting, people with dementia. Late stage of dementia is a terminal disease where the goal of the care may not be prolongation of life at all costs, but rather achievement: quality of life, dignity and comfort. In the initial late dementia, quality of life is the target, treating medical problems and psychiatric symptoms. The dignity of

  3. Late stages of the synchronized macrophage fusion in osteoclast formation depend on dynamin.

    PubMed

    Verma, Santosh K; Leikina, Evgenia; Melikov, Kamran; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2014-12-15

    Macrophage fusion that leads to osteoclast formation is one of the most important examples of cell-cell fusion in development, tissue homoeostasis and immune response. Protein machinery that fuses macrophages remains to be identified. In the present study, we explored the fusion stage of osteoclast formation for RAW macrophage-like murine cells and for macrophages derived from human monocytes. To uncouple fusion from the preceding differentiation processes, we accumulated fusion-committed cells in the presence of LPC (lysophosphatidylcholine) that reversibly blocks membrane merger. After 16 h, we removed LPC and observed cell fusion events that would normally develop within 16 h develop instead within 30-90 min. Thus, whereas osteoclastogenesis, generally, takes several days, our approach allowed us to focus on an hour in which we observe robust fusion between the cells. Complementing syncytium formation assay with a novel membrane merger assay let us study the synchronized fusion events downstream of a local merger between two plasma membranes, but before expansion of nascent membrane connections and complete unification of the cells. We found that the expansion of membrane connections detected as a growth of multinucleated osteoclasts depends on dynamin activity. In contrast, a merger between the plasma membranes of the two cells was not affected by inhibitors of dynamin GTPase. Thus dynamin that was recently found to control late stages of myoblast fusion also controls late stages of macrophage fusion, revealing an intriguing conserved mechanistic motif shared by diverse cell-cell fusion processes.

  4. Placental transport of lindane during early and late stages of gestation in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna, R.N.; Kunwar, K.; Gupta, R.; Gupta, G.S.D. )

    1991-10-01

    Lindane (gamma-isomer of hexachlorocyclohexane, gamma-HCH), an organochlorine pesticide, is widely used as an agricultural pesticide especially in developing countries. Human exposure is likely because of its use in some pharmaceutical preparations and in public health for pest control purpose. It has been detected in human milk and fat samples in India and in many developed countries. The accumulation of lindane over a long period in fat samples and its presence in milk suggests that the human fetus may be exposed to lindane at some time during gestation from the maternal tissue stores. The present study was, therefore, undertaken to determine the placental transfer of lindane in rats during early and late stages of gestation.

  5. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Infections in Mice Lead to Tropism to the Reproductive Organs, and Horizontal and Vertical Transmission.

    PubMed

    Biteau, Nicolas; Asencio, Corinne; Izotte, Julien; Rousseau, Benoit; Fèvre, Muriel; Pillay, Davita; Baltz, Théo

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, transmitted by the tsetse fly, is the main causative agent of Human African trypanosomosis in West Africa and poses a significant health risk to 70 million people. Disease progression varies depending on host immunity, but usually begins with a haemo-lymphatic phase, followed by parasite invasion of the central nervous system. In the current study, the tropism of T. b. gambiense 1135, causing a low level chronic 'silent' infection, was monitored in a murine model using bioluminescence imaging and PCR. A tropism to the reproductive organs, in addition to the central nervous system, after 12-18 months of infection was observed. Bioluminescent analysis of healthy females crossed with infected males showed that 50%, 62.5% and 37.5% of the female mice were subsequently positive for parasites in their ovaries, uteri and brain respectively. Although PCR confirmed the presence of parasites in the uterus of one of these mice, the blood of all mice was negative by PCR and LAMP. Subsequently, bioluminescent imaging of the offspring of infected female mice crossed with healthy males indicated parasites were present in the reproductive organs of both male (80%) and female (60%) offspring. These findings imply that transmission of T. b. gambiense 1135 occurs horizontally, most probably via sexual contact, and vertically in a murine model, which raises the possibility of a similar transmission in humans. This has wide reaching implications. Firstly, the observations made in this study are likely to be valid for wild animals acting as a reservoir for T. b. gambiense. Also, the reproductive organs may act as a refuge for parasites during drug treatment in a similar manner to the central nervous system. This could leave patients at risk of a relapse, ultimately allowing them to act as a reservoir for subsequent transmission by tsetse and possibly, horizontally and vertically.

  6. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Infections in Mice Lead to Tropism to the Reproductive Organs, and Horizontal and Vertical Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Biteau, Nicolas; Asencio, Corinne; Izotte, Julien; Rousseau, Benoit; Fèvre, Muriel; Pillay, Davita; Baltz, Théo

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, transmitted by the tsetse fly, is the main causative agent of Human African trypanosomosis in West Africa and poses a significant health risk to 70 million people. Disease progression varies depending on host immunity, but usually begins with a haemo-lymphatic phase, followed by parasite invasion of the central nervous system. In the current study, the tropism of T. b. gambiense 1135, causing a low level chronic ‘silent’ infection, was monitored in a murine model using bioluminescence imaging and PCR. A tropism to the reproductive organs, in addition to the central nervous system, after 12–18 months of infection was observed. Bioluminescent analysis of healthy females crossed with infected males showed that 50%, 62.5% and 37.5% of the female mice were subsequently positive for parasites in their ovaries, uteri and brain respectively. Although PCR confirmed the presence of parasites in the uterus of one of these mice, the blood of all mice was negative by PCR and LAMP. Subsequently, bioluminescent imaging of the offspring of infected female mice crossed with healthy males indicated parasites were present in the reproductive organs of both male (80%) and female (60%) offspring. These findings imply that transmission of T. b. gambiense 1135 occurs horizontally, most probably via sexual contact, and vertically in a murine model, which raises the possibility of a similar transmission in humans. This has wide reaching implications. Firstly, the observations made in this study are likely to be valid for wild animals acting as a reservoir for T. b. gambiense. Also, the reproductive organs may act as a refuge for parasites during drug treatment in a similar manner to the central nervous system. This could leave patients at risk of a relapse, ultimately allowing them to act as a reservoir for subsequent transmission by tsetse and possibly, horizontally and vertically. PMID:26735855

  7. Chemotherapy of human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Burchmore, Richard J S; Ogbunude, Patrick O J; Enanga, Bertin; Barrett, Michael P

    2002-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness is resurgent [1,2]. The disease is caused by subspecies of the parasitic haemoflagellate, Trypanosoma brucei. Infection starts with the bite of an infected tsetse fly (Glossina spp.). Parasites move from the site of infection to the draining lymphatic vessels and blood stream. The parasites proliferate within the bloodstream and later invade other tissues including the central nervous system. Once they have established themselves within the CNS, a progressive breakdown of neurological function accompanies the disease. Coma precedes death during this late phase. Two forms of the disease are recognised, one caused by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, endemic in Eastern and Southern Africa, in which parasites rapidly invade the CNS causing death within weeks if untreated. T. b. gambiense, originally described in West Africa, but also widespread in Central Africa, proliferates more slowly and can take several years before establishing a CNS-involved infection. Many countries are in the midst of epidemics caused by gambiense-type parasites. Four drugs have been licensed to treat the disease [3]; two of them, pentamidine and suramin, are used prior to CNS involvement. The arsenic-based drug, melarsoprol is used once parasites are established in the CNS. The fourth, eflornithine, is effective against late stage disease caused by T. b. gambiense, but is ineffective against T. b. rhodesiense. Another drug, nifurtimox is licensed for South American trypanosomiasis but also been used in trials against melarsoprol-refractory late sage disease. This review focuses on what is known about modes of action of current drugs and discusses targets for future drug development.

  8. Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification for Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in Urine and Saliva Samples in Nonhuman Primate Model.

    PubMed

    Ngotho, Maina; Kagira, John Maina; Gachie, Beatrice Muthoni; Karanja, Simon Muturi; Waema, Maxwell Wambua; Maranga, Dawn Nyawira; Maina, Naomi Wangari

    2015-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a vector-borne parasitic zoonotic disease. The disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense is the most prevalent in Africa. Early diagnosis is hampered by lack of sensitive diagnostic techniques. This study explored the potential of loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the detection of T. b. gambiense infection in a vervet monkey HAT model. Six vervet monkeys were experimentally infected with T. b. gambiense IL3253 and monitored for 180 days after infection. Parasitaemia was scored daily. Blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), saliva, and urine samples were collected weekly. PCR and LAMP were performed on serum, CSF, saliva, and urine samples. The detection by LAMP was significantly higher than that of parasitological methods and PCR in all the samples. The performance of LAMP varied between the samples and was better in serum followed by saliva and then urine samples. In the saliva samples, LAMP had 100% detection between 21 and 77 dpi, whereas in urine the detection it was slightly lower, but there was over 80% detection between 28 and 91 dpi. However, LAMP could not detect trypanosomes in either saliva or urine after 140 and 126 dpi, respectively. The findings of this study emphasize the importance of LAMP in diagnosis of HAT using saliva and urine samples.

  9. Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification for Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in Urine and Saliva Samples in Nonhuman Primate Model

    PubMed Central

    Ngotho, Maina; Kagira, John Maina; Gachie, Beatrice Muthoni; Karanja, Simon Muturi; Waema, Maxwell Wambua; Maranga, Dawn Nyawira; Maina, Naomi Wangari

    2015-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a vector-borne parasitic zoonotic disease. The disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense is the most prevalent in Africa. Early diagnosis is hampered by lack of sensitive diagnostic techniques. This study explored the potential of loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the detection of T. b. gambiense infection in a vervet monkey HAT model. Six vervet monkeys were experimentally infected with T. b. gambiense IL3253 and monitored for 180 days after infection. Parasitaemia was scored daily. Blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), saliva, and urine samples were collected weekly. PCR and LAMP were performed on serum, CSF, saliva, and urine samples. The detection by LAMP was significantly higher than that of parasitological methods and PCR in all the samples. The performance of LAMP varied between the samples and was better in serum followed by saliva and then urine samples. In the saliva samples, LAMP had 100% detection between 21 and 77 dpi, whereas in urine the detection it was slightly lower, but there was over 80% detection between 28 and 91 dpi. However, LAMP could not detect trypanosomes in either saliva or urine after 140 and 126 dpi, respectively. The findings of this study emphasize the importance of LAMP in diagnosis of HAT using saliva and urine samples. PMID:26504841

  10. Perspectives from NHLBI Global Health Think Tank Meeting for Late Stage (T4) Translation Research.

    PubMed

    Engelgau, Michael M; Peprah, Emmanuel; Sampson, Uchechukwu K A; Mishoe, Helena; Benjamin, Ivor J; Douglas, Pamela S; Hochman, Judith S; Ridker, Paul M; Brandes, Neal; Checkley, William; El-Saharty, Sameh; Ezzati, Majid; Hennis, Anselm; Jiang, Lixin; Krumholz, Harlan M; Lamourelle, Gabrielle; Makani, Julie; Narayan, K M Venkat; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku; Straus, Sharon E; Stuckler, David; Chambers, David A; Belis, Deshirée; Bennett, Glen C; Boyington, Josephine E; Creazzo, Tony L; de Jesus, Janet M; Krishnamurti, Chitra; Lowden, Mia R; Punturieri, Antonello; Shero, Susan T; Young, Neal S; Zou, Shimian; Mensah, George A

    2016-07-21

    Almost three-quarters (74%) of all the noncommunicable disease burden is found within low- and middle-income countries. In September 2014, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute held a Global Health Think Tank meeting to obtain expert advice and recommendations for addressing compelling scientific questions for late stage (T4) research-research that studies implementation strategies for proven effective interventions-to inform and guide the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's global health research and training efforts. Major themes emerged in two broad categories: 1) developing research capacity; and 2) efficiently defining compelling scientific questions within the local context. Compelling scientific questions included how to deliver inexpensive, scalable, and sustainable interventions using alternative health delivery models that leverage existing human capital, technologies and therapeutics, and entrepreneurial strategies. These broad themes provide perspectives that inform an overarching strategy needed to reduce the heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders disease burden and global health disparities.

  11. Treatment options for non-motor symptoms in late-stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Miguel; Ferreira, Joaquim; Rosa, Mário; Sampaio, Cristina

    2008-03-01

    Late-stage Parkinson's disease is characterised by patients dependent on caregivers for their activities of daily living, even under the best levodopa benefit. Non-motor signs that overcome the well-known motor signs of Parkinson's disease dominate late-stage Parkinson's disease and few systematic data exist for the treatment of these signs. The objective of this study was to review the treatment options for Parkinson's disease dementia, psychosis, falls, bone fractures, joint and skeletal deformities, pain, orthostatic hypotension, gastrointestinal abnormalities and urological dysfunction in late-stage Parkinson's disease. The study analysed the available controlled clinical trials for the above medical conditions. When absent, data from case series and the authors' own experience was considered. Few controlled clinical trials specifically addressed late-stage Parkinson's disease as a target population. There is a need for therapeutic data on the symptoms that most afflict late-stage Parkinson's disease patients.

  12. The continuing problem of human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness).

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Peter G E

    2008-08-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis, also known as sleeping sickness, is a neglected disease, and it continues to pose a major threat to 60 million people in 36 countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Transmitted by the bite of the tsetse fly, the disease is caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Trypanosoma and comes in two types: East African human African trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and the West African form caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. There is an early or hemolymphatic stage and a late or encephalitic stage, when the parasites cross the blood-brain barrier to invade the central nervous system. Two critical current issues are disease staging and drug therapy, especially for late-stage disease. Lumbar puncture to analyze cerebrospinal fluid will remain the only method of disease staging until reliable noninvasive methods are developed, but there is no widespread consensus as to what exactly defines biologically central nervous system disease or what specific cerebrospinal fluid findings should justify drug therapy for late-stage involvement. All four main drugs used for human African trypanosomiasis are toxic, and melarsoprol, the only drug that is effective for both types of central nervous system disease, is so toxic that it kills 5% of patients who receive it. Eflornithine, alone or combined with nifurtimox, is being used increasingly as first-line therapy for gambiense disease. There is a pressing need for an effective, safe oral drug for both stages of the disease, but this will require a significant increase in investment for new drug discovery from Western governments and the pharmaceutical industry.

  13. Low specificities of HIV diagnostic tests caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense sleeping sickness.

    PubMed

    Lejon, V; Ngoyi, D Mumba; Ilunga, M; Beelaert, G; Maes, I; Büscher, P; Fransen, K

    2010-08-01

    The accuracy of diagnostic tests for HIV in patients with tropical infections is poorly documented. Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is characterized by a polyclonal B-cell activation, constituting a risk for false-positive reactions to diagnostic tests, including HIV tests. A retrospective study of the accuracy of HIV diagnostic tests was performed with 360 human African HAT patients infected with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense before treatment and 163 T. b. gambiense-infected patients 2 years after successful treatment in Mbuji Mayi, East Kasai, Democratic Republic of the Congo. The sensitivities, specificities, and positive predictive values (PPVs) of individual tests and algorithms consisting of 3 rapid tests were determined. The sensitivity of all tests was 100% (11/11). The low specificity (96.3%, 335/348) and PPV (45.8%, 11/24) of a classical seroconfirmation strategy (Vironostika enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] followed by line immunoassay) complicated the determination of HIV status, which had to be determined by PCR. The specificities of the rapid diagnostic tests were 39.1% for Determine (136/348); 85.3 to 92.8% (297/348 to 323/348) for Vikia, ImmunoFlow, DoubleCheck, and Bioline; and 96.6 to 98.3% (336/348 to 342/348) for Uni-Gold, OraQuick, and Stat-Pak. The specificity of Vironostika was 67.5% (235/348). PPVs ranged between 4.9 and 64.7%. Combining 3 different rapid tests resulted in specificities of 98.3 to 100% (342/348 to 348/348) and PPVs of 64.7 to 100% (11/17 to 11/11). For cured HAT patients, specificities were significantly higher for Vironostika, Determine, Uni-Gold, and ImmunoFlow. T. b. gambiense infection decreases the specificities of antibody detection tests for HIV diagnosis. Unless tests have been validated for interference with HAT, HIV diagnosis using classical algorithms in untreated HAT patients should be avoided. Specific, validated combinations of 3 HIV rapid tests can increase specificity.

  14. Characterization of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense variant surface glycoprotein LiTat 1.5.

    PubMed

    Van Nieuwenhove, L; Rogé, S; Lejon, V; Guisez, Y; Büscher, P

    2012-05-09

    At present, all available diagnostic antibody detection tests for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense human African trypanosomiasis are based on predominant variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs), such as VSG LiTat 1.5. During investigations aiming at replacement of the native VSGs by recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, the sequence of VSG LiTat 1.5 was derived from cDNA and direct N-terminal amino acid sequencing. Characterization of the VSG based on cysteine distribution in the amino acid sequence revealed an unusual cysteine pattern identical to that of VSG Kinu 1 of T. b. brucei. Even though both VSGs lack the third of four conserved cysteines typical for type A N-terminal domains, they can be classified as type A.

  15. Expression of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Antigens in Leishmania tarentolae. Potential for Use in Rapid Serodiagnostic Tests (RDTs)

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Barrie; Piening, Turid; Büscher, Philippe; Rogé, Stijn; Smales, C. Mark

    2015-01-01

    The development of rapid serodiagnostic tests for sleeping sickness and other diseases caused by kinetoplastids relies on the affordable production of parasite-specific recombinant antigens. Here, we describe the production of recombinant antigens from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (T.b. gambiense) in the related species Leishmania tarentolae (L. tarentolae), and compare their diagnostic sensitivity and specificity to native antigens currently used in diagnostic kits against a panel of human sera. A number of T.b. gambiense protein antigen candidates were chosen for recombinant expression in L. tarentolae based on current diagnostics in field use and recent findings on immunodiagnostic antigens found by proteomic profiling. In particular, the extracellular domains of invariant surface glycoprotein 65 (ISG65), variant surface glycoproteins VSG LiTat 1.3 and VSG LiTat 1.5 were fused with C-terminal histidine tags and expressed as soluble proteins in the medium of cultured, recombinant L. tarentolae. Using affinity chromatography, on average 10 mg/L of recombinant protein was purified from cultures and subsequently tested against a panel of sera from sleeping sickness patients from controls, i.e. persons without sleeping sickness living in HAT endemic countries. The evaluation on sera from 172 T.b. gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) patients and from 119 controls showed very high diagnostic potential of the two recombinant VSG and the rISG65 fragments with areas under the curve between 0.97 and 0.98 compared to 0.98 and 0.99 with native VSG LiTat 1.3 and VSG LiTat 1.5 (statistically not different). Evaluation on sera from 78 T.b. rhodesiense HAT patients and from 100 controls showed an acceptable diagnostic potential of rISG65 with an area under the curve of 0.83. These results indicate that a combination of these recombinant antigens has the potential to be used in next generation rapid serodiagnostic tests. In addition, the L. tarentolae expression system

  16. Implications of Heterogeneous Biting Exposure and Animal Hosts on Trypanosomiasis brucei gambiense Transmission and Control

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Chris M.; Chitnis, Nakul

    2015-01-01

    The gambiense form of sleeping sickness is a neglected tropical disease, which is presumed to be anthroponotic. However, the parasite persists in human populations at levels of considerable rarity and as such the existence of animal reservoirs has been posited. Clarifying the impact of animal host reservoirs on the feasibility of interrupting sleeping sickness transmission through interventions is a matter of urgency. We developed a mathematical model allowing for heterogeneous exposure of humans to tsetse, with animal populations that differed in their ability to transmit infections, to investigate the effectiveness of two established techniques, screening and treatment of at-risk populations, and vector control. Importantly, under both assumptions, an integrated approach of human screening and vector control was supported in high transmission areas. However, increasing the intensity of vector control was more likely to eliminate transmission, while increasing the intensity of human screening reduced the time to elimination. Non-human animal hosts played important, but different roles in HAT transmission, depending on whether or not they contributed as reservoirs. If they did not serve as reservoirs, sensitivity analyses suggested their attractiveness may instead function as a sink for tsetse bites. These outcomes highlight the importance of understanding the ecological and environmental context of sleeping sickness in optimizing integrated interventions, particularly for moderate and low transmission intensity settings. PMID:26426854

  17. In vitro investigation of Brazilian Cerrado plant extract activity against Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei gambiense.

    PubMed

    Charneau, Sébastien; de Mesquita, Mariana Laundry; Bastos, Izabela Marques Dourado; Santana, Jaime Martins; de Paula, José Elias; Grellier, Philippe; Espindola, Laila Salmen

    2016-06-01

    The threatened Brazilian Cerrado biome is an important biodiversity hotspot but still few explored that constitutes a potential reservoir of molecules to treat infectious diseases. We selected eight Cerrado plant species for screening against the erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum, human intracellular stages of Trypanosoma cruzi and bloodstream forms of T. brucei gambiense, and for their cytotoxicity upon the rat L6-myoblast cell line. Bioassays were performed with 37 hexane, ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts prepared from different plant organs. Activities against parasites were observed for 24 extracts: 9 with anti-P. falciparum, 4 with anti-T. cruzi and 11 with anti-T. brucei gambiense activities. High anti-protozoal activity (IC50 values < 10 μg/mL) without obvious cytotoxicity to L6 cells was observed for eight extracts from plants: Connarus suberosus, Blepharocalyx salicifolius, Psidium laruotteanum and Myrsine guianensis. Overall, studies of plant extracts will contribute to increase the biodiversity knowledge essential for Cerrado conservation and sustainable development.

  18. Late-stage diversification of biologically active pyridazinones via a direct C-H functionalization strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Fan, Zhoulong; Geng, Kaijun; Xu, Youjun; Zhang, Ao

    2015-01-14

    Divergent C-H functionalization reactions (arylation, carboxylation, olefination, thiolation, acetoxylation, halogenation, naphthylation) using a pyridazinone moiety as an internal directing group were successfully established. This approach offers a late-stage, ortho-selective diversification of a biologically active pyridazinone scaffold. Seven series of novel pyridazinone analogues were synthesized conveniently as the synthetic precursors of potential sortase A (SrtA) inhibitors.

  19. Late-stage [18F]Fluorination: New Solutions to Old Problems

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Allen F.; Topczewski, Joseph J.; Ichiishi, Naoko; Sanford, Melanie S.; Scott, Peter J. H.

    2014-01-01

    The last 2–3 years have seen numerous relationships develop between organometallic chemists, fluorine chemists and PET Centers around the world. These collaborations have led to the development of many new strategies for the late-stage introduction of fluorine-18 into complex bioactive molecules. In this perspective we highlight recent developments and key milestones since 2011. PMID:25379166

  20. Understanding quality-of-life while living with late-stage lung cancer: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Adorno, Gail; Brownell, Gracie

    2014-01-01

    U.S. Veterans have a higher prevalence of advanced lung cancer and poorer survival outcomes compared to the general population; yet, no studies exist which specifically explore the psychosocial and existential quality-of-life (QOL) of late-stage lung cancer among this population. This article presents the perspectives of older veterans (N = 12) living with late-stage lung cancer who were receiving chemotherapy, routine hospice care, or both concurrently. Based on individual interviews, themes associated with loss of functionality, close relationships, and communicative acts contributed to veterans' perceptions of diminished or enhanced QOL while living with advanced disease. An overarching theme, loss of the person I know myself to be, suggests that personhood is an important concept to consider in QOL assessment. While findings suggest that the experiences of older Veterans with late-stage lung cancer are similar to other populations of lung cancer patients, and persons with incurable cancer in general, further research regarding the influence of veteran identity at end-of-life is warranted. Further research is needed which explores the influence of a whole person approach to QOL during life-limiting illness and end-of-life decision-making, particularly while receiving late-stage cancer-directed therapy.

  1. Noradrenergic Action in Prefrontal Cortex in the Late Stage of Memory Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tronel, Sophie; Feenstra, Matthijs G. P.; Sara, Susan J.

    2004-01-01

    These experiments investigated the role of the noradrenergic system in the late stage of memory consolidation and in particular its action at beta receptors in the prelimbic region (PL) of the prefrontal cortex in the hours after training. Rats were trained in a rapidly acquired, appetitively motivated foraging task based on olfactory…

  2. Problem solving, impulse control and planning in patients with early- and late-stage Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Mörkl, Sabrina; Müller, Nicole J; Blesl, Claudia; Wilkinson, Leonora; Tmava, Adelina; Wurm, Walter; Holl, Anna K; Painold, Annamaria

    2016-10-01

    Sub-domains of executive functions, including problems with planning, accuracy, impulsivity, and inhibition, are core features of Huntington's disease. It is known that the decline of cognitive function in Huntington's disease is related to the anatomical progression of pathology in the basal ganglia. However, it remains to be determined whether the severity of executive dysfunction depends on the stage of the disease. To examine the severity of sub-domains of executive dysfunction in early- and late-stage Huntington's disease, we studied performance in the Tower of London task of two groups of Huntington's disease patients (Group 1: early, n = 23, and Group 2: late stage, n = 29), as well as a third group of age, education, and IQ matched healthy controls (n = 34). During the task, we measured the total number of problems solved, total planning time, and total number of breaks taken. One aspect of executive function indexed by the number of solved problems seems to progress in the course of the disease. Late-stage Huntington's disease patients scored significantly worse than early-stage patients and controls, and early-stage patients scored significantly worse than controls on this measure of accuracy. In contrast, late- and early-stage HD patients did not differ in terms of planning time and number of breaks. Early- and late-stage HD pathology has a different impact on executive sub-domains. While accuracy differs between early- and late-stage HD patients, other domains like planning time and number of breaks do not. Striatal degeneration, which is a characteristic feature of the disease, might not affect all aspects of executive function in HD.

  3. A fluoride-derived electrophilic late-stage fluorination reagent for PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunsung; Kamlet, Adam S; Powers, David C; Neumann, Constanze N; Boursalian, Gregory B; Furuya, Takeru; Choi, Daniel C; Hooker, Jacob M; Ritter, Tobias

    2011-11-04

    The unnatural isotope fluorine-18 ((18)F) is used as a positron emitter in molecular imaging. Currently, many potentially useful (18)F-labeled probe molecules are inaccessible for imaging because no fluorination chemistry is available to make them. The 110-minute half-life of (18)F requires rapid syntheses for which [(18)F]fluoride is the preferred source of fluorine because of its practical access and suitable isotope enrichment. However, conventional [(18)F]fluoride chemistry has been limited to nucleophilic fluorination reactions. We report the development of a palladium-based electrophilic fluorination reagent derived from fluoride and its application to the synthesis of aromatic (18)F-labeled molecules via late-stage fluorination. Late-stage fluorination enables the synthesis of conventionally unavailable positron emission tomography (PET) tracers for anticipated applications in pharmaceutical development as well as preclinical and clinical PET imaging.

  4. Gene expression-based biomarkers for discriminating early and late stage of clear cell renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Sherry; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Sehgal, Manika; Kaur, Harpreet; Sharma, Suresh; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to identify expression-based gene biomarkers that can discriminate early and late stage of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients. We have analyzed the gene expression of 523 samples to identify genes that are differentially expressed in the early and late stage of ccRCC. First, a threshold-based method has been developed, which attained a maximum accuracy of 71.12% with ROC 0.67 using single gene NR3C2. To improve the performance of threshold-based method, we combined two or more genes and achieved maximum accuracy of 70.19% with ROC of 0.74 using eight genes on the validation dataset. These eight genes include four underexpressed (NR3C2, ENAM, DNASE1L3, FRMPD2) and four overexpressed (PLEKHA9, MAP6D1, SMPD4, C11orf73) genes in the late stage of ccRCC. Second, models were developed using state-of-art techniques and achieved maximum accuracy of 72.64% and 0.81 ROC using 64 genes on validation dataset. Similar accuracy was obtained on 38 genes selected from subset of genes, involved in cancer hallmark biological processes. Our analysis further implied a need to develop gender-specific models for stage classification. A web server, CancerCSP, has been developed to predict stage of ccRCC using gene expression data derived from RNAseq experiments. PMID:28349958

  5. Distinct Signaling Requirements for the Establishment of ESC Pluripotency in Late-Stage EpiSCs

    PubMed Central

    Illich, Damir Jacob; Zhang, Miao; Ursu, Andrei; Osorno, Rodrigo; Kim, Kee-Pyo; Yoon, Juyong; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J.; Wu, Guangming; Esch, Daniel; Sabour, Davood; Colby, Douglas; Grassme, Kathrin S.; Chen, Jiayu; Greber, Boris; Höing, Susanne; Herzog, Wiebke; Ziegler, Slava; Chambers, Ian; Gao, Shaorong; Waldmann, Herbert; Schöler, Hans R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary It has previously been reported that mouse epiblast stem cell (EpiSC) lines comprise heterogeneous cell populations that are functionally equivalent to cells of either early- or late-stage postimplantation development. So far, the establishment of the embryonic stem cell (ESC) pluripotency gene regulatory network through the widely known chemical inhibition of MEK and GSK3beta has been impractical in late-stage EpiSCs. Here, we show that chemical inhibition of casein kinase 1alpha (CK1alpha) induces the conversion of recalcitrant late-stage EpiSCs into ESC pluripotency. CK1alpha inhibition directly results in the simultaneous activation of the WNT signaling pathway, together with inhibition of the TGFbeta/SMAD2 signaling pathway, mediating the rewiring of the gene regulatory network in favor of an ESC-like state. Our findings uncover a molecular mechanism that links CK1alpha to ESC pluripotency through the direct modulation of WNT and TGFbeta signaling. PMID:27149845

  6. Inhibition of autophagy induced by quercetin at a late stage enhances cytotoxic effects on glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yunke; Shen, Chen; Li, Chenguang; Liu, Yaohua; Gao, Dandan; Shi, Chen; Peng, Fei; Liu, Zhendong; Zhao, Boxian; Zheng, Zhixing; Wang, Xiaoxiong; Hou, Xu; Liu, Huailei; Wu, Jianing; Zou, Huichao; Wang, Kaikai; Zhong, Chen; Zhang, Jiakang; Shi, Changbin; Zhao, Shiguang

    2016-03-01

    Glioma is the most common primary brain tumor in the central nervous system (CNS) with high morbidity and mortality in adults. Although standardized comprehensive therapy has been adapted, the prognosis of glioma patients is still frustrating and thus novel therapeutic strategies are urgently in need. Quercetin (Quer), an important flavonoid compound found in many herbs, is shown to be effective in some tumor models including glioma. Recently, it is reported that adequate regulation of autophagy can strengthen cytotoxic effect of anticancer drugs. However, it is not yet fully clear how we should modulate autophagy to achieve a satisfactory therapeutic effect. 3-Methyladenine (3-MA) and Beclin1 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) were used to inhibit the early stage of autophage while chloroquine (CQ) to inhibit the late stage. MTT assay was implemented to determine cell viability. Transmission electron microscopy, western blot, and immunohistochemistry were adopted to evaluate autophagy. Western blot, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry were used to detect apoptosis. C6 glioma xenograft models were established to assess the therapeutic effect (the body weight change, the median survival time, and tumor volume) in vivo. Quercetin can inhibit cell viability and induce autophagy of U87 and U251 glioma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of early-stage autophagy by 3-MA or shRNA against Beclin1 attenuated the quercetin-induced cytotoxicity. In contrast, suppression of autophagy at a late stage by CQ enhanced the anti-glioma efficiency of quercetin. Therapeutic effect of quercetin for malignant glioma can be strengthened by inhibition of autophagy at a late stage, not initial stage, which may provide a novel opportunity for glioma therapy.

  7. New insights on late stage volcanism in the Pigafetta basin, western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, T.; Tominaga, M.

    2014-12-01

    We document observations of late stage volcanism in the western Pacific Pigafetta Basin by integrating previously published and new multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection profiles, Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drill core, and well log data. We examine data from three seismic experiments (FM35-12, MESOPAC II, and MTr5) conducted in the Pigafetta Basin, one of the oldest, deepest abyssal basins in the world, where crustal age is suggested to range from M29 (~157 Ma) to M44 (~169.8 Ma) based on Japanese Mesozoic magnetic lineations. We use a total of ~2150 km of MCS lines along with core and wire-line logging data from ODP Hole 801C. As a basis for our interpretation, we use previously defined seismic stratigraphy for the Pigafetta Basin, including Horizon B (basement) and lower transparent unit (volcaniclastic turbidites) terminology. We build synthetic seismograms from density and p-wave velocity logs using OpendTect v 4.6.0 tie well to seismic feature. We then incorporate energy and similarity attributes of the MCS profiles with the modeled seismogram to correlate reflectors to ODP Hole 801C lithostratigraphy. From this correlation, to be consistent with previous studies, we assign lithology and age to prominent sedimentary and basement reflectors throughout all survey lines. We characterize widely distributed deformation of Horizon B and lower sedimentary unit reflectors based on coherency of wiggle traces, lateral and vertical energy attenuation, and dip of reflectors over a range of scales (>10 km to <1 km). Our findings provide new evidence of late stage volcanism occurring in the Pigafetta Basin during the mid-Cretaceous (110 - 90 Ma). We classify late stage volcanism into 3 types of volcanic related features: (1) seamounts, (2) sills, and (3) vertical seismic disturbance zones (<<1 km wide) characterized by bilateral upward drag of reflectors (indicating a thin, vertical volcanic intrusion). The distribution of these features provide new insights into

  8. Selection is stronger in early-versus-late stages of divergence in a Neotropical livebearing fish.

    PubMed

    Ingley, Spencer J; Johnson, Jerald B

    2016-03-01

    How selection acts to drive trait evolution at different stages of divergence is of fundamental importance in our understanding of the origins of biodiversity. Yet, most studies have focused on a single point along an evolutionary trajectory. Here, we provide a case study evaluating the strength of divergent selection acting on life-history traits at early-versus-late stages of divergence in Brachyrhaphis fishes. We find that the difference in selection is stronger in the early-diverged population than the late-diverged population, and that trait differences acquired early are maintained over time.

  9. Selection is stronger in early-versus-late stages of divergence in a Neotropical livebearing fish

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jerald B.

    2016-01-01

    How selection acts to drive trait evolution at different stages of divergence is of fundamental importance in our understanding of the origins of biodiversity. Yet, most studies have focused on a single point along an evolutionary trajectory. Here, we provide a case study evaluating the strength of divergent selection acting on life-history traits at early-versus-late stages of divergence in Brachyrhaphis fishes. We find that the difference in selection is stronger in the early-diverged population than the late-diverged population, and that trait differences acquired early are maintained over time. PMID:26979559

  10. Late-stage galaxy mergers in cosmos to z ∼ 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, C. N.; Silverman, J. D.; Salvato, M.; Kampczyk, P.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Sanders, D.; Lee, N.; Capak, P.; Scoville, N.; Civano, F.; Halliday, C.; Ilbert, O.; Le Fèvre, O.; Jahnke, K.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Liu, C. T.; Sheth, K.

    2014-12-01

    The role of major mergers in galaxy and black hole formation is not well-constrained. To help address this, we develop an automated method to identify late-stage galaxy mergers before coalescence of the galactic cores. The resulting sample of mergers is distinct from those obtained using pair-finding and morphological indicators. Our method relies on median-filtering of high-resolution images to distinguish two concentrated galaxy nuclei at small separations. This method does not rely on low surface brightness features to identify mergers, and is therefore reliable to high redshift. Using mock images, we derive statistical contamination and incompleteness corrections for the fraction of late-stage mergers. The mock images show that our method returns an uncontaminated (<10%) sample of mergers with projected separations between 2.2 and 8 kpc out to z∼1. We apply our new method to a magnitude-limited (m{sub FW} {sub 814}<23) sample of 44,164 galaxies from the COSMOS HST/ACS catalog. Using a mass-complete sample with logM{sub ∗}/M{sub ⊙}>10.6 and 0.25late-stage mergers. Correcting for incompleteness and contamination, the fractional merger rate increases strongly with redshift as r{sub merge}∝(1+z){sup 3.8±0.9}, in agreement both with earlier studies and with dark matter halo merger rates. Separating the sample into star-forming and quiescent galaxies shows that the merger rate for star-forming galaxies increases strongly with redshift, (1+z){sup 4.5±1.3}, while the merger rate for quiescent galaxies is consistent with no evolution, (1+z){sup 1.1±1.2}. The merger rate also becomes steeper with decreasing stellar mass. Limiting our sample to galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts from zCOSMOS, we find that the star formation rates and X-ray selected active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in likely late-stage mergers are higher by factors of ∼2 relative to those of a control sample. Combining our sample with more

  11. Cognitive adaptation theory and quality of life in late-stage cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Christianson, Heidi Fowell; Weis, Jo M; Fouad, Nadya A

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the question of whether using slightly illusionary, positive attributions of self, control, and meaning (e.g., cognitive adaptation theory), in the face of disconfirmatory evidence, facilitates quality of life in late-stage cancer patients was examined. Eighty late-stage cancer patients (Mean age = 59.7, SD = 12.5; 48.8% male, 51.2% female; varying cancer diagnoses) who recently failed or refused first line anti-neoplastic treatment completed questionnaires assessing meaning, control, self-esteem, and optimism, as well as physical and psychological quality of life. Findings suggest that greater self-esteem, control, and meaning predicted physical and psychological quality of life, with physical quality of life being influenced by control beliefs and psychological quality of life influenced by self-esteem. Optimism independently predicted physical quality of life and neither mediated nor moderated the relationship between cognitive adaptation and quality of life. Findings suggest that slightly positive, illusionary beliefs of self, control, and meaning predicted quality of life even in the presence of clear, disconfirmatory environmental evidence.

  12. Divergent natural selection promotes immigrant inviability at early and late stages of evolutionary divergence.

    PubMed

    Ingley, Spencer J; Johnson, Jerald B

    2016-03-01

    Natural selection's role in speciation has been of fundamental importance since Darwin first outlined his theory. Recently, work has focused on understanding how selection drives trait divergence, and subsequently reproductive isolation. "Immigrant inviability," a barrier that arises from selection against immigrants in their nonnative environment, appears to be of particular importance. Although immigrant inviability is likely ubiquitous, we know relatively little about how selection acts on traits to drive immigrant inviability, and how important immigrant inviability is at early-versus-late stages of divergence. We present a study evaluating the role of predation in the evolution of immigrant inviability in recently diverged population pairs and a well-established species pair of Brachyrhaphis fishes. We evaluate performance in a high-predation environment by assessing survival in the presence of a predator, and swimming endurance in a low-predation environment. We find strong signatures of local adaptation and immigrant inviability of roughly the same magnitude both early and late in divergence. We find remarkably conserved selection for burst-speed swimming (important in predator evasion), and selection for increased size in low-predation environments. Our results highlight the consistency with which selection acts during speciation, and suggest that similar factors might promote initial population differentiation and maintain differentiation at late stages of divergence.

  13. A review of late-stage CNS drug candidates for the treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Heal, D J; Gosden, J; Smith, S L

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is an important causative factor in morbidity, disability and premature death. Increasing levels of obesity will impose enormous health, financial and social burdens on worldwide society unless effective interventions are implemented. For many obese individuals, diet and behavioural modification need to be supplemented by pharmacotherapy. Preclinical research has revealed a greater understanding of the complex nature of the hypothalamic regulation of food intake and has generated a wide range of new molecular targets for the development of drug candidates for obesity treatment. As shown by the clinical results that have been obtained with this next generation of therapies, some approaches, for example, fixed-dose drug combinations, have already demonstrated an ability to deliver levels of efficacy that are not achievable with the current antiobesity drug therapies. The regulatory and marketing landscape for development, registration and commercialisation of novel centrally acting drugs for treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders has changed substantially in recent years. Now a much greater emphasis is placed on tolerability and safety, as well as efficacy. In this review we briefly describe the therapeutic approaches to tackle obesity that are in late-stage clinical development. We then discuss drugs in late-stage development for the treatment of obesity and also future directions.

  14. Rural Reversal? Rural-Urban Disparities in Late-stage Cancer Risk in Illinois

    PubMed Central

    McLafferty, Sara; Wang, Fahui

    2009-01-01

    Background Differences in late-stage cancer risk between urban and rural residents are a key component of cancer disparities. Using data from the Illinois State Cancer Registry 1998–2002, we investigate the rural-urban gradient in late-stage cancer risk for four major types of cancer: breast, colorectal, lung and prostate. Methods Multilevel modeling is used to evaluate the role of population composition and area-based contextual factors in accounting for rural-urban variation. Instead of a simple binary rural-urban classification, we use a finer-grained classification that differentiates the densely populated city of Chicago from its suburbs and from smaller metropolitan areas, large towns and rural settings. Results For all four cancers, risk is highest in the most highly urbanized area and decreases as rurality increases, following a J-shaped progression that includes a small upturn in risk in the most isolated rural areas. For some cancers, these geographic disparities are associated with differences in population age and race; for others, the disparities remain after controlling for differences in population composition and ZIP code socioeconomic characteristics and spatial access to health care. Conclusion The observed pattern of urban disadvantage emphasizes the need for more extensive urban-based cancer screening and education programs. PMID:19434667

  15. Immunolocalization of TGF-beta2 in the rat thymus during late stages of prenatal development.

    PubMed

    Sonmez, Mehmet Fatih; Colakoglu, Neriman; Kukner, Aysel; Ozan, Enver; Dabak, Durrin Ozlem

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the immunolocalization of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta2) in rat thymic stromal cells and thymocytes and investigate the roles of TGF-beta2 in thymopoiesis during the late stages of fetal development. Twelve adult pregnant female Wistar rats weighing 250-270 g were used in this study. The rats were killed by cervical dislocation on gestation days 16 (GD16), 18 (GD18) and 20 (GD20). Fetal thymus glands were prepared and examined by an immunohistochemical technique to reveal binding of an anti-TGF-beta2 rabbit polyclonal antibody. The thymic primordium was surrounded with a connective tissue capsule at GD16 and at this stage TGF-beta2 immunoreactivity was not observed. At GD18, the connective tissue capsule had formed septa which subdivided the tissue into lobules and at this stage TGF-beta2 immunolocalization was detected in the capsule and in thymocytes. Lobulation was more evident at GD20 and TGF-beta2 immunoreactivity of thymocytes was more extensive than on GD18. Results indicate that TGF-beta2 may play an important role in the organization or development of thymocytes in the late stages of thymopoiesis.

  16. Radiosyntheses using Fluorine-18: the Art and Science of Late Stage Fluorination

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Erin L.; Stewart, Megan N.; Littich, Ryan; Hoareau, Raphael; Scott, Peter J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Positron (β+) emission tomography (PE) is a powerful, noninvasive tool for the in vivo, three-dimensional imaging of physiological structures and biochemical pathways. The continued growth of PET imaging relies on a corresponding increase in access to radiopharmaceuticals (biologically active molecules labeled with short-lived radionuclides such as fluorine-18). This unique need to incorporate the short-lived fluorine-18 atom (t1/2 = 109.77 min) as late in the synthetic pathway as possible has made development of methodologies that enable rapid and efficient late stage fluorination an area of research within its own right. In this review we describe strategies for radiolabeling with fluorine-18, including classical fluorine-18 radiochemistry and emerging techniques for late stage fluorination reactions, as well as labeling technologies such as microfluidics and solid-phase radiochemistry. The utility of fluorine-18 labeled radiopharmaceuticals is showcased through recent applications of PET imaging in the healthcare, personalized medicine and drug discovery settings. PMID:24484425

  17. Management of Anorexia-Cachexia in Late Stage Lung Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Del Ferraro, Catherine; Grant, Marcia; Koczywas, Marianna; Dorr-Uyemura, Laura A

    2012-08-01

    Nutritional deficiencies are experienced by most adults with advanced lung cancer during the course of their disease and treatment. Well-nourished individuals tolerate cancer treatment with less morbidity, mortality, and increased response to treatment as compared to those who are malnourished. Novel anti-cancer therapies cause many deficits that impact nutritional and functional status during the treatment process. Nutritional deficits include weight loss, malnutrition, and anorexia-cachexia. Anorexia-Cachexia is complex, not well understood and seen in many solid tumors in late stage disease. Assessing adequate nutrition is one of the most challenging problems for nurses, their patients and patient's families. The purpose of this review is to define and describe cancer anorexia-cachexia in late stage lung cancer, through case presentation, and to describe palliative strategies for prevention, assessment, and management in the palliative care setting. Early assessment for nutritional imbalances must be done regularly with re-evaluation for intervention effectiveness and should continue throughout the illness trajectory. Management of adverse effects of cancer and cancer-related treatment is critical to improving quality of life. Palliative care and hospice nurses play a critical role in early assessment, education and prevention to support nutritional needs for patients and their families.

  18. Regulation of ITAM adaptor molecules and their receptors by inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT signalling during late stage osteoclast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zawawi, M.S.F.; Dharmapatni, A.A.S.S.K.; Cantley, M.D.; McHugh, K.P.; Haynes, D.R.; Crotti, T.N.

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors FK506 and VIVIT treated human PBMC derived osteoclasts in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential regulation of ITAM receptors and adaptor molecules by calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FK506 and VIVIT suppress ITAM factors during late phase osteoclast differentiation. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are specialised bone resorptive cells responsible for both physiological and pathological bone loss. Osteoclast differentiation and activity is dependent upon receptor activator NF-kappa-B ligand (RANKL) interacting with its receptor RANK to induce the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1). The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway has been identified as a co-stimulatory pathway in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) and triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells (TREM2) are essential receptors that pair with adaptor molecules Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcR{gamma}) and DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) respectively to induce calcium signalling. Treatment with calcineurin-NFAT inhibitors, Tacrolimus (FK506) and the 11R-VIVIT (VIVIT) peptide, reduces NFATc1 expression consistent with a reduction in osteoclast differentiation and activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting calcineurin-NFAT signalling on the expression of ITAM factors and late stage osteoclast genes including cathepsin K (CathK), Beta 3 integrin ({beta}3) and Annexin VIII (AnnVIII). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were differentiated with RANKL and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) over 10 days in the presence or absence of FK506 or VIVIT. Osteoclast formation (as assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)) and activity (assessed by dentine pit resorption) were significantly reduced with treatment. Quantitative real

  19. Video-assisted thoracoscopic decortication for the management of late stage pleural empyema, is it feasible?

    PubMed Central

    Hajjar, Waseem M.; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Al-Nassar, Sami A.; Alsultan, Rawan K.; Alwgait, Waad A.; Alkhalaf, Hanoof H.; Bisht, Shekhar C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical decortication (VATSD) is widely applicable in fibrinopurulent Stage II empyema. While, more chronic thick walled Stage III empyema (organizing stage) needs conversion to open thoracotomy, and existing reports reveal a lacuna in the realm of late stage empyema patient's management through VATS utilization, particularly Stage III empyema. We prospectively evaluated the application of VATSD regardless of the stage of pleural empyema for the effective management of late stage empyema in comparison to open decortications (ODs) to minimize the adverse effects of the disease. METHODS: All patients with pyogenic pleural empyema (Stage II and Stage III) in King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH) (admitted from January 2009 to December 2013) who did not respond to chest tube/pigtail drainage and/or antibiotic therapy were treated with VATSD and/or open thoracotomy. Prospective evaluation was carried out, and the effect of this technique on perioperative outcomes was appraised to evaluate our technical learning with the passage of time and experience with VATS for late stage empyema management. RESULTS: Out of total 63 patients, 26 had Stage II empyema and 37 had Stage III empyema. VATSD was employed on all empyema patients admitted in the KKUH. VATSD was successful in all patients with Stage II empyema. Twenty-five patients (67.6%) with Stage III empyema completed VATSD successfully. However, only 12 cases (32.4%) required conversions to open (thoracotomy) drainage (OD). The median hospital stay for Stage III VATSD required 9.65 ± 4.1 days. Whereas, patients who underwent open thoracotomy took longer time (21.82 ± 16.35 days). Similarly, Stage III VATSD and Stage III open surgery cases showed significance difference among chest tube duration (7.84 ± 3.33 days for VATS and 15.92 ± 8.2 days for open thoracotomy). Significantly, lower postoperative complications were detected in patients treated with VATSD in terms of

  20. The Biting Midge Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) Is Capable of Developing Late Stage Infections of Leishmania enriettii

    PubMed Central

    Seblova, Veronika; Sadlova, Jovana; Vojtkova, Barbora; Votypka, Jan; Carpenter, Simon; Bates, Paul Andrew; Volf, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite their importance in animal and human health, the epidemiology of species of the Leishmania enriettii complex remains poorly understood, including the identity of their biological vectors. Biting midges of the genus Forcipomyia (Lasiohelea) have been implicated in the transmission of a member of the L. enriettii complex in Australia, but the far larger and more widespread genus Culicoides has not been investigated for the potential to include vectors to date. Methodology/Principal Findings Females from colonies of the midges Culicoides nubeculosus Meigen and C. sonorensis Wirth & Jones and the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis Lutz & Nevia (Diptera: Psychodidae) were experimentally infected with two different species of Leishmania, originating from Australia (Leishmania sp. AM-2004) and Brazil (Leishmania enriettii). In addition, the infectivity of L. enriettii infections generated in guinea pigs and golden hamsters for Lu. longipalpis and C. sonorensis was tested by xenodiagnosis. Development of L. enriettii in Lu. longipalpis was relatively poor compared to other Leishmania species in this permissive vector. Culicoides nubeculosus was not susceptible to infection by parasites from the L. enriettii complex. In contrast, C. sonorensis developed late stage infections with colonization of the thoracic midgut and the stomodeal valve. In hamsters, experimental infection with L. enriettii led only to mild symptoms, while in guinea pigs L. enriettii grew aggressively, producing large, ulcerated, tumour-like lesions. A high proportion of C. sonorensis (up to 80%) feeding on the ears and nose of these guinea pigs became infected. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that L. enriettii can develop late stage infections in the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis. This midge was found to be susceptible to L. enriettii to a similar degree as Lutzomyia longipalpis, the vector of Leishmania infantum in South America. Our results support the hypothesis that some

  1. Regulation of ITAM adaptor molecules and their receptors by inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT signalling during late stage osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zawawi, M S F; Dharmapatni, A A S S K; Cantley, M D; McHugh, K P; Haynes, D R; Crotti, T N

    2012-10-19

    Osteoclasts are specialised bone resorptive cells responsible for both physiological and pathological bone loss. Osteoclast differentiation and activity is dependent upon receptor activator NF-kappa-B ligand (RANKL) interacting with its receptor RANK to induce the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1). The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway has been identified as a co-stimulatory pathway in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) and triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells (TREM2) are essential receptors that pair with adaptor molecules Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcRγ) and DNAX-activating protein 12kDa (DAP12) respectively to induce calcium signalling. Treatment with calcineurin-NFAT inhibitors, Tacrolimus (FK506) and the 11R-VIVIT (VIVIT) peptide, reduces NFATc1 expression consistent with a reduction in osteoclast differentiation and activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting calcineurin-NFAT signalling on the expression of ITAM factors and late stage osteoclast genes including cathepsin K (CathK), Beta 3 integrin (β3) and Annexin VIII (AnnVIII). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were differentiated with RANKL and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) over 10days in the presence or absence of FK506 or VIVIT. Osteoclast formation (as assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)) and activity (assessed by dentine pit resorption) were significantly reduced with treatment. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that FK506 treatment significantly (p<0.05) reduced the expression of NFATc1, CathK, OSCAR, FcRγ, TREM2 and DAP12 during the terminal stage of osteoclast formation. VIVIT treatment significantly (p<0.05) decreased CathK, OSCAR, FcRγ, and AnnVIII, gene expression. This data suggest FK506 and VIVIT act differently in targeting the

  2. Significance of increasing poverty levels for determining late-stage breast cancer diagnosis in 1990 and 2000.

    PubMed

    Barry, Janis; Breen, Nancy; Barrett, Michael

    2012-08-01

    We examine the association between late-stage breast cancer diagnosis and residential poverty in Detroit, Atlanta, and San Francisco in 1990 and 2000. We tested whether residence in census tracts with increasing levels of poverty were associated with increased odds of a late-stage diagnosis in 1990 and 2000 and found that it was. To test this, we linked breast cancer cases from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registries with poverty data from the census. Tracts were grouped into low, moderate, and high poverty based on the percentage of households reporting income below the poverty level. While late-stage breast cancer rates and the number of women living in high and moderate-poverty areas declined absolutely between 1990 and 2000, estimates from our combined three-city model showed that odds of a late-stage diagnosis remained stubbornly elevated in increasingly poor areas in both years. Non-Hispanic black women faced higher odds of a late-stage diagnosis relative to non-Hispanic white women in both years. In separate regressions for each city, the odds ratios affirm that combining data across cities may be misleading. In 1990 and 2000, only women living in moderately poor neighborhoods of San Francisco faced elevated odds, while in Detroit women in both moderate- and high-poverty areas faced increased likelihood of late-stage diagnosis. In Atlanta, none of the poverty measures were significant in 1990 or 2000. In our test of physician supply on stage, an increase in the number of neighborhood primary care doctor's offices was associated with decreased odds of a late-stage diagnosis only for Detroit residents and for non-Hispanic whites in the three-city model.

  3. A Strategic Framework for Utilizing Late-Stage (T4) Translation Research to Address Health Inequities

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Class, Maria; Peprah, Emmanuel; Zhang, Xinzhi; Kaufmann, Peter G.; Engelgau, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Achieving health equity requires that every person has the opportunity to attain their full health potential and no one is disadvantaged from achieving this potential because of social position or other socially determined circumstances. Inequity experienced by populations of lower socioeconomic status is reflected in differences in health status and mortality rates, as well as in the distribution of disease, disability and illness across these population groups. This article gives an overview of the health inequities literature associated with heart, lung, blood and sleep (HLBS) disorders. We present an ecological framework that provides a theoretical foundation to study late-stage T4 translation research that studies implementation strategies for proven effective interventions to address health inequities. PMID:27440979

  4. Improved experimental resolution of the Vishniac overstability in scaled late-stage supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, N. J.; Lewis, S. M.; Wisher, M. L.; Kimmel, M. W.; Struve, K. W.; Porter, J. L.; Bengtson, R. D.; Ditmire, T.

    2017-03-01

    Radiative shocks and blast waves are important in many astrophysical contexts, such as supernova remnant formation, cosmic ray production, and gamma ray bursts. Structure formation on radiative blast wave fronts in late-stage supernova remnants is expected to play a role in star formation via seeding of the Jeans instability. The origin of these structures is believed to be an instability described theoretically by Vishniac [1], which has been subject to continued numerical and experimental study. We report here on a series of experiments designed to examine the effect of magnetic fields on the Vishniac overstability. Preliminary results suggest that a strong transverse magnetic field appears to shift the overstability to longer wavelengths, which may have implications for gravitational star formation models. We present unmagnetized results from an experiment in progress which decomposes the spatial structure of the blast wave for quantitative analysis of magnetic and radiative effects.

  5. Aqueous alteration on the parent bodies of carbonaceous chondrites: Computer simulations of late-stage oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourcier, W. L.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1991-01-01

    CI carbonaceous chondrites may be products of hydrous alteration of CV- or anhydrous CM-type materials. The CIs typically contain veins filled with carbonates and sulfates, probably indicating a period of late stage aqueous alteration under oxidizing conditions. To test this idea, computer simulations of aqueous alteration of CV- and CM-type carbonaceous were performed. Simulations were restricted to the oxidation of hydrous mineral assemblages produced in previous simulations in order to determine whether further reaction and oxidation results in the phyllosilicate, carbonate, sulfate and oxide vein assemblages typical of CI carbonaceous chondrites. Our simulations were performed at 1, 25, 100, and 150 C (the appropriate temperature range) for the CV and CM mineral assemblages and using the computer code EQ3/6.

  6. Gas in Debris Disks: Clues to the Late Stages of Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberg, A.

    2008-01-01

    The basic character of debris disks was established soon after their discovery in the mid-80's. These disks around nearby main sequence stars are composed of material produced by collisions and/or evaporation of extrasolar asteroids and comets. Debris disks appear to be largely composed of dust, though little is known about its typical composition. Nonetheless, at least some debris disks have detectable gas, which has very different characteristics from the gas in younger protoplanetary disks. The gas component has resisted observation, but appears to hold important clues to the composition of extrasolar planetesimals during the late-stages of planetary system formation and the formation of terrestrial planet atmospheres. In this talk, I will explain our current understanding of the place of debris disks in the planet formation process and describe what is known about the gas component. Finally, I will outline upcoming opportunities for sensitive new studies of gas in debris disks.

  7. Manganese-catalyzed late-stage aliphatic C-H azidation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiongyi; Bergsten, Tova M; Groves, John T

    2015-04-29

    We report a manganese-catalyzed aliphatic C-H azidation reaction that can efficiently convert secondary, tertiary, and benzylic C-H bonds to the corresponding azides. The method utilizes aqueous sodium azide solution as the azide source and can be performed under air. Besides its operational simplicity, the potential of this method for late-stage functionalization has been demonstrated by successful azidation of various bioactive molecules with yields up to 74%, including the important drugs pregabalin, memantine, and the antimalarial artemisinin. Azidation of celestolide with a chiral manganese salen catalyst afforded the azide product in 70% ee, representing a Mn-catalyzed enantioselective aliphatic C-H azidation reaction. Considering the versatile roles of organic azides in modern chemistry and the ubiquity of aliphatic C-H bonds in organic molecules, we envision that this Mn-azidation method will find wide application in organic synthesis, drug discovery, and chemical biology.

  8. An actuarial approach to comparing early stage and late stage lung cancer mortality and survival.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Sara W; Mulshine, James L; Hagstrom, Dale; Pyenson, Bruce S

    2010-02-01

    Comparing the mortality characteristics of different cohorts is an essential process in the life insurance industry. Pseudodisease, lead-time bias, and length bias, which are critical to determining the value of cancer screening, have close analogues in life insurance company management, including the temporal impact of underwriting. Ratios of all-cause mortality rates for cancer cohorts relative to standard population mortality rates can provide insights into early stage and late stage mortality differences, differences by age, sex, race, and histology, and allow modeling of biases associated with early stage detection or screening protocols. The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data set has characteristics that allow efficient application of actuarial techniques. We show the mortality burden associated with treated early stage lung cancer and that identifying all lung cancers at early stage could reduce US lung cancer deaths by over 70,000 per year.

  9. Effects of feeding on the sustained swimming abilities of late-stage larval Amphiprion melanopus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, R.; Bellwood, D.

    2001-09-01

    To date, all sustained swimming experiments on tropical reef fish larvae have been conducted using unfed larvae. Such studies may produce unrealistic estimates of sustained swimming abilities. We examined the effect of food on the sustained swimming ability of late-stage Amphiprion melanopus. Larvae were swum in a six-channel swimming flume at 7 cm s-1, with "unfed" and "fed" channels. Fed channels had Artemia nauplii added four times per day for 10 min. Feeding larvae during swimming experiments significantly increased their average swimming distance from around 6.9 to 12.2 km, and the maximum swimming distance from around 11.8 to 28.7 km. Existing flume-based estimates of sustained swimming may be underestimating field abilities. With access to food, many larvae may have the potential to swim considerably greater distances than previously suggested.

  10. Between Two Worlds: Liminality and Late-Stage Cancer-Directed Therapy.

    PubMed

    Adorno, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Disease-directed therapy near death is a growing trend among persons living with late-stage cancer. As a sociocultural phenomenon, cancer-directed therapy (e.g., chemotherapy) when given for very advanced disease is a process that offers questionable benefits and portends further suffering, but also suggests potential for growth and transcendence. Theories and concepts drawn from cultural anthropology, sociology, and existentialism illustrate how contextual factors contribute to the creation of a "liminal space"; the latter part of the cancer trajectory where living and dying can overlap. When applied to clinical practice, this theoretical framework gives the patient, family, and health care provider a way of "unmasking" a period of transition during terminal illness when aggressive disease-directed care continues to be provided. The liminal space may function as an existential plane; a gateway or threshold with inherent potential for psychospiritual development during the final stage of life.

  11. Structure of a Dengue Virus Envelope Protein Late-Stage Fusion Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Daryl E.; Choi, Jason L.

    2013-01-01

    The final stages of dengue virus fusion are thought to occur when the membrane-proximal stem drives the transmembrane anchor of the viral envelope protein (E) toward the fusion loop, buried in the target cell membrane. Crystal structures of E have lacked this essential stem region. We expressed and crystallized soluble mutant forms of the dengue virus envelope protein (sE) that include portions of the juxtamembrane stem. Their structures represent late-stage fusion intermediates. The proximal part of the stem has both intra- and intermolecular interactions, so the chain “zips up” along the trimer seam. The penultimate interaction we detected involves the conserved residue F402, which has hydrophobic contacts with a conserved surface on domain II. These interactions do not require any larger-scale changes in trimer packing. The techniques for expression and crystallization of sE containing stem reported here may allow further characterization of the final stages of flavivirus fusion. PMID:23236058

  12. Late-Stage Fluvial Erosion in a Changing Climate on Early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, R. P.; Matsubara, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The decline of heavy bombardment in the solar system coincided with incision of many branching fluvial valleys in the martian highlands. However, these valley networks are underdeveloped relative to typical terrestrial networks, suggesting that valley incision was geologically brief or slow on Mars. Most previous studies have attributed the end of martian fluvial erosion to a monotonic decline of the atmosphere and climate around the Noachian/Hesperian transition. Identification of fluvial valleys on some younger surfaces, including Hesperian volcanoes, and the occurrence of morphologically pristine and degraded reaches in the same valley networks challenged the simplicity of this model. More recently, fluvial valleys and deposits have been recognized on a variety of Hesperian surfaces, including the plateau around Valles Marineris, certain impact craters, and the crustal dichotomy boundary scarp. The extent to which this late-stage erosion represents localized event floods or more widely distributed precipitation and runoff remains to be determined. To evaluate whether Hesperian resurfacing processes were concurrent with (and may have caused) late-stage fluvial erosion, we are identifying any geologically rare or long-lived events that occurred between significant resurfacing events and fluvial erosion of those surfaces. In a variety of locations, we have identified small primary craters that formed between local resurfacing and fluvial dissection of those surfaces, suggesting a gap in time between resurfacing and dissection. These small, otherwise fresh craters have rims or ejecta that were incised by late-stage flows. In other cases, thick stratified deposits accumulated on Hesperian surfaces, and those deposits were later dissected by running water. We also found that highland intercrater plains generally have Early to mid-Hesperian crater populations at diameters less than about 4 km. All smaller primary and secondary craters from the Noachian Period were

  13. Expression profiling of the intermediate and late stages of poxvirus replication.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhilong; Reynolds, Sara E; Martens, Craig A; Bruno, Daniel P; Porcella, Stephen F; Moss, Bernard

    2011-10-01

    The double-stranded DNA genome of vaccinia virus (VACV), the prototype poxvirus, contains approximately 200 open reading frames (ORFs) that are transcribed at early, intermediate, and late stages of infection. Previous high-throughput deep RNA sequencing allowed us to map 118 VACV early genes that are expressed before viral DNA replication and 93 postreplicative genes. However, the intermediate- and late-stage postreplicative genes could not be differentiated. Here, we synchronized infections with a reversible inhibitor of DNA replication and used a VACV mutant that conditionally transcribes late genes to sequence the two classes of mRNAs. In addition, each postreplicative ORF was individually expressed under conditions that distinguished intermediate and late classes. We identified 38 VACV genes that belong to the late class and 53 that belong to the intermediate class, with some of the latter continuing to be expressed late. These data allowed us to prepare a genome-wide early, intermediate, and late transcription map. Inspection of sequences upstream of these ORFs revealed distinctive characteristics of intermediate and late promoters and suggested that some promoters have intermediate and late elements. The intermediate genes encoded many DNA binding/packaging and core-associated proteins in addition to late transcription factors; the late genes encoded many morphogenesis and mature virion membrane proteins, including those involved in entry, in addition to early transcription factors. The top-ranked antigens for CD4(+) T cells and B cells were mainly intermediate rather than late gene products. The differentiation of intermediate and late genes may enhance understanding of poxvirus replication and lead to improvements in expression vectors and recombinant vaccines.

  14. Melarsoprol versus eflornithine for treating late-stage Gambian trypanosomiasis in the Republic of the Congo.

    PubMed Central

    Balasegaram, Manica; Harris, Steve; Checchi, Francesco; Ghorashian, Sara; Hamel, Catherine; Karunakara, Unni

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of melarsoprol and eflornithine in treating late-stage Gambian trypanosomiasis in the Republic of the Congo. METHODS: We analysed the outcomes of death during treatment and relapse within 1 year of discharge for 288 patients treated with eflornithine, 311 patients treated with the standard melarsoprol regimen and 62 patients treated with a short-course (10-day) melarsoprol regimen between April 2001 and April 2005. FINDINGS: A total of 1.7% (5/288) of patients treated with eflornithine died compared with 4.8% (15/311) of those treated with standard melarsoprol and 6.5% (4/62) of those treated with short-course melarsoprol. Patients treated with eflornithine tended to be younger and were more likely to have trypanosomes or higher white blood cell counts in their cerebrospinal fluid. The cumulated incidence of relapse among patients who attended at least one follow-up visit 1 year after discharge was 8.1% (11/136) for those treated with eflornithine, 14% (36/258) for those treated with standard melarsoprol and 15.5% (9/58) for those treated with shortcourse melarsoprol. In a multivariate analysis, when compared with eflornithine, standard melarsoprol was found to be a risk factor for both death (odds ratio (OR) = 2.87; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.03-8.00) and relapse (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.47; 95% CI = 1.22-5.03); when compared with eflornithine, short-course melarsoprol was also found to be a risk factor for death (OR = 3.90; 95% CI = 1.02-14.98) and relapse (HR = 6.65; 95% CI = 2.61-16.94). CONCLUSION: The effectiveness of melarsoprol treatment appears to have diminished. Eflornithine seems to be a better first-line therapy for treating late-stage Gambian trypanosomiasis in the Republic of the Congo. PMID:17128358

  15. The effects of landscape variables on the species-area relationship during late-stage habitat fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guang; Wu, Jianguo; Feeley, Kenneth J; Xu, Gaofu; Yu, Mingjian

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have focused explicitly on the later stages of the fragmentation process, or "late-stage fragmentation", during which habitat area and patch number decrease simultaneously. This lack of attention is despite the fact that many of the anthropogenically fragmented habitats around the world are, or soon will be, in late-stage fragmentation. Understanding the ecological processes and patterns that occur in late-stage fragmentation is critical to protect the species richness in these fragments. We investigated plant species composition on 152 islands in the Thousand Island Lake, China. A random sampling method was used to create simulated fragmented landscapes with different total habitat areas and numbers of patches mimicking the process of late-stage fragmentation. The response of the landscape-scale species-area relationship (LSAR) to fragmentation per se was investigated, and the contribution of inter-specific differences in the responses to late-stage fragmentation was tested. We found that the loss of species at small areas was compensated for by the effects of fragmentation per se, i.e., there were weak area effects on species richness in landscapes due to many patches with irregular shapes and high variation in size. The study also illustrated the importance of inter-specific differences for responses to fragmentation in that the LSARs of rare and common species were differently influenced by the effects of fragmentation per se. In conclusion, our analyses at the landscape scale demonstrate the significant influences of fragmentation per se on area effects and the importance of inter-specific differences for responses to fragmentation in late-stage fragmentation. These findings add to our understanding of the effects of habitat fragmentation on species diversity.

  16. The Effects of Landscape Variables on the Species-Area Relationship during Late-Stage Habitat Fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guang; Wu, Jianguo; Feeley, Kenneth J.; Xu, Gaofu; Yu, Mingjian

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have focused explicitly on the later stages of the fragmentation process, or “late-stage fragmentation”, during which habitat area and patch number decrease simultaneously. This lack of attention is despite the fact that many of the anthropogenically fragmented habitats around the world are, or soon will be, in late-stage fragmentation. Understanding the ecological processes and patterns that occur in late-stage fragmentation is critical to protect the species richness in these fragments. We investigated plant species composition on 152 islands in the Thousand Island Lake, China. A random sampling method was used to create simulated fragmented landscapes with different total habitat areas and numbers of patches mimicking the process of late-stage fragmentation. The response of the landscape-scale species-area relationship (LSAR) to fragmentation per se was investigated, and the contribution of inter-specific differences in the responses to late-stage fragmentation was tested. We found that the loss of species at small areas was compensated for by the effects of fragmentation per se, i.e., there were weak area effects on species richness in landscapes due to many patches with irregular shapes and high variation in size. The study also illustrated the importance of inter-specific differences for responses to fragmentation in that the LSARs of rare and common species were differently influenced by the effects of fragmentation per se. In conclusion, our analyses at the landscape scale demonstrate the significant influences of fragmentation per se on area effects and the importance of inter-specific differences for responses to fragmentation in late-stage fragmentation. These findings add to our understanding of the effects of habitat fragmentation on species diversity. PMID:22937120

  17. Ultradepleted adcumulates from a late-stage mafic dyke of the Bayantsagaan layered intrusion, Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistyakova, Sofya; Latypov, Rais

    2013-04-01

    It is commonly expected that late-stage dykes in mafic layered intrusions must be strongly enriched in all incompatible components that are concentrated in the evolved residual melt. Our recent study of one late-stage dyke from the Bayantsagaan layered intrusion (Mongolia) has revealed, however, that this is not always the case. This 11 cm thick dyke is composed of quite fresh, fully crystalline troctolite with no signs of chilling against host leucotroctolite. Texturally, both dyke and leucotroctolite are composed of medium-grained plagioclase-olivine-magnetite cumulate. The dyke is, however, finer-grained and more adcumulate than leucotroctolite as evident from a much less amount of intercumulus material mainly represented by interstitial amphibole (5 vol.% versus 10 vol.%). The dyke shows three distinctive geochemical features. Firstly, it is compositionally more evolved than leucotroctolite as indicated by notably lower real and normative An-content of plagioclase, whole-rock Mg-number and Cr and higher whole-rock TiO2. Secondly, despite of being more evolved, the dyke is notably depleted in all incompatible components (e.g. K2O, Y, REE). Their concentrations in the dyke are several times lower than in host leucotroctolite (e.g. 0.015 ppm versus 0.112 ppm for Dy). Thirdly, the dyke reveals internal reverse zonation with an inward increase in compatible MgO, TiO2 and normative An-content and a decrease in all incompatible components (e.g. REE). Such a distribution of incompatible components is indicative of an inward decrease in the amount of trapped melt, in other words, the dyke becomes inwards progressively more adcumulate. In layered intrusions, adcumulates are commonly attributed to the almost complete removal of interstitial liquid enriched in incompatible elements from cumulate pile by some primary cumulus (e.g. in situ growth) or post-cumulus processes (e.g. compaction, compositional convection, thermal migration). These processes are, however, not

  18. Geologic Evidence for Late-Stage Equatorial Surface and Ground Ice on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, M. G.

    2003-12-01

    within some ILD mounds. Theatre-headed gullies cut into the flanks of mounds in Hebes, Juventae, Gangis, and Ophir Chasmata. At the MOC scale these gullies display no impact craters and could therefore be extremely young. Finally, one new image attests to possibly recent ground ice within floor material of Juventae Chasma. At the MOC scale, surfaces within this chasma have few impact craters, indicating a very young surface age. MOC image M0804669 shows some interesting geologic/geomorphic relations that occur within the chasma. For instance, on the south side of a chaotic knob, a talus deposit with a flat, possible pediment cap has been cut by late-stage erosion from wind, water, or ice. This relation indicates that relatively steady, talus-forming erosion was interrupted by a period of downcutting that incised the talus and caprock. On the north part of image M08-04669, an impact crater rim and its ejecta blanket are pitted with irregularly shaped depressions that appear similar to terrestrial thermokarst pits found in active glaciated and periglacial terrain due to the meltout of buried ice. The south end of this same image shows possible brittle fracture of channel-confined, dune-covered material. The possible thermokarst pits and brittle fractures may indicate melting of late-stage ground ice. Valles Marineris is a possible volcano-tectonic graben or collapse structure. Dark material within the chasma has been suggested to be very young volcanic material and MOC data appears to show several associated possible volcanic vents. Perhaps late-stage to recent volcanism drove water into the chasma, changed the local atmospheric circulation to create a unique microclimate, and issued forth a fine-grain, protective dust cover of dark ash.

  19. Detection of Circulating Tumor DNA in Early- and Late-Stage Human Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bettegowda, Chetan; Sausen, Mark; Leary, Rebecca J.; Kinde, Isaac; Wang, Yuxuan; Agrawal, Nishant; Bartlett, Bjarne R.; Wang, Hao; Luber, Brandon; Alani, Rhoda M.; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Azad, Nilofer S.; Bardelli, Alberto; Brem, Henry; Cameron, John L.; Lee, Clarence C.; Fecher, Leslie A.; Gallia, Gary L.; Gibbs, Peter; Le, Dung; Giuntoli, Robert L.; Goggins, Michael; Hogarty, Michael D.; Holdhoff, Matthias; Hong, Seung-Mo; Jiao, Yuchen; Juhl, Hartmut H.; Kim, Jenny J.; Siravegna, Giulia; Laheru, Daniel A.; Lauricella, Calogero; Lim, Michael; Lipson, Evan J.; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi; Netto, George J.; Oliner, Kelly S.; Olivi, Alessandro; Olsson, Louise; Riggins, Gregory J.; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Schmidt, Kerstin; Shih, le-Ming; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli Mieko; Siena, Salvatore; Theodorescu, Dan; Tie, Jeanne; Harkins, Timothy T.; Veronese, Silvio; Wang, Tian-Li; Weingart, Jon D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Wood, Laura D.; Xing, Dongmei; Hruban, Ralph H.; Wu, Jian; Allen, Peter J.; Schmidt, C. Max; Choti, Michael A.; Velculescu, Victor E.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Diaz, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    The development of noninvasive methods to detect and monitor tumors continues to be a major challenge in oncology. We used digital polymerase chain reaction–based technologies to evaluate the ability of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) to detect tumors in 640 patients with various cancer types. We found that ctDNA was detectable in >75% of patients with advanced pancreatic, ovarian, colorectal, bladder, gastroesophageal, breast, melanoma, hepatocellular, and head and neck cancers, but in less than 50% of primary brain, renal, prostate, or thyroid cancers. In patients with localized tumors, ctDNA was detected in 73, 57, 48, and 50% of patients with colorectal cancer, gastroesophageal cancer, pancreatic cancer, and breast adenocarcinoma, respectively. ctDNA was often present in patients without detectable circulating tumor cells, suggesting that these two biomarkers are distinct entities. In a separate panel of 206 patients with metastatic colorectal cancers, we showed that the sensitivity of ctDNA for detection of clinically relevant KRAS gene mutations was 87.2% and its specificity was 99.2%. Finally, we assessed whether ctDNA could provide clues into the mechanisms underlying resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor blockade in 24 patients who objectively responded to therapy but subsequently relapsed. Twenty-three (96%) of these patients developed one or more mutations in genes involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Together, these data suggest that ctDNA is a broadly applicable, sensitive, and specific biomarker that can be used for a variety of clinical and research purposes in patients with multiple different types of cancer. PMID:24553385

  20. Late Stage 5 Glacio-isostatic Sea in the St. Lawrence Valley, Canada and United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Occhietti, S.; Balescu, S.; Lamothe, M.; Clet, M.; Cronin, T.; Ferland, P.; Pichet, P.

    1996-01-01

    Although post-glacial marine sediments of late Wisconsinan and early Holocene age are common in eastern Canada and the northeastern United States, remnants of older Pleistocene marine sediments are scarce. A fossiliferous marine clay that predates the classical Wisconsinan was recently discovered in the St. Lawrence Valley. A dominantly estuarine environment is inferred from the geochemistry of the shells (??18O = -7.1) and from benthic foraminifer and ostracode assemblages. The clay indicates a marine invasion (Cartier Sea) shallower and probably shorter than that during the upper late Wisconsinan Champlain Sea episode (12,000-9,500 yr B.P.). The pollen content shows that regional vegetation during the marine episode began as open tundra, then became a Betula and Alnus crispa forest, reached a climatic optimum with Quercus, Corylus, and Abies, and concluded as a Pinus/Picea boreal forest. A corrected infrared stimulated luminescence age of 98,000 ?? 9000 yr is compatible with the epimerization ratio of shells. The Cartier Sea resulted from a post-glacial glacio-isostatic marine invasion in the St. Lawrence lowlands. It probably occurred during late stage 5 and is tentatively assigned to the transition of oxygen isotope substages 5b/5a. This marine episode dates to stage 5 of the preceding continental glacier which extended to middle latitudes in NE America. ?? 1996 University of Washington.

  1. A coping and communication support intervention tailored to older patients diagnosed with late-stage cancer.

    PubMed

    Rose, Julia Hannum; Radziewicz, Rosanne; Bowmans, Karen F; O'Toole, Elizabeth E

    2008-01-01

    As our society ages, increasing numbers of older Americans will be diagnosed and eventually will die of cancer. To date, psycho-oncology interventions for advanced cancer patients have been more successful in reaching younger adult age groups and generally have not been designed to respond to the unique needs and preferences of older patients. Theories and research on successful aging (Baltes and Baltes 1990; Baltes 1997), health information processing style (Miller 1995; Miller et al 2001) and non-directive client-centered therapy (Rogers 1951, 1967), have guided the development of a coping and communication support (CCS) intervention. Key components of this age-sensitive and tailored intervention are described, including problem domains addressed, intervention strategies used and the role of the CCS practitioner. Age group comparisons in frequency of contact, problems raised and intervention strategies used during the first six weeks of follow up indicate that older patients were similar to middle-aged patients in their level of engagement, problems faced and intervention strategies used. Middle-aged patients were more likely to have problems communicating with family members at intervention start up and practical problems as well in follow up contacts. This is the first intervention study specifically designed to be age sensitive and to examine age differences in engagement from the early treatment phase for late-stage cancer through end of life. This tailored intervention is expected to positively affect patients' quality of care and quality of life over time.

  2. Stapled Peptides by Late-Stage C(sp(3) )-H Activation.

    PubMed

    Noisier, Anaïs F M; García, Jesús; Ionuţ, Ioana A; Albericio, Fernando

    2017-01-02

    Despite the importance of stapled peptides for drug discovery, only few practical processes to prepare cross-linked peptides have been described; thus the structural diversity of available staple motifs is currently limited. At the same time, C-H activation has emerged as an efficient approach to functionalize complex molecules. Although there are many reports on the C-H functionalization of amino acids, examples of post-synthetic peptide C-H modification are rare and comprise almost only C(sp(2) )-H activation. Herein, we report the development of a palladium-catalyzed late-stage C(sp(3) )-H activation method for peptide stapling, affording an unprecedented hydrocarbon cross-link. This method was first employed to prepare a library of stapled peptides in solution. The compatibility with various amino acids as well as the influence of the size (i,i+3 and i,i+4) and length of the staple were investigated. Finally, a simple solid-phase procedure was also established.

  3. An elliptical-pore model for late-stage planar viscous sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowdy, Darren G.

    2004-02-01

    A simple ‘elliptical-pore model’ of the shrinkage of compressible pores in late-stage planar viscous sintering is proposed. The model is in the spirit of matched asymptotics and relies on splitting the flow into an ‘inner’ and ‘outer’ problem. The inner problem in the vicinity of any given pore involves solving for its free-surface evolution exactly using complex-variable methods. The outer flow due to all other pores is assumed to be given by an assembly of point sinks/sources. As a test of the model, the evolution of a singly infinite periodic row of compressible pores is considered in detail. The effectiveness of the simple model is tested by comparison with a full numerical simulation. A novel boundary integral method based on Cauchy potentials and conformal mapping is used. In the case of pores with constant pressure, it is found that pores shrink faster than if in isolation. Compressible pores obeying the ideal gas law are also studied and are found to tend to a quasi-steady non-circular state. A higher-order model is also presented and compared with numerical simulations of the viscous sintering of a doubly periodic array of pores in Stokes flow.

  4. Late-stage volatile saturation as a potential trigger for explosive volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Michael J.; Humphreys, Madeleine C. S.; Smith, Victoria C.; Isaia, Roberto; Pyle, David M.

    2016-03-01

    Magma reservoirs are thought to grow relatively slowly, assembling incrementally under volatile-saturated conditions. Eruptions may be triggered by injections of volatile-rich melt, or generation of over-pressure due to protracted crystallization. Here, we analyse fluorine, chlorine and water in apatite crystals trapped at different stages of magma evolution, and in melt inclusions from clinopyroxene and biotite crystals expelled during an explosive eruption of the Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy, about 4,000 years ago. We combine our geochemical analyses with thermodynamic modelling to reconstruct the evolution of magmatic volatile contents leading up to the explosive eruption. We find that the magma reservoir remained persistently water-undersaturated throughout most of its lifetime. Even crystals in contact with the melt shortly before eruption show that the magma was volatile-undersaturated. Our models suggest that the melt reached volatile saturation at low temperatures, just before eruption. We suggest that late-stage volatile saturation probably triggered the eruption, and conclude that `priming’ of the magma system for eruption may occur on timescales much shorter than the decadal to centennial timescales thought typical for magma reservoir assembly. Thus, surface deformation pulses that record magma assembly at depth beneath Campi Flegrei and other similar magmatic systems may not be immediately followed by an eruption; and explosive eruptions may begin with little warning.

  5. Curcumin: A multi-target disease-modifying agent for late-stage transthyretin amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Nelson; Gonçalves, Nádia P.; Saraiva, Maria J.; Almeida, Maria R.

    2016-01-01

    Transthyretin amyloidoses encompass a variety of acquired and hereditary diseases triggered by systemic extracellular accumulation of toxic transthyretin aggregates and fibrils, particularly in the peripheral nervous system. Since transthyretin amyloidoses are typically complex progressive disorders, therapeutic approaches aiming multiple molecular targets simultaneously, might improve therapy efficacy and treatment outcome. In this study, we evaluate the protective effect of physiologically achievable doses of curcumin on the cytotoxicity induced by transthyretin oligomers in vitro by showing reduction of caspase-3 activity and the levels of endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone binding immunoglobulin protein. When given to an aged Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy mouse model, curcumin not only reduced transthyretin aggregates deposition and toxicity in both gastrointestinal tract and dorsal root ganglia but also remodeled congophilic amyloid material in tissues. In addition, curcumin enhanced internalization, intracellular transport and degradation of transthyretin oligomers by primary macrophages from aged Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy transgenic mice, suggesting an impaired activation of naïve phagocytic cells exposed to transthyretin toxic intermediate species. Overall, our results clearly support curcumin or optimized derivatives as promising multi-target disease-modifying agent for late-stage transthyretin amyloidosis. PMID:27197872

  6. Relationship between early and late stages of information processing: an event-related potential study

    PubMed Central

    Portella, Claudio; Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Sack, Alexander T.; Silva, Julio Guilherme; Orsini, Marco; Leite, Marco Antonio Araujo; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Nardi, Antonio E.; Cagy, Mauricio; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    The brain is capable of elaborating and executing different stages of information processing. However, exactly how these stages are processed in the brain remains largely unknown. This study aimed to analyze the possible correlation between early and late stages of information processing by assessing the latency to, and amplitude of, early and late event-related potential (ERP) components, including P200, N200, premotor potential (PMP) and P300, in healthy participants in the context of a visual oddball paradigm. We found a moderate positive correlation among the latency of P200 (electrode O2), N200 (electrode O2), PMP (electrode C3), P300 (electrode PZ) and the reaction time (RT). In addition, moderate negative correlation between the amplitude of P200 and the latencies of N200 (electrode O2), PMP (electrode C3), P300 (electrode PZ) was found. Therefore, we propose that if the secondary processing of visual input (P200 latency) occurs faster, the following will also happen sooner: discrimination and classification process of this input (N200 latency), motor response processing (PMP latency), reorganization of attention and working memory update (P300 latency), and RT. N200, PMP, and P300 latencies are also anticipated when higher activation level of occipital areas involved in the secondary processing of visual input rise (P200 amplitude). PMID:23355929

  7. Vestigial is required during late-stage muscle differentiation in Drosophila melanogaster embryos.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hua; Bell, John B; Simmonds, Andrew J

    2010-10-01

    The somatic muscles of Drosophila develop in a complex pattern that is repeated in each embryonic hemi-segment. During early development, progenitor cells fuse to form a syncytial muscle, which further differentiates via expression of muscle-specific factors that induce specific responses to external signals to regulate late-stage processes such as migration and attachment. Initial communication between somatic muscles and the epidermal tendon cells is critical for both of these processes. However, later establishment of attachments between longitudinal muscles at the segmental borders is largely independent of the muscle-epidermal attachment signals, and relatively little is known about how this event is regulated. Using a combination of null mutations and a truncated version of Sd that binds Vg but not DNA, we show that Vestigial (Vg) is required in ventral longitudinal muscles to induce formation of stable intermuscular attachments. In several muscles, this activity may be independent of Sd. Furthermore, the cell-specific differentiation events induced by Vg in two cells fated to form attachments are coordinated by Drosophila epidermal growth factor signaling. Thus, Vg is a key factor to induce specific changes in ventral longitudinal muscles 1-4 identity and is required for these cells to be competent to form stable intermuscular attachments with each other.

  8. Two phase deglaciation incorporating a late-stage readvance in the Brunswick, Maine area

    SciTech Connect

    Borelli, C.; Smity, P. . Dept. of Geoscience)

    1993-03-01

    Reinterpretation of late Wisconsinan glacial deposits indicate that retreat of the Laurentide ice margin occurred west of the marine limit in the Brunswick area. Marine transgression deposited the overlying Presumpscot Formation which locally contains organic rich, silty sand. A regionally extensive readvance deformed and truncated the uppermost glaciomarine sediments during the oceanic highstand. Striations and other ice flow indicators which are found underlying the Presumpscot Formation consistently trend NW-SE, while those found on exposed outcrops above the Presumpscot Formation dominantly trend NE-SW. These otherwise anomalous directional flow indicators support a late stage readvance of the ice sheet. Areally extensive, stratified, and locally imbricated outwash caps the glaciomarine sediments. Mineral composition of the basal outwash differs from the upper outwash sequences, supporting the readvance model by indicating different source areas. Multi-phase emergence characterized by terraced landforms caused a reworking and redeposition of sediment in a fluvial, tidally influenced environment. Localized eolian deposits record a late phase reworking of sediment.

  9. Emotional conflict occurs at a late stage: evidence from the paired-picture paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fada; Lu, Qingyun; Chen, Yan; Wu, Xiaogang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The present study used paired-picture paradigm, where either congruent or incongruent emotional expressions were presented side by side to measure the neural correlates underlying the processing of emotional conflict effect. Event-related potentials were recorded while participants identified whether the valences of the paired-picture were consistent or not. The results showed that incongruent and congruent picture pairs both elicited larger N2 (210-310 ms) amplitudes than neutral pairs. In contrast, the conflict picture pairs elicited a larger conflict slow potential (conflict SP, 700-1000 ms) than did the positive and neutral picture pairs. There was no significant difference in conflict SP amplitudes between incongruent and congruent picture pairs (i.e., the mean amplitudes of negative and positive picture pairs). The results demonstrated that emotional information was identified and processed during the stage from about 210 ms to 310 ms. However, the emotional conflict effect did not appear until late stage (700-1000 ms). These results supported the distributed attention theory of emotions (DATE). PMID:28123822

  10. Gas and Dust in Debris Disks: Clues to the Late Stages of Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Aki

    2012-01-01

    The basic character of debris disks was established soon after their discovery in the mid- 1980's. These disks around nearby main sequence stars are composed of material (mostly dust) produced by collisions and/or evaporation of extrasolar asteroids and comets. However, fundamental observational questions about debris disks remain unanswered. How much material do debris disks typically contain and how does it evolve with time? What is the composition of their dust and gas? Are planets present or forming in the disks? Answers to these questions will provide insights into the late stages of planetary system formation and the origins of terrestrial planet atmospheres. In this talk, I will explain our current understanding of the place of debris disks in the planet formation process. Progress toward addressing the questions given above will be discussed, with emphasis on recent studies of the small but important gas component. Finally, I will outline the implications of debris dust for future efforts to directly image and characterize extrasolar terrestrial planets.

  11. Estrogen and Cytochrome P450 1B1 Contribute to Both Early- and Late-Stage Head and Neck Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shatalova, Ekaterina G.; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.P.; Devarajan, Karthik; Cukierman, Edna; Clapper, Margie L.

    2010-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) is the sixth most common type of cancer in the U.S. The goal of this study was to evaluate the contribution of estrogens to the development of HNSCCs. Various cell lines derived from early- and late-stage head and neck lesions were used to: characterize the expression of estrogen synthesis and metabolism genes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP)1B1, examine the effect of estrogen on gene expression and evaluate the role of CYP1B1 and/or estrogen in cell motility, proliferation and apoptosis. Estrogen metabolism genes (CYP1B1, CYP1A1, catechol-o-methyltransferase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1, and glutathione-S-transferase P1) and estrogen receptor (ER)β were expressed in cell lines derived from both premalignant (MSK-Leuk1) and malignant (HNSCC) lesions. Exposure to estrogen induced CYP1B1 2.3 to 3.6 fold relative to vehicle-treated controls (P=0.0004) in MSK-Leuk1 cells but not in HNSCC cells. CYP1B1 knockdown by shRNA reduced the migration and proliferation of MSK-Leuk1 cells by 57% and 45%, respectively. Exposure of MSK-Leuk1 cells to estrogen inhibited apoptosis by 26%, while supplementation with the antiestrogen fulvestrant restored estrogen-dependent apoptosis. Representation of the estrogen pathway in human head and neck tissues from 128 patients was examined using tissue microarrays. The majority of the samples exhibited immunohistochemical staining for ERβ (91.9%), CYP1B1 (99.4%) and 17β-estradiol (88.4%). CYP1B1 and ERβ were elevated in HNSCCs relative to normal epithelium (P=0.024 and 0.008, respectively). These data provide novel insight into the mechanisms underlying head and neck carcinogenesis and facilitate the identification new targets for chemopreventive intervention. PMID:21205741

  12. Molecular Chaperone Mediated Late-Stage Neuroprotection in the SOD1G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Anna L.; Dick, James R.; Kanuga, Naheed; Kalmar, Bernadett; Greensmith, Linda; Cheetham, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brain stem, and motor cortex. Mutations in superoxide dismutase (SOD1) are associated with familial ALS and lead to SOD1 protein misfolding and aggregation. Here we show that the molecular chaperone, HSJ1 (DNAJB2), mutations in which cause distal hereditary motor neuropathy, can reduce mutant SOD1 aggregation and improve motor neuron survival in mutant SOD1 models of ALS. Overexpression of human HSJ1a (hHSJ1a) in vivo in motor neurons of SOD1G93A transgenic mice ameliorated disease. In particular, there was a significant improvement in muscle force, increased motor unit number and enhanced motor neuron survival. hHSJ1a was present in a complex with SOD1G93A and led to reduced SOD1 aggregation at late stages of disease progression. We also observed altered ubiquitin immunoreactivity in the double transgenic animals, suggesting that ubiquitin modification might be important for the observed improvements. In a cell model of SOD1G93A aggregation, HSJ1a preferentially bound to mutant SOD1, enhanced SOD1 ubiquitylation and reduced SOD1 aggregation in a J-domain and ubiquitin interaction motif (UIM) dependent manner. Collectively, the data suggest that HSJ1a acts on mutant SOD1 through a combination of chaperone, co-chaperone and pro-ubiquitylation activity. These results show that targeting SOD1 protein misfolding and aggregation in vivo can be neuroprotective and suggest that manipulation of DnaJ molecular chaperones might be useful in the treatment of ALS. PMID:24023695

  13. Molecular chaperone mediated late-stage neuroprotection in the SOD1(G93A) mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Novoselov, Sergey S; Mustill, Wendy J; Gray, Anna L; Dick, James R; Kanuga, Naheed; Kalmar, Bernadett; Greensmith, Linda; Cheetham, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brain stem, and motor cortex. Mutations in superoxide dismutase (SOD1) are associated with familial ALS and lead to SOD1 protein misfolding and aggregation. Here we show that the molecular chaperone, HSJ1 (DNAJB2), mutations in which cause distal hereditary motor neuropathy, can reduce mutant SOD1 aggregation and improve motor neuron survival in mutant SOD1 models of ALS. Overexpression of human HSJ1a (hHSJ1a) in vivo in motor neurons of SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice ameliorated disease. In particular, there was a significant improvement in muscle force, increased motor unit number and enhanced motor neuron survival. hHSJ1a was present in a complex with SOD1(G93A) and led to reduced SOD1 aggregation at late stages of disease progression. We also observed altered ubiquitin immunoreactivity in the double transgenic animals, suggesting that ubiquitin modification might be important for the observed improvements. In a cell model of SOD1(G93A) aggregation, HSJ1a preferentially bound to mutant SOD1, enhanced SOD1 ubiquitylation and reduced SOD1 aggregation in a J-domain and ubiquitin interaction motif (UIM) dependent manner. Collectively, the data suggest that HSJ1a acts on mutant SOD1 through a combination of chaperone, co-chaperone and pro-ubiquitylation activity. These results show that targeting SOD1 protein misfolding and aggregation in vivo can be neuroprotective and suggest that manipulation of DnaJ molecular chaperones might be useful in the treatment of ALS.

  14. Enigmatic Late-Stage Textures In Mafic Cumulates: Skaergaard Intrusion, East Greenland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stripp, G.; Holness, M.; Veksler, I.

    2006-12-01

    The complexities of slow solidification in deep-seated silicate liquid bodies are poorly understood. Late-stage melt migration, due to compaction of the crystal mush, drives re-crystallisation and metasomatism which can have significant effects on chamber-wide chemical evolution. In this contribution we present novel textural observations from mafic cumulates of the Skaergaard Layered Intrusion which may shed light on liquid movement during the last stages of solidification of the crystal mush. Previously undescribed mafic symplectites are widespread in the Skaergaard Layered Series, and comprise vermicular intergrowths of plagioclase and olivine, which may be replaced by clinopyroxene in the outer parts of the symplectite. The symplectites grow outwards from Fe-Ti oxide grains, consuming adjacent cumulus plagioclase. In the Middle Zone of the Layered Series (where symplectites are best developed) symplectite plagioclase adjacent to the Fe-Ti oxide grains contains 1.2 wt% FeOtot which decreases to 0.6 wt% FeOtot at the symplectite margin, compared to a ~ 0.35 wt% average for adjacent cumulus plagioclase. Symplectite plagioclase is up to 40 mol% more An-rich than the adjacent cumulus grains. Olivine compositions range from Fo45 to Fo32 along the growth direction of the symplectite, compared to ~ Fo44 for cumulus olivine at this level in the intrusion. Biotite commonly replaces olivine. Texturally- and compositionally-related patches of intergrown clinopyroxene and An-rich plagioclase occur locally on plagioclase triple junctions and plagioclase grain boundaries. Symplectites are present, but rare, in the lower parts of the Skaergaard Layered Series; increase significantly in volumetric importance in Lower Zone b; are very common in Middle Zone and disappear in UZ. The symplectites resemble those formed by hydrous partial melting of oceanic gabbros (Koepke et al., 2005) but important differences include the presence of clinopyroxene and Fe-rich plagioclase, and the

  15. Growing supermassive black holes in the late stages of galaxy mergers are heavily obscured

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, C.; Bauer, F. E.; Treister, E.; Schawinski, K.; Privon, G. C.; Blecha, L.; Arevalo, P.; Armus, L.; Harrison, F.; Ho, L. C.; Iwasawa, K.; Sanders, D. B.; Stern, D.

    2017-01-01

    Mergers of galaxies are thought to cause significant gas inflows to the inner parsecs, which can activate rapid accretion onto supermassive black holes (SMBHs), giving rise to Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). During a significant fraction of this process, SMBHs are predicted to be enshrouded by gas and dust. Studying 52 galactic nuclei in infrared-selected local Luminous and Ultra-luminous infrared galaxies in different merger stages in the hard X-ray band, where radiation is less affected by absorption, we find that the amount of material around SMBHs increases during the last phases of the merger. We find that the fraction of Compton-thick (CT, N_ H≥ 10^{24} cm^{-2}) AGN in late merger galaxies is higher (f_ CT=65^{+12}_{-13}%) than in local hard X-ray selected AGN (f CT = 27 ± 4%), and that obscuration reaches its maximum when the nuclei of the two merging galaxies are at a projected distance of D12 ≃ 0.4 - 10.8 kiloparsecs (f_ CT=77_{-17}^{+13}%). We also find that all AGN of our sample in late merger galaxies have N_ H> 10^{23} cm^{-2}, which implies that the obscuring material covers 95^{+4}_{-8}% of the X-ray source. These observations show that the material is most effectively funnelled from the galactic scale to the inner tens of parsecs during the late stages of galaxy mergers, and that the close environment of SMBHs in advanced mergers is richer in gas and dust with respect to that of SMBHs in isolated galaxies, and cannot be explained by the classical AGN unification model in which the torus is responsible for the obscuration.

  16. Diagnostic Tests to Support Late-Stage Control Programs for Schistosomiasis and Soil-Transmitted Helminthiases

    PubMed Central

    Cantera, Jason L.; Storey, Helen L.; Leader, Brandon T.; de los Santos, Tala

    2016-01-01

    Global efforts to address schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiases (STH) include deworming programs for school-aged children that are made possible by large-scale drug donations. Decisions on these mass drug administration (MDA) programs currently rely on microscopic examination of clinical specimens to determine the presence of parasite eggs. However, microscopy-based methods are not sensitive to the low-intensity infections that characterize populations that have undergone MDA. Thus, there has been increasing recognition within the schistosomiasis and STH communities of the need for improved diagnostic tools to support late-stage control program decisions, such as when to stop or reduce MDA. Failure to adequately address the need for new diagnostics could jeopardize achievement of the 2020 London Declaration goals. In this report, we assess diagnostic needs and landscape potential solutions and determine appropriate strategies to improve diagnostic testing to support control and elimination programs. Based upon literature reviews and previous input from experts in the schistosomiasis and STH communities, we prioritized two diagnostic use cases for further exploration: to inform MDA-stopping decisions and post-MDA surveillance. To this end, PATH has refined target product profiles (TPPs) for schistosomiasis and STH diagnostics that are applicable to these use cases. We evaluated the limitations of current diagnostic methods with regards to these use cases and identified candidate biomarkers and diagnostics with potential application as new tools. Based on this analysis, there is a need to develop antigen-detecting rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) with simplified, field-deployable sample preparation for schistosomiasis. Additionally, there is a need for diagnostic tests that are more sensitive than the current methods for STH, which may include either a field-deployable molecular test or a simple, low-cost, rapid antigen-detecting test. PMID:28005900

  17. Association of caveolin with Chlamydia trachomatis inclusions at early and late stages of infection.

    PubMed

    Norkin, L C; Wolfrom, S A; Stuart, E S

    2001-06-10

    The mechanism by which the intracellular bacterial pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis enters eukaryotic cells is poorly understood. There are conflicting reports of entry occurring by clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent processes. We report here that C. trachomatis serovar K enters HEp-2 and HeLa 229 epithelial cells and J-774A.1 mouse macrophage/monocyte cells via caveolin-containing sphingolipid and cholesterol-enriched raft microdomains in the host cell plasma membranes. First, filipin and nystatin, drugs that specifically disrupt raft function by cholesterol chelation, each impaired entry of C. trachomatis serovar K. In control experiments, filipin did not impair entry of the same organism by an antibody-mediated opsonic process, nor did it impair entry of BSA-coated microspheres. Second, the chlamydia-containing endocytic vesicles specifically reacted with antisera against the caveolae marker protein caveolin. These vesicles are known to become the inclusions in which parasite replication occurs. They avoid fusion with lysosomes and instead traffic to the Golgi region, where they intercept Golgi-derived vesicles that recycle sphingolipids and cholesterol to the plasma membrane. We also report that late-stage C. trachomatis inclusions continue to display high levels of caveolin, which they likely acquire from the exocytic Golgi vesicles. We suggest that the atypical raft-mediated entry process may have important consequences for the host-pathogen interaction well after entry has occurred. These consequences include enabling the chlamydial vesicle to avoid acidification and fusion with lysosomes, to traffic to the Golgi region, and to intercept sphingolipid-containing vesicles from the Golgi.

  18. Factors related to late stage diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Mahía, Inés; Seoane, Juan; Varela-Centelles, Pablo; Tomás, Inmaculada; López-Cedrún, José-Luis

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To identify factors related to advanced-stage diagnosis of oral cancer to disclose high-risk groups and facilitate early detection strategies. Study design: An ambispective cohort study on 88 consecutive patients treated from January 1998 to December 2003. Inclusion criteria: pathological diagnosis of OSCC (primary tumour) at any oral site and suffering from a tumour at any TNM stage. Variables considered: age, gender, smoking history, alcohol usage, tumour site, macroscopic pattern of the lesion, co-existing precancerous lesion, degree of differentiation, diagnostic delay and TNM stage. Results: A total of 88 patients (mean age 60±11.3; 65.9% males) entered the study. Most patients (54.5%) suffered no delayed diagnosis and 45.5% of the carcinomas were diagnosed at early stages (I-II). The most frequent clinical lesions were ulcers (70.5%). Most cases were well- and moderately-differentiated (91%). Univariate analyses revealed strong associations between advanced stages and moderate-poor differentiation (OR=4.2; 95%CI=1.6-10.9) or tumour site (floor of the mouth (OR=3.6; 95%CI=1.2-11.1); gingivae (OR=8.8; 95%CI=2.0-38.2); and retromolar trigone (OR=8.8; 95%CI=1.5-49.1)). Regression analysis recognised the site of the tumour and the degree of differentiation as significantly associated to high risk of late-stage diagnosis. Conclusions: Screening programmes designed to detect asymptomatic oral cancers should be prioritized. Educational interventions on the population and on the professionals should include a sound knowledge of the disease presentation, specifically on sites like floor of the mouth, gingivae and retromolar trigone. More studies are needed in order to analyse the part of tumour biology on the extension of the disease at the time of diagnosis. Key words: Oral cancer, advanced-stage, diagnosis, cohort study. PMID:21743390

  19. Late stages of high rate tension of aluminum melt: Molecular dynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Polina N.; Mayer, Alexander E.

    2016-08-01

    With the help of molecular dynamic simulation, we investigate late stages of aluminum melt tension up to the deformation degree of about 10, including a stage of bubble liquid, a foamed melt, and a fragmentation with formation of droplets. Complete fracture of melt is a complex process, which includes nucleation of pores, growth and coalescence of neighboring pores, thinning and breaking of walls between them with the formation of a system of jets, and, finally, breaking of jets into droplets. The transition from the foamed melt to the system of jets and the subsequent fragmentation into droplets occur at the volume fraction of condensed matter considerably smaller than 0.1. The number of pores at the volume fraction of condensed matter about 0.5 and the number of droplets at the final stage of fragmentation are not directly connected with each other. At the same time, both numbers are increased together with the increase in the strain rate and have the same order of magnitude. At the stage of melt with pores, the growth and coalescence of pores are controlled by surface tension, which allows us to construct an analytical estimation for time dependence of the pore average radius. Also, we propose analytical estimations for the mean pressure of melt with pores, which remain negative, and for the work of tension. A few times larger work is spent on the tension of melt with pores if compared with the initial stage of tension near the dynamic strength threshold. The last fact is favorable for the production of the foamed aluminum by means of the high-rate tension of its melt.

  20. Separation of Plasmodium falciparum Late Stage-infected Erythrocytes by Magnetic Means

    PubMed Central

    Coronado, Lorena Michelle; Tayler, Nicole Michelle; Correa, Ricardo; Giovani, Rita Marissa; Spadafora, Carmenza

    2013-01-01

    Unlike other Plasmodium species, P. falciparum can be cultured in the lab, which facilitates its study 1. While the parasitemia achieved can reach the ≈40% limit, the investigator usually keeps the percentage at around 10%. In many cases it is necessary to isolate the parasite-containing red blood cells (RBCs) from the uninfected ones, to enrich the culture and proceed with a given experiment. When P. falciparum infects the erythrocyte, the parasite degrades and feeds from haemoglobin 2, 3. However, the parasite must deal with a very toxic iron-containing haem moiety 4, 5. The parasite eludes its toxicity by transforming the haem into an inert crystal polymer called haemozoin 6, 7. This iron-containing molecule is stored in its food vacuole and the metal in it has an oxidative state which differs from the one in haem 8. The ferric state of iron in the haemozoin confers on it a paramagnetic property absent in uninfected erythrocytes. As the invading parasite reaches maturity, the content of haemozoin also increases 9, which bestows even more paramagnetism on the latest stages of P. falciparum inside the erythrocyte. Based on this paramagnetic property, the latest stages of P. falciparum infected-red blood cells can be separated by passing the culture through a column containing magnetic beads. These beads become magnetic when the columns containing them are placed on a magnet holder. Infected RBCs, due to their paramagnetism, will then be trapped inside the column, while the flow-through will contain, for the most part, uninfected erythrocytes and those containing early stages of the parasite. Here, we describe the methodology to enrich the population of late stage parasites with magnetic columns, which maintains good parasite viability 10. After performing this procedure, the unattached culture can be returned to an incubator to allow the remaining parasites to continue growing. PMID:23486405

  1. Progression of gingival squamous cell carcinoma from early to late stage after invasive dental procedure.

    PubMed

    Hinchy, Nicole V; Jayaprakash, Vijayvel; Rigual, Nestor; Reid, Mary; Frustino, Jennifer L; Rossitto, Rachael; Groman, Adrienne; Sullivan, Maureen A

    2016-01-01

    Early presentation of gingival squamous cell carcinoma (GSCC) is at times misdiagnosed as a benign inflammatory or reactive oral condition. Some misdiagnosed patients undergo unnecessary, invasive dental procedures, resulting in delayed cancer diagnosis and an increased risk of accelerated disease progression due to disruption of the periosteum and cortical bone. The records of 58 patients with biopsy-proven GSCC were retrospectively reviewed. The sample included 32 patients who underwent an invasive dental procedure (IDP) prior to cancer diagnosis and 26 patients who did not undergo an IDP (non-case group). Patients from both groups initially presented with similar symptoms. The median duration of symptoms at initial clinical presentation was 6 months for the IDP group and 2 months for the non-case group. In IDP patients, symptoms worsened after the IDP was rendered, with 37.5% presenting with a severe-grade symptom. In both groups, the majority of lesions were found on the posterior mandible and had a histologic grading of moderately differentiated GSCC. The odds of the IDP group having late-stage disease were 2.94 times greater than the odds for the control group. Stage T3/T4 malignancy was diagnosed in 77.4% of the IDP patients versus 53.8% of non-case patients. Disease-specific mortality was comparable; however, surgical treatment was significantly more extensive in the IDP group than in the non-case group. The disruption of alveolar periosteum in undiagnosed oral cancer patients results in significant delay in diagnosis, necessitating more complicated treatment regimens because of local tumor progression.

  2. An analytical model of the large neutral regions during the late stage of reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yidong; Yue, Bin; Chen, Xuelei; Su, Meng; Fan, Zuhui

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the nature and distribution of large neutral regions during the late epoch of reionization. In the 'bubble model' of reionization, the mass distribution of large ionized regions ('bubbles') during the early stage of reionization is obtained by using the excursion set model, where the ionization of a region corresponds to the first up-crossing of a barrier by random trajectories. We generalize this idea and develop a method to predict the distribution of large-scale neutral regions during the late stage of reionization, taking into account the ionizing background after the percolation of H II regions. The large-scale neutral regions, which we call 'neutral islands', are not individual galaxies or minihalos, but larger regions where fewer galaxies formed and hence ionized later and they are identified in the excursion set model with the first down-crossings of the island barrier. Assuming that the consumption rate of ionizing background photons is proportional to the surface area of the neutral islands, we obtained the size distribution of the neutral islands. We also take the 'bubbles-in-island' effect into account by considering the conditional probability of up-crossing a bubble barrier after down-crossing the island barrier. We find that this effect is very important. An additional barrier is set to avoid islands being percolated through. We find that there is a characteristic scale for the neutral islands, while the small islands are rapidly swallowed up by the ionizing background; this characteristic scale does not change much as the reionization proceeds.

  3. The relationship between tectonic evolution and oil-cracking gas accumulation in late stage for marine superimposed basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Min; Wu, Xiaozhi

    2015-04-01

    The marine superimposed basins are rich in oil-cracking gas resources. Their hydrocarbon accumulation processes of late stage have experienced early paleo-oil reservoir accumulation period and late oil-cracking gas period, which are apparently controlled by tectonic evolution. Studying the relationship between tectonic evolution and oil-cracking gas accumulation of late stage has great significance to guide the exploration of oil-cracking gas reservoirs. Taking the relationship between tectonic evolution and oil-cracking gas accumulation of late stage for the Shunan area in the Sichuan Basin as example, through the analysis on the respons of structural evolution to deposition, the relationship between hydrocarbon generation process of ancient source rocks, initial hydrocarbon accumulation, oil cracking and gas accumulation of late stage was studied. The source rocks of the Cambrian Qiongzhusi Fm in the Shunan area experienced three periods of hydrocarbon generation and two periods of hydrocarbon generation lag. During the large-scale tectonic uplift and thick erosion event in the periods of the Caledonian and the Hercynian, the source rocks of the Qiongzhusi Fm had experienced two times of hydrocarbon generation and two times of hydrocarbon generation lag. The overlying super-thick strata deposited during the Indosinian and Yanshan periods made the source rocks of the Qiongzhusi Fm continuously generate oil and gas. The crude oil in the paleo-reservoir of the Longwangmiao Fm had experienced one time of oil-cracking gas process. After the Indo-Chinese epoch, the burial depth of the Triassic strata was deep enough to promote the crude oil in the paleo-reservoir of the Longwangmiao Fm to be cracked gas. This process continued to the late Yanshan period, providing sufficient gas source. The following five conclusions are obtained: The tectonic and depositional evolution of the marine superimposed basins controlled the development of the basic hydrocarbon geology

  4. Metal-catalysed azidation of tertiary C-H bonds suitable for late-stage functionalization.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ankit; Hartwig, John F

    2015-01-29

    Many enzymes oxidize unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds selectively to form alcohols; however, biological systems do not possess enzymes that catalyse the analogous aminations of C-H bonds. The absence of such enzymes limits the discovery of potential medicinal candidates because nitrogen-containing groups are crucial to the biological activity of therapeutic agents and clinically useful natural products. In one prominent example illustrating the importance of incorporating nitrogen-based functionality, the conversion of the ketone of erythromycin to the -N(Me)CH2- group in azithromycin leads to a compound that can be dosed once daily with a shorter treatment time. For such reasons, synthetic chemists have sought catalysts that directly convert C-H bonds to C-N bonds. Most currently used catalysts for C-H bond amination are ill suited to the intermolecular functionalization of complex molecules because they require excess substrate or directing groups, harsh reaction conditions, weak or acidic C-H bonds, or reagents containing specialized groups on the nitrogen atom. Among C-H bond amination reactions, those forming a C-N bond at a tertiary alkyl group would be particularly valuable, because this linkage is difficult to form from ketones or alcohols that might be created in a biosynthetic pathway by oxidation. Here we report a mild, selective, iron-catalysed azidation of tertiary C-H bonds that occurs without excess of the valuable substrate. The reaction tolerates aqueous environments and is suitable for the functionalization of complex structures in the late stages of a multistep synthesis. Moreover, this azidation makes it possible to install a range of nitrogen-based functional groups, including those from Huisgen 'click' cycloadditions and the Staudinger ligation. We anticipate that these reactions will create opportunities to modify natural products, their precursors and their derivatives to produce analogues that contain different polarity and charge as a

  5. Metal-catalysed azidation of tertiary C-H bonds suitable for late-stage functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ankit; Hartwig, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Many enzymes oxidize unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds selectively to form alcohols; however, biological systems do not possess enzymes that catalyse the analogous aminations of C-H bonds. The absence of such enzymes limits the discovery of potential medicinal candidates because nitrogen-containing groups are crucial to the biological activity of therapeutic agents and clinically useful natural products. In one prominent example illustrating the importance of incorporating nitrogen-based functionality, the conversion of the ketone of erythromycin to the -N(Me)CH2- group in azithromycin leads to a compound that can be dosed once daily with a shorter treatment time. For such reasons, synthetic chemists have sought catalysts that directly convert C-H bonds to C-N bonds. Most currently used catalysts for C-H bond amination are ill suited to the intermolecular functionalization of complex molecules because they require excess substrate or directing groups, harsh reaction conditions, weak or acidic C-H bonds, or reagents containing specialized groups on the nitrogen atom. Among C-H bond amination reactions, those forming a C-N bond at a tertiary alkyl group would be particularly valuable, because this linkage is difficult to form from ketones or alcohols that might be created in a biosynthetic pathway by oxidation. Here we report a mild, selective, iron-catalysed azidation of tertiary C-H bonds that occurs without excess of the valuable substrate. The reaction tolerates aqueous environments and is suitable for the functionalization of complex structures in the late stages of a multistep synthesis. Moreover, this azidation makes it possible to install a range of nitrogen-based functional groups, including those from Huisgen `click' cycloadditions and the Staudinger ligation. We anticipate that these reactions will create opportunities to modify natural products, their precursors and their derivatives to produce analogues that contain different polarity and charge as a

  6. Late-stage planetary accretion including hit-and-run collisions and fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, J. E.

    2013-05-01

    To date, most simulations of the final accretion of the terrestrial planets have assumed that all collisions lead to mergers. Recent hydrodynamic simulations of impacts between planetary mass bodies (Leinhardt, Z.M., Stewart, S.T. [2012]. Astrophys. J. 745, 79; Genda, H., Kokubo, E., Ida, S. [2012]. Astrophys J. 744, 137) have parameterized the outcome of planetary collisions in terms of the masses and velocities of the colliding bodies. Using these results, it is now possible to simulate late-stage planetary growth using a more realistic model for collisions. Here, we describe results of eight N-body simulations of terrestrial planet formation that incorporate collisional fragmentation and hit-and-run collisions. The results are compared to simulations using identical initial collisions in which all collisions were assumed to result in mergers (Chambers, J.E. [2001]. Icarus 152, 205-224). The new simulations form 3 to 5 terrestrial planets moving on widely spaced orbits with growth complete by 400 My. The mean time for Earth-like planets to reach half their final mass is 17 My, comparable to the time in simulations without fragmentation. However, the prolonged sweep up of collision fragments lengthens the mean time required for Earth analogues to become fully formed to 159 My. The final planets have somewhat smaller masses m and eccentricities e when fragmentation is included. Masses are particularly reduced in the region now occupied by Mars. The final distributions of m, e and semi-major axis are similar to the terrestrial planets of the Solar System, but the strong concentration of mass in the narrow zone occupied by Earth and Venus is not reproduced. Collisional fragmentation is likely to preferentially eject silicate-rich mantle material leaving a target enriched in iron-rich core material. However, large bodies often reaccrete silicate-rich mantle fragments at a later time, leaving their final composition largely unchanged. The final core mass fractions of

  7. Characterisation of the Broadly-Specific O-Methyl-transferase JerF from the Late Stages of Jerangolid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Steffen; Hemmerling, Franziska; Lindner, Frederick; Warnke, Anna; Wunderlich, Johannes; Berkhan, Gesche; Hahn, Frank

    2016-10-29

    We describe the characterisation of the O-methyltransferase JerF from the late stages of jerangolid biosynthesis. JerF is the first known example of an enzyme that catalyses the formation of a non-aromatic, cyclic methylenolether. The enzyme was overexpressed in E. coli and the cell-free extracts were used in bioconversion experiments. Chemical synthesis gave access to a series of substrate surrogates that covered a broad structural space. Enzymatic assays revealed a broad substrate tolerance and high regioselectivity of JerF, which makes it an attractive candidate for an application in chemoenzymatic synthesis with particular usefulness for late stage application on 4-methoxy-5,6-dihydro-2H-pyran-2-one-containing natural products.

  8. Overexpression of feline tripartite motif-containing 25 interferes with the late stage of feline leukemia virus replication.

    PubMed

    Koba, Ryota; Oguma, Keisuke; Sentsui, Hiroshi

    2015-06-02

    Tripartite motif-containing 25 (TRIM25) regulates various cellular processes through E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Previous studies have revealed that the expression of TRIM25 is induced by type I interferon and that TRIM25 is involved in the host cellular innate immune response against retroviral infection. Although retroviral infection is prevalent in domestic cats, the roles of feline TRIM25 in the immune response against these viral infections are poorly understood. Because feline TRIM25 is expected to modulate the infection of feline leukemia virus (FeLV), we investigated its effects on early- and late-stage FeLV replication. This study revealed that ectopic expression of feline TRIM25 in HEK293T cells reduced viral protein levels leading to the inhibition of FeLV release. Our findings show that feline TRIM25 has a potent antiviral activity and implicate an antiviral mechanism whereby feline TRIM25 interferes with late-stage FeLV replication.

  9. Ultraviolet to Infrared SED (Spectral Energy Distribution) Analysis of Nearby Late-Stage Merging Galaxies Using CIGALE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, Aaron; Ashby, Matthew; Martinez-Galarza, Juan Rafael; Hayward, Christopher C.; Hung, Chao-Ling; Lanz, Lauranne; Rosenthal, Lee; Smith, Howard Alan; Willner, Steven P.; Zezas, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the fundamental properties of nearby merging galaxies based on in-depth analysis of their spectral energy distributions. Our new sample, which is based on the catalog of nearby merging galaxies from the SIGS sample (Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Sample; Lanz et al. 2013, 2014), cross-correlates the Revised IRAC-FSC Redshift Catalogue (Wang et al. 2014) with Galaxy Zoo, which builds on and extends the previous investigation by Lanz et al. in two ways. First it enlarges the sample considerably, increasing the statistical power of the analysis significantly. Second, it includes galaxies in the most advanced merger stage, filling a potential gap in the Lanz et al. sample. The cross-correlation gave 453 possible mergers, between 400 and 453 of which are interacting on some level. After more clearly defining the evolutionary stages of the merging process, these galaxies' stages were identified morphologically, and selected according to brightness () and stage (late stages 4-6), more than tripling the total late-stage sample to about 40 or 50 systems, 16 of which have sufficient observational data for a full SED analysis. These, along with the late-stage mergers found in the SIGS sample, have been photometered from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-infrared (FIR) and subsequently fit and analyzed by the newly revised and updated CIGALE (Code Investigating Galaxy Emission; Burgarella et al. 2005) in order to retrieve key physical properties of the galaxies including star-formation rate (SFR), AGN fraction, and stellar and dust mass, as well as identify any trends in terms of shape and physical properties of spectra within the evolutionary range of late-stage mergers.

  10. Rural-Urban Differences in Late-Stage Breast Cancer: Do Associations Differ by Rural-Urban Classification System?

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Sandi L; Eberth, Jan M; Morris, E Scott; Grinsfelder, David B; Cuate, Erica L

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rural residence is associated with later stage of breast cancer diagnosis in some but not all prior studies. The lack of a standardized definition of rural residence may contribute to these mixed findings. We characterize and compare multiple definitions of rural vs. non-rural residence to provide guidance regarding choice of measures and to further elucidate rural disparities in breast cancer stage at diagnosis. Methods We used Texas Cancer Registry data of 120,738 female breast cancer patients ≥50 years old diagnosed between 1995–2009. We defined rural vs. non-rural residence using 7 different measures and examined their agreement using Kappa statistics. Measures were defined at various geographic levels: county, ZIP code, census tract, and census block group. Late-stage was defined as regional or distant disease. For each measure, we tested the association of rural residence and late-stage cancer with unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression. Covariates included: age; patient race/ethnicity; diagnosis year; census block group-level mammography capacity; and census tract-level percent poverty, percent Hispanic, and percent Black. Results We found moderate to high levels of agreement between measures of rural vs. non-rural residence. For 72.9% of all patients, all 7 definitions agreed as to rural vs. non-rural residence. Overall, 6 of 7 definitions demonstrated an adverse association between rural residence and late-stage disease in unadjusted and adjusted models (Adjusted OR Range = 1.09–1.14). Discussion Our results document a clear rural disadvantage in late-stage breast cancer. We contribute to the heterogeneous literature by comparing varied measures of rural residence. We recommend use of the census tract-level Rural Urban Commuting Area Codes in future cancer outcomes research where small area data are available. PMID:27158685

  11. Proteasome inhibition attenuates heart failure during the late stages of pressure overload through alterations in collagen expression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuedong; Chen, Yili; Yang, Yang; Chen, Baolin; Liu, Dan; Xiong, Zhaojun; Zhang, Chengxi; Dong, Yugang

    2013-01-15

    Although the role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload has been consistently studied, the fundamental importance of the UPS in cardiac fibrosis has received much less attention. Our previous study found that proteasome inhibitor (MG132) treatment attenuated cardiac fibrosis and heart failure during the early and middle stages of pressure overload. However, the effects of this inhibitor on late-stage pressure overload hearts remain unclear and controversial. The present study was designed to investigate the effects and possible mechanisms of MG132 on cardiac fibrosis and dysfunction during the late stages of pressure overload. Male Sprague Dawley rats with abdominal aortic constriction (AAC) or a sham operation received an intraperitoneal injection of MG132 (0.1 mg kg⁻¹ day⁻¹) or vehicle for 16 weeks. Left ventricular (LV) function, collagen deposition and Ang II levels were evaluated at study termination. Ang II-stimulated adult rat cardiac fibroblasts were utilized to examine the effects of MG132 on collagen synthesis and the relationship between the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and the UPS. MG132 treatment attenuated ventricular dysfunction by suppressing cardiac fibrosis rather than inhibiting cardiac hypertrophy during the late-stages of pressure overload. We also found that Ang II activates UPS in the heart and MG132 attenuates Ang II-induced collagen synthesis via suppression of the NF-κB/TGF-β/Smad2 signaling pathways. Proteasome inhibition therefore could provide a new promising therapeutic strategy to prevent cardiac fibrosis and progression of heart failure even during the late-stages of pressure overload.

  12. Mouse fetal liver culture system to dissect target gene functions at the early and late stages of terminal erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baobing; Mei, Yang; Yang, Jing; Ji, Peng

    2014-09-09

    Erythropoiesis involves a dynamic process that begins with committed erythroid burst forming units (BFU-Es) followed by rapidly dividing erythroid colony forming units (CFU-Es). After CFU-Es, cells are morphologically recognizable and generally termed terminal erythroblasts. One of the challenges for the study of terminal erythropoiesis is the lack of experimental approaches to dissect gene functions in a chronological manner. In this protocol, we describe a unique strategy to determine gene functions in the early and late stages of terminal erythropoiesis. In this system, mouse fetal liver TER119 (mature erythroid cell marker) negative erythroblasts were purified and transduced with exogenous expression of cDNAs or small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) for the genes of interest. The cells were subsequently cultured in medium containing growth factors other than erythropoietin (Epo) to maintain their progenitor stage for 12 hr while allowing the exogenous cDNAs or shRNAs to express. The cells were changed to Epo medium after 12 hr to induce cell differentiation and proliferation while the exogenous genetic materials were already expressed. This protocol facilitates analysis of gene functions in the early stage of terminal erythropoiesis. To study late stage terminal erythropoiesis, cells were immediately cultured in Epo medium after transduction. In this way, the cells were already differentiated to the late stage of terminal erythropoiesis when the transduced genetic materials were expressed. We recommend a general application of this strategy that would help understand detailed gene functions in different stages of terminal erythropoiesis.

  13. EPO-mediated expansion of late-stage erythroid progenitors in the bone marrow initiates recovery from sublethal radiation stress

    PubMed Central

    Peslak, Scott A.; Wenger, Jesse; Bemis, Jeffrey C.; Kingsley, Paul D.; Koniski, Anne D.; McGrath, Kathleen E.

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoiesis is a robust process of cellular expansion and maturation occurring in murine bone marrow and spleen. We previously determined that sublethal irradiation, unlike bleeding or hemolysis, depletes almost all marrow and splenic erythroblasts but leaves peripheral erythrocytes intact. To better understand the erythroid stress response, we analyzed progenitor, precursor, and peripheral blood compartments of mice post–4 Gy total body irradiation. Erythroid recovery initiates with rapid expansion of late-stage erythroid progenitors–day 3 burst-forming units and colony-forming units, associated with markedly increased plasma erythropoietin (EPO). Although initial expansion of late-stage erythroid progenitors is dependent on EPO, this cellular compartment becomes sharply down-regulated despite elevated EPO levels. Loss of EPO-responsive progenitors is associated temporally with a wave of maturing erythroid precursors in marrow and with emergence of circulating erythroid progenitors and subsequent reestablishment of splenic erythropoiesis. These circulating progenitors selectively engraft and mature in irradiated spleen after short-term transplantation, supporting the concept that bone marrow erythroid progenitors migrate to spleen. We conclude that sublethal radiation is a unique model of endogenous stress erythropoiesis, with specific injury to the extravascular erythron, expansion and maturation of EPO-responsive late-stage progenitors exclusively in marrow, and subsequent reseeding of extramedullary sites. PMID:22889760

  14. An Internet-Based Multimedia Education Prototype to Enhance Late-Stage Dementia Care: Formative Research Results*

    PubMed Central

    Hobday, John V.; Savik, Kay; Gaugler, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a portable, Internet-based multimedia education program (IBME) to provide a more efficient training resource for direct care workers (DCWs) who care for nursing home residents suffering from late-stage dementia. Thirty-four DCWs from eight nursing homes in eight states completed five post-test open-ended questions and 20 Likert items on the feasibility, strengths, and weaknesses of the IBME prototype. Pre- and post-test surveys also examined whether late-stage dementia care knowledge changed significantly. Over 90% of DCWs “agreed” or “strongly agreed” that the IBME prototype improved DCWs’ feelings of competency and everyday care delivery. Open-ended comments offered several suggestions for improvement, including group-based discussion of the modules. Results also found that DCWs’ late-stage dementia care knowledge significantly increased (p < .001) following completion of the IBME modules. The IBME prototype offers an online, ansychronous training strategy to enhance dementia-pertinent knowledge and skills related to everyday care delivery in nursing homes. PMID:20691503

  15. The Relationship between Neighborhood Immigrant Composition, Limited English Proficiency, and Late-Stage Colorectal Cancer Diagnosis in California

    PubMed Central

    Mojica, Cynthia M.; Glenn, Beth A.; Chang, Cindy; Bastani, Roshan

    2015-01-01

    Despite the availability of effective early detection technologies, more than half (61%) of colorectal cancers in the United States and 55% in California are identified at an advanced stage. Data on colorectal cancer patients (N = 35,030) diagnosed from 2005 to 2007 were obtained from the California Cancer Registry. Multivariate analyses found a relationship among neighborhood concentration of recent immigrants, neighborhood rates of limited English proficiency, and late-stage colorectal cancer diagnosis. Hispanics living in neighborhoods with a greater percentage of recent immigrants (compared to the lowest percentage) had greater odds (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.22, 2.02) of late-stage diagnosis whereas Hispanics living in neighborhoods with the highest percentage of limited English proficiency (compared to the lowest percentage) had lower odds (OR .71, 95% CI .51, .99) of late-stage diagnosis. These relationships were not observed for other ethnic groups. Results highlight the complex relationship among race/ethnicity, neighborhood characteristics, and colorectal cancer stage at diagnosis. PMID:26504808

  16. Differential expression of midgut proteins in Trypanosoma brucei gambiense-stimulated vs. non-stimulated Glossina palpalis gambiensis flies

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Anne; Hamidou Soumana, Illiassou; Tchicaya, Bernadette; Rofidal, Valérie; Decourcelle, Mathilde; Santoni, Véronique; Hem, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    The unicellular pathogenic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei gambiense is responsible for the chronic form of sleeping sickness. This vector-borne disease is transmitted to humans by the tsetse fly of the group Glossina palpalis, including the subspecies G. p. gambiensis, in which the parasite completes its developmental cycle. Sleeping sickness control strategies can therefore target either the human host or the fly vector. Indeed, suppression of one step in the parasite developmental cycle could abolish parasite transmission to humans, with consequences on the spreading of the disease. In order to develop this type of approach, we have identified, at the proteome level, events resulting from the tripartite interaction between the tsetse fly G. p. gambiensis, its microbiome, and the trypanosome. Proteomes were analyzed from four biological replicates of midguts from flies sampled 3 days post-feeding on either a trypanosome-infected (stimulated flies) or a non-infected (non-stimulated flies) bloodmeal. Over 500 proteins were identified in the midguts of flies from both feeding groups, 13 of which were shown to be differentially expressed in trypanosome-stimulated vs. non-stimulated flies. Functional annotation revealed that several of these proteins have important functions that could be involved in modulating the fly infection process by trypanosomes (and thus fly vector competence), including anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic, cellular detoxifying, trypanosome agglutination, and immune stimulating or depressive effects. The results show a strong potential for diminishing or even disrupting fly vector competence, and their application holds great promise for improving the control of sleeping sickness. PMID:26029185

  17. Phospholipase A2 from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and Trypanosoma brucei brucei: inhibition by organotins.

    PubMed

    Shuaibu, M N; Kanbara, H; Yanagi, T; Ameh, D A; Bonire, J J; Nok, A J

    2001-11-01

    Activity and kinetics of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (Wellcome strain) and Trypanosoma brucei brucei (GUTat 3.1) were examined using two different fluorescent substrates. The activity in the supernatants of sonicated parasites was Ca2+-independent, strongly stimulated by Triton X-100 with optimum activity at 37 degrees C and pH 6.5-8.5. To encourage a possible interaction between the parasite enzyme and organotin compounds, fatty acid derivatives of dibutyltin dichloride were synthesized and evaluated as potential inhibitors of PLA2. The enzyme from the two-trypanosome species differ with respect to kinetic parameters and are noncompetitively inhibited by the organotin compounds. The Michaelis constant (KM) for PLA2 from T. b. brucei is 63.87 and 30.90 microM while for T. b. gambiense it is 119.64 and 32.91 microM for the substrates 1,2-bis-(1-pyrenebutanoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PBGPC) and 2-(12-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)dodecanoyl-1-hexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (NBDC12-HPC), respectively.

  18. The challenge of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense sleeping sickness diagnosis outside Africa.

    PubMed

    Lejon, V; Boelaert, M; Jannin, J; Moore, A; Büscher, P

    2003-12-01

    Sleeping sickness is a lethal African disease caused by parasites of the Trypanosoma brucei subspecies, which is transmitted by tsetse flies. Occasionally, patients are reported outside Africa. Diagnosis of such imported cases can be problematic when the infection is due to Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, the chronic form of sleeping sickness found in west and central Africa. The low number of trypanosomes in the blood and the non-specific, variable symptoms make the diagnosis difficult, particularly when the index of suspicion is low. When the trypanosomes have penetrated into the central nervous system, neuropathological signs become apparent but even at this stage, misdiagnosis is frequent. Rapid and correct diagnosis of sleeping sickness can avoid inappropriate or delayed treatment and even death of the patient. In this article, an overview on diagnosis of imported cases of T b gambiense sleeping sickness is given, and possible pitfalls in the diagnostic process are highlighted. Bioclinical parameters that should raise the suspicion of sleeping sickness in a patient who has been in west or central Africa are discussed. Techniques for diagnosis are reviewed. A clinician suspecting sleeping sickness should contact a national reference centre for tropical medicine in his or her country, or the WHO, Geneva, Switzerland, or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, GA, USA, for clinical consultation and provision of specific diagnostic tests. Appropriate drugs for sleeping sickness treatment are also provided by WHO and the CDC.

  19. [Assessment of the association between nursing care services, hypertension, and Alzheimer's disease in elderly patients with late-stage diabetes].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Seiji; Kondo, Yasuko; Kitagawa, Chihiro; Katsuta, Sayaka

    2013-12-01

    In an aging society with fewer children, diabetes self-control is difficult for elderly patients. Under these circumstances, it is expected that living in care homes for the elderly and institutions where nursing care services could be provided will help improve the prognosis of diabetic patients. Therefore, we assessed whether HbA(1c). levels (National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program : NGSP) in 121 elderly patients with late-stage diabetes receiving home medical care in our clinic from March 2008 to March 2013 improved with nursing care services.

  20. Cryo-EM structures of the late-stage assembly intermediates of the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ningning; Chen, Yuling; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Yixiao; Yuan, Yi; Ma, Chengying; Deng, Haiteng; Lei, Jianlin; Gao, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is a process fundamental for all cellular activities. The efficiency and accuracy of the subunit assembly are tightly regulated and closely monitored. In the present work, we characterized, both compositionally and structurally, a set of in vivo 50S subunit precursors (45S), isolated from a mutant bacterial strain. Our qualitative mass spectrometry data indicate that L28, L16, L33, L36 and L35 are dramatically underrepresented in the 45S particles. This protein spectrum shows interesting similarity to many qualitatively analyzed 50S precursors from different genetic background, indicating the presence of global rate-limiting steps in the late-stage assembly of 50S subunit. Our structural data reveal two major intermediate states for the 45S particles. Consistently, both states severally lack those proteins, but they also differ in the stability of the functional centers of the 50S subunit, demonstrating that they are translationally inactive. Detailed analysis indicates that the orientation of H38 accounts for the global conformational differences in these intermediate structures, and suggests that the reorientation of H38 to its native position is rate-limiting during the late-stage assembly. Especially, H38 plays an essential role in stabilizing the central protuberance, through the interaction with the 5S rRNA, and the correctly orientated H38 is likely a prerequisite for further maturation of the 50S subunit. PMID:23700310

  1. Early and late stages of working-memory maintenance contribute differentially to long-term memory formation.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Heiko C; Kiemeneij, Anne; Fernández, Guillén; Kessels, Roy P C

    2013-06-01

    The present paper investigated the role of early and late stages of working-memory maintenance, which have been suggested to differentially contribute to long-term memory formation. In experiment 1, we administered a delayed-match-to-sample task, requiring participants to remember line drawings of non-sense three-dimensional stimuli. In the delay phase, participants were either presented with a fixation cross (for 2 or 9s) or with one of two different interference tasks, varying in visual overlap with the target. The interference task was presented 1.5, 4.5 or 7.5s after target offset. Early interfering and early probing disproportionately affected performance on an unexpected subsequent recognition-memory task compared to later interference or probing. This was not modulated by the type of interference task. In Experiment 2, we examined whether the formation of a holistic internal code of the target may be a gradual process. An analogous delayed-match-to-sample task was administered, with interference after 0.5, 2.5 or 4.5s after target offset. The early and middle interference condition similarly disproportionately affected performance compared to later interference. Hence, the present results support the view of a functional dissociation between early and late stages of working-memory maintenance and that early working-memory processes contribute particularly to long-term memory formation.

  2. Long-term effects of laser-imiquimod combination in the treatment of late-stage melanoma patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, Mark F.; Le, Henry; Li, Xiaosong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2012-03-01

    Topical application of a potent immunological modulator, imiquimod, followed by laser irradiation has been used for the treatment of late-stage melanoma patients. This novel approach, laser-assisted laser immunotherapy (LIT), targets the root course of melanoma, a highly metastatic cancer. We started a phase I clinical trial in 2006 with promising initial outcomes. The laser-imiquimod combination showed significant palliative effects for these patients with multiple treatment cycles. For the returning patients, we found that the recurrent tumors were less aggressive than usually seen in untreated patients. The current protocol uses a light-absorbing dye for selective laser photothermal interaction with a non-invasive treatment mode. It has limitations for patient treatment, particularly for large, deeper tumors, and for patients with dark pigmented skins. This study provides some information on the treated patients (both stage IV and stage IV) during the past several years. We also discuss the future directions of LIT, particularly in the area of photothermal treatment mode with a new approach of interstitial irradiation. The current results in melanoma treatment using LIT indicate that the combination of photothermal therapy and immunological stimulation may hold the key for the treatment of late-stage, metastatic cancers, not only for cutaneous cancers such as melanoma and breast cancer, but also for deep and internal tumors using different operations modes such as interstitial laser irradiation.

  3. Disseminated sulphides in basalts from the northern Central Indian Ridge: implications on late-stage hydrothermal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Ranadip; Ray, Dwijesh

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the mineralogy and mineral chemistry of disseminated sulphides (mainly chalcopyrite-pyrite) in partly altered basalts from the northern Central Indian Ridge, Indian Ocean in order to understand the role of hydrothermal alterations and infer possible sulphide formation history. Pyrite and chalcopyrite are dominant sulphide minerals and generally associated with the oxide phases including magnetite and often ilmenite. Close association of sulphide and oxide minerals suggests that they are paragenetically related. Sulphides also occur as late impregnated veins cutting through the basaltic hosts. The chemical compositions of pyrite (avg. Fe 46.3 wt%, S 53.7 wt%) and chalcopyrite (avg. Cu 34.4 wt%, Fe 30.7 wt%, S 34.7 wt%) are almost uniform, while the secondary ilmenite often shows MnO enrichment (up to 3.0-3.4 wt%). The associated altered minerals typically resemble the greenschist facies mineral assemblages—e.g. chlorite±epidote. Evidence of albitisation and silicification suggests low-temperature hydrothermal alteration processes. This is supported by the bulk Au content (up to 60 ppb) of host-altered basalts with pyrite mineralisation. Au is usually associated with late-stage pyrites and thus related with low-temperature hydrothermal activity. Close to the dredge location, tectonic activity around the Vityaz megamullion might have promoted hydrothermal circulation and subsequent alteration of the mineral constituents in basalts, eventually inducing the formation of late-stage disseminated sulphide minerals in these rocks.

  4. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis enterocolitis during late stages of gestation induces an adverse pregnancy outcome in the murine model.

    PubMed

    Noto Llana, Mariángeles; Sarnacki, Sebastián Hernán; Aya Castañeda, María del Rosario; Pustovrh, María Carolina; Gartner, Alejandra Sonia; Buzzola, Fernanda Roxana; Cerquetti, María Cristina; Giacomodonato, Mónica Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Foodborne diseases caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) are a significant health problem. Pregnancy, state of immunological tolerance, is a predisposing condition for the development of infections with intracellular pathogens. Salmonella species can cause pregnancy complications such as chorioamnionitis, transplacental fetal infection, pre term labor, abortions, neonatal and maternal septicemia. However, the specific mechanisms by which Salmonella infections trigger these alterations are not clear. In the present work, using a self-limiting enterocolitis murine model, we show that the ingestion of a low dose of S. Enteritidis at late stages of pregnancy (day 15 of gestation) is sufficient to induce massive maternal infection. We found that Salmonella infection leads to 40% of pre term delivery, 33% of abortion and fetal growth restriction. Placental dysfunction during S. Enteritidis enterocolitis was confirmed through cellular infiltration and hypoxia markers (MPO activity and COX-1 and COX-2 expression, respectively). Apoptosis in placental tissue due to Salmonella infection was also evident at day 18 of gestation when investigated by morphometric procedure, DNA fragmentation and Fas/FasL expression. Also, the expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17 and IL-10 was up regulated in response to Salmonella not only in placenta, but also in amniotic fluid and maternal serum. Altogether, our results demonstrate that S. Enteritidis enterocolitis during late stages of gestation causes detrimental effect on pregnancy outcome.

  5. Infusion of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Reduces Lung Fibrosis but Not Inflammation in the Late Stages of Murine Silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; Ventura, Túlio G.; de Oliveira, Helena D'Anunciação; Monção-Ribeiro, Leonardo C.; Gutfilen, Bianca; de Souza, Sergio A. L.; Rocco, Patrícia R. M.; Borojevic, Radovan; Morales, Marcelo M.; Takiya, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that infusion of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) in the late stages of silica-induced damage would reduce the remodelling process in a murine model of silicosis. C57BL/6 mice were assigned to 2 groups. In the SIL group, mice were instilled with a silica particle suspension intratracheally. Control (C) mice received saline under the same protocol. On the 40th day, some of the animals from both groups were killed. The others were treated with either saline or BMMCs (1×106cells) intravenously (C+BMMC and SIL+BMMC), and the mice were killed 70 days after the start of the protocol. In the mice in the SIL+BMMC group, collagen deposition, the presence of silica particles inside nodules, the presence of macrophages and cells reactive for inducible nitric oxide synthase were reduced. Lung parameters also improved. Beyond that, the total and differential cellularity of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, immunoexpression of transforming growth factor-β, the number of T regulatory cells and apoptosis were increased. However, the presence of male donor cells in lung tissue was not observed using GFP+ cells (40d) or Y chromosome DNA (70d). Therefore, BMMC therapy in the late stages of experimental silicosis improved lung function by diminishing fibrosis but inflammatory cells persisted, which could be related to expansion of T regulatory cells, responsible for the beneficial effects of cell therapy. PMID:25299237

  6. New insights on the late-stage history of glacial Lake Ojibway: implications for meltwater discharges of the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Martin; Veillette, Jean J.; Godbout, Pierre-Marc

    2016-04-01

    The decay of the Laurentide ice sheet is believed to be responsible for abrupt climate variations during the last deglaciation and early Holocene, notably through massive discharges of meltwater that had accumulated in large ice-dammed lakes such as Lake Agassiz and Lake Ojibway. Indeed, high-resolution North Atlantic marine records indicate that the ocean's circulation was affected by several outbursts of meltwater during the late deglacial interval. Yet, field evidence and geological data supporting multi-step drawdowns of Lake Agassiz-Ojibway are relatively limited, underlying important uncertainties in the late-stage history of these glacial lakes. Furthermore, physical evidence for the drainage of glacial lakes remains relatively rare in depositional records, giving rise to much debate on the location of outlets and discharge pathways, as well as on the climate impact of the attendant meltwater forcing. Recent investigations of geomorphological and sedimentary records in northern Ontario and Quebec (Canada) have revealed new insights on the late-stage evolution of Lake Ojibway. The number of Ojibway lake phases have so far remained poorly documented mainly because of the dominance of fine-grained glaciolacustrine sediments in the lake basin that prevented the formation of extensive sandy/bouldery strandlines. We thus developed an alternative approach based on the study of a complex sequence of relict terraces carved in the Ojibway clay plain. The elevation measurement of 154 raised wave-cut scarps provided evidence for four distinct shorelines, three of which projecting well below the main outlet that controlled the elevation of the lake during the deglaciation. The elevation, uplift gradients, and areal extent of these shorelines indicate that these low-elevation lake levels formed during the late stages of the deglaciation, following abrupt drawdowns of the lake's surface. Insights on the origin of these late-stage phases are provided from sediment sequences

  7. Chemopreventive effects of early-stage and late-stage supplementation of vitamin E and selenium on esophageal carcinogenesis in rats maintained on a low vitamin E/selenium diet.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Fang, Jin; Jia, Xudong; Han, Chi; Chen, Xiaoxin; Yang, Chung S; Li, Ning

    2011-03-01

    Low vitamin E and selenium (Ve/Se) nutritional status is known to be associated with increased risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). A previous human intervention trial demonstrated that Ve/Se supplementation decreased the occurrence of esophageal cancer death among younger participants but not among older ones. In this study, we intended to mimic this human nutritional status to determine the chemopreventive effects of Ve/Se supplementation at the early or late stage of esophageal carcinogenesis in rats maintained on a low Ve/Se diet. ESCC was induced in F344 rats with N-nitrosomethylbenzylamine (NMBzA) (0.35 mg/kg body wt, subcutaneously, three times per week for 5 weeks). The rats were maintained on a modified AIN-93M diet with low levels of Ve/Se or supplementation to the normal level by using the AIN-93M diet. At Week 25, the numbers of visible tumors and ESCC were significantly lower in rats on AIN-93M diet during the entire experimental period (Group D) or during the early stage (Group B) but not during the late stage (Group C). Ve/Se supplementation (switching from the low Ve/Se diet to the AIN-93M diet) also decreased cell proliferation, angiogenesis, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, biosynthesis of prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4, expression of cyclooxygenase 2 and 5-lipoxygenase in the esophagus. Our results demonstrated that Ve/Se supplementation inhibited NMBzA-induced esophageal carcinogenesis in rats on low Ve/Se diet, and supplementation during the early stage is more effective than during the late stage of carcinogenesis.

  8. Chemopreventive effects of early-stage and late-stage supplementation of vitamin E and selenium on esophageal carcinogenesis in rats maintained on a low vitamin E/selenium diet

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Fang, Jin; Jia, Xudong; Han, Chi; Chen, Xiaoxin; Yang, Chung S.; Li, Ning

    2011-01-01

    Low vitamin E and selenium (Ve/Se) nutritional status is known to be associated with increased risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). A previous human intervention trial demonstrated that Ve/Se supplementation decreased the occurrence of esophageal cancer death among younger participants but not among older ones. In this study, we intended to mimic this human nutritional status to determine the chemopreventive effects of Ve/Se supplementation at the early or late stage of esophageal carcinogenesis in rats maintained on a low Ve/Se diet. ESCC was induced in F344 rats with N-nitrosomethylbenzylamine (NMBzA) (0.35 mg/kg body wt, subcutaneously, three times per week for 5 weeks). The rats were maintained on a modified AIN-93M diet with low levels of Ve/Se or supplementation to the normal level by using the AIN-93M diet. At Week 25, the numbers of visible tumors and ESCC were significantly lower in rats on AIN-93M diet during the entire experimental period (Group D) or during the early stage (Group B) but not during the late stage (Group C). Ve/Se supplementation (switching from the low Ve/Se diet to the AIN-93M diet) also decreased cell proliferation, angiogenesis, 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, biosynthesis of prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4, expression of cyclooxygenase 2 and 5-lipoxygenase in the esophagus. Our results demonstrated that Ve/Se supplementation inhibited NMBzA-induced esophageal carcinogenesis in rats on low Ve/Se diet, and supplementation during the early stage is more effective than during the late stage of carcinogenesis. PMID:21186300

  9. Isolation of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense from Cured and Relapsed Sleeping Sickness Patients and Adaptation to Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pyana, Patient Pati; Ngay Lukusa, Ipos; Mumba Ngoyi, Dieudonné; Van Reet, Nick; Kaiser, Marcel; Karhemere Bin Shamamba, Stomy; Büscher, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Background Sleeping sickness due to Trypanosoma brucei (T.b.) gambiense is still a major public health problem in some central African countries. Historically, relapse rates around 5% have been observed for treatment with melarsoprol, widely used to treat second stage patients. Later, relapse rates of up to 50% have been recorded in some isolated foci in Angola, Sudan, Uganda and Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Previous investigations are not conclusive on whether decreased sensitivity to melarsoprol is responsible for these high relapse rates. Therefore we aimed to establish a parasite collection isolated from cured as well as from relapsed patients for downstream comparative drug sensitivity profiling. A major constraint for this type of investigation is that T.b. gambiense is particularly difficult to isolate and adapt to classical laboratory rodents. Methodology/Principal Findings From 360 patients treated in Dipumba hospital, Mbuji-Mayi, D.R. Congo, blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was collected before treatment. From patients relapsing during the 24 months follow-up, the same specimens were collected. Specimens with confirmed parasite presence were frozen in liquid nitrogen in a mixture of Triladyl, egg yolk and phosphate buffered glucose solution. Isolation was achieved by inoculation of the cryopreserved specimens in Grammomys surdaster, Mastomys natalensis and SCID mice. Thus, 85 strains were isolated from blood and CSF of 55 patients. Isolation success was highest in Grammomys surdaster. Forty strains were adapted to mice. From 12 patients, matched strains were isolated before treatment and after relapse. All strains belong to T.b. gambiense type I. Conclusions and Significance We established a unique collection of T.b. gambiense from cured and relapsed patients, isolated in the same disease focus and within a limited period. This collection is available for genotypic and phenotypic characterisation to investigate the mechanism behind

  10. Late-Stage C-H Coupling Enables Rapid Identification of HDAC Inhibitors: Synthesis and Evaluation of NCH-31 Analogues.

    PubMed

    Sekizawa, Hiromi; Amaike, Kazuma; Itoh, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Itami, Kenichiro; Yamaguchi, Junichiro

    2014-05-08

    We previously reported the discovery of NCH-31, a potent histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. By utilizing our C-H coupling reaction, we rapidly synthesized 16 analogues (IYS-1 through IYS-15 and IYS-Me) of NCH-31 with different aryl groups at the C4-position of 2-aminothiazole core of NCH-31. Subsequent biological testing of these derivatives revealed that 3-fluorophenyl (IYS-10) and 4-fluorophenyl (IYS-15) derivatives act as potent pan-HDAC inhibitor. Additionally, 4-methylphenyl (IYS-1) and 3-fluoro-4-methylphenyl (IYS-14) derivatives acted as HDAC6-insensitive inhibitors. The present work clearly shows the power of the late-stage C-H coupling approach to rapidly identify novel and highly active/selective biofunctional molecules.

  11. FORMING CLOSE-IN EARTH-LIKE PLANETS VIA A COLLISION-MERGER MECHANISM IN LATE-STAGE PLANET FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Jianghui; Jin Sheng; Tinney, C. G. E-mail: qingxiaojin@gmail.com

    2011-01-20

    The large number of exoplanets found to orbit their host stars in very close orbits have significantly advanced our understanding of the planetary formation process. It is now widely accepted that such short-period planets cannot have formed in situ, but rather must have migrated to their current orbits from a formation location much farther from their host star. In the late stages of planetary formation, once the gas in the protoplanetary disk has dissipated and migration has halted, gas giants orbiting in the inner disk regions will excite planetesimals and planetary embryos, resulting in an increased rate of orbital crossings and large impacts. We present the results of dynamical simulations for planetesimal evolution in this later stage of planet formation. We find that a mechanism is revealed by which the collision-merger of planetary embryos can kick terrestrial planets directly into orbits extremely close to their parent stars.

  12. Non-canonical Cajal bodies form in the nucleus of late stage avian oocytes lacking functional nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Khodyuchenko, Tatiana; Gaginskaya, Elena; Krasikova, Alla

    2012-07-01

    In the somatic cell nucleus, there are several universal domains such as nucleolus, SC35-domains, Cajal bodies (CBs) and histone locus bodies (HLBs). Among them, CBs were described more than 100 years ago; however, we still do not have a final understanding of their nature and biological significance. The giant nucleus of avian and amphibian growing oocytes represents an advantageous model for analysis of functions and biogenesis of various nuclear domains. Nevertheless, in large-sized avian oocytes that contain transcriptionally active lampbrush chromosomes, CB-like organelles have not been identified yet. Here we demonstrate that in the pigeon (Columba livia) oocyte nucleus, characterized by absence of any functional nucleoli, extrachromosomal spherical bodies contain TMG-capped spliceosomal snRNAs, core proteins of Sm snRNPs and the protein coilin typical for CBs, but not splicing factor SC35 nor the histone pre-mRNA 3'-end processing factor symplekin. The results establish that coilin-rich nuclear organelles in pigeon late-stage oocyte are not the equivalents of HLBs but belong to a group of CBs. At the same time, they do not contain the snoRNP/scaRNP protein fibrillarin involved in 2'-O-methylation of snoRNAs and snRNAs. Thus, the nucleus of late-stage pigeon oocytes houses CB-like organelles that have an unusual molecular composition and are implicated in the snRNP biogenesis pathway. These data demonstrate that snRNP-rich non-canonical CBs can form in the absence of nucleolus. We argue that pigeon oocytes represent a new promising model to investigate CB modular organization, functions and formation mechanism.

  13. SU-E-T-381: Radio-Dynamic Therapy (RDT) for the Treatment of Late-Stage Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C; Chen, L; Price, R; Zhang, Q; Zeng, J; Xu, K; Sun, Q

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Photo-dynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective treatment modality because of the preferential absorption of photosensitizing agent in tumor cells than in surrounding normal tissues. A limitation of PDT for cancer therapy is the finite penetration of laser light to activate the targeting agent in deep-seated tumors. Radio-dynamic therapy (RDT) is designed to overcome this problem by the combination of high-energy (up to 45MV) photon beams and photo/radio-sensitizers. This work investigates the feasibility of PDT for late-stage cancer patients who are no longer respond to conventional therapies available. Methods: The high-energy photon beams are generated using a LA45 RaceTrack Microtron (Top Grade Medical, Beijing, China). The targeting agent investigated is 5- aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA). Both in vitro cell lines and in vivo animal models have been used to investigate the mechanisms of RDT and its therapeutic effects and normal tissue toxicities. Oral 5-ALA (30-60 mg/kg) was administered 4-6 hours before the radiation treatment and the total radiation dose varied between 0.1-4.0Gy in 1-4 fractions. Clinical trials are initiated in China for late-stage cancer patients targeting both primary tumors utilizing localized therapies such as 3DCRT/IMRT and metastases using TBI. Results: There is clear correlation between the cell death and the 5-ALA concentration/radiation dose. The therapeutic effect of RDT is demonstrated using an animal model where the volume of parotid tumors for the RT only group continued to grow after 3Gy irradiation while the RDT group showed a complete response with the same radiation dose. The preliminary clinical results showed encouraging clinical outcome. Conclusion: RDT is a novel treatment technique that may be developed into an effective cancer treatment modality. Further studies on the mechanisms of RDT and its potential clinical applications are warranted.

  14. Late-stage magmatic processes at Albano Maar, Colli Albani, Italy: insights from FTIR analysis of leucites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, J. K.; Roberge, J.; Smith, V.; Giordano, G.; Tomlinson, E.; Menzies, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The recently erupted Albano Maar, one of the Via dei Laghi phreatomagmatic eruptions of Colli Albani, Italy have eruptive deposits that are K-foiditic (9wt% K2O) and silica under-saturated (48-52wt% SiO2). These compositions suggest the melts are low viscosity [1, 2], but they fuelled very explosive eruptions, namely the widespread large Peperino ignimbrite (phreato-Plinian) deposits. Therefore a question asked by researchers is how could these melts explode and would they, if they had not interacted with groundwater? Experimental work has shown that the melt chemistries at Colli Albani require a volatile saturated system [3]. Consequently the CO2 and H2O content of the melts are critical to understanding the petrogenetic processes at Albano Maar. Since the juvenile tephra clasts exhibit extensive late stage micro-crystallization (mainly leucite), analysis of glass is difficult and not representative as the majority of the volatile components may have exsolved from the melt. Melt inclusions are also commonly recrystallized and often leaky so here we unravel the complex volatile histories of the melts using the abundant leucite crystals, which have been shown to contain magmatic water in recent studies [4]. FTIR analysis of leucite phenocrysts and microcrysts within juvenile tephra clasts (syn-eruptive) of all the erupted units at Albano Maar provide an interesting insight into volatile variations and record a late stage CO2 fluxing event, which would have contributed to the explosive nature of the eruptions. This study has also allowed for an increased understanding of the nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) that crucially record volatile speciation and fluxing in high level magmatic systems. [1] Freda et al., 2006, Bul Vol, 68, pp567-591 [2] Cross et al., 2011 IUGG abs [3] Freda et al., 2008, Lithos, pp397-415 [4] Ventura et al., 2008, Am Min, 93, pp1538-1544

  15. Comprehensive out-patient pulmonary rehabilitation: Treatment outcomes in early and late stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Ergün, Pinar; Kaymaz, Dicle; Günay, Ersin; Erdoğan, Yurdanur; Turay, Ülkü Yilmaz; Demir, Neşe; Çanak, Ebru; Sengül, Fatma; Egesel, Nurcan; Köse, Serdal Kenan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to evaluate the outcomes of a comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to establish whether in early disease stage PR is as effective as in late stages of disease. METHODS: A total of 55 stable COPD patients, 28 with early and 27 with late disease stages, were assessed. Patients underwent a comprehensive out-patient PR program for 8 weeks. To eluciate the effects of PR and compare the level of improvement; lung function, dyspnea sensation [Medical Research Council (MRC)], body composition [body mass index (BMI), fat free mass (FFM), fat free mass index (FFMI)], exercise capacity [incremental shuttle walking test, endurance shuttle walking test], health related quality of life (HRQoL) with St. George Respiratory Disease Questionnaire, psycohological status (Hospital anxiety–depression (HAD) scale) were evaluated before and after PR. RESULTS: At the end of PR in the early disease stage group, the improvement in forced vital capacity (FVC) reached a statistically significant level (P < 0.05). In both disease stages, there were no significant differences in BMI, FFM, and FFMI. The decrease in exertional dyspnea for the two groups evaluated with the modified BORG scale were not found statistically significant, though the dyspnea scores evaluated with MRC showed significant improvements (P < 0.001). HRQoL and exercise capacity were significantly improved for the two groups (P < 0.001). Psychological status evaluated with the HAD scale improved after PR (P < 0.001) both in early and late stages. Gainings in the study parameters did not differ in the early and the late disease stages. CONCLUSIONS: These results showed that patients with COPD had benefited from a comprehensive PR program in an out-patient setting regardless of disease severity. Even patients with earlier stage of disease should be referred and encouraged to participate in a PR program. PMID:21572695

  16. Effect of chicory seed extract on glucose tolerance test (GTT) and metabolic profile in early and late stage diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose of the study The goal was to evaluate and compare the effects of aqueous extract of the seeds of chicory, Cichorium intybus L., on glucose tolerance test (GTT) and blood biochemical indices of experimentally-induced hyperglycemic rats. Methods Late stage and early stage of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were induced in rats by streptozotocin (STZ) and a combination of STZ and niacinamide (NIA/STZ), respectively. Within each group, one subgroup received daily i. p. injections of chicory extract (125 mg/kg body weight, for 28 days). Body weight and fasting blood sugar (FBS) were measured weekly. Blood was analyzed for glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and sera for alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), nitric oxide (NO), triacylglycerol (TG), total cholesterol (TC), total protein, and insulin on days 10 and 28 after treatment. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) along with insulin determination was performed on a different set of rats in which the chicory-treated groups received the extract for 10 days. Results During 4 weeks of treatment, chicory prevented body-weight loss and decreased FBS. ALT activities and levels of TG, TC and HbA1c decreased, and concentration of NO increased in the chicory treated groups (p < 0.05). Unlike late-stage diabetes, fasting serum insulin concentrations were higher and GTT pattern approximated to normal in chicory-treated early-stage diabetic rats. Conclusions Chicory appeared to have short-term (about 2 hours, as far as GTT is concerned) and long-term (28 days, in this study) effects on diabetes. Chicory may be useful as a natural dietary supplement for slowing down the pace of diabetes progress, and delaying the development of its complications. PMID:23352214

  17. Plasminogen activators, their inhibitors, and urokinase receptor emerge in late stages of melanocytic tumor progression.

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, T. J.; Quax, P. H.; Denijn, M.; Verrijp, K. N.; Verheijen, J. H.; Verspaget, H. W.; Weidle, U. H.; Ruiter, D. J.; van Muijen, G. N.

    1994-01-01

    Degradation of the extracellular matrix and other tissue barriers by proteases like plasminogen activators (PAs) is a prerequisite for neoplastic growth and metastasis. Recently, we reported that highly metastatic behavior of human melanoma cells in nude mice correlates with urokinase-type PA (u-PA) expression and activity and with PA inhibitor type 1 and 2 (PAI-1, PAI-2) expression. Here we report on the occurrence of components of the PA system in the various stages of human melanoma tumor progression in situ. We studied the protein distribution on freshly frozen lesions of common nevocellular nevi (n = 25), dysplastic (= atypical) nevi (n = 16), early primary melanomas (n = 8), advanced primary melanomas (n = 11), and melanoma metastases (n = 17). Tissue-type PA was present in endothelial cells in all lesions, whereas in metastases it could be detected in tumor cells in a minority of the lesions. u-PA, its receptor, PAI-1, and PAI-2 could not be detected in benign and in early stages but appeared frequently in advanced primary melanoma and melanoma metastasis lesions. u-PA was detected in stromal cells and in tumor cells at the invasive front, the u-PA receptor and PAI-2 in tumor cells, and PAI-1 in the extracellular matrix surrounding tumor cells. Localization of the corresponding messenger RNAs and enzyme activities revealed a similar distribution. We conclude that plasminogen activation is a late event in melanoma tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8291613

  18. LL-37 as a therapeutic target for late stage prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hensel, Jonathan A.; Chanda, Diptiman; Kumar, Sanjay; Sawant, Anandi; Grizzle, William E.; Siegal, Gene P.; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The antimicrobial peptide, LL-37 (leucine-leucine-37), stimulates proliferation, angiogenesis and cellular migration, inhibits apoptosis and is associated with inflammation. Since these functional processes are often exaggerated in cancer, the aim of the present study was to investigate the expression and role of LL-37 in prostate cancer (PCa) and establish its value as a therapeutic target. METHODS We evaluated the expression of LL-37 and the murine orthologue, Cathelicidin Related Anti-Microbial Peptide (CRAMP) in human and murine prostate tumors, respectively. Compared to normal/benign prostate tissue, both LL-37 and CRAMP were increasingly over-expressed with advancing grades of primary prostate cancer and its metastasis in human tissues and in the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model, correspondingly. We subsequently knocked down CRAMP in the highly tumorigenic TRAMP-C1 cell line via a RNA interference (RNAi) strategy to examine the importance of CRAMP on cellular proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, apoptosis, activation of signaling pathways and tumor kinetics. RESULTS Abrogation of CRAMP expression led to decreased proliferation, invasion, type IV collagenase, and the amount of phosphorylated Erk1/2 and Akt signaling in vitro. These results were paralleled in vivo. Syngenic implantation of TRAMP-C1 cells subjected to CRAMP knock-down resulted in a decreased tumor incidence and size, and the down regulation of pro-tumorigenic mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS CRAMP knockdown in a murine prostate cancer model analogously demonstrated the tumorigenic contributions of LL-37 in PCa and its potential as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of PCa and potentially, other cancers over-expressing the peptide. PMID:20957672

  19. Differences in early and late stages of information processing between slow versus fast participants.

    PubMed

    Portella, Claudio; Machado, Sergio; Paes, Flávia; Cagy, Mauricio; Sack, Alexander T; Sandoval-Carrillo, Ada; Salas-Pacheco, Jose; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro; Nardi, Antonio Egídio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    The human brain is a system consisting of various interconnected neural networks, with functional specialization coexisting with functional integration occurring both; temporally and spatially at many levels. The current study ranked and compared fast and slow participants in processing information by assessing latency and amplitude of early and late Event-Related Potential (ERP) components, including P200, N200, Premotor Potential (PMP) and P300. In addition, the Reaction Time (RT) of participants was compared and related to the respective ERP components. For this purpose, twenty right-handed and healthy individuals were subjected to a classical ERP "Oddball" paradigm. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Discriminant Function analyses (DFA) used PRE components and the Reaction Time (RT) to classify individuals. Our results indicate that latencies of P200 (O2 electrode), N200 (O2), PMP (C3) and P300 (Pz) components are significantly reduced in the group of fast responding participants. In addition, the P200 amplitude is significantly increased in the group of fast responding participants. Based on these findings, we suggest that the ERP is able to detect even minimal impairments, in the processing of somatosensory information and cognitive and motor stages. Hence, the study of ERP might also be capable of assessing sensorimotor dysfunctions in healthy old-aged people and in neuropsychiatric patients (suffering from dementia, Parkinson's disease, and other neurological disorders).

  20. The joint effects of census tract poverty and geographic access on late-stage breast cancer diagnosis in 10 US States.

    PubMed

    Henry, Kevin A; Sherman, Recinda; Farber, Steve; Cockburn, Myles; Goldberg, Daniel W; Stroup, Antoinette M

    2013-05-01

    This study evaluated independent and joint effects of census tract (CT) poverty and geographic access to mammography on stage at diagnosis for breast cancer. The study included 161,619 women 40+ years old diagnosed with breast cancer between 2004 -2006 in ten participating US states. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of late-stage breast cancer diagnosis for the entire study population and by state. Poverty was independently associated with late-stage in the overall population (poverty rates >20% OR=1.30, 95% CI=1.26- 1.35) and for 9 of the 10 states. Geographic access was not associated with late-stage diagnosis after adjusting for CT poverty. State-specific analysis provided little evidence that geographic access was associated with breast cancer stage at diagnosis, and after adjusting for poverty, geographic access mattered in only 1 state. Overall, compared to women with private insurance, the adjusted odds ratios for late stage at diagnosis among women with either no insurance, Medicaid, or Medicare were 1.80 (95% CI = 1.65, 1.96), 1.75 (95% CI = 1.68, 1.84), and 1.05 (95% CI 1.01, 1.08), respectively. Although geographic access to mammography was not a significant predictor of late-stage breast cancer diagnosis, women in high poverty areas or uninsured are at greatest risk of being diagnosed with late-stage breast cancer regardless of geographic location and may benefit from targeted interventions.

  1. Do Periodic Plate Reorganisations Control Late-stage Volcanism across a Broad Galápagos Hotspot?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. M.; Hoernle, K.; Wijbrans, J. R.; Werner, R.; Hauff, S. F.; Stoffers, P.

    2010-12-01

    Much of the Galápagos Volcanic Province (GVP), consisting of the Cocos, Carnegie, Coiba and Malpelo aseismic ridges and related seamount provinces, remains poorly understood due to a lack of direct age and geochemical data. In recent years reconnaissance dredge/grab sampling of these submerged regions of the GVP provides some new insights that can be re-evaluated in the context of the three new cruises to the region in 2010. The distribution of 40Ar/39Ar basement ages [1-3] suggest that volcanism migrated time-progressively across GVP in broad regions of long-lived, possible concurrent, hotspot volcanism. Development of the GVP via such broad zones of overlapping volcanism leads to multiple phases of volcanism post-dating the onset of hotspot volcanism, similar to rejuvenescent volcanism that occurs million years after the main shield-building phase of mid-plate oceanic volcano, most notably along the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Chain. Evidence for rejuvenescent volcanism across the GVP provides an opportunity to evaluate this poorly understood process in a very different physical setting compared to the Hawaiian-Emperor Chain (mid-plate versus on/near spreading axis). Widespread episodes of coeval GVP volcanism show that the Galápagos hotspot influences broad regions of the lithosphere implying relative motion between the Cocos and Nazca plates and a broad Galápagos hotspot. The complex spreading history of the Cocos-Nazca spreading centre likely controlled the relative distribution of GVP volcanism between the Cocos and Nazca plates while creating lithosphere of variable age/thickness across the region [3]. But recent age and geochemical studies of other hotspot systems show that lithosphere influenced in the past by hotspot activity is more likely to generate late-stage volcanism in response to changing patterns of stress in the lithosphere. Late stage volcanism across a broad Galápagos hotspot might therefore reflect periodic reorganisations of the Gal

  2. Clinical trials and late-stage drug development for Alzheimer’s disease: an appraisal from 1984 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Lon S.; Mangialasche, Francesca; Andreasen, Niels; Feldman, Howard; Giacobini, Ezio; Jones, Roy; Mantua, Valentina; Mecocci, Patrizia; Pani, Luca; Winblad, Bengt; Kivipelto, Miia

    2014-01-01

    The modern era of drug development for Alzheimer’s disease began with the proposal of the cholinergic hypothesis of memory impairment and the 1984 research criteria for Alzheimer’s disease. Since then, despite the evaluation of numerous potential treatments in clinical trials, only four cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine have shown sufficient safety and efficacy to allow marketing approval at an international level. Although this is probably because the other drugs tested were ineffective, inadequate clinical development methods have also been blamed for the failures. Here we review the development of treatments for Alzheimer’s disease during the past 30 years, considering the drugs, potential targets, late-stage clinical trials, development methods, emerging use of biomarkers and evolution of regulatory considerations in order to summarize advances and anticipate future developments. We have considered late-stage Alzheimer’s disease drug development from 1984 to 2013, including individual clinical trials, systematic and qualitative reviews, meta-analyses, methods, commentaries, position papers and guidelines. We then review the evolution of drugs in late clinical development, methods, biomarkers and regulatory issues. Although a range of small molecules and biological products against many targets have been investigated in clinical trials, the predominant drug targets have been the cholinergic system and the amyloid cascade. Trial methods have evolved incrementally: inclusion criteria have largely remained focused on mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease criteria, recently extending to early or prodromal Alzheimer disease or ‘mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer’s disease’, for drugs considered to be disease modifying. The duration of trials has remained at 6 to 12 months for drugs intended to improve symptoms; 18- to 24-month trials have been established for drugs expected to attenuate clinical course. Cognitive performance, activities

  3. Clinical trials and late-stage drug development for Alzheimer's disease: an appraisal from 1984 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Schneider, L S; Mangialasche, F; Andreasen, N; Feldman, H; Giacobini, E; Jones, R; Mantua, V; Mecocci, P; Pani, L; Winblad, B; Kivipelto, M

    2014-03-01

    The modern era of drug development for Alzheimer's disease began with the proposal of the cholinergic hypothesis of memory impairment and the 1984 research criteria for Alzheimer's disease. Since then, despite the evaluation of numerous potential treatments in clinical trials, only four cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine have shown sufficient safety and efficacy to allow marketing approval at an international level. Although this is probably because the other drugs tested were ineffective, inadequate clinical development methods have also been blamed for the failures. Here, we review the development of treatments for Alzheimer's disease during the past 30 years, considering the drugs, potential targets, late-stage clinical trials, development methods, emerging use of biomarkers and evolution of regulatory considerations in order to summarize advances and anticipate future developments. We have considered late-stage Alzheimer's disease drug development from 1984 to 2013, including individual clinical trials, systematic and qualitative reviews, meta-analyses, methods, commentaries, position papers and guidelines. We then review the evolution of drugs in late clinical development, methods, biomarkers and regulatory issues. Although a range of small molecules and biological products against many targets have been investigated in clinical trials, the predominant drug targets have been the cholinergic system and the amyloid cascade. Trial methods have evolved incrementally: inclusion criteria have largely remained focused on mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease criteria, recently extending to early or prodromal Alzheimer disease or 'mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease', for drugs considered to be disease modifying. The duration of trials has remained at 6-12 months for drugs intended to improve symptoms; 18- to 24-month trials have been established for drugs expected to attenuate clinical course. Cognitive performance, activities of daily living

  4. Late-Stage Caregiving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Daily Life Daily Plan Activities Communication Food & Eating Music & Art Personal Care Incontinence Bathing Dressing & Grooming Dental ... For example, try: Playing his or her favorite music Reading portions of books that have meaning for ...

  5. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Test for Trypanosoma gambiense Group 1 with Stem Primers: A Molecular Xenomonitoring Test for Sleeping Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Mburugu, Gitonga N.

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization has targeted Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) for elimination by 2020 with zero incidence by 2030. To achieve and sustain this goal, accurate and easy-to-deploy diagnostic tests for Gambian trypanosomiasis which accounts for over 98% of reported cases will play a crucial role. Most needed will be tools for surveillance of pathogen in vectors (xenomonitoring) since population screening tests are readily available. The development of new tests is expensive and takes a long time while incremental improvement of existing technologies that have potential for xenomonitoring may offer a shorter pathway to tools for HAT surveillance. We have investigated the effect of including a second set of reaction accelerating primers (stem primers) to the standard T. brucei gambiense LAMP test format. The new test format was analyzed with and without outer primers. Amplification was carried out using Rotorgene 6000 and the portable ESE Quant amplification unit capable of real-time data output. The stem LAMP formats indicated shorter time to results (~8 min), were 10–100-fold more sensitive, and indicated higher diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy compared to the standard LAMP test. It was possible to confirm the predicted product using ESE melt curves demonstrating the potential of combining LAMP and real-time technologies as possible tool for HAT molecular xenomonitoring. PMID:28321260

  6. Population genetics of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in sleeping sickness patients with treatment failures in the focus of Mbuji-Mayi, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    PubMed

    Pyana, Patient Pati; Sere, Modou; Kaboré, Jacques; De Meeûs, Thierry; MacLeod, Annette; Bucheton, Bruno; Van Reet, Nick; Büscher, Philippe; Belem, Adrien Marie Gaston; Jamonneau, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. Until recently, all patients in the second or neurological stage of the disease were treated with melarsoprol. At the end of the past and the beginning of the present century, alarmingly high relapse rates in patients treated with melarsoprol were reported in isolated HAT foci. In the Mbuji-Mayi focus of DRC, a particular mutation that confers cross resistance for pentamidine and melarsoprol was recently found for all strains studied. Nevertheless, treatment successfully cured a significant proportion of patients. To check for the existence of other possible genetic factors of the parasites, we genotyped trypanosomes isolated from patients before and after treatment (relapsing patients) with eight microsatellite markers. We found no evidence of any genetic correlation between parasite genotype and treatment outcome and we concluded that relapse or cure probably depend more on patients' factors such as disease progression, nutritional or immunological status or co-infections with other pathogens. The existence of a melarsoprol and pentamidine resistance associated mutation at such high rates highlights an increasing problem, even for other drugs, especially those using the same transporters as melarsoprol and pentamidine.

  7. RNA-seq de novo Assembly Reveals Differential Gene Expression in Glossina palpalis gambiensis Infected with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense vs. Non-Infected and Self-Cured Flies

    PubMed Central

    Hamidou Soumana, Illiassou; Klopp, Christophe; Ravel, Sophie; Nabihoudine, Ibouniyamine; Tchicaya, Bernadette; Parrinello, Hugues; Abate, Luc; Rialle, Stéphanie; Geiger, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (Tbg), causing the sleeping sickness chronic form, completes its developmental cycle within the tsetse fly vector Glossina palpalis gambiensis (Gpg) before its transmission to humans. Within the framework of an anti-vector disease control strategy, a global gene expression profiling of trypanosome infected (susceptible), non-infected, and self-cured (refractory) tsetse flies was performed, on their midguts, to determine differential genes expression resulting from in vivo trypanosomes, tsetse flies (and their microbiome) interactions. An RNAseq de novo assembly was achieved. The assembled transcripts were mapped to reference sequences for functional annotation. Twenty-four percent of the 16,936 contigs could not be annotated, possibly representing untranslated mRNA regions, or Gpg- or Tbg-specific ORFs. The remaining contigs were classified into 65 functional groups. Only a few transposable elements were present in the Gpg midgut transcriptome, which may represent active transpositions and play regulatory roles. One thousand three hundred and seventy three genes differentially expressed (DEGs) between stimulated and non-stimulated flies were identified at day-3 post-feeding; 52 and 1025 between infected and self-cured flies at 10 and 20 days post-feeding, respectively. The possible roles of several DEGs regarding fly susceptibility and refractoriness are discussed. The results provide new means to decipher fly infection mechanisms, crucial to develop anti-vector control strategies. PMID:26617594

  8. Late stage oxidations during the biosynthesis of the 2-pyridone tenellin in the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Halo, Laura M; Heneghan, Mary N; Yakasai, Ahmed A; Song, Zhongshu; Williams, Katherine; Bailey, Andrew M; Cox, Russell J; Lazarus, Colin M; Simpson, Thomas J

    2008-12-31

    Late stage oxidations during the biosynthesis of the 2-pyridone tenellin in the insect pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana were investigated by a combination of gene knockout, antisense RNA, and gene coexpression studies. Open reading frames (ORF) 3 and 4 of the tenellin biosynthetic gene cluster were previously shown to encode a trans-acting enoyl reductase and a hybrid polyketide synthase nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS), respectively, which together synthesize the acyltetramic acid pretenellin-A. In this work, we have shown that ORF1 encodes a cytochrome P450 oxidase, which catalyzes an unprecedented oxidative ring expansion of pretenellin-A to form the 2-pyridone core of tenellin and related metabolites, and that this enzyme does not catalyze the formation of a hydroxylated precursor. Similar genes appear to be associated with PKS-NRPS genes in other fungi. ORF2 encodes an unusual cytochrome P450 monooxygenase required for the selective N-hydroxylation of the 2-pyridone which is incapable of N-hydroxylation of acyltetramic acids.

  9. Magma mixing in late-stage granitoids of the Pioneer intrusive complex, south central Idaho and tectonic implications

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, A.J.; Geist, D. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Eocene granitoids that intrude the Pioneer Mountain core complex, located approximately twenty miles northeast of Sun Valley, Idaho, grad west to east from mafic granodiorite to porphyritic quartz monzonite. The two main phases, porphyritic coarse-grained quartz monzonite and fine-grained granodiorite, exhibit field evidence suggestive of magma mixing as indicated by gradational contacts with swirling textures on scales from centimeters to tens of meters, and both phases are found as inclusion within each other. Generally, granodiorite intrudes quartz monzonite and may represent a late stage injection into the center of the semi-consolidated monzonitic magma. Petrological modeling indicates the hybrids are mixtures of the monzonite and granodiorite. Field and petrographic evidence suggest emplacement of the granitoids occurred before latest faulting, as demonstrated by a lack of contact metamorphic effects on the surrounding Paleozoic sediments. Moreover, the development of gneissic fabric, cataclastic and mylonitic fabrics, development of cross-cutting chlorite, epidote, and quartz veinlets, and brecciated fault contacts within the granitoids provide further support for Eocene emplacement prior to or contemporaneous with faulting. These observations provide additional constraints on the cessation of extensional tectonics in south central Idaho.

  10. Extreme chemical conditions of crystallisation of Umbrian Melilitolites and wealth of rare, late stage/hydrothermal minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoppa, F.; Schiazza, M.

    2014-12-01

    Melilitolites of the Umbria Latium Ultra-alkaline District display a complete crystallisation sequence of peculiar, late-stage mineral phases and hydrothermal/cement minerals, analogous to fractionated mineral associations from the Kola Peninsula. This paper summarises 20 years of research which has resulted in the identification of a large number of mineral species, some very rare or completely new and some not yet classified. The progressive increasing alkalinity of the residual liquid allowed the formation of Zr-Ti phases and further delhayelitemacdonaldite mineral crystallisation in the groundmass. The presence of leucite and kalsilite in the igneous assemblage is unusual and gives a kamafugitic nature to the rocks. Passage to non-igneous temperatures (T<600 °C) is marked by the metastable reaction and formation of a rare and complex zeolite association (T<300 °C). Circulation of low-temperature (T<100 °C) K-Ca-Ba-CO2-SO2-fluids led to the precipitation of sulphates and hydrated and/or hydroxylated silicate-sulphate-carbonates. As a whole, this mineral assemblage can be considered typical of ultra-alkaline carbonatitic rocks.

  11. Effects of laser immunotherapy on late-stage, metastatic breast cancer patients in a Phase II clinical trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Zhou, Feifan; Li, Xiaosong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Alleruzzo, Luciano; Chen, Wei R.

    2014-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT), a novel technique with a local intervention to induce systemic antitumor effects, was developed to treat metastatic cancers. The pre-clinical studies of LIT have shown its unique characteristics in generating a specific antitumor immunity in treating metastatic tumors in rats and mice. For late-stage, metastatic breast cancer patients, who were considered to be out of other available treatment options, we conducted a small Phase II clinical trial using LIT starting in 2009 in Lima, Peru. This Phase II study was closed in December of 2012, as acknowldged by the Ministry of Health (MOH) of Peur letter 438-2014-OGITT/INS dated March 5th, 2014. Ten patients were enrolled and received LIT in one or multiple 4-week treatment cycles. At the study closing date, four patients were alive and two of them remained cancer free. Here, following the successful conclusion of our Phase II study, we report the clinical effects of LIT on metastatic breast cancer patients. Specifically, we present the overall status of all the patients three years after the treatment and also the outcomes of two long-term surviving patients.

  12. Characterization of mesostasis regions in lunar basalts: Understanding late-stage melt evolution and its influence on apatite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, Nicola J.; TartèSe, Romain; Anand, Mahesh; Westrenen, Wim; Griffiths, Alexandra A.; Barrett, Thomas J.; Franchi, Ian A.

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies geared toward understanding the volatile abundances of the lunar interior have focused on the volatile-bearing accessory mineral apatite. Translating measurements of volatile abundances in lunar apatite into the volatile inventory of the silicate melts from which they crystallized, and ultimately of the mantle source regions of lunar magmas, however, has proved more difficult than initially thought. In this contribution, we report a detailed characterization of mesostasis regions in four Apollo mare basalts (10044, 12064, 15058, and 70035) in order to ascertain the compositions of the melts from which apatite crystallized. The texture, modal mineralogy, and reconstructed bulk composition of these mesostasis regions vary greatly within and between samples. There is no clear relationship between bulk-rock basaltic composition and that of bulk-mesostasis regions, indicating that bulk-rock composition may have little influence on mesostasis compositions. The development of individual melt pockets, combined with the occurrence of silicate liquid immiscibility, exerts greater control on the composition and texture of mesostasis regions. In general, the reconstructed late-stage lunar melts have roughly andesitic to dacitic compositions with low alkali contents, displaying much higher SiO2 abundances than the bulk compositions of their host magmatic rocks. Relevant partition coefficients for apatite-melt volatile partitioning under lunar conditions should, therefore, be derived from experiments conducted using intermediate compositions instead of compositions representing mare basalts.

  13. Differential responses of individuals with late-stage dementia to two novel environments: a multimedia room and an interior garden.

    PubMed

    Goto, Seiko; Kamal, Naveed; Puzio, Helene; Kobylarz, Fred; Herrup, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the responses of individuals with advanced dementia to two novel sensory environments in a nursing home facility. The first was a multisensory Snoezelen room; the second was a temporary Japanese garden. Subjects viewed each environment twice a week for 15 minutes during the study. Stress was measured using heart rate and informant-based behavioral changes. By these criteria, the garden-viewing group showed positive behavioral changes while the responses of the subjects in the Snoezelen group were more negative. The response of the subjects' pulse rate was most dramatic. During the 15 minutes in the garden, the average rate (all subjects/all visits) was significantly less than in their residential room. In the Snoezelen room, we detected little or no change. The impact of the garden could also be seen in the negative behavioral signs elicited upon returning the subjects to the garden room after the installation had been replaced with plants and furniture arranged with no formal design. We propose that exposure to a small interior Japanese garden could be an effective intervention for individuals suffering from late stage Alzheimer's disease.

  14. C-H bond activation enables the rapid construction and late-stage diversification of functional molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wencel-Delord, Joanna; Glorius, Frank

    2013-05-01

    The beginning of the twenty-first century has witnessed significant advances in the field of C-H bond activation, and this transformation is now an established piece in the synthetic chemists' toolbox. This methodology has the potential to be used in many different areas of chemistry, for example it provides a perfect opportunity for the late-stage diversification of various kinds of organic scaffolds, ranging from relatively small molecules like drug candidates, to complex polydisperse organic compounds such as polymers. In this way, C-H activation approaches enable relatively straightforward access to a plethora of analogues or can help to streamline the lead-optimization phase. Furthermore, synthetic pathways for the construction of complex organic materials can now be designed that are more atom- and step-economical than previous methods and, in some cases, can be based on synthetic disconnections that are just not possible without C-H activation. This Perspective highlights the potential of metal-catalysed C-H bond activation reactions, which now extend beyond the field of traditional synthetic organic chemistry.

  15. X-Ray Computed Tomography: Semiautomated Volumetric Analysis of Late-Stage Lung Tumors as a Basis for Response Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Bendtsen, C.; Kietzmann, M.; Korn, R.; Mozley, P. D.; Schmidt, G.; Binnig, G.

    2011-01-01

    Background. This study presents a semiautomated approach for volumetric analysis of lung tumors and evaluates the feasibility of using volumes as an alternative to line lengths as a basis for response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST). The overall goal for the implementation was to accurately, precisely, and efficiently enable the analyses of lesions in the lung under the guidance of an operator. Methods. An anthropomorphic phantom with embedded model masses and 71 time points in 10 clinical cases with advanced lung cancer was analyzed using a semi-automated workflow. The implementation was done using the Cognition Network Technology. Results. Analysis of the phantom showed an average accuracy of 97%. The analyses of the clinical cases showed both intra- and interreader variabilities of approximately 5% on average with an upper 95% confidence interval of 14% and 19%, respectively. Compared to line lengths, the use of volumes clearly shows enhanced sensitivity with respect to determining response to therapy. Conclusions. It is feasible to perform volumetric analysis efficiently with high accuracy and low variability, even in patients with late-stage cancer who have complex lesions. PMID:21747819

  16. [The role of clinical-electrophysiological indices in therapy for late-stage residual stroke by dynamic correction of proprioception].

    PubMed

    Veĭn, A M; Shvarkov, S B; Khaspekova, N B; Vendrova, M I; Davydov, O S; Bobrovskaia, A N

    2001-01-01

    The new method dynamic proprioceptive correction using a medical loading costume was included into complex therapy in patients with late-stage residual stroke. Application of the costume promoted normalization of complex locomotor acts of walking by correcting proprioceptive pulsation resulted from the system of elastic draughts. Thus, a new motor stereotype was forced upon the patients. Clinical observation, computer analysis of the motor potential, spectrum of heart rhythm variabilities before and after therapy, and psychological testing were performed in 120 patients with motor disorders (pareses, paralyses) resulted from acute cerebral circulatory disorders. A steady-state clinical effect (p < 0.05) was found in 71.9% of the patients after 15 sessions of therapy. The patients became to walk independently, a possibility to self-attendance appeared, their speech became better. Lateralization of a damage and preservation of both the most significant homeostatic vasomotor mechanisms and the cerebral mechanisms of preparation of a movement with the minimal manifestations of emotional-affective disorders were shown to have impact on the patients' rehabilitation and on the early clinical features of pyramidal defect.

  17. The Kepler Dichotomy in Planetary Disks: Linking Kepler Observables to Simulations of Late-stage Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, John; Ballard, Sarah

    2016-11-01

    NASA’s Kepler Mission uncovered a wealth of planetary systems, many with planets on short-period orbits. These short-period systems reside around 50% of Sun-like stars and are similarly prevalent around M dwarfs. Their formation and subsequent evolution is the subject of active debate. In this paper, we simulate late-stage, in situ planet formation across a grid of planetesimal disks with varying surface density profiles and total mass. We compare simulation results with observable characteristics of the Kepler sample. We identify mixture models with different primordial planetesimal disk properties that self-consistently recover the multiplicity, radius, period and period ratio, and duration ratio distributions of the Kepler planets. We draw three main conclusions. (1) We favor a “frozen-in” narrative for systems of short-period planets, in which they are stable over long timescales, as opposed to metastable. (2) The “Kepler dichotomy,” an observed phenomenon of the Kepler sample wherein the architectures of planetary systems appear to either vary significantly or have multiple modes, can naturally be explained by formation within planetesimal disks with varying surface density profiles. Finally, (3) we quantify the nature of the “Kepler dichotomy” for both GK stars and M dwarfs, and find that it varies with stellar type. While the mode of planet formation that accounts for high multiplicity systems occurs in 24% ± 7% of planetary systems orbiting GK stars, it occurs in 63% ± 16% of planetary systems orbiting M dwarfs.

  18. Differences in Late-Stage Diagnosis, Treatment, and Colorectal Cancer-Related Death between Rural and Urban African Americans and Whites in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Robert B.; Markossian, Talar W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Disparities in health outcomes due to a diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) have been reported for a number of demographic groups. This study was conducted to examine the outcomes of late-stage diagnosis, treatment, and cancer-related death according to race and geographic residency status (rural vs urban). Methods: This study utilized…

  19. Total synthesis of gracilioether F. Development and application of Lewis acid promoted ketene–alkene [2+2] cycloadditions and late-stage C—H oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Rasik, Christopher M.; Brown, M. Kevin

    2014-12-22

    The first synthesis of gracilioether F, a polyketide natural product with an unusual tricyclic core and five contiguous stereocenters, is described. Key steps of the synthesis include a Lewis acid promoted ketene–alkene [2+2] cycloaddition and a late-stage carboxylic acid directed C(sp³)—H oxidation. The synthesis requires only eight steps from norbornadiene.

  20. Impact of Age, Race and Socio-economic Status on Temporal Trends in Late-Stage Prostate Cancer Diagnosis in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Goovaerts, Pierre; Xiao, Hong; Gwede, Clement K.; Tan, Fei; Huang, Youjie; Adunlin, Georges; Ali, Askal

    2015-01-01

    Individual-level data from the Florida Cancer Data System (1981–2007) were analysed to explore temporal trends of prostate cancer late-stage diagnosis, and how they vary based on race, income and age. Annual census-tract rates were computed for two races (white and black) and two age categories (40–65, >65) before being aggregated according to census tract median household incomes. Joinpoint regression and a new disparity statistic were applied to model temporal trends and detect potential racial and socio-economic differences. Multi-dimensional scaling was used as an innovative way to visualize similarities among temporal trends in a 2-D space. Analysis of time-series indicated that late-stage diagnosis was generally more prevalent among blacks, for age category 40–64 compared to older patients covered by Medicare, and among classes of lower socio-economic status. Joinpoint regression also showed that the rate of decline in late-stage diagnosis was similar among older patients. For younger patients, the decline occurred at a faster pace for blacks with rates becoming similar to whites in the late 90s, in particular for higher incomes. Both races displayed distinct spatial patterns with higher rates of late-stage diagnosis in the Florida Panhandle for whites whereas high rates clustered in South-eastern Florida for blacks. PMID:26644992

  1. Impact of Age, Race and Socio-economic Status on Temporal Trends in Late-Stage Prostate Cancer Diagnosis in Florida.

    PubMed

    Goovaerts, Pierre; Xiao, Hong; Gwede, Clement K; Tan, Fei; Huang, Youjie; Adunlin, Georges; Ali, Askal

    2015-11-01

    Individual-level data from the Florida Cancer Data System (1981-2007) were analysed to explore temporal trends of prostate cancer late-stage diagnosis, and how they vary based on race, income and age. Annual census-tract rates were computed for two races (white and black) and two age categories (40-65, >65) before being aggregated according to census tract median household incomes. Joinpoint regression and a new disparity statistic were applied to model temporal trends and detect potential racial and socio-economic differences. Multi-dimensional scaling was used as an innovative way to visualize similarities among temporal trends in a 2-D space. Analysis of time-series indicated that late-stage diagnosis was generally more prevalent among blacks, for age category 40-64 compared to older patients covered by Medicare, and among classes of lower socio-economic status. Joinpoint regression also showed that the rate of decline in late-stage diagnosis was similar among older patients. For younger patients, the decline occurred at a faster pace for blacks with rates becoming similar to whites in the late 90s, in particular for higher incomes. Both races displayed distinct spatial patterns with higher rates of late-stage diagnosis in the Florida Panhandle for whites whereas high rates clustered in South-eastern Florida for blacks.

  2. Efficacy and safety of osteoporosis medications in a rat model of late-stage chronic kidney disease accompanied by secondary hyperparathyroidism and hyperphosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Ota, M; Takahata, M; Shimizu, T; Kanehira, Y; Kimura-Suda, H; Kameda, Y; Hamano, H; Hiratsuka, S; Sato, D; Iwasaki, N

    2017-04-01

    This study showed that bisphosphonate was safe and effective for the treatment of bone disorders in stage 4 chronic kidney disease (CKD) rats. Intermittent teriparatide therapy showed an anabolic action on bone even under secondary hyperparathyroidism conditions without having an adverse effect on mineral metabolism in late-stage CKD.

  3. Intraperitoneal administration of shiga toxin type 2 in rats in the late stage of pregnancy produces premature delivery of dead fetuses.

    PubMed

    Burdet, J; Zotta, E; Franchi, A M; Ibarra, C

    2009-06-01

    Infection associated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and subsequent Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome (HUS) have become relevant in public health since STEC is considered as one of the most important emergent pathogens. STEC infection may either be asymptomatic or begin with watery diarrhea associated with hemorrhagic colitis and HUS. The major virulence factor of STEC is Shiga toxin type 1 or 2 (Stx1, Stx2) although strains that express only Stx2 are highly prevalent. Up to now, it has not been established whether STEC infection affect pregnant women. In this study, we evaluated the effect of Stx2 on maternal lethality, fetal status and delivery time by injecting Stx2 in rats in the late stage of pregnancy. Stx2 induced fetal resorption, placental abruption, intrauterine hemorrhage and fetal death at 1-2 days post-injection in a dose-dependent manner. With 2ng Stx2/g body weight, placentas and fetuses presented extensive necrotic areas, while uteri and kidneys showed normal histology. Immunolocalization of Stx2 was observed in placentas and fetuses. With 4 and 6ng Stx2/g body weight maternal death was also observed. Those rats that survived after Stx2-treatment were able to become pregnant and deliver normal pups at term. Our results show, for the first time, that the preterm labor with fetal death observed in treated rats may be a consequence of the action of Stx2 on the feto-maternal unit. Although there are no reports of Stx2 effects in human pregnancy, we speculate that STEC infections could be one of the causes not yet determined of fetal morbimortality.

  4. Origin of rhythmic anorthositic-pyroxenitic layering in the Damiao anorthosite complex, China: Implications for late-stage fractional crystallization and genesis of Fe-Ti oxide ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li-Xing; Li, Hou-Min; Li, Yong-Zhan; Yao, Tong; Yang, Xiu-Qing; Chen, Jing

    2015-12-01

    The ∼1.7 Ga Damiao anorthosite complex (DAC) in the North China Craton contains abundant Ti-magnetite-dominated ore deposits. Both the Fe-Ti-P-rich silicate rocks and massive Fe-Ti-(P) ores occur as discordant late-stage dikes cross-cutting early-stage anorthosites with irregular but sharp boundaries. Field and petrographic observations indicate that some late-stage dikes are composed of unique oxide-apatite gabbronorites (OAGNs), whereas others comprise well-developed alternating late-stage anorthosites and Fe-Ti-P-rich pyroxenites defining rhythmic layers. Massive Fe-Ti-(P) ores are closely related to the Fe-Ti-P-rich pyroxenites. Plagioclase and whole-rock compositions of different rock types were analyzed to constrain the late-stage magma evolution and genesis of the Fe-Ti oxide ores. The similar mineralogical assemblages, REE and HFSE patterns suggest that the different rock types formed by differentiation from a common parental magma. Early-stage anorthosites are characterized by positive Eu anomalies and low REE contents, whereas the late-stage dike-like rocks display no significant Eu anomalies and high REE contents. Plagioclase compositions in the late-stage rocks show a decrease of An contents when compared to that of the early-stage rocks. Based on field relations, petrography and well-defined linear compositional trends, the sequence of crystallization is inferred as: early-stage anorthosites + leuconorites + norites, OAGNs, late-stage anorthosites + Fe-Ti-P-rich pyroxenites + massive Fe-Ti-(P) ores, and massive Fe-Ti-(P) ores. The OAGNs which underwent relatively rapid crystallization represent an early phase during the residual magma evolution after anorthosite separation, whereas the rhythmic layers formed by slow but extensive fractional crystallization of interstitial melt. High solubility of phosphorous played an important role in the formation of rhythmic layering. Massive Fe-Ti-(P) ores crystallized and segregated directly from the magma of Fe

  5. Aquaporin 2 mutations in Trypanosoma brucei gambiense field isolates correlate with decreased susceptibility to pentamidine and melarsoprol.

    PubMed

    Graf, Fabrice E; Ludin, Philipp; Wenzler, Tanja; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; Pyana, Patient Pati; Büscher, Philippe; de Koning, Harry P; Horn, David; Mäser, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The predominant mechanism of drug resistance in African trypanosomes is decreased drug uptake due to loss-of-function mutations in the genes for the transporters that mediate drug import. The role of transporters as determinants of drug susceptibility is well documented from laboratory-selected Trypanosoma brucei mutants. But clinical isolates, especially of T. b. gambiense, are less amenable to experimental investigation since they do not readily grow in culture without prior adaptation. Here we analyze a selected panel of 16 T. brucei ssp. field isolates that (i) have been adapted to axenic in vitro cultivation and (ii) mostly stem from treatment-refractory cases. For each isolate, we quantify the sensitivity to melarsoprol, pentamidine, and diminazene, and sequence the genomic loci of the transporter genes TbAT1 and TbAQP2. The former encodes the well-characterized aminopurine permease P2 which transports several trypanocides including melarsoprol, pentamidine, and diminazene. We find that diminazene-resistant field isolates of T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense carry the same set of point mutations in TbAT1 that was previously described from lab mutants. Aquaglyceroporin 2 has only recently been identified as a second transporter involved in melarsoprol/pentamidine cross-resistance. Here we describe two different kinds of TbAQP2 mutations found in T. b. gambiense field isolates: simple loss of TbAQP2, or loss of wild-type TbAQP2 allele combined with the formation of a novel type of TbAQP2/3 chimera. The identified mutant T. b. gambiense are 40- to 50-fold less sensitive to pentamidine and 3- to 5-times less sensitive to melarsoprol than the reference isolates. We thus demonstrate for the first time that rearrangements of the TbAQP2/TbAQP3 locus accompanied by TbAQP2 gene loss also occur in the field, and that the T. b. gambiense carrying such mutations correlate with a significantly reduced susceptibility to pentamidine and melarsoprol.

  6. The Mineralogy of Late-Stage Lunar Volcanism as Observed by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper on Chandrayaan-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staid, M.; Pieters, C. M.; Sunshine, J. M.; Head, J. W.; Taylor, L. A.; Kramer, G. Y.; Isaacson, P.; Klima, R. L.

    2009-12-01

    The last major phases of lunar volcanism produced spectrally unique, high-titanium basalts on the western nearside of the Moon. Various techniques have dated many of these flows as younger than 3.0 Ga [1]; some areas may have erupted as recently as ~1.2 Ga [2, 3], or almost two billion years after the youngest basalts obtained on sample return missions. The reflectance properties of these mare deposits, which occur in Oceanus Procellarum and Mare Imbrium, were first characterized based on telescopic spectra of their soils that showed a relatively strong 1 μm feature and an attenuated or weak 2 μm absorption, consistent with the presence of abundant olivine or Fe-rich glass [4]. Subsequent studies of mare craters and soils using higher spatial resolution Clementine data have further supported interpretations of the presence of abundant olivine within these basalts [5, 6]; however, these data lack the spectral resolution necessary for detailed mineralogical characterizations. The Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) on Chandrayaan-1 has provided detailed new measurements of these basalts at spatial and spectral resolutions required for mineralogical interpretation and mapping of distinct compositional units. The M3 imaging spectrometer covers the wavelength range of ~430 to 3000 nm, acquiring data in 85 spectral bands at 140 to 280 m/pixel in its global mapping mode and 259 spectral bands and higher spatial resolutions in it’s targeted-mode. M3 has confirmed the presence of strong 1 μm and relatively weak 2 μm absorptions for fresh craters and mare soils within these late-stage basalts. The strength of these features, relative to typical lunar basalts dominated by 1 and 2 μm pyroxene absorptions, is observed to vary spatially and stratigraphically. Optically immature craters within younger flows display very-strong and long-wavelength 1 μm ferrous absorptions and very-weak two micron absorptions consistent with abundant olivine and picritic basalt compositions. Mare

  7. Diagenesis and late-stage porosity development in the pennsylvanian strawn formation, val verde basin, Texas, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    David, Newell K.; Goldstein, R.H.; Burdick, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    The Middle Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Strawn Formation in the Trans-Pecos area of Texas was deposited during relative tectonic quiescence that prevailed before rapid infilling of the Val Verde Basin. It represents one of a series of backstepping carbonate ramps formed on the craton side of this foreland basin. Strawn Formation carbonate rocks in three cores - Conoco Anna McClung #3-1, Alex Mitchell S2-1R, and Creek Ranch #10-1 - show several shallowing-up ward sequences, each a few meters thick. The Creek Ranch core displays the deepest-water characteristics of the three cores; the lower part of this core is dominated by graded bedding. The Mitchell and McClung cores contain skeletal-rich carbonates. Both of these cores display characteristics of shallow-water bank or lagoonal environments. All three cores have approximately the same diagenetic history. Primary fluid inclusions indicate early porosity-occluding interparticle and mold-filling calcite precipitated from water with a narrow range of salinities. Modal salinities are that of seawater, but slightly lesser salinities (indicating mixing of seawater and meteoric water) and slightly greater salinities (indicating evaporative concentration of seawater) are also indicated. The influence of meteoric groundwater can be detected by stable-isotope analyses of the early cements at stratigraphic levels that correlate to the tops of the major shallowing-upward depositional sequences. However, subaerial exposure surfaces are not demonstrated in these cores but were likely to be present updip. Most porosity is cement-reduced vugs, dissolution-enlarged (and cement-reduced) molds (> 1/16 mm, < 4 mm), and fractures. Minor intraparticle, intercrystalline, and shelter porosity is also present. Reservoir porosity is caused by fracturing and a late-stage dissolution event. Dissolution in the Creek Ranch core is not as pronounced as in the other cores because of a dearth of skeletal material. Porous zones in the McClung and

  8. Iridium-catalyzed C-H borylation of heteroarenes: scope, regioselectivity, application to late-stage functionalization, and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Matthew A; Hartwig, John F

    2014-03-19

    A study on the iridium-catalyzed C-H borylation of heteroarenes is reported. Several heteroarenes containing multiple heteroatoms were found to be amenable to C-H borylation catalyzed by the combination of an iridium(I) precursor and tetramethylphenanthroline. The investigations of the scope of the reaction led to the development of powerful rules for predicting the regioselectivity of borylation, foremost of which is that borylation occurs distal to nitrogen atoms. One-pot functionalizations are reported of the heteroaryl boronate esters formed in situ, demonstrating the usefulness of the reported methodology for the synthesis of complex heteroaryl structures. Application of this methodology to the synthesis and late-stage functionalization of biologically active compounds is also demonstrated. Mechanistic studies show that basic heteroarenes can bind to the catalyst and alter the resting state from the olefin-bound complex observed during arene borylation to a species containing a bound heteroarene, leading to catalyst deactivation. Studies on the origins of the observed regioselectivity show that borylation occurs distal to N-H bonds due to rapid N-H borylation, creating an unfavorable steric environment for borylation adjacent to these bonds. Computational studies and mechanistic studies show that the lack of observable borylation of C-H bonds adjacent to basic nitrogen is not the result of coordination to a bulky Lewis acid prior to C-H activation, but the combination of a higher-energy pathway for the borylation of these bonds relative to other C-H bonds and the instability of the products formed from borylation adjacent to basic nitrogen.

  9. Necropsy findings in American alligator late-stage embryos and hatchlings from northcentral Florida lakes contaminated with organochlorine pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, M.S.; Del, Piero F.; Wiebe, J.J.; Rauschenberger, H.R.; Gross, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    Increased American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) embryo and neonatal mortality has been reported from several northcentral Florida lakes contaminated with old-use organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). However, a clear relationship among these contaminants and egg viability has not been established, suggesting the involvement of additional factors in these mortalities. Thus, the main objective of this study was to determine the ultimate cause of mortality of American alligator late-stage embryos and hatchlings through the conduction of detailed pathological examinations, and to evaluate better the role of OCPs in these mortalities. Between 2000 and 2001, 236 dead alligators were necropsied at or near hatching (after ???65 days of artificial incubation and up to 1 mo of age posthatch). Dead animals were collected from 18 clutches ranging in viability from 0% to 95%. Total OCP concentrations in yolk ranged from ???100 to 52,000 ??g/kg, wet weight. The most common gross findings were generalized edema (34%) and organ hyperemia (29%), followed by severe emaciation (14%) and gross deformities (3%). Histopathologic examination revealed lesions in 35% of the animals, with over half of the cases being pneumonia, pulmonary edema, and atelectasis. Within and across clutches, dead embryos and hatchlings compared with their live cohorts were significantly smaller and lighter. Although alterations in growth and development were not related to yolk OCPs, there was an increase in prevalence of histologic lesions in clutches with high OCPs. Overall, these results indicate that general growth retardation and respiratory abnormalities were a major contributing factor in observed mortalities and that contaminants may increase the susceptibility of animals to developing certain pathologic conditions. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2006.

  10. Conserved prosegment residues stabilize a late-stage folding transition state of pepsin independently of ground states.

    PubMed

    Dee, Derek R; Horimoto, Yasumi; Yada, Rickey Y

    2014-01-01

    The native folding of certain zymogen-derived enzymes is completely dependent upon a prosegment domain to stabilize the folding transition state, thereby catalyzing the folding reaction. Generally little is known about how the prosegment accomplishes this task. It was previously shown that the prosegment catalyzes a late-stage folding transition between a stable misfolded state and the native state of pepsin. In this study, the contributions of specific prosegment residues to catalyzing pepsin folding were investigated by introducing individual Ala substitutions and measuring the effects on the bimolecular folding reaction between the prosegment peptide and pepsin. The effects of mutations on the free energies of the individual misfolded and native ground states and the transition state were compared using measurements of prosegment-pepsin binding and folding kinetics. Five out of the seven prosegment residues examined yielded relatively large kinetic effects and minimal ground state perturbations upon mutation, findings which indicate that these residues form strengthened and/or non-native contacts in the transition state. These five residues are semi- to strictly conserved, while only a non-conserved residue had no kinetic effect. One conserved residue was shown to form native structure in the transition state. These results indicated that the prosegment, which is only 44 residues long, has evolved a high density of contacts that preferentially stabilize the folding transition state over the ground states. It is postulated that the prosegment forms extensive non-native contacts during the process of catalyzing correct inter- and intra-domain contacts during the final stages of folding. These results have implications for understanding the folding of multi-domain proteins and for the evolution of prosegment-catalyzed folding.

  11. Ribozyme rescue of photoreceptor cells in P23H transgenic rats: long-term survival and late-stage therapy.

    PubMed

    LaVail, M M; Yasumura, D; Matthes, M T; Drenser, K A; Flannery, J G; Lewin, A S; Hauswirth, W W

    2000-10-10

    Ribozyme-directed cleavage of mutant mRNAs appears to be a potentially effective therapeutic measure for dominantly inherited diseases. We previously demonstrated that two ribozymes targeted to the P23H mutation in rhodopsin slow photoreceptor degeneration in transgenic rats for up to 3 months of age when injected before significant degeneration at postnatal day (P) 15. We now have explored whether ribozyme rescue persists at older ages, and whether ribozymes are effective when injected later in the degeneration after significant photoreceptor cell loss. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors incorporating a proximal bovine rod opsin promoter were used to transfer either hairpin or hammerhead ribozyme genes to photoreceptors. For the study of long-term survival, rAAV was administered by subretinal injection at P15, and the rats were allowed to live up to 8 months of age. For the study of late-stage gene transfer, rAAV was administered at P30 or P45, when 40-45% of the photoreceptors already had degenerated. Eyes were examined functionally by the electroretinogram and structurally by morphometric analysis. When injected at P15, expression of either ribozyme markedly slowed the rate of photoreceptor degeneration for at least 8 months and resulted in significantly greater electroretinogram amplitudes at least up to P180. When injected at P30 or P45, virtually the same number of photoreceptors survived at P130 as when injected at P15. Ribozyme rescue appears to be a potentially effective, long-term therapy for autosomal dominant retinal degeneration and is highly effective even when the gene transfer is done after significant photoreceptor cell loss.

  12. Repetitive Religious Chanting Modulates the Late-Stage Brain Response to Fear- and Stress-Provoking Pictures

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Junling; Fan, Jicong; Wu, Bonnie W.; Halkias, Georgios T.; Chau, Maggie; Fung, Peter C.; Chang, Chunqi; Zhang, Zhiguo; Hung, Yeung-Sam; Sik, Hinhung

    2017-01-01

    echo similar research findings on Christian religious practices and brain responses to negative stimuli. Hence, prayer/religious practices may have cross-cultural universality in emotion regulation. This study shows for the first time that Buddhist chanting, or in a broader sense, repetition of religious prayers will not modulate brain responses to negative stimuli during the early perceptual stage, but only during the late-stage emotional/cognitive processing. PMID:28119651

  13. Determination of temperature dependent structure evolution by fast-Fourier transform at late stage spinodal decomposition in bicontinuous biopolymer mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorén, Niklas; Langton, Maud; Hermansson, Anne-Marie

    2002-06-01

    the intermediate or transitional stages of spinodal decomposition. Similarly, after the crossover, it was found that phase separation was in the late stages of spinodal decomposition. Furukawa master plots showed that the structure growth obeyed dynamical scaling and that the dimensionality of the growth was three, given off-critical conditions.

  14. Pioneer and late stage tropical rainforest tree species (French Guiana) growing under common conditions differ in leaf gas exchange regulation, carbon isotope discrimination and leaf water potential.

    PubMed

    Huc, R; Ferhi, A; Guehl, J M

    1994-09-01

    Leaf gas exchange rates, predawn Ψwp and daily minimum Ψwm leaf water potentials were measured during a wet-to-dry season transition in pioneer (Jacaranda copaia, Goupia glabra andCarapa guianensis) and late stage rainforest tree species (Dicorynia guianensis andEperua falcata) growing in common conditions in artificial stands in French Guiana. Carbon isotope discrimination (Δ) was assessed by measuring the stable carbon isotope composition of the cellulose fraction of wood cores. The Δ values were 2.7‰ higher in the pioneer species than in the late stage species. The calculated time integratedC i values derived from the Δ values averaged 281 μmol mol(-1) in the pioneers and 240 μmol mol(-1) in the late stage species. The corresponding time-integrated values of intrinsinc water-use efficiency [ratio CO2 assimilation rate (A)/leaf conductance (g)] ranged from 37 to 47 mmol mol(-1) in the pioneers and the values were 64 and 74 mmol mol(-1) for the two late stage species. The high Δ values were associated-at least inJ. copaia-with high maximumg values and with high plant intrinsinc specific hydraulic conductance [C≔g/(Ψwm-Ψwp], which could reflect a high competitive ability for water and nutrient uptake in the absence of soil drought in the pioneers. A further clear discriminating trait of the pioneer species was the very sensitive stomatal response to drought in the soil, which might be associated with a high vulnerability to cavitation in these species. From a methodological point of view, the results show the relevance of Δ for distinguishing ecophysiological functional types among rainforest trees.

  15. Correlation between Ultrasound Reflection Intensity and Tumor Ablation Ratio of Late-Stage Pancreatic Carcinoma in HIFU Therapy: Dynamic Observation on Ultrasound Reflection Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Hui-Yu; Miao, Li-Ying; Wang, Jin-Rui; Xiong, Liu-Lin; Yan, Fang; Zheng, Cui-Shan; Jia, Jian-Wen; Cui, Li-Gang; Chen, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is thermal ablation treatment for late-stage pancreatic carcinoma with widely recognized safety and effectiveness, but there are currently no instant assessment methods for its ablation effect. It is vital to find a real-time high-sensitive assessment method. This research aims to dynamically observe the variation rules of ultrasound reflection intensity, analyze the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio, and find out the value of ultrasound reflection intensity in prognosis of HIFU ablation effect. HIFU intermittent therapies were retrospectively analyzed for 31 subjects with late-stage pancreatic carcinoma from March 2007 to December 2009 in the study. The variation rules of the ultrasound reflection intensity during HIFU therapy were summarized and the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio was analyzed based on the tumor ablation ratio indicated by CT scanning. The conclusion is that variation of ultrasound reflection intensity can be used for initial assessment of tumor ablation in HIFU therapy and early prognosis of overall HIFU ablation, providing important clinical basis for improving safety and effectiveness of HIFU therapy. Ultrasound can work as a real-time imaging instrument for observation of HIFU ablation effect in treating late-stage pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:24453916

  16. Impact of a National Cancer Prevention and Treatment Program on the Prevalence of Late-Stage Breast Cancer Diagnoses in Oklahoma

    PubMed Central

    Janitz, Amanda; Wendelboe, Aaron M.; Chou, Ann F.; Frank, Summer; Watkins, Angela; Thompson, David; Campbell, Janis

    2016-01-01

    In 2000, Congress passed the Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment Act (BCCPTA) to provide coverage through Medicaid to women who screened positive for breast and cervical cancer. We aimed to determine if late-stage breast cancer prevalence decreased among Oklahoma women after passage of BCCPTA. Data were obtained from the Oklahoma Central Cancer Registry during 2000–2011. We estimated prevalence proportion ratios (PPR) using modified Poisson regression between the proportion of women with late-stage breast cancer and timing of diagnosis related to BCCPTA. Among uninsured women, the probability of being diagnosed with late-stage cancer after enactment of the BCCPTA was 0.80 (95% CI: 0.67, 0.96) times the probability before enactment. This was significant among uninsured women living in metro counties (PPR: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.61, 0.90) but not in non-metro counties (PPR: 1.05, 95% CI: 0.71, 1.56). These findings may be similar to other rural states with large uninsured populations. PMID:27885306

  17. Correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio of late-stage pancreatic carcinoma in HIFU therapy: dynamic observation on ultrasound reflection intensity.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hui-Yu; Miao, Li-Ying; Wang, Jin-Rui; Xiong, Liu-Lin; Yan, Fang; Zheng, Cui-Shan; Jia, Jian-Wen; Cui, Li-Gang; Chen, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is thermal ablation treatment for late-stage pancreatic carcinoma with widely recognized safety and effectiveness, but there are currently no instant assessment methods for its ablation effect. It is vital to find a real-time high-sensitive assessment method. This research aims to dynamically observe the variation rules of ultrasound reflection intensity, analyze the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio, and find out the value of ultrasound reflection intensity in prognosis of HIFU ablation effect. HIFU intermittent therapies were retrospectively analyzed for 31 subjects with late-stage pancreatic carcinoma from March 2007 to December 2009 in the study. The variation rules of the ultrasound reflection intensity during HIFU therapy were summarized and the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio was analyzed based on the tumor ablation ratio indicated by CT scanning. The conclusion is that variation of ultrasound reflection intensity can be used for initial assessment of tumor ablation in HIFU therapy and early prognosis of overall HIFU ablation, providing important clinical basis for improving safety and effectiveness of HIFU therapy. Ultrasound can work as a real-time imaging instrument for observation of HIFU ablation effect in treating late-stage pancreatic carcinoma.

  18. The significance of late-stage processes in lava flow emplacement: squeeze-ups in the 2001 Etna flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegarth, L. J.; Pinkerton, H.; James, M. R.

    2009-04-01

    The general processes associated with the formation and activity of ephemeral boccas in lava flow fields are well documented (e.g. Pinkerton & Sparks 1976; Polacci & Papale 1997). The importance of studying such behaviour is illustrated by observations of the emplacement of a basaltic andesite flow at Parícutin during the 1940s. Following a pause in advance of one month, this 8 km long flow was reactivated by the resumption of supply from the vent, which forced the rapid drainage of stagnant material in the flow front region. The material extruded during drainage was in a highly plastic state (Krauskopf 1948), and its displacement allowed hot fluid lava from the vent to be transported in a tube to the original flow front, from where it covered an area of 350,000 m2 in one night (Luhr & Simkin 1993). Determining when a flow has stopped advancing, and cannot be drained in such a manner, is therefore highly important in hazard assessment and flow modelling, and our ability to do this may be improved through the examination of relatively small-scale secondary extrusions and boccas. The 2001 flank eruption of Mt. Etna, Sicily, resulted in the emplacement of a 7 km long compound `a`ā flow field over a period of 23 days. During emplacement, many ephemeral boccas were observed in the flow field, which were active for between two and at least nine days. The longer-lived examples initially fed well-established flows that channelled fresh material from the main vent. With time, as activity waned, the nature of the extruded material changed. The latest stages of development of all boccas involved the very slow extrusion of material that was either draining from higher parts of the flow or being forced out of the flow interior as changing local flow conditions pressurised parts of the flow that had been stagnant for some time. Here we describe this late-stage activity of the ephemeral boccas, which resulted in the formation of ‘squeeze-ups' of lava with a markedly different

  19. Total Syntheses of (−)-Kopsifoline D and (−)-Deoxoapodine: Divergent Total Synthesis via Late-Stage Key Strategic Bond Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Divergent total syntheses of (−)-kopsifoline D and (−)-deoxoapodine are detailed from a common pentacyclic intermediate 15, enlisting the late-stage formation of two different key strategic bonds (C21–C3 and C21–O–C6) unique to their hexacyclic ring systems that are complementary to its prior use in the total syntheses of kopsinine (C21–C2 bond formation) and (+)-fendleridine (C21–O–C19 bond formation). The combined efforts represent the total syntheses of members of four classes of natural products from a common intermediate functionalized for late-stage formation of four different key strategic bonds uniquely embedded in each natural product core structure. Key to the first reported total synthesis of a kopsifoline that is detailed herein was the development of a transannular enamide alkylation for late-stage formation of the C21–C3 bond with direct introduction of the reactive indolenine C2 oxidation state from a penultimate C21 functionalized Aspidosperma-like pentacyclic intermediate. Central to the assemblage of the underlying Apidosperma skeleton is a powerful intramolecular [4 + 2]/[3 + 2] cycloaddition cascade of a 1,3,4-oxadiazole that provided the functionalized pentacyclic ring system 15 in a single step in which the C3 methyl ester found in the natural products served as a key 1,3,4-oxadiazole substituent, activating it for participation in the initiating Diels–Alder reaction and stabilizing the intermediate 1,3-dipole. PMID:24499015

  20. Genotoxic effect of a binary mixture of dicamba- and glyphosate-based commercial herbicide formulations on Rhinella arenarum (Hensel, 1867) (Anura, Bufonidae) late-stage larvae.

    PubMed

    Soloneski, Sonia; Ruiz de Arcaute, Celeste; Larramendy, Marcelo L

    2016-09-01

    The acute toxicity of two herbicide formulations, namely, the 57.71 % dicamba (DIC)-based Banvel(®) and the 48 % glyphosate (GLY)-based Credit(®), alone as well as the binary mixture of these herbicides was evaluated on late-stage Rhinella arenarum larvae (stage 36) exposed under laboratory conditions. Mortality was used as an endpoint for determining acute lethal effects, whereas the single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay was employed as genotoxic endpoint to study sublethal effects. Lethality studies revealed LC5096 h values of 358.44 and 78.18 mg L(-1) DIC and GLY for Banvel(®) and Credit(®), respectively. SCGE assay revealed, after exposure for 96 h to either 5 and 10 % of the Banvel(®) LC5096 h concentration or 5 and 10 % of the Credit(®) LC5096 h concentration, an equal significant increase of the genetic damage index (GDI) regardless of the concentration of the herbicide assayed. The binary mixtures of 5 % Banvel(®) plus 5 % Credit(®) LC5096 h concentrations and 10 % Banvel(®) plus 10 % Credit(®) LC5096 h concentrations induced equivalent significant increases in the GDI in regard to GDI values from late-stage larvae exposed only to Banvel(®) or Credit(®). This study represents the first experimental evidence of acute lethal and sublethal effects exerted by DIC on the species, as well as the induction of primary DNA breaks by this herbicide in amphibians. Finally, a synergistic effect of the mixture of GLY and DIC on the induction of primary DNA breaks on circulating blood cells of R. arenarum late-stage larvae could be demonstrated.

  1. FDG PET/CT in Early and Late Stages of SAPHO Syndrome: Two Case Reports With MRI and Bone Scintigraphy Correlation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Bai, Yushu; Cui, Yong; Zhang, Jian; Zuo, Changjing

    2016-04-01

    Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome is a rare disease, which may be underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed because of nonspecific clinical and imaging findings. We present 2 cases of SAPHO syndrome with MRI, bone scintigraphy, and FDG PET/CT findings. In case 1 with early-stage disease, the active osteitis showed osteolytic bone destruction with increased FDG uptake. In case 2 with late-stage disease, the inactive bone lesions presented as osteosclerosis with normal FDG uptake. Familiarity with the FDG PET/CT findings of SAPHO syndrome in different stages may be helpful for correct diagnosis.

  2. Total syntheses of (±)-spiroindimicins B and C enabled by a late-stage Schöllkopf-Magnus-Barton-Zard (SMBZ) reaction.

    PubMed

    Blair, Lachlan M; Sperry, Jonathan

    2016-01-14

    The spiroindimicins are a family of structurally unprecedented alkaloids isolated from the deep-sea-derived marine actinomycete Streptomyces sp. SCSIO 03032. The total syntheses of (±)-spiroindimicins B and C are disclosed, the first of any member of this family. Central to the successful strategy was installing the spirocentre using a mild intramolecular Heck reaction, the assembly of a pentacyclic spirobisindole by Fischer indolization and a late-stage Schöllkopf-Magnus-Barton-Zard (SMBZ) reaction to construct the trisubstituted pyrrole.

  3. Frequent CXCR4 tropism of HIV-1 subtype A and CRF02_AG during late-stage disease - indication of an evolving epidemic in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background HIV-1 is one of the fastest evolving pathogens, and is distinguished by geographic and genetic variants that have been classified into different subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs). Early in infection the primary coreceptor is CCR5, but during disease course CXCR4-using HIV-1 populations may emerge. This has been correlated with accelerated disease progression in HIV-1 subtype B. Basic knowledge of HIV-1 coreceptor tropism is important due to the recent introduction of coreceptor antagonists in antiretroviral therapy, and subtype-specific differences regarding how frequently HIV-1 CXCR4-using populations appear in late-stage disease need to be further investigated. To study how frequently CXCR4-using populations appear in late-stage disease among HIV-1 subtype A and CRF02_AG, we evaluated the accuracy of a recombinant virus phenotypic assay for these subtypes, and used it to determine the HIV-1 coreceptor tropism of plasma samples collected during late-stage disease in Guinea-Bissau. We also performed a genotypic analysis and investigated subtype-specific differences in the appearance of CXCR4 tropism late in disease. Results We found that the recombinant virus phenotypic assay accurately predicted HIV-1 coreceptor tropism of subtype A and CRF02_AG. Over the study period (1997-2007), we found an increasing and generally high frequency of CXCR4 tropism (86%) in CRF02_AG. By sequence analysis of the V3 region of our samples we developed a novel genotypic rule for predicting CXCR4 tropism in CRF02_AG, based on the combined criteria of the total number of charged amino acids and net charge. This rule had higher sensitivity than previously described genotypic rules and may be useful for development of future genotypic tools for this CRF. Finally, we conducted a literature analysis, combining data of 498 individuals in late-stage disease, and found high amounts of CXCR4 tropism for all major HIV-1 subtypes (60-77%), except for subtype C (15

  4. Chimerization at the AQP2-AQP3 locus is the genetic basis of melarsoprol-pentamidine cross-resistance in clinical Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates.

    PubMed

    Graf, Fabrice E; Baker, Nicola; Munday, Jane C; de Koning, Harry P; Horn, David; Mäser, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    Aquaglyceroporin-2 is a known determinant of melarsoprol-pentamidine cross-resistance in Trypanosoma brucei brucei laboratory strains. Recently, chimerization at the AQP2-AQP3 tandem locus was described from melarsoprol-pentamidine cross-resistant Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates from sleeping sickness patients in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Here, we demonstrate that reintroduction of wild-type AQP2 into one of these isolates fully restores drug susceptibility while expression of the chimeric AQP2/3 gene in aqp2-aqp3 null T. b. brucei does not. This proves that AQP2-AQP3 chimerization is the cause of melarsoprol-pentamidine cross-resistance in the T. b. gambiense isolates.

  5. Kenyan purple tea anthocyanins and coenzyme-Q10 ameliorate post treatment reactive encephalopathy associated with cerebral human African trypanosomiasis in murine model.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Khalid; Wachira, Francis N; Nyariki, James N; Isaac, Alfred O

    2014-04-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a tropical disease caused by two subspecies of Trypanosoma brucei, the East African variant T. b. rhodesiense and the West African variant T. b. gambiense. Melarsoprol, an organic arsenical, is the only drug used to treat late stage T. b. rhodesiense infection. Unfortunately, this drug induces an extremely severe post treatment reactive encephalopathy (PTRE) in up to 10% of treated patients, half of whom die from this complication. A highly reproducible mouse model was adapted to assess the use of Kenyan purple tea anthocyanins and/or coenzyme-Q10 in blocking the occurrence of PTRE. Female Swiss white mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with approximately 10(4) trypanosome isolate T. b. rhodesiense KETRI 2537 and treated sub-curatively 21days post infection with 5mg/kg diminazene aceturate (DA) daily for 3days to induce severe late CNS infection that closely mirrors PTRE in human subjects. Thereafter mice were monitored for relapse of parasitemia after which they were treated with melarsoprol at a dosage of 3.6mg/kg body weight for 4days and sacrificed 24h post the last dosage to obtain brain samples. Brain sections from mice with PTRE that did not receive any antioxidant treatment showed a more marked presence of inflammatory cells, microglial activation and disruption of the brain parenchyma when compared to PTRE mice supplemented with either coenzyme-Q10, purple tea anthocyanins or a combination of the two. The mice group that was treated with coenzyme-Q10 or purple tea anthocyanins had higher levels of GSH and aconitase-1 in the brain compared to untreated groups, implying a boost in brain antioxidant capacity. Overall, coenzyme-Q10 treatment produced more beneficial effects compared to anthocyanin treatment. These findings demonstrate that therapeutic intervention with coenzyme-Q10 and/or purple tea anthocyanins can be used in an experimental mouse model to ameliorate PTRE associated with cerebral HAT.

  6. Evidence for throttling as a control over localized late-stage Au/Ag mineralization in the Mineral Hill breccia pipe, Golden Sunlight mine, Jefferson County, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Coppinger, W.W.; Porter, E.

    1985-01-01

    A restricted zone of anomalous gold and silver mineralization, coupled with localized intense alteration and textural variations, documents the existence of a natural throttle which controlled Au/Ag emplacement during late-stage mineralization of the Mineral Hill breccia pipe. The zone is roughly funnel-shaped with a maximum width of 10m and a length of 30m. Mineralization and alteration are developed along the trend of a steep-dipping to vertical fracture zone and apparently pinch out at depth. Small displacement post-mineralization cross-faults offset contacts and influence grade distribution within the feature. Breccia texture, nature and intensity of alteration, and ore grade very systematically from the margin to the interior of the zone. The breccia becomes rubbly and friable, with frothy, cellular quartz comprising the matrix and as much as 50 percent of the rock in some locations. Au/Ag grades vary directly with the development of the cellular quartz and are highest in the interior, grading to local background levels in the wallrock. Barite and minor white opaline quartz occur in the matrix adjacent to contacts, diminishing in volume toward the interior. Minor primary hematite occurs in some clasts in the interior. Iron-oxides after sulfides are common throughout the zone. The feature is interpreted as late-stage localized zone of venting and pressure-release developed above a constriction in the Mineral Hill hydrothermal mineralizing system.

  7. Dissociation of mitogenesis and late-stage promotion of tumor cell phenotype by phorbol esters: mitogen-resistant variants are sensitive to promotion.

    PubMed Central

    Colburn, N H; Wendel, E J; Abruzzo, G

    1981-01-01

    The JB-6 mouse epidermal cell line has been used as a model system for studying the mechanism of late-stage promoter-dependent preneoplastic progression. The studies reported here are concerned with determining whether there is a requirement for mitogenic stimulation in promotion of anchorage independence and tumorigenicity in JB-6 cells. Such a requirement would predict that variants selected for 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) mitogen resistance would also be promotion resistant. Promotion-responsive cell lines have been selected for resistance to TPA-induced mitogenic stimulation at plateau density by cotreatment with colchicine and removal of mitogen-responsive colchicine-detached cells. The selected TPA-resistant population of cells showed a mitogenic response that was diminished by a factor of four but showed no diminution in the promotion-of-anchorage-independence response to TPA. Mitogen-resistant clonal lines derived from the selected population fell into three phenotypic classes when assayed in soft agar: (i) anchorage-independent transformants; (ii) variants resistant to promotion of anchorage independence by TPA; and (iii) variants sensitive to promotion by TPA. The existence of the latter class (i.e., the mitogen-resistant promotable variants) indicates a lack of obligatory causal relationship between TPa-induced mitogenesis and late-stage promotion and, thereby suggests that the two events can be dissociated. Images PMID:6947266

  8. Melarsoprol Sensitivity Profile of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Isolates from Cured and Relapsed Sleeping Sickness Patients from the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    PubMed Central

    Pyana Pati, Patient; Van Reet, Nick; Mumba Ngoyi, Dieudonné; Ngay Lukusa, Ipos; Karhemere Bin Shamamba, Stomy; Büscher, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Background Sleeping sickness caused by Trypanosoma brucei (T.b.) gambiense constitutes a serious health problem in sub-Sahara Africa. In some foci, alarmingly high relapse rates were observed in patients treated with melarsoprol, which used to be the first line treatment for patients in the neurological disease stage. Particularly problematic was the situation in Mbuji-Mayi, East Kasai Province in the Democratic Republic of the Congo with a 57% relapse rate compared to a 5% relapse rate in Masi-Manimba, Bandundu Province. The present study aimed at investigating the mechanisms underlying the high relapse rate in Mbuji-Mayi using an extended collection of recently isolated T.b. gambiense strains from Mbuji-Mayi and from Masi-Manimba. Methodology/Principal Findings Forty five T.b. gambiense strains were used. Forty one were isolated from patients that were cured or relapsed after melarsoprol treatment in Mbuji-Mayi. In vivo drug sensitivity tests provide evidence of reduced melarsoprol sensitivity in these strains. This reduced melarsoprol sensitivity was not attributable to mutations in TbAT1. However, in all these strains, irrespective of the patient treatment outcome, the two aquaglyceroporin (AQP) 2 and 3 genes are replaced by chimeric AQP2/3 genes that may be associated with resistance to pentamidine and melarsoprol. The 4 T.b. gambiense strains isolated in Masi-Manimba contain both wild-type AQP2 and a different chimeric AQP2/3. These findings suggest that the reduced in vivo melarsoprol sensitivity of the Mbuji-Mayi strains and the high relapse rates in that sleeping sickness focus are caused by mutations in the AQP2/AQP3 locus and not by mutations in TbAT1. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that mutations in the TbAQP2/3 locus of the local T.b. gambiense strains may explain the high melarsoprol relapse rates in the Mbuji-Mayi focus but other factors must also be involved in the treatment outcome of individual patients. PMID:25275572

  9. A Small Molecule p75NTR Ligand, LM11A-31, Reverses Cholinergic Neurite Dystrophy in Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Models with Mid- to Late-Stage Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Danielle A.; Knowles, Juliet K.; Belichenko, Nadia P.; Banerjee, Gargi; Finkle, Carly; Massa, Stephen M.; Longo, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons contributes significantly to the cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and has been attributed to aberrant signaling through the neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR). Thus, modulating p75NTR signaling is considered a promising therapeutic strategy for AD. Accordingly, our laboratory has developed small molecule p75NTR ligands that increase survival signaling and inhibit amyloid-β-induced degenerative signaling in in vitro studies. Previous work found that a lead p75NTR ligand, LM11A-31, prevents degeneration of cholinergic neurites when given to an AD mouse model in the early stages of disease pathology. To extend its potential clinical applications, we sought to determine whether LM11A-31 could reverse cholinergic neurite atrophy when treatment begins in AD mouse models having mid- to late stages of pathology. Reversing pathology may have particular clinical relevance as most AD studies involve patients that are at an advanced pathological stage. In this study, LM11A-31 (50 or 75 mg/kg) was administered orally to two AD mouse models, Thy-1 hAPPLond/Swe (APPL/S) and Tg2576, at age ranges during which marked AD-like pathology manifests. In mid-stage male APPL/S mice, LM11A-31 administered for 3 months starting at 6–8 months of age prevented and/or reversed atrophy of basal forebrain cholinergic neurites and cortical dystrophic neurites. Importantly, a 1 month LM11A-31 treatment given to male APPL/S mice (12–13 months old) with late-stage pathology reversed the degeneration of cholinergic neurites in basal forebrain, ameliorated cortical dystrophic neurites, and normalized increased basal forebrain levels of p75NTR. Similar results were seen in female Tg2576 mice. These findings suggest that LM11A-31 can reduce and/or reverse fundamental AD pathologies in late-stage AD mice. Thus, targeting p75NTR is a promising approach to reducing AD-related degenerative processes that have progressed

  10. The 11,600-MW protein encoded by region E3 of adenovirus is expressed early but is greatly amplified at late stages of infection.

    PubMed Central

    Tollefson, A E; Scaria, A; Saha, S K; Wold, W S

    1992-01-01

    We have reported that an 11,600-MW (11.6K) protein is coded by region E3 of adenovirus. We have now prepared two new antipeptide antisera that have allowed us to characterize this protein further. The 11.6K protein migrates as multiple diffuse bands having apparent Mws of about 14,000, 21,000, and 31,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunoblotting as well as virus mutants with deletions in the 11.6K gene were used to show that the various gel bands represent forms of 11.6K. The 11.6K protein was synthesized in very low amounts during early stages of infection, from the scarce E3 mRNAs d and e which initiate from the E3 promoter. However, 11.6K was synthesized very abundantly at late stages of infection, approximately 400 times the rate at early stages, from new mRNAs termed d' and e'. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and RNA blot experiments indicated that mRNAs d' and e' had the same body (the coding portion) and the same middle exon (the y leader) as early E3 mRNAs d and e, but mRNAs d' and e' were spliced at their 5' termini to the major late tripartite leader which is found in all mRNAs in the major late transcription unit. mRNAs d' and e' and the 11.6K protein were the only E3 mRNAs and protein that were scarce early and were greatly amplified at late stages of infection. This suggests that specific cis- or trans-acting sequences may function to enhance the splicing of mRNAs d' and e' at late stages of infection and perhaps to suppress the splicing of mRNAs d and e at early stages of infection. We propose that the 11.6K gene be considered not only a member of region E3 but also a member of the major late transcription unit. Images PMID:1316473

  11. Unravelling Human Trypanotolerance: IL8 is Associated with Infection Control whereas IL10 and TNFα Are Associated with Subsequent Disease Development

    PubMed Central

    Ilboudo, Hamidou; Bras-Gonçalves, Rachel; Camara, Mamadou; Flori, Laurence; Camara, Oumou; Sakande, Hassane; Leno, Mamadou; Petitdidier, Elodie; Jamonneau, Vincent; Bucheton, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    In West Africa, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, causing human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), is associated with a great diversity of infection outcomes. In addition to patients who can be diagnosed in the early hemolymphatic phase (stage 1) or meningoencephalitic phase (stage 2), a number of individuals can mount long-lasting specific serological responses while the results of microscopic investigations are negative (SERO TL+). Evidence is now increasing to indicate that these are asymptomatic subjects with low-grade parasitemia. The goal of our study was to investigate the type of immune response occurring in these “trypanotolerant” subjects. Cytokines levels were measured in healthy endemic controls (n = 40), stage 1 (n = 10), early stage 2 (n = 19), and late stage 2 patients (n = 23) and in a cohort of SERO TL+ individuals (n = 60) who were followed up for two years to assess the evolution of their parasitological and serological status. In contrast to HAT patients which T-cell responses appeared to be activated with increased levels of IL2, IL4, and IL10, SERO TL+ exhibited high levels of proinflammatory cytokines (IL6, IL8 and TNFα) and an almost absence of IL12p70. In SERO TL+, high levels of IL10 and low levels of TNFα were associated with an increased risk of developing HAT whereas high levels of IL8 predicted that serology would become negative. Further studies using high throughput technologies, hopefully will provide a more detailed view of the critical molecules or pathways underlying the trypanotolerant phenotype. PMID:25375156

  12. Aliphatic Halogenase Enables Late-Stage C-H Functionalization: Selective Synthesis of a Brominated Fischerindole Alkaloid with Enhanced Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qin; Hillwig, Matthew L; Doi, Yohei; Liu, Xinyu

    2016-03-15

    The anion promiscuity of a newly discovered standalone aliphatic halogenase WelO5 was probed and enabled the selective synthesis of 13R-bromo-12-epi-fischerindole U via late-stage enzymatic functionalization of an unactivated sp(3) C-H bond. Pre-saturating the WelO5 active site with a non-native bromide anion was found to be critical to the highly selective in vitro transfer of bromine, instead of chlorine, to the target carbon center and also allowed the relative binding affinity of bromide and chloride towards the WelO5 enzyme to be assessed. This study further revealed the critical importance of halogen substitution on modulating the antibiotic activity of fischerindole alkaloids and highlights the promise of WelO5-type aliphatic halogenases as enzymatic tools to fine-tune the bioactivity of complex natural products.

  13. Profound anterograde amnesia following routine anesthetic and dental procedure: a new classification of amnesia characterized by intermediate-to-late-stage consolidation failure?

    PubMed

    Burgess, Gerald H; Chadalavada, Bhanu

    2016-01-01

    Anterograde amnesia caused by bilateral hippocampal or diencephalon damage manifests in characteristic symptoms of preserved intellect and implicit learning, and short span of awareness with complete and rapid forgetting of episodic material. A new case, WO, 38-year-old male with anterograde amnesia, in the absence of structural brain changes or psychological explanation is presented, along with four comparison cases from the extant literature that share commonalities between them including preserved intellect, span of awareness greater than working memory, and complete forgetting within hours or days following successful learning, including notably for both explicit and implicit material. WO's amnesia onset coincided with anesthetic injection and root canal procedure, with extended vasovagal-like incident. The commonalities between the five cases presented may suggest a shared biological mechanism involving the breakdown of intermediate-to-late-stage consolidation that does not depend on the structural integrity of the hippocampi. Speculation on the mechanism of consolidation breakdown and diagnostic implications are discussed.

  14. Effects of Dietary Persimmon Peel and its Ethanol Extract on the Production Performance and Liver Lipids in the Late Stage of Egg Production in Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Oh, S. T.; Zheng, L.; Shin, Y. K.; An, B. K.; Kang, C. W.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dietary effects of persimmon peel (PP) and PP ethanol extract (PPE) on egg production, egg quality, and liver lipids in the late stage of egg production in laying hens. One hundred and twenty 50-wk-old Hy-Line Brown layers (n = 120) were fed different diets. Four replicate groups of 6 hens each were randomly assigned to 5 dietary treatments. The 5 dietary treatments were as follows: i) CON, basal diet; ii) PP 0.15, CON+0.15% PP (0.035% tannin); iii) PP 0.5, CON +0.5% PP (0.117% tannin); iv) PPE 0.075, CON+0.075% PPE (0.03% tannin); and v) PPE 0.25, CON+0.25% PPE (0.11% tannin). The total tannin concentration of PPE was higher (p<0.05) than that of PP. Egg production in the PP 0.5 group was higher than in the other groups. Egg production and mass of hens in the PPE 0.25 group showed a greater decrease than that in the other groups (p<0.05). Eggshell color in the PP 0.15, PP 0.5, and PPE 0.075 groups was lighter than that of the control group (p<0.05). The Haugh unit for the groups that were fed PP and PPE were significantly higher than that in the other groups after 7 d of storage (p<0.05). Therefore, PP seems an effective feed additive for improving the production performance and egg quality in late stage laying hens. PMID:25049785

  15. Anti-LRP/LR–Specific Antibody IgG1-iS18 Significantly Impedes Adhesion and Invasion in Early- and Late-Stage Colorectal Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vania, Leila; Chetty, Carryn J; Ferreira, Eloise; Weiss, Stefan FT

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a highly complex disease that has become one of the leading causes of death globally. Metastasis, a major cause of cancer deaths, requires two crucial events, adhesion and invasion. The 37kDa/67kDa laminin receptor (laminin receptor precursor/high-affinity laminin receptor [LRP/LR]) enhances these two steps, consequently aiding in cancer progression. In this study, the role of LRP/LR in adhesion and invasion of early-stage (SW-480 and HT-29) and late-stage (DLD-1) colorectal cancer cells was investigated. Western blotting revealed that early- and late-stage colorectal cancer cells contained significantly higher total LRP/LR levels compared with poorly invasive MCF-7 breast cancer control cells. Flow cytometry revealed that both stages of colorectal cancer displayed significantly higher cell surface LRP/LR levels. Furthermore, upon treatment of colorectal cancer cells with the anti-LRP/LR–specific antibody IgG1-iS18, adhesion to laminin-1 was significantly reduced in both stages. Each stage’s invasive potential was determined using the Matrigel™ invasion assay, showing that invasion was significantly impeded in both colorectal cancer stages when the cells were incubated with IgG1-iS18. In addition, Pearson’s correlation coefficients propose that both total and cell surface LRP/LR levels are directly proportional to the adhesive and invasive potential of both stages of colorectal cancer. Hence, these findings indicate potential for use of the IgG1-iS18 antibody as a promising therapeutic tool for colorectal cancer patients at both stages. PMID:27611822

  16. Propofol exposure during late stages of pregnancy impairs learning and memory in rat offspring via the BDNF-TrkB signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Liang; Luo, Foquan; Zhao, Weilu; Feng, Yunlin; Wu, Liuqin; Lin, Jiamei; Liu, Tianyin; Wang, Shengqiang; You, Xuexue; Zhang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) (BDNF-TrkB) signalling pathway plays a crucial role in regulating learning and memory. Synaptophysin provides the structural basis for synaptic plasticity and depends on BDNF processing and subsequent TrkB signalling. Our previous studies demonstrated that maternal exposure to propofol during late stages of pregnancy impaired learning and memory in rat offspring. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the BDNF-TrkB signalling pathway is involved in propofol-induced learning and memory impairments. Propofol was intravenously infused into pregnant rats for 4 hrs on gestational day 18 (E18). Thirty days after birth, learning and memory of offspring was assessed by the Morris water maze (MWM) test. After the MWM test, BDNF and TrkB transcript and protein levels were measured in rat offspring hippocampus tissues using real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), respectively. The levels of phosphorylated-TrkB (phospho-TrkB) and synaptophysin were measured by western blot. It was discovered that maternal exposure to propofol on day E18 impaired spatial learning and memory of rat offspring, decreased mRNA and protein levels of BDNF and TrkB, and decreased the levels of both phospho-TrkB and synaptophysin in the hippocampus. Furthermore, the TrkB agonist 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF) reversed all of the observed changes. Treatment with 7,8-DHF had no significant effects on the offspring that were not exposed to propofol. The results herein indicate that maternal exposure to propofol during the late stages of pregnancy impairs spatial learning and memory of offspring by disturbing the BDNF-TrkB signalling pathway. The TrkB agonist 7,8-DHF might be a potential therapy for learning and memory impairments induced by maternal propofol exposure.

  17. Follicle cell trypsin-like protease HrOvochymase: Its cDNA cloning, localization, and involvement in the late stage of oogenesis in the ascidian Halocynthia roretzi.

    PubMed

    Mino, Masako; Sawada, Hitoshi

    2016-04-01

    We previously reported that the sperm trypsin-like protease HrAcrosin and its precursor HrProacrosin participate in fertilization of the ascidian Halocynthia roretzi. The HrProacrosin gene is annotated in the H. roretzi genome database as Harore.CG.MTP2014.S89.g15383; our previously reported sequence of HrProacrosin gene appeared to include four nucleotides inserted near the 3'-end of HrProacrosin, resulting in a frame-shift mutation and a premature termination codon. The gene architecture of HrProacrosin and Harore.CG.MTP2014.S89.g15383 resembles that of Xenopus laevis ovochymase-1/OVCH1 and ovochymase-2/OVCH2, which encode egg extracellular polyproteases. Considering these new observations, we evaluated the cDNA cloning, expression, localization, and function of Harore.CG.MTP2014.S89.g15383, herein designated as HrOvochymase/HrOVCH. We found that HrOVCH cDNA consists of a single open reading frame of 1,575 amino acids, containing a signal peptide, three trypsin-like protease domains, and six CUB domains. HrOVCH was transcribed by the testis and ovary, but the majority of protein exists in ovarian follicle cells surrounding eggs. An anti-HrOVCH antibody inhibited elevation of the vitelline coat at a late stage of oogenesis, during the period when self-sterility is acquired. As trypsin inhibitors are reported to block the acquisition of self-sterility during oogenesis, whereas trypsin induces the acquisition of self-sterility and elevation of the vitelline coat in defolliculated ovarian eggs, we propose that HrOVCH may play a role in the acquisition of self-sterility by late-stage H. roretzi oocytes.

  18. Transient photoreceptor deconstruction by CNTF enhances rAAV-mediated cone functional rescue in late stage CNGB3-achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Komáromy, András M; Rowlan, Jessica S; Corr, Amanda T Parton; Reinstein, Shelby L; Boye, Sanford L; Cooper, Ann E; Gonzalez, Amaliris; Levy, Britt; Wen, Rong; Hauswirth, William W; Beltran, William A; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2013-06-01

    Achromatopsia is a genetic disorder of cones, and one of the most common forms is a channelopathy caused by mutations in the β-subunit, CNGB3, of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel. Recombinant adeno-associated virus of serotype 5 (rAAV5)-mediated gene transfer of human CNGB3 cDNA to mutant dog cones results in functional and structural rescue in dogs <0.5 years of age, but treatment is minimally effective in dogs >1 year. We now test a new therapeutic concept by combining gene therapy with the administration of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF). Intravitreal CNTF causes transient dedifferentiation of photoreceptors, a process called deconstruction, whereby visual cells become immature with short outer segments, and decreased retinal function and gene expression that subsequently return to normal. Cone function was successfully rescued in all mutant dogs treated between 14 and 42 months of age with this strategy. CNTF-mediated deconstruction and regeneration of the photoreceptor outer segments prepares the mutant cones optimally for gene augmentation therapy.

  19. Adenoviral vector-mediated GDNF gene therapy in a rodent lesion model of late stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lapchak, P A; Araujo, D M; Hilt, D C; Sheng, J; Jiao, S

    1997-11-28

    A recombinant adenoviral vector encoding the human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene (Ad-GDNF) was used to express the neurotrophic factor GDNF in the unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) denervated substantia nigra (SN) of adult rats ten weeks following the 6-OHDA injection. 6-OHDA lesions significantly increased apomorphine-induced (contralateral) rotations and reduced striatal and nigral dopamine (DA) levels by 99% and 70%, respectively. Ad-GDNF significantly (P < 0.01) decreased (by 30-40%) apomorphine-induced rotations in lesioned rats for up to two weeks following a single injection. Locomotor activity, assessed 7 days following the Ad-GDNF injection, was also significantly (P < 0.05) increased (by 300-400%). Two weeks after the Ad-GDNF injection, locomotor activity was still significantly increased compared to the Ad-beta-gal-injected 6-OHDA lesioned (control) group. Additionally, in Ad-GDNF-injected rats, there was a significant decrease (10-13%) in weight gain which persisted for approximately two weeks following the injection. Consistent with the behavioral changes, levels of DA and the metabolite dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) were elevated (by 98% and 65%, respectively) in the SN, but not the striatum of Ad-GDNF-injected rats. Overall, a single Ad-GDNF injection had significant effects for 2-3 weeks following administration. These results suggest that virally delivered GDNF promotes the recovery of nigral dopaminergic tone (i.e.: increased DA and DOPAC levels) and improves behavioral performance (i.e.: decreased rotations, increased locomotion) in rodents with extensive nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation. Moreover, our results suggest that viral delivery of trophic factors may be used eventually to treat neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease.

  20. Protease activated receptor 4 limits bacterial growth and lung pathology during late stage Streptococcus pneumoniae induced pneumonia in mice.

    PubMed

    de Stoppelaar, S F; Van't Veer, C; van den Boogaard, F E; Nieuwland, R; Hoogendijk, A J; de Boer, O J; Roelofs, J J T H; van der Poll, T

    2013-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common causative pathogen of pneumonia and sepsis. Pneumonia and sepsis are associated with enhanced activation of coagulation, resulting in the production of several host-derived proteases at the primary site of infection and in the circulation. Serine proteases cleave protease activated receptors (PARs), which form a molecular link between coagulation and inflammation. PAR4 is one of four subtypes of PARs and is widely expressed by multiple cell types in the respiratory tract implicated in pulmonary inflammation, by immune cells and by platelets. In mice, mouse (m)PAR4 is the only thrombin receptor expressed by platelets. We here sought to determine the contribution of mPAR4 to the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. Pneumonia was induced by intranasal inoculation with S. pneumoniae in mPAR4-deficient (par4-/-) and wild-type mice. Mice were sacrificed after 6, 24 or 48 hours (h). Blood, lungs, liver and spleen were collected for analyses. Ex vivo stimulation assays were performed with S. pneumoniae and mPAR4 activating peptides. At 48 h after infection, higher bacterial loads were found in the lungs and blood of par4-/- mice (p < 0.05), accompanied by higher histopathology scores and increased cytokine levels (p < 0.05) in the lungs. Ex vivo, co-stimulation with mPAR4 activating peptide enhanced the whole blood cytokine response to S. pneumoniae. Thrombin inhibition resulted in decreased cytokine release after S. pneumoniae stimulation in human whole blood. Our findings suggest that mPAR4 contributes to antibacterial defence during murine pneumococcal pneumonia.

  1. Petrology and geochemistry of late-stage intrusions of the A-type, mid-Proterozoic Pikes Peak batholith (Central Colorado, USA): Implications for petrogenetic models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.R.; Noblett, J.; Wobus, R.A.; Unruh, D.; Douglass, J.; Beane, R.; Davis, C.; Goldman, S.; Kay, G.; Gustavson, B.; Saltoun, B.; Stewart, J.

    1999-01-01

    The ~1.08 Ga anorogenic, A-type Pikes Peak batholith (Front Range, central Colorado) is dominated by coarse-grained, biotite ?? amphibole syenogranites and minor monzogranites, collectively referred to as Pikes Peak granite (PPG). The batholith is also host to numerous small, late-stage plutons that have been subdivided into two groups (e.g. Wobus, 1976. Studies in Colorado Field Geology, Colorado School of Mines Professional Contributions, Colorado): (1) a sodic series (SiO2= ~44-78 wt%; K/Na=0.32-1.36) composed of gabbro, diabase, syenite/quartz syenite and fayalite and sodic amphibole granite; and (2) a potassic series (SiO2= ~ 70-77 wt%; K/Na=0.95-2.05), composed of biotite granite and minor quartz monzonite. Differences in major and trace element and Nd isotopic characteristics for the two series indicate different petrogenetic histories. Potassic granites of the late-stage intrusions appear to represent crustal anatectic melts derived from tonalite sources, based on comparison of their major element compositions with experimental melt products. In addition, Nd isotopic characteristics of the potassic granites [??(Nd)(1.08 Ga) = -0.2 to -2.7] overlap with those for tonalites/granodiorites [ca 1.7 Ga Boulder Creek intrusions; ??(Nd)(1.08 Ga) = -2.4 to -3.6] exposed in the region. Some of the partial melts evolved by fractionation dominated by feldspar. The late-stage potassic granites share geochemical characteristics with most of the PPG, which is also interpreted to have an anatectic origin involving tonalitic crust. The origin of monzogranites associated with the PPG remains unclear, but mixing between granitic and mafic or intermediate magmas is a possibility. Syenites and granites of the sodic series cannot be explained as crustal melts, but are interpreted as fractionation products of mantle-derived mafic magmas with minor crustal input. High temperature and low oxygen fugacity estimates (e.g. Frost et al., 1988. American Mineralogist 73, 727-740) support

  2. Fluid biopsy for circulating tumor cell identification in patients with early-and late-stage non-small cell lung cancer: a glimpse into lung cancer biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, Marco; Bazhenova, Lyudmila; Boshuizen, Rogier; Kolatkar, Anand; Honnatti, Meghana; Cho, Edward H.; Marrinucci, Dena; Sandhu, Ajay; Perricone, Anthony; Thistlethwaite, Patricia; Bethel, Kelly; Nieva, Jorge; van den Heuvel, Michel; Kuhn, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) counts are an established prognostic marker in metastatic prostate, breast and colorectal cancer, and recent data suggest a similar role in late stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, due to sensitivity constraints in current enrichment-based CTC detection technologies, there are few published data about CTC prevalence rates and morphologic heterogeneity in early-stage NSCLC, or the correlation of CTCs with disease progression and their usability for clinical staging. We investigated CTC counts, morphology and aggregation in early stage, locally advanced and metastatic NSCLC patients by using a fluid-phase biopsy approach that identifies CTCs without relying on surface-receptor-based enrichment and presents them in sufficiently high definition (HD) to satisfy diagnostic pathology image quality requirements. HD-CTCs were analyzed in blood samples from 78 chemotherapy-naïve NSCLC patients. 73% of the total population had a positive HD-CTC count (>0 CTC in 1 mL of blood) with a median of 4.4 HD-CTCs mL-1 (range 0-515.6) and a mean of 44.7 (±95.2) HD-CTCs mL-1. No significant difference in the medians of HD-CTC counts was detected between stage IV (n = 31, range 0-178.2), stage III (n = 34, range 0-515.6) and stages I/II (n = 13, range 0-442.3). Furthermore, HD-CTCs exhibited a uniformity in terms of molecular and physical characteristics such as fluorescent cytokeratin intensity, nuclear size, frequency of apoptosis and aggregate formation across the spectrum of staging. Our results demonstrate that despite stringent morphologic inclusion criteria for the definition of HD-CTCs, the HD-CTC assay shows high sensitivity in the detection and characterization of both early- and late-stage lung cancer CTCs. Extensive studies are warranted to investigate the prognostic value of CTC profiling in early-stage lung cancer. This finding has implications for the design of extensive studies examining screening, therapy and surveillance in

  3. Cuprizone decreases intermediate and late-stage progenitor cells in hippocampal neurogenesis of rats in a framework of 28-day oral dose toxicity study

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Hajime; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Mizukami, Sayaka; Saito, Fumiyo; Imatanaka, Nobuya; Akahori, Yumi; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2015-09-15

    Developmental exposure to cuprizone (CPZ), a demyelinating agent, impairs intermediate-stage neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rat offspring. To investigate the possibility of alterations in adult neurogenesis following postpubertal exposure to CPZ in a framework of general toxicity studies, CPZ was orally administered to 5-week-old male rats at 0, 120, or 600 mg/kg body weight/day for 28 days. In the subgranular zone (SGZ), 600 mg/kg CPZ increased the number of cleaved caspase-3{sup +} apoptotic cells. At ≥ 120 mg/kg, the number of SGZ cells immunoreactive for TBR2, doublecortin, or PCNA was decreased, while that for SOX2 was increased. In the granule cell layer, CPZ at ≥ 120 mg/kg decreased the number of postmitotic granule cells immunoreactive for NEUN, CHRNA7, ARC or FOS. In the dentate hilus, CPZ at ≥ 120 mg/kg decreased phosphorylated TRKB{sup +} interneurons, although the number of reelin{sup +} interneurons was unchanged. At 600 mg/kg, mRNA levels of Bdnf and Chrna7 were decreased, while those of Casp4, Casp12 and Trib3 were increased in the dentate gyrus. These data suggest that CPZ in a scheme of 28-day toxicity study causes endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis of granule cell lineages, resulting in aberrations of intermediate neurogenesis and late-stage neurogenesis and following suppression of immediate early gene-mediated neuronal plasticity. Suppression of BDNF signals to interneurons caused by decreased cholinergic signaling may play a role in these effects of CPZ. The effects of postpubertal CPZ on neurogenesis were similar to those observed with developmental exposure, except for the lack of reelin response, which may contribute to a greater decrease in SGZ cells. - Highlights: • Effect of 28-day CPZ exposure on hippocampal neurogenesis was examined in rats. • CPZ suppressed intermediate neurogenesis and late-stage neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. • CPZ suppressed BDNF signals to interneurons by decrease of

  4. Late-Stage HIMU-Type Volcanism on the Walvis Ridge: Not just Part of an Age-Progressive Tristan-Gough Hotspot Track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homrighausen, S.; Hoernle, K.; Hauff, F.; Portnyagin, M.; Werner, R.; Geldmacher, J.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Walvis Ridge forms the NE portion of the Tristan-Gough hotspot track. It links the Etendeka large igneous province (LIP) in Africa, initially connected to the Parana LIP in South America, to the Guyot Province, that ends at the active volcanic islands of Tristan da Cunha and Gough. After the plume head stage, the hotspot changed from a ridge-centered plume tail, forming the Walvis Ridge and Rio Grande Rise (130-60 Ma), to an intraplate setting resulting in the geochemical distinct Tristan and Gough subtracks (Rohde et al. 2013; Geology 41). New major and trace element and radiogenic isotope data have been generated from 36 new dredge locations on the Walvis Ridge during R/V Sonne cruises SO233 and SO234. Based on the bathymetric data, we have identified tectonic structures and subsidence rates which indicate a complex geodynamic interplay of the Walvis Ridge formation and westward migration of the Mid Atlantic Ridge and the Rio Grande Rise. Our new results confirm that the age-progressive basement of the Walvis Ridge reflects only the enriched Gough component with no evidence of the Tristan component being present (Hoernle et al., 2015; Nat. Comm.). Superimposed large seamounts (including ridge- and guyot-like structures), especially in the SE portion of the Walvis Ridge, belong to a later-stage of alkalic volcanism with distinct HIMU incompatible element and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic composition. The HIMU late-stage volcanism (206Pb/204Pb up to 20.8) is similar in composition to St. Helena and a late-stage (Eocene) sample from the Rio Grande Rise (Rohde et al., 2013; Tectonophysics 604). The new geochemical, bathymetric and existing age data indicate a magmatic reactivation c. 20-40 Ma after the formation of the Walvis Ridge basement, which may be related to passage of the Walvis Ridge over a batch of upwelling St. Helena type plume material. Our new results indicate a more complex formation of the Walvis Ridge than previously thought, which included two major

  5. Constraining late stage melt-peridotite interaction in the lithospheric mantle of southern Ethiopia: evidence from lithium elemental and isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemayehu, Melesse; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Seitz, Hans-Michael

    2017-02-01

    Lithium (Li) elemental and isotopic compositions for mineral separates of coexisting olivine, orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene of mantle xenoliths from the Quaternary volcanic rocks of southern Ethiopian rift (Dillo and Megado) reveal the influence of late stage melt-peridotite interaction on the early depleted and variably metasomatized lithospheric mantle. Two types of lherzolites are reported (LREE-depleted La/Sm(N) = 0.11-0.37 × Cl and LREE-enriched, La/Sm(N) = 1.88-15.72 × Cl). The depleted lherzolites have variable range in Li concentration (olivine: 2.1-5.4 ppm; opx: 1.1-2.3 ppm; cpx: 1.0-1.8 ppm) and in Li isotopic composition (δ7Li in olivine: -9.4 to 1.5‰; in opx: -4.5 to 3.6‰; in cpx: -17.0 to 4.8‰), indicating strong disequilibrium in Li partitioning and Li isotope fractionation between samples. The enriched lherzolites have limited range in both Li abundances (olivine: 2.7-3.0 ppm; opx: 1.1-3.1 ppm; cpx: 1.1-2.3 ppm) and Li isotopic compositions (δ7Li in olivine: -1.3 to +1.3‰; in opx: -2.0 to +5.0‰; in cpx: -7.5 to +4.8‰), suggest that the earlier metasomatic event which lead to LREE enrichment could also homogenize the Li contents and its isotopes. The enriched harzburgite and clinopyroxenite minerals show limited variation in Li abundances and variable Li isotopic compositions. The Li enrichments of olivine and clinopyroxene correlate neither with the incompatible trace element enrichment nor with the Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of clinopyroxene. These observations indicate that the metasomatic events which are responsible for the LREE enrichment and for the Li addition are distinct, whereby the LREE-enrichment pre-dates the influx of Li. The presence of large Li isotopic disequilibria within and between minerals of depleted and enriched peridotites suggest that the lithospheric mantle beneath the southern Ethiopian rift has experienced recent melt-peridotite interaction. Thus, the Li data set reported in this study offer new

  6. Rates of oxygen uptake increase independently of changes in heart rate in late stages of development and at hatching in the green iguana, Iguana iguana.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Marina R; Abe, Augusto S; Crossley, Dane A; Taylor, Edwin W

    2017-03-01

    Oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate (fH), heart mass (Mh) and body mass (Mb) were measured during embryonic incubation and in hatchlings of green iguana (Iguana iguana). Mean fH and VO2 were unvarying in early stage embryos. VO2 increased exponentially during the later stages of embryonic development, doubling by the end of incubation, while fH was constant, resulting in a 2.7-fold increase in oxygen pulse. Compared to late stage embryos, the mean inactive level of VO2 in hatchlings was 1.7 fold higher, while fH was reduced by half resulting in a further 3.6 fold increase in oxygen pulse. There was an overall negative correlation between mean fH and VO2 when data from hatchlings was included. Thus, predicting metabolic rate as VO2 from measurements of fH is not possible in embryonic reptiles. Convective transport of oxygen to supply metabolism during embryonic incubation was more reliably indicated as an index of cardiac output (COi) derived from the product of fH and Mh. However, a thorough analysis of factors determining rates of oxygen supply during development and eclosion in reptiles will require cannulation of blood vessels that proved impossible in the present study, to determine oxygen carrying capacity by the blood and arteriovenous oxygen content difference (A-V diff), plus patterns of blood flow.

  7. Tendon Interposition and Ligament Reconstruction with ECRL Tendon in the Late Stages of Kienböck's Disease: A Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Karalezli, Nazım; Uz, Aysun; Esmer, Ali Fırat; Demirtaş, Mehmet; Taşcı, Arzu Gül; Kütahya, Harun; Ulusoy, Gürhan

    2013-01-01

    Background. The optimal surgical treatment for Kienböck's disease with stages IIIB and IV remains controversial. A cadaver study was carried out to evaluate the use of coiled extensor carpi radialis longus tendon for tendon interposition and a strip obtained from the same tendon for ligament reconstruction in the late stages of Kienböck's disease. Methods. Coiled extensor carpi radialis longus tendon was used to fill the cavity of the excised lunate, and a strip obtained from this tendon was sutured onto itself after passing through the scaphoid and the triquetrum acting as a ligament to preserve proximal row integrity. Biomechanical tests were carried out in order to evaluate this new ligamentous reconstruction. Results. It was biomechanically confirmed that the procedure was effective against axial compression and distributed the upcoming mechanical stress to the distal row. Conclusion. Extensor carpi radialis longus tendon has not been used for tendon interposition and ligament reconstruction in the treatment of this disease before. In view of the biomechanical data, the procedure seems to be effective for the stabilization of scaphoid and carpal bones. PMID:23606814

  8. Efficient embryo transfer in the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) with a reduced transfer volume: a non-surgical approach with cryopreserved late-stage embryos.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Hidetoshi; Motohashi, Hideyuki H; Kumon, Mami; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Okada, Hironori; Okada, Takashi; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2013-05-01

    Among primates, the common marmoset is suitable for primate embryology research. Its small body size, however, has delayed the technical development of efficient embryo transfer. Furthermore, three factors have been determined to adversely affect the performance of marmoset embryo transfer: nonsurgical approaches, the use of cryopreserved embryos, and the use of late-stage embryos. Here we performed embryo transfer under conditions that included the above three factors and using either a small (1 μl or less) or a large volume (2-3 μl) of medium. The pregnancy and birth rates were 50% (5/10) and 27% (3/11), respectively, when using the large volume, and 80% (8/10) and 75% (9/12), respectively, when using the small volume. The latter scores exceed those of previous reports using comparable conditions. Thus, it appears that these three previously considered factors could be overcome, and we propose that reducing the transfer volume to 1 μl or less is essential for successful marmoset embryo transfer.

  9. On the spherical prototype of a complex dissipative late-stage formation seen in terms of least action Vojta-Natanson principle.

    PubMed

    Gadomski, A

    2008-12-01

    The spherical prototype of a crystalline and/or disorderly formation may help in understanding the final stages of many complex biomolecular arrangements. These stages are important for both naturally organized simple biosystems, such as protein (or, other amphiphilic) aggregates in vivo, as well as certain their artificial counterparts, mimicking either in vitro or in silico their structure-property principal relationship. For our particular one-seed based realization of a protein crystal/aggregate late-stage nucleus grown from nearby fluctuating environment, it turns out that the (osmotic-type) pressure could be, due to local inhomogeneities, and their dynamics shown up in the double layer tightly surrounding the growing object, still an appreciably detectable quantity. This is due to the fact that a special-type generalized thermodynamic (Vojta-Natanson) momentum, subjected to the nucleus' surface, is manifested interchangeably, whereas the total energy of the solution in the double layer could not be such within the stationary regime explored. It is plausible since the double layer width, related to the object's surface, contributes ultimately, while based on the so-defined momentum's changes, to the pressure within this narrow flickering zone, while leaving the total energy fairly unchanged. From the hydrodynamic point of view, the system behaves quite trivially, since the circumventing flow should rather be of laminar, thus not-with-matter supplying, character.

  10. Endoscope-Assisted and Controlled Argus II Epiretinal Prosthesis Implantation in Late-Stage Retinitis Pigmentosa: A Report of 2 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Özmert, Emin; Demirel, Sibel

    2016-01-01

    Several different approaches for restoring sight in subjects who are blind due to outer retinal degeneration are currently under investigation, including stem cell therapy, gene therapy, and visual prostheses. Although many different types of visual prostheses have shown promise, to date, the Argus II Epiretinal Prosthesis System, developed in a clinical setting over the course of 10 years, is the world's first and only retinal prosthesis that has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and has been given the CE-Mark for sale within the European Economic Area (EEA). The incidence of serious adverse events from Argus II implantation decreased over time after minor changes in the implant design and improvements in the surgical steps used for the procedure had been made. In order to further decrease the scleral incision-related complications and enhance the assessment of the tack position and the contact between the array and the inner macular surface, we used an ophthalmic endoscope during the regular course of Argus II implantation surgery in 2 patients with late-stage retinitis pigmentosa in an attempt to improve the anatomical and functional outcomes. PMID:28203188

  11. Endoscope-Assisted and Controlled Argus II Epiretinal Prosthesis Implantation in Late-Stage Retinitis Pigmentosa: A Report of 2 Cases.

    PubMed

    Özmert, Emin; Demirel, Sibel

    2016-01-01

    Several different approaches for restoring sight in subjects who are blind due to outer retinal degeneration are currently under investigation, including stem cell therapy, gene therapy, and visual prostheses. Although many different types of visual prostheses have shown promise, to date, the Argus II Epiretinal Prosthesis System, developed in a clinical setting over the course of 10 years, is the world's first and only retinal prosthesis that has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and has been given the CE-Mark for sale within the European Economic Area (EEA). The incidence of serious adverse events from Argus II implantation decreased over time after minor changes in the implant design and improvements in the surgical steps used for the procedure had been made. In order to further decrease the scleral incision-related complications and enhance the assessment of the tack position and the contact between the array and the inner macular surface, we used an ophthalmic endoscope during the regular course of Argus II implantation surgery in 2 patients with late-stage retinitis pigmentosa in an attempt to improve the anatomical and functional outcomes.

  12. Quantitative Changes in the Mitochondrial Proteome from Subjects with Mild Cognitive Impairment, Early Stage and Late Stage Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Bert C.; Wang, Jianquan; Markesbery, William R.; Lovell, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    The major barrier to treating or preventing Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is its unknown etiology/pathogenesis. Although increasing evidence supports a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of AD, there have been few studies that simultaneously evaluate changes in multiple mitochondrial proteins. To evaluate changes in suites of potentially interacting mitochondrial proteins, we applied 2-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and the isotope coded affinity tag (ICAT) method to identify and quantify proteins in mitochondrial enriched fractions isolated from short postmortem interval temporal pole specimens from subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, 4 subjects pooled), early Alzheimer’s disease (EAD, 4 subjects pooled), late-stage AD (LAD, 8 subjects pooled) and age-matched normal control (NC, 7 subjects pooled) subjects. A total of 112 unique, non-redundant proteins were identified and quantified in common to all three stages of disease progression. Overall, patterns of protein change suggest activation of mitochondrial pathways that include proteins responsible for transport and utilization of ATP. These proteins include adenine nucleotide translocase (ADT1), voltage dependent anion channels (VDACs), hexokinase (HXK1) and creatine kinase (KCRU). Comparison of protein changes throughout the progression of AD suggests the most pronounced changes occur in EAD mitochondria. PMID:20061648

  13. Impact of socio-economic factors in delayed reporting and late-stage presentation among patients with cervix cancer in a major cancer hospital in South India.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Michelle; Mathew, Aleyamma; Rajan, B

    2008-01-01

    The impact of socio- economic and demographic status (SEDS) factors on the stage of cervical cancer rat diagnosis, symptom duration and delay-time from diagnosis to registration was determined by analysing data for the year 2006 from the Regional Cancer Centre (RCC), Trivandrum, Kerala, India. Patients (n=349) were included if they were from the states of Kerala or Tamil Nadu. SEDS factors included age, residing district, religion, marital status, income, education and occupation. Associations between SEDS factors by stage at diagnosis and symptom duration were tested using chi-square statistics with odds ratios (OR) estimated through logistic regression modeling. Elevated risks for late stage reporting among cervical cancer patients were observed for women who were widowed/divorced (OR=2.08; 95%CI: 1.24-3.50) and had a lower education (OR=2.62; 95%CI:1.29-5.31 for women with primary school education only). Patients who had symptoms of bleeding/bleeding with other symptoms (77%) were more likely to seek treatment within one month, compared to patients with other symptoms only (23%) (p=0.016). This analysis helped to identify populations at increased risk of diagnosis at later stages of cancer with the ultimate intent of providing health education and detecting cancer at earlier stages.

  14. Distribution of Cathepsin K in Late Stage of Tooth Germ Development and Its Function in Degrading Enamel Matrix Proteins in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Liu, Fen; Wang, Wei-Guang; Jiang, Xin; Wen, Xuan; Hu, Kai-Jin; Xue, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Cathepsin K (CTSK) is a member of cysteine proteinase family, and is predominantly expressed in osteoclastsfor degradationof bone matrix proteins. Given the similarity in physical properties of bone and dental mineralized tissues, including enamel, dentin and cementum, CTSK is likely to take part in mineralization process during odontogenesis. On the other hand, patients with pycnodysostosis caused by mutations of the CTSK gene displayedmultipledental abnormalities, such as hypoplasia of the enamel, obliterated pulp chambers, hypercementosis and periodontal disease. Thereforeitis necessary to study the metabolic role of CTSK in tooth matrix proteins. In this study, BALB/c mice at embryonic day 18 (E18), post-natal day 1 (P1), P5, P10 and P20 were used (5 mice at each time point)for systematic analyses of CTSK expression in the late stage of tooth germ development. We found that CTSK was abundantly expressed in the ameloblasts during secretory and maturation stages (P5 and P10) by immunohistochemistry stainings.During dentinogenesis, the staining was also intense in the mineralization stage (P5 and P10),but not detectable in the early stage of dentin formation (P1) and after tooth eruption (P20).Furthermore, through zymography and digestion test in vitro, CTSK was proved to be capable of hydrolyzing Emdogain and also cleaving Amelogenininto multiple products. Our resultsshed lights on revealing new functions of CTSK and pathogenesis of pycnodysostosis in oral tissues.

  15. Distribution of Cathepsin K in Late Stage of Tooth Germ Development and Its Function in Degrading Enamel Matrix Proteins in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tao; Liu, Fen; Wang, Wei-Guang; Jiang, Xin; Wen, Xuan; Hu, Kai-Jin; Xue, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Cathepsin K (CTSK) is a member of cysteine proteinase family, and is predominantly expressed in osteoclastsfor degradationof bone matrix proteins. Given the similarity in physical properties of bone and dental mineralized tissues, including enamel, dentin and cementum, CTSK is likely to take part in mineralization process during odontogenesis. On the other hand, patients with pycnodysostosis caused by mutations of the CTSK gene displayedmultipledental abnormalities, such as hypoplasia of the enamel, obliterated pulp chambers, hypercementosis and periodontal disease. Thereforeitis necessary to study the metabolic role of CTSK in tooth matrix proteins. In this study, BALB/c mice at embryonic day 18 (E18), post-natal day 1 (P1), P5, P10 and P20 were used (5 mice at each time point)for systematic analyses of CTSK expression in the late stage of tooth germ development. We found that CTSK was abundantly expressed in the ameloblasts during secretory and maturation stages (P5 and P10) by immunohistochemistry stainings.During dentinogenesis, the staining was also intense in the mineralization stage (P5 and P10),but not detectable in the early stage of dentin formation (P1) and after tooth eruption (P20).Furthermore, through zymography and digestion test in vitro, CTSK was proved to be capable of hydrolyzing Emdogain and also cleaving Amelogenininto multiple products. Our resultsshed lights on revealing new functions of CTSK and pathogenesis of pycnodysostosis in oral tissues. PMID:28095448

  16. The Neutrino Energy Loss of Nuclides by K-shell Continuum State Electron Capture at the Late Stage of Stellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. J.; Lin, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the Weinberg-Salam theory and taken into consideration of the Coulomb effect on electron gas, the neutrino energy loss rates by K-shell continuum state electron capture are discussed for ^{12}C, ^{16}O, ^{20}Ne, ^{24}Mg, ^{28}Si and ^{56}Fe under the condition of complete ionization and at the late stage of stellar evolution. Our results are compared with those of Beaudet, Petrosian and Salpeter (BPS). It is shown that at relatively high temperatures (e.g., {T_9 = 0.1} and {T_9 = 1}, T_9 represents the temperature in units of 10^9 K), our results agree well with BPS's. However, at relatively low temperatures (e.g., {T_9 = 0.01} and {T_9 = 0.001}), the neutrino energy loss rates of BPS for ^{16}O, ^{20}Ne, ^{24}Mg and ^{28}Si are higher than our results by 10˜ 70 times, and even by 2 orders of magnitude for nuclide ^{12}C. Our results may be of great importance in the research of late stellar evolution, especially for the cooling mechanism of white dwarf, during which the nucleus collapsed to the stage with a relatively low temperature and intermediate density.

  17. How to shorten patient follow-up after treatment for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense sleeping sickness.

    PubMed

    Mumba Ngoyi, Dieudonné; Lejon, Veerle; Pyana, Pati; Boelaert, Marleen; Ilunga, Médard; Menten, Joris; Mulunda, Jean Pierre; Van Nieuwenhove, Simon; Muyembe Tamfum, Jean Jacques; Büscher, Philippe

    2010-02-01

    BACKGROUND. Clinical management of human African trypanosomiasis requires patient follow-up of 2 years' duration. At each follow-up visit, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is examined for trypanosomes and white blood cells (WBCs). Shortening follow-up would improve patient comfort and facilitate control of human African trypanosomiasis. METHODS. A prospective study of 360 patients was performed in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The primary outcomes of the study were cure, relapse, and death. The WBC count, immunoglobulin M level, and specific antibody levels in CSF samples were evaluated to detect treatment failure. The sensitivity and specificity of shortened follow-up algorithms were calculated. RESULTS. The treatment failure rate was 37%. Trypanosomes, a WBC count of > or = 100 cells/microL, and a LATEX/immunoglobulin M titer of 1:16 in CSF before treatment were risk factors for treatment failure, whereas human immunodeficiency virus infection status was not a risk factor. The following algorithm, which had 97.8% specificity and 94.4% sensitivity, is proposed for shortening the duration of follow-up: at 6 months, patients with trypanosomes or a WBC count of > or = 50 cells/microL in CSF are considered to have treatment failure, whereas patients with a CSF WBC count of > or = 5 cells/microL are considered to be cured and can discontinue follow-up. At 12 months, the remaining patients (those with a WBC count of > or = 6-49 cells/microL) need a test of cure, based on trypanosome presence and WBC count, applying a cutoff value of > or = 20 cells/microL. CONCLUSION. Combining criteria for failure and cure allows follow-up of patients with second-stage human African trypanosomiasis to be shortened to a maximum duration of 12 months.

  18. Kynurenine pathway inhibition reduces central nervous system inflammation in a model of human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Jean; Stone, Trevor W; Barrett, Michael P; Bradley, Barbara; Kennedy, Peter G E

    2009-05-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, is caused by the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense or Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, and is a major cause of systemic and neurological disability throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Following early-stage disease, the trypanosomes cross the blood-brain barrier to invade the central nervous system leading to the encephalitic, or late stage, infection. Treatment of human African trypanosomiasis currently relies on a limited number of highly toxic drugs, but untreated, is invariably fatal. Melarsoprol, a trivalent arsenical, is the only drug that can be used to cure both forms of the infection once the central nervous system has become involved, but unfortunately, this drug induces an extremely severe post-treatment reactive encephalopathy (PTRE) in up to 10% of treated patients, half of whom die from this complication. Since it is unlikely that any new and less toxic drug will be developed for treatment of human African trypanosomiasis in the near future, increasing attention is now being focussed on the potential use of existing compounds, either alone or in combination chemotherapy, for improved efficacy and safety. The kynurenine pathway is the major pathway in the metabolism of tryptophan. A number of the catabolites produced along this pathway show neurotoxic or neuroprotective activities, and their role in the generation of central nervous system inflammation is well documented. In the current study, Ro-61-8048, a high affinity kynurenine-3-monooxygenase inhibitor, was used to determine the effect of manipulating the kynurenine pathway in a highly reproducible mouse model of human African trypanosomiasis. It was found that Ro-61-8048 treatment had no significant effect (P = 0.4445) on the severity of the neuroinflammatory pathology in mice during the early central nervous system stage of the disease when only a low level of inflammation was present. However, a significant (P = 0.0284) reduction in

  19. Formation of the Short-lived Radionuclide 36Cl in the Protoplanetary Disk During Late-stage Irradiation of a Volatile-rich Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Benjamin; Matzel, Jennifer; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Krot, Alexander N.; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Ramon, Erick C.; Weber, Peter K.; Ishii, Hope A.; Ciesla, Fred J.

    2011-04-01

    Short-lived radionuclides (SLRs) in the early solar system provide fundamental insight into protoplanetary disk evolution. We measured the 36Cl-36S-isotope abundance in wadalite (<15 μm), a secondary chlorine-bearing mineral found in calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) in the Allende CV chondrite, to decipher the origin of the SLR 36Cl (τ 1/2 ~ 3 × 105 yr) in the early solar system. Its presence, initial abundance, and the noticeable decoupling from 26Al raise serious questions about the origin of SLRs. The inferred initial 36Cl abundance for wadalite, corresponding to a 36Cl/35Cl ratio of (1.81 ± 0.13) × 10-5, is the highest 36Cl abundance ever reported in any early solar system material. The high level of 36Cl in wadalite and the absence of 26Al (26Al/27Al <= 3.9 × 10-6) in co-existing grossular (1) unequivocally support the production of 36Cl by late-stage solar energetic particle irradiation in the protoplanetary disk and (2) indicates that the production of 36Cl, recorded by wadalite, is unrelated to the origin of 26Al and other SLRs (10Be, 53Mn) recorded by primary minerals of CAIs and chondrules. We infer that 36Cl was largely produced by irradiation of a volatile-rich reservoir in an optically thin protoplanetary disk adjacent to the region in which the CV chondrite parent asteroid accreted while the Sun was a weak T Tauri star. Subsequently, 36Cl accreted into the Allende CV chondrite together with condensed water ices.

  20. FORMATION OF THE SHORT-LIVED RADIONUCLIDE {sup 36}Cl IN THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK DURING LATE-STAGE IRRADIATION OF A VOLATILE-RICH RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, Benjamin; Yin Qingzhu; Matzel, Jennifer; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Ramon, Erick C.; Weber, Peter K.; Krot, Alexander N.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Ishii, Hope A.; Ciesla, Fred J.

    2011-04-20

    Short-lived radionuclides (SLRs) in the early solar system provide fundamental insight into protoplanetary disk evolution. We measured the {sup 36}Cl-{sup 36}S-isotope abundance in wadalite (<15 {mu}m), a secondary chlorine-bearing mineral found in calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) in the Allende CV chondrite, to decipher the origin of the SLR {sup 36}Cl ({tau}{sub 1/2} {approx} 3 x 10{sup 5} yr) in the early solar system. Its presence, initial abundance, and the noticeable decoupling from {sup 26}Al raise serious questions about the origin of SLRs. The inferred initial {sup 36}Cl abundance for wadalite, corresponding to a {sup 36}Cl/{sup 35}Cl ratio of (1.81 {+-} 0.13) x 10{sup -5}, is the highest {sup 36}Cl abundance ever reported in any early solar system material. The high level of {sup 36}Cl in wadalite and the absence of {sup 26}Al ({sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al {<=} 3.9 x 10{sup -6}) in co-existing grossular (1) unequivocally support the production of {sup 36}Cl by late-stage solar energetic particle irradiation in the protoplanetary disk and (2) indicates that the production of {sup 36}Cl, recorded by wadalite, is unrelated to the origin of {sup 26}Al and other SLRs ({sup 10}Be, {sup 53}Mn) recorded by primary minerals of CAIs and chondrules. We infer that {sup 36}Cl was largely produced by irradiation of a volatile-rich reservoir in an optically thin protoplanetary disk adjacent to the region in which the CV chondrite parent asteroid accreted while the Sun was a weak T Tauri star. Subsequently, {sup 36}Cl accreted into the Allende CV chondrite together with condensed water ices.

  1. Presynaptic proteins complexin-I and complexin-II differentially influence cognitive function in early and late stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Miguel, Alfredo; Sawada, Ken; Jones, Andrea A; Thornton, Allen E; Barr, Alasdair M; Leurgans, Sue E; Schneider, Julie A; Bennett, David A; Honer, William G

    2017-03-01

    Progressive accumulation of Alzheimer's disease-related pathology is associated with cognitive dysfunction. Differences in cognitive reserve may contribute to individual differences in cognitive function in the presence of comparable neuropathology. The protective effects of cognitive reserve could contribute differentially in early versus late stages of the disease. We investigated presynaptic proteins as measures of brain reserve (a subset of total cognitive reserve), and used Braak staging to estimate the progression of Alzheimer's disease. Antemortem evaluations of cognitive function, postmortem assessments of pathologic indices, and presynaptic protein analyses, including the complexins I and II as respective measures of inhibitory and excitatory terminal function, were assayed in multiple key brain regions in 418 deceased participants from a community study. After covarying for demographic variables, pathologic indices, and overall synapse density, lower brain complexin-I and -II levels contributed to cognitive dysfunction (P < 0.01). Each complexin appeared to be dysregulated at a different Braak stage. Inhibitory complexin-I explained 14.4% of the variance in global cognition in Braak 0-II, while excitatory complexin-II explained 7.3% of the variance in Braak V-VI. Unlike other presynaptic proteins, complexins did not colocalize with pathologic tau within neuritic plaques, suggesting that these functional components of the synaptic machinery are cleared early from dystrophic neurites. Moreover, complexin levels showed distinct patterns of change related to memory challenges in a rat model, supporting the functional specificity of these proteins. The present results suggest that disruption of inhibitory synaptic terminals may trigger early cognitive impairment, while excitatory terminal disruption may contribute relatively more to later cognitive impairment.

  2. Early and late stage positron emission tomography (PET) studies on the haemocirculation and metabolism of seemingly normal brain tissue in patients with gliomas following radiochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mineura, K; Suda, Y; Yasuda, T; Kowada, M; Ogawa, T; Shishido, F; Uemura, K

    1988-01-01

    Haemocirculatory and metabolic changes in seemingly normal brain tissue following radiochemotherapy including nimustine hydrochloride (ACNU) and tegafur (FT) were analyzed using oxygen-15 and fluorine-18 positron emission tomography (PET) in seven patients with gliomas. At an early stage (within one month) after radiochemotherapy, marginal increases in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and cerebral blood volume (rCBV) were found contralateral to the tumour in gray matter which was apparently normal brain structure, as seen on computerized tomography (CT). The oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) decreased significantly (p less than 0.05 by a paired-t test) from that of the pretreatment study, due to surgical decompression and radiochemotherapy. At the late stage (three to thirty-one months with a mean of thirteen months), rCBF decreased significantly from the early stage study (p less than 0.05); oxygen consumption (rCMRO2) fell in all cases significantly from the pretreatment study (p less than 0.01) and from the early stage study (p less than 0.05); consequently, rOEF remained unchanged at a level similar to the early stage study. Glucose consumption (rCMRG1) increased slightly as compared with the early stage study but failed to be restored to the level of the pretreatment study. Noteworthy was a coupling reduction of rCBF and rCMRO2--presumably, a late delayed effect of radiochemotherapy. These preliminary results indicate that with PET studies it may be possible to predict damage to normal brain tissue after radiochemotherapy.

  3. MeCP2 is critical for maintaining mature neuronal networks and global brain anatomy during late stages of postnatal brain development and in the mature adult brain.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Vu Chuong; Du, Fang; Felice, Christy A; Shan, Xiwei; Nigam, Aparna; Mandel, Gail; Robinson, John K; Ballas, Nurit

    2012-07-18

    Mutations in the X-linked gene, methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (Mecp2), underlie a wide range of neuropsychiatric disorders, most commonly, Rett Syndrome (RTT), a severe autism spectrum disorder that affects approximately one in 10,000 female live births. Because mutations in the Mecp2 gene occur in the germ cells with onset of neurological symptoms occurring in early childhood, the role of MeCP2 has been ascribed to brain maturation at a specific developmental window. Here, we show similar kinetics of onset and progression of RTT-like symptoms in mice, including lethality, if MeCP2 is removed postnatally during the developmental stage that coincides with RTT onset, or adult stage. For the first time, we show that brains that lose MeCP2 at these two different stages are actively shrinking, resulting in higher than normal neuronal cell density. Furthermore, we show that mature dendritic arbors of pyramidal neurons are severely retracted and dendritic spine density is dramatically reduced. In addition, hippocampal astrocytes have significantly less complex ramified processes. These changes accompany a striking reduction in the levels of several synaptic proteins, including CaMKII α/β, AMPA, and NMDA receptors, and the synaptic vesicle proteins Vglut and Synapsin, which represent critical modifiers of synaptic function and dendritic arbor structure. Importantly, the mRNA levels of these synaptic proteins remains unchanged, suggesting that MeCP2 likely regulates these synaptic proteins post-transcriptionally, directly or indirectly. Our data suggest a crucial role for MeCP2 in post-transcriptional regulation of critical synaptic proteins involved in maintaining mature neuronal networks during late stages of postnatal brain development.

  4. Effects of reducing dietary protein, methionine, choline, folic acid, and vitamin B12 during the late stages of the egg production cycle on performance and eggshell quality.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, K

    2003-09-01

    A series of four experiments was conducted to determine whether-shell quality during the late stages of egg production can be improved by using diets that are effective in reducing egg size. The experiments involved dietary manipulation of protein, methionine, choline, folic acid, and vitamin B12. In experiment 1, reducing dietary protein in combination of reducing the dietary methionine and choline or this diet without supplemental folic acid and vitamin B12 resulted in reduced egg weight and improved shell quality. However, egg production also was drastically reduced. In experiment 2, reducing the dietary level of methionine, without adding supplemental choline, folic acid, and vitamin B12 reduced egg size and improved shell quality, but egg production was reduced as well. In this experiment reducing the dietary methionine without supplemental folic acid and vitamin B12 reduced egg size and improved shell quality with no adverse effect on egg production. In experiment 3, reducing the dietary level of methionine and choline or reducing the dietary level of choline, folic acid, and vitamin B12 reduced egg size and improved shell quality without adverse effects on egg production. On the other hand, reducing dietary methionine, folic acid, vitamin B12, and supplemental choline reduced egg weight and improved shell quality but lowered egg production. In experiment 4, reducing dietary methionine together with reducing choline and vitamin B12 reduced egg size and improved shell quality with no adverse effect on egg production. The results of this series of experiments generally indicate that certain manipulations of the combination of methionine, choline, folic acid, and vitamin B12 have the potential to reduce egg weight and improve shell quality without affecting egg production during the latter stages of the egg production cycle.

  5. Dosimetric consequences of the parotid glands using CT-to-CBCT deformable registration during IMRT for late stage head and neck cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conill, Annette L.

    Patients receiving Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for late stage head and neck (HN) cancer often experience anatomical changes due to weight loss, tumor regression, and positional changes of normal anatomy (1). As a result, the actual dose delivered may vary from the original treatment plan. The purpose of this study was (a) to evaluate the dosimetric consequences of the parotid glands during the course of treatment, and (b) to determine if there would be an optimal timeframe for replanning. Nineteen locally advanced HN cancer patients underwent definitive IMRT. Each patient received an initial computerized tomography simulation (CT-SIM) scan and weekly cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) scans. A Deformable Image Registration (DIR) was performed between the CT-SIM and CBCT of the parotid glands and Planning Target Volumes (PTVs) using the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) and the Velocity deformation software. A recalculation of the dose was performed on the weekly CBCTs using the original monitor units. The parameters for evaluation of our method were: the changes in volume of the PTVs and parotid glands, the dose coverage of the PTVs, the lateral displacement in the Center of Mass (COM), the mean dose, and Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) of the parotid glands. The studies showed a reduction of the volume in the PTVs and parotids, a medial displacement in COM, and alterations of the mean dose to the parotid glands as compared to the initial plans. Differences were observed for the dose volume coverage of the PTVs and NTCP of the parotid gland values between the initial plan and our proposed method utilizing deformable registration-based dose calculations.

  6. Expression of CP4 EPSPS in microspores and tapetum cells of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) is critical for male reproductive development in response to late-stage glyphosate applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Chia Sophia; Hubmeier, Christopher; Tran, Minhtien; Martens, Amy; Cerny, R Eric; Sammons, R Doug; CaJacob, Claire

    2006-09-01

    Plants expressing Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (CP4 EPSPS) are known to be resistant to glyphosate, a potent herbicide that inhibits the activity of the endogenous plant EPSPS. The RR1445 transgenic cotton line (current commercial line for Roundup Ready Cotton) was generated using the figwort mosaic virus (FMV) 35S promoter to drive the expression of the CP4 EPSPS gene, and has excellent vegetative tolerance to glyphosate. However, with high glyphosate application rates at developmental stages later than the four-leaf stage (late-stage applications: applications that are inconsistent with the Roundup labels), RR1445 shows male sterility. Another transgenic cotton line, RR60, was generated using the FMV 35S promoter and the Arabidopsis elongation factor-1alpha promoter (AtEF1alpha) for the expression of CP4 EPSPS. RR60 has excellent vegetative and reproductive tolerance to applications of glyphosate at all developmental stages. Histochemical analyses were conducted to examine the male reproductive development at the cellular level of these cotton lines in response to glyphosate applications, and to investigate the correlation between glyphosate injury and the expression of CP4 EPSPS in male reproductive tissues. The expression of CP4 EPSPS in RR60 was found to be strong in all male reproductive cell types. Conversely, CP4 EPSPS expression in RR1445 was low in pollen mother cells, male gametophytes and tapetum, three crucial male reproductive cell types. Our results indicate that the FMV 35S promoter, although expressing strongly in most vegetative tissues in plants, has extremely low activity in these cell types.

  7. Plasma Neurofilament Heavy Chain Levels Correlate to Markers of Late Stage Disease Progression and Treatment Response in SOD1G93A Mice that Model ALS

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ching-Hua; Petzold, Axel; Kalmar, Bernadett; Dick, James; Malaspina, Andrea; Greensmith, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an incurable neurodegenerative disorder characterised by progressive degeneration of motor neurons leading to death, typically within 3–5 years of symptom onset. The diagnosis of ALS is largely reliant on clinical assessment and electrophysiological findings. Neither specific investigative tools nor reliable biomarkers are currently available to enable an early diagnosis or monitoring of disease progression, hindering the design of treatment trials. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, using the well-established SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS and a new in-house ELISA method, we have validated that plasma neurofilament heavy chain protein (NfH) levels correlate with both functional markers of late stage disease progression and treatment response. We detected a significant increase in plasma levels of phosphorylated NfH during disease progression in SOD1G93A mice from 105 days onwards. Moreover, increased plasma NfH levels correlated with the decline in muscle force, motor unit survival and, more significantly, with the loss of spinal motor neurons in SOD1 mice during this critical period of decline. Importantly, mice treated with the disease modifying compound arimoclomol had lower plasma NfH levels, suggesting plasma NfH levels could be validated as an outcome measure for treatment trials. Conclusions/Significance These results show that plasma NfH levels closely reflect later stages of disease progression and therapeutic response in the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS and may potentially be a valuable biomarker of later disease progression in ALS. PMID:22815892

  8. Cuprizone decreases intermediate and late-stage progenitor cells in hippocampal neurogenesis of rats in a framework of 28-day oral dose toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hajime; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Mizukami, Sayaka; Saito, Fumiyo; Imatanaka, Nobuya; Akahori, Yumi; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2015-09-15

    Developmental exposure to cuprizone (CPZ), a demyelinating agent, impairs intermediate-stage neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rat offspring. To investigate the possibility of alterations in adult neurogenesis following postpubertal exposure to CPZ in a framework of general toxicity studies, CPZ was orally administered to 5-week-old male rats at 0, 120, or 600mg/kg body weight/day for 28days. In the subgranular zone (SGZ), 600mg/kg CPZ increased the number of cleaved caspase-3(+) apoptotic cells. At ≥120mg/kg, the number of SGZ cells immunoreactive for TBR2, doublecortin, or PCNA was decreased, while that for SOX2 was increased. In the granule cell layer, CPZ at ≥120mg/kg decreased the number of postmitotic granule cells immunoreactive for NEUN, CHRNA7, ARC or FOS. In the dentate hilus, CPZ at ≥120mg/kg decreased phosphorylated TRKB(+) interneurons, although the number of reelin(+) interneurons was unchanged. At 600mg/kg, mRNA levels of Bdnf and Chrna7 were decreased, while those of Casp4, Casp12 and Trib3 were increased in the dentate gyrus. These data suggest that CPZ in a scheme of 28-day toxicity study causes endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis of granule cell lineages, resulting in aberrations of intermediate neurogenesis and late-stage neurogenesis and following suppression of immediate early gene-mediated neuronal plasticity. Suppression of BDNF signals to interneurons caused by decreased cholinergic signaling may play a role in these effects of CPZ. The effects of postpubertal CPZ on neurogenesis were similar to those observed with developmental exposure, except for the lack of reelin response, which may contribute to a greater decrease in SGZ cells.

  9. Epidemiology of human African trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Jose R; Simarro, Pere P; Diarra, Abdoulaye; Jannin, Jean G

    2014-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), or sleeping sickness, is caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, which is a chronic form of the disease present in western and central Africa, and by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, which is an acute disease located in eastern and southern Africa. The rhodesiense form is a zoonosis, with the occasional infection of humans, but in the gambiense form, the human being is regarded as the main reservoir that plays a key role in the transmission cycle of the disease. The gambiense form currently assumes that 98% of the cases are declared; the Democratic Republic of the Congo is the most affected country, with more than 75% of the gambiense cases declared. The epidemiology of the disease is mediated by the interaction of the parasite (trypanosome) with the vectors (tsetse flies), as well as with the human and animal hosts within a particular environment. Related to these interactions, the disease is confined in spatially limited areas called “foci”, which are located in Sub-Saharan Africa, mainly in remote rural areas. The risk of contracting HAT is, therefore, determined by the possibility of contact of a human being with an infected tsetse fly. Epidemics of HAT were described at the beginning of the 20th century; intensive activities have been set up to confront the disease, and it was under control in the 1960s, with fewer than 5,000 cases reported in the whole continent. The disease resurged at the end of the 1990s, but renewed efforts from endemic countries, cooperation agencies, and nongovernmental organizations led by the World Health Organization succeeded to raise awareness and resources, while reinforcing national programs, reversing the trend of the cases reported, and bringing the disease under control again. In this context, sustainable elimination of the gambiense HAT, defined as the interruption of the transmission of the disease, was considered as a feasible target for 2030. Since rhodesiense HAT is a zoonosis

  10. Continuous evaluation of changes in the serum proteome from early to late stages of sepsis caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Raju M, Swathi; V, Jahnavi; Kamaraju, Ratnakar S; Sritharan, Venkataraman; Rajkumar, Karthik; Natarajan, Sumathi; Kumar, Anil D; Burgula, Sandeepta

    2016-06-01

    Serum protein profiles of patients with bacterial sepsis from the day of diagnosis until recovery/mortality were compared from early to late stages in response to severe sepsis using two dimensional electrophoresis. The proteins exhibiting changes during the course of sepsis (20‑28 day mortality) were selected and identified by matrix‑assisted laser desorption ionization‑time of flight‑tandem mass spectrometry. Among the proteins identified, haptoglobin (Hp), transthyretin (TTR), orosomucoid 1/α1 acid glycoprotein (ORM1), α1 antitrypsin (A1AT), serum amyloid A (SAA) and S100A9 exhibited differential expression patterns between survivors (S; n=6) and non‑survivors (NS; n=6), particularly during the early stages of sepsis. Expression factors (EFs), taken as the ratio between the NS and S during early stages, showed ratios of Hp, 0.39 (P≤0.012); TTR, 3.96 (P≤0.03); ORM1, 0.69 (P≤0.79); A1AT, 0.92 (P≤0.87) and SAA, 0.69 (P≤0.01). S100A9, an acute phase protein, exhibited an EF ratio of 1.68 (P≤0.004) during the end stages of sepsis. A delayed rise in levels was observed in Hp, A1AT, ORM1, S100A9 and SAA, whereas TTR levels increased during the early stages of sepsis in NS. Analysis of inflammatory responses in the early stages of sepsis revealed increased mRNA expression in leukocytes of interleukin (IL)‑6 (EF, 2.50), IL‑10 (EF, 1.70) and prepronociceptin (EF, 1.6), which is a precursor for nociceptin in NS compared with S, and higher Toll‑like receptor‑4 (EF, 0.30) levels in S compared with NS. Therefore, a weaker acute phase response in the early stages of sepsis in NS, combined with an inefficient inflammatory response, may contribute to sepsis mortality.

  11. Safinamide as Add-On Therapy to Levodopa in Mid- to Late-Stage Parkinson’s Disease Fluctuating Patients: Post hoc Analysesof Studies 016 and SETTLE

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, Carlo; Sardina, Marco; Bonizzoni, Ermino

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies 016 and SETTLE showed that safinamide was safe and effective as adjunct therapy in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD) and motor fluctuations. The addition of safinamide to a stable dose of levodopa alone or with other antiparkinsonian medications significantly increased ON time with no/non-troublesome dyskinesia, decreased OFF time and improved Parkinson’s symptoms. Objective: To evaluate the clinical effects of safinamide 100 mg/day on motor fluctuations and cardinal Parkinson’s symptoms in specific patient subgroups using pooled data from Studies 016 and SETTLE. Methods: Both studies were double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, phase 3 trials which enrolled patients with mid- to late-stage PD experiencing motor fluctuations while receiving optimized and stable doses of levodopa, alone or with other dopaminergic treatments. The present post-hoc analyses assessed the change from baseline in ON time (with no or non-troublesome dyskinesia) and OFF time in subgroups of patients who were receiving only levodopa at baseline, who were classified as “mild fluctuators” (daily OFF time ≤4 h), and who were receiving concomitant dopaminergic therapy, with or without amantadine, and the effects of safinamide versus placebo on individual cardinal PD symptoms during ON time. Results: Safinamide significantly increased mean ON time (with no or non-troublesome dyskinesia) and reduced mean OFF time when used as first adjunct therapy in levodopa-treated patients and patients with mild motor fluctuations. Mean daily ON time (with no or non-troublesome dyskinesia) and OFF time were favorably changed, compared with placebo, to similar extents regardless of whether patients were receiving concomitant dopamine agonists, catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors and amantadine. Additionally, safinamide improved bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor and gait. Conclusions: Safinamide was a safe and effective first adjunct therapy in levodopa

  12. Mineral thermobarometry and fluid inclusion studies on the Closepet granite, Eastern Dharwar Craton, south India: Implications to emplacement and evolution of late-stage fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sourabh; Panigrahi, Mruganka K.; Jayananda, M.

    2014-09-01

    The Closepet granite (CPG), a spectacularly exposed magmatic body along with other intrusive bodies (to the east of it) typifies the late Archean granitic activity in the Eastern Dharwar Craton (EDC), south India. In the present study, the P-T-fO2 conditions of emplacement and physico-chemical environment of the associated magmatic-hydrothermal regime of CPG have been retrieved on the basis of mineral chemical and fluid inclusion studies. Amphibole-plagioclase Ti-in-amphibole and Ti-in-biotite geothermometers along with Al-in-amphibole geobarometer have been used to reconstruct the emplacement temperature and pressure conditions in the majority of the pluton. Estimated temperatures of emplacement of CPG vary from to 740 to 540 °C. A variation of pressure from 4.8 to 4.1 kilo bars corresponding to this temperature range was obtained. While there is a faint south to north negative gradient in temperature, the variation of pressure does not seem to follow this trend and indicates more or less same crustal level of emplacement for the body between Ramanagaram-Kalyandurga segment extending for about 230 km. Mineral chemistry of biotite indicates crystallization of CPG under high oxygen fugacity conditions (mostly above QFM buffer) with no clear spatial variation in the fugacity of halogen species in the late-stage magmatic fluid. It may be surmised that barring the southernmost part of CPG, there is no perceptible variation in the physicochemical environment of emplacement. Fluid Inclusion studies in the granitic matrix quartz and pegmatite/vein quartz show dominance of H2O and H2O-CO2 fluids respectively in them. The difference in the fluid characteristics is interpreted in terms of the initial loss of CO2 rich fluid from granitic magma and aqueous-rich nature during the later stages of crystallization of quartz. The exsolved CO2-rich fluid was responsible in formation of the later quartz and pegmatitic veins at different crustal levels and also possibly was

  13. Formation of short-lived radionuclides in the protoplanetary disk during late-stage irradiation of a volatile-rich reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, B; Matzel, J; Hutcheon, I D; Krot, A N; Yin, Q -; Nagashima, K; Ramon, E; Weber, P; Ishii, H; Ciesla, F

    2010-11-30

    The origin of short-lived (t{sub 1/2} < 5 Myr) and now extinct radionuclides ({sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 41}Ca, {sup 53}Mn, {sup 60}Fe; hereafter SLRs) is fundamental to understanding the formation of the early solar system. Two distinct classes of models have been proposed to explain the origin of SLRs: (1) injection from a nearby stellar source (e.g., supernova, asymptotic giant branch star or Wolf-Rayet star) and (2) solar energetic particle irradiation of dust and gas near the proto-Sun. Recent studies have demonstrated that {sup 36}Cl was extant in the early solar system. However, its presence, initial abundance and the noticeable decoupling from {sup 26}Al raise serious questions about the origin of SLRs. Here we report {sup 36}Cl-{sup 36}S and {sup 26}Al-{sup 26}Mg systematics for wadalite and grossular, secondary minerals in a calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) from the CV chondrite Allende that allow us to reassess the origin of SLRs. The inferred abundance of {sup 36}Cl in wadalite, corresponding to a {sup 36}Cl/{sup 35}Cl ratio of (1.81 {+-} 0.13) x 10{sup -5}, is the highest {sup 36}Cl abundance reported in any early solar system material. The high level of {sup 36}Cl in wadalite and the absence of {sup 26}Al ({sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al {le} 3.9 x 10{sup -6}) in co-existing grossular indicates that (1) {sup 36}Cl formed by late-stage solar energetic particle irradiation and (2) the production of {sup 36}Cl, recorded by secondary minerals, is unrelated to the origin of {sup 26}Al and other SLRs ({sup 10}Be, {sup 53}Mn) recorded by primary minerals of CAIs and chondrules. We conclude that 36Cl was produced by solar energetic particle irradiation of a volatile-rich reservoir in an optically thin protoplanetary disk adjacent to the accretion region of the CV chondrite parent asteroid.

  14. Dosimetric difference amongst 3 techniques: TomoTherapy, sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and RapidArc radiotherapy in the treatment of late-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Francis Kar-ho Yip, Celia Wai-yi; Cheung, Frankie Chun-hung; Leung, Alex Kwok-cheung; Chau, Ricky Ming-chun; Ngan, Roger Kai-cheong

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the dosimetric difference amongst TomoTherapy, sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and RapidArc radiotherapy in the treatment of late-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten patients with late-stage (Stage III or IV) NPC treated with TomoTherapy or IMRT were selected for the study. Treatment plans with these 3 techniques were devised according to departmental protocol. Dosimetric parameters for organ at risk and treatment targets were compared between TomoTherapy and IMRT, TomoTherapy and RapidArc, and IMRT and RapidArc. Comparison amongst the techniques was done by statistical tests on the dosimetric parameters, total monitor unit (MU), and expected delivery time. All 3 techniques achieved similar target dose coverage. TomoTherapy achieved significantly lower doses in lens and mandible amongst the techniques. It also achieved significantly better dose conformity to the treatment targets. RapidArc achieved significantly lower dose to the eye and normal tissue, lower total MU, and less delivery time. The dosimetric advantages of the 3 techniques were identified in the treatment of late-stage NPC. This may serve as a guideline for selection of the proper technique for different clinical cases.

  15. Evaluation of Antigens for Development of a Serological Test for Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Biéler, Sylvain; Waltenberger, Harald; Barrett, Michael P.; McCulloch, Richard; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Carrington, Mark; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; McKerrow, James; Phillips, Margaret A.; Michels, Paul A.; Büscher, Philippe; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Bishop, Richard; Robinson, Derrick R.; Bangs, James; Ferguson, Michael; Nerima, Barbara; Albertini, Audrey; Michel, Gerd; Radwandska, Magdalena; Ndung’u, Joseph Mathu

    2016-01-01

    Background Control and elimination of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) can be accelerated through the use of diagnostic tests that are more accurate and easier to deploy. The goal of this work was to evaluate the immuno-reactivity of antigens and identify candidates to be considered for development of a simple serological test for the detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense infections, ideally both. Methodology/Principal Findings The reactivity of 35 antigens was independently evaluated by slot blot and ELISA against sera from both T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense infected patients and controls. The antigens that were most reactive by both tests to T. b. gambiense sera were the membrane proteins VSG LiTat 1.3, VSG LiTat 1.5 and ISG64. Reactivity to T. b. rhodesiense sera was highest with VSG LiTat 1.3, VSG LiTat 1.5 and SRA, although much lower than with T. b. gambiense samples. The reactivity of all possible combinations of antigens was also calculated. When the slot blot results of 2 antigens were paired, a VSG LiTat 1.3- ISG75 combination performed best on T. b. gambiense sera, while a VSG LiTat 1.3-VSG LiTat 1.5 combination was the most reactive using ELISA. A combination of SRA and either VSG LiTat 1.3 or VSG LiTat 1.5 had the highest reactivity on T. b. rhodesiense sera according to slot blot, while in ELISA, pairing SRA with either GM6 or VSG LiTat 1.3 yielded the best results. Conclusions This study identified antigens that were highly reactive to T. b. gambiense sera, which could be considered for developing a serological test for gambiense HAT, either individually or in combination. Antigens with potential for inclusion in a test for T. b. rhodesiense HAT were also identified, but because their reactivity was comparatively lower, a search for additional antigens would be required before developing a test for this form of the disease. PMID:27936225

  16. Sn-polymetallic greisen-type deposits associated with late-stage rapakivi granites, Brazil: fluid inclusion and stable isotope characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettencourt, Jorge S.; Leite, Washington B.; Goraieb, Claudio L.; Sparrenberger, Irena; Bello, Rosa M. S.; Payolla, Bruno L.

    2005-03-01

    Tin-polymetallic greisen-type deposits in the Itu Rapakivi Province and Rondônia Tin Province, Brazil are associated with late-stage rapakivi fluorine-rich peraluminous alkali-feldspar granites. These granites contain topaz and/or muscovite or zinnwaldite and have geochemical characteristics comparable to the low-P sub-type topaz-bearing granites. Stockworks and veins are common in Oriente Novo (Rondônia Tin Province) and Correas (Itu Rapakivi Province) deposits, but in the Santa Bárbara deposit (Rondônia Tin Province) a preserved cupola with associated bed-like greisen is predominant. The contrasting mineralization styles reflect different depths of formation, spatial relationship to tin granites, and different wall rock/fluid proportions. The deposits contain a similar rare-metal suite that includes Sn (±W, ±Ta, ±Nb), and base-metal suite (Zn-Cu-Pb) is present only in Correas deposit. The early fluid inclusions of the Correas and Oriente Novo deposits are (1) low to moderate-salinity (0-19 wt.% NaCl eq.) CO 2-bearing aqueous fluids homogenizing at 245-450 °C, and (2) aqueous solutions with low CO 2, low to moderate salinity (0-14 wt.% NaCl eq.), which homogenize between 100 and 340 °C. In the Santa Bárbara deposit, the early inclusions are represented by (1) low-salinity (5-12 wt.% NaCl eq.) aqueous fluids with variable CO 2 contents, homogenizing at 340 to 390 °C, and (2) low-salinity (0-3 wt.% NaCl eq.) aqueous fluid inclusions, which homogenize at 320-380 °C. Cassiterite, wolframite, columbite-tantalite, scheelite, and sulfide assemblages accompany these fluids. The late fluid in the Oriente Novo and Correas deposit was a low-salinity (0-6 wt.% NaCl eq.) CO 2-free aqueous solution, which homogenizes at (100-260 °C) and characterizes the sulfide-fluorite-sericite association in the Correas deposit. The late fluid in the Santa Bárbara deposit has lower salinity (0-3 wt.% NaCl eq.) and characterizes the late-barren-quartz, muscovite and kaolinite

  17. Population genomics reveals the origin and asexual evolution of human infective trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Weir, William; Capewell, Paul; Foth, Bernardo; Clucas, Caroline; Pountain, Andrew; Steketee, Pieter; Veitch, Nicola; Koffi, Mathurin; De Meeûs, Thierry; Kaboré, Jacques; Camara, Mamadou; Cooper, Anneli; Tait, Andy; Jamonneau, Vincent; Bucheton, Bruno; Berriman, Matt; MacLeod, Annette

    2016-01-26

    Evolutionary theory predicts that the lack of recombination and chromosomal re-assortment in strictly asexual organisms results in homologous chromosomes irreversibly accumulating mutations and thus evolving independently of each other, a phenomenon termed the Meselson effect. We apply a population genomics approach to examine this effect in an important human pathogen, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. We determine that T.b. gambiense is evolving strictly asexually and is derived from a single progenitor, which emerged within the last 10,000 years. We demonstrate the Meselson effect for the first time at the genome-wide level in any organism and show large regions of loss of heterozygosity, which we hypothesise to be a short-term compensatory mechanism for counteracting deleterious mutations. Our study sheds new light on the genomic and evolutionary consequences of strict asexuality, which this pathogen uses as it exploits a new biological niche, the human population.

  18. Human African trypanosomiasis in endemic populations and travellers.

    PubMed

    Blum, J A; Neumayr, A L; Hatz, C F

    2012-06-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) or sleeping sickness is caused by the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma brucei (T.b.) gambiense (West African form) and T.b. rhodesiense (East African form) that are transmitted by the bite of the tsetse fly, Glossina spp.. Whereas most patients in endemic populations are infected with T.b. gambiense, most tourists are infected with T.b. rhodesiense. In endemic populations, T.b. gambiense HAT is characterized by chronic and intermittent fever, headache, pruritus, and lymphadenopathy in the first stage and by sleep disturbances and neuro-psychiatric disorders in the second stage. Recent descriptions of the clinical presentation of T.b. rhodesiense in endemic populations show a high variability in different foci. The symptomatology of travellers is markedly different from the usual textbook descriptions of African HAT patients. The onset of both infections is almost invariably an acute and febrile disease. Diagnosis and treatment are difficult and rely mostly on old methods and drugs. However, new molecular diagnostic technologies are under development. A promising new drug combination is currently evaluated in a phase 3 b study and further new drugs are under evaluation.

  19. The geology and geochemistry of Isla Floreana, Galápagos: A different type of late-stage ocean island volcanism: Chapter 6 in The Galápagos: A natural laboratory for the earth sciences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harpp, Karen S.; Geist, Dennis J.; Koleszar, Alison M.; Christensen, Branden; Lyons, John; Sabga, Melissa; Rollins, Nathan; Harpp, Karen S.; Mittelstaedt, Eric; d'Ozouville, Noémi; Graham, David W

    2014-01-01

    Isla Floreana, the southernmost volcano in the Galápagos Archipelago, has erupted a diverse suite of alkaline basalts continually since 1.5 Ma. Because these basalts have different compositions than xenoliths and older lavas from the deep submarine sector of the volcano, Floreana is interpreted as being in a rejuvenescent or late-stage phase of volcanism. Most lavas contain xenoliths, or their disaggregated remains. The xenolithic debris and large ranges in composition, including during single eruptions, indicate that the magmas do not reside in crustal magma chambers, unlike magmas in the western Galápagos. Floreana lavas have distinctive trace element compositions that are rich in fluid-immobile elements (e.g., Ta, Nb, Th, Zr) and even richer in fluid-mobile elements (e.g., Ba, Sr, Pb). Rare earth element (REE) patterns are light REE-enriched and distinctively concave-up. Neodymium isotopic ratios are comparable to those from Fernandina, at the core of the Galápagos plume, but Floreana has the most radiogenic Sr and Pb isotopic ratios in the archipelago. These trace element patterns and isotopic ratios are attributed to a mixed source originating within the Galápagos plume, which includes depleted upper mantle, plume material rich in TITAN elements (Ti, Ta, Nb), and recycled oceanic crust that has undergone partial dehydration in an ancient subduction zone. Because Floreana lies at the periphery of the Galápagos plume, melting occurs mostly in the spinel zone, and enriched components dominate; the Floreana recycled mantle component influence is detectable in volcanoes along the entire southern periphery of the archipelago as well. Floreana is the only Galápagos volcano known to have undergone late-stage volcanism. Here, however, the secondary stage activity is more compositionally enriched than the shield-building phase, in contrast to what is observed in Hawai‘i, suggesting that the mechanism driving late-stage volcanism may vary among ocean island

  20. Insights into the late-stage differentiation processes of the Catalão I carbonatite complex in Brazil: New Sr-Nd and C-O isotopic data in minerals from niobium ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Ítalo L.; Brod, José A.; Cordeiro, Pedro F. O.; Dantas, Elton L.; Mancini, Luis H.

    2017-03-01

    The Late Cretaceous Catalão I carbonatite complex consists of ultramafic silicate rocks, phoscorites, nelsonites and carbonatites. The latest stages of the evolution of the complex are characterized by several nelsonite (magnetite-apatite rock) and carbonatite dykes, plugs and veins crosscutting earlier alkaline rocks. The interaction between the latter and late-stage carbonatites and/or carbo-hydrothermal fluids, converted the original dunites and bebedourites to metasomatic phlogopitites. Late-stage nelsonites (N1), pseudonelsonites (N2) and various types of dolomite carbonatites (DC) including norsethite-, magnesite- and/or monazite-bearing varieties show significant whole-rock Nd and Sr isotopic variations. To elucidate whether magmatic or metasomatic processes, or both, were responsible for these isotope variations we characterized the Nd and Sr isotope compositions of major mineral phases (i.e. apatite, dolomite, norsethite, pyrochlore and tetraferriphlogopite) in these late-stage rocks. Mineral isotope data recorded the same differences observed between N1 and N2 whole-rocks with N2 minerals showing more enriched isotopic signatures than minerals from N1. Sr isotopic disequilibrium among minerals from N2 pseudonelsonites and spatially related dolomite carbonatite pockets implies formation from batches of carbonate melts with distinct isotopic compositions. A detailed investigation of Nd and Sr isotopes from whole-rocks and minerals suggests that the most evolved rocks of the Catalão I complex probably derive from two different evolution paths. We propose that an earlier magmatic trend (path A) could be explained by several batches of immiscible and/or residual melts derived from carbonated-silicate parental magma (e.g. phlogopite picrite) contaminated with continental crust to a variable extent, in an AFCLI-like process. A second trend (path B) comprises highly variable 143Nd/144Ndi at nearly constant 87Sr/86Sri coupled with high δ18O in carbonates. This

  1. Identification and Characterization of FTY720 for the Treatment of Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Marcel; Avery, Vicky M.

    2015-01-01

    The screening of a focused library identified FTY720 (Fingolimod; Gilenya) as a potent selective antitrypanosomal compound active against Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. brucei rhodesiense, the causative agents of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). This is the first report of trypanocidal activity for FTY720, an oral drug registered for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis, and the characterization of sphingolipids as a potential new class of compounds for HAT. PMID:26666915

  2. Effect of Debagging Time on Pigment Patterns in the Peel and Sugar and Organic Acid Contents in the Pulp of ‘Golden Delicious’ and ‘Qinguan’ Apple Fruit at Mid and Late Stages of Development

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Chenjuan; Ma, Changqing; Zhang, Juan; Jing, Shujuan; Jiang, Xiaobing; Yang, Yazhou; Zhao, Zhengyang

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effect of debagging time on color and flavor / taste compounds in the non-red apple cultivar ‘Golden Delicious’ and red cultivar ‘Qinguan’ at mid and late stages of fruit development. Debagging briefly improved the red color in both cultivars, the peel of ‘Golden Delicious’ presenting pale-pink hue. However, rapid anthocyanin accumulation occurred in apple peel at a specific time (after 179 days after flowering (DAF) in ‘Qinguan’) and was unaltered by debagging time in the red cultivar ‘Qinguan’. Furthermore, untimely debagging had a detrimental effect on the content of anthocyanin. All sugars increased and organic acids decreased in apple pulp at mid to late stages of development. Bagging treatment reduced the content of most sugars and organic acids, as well as, the overall total. However, glucose and citric acid contents were higher in bagged fruit than non-bagged fruit; the maximum occurred in T7 treatment that was no-debagging at DAF 159 / 196 (‘Golden delicious’ / ‘Qinguan’), i.e., 24.35 and 0.07 mg g-1 FW in ‘Golden delicious’, and 38.86 and 0.06 mg g-1 FW in ‘Qinguan’, respectively. In a word, bagging treatment can alter the pattern of peel color development in apple fruit; however, it remains difficult to alter the timing of rapid anthocyanin accumulation as it is regulated solely by development. Moreover, bagging treatment reduced the total accumulation of sugars and organic acids, and even the over total in pulp, but increased the glucose and citric acid contents in apple pulp. PMID:27788164

  3. A New Nonpolar N-Hydroxy Imidazoline Lead Compound with Improved Activity in a Murine Model of Late-Stage Trypanosoma brucei brucei Infection Is Not Cross-Resistant with Diamidines

    PubMed Central

    Ríos Martínez, Carlos H.; Miller, Florence; Ganeshamoorthy, Kayathiri; Glacial, Fabienne; Kaiser, Marcel; de Koning, Harry P.; Eze, Anthonius A.; Lagartera, Laura; Herraiz, Tomás

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of late-stage sleeping sickness requires drugs that can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to reach the parasites located in the brain. We report here the synthesis and evaluation of four new N-hydroxy and 12 new N-alkoxy derivatives of bisimidazoline leads as potential agents for the treatment of late-stage sleeping sickness. These compounds, which have reduced basicity compared to the parent leads (i.e., are less ionized at physiological pH), were evaluated in vitro against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and in vivo in murine models of first- and second-stage sleeping sickness. Resistance profile, physicochemical parameters, in vitro BBB permeability, and microsomal stability also were determined. The N-hydroxy imidazoline analogues were the most effective in vivo, with 4-((1-hydroxy-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)amino)-N-(4-((1-hydroxy-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)amino)phenyl)benzamide (14d) showing 100% cures in the first-stage disease, while 15d, 16d, and 17d appeared to slightly improve survival. In addition, 14d showed weak activity in the chronic model of central nervous system infection in mice. No evidence of reduction of this compound with hepatic microsomes and mitochondria was found in vitro, suggesting that N-hydroxy imidazolines are metabolically stable and have intrinsic activity against T. brucei. In contrast to its unsubstituted parent compound, the uptake of 14d in T. brucei was independent of known drug transporters (i.e., T. brucei AT1/P2 and HAPT), indicating a lower predisposition to cross-resistance with other diamidines and arsenical drugs. Hence, the N-hydroxy bisimidazolines (14d in particular) represent a new class of promising antitrypanosomal agents. PMID:25421467

  4. A new nonpolar N-hydroxy imidazoline lead compound with improved activity in a murine model of late-stage Trypanosoma brucei brucei infection is not cross-resistant with diamidines.

    PubMed

    Ríos Martínez, Carlos H; Miller, Florence; Ganeshamoorthy, Kayathiri; Glacial, Fabienne; Kaiser, Marcel; de Koning, Harry P; Eze, Anthonius A; Lagartera, Laura; Herraiz, Tomás; Dardonville, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    Treatment of late-stage sleeping sickness requires drugs that can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to reach the parasites located in the brain. We report here the synthesis and evaluation of four new N-hydroxy and 12 new N-alkoxy derivatives of bisimidazoline leads as potential agents for the treatment of late-stage sleeping sickness. These compounds, which have reduced basicity compared to the parent leads (i.e., are less ionized at physiological pH), were evaluated in vitro against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and in vivo in murine models of first- and second-stage sleeping sickness. Resistance profile, physicochemical parameters, in vitro BBB permeability, and microsomal stability also were determined. The N-hydroxy imidazoline analogues were the most effective in vivo, with 4-((1-hydroxy-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)amino)-N-(4-((1-hydroxy-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)amino)phenyl)benzamide (14d) showing 100% cures in the first-stage disease, while 15d, 16d, and 17d appeared to slightly improve survival. In addition, 14d showed weak activity in the chronic model of central nervous system infection in mice. No evidence of reduction of this compound with hepatic microsomes and mitochondria was found in vitro, suggesting that N-hydroxy imidazolines are metabolically stable and have intrinsic activity against T. brucei. In contrast to its unsubstituted parent compound, the uptake of 14d in T. brucei was independent of known drug transporters (i.e., T. brucei AT1/P2 and HAPT), indicating a lower predisposition to cross-resistance with other diamidines and arsenical drugs. Hence, the N-hydroxy bisimidazolines (14d in particular) represent a new class of promising antitrypanosomal agents.

  5. Effect of Debagging Time on Pigment Patterns in the Peel and Sugar and Organic Acid Contents in the Pulp of 'Golden Delicious' and 'Qinguan' Apple Fruit at Mid and Late Stages of Development.

    PubMed

    Jing, Chenjuan; Ma, Changqing; Zhang, Juan; Jing, Shujuan; Jiang, Xiaobing; Yang, Yazhou; Zhao, Zhengyang

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effect of debagging time on color and flavor / taste compounds in the non-red apple cultivar 'Golden Delicious' and red cultivar 'Qinguan' at mid and late stages of fruit development. Debagging briefly improved the red color in both cultivars, the peel of 'Golden Delicious' presenting pale-pink hue. However, rapid anthocyanin accumulation occurred in apple peel at a specific time (after 179 days after flowering (DAF) in 'Qinguan') and was unaltered by debagging time in the red cultivar 'Qinguan'. Furthermore, untimely debagging had a detrimental effect on the content of anthocyanin. All sugars increased and organic acids decreased in apple pulp at mid to late stages of development. Bagging treatment reduced the content of most sugars and organic acids, as well as, the overall total. However, glucose and citric acid contents were higher in bagged fruit than non-bagged fruit; the maximum occurred in T7 treatment that was no-debagging at DAF 159 / 196 ('Golden delicious' / 'Qinguan'), i.e., 24.35 and 0.07 mg g-1 FW in 'Golden delicious', and 38.86 and 0.06 mg g-1 FW in 'Qinguan', respectively. In a word, bagging treatment can alter the pattern of peel color development in apple fruit; however, it remains difficult to alter the timing of rapid anthocyanin accumulation as it is regulated solely by development. Moreover, bagging treatment reduced the total accumulation of sugars and organic acids, and even the over total in pulp, but increased the glucose and citric acid contents in apple pulp.

  6. Late-stage sulfides and sulfarsenides in Lower Cambrian black shale (stone coal) from the Huangjiawan mine, Guizhou Province, People's Republic of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, H. E.; Luo, K.

    2008-03-01

    The Ni-Mo Huangjiawan mine, Guizhou Province, People’s Republic of China, occurs in Lower Cambrian black shale (stone coal) in an area where other mines have recently extracted ore from the same horizon. Detailed electron microprobe (EMPA) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses of representative thin sections have revealed a complex assemblage of sulfides and sulfarsenides. Early sulfidic and phosphatic nodules and host matrix have been lithified, somewhat fractured, and then mineralized with later-stage sulfides and sulfarsenides. Gersdorffite, millerite, polydymite, pyrite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, galena, and clausthalite have been recognized. EMPA data are given for the major phases. Pyrite trace-element distributions and coeval Ni-, As-sulfides indicate that in the main ore layer, the last sulfide deposition was Ni-As-Co-rich. Mo and V deposition were early in the petrogenesis of these rocks. The assemblages gersdorffite-millerite-polydymite (pyrite) and millerite-gersdorffite (pyrite) and the composition of gersdorffite indicate a formation temperature of between 200° and 300 °C suggesting that the last solutions to infiltrate and mineralize the samples were related to hydrothermal processes. Environmentally sensitive elements such as As, Cd, and Se are hosted by sulfides and sulfarsenides and are the main source of these elements to residual soil. Crops grown on them are enriched in these elements, and they may be hazardous for animal and human consumption.

  7. Late-stage sulfides and sulfarsenides in Lower Cambrian black shale (stone coal) from the Huangjiawan mine, Guizhou Province, People's Republic of China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belkin, H.E.; Luo, K.

    2008-01-01

    The Ni-Mo Huangjiawan mine, Guizhou Province, People's Republic of China, occurs in Lower Cambrian black shale (stone coal) in an area where other mines have recently extracted ore from the same horizon. Detailed electron microprobe (EMPA) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses of representative thin sections have revealed a complex assemblage of sulfides and sulfarsenides. Early sulfidic and phosphatic nodules and host matrix have been lithified, somewhat fractured, and then mineralized with later-stage sulfides and sulfarsenides. Gersdorffite, millerite, polydymite, pyrite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, galena, and clausthalite have been recognized. EMPA data are given for the major phases. Pyrite trace-element distributions and coeval Ni-, As-sulfides indicate that in the main ore layer, the last sulfide deposition was Ni-As-Co-rich. Mo and V deposition were early in the petrogenesis of these rocks. The assemblages gersdorffite-millerite-polydymite (pyrite) and millerite-gersdorffite (pyrite) and the composition of gersdorffite indicate a formation temperature of between 200?? and 300??C suggesting that the last solutions to infiltrate and mineralize the samples were related to hydrothermal processes. Environmentally sensitive elements such as As, Cd, and Se are hosted by sulfides and sulfarsenides and are the main source of these elements to residual soil. Crops grown on them are enriched in these elements, and they may be hazardous for animal and human consumption. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  8. An inhibitor of fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) promotes late-stage terminal differentiation from NGN3+ pancreatic endocrine progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita-Sugahara, Yzumi; Matsumoto, Masahito; Ohtaka, Manami; Nishimura, Ken; Nakanishi, Mahito; Mitani, Kohnosuke; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) provide a potential resource for regenerative medicine. To identify the signalling pathway(s) contributing to the development of functional β cells, we established a tracing model consisting of dual knock-in hiPSCs (INS-Venus/NGN3-mCherry) (hIveNry) expressing the fluorescent proteins Venus and mCherry under the control of intrinsic insulin (INS) and neurogenin 3 (NGN3) promoters, respectively. hIveNry iPSCs differentiated into NGN3- and mCherry-positive endocrine progenitors and then into Venus-positive β cells expressing INS, PDX1, NKX6.1, and glucokinase (GCK). Using these cells, we conducted high-throughput screening of chemicals and identified a specific kinase inhibitor of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) that acted in a stage-dependent manner to promote the terminal differentiation of pancreatic endocrine cells, including β cells, from the intermediate stage of pancreatic endocrine progenitors while blocking the early development of pancreatic progenitors. This FGFR1 inhibitor augmented the expression of functional β cell markers (SLC30A8 and ABCC8) and improved glucose-stimulated INS secretion. Our findings indicate that the hIveNry model could provide further insights into the mechanisms of hiPS-derived β cell differentiation controlled by FGFR1-mediated regulatory pathways in a temporal-dependent fashion. PMID:27786288

  9. Development of multiplex serological assay for the detection of human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Nzou, Samson Muuo; Fujii, Yoshito; Miura, Masashi; Mwau, Matilu; Mwangi, Anne Wanjiru; Itoh, Makoto; Salam, Md Abdus; Hamano, Shinjiro; Hirayama, Kenji; Kaneko, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a disease caused by Kinetoplastid infection. Serological tests are useful for epidemiological surveillance. The aim of this study was to develop a multiplex serological assay for HAT to assess the diagnostic value of selected HAT antigens for sero-epidemiological surveillance. We cloned loci encoding eight antigens from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, expressed the genes in bacterial systems, and purified the resulting proteins. Antigens were subjected to Luminex multiplex assays using sera from HAT and VL patients to assess the antigens' immunodiagnostic potential. Among T. b. gambiense antigens, the 64-kDa and 65-kDa invariant surface glycoproteins (ISGs) and flagellar calcium binding protein (FCaBP) had high sensitivity for sera from T. b. gambiense patients, yielding AUC values of 0.871, 0.737 and 0.858 respectively in receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. The ISG64, ISG65, and FCaBP antigens were partially cross-reactive to sera from Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense patients. The GM6 antigen was cross-reactive to sera from T. b. rhodesiense patients as well as to sera from VL patients. Furthermore, heterogeneous antibody responses to each individual HAT antigen were observed. Testing for multiple HAT antigens in the same panel allowed specific and sensitive detection. Our results demonstrate the utility of applying multiplex assays for development and evaluation of HAT antigens for use in sero-epidemiological surveillance.

  10. Silver-catalyzed late-stage fluorination.

    PubMed

    Tang, Pingping; Furuya, Takeru; Ritter, Tobias

    2010-09-01

    Carbon-fluorine bond formation by transition metal catalysis is difficult, and only a few methods for the synthesis of aryl fluorides have been developed. All reported transition-metal-catalyzed fluorination reactions for the synthesis of functionalized arenes are based on palladium. Here we present silver catalysis for carbon-fluorine bond formation. Our report is the first example of the use of the transition metal silver to form carbon-heteroatom bonds by cross-coupling catalysis. The functional group tolerance and substrate scope presented here have not been demonstrated for any other fluorination reaction to date.

  11. Late Stage Azidation of Complex Molecules

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Selective functionalization of complex scaffolds is a promising approach to alter the pharmacological profiles of natural products and their derivatives. We report the site-selective azidation of benzylic and aliphatic C–H bonds in complex molecules catalyzed by the combination of Fe(OAc)2 and a PyBox ligand. The same system also catalyzes the trifluoromethyl azidation of olefins to form derivatives of natural products containing both fluorine atoms and azides. In general, both reactions tolerate a wide range of functional groups and occur with predictable regioselectivity. Azides obtained by functionalization of C–H and C=C bonds were converted to the corresponding amines, amides, and triazoles, thus providing a wide variety of nitrogen-containing complex molecules. PMID:27800554

  12. Strategies in late stage cervix carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Krochak, R.

    1986-03-01

    Stage IIB-IV squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix when treated by irradiation has a significant failure rate. Causes of pelvic and distant failure are discussed. New techniques employed to improve local control and decrease distant metastasis are presented. Data on morbidity, mortality, and survival will be reviewed with respect to these new strategies employed.

  13. The effect of expressive and instrumental touch on the behavior states of older adults with late-stage dementia of the Alzheimer's type and on music therapist's perceived rapport.

    PubMed

    Belgrave, Melita

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of music therapy interventions utilizing two types of touch, expressive touch and instrumental touch, on the behavior states of older adults who have late-stage dementia of the Alzheimer's type. A secondary purpose of this study was to examine the perceived effectiveness of the music therapist when expressive and instrumental touch was employed during music therapy sessions. A within-subject design was used with 9 participants receiving 3 sessions in each of the experimental conditions: no touch, expressive touch, and instrumental touch. Results of a one-way ANOVA revealed that expressive touch was significantly more effective during the initial session in eliciting and maintaining alert behavior states than the instrumental and control conditions; however, there were no significant differences between the experimental and control conditions during the first and second session repetitions. Rapport ratings revealed that the therapist's client rapport was perceived to be significantly higher during both the expressive touch and instrumental touch conditions than during the control condition. These findings have important implications for music therapy practice and the effective use of nonverbal communication.

  14. Maternal exposure to 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile targets late-stage differentiation of hippocampal granule cell lineages to affect brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling and interneuron subpopulations in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Itahashi, Megu; Abe, Hajime; Tanaka, Takeshi; Mizukami, Sayaka; Kikuchihara, Yoh; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2015-08-01

    3,3'-Iminodipropionitrile (IDPN) causes neurofilament (NF)-filled swellings in the proximal segments of many large-caliber myelinated axons. This study investigated the effect of maternal exposure to IDPN on hippocampal neurogenesis in rat offspring using pregnant rats supplemented with 0 (controls), 67 or 200 ppm IDPN in drinking water from gestational day 6 to day 21 after delivery. On postnatal day (PND) 21, female offspring subjected to analysis had decreased parvalbumin(+), reelin(+) and phospho-TrkB(+) interneurons in the dentate hilus at 200 ppm and increased granule cell populations expressing immediate-early gene products, Arc or c-Fos, at ≥  67 ppm. mRNA expression in the dentate gyrus examined at 200 ppm decreased with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) and very low density lipoprotein receptor. Immunoreactivity for phosphorylated NF heavy polypeptide decreased in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus and the stratum radiatum of the cornu ammonis (CA) 3, portions showing axonal projections from mossy cells and pyramidal neurons, at 200 ppm on PND 21, whereas immunoreactivity for synaptophysin was unchanged in the dentate gyrus. Observed changes all disappeared on PND 77. There were no fluctuations in the numbers of apoptotic cells, proliferating cells and subpopulations of granule cell lineage in the subgranular zone on PND 21 and PND 77. Thus, maternal IDPN exposure may reversibly affect late-stage differentiation of granule cell lineages involving neuronal plasticity as evident by immediate-early gene responses to cause BDNF downregulation resulting in a reduction in parvalbumin(+) or reelin(+) interneurons and suppression of axonal plasticity in the mossy cells and CA3 pyramidal neurons.

  15. Human African trypanosomiasis in non-endemic countries.

    PubMed

    Sudarshi, Darshan; Brown, Mike

    2015-02-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) or sleeping sickness is a parasitic disease, acquired by the bite of an infected tsetse fly. In non-endemic countries HAT is rare, and therefore the diagnosis may be delayed leading to potentially fatal consequences. In this article the clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of the two forms of HAT are outlined. Rhodesiense HAT is an acute illness that presents in tourists who have recently visited game parks in Eastern or Southern Africa, whereas Gambiense HAT has a more chronic clinical course, in individuals from West or Central Africa.

  16. Alteration of mTOR signaling occurs early in the progression of Alzheimer disease (AD): analysis of brain from subjects with pre-clinical AD, amnestic mild cognitive impairment and late-stage AD.

    PubMed

    Tramutola, Antonella; Triplett, Judy C; Di Domenico, Fabio; Niedowicz, Dana M; Murphy, Michael P; Coccia, Raffaella; Perluigi, Marzia; Butterfield, D Allan

    2015-06-01

    ) and late stage of Alzheimer Disease. The progression of the disease is associated with a reduction in autophagy (Beclin-1 and LC-3) observed in Inferior parietal lobe of PCAD, MCI, and AD subjects (light red). Related to the autophagy impairment, the graph shows the impairment of PI3K/Akt/mTOR in MCI and AD subjects (dark red).

  17. Determinants of Human African Trypanosomiasis Elimination via Paratransgenesis.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jennifer A; Medlock, Jan; Townsend, Jeffrey P; Aksoy, Serap; Ndeffo Mbah, Martial; Galvani, Alison P

    2016-03-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), transmitted by tsetse flies, has historically infected hundreds of thousands of individuals annually in sub-Saharan Africa. Over the last decade, concerted control efforts have reduced reported cases to below 10,000 annually, bringing complete elimination within reach. A potential technology to eliminate HAT involves rendering the flies resistant to trypanosome infection. This approach can be achieved through the introduction of transgenic Sodalis symbiotic bacteria that have been modified to produce a trypanocide, and propagated via Wolbachia symbionts, which confer a reproductive advantage to the paratransgenic tsetse. However, the population dynamics of these symbionts within tsetse flies have not yet been evaluated. Specifically, the key factors that determine the effectiveness of paratransgenesis have yet to be quantified. To identify the impact of these determinants on T.b. gambiense and T.b. rhodesiense transmission, we developed a mathematical model of trypanosome transmission that incorporates tsetse and symbiont population dynamics. We found that fecundity and mortality penalties associated with Wolbachia or recombinant Sodalis colonization, probabilities of vertical transmission, and tsetse migration rates are fundamental to the feasibility of HAT elimination. For example, we determined that HAT elimination could be sustained over 25 years when Wolbachia colonization minimally impacted fecundity or mortality, and when the probability of recombinant Sodalis vertical transmission exceeded 99.9%. We also found that for a narrow range of recombinant Sodalis vertical transmission probability (99.9-90.6% for T.b. gambiense and 99.9-85.8% for T.b. rhodesiense), cumulative HAT incidence was reduced between 30% and 1% for T.b. gambiense and between 21% and 3% for T.b. rhodesiense, although elimination was not predicted. Our findings indicate that fitness and mortality penalties associated with paratransgenic symbionts, as well

  18. Determinants of Human African Trypanosomiasis Elimination via Paratransgenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Jennifer A.; Medlock, Jan; Townsend, Jeffrey P.; Aksoy, Serap

    2016-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), transmitted by tsetse flies, has historically infected hundreds of thousands of individuals annually in sub-Saharan Africa. Over the last decade, concerted control efforts have reduced reported cases to below 10,000 annually, bringing complete elimination within reach. A potential technology to eliminate HAT involves rendering the flies resistant to trypanosome infection. This approach can be achieved through the introduction of transgenic Sodalis symbiotic bacteria that have been modified to produce a trypanocide, and propagated via Wolbachia symbionts, which confer a reproductive advantage to the paratransgenic tsetse. However, the population dynamics of these symbionts within tsetse flies have not yet been evaluated. Specifically, the key factors that determine the effectiveness of paratransgenesis have yet to be quantified. To identify the impact of these determinants on T.b. gambiense and T.b. rhodesiense transmission, we developed a mathematical model of trypanosome transmission that incorporates tsetse and symbiont population dynamics. We found that fecundity and mortality penalties associated with Wolbachia or recombinant Sodalis colonization, probabilities of vertical transmission, and tsetse migration rates are fundamental to the feasibility of HAT elimination. For example, we determined that HAT elimination could be sustained over 25 years when Wolbachia colonization minimally impacted fecundity or mortality, and when the probability of recombinant Sodalis vertical transmission exceeded 99.9%. We also found that for a narrow range of recombinant Sodalis vertical transmission probability (99.9–90.6% for T.b. gambiense and 99.9–85.8% for T.b. rhodesiense), cumulative HAT incidence was reduced between 30% and 1% for T.b. gambiense and between 21% and 3% for T.b. rhodesiense, although elimination was not predicted. Our findings indicate that fitness and mortality penalties associated with paratransgenic symbionts, as

  19. Tsetse Flies (Glossina) as Vectors of Human African Trypanosomiasis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Changasi, Robert Emojong

    2016-01-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) transmitted by the tsetse fly continues to be a public health issue, despite more than a century of research. There are two types of the disease, the chronic gambiense and the acute rhodesiense-HAT. Fly abundance and distribution have been affected by changes in land-use patterns and climate. However, disease transmission still continues. Here, we review some aspects of HAT ecoepidemiology in the context of altered infestation patterns and maintenance of the transmission cycle as well as emerging options in disease and vector control. PMID:27034944

  20. Tsetse Flies (Glossina) as Vectors of Human African Trypanosomiasis: A Review.

    PubMed

    Wamwiri, Florence Njeri; Changasi, Robert Emojong

    2016-01-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) transmitted by the tsetse fly continues to be a public health issue, despite more than a century of research. There are two types of the disease, the chronic gambiense and the acute rhodesiense-HAT. Fly abundance and distribution have been affected by changes in land-use patterns and climate. However, disease transmission still continues. Here, we review some aspects of HAT ecoepidemiology in the context of altered infestation patterns and maintenance of the transmission cycle as well as emerging options in disease and vector control.

  1. The Burden of Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Fèvre, Eric M.; Wissmann, Beatrix v.; Welburn, Susan C.; Lutumba, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, or sleeping sickness) is a protozoan parasitic infection caused by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense or Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. These are neglected tropical diseases, and T.b. rhodesiense HAT is a zoonosis. We review current knowledge on the burden of HAT in sub-Saharan Africa, with an emphasis on the disability-adjusted life year (DALY), data sources, and methodological issues relating to the use of this metric for assessing the burden of this disease. We highlight areas where data are lacking to properly quantify the impact of these diseases, mainly relating to quantifying under-reporting and disability associated with infection, and challenge the HAT research community to tackle the neglect in data gathering to enable better evidence-based assessments of burden using DALYs or other appropriate measures. PMID:19104653

  2. Population genomics reveals the origin and asexual evolution of human infective trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Weir, William; Capewell, Paul; Foth, Bernardo; Clucas, Caroline; Pountain, Andrew; Steketee, Pieter; Veitch, Nicola; Koffi, Mathurin; De Meeûs, Thierry; Kaboré, Jacques; Camara, Mamadou; Cooper, Anneli; Tait, Andy; Jamonneau, Vincent; Bucheton, Bruno; Berriman, Matt; MacLeod, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that the lack of recombination and chromosomal re-assortment in strictly asexual organisms results in homologous chromosomes irreversibly accumulating mutations and thus evolving independently of each other, a phenomenon termed the Meselson effect. We apply a population genomics approach to examine this effect in an important human pathogen, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. We determine that T.b. gambiense is evolving strictly asexually and is derived from a single progenitor, which emerged within the last 10,000 years. We demonstrate the Meselson effect for the first time at the genome-wide level in any organism and show large regions of loss of heterozygosity, which we hypothesise to be a short-term compensatory mechanism for counteracting deleterious mutations. Our study sheds new light on the genomic and evolutionary consequences of strict asexuality, which this pathogen uses as it exploits a new biological niche, the human population. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11473.001 PMID:26809473

  3. Human African trypanosomiasis with 7-year incubation period: clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging findings.

    PubMed

    Wengert, Oliver; Kopp, Marcel; Siebert, Eberhard; Stenzel, Werner; Hegasy, Guido; Suttorp, Norbert; Stich, August; Zoller, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also referred to as "sleeping sickness", is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Diagnosing imported HAT outside endemic areas is difficult and diagnosis is often delayed. We report a case of imported human African trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense with an unusually long incubation period of at least 7 years. A 33 year old male African patient, a former resident of Cameroon, presented with a 4-month history of progressive personality changes. A few weeks before presentation the patient had first been admitted to a psychiatric ward and received antidepressant treatment, until a lumbar puncture showed pleocytosis and then antibiotic treatment for suspected neuroborreliosis was initiated. The patient continued to deteriorate during antibiotic treatment and became increasingly lethargic. Under antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory treatment, the condition of the patient gradually improved over the following months and he recovered completely after 24 months of follow-up. This well-documented case illustrates typical difficulties in establishing the correct diagnosis outside endemic areas and provides an overview of typical clinical, neuropathological and neuroimaging findings in T. b. gambiense trypanosomiasis, guiding the clinician in establishing the correct diagnosis in this rare disease.

  4. Control and surveillance of human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    In the 1960s, it appeared that human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) could be effectively controlled, but by the beginning of the twenty-first century several decades of neglect had led to alarming numbers of reported new cases, with an estimated 300 000 people infected. The World Health Organization (WHO) responded with a series of initiatives aimed at bringing HAT under control again. Since 2001, the pharmaceutical companies that produce drugs for HAT have committed themselves to providing them free of charge to WHO for distribution for the treatment of patients. In addition, funds have been provided to WHO to support national sleeping sickness control programmes to boost control and surveillance of the disease. That, coupled with bilateral cooperation and the work of nongovernmental organizations, helped reverse the upward trend in HAT prevalence. By 2012, the number of reported cases was fewer than 8000. This success in bringing HAT under control led to its inclusion in the WHO Roadmap for eradication, elimination and control of neglected tropical diseases, with a target set to eliminate the disease as a public health problem by 2020. A further target has been set, by countries in which HAT is endemic, to eliminate gambiense HAT by reducing the incidence of infection to zero in a defined geographical area. This report provides information about new diagnostic approaches, new therapeutic regimens and better understanding of the distribution of the disease with high-quality mapping. The roles of human and animal reservoirs and the tsetse fly vectors that transmit the parasites are emphasized. The new information has formed the basis for an integrated strategy with which it is hoped that elimination of gambiense HAT will be achieved. The report also contains recommendations on the approaches that will lead to elimination of the disease.

  5. Human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Lejon, Veerle; Bentivoglio, Marina; Franco, José Ramon

    2013-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness is a neglected tropical disease that affects populations in sub-Saharan Africa. The disease is caused by infection with the gambiense and rhodesiense subspecies of the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei, and is transmitted to humans by bites of infected tsetse flies. The disease evolves in two stages, the hemolymphatic and meningoencephalitic stages, the latter being defined by central nervous system infection after trypanosomal traversal of the blood-brain barrier. African trypanosomiasis, which leads to severe neuroinflammation, is fatal without treatment, but the available drugs are toxic and complicated to administer. The choice of medication is determined by the infecting parasite subspecies and disease stage. Clinical features include a constellation of nonspecific symptoms and signs with evolving neurological and psychiatric alterations and characteristic sleep-wake disturbances. Because of the clinical profile variability and insidiously progressive central nervous system involvement, disease staging is currently based on cerebrospinal fluid examination, which is usually performed after the finding of trypanosomes in blood or other body fluids. No vaccine being available, control of human African trypanosomiasis relies on diagnosis and treatment of infected patients, assisted by vector control. Better diagnostic tools and safer, easy to use drugs are needed to facilitate elimination of the disease.

  6. A current analysis of chemotherapy strategies for the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Babokhov, Peter; Sanyaolu, Adekunle O; Oyibo, Wellington A; Fagbenro-Beyioku, Adetayo F; Iriemenam, Nnaemeka C

    2013-07-01

    Despite the recent advances in drug research, finding a safe, effective, and easy to use chemotherapy for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) remains a challenging task. The four current anti-trypanosomiasis drugs have major disadvantages that limit more widespread use of these drugs in the endemic regions of sub-Saharan Africa. Pentamidine and suramin are limited by their effectiveness against the only first stage of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, respectively. In addition, melarsoprol and eflornithine (two second stage drugs) each have disadvantages of their own. The former is toxic and has increasing treatment failures while the latter is expensive, laborious to administer, and lacks efficacy against T. b. rhodesiense. Furthermore, melarsoprol's toxicity and decreasing efficacy are glaring problems and phasing out the drug as a frontline treatment against T. b. gambiense is now possible with the emergence of competent, safe combination chemotherapies such as nifurtimox-eflornithine combination treatment (NECT). The future of eflornithine, on the other hand, is more promising. The drug is useful in the context of combination chemotherapy and potential orally administered analogues. Due to the limits of monotherapies, greater emphasis should be placed on the research and development of combination chemotherapies, based on the successful clinical tests with NECT and its current use as a frontline anti-trypanosomiasis treatment. This review discussed the current and future chemotherapy strategies for the treatment of HAT.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of algorithms for confirmation test of human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Lutumba, Pascal; Meheus, Filip; Robays, Jo; Miaka, Constantin; Kande, Victor; Büscher, Philippe; Dujardin, Bruno; Boelaert, Marleen

    2007-10-01

    The control of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is compromised by low sensitivity of the routinely used parasitologic confirmation tests. More sensitive alternatives, such as mini-anion exchange centrifugation technique (mAECT) or capillary tube centrifugation (CTC), are more expensive. We used formal decision analysis to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative HAT confirmation algorithms in terms of cost per life saved. The effectiveness of the standard method, a combination of lymph node puncture (LNP), fresh blood examination (FBE), and thick blood film (TBF), was 36.8%; the LNP-FBE-CTC-mAECT sequence reached almost 80%. The cost per person examined ranged from euro1.56 for LNP-FBE-TBF to euro2.99 for LNP-TBF-CTC-mAECT-CATT (card agglutination test for trypanosomiasis) titration. LNP-TBF-CTC-mAECT was the most cost-effective in terms of cost per life saved. HAT confirmation algorithms that incorporate concentration techniques are more effective and efficient than the algorithms that are currently and routinely used by several T.b. gambiense control programs.

  8. Identification of a Late Stage of Small Noncycling pTα−  Pre-T Cells as Immediate Precursors of T Cell Receptor α/β+  Thymocytes

    PubMed Central

    Trigueros, César; Ramiro, Almudena R.; Carrasco, Yolanda R.; de Yebenes, Virginia G.; Albar, Juan P.; Toribio, María L.

    1998-01-01

    During thymocyte development, progression from T cell receptor (TCR)β to TCRα rearrangement is mediated by a CD3-associated pre-TCR composed of the TCRβ chain paired with pre-TCRα (pTα). A major issue is how surface expression of the pre-TCR is regulated during normal thymocyte development to control transition through this checkpoint. Here, we show that developmental expression of pTα is time- and stage-specific, and is confined in vivo to a limited subset of large cycling human pre-T cells that coexpress low density CD3. This restricted expression pattern allowed the identification of a novel subset of small CD3− thymocytes lacking surface pTα, but expressing cytoplasmic TCRβ, that represent late noncycling pre-T cells in which recombination activating gene reexpression and downregulation of T early α transcription are coincident events associated with cell cycle arrest, and immediately preceding TCRα gene expression. Importantly, thymocytes at this late pre-T cell stage are shown to be functional intermediates between large pTα+ pre-T cells and TCRα/β+ thymocytes. The results support a developmental model in which pre-TCR–expressing pre-T cells are brought into cycle, rapidly downregulate surface pre-TCR, and finally become small resting pre-T cells, before the onset of TCRα gene expression. PMID:9782117

  9. Diversity of response to Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infections in the Forecariah mangrove focus (Guinea): perspectives for a better control of sleeping sickness.

    PubMed

    Ilboudo, Hamidou; Jamonneau, Vincent; Camara, Mamadou; Camara, Oumou; Dama, Emilie; Léno, Mamadou; Ouendeno, Frédéric; Courtin, Fabrice; Sakande, Hassane; Sanon, René; Kaboré, Jacques; Coulibaly, Bamoro; N'Dri, Louis; Diarra, Abdoulaye; N'Goran, Eliezer; Bucheton, Bruno

    2011-10-01

    At a time when human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) elimination again seems a reachable goal in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa, it is becoming increasingly important to characterise the factors involved in disease resurgence or maintenance to develop sustainable control strategies. In this study conducted in the Forecariah mangrove focus in Guinea, HAT patients and serological suspects (SERO) were identified through mass screening of the population with the Card Agglutination Test for Trypanosomiasis (CATT) and were followed up for up to 2 years. Analysis of the samples collected during the follow-up of HAT patients and SERO was performed with PCR (TBR1/TBR2) and the trypanolysis serological test (TL) in order to clarify the role played by these individuals in the epidemiology of HAT. PCR positivity was higher in TL⁺ than in SERO TL⁻ (50% vs. 18%, respectively). Whereas CATT plasma titres decreased both in treated HAT patients and SERO TL⁻, SERO TL⁺ maintained high CATT titres. Four out of 17 SERO TL⁺ developed HAT during the study. These results strongly suggest that SERO TL⁺ individuals are asymptomatic carriers. In the context where disease prevalence is sufficiently low, treating SERO TL⁺ individual may thus be of crucial importance in order to cut transmission.

  10. Human African trypanosomiasis of the CNS: current issues and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Peter G.E.

    2004-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in sub-Saharan Africa. Current therapy with melarsoprol for CNS HAT has unacceptable side-effects with an overall mortality of 5%. This review discusses the issues of diagnosis and staging of CNS disease, its neuropathogenesis, and the possibility of new therapies for treating late-stage disease. PMID:14966556

  11. Late stages in the evolution of classical novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Krautter, J.; Sonneborn, G.; Shore, S. N.; Wagner, R. M.; Austin, S.; Saizar, P.; Ferland, G.; Wade, R.; Gehrz, R. D.

    1990-01-01

    We have begun a study of the long term evolution of novae in outburst in order to determine the means by which they return in quiescence when nuclear burning has ended. This project involves both IUE and optical observations and theoretical predictions. Recently, in the initial observational part of this project, we have obtained IUE Short Wavelength Prime (SWP) spectra of GQ Mus 1983 and QU Vul 1984. Each spectrum was a 16 hour exposure using a combined US1 plus Vilspa shift. No novae have been studied in the UV for as long as QU Vul and GQ Mus and observations of their spectral evolution are providing unique data on the turn-off time scale. We have also obtained the spectra of old novae from the IUE archives in order to compare and contrast the existing spectra with those of GQ Mus and Qu Vul. The theoretical prediction is that a nova should be very hot just before turnoff but x ray observations from EXOSAT do not confirm this prediction.

  12. Late Stages of Accretion of Uranus and Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Glen R.

    2002-01-01

    A series of N-body simulations were done to try and form Uranus and Neptune from a swarm of a hundred sub-Earth-sized planetary embryos initially on low-inclination, nearly circular orbits beyond Saturn. These calculations were designed to test published Monte Carlo simulations and N-body simulations. Whereas these studies reported successful formation of Uranus and Neptune sized planets, we found very little accretion at all. This occurs because the embryos are dynamically excited by each other and the gravitational effects of Jupiter and Saturn on a time scale that is short compared to the collision time scale. This process produces large orbital eccentricities and inclinations which significantly reduce the collisional cross-section of the embryos because it reduces the effect of gravitational focusing.

  13. Late stages of massive star evolution and nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Hashimoto, Masa-aki

    1986-01-01

    The evolution of massive stars in the mass range of 8 to 25 M solar mass is reviewed. The effect of electron degeneracy on the gravothermal nature of stars is discussed. Depending on the stellar mass, the stars form three types of cores, namely, non-degenerate, semi-degenerate, and strongly degenerate cores. The evolution for these cases is quite distinct from each other and leads to the three different types of final fate. It is suggested that our helium star model, which is equivalent to a 25 M solar mass star, will form a relatively small mass iron core despite the faster /sup 12/C(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 16/O reaction. 50 refs., 21 figs.

  14. Late stages of stellar evolution in population models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraston, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    My contribution to Roger's celebration symposium focuses on the treatment of late stellar evolutionary phases in stellar population models, reviewing the state of art and discussing some very recent developments, ranging from local stellar clusters up to distant galaxies at high redshift. I shall focus in particular on the Thermally Pulsating Asymptotic Giant Branch, about which a vivid discussion has been ongoing since a few years. I shall present renewed evidence in favour of a sizable contribution from this phase for matching the observed spectral energy distribution of distant massive galaxies. I shall also discuss the possible reasons why such a conclusion has been controversial in the recent literature. Stellar population models are the magic tool to shape the physics of galaxies out of their observed light, and enter virtually all papers presented at this symposium. In a collective effort to properly treat all relevant aspects of the modelling, we split the discussion into six contributions given by experts in the field, as our present to Roger and his outstanding career.

  15. Late-stage accretion and habitability of terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Sean Neylon

    The final stage in the formation of terrestrial planets consists of the accumulation of ~1000 km "planetary embryos" and ~1 km planetesimals via collisional accretion., under the mutual gravity of other solid bodies and the gas giant planets (if any). Water is delivered to planets via collisions with volatile-rich bodies that condensed past the snow line, beyond about 2.5 AU. We present results of a large number of relatively low-resolution simulations, designed to assess the predictability of systems of terrestrial planets as a function of "observables" such as the orbit of gas giant planets. These show that a variety of terrestrial planets can form, from small, dry, Mars-like worlds to planets with similar properties to Earth, to >3 Earth mass "water worlds" with >=30 times as much water as the Earth. The terrestrial planets are largely shaped by the influence of the giant planets and the surface density of material. We have uncovered trends between the terrestrial planets and (i) the mass, (ii) the orbital distance and (iii) the orbital eccentricity of a giant planet, (iv) the surface density of the disk, and (v) the disk's density profile. Five simulations with 1000-2000 particles reveal new aspects of the accretion process Water is delivered to the terrestrial planets as a few large planetesimals in a "hit or miss" process, and as billions of planetesimals in a robust way. The water delivery process is therefore more robust than previously thought, implying that the range of water contents of extra-solar Earths is less stochastic than indicated in previous studies; most planets accrete water- rich bodies. We simulate terrestrial accretion in the presence of close-in giant planets (e.g., "hot jupiters"), assuming these form and migrate quickly. Potentially habitable planets can form in these systems, but are likely to be iron-poor. Asteroid belts may exist between the terrestrial planets and hot jupiters in these systems. We have also tested the accretion process in four known extra- solar planetary systems. In 55 Cancri, terrestrial planets form relatively easily, and may have orbits in the habitable zone and significant water contents.

  16. Late-stage summit activity of Martian shield volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    The preservation of morphologically fresh lava flows which pre-date the most recent episodes of caldera collapse at the summits of Ascraeus, Arsia and Olympus Montes indicates that explosive eruptions were not associated with this stage of Tharsis shield volcanism. The existence of resurfaced floor segments, complex wrinkle ridges, and lava terraces within the summit craters suggests that lava lakes comprised the dominant form of the intra-caldera activity. Multiple collapse episodes on Ascraeus and Olympus Montes are indicated by the nested summit craters. The most plausible cause of caldera collapse appears to be large-scale sub-terminal effusive activity, which is corroborated by the previously recognized existence of large lava flows on the flanks of these volcanoes. Due to the implied sequence of large-scale explosive (silicic) volcanism followed by effusive (basaltic) activity, it appears highly unlikely that ignimbrites or other forms of pyroclastic flows (previously proposed as possible deposits within the Olympus Mons aureole material) were ever erupted from the Tharsis Montes.

  17. Recent Simulations of the Late Stages Growth of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; D'Angelo, Gennaro; Hubickyj, Olenka

    2012-01-01

    Presented by Lissauer et al. (2009, Icarus 199, 338) are used to test the model of capture of Jupiter's irregular satellites within proto-Jupiter's distended and thermally-supported envelope. We find such capture highly unlikely, since the envelope shrinks too slowly for a large number of moons to be retained, and many of those that would be retained would orbit closer to the planet than do the observed Jovian irregulars. Our calculations do not address (and therefore do not exclude) the possibility that the irregular satellites were captured as a result of gas drag within a circumjovian disk. Support for this research from NASA Outer Planets Research Program is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Late stages of accumulation and early evolution of the planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vityazev, Andrey V.; Perchernikova, G. V.

    1991-01-01

    Recently developed solutions of problems are discussed that were traditionally considered fundamental in classical solar system cosmogony: determination of planetary orbit distribution patterns, values for mean eccentricity and orbital inclinations of the planets, and rotation periods and rotation axis inclinations of the planets. Two important cosmochemical aspects of accumulation are examined: the time scale for gas loss from the terrestrial planet zone, and the composition of the planets in terms of isotope data. It was concluded that the early beginning of planet differentiation is a function of the heating of protoplanets during collisions with large (thousands of kilometers) bodies. Energetics, heat mass transfer processes, and characteristic time scales of these processes at the early stages of planet evolution are considered.

  19. Failed magmatic eruptions: Late-stage cessation of magma ascent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, S.C.; Newhall, C.; Roman, D.C.

    2011-01-01

    When a volcano becomes restless, a primary question is whether the unrest will lead to an eruption. Here we recognize four possible outcomes of a magmatic intrusion: "deep intrusion", "shallow intrusion", "sluggish/viscous magmatic eruption", and "rapid, often explosive magmatic eruption". We define "failed eruptions" as instances in which magma reaches but does not pass the "shallow intrusion" stage, i. e., when magma gets close to, but does not reach, the surface. Competing factors act to promote or hinder the eventual eruption of a magma intrusion. Fresh intrusion from depth, high magma gas content, rapid ascent rates that leave little time for enroute degassing, opening of pathways, and sudden decompression near the surface all act to promote eruption, whereas decreased magma supply from depth, slow ascent, significant enroute degassing and associated increases in viscosity, and impingement on structural barriers all act to hinder eruption. All of these factors interact in complex ways with variable results, but often cause magma to stall at some depth before reaching the surface. Although certain precursory phenomena, such as rapidly escalating seismic swarms or rates of degassing or deformation, are good indicators that an eruption is likely, such phenomena have also been observed in association with intrusions that have ultimately failed to erupt. A perpetual difficulty with quantifying the probability of eruption is a lack of data, particularly on instances of failed eruptions. This difficulty is being addressed in part through the WOVOdat database. Papers in this volume will be an additional resource for scientists grappling with the issue of whether or not an episode of unrest will lead to a magmatic eruption.

  20. Stress Potentiates Early and Attenuates Late Stages of Visual Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-19

    A.J.S.). We thank K. Berling, S. Blume, D. Cole, I. Dolski, L. Friedman, J. Koger, J. Nichols, and A. Teche for assistance; and A. Fox, A. Heller , J...monkey. J Neurosci 9:81–93. Qin S, Hermans EJ, van Marle HJ, Luo J, Fernández G (2009) Acute psycho- logical stress reduces working memory-related...Neurosci 11:843– 850. van Marle HJ, Hermans EJ, Qin S, Fernández G (2009) From specificity to sensitivity: how acute stress affects amygdala processing of

  1. Beyond Tsetse--Implications for Research and Control of Human African Trypanosomiasis Epidemics.

    PubMed

    Welburn, Susan C; Molyneux, David H; Maudlin, Ian

    2016-03-01

    Epidemics of both forms of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) are confined to spatially stable foci in Sub-Saharan Africa while tsetse distribution is widespread. Infection rates of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in tsetse are extremely low and cannot account for the catastrophic epidemics of Gambian HAT (gHAT) seen over the past century. Here we examine the origins of gHAT epidemics and evidence implicating human genetics in HAT epidemiology. We discuss the role of stress causing breakdown of heritable tolerance in silent disease carriers generating gHAT outbreaks and see how peculiarities in the epidemiologies of gHAT and Rhodesian HAT (rHAT) impact on strategies for disease control.

  2. Xylosyltransferase-I regulates glycosaminoglycan synthesis during the pathogenic process of human osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Narayanan; Barré, Lydia; Bourhim, Mustapha; Magdalou, Jacques; Mainard, Didier; Netter, Patrick; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie; Ouzzine, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Loss of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains of proteoglycans (PGs) is an early event of osteoarthritis (OA) resulting in cartilage degradation that has been previously demonstrated in both huma and experimental OA models. However, the mechanism of GAG loss and the role of xylosyltransferase-I (XT-I) that initiates GAG biosynthesis onto PG molecules in the pathogenic process of human OA are unknown. In this study, we have characterized XT-I expression and activity together with GAG synthesis in human OA cartilage obtained from different regions of the same joint, defined as "normal", "late-stage" or adjacent to "late-stage". The results showed that GAG synthesis and content increased in cartilage from areas flanking OA lesions compared to cartilage from macroscopically "normal" unaffected regions, while decreased in "late-stage" OA cartilage lesions. This increase in anabolic state was associated with a marked upregulation of XT-I expression and activity in cartilage "next to lesion" while a decrease in the "late-stage" OA cartilage. Importantly, XT-I inhibition by shRNA or forced-expression with a pCMV-XT-I construct correlated with the modulation of GAG anabolism in human cartilage explants. The observation that XT-I gene expression was down-regulated by IL-1β and up-regulated by TGF-β1 indicates that these cytokines may play a role in regulating GAG content in human OA. Noteworthy, expression of IL-1β receptor (IL-1R1) was down-regulated whereas that of TGF-β1 was up-regulated in early OA cartilage. Theses observations may account for upregulation of XT-I and sustained GAG synthesis prior to the development of cartilage lesions during the pathogenic process of OA.

  3. Glossina fuscipes populations provide insights for Human African Trypanosomiasis transmission in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Serap; Caccone, Adalgisa; Galvani, Alison P.; Okedi, Loyce M.

    2013-01-01

    Uganda has both forms of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT): the chronic gambiense disease in the northwest and the acute rhodesiense disease in the south. The recent spread of rhodesiense into central Uganda has raised concerns given the different control strategies the two diseases require. We present knowledge on the population genetics of the major vector species Glossina fuscipes fuscipes in Uganda with a focus on population structure, measures of gene flow between populations, and the occurrence of polyandry. The microbiome composition and diversity is discussed, focusing on their potential role on trypanosome infection outcomes. We discuss the implications of these findings for large-scale tsetse control programs, including suppression or eradication, being undertaken in Uganda and potential future genetic applications. PMID:23845311

  4. Glossina fuscipes populations provide insights for human African trypanosomiasis transmission in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Serap; Caccone, Adalgisa; Galvani, Alison P; Okedi, Loyce M

    2013-08-01

    Uganda has both forms of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT): the chronic gambiense disease in the northwest and the acute rhodesiense disease in the south. The recent spread of rhodesiense into central Uganda has raised concerns given the different control strategies the two diseases require. We present knowledge on the population genetics of the major vector species Glossina fuscipes fuscipes in Uganda with a focus on population structure, measures of gene flow between populations, and the occurrence of polyandry. The microbiome composition and diversity is discussed, focusing on their potential role on trypanosome infection outcomes. We discuss the implications of these findings for large-scale tsetse control programs, including suppression or eradication, being undertaken in Uganda, and potential future genetic applications.

  5. Combination chemotherapy with a substance P receptor antagonist (aprepitant) and melarsoprol in a mouse model of human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Jean; Bradley, Barbara; Kennedy, Peter G E

    2007-12-01

    Drug therapy for late-stage (encephalitic) human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is currently very unsatisfactory with the most commonly used drug, melarsoprol, having a 5% overall mortality. There is evidence in a mouse model of HAT that Substance P (SP) receptor antagonism reduces the neuroinflammatory reaction to CNS trypanosome infection. In this study we investigated the effects of combination chemotherapy with melarsoprol and a humanised SP receptor antagonist aprepitant (EMEND) in this mouse model. The melarsoprol/aprepitant drug combination did not produce any clinical signs of illness in mice with CNS trypanosome infection. This lack of any additional or unexpected CNS toxicity in the mouse model of CNS HAT provides valuable safety data for the future possible use of this drug combination in patients with late-stage HAT.

  6. Ameliorating replicative senescence of human bone marrow stromal cells by PSMB5 overexpression

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Li; Song, Hui-Fang; Wei, Jiao-Long; Liu, Xue-Qin; Song, Wen-Hui; Yan, Ba-Yi; Yang, Gui-Jiao; Li, Ang; Yang, Wu-Lin

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • PSMB5 overexpression restores the differentiation potential of aged hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression enhances the proteasomal activity of late-stage hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression inhibits replicative senescence and improved cell viability. • PSMB5 overexpression promotes cell growth by upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. - Abstract: Multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) potentially serve as a source for cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine. However, in vitro expansion was inescapably accompanied with cell senescence, characterized by inhibited proliferation and compromised pluripotency. We have previously demonstrated that this aging process is closely associated with reduced 20S proteasomal activity, with down-regulation of rate-limiting catalytic β-subunits particularly evident. In the present study, we confirmed that proteasomal activity directly contributes to senescence of hBMSCs, which could be reversed by overexpression of the β5-subunit (PSMB5). Knocking down PSMB5 led to decreased proteasomal activity concurrent with reduced cell proliferation in early-stage hBMSCs, which is similar to the senescent phenotype observed in late-stage cells. In contrast, overexpressing PSMB5 in late-stage cells efficiently restored the normal activity of 20S proteasomes and promoted cell growth, possibly via upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. Additionally, PSMB5 could enhance cell resistance to oxidative stress, as evidenced by the increased cell survival upon exposing senescent hBMSCs to hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, PSMB5 overexpression retained the pluripotency of late-stage hBMSCs by facilitating their neural differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our work reveals a critical role of PSMB5 in 20S proteasome-mediated protection against replicative senescence, pointing to a possible strategy for maintaining the integrity of culture-expanded hBMSCs by manipulating the expression of PSMB5.

  7. Reducing Human-Tsetse Contact Significantly Enhances the Efficacy of Sleeping Sickness Active Screening Campaigns: A Promising Result in the Context of Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Courtin, Fabrice; Camara, Mamadou; Rayaisse, Jean-Baptiste; Kagbadouno, Moise; Dama, Emilie; Camara, Oumou; Traoré, Ibrahima S.; Rouamba, Jérémi; Peylhard, Moana; Somda, Martin B.; Leno, Mamadou; Lehane, Mike J.; Torr, Steve J.; Solano, Philippe; Jamonneau, Vincent; Bucheton, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Background Control of gambiense sleeping sickness, a neglected tropical disease targeted for elimination by 2020, relies mainly on mass screening of populations at risk and treatment of cases. This strategy is however challenged by the existence of undetected reservoirs of parasites that contribute to the maintenance of transmission. In this study, performed in the Boffa disease focus of Guinea, we evaluated the value of adding vector control to medical surveys and measured its impact on disease burden. Methods The focus was divided into two parts (screen and treat in the western part; screen and treat plus vector control in the eastern part) separated by the Rio Pongo river. Population census and baseline entomological data were collected from the entire focus at the beginning of the study and insecticide impregnated targets were deployed on the eastern bank only. Medical surveys were performed in both areas in 2012 and 2013. Findings In the vector control area, there was an 80% decrease in tsetse density, resulting in a significant decrease of human tsetse contacts, and a decrease of disease prevalence (from 0.3% to 0.1%; p=0.01), and an almost nil incidence of new infections (<0.1%). In contrast, incidence was 10 times higher in the area without vector control (>1%, p<0.0001) with a disease prevalence increasing slightly (from 0.5 to 0.7%, p=0.34). Interpretation Combining medical and vector control was decisive in reducing T. b. gambiense transmission and in speeding up progress towards elimination. Similar strategies could be applied in other foci. PMID:26267667

  8. State of the Art in African Trypanosome Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Robert T.; Nare, Bakela; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2011-01-01

    African sleeping sickness is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa where the WHO estimates that 60 million people are at risk for the disease. Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is 100% fatal if untreated and the current drug therapies have significant limitations due to toxicity and difficult treatment regimes. No new chemical agents have been approved since eflornithine in 1990. The pentamidine analog DB289, which was in late stage clinical trials for the treatment of early stage HAT recently failed due to toxicity issues. A new protocol for the treatment of late-stage T. brucei gambiense that uses combination nifurtomox/eflornithine (NECT) was recently shown to have better safety and efficacy than eflornithine alone, while being easier to administer. This breakthrough represents the only new therapy for HAT since the approval of eflornithine. A number of research programs are on going to exploit the unusual biochemical pathways in the parasite to identify new targets for target based drug discovery programs. HTS efforts are also underway to discover new chemical entities through whole organism screening approaches. A number of inhibitors with anti-trypanosomal activity have been identified by both approaches, but none of the programs are yet at the stage of identifying a preclinical candidate. This dire situation underscores the need for continued effort to identify new chemical agents for the treatment of HAT. PMID:21401507

  9. BACE2 expression increases in human neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Holler, Christopher J; Webb, Robin L; Laux, Ashley L; Beckett, Tina L; Niedowicz, Dana M; Ahmed, Rachel R; Liu, Yinxing; Simmons, Christopher R; Dowling, Amy L S; Spinelli, Angela; Khurgel, Moshe; Estus, Steven; Head, Elizabeth; Hersh, Louis B; Murphy, M Paul

    2012-01-01

    β-Secretase, the rate-limiting enzymatic activity in the production of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, is a major target of Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapeutics. There are two forms of the enzyme: β-site Aβ precursor protein cleaving enzyme (BACE) 1 and BACE2. Although BACE1 increases in late-stage AD, little is known about BACE2. We conducted a detailed examination of BACE2 in patients with preclinical to late-stage AD, including amnestic mild cognitive impairment, and age-matched controls, cases of frontotemporal dementia, and Down's syndrome. BACE2 protein and enzymatic activity increased as early as preclinical AD and were found in neurons and astrocytes. Although the levels of total BACE2 mRNA were unchanged, the mRNA for BACE2 splice form C (missing exon 7) increased in parallel with BACE2 protein and activity. BACE1 and BACE2 were strongly correlated with each other at all levels, suggesting that their regulatory mechanisms may be largely shared. BACE2 was also elevated in frontotemporal dementia but not in Down's syndrome, even in patients with substantial Aβ deposition. Thus, expression of both forms of β-secretase are linked and may play a combined role in human neurologic disease. A better understanding of the normal functions of BACE1 and BACE2, and how these change in different disease states, is essential for the future development of AD therapeutics.

  10. Emerging trends in the diagnosis of human African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Radwanska, Magdalena

    2010-12-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) or sleeping sickness is caused by protozoan parasites Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense. Despite the enormous technological progress in molecular parasitology in recent years, the diagnosis of HAT is still problematic due to the lack of specific tools. To date, there are two realities when it comes to HAT; the first one being the world of modern experimental laboratories, equipped with the latest state-of-the-art technology, and the second being the world of HAT diagnosis, where the latest semi-commercial test was introduced 30 years ago (Magnus et al. 1978). Hence, it appears that the lack of progress in HAT diagnosis is not primarily due to a lack of scientific interest or a lack of research funds, but mainly results from the many obstacles encountered in the translation of basic research into field-applicable diagnostics. This review will provide an overview of current diagnostic methods and highlight specific difficulties in solving the shortcomings of these methods. Future perspectives for accurate, robust, affordable diagnostics will be discussed as well.

  11. Comparative genomics reveals multiple genetic backgrounds of human pathogenicity in the Trypanosoma brucei complex.

    PubMed

    Sistrom, Mark; Evans, Benjamin; Bjornson, Robert; Gibson, Wendy; Balmer, Oliver; Mäser, Pascal; Aksoy, Serap; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2014-10-05

    The Trypanosoma brucei complex contains a number of subspecies with exceptionally variable life histories, including zoonotic subspecies, which are causative agents of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) in sub-Saharan Africa. Paradoxically, genomic variation between taxa is extremely low. We analyzed the whole-genome sequences of 39 isolates across the T. brucei complex from diverse hosts and regions, identifying 608,501 single nucleotide polymorphisms that represent 2.33% of the nuclear genome. We show that human pathogenicity occurs across a wide range of parasite genotypes, and taxonomic designation does not reflect genetic variation across the group, as previous studies have suggested based on a small number of genes. This genome-wide study allowed the identification of significant host and geographic location associations. Strong purifying selection was detected in genomic regions associated with cytoskeleton structure, and regulatory genes associated with antigenic variation, suggesting conservation of these regions in African trypanosomes. In agreement with expectations drawn from meiotic reciprocal recombination, differences in average linkage disequilibrium between chromosomes in T. brucei correlate positively with chromosome size. In addition to insights into the life history of a diverse group of eukaryotic parasites, the documentation of genomic variation across the T. brucei complex and its association with specific hosts and geographic localities will aid in the development of comprehensive monitoring tools crucial to the proposed elimination of HAT by 2020, and on a shorter term, for monitoring the feared merger between the two human infective parasites, T. brucei rhodesiense and T. b. gambiense, in northern Uganda.

  12. Functional Characterization of Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Authors Glenn E.; Obejero-Paz, Carlos A.; Bruening-Wright, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac toxicity is a leading contributor to late-stage attrition in the drug discovery process and to withdrawal of approved from the market. In vitro assays that enable earlier and more accurate testing for cardiac risk provide early stage predictive indicators that aid in mitigating risk. Human cardiomyocytes, the most relevant subjects for early stage testing, are severely limited in supply. But human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (SC-hCM) are readily available from commercial sources and are increasingly used in academic research, drug discovery and safety pharmacology. As a result, SC-hCM electrophysiology has become a valuable tool to assess cardiac risk associated with drugs. This unit describes techniques for recording individual currents carried by sodium, calcium and potassium ions, as well as single cell action potentials, and impedance recordings from contracting syncytia of thousands of interconnected cells. PMID:25152802

  13. Nontraditional approaches to first-in-human studies to increase efficiency of drug development: will microdose studies make a significant impact?

    PubMed

    Boyd, R A; Lalonde, R L

    2007-01-01

    Much has been written recently about low productivity in the pharmaceutical industry and the high cost of drug development. Over a 10-year period ending in 2000, only approximately 11% of compounds tested in humans across 10 large pharmaceutical companies were eventually approved for marketing in the United States and/or Europe. Attrition was highest during phase II (62%) but still significant in phase III (45%) and at the time of registration (23%). Clearly, given the high cost and time required for clinical development, these late-stage failures are unsustainable.

  14. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses exploit different mechanisms to enter and infect human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Nancy Y.; Bartee, Eric; Mohamed, Mohamed R.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Barrett, John W.; McFadden, Grant

    2010-06-05

    Myxoma (MYXV) and vaccinia (VACV) viruses have recently emerged as potential oncolytic agents that can infect and kill different human cancer cells. Although both are structurally similar, it is unknown whether the pathway(s) used by these poxviruses to enter and cause oncolysis in cancer cells are mechanistically similar. Here, we compared the entry of MYXV and VACV-WR into various human cancer cells and observed significant differences: 1 - low-pH treatment accelerates fusion-mediated entry of VACV but not MYXV, 2 - the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibits entry of VACV, but not MYXV, 3 - knockdown of PAK1 revealed that it is required for a late stage event downstream of MYXV entry into cancer cells, whereas PAK1 is required for VACV entry into the same target cells. These results suggest that VACV and MYXV exploit different mechanisms to enter into human cancer cells, thus providing some rationale for their divergent cancer cell tropisms.

  15. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses exploit different mechanisms to enter and infect human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Villa, Nancy Y; Bartee, Eric; Mohamed, Mohamed R; Rahman, Masmudur M; Barrett, John W; McFadden, Grant

    2010-06-05

    Myxoma (MYXV) and vaccinia (VACV) viruses have recently emerged as potential oncolytic agents that can infect and kill different human cancer cells. Although both are structurally similar, it is unknown whether the pathway(s) used by these poxviruses to enter and cause oncolysis in cancer cells are mechanistically similar. Here, we compared the entry of MYXV and VACV-WR into various human cancer cells and observed significant differences: 1--low-pH treatment accelerates fusion-mediated entry of VACV but not MYXV, 2--the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibits entry of VACV, but not MYXV, 3--knockdown of PAK1 revealed that it is required for a late stage event downstream of MYXV entry into cancer cells, whereas PAK1 is required for VACV entry into the same target cells. These results suggest that VACV and MYXV exploit different mechanisms to enter into human cancer cells, thus providing some rationale for their divergent cancer cell tropisms.

  16. Forecasting Human African Trypanosomiasis Prevalences from Population Screening Data Using Continuous Time Models

    PubMed Central

    Hasker, Epco; Lumbala, Crispin; Lutumba, Pascal; de Vlas, Sake J.; van de Klundert, Joris

    2016-01-01

    To eliminate and eradicate gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), maximizing the effectiveness of active case finding is of key importance. The progression of the epidemic is largely influenced by the planning of these operations. This paper introduces and analyzes five models for predicting HAT prevalence in a given village based on past observed prevalence levels and past screening activities in that village. Based on the quality of prevalence level predictions in 143 villages in Kwamouth (DRC), and based on the theoretical foundation underlying the models, we consider variants of the Logistic Model—a model inspired by the SIS epidemic model—to be most suitable for predicting HAT prevalence levels. Furthermore, we demonstrate the applicability of this model to predict the effects of planning policies for screening operations. Our analysis yields an analytical expression for the screening frequency required to reach eradication (zero prevalence) and a simple approach for determining the frequency required to reach elimination within a given time frame (one case per 10000). Furthermore, the model predictions suggest that annual screening is only expected to lead to eradication if at least half of the cases are detected during the screening rounds. This paper extends knowledge on control strategies for HAT and serves as a basis for further modeling and optimization studies. PMID:27657937

  17. The Influence of Monomer Chemical Structure on Late-Stage Cure Kinetics of Dicyanate Ester Resins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-03

    such as pultrusion [7], filament winding [8], and VARTM [9], with higher maximum use temperatures, better flame, smoke, and toxicity characteristics...esters: VARTM , filament winding and pultrusion.” Proceedings of SAMPE, Vol. 49. Covina, CA: SAMPE International Business Office, 2004, pp. 1895

  18. Late-Stage Diversification of Biologically Active Molecules via Chemoenzymatic C-H Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Durak, Landon J; Payne, James T; Lewis, Jared C

    2016-03-04

    Engineered variants of rebeccamycin halogenase were used to selectively halogenate a number of biologically active aromatic compounds. Subsequent Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions on the crude extracts of these reactions were used to install aryl, amine, and ether substituents at the halogenation site. This simple, chemoenzymatic method enables non-directed functionalization of C-H bonds on a range of substrates to provide access to derivatives that would be challenging or inefficient to prepare by other means.

  19. Gold deposition caused by carbonation of biotite during late-stage fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Mark A.; White, Alistair J. R.; Fisher, Louise A.; Hough, Robert M.; Cleverley, James S.

    2015-12-01

    Alteration reactions associated with gold mineralisation can be used to elucidate the nature of the fluid that transported gold into a deposit. At the Junction gold deposit, Kambalda, Western Australia, gold is hosted in a metamorphosed and hydrothermally altered dolerite. Mineralisation at the deposit scale is associated with zones of K, CO2 and S metasomatism, as is common in many greenstone hosted gold deposits. However, at the thin-section scale gold is not closely associated with sulphide minerals but within zones of carbonate metasomatism and K-loss where pre-existing biotite has reacted to produce chlorite, muscovite and Fe-Mg carbonates. Gold precipitation is intimately associated with biotite breakdown where calcite is locally absent. Quantified mineral modes from detailed microstructural mapping are used to balance reactions describing the breakdown of biotite in the presence and absence of calcite. Using the basic assumption that Al is immobile during metasomatism the reactions are successfully balanced, even in a manifestly open system. Modelling of fluid-rock reactions using HCh constrains the fluid composition (0.11 < X(CO2) < 0.13) and fluid-rock ratios (< 12:1) that can produce the observed mineral assemblage. Additional modelling of solid solution mineral phases using THERMOCALC estimates alteration conditions of 390 °C, 4 kbar and also suggests a fluid X(CO2) ~ 0.1. Both these models show that the observed muscovite and chlorite compositions can be produced primarily through the removal of K from the measured precursor biotite. We show that it is not possible to transport and deposit all the gold observed in the alteration zone with the low fluid-rock ratios obtained from modelling of silicate alteration and inferred gold concentrations in these fluids. We suggest that this is typical of greenstone hosted gold deposits and that mechanisms other than aqueous solution, which can transport higher gold concentrations, must be considered.

  20. The I/S-to-illite reaction in the late stage diagenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanson, B.; Champion, D.

    1991-01-01

    XRF analyses of individual grains show that the I/S minerals become more illitic (near mica composition) with depth, but they always contain a portion of a smectite component, that is, silica-rich, low layer charge component. Both lath I/S and hexagonal illite minerals appear to grow by adding illite layers of the same composition (0.9 potassium atoms and a slight celadonite, phengite component) onto original crystallites. -from Authors

  1. Evolution of late stage differentiates in the Palisades Sill, New York and New Jersey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Karin A.; Steiner, Jeffrey C.; Puffer, John H.; Jones, Kevin M.; Goldstein, Steven L.

    2015-08-01

    The Palisades Sill at Upper Nyack, NY contains evolved rocks that crystallized as ferrodiabase and ferrogranophyre and occupy 50% to 60% of the local thickness. 143Nd/144Nd isotope values for rocks representing Palisades diversity range between 0.512320 and 0.512331, and indicate a homogeneous source for the Palisades and little or no contamination from shallow crustal sediments. Petrographic analysis of ferrodiabase suggests that strong iron enrichment was the result of prolonged quiescence in cycles of magmatic input. Ferrogranophyres in the updip northern Palisades at Upper Nyack are members of a suite of cogenetic rocks with similar composition to 'sandwich horizon' rocks of the southern Palisades at Fort Lee, NJ, but display distinct mineralogical and textural features. Differences in textural and mineralogical features are attributed to a) updip (lateral) migration of residual liquid as the sill propagated closer to the surface; b) deformation caused by tectonic shifts; and c) crystallization in the presence of deuteric hydrothermal fluids resulting in varying degrees of alteration. A model connecting multiple magmatic pulses, compaction and mobilization of residual liquid by compositional convection, closed-system differentiation, synchronous with tapping of the sill for extrusion of coeval basaltic subaerial flows is presented. The persistence of a low-temperature mushy layer, represented by ferrogranophyres, supports the possibility of a long-lived conduit subject to reopening after periods of quiescence in magmatic input, leading to the extrusion of the multiple flows of the Orange Mountain Basalt and perhaps even subsequent Preakness Basalt flows, depending on solidification conditions. A sub-Newark Basin network of sills subjected to similar protracted input of pulses as hypothesized for the Palisades was likely responsible for 600 ka of magmatic activity required to emplace a third set of Watchung flood basalts, the Hook Mountain Basalt.

  2. Weak bases affect late stages of Mayaro virus replication cycle in vertebrate cells.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, D F; Santo, M P; Rebello, M A; Rebello, M C

    2000-04-01

    This paper describes the effect of two weak bases (ammonium chloride and chloroquine) on the morphogenesis of Mayaro virus. When Mayaro virus-infected TC7 (monkey kidney) cells were treated with these agents it was observed that weak bases caused a significant reduction in virus yield. Also, cellular protein synthesis, which is inhibited by Mayaro virus infection, recovered to nearly normal levels. However, the synthesis of Mayaro virus proteins was affected. These phenomena were dose-dependent. The process of Mayaro virus infection in vertebrate cells is very rapid. Virus precursors are not observed in cell cytoplasm and budding through the plasma membrane seems to be the only way of virus release. Electron microscopy of cells infected with Mayaro virus and treated with weak bases revealed an accumulation of virus structures in cell cytoplasm. The study also noted an inhibition of budding through the plasma membrane and the appearance of virus particles inside intracytoplasmic vacuoles. These observations indicate an impairment at the final stages of the virus replication cycle.

  3. Characterization of Two Late-Stage Enzymes Involved in Fosfomycin Biosynthesis in Pseudomonads

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, Philip; Ulrich, Emily C.; Chekan, Jonathan R.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Nair, Satish K.

    2017-01-01

    The broad-spectrum phosphonate antibiotic fosfomycin is currently in use for clinical treatment of infections caused by both Gram-positive and Gram-negative uropathogens. The antibiotic is biosynthesized by various streptomycetes, as well as by pseudomonads. Notably, the biosynthetic strategies used by the two genera share only two steps: the first step in which the primary metabolite phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) is converted to phosphonopyruvate (PnPy), and the terminal step in which 2-hydroxypropylphosphonate (2-HPP) is converted to fosfomycin. Otherwise, distinct enzymatic paths are employed. Here, we biochemically confirm the last two steps in the fosfomycin biosynthetic pathway of Pseudomonas syringae PB-5123, showing that Psf3 carries out the reduction of 2-oxopropylphosphonate (2-OPP) to (S)-2-HPP, followed by the Psf4-catalyzed epoxidation of (S)-2-HPP to fosfomycin. Psf4 can also accept (R)-2-HPP as a substrate, but instead performs an oxidation to make 2-OPP. We show that the combined activities of Psf3 and Psf4 can be used to convert racemic 2-HPP to fosfomycin in an enantioconvergent process. X-ray structures of each enzyme with bound substrates provide insights into the stereospecificity of each conversion. These studies shed light into the reaction mechanisms of the terminal two enzymes in a distinct pathway employed by pseudomonads for the production of a potent antimicrobial agent. PMID:27977135

  4. Synthesis and dephosphorylation of MARCKS in the late stages of megakaryocyte maturation drive proplatelet formation.

    PubMed

    Machlus, Kellie R; Wu, Stephen K; Stumpo, Deborah J; Soussou, Thomas S; Paul, David S; Campbell, Robert A; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Bergmeier, Wolfgang; Weyrich, Andrew S; Blackshear, Perry J; Hartwig, John H; Italiano, Joseph E

    2016-03-17

    Platelets are essential for hemostasis, and thrombocytopenia is a major clinical problem. Megakaryocytes (MKs) generate platelets by extending long processes, proplatelets, into sinusoidal blood vessels. However, very little is known about what regulates proplatelet formation. To uncover which proteins were dynamically changing during this process, we compared the proteome and transcriptome of round vs proplatelet-producing MKs by 2D difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and polysome profiling, respectively. Our data revealed a significant increase in a poorly-characterized MK protein, myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS), which was upregulated 3.4- and 5.7-fold in proplatelet-producing MKs in 2D DIGE and polysome profiling analyses, respectively. MARCKS is a protein kinase C (PKC) substrate that binds PIP2. In MKs, it localized to both the plasma and demarcation membranes. MARCKS inhibition by peptide significantly decreased proplatelet formation 53%. To examine the role of MARCKS in the PKC pathway, we treated MKs with polymethacrylate (PMA), which markedly increased MARCKS phosphorylation while significantly inhibiting proplatelet formation 84%, suggesting that MARCKS phosphorylation reduces proplatelet formation. We hypothesized that MARCKS phosphorylation promotes Arp2/3 phosphorylation, which subsequently downregulates proplatelet formation; both MARCKS and Arp2 were dephosphorylated in MKs making proplatelets, and Arp2 inhibition enhanced proplatelet formation. Finally, we used MARCKS knockout (KO) mice to probe the direct role of MARCKS in proplatelet formation; MARCKS KO MKs displayed significantly decreased proplatelet levels. MARCKS expression and signaling in primary MKs is a novel finding. We propose that MARCKS acts as a "molecular switch," binding to and regulating PIP2 signaling to regulate processes like proplatelet extension (microtubule-driven) vs proplatelet branching (Arp2/3 and actin polymerization-driven).

  5. Distinct actions of Rab3 and Rab27 GTPases on late stages of exocytosis of insulin.

    PubMed

    Cazares, Victor A; Subramani, Arasakumar; Saldate, Johnny J; Hoerauf, Widmann; Stuenkel, Edward L

    2014-09-01

    Rab GTPases associated with insulin-containing secretory granules (SGs) are key in targeting, docking and assembly of molecular complexes governing pancreatic β-cell exocytosis. Four Rab3 isoforms along with Rab27A are associated with insulin granules, yet elucidation of the distinct roles of these Rab families on exocytosis remains unclear. To define specific actions of these Rab families we employ Rab3GAP and/or EPI64A GTPase-activating protein overexpression in β-cells from wild-type or Ashen mice to selectively transit the entire Rab3 family or Rab27A to a GDP-bound state. Ashen mice carry a spontaneous mutation that eliminates Rab27A expression. Using membrane capacitance measurements we find that GTP/GDP nucleotide cycling of Rab27A is essential for generation of the functionally defined immediately releasable pool (IRP) and central to regulating the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP). By comparison, nucleotide cycling of Rab3 GTPases, but not of Rab27A, is essential for a kinetically rapid filling of the RRP with SGs. Aside from these distinct functions, Rab3 and Rab27A GTPases demonstrate considerable functional overlap in building the readily releasable granule pool. Hence, while Rab3 and Rab27A cooperate to generate release-ready SGs in β-cells, they also direct unique kinetic and functional properties of the exocytotic pathway.

  6. Physics and chemistry of the late stages of stellar evolution — an introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Sun

    2016-07-01

    The stellar evolution from the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) to planetary nebulae (PN) contains some of the most interesting physical and chemical processes in the Universe. Within a time period of one million years starting from the nucleosynthesis of carbon in the core, we witness the chemical synthesis of molecules in the atmosphere, followed by the condensation of minerals and organics in the stellar outflow. Different phases of supersonic stellar winds, both spherical symmetric and highly collimated, and their interactions lead to a series of dynamical processes and morphological transformation of the stellar ejecta. Most interestingly, PN are now known to be major sources of complex organics in the Galaxy. Organic compounds of mixed aromatic and aliphatic structures have been observed to form in the post-AGB evolution over time scales as short as hundreds of years. There is likely that these stellar organics journeyed through the Galaxy and were embedded in early Solar System.

  7. Spontaneous locomotor activity in late-stage chicken embryos is modified by stretch of leg muscles

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Nina S.; Ryu, Young U.; Yeseta, Marie C.

    2014-01-01

    Chicks initiate bilateral alternating steps several days before hatching and adaptively walk within hours of hatching, but emergence of precocious walking skills is not well understood. One of our aims was to determine whether interactions between environment and movement experience prior to hatching are instrumental in establishing precocious motor skills. However, physiological evidence of proprioceptor development in the chick has yet to be established; thus, one goal of this study was to determine when in embryogenesis proprioception circuits can code changes in muscle length. A second goal was to determine whether proprioception circuits can modulate leg muscle activity during repetitive limb movements for stepping (RLMs). We hypothesized that proprioception circuits code changes in muscle length and/or tension, and modulate locomotor circuits producing RLMs in anticipation of adaptive locomotion at hatching. To this end, leg muscle activity and kinematics were recorded in embryos during normal posture and after fitting one ankle with a restraint that supported the limb in an atypical posture. We tested the hypotheses by comparing leg muscle activity during spontaneous RLMs in control posture and ankle extension restraint. The results indicated that proprioceptors detect changes in muscle length and/or muscle tension 3 days before hatching. Ankle extension restraint produced autogenic excitation of the ankle flexor and reciprocal inhibition of the ankle extensor. Restraint also modified knee extensor activity during RLMs 1 day before hatching. We consider the strengths and limitations of these results and propose that proprioception contributes to precocious locomotor development during the final 3 days before hatching. PMID:24265423

  8. The Influence of Monomer Chemical Structure on Late-Stage Cure Kinetics of Dicyanate Ester Resins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-20

    Kinetics of 5b. GRANT NUMBER Dicyanate Ester Resins 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Andrew J Guenthner , Kevin R. Lamison, Josiah T. Reams... Guenthner , A. J.; Davis, M. C.; Lamison, K. R.; Yandek, G. R.; Cambrea, L. R.; Groshens, T. J.; Baldwin, L. C.; Mabry, J. M. “Synthesis, Cure Kinetics

  9. Requirement of vasculogenesis and blood circulation in late stages of liver growth in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Korzh, Svetlana; Pan, Xiufang; Garcia-Lecea, Marta; Winata, Cecilia Lanny; Pan, Xiaotao; Wohland, Thorsten; Korzh, Vladimir; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2008-01-01

    Background Early events in vertebrate liver development have been the major focus in previous studies, however, late events of liver organogenesis remain poorly understood. Liver vasculogenesis in vertebrates occurs through the interaction of endoderm-derived liver epithelium and mesoderm-derived endothelial cells (ECs). In zebrafish, although it has been found that ECs are not required for liver budding, how and when the spatio-temporal pattern of liver growth is coordinated with ECs remains to be elucidated. Results To study the process of liver development and vasculogenesis in vivo, a two-color transgenic zebrafish line Tg(lfabf:dsRed; elaA:EGFP) was generated and named LiPan for liver-specific expression of DsRed RFP and exocrine pancreas-specific expression of GFP. Using the LiPan line, we first followed the dynamic development of liver from live embryos to adult and showed the formation of three distinct yet connected liver lobes during development. The LiPan line was then crossed with Tg(fli1:EGFP)y1 and vascular development in the liver was traced in vivo. Liver vasculogenesis started at 55–58 hpf when ECs first surrounded hepatocytes from the liver bud surface and then invaded the liver to form sinusoids and later the vascular network. Using a novel non-invasive and label-free fluorescence correction spectroscopy, we detected blood circulation in the liver starting at ~72 hpf. To analyze the roles of ECs and blood circulation in liver development, both cloche mutants (lacking ECs) and Tnnt2 morphants (no blood circulation) were employed. We found that until 70 hpf liver growth and morphogenesis depended on ECs and nascent sinusoids. After 72 hpf, a functional sinusoidal network was essential for continued liver growth. An absence of blood circulation in Tnnt2 morphants caused defects in liver vasculature and small liver. Conclusion There are two phases of liver development in zebrafish, budding and growth. In the growth phase, there are three distinct stages: avascular growth between 50–55 hpf, where ECs are not required; endothelium-dependent growth, where ECs or sinusoids are required for liver growth between 55–72 hpf before blood circulation in liver sinusoids; and circulation-dependent growth, where the circulation is essential to maintain vascular network and to support continued liver growth after 72 hpf. PMID:18796162

  10. Transcriptome analysis of peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) during the late stage of fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Pan, H F; Sheng, Y; Gao, Z H; Chen, H L; Qi, Y J; Yi, X K; Qin, G H; Zhang, J Y

    2016-12-23

    Fruit ripening is a complex developmental process, the details of which remain largely unknown in fleshy fruits. In this paper, the fruit flesh of two peach varieties, "Zhongyou9" (a nectarine; Prunus persica L. Batsch) and its mutant "Hongyu", was analyzed by RNA-seq technology during two stages of ripening at 20-day intervals. One hundred and eighty significant upregulated and two hundred and thirty-five downregulated genes were identified in the experiment. Many of these genes were related to plant hormones, chlorophyll breakdown, accumulation of aroma and flavor volatiles, and stress. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first transcriptome analysis of peach ripening, and our data will be useful for further studies of the molecular basis of fruit ripening.

  11. Synthesis and dephosphorylation of MARCKS in the late stages of megakaryocyte maturation drive proplatelet formation

    PubMed Central

    Machlus, Kellie R.; Wu, Stephen K.; Stumpo, Deborah J.; Soussou, Thomas S.; Paul, David S.; Campbell, Robert A.; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Bergmeier, Wolfgang; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Blackshear, Perry J.; Hartwig, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are essential for hemostasis, and thrombocytopenia is a major clinical problem. Megakaryocytes (MKs) generate platelets by extending long processes, proplatelets, into sinusoidal blood vessels. However, very little is known about what regulates proplatelet formation. To uncover which proteins were dynamically changing during this process, we compared the proteome and transcriptome of round vs proplatelet-producing MKs by 2D difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and polysome profiling, respectively. Our data revealed a significant increase in a poorly-characterized MK protein, myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS), which was upregulated 3.4- and 5.7-fold in proplatelet-producing MKs in 2D DIGE and polysome profiling analyses, respectively. MARCKS is a protein kinase C (PKC) substrate that binds PIP2. In MKs, it localized to both the plasma and demarcation membranes. MARCKS inhibition by peptide significantly decreased proplatelet formation 53%. To examine the role of MARCKS in the PKC pathway, we treated MKs with polymethacrylate (PMA), which markedly increased MARCKS phosphorylation while significantly inhibiting proplatelet formation 84%, suggesting that MARCKS phosphorylation reduces proplatelet formation. We hypothesized that MARCKS phosphorylation promotes Arp2/3 phosphorylation, which subsequently downregulates proplatelet formation; both MARCKS and Arp2 were dephosphorylated in MKs making proplatelets, and Arp2 inhibition enhanced proplatelet formation. Finally, we used MARCKS knockout (KO) mice to probe the direct role of MARCKS in proplatelet formation; MARCKS KO MKs displayed significantly decreased proplatelet levels. MARCKS expression and signaling in primary MKs is a novel finding. We propose that MARCKS acts as a “molecular switch,” binding to and regulating PIP2 signaling to regulate processes like proplatelet extension (microtubule-driven) vs proplatelet branching (Arp2/3 and actin polymerization-driven). PMID:26744461

  12. Progressive Cone Dysfunction and Geographic Atrophy of the Macula in Late Stage Autosomal Dominant Vitreoretinochoroidopathy (ADVIRC).

    PubMed

    Chen, Connie June; Goldberg, Morton F

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy (ADVIRC) is a rare inherited ocular disease associated with distinct mutations in the BEST1 gene. Typically, patients have only mild visual impairment, and rarely do patients have moderate or severe visual impairment, often as a result of vitreous hemorrhage. We now describe progressive central macular atrophy and cone dysfunction leading to visual loss in an elderly ADVIRC patient 33 years after initial presentation.

  13. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Cotton Fiber Development and Protein Extraction Method Comparison in Late Stage Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Mujahid, Hana; Pendarvis, Ken; Reddy, Joseph S.; Nallamilli, Babi Ramesh Reddy; Reddy, K. R.; Nanduri, Bindu; Peng, Zhaohua

    2016-01-01

    The distinct stages of cotton fiber development and maturation serve as a single-celled model for studying the molecular mechanisms of plant cell elongation, cell wall development and cellulose biosynthesis. However, this model system of plant cell development is compromised for proteomic studies due to a lack of an efficient protein extraction method during the later stages of fiber development, because of a recalcitrant cell wall and the presence of abundant phenolic compounds. Here, we compared the quality and quantities of proteins extracted from 25 dpa (days post anthesis) fiber with multiple protein extraction methods and present a comprehensive quantitative proteomic study of fiber development from 10 dpa to 25 dpa. Comparative analysis using a label-free quantification method revealed 287 differentially-expressed proteins in the 10 dpa to 25 dpa fiber developmental period. Proteins involved in cell wall metabolism and regulation, cytoskeleton development and carbohydrate metabolism among other functional categories in four fiber developmental stages were identified. Our studies provide protocols for protein extraction from maturing fiber tissues for mass spectrometry analysis and expand knowledge of the proteomic profile of cotton fiber development. PMID:28248216

  14. Cholinergic systems are essential for late-stage maturation and refinement of motor cortical circuits

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Dhakshin S.; Conner, James M.; Anilkumar, Arjun A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies reported that early postnatal cholinergic lesions severely perturb early cortical development, impairing neuronal cortical migration and the formation of cortical dendrites and synapses. These severe effects of early postnatal cholinergic lesions preclude our ability to understand the contribution of cholinergic systems to the later-stage maturation of topographic cortical representations. To study cholinergic mechanisms contributing to the later maturation of motor cortical circuits, we first characterized the temporal course of cortical motor map development and maturation in rats. In this study, we focused our attention on the maturation of cortical motor representations after postnatal day 25 (PND 25), a time after neuronal migration has been accomplished and cortical volume has reached adult size. We found significant maturation of cortical motor representations after this time, including both an expansion of forelimb representations in motor cortex and a shift from proximal to distal forelimb representations to an extent unexplainable by simple volume enlargement of the neocortex. Specific cholinergic lesions placed at PND 24 impaired enlargement of distal forelimb representations in particular and markedly reduced the ability to learn skilled motor tasks as adults. These results identify a novel and essential role for cholinergic systems in the late refinement and maturation of cortical circuits. Dysfunctions in this system may constitute a mechanism of late-onset neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett syndrome and schizophrenia. PMID:25505106

  15. Late Stages of Stellar Evolution and their Impact on Spectrophotometric Properties of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzoni, A.

    2007-12-01

    The connection between AGB evolution of stellar populations and infrared vs. ultraviolet properties of the parent galaxies is reviewed relying on the updated lookout provided by population-synthesis theory. In particular, planetary-nebula events and hot horizontal-branch evolution are assessed in a unitary view to outline a plain general picture of galaxy spectrophotometric evolution. This will include a brief discussion of relevant phenomena such as the ``UV upturn'' in ellipticals and the stellar mass loss properties along the galaxy morphological sequence.

  16. Molecular analysis of late-stage fiber development in upland cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton is the world's most important textile and the number one value-added crop. It plays a crucial role in the economy of Texas – supporting close to 50,000 jobs and supplying $2 billion to the state economy. Its role is even more evident in the South Plains of Texas, which supplies approximately...

  17. Late-stage functionalization of biologically active heterocycles through photoredox catalysis.

    PubMed

    Dirocco, Daniel A; Dykstra, Kevin; Krska, Shane; Vachal, Petr; Conway, Donald V; Tudge, Matthew

    2014-05-05

    The direct CH functionalization of heterocycles has become an increasingly valuable tool in modern drug discovery. However, the introduction of small alkyl groups, such as methyl, by this method has not been realized in the context of complex molecule synthesis since existing methods rely on the use of strong oxidants and elevated temperatures to generate the requisite radical species. Herein, we report the use of stable organic peroxides activated by visible-light photoredox catalysis to achieve the direct methyl-, ethyl-, and cyclopropylation of a variety of biologically active heterocycles. The simple protocol, mild reaction conditions, and unique tolerability of this method make it an important tool for drug discovery.

  18. Successes and Failures for Drugs in Late-Stage Development for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Berk, Camryn; Sabbagh, Marwan

    2014-01-01

    To date, symptomatic medications prevail as the mainstay of treatment options for Alzheimer's disease (AD). There have been tremendous investments made to increase the numbers of drugs approved and the targets engaged, in an effort to alter the disease course or pathophysiology of AD. Unfortunately, almost all studies have not met expectations and no new drug (beyond medical foods) has been approved for the treatment of AD in the last decade. This review is a comparison of novel AD therapies in the late phases of clinical testing with recent high-profile clinical failures and agents in development with relatively unexplored mechanisms of action, with a focus on their potential as therapeutic agents and their proposed advantages over the treatments currently in use. PMID:23943247

  19. Perceptions of Burden in Patients With Late-Stage Cancer and Their Caregivers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-27

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Depression; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  20. Diversity of Planets in the Aftermath of Late Stage Accretion (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, E. I.; Reufer, A.

    2013-12-01

    It is a mistake to view giant impacts or similar sized collisions between planets or planetary embryos as large-scale versions of impact cratering. Although much of the physics is the same (material mechanics, and shocks in the case of hypervelocity events), fundamentally a similar sized collision is a gravity-regime phenomenon where too much angular momentum is trying to accrete into one place, as the video linked below illustrates. When we see material 'escaping' from a collision, in simulations, it is not so much that it was blasted from the target (this is rarely the case) than that it was not accreted by the target. When we see a disk forming around the proto-Earth, in Moon-forming simulations, it was not ejected from the Earth (in the standard model) but rather it forms from impactor material that was only partially accreted (c.f. Canup 2004). Hence the quandary of oxygen isotopes in Moon formation. With this perspective, a number of novel pathways for meteorite petrogenesis and planetary origins open up: hit and run collisions, which can leave behind iron-rich relics (or rock-rich relics in the case of KBO collisions); partial accretion, which is the standard model for the silicate-rich Moon; and the formation of families of bodies (self-gravitating clumps formed in escaping tidal arms) which offer a new way of forming isotopically closely related bodies from a common parent that may have dramatically different bulk compositions. The concept of imperfect accretion creates a coeval timescale for planetary disruption, one that occurs while the planets are coming together, rather than long afterwards as battered pieces of the Main Belt or the Kuiper Belt -- disruption by accretion, and in many cases, disruption without shock. As time permits we shall present hypotheses invoking imperfect pairwise accretion as an origin scenario for specific planetary bodies such as Mercury and the satellites of Saturn. The linked video is from an origins model by Asphaug and Reufer (Icarus 2013) where differentiated Galilean-sized icy satellites accrete, spawning middle-sized moons. Similar models are presented for differentiated silicate bodies. The longer term problem is to track the dynamical fate of the bodies that are formed in similar sized collisions, because ultimately their fate is to be accreted (remaining close to the target in dynamical space) unless they are scattered into protected locations, so the talk ends with some progress on that front.

  1. Crevasse-squeeze ridge corridors: Diagnostic features of late-stage palaeo-ice stream activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David J. A.; Storrar, Robert D.; Rea, Brice R.

    2016-04-01

    A 200-km-long and 10-km-wide linear assemblage of till-filled geometrical ridges on the bed of the Maskwa palaeo-ice stream of the late Wisconsinan southwest Laurentide Ice Sheet are interpreted as crevasse-squeeze ridges (CSR) developed during internal flow unit reorganization, immediately prior to ice stream shutdown. Ridge orientations are predominantly orientated WNW-ESE, with a subordinate WSW-ENE alignment, both indicative of ice fracture development transverse to former ice stream flow, as indicated by NNE-SSW aligned MSGL. Subglacial till injection into basal and/or full depth, mode I and II crevasses occurred at the approximate centreline of the ice stream, in response to extension and fracturing. Landform preservation indicates that this took place during the final stages of ice streaming, immediately prior to ice stream shutdown. This linear zone of ice fracturing therefore likely represents the narrowing of the fast-flowing trunk, similar to the plug flow identified in some surging valley glaciers. Lateral drag between the final active flow unit and the slower moving ice on either side is likely recorded by the up-ice bending of the CSR limbs. The resulting CSR corridor, here related to an individual ice stream flow unit, constitutes a previously unreported style of crevasse infilling and contrasts with two existing CSR patterns: (1) wide arcuate zones of CSRs related to widespread fracturing within glacier surge lobes; and (2) narrow concentric arcs of CSRs and recessional push moraines related to submarginal till deformation at active temperate glacier lobes.

  2. Characterization of Two Late-Stage Enzymes Involved in Fosfomycin Biosynthesis in Pseudomonads.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Philip; Ulrich, Emily C; Chekan, Jonathan R; van der Donk, Wilfred A; Nair, Satish K

    2017-02-17

    The broad-spectrum phosphonate antibiotic fosfomycin is currently in use for clinical treatment of infections caused by both Gram-positive and Gram-negative uropathogens. The antibiotic is biosynthesized by various streptomycetes, as well as by pseudomonads. Notably, the biosynthetic strategies used by the two genera share only two steps: the first step in which primary metabolite phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) is converted to phosphonopyruvate (PnPy) and the terminal step in which 2-hydroxypropylphosphonate (2-HPP) is converted to fosfomycin. Otherwise, distinct enzymatic paths are employed. Here, we biochemically confirm the last two steps in the fosfomycin biosynthetic pathway of Pseudomonas syringae PB-5123, showing that Psf3 performs the reduction of 2-oxopropylphosphonate (2-OPP) to (S)-2-HPP, followed by the Psf4-catalyzed epoxidation of (S)-2-HPP to fosfomycin. Psf4 can also accept (R)-2-HPP as a substrate but instead performs an oxidation to make 2-OPP. We show that the combined activities of Psf3 and Psf4 can be used to convert racemic 2-HPP to fosfomycin in an enantioconvergent process. X-ray structures of each enzyme with bound substrates provide insights into the stereospecificity of each conversion. These studies shed light on the reaction mechanisms of the two terminal enzymes in a distinct pathway employed by pseudomonads for the production of a potent antimicrobial agent.

  3. Art Therapy for an Individual with Late Stage Dementia: A Clinical Case Description

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucknott-Cohen, Tisah; Ehresman, Crystal

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the healing benefits of art therapy for an individual with dementia of the Alzheimer's type. In this clinical case description, a woman diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease received individual art therapy for 17 weeks. The treatment concerns that arose, altered view of reality, agitation, and retrogenesis provide insight on…

  4. Abnormalities of plantar pressure distribution in early, intermediate, and late stages of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Isabel C N; Hamamoto, Adriana N; Tonicelli, Lucas M G; Watari, Ricky; Ortega, Neli R S; Sartor, Cristina D

    2014-09-01

    Inconsistent findings with regard to plantar pressure while walking in the diabetic population may be due to the heterogeneity of the studied groups resulting from the classification/grouping criteria adopted. The clinical diagnosis and classification of diabetes have inherent uncertainties that compromise the definition of its onset and the differentiation of its severity stages. A fuzzy system could improve the precision of the diagnosis and classification of diabetic neuropathy because it takes those uncertainties into account and combines different assessment methods. Here, we investigated how plantar pressure abnormalities evolve throughout different severity stages of diabetic polyneuropathy (absent, n=38; mild, n=20; moderate, n=47; severe, n=24). Pressure distribution was analysed over five areas while patients walked barefoot. Patients with mild neuropathy displayed an increase in pressure-time integral at the forefoot and a lower peak pressure at the heel. The peak and pressure-time integral under the forefoot and heel were aggravated in later stages of the disease (moderate and severe) compared with early stages of the disease (absent and mild). In the severe group, lower pressures at the lateral forefoot and hallux were observed, which could be related to symptoms that develop with the aggravation of neuropathy: atrophy of the intrinsic foot muscles, reduction of distal muscle activity, and joint stiffness. Although there were clear alterations over the forefoot and in a number of plantar areas with higher pressures within each severity stage, they did not follow the aggravation evolution of neuropathy classified by the fuzzy model. Based on these results, therapeutic interventions should begin in the early stages of this disease to prevent further consequences of the disease.

  5. Large planetary nebulae and their significance to the late stages of stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaler, James B.; Shaw, Richard A.; Kwitter, Karen B.

    1990-01-01

    Spectrophotometry of 75 large PNe with Shklovsky radii greater than 0.15 pc is presented and used to calculate nebular parameters and compositions, stellar Zanstra temperatures and luminosities, and core masses. Nine new Peimbert type I nebulae are identified. About 40 percent of the stars that are on cooling tracks are above 0.7 solar mass, and over 15 percent are above 0.8 solar mass. The large planetaries demonstrate a clear positive correlation between nitrogen enrichment and core mass. N/O is anticorrelated with O/H. The radii of the nebulae whose stars lie along specific cooling tracks increase monotonically with decreasing central star temperature. For a given central temperature, the nebular radii also increase with increasing core mass, showing that in this part of the log L-log T plane the higher mass cores evolve more slowly in agreement with theoretical prediction. However, theoretical evolutionary rates for the large nebulae stars appear to be much too slow.

  6. Increased platelet reactivity in patients with late-stage metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Niamh M; Egan, Karl; McFadden, Siobhan; Grogan, Liam; Breathnach, Oscar S; O'Leary, John; Hennessy, Bryan T; Kenny, Dermot

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Platelet hyperreactivity is associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. Cancer patients are at an increased risk of thrombosis, a risk that increases with disease progression. While cancer patients show evidence of platelet activation in vivo, few studies have extensively assessed whether these patients display platelet hyperreactivity. We hypothesized that patients with metastatic cancer would display platelet hyperreactivity, reflecting their associated high risk of thrombosis. In a cohort of patients with metastatic cancer (n = 13), we assessed platelet function using well-established assays of platelet reactivity (agonist-induced platelet aggregation, spontaneous platelet aggregation, and agonist-induced P-selectin expression). In comparison with healthy controls (n = 10), patients with metastatic cancer displayed global platelet hyperreactivity. Agonist-induced platelet aggregation responses to ADP (adenosine diphosphate), epinephrine, collagen, arachidonic acid, and PAR-1 (protease-activated receptor-1) activating peptide, as well as spontaneous platelet aggregation, were significantly increased in patients with metastatic cancer. Furthermore, agonist-induced platelet P-selectin expression was also significantly increased within the patient cohort. We demonstrate that patients with metastatic cancer are characterized by global platelet hyperreactivity, a factor that may contribute to their increased risk of thrombosis. We assessed platelet function in a cohort of patients with metastatic cancer (n = 13) using well-established assays of platelet reactivity. Agonist-induced platelet aggregation and activation in response to platelet agonists, as well as spontaneous platelet aggregation, was significantly increased in cancer patients compared with healthy controls. We demonstrate that patients with metastatic cancer are characterized by global platelet hyperreactivity, a factor that may contribute to their increased risk of thrombosis. PMID:24156029

  7. Use of ultrasonography to identify late-stage maturity in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Morphometric measurements by ultrasonography has been used to determine gonad and follicle size in many species of fish for purposes of identifying sex and estimating stage of maturation. We have been using a portable ultrasound system (SonoSite MicroMaxx, L25e/13-6 MHz transducer) to identify fem...

  8. Metal-Catalyzed Azidation of Tertiary C–H Bonds Suitable for Late-Stage Functionalization

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ankit

    2014-01-01

    Some enzymes are able to selectively oxidize unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds to form alcohols; however biological systems do not possess enzymes that are able to catalyze the analogous amination of a C-H bond.1,2 The absence of such chemistry is limiting because nitrogen-containing groups are found in therapeutic agents and clinically useful natural products. In one prominent example, the conversion of the ketone of erythromycin to the –N(Me)CH2– group in azithromycin leads to a compound that can be dosed once daily with a shorter length of treatment.3,4 For such reasons, synthetic chemists are very interested in identifying catalysts that can directly convert C-H bonds to C-N bonds. Most currently used catalysts for C-H bond amination are ill suited for the functionalization of complex molecules, because they require excess substrate or directing groups, harsh reaction conditions, weak or acidic C-H bonds, or reagents containing specialized groups on the nitrogen atom.5-14 Among C-H bond amination reactions, those forming a carbon-nitrogen bond at a tertiary alkyl group would be particularly valuable, because this linkage is difficult to generate enzymatically from ketone or alcohol precursors.15 In this manuscript, we report a mild, selective, iron-catalyzed azidation of tertiary C-H bonds with substrate as limiting reagent. The reaction tolerates aqueous environments and is suitable for “late-stage” functionalization of complex structures. Moreover, this azidation creates the ability to install a range of nitrogen functional groups, including those from bio-orthogonal Huisgen “click” cycloadditions and the Staudinger ligation.16-19 For these reasons, we anticipate this methodology will create opportunities to easily modify natural products, their precursors, and their derivatives to analogs that contain distinct polarity and charge from nitrogen-containing groups. It could also be used to help identify targets of biologically active molecules by creating a point of attachment, for example to fluorescent tags or ‘handles’ for affinity chromatography, directly onto complex molecular structures. PMID:25631448

  9. Cold, warm, and hot gas in the late-stage merger NGC 7252

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, J. E.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Schweizer, Francois

    1994-01-01

    We present the first observations of the neutral hydrogen distribution and x-ray emission in the prototypical merger remnant NGC 7252, the 'Atoms-for-Peace' galaxy. These data are supplemented by accurate B and R surface photometry, reaching a limit of mu(sub B) = 26.5 mag/sq arcsec, and images taken through a narrow-band H alpha filter. We find all of the 2 x 10(exp 9)/sq h solar mass of atomic gas to be restricted to the outer, tidal regions of this system (H(sub zero) = 100 h km/s/Mpc). By contrast, the molecular gas traced by the (12)CO(1 approaches zero) map of Wang et al. (1992) is confined to an inner rotating disk of radius 7 seconds and has an H alpha counterpart. The gap between the atomic and molecular gas distributions is filled in by diffuse H alpha emission and perhaps by x-ray emission. The velocity field of the atomic gas in the tidal tails indicates that they are swinging through space in the same sense as the rotation of the inner gas disk. The H I at the apparent base of the northwestern tail seems to be falling back toward the main body of the galaxy, yet there is no H I associated with this main stellar body: This suggests ongoing efficient conversion of the atomic gas into other phases in this region. The H alpha velocity anomalies previously found in the remnant body may be produced in part by the combination of tail-related, noncircular motions and the inner gas-disk rotation. Both tidal tails have bluer B-R colors than the main body of the remnant, with the bluest regions coinciding with peaks in the gas column density. Each tail contains one giant H II region near the end of its optical light distribution. These H II regions are associated with large concentrations of gas and stars that approach the sizes and gas contents of dwarf galaxies. The H I extends beyond the end of the optical tails and reaches projected distances of 62/h kpc east and 120/h kpc northwest from the center. We discuss the possible relevance of these data to : (1) the transformation of merged spirals into ellipticls; (2) the generation of ripples by returning tidal material; and (3) the formation of bound stellar systems from tidally torn material.

  10. Approaching a flat boundary with a block copolymer coated emulsion drop: late stage drainage dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozairo, Damith; Croll, Andrew

    Understanding the dynamics of the formation and drainage of the thin fluid film that becomes trapped by a deformable droplet as it approaches another object is crucial to the advancement of many industrial and biomedical applications. Adding amphiphilic diblock copolymers, which are becoming more commonly used in drug delivery and oil recovery, only add to the complexity. Despite their increased use, little is known about how long polymer chains fill an emulsion drop's interface or how the molecules influence hydrodynamic processes. We study the drainage dynamics of a thin water film trapped between mica and a diblock copolymer saturated oil droplet. Specifically, we examine several different polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-PEO) molecules self-assembled at a toluene-water interface using laser scanning confocal microscopy. Our experiments reveal that the molecular details of the polymer chains deeply influence the drainage times, indicating that they are not acting as a 'simple' surfactant. The presence of the chains creates a much slower dynamic as fluid is forced to drain through an effective polymer brush, the brush itself determined by chain packing at the interface. We present a simple model which accounts for the basic physics of the interface.

  11. [A modified laryngectomy combined with radical neck dissection for late-staged supraglottic carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Chen, E; Lin, X; Shi, Q

    1998-03-01

    8 cases of supraglottic or transglottic carcinoma with neck lymphatic metastasis received a modified laryngectomy or subtotal laryngectomy combined with radical neck dissection. Laryngeal function was reconstructed in 3 of them. No postoperative complication occurred. All cases survived uneventfully through a five-year following up, except one who died of neck lymphatic and lung metastasis. The indication, procedure and advantage of this operation are discussed in this article.

  12. Facial affect recognition in early and late-stage schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Romero-Ferreiro, María Verónica; Aguado, Luis; Rodriguez-Torresano, Javier; Palomo, Tomás; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Roberto; Pedreira-Massa, José Luis

    2016-04-01

    Prior studies have shown deficits in social cognition and emotion perception in first-episode psychosis (FEP) and multi-episode schizophrenia (MES) patients. These studies compared patients at different stages of the illness with only a single control group which differed in age from at least one clinical group. The present study provides new evidence of a differential pattern of deficit in facial affect recognition in FEP and MES patients using a double age-matched control design. Compared to their controls, FEP patients only showed impaired recognition of fearful faces (p=.007). In contrast to this, the MES patients showed a more generalized deficit compared to their age-matched controls, with impaired recognition of angry, sad and fearful faces (ps<.01) and an increased misattribution of emotional meaning to neutral faces. PANSS scores of FEP patients on Depressed factor correlated positively with the accuracy to recognize fearful expressions (r=.473). For the MES group fear recognition correlated positively with negative PANSS factor (r=.498) and recognition of sad and neutral expressions was inversely correlated with disorganized PANSS factor (r=-.461 and r=-.541, respectively). These results provide evidence that a generalized impairment of affect recognition is observed in advanced-stage patients and is not characteristic of the early stages of schizophrenia. Moreover, the finding that anomalous attribution of emotional meaning to neutral faces is observed only in MES patients suggests that an increased attribution of salience to social stimuli is a characteristic of social cognition in advanced stages of the disorder.

  13. Resolving RAD51C function in late stages of homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Sharan, Shyam K; Kuznetsov, Sergey G

    2007-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks are efficiently repaired by homologous recombination. One of the last steps of this process is resolution of Holliday junctions that are formed at the sites of genetic exchange between homologous DNA. Although various resolvases with Holliday junctions processing activity have been identified in bacteriophages, bacteria and archaebacteria, eukaryotic resolvases have been elusive. Recent biochemical evidence has revealed that RAD51C and XRCC3, members of the RAD51-like protein family, are involved in Holliday junction resolution in mammalian cells. However, purified recombinant RAD51C and XRCC3 proteins have not shown any Holliday junction resolution activity. In addition, these proteins did not reveal the presence of a nuclease domain, which raises doubts about their ability to function as a resolvase. Furthermore, oocytes from infertile Rad51C mutant mice exhibit precocious separation of sister chromatids at metaphase II, a phenotype that reflects a defect in sister chromatid cohesion, not a lack of Holliday junction resolution. Here we discuss a model to explain how a Holliday junction resolution defect can lead to sister chromatid separation in mouse oocytes. We also describe other recent in vitro and in vivo evidence supporting a late role for RAD51C in homologous recombination in mammalian cells, which is likely to be resolution of the Holliday junction. PMID:17547768

  14. [Impact of the dynamics of human settlement on tsetse and trypanosomosis distribution in the Mouhoun river basin (Burkina Faso)].

    PubMed

    Rouamba, J; Jamonneau, V; Sidibé, I; Solano, P; Courtin, F

    2009-03-01

    In Burkina Faso, the Mouhoun river basin (formerly "Black Volta") constitutes a historical focus of Human (HAT) and Animal (AAT) African Trypanosomoses, both transmitted by tsetse flies. Nowadays, HAT seems to have disappeared from this area, while AAT still causes severe economic losses. In order to explain these different epidemiological situations, we undertook a geographical study based on the analysis of aerial pictures between 1952 and 2007, and field surveys to collect medical, entomological, and veterinary data on trypanosomoses. Our results suggest that in this area, landscapes have been dramatically modified as a consequence of population growth, and in turn have had an impact on the number and distribution of tsetse flies. Combined with the historical medical action on HAT which probably led to the disappearance of T. b. gambiense, this environmental degradation and the development of hydrological structures provide explanations for the local disappearance of HAT, and for the maintenance of AAT. It appears necessary to extrapolate these studies to other areas in order to identify the factors explaining the presence/absence of trypanosomoses in the context of human population growth and climatic changes, in order to help to target priority areas for the control of these diseases.

  15. Retinal remodeling in human retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Jones, B W; Pfeiffer, R L; Ferrell, W D; Watt, C B; Marmor, M; Marc, R E

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) in the human is a progressive, currently irreversible neural degenerative disease usually caused by gene defects that disrupt the function or architecture of the photoreceptors. While RP can initially be a disease of photoreceptors, there is increasing evidence that the inner retina becomes progressively disorganized as the outer retina degenerates. These alterations have been extensively described in animal models, but remodeling in humans has not been as well characterized. This study, using computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) seeks to advance our understanding of the retinal remodeling process in humans. We describe cone mediated preservation of overall topology, retinal reprogramming in the earliest stages of the disease in retinal bipolar cells, and alterations in both small molecule and protein signatures of neurons and glia. Furthermore, while Müller glia appear to be some of the last cells left in the degenerate retina, they are also one of the first cell classes in the neural retina to respond to stress which may reveal mechanisms related to remodeling and cell death in other retinal cell classes. Also fundamentally important is the finding that retinal network topologies are altered. Our results suggest interventions that presume substantial preservation of the neural retina will likely fail in late stages of the disease. Even early intervention offers no guarantee that the interventions will be immune to progressive remodeling. Fundamental work in the biology and mechanisms of disease progression are needed to support vision rescue strategies.

  16. Structural and functional conservation of fungal MatA and human SRY sex-determining proteins.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Wioletta; Miller, Karen Y; Skinner, Michael K; Miller, Bruce L

    2014-11-17

    Sex determination in animals and fungi is regulated by specific sex-determining genes. The Aspergillus nidulans mating type gene matA and the human SRY (Sex-Determining Region Y) encode proteins containing a single HMG (high-mobility group) domain. Analysis of the amino-acid sequence of MatA and SRY transcription factors revealed significant structural similarity. The human SRY protein is able to functionally replace MatA and drives the sexual cycle in the fungus A. nidulans. Functional studies indicate that SRY drives early fruiting body development, and hybrid MatA protein carrying the SRY HMG box is fully capable of driving both early and late stages of sexual development, including gametogenesis. Our data suggest that SRY and MatA are both structurally and functionally related and conserved in regulating sexual processes. The fundamental mechanisms driving evolution of the genetic pathways underlying sex determination, sex chromosomes and sexual reproduction in eukaryotes appear similar.

  17. Potential Use of Bacterial Community Succession in Decaying Human Bone for Estimating Postmortem Interval.

    PubMed

    Damann, Franklin E; Williams, Daniel E; Layton, Alice C

    2015-07-01

    Bacteria are taphonomic agents of human decomposition, potentially useful for estimating postmortem interval (PMI) in late-stage decomposition. Bone samples from 12 individuals and three soil samples were analyzed to assess the effects of decomposition and advancing time on bacterial communities. Results indicated that partially skeletonized remains maintained a presence of bacteria associated with the human gut, whereas bacterial composition of dry skeletal remains maintained a community profile similar to soil communities. Variation in the UniFrac distances was significantly greater between groups than within groups (p < 0.001) for the unweighted metric and not the weighted metric. The members of the bacterial communities were more similar within than between decomposition stages. The oligotrophic environment of bone relative to soft tissue and the physical protection of organic substrates may preclude bacterial blooms during the first years of skeletonization. Therefore, community membership (unweighted) may be better for estimating PMI from skeletonized remains than community structure (weighted).

  18. N-Myc Drives Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer Initiated from Human Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Smith, Bryan A; Park, Jung Wook; Stoyanova, Tanya; McCaffrey, Erin F; Baertsch, Robert; Sokolov, Artem; Meyerowitz, Justin G; Mathis, Colleen; Cheng, Donghui; Stuart, Joshua M; Shokat, Kevan M; Gustafson, W Clay; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-11

    MYCN amplification and overexpression are common in neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC). However, the impact of aberrant N-Myc expression in prostate tumorigenesis and the cellular origin of NEPC have not been established. We define N-Myc and activated AKT1 as oncogenic components sufficient to transform human prostate epithelial cells to prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC with phenotypic and molecular features of aggressive, late-stage human disease. We directly show that prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC can arise from a common epithelial clone. Further, N-Myc is required for tumor maintenance, and destabilization of N-Myc through Aurora A kinase inhibition reduces tumor burden. Our findings establish N-Myc as a driver of NEPC and a target for therapeutic intervention.

  19. Hepatitis C virus represses E-cadherin expression via DNA methylation to induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungmi; Jang, Kyung Lib

    2014-04-04

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is known to induce promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes including E-cadherin to repress their expression when overexpressed in human hepatocytes; however, its actual role during HCV infection is still unknown. Here, we report that infection with HCV derived from pJFH-1 replicon system that mimics natural infection elevates protein levels of DNA methyltransferase 1 and 3b to enhance DNMT activity in human hepatocytes. As a consequence, HCV induced promoter hypermethylation of E-cadherin, resulting in repression of its expression. In addition down-regulation of E-cadherin by HCV led to epithelial-mesenchymal transition that is known to be a critical event during the late stage of tumorigenesis.

  20. BZL101, a phytochemical extract from the Scutellaria barbata plant, disrupts proliferation of human breast and prostate cancer cells through distinct mechanisms dependent on the cancer cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Marconett, Crystal N; Morgenstern, Travis J; San Roman, Adrianna K; Sundar, Shyam N; Singhal, Ankur K; Firestone, Gary L

    2010-08-15

    BZL101 is an aqueous extract from the Scutellaria barbata plant shown to have anticancer properties in a variety of human cancers. In order to determine its efficacy on human reproductive cancers, we assessed the responses of two human breast cancer cell lines, estrogen sensitive MCF7 and estrogen insensitive MDA-MB-231, and of two human prostate cancer cell lines, androgen sensitive LNCaP and androgen insensitive PC3 which are human cell lines that represent early and late stage reproductive cancers. BZL101 inhibited reproductive cancer growth in all cell lines by regulating expression levels of key cell cycle components that differ with respect to the cancer cell phenotypes. In early stage estrogen sensitive MCF7 cells, BZL101 induced a G₁ cell cycle arrest and ablated expression of key G₁ cell cycle regulators Cyclin D1, CDK2 and CDK4, as well as growth factor stimulatory pathways and estrogen receptor-α expression. Transfection of luciferase reporter plasmids revealed that the loss of CDK2, CDK4 and estrogen receptor-α transcript expression resulted from the BZL-dependent ablation of promoter activities. BZL101 growth arrests early stage androgen sensitive LNCaP cells in the G₂/M phase with corresponding decreases in Cyclin B1, CDK1 and androgen receptor expression. In late stage hormone insensitive breast (MDA-MB-231) and prostate (PC3) cancer cells, BZL101 induced an S phase arrest with corresponding ablations in Cyclin A2 and CDK2 expression. Our results demonstrate that BZL101 exerts phenotype specific anti-proliferative gene expression responses in human breast and prostate cancer cells, which will be valuable in the potential development of BZL-based therapeutic strategies for human reproductive cancers.

  1. Splicing and Polyadenylation of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chengjun; Kajitani, Naoko; Schwartz, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) life cycle can be divided into an early stage in which the HPV16 genomic DNA is replicated, and a late stage in which the HPV16 structural proteins are synthesized and virions are produced. A strong coupling between the viral life cycle and the differentiation state of the infected cell is highly characteristic of all HPVs. The switch from the HPV16 early gene expression program to the late requires a promoter switch, a polyadenylation signal switch and a shift in alternative splicing. A number of cis-acting RNA elements on the HPV16 mRNAs and cellular and viral factors interacting with these elements are involved in the control of HPV16 gene expression. This review summarizes our knowledge of HPV16 cis-acting RNA elements and cellular and viral trans-acting factors that regulate HPV16 gene expression at the level of splicing and polyadenylation. PMID:28208770

  2. Modulation of Different Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef Functions during Progression to AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Carl, Silke; Greenough, Thomas C.; Krumbiegel, Mandy; Greenberg, Michael; Skowronski, Jacek; Sullivan, John L.; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2001-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Nef protein has several independent functions that might contribute to efficient viral replication in vivo. Since HIV-1 adapts rapidly to its host environment, we investigated if different Nef properties are associated with disease progression. Functional analysis revealed that nef alleles obtained during late stages of infection did not efficiently downmodulate class I major histocompatibility complex but were highly active in the stimulation of viral replication. In comparison, functional activity in downregulation of CD4 and enhancement of HIV-1 infectivity were maintained or enhanced after AIDS progression. Our results demonstrate that various Nef activities are modulated during the course of HIV-1 infection to maintain high viral loads at different stages of disease progression. These findings suggest that all in vitro Nef functions investigated contribute to AIDS pathogenesis and indicate that nef variants with increased pathogenicity emerge in a significant number of HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:11264355

  3. Discovery and Verification of Osteopontin and Beta-2-microglobulin as Promising Markers for Staging Human African Trypanosomiasis*

    PubMed Central

    Tiberti, Natalia; Hainard, Alexandre; Lejon, Veerle; Robin, Xavier; Ngoyi, Dieudonné Mumba; Turck, Natacha; Matovu, Enock; Enyaru, John; Ndung'u, Joseph Mathu; Scherl, Alexander; Dayon, Loïc; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2010-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, is a parasitic disease endemic in sub-Saharan Africa, transmitted to humans through the bite of a tsetse fly. The first or hemolymphatic stage of the disease is associated with presence of parasites in the bloodstream, lymphatic system, and body tissues. If patients are left untreated, parasites cross the blood-brain barrier and invade the cerebrospinal fluid and the brain parenchyma, giving rise to the second or meningoencephalitic stage. Stage determination is a crucial step in guiding the choice of treatment, as drugs used for S2 are potentially dangerous. Current staging methods, based on counting white blood cells and demonstrating trypanosomes in cerebrospinal fluid, lack specificity and/or sensitivity. In the present study, we used several proteomic strategies to discover new markers with potential for staging human African trypanosomiasis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected from patients infected with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The stage was determined following the guidelines of the national control program. The proteome of the samples was analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (n = 9), and by sixplex tandem mass tag (TMT) isobaric labeling (n = 6) quantitative mass spectrometry. Overall, 73 proteins were overexpressed in patients presenting the second stage of the disease. Two of these, osteopontin and β-2-microglobulin, were confirmed to be potential markers for staging human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) by Western blot and ELISA. The two proteins significantly discriminated between S1 and S2 patients with high sensitivity (68% and 78%, respectively) for 100% specificity, and a combination of both improved the sensitivity to 91%. The levels of osteopontin and β-2-microglobulin in CSF of S2 patients (μg/ml range), as well as the fold increased concentration in S2 compared with S1 (3.8 and 5.5 respectively) make the two markers good

  4. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin reduces human alveolar epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin; Metcalf, Jordan Patrick

    2012-12-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness.

  5. Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Reduces Human Alveolar Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M.; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin

    2012-01-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness. PMID:23027535

  6. RPGR-Associated Retinal Degeneration in Human X-Linked RP and a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei Chieh; Wright, Alan F.; Roman, Alejandro J.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Manson, Forbes D.; Gewaily, Dina Y.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Sadigh, Sam; Limberis, Maria P.; Bell, Peter; Wilson, James M.; Swaroop, Anand; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. We investigated the retinal disease due to mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene in human patients and in an Rpgr conditional knockout (cko) mouse model. Methods. XLRP patients with RPGR-ORF15 mutations (n = 35, ages at first visit 5–72 years) had clinical examinations, and rod and cone perimetry. Rpgr-cko mice, in which the proximal promoter and first exon were deleted ubiquitously, were back-crossed onto a BALB/c background, and studied with optical coherence tomography and electroretinography (ERG). Retinal histopathology was performed on a subset. Results. Different patterns of rod and cone dysfunction were present in patients. Frequently, there were midperipheral losses with residual rod and cone function in central and peripheral retina. Longitudinal data indicated that central rod loss preceded peripheral rod losses. Central cone-only vision with no peripheral function was a late stage. Less commonly, patients had central rod and cone dysfunction, but preserved, albeit abnormal, midperipheral rod and cone vision. Rpgr-cko mice had progressive retinal degeneration detectable in the first months of life. ERGs indicated relatively equal rod and cone disease. At late stages, there was greater inferior versus superior retinal degeneration. Conclusions. RPGR mutations lead to progressive loss of rod and cone vision, but show different patterns of residual photoreceptor disease expression. Knowledge of the patterns should guide treatment strategies. Rpgr-cko mice had onset of degeneration at relatively young ages and progressive photoreceptor disease. The natural history in this model will permit preclinical proof-of-concept studies to be designed and such studies should advance progress toward human therapy. PMID:22807293

  7. Identification of haptoglobin as a natural inhibitor of trypanocidal activity in human serum.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, A B; Hajduk, S L

    1995-01-01

    Trypanosomes are protozoan parasites of medical and veterinary importance. Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infect humans, causing African sleeping sickness. However, Trypanosoma brucei brucei can only infect animals, causing the disease Nagana in cattle. Man is protected from this subspecies of trypanosomes by a toxic subtype of high density lipoproteins (HDLs) called the trypanosome lytic factor (TLF). The toxic molecule in TLF is believed to be the haptoglobin-related protein that when bound to hemoglobin kills the trypanosome via oxidative damage initiated by its peroxidase activity. The amount of lytic activity in serum varies widely between different individuals with up to a 60-fold difference in activity. In addition, an increase in the total amount of lytic activity occurs during the purification of TLF, suggesting that an inhibitor of TLF (ITLF) exists in human serum. We now show that the individual variation in trypanosome lytic activity in serum correlates to variations in the amount of ITLF. Immunoblots of ITLF probed with antiserum against haptoglobin recognize a 120-kDa protein, indicating that haptoglobin is present in partially purified ITLF. Haptoglobin involvement is further shown in that it inhibits TLF in a manner similar to ITLF. Using an anti-haptoglobin column to remove haptoglobin from ITLF, we show that the loss of haptoglobin coincides with the loss of inhibitor activity. Addition of purified haptoglobin restores inhibitor activity. This indicates that haptoglobin is the molecule responsible for inhibition and therefore causing the individual variation in serum lytic activity. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7479764

  8. A literature review of economic evaluations for a neglected tropical disease: human African trypanosomiasis ("sleeping sickness").

    PubMed

    Sutherland, C Simone; Yukich, Joshua; Goeree, Ron; Tediosi, Fabrizio

    2015-02-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a disease caused by infection with the parasite Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense. It is transmitted to humans via the tsetse fly. Approximately 70 million people worldwide were at risk of infection in 1995, and approximately 20,000 people across Africa are infected with HAT. The objective of this review was to identify existing economic evaluations in order to summarise cost-effective interventions to reduce, control, or eliminate the burden of HAT. The studies included in the review were compared and critically appraised in order to determine if there were existing standardised methods that could be used for economic evaluation of HAT interventions or if innovative methodological approaches are warranted. A search strategy was developed using keywords and was implemented in January 2014 in several databases. The search returned a total of 2,283 articles. After two levels of screening, a total of seven economic evaluations were included and underwent critical appraisal using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) Methodology Checklist 6: Economic Evaluations. Results from the existing studies focused on the cost-effectiveness of interventions for the control and reduction of disease transmission. Modelling was a common method to forecast long-term results, and publications focused on interventions by category, such as case detection, diagnostics, drug treatments, and vector control. Most interventions were considered cost-effective based on the thresholds described; however, the current treatment, nifurtomix-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT), has not been evaluated for cost-effectiveness, and considerations for cost-effective strategies for elimination have yet to be completed. Overall, the current evidence highlights the main components that play a role in control; however, economic evaluations of HAT elimination strategies are needed to assist national decision makers, stakeholders, and

  9. Domestic Animal Hosts Strongly Influence Human-Feeding Rates of the Chagas Disease Vector Triatoma infestans in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Gürtler, Ricardo E.; Cecere, María C.; Vázquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M.; Ceballos, Leonardo A.; Gurevitz, Juan M.; Fernández, María del Pilar; Kitron, Uriel; Cohen, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Background The host species composition in a household and their relative availability affect the host-feeding choices of blood-sucking insects and parasite transmission risks. We investigated four hypotheses regarding factors that affect blood-feeding rates, proportion of human-fed bugs (human blood index), and daily human-feeding rates of Triatoma infestans, the main vector of Chagas disease. Methods A cross-sectional survey collected triatomines in human sleeping quarters (domiciles) of 49 of 270 rural houses in northwestern Argentina. We developed an improved way of estimating the human-feeding rate of domestic T. infestans populations. We fitted generalized linear mixed-effects models to a global model with six explanatory variables (chicken blood index, dog blood index, bug stage, numbers of human residents, bug abundance, and maximum temperature during the night preceding bug catch) and three response variables (daily blood-feeding rate, human blood index, and daily human-feeding rate). Coefficients were estimated via multimodel inference with model averaging. Findings Median blood-feeding intervals per late-stage bug were 4.1 days, with large variations among households. The main bloodmeal sources were humans (68%), chickens (22%), and dogs (9%). Blood-feeding rates decreased with increases in the chicken blood index. Both the human blood index and daily human-feeding rate decreased substantially with increasing proportions of chicken- or dog-fed bugs, or the presence of chickens indoors. Improved calculations estimated the mean daily human-feeding rate per late-stage bug at 0.231 (95% confidence interval, 0.157–0.305). Conclusions and Significance Based on the changing availability of chickens in domiciles during spring-summer and the much larger infectivity of dogs compared with humans, we infer that the net effects of chickens in the presence of transmission-competent hosts may be more adequately described by zoopotentiation than by zooprophylaxis

  10. Parasites in the brain? The search for sleeping sickness biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Burchmore, Richard

    2012-11-01

    Evaluation of: Tiberti N, Hainard A, Lejon V et al. Cerebrospinal fluid neopterin as marker of the meningo-encephalitic stage of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense sleeping sickness. PLoS ONE 7(7), e40909 (2012). Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a fatal parasitic disease that progresses from an early stage (stage 1), where parasites multiply in the hemolymphatic system, to a late stage (stage 2) disease, where parasites have become manifest within the CNS. Patients with stage 1 disease are treated with relatively safe drugs, but stage 2 disease requires treatment with drugs that are very toxic or difficult to administer. Thus, it is important to determine the stage of HAT infection before treating. HAT staging currently involves microscopic examination of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), looking for the presence of parasites, or for more than five white blood cells per microliter CSF. This article tested the specificity and selectivity of eight potential CSF markers for stage 2 HAT, by analysis of levels in 400 CSF samples from patients diagnosed with stage 1 or stage 2 HAT by WHO protocols. Two of these markers gave results that were comparable with those obtained by conventional diagnosis. The potential for and challenges of developing improved staging for HAT are discussed.

  11. Human cementum tumor cells have different features from human osteoblastic cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Arzate, H; Alvarez-Pérez, M A; Aguilar-Mendoza, M E; Alvarez-Fregoso, O

    1998-07-01

    Cells obtained from human cementoblastoma and alveolar bone were isolated and cultured. Initial and late stages of mineralization were assessed by using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis. In cultures of cementoblastoma-derived cells the initial stages of mineralization showed well-defined spherical-shaped structures, while the osteoblastic cells showed plaque-like deposits. These morphological patterns of mineral deposition could serve as nucleation centers for hydroxyapatite crystals. Late stages of mineralization at 28 and 35 d maintained those morphological differences established in initial cultures. The material deposited by cementoblastoma and osteoblastic cells, analyzed by EDX spectra, revealed similar Ca/P ratios for both cell types. These values were similar to those reported for hydroxyapatite in enamel and bone. Alkaline phosphatase specific activity (AlP), of osteoblastic cells at 3, 7 and 11 d, showed an increase of 27.9, 50.9 and 37.0% (p < 0.001), respectively. However, at 15 and 19 d there was an increase of AlP activity of cementoblastoma cells by 39.4 and 34.5% over osteoblastic cells (p < 0.001). Immunostaining of cementoblastoma and osteoblastic cells using a specific mAb against a cementum-derived attachment protein revealed strong immunostaining of cementoblastoma cells which was localized to the cell membrane and fibril-like structures (96.2 +/- 1.3). A few osteoblastic cells also stained weakly with the anti-CAP mAb (6.4 +/- 0.6). Sections of decalcified paraffin embedded cementoblastoma specimens, when immunostained with anti-CAP mAb, showed strong immunostaining of the cells surrounding the regular and irregularly-shaped calcified masses of the tumor. Putative cementocytes also stained positively. Immunostaining with a polyclonal antibody against osteopontin strongly stained the osteoblastic cells (89.0 +/- 3.6). Cementoblastoma cells showed weaker staining (54.2 +/- 2.4). The results suggest

  12. Intrinsic functional brain architecture derived from graph theoretical analysis in the human fetus.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Moriah E; Brown, Jesse A; Dassanayake, Maya T; Shastri, Rupal; Marusak, Hilary A; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Yeo, Lami; Mody, Swati; Berman, Susan; Hassan, Sonia S; Romero, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The human brain undergoes dramatic maturational changes during late stages of fetal and early postnatal life. The importance of this period to the establishment of healthy neural connectivity is apparent in the high incidence of neural injury in preterm infants, in whom untimely exposure to ex-uterine factors interrupts neural connectivity. Though the relevance of this period to human neuroscience is apparent, little is known about functional neural networks in human fetal life. Here, we apply graph theoretical analysis to examine human fetal brain connectivity. Utilizing resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from 33 healthy human fetuses, 19 to 39 weeks gestational age (GA), our analyses reveal that the human fetal brain has modular organization and modules overlap functional systems observed postnatally. Age-related differences between younger (GA <31 weeks) and older (GA≥31 weeks) fetuses demonstrate that brain modularity decreases, and connectivity of the posterior cingulate to other brain networks becomes more negative, with advancing GA. By mimicking functional principles observed postnatally, these results support early emerging capacity for information processing in the human fetal brain. Current technical limitations, as well as the potential for fetal fMRI to one day produce major discoveries about fetal origins or antecedents of neural injury or disease are discussed.

  13. cDNA cloning and sequence of MAL, a hydrophobic protein associated with human T-cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, M A; Weissman, S M

    1987-01-01

    We have isolated a human cDNA that is expressed in the intermediate and late stages of T-cell differentiation. The cDNA encodes a highly hydrophobic protein, termed MAL, that lacks a hydrophobic leader peptide sequence and contains four potential transmembrane domains separated by short hydrophilic segments. The predicted configuration of the MAL protein resembles the structure of integral proteins that form pores or channels in the plasma membrane and that are believed to act as transporters of water-soluble molecules and ions across the lipid bilayer. The presence of MAL mRNA in a panel of T-cell lines that express both the T-cell receptor and the T11 antigen suggests that MAL may be involved in membrane signaling in T cells activated via either T11 or T-cell receptor pathways. Images PMID:3494249

  14. Melarsoprol cyclodextrin inclusion complexes as promising oral candidates for the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Jean; Jones, Amy; Gibaud, Stéphane; Bradley, Barbara; McCabe, Christopher; Barrett, Michael P; Gettinby, George; Kennedy, Peter G E

    2011-09-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), or sleeping sickness, results from infection with the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma brucei (T. b.) gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense and is invariably fatal if untreated. There are 60 million people at risk from the disease throughout sub-Saharan Africa. The infection progresses from the haemolymphatic stage where parasites invade the blood, lymphatics and peripheral organs, to the late encephalitic stage where they enter the central nervous system (CNS) to cause serious neurological disease. The trivalent arsenical drug melarsoprol (Arsobal) is the only currently available treatment for CNS-stage T. b. rhodesiense infection. However, it must be administered intravenously due to the presence of propylene glycol solvent and is associated with numerous adverse reactions. A severe post-treatment reactive encephalopathy occurs in about 10% of treated patients, half of whom die. Thus melarsoprol kills 5% of all patients receiving it. Cyclodextrins have been used to improve the solubility and reduce the toxicity of a wide variety of drugs. We therefore investigated two melarsoprol cyclodextrin inclusion complexes; melarsoprol hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and melarsoprol randomly-methylated-β-cyclodextrin. We found that these compounds retain trypanocidal properties in vitro and cure CNS-stage murine infections when delivered orally, once per day for 7-days, at a dosage of 0.05 mmol/kg. No overt signs of toxicity were detected. Parasite load within the brain was rapidly reduced following treatment onset and magnetic resonance imaging showed restoration of normal blood-brain barrier integrity on completion of chemotherapy. These findings strongly suggest that complexed melarsoprol could be employed as an oral treatment for CNS-stage HAT, delivering considerable improvements over current parenteral chemotherapy.

  15. Control of human African trypanosomiasis in the Quiçama focus, Angola.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, José Antonio; Simarro, Pere P.; Josenando, Teofilo

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To update the epidemiological status of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, in the Quiçama focus, province of Bengo, Angola, and to establish a HAT control programme. METHODS: In 1997, 8796 people (the population of 31 villages) were serologically screened for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, the causative agent of HAT. In 1998 and 1999, surveys were carried out in villages where HAT cases had been identified in 1997. Individuals were screened using the card agglutination trypanosomiasis test (CATT), and then examined for the presence of the parasite. CATT- positive individuals in whom the presence of the parasite could not be confirmed were further tested with the CATT using serum dilutions, and those with a positive antibody end titre of 1-in-4 or above were followed-up. Patients with < or =10 white cells/micro l and no trypanosomes in their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were classified as being in the first stage of the disease. Vector control was not considered necessary or feasible. FINDINGS: The main transmission areas were on the Kwanza riverbanks, where 5042 inhabitants live. In 1997, the HAT prevalence was 1.97%, but this decreased to 0.55% in 1998 and to 0.33% in 1999. The relapse rate was 3% in patients treated with pentamidine and 3.5% in patients treated with melarsoprol. In patients treated with pentamidine, there was no difference in the relapse rate for patients with initial CSF white cell counts of 0-5 cells/ micro l or 6-10 cells/micro l. The overall mortality rate was 0.6% and the rate of reactive arsenical encephalopathy among the melarsoprol-treated patients was 1.7%. CONCLUSION: The epidemiological status of the disease was updated and the transmission areas were defined. The control methods implemented allowed the disease prevalence to be reduced. PMID:12378293

  16. Metabolomics Identifies Multiple Candidate Biomarkers to Diagnose and Stage Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Isabel M.; Daly, Rónán; Courtioux, Bertrand; Cattanach, Amy M.; Biéler, Sylvain; Ndung’u, Joseph M.; Bisser, Sylvie; Barrett, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for human African trypanosomiasis is dependent on the species of trypanosome causing the disease and the stage of the disease (stage 1 defined by parasites being present in blood and lymphatics whilst for stage 2, parasites are found beyond the blood-brain barrier in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)). Currently, staging relies upon detecting the very low number of parasites or elevated white blood cell numbers in CSF. Improved staging is desirable, as is the elimination of the need for lumbar puncture. Here we use metabolomics to probe samples of CSF, plasma and urine from 40 Angolan patients infected with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, at different disease stages. Urine samples provided no robust markers indicative of infection or stage of infection due to inherent variability in urine concentrations. Biomarkers in CSF were able to distinguish patients at stage 1 or advanced stage 2 with absolute specificity. Eleven metabolites clearly distinguished the stage in most patients and two of these (neopterin and 5-hydroxytryptophan) showed 100% specificity and sensitivity between our stage 1 and advanced stage 2 samples. Neopterin is an inflammatory biomarker previously shown in CSF of stage 2 but not stage 1 patients. 5-hydroxytryptophan is an important metabolite in the serotonin synthetic pathway, the key pathway in determining somnolence, thus offering a possible link to the eponymous symptoms of “sleeping sickness”. Plasma also yielded several biomarkers clearly indicative of the presence (87% sensitivity and 95% specificity) and stage of disease (92% sensitivity and 81% specificity). A logistic regression model including these metabolites showed clear separation of patients being either at stage 1 or advanced stage 2 or indeed diseased (both stages) versus control. PMID:27941966

  17. In-depth LC-MS/MS analysis of the chicken ovarian cancer proteome reveals conserved and novel differentially regulated proteins in humans

    PubMed Central

    Nepomuceno, Angelito I.; Shao, Huanjie; Jing, Kai; Ma, Yibao; Petitte, James N.; Idowu, Michael O.; Muddiman, David C.; Fang, Xianjun

    2017-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OVC) remains the most lethal gynecological malignancy in the world due to the combined lack of early-stage diagnostics and effective therapeutic strategies. The development and application of advanced proteomics technology and new experimental models has created unique opportunities for translational studies. In this study, we investigated the ovarian cancer proteome of the chicken, an emerging experimental model of OVC that develops ovarian tumors spontaneously. Matched plasma, ovary, and oviduct tissue biospecimens derived from healthy, early-stage OVC, and late-stage OVC birds were quantitatively characterized by label-free proteomics. Over 2600 proteins were identified in this study, 348 of which were differentially expressed by more than twofold (p≤0.05) in early- and late-stage ovarian tumor tissue specimens relative to healthy ovarian tissues. Several of the 348 proteins are known to be differentially regulated in human cancers including B2M, CLDN3, EPCAM, PIGR, S100A6, S100A9, S100A11, and TPD52. Of particular interest was ovostatin 2 (OVOS2), a novel 165-kDa protease inhibitor found to be strongly upregulated in chicken ovarian tumors (p=0.0005) and matched plasma (p=0.003). Indeed, RT-quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated that OVOS2 mRNA and protein were also upregulated in multiple human OVC cell lines compared to normal ovarian epithelia (NOE) cells and immunohistochemical staining confirmed overexpression of OVOS2 in primary human ovarian cancers relative to non-cancerous tissues. Collectively, these data provide the first evidence for involvement of OVOS2 in the pathogenesis of both chicken and human ovarian cancer. PMID:26159569

  18. A Literature Review of Economic Evaluations for a Neglected Tropical Disease: Human African Trypanosomiasis (“Sleeping Sickness”)

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, C. Simone; Yukich, Joshua; Goeree, Ron; Tediosi, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a disease caused by infection with the parasite Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense. It is transmitted to humans via the tsetse fly. Approximately 70 million people worldwide were at risk of infection in 1995, and approximately 20,000 people across Africa are infected with HAT. The objective of this review was to identify existing economic evaluations in order to summarise cost-effective interventions to reduce, control, or eliminate the burden of HAT. The studies included in the review were compared and critically appraised in order to determine if there were existing standardised methods that could be used for economic evaluation of HAT interventions or if innovative methodological approaches are warranted. A search strategy was developed using keywords and was implemented in January 2014 in several databases. The search returned a total of 2,283 articles. After two levels of screening, a total of seven economic evaluations were included and underwent critical appraisal using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) Methodology Checklist 6: Economic Evaluations. Results from the existing studies focused on the cost-effectiveness of interventions for the control and reduction of disease transmission. Modelling was a common method to forecast long-term results, and publications focused on interventions by category, such as case detection, diagnostics, drug treatments, and vector control. Most interventions were considered cost-effective based on the thresholds described; however, the current treatment, nifurtomix-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT), has not been evaluated for cost-effectiveness, and considerations for cost-effective strategies for elimination have yet to be completed. Overall, the current evidence highlights the main components that play a role in control; however, economic evaluations of HAT elimination strategies are needed to assist national decision makers, stakeholders, and

  19. Human trypanolytic factor APOL1 forms pH-gated cation-selective channels in planar lipid bilayers: Relevance to trypanosome lysis

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Russell; Finkelstein, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein L-1 (APOL1), the trypanolytic factor of human serum, can lyse several African trypanosome species including Trypanosoma brucei brucei, but not the human-infective pathogens T. brucei rhodesiense and T. brucei gambiense, which are resistant to lysis by human serum. Lysis follows the uptake of APOL1 into acidic endosomes and is apparently caused by colloid-osmotic swelling due to an increased ion permeability of the plasma membrane. Here we demonstrate that nanogram quantities of full-length recombinant APOL1 induce ideally cation-selective macroscopic conductances in planar lipid bilayers. The conductances were highly sensitive to pH: their induction required acidic pH (pH 5.3), but their magnitude could be increased 3,000-fold upon alkalinization of the milieu (pKa = 7.1). We show that this phenomenon can be attributed to the association of APOL1 with the bilayer at acidic pH, followed by the opening of APOL1-induced cation-selective channels upon pH neutralization. Furthermore, the conductance increase at neutral pH (but not membrane association at acidic pH) was prevented by the interaction of APOL1 with the serum resistance-associated protein, which is produced by T. brucei rhodesiense and prevents trypanosome lysis by APOL1. These data are consistent with a model of lysis that involves endocytic recycling of APOL1 and the formation of cation-selective channels, at neutral pH, in the parasite plasma membrane. PMID:25730870

  20. FGF21 and the late adaptive response to starvation in humans.

    PubMed

    Fazeli, Pouneh K; Lun, Mingyue; Kim, Soo M; Bredella, Miriam A; Wright, Spenser; Zhang, Yang; Lee, Hang; Catana, Ciprian; Klibanski, Anne; Patwari, Parth; Steinhauser, Matthew L

    2015-11-03

    In mice, FGF21 is rapidly induced by fasting, mediates critical aspects of the adaptive starvation response, and displays a number of positive metabolic properties when administered pharmacologically. In humans, however, fasting does not consistently increase FGF21, suggesting a possible evolutionary divergence in FGF21 function. Moreover, many key aspects of FGF21 function in mice have been identified in the context of transgenic overexpression or administration of supraphysiologic doses, rather than in a physiologic setting. Here, we explored the dynamics and function of FGF21 in human volunteers during a 10-day fast. Unlike mice, which show an increase in circulating FGF21 after only 6 hours, human subjects did not have a notable surge in FGF21 until 7 to 10 days of fasting. Moreover, we determined that FGF21 induction was associated with decreased thermogenesis and adiponectin, an observation that directly contrasts with previous reports based on supraphysiologic dosing. Additionally, FGF21 levels increased after ketone induction, demonstrating that endogenous FGF21 does not drive starvation-mediated ketogenesis in humans. Instead, a longitudinal analysis of biologically relevant variables identified serum transaminases--markers of tissue breakdown--as predictors of FGF21. These data establish FGF21 as a fasting-induced hormone in humans and indicate that FGF21 contributes to the late stages of adaptive starvation, when it may regulate the utilization of fuel derived from tissue breakdown.

  1. FGF21 and the late adaptive response to starvation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Lun, Mingyue; Kim, Soo M.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Wright, Spenser; Zhang, Yang; Lee, Hang; Catana, Ciprian; Klibanski, Anne; Patwari, Parth; Steinhauser, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    In mice, FGF21 is rapidly induced by fasting, mediates critical aspects of the adaptive starvation response, and displays a number of positive metabolic properties when administered pharmacologically. In humans, however, fasting does not consistently increase FGF21, suggesting a possible evolutionary divergence in FGF21 function. Moreover, many key aspects of FGF21 function in mice have been identified in the context of transgenic overexpression or administration of supraphysiologic doses, rather than in a physiologic setting. Here, we explored the dynamics and function of FGF21 in human volunteers during a 10-day fast. Unlike mice, which show an increase in circulating FGF21 after only 6 hours, human subjects did not have a notable surge in FGF21 until 7 to 10 days of fasting. Moreover, we determined that FGF21 induction was associated with decreased thermogenesis and adiponectin, an observation that directly contrasts with previous reports based on supraphysiologic dosing. Additionally, FGF21 levels increased after ketone induction, demonstrating that endogenous FGF21 does not drive starvation-mediated ketogenesis in humans. Instead, a longitudinal analysis of biologically relevant variables identified serum transaminases — markers of tissue breakdown — as predictors of FGF21. These data establish FGF21 as a fasting-induced hormone in humans and indicate that FGF21 contributes to the late stages of adaptive starvation, when it may regulate the utilization of fuel derived from tissue breakdown. PMID:26529252

  2. Foscarnet, zidovudine and dolutegravir combination efficacy and tolerability for late stage HIV salvage therapy: A case-series experience.

    PubMed

    Delory, Tristan; Papot, Emmanuelle; Rioux, Christophe; Charpentier, Charlotte; Auge-Courtoi, Claire; Michard, Florence; Peytavin, Gilles; Descamps, Diane; Matheron, Sophie; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan

    2016-07-01

    Salvage therapy including foscarnet (PFA), zidovudine (ZDV) and an optimized background ART (OBT) has been shown to be effective in patients with advanced HIV infection, and no therapeutic options. Dolutegravir (DTG) may offer a more active combination. Objective was to describe efficacy and tolerability of PFA-ZDV-DTG containing regimen. In our cohort, we identified patients who: (i) had plasma HIV-1 RNA load (pVL) >50 c/ml (>100 for HIV-2) on combination ART (cART); (ii) had at least 1 PI/r, 1 NRTI, 1 NNRTI (for HIV-1), and at least 1 raltegravir resistance mutations; (iii) were naive to DTG; and (iv) initiated on a PFA-ZDV-DTG containing-regimen with 48 weeks (W48) of follow-up. Out of 5 patients, 2 were infected with HIV-2. At PFA-ZDV-DTG initiation, CD4 cell count was (/mm(3) ) of 64, 40, 10, in HIV-1, and 37, 199, in HIV-2 infected patients; and pVL (log10 c/ml) of 4.8, 5.1, 4.4, in HIV-1, and 3.6, 4.2, in HIV-2 infected patients, respectively. Median OBT genotypic sensitivity score was 1.5 [1-2]. PFA was discontinued in one patient, due to an acute renal failure. At W48, one HIV-1 infected patient had a pVL <50 c/ml and two <200 c/ml; the two HIV-2 infected patients had pVL >100 c/ml. No lack of treatment adherence was observed. In treatment experienced HIV-infected patients, failing cART and without other therapeutic options, a PFA-ZDV-DTG combination therapy could be effective. Renal adverse events should be monitored.

  3. The role of the amygdala during emotional processing in Huntington's disease: From pre-manifest to late stage disease

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Sarah L.; Zhang, Jiaxiang; Begeti, Faye; Guzman, Natalie Valle; Lazar, Alpar S.; Rowe, James B.; Barker, Roger A.; Hampshire, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Background Deficits in emotional processing can be detected in the pre-manifest stage of Huntington's disease and negative emotion recognition has been identified as a predictor of clinical diagnosis. The underlying neuropathological correlates of such deficits are typically established using correlative structural MRI studies. This approach does not take into consideration the impact of disruption to the complex interactions between multiple brain circuits on emotional processing. Therefore, exploration of the neural substrates of emotional processing in pre-manifest HD using fMRI connectivity analysis may be a useful way of evaluating the way brain regions interrelate in the period prior to diagnosis. Methods We investigated the impact of predicted time to disease onset on brain activation when participants were exposed to pictures of faces with angry and neutral expressions, in 20 pre-manifest HD gene carriers and 23 healthy controls. On the basis of the results of this initial study went on to look at amygdala dependent cognitive performance in 79 Huntington's disease patients from a cross-section of disease stages (pre-manifest to late disease) and 26 healthy controls, using a validated theory of mind task: “the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test” which has been previously been shown to be amygdala dependent. Results Psychophysiological interaction analysis identified reduced connectivity between the left amygdala and right fusiform facial area in pre-manifest HD gene carriers compared to controls when viewing angry compared to neutral faces. Change in PPI connectivity scores correlated with predicted time to disease onset (r=0.45, p<0.05). Furthermore, performance on the “Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test” correlated negatively with proximity to disease onset and became progressively worse with each stage of disease. Conclusion Abnormalities in the neural networks underlying social cognition and emotional processing can be detected prior to clinical diagnosis in Huntington's disease. Connectivity between the amygdala and other brain regions is impacted by the disease process in pre-manifest HD and may therefore be a useful way of identifying participants who are approaching a clinical diagnosis. Furthermore, the “Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test” is a surrogate measure of amygdala function that is clinically useful across the entire cross-section of disease stages in HD. PMID:25700742

  4. Late-stage exhumation of metamorphic core complexes and landscape development during orogenic collapse of the North American Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokombayev, Askhat

    Renewable portfolio standards prescribe for penetration of high amounts of renewable energy sources (RES) that may change the structure of existing power systems. The load growth and changes in power flow caused by RES integration may result in requirements of new available transmission capabilities and upgrades of existing transmission paths. Construction difficulties of new transmission lines can become a problem in certain locations. The increase of transmission line thermal ratings by reconductoring using High Temperature Low Sag (HTLS) conductors is a comparatively new technology introduced to transmission expansion. A special design permits HTLS conductors to operate at high temperatures (e.g., 200°C), thereby allowing passage of higher current. The higher temperature capability increases the steady state and emergency thermal ratings of the transmission line. The main disadvantage of HTLS technology is high cost. The high cost may place special emphasis on a thorough analysis of cost to benefit of HTLS technology implementation. Increased transmission losses in HTLS conductors due to higher current may be a disadvantage that can reduce the attractiveness of this method. Studies described in this thesis evaluate the expenditures for transmission line reconductoring using HTLS and the consequent benefits obtained from the potential decrease in operating cost for thermally limited transmission systems. Studies performed consider the load growth and penetration of distributed renewable energy sources according to the renewable portfolio standards for power systems. An evaluation of payback period is suggested to assess the cost to benefit ratio of HTLS upgrades. The thesis also considers the probabilistic nature of transmission upgrades. The well-known Chebyshev inequality is discussed with an application to transmission upgrades. The Chebyshev inequality is proposed to calculate minimum payback period obtained from the upgrades of certain transmission lines. The cost to benefit evaluation of HTLS upgrades is performed using a 225 bus equivalent of the 2012 summer peak Arizona portion of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC).

  5. Glycoprotein 130 is associated with adverse postoperative clinical outcomes of patients with late-stage non-metastatic gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yifan; Zhang, Heng; Liu, Hao; Lin, Chao; Li, Ruochen; Wu, Songyang; He, Hongyong; Li, He; Xu, Jiejie

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of glycoprotein 130 (gp130) with the cytokines of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) family has proved to play a crucial part in several cancers. Our current study is designed to discover the clinical prognostic significance of gp130 in non-metastatic gastric cancer. We examined intratumoral gp130 expression in retrospectively enrolled 370 gastric cancer patients who underwent radical gastrectomy with standard D2 lymphadenectomy at Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University during 2007 and 2008 by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of gp130 was significantly correlated with T classification, N classification and TNM stage (P = 0.003, P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively; T, N, TNM refers to Tumor Invasion, Regional lymph node metastasis and Tumor Node Metastasis, respectively). Elevated intratumoral gp130 expression implied unfavourable overall survival (OS) (P < 0.001) and disease-free survival (DFS) (P < 0.001), respectively. Furthermore, among TNM II and III gp130-high patients, those who were treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based adjuvant chemotherapy had better OS (P < 0.001). The generated nomogram performed well in predicting the 3- and 5-year OS of gastric cancer patients. The incorporation of gp130 into contemporary TNM staging system would be of great significance to improve the current individual risk stratification. These findings contribute to better clinical management for those patients who would benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:27917904

  6. Ultrasonic force microscopy for nanomechanical characterization of early and late-stage amyloid-β peptide aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinker-Mill, Claire; Mayes, Jennifer; Allsop, David; Kolosov, Oleg V.

    2014-02-01

    The aggregation of amyloid-β peptides into protein fibres is one of the main neuropathological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD). While imaging of amyloid-β aggregate morphology in vitro is extremely important for understanding AD pathology and in the development of aggregation inhibitors, unfortunately, potentially highly toxic, early aggregates are difficult to observe by current electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods, due to low contrast and variability of peptide attachment to the substrate. Here, we use a poly-L-Lysine (PLL) surface that captures all protein components from monomers to fully formed fibres, followed by nanomechanical mapping via ultrasonic force microscopy (UFM), which marries high spatial resolution and nanomechanical contrast with the non-destructive nature of tapping mode AFM. For the main putative AD pathogenic component, Aβ1-42, the PLL-UFM approach reveals the morphology of oligomers, protofibrils and mature fibres, and finds that a fraction of small oligomers is still present at later stages of fibril assembly.

  7. Several loci at chromosome 9p are involved in early and late stages of growth of cutaneous malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Puig, S. |; Ruiz, A.; Lazaro, C.

    1994-09-01

    To study the inactivation of a possible tumor suppressor gene at chromosome 9p associated with the development and progression of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM), we have analyzed 12 microsatellite markers in 54 paired tumors and normal tissues. Forty-six percent of the tumors (corresponding to 52% of patients) showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for at least one marker. The smallest deleted region included markers D9S126, D9S265 and D9S259, spanning 5 centiMorgans of chromosome 9p21. Forty-two percent of the metastasic tumors and 50% of the primary tumors, including two in situ CMM, showed 9p21 deletions. Tumors with the worst prognoses showed larger deletions at 9p, ({chi}{sup 2} = 4.16, p < 0.04), and three cases showed two non-contiguous regions deleted, one telomeric to IFNA and the other centromeric. The presence of large and non-contiguous deletions, in the cases with the worst prognoses, suggests the existence of more than one tumor suppressor gene at 9p involved in the predisposition to, and progression of, malignant melanoma, outside the region of the recently identified p16 gene (MTS1), which has been found deleted in about 60% of melanoma cell lines.

  8. Different Roles of GNAS and cAMP Signaling During Early and Late Stages of Osteogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S.; Kaplan, F. S.; Shore, E. M.

    2013-01-01

    Progressive osseous heteroplasia (POH) and fibrous dysplasia (FD) are genetic diseases of bone formation at opposite ends of the osteogenic spectrum: imperfect osteogenesis of the skeleton occurs in FD, while heterotopic ossification in skin, subcutaneous fat, and skeletal muscle forms in POH. POH is caused by heterozygous inactivating germline mutations in GNAS, which encodes G-protein subunits regulating the cAMP pathway, while FD is caused by GNAS somatic activating mutations. We used pluripotent mouse ES cells to examine the effects of Gnas dysregulation on osteoblast differentiation. At the earliest stages of osteogenesis, Gnas transcripts Gs α, XLαs and 1A are expressed at low levels and cAMP levels are also low. Inhibition of cAMP signaling (as in POH) by 2′,5′-dideoxyadenosine enhanced osteoblast differentiation while conversely, increased cAMP signaling (as in FD), induced by forskolin, inhibited osteoblast differentiation. Notably, increased cAMP was inhibitory for osteogenesis only at early stages after osteogenic induction. Expression of osteogenic and adipogenic markers showed that increased cAMP enhanced adipogenesis and impaired osteoblast differentiation even in the presence of osteogenic factors, supporting cAMP as a critical regulator of osteoblast and adipocyte lineage commitment. Furthermore, increased cAMP signaling decreased BMP pathway signaling, indicating that G protein-cAMP pathway activation (as in FD) inhibits osteoblast differentiation, at least in part by blocking the BMP-Smad pathway, and suggesting that GNAS inactivation as occurs in POH enhances osteoblast differentiation, at least in part by stimulating BMP signaling. These data support that differences in cAMP levels during early stages of cell differentiation regulate cell fate decisions. PMID:22903279

  9. Plagiogranites as late-stage immiscible liquids in ophiolite and mid-ocean ridge suites - An experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, S.; Rutherford, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    A study of relationships between basic and acidic rocks was made by fractionating primitive basalt at low pressure anhydrous conditions at various fugacities. Fractionally crystallized basalt became increasingly enriched in iron which became silicate liquid immiscible, producing Fe-enriched basaltic and granitic liquids. The latter is similar to plagiogranites found in mid-oceanic rift (MOR) regions, showing that silicate liquid immiscibility could be the petrogenic process which produces plagiogranites in some MOR regions and ophiolites. The major problem in considering plagiogranites as products of silicate liquid immiscibility is absence of any description of the Fe-enriched conjugate liquid in the ophiolite or MOR literature, and the identification of this magma is essential for a definite case of silicate liquid immiscibility.

  10. The BH3-only protein BIM contributes to late-stage involution in the mouse mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Schuler, F; Baumgartner, F; Klepsch, V; Chamson, M; Müller-Holzner, E; Watson, C J; Oh, S; Hennighausen, L; Tymoszuk, P; Doppler, W; Villunger, A

    2016-01-01

    After cessation of lactation, involution of the mouse mammary gland proceeds in two distinct phases, a reversible and an irreversible one, which leads to the death and removal of alveolar cells. Cell death is preceded by the loss of STAT5 activity, which abrogates cell differentiation and gain of STAT3 activity. Despite early observations implicating BCL2 (B cell lymphoma 2) family proteins in this process, recent evidence suggests that STAT3-controlled cathepsin activity is most critical for cell death at the early stage of involution. Somewhat surprisingly, this cell death associates with but does not depend on the activation of pro-apoptotic effector caspases. However, transgenic overexpression of BCL2, that blocks caspase activation, delays involution while conditional deletion of BclX accelerates this process, suggesting that BCL2 family proteins are needed for the effective execution of involution. Here, we report on the transcriptional induction of multiple pro-apoptotic BCL2 family proteins of the ‘BH3-only' subgroup during involution and the rate-limiting role of BIM in this process. Loss of Bim delayed epithelial cell clearance during involution after forced weaning in mice, whereas the absence of related Bmf had minor and loss of Bad or Noxa no impact on this process. Consistent with a contribution of BCL2 family proteins to the second wave of cell death during involution, loss of Bim reduced the number of apoptotic cells in this irreversible phase. Notably, the expression changes observed within the BCL2 family did not depend on STAT3 signalling, in line with its initiating role early in the process, but rather appear to result from relief of repression by STAT5. Our findings support the existence of a signalling circuitry regulating the irreversible phase of involution in mice by engaging BH3-only protein-driven mitochondrial apoptosis. PMID:26045049

  11. Large volumes of rejuvenated volcanism in Samoa: Evidence supporting a tectonic influence on late-stage volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konter, Jasper G.; Jackson, Matthew G.

    2012-06-01

    Hot spot volcanoes are commonly constructed in a characteristic sequence of stages. After the volumetrically dominant shield stage, a protracted period of quiescence ends with a final stage of activity: rejuvenated volcanism. The mechanism responsible for generating rejuvenated volcanism is not generally agreed upon. New data obtained for samples 200 m down-section in a deeply incised canyon on Savai`i (Samoa) are unusually enriched isotopically and indicate a relatively voluminous rejuvenated stage compared to other intraplate volcanoes. Using a modified flexural model originally proposed for Hawai`i, we suggest that the location of Samoa near the Tonga Trench terminus causes plate flexure resulting in upward flow of the shallow mantle driving partial melting. In particular, subduction-related plate bending in the Samoan region may cause a larger flexural amplitude than generated by volcanic loading in Hawai`i. The larger amplitude may explain the larger volume of rejuvenated melt in Samoa, constrained by our new data. Moreover, we argue that Sr-Nd-Pb-Os-He-Ne isotopes in Samoan rejuvenated lavas are all consistent with sampling of a lithospheric component that is characterized by a metasomatic imprint from the Pacific Plate's earlier passage over the Rarotonga hot spot. Furthermore, temperature estimates for the melts suggest a drop in temperature during the predicted shallower melting due to flexural uplift, compared to the conditions during shield volcanism. Thus, flexural bending and metasomatism of the Samoan lithosphere may have generated the voluminous and geochemically distinct Samoan rejuvenated lavas, implying the lithosphere may play an important role during this stage in non- Hawaiian hot spots.

  12. Late-Stage Refocusing of Irish-Language Programme Evaluation: Maximizing the Potential for Productive Debate and Remediation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, John

    2009-01-01

    The teaching and learning of Irish in primary school is both an important educational issue and central to the national language revitalization effort. The findings of Irish-language programme evaluations, therefore, are invariably scrutinized very closely by different sectors. This paper examines how the later stages of a major evaluation took…

  13. Scoping assessments of ATF impact on late-stage accident progression including molten core-concrete interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, M. T.; Leibowitz, L.; Terrani, K. A.; Robb, K. R.

    2014-05-01

    Simple scoping models that can be used to evaluate ATF performance under severe accident conditions have been developed. The methodology provides a fundamental technical basis (a.k.a. metric) based on the thermodynamic boundary for evaluating performance relative to that of traditional Zr-based claddings. The initial focus in this study was on UO2 fuel with the advanced claddings 310 SS, D9, FeCrAl, and SiC. The evaluation considered only energy release with concurrent combustible gas production from fuel-cladding-coolant interactions and, separately, molten core-concrete interactions at high temperatures. Other important phenomenological effects that can influence the rate and extent of cladding decomposition (e.g., eutectic interactions, degradation of other core constituents) were not addressed. For the cladding types addressed, potential combustible gas production under both in-vessel and ex-vessel conditions was similar to that for Zr. However, exothermic energy release from cladding oxidation was substantially less for iron-based alloys (by at least a factor of 4), and modestly less (by ∼20%) for SiC. Data on SiC-clad UO2 fuel performance under severe accident conditions are sparse in the literature; thus, assumptions on the nature of the cladding decomposition process were made in order to perform this initial screening evaluation. Experimental data for this system under severe accident conditions is needed for a proper evaluation and comparison to iron-based claddings.

  14. Improving Psychological Adjustment among Late-Stage Ovarian Cancer Patients: Examining the Role of Avoidance in Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rost, Ann D.; Wilson, Kelly; Buchanan, Erin; Hildebrandt, Mikaela J.; Mutch, David

    2012-01-01

    Data suggest that individuals dealing with a cancer diagnosis are less likely to suffer from depression, anxiety, and psychological distress when they cope with their condition from a stance of emotional and cognitive acceptance (e.g. Dunkel, et al., 1992; Stanton, et al., 2000). Although traditional CBT often includes some acceptance-oriented…

  15. Late-stage optimization of a tercyclic class of S1P3-sparing, S1P1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Horan, Joshua C; Kuzmich, Daniel; Liu, Pingrong; DiSalvo, Darren; Lord, John; Mao, Can; Hopkins, Tamara D; Yu, Hui; Harcken, Christian; Betageri, Raj; Hill-Drzewi, Melissa; Patenaude, Lori; Patel, Monica; Fletcher, Kimberly; Terenzzio, Donna; Linehan, Brian; Xia, Heather; Patel, Mita; Studwell, Debbie; Miller, Craig; Hickey, Eugene; Levin, Jeremy I; Smith, Dustin; Kemper, Raymond A; Modis, Louise K; Bannen, Lynne C; Chan, Diva S; Mac, Morrison B; Ng, Stephanie; Wang, Yong; Xu, Wei; Lemieux, René M

    2016-01-15

    Poor solubility and cationic amphiphilic drug-likeness were liabilities identified for a lead series of S1P3-sparing, S1P1 agonists originally developed from a high-throughput screening campaign. This work describes the subsequent optimization of these leads by balancing potency, selectivity, solubility and overall molecular charge. Focused SAR studies revealed favorable structural modifications that, when combined, produced compounds with overall balanced profiles. The low brain exposure observed in rat suggests that these compounds would be best suited for the potential treatment of peripheral autoimmune disorders.

  16. Aiding or Dissuading? The Effect of Maintaining Eligibility for Need-Based Financial Aid on Late Stage Persistence and Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabel, Zachary A.

    2016-01-01

    The returns to higher education have increased dramatically in recent decades with the rise of the global, knowledge-based economy. Research shows that the college earnings premium has increased more than 10 percent over the last fifteen years and that the returns to college are concentrated among completers. Despite these benefits, many students…

  17. microRNA Alterations Driving Acute and Late Stages of Radiation-Induced Fibrosis in a Murine Skin Model

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, Brittany A.; Ly, David; Savage, Jason E.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Dan, Tu D.; Ylaya, Kris; Shankavaram, Uma; Lim, Meng; Jin, Lianjin; Camphausen, Kevin; Mitchell, James B.; Simone, Nicole L.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Although ionizing radiation is critical in treating cancer, radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) can have a devastating impact on patients' quality of life. The molecular changes leading to radiation-induced fibrosis must be elucidated so that novel treatments can be designed. Methods and Materials: To determine whether microRNAs (miRs) could be responsible for RIF, the fibrotic process was induced in the right hind legs of 9-week old CH3 mice by a single-fraction dose of irradiation to 35 Gy, and the left leg served as an unirradiated control. Fibrosis was quantified by measurements of leg length compared with control leg length. By 120 days after irradiation, the irradiated legs were 20% (P=.013) shorter on average than were the control legs. Results: Tissue analysis was done on muscle, skin, and subcutaneous tissue from irradiated and control legs. Fibrosis was noted on both gross and histologic examination by use of a pentachrome stain. Microarrays were performed at various times after irradiation, including 7 days, 14 days, 50 days, 90 days, and 120 days after irradiation. miR-15a, miR-21, miR-30a, and miR-34a were the miRs with the most significant alteration by array with miR-34a, proving most significant on confirmation by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, c-Met, a known effector of fibrosis and downstream molecule of miR-34a, was evaluated by use of 2 cell lines: HCT116 and 1522. The cell lines were exposed to various stressors to induce miR changes, specifically ionizing radiation. Additionally, in vitro transfections with pre-miRs and anti-miRs confirmed the relationship of miR-34a and c-Met. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate an inverse relationship with miR-34a and c-Met; the upregulation of miR-34a in RIF causes inhibition of c-Met production. miRs may play a role in RIF; in particular, miR-34a should be investigated as a potential target to prevent or treat this devastating side effect of irradiation.

  18. Targeted Radio-Immunotherapy with Bexxar Produces Durable Remissions in Patients with Late Stage Low Grade Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Capizzi, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Patients with low grade (LG) non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs) typically have a median survival of 8-10 years during which they sustain a series of responses and relapses to therapy. More than 95% of B-cell NHLs express the CD20 surface antigen, affording opportunities for CD20-directed therapy of NHL. Since 1990, 5 trials have tested the safety and efficacy of the murine CD20 MAb Tositumomab and Iodine I 131 Tositumomab (Bexxar((R)) therapeutic regimen) in 250 patients with relapsed, refractory, or transformed LG NHL. The I-131 irradiates MAb-bound cells and those within the path length of the isotope. Response rates were 56% (overall) and 30% (complete). With a median follow-up of 44.6 months, 30% of the patients achieved a long-term, durable response; median time to progressive disease or death was 5 years. Thus, a single treatment with Bexxar may produce durable responses and partially reverse the natural history of LG NHL. PMID:17060972

  19. A Novel Sperm-Delivered Toxin Causes Late-Stage Embryo Lethality and Transmission Ratio Distortion in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Hannah S.; Ailion, Michael; Li, Jialing; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Rockman, Matthew V.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary fate of an allele ordinarily depends on its contribution to host fitness. Occasionally, however, genetic elements arise that are able to gain a transmission advantage while simultaneously imposing a fitness cost on their hosts. We previously discovered one such element in C. elegans that gains a transmission advantage through a combination of paternal-effect killing and zygotic self-rescue. Here we demonstrate that this element is composed of a sperm-delivered toxin, peel-1, and an embryo-expressed antidote, zeel-1. peel-1 and zeel-1 are located adjacent to one another in the genome and co-occur in an insertion/deletion polymorphism. peel-1 encodes a novel four-pass transmembrane protein that is expressed in sperm and delivered to the embryo via specialized, sperm-specific vesicles. In the absence of zeel-1, sperm-delivered PEEL-1 causes lethal defects in muscle and epidermal tissue at the 2-fold stage of embryogenesis. zeel-1 is expressed transiently in the embryo and encodes a novel six-pass transmembrane domain fused to a domain with sequence similarity to zyg-11, a substrate-recognition subunit of an E3 ubiquitin ligase. zeel-1 appears to have arisen recently, during an expansion of the zyg-11 family, and the transmembrane domain of zeel-1 is required and partially sufficient for antidote activity. Although PEEL-1 and ZEEL-1 normally function in embryos, these proteins can act at other stages as well. When expressed ectopically in adults, PEEL-1 kills a variety of cell types, and ectopic expression of ZEEL-1 rescues these effects. Our results demonstrate that the tight physical linkage between two novel transmembrane proteins has facilitated their co-evolution into an element capable of promoting its own transmission to the detriment of organisms carrying it. PMID:21814493

  20. Glial alterations from early to late stages in a model of Alzheimer's disease: Evidence of autophagy involvement in Aβ internalization.

    PubMed

    Pomilio, Carlos; Pavia, Patricio; Gorojod, Roxana Mayra; Vinuesa, Angeles; Alaimo, Agustina; Galvan, Veronica; Kotler, Monica Lidia; Beauquis, Juan; Saravia, Flavia

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease without effective therapy. Brain amyloid deposits are classical histopathological hallmarks that generate an inflammatory reaction affecting neuronal and glial function. The identification of early cell responses and of brain areas involved could help to design new successful treatments. Hence, we studied early alterations of hippocampal glia and their progression during the neuropathology in PDAPP-J20 transgenic mice, AD model, at 3, 9, and 15 months (m) of age. At 3 m, before deposits formation, microglial Iba1+ cells from transgenic mice already exhibited signs of activation and larger soma size in the hilus, alterations appearing later on stratum radiatum. Iba1 immunohistochemistry revealed increased cell density and immunoreactive area in PDAPP mice from 9 m onward selectively in the hilus, in coincidence with prominent amyloid Congo red + deposition. At pre-plaque stages, GFAP+ astroglia showed density alterations while, at an advanced age, the presence of deposits was associated with important glial volume changes and apparently being intimately involved in amyloid degradation. Astrocytes around plaques were strongly labeled for LC3 until 15 m in Tg mice, suggestive of increased autophagic flux. Moreover, β-Amyloid fibrils internalization by astrocytes in in vitro conditions was dependent on autophagy. Co-localization of Iba1 with ubiquitin or p62 was exclusively found in microglia contacting deposits from 9 m onward, suggesting torpid autophagy. Our work characterizes glial changes at early stages of the disease in PDAPP-J20 mice, focusing on the hilus as an especially susceptible hippocampal subfield, and provides evidence that glial autophagy could play a role in amyloid processing at advanced stages.

  1. Manipulation of Developing Juvenile Structures in Purple Sea Urchins (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) by Morpholino Injection into Late Stage Larvae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sea urchins have been used as experimental organisms for developmental biology for over a century. Yet, as is the case for many other marine invertebrates, understanding the development of the juveniles and adults has lagged far behind that of their embryos and larvae. The reasons for this are, in large part, due to the difficulty of experimentally manipulating juvenile development. Here we develop and validate a technique for injecting compounds into juvenile rudiments of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We first document the distribution of rhodaminated dextran injected into different compartments of the juvenile rudiment of sea urchin larvae. Then, to test the potential of this technique to manipulate development, we injected Vivo-Morpholinos (vMOs) designed to knock down p58b and p16, two proteins involved in the elongation of S. purpuratus larval skeleton. Rudiments injected with these vMOs showed a delay in the growth of some juvenile skeletal elements relative to controls. These data provide the first evidence that vMOs, which are designed to cross cell membranes, can be used to transiently manipulate gene function in later developmental stages in sea urchins. We therefore propose that injection of vMOs into juvenile rudiments, as shown here, is a viable approach to testing hypotheses about gene function during development, including metamorphosis. PMID:25436992

  2. Late-stage stretching and subsidence rates in the Danakil Depression, evidenced from borehole records and seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Adam; Bastow, Ian; Magee, Craig; Keir, Derek; Corti, Giacomo; Jackson, Chris; Wilkinson, Jason

    2016-04-01

    The Ethiopian and Afar Rift systems provide a globally unique opportunity to study the incipient transition from continental rifting to sea-floor spreading. A consensus has emerged that a considerable proportion of plate extension in Ethiopia is accommodated by dyke intrusion, with smaller contributions from crustal thinning. However, observations of thinned crust and a pulse in Quaternary-Recent basaltic volcanism within Ethiopia's Danakil Depression have been cited (Bastow and Keir, 2011) as evidence that localised plate stretching may mark the final stages of continent-ocean transition. We explore this hypothesis using an archive of five 2-D seismic reflection profiles, each between 7-10 km in length, and ˜120 borehole records distributed over an area of 225 km2. From depth and age relationships of key marker horizons, we also suggest local subsidence and extension rates. The borehole archive reveals extensive evaporite sequences deposited in and around an asymmetric basin, bounded to the west by a network of east-dipping normal faults. West of the basin, the maximum observed thickness of evaporites is 150 m, beneath which are deposits of clastic sediment, but a sequence of evaporites at least 900 m thick is observed at the basin centre. The sedimentary architecture of these sequences suggests deposition in a shallow salt-pan environment, with seasonal - potentially diurnal - freshening of the brine supply (Warren, 2012). Isotopic analysis of reef carbonates in the basin flank dates the last marine incursion into the Danakil Depression at 24-230ka (Lalou et al., 1970; Bonatti et al., 1971; Bannert et al., 1971), therefore the evaporite sequence must be younger than this. A key marker horizon within the evaporites is the potash-bearing Houston Formation, also distinct in borehole records given its high porosity (25-40%) and radioactivity (50-250 API units). The elevation of the Houston Formation is ˜500 m deeper in the centre of the basin than on the flank. This depth change corresponds to a plausible vertical subsidence rate of between 2-20 mma-1 and, assuming a 60° fault dip, a horizontal extension rate of 1-12 mma-1 during the deposition of the Houston Formation, consistent with recent geodetic constraints offered by Ar Rajehi et al. (2010). The borehole archive shows no evidence of significant magmatism anywhere in the survey area, and the characteristic reflectivity of igneous bodies is absent in the seismic data. Extension of this basin is, therefore, not obviously explained by dyke intrusion. We consider that the ˜500 m change in elevation of the Houston Formation is instead diagnostic of rapid stretching, possibly indicating a late period of non-magmatic extension in the transition to sea-floor spreading in the Danakil Depression.

  3. Late-stage neuronal progenitors in the retina are radial Müller glia that function as retinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bernardos, Rebecca L; Barthel, Linda K; Meyers, Jason R; Raymond, Pamela A

    2007-06-27

    Neuronal progenitors in the mammalian brain derive from radial glia or specialized astrocytes. In developing neural retina, radial glia-like Müller cells are generated late in neurogenesis and are not considered to be neuronal progenitors, but they do proliferate after injury and can express neuronal markers, suggesting a latent neurogenic capacity. To examine the neurogenic capacity of retinal glial cells, we used lineage tracing in transgenic zebrafish with a glial-specific promoter (gfap, for glial fibrillary acid protein) driving green fluorescent protein in differentiated Müller glia. We found that all Müller glia in the zebrafish retina express low levels of the multipotent progenitor marker Pax6 (paired box gene 6), and they proliferate at a low frequency in the intact, uninjured retina. Müller glia-derived progenitors express Crx (cone rod homeobox) and are late retinal progenitors that generate the rod photoreceptor lineage in the postembryonic retina. These Müller glia-derived progenitors also remain competent to produce earlier neuronal lineages, in that they respond to loss of cone photoreceptors by specifically regenerating the missing neurons. We conclude that zebrafish Müller glia function as multipotent retinal stem cells that generate retinal neurons by homeostatic and regenerative developmental mechanisms.

  4. Manipulation of developing juvenile structures in purple sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) by morpholino injection into late stage larvae.

    PubMed

    Heyland, Andreas; Hodin, Jason; Bishop, Cory

    2014-01-01

    Sea urchins have been used as experimental organisms for developmental biology for over a century. Yet, as is the case for many other marine invertebrates, understanding the development of the juveniles and adults has lagged far behind that of their embryos and larvae. The reasons for this are, in large part, due to the difficulty of experimentally manipulating juvenile development. Here we develop and validate a technique for injecting compounds into juvenile rudiments of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We first document the distribution of rhodaminated dextran injected into different compartments of the juvenile rudiment of sea urchin larvae. Then, to test the potential of this technique to manipulate development, we injected Vivo-Morpholinos (vMOs) designed to knock down p58b and p16, two proteins involved in the elongation of S. purpuratus larval skeleton. Rudiments injected with these vMOs showed a delay in the growth of some juvenile skeletal elements relative to controls. These data provide the first evidence that vMOs, which are designed to cross cell membranes, can be used to transiently manipulate gene function in later developmental stages in sea urchins. We therefore propose that injection of vMOs into juvenile rudiments, as shown here, is a viable approach to testing hypotheses about gene function during development, including metamorphosis.

  5. A human melanoma metastasis-suppressor locus maps to 6q16.3-q23.

    PubMed

    Miele, M E; Jewett, M D; Goldberg, S F; Hyatt, D L; Morelli, C; Gualandi, F; Rimessi, P; Hicks, D J; Weissman, B E; Barbanti-Brodano, G; Welch, D R

    2000-05-15

    Loss, deletion or rearrangement along large portions of the long arm (q-arm) of chromosome 6 occurs in >80% of late-stage human melanomas, suggesting that genes controlling malignant characteristics are encoded there. Metastasis, but not tumorigenicity, was completely suppressed in the human melanoma cell line C8161 into which an additional intact chromosome 6 had been introduced by microcell-mediated chromosome transfer. Our objective was to refine the location of a putative metastasis suppressor gene. To do this, we transferred an intact (neo6) and a deletion variant [neo6qdel; neo6(del)(q16.3-q23)] of neomycin-tagged human chromosome 6 into metastatic C8161 subclone 9 (C8161.9) by MMCT. Single cell hybrid clones were selected in G-418 and isolated. Following verification that the hybrids retained the expected regions of chromosome 6 using a panel of polymorphic sequence-tagged sites, the hybrids were tested for tumorigenicity and metastasis in athymic mice. As reported previously, intact, normal chromosome 6 suppressed metastasis whether tumor cells were injected i.v. or into an orthotopic (i.e., intradermal) site. In contrast, metastasis was not suppressed in the neo6qdel hybrids. Tumorigenicity was unaffected in hybrids prepared with either chromosome 6 donor. These data strongly suggest that a human melanoma metastasis suppressor locus maps between 6q16.3-q23 ( approximately 40 cM).

  6. Immunological and Functional Characterization of RhoGDI3 and Its Molecular Targets RhoG and RhoB in Human Pancreatic Cancerous and Normal Cells.

    PubMed

    de León-Bautista, Mercedes Piedad; Cardenas-Aguayo, Maria Del Carmen; Casique-Aguirre, Diana; Almaraz-Salinas, Manuel; Parraguirre-Martinez, Sara; Olivo-Diaz, Angelica; Thompson-Bonilla, María Del Rocío; Vargas, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    RhoGDI proteins have been implicated in several human cancers; changes in their expression levels have shown pro- or anti-tumorigenic effects. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a complex pathology, with poor prognosis, and most patients die shortly after diagnosis. Efforts have been focused on understanding the role of RhoGDI's in PDAC, specially, RhoGDI1 and RhoGDI2. However, the role of RhoGDI3 has not been studied in relation to cancer or to PDAC. Here, we characterized the expression and functionality of RhoGDI3 and its target GTPases, RhoG and RhoB in pancreatic cell lines from both normal pancreatic tissue and tissue in late stages of PDAC, and compared them to human biopsies. Through immunofluorescences, pulldown assays and subcellular fractionation, we found a reduction in RhoGDI3 expression in the late stages of PDAC, and this reduction correlates with tumor progression and aggressiveness. Despite the reduction in the expression of RhoGDI3 in PDAC, we found that RhoB was underexpressed while RhoG was overexpressed, suggesting that cancerous cells preserve their capacity to activate this pathway, thus these cells may be more eager to response to the stimuli needed to proliferate and become invasive unlike normal cells. Surprisingly, we found nuclear localization of RhoGDI3 in non-cancerous pancreatic cell line and normal pancreatic tissue biopsies, which could open the possibility of novel nuclear functions for this protein, impacting gene expression regulation and cellular homeostasis.

  7. MicroRNA-378-mediated suppression of Runx1 alleviates the aggressive phenotype of triple negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Gillian; Dragon, Julie A.; Hong, Deli; Messier, Terri L.; Gordon, Jonathan A. R.; Farina, Nicholas H.; Boyd, Joseph R.; VanOudenhove, Jennifer J.; Perez, Andrew W.; Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.; Lian, Jane B.

    2016-01-01

    The Runx1 transcription factor, known for its essential role normal hematopoiesis, was reported in limited studies to be mutated or associated with human breast tumor tissues. Runx 1 increases concomitant with disease progression in the MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse model of breast cancer. Compelling questions relate to mechanisms that regulate Runx1 expression in breast cancer. Here, we tested the hypothesis that dysregulation of Runx1-targeting microRNAs (miRNAs) allows for pathologic increase of Runx1 during breast cancer progression. Microarray profiling of the MMTV-PyMT model revealed significant down-regulation of numerous miRNAs predicted to target Runx1. One of these, miR-378, was inversely correlated with Runx1 expression during breast cancer progression in mouse, and in human breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and triple negative MDA-MB-231 that represent early and late stage disease, respectively. MiR-378 is nearly absent in MDA-MB-231 cells. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that miR-378 binds the Runx1 3′UTR and inhibits Runx1 expression. Functionally, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of miR-378 in MDA-MB-231 cells inhibited Runx1 and suppressed migration and invasion; while inhibition of miR-378 in MCF7 cells increased Runx1 levels and cell migration. Depletion of Runx1 in late stage breast cancer cells resulted in increased expression of both the miR-378 host gene PPARGC1B and pre-miR-378, suggesting a feedback loop. Taken together, our study identifies a novel and clinically relevant mechanism for regulation of Runx1 in breast cancer that is mediated by a PPARGC1B-miR-378-Runx1 regulatory pathway. Our results highlight the translational potential of miRNA replacement therapy for inhibiting Runx1 in breast cancer. PMID:26749280

  8. Immunological and Functional Characterization of RhoGDI3 and Its Molecular Targets RhoG and RhoB in Human Pancreatic Cancerous and Normal Cells

    PubMed Central

    de León-Bautista, Mercedes Piedad; Cardenas-Aguayo, Maria del Carmen; Casique-Aguirre, Diana; Almaraz-Salinas, Manuel; Parraguirre-Martinez, Sara; Olivo-Diaz, Angelica; Thompson-Bonilla, María del Rocío

    2016-01-01

    RhoGDI proteins have been implicated in several human cancers; changes in their expression levels have shown pro- or anti-tumorigenic effects. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a complex pathology, with poor prognosis, and most patients die shortly after diagnosis. Efforts have been focused on understanding the role of RhoGDI's in PDAC, specially, RhoGDI1 and RhoGDI2. However, the role of RhoGDI3 has not been studied in relation to cancer or to PDAC. Here, we characterized the expression and functionality of RhoGDI3 and its target GTPases, RhoG and RhoB in pancreatic cell lines from both normal pancreatic tissue and tissue in late stages of PDAC, and compared them to human biopsies. Through immunofluorescences, pulldown assays and subcellular fractionation, we found a reduction in RhoGDI3 expression in the late stages of PDAC, and this reduction correlates with tumor progression and aggressiveness. Despite the reduction in the expression of RhoGDI3 in PDAC, we found that RhoB was underexpressed while RhoG was overexpressed, suggesting that cancerous cells preserve their capacity to activate this pathway, thus these cells may be more eager to response to the stimuli needed to proliferate and become invasive unlike normal cells. Surprisingly, we found nuclear localization of RhoGDI3 in non-cancerous pancreatic cell line and normal pancreatic tissue biopsies, which could open the possibility of novel nuclear functions for this protein, impacting gene expression regulation and cellular homeostasis. PMID:27832197

  9. In Silico Identification of a Candidate Synthetic Peptide (Tsgf118–43) to Monitor Human Exposure to Tsetse Flies in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Dama, Emilie; Cornelie, Sylvie; Camara, Mamadou; Somda, Martin Bienvenu; Poinsignon, Anne; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Elanga Ndille, Emmanuel; Jamonneau, Vincent; Solano, Philippe; Remoue, Franck; Bengaly, Zakaria; Belem, Adrien Marie Gaston; Bucheton, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Background The analysis of humoral responses directed against the saliva of blood-sucking arthropods was shown to provide epidemiological biomarkers of human exposure to vector-borne diseases. However, the use of whole saliva as antigen presents several limitations such as problems of mass production, reproducibility and specificity. The aim of this study was to design a specific biomarker of exposure to tsetse flies based on the in silico analysis of three Glossina salivary proteins (Ada, Ag5 and Tsgf1) previously shown to be specifically recognized by plasma from exposed individuals. Methodology/Principal Findings Synthetic peptides were designed by combining several linear epitope prediction methods and Blast analysis. The most specific peptides were then tested by indirect ELISA on a bank of 160 plasma samples from tsetse infested areas and tsetse free areas. Anti-Tsgf118–43 specific IgG levels were low in all three control populations (from rural Africa, urban Africa and Europe) and were significantly higher (p<0.0001) in the two populations exposed to tsetse flies (Guinean HAT foci, and South West Burkina Faso). A positive correlation was also found between Anti-Tsgf118–43 IgG levels and the risk of being infected by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in the sleeping sickness foci of Guinea. Conclusion/Significance The Tsgf118–43 peptide is a suitable and promising candidate to develop a standardize immunoassay allowing large scale monitoring of human exposure to tsetse flies in West Africa. This could provide a new surveillance indicator for tsetse control interventions by HAT control programs. PMID:24086785

  10. Type I Interferon Response Is Delayed in Human Astrovirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Guix, Susana; Pérez-Bosque, Anna; Miró, Lluïsa; Moretó, Miquel; Bosch, Albert; Pintó, Rosa M.

    2015-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) activation and its subsequent effects are important in the response to viral infections. Here we show that human astroviruses (HAstVs), which are important agents of acute gastroenteritis in children, induce a mild and delayed IFN response upon infecting CaCo-2 cells. Although IFN-β mRNA is detected within infected cells and supernatant from infected cells show antiviral activity against the replication of other well-known IFN-sensitive viruses, these responses occur at late stages of infection once genome replication has taken place. On the other hand, HAstV replication can be partially reduced by the addition of exogenous IFN, and inhibition of IFN activation by BX795 enhances viral replication, indicating that HAstVs are IFN-sensitive viruses. Finally, different levels of IFN response were observed in cells infected with different HAstV mutants with changes in the hypervariable region of nsP1a/4, suggesting that nsP1a/4 genotype may potentially have clinical implications due to its correlation with the viral replication phenotype and the antiviral responses induced within infected cells. PMID:25837699

  11. Type I interferon response is delayed in human astrovirus infections.

    PubMed

    Guix, Susana; Pérez-Bosque, Anna; Miró, Lluïsa; Moretó, Miquel; Bosch, Albert; Pintó, Rosa M

    2015-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) activation and its subsequent effects are important in the response to viral infections. Here we show that human astroviruses (HAstVs), which are important agents of acute gastroenteritis in children, induce a mild and delayed IFN response upon infecting CaCo-2 cells. Although IFN-β mRNA is detected within infected cells and supernatant from infected cells show antiviral activity against the replication of other well-known IFN-sensitive viruses, these responses occur at late stages of infection once genome replication has taken place. On the other hand, HAstV replication can be partially reduced by the addition of exogenous IFN, and inhibition of IFN activation by BX795 enhances viral replication, indicating that HAstVs are IFN-sensitive viruses. Finally, different levels of IFN response were observed in cells infected with different HAstV mutants with changes in the hypervariable region of nsP1a/4, suggesting that nsP1a/4 genotype may potentially have clinical implications due to its correlation with the viral replication phenotype and the antiviral responses induced within infected cells.

  12. Urinary acylcarnitines are altered in human kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Ganti, Sheila; Taylor, Sandra L; Kim, Kyoungmi; Hoppel, Charles L; Guo, Lining; Yang, Joy; Evans, Christopher; Weiss, Robert H

    2012-06-15

    Kidney cancer often diagnosed at late stages when treatment options are severely limited. Thus, greater understanding of tumor metabolism leading ultimately to novel approaches to diagnosis is needed. Our laboratory has been utilizing metabolomics to evaluate compounds appearing in kidney cancer patients' biofluids at concentrations different from control patients. Here, we collected urine samples from kidney cancer patients and analyzed them by chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Once normalized to control for urinary concentration, samples were analyzed by two independent laboratories. After technical validation, we now show differential urinary concentrations of several acylcarnitines as a function of both cancer status and kidney cancer grade, with most acylcarnitines being increased in the urine of cancer patients and in those patients with high cancer grades. This finding was validated in a mouse xenograft model of human kidney cancer. Biological validation shows carbon chain length-dependent effects of the acylcarnitines on cytotoxicity in vitro, and higher chain length acylcarnitines demonstrated inhibitory effects on NF-κB activation, suggesting an immune modulatory effect of these compounds. Thus, acylcarnitines in the kidney cancer urine may reflect alterations in metabolism, cell component synthesis and/or immune surveillance, and may help explain the profound chemotherapy resistance seen with this cancer. This study shows for the first time the value of a novel class of metabolites which may lead to new therapeutic approaches for cancer and may prove useful in cancer biomarker studies. Furthermore, these findings open up a new area of investigation into the metabolic basis of kidney cancer.

  13. Retinal Remodeling and Metabolic Alterations in Human AMD.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bryan W; Pfeiffer, Rebecca L; Ferrell, William D; Watt, Carl B; Tucker, James; Marc, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive retinal degeneration resulting in central visual field loss, ultimately causing debilitating blindness. AMD affects 18% of Americans from 65 to 74, 30% older than 74 years of age and is the leading cause of severe vision loss and blindness in Western populations. While many genetic and environmental risk factors are known for AMD, we currently know less about the mechanisms mediating disease progression. The pathways and mechanisms through which genetic and non-genetic risk factors modulate development of AMD pathogenesis remain largely unexplored. Moreover, current treatment for AMD is palliative and limited to wet/exudative forms. Retina is a complex, heterocellular tissue and most retinal cell classes are impacted or altered in AMD. Defining disease and stage-specific cytoarchitectural and metabolic responses in AMD is critical for highlighting targets for intervention. The goal of this article is to illustrate cell types impacted in AMD and demonstrate the implications of those changes, likely beginning in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), for remodeling of the the neural retina. Tracking heterocellular responses in disease progression is best achieved with computational molecular phenotyping (CMP), a tool that enables acquisition of a small molecule fingerprint for every cell in the retina. CMP uncovered critical cellular and molecular pathologies (remodeling and reprogramming) in progressive retinal degenerations such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We now applied these approaches to normal human and AMD tissues mapping progression of cellular and molecular changes in AMD retinas, including late-stage forms of the disease.

  14. Characterization of the human analogue of a Scrapie-responsive gene.

    PubMed

    Dron, M; Dandoy-Dron, F; Guillo, F; Benboudjema, L; Hauw, J J; Lebon, P; Dormont, D; Tovey, M G

    1998-07-17

    We have recently described a novel mRNA denominated ScRG-1, the level of which is increased in the brains of Scrapie-infected mice (Dandoy-Dron, F., Guillo, F., Benboudjema, L., Deslys, J.-P., Lasmézas, C., Dormont, D., Tovey, M. G., and Dron, M. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 7691-7697). The increase in ScRG-1 mRNA in the brain follows the accumulation of PrPSc, the proteinase K-resistant form of the prion protein (PrP), and precedes the widespread neuronal death that occurs in late stage disease. In the present study, we have isolated a cDNA encoding the human counterpart of ScRG-1. Comparison of the human and mouse transcripts firmly established that both sequences encode a highly conserved protein of 98 amino acids that contains a signal peptide, suggesting that the protein may be secreted. Examination of the distribution of human ScRG-1 mRNA in adult and fetal tissues revealed that the gene was expressed primarily in the central nervous system as a 0.7-kilobase message and was under strict developmental control.

  15. Matriptase regulates proliferation and early, but not terminal, differentiation of human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Wen; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Chou, Fen-Pai; Wu, Bai-Yao; Hsiao, Hui-Chung; Chiu, Han; Xu, Zhonghong; Baksh, Adrienne N H; Shi, Galen; Kaul, Malvika; Barndt, Robert; Shanmugam, Victoria K; Johnson, Michael D; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2014-02-01

    Genetic defects in matriptase are linked to two congenital ichthyoses: autosomal recessive ichthyosis with hypotrichosis (ARIH, OMIM 610765) and ichthyosis, follicular atrophoderma, hypotrichosis, and hypohidrosis (IFAH, OMIM 602400). Mouse models with matriptase deficiency indicate an involvement of matriptase in suprabasal keratinocytes in the maintenance of the epidermal barrier. In contrast to what has been reported for mouse skin, we show that in human skin matriptase is primarily expressed in the basal and spinous keratinocytes, but not in the more differentiated keratinocytes of the granular layer. In addition, matriptase zymogen activation was predominantly detected in the basal cells. Furthermore, by using skin organotypic cultures as a model system to monitor the course of human epidermal differentiation, we found elevated matriptase zymogen activation during early stages of epidermal differentiation, coupled with a loss of matriptase expression in the late stages of this process. We also show here that matriptase deficiency in HaCaT cells modestly reduces cell proliferation and temporally affects calcium-induced expression of differentiation markers. These collective data suggest that, unlike mouse matriptase, human matriptase may be involved in the regulation of keratinocyte growth and early differentiation, rather than terminal differentiation, providing mechanistic insights into the pathology of the two congenital ichthyoses: ARIH and IFAH.

  16. Brd4 Activates Early Viral Transcription upon Human Papillomavirus 18 Infection of Primary Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Caleb C.; Kim, Min Jung; Chen, Dan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) replicate in the cutaneous and mucosal epithelia, and the infectious cycle is synchronous with the differentiation program of the host keratinocytes. The virus initially infects dividing cells in the lower layers of the epithelium, where it establishes a persistent infection. The viral genome is maintained as a low-copy-number, extrachromosomal element in these proliferating cells but switches to the late stage of the life cycle in differentiated cells. The cellular chromatin adaptor protein Brd4 is involved in several stages and processes of the viral life cycle. In concert with the viral transcriptional regulator E2, Brd4 can repress transcription from the early viral promoter. Brd4 and E2 form a complex with the viral genome that associates with host chromosomes to partition the viral genome in dividing cells; Brd4 also localizes to active sites of productive HPV DNA replication. However, because of the difficulties in producing HPV viral particles, the role of Brd4 in modulating viral transcription and replication at the initial stage of infection is unclear. In this study, we have used an HPV18 quasivirus-based genome delivery system to assess the role of Brd4 in the initial infectivity of primary human keratinocytes. We show that, upon infection of primary human keratinocytes with HPV18 quasivirus, Brd4 activates viral transcription and replication. Furthermore, this activation is independent of the functional interaction between Brd4 and the HPV18 E2 protein. PMID:27879331

  17. Polysomnography as a diagnosis and post-treatment follow-up tool in human African trypanosomiasis: a case study in an infant.

    PubMed

    Mpandzou, Ghislain; Cespuglio, Raymond; Ngampo, Stéphane; Bandzouzi, Bébène; Bouteille, Bernard; Vincendeau, Philippe; Buguet, Alain

    2011-06-15

    Gambian (Trypanosoma brucei gambiense) human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) evolves from the hemolymphatic stage 1, treated with pentamidine, to the meningoencephalitic stage 2, often treated with melarsoprol. This arseniate may provoke a deadly reactive encephalopathy. It is therefore crucial to diagnose precisely the stages of HAT, especially when clinical and biological examinations are doubtful. We present here the case of a 30-month old girl (E20 KOLNG) diagnosed with stage 1 HAT during a field survey in June 2007 in Congo. She was followed-up every six months for 18 months in a village dispensary facility at Mpouya. Her health status deteriorated in December 2008, although cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) white blood cell (WBC) count was normal. The child was hospitalized at Brazzaville and a daytime polysomnographic recording (electroencephalogram, electrooculogram, and electromyogram) was performed (Temec Vitaport 3® portable recorder) to avoid a new lumbar puncture. The child presented a complete polysomnographic syndrome of HAT with a major disturbance of the distribution of sleep and wake episodes and the occurrence of sleep onset REM periods (SOREMPs). The relapse at stage 2 was confirmed by a new CSF examination that showed an elevated WBC count (23cells·μL(-1)) with the presence of B lymphocytes. Melarsoprol treatment was undertaken. A post-treatment recording was immediately performed, showing the resolution of sleepwake pattern abnormalities. Another polysomnography, taken four months later, confirmed the normalization of sleep-wake patterns indicating healing. We therefore propose that polysomnography, being a non-invasive technique, should be used in children to alleviate burden caused by HAT staging procedures, especially regarding lumbar punctures in remote African villages.

  18. Treatment outcomes and risk factors for relapse in patients with early-stage human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) in the Republic of the Congo.

    PubMed Central

    Balasegaram, Manica; Harris, Steve; Checchi, Francesco; Hamel, Catherine; Karunakara, Unni

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In 2002-03, the Republic of the Congo increased the threshold separating stage 1 and 2 cases of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) from a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) white cell count of 5 cells/mm(3) to 10 cells/mm(3). We aimed to assess whether the increased threshold of 10 cells/mm(3) is a safe indicator of stage 2 disease. METHODS: We assessed patients treated for stage 1 HAT caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in the Republic of the Congo between April 2001 and April 2005. Patients with 0-10 cells/mm(3) in CSF were classed as stage 1 and treated with pentamidine. Patients with CSF of > 10 cells/mm(3) were classed as stage 2 and treated with either melarsoprol or eflornithine. We did a retrospective analysis of all patients treated after the September 2002 increase in threshold for classification of HAT disease stage 2, and who were eligible for at least 1 year of follow-up. Primary outcome was survival without death or relapse within 1 year of discharge. Risk factors for treatment failure, in particular CSF white cell count on diagnosis, were assessed. FINDINGS: Between September 2002 to April 2004, 692 patients eligible for our analysis were treated with pentamidine. All were discharged alive. Relapse rate was 5% (n = 33). The only identified risk factor for relapse was a CSF white cell count of 6-10 cells/mm(3) rather than 0-5 cells/mm(3) (adjusted hazard ratio 3.27 (95% confidence interval, 1.52-7.01); P = 0.002). CONCLUSION: A threshold of 5 white cells/mm(3) in CSF is safer than 10 cells/mm(3) to determine stage 2 HAT and reduce risk of relapse. PMID:17128357

  19. Th1/Th17 Plasticity Is a Marker of Advanced β Cell Autoimmunity and Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Reinert-Hartwall, Linnea; Honkanen, Jarno; Salo, Harri M.; Nieminen, Janne K.; Luopajärvi, Kristiina; Härkönen, Taina; Veijola, Riitta; Simell, Olli; Ilonen, Jorma; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Knip, Mikael; Knip, Mikael; Koski, Katriina; Koski, Matti; Härkönen, Taina; Ryhänen, Samppa; Hämäläinen, Anu-Maaria; Ormisson, Anne; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Ulich, Valentina; Kuzmicheva, Elena; Mokurov, Sergei; Markova, Svetlana; Pylova, Svetlana; Isakova, Marina; Shakurova, Elena; Petrov, Vladimir; Dorshakova, Natalya V.; Karapetyan, Tatyana; Varlamova, Tatyana; Ilonen, Jorma; Kiviniemi, Minna; Alnek, Kristi; Janson, Helis; Uibo, Raivo; Salum, Tiit; von Mutius, Erika; Weber, Juliane; Ahlfors, Helena; Kallionpää, Henna; Laajala, Essi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Moulder, Robert; Nieminen, Janne; Ruohtula, Terhi; Vaarala, Outi; Honkanen, Hanna; Hyöty, Heikki; Kondrashova, Anita; Oikarinen, Sami; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; De Goffau, Marcus C.; Welling, Gjalt; Alahuhta, Kirsi; Virtanen, Suvi M.

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of IL-17 immunity and detrimental effects of IL-17 on human islets have been implicated in human type 1 diabetes. In animal models, the plasticity of Th1/Th17 cells contributes to the development of autoimmune diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate that the upregulation of the IL-17 pathway and Th1/Th17 plasticity in peripheral blood are markers of advanced β cell autoimmunity and impaired β cell function in human type 1 diabetes. Activated Th17 immunity was observed in the late stage of preclinical diabetes in children with β cell autoimmunity and impaired glucose tolerance, but not in children with early β cell autoimmunity. We found an increased ratio of IFN-γ/IL-17 expression in Th17 cells in children with advanced β cell autoimmunity, which correlated with HbA1c and plasma glucose concentrations in an oral glucose tolerance test, and thus impaired β cell function. Low expression of Helios was seen in Th17 cells, suggesting that Th1/Th17 cells are not converted thymus-derived regulatory T cells. Our results suggest that the development of Th1/Th17 plasticity may serve as a biomarker of disease progression from β cell autoantibody positivity to type 1 diabetes. These data in human type 1 diabetes emphasize the role of Th1/Th17 plasticity as a potential contributor to tissue destruction in autoimmune conditions. PMID:25480564

  20. Reduced graphene oxide-coated hydroxyapatite composites stimulate spontaneous osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong Ho; Shin, Yong Cheol; Jin, Oh Seong; Kang, Seok Hee; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Park, Jong-Chul; Hong, Suck Won; Han, Dong-Wook

    2015-07-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have great potential as cell sources for bone tissue engineering and regeneration, but the control and induction of their specific differentiation into bone cells remain challenging. Graphene-based nanomaterials are considered attractive candidates for biomedical applications such as scaffolds in tissue engineering, substrates for SC differentiation and components of implantable devices, due to their biocompatible and bioactive properties. Despite the potential biomedical applications of graphene and its derivatives, only limited information is available regarding their osteogenic activity. This study concentrates upon the effects of reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-coated hydroxyapatite (HAp) composites on osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. The average particle sizes of HAp and rGO were 1270 +/- 476 nm and 438 +/- 180 nm, respectively. When coated on HAp particulates, rGO synergistically enhanced spontaneous osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, without hampering their proliferation. This result was confirmed by determining alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization of calcium and phosphate as early and late stage markers of osteogenic differentiation. It is suggested that rGO-coated HAp composites can be effectively utilized as dental and orthopedic bone fillers since these graphene-based particulate materials have potent effects on stimulating the spontaneous differentiation of MSCs and show superior bioactivity and osteoinductive potential.Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have great potential as cell sources for bone tissue engineering and regeneration, but the control and induction of their specific differentiation into bone cells remain challenging. Graphene-based nanomaterials are considered attractive candidates for biomedical applications such as scaffolds in tissue engineering, substrates for SC differentiation and components of implantable devices, due to their biocompatible and bioactive properties. Despite

  1. Predictivity of dog co-culture model, primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells for the detection of hepatotoxic drugs in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Atienzar, Franck A.; Novik, Eric I.; Gerets, Helga H.; Parekh, Amit; Delatour, Claude; Cardenas, Alvaro; MacDonald, James; Yarmush, Martin L.; Dhalluin, Stéphane

    2014-02-15

    Drug Induced Liver Injury (DILI) is a major cause of attrition during early and late stage drug development. Consequently, there is a need to develop better in vitro primary hepatocyte models from different species for predicting hepatotoxicity in both animals and humans early in drug development. Dog is often chosen as the non-rodent species for toxicology studies. Unfortunately, dog in vitro models allowing long term cultures are not available. The objective of the present manuscript is to describe the development of a co-culture dog model for predicting hepatotoxic drugs in humans and to compare the predictivity of the canine model along with primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. After rigorous optimization, the dog co-culture model displayed metabolic capacities that were maintained up to 2 weeks which indicates that such model could be also used for long term metabolism studies. Most of the human hepatotoxic drugs were detected with a sensitivity of approximately 80% (n = 40) for the three cellular models. Nevertheless, the specificity was low approximately 40% for the HepG2 cells and hepatocytes compared to 72.7% for the canine model (n = 11). Furthermore, the dog co-culture model showed a higher superiority for the classification of 5 pairs of close structural analogs with different DILI concerns in comparison to both human cellular models. Finally, the reproducibility of the canine system was also satisfactory with a coefficient of correlation of 75.2% (n = 14). Overall, the present manuscript indicates that the dog co-culture model may represent a relevant tool to perform chronic hepatotoxicity and metabolism studies. - Highlights: • Importance of species differences in drug development. • Relevance of dog co-culture model for metabolism and toxicology studies. • Hepatotoxicity: higher predictivity of dog co-culture vs HepG2 and human hepatocytes.

  2. Apolipoprotein L1 Variant Associated with Increased Susceptibility to Trypanosome Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cuypers, Bart; Lecordier, Laurence; Meehan, Conor J.; Van den Broeck, Frederik; Imamura, Hideo; Büscher, Philippe; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Laukens, Kris; Schnaufer, Achim; Dewar, Caroline; Lewis, Michael; Balmer, Oliver; Azurago, Thomas; Kyei-Faried, Sardick; Ohene, Sally-Ann; Duah, Boateng; Homiah, Prince; Mensah, Ebenezer Kofi; Anleah, Francis; Franco, Jose Ramon; Pays, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT African trypanosomes, except Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, which cause human African trypanosomiasis, are lysed by the human serum protein apolipoprotein L1 (ApoL1). These two subspecies can resist human ApoL1 because they express the serum resistance proteins T. b. gambiense glycoprotein (TgsGP) and serum resistance-associated protein (SRA), respectively. Whereas in T. b. rhodesiense, SRA is necessary and sufficient to inhibit ApoL1, in T. b. gambiense, TgsGP cannot protect against high ApoL1 uptake, so different additional mechanisms contribute to limit this uptake. Here we report a complex interplay between trypanosomes and an ApoL1 variant, revealing important insights into innate human immunity against these parasites. Using whole-genome sequencing, we characterized an atypical T. b. gambiense infection in a patient in Ghana. We show that the infecting trypanosome has diverged from the classical T. b. gambiense strains and lacks the TgsGP defense mechanism against human serum. By sequencing the ApoL1 gene of the patient and subsequent in vitro mutagenesis experiments, we demonstrate that a homozygous missense substitution (N264K) in the membrane-addressing domain of this ApoL1 variant knocks down the trypanolytic activity, allowing the trypanosome to avoid ApoL1-mediated immunity. PMID:27073096

  3. Adenosine Triphosphate stimulates differentiation and mineralization in human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Cutarelli, Alessandro; Marini, Mario; Tancredi, Virginia; D'Arcangelo, Giovanna; Murdocca, Michela; Frank, Claudio; Tarantino, Umberto

    2016-05-01

    In the last years adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and subsequent purinergic system activation through P2 receptors were investigated highlighting their pivotal role in bone tissue biology. In osteoblasts ATP can regulate several activities like cell proliferation, cell death, cell differentiation and matrix mineralization. Since controversial results exist, in this study we analyzed the ATP effects on differentiation and mineralization in human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. We showed for the first time the altered functional activity of ATP receptors. Despite that, we found that ATP can reduce cell proliferation and stimulate osteogenic differentiation mainly in the early stages of in vitro maturation as evidenced by the enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Osteocalcin (OC) genes and by the increased ALP activity. Moreover, we found that ATP can affect mineralization in a biphasic manner, at low concentrations ATP always increases mineral deposition while at high concentrations it always reduces mineral deposition. In conclusion, we show the osteogenic effect of ATP on both early and late stage activities like differentiation and mineralization, for the first time in human osteoblastic cells.

  4. Significance of Notch1-signaling pathway in human pancreatic development and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huankai; Zhou, Lan; Awadallah, Amad; Xin, Wei

    2013-05-01

    In animal studies, Notch1-signaling pathway plays an important role in the pancreatic embryogenesis by promoting pancreatic progenitor cells self-renewal and exocrine linage development. The persistent activation of Notch pathway could arrest the organ development and keep cells at an undifferentiated stage. Studies have shown that Notch1-signaling pathway is upregulated in invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Here we examined the expression pattern of Notch1 and Hes1 in human fetal pancreatic tissues to elucidate the role of Notch1 in human pancreatic embryonic development. We also compared Notch1 expression in tissues from PDAC, chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm. Our data show that Notch1/Hes1-signaling pathway is activated during early pancreatic embryogenesis and reaches the highest at birth. After pancreas is fully developed, Notch1/Hes1 pathway is inactivated even though Notch1 protein cell-surface expression is upregulated. We also showed that the expression of both Notch1 and Hes1 are present in 50% (33/66) of PDACs, but not in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms. These findings indicate that Notch1 activation is only apparent in late stage of pancreatic carcinogenesis, suggesting that treatment with Notch-signaling inhibitors including γ-secretase should be selectively used for PDACs with confirmed Notch1-signaling activation.

  5. Evidence that filaggrin is a component of cornified cell envelopes in human plantar epidermis.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, M; Haftek, M; Sebbag, M; Montézin, M; Girbal-Neuhauser, E; Schmitt, D; Serre, G

    1996-01-01

    Cornified cell envelope (CE) is generated during the late stages of epidermal differentiation and is made up of proteins covalently linked together by transglutaminases. To determine whether filaggrin is a component of this structure in humans, we analysed highly purified CE from plantar stratum corneum. An immunoelectron microscopy analysis showed specific binding of four different anti-(pro)filaggrin monoclonal antibodies to the surface of the CE, proved previously to be free of non-covalently linked proteins. Moreover, the anti-filaggrin activity of one of the antibodies was absorbed by preincubation with the plantar CE, as determined by ELISA. Convincingly, fragments of CE produced by proteolytic digestion of the structures were stained by this antibody on immunoblots. These data provide direct evidence that filaggrin is a component of CE purified from human plantar stratum corneum. Cross-linking between CE and the filaggrin-containing fibrous matrix may enhance the structural cohesion of the corneocytes and thus the resistance of the stratum corneum. PMID:8694761

  6. Opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans elicits a temporal response in primary human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Lopes, José Pedro; Stylianou, Marios; Nilsson, Gunnar; Urban, Constantin F

    2015-07-20

    Immunosuppressed patients are frequently afflicted with severe mycoses caused by opportunistic fungal pathogens. Besides being a commensal, colonizing predominantly skin and mucosal surfaces, Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen. Mast cells are present in tissues prone to fungal colonization being expectedly among the first immune cells to get into contact with C. albicans. However, mast cell-fungus interaction remains a neglected area of study. Here we show that human mast cells mounted specific responses towards C. albicans. Collectively, mast cell responses included the launch of initial, intermediate and late phase components determined by the secretion of granular proteins and cytokines. Initially mast cells reduced fungal viability and occasionally internalized yeasts. C. albicans could evade ingestion by intracellular growth leading to cellular death. Furthermore, secreted factors in the supernatants of infected cells recruited neutrophils, but not monocytes. Late stages were marked by the release of cytokines that are known to be anti-inflammatory suggesting a modulation of initial responses. C. albicans-infected mast cells formed extracellular DNA traps, which ensnared but did not kill the fungus. Our results suggest that mast cells serve as tissue sentinels modulating antifungal immune responses during C. albicans infection. Consequently, these findings open new doors for understanding fungal pathogenicity.

  7. Bridging in vitro and in vivo metabolism and transport of faldaprevir in human using a novel cocultured human hepatocyte system, HepatoPac.

    PubMed

    Ramsden, Diane; Tweedie, Donald J; Chan, Tom S; Taub, Mitchell E; Li, Yongmei

    2014-03-01

    An increased appreciation of the importance of transporter and enzyme interplay in drug clearance and a desire to delineate these mechanisms necessitates the utilization of models that contain a full complement of enzymes and transporters at physiologically relevant activities. Additionally, the development of drugs with longer half-lives requires in vitro systems with extended incubation times that allow characterization of metabolic pathways for low-clearance drugs. A recently developed coculture hepatocyte model, HepatoPac, has been applied to meet these challenges. Faldaprevir is a drug in late-stage development for the treatment of hepatitis C. Faldaprevir is a low-clearance drug with the somewhat unique characteristic of being slowly metabolized, producing two abundant hydroxylated metabolites (M2a and M2b) in feces (∼40% of the dose) without exhibiting significant levels of circulating metabolites in humans. The human HepatoPac model was investigated to characterize the metabolism and transport of faldaprevir. In human HepatoPac cultures, M2a and M2b were the predominant metabolites formed, with extents of formation comparable to in vivo. Direct glucuronidation of faldaprevir was shown to be a minor metabolic pathway. HepatoPac studies also demonstrated that faldaprevir is concentrated in liver with active uptake by multiple transporters (including OATP1B1 and Na(+)-dependent transporters). Overall, human HepatoPac cultures provided valuable insights into the metabolism and disposition of faldaprevir in humans and demonstrated the importance of enzyme and transporter interplay in the clearance of the drug.

  8. The human papillomavirus type 11 E1/\\E4 protein is not essential for viral genome amplification.

    PubMed

    Fang, L; Budgeon, L R; Doorbar, J; Briggs, E R; Howett, M K

    2006-08-01

    An abundant human papillomavirus (HPV) protein E1/\\E4 is expressed late in the virus life cycle in the terminally differentiated layers of epithelia. The expression of E1/\\E4 usually coincides with the onset of viral DNA amplification. However, the function of E1/\\E4 in viral life cycle is not completely understood. To examine the role of E1/\\E4 in the virus life cycle, we introduced a single nucleotide change in the HPV-11 genome to result in a truncation of E1/\\E4 protein without affecting the E2 amino acid sequence. This mutated HPV-11 genome was introduced into a human foreskin keratinocyte cell line immortalized by the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, deficient in p16(INK4a) expression, and previously shown to support the HPV-11 life cycle when grown in organotypic raft culture. We have demonstrated that E1/\\E4 is dispensable for HPV-11 viral DNA amplification in the late stages of the viral life cycle.

  9. Human cytomegalovirus US28 facilitates cell-to-cell viral dissemination.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Vanessa M; Gardner, Thomas J; Redmann, Veronika; Bongers, Gerold; Lira, Sergio A; Tortorella, Domenico

    2014-03-12

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes a number of viral proteins with homology to cellular G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These viral GPCRs, including US27, US28, UL33, and UL78, have been ascribed numerous functions during infection, including activating diverse cellular pathways, binding to immunomodulatory chemokines, and impacting virus dissemination. To investigate the role of US28 during virus infection, two variants of the clinical isolate TB40/E were generated: TB40/E-US28(YFP) expressing a C-terminal yellow fluorescent protein tag, and TB40/E-FLAG(YFP) in which a FLAG-YFP cassette replaces the US28 coding region. The TB40/E-US28(YFP) protein localized as large perinuclear fluorescent structures at late times post-infection in fibroblasts, endothelial, and epithelial cells. Interestingly, US28(YFP) is a non-glycosylated membrane protein throughout the course of infection. US28 appears to impact cell-to-cell spread of virus, as the DUS28 virus (TB40/E-FLAG(YFP)) generated a log-greater yield of extracellular progeny whose spread could be significantly neutralized in fibroblasts. Most strikingly, in epithelial cells, where dissemination of virus occurs exclusively by the cell-to-cell route, TB40/E-FLAG(YFP) (DUS28) displayed a significant growth defect. The data demonstrates that HCMV US28 may contribute at a late stage of the viral life cycle to cell-to-cell dissemination of virus.

  10. Slower evolution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 quasispecies during progression to AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Delwart, E L; Pan, H; Sheppard, H W; Wolpert, D; Neumann, A U; Korber, B; Mullins, J I

    1997-01-01

    The evolution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) quasispecies at the envelope gene was studied from the time of infection in 11 men who experienced different rates of CD4+ cell count decline and 6 men with unknown dates of infection by using DNA heteroduplex mobility assays. Quasispecies were genetically homogeneous near the time of seroconversion. Subsequently, slower proviral genetic diversification and higher plasma viremia correlated with rapid CD4+ cell count decline. Except for the fastest progressors to AIDS, highly diverse quasispecies developed in all subjects within 3 to 4 years. High quasispecies diversity was then maintained for years until again becoming more homogeneous in a subset of late-stage AIDS patients. Individuals who maintained high CD4+ cell counts showed continuous genetic turnover of their complex proviral quasispecies, while more closely related sets of variants were found in longitudinal samples of severely immunocompromised patients. The limited number of variants that grew out in short-term PBMC cocultures were rare in the uncultured proviral quasispecies of healthy, long-term infected individuals but more common in vivo in patients with low CD4+ cell counts. The slower evolution of HIV-1 observed during rapid progression to AIDS and in advanced patients may reflect ineffective host-mediated selection pressures on replicating quasispecies. PMID:9311829

  11. Using tumour phylogenetics to identify the roots of metastasis in humans.

    PubMed

    Naxerova, Kamila; Jain, Rakesh K

    2015-05-01

    In cancer, much uncertainty remains regarding the origins of metastatic disease. Models of metastatic progression offer competing views on when dissemination occurs (at an early or late stage of tumour development), whether metastases at different sites arise independently and directly from the primary tumour or give rise to each other, and whether dynamic cell exchange occurs between synchronously growing lesions. Although it is probable that many routes can lead to the establishment of systemic disease, clinical observations suggest that distinct modes of metastasis might prevail in different tumour types. Gaining a more-comprehensive understanding of the evolutionary processes that underlie metastasis is not only relevant from a basic biological perspective, but also has profound clinical implications. The 'tree of life' of metastatic cancer contains answers to many outstanding questions about the development of systemic disease, but has only been reconstructed in a limited number of patients. Here we review available data on the phylogenetic relationships between primary solid tumours and their metastases, and examine to what degree they support different models of metastatic progression. We provide a description of experimental methods for lineage tracing in human cancer, ranging from broad DNA-sequencing approaches to more-targeted techniques, and discuss their respective benefits and caveats. Finally, we propose future research questions in the area of cancer phylogenetics.

  12. Reduced graphene oxide-coated hydroxyapatite composites stimulate spontaneous osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Ho; Shin, Yong Cheol; Jin, Oh Seong; Kang, Seok Hee; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Park, Jong-Chul; Hong, Suck Won; Han, Dong-Wook

    2015-07-21

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have great potential as cell sources for bone tissue engineering and regeneration, but the control and induction of their specific differentiation into bone cells remain challenging. Graphene-based nanomaterials are considered attractive candidates for biomedical applications such as scaffolds in tissue engineering, substrates for SC differentiation and components of implantable devices, due to their biocompatible and bioactive properties. Despite the potential biomedical applications of graphene and its derivatives, only limited information is available regarding their osteogenic activity. This study concentrates upon the effects of reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-coated hydroxyapatite (HAp) composites on osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. The average particle sizes of HAp and rGO were 1270 ± 476 nm and 438 ± 180 nm, respectively. When coated on HAp particulates, rGO synergistically enhanced spontaneous osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, without hampering their proliferation. This result was confirmed by determining alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization of calcium and phosphate as early and late stage markers of osteogenic differentiation. It is suggested that rGO-coated HAp composites can be effectively utilized as dental and orthopedic bone fillers since these graphene-based particulate materials have potent effects on stimulating the spontaneous differentiation of MSCs and show superior bioactivity and osteoinductive potential.

  13. Laser immunotherapy: initial results from a human breast cancer pilot trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hode, Tomas; Guerra, Maria C.; Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Lunn, John A.; Adelsteinsson, Orn; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2010-02-01

    Laser Immunotherapy is an experimental treatment modality for late-stage, metastatic tumors, which targets solid primary and/or secondary tumors and utilizes an autologous vaccine-like approach to stimulate immune responses. Specifically, laser immunotherapy combines laser-induced in situ tumor devitalization with an immunoadjuvant for local immunostimulation. Here we report the initial results from a human breast cancer pilot trial with laser immunotherapy. Six stage III and IV cancer patients were treated, all of which were considered to be out of all other options, and preliminary data at the three-month examination are presented. The immediate goal of the trial was to determine the patient tolerance and the toxicity of the therapy, the optimal dose for the alteration of the course of the disease, and the reduction of the tumor burden. Each patient was individually evaluated for toxicity tolerance through physical exams and by appropriate supplemental and routine laboratory tests. Observable tumors in patients were followed with physical examination and radiological evaluations. Treatment efficacy was judged by the size and number of local and distant metastases before and after treatment.

  14. Inhibition of infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 particle formation by Gag protein-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Niedrig, M; Gelderblom, H R; Pauli, G; März, J; Bickhard, H; Wolf, H; Modrow, S

    1994-06-01

    Sequential overlapping Gag protein-derived oligopeptides of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) 22 to 24 amino acids long, were synthesized and tested in vitro for antiviral activity. Two synthetic peptides, one derived from the matrix protein p17 (NPGLLETSEGCRQ, amino acids 47 to 59) and one located in the capsid protein p24 (PAATLEEMMTA, amino acids 339 to 349) inhibited the production of infectious virus when added to HIV-1-infected cultures when used in the range of 20 to 200 micrograms/ml. As shown by thin section electron microscopy, peptide treatment resulted in the release of immature, deformed virus particles suggesting that the two peptides interfered with assembly and maturation. Other Gag protein-derived oligopeptides had little or no influence on virus production. To characterize further the functionally active regions we synthesized peptide derivatives with three consecutive amino acids substituted by alanine; they did not cause inhibition. Therefore the regions responsible for inhibition were located between amino acids 50 to 61 in p17, and 342 to 350 in p24. These observations might lead to the development of a new antiviral strategy affecting the late stage of virus replication.

  15. Global gene expression profiles induced by phytoestrogens in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dip, Ramiro; Lenz, Sarah; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Le Bizec, Bruno; Gmuender, Hans; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2008-03-01

    The nutritional intake of phytoestrogens seems to reduce the risk of breast cancer or other neoplastic diseases. However, these epidemiological findings remain controversial because low doses of phytoestrogens, achievable through soy-rich diets, stimulate the proliferation of estrogen-sensitive tumor cells. The question of whether such phytochemicals prevent cancer or rather pose additional health hazards prompted us to examine global gene expression programs induced by a typical soy product. After extraction from soymilk, phytoestrogens were deconjugated and processed through reverse- and normal-phase cartridges. The resulting mixture was used to treat human target cells that represent a common model system for mammary tumorigenesis. Analysis of mRNA on high-density microarrays revealed that soy phytoestrogens induce a genomic fingerprint that is indistinguishable from the transcriptional effects of the endogenous hormone 17beta-estradiol. Highly congruent responses were also observed by comparing the physiologic estradiol with daidzein, coumestrol, enterolactone, or resveratrol, each representing distinct phytoestrogen structures. More diverging transcriptional profiles were generated when an inducible promoter was used to reconstitute the expression of estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta). Therefore, phytoestrogens appear to mitigate estrogenic signaling in the presence of both ER subtypes but, in late-stage cancer cells lacking ERbeta, these phytochemicals contribute to a tumor-promoting transcriptional signature.

  16. Pathway-Specific Engineered Mouse Allograft Models Functionally Recapitulate Human Serous Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Szabova, Ludmila; Bupp, Sujata; Kamal, Muhaymin; Householder, Deborah B.; Hernandez, Lidia; Schlomer, Jerome J.; Baran, Maureen L.; Yi, Ming; Stephens, Robert M.; Annunziata, Christina M.; Martin, Philip L.; Van Dyke, Terry A.

    2014-01-01

    The high mortality rate from ovarian cancers can be attributed to late-stage diagnosis and lack of effective treatment. Despite enormous effort to develop better targeted therapies, platinum-based chemotherapy still remains the standard of care for ovarian cancer patients, and resistance occurs at a high rate. One of the rate limiting factors for translation of new drug discoveries into clinical treatments has been the lack of suitable preclinical cancer models with high predictive value. We previously generated genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models based on perturbation of Tp53 and Rb with or without Brca1 or Brca2 that develop serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC) closely resembling the human disease on histologic and molecular levels. Here, we describe an adaptation of these GEM models to orthotopic allografts that uniformly develop tumors with short latency and are ideally suited for routine preclinical studies. Ovarian tumors deficient in Brca1 respond to treatment with cisplatin and olaparib, a PARP inhibitor, whereas Brca1-wild type tumors are non-responsive to treatment, recapitulating the relative sensitivities observed in patients. These mouse models provide the opportunity for evaluation of effective therapeutics, including prediction of differential responses in Brca1-wild type and Brca1–deficient tumors and development of relevant biomarkers. PMID:24748377

  17. Photoacoustic detection of metastatic melanoma cells in the human circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Weight, Ryan M; Viator, John A; Dale, Paul S; Caldwell, Charles W; Lisle, Allison E

    2006-10-15

    Detection of disseminating tumor cells among patients suffering from various types and stages of cancer can function as an early warning system, alerting the physician of the metastatic spread or recurrence of the disease. Early detection of such cells can result in preventative treatment of the disease, while late stage detection can serve as an indicator of the effectiveness of chemotherapeutics. The prognostic value of exposing disseminating tumor cells poses an urgent need for an efficient, accurate screening method for metastatic cells. We propose a system for the detection of metastatic circulating tumor cells based on the thermoelastic properties of melanoma. The method employs photoacoustic excitation coupled with a detection system capable of determining the presence of disseminating cells within the circulatory system in vitro. Detection trials consisting of tissue phantoms and a human melanoma cell line resulted in a detection threshold of the order of ten individual cells, thus validating the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism. Results imply the potential to assay simple blood draws, from healthy and metastatic patients, for the presence of cancerous melanoma providing an unprecedented method for routine cancer screening.

  18. Photoacoustic detection of metastatic melanoma cells in the human circulatory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weight, Ryan M.; Viator, John A.; Dale, Paul S.; Caldwell, Charles W.; Lisle, Allison E.

    2006-10-01

    Detection of disseminating tumor cells among patients suffering from various types and stages of cancer can function as an early warning system, alerting the physician of the metastatic spread or recurrence of the disease. Early detection of such cells can result in preventative treatment of the disease, while late stage detection can serve as an indicator of the effectiveness of chemotherapeutics. The prognostic value of exposing disseminating tumor cells poses an urgent need for an efficient, accurate screening method for metastatic cells. We propose a system for the detection of metastatic circulating tumor cells based on the thermoelastic properties of melanoma. The method employs photoacoustic excitation coupled with a detection system capable of determining the presence of disseminating cells within the circulatory system in vitro. Detection trials consisting of tissue phantoms and a human melanoma cell line resulted in a detection threshold of the order of ten individual cells, thus validating the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism. Results imply the potential to assay simple blood draws, from healthy and metastatic patients, for the presence of cancerous melanoma providing an unprecedented method for routine cancer screening.

  19. Expression of HGF and c-Met Proteins in Human Keratoconus Corneas.

    PubMed

    You, Jingjing; Wen, Li; Roufas, Athena; Hodge, Chris; Sutton, Gerard; Madigan, Michele C

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is a progressive degenerative inflammatory-related disease of the human cornea leading to decreased visual function. The pathogenesis of KC remains to be understood. Recent genetic studies indicate that gene variants of an inflammation-related molecule, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), are associated with an increased susceptibility for developing KC. However HGF protein expression in KC has not been explored. In this initial study, we investigated late-stage KC and control corneas for the expression of HGF and its receptor mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (c-Met/Met). KC buttons (~8 mm diameter) (n = 10) and whole control corneas (n = 6) were fixed in 10% formalin or 2% paraformaldehyde, paraffin embedded and sectioned. Sections were immunolabelled with HGF and c-Met antibodies, visualised using immunofluorescence, and examined with scanning laser confocal microscopy. Semiquantitative grading was used to compare HGF and c-Met immunostaining in KC and control corneas. Overall, KC corneas showed increased HGF and c-Met immunostaining compared to controls. KC corneal epithelium displayed heterogeneous moderate-to-strong immunoreactivity for HGF and c-Met, particularly in the basal epithelium adjacent to the cone area. Taken together with the recent genetic studies, our results further support a possible role for HGF/c-Met in the pathogenesis of KC.

  20. Bap31 is a novel target of the human papillomavirus E5 protein.

    PubMed

    Regan, Jennifer A; Laimins, Laimonis A

    2008-10-01

    The E5 proteins of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small hydrophobic proteins that are expressed in the early and late stages of the viral life cycle; however, their role in HPV pathogenesis is not clearly understood. In this study, a split-ubiquitin yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid system was used to identify B-cell-associated protein 31 (Bap31) as a binding partner of HPV E5 proteins. The association of these proteins was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation of complexes of Bap31 with either HPV type 16 (HPV16) or HPV31 E5. In addition, Bap31 and E5 were found to colocalize in perinuclear patterns consistent with localization to the endoplasmic reticulum. Mutational analysis of E5 identified amino acids in the extreme C terminus as important for stabilizing the interaction with Bap31. Deletion of these C-terminal amino acids of E5 in the context of complete HPV31 genomes resulted in impaired proliferative capacity of HPV-positive keratinocytes following differentiation. When small interfering RNAs were used to reduce the levels of Bap31, the proliferative ability of HPV-positive keratinocytes upon differentiation was also reduced, implicating Bap31 as a regulator of this process. These studies identify a novel binding partner of the high-risk HPV E5 proteins and provide insight into how the E5 proteins may modulate the life cycle in differentiating cells.

  1. Sleeping Sickness in Travelers - Do They Really Sleep?

    PubMed Central

    Urech, Karin; Neumayr, Andreas; Blum, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    The number of imported Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) cases in non-endemic countries has increased over the last years. The objective of this analysis is to describe the clinical presentation of HAT in Caucasian travelers. Literature was screened (MEDLINE, Pubmed) using the terms “Human African Trypanosomiasis”, “travelers” and “expatriates”; all European languages except Slavic ones were included. Publications without clinical description of patients were only included in the epidemiological analysis. Forty-five reports on Caucasians with T.b. rhodesiense and 15 with T.b. gambiense infections were included in the analysis of the clinical parameters. Both species have presented with fever (T.b. rhodesiense 97.8% and T.b. gambiense 93.3%), headache (50% each) and a trypanosomal chancre (T.b. rhodesiense 84.4%, T.b. gambiense 46.7%). While sleeping disorders dominate the clinical presentation of HAT in endemic regions, there have been only rare reports in travelers: insomnia (T.b. rhodesiense 7.1%, T.b. gambiense 21.4%), diurnal somnolence (T.b. rhodesiense 4.8%, T.b. gambiense none). Surprisingly, jaundice has been seen in 24.2% of the Caucasian T.b. rhodesiense patients, but has never been described in HAT patients in endemic regions. These results contrast to the clinical presentation of T.b. gambiense and T.b. rhodesiense HAT in Africans in endemic regions, where the presentation of chronic T.b. gambiense and acute T.b. rhodesiense HAT is different. The analysis of 14 reports on T.b. gambiense HAT in Africans living in a non-endemic country shows that neurological symptoms such as somnolence (46.2%), motor deficit (64.3%) and reflex anomalies (14.3%) as well as psychiatric symptoms such as hallucinations (21.4%) or depression (21.4%) may dominate the clinical picture. Often, the diagnosis has been missed initially: some patients have even been hospitalized in psychiatric clinics. In travelers T.b. rhodesiense and gambiense present as acute

  2. Sleeping sickness in travelers - do they really sleep?

    PubMed

    Urech, Karin; Neumayr, Andreas; Blum, Johannes

    2011-11-01

    The number of imported Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) cases in non-endemic countries has increased over the last years. The objective of this analysis is to describe the clinical presentation of HAT in Caucasian travelers. Literature was screened (MEDLINE, Pubmed) using the terms "Human African Trypanosomiasis", "travelers" and "expatriates"; all European languages except Slavic ones were included. Publications without clinical description of patients were only included in the epidemiological analysis. Forty-five reports on Caucasians with T.b. rhodesiense and 15 with T.b. gambiense infections were included in the analysis of the clinical parameters. Both species have presented with fever (T.b. rhodesiense 97.8% and T.b. gambiense 93.3%), headache (50% each) and a trypanosomal chancre (T.b. rhodesiense 84.4%, T.b. gambiense 46.7%). While sleeping disorders dominate the clinical presentation of HAT in endemic regions, there have been only rare reports in travelers: insomnia (T.b. rhodesiense 7.1%, T.b. gambiense 21.4%), diurnal somnolence (T.b. rhodesiense 4.8%, T.b. gambiense none). Surprisingly, jaundice has been seen in 24.2% of the Caucasian T.b. rhodesiense patients, but has never been described in HAT patients in endemic regions. These results contrast to the clinical presentation of T.b. gambiense and T.b. rhodesiense HAT in Africans in endemic regions, where the presentation of chronic T.b. gambiense and acute T.b. rhodesiense HAT is different. The analysis of 14 reports on T.b. gambiense HAT in Africans living in a non-endemic country shows that neurological symptoms such as somnolence (46.2%), motor deficit (64.3%) and reflex anomalies (14.3%) as well as psychiatric symptoms such as hallucinations (21.4%) or depression (21.4%) may dominate the clinical picture. Often, the diagnosis has been missed initially: some patients have even been hospitalized in psychiatric clinics. In travelers T.b. rhodesiense and gambiense present as acute illnesses and

  3. Knowledge Gaps in Rodent Pancreas Biology: Taking Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Beta Cells into Our Own Hands

    PubMed Central

    Santosa, Munirah Mohamad; Low, Blaise Su Jun; Pek, Nicole Min Qian; Teo, Adrian Kee Keong

    2016-01-01

    In the field of stem cell biology and diabetes, we and others seek to derive mature and functional human pancreatic β cells for disease modeling and cell replacement therapy. Traditionally, knowledge gathered from rodents is extended to human pancreas developmental biology research involving human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). While much has been learnt from rodent pancreas biology in the early steps toward Pdx1+ pancreatic progenitors, much less is known about the transition toward Ngn3+ pancreatic endocrine progenitors. Essentially, the later steps of pancreatic β cell development and maturation remain elusive to date. As a result, the most recent advances in the stem cell and diabetes field have relied upon combinatorial testing of numerous growth factors and chemical compounds in an arbitrary trial-and-error fashion to derive mature and functional human pancreatic β cells from hPSCs. Although this hit-or-miss approach appears to have made some headway in maturing human pancreatic β cells in vitro, its underlying biology is vaguely understood. Therefore, in this mini-review, we discuss some of these late-stage signaling pathways that are involved in human pancreatic β cell differentiation and highlight our current understanding of their relevance in rodent pancreas biology. Our efforts here unravel several novel signaling pathways that can be further studied to shed light on unexplored aspects of rodent pancreas biology. New investigations into these signaling pathways are expected to advance our knowledge in human pancreas developmental biology and to aid in the translation of stem cell biology in the context of diabetes treatments. PMID:26834702

  4. Knowledge Gaps in Rodent Pancreas Biology: Taking Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Beta Cells into Our Own Hands.

    PubMed

    Santosa, Munirah Mohamad; Low, Blaise Su Jun; Pek, Nicole Min Qian; Teo, Adrian Kee Keong

    2015-01-01

    In the field of stem cell biology and diabetes, we and others seek to derive mature and functional human pancreatic β cells for disease modeling and cell replacement therapy. Traditionally, knowledge gathered from rodents is extended to human pancreas developmental biology research involving human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). While much has been learnt from rodent pancreas biology in the early steps toward Pdx1(+) pancreatic progenitors, much less is known about the transition toward Ngn3(+) pancreatic endocrine progenitors. Essentially, the later steps of pancreatic β cell development and maturation remain elusive to date. As a result, the most recent advances in the stem cell and diabetes field have relied upon combinatorial testing of numerous growth factors and chemical compounds in an arbitrary trial-and-error fashion to derive mature and functional human pancreatic β cells from hPSCs. Although this hit-or-miss approach appears to have made some headway in maturing human pancreatic β cells in vitro, its underlying biology is vaguely understood. Therefore, in this mini-review, we discuss some of these late-stage signaling pathways that are involved in human pancreatic β cell differentiation and highlight our current understanding of their relevance in rodent pancreas biology. Our efforts here unravel several novel signaling pathways that can be further studied to shed light on unexplored aspects of rodent pancreas biology. New investigations into these signaling pathways are expected to advance our knowledge in human pancreas developmental biology and to aid in the translation of stem cell biology in the context of diabetes treatments.

  5. LIN28 cooperates with WNT signaling to drive invasive intestinal and colorectal adenocarcinoma in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Ho-Chou; Schwitalla, Sarah; Qian, Zhirong; LaPier, Grace S.; Yermalovich, Alena; Ku, Yuan-Chieh; Chen, Shann-Ching; Viswanathan, Srinivas R.; Zhu, Hao; Nishihara, Reiko; Inamura, Kentaro; Kim, Sun A.; Morikawa, Teppei; Mima, Kosuke; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Yang, Juhong; Meredith, Gavin; Fuchs, Charles S.; Ogino, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a major contributor to cancer-related mortality. LIN28A and LIN28B are highly related RNA-binding protein paralogs that regulate biogenesis of let-7 microRNAs and influence development, metabolism, tissue regeneration, and oncogenesis. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of either LIN28 paralog cooperates with the Wnt pathway to promote invasive intestinal adenocarcinoma in murine models. When LIN28 alone is induced genetically, half of the resulting tumors harbor Ctnnb1 (β-catenin) mutation. When overexpressed in ApcMin/+ mice, LIN28 accelerates tumor formation and enhances proliferation and invasiveness. In conditional genetic models, enforced expression of a LIN28-resistant form of the let-7 microRNA reduces LIN28-induced tumor burden, while silencing of LIN28 expression reduces tumor volume and increases tumor differentiation, indicating that LIN28 contributes to tumor maintenance. We detected aberrant expression of LIN28A and/or LIN28B in 38% of a large series of human CRC samples (n = 595), where LIN28 expression levels were associated with invasive tumor growth. Our late-stage CRC murine models and analysis of primary human tumors demonstrate prominent roles for both LIN28 paralogs in promoting CRC growth and progression and implicate the LIN28/let-7 pathway as a therapeutic target. PMID:25956904

  6. Urea Derivatives of 2-Aryl-benzothiazol-5-amines: A New Class of Potential Drugs for Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Donald A; Gillespie, J Robert; McQueen, Joshua; Hulverson, Matthew A; Ranade, Ranae M; Creason, Sharon A; Herbst, Zackary M; Gelb, Michael H; Buckner, Frederick S; Tidwell, Richard R

    2017-02-09

    A previous publication from this lab (Patrick, et al. Bioorg. Med. Chem. 2016, 24 , 2451 - 2465 ) explored the antitrypanosomal activities of novel derivatives of 2-(2-benzamido)ethyl-4-phenylthiazole (1), which had been identified as a hit against Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis. While a number of these compounds, particularly the urea analogues, were quite potent, these molecules as a whole exhibited poor metabolic stability. The present work describes the synthesis of 65 new analogues arising from medicinal chemistry optimization at different sites on the molecule. The most promising compounds were the urea derivatives of 2-aryl-benzothiazol-5-amines. One such analogue, (S)-2-(3,4-difluorophenyl)-5-(3-fluoro-N-pyrrolidylamido)benzothiazole (57) was chosen for in vivo efficacy studies based upon in vitro activity, metabolic stability, and brain penetration. This compound attained 5/5 cures in murine models of both early and late stage human African trypanosomiasis, representing a new lead for the development of drugs to combat this neglected disease.

  7. Molecular genetics of human cancer predisposition and progression.

    PubMed

    Cavenee, W K; Scrable, H J; James, C D

    1991-04-01

    The development of human cancer is generally thought to entail a series of events that cause a progressively more malignant phenotype. Such a hypothesis predicts that tumor cells of the ultimate stage will carry each of the events, cells of the penultimate stage will carry each of the events less the last one and so on. A dissection of the pathway from a normal cell to a fully malignant tumor may thus be viewed as the unraveling of a nested set of aberrations. In experiments designed to elucidate these events we have compared genotypic combinations at genomic loci defined by restriction endonuclease recognition site variation in normal and tumor tissues from patients with various forms and stages of cancer. The first step, inherited predisposition, is best described for retinoblastoma in which a recessive mutation of a locus residing in the 13q14 region of the genome is unmasked by aberrant, but specific, mitotic chromosomal segregation. Similar mechanisms involving the distal short arm of chromosome 17 are apparent in astrocytic tumors and the events are shared by cells in each malignancy state. DNA sequencing indicates that these events accomplish the homozygosis of mutant alleles of the p53 gene. Copy number amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene occurs in intermediate and late-stage tumors whereas loss of heterozygosity for loci on chromosome 10 is restricted to the ultimate stage, glioblastoma multiforme. These results suggest a genetic approach to defining degrees of tumor progression and the locations of genes involved in the pathway as a prelude to their molecular isolation and characterization.

  8. Retinal Remodeling and Metabolic Alterations in Human AMD

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Bryan W.; Pfeiffer, Rebecca L.; Ferrell, William D.; Watt, Carl B.; Tucker, James; Marc, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive retinal degeneration resulting in central visual field loss, ultimately causing debilitating blindness. AMD affects 18% of Americans from 65 to 74, 30% older than 74 years of age and is the leading cause of severe vision loss and blindness in Western populations. While many genetic and environmental risk factors are known for AMD, we currently know less about the mechanisms mediating disease progression. The pathways and mechanisms through which genetic and non-genetic risk factors modulate development of AMD pathogenesis remain largely unexplored. Moreover, current treatment for AMD is palliative and limited to wet/exudative forms. Retina is a complex, heterocellular tissue and most retinal cell classes are impacted or altered in AMD. Defining disease and stage-specific cytoarchitectural and metabolic responses in AMD is critical for highlighting targets for intervention. The goal of this article is to illustrate cell types impacted in AMD and demonstrate the implications of those changes, likely beginning in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), for remodeling of the the neural retina. Tracking heterocellular responses in disease progression is best achieved with computational molecular phenotyping (CMP), a tool that enables acquisition of a small molecule fingerprint for every cell in the retina. CMP uncovered critical cellular and molecular pathologies (remodeling and reprogramming) in progressive retinal degenerations such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We now applied these approaches to normal human and AMD tissues mapping progression of cellular and molecular changes in AMD retinas, including late-stage forms of the disease. PMID:27199657

  9. Glycoconjugates reveal diversity of human neural stem cells (hNSCs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs).

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Majury; Roll, Lars; Langenstroth, Daniel; Brüstle, Oliver; Faissner, Andreas

    2017-03-15

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into various cell types of the central nervous system. This potential can be recapitulated by human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) in vitro. The differentiation capacity of hiPSCs is characterized by several stages with distinct morphologies and the expression of various marker molecules. We used the monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 487(LeX), 5750(LeX) and 473HD to analyze the expression pattern of particular carbohydrate motifs as potential markers at six differentiation stages of hiPSCs. Mouse ESCs were used as a comparison. At the pluripotent stage, 487(LeX)-, 5750(LeX)- and 473HD-related glycans were differently expressed. Later, cells of the three germ layers in embryoid bodies (hEBs) and, even after neuralization of hEBs, subpopulations of cells were labeled with these surface antibodies. At the human rosette-stage of NSCs (hR-NSC), LeX- and 473HD-related epitopes showed antibody-specific expression patterns. We also found evidence that these surface antibodies could be used to distinguish the hR-NSCs from the hSR-NSCs stages. Characterization of hNSCs(FGF-2/EGF) derived from hSR-NSCs revealed that both LeX antibodies and the 473HD antibody labeled subpopulations of hNSCs(FGF-2/EGF). Finally, we identified potential LeX carrier molecules that were spatiotemporally regulated in early and late stages of differentiation. Our study provides new insights into the regulation of glycoconjugates during early human stem cell development. The mAbs 487(LeX), 5750(LeX) and 473HD are promising tools for identifying distinct stages during neural differentiation.

  10. Dysfunctional Patterns of Gamma-Band Activity in Response to Human Faces Compared to Non-Facial Stimuli in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Sangrae; Shim, Mi-Seon; Kim, Do-Won

    2016-01-01

    Objective Healthy individuals show stronger gamma-band activities (GBAs) for socially relevant stimuli (human faces) than for non-relevant ones. This study aimed to examine whether this gamma-band preference occurs in patients with schizophrenia. Methods EEG was recorded for 24 patients with schizophrenia and 23 healthy controls while they viewed pictures of human faces, chairs, and nature scenes. The spectral powers of high-beta (20–30 Hz) and gamma (30–80 Hz) frequencies were analyzed along 3 midline cortical regions, and phase synchronization was calculated. Results Compared to the response to non-facial stimuli, higher event related deactivation to facial stimuli was observed for the high-beta frequency across groups. For the gamma frequency, early-stage GBA was increased and late-stage GBA was decreased for all 3 stimuli in patients with schizophrenia compared to healthy controls. Preferential GBA patterns (100–200 and 200–300 ms) were found in healthy controls, but not in patients with schizophrenia. Significant correlation existed between negative symptoms and GBA in the frontal region for chair and scene stimuli. There was no significant intergroup difference in phase synchronization pattern. Conclusion Our results suggest that patients with schizophrenia have deficits in the preferential pattern of GBA for human faces and the deficits in the preferential pattern were mainly influenced by over-response to socially non-relevant stimuli. PMID:27247603

  11. Knockout of Epstein-Barr Virus BPLF1 Retards B-Cell Transformation and Lymphoma Formation in Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guangming; Montgomery, Stephanie A.; Montgomery, Nathan D.; Su, Lishan; Pagano, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT BPLF1 of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is classified as a late lytic cycle protein but is also found in the viral tegument, suggesting its potential involvement at both initial and late stages of viral infection. BPLF1 possesses both deubiquitinating and deneddylating activity located in its N-terminal domain and is involved in processes that affect viral infectivity, viral DNA replication, DNA repair, and immune evasion. A recently constructed EBV BPLF1-knockout (KO) virus was used in conjunction with a humanized mouse model that can be infected with EBV, enabling the first characterization of BPLF1 function in vivo. Results demonstrate that the BPLF1-knockout virus is approximately 90% less infectious than wild-type (WT) virus. Transformation of human B cells, a hallmark of EBV infection, was delayed and reduced with BPLF1-knockout virus. Humanized mice infected with EBV BPLF1-knockout virus showed less weight loss and survived longer than mice infected with equivalent infectious units of WT virus. Additionally, splenic tumors formed in 100% of mice infected with WT EBV but in only 25% of mice infected with BPLF1-KO virus. Morphological features of spleens containing tumors were similar to those in EBV-induced posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) and were almost identical to cases seen in human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The presence of EBV genomes was detected in all mice that developed tumors. The results implicate BPLF1 in human B-cell transformation and tumor formation in humanized mice. PMID:26489865

  12. Human Development, Human Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smillie, David

    One of the truly remarkable events in human evolution is the unprecedented increase in the size of the brain of "Homo" over a brief span of 2 million years. It would appear that some significant selective pressure or opportunity presented itself to this branch of the hominid line and caused a rapid increase in the brain, introducing a…

  13. Humanizing the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Dennis

    1983-01-01

    Reviews some of the steps taken at Shoreline Community College to develop cooperative programs involving vocational and academic faculty, including the creation of a Humanities Advisory Council. Briefly describes some of the cooperative programs, e.g., symposia on critical issues in higher education, guest lectures, and high school outreach. (AYC)

  14. Humanity and human DNA.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Jean-François

    2012-10-01

    Genetics has marked the second half of the 20th century by addressing such formidable problems as the identification of our genes and their role, their interaction with the environment, and even their therapeutic uses. The identification of genes raises questions about differences between humans and non-humans, as well as about the evolution towards trans-humanism and post-humanism. In practise, however, the main question concerns the limits of prenatal genetic diagnosis, not only on account of the seriousness of the affections involved but also because of the choice to be made between following-up the medical indication and engaging in a systematic public health strategy aimed at eliminating children with certain handicaps. History reminds us that genetic science has already been misused by political forces influenced by the ideas of eugenics, particularly in the Nazi period. We may wonder whether it is reasonable to formulate a judgement on the life of a child yet to be born, merely on the basis of a DNA analysis. My experience as a practising geneticist and my involvement in French politics forces me to stress the dangers of a new eugenics hiding behind a medical mask. As demonstrated by epigenetics, human beings cannot be reduced to their DNA alone. In our society, one of the problems concerns individuals whose lives may be considered by some as simply not worth living. Another problem is the place and the social significance of the handicapped amongst us. Fortunately, recent progresses in gene therapy, biotherapy, and even pharmacology, appear to be opening up promising therapeutic perspectives. We should bear in mind that the chief vocation of medical genetics, which fully belongs to the art of medicine, is to heal and to cure. This is precisely where genetics should concentrate its efforts software.

  15. Human Lung Tissue Explants Reveal Novel Interactions during Legionella pneumophila Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Jens; Marwitz, Sebastian; Tiefenau, Jana; Rasch, Janine; Shevchuk, Olga; Kugler, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Histological and clinical investigations describe late stages of Legionnaires' disease but cannot characterize early events of human infection. Cellular or rodent infection models lack the complexity of tissue or have nonhuman backgrounds. Therefore, we developed and applied a novel model for Legionella pneumophila infection comprising living human lung tissue. We stimulated lung explants with L. pneumophila strains and outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) to analyze tissue damage, bacterial replication, and localization as well as the transcriptional response of infected tissue. Interestingly, we found that extracellular adhesion of L. pneumophila to the entire alveolar lining precedes bacterial invasion and replication in recruited macrophages. In contrast, OMVs predominantly bound to alveolar macrophages. Specific damage to septa and epithelia increased over 48 h and was