Science.gov

Sample records for late-stage metastatic colorectal

  1. Poor awareness of colorectal cancer symptoms; a preventable cause of emergency and late stage presentation.

    PubMed

    Manning, A T; Waldron, R; Barry, K

    2006-01-01

    To assess knowledge of colorectal cancer (CRC) symptoms among outpatient attendees, and to review disease stage, presentation and duration of symptoms in patients diagnosed with CRC. A questionnaire survey was used to evaluate knowledge of symptoms of CRC and other malignancies. A review of patients diagnosed with CRC during a two-year period was performed. Of 350 survey participants 26.6% could name a CRC symptom, compared to 53.4% for lung cancer and 71.5% for breast cancer. Of 102 patients diagnosed with CRC 3.9% had Dukes A disease, 32.4% had Dukes B, 39.2% had Dukes C and 24.5% had distant metastases. Forty per cent of patients presented acutely. The mean duration of symptoms was 24 weeks. Knowledge of CRC symptoms is poor and is reflected in the percentage of late stage and emergency presentations. Increasing public awareness of CRC may lead to earlier presentation and improved survival.

  2. The Relationship between Neighborhood Immigrant Composition, Limited English Proficiency, and Late-Stage Colorectal Cancer Diagnosis in California

    PubMed Central

    Mojica, Cynthia M.; Glenn, Beth A.; Chang, Cindy; Bastani, Roshan

    2015-01-01

    Despite the availability of effective early detection technologies, more than half (61%) of colorectal cancers in the United States and 55% in California are identified at an advanced stage. Data on colorectal cancer patients (N = 35,030) diagnosed from 2005 to 2007 were obtained from the California Cancer Registry. Multivariate analyses found a relationship among neighborhood concentration of recent immigrants, neighborhood rates of limited English proficiency, and late-stage colorectal cancer diagnosis. Hispanics living in neighborhoods with a greater percentage of recent immigrants (compared to the lowest percentage) had greater odds (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.22, 2.02) of late-stage diagnosis whereas Hispanics living in neighborhoods with the highest percentage of limited English proficiency (compared to the lowest percentage) had lower odds (OR .71, 95% CI .51, .99) of late-stage diagnosis. These relationships were not observed for other ethnic groups. Results highlight the complex relationship among race/ethnicity, neighborhood characteristics, and colorectal cancer stage at diagnosis. PMID:26504808

  3. Effects of laser immunotherapy on late-stage, metastatic breast cancer patients in a Phase II clinical trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Zhou, Feifan; Li, Xiaosong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Alleruzzo, Luciano; Chen, Wei R.

    2014-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT), a novel technique with a local intervention to induce systemic antitumor effects, was developed to treat metastatic cancers. The pre-clinical studies of LIT have shown its unique characteristics in generating a specific antitumor immunity in treating metastatic tumors in rats and mice. For late-stage, metastatic breast cancer patients, who were considered to be out of other available treatment options, we conducted a small Phase II clinical trial using LIT starting in 2009 in Lima, Peru. This Phase II study was closed in December of 2012, as acknowldged by the Ministry of Health (MOH) of Peur letter 438-2014-OGITT/INS dated March 5th, 2014. Ten patients were enrolled and received LIT in one or multiple 4-week treatment cycles. At the study closing date, four patients were alive and two of them remained cancer free. Here, following the successful conclusion of our Phase II study, we report the clinical effects of LIT on metastatic breast cancer patients. Specifically, we present the overall status of all the patients three years after the treatment and also the outcomes of two long-term surviving patients.

  4. Increased platelet reactivity in patients with late-stage metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Niamh M; Egan, Karl; McFadden, Siobhan; Grogan, Liam; Breathnach, Oscar S; O'Leary, John; Hennessy, Bryan T; Kenny, Dermot

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Platelet hyperreactivity is associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. Cancer patients are at an increased risk of thrombosis, a risk that increases with disease progression. While cancer patients show evidence of platelet activation in vivo, few studies have extensively assessed whether these patients display platelet hyperreactivity. We hypothesized that patients with metastatic cancer would display platelet hyperreactivity, reflecting their associated high risk of thrombosis. In a cohort of patients with metastatic cancer (n = 13), we assessed platelet function using well-established assays of platelet reactivity (agonist-induced platelet aggregation, spontaneous platelet aggregation, and agonist-induced P-selectin expression). In comparison with healthy controls (n = 10), patients with metastatic cancer displayed global platelet hyperreactivity. Agonist-induced platelet aggregation responses to ADP (adenosine diphosphate), epinephrine, collagen, arachidonic acid, and PAR-1 (protease-activated receptor-1) activating peptide, as well as spontaneous platelet aggregation, were significantly increased in patients with metastatic cancer. Furthermore, agonist-induced platelet P-selectin expression was also significantly increased within the patient cohort. We demonstrate that patients with metastatic cancer are characterized by global platelet hyperreactivity, a factor that may contribute to their increased risk of thrombosis. We assessed platelet function in a cohort of patients with metastatic cancer (n = 13) using well-established assays of platelet reactivity. Agonist-induced platelet aggregation and activation in response to platelet agonists, as well as spontaneous platelet aggregation, was significantly increased in cancer patients compared with healthy controls. We demonstrate that patients with metastatic cancer are characterized by global platelet hyperreactivity, a factor that may contribute to their increased risk of thrombosis. PMID

  5. Differences in Late-Stage Diagnosis, Treatment, and Colorectal Cancer-Related Death between Rural and Urban African Americans and Whites in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Robert B.; Markossian, Talar W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Disparities in health outcomes due to a diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) have been reported for a number of demographic groups. This study was conducted to examine the outcomes of late-stage diagnosis, treatment, and cancer-related death according to race and geographic residency status (rural vs urban). Methods: This study utilized…

  6. Differences in Late-Stage Diagnosis, Treatment, and Colorectal Cancer-Related Death between Rural and Urban African Americans and Whites in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Robert B.; Markossian, Talar W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Disparities in health outcomes due to a diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) have been reported for a number of demographic groups. This study was conducted to examine the outcomes of late-stage diagnosis, treatment, and cancer-related death according to race and geographic residency status (rural vs urban). Methods: This study utilized…

  7. Tucatinib (ONT-380) and Trastuzumab for Patients With HER2-positive Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (MOUNTAINEER)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Colorectal Cancer; Colorectal Carcinoma; Colorectal Tumors; Neoplasms, Colorectal; HER-2 Gene Amplification; Metastatic Cancer; Metastatic Colon Cancer; Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum

  8. TAS-102 for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared TAS-102 with placebo in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose disease progressed following prior treatments or who had health conditions that prevented the re-administrati

  9. TAS-102 for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared TAS-102 with placebo in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose disease progressed following prior treatments or who had health conditions that prevented the re-administrati

  10. Factors associated with late stage at diagnosis among Puerto Rico's government health plan colorectal cancer patients: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Ortiz, Karen J; Ríos-Motta, Ruth; Marín-Centeno, Heriberto; Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Ortiz, Ana Patricia

    2016-08-03

    Late stage at diagnosis of cancer is considered a key predictor factor for a lower survival rate. Knowing and understanding the barriers to an early diagnosis of colorectal cancer is critical in the fight to reduce the social and economic burden caused by cancer in Puerto Rico. This study evaluates factors associated to colorectal cancer stage at diagnosis among Puerto Rico's Government Health Plan (GHP) patients. We conducted a cross-sectional study based on a secondary data analysis using information from the Puerto Rico Central Cancer Registry (PRCCR) and the Puerto Rico Health Insurance Administration (PRHIA). Logistic regression models were used to estimate the unadjusted odds ratio (ORs) and adjusted odds ratio (AORs), and their 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Colorectal cancer cases diagnosed between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012, among persons 50 to 64 years of age, participants of the GHP and with a cancer diagnosis reported to the PRCCR were included in the study. There were 68 (35.79 %) colorectal cancer patients diagnosed at early stage while 122 (64.21 %) where diagnosed at late stage. In the multivariate analysis having a diagnostic delay of more than 59 days (AOR 2.94, 95 % CI: 1.32 to 6.52) and having the first visit through the emergency room (AOR 3.48, 95 % CI: 1.60 to 7.60) were strong predictors of being diagnosed with colorectal cancer at a late stage. These results are relevant to understand the factors that influence the outcomes of colorectal cancer patients in the GHP. Therefore, it is important to continue developing studies to understand the Government Health Plan patient's pathways to a cancer diagnosis, in order to promote assertive decisions to improve patient outcomes.

  11. Anti-LRP/LR–Specific Antibody IgG1-iS18 Significantly Impedes Adhesion and Invasion in Early- and Late-Stage Colorectal Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vania, Leila; Chetty, Carryn J; Ferreira, Eloise; Weiss, Stefan FT

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a highly complex disease that has become one of the leading causes of death globally. Metastasis, a major cause of cancer deaths, requires two crucial events, adhesion and invasion. The 37kDa/67kDa laminin receptor (laminin receptor precursor/high-affinity laminin receptor [LRP/LR]) enhances these two steps, consequently aiding in cancer progression. In this study, the role of LRP/LR in adhesion and invasion of early-stage (SW-480 and HT-29) and late-stage (DLD-1) colorectal cancer cells was investigated. Western blotting revealed that early- and late-stage colorectal cancer cells contained significantly higher total LRP/LR levels compared with poorly invasive MCF-7 breast cancer control cells. Flow cytometry revealed that both stages of colorectal cancer displayed significantly higher cell surface LRP/LR levels. Furthermore, upon treatment of colorectal cancer cells with the anti-LRP/LR–specific antibody IgG1-iS18, adhesion to laminin-1 was significantly reduced in both stages. Each stage’s invasive potential was determined using the Matrigel™ invasion assay, showing that invasion was significantly impeded in both colorectal cancer stages when the cells were incubated with IgG1-iS18. In addition, Pearson’s correlation coefficients propose that both total and cell surface LRP/LR levels are directly proportional to the adhesive and invasive potential of both stages of colorectal cancer. Hence, these findings indicate potential for use of the IgG1-iS18 antibody as a promising therapeutic tool for colorectal cancer patients at both stages. PMID:27611822

  12. Increasing late stage colorectal cancer and rectal cancer mortality demonstrates the need for screening: a population based study in Ireland, 1994-2010.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Nicholas; McDevitt, Joseph; Kearney, Patricia M; Sharp, Linda

    2014-05-13

    This paper describes trends in colorectal cancer incidence, survival and mortality from 1994 to 2010 in Ireland prior to the introduction of population-based screening. We examined incidence (National Cancer Registry Ireland (NCRI) and mortality (Central Statistics Office) from 1994 to 2010. Age standardised rates (ASR) for incidence and mortality have been calculated, weighted by the European standard population. Annual percentage change was calculated in addition to testing for linear trends in treatment and case fraction of early and late stage disease. Relative survival was calculated considering deaths from all causes. The colorectal cancer ASR was 63.7 per 100,000 in males and 38.7 per 100,000 in females in 2010. There was little change in the ASR over time in either sex, or when colon and rectal cancers were considered separately; however the number of incident cancers increased significantly during 1994-2010 (1752 to 2298). The case fractions of late stage (III/IV) colon and rectal cancers rose significantly over time. One and 5 year relative survival improved for both sexes between the periods 1994-2008. Colorectal cancer mortality ASRs decreased annually from 1994-2009 by 1.8% (95% CI -2.2, -1.4). Rectal cancer mortality ASRs rose annually by 2.4% (95% CI 1.1, 3.6) and 2.8% (95% CI 1.2, 4.4) in males and females respectively. Increases in late-stage disease and rectal cancer mortality demonstrate an urgent need for colorectal cancer screening. However, the narrow age range at which screening is initially being rolled-out in Ireland means that the full potential for reductions in late-stage cancers and incidence and mortality are unlikely to be achieved. While it is possible that the observed increase in rectal cancer mortality may be partly an artefact of cause of death misclassification, it could also be explained by variations in treatment and adherence to best practice guidelines; further investigation is warranted.

  13. Glycoprotein 130 is associated with adverse postoperative clinical outcomes of patients with late-stage non-metastatic gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yifan; Zhang, Heng; Liu, Hao; Lin, Chao; Li, Ruochen; Wu, Songyang; He, Hongyong; Li, He; Xu, Jiejie

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of glycoprotein 130 (gp130) with the cytokines of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) family has proved to play a crucial part in several cancers. Our current study is designed to discover the clinical prognostic significance of gp130 in non-metastatic gastric cancer. We examined intratumoral gp130 expression in retrospectively enrolled 370 gastric cancer patients who underwent radical gastrectomy with standard D2 lymphadenectomy at Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University during 2007 and 2008 by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of gp130 was significantly correlated with T classification, N classification and TNM stage (P = 0.003, P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively; T, N, TNM refers to Tumor Invasion, Regional lymph node metastasis and Tumor Node Metastasis, respectively). Elevated intratumoral gp130 expression implied unfavourable overall survival (OS) (P < 0.001) and disease-free survival (DFS) (P < 0.001), respectively. Furthermore, among TNM II and III gp130-high patients, those who were treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based adjuvant chemotherapy had better OS (P < 0.001). The generated nomogram performed well in predicting the 3- and 5-year OS of gastric cancer patients. The incorporation of gp130 into contemporary TNM staging system would be of great significance to improve the current individual risk stratification. These findings contribute to better clinical management for those patients who would benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:27917904

  14. Role of SMC1A overexpression as a predictor of poor prognosis in late stage colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianwei; Yu, Shaojun; Cui, Liming; Wang, Wenhui; Li, Jun; Wang, Ke; Lao, Xinyuan

    2015-03-04

    Structural maintenance of chromosomes 1A (SMC1A) is a member of the cohesion family of proteins that plays crucial roles in cell cycle control. Recent studies have concluded that SMC1A is involved in the pathogenesis of cancer. This study aims to evaluate the functional role of SMC1A in colorectal cancer (CRC) both in vitro and in vivo, and the underlying molecular mechanisms. We firstly investigated the expression levels of SMC1A in 427 CRC specimens. Antigen expression was determined by immunohistochemical analysis of SMC1A on tissue microarrays. Stable SMC1A knockdown CRC cell lines were employed. The effects of SMC1A depletion on cell growth in vitro were examined by MTT, colony formation and flow cytometry assays. Tumor forming was evaluated by nude mice model in vivo. To detect the activation of intracellular signaling, pathscan intracellular signaling array and western blotting were performed. The expression of SMC1A was much stronger in CRC tumor tissues than in adenomas and normal colorectal tissues. High SMC1A expression, indicated as an independent poor prognostic predictor for patients with stage III and stage IV CRC, was correlated with overall survival (OS) (p = 0.008). Functional analysis indicated that SMC1A knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) mediated the significant inhibition of cell proliferation; induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via the suppression of CDK4, PCNA and PARP; and blocked the activation of the Erk1/2 and Akt cascades in CRC cells. In addition, SMC1A depletion significantly decreased the growth of subcutaneously inoculated tumors in nude mice. These results suggest that SMC1A plays an essential role in the development of CRC and may be a predictive factor in patients with CRC. The inhibition of SMC1A may serve as a promising therapeutic strategy for human CRC.

  15. Intrahepatic therapy for liver-dominant metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Groote, Kerlijne; Prenen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    In patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, the liver is the most common site of metastatic disease. In patients with liver-dominant disease, consideration needs to be given to locoregional treatments such as hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, transarterial chemoembolisation and selective internal radiation therapy because hepatic metastases are a major cause of liver failure especially in chemorefractory disease. In this review we provide insights on the published literature for locoregional treatment of liver metastases in metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:26380058

  16. An Update on Randomized Clinical Trials in Metastatic Colorectal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ikoma, Naruhiko; Raghav, Kanwal; Chang, George

    2017-10-01

    There have been remarkable advances in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer over the past 20 years, chiefly achieved by development of new active drugs and establishment of effective systemic therapy regimens. Multidisciplinary care of resectable liver disease with use of perioperative systemic therapy and superior liver resection has resulted in prolonged survival of select patients. Median overall survival has significantly improved with the modern multiagent regimens. This article reviews recent high-quality randomized clinical trials that were conducted to address optimal treatment of advanced and metastatic colorectal carcinoma, mainly focused on initially inoperable metastatic disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Genomic landscape of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Haan, Josien C; Labots, Mariette; Rausch, Christian; Koopman, Miriam; Tol, Jolien; Mekenkamp, Leonie J M; van de Wiel, Mark A; Israeli, Danielle; van Essen, Hendrik F; van Grieken, Nicole C T; Voorham, Quirinus J M; Bosch, Linda J W; Qu, Xueping; Kabbarah, Omar; Verheul, Henk M W; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Punt, Cornelis J A; Ylstra, Bauke; Meijer, Gerrit A

    2014-11-14

    Response to drug therapy in individual colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is associated with tumour biology. Here we describe the genomic landscape of tumour samples of a homogeneous well-annotated series of patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) of two phase III clinical trials, CAIRO and CAIRO2. DNA copy number aberrations of 349 patients are determined. Within three treatment arms, 194 chromosomal subregions are associated with progression-free survival (PFS; uncorrected single-test P-values <0.005). These subregions are filtered for effect on messenger RNA expression, using an independent data set from The Cancer Genome Atlas which returned 171 genes. Three chromosomal regions are associated with a significant difference in PFS between treatment arms with or without irinotecan. One of these regions, 6q16.1-q21, correlates in vitro with sensitivity to SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan. This genomic landscape of mCRC reveals a number of DNA copy number aberrations associated with response to drug therapy.

  18. Genomic landscape of metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haan, Josien C.; Labots, Mariette; Rausch, Christian; Koopman, Miriam; Tol, Jolien; Mekenkamp, Leonie J. M.; van de Wiel, Mark A.; Israeli, Danielle; van Essen, Hendrik F.; van Grieken, Nicole C. T.; Voorham, Quirinus J. M.; Bosch, Linda J. W.; Qu, Xueping; Kabbarah, Omar; Verheul, Henk M. W.; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Ylstra, Bauke; Meijer, Gerrit A.

    2014-01-01

    Response to drug therapy in individual colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is associated with tumour biology. Here we describe the genomic landscape of tumour samples of a homogeneous well-annotated series of patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) of two phase III clinical trials, CAIRO and CAIRO2. DNA copy number aberrations of 349 patients are determined. Within three treatment arms, 194 chromosomal subregions are associated with progression-free survival (PFS; uncorrected single-test P-values <0.005). These subregions are filtered for effect on messenger RNA expression, using an independent data set from The Cancer Genome Atlas which returned 171 genes. Three chromosomal regions are associated with a significant difference in PFS between treatment arms with or without irinotecan. One of these regions, 6q16.1–q21, correlates in vitro with sensitivity to SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan. This genomic landscape of mCRC reveals a number of DNA copy number aberrations associated with response to drug therapy. PMID:25394515

  19. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Regorafenib for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Daniel A.; Ahmad, Bilal B.; Chen, Qiushi; Ayer, Turgay; Howard, David H.; Lipscomb, Joseph; El-Rayes, Bassel F.; Flowers, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Regorafenib is a standard-care option for treatment-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer that increases median overall survival by 6 weeks compared with placebo. Given this small incremental clinical benefit, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of regorafenib in the third-line setting for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer from the US payer perspective. Methods We developed a Markov model to compare the cost and effectiveness of regorafenib with those of placebo in the third-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Health outcomes were measured in life-years and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Drug costs were based on Medicare reimbursement rates in 2014. Model robustness was addressed in univariable and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Results Regorafenib provided an additional 0.04 QALYs (0.13 life-years) at a cost of $40,000, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $900,000 per QALY. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for regorafenib was > $550,000 per QALY in all of our univariable and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Conclusion Regorafenib provides minimal incremental benefit at high incremental cost per QALY in the third-line management of metastatic colorectal cancer. The cost-effectiveness of regorafenib could be improved by the use of value-based pricing. PMID:26304904

  20. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Regorafenib for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Daniel A; Ahmad, Bilal B; Chen, Qiushi; Ayer, Turgay; Howard, David H; Lipscomb, Joseph; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Flowers, Christopher R

    2015-11-10

    Regorafenib is a standard-care option for treatment-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer that increases median overall survival by 6 weeks compared with placebo. Given this small incremental clinical benefit, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of regorafenib in the third-line setting for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer from the US payer perspective. We developed a Markov model to compare the cost and effectiveness of regorafenib with those of placebo in the third-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Health outcomes were measured in life-years and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Drug costs were based on Medicare reimbursement rates in 2014. Model robustness was addressed in univariable and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Regorafenib provided an additional 0.04 QALYs (0.13 life-years) at a cost of $40,000, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $900,000 per QALY. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for regorafenib was > $550,000 per QALY in all of our univariable and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Regorafenib provides minimal incremental benefit at high incremental cost per QALY in the third-line management of metastatic colorectal cancer. The cost-effectiveness of regorafenib could be improved by the use of value-based pricing. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  1. InCVAX - A novel strategy for treatment of late-stage, metastatic cancers through photoimmunotherapy induced tumor-specific immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feifan; Li, Xiaosong; Naylor, Mark F.; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Alleruzzo, Luciano; Raker, Joseph; Lam, Samuel S.K.; Du, Nan; Shi, Lei; Wang, Xiuli; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-01-01

    A novel, promising potential cancer vaccine strategy was proposed to use a two-injection procedure for solid tumors to prompt the immune system to identify and systemically eliminate the primary and metastatic cancers. The two-injection procedure consists of local photothermal application on a selected tumor intended to liberate whole cell tumor antigens, followed by a local injection of an immunoadjuvant that consists of a semi-synthetic functionalized glucosamine polymer, N-dihydro-galacto-chitosan (GC), which is intended to activate antigen presenting cells and facilitate an increased uptake of tumor antigens. This strategy is thus proposed as an in situ autologous cancer vaccine (inCVAX) that may activate antigen presenting cells and expose them to tumor antigens in situ, with the intention of inducing a systemic tumor specific T-cell response. Here, the development of inCVAX for the treatment of metastatic cancers in the past decades are systematically reviewed. The antitumor immune responses of local photothermal treatment and immunological stimulation with GC are also discussed. This treatment approach is also commonly referred to as laser immunotherapy (LIT). PMID:25633839

  2. Contribution of the R-Ras2 GTP-binding protein to primary breast tumorigenesis and late-stage metastatic disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larive, Romain M.; Moriggi, Giulia; Menacho-Márquez, Mauricio; Cañamero, Marta; Álava, Enrique De; Alarcón, Balbino; Dosil, Mercedes; Bustelo, Xosé R.

    2014-05-01

    R-Ras2 is a transforming GTPase that shares downstream effectors with Ras subfamily proteins. However, little information exists about the function of this protein in tumorigenesis and its signalling overlap with classical Ras GTPases. Here we show, by combining loss- and gain-of-function studies in breast cancer cells, mammary epithelial cells and mouse models, that endogenous R-Ras2 has a role in both primary breast tumorigenesis and the late metastatic steps of cancer cells in the lung parenchyma. R-Ras2 drives tumorigenesis in a phosphatidylinostiol-3 kinase (PI3K)-dependent and signalling autonomous manner. By contrast, its prometastatic role requires other priming oncogenic signals and the engagement of several downstream elements. R-Ras2 function is required even in cancer cells exhibiting constitutive activation of classical Ras proteins, indicating that these GTPases are not functionally redundant. Our results also suggest that application of long-term R-Ras2 therapies will result in the development of compensatory mechanisms in breast tumours.

  3. Economics of ramucirumab for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Simon B; Kohn, Christine G; Goldstein, Daniel A

    2016-12-01

    Despite its FDA approval and incorporation into the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) treatment guidelines, ramucirumab (RAM) is associated with a drug acquisition cost that is substantially higher than other approved options. Given its substantial cost, the presence of a viable alternative treatment option, and its minimal survival improvement, the usefulness of RAM in clinical practice has been called into question. Areas covered: In this paper, we outline the cost, benefits, and economic implications of RAM from a US perspective, as it is used in the treatment of mCRC. We also dissect its use in other tumor types and in other healthcare systems around the world, and briefly compare it with similar drugs targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway. We used the search engine PubMed using the following as search terms: cost-effectiveness; ramucirumab; metastatic colon cancer; angiogenesis; and value-based medicine. Expert commentary: The use of ramucirumab in the treatment of mCRC serves as a microcosm of the worsening healthcare crisis within the US and the ongoing controversy regarding oncology drug costs, benefits, and value. Therefore, there must be a joint effort in moving towards value based pricing models.

  4. Combining chemotherapy and targeted therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J; Zarate, R; Bandres, E; Viudez, A; Chopitea, A; García-Foncillas, J; Gil-Bazo, I

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer remains one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide. During the past years, the development of new effective treatment options has led to a considerable improvement in the outcome of this disease. The advent of agents such as capecitabine, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, cetuximab and bevacizumab has translated into median survival times in the range of 2 years. Intense efforts have focused on identifying novel agents targeting specific growth factor receptors, critical signal transduction pathways or mediators of angiogenesis. In addition, several clinical trials have suggested that some of these molecularly targeted drugs can be safely and effectively used in combination with conventional chemotherapy. In this article we review various treatment options combining cytotoxic and targeted therapies currently available for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:17990352

  5. A novel antimetabolite: TAS-102 for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuji; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Baba, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    TAS-102 is a new oral anti-tumor drug, composed of a thymidine-based nucleoside analog (trifluridine: FTD) and a thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor (tipiracil hydrochloride: TPI). TAS-102 has been shown to significantly improve overall survival and progression-free survival in patients with refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in placebo-controlled randomized phase II and III trials. The current review summarizes mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics/dynamics and preclinical and clinical data of TAS-102 in colorectal cancer. TAS-102 is a new salvage-line treatment option for patients with mCRC. TAS-102 is well tolerated and has great potential in future clinical drug combination therapies.

  6. Liver resection for metastatic colorectal leiomyosarcoma: a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    El-Kehdy, Jessica; Nounou, Ghina El; Deeba, Samer; Fakih, Hawraa; Jabbour, Mark; Haydar, Ali; El Naaj, Abdallah Abou; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K.; O’Reilly, Eileen M.; Shamseddine, Ali; Khalife, Mohamad; Mukherji, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Background Leiomyosarcoma arising in the colorectum is a rare malignancy of the smooth muscles accounting for less than 1% of gastrointestinal tumors. Surgery remains the most accepted modality for the treatment of this entity however management of liver metastases remains controversial. Methods & results From 1998 to 2009, five patients diagnosed with primary leiomyosarcoma of colorectal origin with metastatic liver disease, underwent liver resections at the American University of Beirut Medical Center. The median overall survival was 47 months (range, 7-135 months). Conclusions Leiomyosarcoma of colorectal origin with liver metastasis is a very rare entity. Long-term survival can be achieved after surgical resection and should be considered for all patients. PMID:26487954

  7. RAS and BRAF in metastatic colorectal cancer management

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jun; Cho, May

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has been further refined with the development of monoclonal antibodies, cetuximab and panitumumab, towards the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Anti-EGFR therapy has afforded improved survival in those with wild-type RAS mCRC but provides no benefit and even harm in those with RAS-mutant tumors. BRAF mutations have also been shown to predict lack of clinically meaningful benefit to anti-EGFR therapy in mCRC. Mechanisms of resistance to EGFR blockade in wild-type RAS or BRAF metastatic colorectal tumors appear to converge on the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Clinical trials involving combined BRAF, EGFR, and/or MAPK kinase (MEK) inhibition have shown promising activity in BRAF-mutant mCRC. Here, we review pivotal clinical trials that have redefined our treatment approach in mCRC with respect to anti-EGFR therapy based on RAS and BRAF mutation status. Future studies will likely focus on improving efficacy of anti-EGFR-based therapy in mCRC through sustained MAPK pathway inhibition. PMID:27747083

  8. Current controversies in the management of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vera, Ruth; Alonso, Vicente; Gállego, Javier; González, Encarnación; Guillén-Ponce, Carmen; Pericay, Carles; Rivera, Fernando; Safont, M José; Valladares-Ayerbes, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    The factors affecting the decisions for the treatment for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) are related to the patient, the tumor, and the treatment itself. Both cetuximab and panitumumab are anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody options for patients with RAS wild-type tumors. Several trials comparing these agents with bevacizumab are analyzed in this paper. The liver is the most common site of metastases in patients with CRC, and perioperative chemotherapy has been shown to yield benefits in this setting. In the second-line treatment for mCRC, maintenance with bevacizumab after progression following first-line treatment is convenient in some groups of patients with mCRC. Also, aflibercept has demonstrated benefits in response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival in second-line treatment, whereas regorafenib provides benefits to patients progressing on all standard therapies. Several novel therapeutic options for patients with mCRC are under development, and these are discussed.

  9. Personalizing medicine for metastatic colorectal cancer: Current developments

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Andrea Marin; Turner, Alice; de Mello, Ramon Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is still one of the tumor types with the highest incidence and mortality. In 2012, colorectal cancer was the second most prevalence cancer among males (9%) and the third among females (8%). In this disease, early diagnosis is important to improve treatment outcomes. However, at the time of diagnosis, about one quarter of patients already have metastases, and overall survival of these patients at 5-years survival is very low. Because of these poor statistics, the development of new drugs against specific targets, including the pathway of angiogenesis, has witnessed a remarkable increase. So, targets therapies through epidermal growth factor and its receptor and also KRAS pathways modulation acquired a main role whether in association with standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy. With the current knowledge in the field of molecular biology, including genetic mutations and polymorphisms, we know better why patients respond so differently to the same treatments. So, in the future we can develop increasingly personalized treatments to the patient and not the disease. This review aims to summarize some molecular pathways and their relation to tumor growth, as well as novel targeted developing drugs and recently approved for mCRC. PMID:25132758

  10. Chromothripsis and progression-free survival in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Skuja, Elina; Kalniete, Dagnija; Nakazawa-Miklasevica, Miki; Daneberga, Zanda; Abolins, Arnis; Purkalne, Gunta; Miklasevics, Edvins

    2017-01-01

    Metastatic dissemination of the primary tumor is the major cause of death in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Multiple chromosomal breaks and chromothripsis, a phenomenon involving multiple chromosomal fragmentations occurring in a single catastrophic event, are associated with cancer genesis, progression and developing of metastases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chromothripsis and total breakpoint count (breakpoint instability index) on progression-free survival (PFS). A total of 19 patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) receiving FOLFOX first-line palliative chemotherapy between August, 2011 and October, 2012 were selected for this study. The results indicated that the highest breakpoint count was observed in chromosomes 1, 2 and 6. Chromothripsis was detected in 52.6% of the study patients. Furthermore, chromothripsis was associated with an increased median PFS (mPFS; 14 vs. 8 months, respectively; P=0.03), but an association with overall survival was not identified. The present study demonstrated that chromothripsis affected CRC patient survival, suggesting a role for this event as a prognostic and predictive marker in mCRC treatment. PMID:28357089

  11. Updated options for liver-limited metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Steven R

    2008-12-01

    Liver metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) are common in patients presenting with an initial diagnosis of metastatic disease or at the time of recurrence. Without treatment, patients with metastatic disease have a poor prognosis. Surgical resection of the metastases might provide long-term benefit.; however, the size, number, or location of the metastases can limit the ability to perform a resection. The use of chemotherapy, both systemic and via hepatic artery infusion, in patients undergoing surgery for liver metastases from CRC has augmented the long-term survival benefits and even the cure obtained in some patients with surgery. Chemotherapy might also convert a portion of patients with initially unresectable liver metastases to resectable. A growing body of literature is helping to define the role of chemotherapy for potentially resectable liver metastases and for initially unresectable liver metastases. The introduction of newer agents such as oxaliplatin and irinotecan, and targeted agents such as cetuximab and bevacizumab, has led to meaningful improvements in response rates and survival over those previously achieved with 5-fluorouracil. Further trials are needed to refine the use of chemotherapy and targeted agents in the management of patients with liver metastases.

  12. Surgical therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer with a potential for cure.

    PubMed

    Chua, Terence C; Liauw, Winston; Koong, Heng-Nung; Esquivel, Jesus

    2011-06-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer has evolved from a paradigm that was previously centered upon the use of systemic chemotherapy to one of multimodality therapy. Hepatectomy, pulmonary metastasectomy, and cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy are surgical procedures that are now routinely performed in specialized institutions treating patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Emerging evidence suggests that in selected patients, these procedures are safe and may be beneficial in contributing to long-term survival.

  13. Lymph node-independent liver metastasis in a model of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Enquist, Ida B; Good, Zinaida; Jubb, Adrian M; Fuh, Germaine; Wang, Xi; Junttila, Melissa R; Jackson, Erica L; Leong, Kevin G

    2014-03-26

    Deciphering metastatic routes is critically important as metastasis is a primary cause of cancer mortality. In colorectal cancer (CRC), it is unknown whether liver metastases derive from cancer cells that first colonize intestinal lymph nodes, or whether such metastases can form without prior lymph node involvement. A lack of relevant metastatic CRC models has precluded investigations into metastatic routes. Here we describe a metastatic CRC mouse model and show that liver metastases can manifest without a lymph node metastatic intermediary. Colorectal tumours transplanted onto the colonic mucosa invade and metastasize to specific target organs including the intestinal lymph nodes, liver and lungs. Importantly, this metastatic pattern differs from that observed following caecum implantation, which invariably involves peritoneal carcinomatosis. Anti-angiogenesis inhibits liver metastasis, yet anti-lymphangiogenesis does not impact liver metastasis despite abrogating lymph node metastasis. Our data demonstrate direct hematogenous spread as a dissemination route that contributes to CRC liver malignancy.

  14. Mutational analysis and clinical correlation of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Russo, Andrea L; Borger, Darrell R; Szymonifka, Jackie; Ryan, David P; Wo, Jennifer Y; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S; Kwak, Eunice L; Allen, Jill N; Wadlow, Raymond C; Zhu, Andrew X; Murphy, Janet E; Faris, Jason E; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Haigis, Kevin M; Ellisen, Leif W; Iafrate, Anthony J; Hong, Theodore S

    2014-05-15

    Early identification of mutations may guide patients with metastatic colorectal cancer toward targeted therapies that may be life prolonging. The authors assessed tumor genotype correlations with clinical characteristics to determine whether mutational profiling can account for clinical similarities, differences, and outcomes. Under Institutional Review Board approval, 222 patients with metastatic colon adenocarcinoma (n = 158) and rectal adenocarcinoma (n = 64) who underwent clinical tumor genotyping were reviewed. Multiplexed tumor genotyping screened for >150 mutations across 15 commonly mutated cancer genes. The chi-square test was used to assess genotype frequency by tumor site and additional clinical characteristics. Cox multivariate analysis was used to assess the impact of genotype on overall survival. Broad-based tumor genotyping revealed clinical and anatomic differences that could be linked to gene mutations. NRAS mutations were associated with rectal cancer versus colon cancer (12.5% vs 0.6%; P < .001) and with age ≥56 years (7% vs 0.9%; P = .02). Conversely, v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) mutations were associated with colon cancer (13% vs 3%; P = .024) and older age (15.8% vs 4.6%; P = .006). TP53 mutations were associated with rectal cancer (30% vs 18%; P = .048), younger age (14% vs 28.7%; P = .007), and men (26.4% vs 14%; P = .03). Lung metastases were associated with PIK3CA mutations (23% vs 8.7%; P = .004). Only mutations in BRAF were independently associated with decreased overall survival (hazard ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-5.27; P = .029). The current study suggests that underlying molecular profiles can differ between colon and rectal cancers. Further investigation is warranted to assess whether the differences identified are important in determining the optimal treatment course for these patients. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  15. Downregulation of osteoprotegerin expression in metastatic colorectal carcinoma predicts recurrent metastasis and poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Youn-Wha

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported the downregulation of osteoprotegerin expression in primary colorectal carcinoma and its significant association with aggressive oncogenic behavior, which suggest that this process contributes to colorectal carcinoma development and progression. In this study, we used immunohistochemical staining to evaluate osteoprotegerin expression in 81 colorectal liver metastasis tissue samples and investigated its possible association with the clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes of patients with colorectal liver metastasis. These tissues exhibited significantly reduced expression of osteoprotegerin compared to primary colorectal carcinomas and normal colorectal mucosa. This reduced expression was significantly associated with the extent of colorectal liver metastasis, including multiplicity of metastatic tumors, involvement of the bilateral hepatic lobes, and higher histological grade. In addition, reduced osteoprotegerin expression was an independent significant predictor of recurrent liver metastasis and prognostic factor for reduced patient survival. These findings suggest that osteoprotegerin expression may be a novel predictor of recurrent liver metastasis and a prognostic biomarker in patients with colorectal liver metastasis. Patients harboring colorectal liver metastasis with reduced osteoprotegerin expression should be carefully monitored after hepatic resection for colorectal liver metastasis to enable early detection of potentially resectable metastatic recurrences. PMID:27764814

  16. Patient considerations in metastatic colorectal cancer – role of panitumumab

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jane E

    2017-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in many malignancies, including colorectal cancer (CRC), making EGFR an attractive treatment option. Panitumumab and cetuximab, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed at EGFR, are both currently utilized in the management of metastatic CRC (mCRC). Through the development of these agents in mCRC, key issues surrounding each mAbs use have been revealed. These key issues include negative patient outcome avoidance when determining use, the economic burden with high-cost medication, predictive biomarkers, tumor location, patient geographic location, patient quality of life, and the prevention of debilitating adverse effects. CRC remains a common malignancy, with many of these patients expected to receive targeted therapy, including EGFR mAb therapy. Oncologists must recognize these EGFR mAb factors in order to improve outcomes. This review aims to provide a chronological timeline on the development of panitumumab, clinical pearls, and guidance on the current use of panitumumab in mCRC. PMID:28435294

  17. Oral drugs in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kwakman, J J M; Punt, C J A

    2016-07-01

    Intravenous administration of fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy has been the cornerstone of treatment in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) for decades. The availability of oral capecitabine has improved the tolerability in monotherapy schedules, and has simplified combination schedules. Since then, other oral drugs have proven efficacy in this setting. We review the available evidence and most recent data concerning oral drugs with proven efficacy in mCRC, including capecitabine, S-1, trifluridine-tipiracil (TAS-102) and regorafenib. The use of capecitabine is widely implemented in the care of mCRC. However, with recent data supporting its prolonged use, the relatively high incidence of hand-foot syndrome (HFS) may impair quality of life. In Asian populations, S-1 is associated with equivalent efficacy but lower incidence of HFS compared to capecitabine. Further studies evaluating the effects of S-1 in Western populations are needed. Both regorafenib and TAS-102 improve the overall survival of patients in whom all other treatment options have failed. Since only a subset of patients appears to benefit, future studies to identify predictive biomarkers are needed.

  18. Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Management With Trifluridine/Tipiracil
.

    PubMed

    White, Teresa; Larson, Heidi; Minnella, Alexandra; Hochster, Howard S

    2017-04-01

    Treatment-related adverse events (AEs) are common in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) receiving chemotherapy. These AEs may affect patient adherence, particularly with completely oral regimens, such as trifluridine/tipiracil (TAS-102, Lonsurf®), an antimetabolite agent for patients with mCRC refractory or intolerant to standard therapies.
. This article reviews strategies for promoting adherence and educating patients and caregivers about oral therapy with trifluridine/tipiracil. 
. Recommended strategies for managing AEs are reviewed, with a focus on the most common AEs reported in patients with mCRC receiving trifluridine/tipiracil in clinical trials.
. Oncology nurses play an important role in educating and counseling patients regarding treatment and its potential side effects. Among patients with mCRC refractory or intolerant to standard therapies, trifluridine/tipiracil was found to have a favorable safety profile. It is associated with hematologic AEs as well as a low incidence of nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, anorexia, and fatigue.

  19. Trifluridine/Tipiracil: A Review in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Burness, Celeste B; Duggan, Sean T

    2016-09-01

    Trifluridine/tipiracil (Lonsurf(®)) is a novel, orally active, antimetabolite agent comprised of trifluridine, a thymidine-based nucleoside analogue, and tipiracil, a potent thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor. Trifluridine is incorporated into DNA via phosphorylation, ultimately inhibiting cell proliferation. Tipiracil increases systemic exposure of trifluridine when coadministered. Trifluridine/tipiracil has recently been approved for the treatment of adult patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) who are refractory to or are not considered candidates for, current standard chemotherapy and biological therapy in the EU and USA and in unresectable advanced or recurrent CRC in Japan. The approved regimen of oral twice-daily trifluridine/tipiracil (35 mg/m(2) twice daily on days 1-5 and 8-12 of each 28-day cycle) significantly improved overall survival and progression-free survival and was associated with a significantly higher disease control rate than placebo when added to best supportive care in the multinational, pivotal phase III trial (RECOURSE) and a phase II Japanese trial. Trifluridine/tipiracil was associated with an acceptable tolerability profile, with adverse events generally being managed with dose reductions, temporary interruptions in treatment or administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. The most common grade 3-4 adverse events (≥10 %) were anaemia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. In conclusion, trifluridine/tipiracil is a useful additional treatment option for the management of mCRC in patients who are refractory to, or are not considered candidates for, currently available therapies.

  20. TAS-102 for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Lisa; Rossini, Daniele; Moretto, Roberto; Cremolini, Chiara; Schirripa, Marta; Antoniotti, Carlotta; Marmorino, Federica; Loupakis, Fotios; Falcone, Alfredo; Masi, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    The survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer has notably increased in the past 20 years, from 12 months to around 30 months. Nevertheless, the prognosis of patients pretreated with all available agents is poor and there is high unmet need for newer treatments. TAS-102 is an orally administered combination of the nucleoside analogue trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride, a thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor. In a randomized trial of 800 patients who had received at least two other treatments previously (most patients had received more than four treatments). TAS-102 demonstrated a significant prolongation of overall survival compared with placebo (median survival 7.1 vs. 5.3 months; hazard ratio 0 · 68, 95%CI: 0 · 58-0 · 81; p < 0 · 001). The toxicity was manageable, grade 3 or higher events occurred in 69% of patients in the TAS-102 group versus 52% in the placebo group, with neutropenia the most common event.

  1. Metastatic colorectal cancer: role of target therapies and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nappi, Anna; Berretta, Massimiliano; Romano, Carmela; Tafuto, Salvatore; Cassata, Antonino; Casaretti, Rossana; Silvestro, Lucrezia; De Divitiis, Chiara; Alessandrini, Lara; Fiorica, Francesco; Ottaiano, Alessandro; Nasti, Guglielmo

    2017-02-08

    Today, we are experiencing a real cultural revolution in the therapeutic approach to cancer of the colon - rectum, that, by orphan disease, it is now becoming an important paradigm of scientific innovations and concepts. Survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (m-CRC) has been significantly improved with the introduction of the monoclonal antibodies that have as target the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Novel agents such as aflibercept and regorafenib have recently been approved. The PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in cancer is implicated in tumors escaping immune destruction and is a promising therapeutic target. The development of anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 agents marks a new era in the treatment of cancer with immunotherapies. Early clinical experience has shown encouraging activity of these agents in a variety of tumors, and further results are eagerly awaited from completed and ongoing studies. The aim of this mini review is to summarize and assess the effects of molecular agents in m-CRC based on the available phase II and III trials, pooled analyses, and meta-analyses/systematic reviews. We can say that, among the various treatment options, the challenge of the future will be a better selection of the population, to ensure the best possible benefit from treatment with anti-VEGF drugs or anti-EGFR and a careful and customized planning of the therapeutic strategy for each patient .

  2. Role of targeted therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ohhara, Yoshihito; Fukuda, Naoki; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Honma, Rio; Shimizu, Yasushi; Kinoshita, Ichiro; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a significant cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality all over the world. Improvements of cytotoxic and biologic agents have prolonged the survival in metastatic CRC (mCRC), with a median overall survival of approximately 2 years and more in the past two decades. The biologic agents that have proven clinical benefits in mCRC mainly target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In particular, bevacizumab targeting VEGF and cetuximab and panitumumab targeting EGFR have demonstrated significant survival benefits in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy in the first-line, second-line, or salvage setting. Aflibercept, ramucirumab, and regorafenib are also used in second-line or salvage therapy. Recent retrospective analyses have shown that KRAS or NRAS mutations were negative predictive markers for anti-EGFR therapy. Based on the evidence from large randomized clinical trials, personalized therapy is necessary for patients with mCRC according to their tumor biology and characteristics. The aim of this paper was to summarize the results of the major randomized clinical trials and highlight the benefits of the molecular targeted agents in patients with mCRC. PMID:27672422

  3. Immunotherapy of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Prevailing Challenges and New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Zumwalt, Timothy J; Goel, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Patients with recurring or metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) have strikingly low long-term survival, while conventional treatments such as chemotherapeutic intervention and radiation therapy marginally improve longevity. Although, many factors involving immunosurveillance and immunosuppression were recently validated as important for patient prognosis and care, a multitude of experimental immunotherapies designed to combat unresectable mCRC have, in few cases, successfully mobilized antitumor immune cells against malignancies, nor conclusively or consistently granted protection, complete remission, and/or stable disease from immunotherapy – of which benefit less than 10% of those receiving therapy. After decades of progress, however, new insights into the mechanisms of immunosuppression, tolerance, and mutation profiling established novel therapies that circumvent these immunological barriers. This review underlines the most exciting methods to date that manipulate immune cells to curb mCRC, including adoptive cell therapy, dendritic cell vaccines, and checkpoint inhibitor antibodies – of which hint at effective and enduring protection against disease progression and undetected micrometastases. PMID:26441489

  4. Alternating XELFOX and XELFIRI in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Recchia, Francesco; Candeloro, Giampiero; Necozione, Stefano; Bratta, Massimo; Bisegna, Roberta; Rea, Silvio

    2008-08-01

    To evaluate the antitumor activity and toxicity of 5-fluorouracil (FU)/leucovorin (LV) and capecitabine (C) given with either oxaliplatin (OX) or camptothecin (CPT-11) in the treatment of chemotherapy naive patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The outpatient treatment, consisted of 2 consecutive days of LV, 200 mg/m(2), 5-FU 400 mg/m(2), and C 2000 mg/m(2) that, in one cycle, was preceded by 2 days of OX 50 mg/m(2), and, in the subsequent cycle, by CPT-11, 90 mg/m(2). All 54 patients were assessable for toxicity and response. Thirty-two patients responded, giving an overall response rate of 59.3%. Median progression-free survival was 12.3 months and median survival was 20.5 months. Toxicity included grade 3 to 4 neutropenia in 43% of patients, grade 3 diarrhea in 7% of patients, and grade 2 neurotoxicity in 6% of patients. The alternating, bimonthly schedule of OX and CPT-11 plus 5-FU/LV/C has substantial antitumor activity and is well tolerated.

  5. KRAS discordance between primary and metastatic tumor in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Siyar Ekinci, Ahmet; Demirci, Umut; Cakmak Oksuzoglu, Berna; Ozturk, Ayse; Esbah, Onur; Ozatli, Tahsin; Celik, Burcin; Budakoglu, Burcin; Turker, Ibrahim; Bal, Oznur; Turan, Nedim

    2015-01-01

    Adding targeted therapies to chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) improves response rates and survival. KRAS is a predictive indicator for anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) treatments. The most important reasons for KRAS discordance are intratumoral heterogeneity and incorrect mutation analysis. Evaluating the status of KRAS in primary and metastatic lesions becomes even more crucial to ensure efficient usage of anti-EGFR treatments. Patients with metastatic CRC, whose primary disease and liver and/or lung metastases were operated, were retrospectively evaluated, and KRAS assessment was performed on 31 patients who were suitable for DNA analysis. Pyrosequencing with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for KRAS analysis. The median age of 31 patients diagnosed with rectal cancer (N=13) and colon cancer (N=18) was 63 years (range 33-73). Metastasectomy locations included the liver (N=27), lung (N=3), and both lung and liver (N=1). KRAS discordance was detected in 22% (7/31) of the patients. While 3 patients with detected discordance had mutated KRAS in the primary material, wild type KRAS was detected in their liver or lung lesions. On the other hand, while 4 patients had wild type KRAS in the primary material, mutated KRAS was determined in their liver or lung lesions. The McNemar test revealed no significant discordance between primary and metastatic disease (p=1.00). No progression free survival (PFS) difference was detected between patients with determined discordance and patients with undetermined discordance (10.6 vs 14.7 months, p=0.719). This is the first study to evaluate KRAS discordance between primary and metastasis in CRC patients, who underwent metastasectomy, together with survival data. In the literature and recent studies with large patient numbers in which modern KRAS tests were used, the KRAS discordance rate varies between 3-12%. In our study, a higher KRAS discordance (22%) was detected, and no survival difference

  6. Ramucirumab in metastatic colorectal cancer: evidence to date and place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Verdaguer, Helena; Tabernero, Josep; Macarulla, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequent cancer worldwide. Overall survival rates have improved greatly over the last few years due, at least in part, to the addition of targeted therapies to standard of care chemotherapy. Angiogenesis plays an important role in colorectal cancer, and therapies directed against the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) axis have contributed significantly to improving the outcome of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Over the past few years, several new targeted antiangiogenic agents have been approved for this patient population, confirming the value of inhibiting tumour angiogenesis. The most recent among them is ramucirumab, a fully humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the extracellular domain of VEGF receptor 2. It has proven valuable in multiple tumour types including colorectal cancer. Several phase I and II clinical trials showed a favourable toxicity profile and promising clinical antitumour efficacy in colorectal cancer patients. In the phase III RAISE clinical trial, the addition of ramucirumab to FOLFIRI-based chemotherapy resulted in an improvement of overall survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who had been previously treated with bevacizumab, oxaliplatin and a fluoropyrimidine. On the basis of these results, ramucirumab was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for this setting. We present an overview of the key preclinical and clinical studies in the development of ramucirumab in the context of metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:27239240

  7. Arctigenin Inhibits Lung Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer by Regulating Cell Viability and Metastatic Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yo-Han; Kee, Ji-Ye; Kim, Dae-Seung; Mun, Jeong-Geon; Jeong, Mi-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Byung-Min; Park, Sung-Joo; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Um, Jae-Young; Hong, Seung-Heon

    2016-08-27

    Arctigenin (ARC) has been shown to have an anti-cancer effect in various cell types and tissues. However, there have been no studies concerning metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we investigated the anti-metastatic properties of ARC on colorectal metastasis and present a potential candidate drug. ARC induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CT26 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via MAPKs signaling. In several metastatic phenotypes, ARC controlled epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through increasing the expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expressions of mesenchymal markers; N-cadherin, vimentin, β-catenin, and Snail. Moreover, ARC inhibited migration and invasion through reducing of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 expressions. In an experimental metastasis model, ARC significantly inhibited lung metastasis of CT26 cells. Taken together, our study demonstrates the inhibitory effects of ARC on colorectal metastasis.

  8. A systematic review of treatment guidelines for metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, M S; Chadda, S D; Zhao, Z; Barber, B L; Sykes, D P

    2012-01-01

    Aim A systematic review of treatment guidelines for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) was performed to assess recommendations for monoclonal antibody therapy in these guidelines. Method Relevant papers were identified through electronic searches of MEDLINE, MEDLINE In Process, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library; through manual searches of reference lists; and by searching the Internet. Results A total of 57 relevant guidelines were identified, 32 through electronic database searches and 25 through the website searches. The majority of guidelines were published between 2004 and 2010. The country publishing the most guidelines was the USA (12), followed by the UK (10), Canada (eight), France (eight), Germany (three), Australia (two), Spain (two) and Italy (one). In addition, eight European and three international guidelines were identified. As monoclonal antibody therapy for mCRC was not introduced until 2004, no firm recommendations for monoclonal antibody therapy were made in guidelines published between 2004 and 2006. Recommendations for monoclonal antibody therapy first appeared in 2007 and evolved as more data became available. The most recent international, European and US guidelines recommend combination chemotherapy with the addition of a monoclonal antibody for the first-line treatment of mCRC. Second-line treatment depends on the first-line regimen used. For chemoresistant mCRC, cetuximab or panitumumab are recommended as monotherapy in patients with wild-type KRAS tumours. Conclusion The study indicates that recent treatment guidelines have recognized the role of monoclonal antibodies in the management of mCRC, and that treatment guidelines should be updated in a timely manner to reflect the most recently available data. PMID:21848897

  9. Dendritic cell vaccination of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf, Stefan K

    2010-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is with more than 4000 new cases every year the third most common cancer in Denmark. Metastases are most often found in the liver, and 20-25% of the patients have synchronous metastases to the liver at time of primary diagnosis. Other frequent sites for metastases are lungs and lymph nodes. Without treatment the median survival for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer is 7-9 months. Patients receiving systemic or regional chemotherapy now have a median survival of approximately 20 months. Up to 40% of the patients undergoing intended curative surgery subsequently relapse with local or distant disease, and approximately 80% of the relapses appear within the first 3 years. If the cancer metastasises, and the chances of radical surgery are eliminated, the prognosis is poor. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical and immunological effects of treating patients with disseminated colorectal cancer with a dendritic cell based cancer vaccine (MelCancerVac). The vaccine consisted of dendritic cells generated from autologous mononuclear cells pulsed with an allogeneic tumor cell lysate, selected for its high expression of cancer associated antigens. A clinical phase I study evaluating tolerability and toxicity of the treatment was established. Six patients with progressive disease were included and the analysis revealed that the treatment was well tolerated and not associated with toxicity. A subsequent clinical phase II study evaluating the activity of the treatment with CT-scan based measurements of tumors (RECIST), self reported quality of life (SF-36), and clinical evaluation was established. Out of twenty included patients with progressive disease, seventeen received intervention with the vaccine. Stable disease was achieved in four patients and two of these remained stable throughout the entire study period. Quality of life remained for most parameters included in the evaluation high and stable. The immunological consequences

  10. APN401 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-02

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Metastatic Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Solid Neoplasm; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Unresectable Solid Neoplasm

  11. Outcomes in patients with obstructive jaundice from metastatic colorectal cancer and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Shawnn D; Albert, Scott; Shirley, Lawrence; Schmidt, Carl; Abdel-Misih, Sherif; El-Dika, Samer; Groce, J Royce; Wu, Christina; Goldberg, Richard M; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Bloomston, Mark

    2014-12-01

    Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer can develop jaundice from intrahepatic or extrahepatic causes. Currently, there is little data on the underlying causes and overall survival after onset of jaundice. The purpose of this study was to characterize the causes of jaundice and determine outcomes. Six hundred twenty-nine patients treated for metastatic colorectal cancer between 2004 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Those developing jaundice were grouped as having intrahepatic or extrahepatic obstruction. Demographics, clinicopathologic, and outcome data were analyzed. Sixty-two patients with metastatic colorectal cancer developed jaundice. Intrahepatic biliary obstruction was most common, occurring in younger patients. Time from metastatic diagnosis to presentation of jaundice was similar between groups, as was the mean number of prior lines of chemotherapy. Biliary decompression was successful 41.7 % of the time and was attempted more commonly for extrahepatic causes. Median overall survival after onset of jaundice was 1.5 months and it was similar between groups, but improved to 9.6 months in patients who were able to receive further chemotherapy. Jaundice due to metastatic colorectal cancer is an ominous finding, representing aggressive tumor biology or exhaustion of therapies. Biliary decompression is often difficult and should only be pursued when additional treatment options are available.

  12. Outcomes in Patients with Obstructive Jaundice from Metastatic Colorectal Cancer and Implications for Management

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Shawnn D.; Albert, Scott; Shirley, Lawrence; Schmidt, Carl; Abdel-Misih, Sherif; El-Dika, Samer; Groce, J. Royce; Wu, Christina; Goldberg, Richard M.; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Bloomston, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer can develop jaundice from intrahepatic or extrahepatic causes. Currently, there is little data on the underlying causes and overall survival after onset of jaundice. The purpose of this study was to characterize the causes of jaundice and determine outcomes. Methods Six hundred twenty-nine patients treated for metastatic colorectal cancer between 2004 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Those developing jaundice were grouped as having intrahepatic or extrahepatic obstruction. Demographics, clinicopathologic, and outcome data were analyzed. Results Sixty-two patients with metastatic colorectal cancer developed jaundice. Intrahepatic biliary obstruction was most common, occurring in younger patients. Time from metastatic diagnosis to presentation of jaundice was similar between groups, as was the mean number of prior lines of chemotherapy. Biliary decompression was successful 41.7 % of the time and was attempted more commonly for extrahepatic causes. Median overall survival after onset of jaundice was 1.5 months and it was similar between groups, but improved to 9.6 months in patients who were able to receive further chemotherapy. Conclusions Jaundice due to metastatic colorectal cancer is an ominous finding, representing aggressive tumor biology or exhaustion of therapies. Biliary decompression is often difficult and should only be pursued when additional treatment options are available. PMID:25300799

  13. Excessive collagen turnover products are released during colorectal cancer progression and elevated in serum from metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kehlet, S. N.; Sanz-Pamplona, R.; Brix, S.; Leeming, D. J.; Karsdal, M. A.; Moreno, V.

    2016-01-01

    During cancer progression, the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix becomes imbalanced with an excessive collagen remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, small protein fragments of degraded collagens are released into the circulation. We have investigated the potential of protein fragments of collagen type I, III and IV as novel biomarkers for colorectal cancer. Specific fragments of degraded type I, III and IV collagen (C1M, C3M, C4M) and type III collagen formation (Pro-C3) were assessed in serum from colorectal cancer patients, subjects with adenomas and matched healthy controls using well-characterized and validated ELISAs. Serum levels of the biomarkers were significantly elevated in colorectal cancer patients compared to subjects with adenomas (C1M, Pro-C3, C3M) and controls (C1M, Pro-C3). When patients were stratified according to their tumour stage, all four biomarkers were able to differentiate stage IV metastatic patients from all other stages. Combination of all markers with age and gender in a logistic regression model discriminated between metastatic and non-metastatic patients with an AUROC of 0.80. The data suggest that the levels of these collagen remodeling biomarkers may be a measure of tumour activity and invasiveness and may provide new clinical tools for monitoring of patients with advanced stage colorectal cancer. PMID:27465284

  14. Endoscopy-guided orthotopic implantation of colorectal cancer cells results in metastatic colorectal cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Bettenworth, Dominik; Mücke, Marcus M; Schwegmann, Katrin; Faust, Andreas; Poremba, Christopher; Schäfers, Michael; Domagk, Dirk; Lenz, Philipp

    2016-08-01

    Advanced stage colorectal cancer (CRC) is still associated with limited prognosis. For preclinical evaluation of novel therapeutic approaches, murine models with orthotopic tumor growth and distant metastases are required. However, these models usually require surgical procedures possibly influencing tumor immunogenicity and development. The aim of this study was to establish a minimal-invasive endoscopy-based murine orthotopic model of metastatic CRC. During colonoscopy of CD-1 nude and non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice, implantation of Caco-2 and HT-29 CRC cells was performed subcutaneously (s.c.) or orthotopic into the colonic submucosa. White light endoscopy (WLE) and fluorescence endoscopy (FE) were applied for tumor detection in vivo. Ex vivo, resected tumors were examined by fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI), histology, gelatin zymography and immunohistochemistry. In CD-1 nude mice, marked tumor growth was observed within 14 days after subcutaneous implantation while submucosal implantation failed to induce CRC after 17 weeks. In contrast, in NOD/SCID mice submucosal injection of HT-29 cells resulted in pronounced tumor growth 12 days post injectionem. Subsequently, rapid tumor expansion occurred, occupying the entire colonic circumference. Importantly, post mortem histological analyses confirmed liver metastases in 28.6 % and peritoneal metastases in 14.3 % of all mice. FRI and gelatin zymography did not detect a significantly increased matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) expression in s.c. implanted tumors while MMP-tracer uptake was significantly enhanced in orthotopic implanted tumors. Neither s.c. nor orthotopic Caco-2 cell implantation resulted in tumor development. We successfully established an endoscopy-based model of metastatic CRC in immunodeficient mice.

  15. Costs of hospital events in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Overbeek, Jetty A; Zhao, Zhongyun; van Herk-Sukel, Myrthe P P; Barber, Beth L; Gao, Sue; Herings, Ron M C

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade, the number of new agents, including monoclonal antibodies, being developed to treat metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) increased rapidly. While improving outcomes, these new treatments also have distinct and known safety profiles with toxicities that may require hospitalizations. However, patterns and costs of hospitalizations of toxicities of these new 'targeted' drugs are often unknown. This study aimed to estimate the costs of hospital events associated with adverse events specified in the 'Special Warnings and Precautions for Use' section of the European Medicinal Agency Summary of Product Characteristics for bevacizumab, cetuximab, and panitumumab, in patients with mCRC. From the PHARMO Record Linkage System (RLS), patients with a primary or secondary hospital discharge code for CRC and distant metastasis between 2000-2008 were selected and defined as patients with mCRC. The first discharge diagnosis defining metastases served as the index date. Patients were followed from index date until end of data collection, death, or end of study period, whichever occurred first. Hospital events during follow-up were identified through primary hospital discharge codes. Main outcomes for each event were length of stay and costs per hospital admission. Among 2964 mCRC patients, 271 hospital events occurred in 210 patients (mean [SD] duration of follow-up: 34 [31] months). The longest mean (SD) length of stay per hospital admission were for stroke (16 [33] days), arterial thromboembolism (ATE) (14 [21] days), wound-healing complications (WHC), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), congestive heart failure (CHF), and neutropenia (all 9 days; SD 5-15). Highest mean (SD) costs per admission were for stroke (€13,500 [€28,800]), ATE (€13,300 [€18,800]), WHC (€10,800 [€20,500]). Although no causal link could be identified between any specific event and any specific treatment, data from this study are valuable for pharmacoeconomic evaluations of newer

  16. Tolerability profile of bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer: about a Medical Department experience

    PubMed Central

    Khmamouche, Mohamed Reda; Mahfoud, Tarik; Bazine, Aziz; Tanz, Rachid; Ichou, Mohamed; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and associated with high mortality rates in our country. The prognosis of patients diagnosed with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has improved markedly over the last 12 years, increasing from 5 months with best supportive care to almost 2 years with combination chemotherapy plus bevacizumab. Bevacizumab is well suited for use in combination with first or second line chemotherapy in the treatment of mCRC because its side effects are predictable and appear not to add to the incidence or severity of the side effects of chemotherapy. The aim of our small study is to explore the tolerability profile of bevacizumab used in daily clinical practice in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in our department. PMID:28292081

  17. Response to angiotensin blockade with irbesartan in a patient with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jones, M. R.; Schrader, K. A.; Shen, Y.; Pleasance, E.; Ch'ng, C.; Dar, N.; Yip, S.; Renouf, D. J.; Schein, J. E.; Mungall, A. J.; Zhao, Y.; Moore, R.; Ma, Y.; Sheffield, B. S.; Ng, T.; Jones, S. J. M.; Marra, M. A.; Laskin, J.; Lim, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background A patient suffering from metastatic colorectal cancer, treatment-related toxicity and resistance to standard chemotherapy and radiation was assessed as part of a personalized oncogenomics initiative to derive potential alternative therapeutic strategies. Patients and methods Whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing was used to interrogate a metastatic tumor refractory to standard treatments of a patient with mismatch repair-deficient metastatic colorectal cancer. Results Integrative genomic analysis indicated overexpression of the AP-1 transcriptional complex suggesting experimental therapeutic rationales, including blockade of the renin–angiotensin system. This led to the repurposing of the angiotensin II receptor antagonist, irbesartan, as an anticancer therapy, resulting in the patient experiencing a dramatic and durable response. Conclusions This case highlights the utility of comprehensive integrative genomic profiling and bioinformatics analysis to provide hypothetical rationales for personalized treatment options. PMID:27022066

  18. Inhibitory effect of quercetin on colorectal lung metastasis through inducing apoptosis, and suppression of metastatic ability.

    PubMed

    Kee, Ji-Ye; Han, Yo-Han; Kim, Dae-Seung; Mun, Jeong-Geon; Park, Jinbong; Jeong, Mi-Young; Um, Jae-Young; Hong, Seung-Heon

    2016-12-01

    Quercetin is a major dietary flavonoid found in a various fruits, vegetables, and grains. Although the inhibitory effects of quercetin have previously been observed in several types of cancer cells, the anti-metastatic effect of quercetin on colorectal metastasis has not been determined. This study investigated whether quercetin exhibits inhibitory effect on colorectal lung metastasis. The effects of quercetin on cell viability, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation, migration, invasion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and lung metastasis were investigated. We investigated the effect of quercetin on metastatic colon cancer cells using WST assay, Annexin V assay, real-time RT-PCR, western blot analysis and gelatin zymography. The anti-metastatic effect of quercetin in vivo was confirmed in a colorectal lung metastasis model. Quercetin inhibited the cell viability of colon 26 (CT26) and colon 38 (MC38) cells and induced apoptosis through the MAPKs pathway in CT26 cells. Expression of EMT markers, such as E-, N-cadherin, β-catenin, and snail, were regulated by non-toxic concentrations of quercetin. Moreover, the migration and invasion abilities of CT26 cells were inhibited by quercetin through expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) regulation. Quercetin markedly decreased lung metastasis of CT26 cells in an experimental in vivo metastasis model. In conclusion, this study demonstrates for the first time that quercetin can inhibit the survival and metastatic ability of CT26 cells, and it can subsequently suppress colorectal lung metastasis in the mouse model. These results indicate that quercetin may be a potent therapeutic agent for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantitative proteomics of extracellular vesicles derived from human primary and metastatic colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-Sic; Choi, Do-Young; Hong, Bok Sil; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Gho, Yong Song

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells actively release extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles, into surrounding tissues. These EVs play pleiotropic roles in cancer progression and metastasis, including invasion, angiogenesis, and immune modulation. However, the proteomic differences between primary and metastatic cancer cell-derived EVs remain unclear. Here, we conducted comparative proteomic analysis between EVs derived from human primary colorectal cancer cells (SW480) and their metastatic derivatives (SW620). Using label-free quantitation, we identified 803 and 787 proteins in SW480 EVs and SW620 EVs, respectively. Based on comparison between the estimated abundance of EV proteins, we identified 368 SW480 EV-enriched and 359 SW620 EV-enriched proteins. SW480 EV-enriched proteins played a role in cell adhesion, but SW620 EV-enriched proteins were associated with cancer progression and functioned as diagnostic indicators of metastatic cancer; they were overexpressed in metastatic colorectal cancer and played roles in multidrug resistance. As the first proteomic analysis comparing primary and metastatic cancer-derived EVs, this study increases our understanding of the pathological function of EVs in the metastatic process and provides useful biomarkers for cancer metastasis.

  20. Bevacizumab for metastatic colorectal cancer: a NICE single technology appraisal.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Sophie; Pandor, Abdullah; Stevenson, Matt

    2012-12-01

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of bevacizumab (Roche Products) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of this drug for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), as part of the Institute's Single Technology Appraisal (STA) process. The School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) at the University of Sheffield was commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). This paper provides a description of the company submission, the ERG review and NICE's subsequent decisions. The ERG produced a critical review of the evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of the technology provided within the manufacturer's submission to NICE. The ERG also independently searched for relevant evidence and modified the manufacturer's decision analytic model to examine the impact of altering some of the key assumptions. The main clinical effectiveness data were derived from a phase III, multicentre, multinational, two-arm, randomized, open-label study with the primary objective of confirming the non-inferiority of oxaliplatin plus capecitabine (XELOX) compared with oxaliplatin plus 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid (FOLFOX-4) in adult patients with histologically confirmed mCRC who had not previously been treated. The ERG considered that the NO16966 trial was of reasonable methodological quality and demonstrated a significant improvement in both progression-free and overall survival when bevacizumab is added to either XELOX or FOLFOX-4. The ERG considered that the size of the actual treatment effect of bevacizumab was uncertain due to trial design limitations, imbalance of a known prognostic factor, relatively short treatment duration compared with that allowed within the trial protocol, and interpretation of the statistical analyses. The manufacturer's submission included a de novo economic evaluation using a cost-effectiveness model built in Microsoft® Excel. The ERG

  1. Role of the antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab in the treatment of elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Pietrantonio, Filippo; Martinetti, Antonia; Buzzoni, Roberto; Gevorgyan, Arpine; Bajetta, Emilio

    2011-02-01

    Although major progress has been achieved in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer with the employment of biological antiangiogenic agents, several questions remain open for discussion regarding the use of this therapy in elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. In Western countries, the total number of elderly patients with colorectal cancer is expected to increase in the future. As adverse physical or socioeconomic conditions are more common in the elderly, an assessment of the patient's suitability for this therapy should be performed before a treatment decision is made. Most patients in clinical trials of the antiangiogenic drug bevacizumab were aged <65 years and thus the efficacy and tolerability of this agent in older patients has been less well explored. However, this article shows that older and younger patients with metastatic colorectal cancer appeared to derive similar survival benefit from bevacizumab treatment. Elderly patients were also found to have significant prolongation of median progression-free survival with the addition of bevacizumab to their treatment, with a similar magnitude of improvement in this outcome being observed in younger and older patients. It should be emphasized that the patients included in the studies discussed in this article were eligible for clinical trials and therefore may not be representative of a more general elderly population. Careful selection of patients and monitoring of treatment effects are required to optimize use of the antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab in older patients.

  2. Neoplastic infiltration of the sphenoid wing: a rare manifestation of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Pinato, David James; Krell, Jonathan; Wasan, Harpreet; Sharma, Rohini

    2011-12-01

    Atypical patterns of metastatic spread from colorectal primary tumors are often misdiagnosed, with potential implications for the clinical outcome. Metastatic diffusion to the splanchnocranium is extremely rare in colorectal cancer. A histological proof of diagnosis is rarely obtained and therapeutic management is a challenge. We describe the case of a 46-year-old patient who presented with a radiologically proven sphenoid wing metastasis. The patient presented with left-sided exophthalmos while receiving systemic chemotherapy for relapsed high-risk colorectal cancer. A left sphenoid wing metastasis was proven by a head computed tomography scan. A metastatic spread to the sino-nasal tract is regarded as a poor prognosis determinant in colorectal cancer and presents a unique set of diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The compression of noble structures such as the optic nerve holds serious implications in terms of quality of life but there is insufficient evidence clarifying whether radiotherapy or surgery represent the best option for these patients, leaving the therapeutic plan to be decided case by case.

  3. Molecular subtypes of metastatic colorectal cancer are associated with patient response to irinotecan-based therapies.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, M; Mollevi, C; Bibeau, F; Vie, N; Selves, J; Emile, J-F; Roger, P; Gongora, C; Robert, J; Tubiana-Mathieu, N; Ychou, M; Martineau, P

    2017-05-01

    Currently, metastatic colorectal cancer is treated as a homogeneous disease and only RAS mutational status has been approved as a negative predictive factor in patients treated with cetuximab. The aim of this study was to evaluate if recently identified molecular subtypes of colon cancer are associated with response of metastatic patients to first-line therapy. We collected and analysed 143 samples of human colorectal tumours with complete clinical annotations, including the response to treatment. Gene expression profiling was used to classify patients in three to six classes using four different molecular classifications. Correlations between molecular subtypes, response to treatment, progression-free and overall survival were analysed. We first demonstrated that the four previously described molecular classifications of colorectal cancer defined in non-metastatic patients also correctly classify stage IV patients. One of the classifications is strongly associated with response to FOLFIRI (P=0.003), but not to FOLFOX (P=0.911) and FOLFIRI + Bevacizumab (P=0.190). In particular, we identify a molecular subtype representing 28% of the patients that shows an exceptionally high response rate to FOLFIRI (87.5%). These patients have a two-fold longer overall survival (40.1 months) when treated with FOLFIRI, as first-line regimen, instead of FOLFOX (18.6 months). Our results demonstrate the interest of molecular classifications to develop tailored therapies for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and a strong impact of the first-line regimen on the overall survival of some patients. This however remains to be confirmed in a large prospective clinical trial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Treatment with capecitabine + bevacizumab following induction treatment with FOLFIRI + bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tatlı, Ali Murat; Coşkun, Hasan Şenol; Uysal, Mükremin; Arslan, Deniz; Sezgin Göksu, Sema; Güenay Gündüz, Şeyda; Çakal, Selda; Bozcuk, Hakan Şat; Savaş, Burhan

    2014-01-01

    Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor, and it has been found to increase both progression-free survival and overall survival when it is combined with chemotherapeutic agents in the first-line and subsequent treatment of metastatic colorectal carcinoma. The objective of this study was to show the efficacy of maintenance treatment with capecitabine plus bevacizumab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who responded to treatment with FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab. The study included patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who received FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab as a first-line treatment. Patients who had objective response with FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab treatment after an average period of 6 months received a maintenance treatment with capecitabine plus bevacizumab (capecitabine 2 x 1000 mg/m2, 1 - 14 days, every 21 days, bevacizumab 7.5 mg/m2, every 21 days) until disease progression or toxicity. The time to progression on bevacizumab treatment was evaluated. A total of 29 patients (15 male, 14 female) were included. The mean age was 62 years. The mean number of cycles for maintenance treatment with capecitabine plus bevacizumab was 12. The median PFS was 16 ± 3 months, and OS was 42 ± 11 months. PFS and OS were remarkably higher in patients with a complete or near complete response to induction treatment. Fourteen patients (48%) experienced hand-foot syndrome associated with capecitabine plus bevacizumab treatment, without any severe toxicity. Inselected patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma who had a remarkable objective response to FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab treatment, a maintenance treatment with capecitabine plus bevacizumab following FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab until disease progression may be a suitable, effective and tolerable regimen, which requires further studies. PMID:25232406

  5. Meeting An Unmet Need in Metastatic Colorectal Carcinoma with Regorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Melosky, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a global issue, affecting men and women equally. Over the last 25 years, advances in therapy and multidisciplinary care have led to improvements in survival for those with colorectal cancer. Despite these advances, more therapeutic options are needed for those being treated for this disease. Regorafenib is an oral drug that is a new therapeutic option for our patients. The CORRECT and CONCUR trials demonstrate the efficacy of regorafenib in the last line setting. This article summarizes some of the regorafenib clinical trial data and discusses the strategies to help manage the side effects of this drug including patient education, dose reductions and interruptions, and monitoring hypertension and liver function. PMID:27981140

  6. Trifluridine/tipiracil and regorafenib: new weapons in the war against metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Benjamin A; Marshall, John L; Salem, Mohamed E

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Approximately 20% of patients have metastatic disease at diagnosis, and a vast number of these patients die within 5 years. The advent of modern chemotherapeutics has improved median overall survival for these patients; nonetheless, we must keep striving for better outcomes. Trifluridine/tipiracil (TAS-102) and regorafenib are agents newly approved by the US Food and Drug Administration that show promise in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. These drugs have the benefit of being formulated for oral administration and have different side effect profiles. These differences are important in the selection of the best therapy for each patient, especially if the patient is prone to a side effect that is unique to just one of the treatments. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of action, side effect profile, and clinical efficacy of trifluridine/tipiracil, and compare them with those of regorafenib. Future trials will evaluate the use of these drugs in earlier lines of therapy, alone and in combination with other agents. We now have 2 more agents in the arsenal against metastatic colorectal cancer and the future is looking brighter for patients, although we still have a long way to go.

  7. KRAS mutation testing of metastatic colorectal cancer in Australia: where are we at?

    PubMed

    Scott, Rodney J; Fox, Stephen B; Desai, Jayesh; Grieu, Fabienne; Amanuel, Benhur; Garrett, Kerryn; Harraway, James; Cheetham, Glenice; Pattle, Neville; Haddad, Afaf; Byron, Keith; Rudzki, Barney; Waring, Paul; Iacopetta, Barry

    2014-09-01

    To carry out a nationwide study of KRAS testing in metastatic colorectal cancer as reported by nine major molecular pathology service providers in Australia, including mutation frequencies and turnaround times that might impact on patient care. Participating laboratories contributed information on KRAS mutation frequencies, including the G13D mutation type, as well as turnaround times for tumor block retrieval and testing. The KRAS mutation frequency observed by nine different test sites for a total of 3688 metastatic colorectal cancers ranged from 34.4% to 40.7%, with an average across all sites of 38.8%. The average frequency of the G13D mutation type among all cases was 8.0%. The median turnaround time was 17 days (range 0-191), with 20% of cases requiring more than 4 weeks for a KRAS test result. The major contributor to long turnaround times was the time taken to retrieve archived blocks of primary tumor, particularly from sources external to the test site. The frequency of KRAS mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer reported by the major Australian test sites is very similar to that reported by other large overseas studies. More widespread introduction of routine testing at the time of initial diagnosis should eliminate the long turnaround times currently being experienced in a significant proportion of cases. Future expansion of testing to include other KRAS and NRAS mutation hotspots may spur the introduction of next-generation sequencing platforms. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Capecitabine: indications and future perspectives in the treatment of metastatic colorectal and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cassata, A; Procoplo, G; Alù, M; Ferrari, L; Ferrario, E; Beretta, E; Longarini, R; Busto, G; De Candis, D; Bajetta, E

    2001-01-01

    Fluoropyrimidines remain the most important drugs in the treatment of breast and colorectal carcinoma, but response rates and survival time have been disappointing. Optimal administration is by continuous intravenous infusion, which makes it cumbersome to use and compromises patient independence. Recently, a number of new agents, including fluorouracil prodrugs and selective dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase inhibitors, have been studied, with promising results. Capecitabine is the first in a new class of fluoropyrimidines. It is an oral, tumor-activated anticancer drug whose activity mimics that of continuously infused 5-fluorouracil. Capecitabine circumvents dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase catabolism and appears to be at least as active against metastatic colorectal and breast cancer as conventionally administered intravenous 5-fluorouracil, with significantly less toxicity, an improved quality of life, and lesser cost. Capecitabine may ultimately provide enhanced antitumor activity to fluorouracil-containing regimes for advanced colorectal and breast cancer.

  9. Indocyanine green fluorescence-guided surgery after IV injection in metastatic colorectal cancer: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Liberale, G; Bourgeois, P; Larsimont, D; Moreau, M; Donckier, V; Ishizawa, T

    2017-09-01

    Indocyanine green fluorescence-guided surgery (ICG-FGS) has emerged as a potential new imaging modality for improving the detection of hepatic, lymph node (LN), and peritoneal metastases in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. The aim of this paper is to review the available literature in the clinical setting of ICG-FGS for tumoral detection in various fields of metastatic colorectal disease. PubMed and Medline literature databases were searched for original articles on the use of ICG in the setting of clinical studies on colorectal cancer. The search terms used were "near-infrared fluorescence", "intraoperative imaging", "indocyanine green", "human" and "colorectal cancer". ICG fluorescence imaging (ICG-FI) is clearly supported as an intraoperative technique that allows the detection of additional superficial hepatic metastases of CRC. Data on the role of ICG-FI in the intraoperative detection of peritoneal metastases and LN metastases are scarce but encouraging and ICG-FI could potentially improve the staging and treatment of these patients. ICG-FI is a promising imaging technique in the detection of small infraclinic LN, hepatic, and peritoneal metastatic deposits that may allow better staging and more complete surgical resection with a potential prognostic benefit for patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  10. GUCY2C lysosomotropic endocytosis delivers immunotoxin therapy to metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marszalowicz, Glen P.; Snook, Adam E.; Magee, Michael S.; Merlino, Dante; Lisa, D. Berman-Booty; Waldman, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of targeted cancer therapy has been limited by the paucity of determinants which are tumor-specific and generally associated with disease, and have cell dynamics which effectively deploy cytotoxic payloads. Guanylyl cyclase C (GUCY2C) may be ideal for targeting because it is normally expressed only in insulated barrier compartments, including intestine and brain, but over-expressed by systemic metastatic colorectal tumors. Here, we reveal that GUCY2C rapidly internalizes from the cell surface to lysosomes in intestinal and colorectal cancer cells. Endocytosis is independent of ligand binding and receptor activation, and is mediated by clathrin. This mechanism suggests a design for immunotoxins comprising a GUCY2C-directed monoclonal antibody conjugated through a reducible disulfide linkage to ricin A chain, which is activated to a potent cytotoxin in lysosomes. Indeed, this immunotoxin specifically killed GUCY2C-expressing colorectal cancer cells in a lysosomal- and clathrin-dependent fashion. Moreover, this immunotoxin reduced pulmonary tumors >80% (p<0.001), and improved survival 25% (p<0.001), in mice with established colorectal cancer metastases. Further, therapeutic efficacy was achieved without histologic evidence of toxicity in normal tissues. These observations support GUCY2C-targeted immunotoxins as novel therapeutics for metastatic tumors originating in the GI tract, including colorectum, stomach, esophagus, and pancreas. PMID:25294806

  11. Beclin 1 and LC3 as predictive biomarkers for metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Yang, Maopeng; Zhao, Bin

    2017-08-29

    Autophagy is a highly conserved self-destructive process that disassembles dysfunctional or unnecessary cellular components. It plays an important role in cancer metastasis, which is of particular interest considering metastatic disease is the major cause of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) related mortality. Here, we investigated the immunohistochemical expression of autophagy-related protein Beclin 1 and Microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3) within surgical CRC specimens, first in a training cohort (205 patients), then in an inner validation cohort (160 patients) and an independent cohort (161 patients). The expressions of Beclin 1 and LC3 were lower in metastatic CRC compared with non-metastatic CRC. Furthermore, we developed an autophagy-based classifier for metastatic prediction. This classifier, including Beclin 1, LC3 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, resulted in 82.9% sensitivity and 89.8% specificity for metastatic detection in the training cohort. In the independent cohort, it achieved 77.9% sensitivity and 90.3% specificity in predicting the metastasis of CRC. These results suggested that low expression of Beclin 1 and LC3 contributed to a more aggressive cancer cell phenotype, and our autophagy-based classifier was a reliable tool for metastatic prediction in CRC.

  12. Sense of Coherence and Defense Style Predict Sleep Difficulties in Early Non-metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hyphantis, Thomas; Goulia, Panagiota; Zerdes, Ioannis; Solomou, Solomis; Andreoulakis, Elias; Carvalho, André F; Pavlidis, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common in cancer patients, but little is known about the complex interplay between the background psychological profile, coping with health stressors capacities and psychological distress in the formation of sleep difficulties in colorectal cancer. To study the course and to identify psychological predictors of sleep difficulties in early non-metastatic colorectal cancer patients over a one-year period. In this 1-year prospective study, we assessed in 84 early non-metastatic colorectal cancer patients the association of psychological distress (SCL-90-R), sense of coherence (SOC-29), and defense styles (Defense Style Questionnaire) with sleep difficulties (SCL-90-R) in multiple regression models. Eighty-two patients with breast cancer and 50 patients with cancer of unknown primary site served as disease controls, and 84 matched for age and sex alleged healthy individuals served as healthy controls. Colorectal cancer patients presented more sleep difficulties compared to healthy participants but fewer than patients with breast cancer and cancer of unknown primary site. Colorectal cancer patients' trouble falling asleep (p = 0.033) and wakening up early in the morning (p < 0.001) deteriorated over time. Sleep that was restless or disturbed was independently associated with low SOC (p = 0.046) and maladaptive defenses (p = 0.008). Anxiety symptoms (p < 0.001) predicted deterioration in trouble falling asleep, while depressive symptoms (p = 0.022) and self-sacrificing defense style (p = 0.049) predicted deterioration in wakening up early in the morning. Psychological parameters and coping with health stressors capacities are independently associated with sleep difficulties in colorectal cancer patients, indicating the need for psychological interventions aiming at improving adjustment to the disease.

  13. Lower or Standard Dose Regorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-11

    Colon Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer

  14. Metastatic colorectal cancer presenting with bone marrow metastasis: a case series and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Rita; Mukherji, Deborah; Haydar, Ali; Saroufim, Maya; Temraz, Sally

    2016-01-01

    With advances in treatment, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) are now living longer with an apparent increase in the incidence of bone and bone marrow metastases (BMM). Common sites of metastatic disease from CRC include the liver and lungs with bone metastasis rarely occurring in the absence of visceral metastatic disease. We report a series of three patients presenting with isolated bone and BMM leading to a diagnosis of primary CRC. We have reviewed the literature regarding diagnosis, potential mechanisms leading to the development of osseous metastasis and outcome. A high level of clinical suspicion and in-depth understanding of the natural history of these rare metastases may guide future management and treatment decisions. PMID:27034798

  15. Primary colorectal adenocarcinoma metastatic to the breast: case report and review of nineteen cases.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, Rodney E; Allam-Nandyala, Pushpa; Bui, Marilyn M; Kiluk, John V; Esposito, Nicole Nicosia

    2011-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from extramammary primaries are uncommon and account for 0.5-6% of all breast malignancies (Georgiannos et al., 2001, and Vizcaíno et al., 2001). Malignant melanoma, lymphoma, and lung and gastric carcinomas are the most frequently encountered nonmammary metastases to the breast in adults (Georgiannos et al., 2001, and Chaignaud et al., 1994). Primary colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) metastatic to the breast is extremely rare, with the medical literature having only 19 recorded cases. Typically CRC metastatic to the breast is indicative of widely disseminated disease and a poor prognosis. Here we present a case of poorly differentiated colon cancer metastatic to the breast and review the current literature on this rare event.

  16. Large scale systematic proteomic quantification from non-metastatic to metastatic colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xuefei; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Shaowen; Jin, Hong; Wang, Wenhai; Yang, Pengyuan

    2015-07-01

    A systematic proteomic quantification of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) colorectal cancer tissues from stage I to stage IIIC was performed in large scale. 1017 proteins were identified with 338 proteins in quantitative changes by label free method, while 341 proteins were quantified with significant expression changes among 6294 proteins by iTRAQ method. We found that proteins related to migration expression increased and those for binding and adherent decreased during the colorectal cancer development according to the gene ontology (GO) annotation and ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA). The integrin alpha 5 (ITA5) in integrin family was focused, which was consistent with the metastasis related pathway. The expression level of ITA5 decreased in metastasis tissues and the result has been further verified by Western blotting. Another two cell migration related proteins vitronectin (VTN) and actin-related protein (ARP3) were also proved to be up-regulated by both mass spectrometry (MS) based quantification results and Western blotting. Up to now, our result shows one of the largest dataset in colorectal cancer proteomics research. Our strategy reveals a disease driven omics-pattern for the metastasis colorectal cancer.

  17. Racial disparity in consultation, treatment, and the impact on survival in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Daniel R; Martínez, María Elena; Gupta, Samir; Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona; Mell, Loren K; Heestand, Gregory; Fanta, Paul; Ramamoorthy, Sonia; Le, Quynh-Thu; Murphy, James D

    2013-12-04

    Black patients with metastatic colorectal cancer have inferior survival compared to white patients. The purpose of this study was to examine disparity in specialist consultation and multimodality treatment and the impact that treatment inequality has on survival. We identified 9935 non-Hispanic white and 1281 black patients with stage IV colorectal cancer aged 66 years and older from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Logistic regression models identified race-based differences in consultation rates and subsequent treatment with surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation. Multivariable Cox regression models identified potential factors that explain race-based survival differences. All statistical tests were two-sided. Black patients had lower rates of consultation with surgery, medical oncology, and radiation oncology. Among patients seen in consultation, black patients received less surgery directed at the primary tumor, liver- or lung-directed surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Unadjusted survival analysis found a 15% higher chance of dying for black patients compared with white patients (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.15; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.08 to 1.22; P < .001). Adjustment for patient, tumor, and demographic variables marginally reduced the risk of death (HR = 1.08; 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.15; P = .03). After adjustment for differences in treatment, the increased risk of death for black patients disappeared. Our study shows racial disparity in specialist consultation as well as subsequent treatment with multimodality therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer, and it suggests that inferior survival for black patients may stem from this treatment disparity. Further research into the underlying causes of this inequality will improve access to treatment and survival in metastatic colorectal cancer.

  18. Long-term oncologic outcomes for simultaneous resection of synchronous metastatic liver and primary colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Silberhumer, Gerd R; Paty, Philip B; Denton, Brian; Guillem, Jose; Gonen, Mithat; Araujo, Raphael L C; Nash, Garret M; Temple, Larissa K; Allen, Peter J; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Weiser, Martin R; Wong, W Douglas; Jarnagin, William R; D'Angelica, Michael I; Fong, Yuman

    2016-07-01

    Twenty-five percent of patients with colorectal cancer present with simultaneous liver metastasis. Complete resection is the only potential curative treatment. Due to improvements in operative and perioperative management, simultaneous liver and colon resections are an accepted procedure at specialized centers for selected patients. Nevertheless, little is known about the long-term, oncologic results of simultaneous operative procedures compared with those of staged operations. Patients with colorectal cancer and simultaneous liver metastases presenting for complete resection at a tertiary cancer center were identified. Patients who received the primary colon resection at an outside institution were excluded from analysis. Between 1984 and 2008, 429 patients underwent operative treatment for colorectal cancer with simultaneous liver metastasis. Of these, 320 (75%) had simultaneous resection and 109 had staged resection. There was no difference in the distribution of primary tumor locations between the 2 groups. Mean size of the hepatic metastases was significantly greater in the staged group (median 4 cm vs 2.5 cm; P < .01). Neither disease-free nor overall survival differed significantly between the 2 treatment strategies. The extent of the liver procedure (more than 3 segments) was identified as a risk factor for decreased disease-free and overall survival (both P < .01). Simultaneous liver and colorectal resections for metastatic colorectal cancer are associated with similar long-term cancer outcome compared with staged procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cetuximab strongly enhances immune cell infiltration into liver metastatic sites in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuka; Hazama, Shoichi; Suzuki, Nobuaki; Tokumitsu, Yukio; Kanekiyo, Shinsuke; Tomochika, Shinobu; Tsunedomi, Ryouichi; Tokuhisa, Yoshihiro; Iida, Michihisa; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Shigeru; Ueno, Tomio; Yoshino, Shigefumi; Nagano, Hiroaki

    2017-03-01

    Cetuximab has activity against colorectal cancers. Recent studies demonstrated that cetuximab induces antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity via immune cells, and a new immune-related mechanism of inducing immunogenic cell death. This study aimed to evaluate the immune responses induced by cetuximab in tumor microenvironments at liver metastasis sites of metastatic colorectal cancer patients. We assessed immune cell infiltration in the liver metastatic sites of 53 colorectal cancer patients. These patients were divided into three groups according to the treatment before operation: chemotherapy with cetuximab, chemotherapy without cetuximab, and no chemotherapy. The inflammatory cells in the liver metastatic sites were assessed by hematoxylin-eosin staining, focusing on the invasive margin. The overall inflammatory reaction and number of lymphoid cells were assessed with a four-point scoring system. We then assessed immune cell infiltration (CD3, CD8 and CD56) in 15 liver metastatic sites. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated more inflammatory cells in the chemotherapy with cetuximab group than in the other groups (P < 0.001). Of note, inflammatory cells were found in intratumoral areas, and the destruction of cancer cell foci was observed in the chemotherapy with cetuximab group. Moreover, a higher infiltration of CD3+ (P = 0.003), CD8+ (P = 0.003) and CD56+ (P = 0.001) cells was observed in the chemotherapy with cetuximab group than in the other groups. These results suggest that cetuximab might have an immune-enhancing effect. As such, the immune-related mechanism of action of cetuximab may enhance the efficacy of combination therapy, such as chemotherapy and immunotherapy using therapeutic peptides.

  20. Hepatic artery infusion therapy is effective for chemotherapy-resistant liver metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Goi, Takanori; Naruse, Takayuki; Kimura, Youhei; Fujimoto, Daisuke; Morikawa, Mitsuhiro; Koneri, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Akio

    2015-10-09

    Systemic FOLFOX (folinic acid (leucovorin (LV)), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and oxaliplatin), FOLFIRI (LV, 5-FU, and irinotecan), or FOLFOXIRI (5-FU, leucovorin, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan) chemotherapy regimens and additional molecular-target treatments, including anti-vascular endothelial growth factor, anti-epidermal growth factor receptor, and anti-multi-kinase antibodies, have been recommended for unresectable recurrent colorectal cancers. However, no effective treatments are currently available for cases refractory to these therapies. Therefore, the development of alternative therapies is desired. In the present study, we administered and observed the effectiveness of hepatic artery infusion therapy (HAIC) in patients with unresectable liver metastatic colorectal cancers refractory to systemic chemotherapy. In addition, we observed that in an experimental system with anticancer drug-resistant colorectal cancer lines, apoptosis and cell death could be induced by increasing anticancer drug concentrations. The subjects had liver metastatic colorectal cancers that were unresponsive to systemic chemotherapy (FOLFOX/FOLFIRI) or to additional molecular-target therapies for progressive disease. Hepatic infusion tube placement was conducted according to the Seldinger method to insert a catheter with a side hole via the right femoral artery. A coiling procedure was performed to prevent drug influx into the gastroduodenal artery. Ten subjects were selected, and the results were evaluated after HAIC (5-FU and LV administered once weekly). Moreover, anticancer drug-resistant colorectal cancer lines were subsequently prepared to investigate whether increased anticancer drug concentrations could induce apoptosis or cell death. Of the 10 subjects, 3 (30 %) showed partial response and 4 (40 %) showed no change according to computed tomography imaging findings obtained after hepatic artery infusion. The disease control rate was 70 %. Eight subjects had improved quality of life

  1. Randomized trial of TAS-102 for refractory metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Robert J; Van Cutsem, Eric; Falcone, Alfredo; Yoshino, Takayuki; Garcia-Carbonero, Rocio; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Tabernero, Josep; Komatsu, Yoshito; Sobrero, Alberto; Boucher, Eveline; Peeters, Marc; Tran, Ben; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Zaniboni, Alberto; Hochster, Howard; Cleary, James M; Prenen, Hans; Benedetti, Fabio; Mizuguchi, Hirokazu; Makris, Lukas; Ito, Masanobu; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2015-05-14

    Early clinical trials conducted primarily in Japan have shown that TAS-102, an oral agent that combines trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride, was effective in the treatment of refractory colorectal cancer. We conducted a phase 3 trial to further assess the efficacy and safety of TAS-102 in a global population of such patients. In this double-blind study, we randomly assigned 800 patients, in a 2:1 ratio, to receive TAS-102 or placebo. The primary end point was overall survival. The median overall survival improved from 5.3 months with placebo to 7.1 months with TAS-102, and the hazard ratio for death in the TAS-102 group versus the placebo group was 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58 to 0.81; P<0.001). The most frequently observed clinically significant adverse events associated with TAS-102 were neutropenia, which occurred in 38% of those treated, and leukopenia, which occurred in 21%; 4% of the patients who received TAS-102 had febrile neutropenia, and one death related to TAS-102 was reported. The median time to worsening performance status (a change in Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status [on a scale of 0 to 5, with 0 indicating no symptoms and higher numbers indicating increasing degrees of disability] from 0 or 1 to 2 or more) was 5.7 months with TAS-102 versus 4.0 months with placebo (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.78; P<0.001). In patients with refractory colorectal cancer, TAS-102, as compared with placebo, was associated with a significant improvement in overall survival. (Funded by Taiho Oncology-Taiho Pharmaceutical; RECOURSE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01607957.).

  2. Systemic Therapies for Late-stage Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Peter W.; Friedlander, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Late-stage melanoma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Classic treatment methods relied on cytotoxic chemotherapy, which is limited by low response rates and significant adverse effects. Recent advances in immunogenetics have led to the advent of important new systemictreatments.Thisarticle reviews the latest therapy options for advanced melanoma. PMID:27847547

  3. EGFR expression variance in paired colorectal cancer primary and metastatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Yarom, Nirit; Marginean, Celia; Moyana, Terence; Gorn-Hondermann, Ivan; Birnboim, H Chaim; Marginean, Horia; Auer, Rebecca C; Vickers, Michael; Asmis, Timothy R; Maroun, Jean; Jonker, Derek

    2010-09-01

    Previous studies indicate that drugs targeting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signaling pathways can induce objective responses, prolong time to progression and improve survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). EGFR expression in the primary tumour may not predict response to these agents and data is conflicting regarding the correlation of EGFR expression in the primary tumour with the metastatic site. In other tumour sites, the presence of EGFR mutations was associated with efficacy in a subset of patients. The goal of this study is to correlate tumour EGFR expression between primary and liver metastatic sites, and to assess the mutational status in the EGFR kinase domain. This is a single center retrospective study of patients who underwent surgical resection of CRC, for whom paired paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of primary tumours and resected liver metastases were available. EGFR immunostaining and mutation analyses were preformed. Fifty six paired colorectal primaries and metastases were available for analysis. EGFR was detectable in 96.6% of the primary samples and in 89.7% of the metastatic samples. Perfect concordance in the intensity score between the primary and the metastases was found in 46.5% of the cases. While individual pairs were poorly concordant for intensity, the proportion of primaries with intense staining was similar to the proportion with intense staining in the metastatic samples. Overall survival did not correlate with either EGFR expression in the primary tumour, or with EGFR expression in the metastasis. There were 2 cases with mutations in the EGFR kinase domain. Both mutations were found in exon21 C>T. In this analysis, EGFR expression in the primary tumor site was not predictive of its level in the metastasis. EGFR expression levels in the primaries and in the metastases do not appear to be useful prognostic markers.

  4. The continuum of care: a paradigm for the management of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Richard M; Rothenberg, Mace L; Van Cutsem, Eric; Benson, Al B; Blanke, Charles D; Diasio, Robert B; Grothey, Axel; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Meropol, Neal J; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Becerra, Carlos H Roberto; Wickham, Rita; Armstrong, Delma; Viele, Carol

    2007-01-01

    New agents for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer have extended median overall survival to more than 20 months, an increase that has changed the view of advanced colorectal cancer from an acute to a chronic condition. This article proposes a shift in treatment strategy from the concept of successive "lines" of therapy, in which chemotherapy is continued until disease progression, to that of a continuum of care, in which the use of chemotherapy is tailored to the clinical setting and includes switching chemotherapy prior to disease progression, maintenance therapy, drug "holidays," and surgical resection of metastases in selected patients. In this approach, the distinction between lines of therapy is no longer absolute. This represents a paradigm shift in the management of metastatic colorectal cancer to that of a continuum of care approach that includes individualized planning, in which patients are given the opportunity to benefit from exposure to all active agents and modalities while minimizing unnecessary treatment and toxicity, with the ultimate goal of improving survival as well as quality of life.

  5. Hope, optimism and survival in a randomised trial of chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Penelope E; Stockler, M R; Zannino, D; Tebbutt, N C; Price, T J; Simes, R J; Wong, N; Pavlakis, N; Ransom, D; Moylan, E; Underhill, C; Wyld, D; Burns, I; Ward, R; Wilcken, N; Jefford, M

    2016-01-01

    Psychological responses to cancer are widely believed to affect survival. We investigated associations between hope, optimism, anxiety, depression, health utility and survival in patients starting first-line chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. Four hundred twenty-nine subjects with metastatic colorectal cancer in a randomised controlled trial of chemotherapy completed baseline questionnaires assessing the following: hopefulness, optimism, anxiety and depression and health utility. Hazard ratios (HRs) and P values were calculated with Cox models for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in univariable and multivariable analyses. Median follow-up was 31 months. Univariable analyses showed that OS was associated negatively with depression (HR 2.04, P < 0.001) and positively with health utility (HR 0.56, P < 0.001) and hopefulness (HR 0.75, P = 0.013). In multivariable analysis, OS was also associated negatively with depression (HR 1.72, P < 0.001) and positively with health utility (HR 0.73, P = 0.014), but not with optimism, anxiety or hopefulness. PFS was not associated with hope, optimism, anxiety or depression in any analyses. Depression and health utility, but not optimism, hope or anxiety, were associated with survival after controlling for known prognostic factors in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Further research is required to understand the nature of the relationship between depression and survival. If a causal mechanism is identified, this may lead to interventional possibilities.

  6. Safety and efficacy of FOLFOX followed by cetuximab for metastatic colorectal cancer with severe liver dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Elsoueidi, Raymond; Craig, Jessica; Mourad, Hesham; Richa, Elie M

    2014-02-01

    Both 5-FU and oxaliplatin have been used as single agents in patients with colorectal cancer and severe liver dysfunction, but the combination of these drugs has not yet been investigated. A 67-year-old man diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2008 presented in April 2011 to Appalachian Regional Healthcare Cancer Center with obstructive jaundice and weight loss. Imaging studies were compatible with a liver mass and dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts. A liver biopsy confirmed metastatic colorectal cancer. Because his total bilirubin level was 23.1 mg/dL, a percutaneous catheter was placed in May 2011. His total bilirubin level decreased to 5.9 mg/dL, but then increased to 9.4 mg/dL in June 2011. He was started on a FOLFOX regimen, with a 50% dose reduction of 5-FU bolus (200 mg/m(2)) and continuous infusion (1200 mg/m(2)) over 46 hours, and a 15% dose reduction of oxaliplatin (75 mg/m(2)) every 2 weeks. He tolerated this regimen very well, with normalization of his bilirubin level, a significant decrease in his tumor markers, and a partial response seen on PET/CT scan. His only significant toxicity was a grade 2 stomatitis. He received 21 cycles of FOLFOX, and was later switched to cetuximab treatment after disease progression. These findings suggest that FOLFOX might be effective in metastatic colon cancer with severe liver dysfunction, with minimal toxicity, and deserves further investigation.

  7. Selumetinib and Cyclosporine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-28

    Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  8. A logistic model for the detection of circulating tumour cells in human metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barbazán, Jorge; Vieito, María; Abalo, Alicia; Alonso-Alconada, Lorena; Muinelo-Romay, Laura; Alonso-Nocelo, Marta; León, Luís; Candamio, Sonia; Gallardo, Elena; Anido, Urbano; Doll, Andreas; los Ángeles Casares, María; Gómez-Tato, Antonio; Abal, Miguel; López-López, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy in the diagnosis of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) represents one of the challenges in the clinical management of patients. The detection of circulating tumour cells (CTC) is becoming a promising alternative to current detection techniques, as it focuses on one of the players of the metastatic disease and it should provide with more specific and sensitive detection rates. Here, we describe an improved method of detection of CTC from mCRC patients by combining immune-enrichment, optimal purification of RNA from very low cell numbers, and the selection of accurate PCR probes. As a result, we obtained a logistic model that combines GAPDH and VIL1 normalized to CD45 rendering powerful results in the detection of CTC from mCRC patients (AUROC value 0.8599). We further demonstrated the utility of this model at the clinical setting, as a reliable prognosis tool to determine progression-free survival in mCRC patients. Overall, we developed a strategy that ameliorates the specificity and sensitivity in the detection of CTC, resulting in a robust and promising logistic model for the clinical management of metastatic colorectal cancer patients. PMID:22304365

  9. Study on adherence to capecitabine among patients with colorectal cancer and metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo Junior, Adiel Goes de; Forones, Nora Manoukian

    2014-01-01

    Capecitabine, an oral drug, is as effective as traditional chemotherapy drugs. To investigate the adhesion to treatment with oral capecitabine in breast and colorectal cancer, and to determine any correlation with changes in patient's quality of life. Patients with colorectal cancer or breast cancer using capecitabine were included. The patients were asked to bring any medication left at the time of scheduled visits. The QLQ-C30 questionnaire was applied at the first visit and 8-12 weeks after treatment. Thirty patients were evaluated. Adherence was 88.3% for metastatic colon cancer, 90.4% for non-metastatic colon cancer, 94.3% for rectal cancer and 96.2% for metastatic breast cancer. No strong correlation between adherence and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 functional or symptom scale rates had been found. There was no statistically significant correlation between compliance and the functional and symptom scales of the questionnaire before and after chemotherapy, with the exception of dyspnea. Although no absolute adherence to oral capecitabine treatment had been observed, the level of adherence was good. Health professionals therefore need a greater focus in the monitoring the involvement of patients with oral treatment regimens. Patients with lesser degrees of dyspnea had greater compliance.

  10. Signet ring cell carcinoma of resectable metastatic colorectal cancer has rare surgical value.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jianfei; Wu, Lunpo; Jiang, Mengjie; Tan, Yinuo; Li, Dan; Chen, Fei; Jiang, Ting; Du, Jinlin

    2016-12-01

    Signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is a uniquely separated subgroup in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The aims are to investigate the value of resection in patients with resectable metastatic signet ring cell colorectal cancer. Patients with mCRC who underwent resection in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database during 1998-2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Kaplan-Meier and COX models were used to analyze the differences in the survival. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the relationship between SRCC and other clinicopathological factors. Among the 3,568 patients, 94 (2.63%) patients had SRCC. The median survival time of patients with SRCC and non-SRCC were 17 and 29 months, respectively (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis indicated that SRCC was an independent prognostic factor for poor overall survival. Logistic regression model based on variables identified by univariate analysis indicated that younger age (≤50 years old) (P = 0.005), female (P < 0.001), location in colon (P = 0.012), and N positive status (P = 0.003) were independent variables correlated with the SRCC subgroup. SRCC had a dramatically higher invalid surgical outcome rate than non-SRCC (P = 0.001). SRCC patients might benefit little from the resection of primary and metastatic lesions with a high rate of undergoing invalid operations. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:1004-1008. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Second-line angiogenesis inhibition in metastatic colorectal cancer patients: Straightforward or overcrowded?

    PubMed

    Giampieri, Riccardo; Caporale, Marta; Pietrantonio, Filippo; De Braud, Filippo; Negri, Francesca V; Giuliani, Francesco; Pusceddu, Valeria; Demurtas, Laura; Restivo, Angelo; Fontanella, Caterina; Aprile, Giuseppe; Cascinu, Stefano; Scartozzi, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Although the number of therapeutic options targeting tumour angiogenesis is becoming increasingly relevant, the question of the optimal choice for second-line anti-angiogenic inhibition in combination with chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer patients remains largely unanswered. In fact the lack of head to head comparison between consolidated options such as bevacizumab and new treatment alternatives such as aflibercept and ramucirumab makes the selection in the clinical practice challenging, particularly when the patient has already received an anti-angiogenic-based combination up-front. In the following pages we described the biological scenario validating second-line angiogenesis inhibition in colorectal cancer along with potential mechanism of resistance. We also critically described the available evidence recommending the use of the bevacizumab, aflibercept and ramucirumab in this setting with the final aim to guide the choice in the clinical practice.

  12. Developing a national database for metastatic colorectal cancer management: perspectives and challenges.

    PubMed

    Field, K; Wong, H-L; Shapiro, J; Kosmider, S; Tie, J; Bae, S; Yip, D; McKendrick, J; Nott, L; Desai, J; Harold, M; Lipton, L; Stefanou, G; Lim, L; Parente, P; Gibbs, P

    2013-11-01

    The changing treatment landscape for metastatic colorectal cancer creates multiple potential treatment strategies. An Australian-centric database capturing comprehensive information across a range of treatment locations would create a valuable resource enabling multiple important research questions to be addressed. To establish a collection of a consensus dataset capturing treatment and outcomes at multiple public and private hospitals across Australia. An electronic database was developed by a panel of clinicians, to capture an agreed dataset for patients with newly diagnosed metastatic colorectal cancer. Of particular interest were clinician decision-making, the impact of comorbidities and the frequency of major adverse events. Since July 2009, data collection has been established at six public and eight private hospitals across three Australian states and territories. Successful linkage and analysis, with support from BioGrid Australia, of selected data on the initial 864 patients demonstrates that data can be captured from diverse sites, including public and private practice, that multiple factors impact on treatment delivered and outcomes achieved and that comprehensive data on rare but important adverse events can be captured. As a clinical research tool, the project has been highly successful, generating multiple presentations at national and international conferences related to a diverse range of research questions. Multistate, project-specific data collection involving large numbers of patients is achievable. Providing invaluable insight into the routine clinical management of metastatic colorectal cancer in the era of targeted therapies, this also creates a significant resource for research, including many questions not being addressed by clinical trials. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  13. Making sense of anti-EGFR plus oxaliplatin-based therapy in the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fakih, Marwan G

    2011-02-01

    EGF receptor (EGFR) targeting in patients with wild-type KRAS metastatic colorectal cancer has been associated with clinical activity in first-, second- and third-line therapies. Panitumumab, a human monoclonal antibody that targets EGFRs, had previously been associated with tumor regressions and improved progression-free survival in patients with chemotherapy-resistant metastatic colorectal cancer. Douillard et al. have reported on the results of the Phase III Panitumumab Randomized Trial in Combination with Chemotherapy for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer to Determine Efficacy (PRIME) Phase III of fluoroucil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin, with and without panitumumab, in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. This article focuses on the PRIME study and its implications on clinical practice. In addition, the results of the PRIME study in the context of another EGFR-targeting agent, cetuximab, when combined with oxaliplatin-based first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer, is discussed.

  14. Anti-angiogenic therapies for metastatic colorectal cancer: Current and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Inês; Araújo, António; de Mello, Ramon Andrade

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States, with about 142820 new cases and 50830 deaths expected in 2013. Metastatic disease (mCRC) remains a challenge for oncologists worldwide due to its potential comorbidities. Recently, chemotherapy regimens containing 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin and irinotecan combinations are a standard of care in the metastatic disease. Currently, biological therapies involving vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor receptor pathways, such as bevacizumab and cetuximab, have emerged as good option for improving mCRC patient survival. Now, aflibercept plus standard chemotherapy has also been approved in second line regimen for mCRC patients. Our review will discuss novel biological drugs and their indications for mCRC patients and will bring future perspectives in this regard. PMID:24307789

  15. Fournier gangrene as a manifestation of undiagnosed metastatic perforated colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cyrus C; Williams, Mallory

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Fournier gangrene is a necrotizing soft tissue infection involving the perineum. We present a case of Fournier gangrene as the clinical presentation of perforated metastatic rectal cancer. The patient is a 78-year-old man in a nursing home who presented to our institution with necrosis and ischemia of the scrotum. After wide debridement of necrotic tissue and bilateral orchiectomy, computed tomography was carried out to investigate abnormal findings seen on his chest X-ray, which revealed multiple pulmonary metastases as well as a mass highly suspicious for a perforated rectal mass. Once stable, a diverting colostomy and biopsies of the rectal mass were performed, confirming the presence of a metastatic, poorly differentiated rectal adenocarcinoma. Albeit an unusual etiology of Fournier gangrene, this case highlights the rare but important causes of this deadly condition and teaches us to be cognizant of the variations in the presentation of colorectal cancer.

  16. Metastatic colorectal cancer KRAS genotyping in routine practice: results and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Aude; Blanchard, France; Le Pessot, Florence; Sesboüé, Richard; Di Fiore, Frédéric; Bossut, Jessie; Fiant, Elodie; Frébourg, Thierry; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe

    2011-08-01

    KRAS genotyping is mandatory before anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer, which is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States and in Europe. Thus, large-scale KRAS mutation screening is needed for efficient patient management and in the future metastatic colorectal cancer genotyping might also include the detection of the BRAF V600E mutation, which is a very strong negative prognostic factor in colorectal cancer. We report our experience of routine KRAS/BRAF mutation screening practice performed on 1130 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples from 992 colorectal cancer patients. DNA was extracted from macrodissected tumor areas highlighted by a pathologist, KRAS codons 12/13 and BRAF V600E mutations were assessed in a single SNaPshot® multiplex assay and each mutation was confirmed by an independent analysis. KRAS and BRAF mutations were, respectively, present in 41.8 and 6.5% of the tumor samples. If KRAS and BRAF mutations were mutually exclusive, four samples presented two concomitant KRAS mutations. Genotyping of paired primary tumors and metastases from 44 patients indicated that 5 patients (11.4%) presented discordant KRAS mutational status. KRAS genotype heterogeneity was also observed within primary tumor sites in seven cases. Non-reproducible KRAS artefactual mutations were detected in 53 samples (4.7%). We found that the prominent mechanism leading to these artefactual mutations was the fragmentation of DNA occurring during tissue processing. Routine KRAS genotyping performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues requires, therefore, the development of quality control scheme for molecular pathology, especially because of DNA damages induced by formalin fixation. The tumor heterogeneity observed in some patients indicates that it should be more appropriate to perform KRAS genotyping on metastases if sample is available.

  17. Intraarticular hemorrhage due to bevacizumab in a patient with metastatic colorectal cancer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor. It is widely used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. It has some specific side effects including severe bleeding, wound healing problems, gastrointestinal perforation, proteinuria and hypertension. Case presentation We present the case of a 65-year old Asian man with synovial metastasis of the knee who experienced intraarticular hemorrhage after bevacizumab treatment. He presented with monoarthritis of the left knee. Conclusion Bevacizumab-related hemorrhage can cause serious morbidity and unusual sites of hemorrhage may be seen. PMID:22776219

  18. Spotlight on bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer: patient selection and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bupathi, Manojkumar; Ahn, Daniel H; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is a prevalent disease for which combination cytotoxic chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment. With the use of targeted therapy, including anti-angiogenic agents, there have been significant improvements in overall outcome of patients with mCRC. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor ligand A, is approved for use in mCRC patients in both the first and second lines of therapy. With a better understanding of the disease through molecular profiling, identification of prognostic biomarkers may lead to better patient selection with improved outcomes for those affected by this disease. PMID:28190957

  19. (Non-V600) BRAF Mutations Define a Clinically Distinct Molecular Subtype of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeremy C; Renfro, Lindsay A; Al-Shamsi, Humaid O; Schrock, Alexa B; Rankin, Andrew; Zhang, Ben Y; Kasi, Pashtoon M; Voss, Jesse S; Leal, Alexis D; Sun, James; Ross, Jeffrey; Ali, Siraj M; Hubbard, Joleen M; Kipp, Benjamin R; McWilliams, Robert R; Kopetz, Scott; Wolff, Robert A; Grothey, Axel

    2017-08-10

    Purpose Molecular diagnostic testing has become an integral part of the evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Expanded mutational testing, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), often identifies mutations with unclear clinical or prognostic implications. One such example is BRAF mutations that occur outside of codon 600 ((non-V600) BRAF mutations). Methods We conducted this multicenter, retrospective cohort study to characterize the clinical, pathologic, and survival implications of (non-V600) BRAF mutations in metastatic CRC. We pooled patients in whom (non-V600) BRAF mutations were identified from NGS databases at three large molecular genetics reference laboratories. Results A total of 9,643 patients with metastatic CRC underwent NGS testing. We identified 208 patients with (non-V600) BRAF mutations, which occurred in 2.2% of all patients tested and accounted for 22% of all BRAF mutations identified. Cancers with (non-V600) BRAF mutations, compared with cancers with V600E BRAF ((V600E) BRAF) mutations, were found in patients who were significantly younger (58 v 68 years, respectively), fewer female patients (46% v 65%, respectively), and patients who had fewer high-grade tumors (13% v 64%, respectively) or right-sided primary tumors (36% v 81%, respectively). Median overall survival was significantly longer in patients with (non-V600) BRAF-mutant metastatic CRC compared with those with both (V600E) BRAF-mutant and wild-type BRAF metastatic CRC (60.7 v 11.4 v 43.0 months, respectively; P < .001). In multivariable analysis, (non-V600) BRAF mutation was independently associated with improved overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.18; P < .001). Conclusion (Non-V600) BRAF mutations occur in approximately 2.2% of patients with metastatic CRC and define a clinically distinct subtype of CRC with an excellent prognosis.

  20. Comparison of the Mismatch Repair System between Primary and Metastatic Colorectal Cancers Using Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jiyoon; Kang, Youngjin; Lee, Yoo Jin; Kim, Eojin; Ahn, Bokyung; Lee, Eunjung; Kim, Joo Young; Lee, Jeong Hyeon; Lee, Youngseok; Kim, Chul Hwan; Chae, Yang-Seok

    2017-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Approximately 10%–15% of the CRC cases have defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Although the high level of microsatellite instability status is a predictor of favorable outcome in primary CRC, little is known about its frequency and importance in secondary CRC. Immunohistochemical staining (IHC) for MMR proteins (e.g., MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2) has emerged as a useful technique to complement polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. Methods In this study, comparison between the MMR system of primary CRCs and paired liver and lung metastatic lesions was done using IHC and the correlation with clinical outcomes was also examined. Results Based on IHC, 7/61 primary tumors (11.4%) showed deficient MMR systems, while 13/61 secondary tumors (21.3%) showed deficiencies. In total, 44 cases showed proficient expression in both the primary and metastatic lesions. Three cases showed deficiencies in both the primary and paired metastatic lesions. In 10 cases, proficient expression was found only in the primary lesions, and not in the corresponding metastatic lesions. In four cases, proficient expression was detected in the secondary tumor, but not in the primary tumor. Conclusions Although each IHC result and the likely defective genes were not exactly matched between the primary and the metastatic tumors, identical results for primary and metastatic lesions were obtained in 77% of the cases (47/61). These data are in agreement with the previous microsatellite detection studies that used PCR and IHC. PMID:28192899

  1. Proteome profiling of exosomes derived from human primary and metastatic colorectal cancer cells reveal differential expression of key metastatic factors and signal transduction components.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Greening, David W; Barnes, Thomas W; Lim, Justin W; Tauro, Bow J; Rai, Alin; Xu, Rong; Adda, Christopher; Mathivanan, Suresh; Zhao, Wei; Xue, Yanhong; Xu, Tao; Zhu, Hong-Jian; Simpson, Richard J

    2013-05-01

    Exosomes are small extracellular 40-100 nm diameter membrane vesicles of late endosomal origin that can mediate intercellular transfer of RNAs and proteins to assist premetastatic niche formation. Using primary (SW480) and metastatic (SW620) human isogenic colorectal cancer cell lines we compared exosome protein profiles to yield valuable insights into metastatic factors and signaling molecules fundamental to tumor progression. Exosomes purified using OptiPrep™ density gradient fractionation were 40-100 nm in diameter, were of a buoyant density ~1.09 g/mL, and displayed stereotypic exosomal markers TSG101, Alix, and CD63. A major finding was the selective enrichment of metastatic factors (MET, S100A8, S100A9, TNC), signal transduction molecules (EFNB2, JAG1, SRC, TNIK), and lipid raft and lipid raft-associated components (CAV1, FLOT1, FLOT2, PROM1) in exosomes derived from metastatic SW620 cells. Additionally, using cryo-electron microscopy, ultrastructural components in exosomes were identified. A key finding of this study was the detection and colocalization of protein complexes EPCAM-CLDN7 and TNIK-RAP2A in colorectal cancer cell exosomes. The selective enrichment of metastatic factors and signaling pathway components in metastatic colon cancer cell-derived exosomes contributes to our understanding of the cross-talk between tumor and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment.

  2. Randomised phase III trial of S-1 versus capecitabine in the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: SALTO study by the Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group.

    PubMed

    Kwakman, J J M; Simkens, L H J; van Rooijen, J M; van de Wouw, A J; Ten Tije, A J; Creemers, G J M; Hendriks, M P; Los, M; van Alphen, R J; Polée, M B; Muller, E W; van der Velden, A M T; van Voorthuizen, T; Koopman, M; Mol, L; van Werkhoven, E; Punt, C J A

    2017-04-05

    Hand-foot syndrome (HFS) is a common side effect of capecitabine. S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine with comparable efficacy to capecitabine in gastrointestinal cancers but associated with a lower incidence of HFS in Asian patients. This study compares the incidence of HFS between S-1 and capecitabine as first-line treatment in Western metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients.

  3. Proactive strategies for regorafenib in metastatic colorectal cancer: implications for optimal patient management

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Gazala; Moss, Rebecca A; Braiteh, Fadi; Saltzman, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Regorafenib is a broad-spectrum oral multikinase inhibitor that targets several angiogenic, oncogenic, and stromal receptor tyrosine kinases that support the tumor microenvironment. Results from the pivotal Phase III Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treated with Regorafenib or Placebo After Failure of Standard Therapy (CORRECT) trial showed that the addition of regorafenib to best supportive care resulted in a significant improvement in median overall survival and progression-free survival compared with placebo plus best supportive care in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) following all available approved therapies. Thus, regorafenib is the first oral multikinase inhibitor indicated for mCRC; it currently has approval in the USA, EU, Japan, Canada, and Singapore for the treatment of mCRC patients who have been previously treated with fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin-, and irinotecan-based chemotherapy, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy, and, if the tumor is KRAS wild-type, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy. In this review, we highlight regorafenib’s mechanism of action, present key efficacy data from the CORRECT trial, and discuss how to proactively manage common adverse events (eg, hand-foot skin reaction, hypertension, oral mucositis, diarrhea, and fatigue) experienced by patients receiving regorafenib. Increased awareness of potential adverse events associated with regorafenib and the implementation of proactive strategies to prevent, monitor, and manage these events early in the course of treatment will be instrumental in ensuring optimal patient management and continuation of regorafenib therapy. PMID:24623990

  4. Urinary neopterin concentrations during combination therapy with cetuximab in previously treated patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Melichar, Bohuslav; Kalábová, Hana; Krčmová, Lenka Kujovská; Trivedi, Sachin Vipin; Králíčková, Pavlína; Malířová, Eva; Pecka, Miroslav; Študentová, Hana; Zezulová, Michaela; Holečková, Petra; Solichová, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    Increased concentrations of neopterin, a biomarker of systemic immune response, have been reported after administration of cytokines, cytotoxic chemotherapy or external-beam radiation, but little is known about the effects of targeted-agents on neopterin. Urinary neopterin was studied in pre-treated patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma during therapy with cetuximab, administered mostly in combination with irinotecan, 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin. Urinary neopterin was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. High initial urinary neopterin concentrations predicted poor prognosis. A significant correlation was observed between urinary neopterin and peripheral blood leukocyte count, hemoglobin and carcinoembryonic antigen concentrations. Urinary neopterin concentrations significantly increased during therapy only in patients with initially low neopterin concentrations. Urinary neopterin concentrations predict prognosis in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma treated with cetuximab. Rising neopterin concentrations indicate an activation of systemic immune response that could be responsible for the antitumor activity of cetuximab. Copyright © 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  5. Phase II Pilot Study of Vemurafenib in Patients With Metastatic BRAF-Mutated Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kopetz, Scott; Desai, Jayesh; Chan, Emily; Hecht, Joel Randolph; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Maru, Dipen; Morris, Van; Janku, Filip; Dasari, Arvind; Chung, Woonbook; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.; Gibbs, Peter; James, Brian; Powis, Garth; Nolop, Keith B.; Bhattacharya, Suman; Saltz, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose BRAF V600E mutation is seen in 5% to 8% of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) and is associated with poor prognosis. Vemurafenib, an oral BRAF V600 inhibitor, has pronounced activity in patients with metastatic melanoma, but its activity in patients with BRAF V600E–positive metastatic CRC was unknown. Patients and Methods In this multi-institutional, open-label study, patients with metastatic CRC with BRAF V600 mutations were recruited to an expansion cohort at the previously determined maximum-tolerated dose of 960 mg orally twice a day. Results Twenty-one patients were enrolled, of whom 20 had received at least one prior metastatic chemotherapy regimen. Grade 3 toxicities included keratoacanthomas, rash, fatigue, and arthralgia. Of the 21 patients treated, one patient had a confirmed partial response (5%; 95% CI, 1% to 24%) and seven other patients had stable disease by RECIST criteria. Median progression-free survival was 2.1 months. Patterns of concurrent mutations, microsatellite instability status, CpG island methylation status, PTEN loss, EGFR expression, and copy number alterations were not associated with clinical benefit. In contrast to prior expectations, concurrent KRAS and NRAS mutations were detected at low allele frequency in a subset of the patients' tumors (median, 0.21% allele frequency) and were apparent mechanisms of acquired resistance in vemurafenib-sensitive patient-derived xenograft models. Conclusion In marked contrast to the results seen in patients with BRAF V600E–mutant melanoma, single-agent vemurafenib did not show meaningful clinical activity in patients with BRAF V600E mutant CRC. Combination strategies are now under development and may be informed by the presence of intratumor heterogeneity of KRAS and NRAS mutations. PMID:26460303

  6. Chemotherapeutic strategies in metastatic colorectal cancer: an overview of current clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Köhne-Wömpner, C H; Schmoll, H J; Harstrick, A; Rustum, Y M

    1992-04-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is still the mainstay of chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. A prolonged infusion of 5-FU is more active than any other schedule of 5-FU used to date. Cisplatin does not improve treatment results compared with 5-FU alone and is not recommended outside clinical trials. Biomodulation of 5-FU is a major step forward in the treatment of colorectal cancer patients and as the standard chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer. Two schedules of folinic acid daily for 5-day (low and high doses) and weekly high dose in combination with daily or weekly 5-FU are the most widely used schedules. Although the response rates to either schedule are comparable, the profile of toxicity is different, being stomatitis for the daily schedule and diarrhea for the weekly schedule as the dose-limiting toxicity. Modulation of 5-FU by methotrexate is time dependent. An interval of 24 hours between methotrexate and 5-FU is necessary for effective modulation. Other modulators, like interferon and N-phosphonoactyl-L-aspartate (PALA), are promising treatment options currently under investigation in randomized trials. The data from phase II and III trials using modulation of 5-FU by folinic acid, PALA, or methotrexate, or using continuous infusion 5-FU indicate that all of these strategies are active. Randomized trials are currently underway to further investigate these therapeutic approaches and whether a specific modulation offers more therapeutic advantages.

  7. First-line targeted therapies in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer – role of cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    Tonini, Giuseppe; Calvieri, Alice; Vincenzi, Bruno; Santini, Daniele

    2009-01-01

    Worldwide, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most commonly diagnosed malignant disease and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in Western nations. In 2008 there were an estimated 148,810 new cases and 49,960 deaths in the US. For several years different chemotherapeutic regimens, based on fluoropyrimidines, irinotecan and oxaliplatin, have been used in advanced CRC, but survival is still unsatisfactory. New targeted therapies, including drugs and monoclonal antibodies (MoABs), show great promise in the fight against CRC and have shown activity in different disease settings. Cetuximab, a chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody that binds to the extracellular domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is active in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). As an IgG1 antibody, cetuximab may exert its antitumor efficacy through both EGFR antagonism and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. The combination of this drug with classical chemotherapies has shown better clinical profiles reflected in an improvement in overall and progression-free survival. Clinical trials established the role of cetuximab, particularly with irinotecan, in irinotecan-refractory/heavily pretreated patients. Whereas cetuximab has a clear indication in the salvage setting, its role in first-line therapy remains investigational. It is particularly encouraging that cetuximab may enhance curative opportunities in patients with early metastatic disease, suggesting that adding cetuximab in first-line therapy may downstage disease in some patients, and, as a result, allow potentially curative resection of previously unresectable metastases. In this review we will focus on the main epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors demonstrating clinical benefit, and the role of cetuximab in first-line treatment of metastatic CRC. PMID:20616896

  8. Late-stage sinking of plutons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glazner, A.F.; Miller, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    Many granodiorite to diorite plutons in the Great Basin of western North America are surrounded by rim monoclines or anticlines that suggest relative downward movement of the plutons while wall rocks were hot and ductile. We propose that such plutons rise to a level of approximately neutral buoyancy and then founder as their densities increase ??? 40% during crystallization. Late-stage sinking of intermediate to mafic plutons should be common when wall rocks are rich in weak, low-density minerals such as quartz and calcite. Structures related to sinking will overprint those related to initial pluton emplacement and may be mistaken for regional tectonic structures.

  9. Current Options for Third-Line Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Grothey, Axel; Marshall, John L; Seery, Tara E

    2016-03-01

    Until recently, treatment options for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) were limited to chemotherapy, vascular endothelial growth factor–targeted therapy, and, for patients with RAS-wild type tumors, epidermal growth factor receptor–targeted therapy. For patients with disease progression after treatment, newer agents are now available: the multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor regorafenib and the cytotoxic combination of trifluridine and tipiracil (TAS-102). Both regorafenib and trifluridine/tipiracil have demonstrated significant improvements in overall survival in patients with refractory metastatic CRC. Durable responses exceeding a year have been reported with regorafenib. The agents differ in their safety profiles. Regorafenib is associated with hand-foot skin reaction and fatigue, primarily in the first cycle. Alternative dosing strategies appear to improve the tolerability of regorafenib, and randomized dosing studies are underway to define the optimal strategy. Trifluridine/tipiracil is associated primarily with myelosuppression. Sequencing of these agents can be guided by patient characteristics, such as comorbidities and adverse reactions to previous treatments. Patients with a poor performance status are not likely to benefit from regorafenib. Ongoing studies are further defining the role of regorafenib and trifluridine/tipiracil in the treatment of metastatic CRC.

  10. Identification of 42 Genes Linked to Stage II Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Al-Temaimi, Rabeah A.; Tan, Tuan Zea; Marafie, Makia J.; Thiery, Jean Paul; Quirke, Philip; Al-Mulla, Fahd

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Metastasis remains the primary cause of CRC death. Predicting the possibility of metastatic relapse in early-stage CRC is of paramount importance to target therapy for patients who really need it and spare those with low-potential of metastasis. Ninety-six stage II CRC cases were stratified using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data based on a predictive survival algorithm and supervised clustering. All genes included within the resultant copy number aberrations were each interrogated independently at mRNA level using CRC expression datasets available from public repositories, which included 1820 colon cancers, and 167 normal colon tissues. Reduced mRNA expression driven by copy number losses and increased expression driven by copy number gains revealed 42 altered transcripts (29 reduced and 13 increased transcripts) associated with metastatic relapse, short disease-free or overall survival, and/or epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Resultant genes were classified based on gene ontology (GO), which identified four functional enrichment groups involved in growth regulation, genomic integrity, metabolism, and signal transduction pathways. The identified 42 genes may be useful for predicting metastatic relapse in stage II CRC. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings. PMID:27136531

  11. Amplification of Thymidylate Synthetase in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Pretreated with 5-Fluorouracil-based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Roshawn G; Muhale, Filipe; Thorne, Leigh B; Yu, Jinsheng; O'Neil, Bert H; Hoskins, Janelle M; Meyers, Michael O; Deal, Allison M; Ibrahim, Joseph G; Hudson, Michael L; Walko, Christine M; McLeod, Howard L; Auman, James T

    2010-01-01

    Resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) represents a major contributor to cancer-related mortality in advanced colorectal cancer patients. Genetic variations and expression alterations in genes involved in 5-FU metabolism and effect have been shown to modulate 5-FU sensitivity in vitro, however these alterations do not fully explain clinical resistance to 5-FU-based chemotherapy. To determine if alterations of DNA copy number in genes involved in 5-FU metabolism impacted clinical resistance to 5-FU-based chemotherapy, we assessed thymidylate synthetase (TYMS) and thymidine phosphorylase (TYMP) copy number in colorectal liver metastases. DNA copy number of TYMS and TYMP was evaluated using real time quantitative PCR in frozen colorectal liver metastases procured from 62 patients who were pretreated with 5-FU-based chemotherapy prior to surgical resection (5-FU exposed) and from 51 patients who received no pretreatment (unexposed). Gain of TYMS DNA copy number was observed in 18% of the 5-FU exposed metastases, while only 4% of the unexposed metastases exhibited TYMS copy gain (p=0.036). No significant differences were noted in TYMP copy number alterations between 5-FU exposed and unexposed metastases. Median survival time was similar in 5-FU exposed patients with metastases containing TYMS amplification and those with no amplification. However, TYMS amplification was associated with shorter median survival in patients receiving post-resection chemotherapy (hazard ratio = 2.7, 95% confidence interval = 1.1 to 6.6; p=0.027). These results suggest amplification of TYMS amplification as a putative mechanism for clinical resistance to 5-FU-based chemotherapy and may have important ramifications for the post-resection chemotherapy choices for metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:20727737

  12. Amplification of thymidylate synthetase in metastatic colorectal cancer patients pretreated with 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Watson, Roshawn G; Muhale, Filipe; Thorne, Leigh B; Yu, Jinsheng; O'Neil, Bert H; Hoskins, Janelle M; Meyers, Michael O; Deal, Allison M; Ibrahim, Joseph G; Hudson, Michael L; Walko, Christine M; McLeod, Howard L; Auman, James T

    2010-12-01

    Resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) represents a major contributor to cancer-related mortality in advanced colorectal cancer patients. Genetic variations and expression alterations in genes involved in 5-FU metabolism and effect have been shown to modulate 5-FU sensitivity in vitro, however these alterations do not fully explain clinical resistance to 5-FU-based chemotherapy. To determine if alterations of DNA copy number in genes involved in 5-FU metabolism-impacted clinical resistance to 5-FU-based chemotherapy, we assessed thymidylate synthetase (TYMS) and thymidine phosphorylase (TYMP) copy number in colorectal liver metastases. DNA copy number of TYMS and TYMP was evaluated using real time quantitative PCR in frozen colorectal liver metastases procured from 62 patients who were pretreated with 5-FU-based chemotherapy prior to surgical resection (5-FU exposed) and from 51 patients who received no pretreatment (unexposed). Gain of TYMS DNA copy number was observed in 18% of the 5-FU exposed metastases, while only 4% of the unexposed metastases exhibited TYMS copy gain (p = 0.036). No significant differences were noted in TYMP copy number alterations between 5-FU-exposed and -unexposed metastases. Median survival time was similar in 5-FU-exposed patients with metastases containing TYMS amplification and those with no amplification. However, TYMS amplification was associated with shorter median survival in patients receiving post-resection chemotherapy (hazard ratio = 2.7, 95% confidence interval = 1.1-6.6; p = 0.027). These results suggest amplification of TYMS amplification as a putative mechanism for clinical resistance to 5-FU-based chemotherapy and may have important ramifications for the post-resection chemotherapy choices for metastatic colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An Evaluation of Algorithms for Identifying Metastatic Breast, Lung, or Colorectal Cancer in Administrative Claims Data.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Joanna L; Engel-Nitz, Nicole M; Teitelbaum, April; Gomez Rey, Gabriel; Kallich, Joel D

    2015-07-01

    Administrative health care claims data are used for epidemiologic, health services, and outcomes cancer research and thus play a significant role in policy. Cancer stage, which is often a major driver of cost and clinical outcomes, is not typically included in claims data. Evaluate algorithms used in a dataset of cancer patients to identify patients with metastatic breast (BC), lung (LC), or colorectal (CRC) cancer using claims data. Clinical data on BC, LC, or CRC patients (between January 1, 2007 and March 31, 2010) were linked to a health care claims database. Inclusion required health plan enrollment ≥3 months before initial cancer diagnosis date. Algorithms were used in the claims database to identify patients' disease status, which was compared with physician-reported metastases. Generic and tumor-specific algorithms were evaluated using ICD-9 codes, varying diagnosis time frames, and including/excluding other tumors. Positive and negative predictive values, sensitivity, and specificity were assessed. The linked databases included 14,480 patients; of whom, 32%, 17%, and 14.2% had metastatic BC, LC, and CRC, respectively, at diagnosis and met inclusion criteria. Nontumor-specific algorithms had lower specificity than tumor-specific algorithms. Tumor-specific algorithms' sensitivity and specificity were 53% and 99% for BC, 55% and 85% for LC, and 59% and 98% for CRC, respectively. Algorithms to distinguish metastatic BC, LC, and CRC from locally advanced disease should use tumor-specific primary cancer codes with 2 claims for the specific primary cancer >30-42 days apart to reduce misclassification. These performed best overall in specificity, positive predictive values, and overall accuracy to identify metastatic cancer in a health care claims database.

  14. Cost-effectiveness Analysis of Cetuximab in Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer in Iranian Pharmaceutical Market.

    PubMed

    Davari, Majid; Ashrafi, Farzaneh; Maracy, Mohammadreza; Aslani, Abolfazl; Tabatabaei, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody which acts against the epidermal growth-factor receptor. Randomized controlled trials show that the addition of cetuximab to folinic acid, 5-flourouracil, irinotecan (FOLFIRI), folinic acid, 5-flourouracil, oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) and capecitabin + oxaliplatin (CAPOX) regimens, as the first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), increases the overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) compared to FOLFIRI, FOLFOX and CAPOX regimens alone. The aim of this study was to analyze the cost-effectiveness of different treatment programs for managing metastatic CRC with and without cetuximab in the first-line treatment of unresectable metastatic CRC in Iran. A systematic search of the literature was performed in PubMed, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination Databases and Cochrane Library to assess the effectiveness of the drug in the context of PFS, OS and the adverse events. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of each treatment program was calculated. An extensive sensitivity analysis was conducted on the results regarding the effectiveness. The addition of cetuximab to FOLFIRI, FOLFOX and CAPOX programs increased PFS by 0.1, 0.042 and 0.042 years, respectively. Similarly, the addition of cetuximab to FOLFIRI, FOLFOX and CAPOX increased OS by 0.325, 0.442 and 0.442 years and also cost $212825, $202484 and $204198 individually. Whereas, based on the World Health Organisation (WHO) suggested threshold for cost-effectiveness analysis, even FOLFOX + cetuximab was very higher than the threshold in Iran (37.4 times higher). The FOLFOX regimen + cetuximab provides lower costs per additional life years gained (more cost-effective) compared with its alternatives in the treatment of patients with unresectable metastatic CRC. However, according to the WHO indicator, none of the cetuximab regimens could be considered as cost effective for the Iranian health care market.

  15. Epidermal growth factor receptor and metastatic colorectal cancer: Insights into target therapies

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Ramon Andrade; Marques, Andrea Marin; Araújo, António

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) has high incidence and mortality worldwide. In 2012, CRC was the second most prevalent cancer among males (9%) and the third among females (8%). In recent decades, standard chemotherapies protocols combining 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan and oxaliplatin were important for improve survival in this set of patients. Further, biological drugs throughout epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathways showed interesting results in metastatic disease (mCRC) control when in association to standard chemotherapy regimens. Cetuximab and panitumumab are two cornerstones for mCRC treatment and are both approved in Europe and United States based on previous results phase III trials. This paper will briefly summarize those anti-EGFR therapies framework in mCRC and discusses some issues in this regard. PMID:24151349

  16. Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review of the Value of Current Therapies.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Daniel A; Zeichner, Simon B; Bartnik, Catherine M; Neustadter, Eli; Flowers, Christopher R

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate, from a US payer perspective, the cost-effectiveness of treatment strategies for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), we performed a systematic review of published cost-effectiveness analyses. We identified 14 papers that fulfilled our search criteria and revealed varying levels of value among current treatment strategies. Older agents such as 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin provide high-value treatments. More modern agents targeting the EGFR or VEGF pathways, such as bevacizumab, cetuximab, and panitumumab, do not appear to be cost-effective treatments at their current costs. The analytical methods used within the papers varied widely, and this variation likely plays a significant role in the heterogeneity in incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. The cost-effectiveness of current treatment strategies for mCRC is highly variable. Drugs recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for mCRC are not cost-effective, and this is primarily driven by high drug costs.

  17. [Treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: an illustration of the changes in the cancer paradigms].

    PubMed

    Goldwasser, François

    2012-01-01

    Until the 2000 decade, survival gains in metastatic colorectal cancer were due to the addition of new cytotoxic agents with original mechanism of action: fluorouracile, the oxaliplatin and irinotecan and also the improvements of liver surgery. During the 2000 decade, the treatment improvements are related to monoclonal antibodies, directed either against the EGF receptor or the VEGF receptor. The molecular characterization of the tumor, especially the presence or absence of k-ras mutation guides the use of targeted therapy. Finally, changes in habits represents an underestimated way to reduce the risk of recurrence and clinical trials are undergoing to evaluate the impact of changes in nutrition and physical exercice. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Bevacizumab-Based Therapies in the First-Line Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Herbert I.

    2012-01-01

    Since its approval for the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), bevacizumab has become a standard treatment option in combination with chemotherapy for patients with mCRC. Bevacizumab has demonstrated efficacy in combination with a number of different backbone chemotherapy regimens, and its widespread use has introduced several important questions regarding the selection and optimization of bevacizumab-based treatment regimens, its use in various patient populations, and the identification of associated adverse events. This review discusses the results of several phase II and phase III clinical trials, as well as large observational studies, to address the use of bevacizumab in the treatment of patients with mCRC in the first-line setting. PMID:22477726

  19. Novel therapeutics in metastatic colorectal cancer: molecular insights and pharmacogenomic implications.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Diana L; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2016-08-01

    Although the survival of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients has improved five-fold over the last century, CRC remains a significant global health burden. Impressive strides have been made in identifying new regimens, employing maintenance strategies to limit treatment toxicities, and combining multidisciplinary approaches to achieve cure in oligometastatic disease. Attempts at personalized integration of targeted agents have been limited by the ability to identify molecularly enriched patient populations most likely to benefit. In this review, we discuss novel therapeutics and regimens recently approved and in development for mCRC. In addition, we discuss using older agents in novel combination and maintenance strategies, and highlight evidence for implementing pharmacogenomic data and non-invasive monitoring into the personalized management of mCRC patients.

  20. Role of capecitabine in treating metastatic colorectal cancer in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Wang, Feng-Hua; Bai, Long; Xu, Rui-Hua

    2014-01-01

    The China Food and Drug Administration approved the use of capecitabine in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in 2004. This paper reviews the available information of capecitabine in Chinese patients with mCRC, focusing on its effectiveness and safety against mCRC. Identification of all eligible studies was made by searching the PubMed and Wanfang database from 2000 to 2013. Published data examining various aspects of clinical response and tolerability with capecitabine alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic or biological agents for first- and second-line mCRC were examined. Capecitabine and its combination displayed high efficacy in Chinese patients with mCRC. Toxicities are generally manageable, and elderly patients can tolerate capecitabine well. PMID:24729715

  1. Recent Advances in Targeting the EGFR Signaling Pathway for the Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuji; Suyama, Koichi; Baba, Hideo

    2017-04-02

    Outcomes for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients have been improved by treatment with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) antibodies, particularly when combined with predictive biomarkers to select patients lacking RAS mutations. New technologies such as liquid biopsy and next-generation sequencing have revealed that potential mechanisms of resistance to anti-EGFR therapies act through acquired mutations of KRAS and the EGFR ectodomain. Mutations in cross-talking molecular effectors that participate in downstream EGFR signaling are also negative predictors for anti-EGFR therapy. In the current review, we describe recent advances in anti-EGFR therapy and discuss new treatment strategies to target downstream RAS-MAPK signaling in mCRC.

  2. Treatment dilemmas of cetuximab combined with chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Feng; Li, Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Although monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have largely enriched the available therapeutic choices for colorectal cancer (CRC), the understanding and management of their associated clinical toxicities are limited. In addition, the combined strategies of administering EGFR mAbs and traditional cytotoxic agents, such as 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin and irinotecan, have resulted in a more complicated management of CRC treatment-related side effects compared with EGFR mAb monotherapy. We believe that a thorough recognition of the toxicities of EGFR mAb drugs is essential for physicians to increase the therapeutic index in the treatment of CRC. This review aims to summarize the existing information regarding the treatment dilemmas of cetuximab combined with chemotherapy in the management of metastatic CRC. PMID:27340349

  3. Nutraceutical use in late-stage cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Jay; Brown, Vondina; Ellis, Jane; Logothetis, Britt; Weber, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Access to a wealth of information on the internet has led many cancer patients to use complementary methods as an adjunct to traditional therapy for cancer, with, and more often, without informing their primary caregiver. Of the common complementary modalities, the use of dietary supplements appears to be highly prevalent in patients in active treatment for cancer, and later in cancer survivors. Emerging research suggests that some plant-based agents may, indeed, impact late-stage cancer, influencing molecular processes corrupted by tumor cells to evade detection, expand clonally, and invade surrounding tissues. The intent of this article is to review some of the current science underpinning the use of nutraceuticals in the latter stages of cancer. PMID:20714787

  4. Angiogenesis inhibitors and symptomatic anal ulcers in metastatic colorectal cancer patients (*).

    PubMed

    Bergamo, Francesca; Lonardi, Sara; Salmaso, Beatrice; Lacognata, Carmelo; Battaglin, Francesca; Cavallin, Francesco; Saadeh, Luca; Murgioni, Sabina; Caruso, Antonino; Aliberti, Camillo; Zagonel, Vittorina; Castoro, Carlo; Scarpa, Marco

    2017-07-15

    Angiogenesis inhibitors are a standard first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer. Anal canal pain is a common adverse event, but its cause has never been described. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors and symptomatic anal ulcer development. This retrospective cohort study included all 601 consecutive metastatic colorectal cancer patients undergoing first line treatment from January 2010 to June 2016 at the Veneto Institute of Oncology. Details about patient characteristics, treatment and proctology reports were retrieved and compared. Vascularization of the anal canal was evaluated with contrast MRI. Fifty out of 601 patients reported perianal complaints during treatment and underwent proctologic evaluation. Among those, 16 were found to have an anal ulcer. Symptomatic anal ulcers occurred only in patients receiving bevacizumab (4.2% vs. 0% with other regimens, p = .009). The peak incidence was 4-8 weeks after treatment start. Vascularization of anal canal was significantly lower in patients treated with bevacizumab (p = .03). Hypertension and hemorrhoids were associated with a lower risk of anal ulcer occurrence (p = .009 and p = .036). Pain intensity was severe. All attempts at symptomatic treatment only led to transient benefit. The absence of symptomatic ulcers was protective against earlier permanent discontinuation of treatment (HR = .22, 95%CI: 0.04-0.62). The development of symptomatic anal ulcers in patients receiving angiogenesis inhibitor is a common adverse event which can compromise the continuation of cancer therapy. We recommend an early proctologic evaluation in case of anal symptoms with the aim to prevent and timely manage such complication.

  5. Detection of KRAS mutations in circulating tumor cells from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Buim, Marcilei EC; Fanelli, Marcello F; Souza, Virgilio S; Romero, Juliana; Abdallah, Emne A; Mello, Celso AL; Alves, Vanessa; Ocea, Luciana MM; Mingues, Natália B; Barbosa, Paula NVP; Tyng, Chiang J; Chojniak, Rubens; Chinen, Ludmilla TD

    2015-01-01

    Background: Quantification of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) as a prognostic marker in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has already been validated and approved for routine use. However, more than quantification, qualification or characterization of CTCs is gaining importance, since the genetic characterization of CTCs may reflect, in a real time fashion, genetic profile of the disease. Objective: To characterize KRAS mutations (codon 12 and 13) in CTCs from patients with mCRC and to compare with matched primary tumor. Additionally, correlate these mutations with clinical and pathological features of patients. Methods: Blood samples were collected from 26 patients with mCRC from the AC Camargo Cancer Center (São Paulo-Brazil). CTCs were isolated by ISET technology (Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumors; Rarecells Diagnostics, France) and mutations analyzes were performed by pyrosequencing (QIAGEN). Results: KRAS mutation was detected in 7 of the 21 cases (33%) of samples from CTCs. In matched primary tumors, 9 of the 24 cases (37.5%) were found KRAS mutated. We observed that 5 of the 9 samples with KRAS mutation in their primary tumor had also KRAS mutation in CTCs, meaning a concordance of 71% of matched cases (P = 0.017). KRAS mutation neither on primary tumor nor in CTCs was associated with clinical-pathological parameters analyzed. Conclusion: Faced with a polyclonal disease like colorectal cancer, which is often treated with alternating and successive lines of chemotherapy, real time genetic characterization of CTCs, in a fast and feasible fashion, can provide important information to clinical management of metastatic patients. Although our cohort was limited, it was possible to show a high grade of concordance between primary tumor and CTCs, which suggests that CTCs can be used as surrogate of primary tumors in clinical practice, when the knowledge of mutation profile is necessary and the primary tumor is not available. PMID:26252055

  6. Detection of KRAS mutations in circulating tumor cells from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Buim, Marcilei Ec; Fanelli, Marcello F; Souza, Virgilio S; Romero, Juliana; Abdallah, Emne A; Mello, Celso Al; Alves, Vanessa; Ocea, Luciana Mm; Mingues, Natália B; Barbosa, Paula Nvp; Tyng, Chiang J; Chojniak, Rubens; Chinen, Ludmilla Td

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) as a prognostic marker in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has already been validated and approved for routine use. However, more than quantification, qualification or characterization of CTCs is gaining importance, since the genetic characterization of CTCs may reflect, in a real time fashion, genetic profile of the disease. To characterize KRAS mutations (codon 12 and 13) in CTCs from patients with mCRC and to compare with matched primary tumor. Additionally, correlate these mutations with clinical and pathological features of patients. Blood samples were collected from 26 patients with mCRC from the AC Camargo Cancer Center (São Paulo-Brazil). CTCs were isolated by ISET technology (Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumors; Rarecells Diagnostics, France) and mutations analyzes were performed by pyrosequencing (QIAGEN). KRAS mutation was detected in 7 of the 21 cases (33%) of samples from CTCs. In matched primary tumors, 9 of the 24 cases (37.5%) were found KRAS mutated. We observed that 5 of the 9 samples with KRAS mutation in their primary tumor had also KRAS mutation in CTCs, meaning a concordance of 71% of matched cases (P = 0.017). KRAS mutation neither on primary tumor nor in CTCs was associated with clinical-pathological parameters analyzed. Faced with a polyclonal disease like colorectal cancer, which is often treated with alternating and successive lines of chemotherapy, real time genetic characterization of CTCs, in a fast and feasible fashion, can provide important information to clinical management of metastatic patients. Although our cohort was limited, it was possible to show a high grade of concordance between primary tumor and CTCs, which suggests that CTCs can be used as surrogate of primary tumors in clinical practice, when the knowledge of mutation profile is necessary and the primary tumor is not available.

  7. Targeted Therapies in Elderly Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A Review of the Evidence.

    PubMed

    Tapia Rico, Gonzalo; Townsend, Amanda R; Broadbridge, Vy; Price, Timothy J

    2017-03-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. As the population of the western world ages, the incidence of colorectal tumours among elderly patients is increasing and consequently so is the demand for treatments for elderly patients. Unfortunately, elderly patients (≥65 years) often go untreated and they are also under-represented in clinical trials. Yet there is some evidence suggesting that 'fit' elderly patients have similar outcomes and tolerance to chemotherapy treatment to their younger counterparts (although the definition of fitness in the elderly population is still a matter of debate). The evidence supporting the administration of new targeted therapies in patients older than 65 years is scarce and more research is needed. In this paper, we review all the available data concerning the use of targeted therapies for mCRC in patients older than 65 years of age and discuss the differences between this age subgroup and younger patients.

  8. Prognostic value of amphiregulin and epiregulin mRNA expression in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    You, Zhai; Qiong, Qian; Jun, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its ligands amphiregulin (AREG) and epiregulin (EREG) play a central role in the development of colorectal cancer, but the prognostic values of AREG and EREG are controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies that investigated AREG and/or EREG mRNA levels in primary tumors to determine their prognostic value in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). In addition, RAS status was assessed. Relevant articles were identified by searching the EMBASE, PubMed, and Cochrane Library databases. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model. Nine studies involving 2167 patients were included in this meta-analysis. High AREG expression was associated with longer overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). High EREG expression was also associated with prolonged OS and PFS. In RAS wild-type (WT) patients who received anti-EGFR therapy, high AREG and EREG expression was associated with longer OS. Our results indicate that high AREG and EREG mRNA expression are independent favorable prognostic biomarkers in mCRC. The expression of these ligands should be considered when evaluating prognoses in RAS-WT patients receiving anti-EGFR therapy. PMID:27344184

  9. TAS-102 (Lonsurf) for the Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer. A Concise Review.

    PubMed

    Zaniboni, Alberto; Bertocchi, Paola; Barni, Sandro; Petrelli, Fausto

    2016-12-01

    Within the past several years, no chemotherapy has been sufficient to increase the overall survival of patients with chemorefractory colorectal cancer. TAS-102 (Lonsurf) is an oral fluoropyrimidine that is formed by the combination of 2 active drugs: trifluridine (a nucleoside analog) and tipiracil hydrochloride (a thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor). This drug extended the median overall survival by approximately 2 months compared with placebo in a randomized phase III trial composed of Asian and non-Asian patients with refractory (or intolerant) metastatic colorectal cancer. The clinical development of TAS-102 began approximately a decade ago and included 2 pivotal randomized studies, which are discussed in this review. This drug has just been approved in Japan, and as soon as possible, it will be marketed in Western countries as well; it will therefore become the standard of care for this patient population. The optimal combination of TAS-102 with other agents, as well as the mechanism of resistance to this regimen should be defined in the near future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Inflammatory indexes as predictors of prognosis and bevacizumab efficacy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cavanna, Luigi; Dall'Agata, Monia; Tassinari, Davide; Leo, Silvana; Bernardini, Ilaria; Gelsomino, Fabio; Tamberi, Stefano; Brandes, Alba A.; Tenti, Elena; Vespignani, Roberto; Frassineti, Giovanni L.; Amadori, Dino; De Giorgi, Ugo

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the role of pre-treatment inflammatory indexes (II) as predictors of prognosis and treatment efficacy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer mCRC randomized onto the prospective multicenter randomized ITACa (Italian Trial in Advanced Colorectal Cancer) trial to receive first-line chemotherapy (CT) with or without bevacizumab (Bev). Results In the overall population, PFS and OS were higher in patients with low SII (p = .015 and .002, respectively), low NLR (p = .0001 and <.0001, respectively) and low PLR (p = .004 and .008, respectively). Patients with low NLR in the CT plus Bev arm had a higher PFS than those treated with CT alone (HR = 0.69, p = .021). Patients and Methods Two hundred and eighty-nine patients were considered for this study, 141 receiving CT plus Bev and 148 receiving CT alone. The pre-treatment systemic immune-inflammation index (SII), neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) were evaluated to identify a potential correlation with progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in both the overall population and the 2 treatment arms. Conclusion Our results indicate that II, in particular NLR, are good prognostic and predictive markers for mCRC patients who are candidates for CT plus Bev. PMID:27120807

  11. Current status of treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer with special reference to cetuximab and elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Per; Qvortrup, Camilla; Bjerregaard, Jon K

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Elderly cancer patients often have co-morbidities and other characteristics that make the selection of optimal treatment more complex. The introduction of targeted therapies in colorectal cancer has further complicated this problem. This review will focus on the role of the EGFR antibody cetuximab in elderly patients. Methods: We have reviewed the available evidence in the literature to evaluate the results of therapy with cetuximab, alone or in combination with chemotherapy, with a focus on elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Results: In patients with mCRC, combination chemotherapy prolongs median survival to more than 18 months and even around 24 months in combination with cetuximab in selected patients. No prospective studies have evaluated cetuximab in elderly patients. However, subgroup analyses from randomized trials and retrospective analysis suggest that the efficacy of chemotherapy and cetuximab is maintained in fit elderly patients, but with slightly increased but acceptable toxicity. Conclusion: No prospective cetuximab studies have been conducted solely in a population of elderly patients. However, available data suggest that outcomes in the fit elderly mirror results observed in younger patients. PMID:20616891

  12. Use of monoclonal antibodies for metastatic colorectal cancer in the Andalusian public health system.

    PubMed

    Santos-Ramos, Bernardo; Fernández-Fernández, Rocío; Marín-Gil, Roberto; Espinosa-Bosch, María; Peiró-Moreno, Salvador; Pérez-Guerrero, Concepción; Bautista-Paloma, Javier

    2013-08-01

    The place of monoclonal antibodies in metastatic colorectal cancer has not been clearly defined. To determine the treatment pattern of monoclonal antibodies in colorectal cancer patients in the Andalusian Public Healthcare System. Data were collected from all patients treated with these drugs from July 2009 to December 2010 from pharmacy programs and medical records. Three hundred patients were included, of whom 227 received the antibody at the forefront. The proportion of patients who received bevacizumab in the first line is greater than that of cetuximab (62.1 vs. 37.5 % respectively) and similar in the second line and subsequent (47.8 vs. 53.8 % and 48.5 vs. 46.2 % respectively). XELOXbevacizumab was the most frequently prescribed scheme (35.3 %) followed by FOLFOX-monoclonal antibody schemes, regardless that this was bevacizumab or cetuximab (22.5 %). The median progression free survival (PFS) was 11.7 months for patients receiving cetuximab, 9.6 months for patients receiving bevacizumab and 8.2 months for those who received no monoclonal antibody in the first line. Bevacizumab was the antibody of choice in first line, showing utilization rates similar to cetuximab in second line and subsequent. The median PFS in our study is related to the PFS of the major clinical trials.

  13. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma versus metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma: a persisting diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim This study attempted to distinguish primary bladder adenocarcinoma (PBA) from metastatic colonic adenocarcinomas (MCA), which is a difficult diagnostic and clinical problem. Methods Twenty-four cases of bladder adenocarcinomas (12 primary & 12 metastatic colorectal) were included in the study with urothelial carcinoma (UC) and colonic adenocarcinoma (CA) as controls. A panel of immunohistochemical (IHC) stains along with fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), using the UroVysion probe set, was performed. Results The majority of the PBAs presented with advanced disease. Enteric histologic subtype was the most common morphological variant. Strong nuclear with cytoplasmic-membranous staining of β-catenin was seen in 75% of MCA and only 16.7% PBA (<10% staining cells). Although abnormal nuclear staining with E-cadherin was seen in both PBA and MCA, it was more frequent in former. CK-7, CK-20, villin and CDX-2 stains were not helpful in distinguishing the two entities. FISH did not reveal any unique differences in chromosomal abnormality between the two groups. Conclusion Although there was a statistically significant difference in β-catenin and E-cadherin staining between two groups, we did not find any IHC or FISH marker that was specific for PBA. Distinction between PBA and MCA remains a diagnostic problem and clinical correlation is vital before rendering a diagnosis. Virtual slides The virtual slides for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1393156268152357 PMID:23121893

  14. Comparison of dietary and lifestyle habits among stage III and metastatic colorectal cancer patients: findings from CALGB 89803 and CALGB 80405.

    PubMed

    Van Loon, Katherine; Wigler, Devin; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Venook, Alan P; Fuchs, Charles; Blanke, Charles; Saltz, Leonard; Goldberg, Richard M; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A

    2013-06-01

    Self-administered questionnaires were completed by patients undergoing chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer (n=1095) and metastatic colorectal cancer (n=875). We describe the prevalence of a wide-range of health-related dietary patterns and lifestyle behaviors among colorectal cancer patients with stage III and metastatic disease and report notable similarities in these 2 cohorts. Cancer patients often pursue lifestyle and dietary changes with the aim to improve outcomes. Using data from 2 large National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, we report on the dietary and lifestyle practices of patients receiving therapy for stage III colon or metastatic colorectal cancer. Self-administered questionnaires were completed by patients undergoing chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer (n=1095) and metastatic colorectal cancer (n=875). Descriptive statistical analyses were performed to evaluate anthropometrics, diet, and lifestyle in each cohort. Median body mass index was comparable for stage III and metastatic patients (27.3 vs. 26.5 kg/m2). Stage III patients reported a modestly higher median level of physical activity than metastatic patients (4.6 vs. 3.4 metabolic equivalent task-hours per week). Ten percent of stage III and 9% of metastatic patients reported ongoing cigarette use. Avoidance of alcohol was reported by 47% of stage III and 43% of metastatic patients. Dietary patterns for both groups were comparable with more than 80% of stage III and metastatic patients failing to meet the recommended daily intake of vegetables, fruits, and milk products. Usage of at least 2 multivitamins per week was reported by 49% of stage III and 40% of metastatic patients. Two percent of stage III and 5% of metastatic patients reported vitamin D supplement use. We observed notable similarities in dietary and lifestyle behaviors between stage III colon and metastatic colorectal cancer patients actively receiving chemotherapy. Future research should aim to elucidate the

  15. RAS mutations affect pattern of metastatic spread and increase propensity for brain metastasis in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yaeger, Rona; Cowell, Elizabeth; Chou, Joanne F; Gewirtz, Alexandra N; Borsu, Laetitia; Vakiani, Efsevia; Solit, David B; Rosen, Neal; Capanu, Marinela; Ladanyi, Marc; Kemeny, Nancy

    2015-04-15

    RAS and PIK3CA mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) have been associated with worse survival. We sought to evaluate the impact of RAS and PIK3CA mutations on cumulative incidence of metastasis to potentially curable sites of liver and lung and other sites such as bone and brain. We performed a computerized search of the electronic medical record of our institution for mCRC cases genotyped for RAS or PIK3CA mutations from 2008 to 2012. Cases were reviewed for patient characteristics, survival, and site-specific metastasis. Among the 918 patients identified, 477 cases were RAS wild type, and 441 cases had a RAS mutation (394 at KRAS exon 2, 29 at KRAS exon 3 or 4, and 18 in NRAS). RAS mutation was significantly associated with shorter median overall survival (OS) and on multivariate analysis independently predicted worse OS (HR, 1.6; P < .01). RAS mutant mCRC exhibited a significantly higher cumulative incidence of lung, bone, and brain metastasis and on multivariate analysis was an independent predictor of involvement of these sites (HR, 1.5, 1.6, and 3.7, respectively). PIK3CA mutations occurred in 10% of the 786 cases genotyped, did not predict for worse survival, and did not exhibit a site-specific pattern of metastatic spread. The metastatic potential of CRC varies with the presence of RAS mutation. RAS mutation is associated with worse OS and increased incidence of lung, bone, and brain metastasis. An understanding of this site-specific pattern of spread may help to inform physicians' assessment of symptoms in patients with mCRC. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  16. Factors that influence survival in unresectable metastatic or locally advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chao-Wen; King, Tai-Ming; Wang, Hsin-Tai; Wang, Jui-Ho

    2011-12-01

    Half of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) have metastasis during the whole course of the disease. Fewer than 10% of those are still alive at 5 years. Locally advanced CRC accounts for 7% to 33% of CRC relapses. Of these, only a small number of patients are resectable with a curative intent. Management of unresectable metastatic or locally advanced CRC is a significant challenge. In this study, we focus on patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic CRC and analyze survival rate and prognostic factors influencing the survival. There were 277 patients identified. Several clinicopathologic parameters were evaluated. To determine the prognostic impact of the factors in survival, all parameters were tested from their relationship in Cox-regression model and Cox proportional hazards model. Survival curves were generated according to Kaplan-Meier method and the differences in survival were determined by employing the log-rank test. Three factors that influence the survival were identified: one or more than two organs involved (p = 0.041), higher carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level (p = 0.001), and different salvage treatment (p < 0.001). In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, there were significant differences between patients with one and more than two organs involved (p = 0.027), different ranges of CEA level (p = 0.004), and different salvage treatment (p < 0.001). We clearly demonstrated three factors that influence the survival, including more than two organs involved, higher CEA level, and different salvage treatment. The higher the CEA level and the more organs (≥2) involved, the worse the survival. Even in patients with unresectable metastatic or locally advanced, aggressive treatment with target therapy seems to have survival benefit.

  17. Mutational analysis of primary and metastatic colorectal cancer samples underlying the resistance to cetuximab-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Nemecek, Radim; Berkovcova, Jitka; Radova, Lenka; Kazda, Tomas; Mlcochova, Jitka; Vychytilova-Faltejskova, Petra; Slaby, Ondrej; Svoboda, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Although several molecular markers predicting resistance to cetuximab- or panitumumab-based therapy of metastatic colorectal cancer were described, mutations in RAS proto-oncogenes remain the only predictors being used in daily clinical practice. However, 35%-45% of wild-type RAS patients still do not respond to this anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) monoclonal antibody-based therapy, and therefore the definition of other predictors forms an important clinical need. The aim of the present retrospective single-institutional study was to evaluate potential genes responsible for resistance to anti-EGFR therapy in relation to mutational analysis of primary versus metastatic lesions. Twenty-four paired primary and corresponding metastatic tissue samples from eight nonresponding and four responding metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with cetuximab-based therapy were sequenced using a next-generation sequencing panel of 26 genes involved in EGFR signaling pathway and colorectal carcinogenesis. Mutational status of primary tumors and metastatic lesions was highly concordant in TP53, APC, CTNNB1, KRAS, PIK3CA, PTEN, and FBXW7 genes. Metastatic samples harbor significantly more mutations than primary tumors. Potentially negative predictive value of FBXW7 mutations in relationship to anti-EGFR treatment outcomes was confirmed. Finally, new occurrences of activating KRAS mutations were identified in a group of patients initially determined as wild-type RAS by routinely used qPCR-based RAS mutational tests. All newly detected activating KRAS mutations most likely led to cetuximab treatment failure. The results of the present study suggest a need of careful consideration of previously published results of anti-EGFR-targeted therapy with regard to potentially inaccurate diagnostic tools used in the past. Based on our findings, we recommend more extensive use of next-generation sequencing testing in daily clinical practice, as it brings a significant

  18. Late Stage Infection in Sleeping Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Acker, Sven; Frey, Claudia; Meinert, Monika; Schönfeld, Caroline; Lazarus, Michael; Urade, Yoshihiro; Kubata, Bruno Kilunga; Duszenko, Michael

    2012-01-01

    At the turn of the 19th century, trypanosomes were identified as the causative agent of sleeping sickness and their presence within the cerebrospinal fluid of late stage sleeping sickness patients was described. However, no definitive proof of how the parasites reach the brain has been presented so far. Analyzing electron micrographs prepared from rodent brains more than 20 days after infection, we present here conclusive evidence that the parasites first enter the brain via the choroid plexus from where they penetrate the epithelial cell layer to reach the ventricular system. Adversely, no trypanosomes were observed within the parenchyma outside blood vessels. We also show that brain infection depends on the formation of long slender trypanosomes and that the cerebrospinal fluid as well as the stroma of the choroid plexus is a hostile environment for the survival of trypanosomes, which enter the pial space including the Virchow-Robin space via the subarachnoid space to escape degradation. Our data suggest that trypanosomes do not intend to colonize the brain but reside near or within the glia limitans, from where they can re-populate blood vessels and disrupt the sleep wake cycles. PMID:22496723

  19. Late stage infection in sleeping sickness.

    PubMed

    Wolburg, Hartwig; Mogk, Stefan; Acker, Sven; Frey, Claudia; Meinert, Monika; Schönfeld, Caroline; Lazarus, Michael; Urade, Yoshihiro; Kubata, Bruno Kilunga; Duszenko, Michael

    2012-01-01

    At the turn of the 19(th) century, trypanosomes were identified as the causative agent of sleeping sickness and their presence within the cerebrospinal fluid of late stage sleeping sickness patients was described. However, no definitive proof of how the parasites reach the brain has been presented so far. Analyzing electron micrographs prepared from rodent brains more than 20 days after infection, we present here conclusive evidence that the parasites first enter the brain via the choroid plexus from where they penetrate the epithelial cell layer to reach the ventricular system. Adversely, no trypanosomes were observed within the parenchyma outside blood vessels. We also show that brain infection depends on the formation of long slender trypanosomes and that the cerebrospinal fluid as well as the stroma of the choroid plexus is a hostile environment for the survival of trypanosomes, which enter the pial space including the Virchow-Robin space via the subarachnoid space to escape degradation. Our data suggest that trypanosomes do not intend to colonize the brain but reside near or within the glia limitans, from where they can re-populate blood vessels and disrupt the sleep wake cycles.

  20. The Nlrp3 Inflammasome Suppresses Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Growth in the Liver by Promoting Natural Killer Cell Tumoricidal Activity.

    PubMed

    Dupaul-Chicoine, Jeremy; Arabzadeh, Azadeh; Dagenais, Maryse; Douglas, Todd; Champagne, Claudia; Morizot, Alexandre; Rodrigue-Gervais, Ian Gaël; Breton, Valérie; Colpitts, Sara L; Beauchemin, Nicole; Saleh, Maya

    2015-10-20

    The crosstalk between inflammation and tumorigenesis is now clearly established. However, how inflammation is elicited in the metastatic environment and the corresponding contribution of innate immunity pathways in suppressing tumor growth at secondary sites are poorly understood. Here, we show that mice deficient in Nlrp3 inflammasome components had exacerbated liver colorectal cancer metastatic growth, which was mediated by impaired interleukin-18 (IL-18) signaling. Control of tumor growth was independent of differential cancer cell colonization or proliferation, intestinal microbiota effects, or tumoricidal activity by the adaptive immune system. Instead, the inflammasome-IL-18 pathway impacted maturation of hepatic NK cells, surface expression of the death ligand FasL, and capacity to kill FasL-sensitive tumors. Our results define a regulatory signaling circuit within the innate immune system linking inflammasome activation to effective NK-cell-mediated tumor attack required to suppress colorectal cancer growth in the liver. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Multicenter retrospective analysis of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H).

    PubMed

    Goldstein, J; Tran, B; Ensor, J; Gibbs, P; Wong, H L; Wong, S F; Vilar, E; Tie, J; Broaddus, R; Kopetz, S; Desai, J; Overman, M J

    2014-05-01

    The microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) phenotype, present in 15% of early colorectal cancer (CRC), confers good prognosis. MSI-H metastatic CRC is rare and its impact on outcomes is unknown. We describe survival outcomes and the impact of chemotherapy, metastatectomy, and BRAF V600E mutation status in the largest reported cohort of MSI-H metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). A retrospective review of 55 MSI-H metastatic CRC patients from two institutions, Royal Melbourne Hospital (Australia) and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States), was conducted. Statistical analyses utilized Kaplan-Meier method, Log-rank test, and Cox proportional hazards models. Median age was 67 years (20-90), 58% had poor differentiation, and 45% had stage IV disease at presentation. Median overall survival (OS) from metastatic disease was 15.4 months. Thirteen patients underwent R0/R1 metastatectomies, with median OS from metastatectomy 33.8 months. Thirty-one patients received first-line systemic chemotherapy for metastatic disease with median OS from the start of chemotherapy 11.5 months. No statistically significant difference in progression-free survival or OS was seen between fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, or irinotecan based chemotherapy. BRAF V600E mutation was present in 14 of 47 patients (30%). BRAF V600E patients demonstrated significantly worse median OS; 10.1 versus 17.3 months, P = 0.03. In multivariate analyses, BRAF V600E mutants had worse OS (HR 4.04; P = 0.005), while patients undergoing metastatectomy (HR 0.11; P = <0.001) and patients who initially presented as stage IV disease had improved OS (HR 0.27; P = 0.003). Patients with MSI-H metastatic CRC do not appear to have improved outcomes. BRAF V600E mutation is a poor prognostic factor in MSI-H metastatic CRC.

  2. High Calcium (~80mol%) Late Stage Carbonate in ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildea, K. J.; Holland, G.; Lyon, I. C.; Chatzitheodoridis, E.; Burgess, R.

    2006-03-01

    Brief petrological, chemical and textural description of previously undescribed high Ca late stage carbonate in Martian meteorite ALH84001. This carbonate surrounds Mg rich carbonates and rosette fragments.

  3. Insurance Status and Hospital Payer Mix Are Linked With Variation in Metastatic Site Resection in Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Healy, Mark A; Pradarelli, Jason C; Krell, Robert W; Regenbogen, Scott E; Suwanabol, Pasithorn A

    2016-11-01

    Despite substantially improved survival with metastatic site resection in colorectal cancers, uptake of aggressive surgical approaches remains low among certain patients. It is unknown whether financial determinants of care, such as insurance status, play a role in this treatment gap. We sought to evaluate the effect of insurance status on metastasectomy in patients with advanced colorectal cancers. This was a retrospective cohort study. Using the National Cancer Data Base Participant User File, incident cases of colorectal cancer metastatic to the lung and/or liver with diagnosis from 2010 to 2013 were identified. We identified 42,300 patients in our cohort with a mean age 64 years. Controlling for patient, tumor, and hospital characteristics, hierarchical regression was used to examine associations between hospital payer mix and metastatic site resection. Metastatic site resection occurred in 12.3% of all patients. Adjusting for patient and hospital fixed effects, we found that patients who were uninsured or on Medicaid were 38% less likely to undergo metastasectomy (OR = 0.62 (95% CI, 0.56-0.66)). Patients in hospitals with staff treating a high percentage of uninsured patients or patients with Medicaid were less likely to undergo metastasectomy, even after controlling for individual patient insurance status. The study was limited by its retrospective design and the granularity and accuracy of the National Cancer Data Base. Differences in insurance status and hospital payer mix are associated with differences in rates of metastatic site resection in patients with colorectal cancer that is metastatic to the lung and/or liver. There is a need for improved access to metastatic site resection for individual patients who are uninsured or who have Medicaid insurance, as well as for all patients who seek care at hospitals treating a large proportion of patients who are uninsured or on Medicaid. Remedies for individual patients could include improved access to private

  4. Outpatient Palliative Care and Aggressiveness of End-of-Life Care in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Si Won; Jho, Hyun Jung; Baek, Ji Yeon; Shim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Hyun Mi; Ku, Ji Yeon; Nam, Eun Jung; Chang, Yoon-Jung; Choi, Hye Jin; Kim, Sun Young

    2017-01-01

    Palliative care in outpatient setting has been shown to promote better symptom management and transition to hospice care among patients with advanced cancer. Nevertheless, specialized palliative care is rarely provided at cancer centers in Korea. Herein, we aimed to assess aggressiveness of end-of-life care for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer according to the use of outpatient palliative care (OPC) at a single cancer center in Korea. We performed a retrospective medical record review for 132 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who died between 2011 and 2014. Fifty patients used OPC (OPC group), while 82 patients did not (non-OPC group). Indicators of aggressiveness of end-of-life care including chemotherapy use, emergency department visits, hospitalization, and utilization of hospice care were analyzed according to the use of OPC. More patients in the OPC group were admitted to hospice than those in the non-OPC group (32% vs 17%, P = .047). The mean of inpatient days within 30 days of death was shorter for the OPC group than the non-OPC group (4.02 days vs 7.77 days, respectively, P = .032). There were no differences in the proportions of patients who received chemotherapy and visited the emergency department within 30 days from death. Among patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, OPC was associated with shorter inpatient days near death and greater hospice utilization. Further prospective studies are needed to evaluate the impact of OPC on end-of-life care in Korea.

  5. How accurate are medical oncologists' impressions of management of metastatic colorectal cancer in Australia?

    PubMed

    Au, Lewis; Turner, Natalie; Wong, Hui-Li; Field, Kathryn; Lee, Belinda; Boadle, David; Cooray, Prasad; Karikios, Deme; Kosmider, Suzanne; Lipton, Lara; Nott, Louise; Parente, Phillip; Tie, Jeanne; Tran, Ben; Wong, Rachel; Yip, Desmond; Shapiro, Jeremy; Gibbs, Peter

    2017-03-16

    Current efforts to understand patient management in clinical practice are largely based on clinician surveys with uncertain reliability. The TRACC (Treatment of Recurrent and Advanced Colorectal Cancer) database is a multisite registry collecting comprehensive treatment and outcome data on consecutive metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients at multiple sites across Australia. This study aims to determine the accuracy of oncologists' impressions of real-word practice by comparing clinicians' estimates to data captured by TRACC. Nineteen medical oncologists from nine hospitals contributing data to TRACC completed a 34-question survey regarding their impression of the management and outcomes of mCRC at their own practice and other hospitals contributing to the database. Responses were then compared with TRACC data to determine how closely their impressions reflected actual practice. Data on 1300 patients with mCRC were available. Median clinician estimated frequency of KRAS testing within 6 months of diagnosis was 80% (range: 20-100%); the TRACC documented rate was 43%. Clinicians generally overestimated the rates of first-line treatment, particularly in patients over 75 years. Estimate for bevacizumab in first line was 60% (35-80%) versus 49% in TRACC. Estimated rate for liver resection varied substantially (5-35%), and the estimated median (27%) was inconsistent with the TRACC rate (12%). Oncologists generally felt their practice was similar to other hospitals. Oncologists' estimates of current clinical practice varied and were discordant with the TRACC database, often with a tendency to overestimate interventions. Clinician surveys alone do not reliably capture contemporary clinical practices in mCRC. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. KRAS mutations: variable incidences in a Brazilian cohort of 8,234 metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background KRAS mutations are frequently found in colorectal cancer (CRC) indicating the importance of its genotyping in the study of the molecular mechanisms behind this disease. Although major advances have occurred over the past decade, there are still important gaps in our understanding of CRC carcinogenesis, particularly whether sex-linked factors play any role. Methods The profile of KRAS mutations in the Brazilian population was analyzed by conducting direct sequencing of KRAS codons 12 and 13 belonging to 8,234 metastatic CRC patient samples. DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue, exon 1 was amplified by PCR and submitted to direct sequencing. The data obtained was analysed comparing different geographical regions, gender and age. Results The median age was 59 years and the overall percentage of wild-type and mutated KRAS was 62.8% and 31.9%, respectively. Interestingly, different percentages of mutated KRAS patients were observed between male and female patients (32.5% versus 34.8%, respectively; p = 0.03). KRAS Gly12Asp mutation was the most prevalent for both genders and for most regions, with the exception of the North where Gly12Val was the most frequent mutation found. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge this is one of the largest cohorts of KRAS genotyping in CRC patients and the largest to indicate a higher incidence of KRAS mutation in females compared to males in Brazil. Nevertheless, further research is required to better address the impact of gender differences in colorectal cancer. PMID:24720724

  7. Physiologically based mathematical models to optimize therapies against metastatic colorectal cancer: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Ballesta, Annabelle; Clairambault, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and improving the effects of combined drug treatments in metastatic colorectal Cancer (mCRC) is a multidisciplinary and multiscale problem, that can benefit from a systems biology approach. Although a quite limited number of active drugs have been approved for clinical applications, a variety of combined delivery regimen options are actually used in the clinic, so that choosing between them, or designing new ones, is not an obvious task, which calls for some rationalization based on physiological principles. We propose some physiologically based molecular pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics models for the main cytotoxic drugs used in the clinic and call for others describing more recently used agents, such as associated with monoclonal antibodies. We also advocate simultaneously designing models of the proliferating cell populations under therapeutic control, as cancer is primarily a disruption of physiological control on tissue proliferation. These two types of models are based on differential equations to continuously describe both the fate of drugs in the organism, from infusion until pharmacological effects, and their impact on the proliferation of cell populations, healthy and tumor. The multiscale nature of colorectal cancer, from the disruption of intracellular pathways to tumor growth observed at the macroscopic level, together with its frequent multilocal extension by simultaneous metastases in various healthy tissues of the organism at the time of diagnosis, and later, call for multiscale mathematical models. We thus propose a multi-level vision of cytotoxic drug use in the clinic, in which the weapon in the hands of clinicians, a drug combination regimen, the targets -wanted and unwanted -on which it exerts its effects, molecular pathways in proliferating cell populations, and the environment of the latter in a whole organism, are all considered in order to design a rationale for appropriate shooting, i.e., treatment optimization under

  8. FBXW7 missense mutation: a novel negative prognostic factor in metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Korphaisarn, Krittiya; Morris, Van Karlyle; Overman, Michael J.; Fogelman, David R.; Kee, Bryan K.; Kanwal Pratap Singh, Raghav; Manuel, Shanequa; Shureiqi, Imad; Wolff, Robert A.; Eng, Cathy; Menter, David; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Kopetz, Scott; Dasari, Arvind

    2017-01-01

    Background FBXW7 functions as a ubiquitin ligase tagging multiple dominant oncogenic proteins and commonly mutates in colorectal cancer. Data suggest missense mutations lead to greater loss of FBXW7 function than other gene aberrations do. However, the clinicopathologic factors and outcomes associated with FBXW7 missense mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) have not been described. Methods Data were obtained from mCRC patients whose tumors were evaluated by next-generation sequencing for hotspot mutations at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Alterations in FBXW7 were identified, and their associations with clinicopathologic features and overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Results Of 855 mCRC patients, 571 had data on FBXW7 status; 43 (7.5%) had FBXW7 mutations, including 37 with missense mutations. R465C mutations in exon 9 were the most common missense mutations (18.6%). PIK3CA mutations were associated with FBXW7 missense mutations (p=0.012). On univariate analysis, patients with FBXW7 missense mutations had significantly worse OS (median 28.7 mo) than those with wild-type FBXW7 (median 46.6 mo; p=0.003). On multivariate analysis including other known prognostic factors such as BRAF mutations, FBXW7 missense mutations were the strongest negative prognostic factor for OS (hazard ratio 2.0; p=0.003). Conclusions In the largest clinical dataset of mCRC to date, FBXW7 missense mutations showed a strong negative prognostic association. PMID:28424412

  9. Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients ≥75 Years Old in Clinical Practice: A Multicenter Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grande, Roberta; Natoli, Clara; Ciancola, Fabrizio; Gemma, Donatello; Pellegrino, Arianna; Pavese, Ida; Garufi, Carlo; Di Lauro, Luigi; Corsi, Domenico; Signorelli, Diego; Sperduti, Isabella; Cortese, Giada; Risi, Emanuela; Morano, Federica; Sergi, Domenico; Signorelli, Carlo; Ruggeri, Enzo Maria; Zampa, Germano; Russano, Marco; Gamucci, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer patients have a median age of incidence >65years although they are largely under-represented in phase-III trials. This large population contains patients unfit for treatment, those suitable for monotherapy or for doublets and the impact of chemotherapy outside clinical trial is unclear. The aim of the study was to retrospectively analyse Overall Survival(OS) of elderly metastatic colorectal cancer(mCRC) patients treated with chemotherapy in daily practice. Methods Kaplan-Meir method was used for OS, the log-rank or Tarone-Ware test for differences between subgroups, Cox’s proportional hazard model to assess the impact of known prognostic factors and treatment. Results 751 patients with mCRC observed between January 2000 and January 2013 were collected. Median age was 79 year(75–93); Male/Female 61/39%, ECOG-PS 0-1/2 85/15%; colon/rectum 74/26%; multiple metastatic sites 34%, only liver metastasis in 41% of patients. KRAS status was studied in 35% of patients: 44% of them showed gene mutation. 20.5% of patients did not received any kind of treatment including surgery. Comorbidities observed: cardiovascular 34%, diabetes 14%, hypertension 50%. Primary tumor was resected in 80.6%; surgery of liver metastasis was done in 19% of patients (2.3% of patients >80years). 78% of patients underwent chemotherapy. Median follow up was 12 months(range 1–124). Median OS was 17 months (CI 95%15–19);median OS in no-treated patients was 5 months (4–6); mOS of patients with at least one treatment was 20 months (18–22). In KRAS mutated group median OS was 19months (15–23) while in KRAS wild type patients median OS was 25 months (20–30). At multivariate analysis sex(Female), age(<80y), performance status(0–1), chemotherapy, Surgery of metastasis, Surgery of primary tumor and Site of metastasis(liver) were prognostic factors for OS. Conclusion The results of our study show that in clinical practice treatment has a positive impact on OS of

  10. Prognostic significance of K-Ras mutation rate in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Vincenzi, Bruno; Cremolini, Chiara; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Russo, Antonio; Mannavola, Francesco; Perrone, Giuseppe; Pantano, Francesco; Loupakis, Fotios; Rossini, Daniele; Ongaro, Elena; Bonazzina, Erica; Dell'Aquila, Emanuela; Imperatori, Marco; Zoccoli, Alice; Bronte, Giuseppe; De Maglio, Giovanna; Fontanini, Gabriella; Natoli, Clara; Falcone, Alfredo; Santini, Daniele; Onetti-Muda, Andrea; Siena, Salvatore; Tonini, Giuseppe; Aprile, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Activating mutations of K-Ras gene have a well-established role as predictors of resistance to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. Their prognostic value is controversial, and no data regarding the prognostic value of mutation rate, defined as the percentage of mutated alleles/tumor sample, are available. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of K-Rasmutation rate in a homogenous cohort of mCRC patients receiving first-line doublet plus bevacizumab. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study enrolled 397 K-Ras mutant mCRC patients from 6 Italian centers, and 263 patients were fully evaluable for our analysis. K-Ras mutation rate was assessed by pyrosequencing. Patients with less than 60% of cancer cells in tumor tissue were excluded. No patients received anti-EGFR containing anticancer therapy, at any time. Median mutation rate was 40% and was adopted as cut-off. The primary and secondary endpoints were PFS and OS respectively. Results: At univariate analysis, K-Ras mutation rate higher than 40% was significantly associated with lower PFS (7.3 vs 9.1 months; P < 0.0001) and OS (21 vs 31 months; P = 0.004). A multivariate model adjusted for age at diagnosis, site of origin of tumor tissue (primary vs metastases), referral center, number of metastatic sites, and first-line chemotherapy backbone, showed that K-Ras mutation rate remained a significant predictor of PFS and OS in the whole population. Discussion: Our data demonstrate an association between K-Ras mutation rate and prognosis in mCRC patients treated with bevacizumab-containing first-line therapy. These data deserve to be verified in an independent validation set. PMID:26384309

  11. Patterns of practice with third-line anti-EGFR antibody for metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ho, M.Y.; Renouf, D.J.; Cheung, W.Y.; Lim, H.J.; Speers, C.H.; Zhou, C.; Kennecke, H.F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapy with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (egfr) monoclonal antibody improves outcomes for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mcrc) in the first-, second-, and third-line trial settings. In British Columbia, the use of egfr inhibitors (egfris) is confined to third-line therapy, which might lower the proportion of patients who receive this therapy. The objective of the present study was to describe egfri treatment patterns when those agents are limited to the third-line setting. The results will inform decisions about optimal use of egfri agents, including earlier in the course of therapy for metastatic disease. Methods All patients with newly diagnosed mcrc who were referred to BC Cancer Agency clinics in 2009 were included in the study. Prognostic and treatment information was prospectively collected; KRAS test results were determined by chart review. Results The study included 443 patients with a median age of 66 years. For the 321 patients who received systemic therapy, median survival was 22.3 months. Of the 117 patients who were treated with 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan, and who were potentially eligible for egfri therapy, 90% (105 patients) were tested for KRAS status. Of the 60 patients with KRAS wild-type tumours, 82% (49 patients) received egfri therapy. Conclusions When egfri therapy is limited to the third-line setting, only a small proportion of patients receive such therapy, with death and poor performance status preventing its use in the rest. Availability of egfri in earlier lines of therapy could increase the proportion of patients treated with all active systemic agents. PMID:27803597

  12. Prognostic significance of K-Ras mutation rate in metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Bruno; Cremolini, Chiara; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Russo, Antonio; Mannavola, Francesco; Perrone, Giuseppe; Pantano, Francesco; Loupakis, Fotios; Rossini, Daniele; Ongaro, Elena; Bonazzina, Erica; Dell'Aquila, Emanuela; Imperatori, Marco; Zoccoli, Alice; Bronte, Giuseppe; De Maglio, Giovanna; Fontanini, Gabriella; Natoli, Clara; Falcone, Alfredo; Santini, Daniele; Onetti-Muda, Andrea; Siena, Salvatore; Tonini, Giuseppe; Aprile, Giuseppe

    2015-10-13

    Activating mutations of K-Ras gene have a well-established role as predictors of resistance to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. Their prognostic value is controversial, and no data regarding the prognostic value of mutation rate, defined as the percentage of mutated alleles/tumor sample, are available. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of K-Rasmutation rate in a homogenous cohort of mCRC patients receiving first-line doublet plus bevacizumab. This retrospective study enrolled 397 K-Ras mutant mCRC patients from 6 Italian centers, and 263 patients were fully evaluable for our analysis. K-Ras mutation rate was assessed by pyrosequencing. Patients with less than 60% of cancer cells in tumor tissue were excluded. No patients received anti-EGFR containing anticancer therapy, at any time. Median mutation rate was 40% and was adopted as cut-off. The primary and secondary endpoints were PFS and OS respectively. At univariate analysis, K-Ras mutation rate higher than 40% was significantly associated with lower PFS (7.3 vs 9.1 months; P < 0.0001) and OS (21 vs 31 months; P = 0.004). A multivariate model adjusted for age at diagnosis, site of origin of tumor tissue (primary vs metastases), referral center, number of metastatic sites, and first-line chemotherapy backbone, showed that K-Ras mutation rate remained a significant predictor of PFS and OS in the whole population. Our data demonstrate an association between K-Ras mutation rate and prognosis in mCRC patients treated with bevacizumab-containing first-line therapy. These data deserve to be verified in an independent validation set.

  13. Metastatic colorectal cancer first-line treatment with bevacizumab: the impact of K-ras mutation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Luigi; Veltri, Enzo; Zullo, Angelo; Zoratto, Federica; Colonna, Maria; Longo, Flavia; Mottolese, Marcella; Giannarelli, Diana; Ruco, Luigi; Marchetti, Paolo; Romiti, Adriana; Barucca, Viola; Giannini, Giuseppe; Bianchi, Loredana; Tomao, Silverio

    2013-01-01

    Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy prolongs progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Although there is strong evidence to suggest that the mutational status of the K-ras oncogene has a role as a predictive factor for activity in patients treated with cetuximab and panitumumab, few data have been obtained in patients treated with bevacizumab. We conducted an additional retrospective analysis to investigate the prognostic value of K-ras mutation relative to mCRC first-line treatment with bevacizumab. A total of 108 patients were retrospectively reviewed. K-ras status was assessed in the overall population by sequencing. Statistical association for PFS and OS was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method, and the prognostic role of K-ras was determined using the logrank test. Median PFS was 10 months both for patients with wild-type (WT) K-ras and mutated (MT) K-ras (hazard ratio [HR] 0.94, P=0.75); neither difference in median OS was significant (27 months WT K-ras versus 26 months MT K-ras, HR 0.92; P=0.70). A further analysis was carried out in the two groups according to metastatic sites. No statistically significant difference in terms of PFS and OS was demonstrated between WT K-ras and MT K-ras with liver metastases only and in those with extrahepatic disease. Although further study is required, our results seem to confirm that K-ras mutation does not have a prognostic role in mCRC patients receiving first-line treatment with bevacizumab.

  14. Update on the Role of Imaging in Management of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Kim, Kyung Won; Nishino, Mizuki; Howard, Stephanie A.; Krajewski, Katherine M.; Jagannathan, Jyothi P.; Cleary, James M.; Ramaiya, Nikhil H.

    2014-01-01

    Evolution in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has led to significant improvement in the survival of these patients. Surgery is useful in patients with resectable disease. Liver-directed therapies such as hepatic arterial infusion, transarterial radio- and chemoembolization, and percutaneous ablation are sometimes used by oncologists when the liver is the only site of metastatic disease. Unresectable mCRC is typically treated with systemic chemotherapy. First-line systemic chemotherapeutic regimens for mCRC are FOLFOX (combination of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin [5-FU/LV] and oxaliplatin) and FOLFIRI (combination of 5-FU/LV and irinotecan) combined with molecular targeted drugs. Molecular targeted therapies that are effective in treating mCRC include antiangiogenic agents such as bevacizumab—an antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor—and antibodies directed against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). EGFR-directed antibodies such as cetuximab and panitumumab have been shown to produce activity only in wild-type KRAS tumors. Imaging modalities such as multidetector computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography/CT play a major role in the selection of appropriate treatment strategies. Assessment of treatment response in patients who undergo liver-directed and systemic therapy requires imaging at regular intervals. Recent studies have shown that alternative treatment response criteria may be more predictive of pathologic response in mCRC than conventional criteria such as Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Awareness of unusual response patterns, as well as of complications and toxicities, is helpful in guiding patient management. ©RSNA, 2014 PMID:25384292

  15. A phase II trial of ISIS 3521 in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John L; Eisenberg, Steven G; Johnson, Michael D; Hanfelt, John; Dorr, F Andrew; El-Ashry, Dorraya; Oberst, Michael; Fuxman, Yair; Holmlund, Jon; Malik, Shakun

    2004-11-01

    This phase II study was designed to characterize the clinical activity of ISIS 3521 in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Sixteen patients with pretreated or refractory CRC were treated with ISIS 3521. Eleven patients were given a dose of 2.0 mg/kg per day, and 5 patients received 3.0 mg/kg per day given over 21 days followed by a 7-day rest period. Patients continued with study until evidence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity was detected. Patients underwent baseline tumor biopsies followed by a second biopsy during the last week of the first 21-day infusion. All 16 patients underwent baseline tumor biopsies, and 12 of the 16 patients underwent on-study tumor biopsies. No evidence of tumor response was observed. One patient had stable disease after 2 cycles and remained on for 1 additional cycle only to demonstrate progression of disease at that time. No dose-limiting or other significant toxicities were observed at both dosages, which could not be explained by progression of disease. Fatigue was common in all patients treated but was not dose limiting, and there was no evidence of coagulopathy. Analysis of the tumor biopsies obtained from the 11 evaluable samples showed marked uptake of ISIS 3521 in the normal liver parenchyma. However, there was minimal uptake within the tumor cells. In addition, no evidence of any alteration in protein kinase C-a within the tumors or any downstream effects leading to apoptosis were observed. ISIS 3521 demonstrated no clinical activity or target modulation in refractory metastatic CRC.

  16. Phosphorylated protein phosphatase 2A determines poor outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cristóbal, I; Manso, R; Rincón, R; Caramés, C; Zazo, S; del Pulgar, T G; Cebrián, A; Madoz-Gúrpide, J; Rojo, F; García-Foncillas, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a tumour suppressor frequently inactivated in human cancer and its tyrosine-307 phosphorylation has been reported as a molecular inhibitory mechanism. Methods: Expression of phosphorylated PP2A (p-PP2A) was evaluated in 250 metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Chi-square, Kaplan–Meier and Cox analyses were used to determine correlations with clinical and molecular parameters and impact on clinical outcomes. Results: High p-PP2A levels were found in 17.2% cases and were associated with ECOG performance status (P=0.001) and presence of synchronous metastasis at diagnosis (P=0.035). This subgroup showed substantially worse overall survival (OS) (median OS, 6.0 vs 26.2 months, P<0.001) and progression-free survival (PFS) (median PFS, 3.8 vs 13.3 months, P<0.001). The prognostic impact of p-PP2A was particularly evident in patients aged <70 years (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that p-PP2A retained its prognostic impact for OS (hazard ratio 2.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.8–4.1; P<0.001) and PFS (hazard ratio 3.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.8–5.0; P<0.001). Conclusions: Phosphorylated PP2A is an alteration that determines poor outcome in metastatic CRC and represents a novel potential therapeutic target in this disease, thus enabling to define a subgroup of patients who could benefit from future treatments based on PP2A activators. PMID:25003662

  17. Prognostic and predictive biomarkers in metastatic colorectal cancer anti-EGFR therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lo Nigro, Cristiana; Ricci, Vincenzo; Vivenza, Daniela; Granetto, Cristina; Fabozzi, Teresa; Miraglio, Emanuela; Merlano, Marco C

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To reviewing genetic and epigenetic make-up of metastatic colorectal cancers (mCRCs) addicted to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling. METHODS: The present study summarizes the potential value of prognostic and predictive biomarkers in selecting mCRC patients treated with anti-EGFR therapy. A meta-analysis was performed using a systematic search of PubMed, Medline and Web of Science to identify eligible papers until March 21st, 2016 using these following terms: ‘‘colorectal cancer’’, “predictive biomarkers’’, “anti-EGFR therapy”, “KRAS”, “NRAS’’, “PIK3CA”, “TP53”, “PTEN”, ‘‘EGFR”, “MET”, “HER2”, “epiregulin”, “amphiregulin”, “prognostic biomarkers”, “BRAF”, “miRNA” and “antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity”. Two investigators independently evaluated and extracted data from each identified studies based on selected criteria of inclusion and exclusion. RESULTS: The introduction of agents targeting EGFR such as cetuximab and panitumumab increased overall survival of mCRCs. Nevertheless, it has firstly became evident that response rates to cetuximab regimens in unselected patient populations were typically lower than 30%. Clinical data confirmed the predictive value of RAS mutations for resistance to cetuximab and panitumumab leading to the license of these monoclonal antibodies exclusively for the management of patients with RAS-wild type colorectal cancers. So far the identification of predictive biomarkers have generated interesting, though preliminary and, at times, conflicting data on the importance of tumour mRNA levels of EGFR ligands, of activating mutations in other genes such as NRAS and PIK3CA. The prognostic value of selected microRNAs level and ADCC activity is under investigation, while the prognostic impact of BRAF status remains controversial. CONCLUSION: This review focuses on the personalized treatment of mCRC and discusses the

  18. Therapeutic potential and critical analysis of trastuzumab and bevacizumab in combination with different chemotherapeutic agents against metastatic breast/colorectal cancer affecting various endpoints.

    PubMed

    Wahid, Mohd; Mandal, Raju K; Dar, Sajad A; Jawed, Arshad; Lohani, Mohtashim; Areeshi, Mohammad Y; Akhter, Naseem; Haque, Shafiul

    2016-08-01

    Researchers are working day and night across the globe to eradicate or at least lessen the menace of cancer faced by the mankind. The two very frequently occurring cancers faced by the human beings are metastatic breast cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer. The various chemotherapeutic agents like anthracycline, cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel, irinotecan, fluorouracil and leucovorin etc., have been used impressively for long. But the obstinate character of metastatic breast cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer needs more to tackle the threat. So, the scientists found the use of monoclonal antibodies trastuzumab (Herceptin(®)) and bevacizumab (Avastin(®)) for the same. The current study critically investigates the therapeutic potential of trastuzumab and bevacizumab in combination with various chemotherapeutic agents against metastatic breast cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the very first critical analysis showing percent wise increase in various positive endpoints like median time to disease progression, median survival, and progression free survival etc. for the treatment of metastatic breast/colorectal cancer using trastuzumab and bevacizumab in combination with different chemotherapeutic agents and provides the rational for the success and failure of the selected monoclonal antibodies.

  19. Significance of E-cadherin and CD44 expression in patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Iseki, Yasuhito; Shibutani, Masatsune; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Nagahara, Hisashi; Ikeya, Tetsuro; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2017-07-01

    The loss of adhesion molecules is reported to be associated with tumor invasion and metastasis in numerous types of cancer. Epithelial (E)-cadherin is an important molecule for cell-to-cell adhesion, while cluster of differentiation (CD)44 is an important molecule for cell-to-extracellular matrix adhesion. The focus of the present study was to evaluate the significance of the expression of E-cadherin and CD44 in patients with the unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) who are undergoing palliative chemotherapy. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples were obtained from 49 patients who underwent primary tumor resection and who were receiving palliative chemotherapy for unresectable metastatic CRC. The expression of E-cadherin and CD44 was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. The expression of E-cadherin was not significantly associated with progression-free survival (PFS; P=0.2825) or overall survival (OS; P=0.6617). The expression of CD44 was not associated with PFS (P=0.4365), but it did exhibit a certain level of association with OS (P=0.0699). However, the combined low expression of E-cadherin and CD44 demonstrated a significant association with decreased PFS (P=0.0101) and OS (P=0.0009). The combined loss of E-cadherin and CD44 expression also led to a reduction in the objective response rate and disease control rate (P=0.0076 and P=0.0294, respectively). A univariate analysis indicated that the combined low expression of E-cadherin and CD44 (P=0.0474) and sex (P=0.0330) were significantly associated with decreased PFS, and multivariate analysis confirmed combined low expression of E-cadherin and CD44 as an independent risk factor for decreased PFS [hazard ratio (HR), 8.276; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.383-43.311; P=0.0227]. Univariate and multivariate analyses also indicated that the combined low expression of E-cadherin and CD44 expression was a significant prognostic factor for poor OS (HR, 15.118; 95% CI, 2.645-77.490; P=0.0039). Therefore

  20. Are sheath folds late stage flanking structures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reber, Jacqueline E.; Dabrowski, Marcin; Schmid, Daniel W.

    2010-05-01

    Sheath folds can be described as highly non-cylindrical folds or as cone shaped with a rounded apex. A cross section of a sheath fold perpendicular to its elongation direction shows usually an elliptical shape. Sheath folds can be observed in nature within a wide range of materials and across many orders of size magnitude. A classification scheme has been developed by Alsop and Holdsworth (Journal of Structural Geology, 2006) which divides sheath folds into different categories depending on the ratio of the aspect ratio of the innermost and outermost "ring". Different initial conditions such as rigid objects and precursor folds formed through buckling were suggested as a trigger for the development of sheath folds. However, in nature sheath folds can also be observed where no rigid objects or precursor folds can be seen. In such cases we propose weak objects or zones as possible activators. According to this approach sheath folds represent a late stage of flanking structures. To simulate the weak zone we use an infinitely weak elliptical inclusion embedded in a homogeneous matrix. Planar markers such as bedding or foliation make the sheath geometry visible. To test the impact of the initial shape of the weak zone on the formation of the sheath folds the aspect ratio of the slip ellipse is changed systematically. As the geometry of sheath folds is truly three dimensional we use a 3D analytical model to investigate their formation. The model is based on an adapted internal and external Eshelby solution (Eshelby, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London series a-Mathematical and Physical Sciences, 1957 and 1959) for viscous rheologies and elliptical inclusions described in Exner and Dabrowski (Journal of Structural Geology, 2010 (submitted)). The ellipse as well as the matrix has linear viscous, isotropic, incompressible material properties. To analyze the cross-section the calculated folds are cut perpendicular to the simple shear stretching direction while the

  1. An update on the current and emerging targeted agents in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chu, Edward

    2012-03-01

    Over the past 8 to 10 years, significant advances have been made in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). In particular, the development of the targeted biologic agents bevacizumab, cetuximab, and panitumumab, and their integration with cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens has led to improvements in clinical efficacy. Despite these gains, the overall impact of current targeted agents in the treatment of mCRC has been relatively modest, and while 2-year survival has improved, no gains have been made, as of yet, in 5-year survival. Intense efforts continue to be focused on developing novel targeted agents with a different spectrum of activity. Presently, five novel targeted molecules are in phase III trials, including the antiangiogenesis agents aflibercept and ramucirumab, two novel receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, regorafenib and brivanib, and the Akt inhibitor perifosine. There are an additional 52 phase II trials investigating a wide range of other candidate molecules. The potential list of approved targeted agents in mCRC seems likely to increase over the next 5 to 10 years. To maximize their potential clinical impact, however, it will be critically important to introduce efficient molecular diagnostic methodologies into the drug development process for the identification and validation of predictive biomarkers for chemosensitivity. This article reviews the development of targeted agents for the treatment of mCRC, including the three molecules currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), as well as the main non-FDA-approved therapeutics currently undergoing phase II and III clinical testing.

  2. Capecitabine and irinotecan with bevacizumab 2-weekly for metastatic colorectal cancer: the phase II AVAXIRI study.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Alfonso, Pilar; Chaves, Manuel; Muñoz, Andrés; Salud, Antonieta; García-Gonzalez, Maria; Grávalos, Cristina; Massuti, Bartomeu; González-Flores, Encarna; Queralt, Bernardo; López-Ladrón, Amelia; Losa, Ferran; Gómez, Maria Jose; Oltra, Amparo; Aranda, Enrique

    2015-04-29

    The optimal sequence of chemotherapeutic agents is not firmly established for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). This phase II multi-centre study investigated the efficacy and tolerability of a standard capecitabine plus irinotecan (XELIRI) regimen with bevacizumab in previously untreated patients with mCRC. Patients received intravenous irinotecan 175 mg/m(2) on day 1 and oral capecitabine 1000 mg/m(2) (800 mg/m(2) for patients >65 years of age) twice daily on days 2-8, followed by a 1-week rest, and bevacizumab 5 mg/kg as an intravenous infusion on day 1 every 2 weeks. Seventy-seven patients were included in the intention-to-treat and safety populations. Progression-free survival at 9 months was 61%. The overall response and disease control rates were 51% and 84%, respectively. Median progression-free and overall survival times were 11.9 and 24.8 months, respectively. 48 patients (62%) had at least one grade 3/4 adverse event, the most common being asthenia, diarrhoea and neutropenia. Quality of life varied little over the study period with mean visual analogue scale general health scores ranging from 71 to 76 over cycles 1-11. Our study found irinotecan and capecitabine administered fortnightly with bevacizumab in patients with mCRC to be an effective and tolerable regimen. clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00875771. Trial registration date: 04/02/2009.

  3. Managing toxicities associated with antiangiogenic biologic agents in combination with chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Grenon, Nina N

    2013-08-01

    Toxicities commonly associated with antiangiogenic agents include hypertension, proteinuria, wound-healing complications, bleeding or hemorrhage, thromboembolic events, hypersensitivity reactions, and gastrointestinal perforation; however, toxicities most often attributed to chemotherapy include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, fatigue, neuropathy, mucositis, hand-foot syndrome, hypersensitivity reactions, and myelosuppression. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) who receive an antiangiogenic agent in combination with chemotherapy may experience toxicities related to both chemotherapy and the antiangiogenic agent. If possible, evidence-based interventions should be used for the management of toxicities. Patient education about expected toxicities and optimal toxicity management can promote the optimal use of therapy to improve survival and quality of life. Oncology nurses are well positioned to educate patients and their families on anticipated treatment and management of side effects. This article summarizes the incidence of toxicities associated with the antiangiogenic biologic agents aflibercept and bevacizumab, in combination with chemotherapy for patients with mCRC, and provides strategies for managing these toxicities based on clinical practice guidelines.

  4. Treatment decisions in metastatic colorectal cancer - Beyond first and second line combination therapies.

    PubMed

    Vogel, A; Hofheinz, R D; Kubicka, S; Arnold, D

    2017-09-01

    Median overall survival (OS) of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has reached up to 30months in recent clinical trials of first line therapies. Following disease progression after the standard in both, 1st and 2nd line, combination chemotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, many patients maintain a good performance status and a significant proportion is motivated to undergo further therapy. Choices of treatment beyond the second line setting for mCRC are therefore becoming increasingly important. New options have entered the therapeutic field recently: Regorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor approved for mCRC patients who have progressed on chemotherapy (including fluoropyrimidines, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin), plus VEGF inhibitor(s) and - if RAS wild-type - an anti-EGFR inhibitor. Regorafenib significantly improved OS, compared to placebo, in two phase III trials (CORRECT and CONCUR) in mCRC patients. Trifluridine/Tipiracil, an oral fluoropyrimidine, also resulted in significantly improved OS when compared to placebo in the phase III RECOURSE trial, which was conducted in a similar patient population to CORRECT. Reintroduction of previously administered therapy is another valid and commonly used approach, especially for those regimens which were discontinued before progression, e.g. if associated with cumulative toxicities, such as peripheral neuropathy or due to treatment breaks. Re-challenge of drugs to which patients developed resistance is also feasible although evidence for this strategy is limited. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Generation of a human antibody that inhibits TSPAN8-mediated invasion of metastatic colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taek-Keun; Park, Chang Sik; Jeoung, Mee Hyun; Lee, Woo Ran; Go, Nam Kyung; Choi, Jong Rip; Lee, Tae Sup; Shim, Hyunbo; Lee, Sukmook

    2015-12-25

    Tetraspanin 8 (TSPAN8) is a tumor-associated antigen implicated in tumor progression and metastasis. However, the validation of TSPAN8 as a potential therapeutic target in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has not yet been studied. In this study, through several in vitro methodologies, we identified a large extracellular loop of TSPAN8 (TSPAN8-LEL) as a key domain for regulating mCRC invasion. Using phage display technology, we developed a novel anti-TSPAN8-LEL human antibody with subnanomolar affinity that specifically recognizes amino acids 140-205 of TSPAN8-LEL in a conformation-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrated that the antibody specifically reduces invasion in the HCT116 and LoVo mCRC cell lines more potently than in the HCT-8 and SW480 non-mCRC cell lines. Our data suggest that TSPAN8-LEL may play an important role in mCRC cell invasion, and that the antibody we have developed could be a useful tool for inhibiting the invasion of TSPAN8-expressing mCRCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Serum LDH predicts benefit from bevacizumab beyond progression in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Marmorino, Federica; Salvatore, Lisa; Barbara, Cecilia; Allegrini, Giacomo; Antonuzzo, Lorenzo; Masi, Gianluca; Loupakis, Fotios; Borelli, Beatrice; Chiara, Silvana; Banzi, Maria Chiara; Miraglio, Emanuela; Amoroso, Domenico; Dargenio, Francesco; Bonetti, Andrea; Martignetti, Angelo; Paris, Myriam; Tomcikova, Daniela; Boni, Luca; Falcone, Alfredo; Cremolini, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    Different antiangiogenics are currently indicated in the second-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), following a first-line bevacizumab-containing treatment. The magnitude of benefit is limited, but no predictors of benefit have been identified. A total of 184 mCRC patients progressing to a first-line bevacizumab-containing treatment were randomised in the BEBYP study to continue or not the antiangiogenic in combination with a second-line chemotherapy. A subgroup analysis according to baseline serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels was carried out. A significant interaction effect between LDH levels and treatment was found in terms of progression-free survival (PFS; P=0.002). Although patients with low LDH levels achieved significant PFS benefit from the continuation of bevacizumab (HR: 0.39 (95% CI: 0.23-0.65)), patients with high levels did not (HR: 1.10 (95% CI: 0.74-1.64)). Consistent results were reported in overall survival (OS; P=0.075). As preclinical evidence suggests that serum LDH may be a marker of tumour angiogenesis activation, low levels may indicate that bevacizumab is still efficacious in inhibiting angiogenesis. Validation of present results in subgroup analyses of other randomised trials of second-line angiogenesis inhibitors is warranted.

  7. Plasma TIMP-1 levels and treatment outcome in patients treated with XELOX for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, C; Qvortrup, C; Christensen, I J; Glimelius, B; Berglund, A; Jensen, B V; Nielsen, S E; Keldsen, N; Nielsen, H J; Brünner, N; Pfeiffer, P

    2011-02-01

    The aim was to evaluate the association between plasma tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels and outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) receiving XELOX (combination chemotherapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin) as first-line treatment. One hundred and twenty patients were included. Blood samples were collected before treatment and 3 weeks later before the next treatment cycle. Plasma TIMP-1 and serum CEA levels were correlated to treatment outcome. No significant associations between baseline TIMP-1 or CEA levels and best response to treatment or progression-free survival (PFS) could be demonstrated. In contrast, high baseline plasma TIMP-1 levels were associated with poor overall survival (OS), P = 0.008, hazard ratio (HR) = 1.80 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.17-2.78]. Furthermore, increase in TIMP-1 levels from baseline to immediately before the second cycle of chemotherapy had a significant negative effect on survival (P = 0.03, HR = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.02-1.65) while a decrease in TIMP-1 was significantly associated with a higher objective response rate (P = 0.03). Both high baseline and subsequent increase in TIMP-1 levels were associated with shorter OS in patients with mCRC receiving XELOX as first-line treatment, whereas baseline TIMP-1 levels were not associated with response or PFS following XELOX treatment.

  8. Lower treatment intensity and poorer survival in metastatic colorectal cancer patients who live alone.

    PubMed

    Cavalli-Björkman, N; Qvortrup, C; Sebjørnsen, S; Pfeiffer, P; Wentzel-Larsen, T; Glimelius, B; Sorbye, H

    2012-06-26

    Socioeconomic status (SES) and social support influences cancer survival. If SES and social support affects cancer treatment has not been thoroughly explored. A cohort consisting of all patients who were initially diagnosed with or who developed metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, n=781) in three Scandinavian university hospitals from October 2003 to August 2006 was set up. Clinical and socioeconomic data were registered prospectively. Patients living alone more often had synchronous metastases at presentation and were less often treated with combination chemotherapy than those cohabitating (HR 0.19, 95% CI 0.04-0.85, P=0.03). Surgical removal of metastases was less common in patients living alone (HR 0.29, 95% CI 0.10-0.86, P=0.02) but more common among university-educated patients (HR 2.22, 95% CI 1.10-4.49, P=0.02). Smoking, being married and having children did not influence treatment or survival. Median survival was 7.7 months in patients living alone and 11.7 months in patients living with someone (P<0.001). Living alone remained a prognostic factor for survival after correction for age and comorbidity. Patients living alone received less combination chemotherapy and less secondary surgery. Living alone is a strong independent risk factor for poor survival in mCRC.

  9. Venous thromboembolism and port-related thrombosis in metastatic colorectal cancer patients: a monocenter experience.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Elisabetta; Di Cicilia, Roberto; Di Battista, Monica; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria; Paragona, Marco; Corbelli, Jody; Macchini, Marina; Prandoni, Paolo; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) may occur during the natural history of neoplastic disease and is a common cause of mortality and morbidity in cancer patients. Major risk factors for VTE in cancer patients include surgery, immobilization, hospitalization, and the administration of granulopoietic and/or erythropoietic (stimulatory) agents. Chemotherapy is a supplementary independent risk factor for VTE and the use of central venous catheters (CVC) in clinical practice has increased the risk of thromboembolic events. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate CVC-related thrombosis and the VTE rate in 145 consecutive metastatic colorectal cancer patients. We observed only 2 cases of symptomatic CVC- related thrombotic events (1.38%) and 10 cases of thromboembolic events (6.9%) in our series. Only surgery for metastases was found to be significantly related to the development of VTE, with an incidence of 16.1% vs. 4.4 in patients who did not undergo surgery (p = 0.037). In addition, a history of VTE seems to be a supplementary risk factor for CVC-related thrombosis (p = 0.055).

  10. Predictors of irinotecan toxicity and efficacy in treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Paulík, Adam; Grim, Jirí; Filip, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    The colorectal cancer ranks high among the malignant tumours in incidence and mortality and irinotecan is standardly used in palliative treatment of metastatic disease in every therapeutic line. Unfortunately, the treatment with irinotecan is often associated with severe toxicities, especially neutropenia and diarrhea. The majority of the toxic manifestation is caused by the insufficient deactivation (glucuronidation) of irinotecan active metabolite SN-38 by UGT1A enzyme. The elevated SN-38 plasma concentration is responsible for the hematological and gastrointestinal toxicity that can become life-threatening. The patients carrying the mutation of the gene encoding UGT1A enzyme lack the ability of bilirubin glucuronidation, and suffer from the inherited un-conjugated hyperbilirubinemia (Gilbert syndrome, Crigler-Najjar type 1 and 2 syndrome). The mutations in other enzyme systems also play role in the etiopathogenesis of the irinotecan toxicity: CYP3A (cytochrome P-450), ABC family of transmembrane transporters (adenosine-triphosphate binding cassette). The goal of the contemporary research is to determine the predictive factors that will enable the individual adjustment of the individual drug dosage while minimising the adverse effects and maintaining the treatment benefit.

  11. Strategies to overcome resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woo-Jeong; Cha, Pu-Hyeon; Choi, Kang-Yell

    2014-08-07

    Administration of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) such as cetuximab and panitumumab in combination with conventional chemotherapy substantially prolongs survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, the efficacy of these mAbs is limited due to genetic variation among patients, in particular K-ras mutations. The discovery of K-ras mutation as a predictor of non-responsiveness to EGFR mAb therapy has caused a major change in the treatment of mCRC. Drugs that inhibit transformation caused by oncogenic alterations of Ras and its downstream components such as BRAF, MEK and AKT seem to be promising cancer therapeutics as single agents or when given with EGFR inhibitors. Although multiple therapeutic strategies to overcome EGFR mAb-resistance are under investigation, our understanding of their mode of action is limited. Rational drug development based on stringent preclinical data, biomarker validation, and proper selection of patients is of paramount importance in the treatment of mCRC. In this review, we will discuss diverse approaches to overcome the problem of resistance to existing anti-EGFR therapies and potential future directions for cancer therapies related to the mutational status of genes associated with EGFR-Ras-ERK and PI3K signalings.

  12. Mutations of KRAS/NRAS/BRAF predict cetuximab resistance in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hung-Chih; Thiam, Tan Kien; Lu, Yen-Jung; Yeh, Chien Yuh; Tsai, Wen-Sy; You, Jeng Fu; Hung, Hsin Yuan; Tsai, Chi-Neu; Hsu, An; Chen, Hua-Chien; Chen, Shu-Jen; Yang, Tsai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 45% of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients with wild-type KRAS exon 2 are resistant to cetuximab treatment. We set out to identify additional genetic markers that might predict the response to cetuximab treatment. Fifty-three wild-type KRAS exon 2 mCRC patients were treated with cetuximab/irinotecan-based chemotherapy as a first- or third-line therapy. The mutational statuses of 10 EGFR pathway genes were analyzed in primary tumors using next-generation sequencing. BRAF, PIK3CA, KRAS (exons 3 and 4), NRAS, PTEN, and AKT1 mutations were detected in 6, 6, 5, 4, 1, and 1 patient, respectively. Four of the BRAF mutations were non-V600 variants. Four tumors harbored multiple co-existing (complex) mutations. All patients with BRAF mutations or complex mutation patterns were cetuximab non-responders. All patients but one harboring KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF mutations were non-responders. Mutations in any one of these three genes were associated with a poor response rate (7.1%) and reduced survival (PFS = 8.0 months) compared to wild-type patients (74.4% and 11.6 months). Our data suggest that KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutations predict response to cetuximab treatment in mCRC patients. PMID:26989027

  13. Correlation between non-metastatic protein 23 expression and clinicopathological features of colorectal cancer in Asians.

    PubMed

    Fu, J W; Chu, X Q

    2015-12-02

    The current meta-analysis was performed to investigate the association between non-metastatic protein 23 (NM23) expression, tumor pathology, and disease prognosis in colorectal cancer (CRC) among Asians. English and Chinese language-based electronic databases (e.g., PubMed, EBSCO, Ovid, Springerlink, Wiley, Web of Science, Wanfang databases, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP databases) were searched using search terms to identify published studies relevant to NM23 and CRC with immunohistochemistry. In total, 289 studies were identified through database searches, and 16 cohort studies (4 studies in English, 12 in Chinese) were chosen for meta-analysis, which included 1592 CRC patients. The results revealed that NM23 protein expression in CRC tissue was higher in patients with Dukes stages A and B than in patients with Dukes stages C and D. The NM23 protein was expressed at higher levels in well- and moderately differentiated tumors than in poorly differentiated tumors. The 5-year survival rate was also higher in CRC patients with NM23-positive tumors than in CRC patients with NM23-negative tumors. Significantly, 5-year tumor relapse and metastasis were lower in patients with NM23-positive tumors than in CRC patients with NM23-negative tumors. The findings suggest that NM23 expression status is associated with tumor aggressiveness and survival in CRC among Asians. Importantly, CRC patients with NM23-positive tumors had a better prognosis, and thus NM23 expression maybe used as a key prognostic indicator for CRC.

  14. RAS testing in metastatic colorectal cancer: excellent reproducibility amongst 17 Dutch pathology centers

    PubMed Central

    Boleij, Annemarie; Tops, Bastiaan B.J.; Rombout, Paul D.M.; Dequeker, Elizabeth M.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.L.; van Krieken, J. Han

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 the European Medicine Agency (EMA) restricted the indication for anti-EGFR targeted therapy to metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with a wild-type RAS gene, increasing the need for reliable RAS mutation testing. We evaluated the completeness and reproducibility of RAS-testing in the Netherlands. From 17 laboratories, tumor DNA of the first 10 CRC cases tested in 2014 in routine clinical practice was re-tested by a reference laboratory using a custom next generation sequencing panel. In total, 171 CRC cases were re-evaluated for hotspot mutations in KRAS, NRAS and BRAF. Most laboratories had introduced complete RAS-testing (65%) and BRAF-testing (71%) by January 2014. The most employed method for all hotspot regions was Sanger sequencing (range 35.7 – 49.2%). The reference laboratory detected all mutations that had been found in the participating laboratories (n = 92), plus 10 additional mutations. This concerned three RAS and seven BRAF mutations that were missed due to incomplete testing of the participating laboratory. Overall, the concordance of tests performed by both the reference and participating laboratory was 100% (163/163; κ-static 1.0) for RAS and 100% (144/144; κ-static 1.0) for BRAF. Our study shows that RAS and BRAF mutations can be reproducibly assessed using a variety of testing methods. PMID:25944693

  15. Capecitabine and bevacizumab as first-line treatment in elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Feliu, J; Safont, M J; Salud, A; Losa, F; García-Girón, C; Bosch, C; Escudero, P; López, R; Madroñal, C; Bolaños, M; Gil, M; Llombart, A; Castro-Carpeño, J; González-Barón, M

    2010-05-11

    The efficacy and safety of capecitabine and bevacizumab in elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) considered unsuitable for receiving first-line chemotherapy with an irinotecan or oxaliplatin-based combination were assessed in a phase II, open, multicentre, uncontrolled study. Treatment consisted of capecitabine 1250 mg m(-2) (or 950 mg m(-2) for patients with a creatinine clearance of 30-50 ml min(-1)) twice daily on days 1-14 and bevacizumab (7.5 mg kg(-1)) on day 1 every 3 weeks. A total of 59 patients aged >or=70 years with mCRC were enrolled. In an intention-to-treat analysis, the overall response rate was 34%, with 71% of patients achieving disease control. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 10.8 months and 18 months, respectively. In all, 32 patients (54%) had grade 3/4 adverse events (AEs), the most common being hand-foot syndrome (19%), diarrhoea (9%) and deep venous thrombosis (7%). Four patients died because of treatment-related AEs. A relationship was detected between creatinine clearance

  16. Metabolic syndrome contributes to an increased recurrence risk of non-metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    You, Jie; Liu, Wen-Yue; Zhu, Gui-Qi; Wang, Ou-Chen; Ma, Rui-Min; Huang, Gui-Qian; Shi, Ke-Qing; Guo, Gui-Long; Braddock, Martin; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2015-08-14

    Epidemiological data suggests a close link between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and non-metastatic colorectal cancer (NMCRC). However, the relationship between MetS and the outcome of NMCRC is less well understood. We aim to evaluate the impact of MetS on the prognosis in NMCRC patients. We performed a large cohort study of 1069 NMCRC patients. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the cumulative survival rate. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to analyze the prognosis associated with MetS adjusting for clinicopathologic variables. MetS was identified in 20.7% of NMCRC patients. Patients with MetS were more likely to be older, higher levels of blood glucose, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein, and uric acid than patients without MS (P < 0.05 for all). During a mean period of 59.6 months follow-up, patients with MetS had a statistically significantly lower rate of disease-free survival (DFS) than the patients without MetS (P = 0.014), especially local recurrence (P = 0.040). However, there was no difference in overall survival (P = 0.116). Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of MetS was an independent risk factor for DFS (HR = 0.733, 95%CI 0.545-0.987, P = 0.041), but not for OS (P = 0.118). MetS is associated with an increased recurrence risk of NMCRC.

  17. Interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein as prognostic biomarkers in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Maria; Kersten, Christian; Sorbye, Halfdan; Skovlund, Eva; Glimelius, Bengt; Pfeiffer, Per; Johansen, Julia S.; Kure, Elin H.; Ikdahl, Tone; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Christoffersen, Thoralf; Guren, Tormod Kyrre

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to explore the prognostic significance of IL-6 and markers of systemic inflammatory response (SIR), in particular C-reactive protein (CRP), in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients, in the total study population and according to RAS and BRAF mutation status. Results High levels of pretreatment serum IL-6 or CRP were associated with impaired outcome, in terms of reduced PFS and OS. Patients with low versus high serum IL-6 levels had median OS of 26.0 versus 16.6 months, respectively (P < 0.001). Stratified according to increasing CRP levels, median OS varied from 24.3 months to 12.3 months, (P < 0.001). IL-6 and CRP levels affected overall prognosis also in adjusted analyses. The effect of IL-6 was particularly pronounced in patients with BRAF mutation (interaction P = 0.004). Materials and Methods IL-6 and CRP were determined in pre-treatment serum samples from 393 patients included in the NORDIC-VII trial, in which patients with mCRC received first line treatment. The effect of serum IL-6 and CRP on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was estimated. Conclusions High baseline serum consentrations of IL-6 or CRP were associated with impaired prognosis in mCRC. IL-6 and CRP give independent prognostic information in addition to RAS and BRAF mutation status. PMID:27738330

  18. Complete response to capecitabine in a frail, elderly patient with metastatic colorectal cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Morena; Fabozzi, Alessio; Giordano, Guido; Venturini, Filippo; Aurilio, Gaetano; Cantile, Flavia; Fabozzi, Teresa; Ricci, Vincenzo; Santabarbara, Giuseppe; Morgillo, Floriana; Ciardiello, Fortunato; De Vita, Ferdinando

    2017-01-01

    The clinical management of frail, elderly patients affected by colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a subject of debate. The present study reports the case of an elderly man with metastatic CRC (mCRC) who was successfully treated with capecitabine. The patient survived for 29 months, thus highlighting its potential activity in terms of obtaining a complete response and high efficacy. A 77-year-old man presented with adenocarcinoma of the rectum with multiple and synchronous liver metastases, in addition to several comorbidities. The patient received single-agent capecitabine chemotherapy (825 mg/mq twice a day) on days 1–14 of a 21-day cycle. Following 12 cycles of well-tolerated therapy, a computed tomography scan revealed a complete response with no evidence of liver metastases. An overall survival of 29 months was documented, and the patient eventually succumbed to a diabetes-related complication. In compromised patients with mCRC, reduced-dose capecitabine is an excellent therapeutic option due to its positive safety profile, activity and efficacy. PMID:28356988

  19. The cardiotoxicity of cetuximab as single therapy in Chinese chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xue-Miao; Chen, Hao; Liu, Yu; Huang, Bin-Lian; Zhang, Xiu-Quan; Yuan, Jian-Mei; He, Xia

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The cardiac safety of cetuximab, particularly as single approach, has not been investigated extensively. This trial was designed to evaluate the cardiac safety of cetuximab as salvage monotherapy in Chinese chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. Cetuximab was administrated at an initial dose of 400 mg/m2on day 1 (week 1), followed by a maintenance dose of 250 mg/m2 on day 1 of each 7-day cycle. Electrocardiograph (ECG), routine laboratory tests, and troponin I (TNI) Ultra were performed at baseline, during, and after the cetuximab therapy. The incidence of abnormal ECGs, elevated TNI Ultra, cardiac events, and noncardiac events were recorded and analyzed. TNI Ultra+ was found in 20 patients (32.3%) during the cetuximab therapy.TNI Ultra+ occurred more frequently in patients with more than 3 organs affected and accepted fourth or above lines of chemotherapy. The most frequent abnormal ECG was ST depression in 24 (38.7%) patients. The elevated TNI Ultra and abnormal ECGs could recover after the cetuximab therapy. The most of cardiac adverse events were mild and transient and the noncardiac adverse events were also consistent with the known safety profile for cetuximab. Cetuximab showed its cardiac safety as a single agent for chemotherapy-refractory mCRC patients. And TNI Ultra and ECG could be sensitive and convenient approaches for the surveillance of adverse events. PMID:28099361

  20. Oxaliplatin-induced severe anaphylactic reactions in metastatic colorectal cancer: case series analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jui-Ho; King, Tai-Ming; Chang, Min-Chi; Hsu, Chao-Wen

    2012-10-14

    To investigate oxaliplatin-induced severe anaphylactic reactions (SAR) in metastatic colorectal cancer in a retrospective case series analysis and to conduct a systemic literature review. During a 6-year period from 2006 to 2011 at Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, a total of 412 patients exposed to oxaliplatin-related chemotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Relevant English-language studies regarding life-threatening SAR following oxaliplatin were also reviewed in MEDLINE® and PubMed® search. Eight patients (1.9%, 8 of 412 cases) were identified. Seven patients were successful resuscitated without any sequelae and one patient expired. We changed the chemotherapy regimen in five patients and rechallenged oxaliplatin use in patient 3. Twenty-three relevant English-language studies with 66 patients were reported. Patients received a median of 10 cycles of oxaliplatin (range, 2 to 29). Most common symptoms were respiratory distress (60%), fever (55%), and hypotension (54%). Three fatal events were reported (4.5%). Eleven patients (16%) of the 66 cases were rechallenged by oxaliplatin. SAR must be considered in patients receiving oxaliplatin-related chemotherapy, especially in heavily pretreated patients. Further studies on the mechanism, predictors, preventive methods and management of oxaliplatin-related SAR are recommended.

  1. Oxaliplatin-induced severe anaphylactic reactions in metastatic colorectal cancer: Case series analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jui-Ho; King, Tai-Ming; Chang, Min-Chi; Hsu, Chao-Wen

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate oxaliplatin-induced severe anaphylactic reactions (SAR) in metastatic colorectal cancer in a retrospective case series analysis and to conduct a systemic literature review. METHODS: During a 6-year period from 2006 to 2011 at Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, a total of 412 patients exposed to oxaliplatin-related chemotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Relevant English-language studies regarding life-threatening SAR following oxaliplatin were also reviewed in MEDLINE® and PubMed® search. RESULTS: Eight patients (1.9%, 8 of 412 cases) were identified. Seven patients were successful resuscitated without any sequelae and one patient expired. We changed the chemotherapy regimen in five patients and rechallenged oxaliplatin use in patient 3. Twenty-three relevant English-language studies with 66 patients were reported. Patients received a median of 10 cycles of oxaliplatin (range, 2 to 29). Most common symptoms were respiratory distress (60%), fever (55%), and hypotension (54%). Three fatal events were reported (4.5%). Eleven patients (16%) of the 66 cases were rechallenged by oxaliplatin. CONCLUSION: SAR must be considered in patients receiving oxaliplatin-related chemotherapy, especially in heavily pretreated patients. Further studies on the mechanism, predictors, preventive methods and management of oxaliplatin-related SAR are recommended. PMID:23082060

  2. Perioperative Systemic Therapy and Surgery Versus Surgery Alone for Resectable Colorectal Peritoneal Metastases.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-05

    Colorectal Cancer; Colorectal Neoplasms; Colorectal Carcinoma; Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; Colorectal Cancer Metastatic; Peritoneal Carcinoma; Peritoneal Neoplasms; Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Peritoneal Metastases

  3. KRAS and BRAF mutational status in primary colorectal tumors and related metastatic sites: biological and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Antoine; Hostein, Isabelle; Soubeyran, Isabelle; Fabas, Thibault; Benchimol, Daniel; Evrard, Serge; Gugenheim, Jean; Becouarn, Yves; Brunet, René; Fonck, Marianne; François, Eric; Saint-Paul, Marie-Christine; Pedeutour, Florence

    2010-05-01

    KRAS and BRAF mutations in primary colorectal tumors (PT) are predictive of nonresponse to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The question of primary resistance to anti-EGFR treatment as a result of the presence of KRAS or BRAF mutations only in metastases has been raised but not resolved. We analyzed the mutational status of KRAS and BRAF in 64 new patients with mCRC and performed a systematic review of published data from 285 patients. A total of 285 and 95 matched PT/metastases were available for the analysis of the KRAS and the BRAF status, respectively. An identical mutational pattern of KRAS in PT and the matching metastases were reported in all the cases but 14 (5%). In six cases (2%), KRAS was mutated in the PT and wild type in the metastatic site, whereas in eight cases (3%), KRAS was wild type in the PT and mutated in the metastatic site. An identical mutational pattern of BRAF in PT and the matching metastases was reported in all but two cases (3%). In one case (1.5%), BRAF was mutated in the PT and wild type in the metastatic site, whereas in one case (1.5%), BRAF was wild type in the PT and mutated in the metastatic site. The acquisition by metastases of a KRAS or a BRAF mutation that was not present in the PT is a rare event, occurring in 5% of cases of mCRC. This is not a frequent mechanism of primary resistance to anti-EGFR treatments in mCRC.

  4. The association between preoperative chemotherapy and the prevalence of hepatic steatosis in hepatectomy for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kalil, Antonio Nocchi; Coral, Gabriela Perdomo; Santos, Félix Antônio Insaurriaga dos; Gonzalez, Maria Cristina; Neutzling, Cristiane Becker

    2014-01-01

    Some studies have suggested that preoperative chemotherapy for hepatic colorectal metastases may cause hepatic injury and increase perioperative morbidity and mortality. To evaluate the prevalence of hepatic steatosis in patients undergoing preoperative chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. Observational retrospective cohort study in which 166 patients underwent 185 hepatectomies for metastatic colorectal cancer with or without associated preoperative chemotherapy from 2004 to 2011. The data were obtained from a review of the medical records and an analysis of the anatomopathological report on the non-tumor portion of the surgical specimen. The study sample was divided into two groups: those who were exposed and those who were unexposed to chemotherapy. From the hepatectomies, 136 cases (73.5%) underwent preoperative chemotherapy, with most (62.5%) using a regimen of 5-fluorouracil + leucovorin. A 40% greater risk of cell damage was detected in 62% of the exposed group. The predominant histological pattern of the cell damage was steatosis, which was detected in 51% of the exposed cases. Exposure to chemotherapy increased the risk of steatosis by 2.2 fold. However, when the risk factors were controlled, only the presence of risk of hepatopathy was associated with steatosis, with a relative risk of 4 (2.7-5.9). Patients exposed to chemotherapy have 2.2 times the risk of developing hepatic steatosis, and its occurrence is associated with the presence of predisposing factors such as diabetes mellitus and hepatopathy.

  5. Should hepatic metastatic colorectal cancer patients with extrahepatic disease undergo liver resection/ablation?

    PubMed

    Byam, Jerome; Reuter, Nathaniel P; Woodall, Charles E; Scoggins, Charles R; McMasters, Kelly M; Martin, Robert C G

    2009-11-01

    Surgical therapy has been proven to be the mainstay of treatment for hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer (CRM) in the appropriate patient. Previous contraindications were patients with extrahepatic disease (EHD) do not benefit from liver resection or ablation. We hypothesized that the survival of patients with EHD who receive aggressive multimodality care would be the same as those without EHD. A review of our 1305 patient prospective hepato-pancreatico-biliary database from August 1995 to April 2008 identified 383 patients with surgical management of metastatic CRM to the liver. A total of 39 patients with limited EHD underwent liver resection/ablation vs 344 patients without EHD. There were no significant differences in hepatic disease burden (mean clinical risk score of 2.3 and 2.1 in patients with and without EHD, P=.19, and median number of hepatic metastases of 2 in each group, P=.88) or size of the largest lesion (mean 4.6 vs 4.5 cm with and without EHD, P=.84). EHD consisted of lung metastases in 33%, nodal metastases in 21%, peritoneal in 15%, unknown in 15%, and other in 15%. There was no difference in patients with and without EHD undergoing surgical with resection only in 41% vs 48%, ablation only in 31% vs 30%, and combined resection and ablation in 28% vs 22% (P=.61). Overall survival in patients with EHD was not significantly different (median survival 24 vs 33 months, P=.06). A thorough understanding of the biology of disease and appropriate multimodality care can lead to improved survival in patients with EHD, when compared with chemotherapy alone.

  6. Next generation sequencing identifies ‘interactome’ signatures in relapsed and refractory metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Laurence; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2017-01-01

    Background In the management of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), KRAS, NRAS and BRAF mutational status individualizes therapeutic options and identify a cohort of patients (pts) with an aggressive clinical course. We hypothesized that relapsed and refractory mCRC pts develop unique mutational signatures that may guide therapy, predict for a response and highlight key signaling pathways important for clinical decision making. Methods Relapsed and refractory mCRC pts (N=32) were molecularly profiled utilizing commercially available next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms. Web-based bioinformatics tools (Reactome/Enrichr) were utilized to elucidate mutational profile linked pathways-networks that have the potential to guide therapy. Results Pts had progressed on fluoropyrimidines, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, bevacizumab, cetuximab and/or panitumumab. Most common histology was adenocarcinoma (colon N=29; rectal N=3). Of the mutations TP53 was the most common, followed by APC, KRAS, PIK3CA, BRAF, SMAD4, SPTA1, FAT1, PDGFRA, ATM, ROS1, ALK, CDKN2A, FBXW7, TGFBR2, NOTCH1 and HER3. Pts had on average had ≥5 unique mutations. The most frequent activated signaling pathways were: HER2, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), p38 through BRAF-MEK cascade via RIT and RIN, ARMS-mediated activation of MAPK cascade, and VEGFR2. Conclusions Dominant driver oncogene mutations do not always equate to oncogenic dependence, hence understanding pathogenic ‘interactome(s)’ in individual pts is key to both clinically relevant targets and in choosing the next best therapy. Mutational signatures derived from corresponding ‘pathway-networks’ represent a meaningful tool to (I) evaluate functional investigation in the laboratory; (II) predict response to drug therapy; and (III) guide rational drug combinations in relapsed and refractory mCRC pts. PMID:28280605

  7. Hepatic intra-arterial chemotherapy using a percutaneous catheter in pretreated patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fazio, N; Orsi, F; Grasso, R F; Ferretti, G; Medici, M; Rocca, A; Zampino, G; Curigliano, G; De Pas, T; Colleoni, M; Bonomo, G; Marrocco, E; Lunghi, L; De Braud, F

    2003-01-01

    Hepatic intra-arterial chemotherapy (HIAC) leads to a higher response rate than systemic administration in untreated patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity and safety of giving HIAC through a percutaneous catheter in pre-treated patients. Forty-five CRC patients with liver-only or liver-dominant metastases, resistant or refractory to previous systemic therapy, were treated using a temporary trans-subclavian catheter. A 3-day chemotherapy regimen of daily 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) 1000 mg/m2/day + heparin 5000 IU/day given as a 24-hour continuous infusion, and twice daily bolus injections of cisplatin (CDDP) 10 mg/m2 and mitomycin C (MMC) 2 mg/m2, was administered every six weeks. One hundred and seventeen courses were administered to 45 patients (a median of three per patient: range 1-5). Of the 44 patients evaluable for response, 16 (35%) had a partial response, 15 (33%) stable disease and 12 (26%) progressive disease. Eleven of the 16 responding patients had been refractory to a previous 5-FU-based systemic therapy. The most relevant grade 3-4 toxicities included neutropenia (22%) and thrombocytopenia (15%). Gastro-duodenal ulcers occurred in nine patients. Catheter displacement was recorded during 22 out of 117 (18%) courses. HIAC with 5-FU, CDDP and MMC given through a temporary percutaneous catheter is safe and active in pretreated patients with metastatic CRC. Iatrogenic gastroduodenal ulcers are a serious but manageable complication.

  8. Regorafenib Versus Trifluridine/Tipiracil for Refractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A Retrospective Comparison.

    PubMed

    Masuishi, Toshiki; Taniguchi, Hiroya; Hamauchi, Satoshi; Komori, Azusa; Kito, Yosuke; Narita, Yukiya; Tsushima, Takahiro; Ishihara, Makoto; Todaka, Akiko; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Yokota, Tomoya; Kadowaki, Shigenori; Machida, Nozomu; Ura, Takashi; Fukutomi, Akira; Ando, Masashi; Onozawa, Yusuke; Tajika, Masahiro; Yasui, Hirofumi; Muro, Kei; Mori, Keita; Yamazaki, Kentaro

    2017-06-01

    Regorafenib and trifluridine/tipiracil (TAS-102) both prolong survival for patients with refractory metastatic colorectal cancer. However, it is unclear which drug should be administered first. We retrospectively evaluated the data from patients who had received regorafenib or TAS-102 at 2 institutions from May 2013 to March 2015. The inclusion criteria were disease refractory or intolerant to fluoropyrimidines, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibodies, and anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies (if KRAS exon 2 wild-type), and no previous treatment with regorafenib or TAS-102. A total of 146 and 54 patients received regorafenib and TAS-102, respectively. The baseline characteristics were similar between the 2 groups, except for a history of irinotecan and anti-EGFR therapy and high alkaline phosphatase levels. The median progression-free survival and overall survival were 2.1 months and 6.7 months, respectively, with regorafenib and 2.1 months and 6.5 months, respectively, with TAS-102 (progression-free survival hazard ratio 1.20, P = .27; overall survival hazard ratio, 1.01, P = .97). The analysis of overall survival for patients after the approval of TAS-102 in Japan was similar to the overall survival for the entire population. The frequency of hand-foot syndrome and increased aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and bilirubin levels was higher and the frequency of neutropenia, leukopenia, anemia, nausea, and febrile neutropenia was lower with regorafenib than with TAS-102. No remarkable differences were found in the efficacy and safety of TAS-102 between patients with and without previous regorafenib and vice versa. Regorafenib and TAS-102 had similar efficacy but resulted in different toxicities, which could guide the agent choice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinico-pathological nomogram for predicting BRAF mutational status of metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loupakis, Fotios; Moretto, Roberto; Aprile, Giuseppe; Muntoni, Marta; Cremolini, Chiara; Iacono, Donatella; Casagrande, Mariaelena; Ferrari, Laura; Salvatore, Lisa; Schirripa, Marta; Rossini, Daniele; De Maglio, Giovanna; Fasola, Gianpiero; Calvetti, Lorenzo; Pilotto, Sara; Carbognin, Luisa; Fontanini, Gabriella; Tortora, Giampaolo; Falcone, Alfredo; Sperduti, Isabella; Bria, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Background: In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), BRAFV600E mutation has been variously associated to specific clinico-pathological features. Methods: Two large retrospective series of mCRC patients from two Italian Institutions were used as training-set (TS) and validation-set (VS) for developing a nomogram predictive of BRAFV600E status. The model was internally and externally validated. Results: In the TS, data from 596 mCRC patients were gathered (RAS wild-type (wt) 281 (47.1%); BRAFV600E mutated 54 (9.1%)); RAS and BRAFV600E mutations were mutually exclusive. In the RAS-wt population, right-sided primary (odds ratio (OR): 7.80, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.05–19.92), female gender (OR: 2.90, 95% CI 1.14–7.37) and mucinous histology (OR: 4.95, 95% CI 1.90–12.90) were independent predictors of BRAFV600E mutation, with high replication at internal validation (100%, 93% and 98%, respectively). A predictive nomogram was calculated: patients with the highest score (right-sided primary, female and mucinous) had a 81% chance to bear a BRAFV600E-mutant tumour; accuracy measures: AUC=0.812, SE:0.034, sensitivity:81.2% specificity:72.1%. In the VS (508 pts, RAS wt: 262 (51.6%), BRAFV600E mutated: 49 (9.6%)), right-sided primary, female gender and mucinous histology were confirmed as independent predictors of BRAFV600E mutation with high accuracy. Conclusions: Three simple and easy-to-collect characteristics define a useful nomogram for predicting BRAF status in mCRC with high specificity and sensitivity. PMID:26575603

  10. Joint prognostic effect of obesity and chronic systemic inflammation in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Manasi S.; Fogelman, David R.; Raghav, Kanwal Pratap Singh; Heymach, John V.; Tran, Hai T.; Jiang, Zhi-Qin; Kopetz, Scott; Daniel, Carrie R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Obesity is strongly linked with chronic systemic inflammation, and each has been linked with progression and survival in colorectal cancer (CRC). We investigated the joint prognostic effects of obesity and circulating cytokines in metastatic CRC (mCRC), an understudied patient group. METHODS In 242 chemotherapy naïve mCRC patients, we measured a multiplex cytokine panel and abstracted clinical-pathological features, height, and weight from medical records. Overall survival (OS) was calculated from the date of diagnosis until the date of death from any cause and evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models. Cut points for cytokines were determined by restricted cubic spline regression. RESULTS In multivariable models, elevated interleukin (IL)-8, IL-2 receptor alpha and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) emerged as significant predictors of poor OS [hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for above vs. below (ref) knot point: 2.5 (1.7, 3.7); 1.9 (1.3, 2.7); and 2.2 (1.6, 3.1), respectively; all P<0.001]. Obesity (BMI>30) was not associated with OS, but appeared to modify the relationships observed with IL-8 and LDH, which were associated with a significant 4- and 5-fold risk of death in obese patients, as compared to a 2-fold risk of death in non-obese patients (P-interaction= 0.06 and 0.04, respectively). Similar results emerged from joint effects analysis, where obese patients with high IL-8 (or LDH) experienced the highest risk of death. CONCLUSIONS Although obesity itself was not independently associated with survival in mCRC patients, the adverse prognostic importance of LDH and IL-8 was enhanced in obese patients. PMID:25975416

  11. Joint prognostic effect of obesity and chronic systemic inflammation in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manasi S; Fogelman, David R; Raghav, Kanwal Pratap Singh; Heymach, John V; Tran, Hai T; Jiang, Zhi-Qin; Kopetz, Scott; Daniel, Carrie R

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is strongly linked with chronic systemic inflammation, and each has been linked with disease progression and survival in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). The authors investigated the joint prognostic effects of obesity and circulating cytokines in patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC), an understudied patient group. In 242 chemotherapy-naive patients with mCRC, the authors measured a multiplex cytokine panel and abstracted clinicopathological features, height, and weight from medical records. Overall survival (OS) was calculated from the date of mCRC diagnosis until the date of death from any cause and evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models. Cut points for cytokines were determined by restricted cubic spline regression. In multivariable models, elevated interleukin (IL)-8, IL-2 receptor alpha, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) emerged as significant predictors of poor OS (hazard ratio [HR] and 95% confidence interval [95% CI] for above vs below the (referent) knot point: 2.5 [95% CI, 1.7-3.7], 1.9 [95% CI, 1.3-2.7], and 2.2 [95% CI, 1.6-3.1], respectively; all P<.001). Obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) ) was not found to be associated with OS, but appeared to modify the relationships observed with IL-8 and LDH, which were associated with a significant 4-fold and 5-fold risk of death, respectively, in obese patients compared with a 2-fold risk of death in nonobese patients (P for interaction of .06 and .04, respectively). Similar results emerged from joint effects analysis, in which obese patients with high IL-8 (or LDH) experienced the highest risk of death. Although obesity itself was not found to be independently associated with survival in patients with mCRC, the adverse prognostic significance of LDH and IL-8 was found to be enhanced in obese patients. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  12. Strategies of sequential therapies in unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Asmis, T; Berry, S; Cosby, R; Chan, K; Coburn, N; Rother, M

    2014-12-01

    Before the emergence of first-line combination chemotherapy, the standard of care for unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer (mcrc) was first-line monotherapy with modulated 5-fluorouracil. Several large phase iii randomized controlled trials, now completed, have assessed whether a planned sequential chemotherapy strategy-beginning with fluoropyrimidine monotherapy until treatment failure, followed by another regimen (either monotherapy or combination chemotherapy) until treatment failure-could result in the same survival benefit produced with an upfront combination chemotherapy strategy, but with less toxicity for patients. The medline and embase databases, and abstracts from meetings of the American Society for Clinical Oncology and the European Society for Medical Oncology, were searched for reports comparing a sequential strategy of chemotherapy with an upfront combination chemotherapy in adult patients with mcrc. Publications that reported efficacy or toxicity data (or both) were included. The five eligible trials that were identified included 4532 patients. A meta-analysis of those trials demonstrates a statistically significant survival advantage for combination chemotherapy (hazard ratio: 0.92; 95% confidence interval: 0.86 to 0.99). However, the median survival advantage (3-6 weeks in most trials) is small and of questionable clinical significance. Three trials reported first-line toxicities. Upfront combination chemotherapy results in significantly more neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and sensory neuropathy. Sequential chemotherapy results in significantly more hand-foot syndrome. Given the small survival advantage associated with upfront combination chemotherapy, planned sequential chemotherapy and upfront combination chemotherapy can both be considered treatment strategies. Treatment should be chosen on an individual basis considering patient and tumour characteristics, toxicity of each strategy, and

  13. Degradation Rate of 5-Fluorouracil in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A New Predictive Outcome Biomarker?

    PubMed Central

    Botticelli, Andrea; Borro, Marina; Onesti, Concetta Elisa; Strigari, Lidia; Gentile, Giovanna; Cerbelli, Bruna; Romiti, Adriana; Occhipinti, Mario; Sebastiani, Claudia; Lionetto, Luana; Marchetti, Luca; Simmaco, Maurizio; Marchetti, Paolo; Mazzuca, Federica

    2016-01-01

    Background 5-FU based chemotherapy is the most common first line regimen used for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Identification of predictive markers of response to chemotherapy is a challenging approach for drug selection. The present study analyzes the predictive role of 5-FU degradation rate (5-FUDR) and genetic polymorphisms (MTHFR, TSER, DPYD) on survival. Materials and Methods Genetic polymorphisms of MTHFR, TSER and DPYD, and the 5-FUDR of homogenous patients with mCRC were retrospectively studied. Genetic markers and the 5-FUDR were correlated with clinical outcome. Results 133 patients affected by mCRC, treated with fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy from 2009 to 2014, were evaluated. Patients were classified into three metabolic classes, according to normal distribution of 5-FUDR in more than 1000 patients, as previously published: poor-metabolizer (PM) with 5-FU-DR ≤ 0,85 ng/ml/106 cells/min (8 pts); normal metabolizer with 0,85 < 5-FU-DR < 2,2 ng/ml/106 cells/min (119 pts); ultra-rapid metabolizer (UM) with 5-FU-DR ≥ 2,2 ng/ml/106 cells/min (6 pts). PM and UM groups showed a longer PFS respect to normal metabolizer group (14.5 and 11 months respectively vs 8 months; p = 0.029). A higher G3-4 toxicity rate was observed in PM and UM, respect to normal metabolizer (50% in both PM and UM vs 18%; p = 0.019). No significant associations between genes polymorphisms and outcomes or toxicities were observed. Conclusion 5-FUDR seems to be significantly involved in predicting survival of patients who underwent 5-FU based CHT for mCRC. Although our findings require confirmation in large prospective studies, they reinforce the concept that individual genetic variation may allow personalized selection of chemotherapy to optimize clinical outcomes. PMID:27656891

  14. Symptom burden & quality of life among patients receiving second-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bevacizumab (B) and cetuximab (C) are both approved for use in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in the second-line. We examined patient reported symptom burden during second-line treatment of mCRC. Methods Adult mCRC patients treated in the second-line setting with a regimen that included B, C, or chemotherapy only (O) and who had completed ≥ 1 Patient Care Monitor (PCM) surveys as part of routine clinical care were drawn from the ACORN Data Warehouse. Primary endpoints were rash, dry skin, itching, nail changes, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, burning in hands/feet, and diarrhea. Linear mixed models examined change in PCM scores across B, C and O (B = reference). Results 182 patients were enrolled (B: n = 106, C: n = 38, O: n = 38). Patients were 51% female, 67% Caucasian, with mean age of 62.0 (SD = 12.6). Groups did not differ on demographic or clinical characteristics. The most common second-line regimens were FOLFIRI ± B or C (23.1%) and FOLFOX ± B or C (22.5%). Results showed baseline scores to be strongly predictive of second-line symptoms across all PCM items (all p’s < .0001 except for Rash, p = .0013). Controlling for baseline, patients on B tended to have more stable and less severe symptoms. Patients on C had more severe rash, dry skin, and itching and had nail change scores that worsened faster than did B patients. Conclusions Patients receiving second-line treatment for mCRC with B report less symptom burden, especially dermatologic, compared to patients treated with C. PMID:22716038

  15. Comparison between three oxaliplatin-based regimens with bevacizumab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ohhara, Yoshihito; Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Shinozaki, Eiji; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Background A previous pivotal Phase III study (NO16966) demonstrated the benefit of the addition of bevacizumab (BV) to oxaliplatin-based regimens in metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC). Our study evaluated the safety and efficacy of three oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy regimens (FOLFOX4 [intravenous twice-bolus and twice-infusional 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid plus oxaliplatin], mFOLFOX6 [intravenous once-bolus and once-infusional 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid plus oxaliplatin], and XELOX [capecitabine plus oxaliplatin]) plus BV in the first-line treatment of MCRC patients. Methods Patients with MCRC who started treatment between June 2007 and September 2010 were evaluated in this retrospective cohort study. We also evaluated early objective tumor response (EOTR) within 12 weeks, which was defined as a relative change of ≥30% in the sum of the longest diameters of target lesions when compared with baseline. The primary study endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS) and response rate. Results A total of 185 patients received the following chemotherapy: FOLFOX4 + BV (FF4 arm, n=85), mFOLFOX6 + BV (FF6 arm, n=40), and XELOX + BV (XELOX arm, n=60). The overall response rates were 61.2%, 72.5%, and 75.0% (95% confidence interval: 50.6%–71.8%, 58.0%–87.0%, and 63.7%–86.3%). Median PFS was 18.0, 15.5, and 13.7 months, respectively (log-rank: P=0.254; data cut-off: May 2013). Patients with EOTR (n=117) had significantly better PFS than those without-EOTR (n=68) (17.5 versus 12.7 months, P=0.004). Conclusion This study suggests that these three BV plus oxaliplatin-based treatments might have comparable benefit in terms of tumor response and PFS. Moreover, EOTR may be a predictive factor for PFS in patients with MCRC. PMID:25767397

  16. Mitomycin C pharmacokinetics in patients with recurrent or metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Erlichman, C; Rauth, A M; Battistella, R; Fine, S

    1987-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics of mitomycin C as a single agent have been determined in 25 treatment courses given to 18 patients with recurrent or metastatic colorectal carcinoma using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay to analyze plasma and urine samples. The plasma pharmacokinetics conformed to a two-compartment linear model in 21 of 25 courses monitored with a mean t1/2 lambda 1 of 9.8 +/- 1.2 (SEM) min and mean t1/2 lambda z of 64.1 +/- 8.9 (SEM) min. The large variation observed in t1/2 lambda z was not related to dose or treatment, but an interaction of these two factors approached significance (p = 0.057). Renal excretion in the 12 courses in which it was determined averaged only 2.3% of the total administered dose during the first 4 h monitored and no mitomycin C metabolites were detected in plasma or urine by the HPLC technique used. The most common toxicity, thrombocytopenia, did not correlate with t1/2 lambda z or the area under the curve. This may be due to a failure to monitor active metabolites of mitomycin C; other factors besides plasma drug concentrations that mediate toxicity towards marrow elements; or the small number of courses associated with thrombocytopenia (less than 100,000/mm3). Our study indicates that an interaction of drug dose and treatment course may be associated with increasing t1/2 lambda z; the renal clearance contributes a small component of mitomycin C elimination; metabolites of mitomycin C cannot be detected by the present HPLC technique; and routine monitoring of mitomycin C using present methods cannot be recommended for clinical use to predict toxicity.

  17. The development of a value based pricing index for new drugs in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Dranitsaris, George; Truter, Ilse; Lubbe, Martie S

    2011-06-01

    Worldwide, prices for cancer drugs have been under downward pressure where several governments have mandated price cuts of branded products. A better alternative to government mandated price cuts would be to estimate a final price based on drug performance, cost effectiveness and a country's ability to pay. We developed a global pricing index for new cancer drugs in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) that encompasses all of these attributes. A pharmacoeconomic model was developed to simulate mCRC patients receiving chemotherapy plus a 'new drug' that improves survival by 1.4, 3 and 6months, respectively. Cost and utility data were obtained from cancer centres and oncology nurses (n=112) in Canada, Spain, India, South Africa and Malaysia. Multivariable analysis was then used to develop the pricing index, which considers survival benefit, per capita GDP and income dispersion (as measured by the Gini coefficient) as predictor variables. Higher survival benefits were associated with elevated drug prices, especially in higher income countries such as Canada. For Argentina with a per capita GDP of $15,000 and a Gini coefficient of 51, the index estimated that for a drug which provides a 4month survival benefit in mCRC, the value based price would be $US 630 per dose. In contrast, the same drug in a wealthier country like Norway (per capita GDP=$50,000) could command a price of $US 2,775 per dose. The application of this index to estimate a price based on cost effectiveness and the wealth of a nation would be important for opening dialogue between the key stakeholders and a better alternative to government mandated price cuts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 'Deepness of Response' Is Associated with Overall Survival in Standard Systemic Chemotherapy for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Hiroaki; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Junichiro; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Kawai, Kazushige; Hata, Keisuke; Kazama, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    The identification of responders is an important issue in chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). 'Deepness of response' (DpR), defined as the maximum rate of reduction from the initial tumor burden, was recently proposed as a novel hypothetical parameter associated with overall survival (OS) in first-line chemotherapy plus cetuximab for mCRC. We determined whether this concept was universally applicable to diverse standard chemotherapeutic regimens for mCRC. We reviewed mCRC patients who received the first-line systemic chemotherapy regimens FOLFOX, CapeOX or FOLFIRI (with biologics) at our department between June 2005 and March 2015. Data such as clinicopathological parameters, metastasized organs, chemotherapeutic regimens, the best response by RECIST v1.1, progression-free survival (PFS) and OS were retrospectively retrieved for patients who exhibited tumor shrinkage. DpR was calculated as the uni-dimensional maximum reduction rate of measurable tumors. We addressed the association between DpR and survival. Of the 156 patients receiving first-line chemotherapy regimens, tumor shrinkage was observed in 63 (41 of whom were men; median age 62 years). Complete remission was achieved in 6 patients, partial remission in 42 and stable disease in 15. The median DpR was 44.2% and was employed as the cutoff, in line with previous reports. DpR ≥45% (31 patients) was correlated with longer PFS (median 16.4 vs. 8.1 months for DpR <45%, p = 0.006) and OS (median 58.6 vs. 30.9 months for DpR <45%, p = 0.041). There was basically no difference in the subsequent chemotherapy between the DpR ≥45% and DpR <45% groups. DpR correlated with OS in various first-line systemic upfront chemotherapy regimens for mCRC. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Vorinostat and hydroxychloroquine improve immunity and inhibit autophagy in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sukeshi; Hurez, Vincent; Nawrocki, Steffan T.; Goros, Martin; Michalek, Joel; Sarantopoulos, John; Curiel, Tyler; Mahalingam, Devalingam

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) enhances the anti-cancer activity of the histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat (VOR), in pre-clinical models and early phase clinical studies of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Mechanisms could include autophagy inhibition, accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, and subsequent tumor cell apoptosis. There is growing evidence that autophagy inhibition could lead to improved anti-cancer immunity. To date, effects of autophagy on immunity have not been reported in cancer patients. To address this, we expanded an ongoing clinical study to include patients with advanced, refractory mCRC to evaluate further the clinical efficacy and immune effects of VOR plus HCQ. Refractory mCRC patients received VOR 400 milligrams orally with HCQ 600 milligrams orally daily, in a 3-week cycle. The primary endpoint was median progression-free survival (mPFS). Secondary endpoints include median overall survival (mOS), adverse events (AE), pharmacodynamic of inhibition of autophagy in primary tumors, immune cell analyses, and cytokine levels. Twenty patients were enrolled (19 evaluable for survival) with a mPFS of 2.8 months and mOS of 6.7 months. Treatment-related grade 3–4 AEs occurred in 8 patients (40%), with fatigue, nausea/vomiting, and anemia being the most common. Treatment significantly reduced CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ regulatory and PD-1+ (exhausted) CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and decreased CD45RO-CD62L+ (naive) T cells, consistent with improved anti-tumor immunity. On-study tumor biopsies showed increases in lysosomal protease cathepsin D and p62 accumulation, consistent with autophagy inhibition. Taken together, VOR plus HCQ is active, safe and well tolerated in refractory CRC patients, resulting in potentially improved anti-tumor immunity and inhibition of autophagy. PMID:27463016

  20. KRAS-mutated plasma DNA as predictor of outcome from irinotecan monotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Spindler, K G; Appelt, A L; Pallisgaard, N; Andersen, R F; Jakobsen, A

    2013-01-01

    Background: We investigated the clinical implications of KRAS and BRAF mutations detected in both archival tumor tissue and plasma cell-free DNA in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with irinotecan monotherapy. Methods: Two hundred and eleven patients receiving second-line irinotecan (350 mg m−2 q3w) were included in two independent cohorts. Plasma was obtained from pretreatment EDTA blood-samples. Mutations were detected in archival tumour and plasma with qPCR methods. Results: Mutation status in tumor did not correlate to efficacy in either cohort, whereas none of the patients with mutations detectable in plasma responded to therapy. Response rate and disease control rate in plasma KRAS wt patients were 19 and 66% compared with 0 and 37%, in patients with pKRAS mutations, (P=0.04 and 0.01). Tumor KRAS status was not associated with PFS but with OS in the validation cohort. Plasma BRAF and KRAS demonstrated a strong influence on both PFS and OS. The median OS was 13.0 mo in pKRAS wt patients and 7.8 in pKRAS-mutated, (HR=2.26, P<0.0001). PFS was 4.6 and 2.7 mo, respectively (HR=1,69, P=0.01). Multivariate analysis confirmed the independent prognostic value of pKRAS status but not KRAS tumor status. Conclusion: Tumor KRAS has minor clinical impact, whereas plasma KRAS status seems to hold important predictive and prognostic information. PMID:24263065

  1. Risk and management of venous thromboembolisms in bevacizumab-treated metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yu, Irene; Chen, Leo; Ruan, Jenny Y; Chang, Jennifer T; Cheung, Winson Y

    2016-03-01

    Bevacizumab may potentiate the risk of venous thromboembolisms (VTEs) in cancer patients, who are already predisposed to pro-thrombotic states. We aimed to characterize the incidence of VTEs in a population-based cohort of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with bevacizumab, describe patient and treatment factors associated with VTEs, and examine how VTEs are managed. Patients diagnosed with mCRC from 2006 to 2009 and offered bevacizumab were included. Descriptive statistics were used to describe VTE occurrences and management. Univariate and multivariate regression models were constructed to explore associations between clinical factors and VTEs. We identified 541 mCRC patients: 27 never started bevacizumab and 15 were lost to follow-up. Of the 499 evaluable patients, median age was 61, 59.3% were men, 88.1% had ECOG 0/1, and 5.2% reported previous VTEs. Mean number of bevacizumab doses was 13.3 cycles. After receiving bevacizumab, 81 patients developed 93 cases of VTEs, with 9 patients experiencing >1 event. Individuals who experienced VTEs were more likely to have had pre-existing cardiovascular disease (OR 2.259, p = 0.0245), resection of primary cancer (OR 3.262, p = 0.0269), pre-chemotherapy platelet count ≥350,000/μL (OR 2.295, p = 0.0293), and received >12 bevacizumab cycles (OR 2.172, p = 0.0158). Use of bevacizumab varied after occurrence of VTE where it was discontinued in 34.4%, continued in 34.4%, and temporarily held in 1.1%. VTE risk can be high, especially in patients with specific pre-treatment risk factors as well as in those who received more bevacizumab, suggesting a potential dose-related effect. Management of bevacizumab-related VTEs was variable.

  2. Capecitabine and bevacizumab as first-line treatment in elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Feliu, J; Safont, M J; Salud, A; Losa, F; García-Girón, C; Bosch, C; Escudero, P; López, R; Madroñal, C; Bolaños, M; Gil, M; Llombart, A; Castro-Carpeño, J; González-Barón, M

    2010-01-01

    Background: The efficacy and safety of capecitabine and bevacizumab in elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) considered unsuitable for receiving first-line chemotherapy with an irinotecan or oxaliplatin-based combination were assessed in a phase II, open, multicentre, uncontrolled study. Methods: Treatment consisted of capecitabine 1250 mg m−2 (or 950 mg m−2 for patients with a creatinine clearance of 30–50 ml min−1) twice daily on days 1–14 and bevacizumab (7.5 mg kg−1) on day 1 every 3 weeks. Results: A total of 59 patients aged ⩾70 years with mCRC were enrolled. In an intention-to-treat analysis, the overall response rate was 34%, with 71% of patients achieving disease control. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 10.8 months and 18 months, respectively. In all, 32 patients (54%) had grade 3/4 adverse events (AEs), the most common being hand–foot syndrome (19%), diarrhoea (9%) and deep venous thrombosis (7%). Four patients died because of treatment-related AEs. A relationship was detected between creatinine clearance ⩽50 ml min−1 and the development of non-bevacizumab-related grade 3/4 AEs. The incidence of bevacizumab-associated AEs (hypertension, thromboembolic events and proteinuria) was consistent with that of previous reports in elderly patients. Conclusion: Bevacizumab combined with capecitabine represents a valid therapeutic alternative in elderly patients considered to be unsuitable for receiving polychemotherapy. PMID:20424611

  3. Cost-effectiveness analysis of screening for KRAS and BRAF mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Behl, Ajay S; Goddard, Katrina A B; Flottemesch, Thomas J; Veenstra, David; Meenan, Richard T; Lin, Jennifer S; Maciosek, Michael V

    2012-12-05

    In 2009, the American Society of Clinical Oncology recommended that patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) who are candidates for anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy have their tumors tested for KRAS mutations because tumors with such mutations do not respond to anti-EGFR therapy. Limiting anti-EGFR therapy to those without KRAS mutations will reserve treatment for those likely to benefit while avoiding unnecessary costs and harm to those who would not. Similarly, tumors with BRAF genetic mutations may not respond to anti-EGFR therapy, though this is less clear. Economic analyses of mutation testing have not fully explored the roles of alternative therapies and resection of metastases. This paper is based on a decision analytic framework that forms the basis of a cost-effectiveness analysis of screening for KRAS and BRAF mutations in mCRC in the context of treatment with cetuximab. A cohort of 50 000 patients with mCRC is simulated 10 000 times, with attributes randomly assigned on the basis of distributions from randomized controlled trials. Screening for both KRAS and BRAF mutations compared with the base strategy (of no anti-EGFR therapy) increases expected overall survival by 0.034 years at a cost of $22 033, yielding an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of approximately $650 000 per additional year of life. Compared with anti-EGFR therapy without screening, adding KRAS testing saves approximately $7500 per patient; adding BRAF testing saves another $1023, with little reduction in expected survival. Screening for KRAS and BFAF mutation improves the cost-effectiveness of anti-EGFR therapy, but the incremental cost effectiveness ratio remains above the generally accepted threshold for acceptable cost effectiveness ratio of $100 000/quality adjusted life year.

  4. Circulating tumor DNA as an early marker of therapeutic response in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tie, J.; Kinde, I.; Wang, Y.; Wong, H. L.; Roebert, J.; Christie, M.; Tacey, M.; Wong, R.; Singh, M.; Karapetis, C. S.; Desai, J.; Tran, B.; Strausberg, R. L.; Diaz, L. A.; Papadopoulos, N.; Kinzler, K. W.; Vogelstein, B.; Gibbs, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Early indicators of treatment response in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) could conceivably be used to optimize treatment. We explored early changes in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) levels as a marker of therapeutic efficacy. Patients and methods This prospective study involved 53 mCRC patients receiving standard first-line chemotherapy. Both ctDNA and CEA were assessed in plasma collected before treatment, 3 days after treatment and before cycle 2. Computed tomography (CT) scans were carried out at baseline and 8–10 weeks and were centrally assessed using RECIST v1.1 criteria. Tumors were sequenced using a panel of 15 genes frequently mutated in mCRC to identify candidate mutations for ctDNA analysis. For each patient, one tumor mutation was selected to assess the presence and the level of ctDNA in plasma samples using a digital genomic assay termed Safe-SeqS. Results Candidate mutations for ctDNA analysis were identified in 52 (98.1%) of the tumors. These patient-specific candidate tissue mutations were detectable in the cell-free DNA from the plasma of 48 of these 52 patients (concordance 92.3%). Significant reductions in ctDNA (median 5.7-fold; P < 0.001) levels were observed before cycle 2, which correlated with CT responses at 8–10 weeks (odds ratio = 5.25 with a 10-fold ctDNA reduction; P = 0.016). Major reductions (≥10-fold) versus lesser reductions in ctDNA precycle 2 were associated with a trend for increased progression-free survival (median 14.7 versus 8.1 months; HR = 1.87; P = 0.266). Conclusions ctDNA is detectable in a high proportion of treatment naïve mCRC patients. Early changes in ctDNA during first-line chemotherapy predict the later radiologic response. PMID:25851626

  5. Strategies of sequential therapies in unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Asmis, T.; Berry, S.; Cosby, R.; Chan, K.; Coburn, N.; Rother, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Before the emergence of first-line combination chemotherapy, the standard of care for unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer (mcrc) was first-line monotherapy with modulated 5-fluorouracil. Several large phase iii randomized controlled trials, now completed, have assessed whether a planned sequential chemotherapy strategy—beginning with fluoropyrimidine monotherapy until treatment failure, followed by another regimen (either monotherapy or combination chemotherapy) until treatment failure—could result in the same survival benefit produced with an upfront combination chemotherapy strategy, but with less toxicity for patients. Methods The medline and embase databases, and abstracts from meetings of the American Society for Clinical Oncology and the European Society for Medical Oncology, were searched for reports comparing a sequential strategy of chemotherapy with an upfront combination chemotherapy in adult patients with mcrc. Publications that reported efficacy or toxicity data (or both) were included. Results The five eligible trials that were identified included 4532 patients. A meta-analysis of those trials demonstrates a statistically significant survival advantage for combination chemotherapy (hazard ratio: 0.92; 95% confidence interval: 0.86 to 0.99). However, the median survival advantage (3–6 weeks in most trials) is small and of questionable clinical significance. Three trials reported first-line toxicities. Upfront combination chemotherapy results in significantly more neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and sensory neuropathy. Sequential chemotherapy results in significantly more hand–foot syndrome. Conclusions Given the small survival advantage associated with upfront combination chemotherapy, planned sequential chemotherapy and upfront combination chemotherapy can both be considered treatment strategies. Treatment should be chosen on an individual basis considering patient and tumour

  6. Resilience and hope during advanced disease: a pilot study with metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Solano, Joao Paulo Consentino; da Silva, Amanda Gomes; Soares, Ivan Agurtov; Ashmawi, Hazem Adel; Vieira, Joaquim Edson

    2016-08-02

    The balance between hope-hopelessness plays an important role in the way terminally ill patients report quality of life, and personal resilience may be related to hope at the end of life. The objective of this study was to explore associations between personal resilience, hope, and other possible predictors of hope in advanced cancer patients. A cross-sectional pilot study was carried out with metastatic colorectal cancer patients in a tertiary hospital. The patients answered the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, Herth Hope Index, Barthel Index, an instrument addressing family and social support, visual-numeric scales for pain and suffering, a two-item screening for depression, socio-demographic and socio-economic information about the family. Forty-four patients were interviewed (mean age 56 years; range 29-86). A strong correlation was noted between resilience and hope (0.63; p < 0.05). No correlation was found between hope and independence for activities of daily living, support from family and community, and pain and suffering levels. Of the 44 patients, 20 presented with depressive symptoms. These depressive patients had lower resilience (p = 0.005) and hope (p = 0.003), and higher scores of suffering (p < 0.001). The association between resilience and hope kept stable after adjusting for age, gender, and presence of depression (p < 0.001). Given that resilience is a dynamic, changeable path that can improve hope, resilience-fostering interventions should be most valued in palliative care settings and should be commenced as soon as possible with cancer patients. Patients with advanced stages of non-malignant conditions would also probably benefit from such interventions.

  7. Gene expression profile predictive of response to chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Estevez-Garcia, Purificacion; Rivera, Fernando; Molina-Pinelo, Sonia; Benavent, Marta; Gómez, Javier; Limón, Maria Luisa; Pastor, Maria Dolores; Martinez-Perez, Julia; Paz-Ares, Luis; Carnero, Amancio; Garcia-Carbonero, Rocio

    2015-03-20

    Fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy (CT) has been the mainstay of care of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) for years. Response rates are only observed, however, in about half of treated patients, and there are no reliable tools to prospectively identify patients more likely to benefit from therapy. The purpose of our study was to identify a gene expression profile predictive of CT response in mCRC. Whole genome expression analyses (Affymetrix GeneChip HG-U133 Plus 2.0) were performed in fresh frozen tumor samples of 37 mCRC patients (training cohort). Differential gene expression profiles among the two study conditions (responders versus non-responders) were assessed using supervised class prediction algorithms. A set of 161 differentially expressed genes in responders (23 patients; 62%) versus non-responders (14 patients; 38%) was selected for further assessment and validation by RT-qPCR (TaqMan Low Density Arrays (TLDA) 7900 HT Micro Fluidic Cards) in an independent multi-institutional cohort (53 mCRC patients). Seven of these genes were confirmed as significant predictors of response. Patients with a favorable predictive signature had significantly greater response rate (58% vs. 13%, p = 0.024), progression-free survival (61% vs. 13% at 1 year, HR = 0.32, p = 0.009) and overall survival (32 vs. 16 months, HR = 0.21, p = 0.003) than patients with an unfavorable gene signature. This is the first study to validate a gene-expression profile predictive of response to CT in mCRC patients. Larger and prospective confirmatory studies are required, however, in order to successfully provide oncologists with adequate tools to optimize treatment selection in routine clinical practice.

  8. Observational cohort study focused on treatment continuity of patients administered XELOX plus bevacizumab for previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kotaka, Masahito; Ikeda, Fusao; Tsujie, Masaki; Yoshioka, Shinichi; Nakamoto, Yoshihiko; Ishii, Takaaki; Kyogoku, Takahisa; Kato, Takeshi; Tsuji, Akihito; Kobayashi, Michiya

    2016-01-01

    Background There has been remarkable progress in systemic chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer due to the widespread use of irinotecan, oxaliplatin, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody, and anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody. It is important to continue treatment with the optimal combination of these drugs and prolong progression-free survival (PFS) to improve overall survival (OS). We conducted a prospective observational cohort study of 40 patients treated with XELOX plus bevacizumab for previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer to investigate treatment continuity. Patients and methods Eligibility criteria were as follows: 1) histologically confirmed metastatic colorectal cancer; 2) lesions evaluable by imaging; 3) previously untreated; 4) suitable condition to receive XELOX plus bevacizumab; and 5) written informed consent. Outcomes were treatment continuity, overall response rate, resection rate, liver resection rate, time to treatment failure, PFS, and OS. Forty patients were enrolled and followed up for 2 years. Results Between July 2010 and June 2012, 40 patients were enrolled. The median number of treatment cycles was 7.5, and the reasons for discontinuation of treatment were as follows: complete response (five patients), resection (ten patients), progression (15 patients), adverse events (seven patients), and patient refusal (three patients). The overall response rate was 57.5%, resection rate was 25%, and liver resection rate was 15%. After a median follow-up of 31.4 months, the median time to treatment failure, PFS, and OS were 5.3, 13.3, and 38.9 months, respectively. Conclusion Although the median time to treatment failure was 5.3 months, the median PFS and OS were prolonged to 13.3 and 38.9 months, respectively. This may have resulted from the chemotherapy-free interval due to complete response in five patients and resection in ten patients. PMID:27468238

  9. Bevacizumab in combination with cetuximab and irinotecan after failure of cetuximab and irinotecan in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Finn Ole; Pfeiffer, Per; Nielsen, Dorte; Skougaard, Kristin; Qvortrup, Camilla; Vistisen, Kirsten; Fromm, Anne-Lene; Jørgensen, Trine L; Bjerregaard, Jon K; Hoegdall, Estrid; Jensen, Benny V

    2011-05-01

    The efficacy and safety of concurrent administration of irinotecan with the two monoclonal antibodies cetuximab and bevacizumab as fourth line therapy in heavily pretreated patients with metastatic colorectal cancer were evaluated. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who had progressed on therapy with 5-FU, oxaliplatin and irinotecan in the first and second line setting and on the combination of irinotecan and cetuximab in third line setting independent of their KRAS mutation status, were treated with irinotecan and cetuximab combined with bevacizumab in a dosage of 5 mg/kg. All drugs were administered every second week. From January 2007 to November 2008 27 patients were treated with cetuximab, irinotecan and bevacizumab. The triple-combination was well tolerated. Progression free survival (PFS) was 8.3 months and median overall survival (mOS) was 12.0 months. Two patients without KRAS mutation (7%) obtained a partial response and 17 (63%) had stable disease for at least two months. A retrospective KRAS mutation analysis revealed that there was a trend toward longer PFS and mOS in patients without KRAS mutations compared to patients with KRAS mutations with a PFS of 8.9 vs. 5.1 months and a mOS of 12.7 vs. 9.0 months. Bevacizumab is safe to add to irinotecan and cetuximab with a toxicity profile that seems to be similar to what would be expected from the agents alone. The results indicate that adding bevacizumab to irinotecan and cetuximab in a fourth line setting may induce a high rate of disease control in heavily pretreated patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  10. The psychosocial impact of late-stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Calne, Susan M

    2003-12-01

    The late stage of Parkinson's disease (PD) can be protracted with inexorable changes in physical and mental health, loss of autonomy and self-esteem, altered relationships, and social isolation. Severely affected patients (Hoehn & Yahr stage 4-5) present a challenge to nurses who care for them; addressing their needs takes time and patience. Changes in mental status have profound implications for the welfare of the late-stage PD patient as well as of the caregiver(s). Depression and dementia in patients with PD are two factors that interfere with the ability to deliver effective care in late-stage PD as they lead to loss of initiative and cooperation. Primary caregivers often have their own medical problems, with limited stamina and support; relationships may change, leading to sadness or conflict. Nurses can be powerful advocates for the physical and mental health of both the patient with late-stage Parkinson's disease and the primary caregiver.

  11. How to find the Ariadne's thread in the labyrinth of salvage treatment options for metastatic colorectal cancer?

    PubMed

    Bronte, Giuseppe; Rolfo, Christian; Peeters, Marc; Russo, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    Since a chance for cure was found out in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients undergoing a resection of liver and lung metastases, high tumor shrinkage by chemotherapy regimens and their combination with targeted agents have been addressed in potentially resectable mCRC. However, most mCRC patients cannot reach this opportunity because of tumor burden or metastatic sites. For these patients a salvage systemic therapy could be offered to prolong survival. To date, a huge number of clinical trials provided some evidences for the achievement of this goal. A lot of chemotherapeutic regimens in combination with biological therapies are now available. We tried to propose a simple way to choose the best options and to plan an optimal sequence of treatments. This tool could help the oncologists worldwide to better and easily manage mCRC patients who need salvage systemic therapy.

  12. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans undergo differential expression alterations in right sided colorectal cancer, depending on their metastatic character.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Vega, Iván; García-Suárez, Olivia; García, Beatriz; Crespo, Ainara; Astudillo, Aurora; Quirós, Luis M

    2015-10-20

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are complex molecules involved in the growth, invasion and metastatic properties of cancerous cells. This study analyses the alterations in the expression patterns of these molecules in right sided colorectal cancer (CRC), both metastatic and non-metastatic. Twenty right sided CRCs were studied. A transcriptomic approach was used, employing qPCR to analyze both the expression of the enzymes involved in heparan sulfate (HS) chains biosynthesis, as well as the proteoglycan core proteins. Since some of these proteoglycans can also carry chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains, we include the study of the genes involved in the biosynthesis of these glycosaminoglycans. Immunohistochemical techniques were also used to analyze tissue expression of particular genes showing significant expression differences, of potential interest. Changes in proteoglycan core proteins differ depending on their location; those located intracellularly or in the extracellular matrix show very similar alteration patterns, while those located on the cell surface vary greatly depending on the nature of the tumor: glypicans 1, 3, 6 and betaglycan are affected in the non-metastatic tumors, whereas in the metastatic, only glypican-1 and syndecan-1 are modified, the latter showing opposing alterations in levels of RNA and of protein, suggesting post-transcriptional regulation in these tumors. Furthermore, in non-metastatic tumors, polymerization of glycosaminoglycan chains is modified, particularly affecting the synthesis of the tetrasaccharide linker and the initiation and elongation of CS chains, HS chains being less affected. Regarding the enzymes responsible for the modificaton of the HS chains, alterations were only found in non-metastatic tumors, affecting N-sulfation and the isoforms HS6ST1, HS3ST3B and HS3ST5. In contrast, synthesis of the CS chains suggests changes in epimerization and sulfation of the C4 and C2 in both types of tumor. Right sided CRCs show

  13. 5-FU Based Maintenance Therapy in RAS Wild Type Metastatic Colorectal Cancer After Induction With FOLFOX Plus Panitumumab

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-28

    Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; RAS Wild Type; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  14. Cetuximab therapy in first-line metastatic colorectal cancer and intermittent palliative chemotherapy: review of the COIN trial.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard; Meade, Angela; Wasan, Harpreet; Griffiths, Gareth; Maughan, Tim

    2008-08-01

    The aim of palliative chemotherapy is to increase survival whilst maintaining maximum quality of life for the individual concerned. It is evident that the survival advantage offered by palliative chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer has increased incrementally with the addition of each newly licensed therapeutic agent. More recently, advances in the field have led to the introduction of targeted monoclonal antibodies, whose benefits are documented in clinical trials and are acknowledged in their approval and licensing. Whilst we are continuing to explore the optimum use of the more traditional chemotherapy agents, with respect to both quantity and quality of life, these novel agents are battling to find their optimum place in the armamentarium. It is evident that a continuing add-one-in policy is likely to be detrimental to both patient and budget. Defining the positioning and duration of these combination therapies has become the subject of much debate and numerous current clinical trials. The Medical Research Council COIN trial is one of these trials, with a remit to explore further the optimum use of both standard agents and novel agents in the first-line setting for metastatic colorectal cancer.

  15. An interview with Alfredo Falcone and Lisa Salvatore: RECOURSE and trifluridine/tipiracil in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Alfredo; Salvatore, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    Professor Alfredo Falcone and Dr Lisa Salvatore speak to Roshaine Gunawardana, Managing Commissioning Editor: Professor Alfredo Falcone is the Director of the Department of Oncology and the Specialization School at the University Hospital of Pisa, Italy. He trained in Pisa and Genoa, Italy, and has held major positions in Italian oncology since 2000. He currently has more than 300 publications, including papers in peer-reviewed international and national journals, book chapters, and more than 600 abstracts of presentations to international and national conferences. The majority of his papers regard clinical and translational research, with a particular focus on metastatic colorectal cancer. Dr Lisa Salvatore is a medical oncologist in the Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery at the University of Pisa. She has been an author on about 40 publications in major peer-reviewed publications and has made numerous presentations in national and international conferences. Her main interest is focused on clinical and translational research in metastatic colorectal cancer.

  16. FCGR polymorphisms and cetuximab efficacy in chemorefractory metastatic colorectal cancer: an international consortium study.

    PubMed

    Geva, Ravit; Vecchione, Loredana; Kalogeras, Konstantinos T; Jensen, Benny Vittrup; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Yoshino, Takayuki; Paez, David; Montagut, Clara; Souglakos, John; Cappuzzo, Federico; Cervantes, Andrés; Frattini, Milo; Fountzilas, George; Johansen, Julia S; Høgdall, Estrid Vilma; Zhang, Wu; Yang, Dongyun; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Nishina, Tomohiro; Papamichael, Demetris; Vincenzi, Bruno; Macarulla, Teresa; Loupakis, Fotios; De Schutter, Jef; Spindler, Karen Lise Garm; Pfeiffer, Per; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Piessevaux, Hubert; Tejpar, Sabine

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to better clarify the role of germline variants of the FCG2 receptor, FCGR2A-H131R and FCGR3A-V158F, on the therapeutic efficacy of cetuximab in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). A large cohort with sufficient statistical power was assembled. To show a HR advantage of 0.6 in progression-free survival (PFS) for FCGR2A-HH versus the rest and FCGR3A-VV versus the rest, with an 80% power, 80 Kirsten Rat Sarcoma Viral Oncogene Homolog (KRAS) wild-type (KRAS-WT) and 52 KRAS-WT patients are required, respectively. This leads to a total sample size of 952 and 619 patients, respectively. Samples were collected from 1123 mCRC patients from 15 European centres treated with cetuximab alone or in combination with chemotherapy. Fc gamma receptor (FCGR) status was centrally genotyped. Two additional externally genotyped series were included. Incidences of FCGR2A-HH and FCGR3A-VV in KRAS-WT patients were 220/660 (33%) and 109/676 (16.1%) respectively. There was no difference in median PFS (mPFS) for KRAS-WT patients with FCGR2A-HH (22.0 weeks; 95% CI18.8 to 25.2) versus non-HH (22.0 weeks; 95% CI 19.4 to 24.6) or for FCGR3A-VV (16.4 weeks; 95% CI 13.0 to 19.8) versus non-VV (23 weeks; 95% CI 21.1 to 24.9) (p=0.06). Median overall survival, response rate and disease control rate assessments showed no benefit for either HH or VV. No differences in mPFS were found between the FCGR polymorphisms HH and the others and VV versus the others in KRAS-WT mCRC patients refractory to irinotecan, oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil treated with cetuximab. We cannot confirm the effects of other IgG1 antibodies, which may be weaker than previously suggested. Other markers may be needed to study the actual host antibody response to cetuximab. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Interstitial pneumonia in a patient treated with TAS-102 for metastatic colorectal cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Hideki; Ishibashi, Nobuya; Tanigawa, Masahiko; Yamaguchi, Keizo; Uchida, Masafumi; Akagi, Yoshito

    2016-11-03

    TAS-102, a new treatment option for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer that is refractory or intolerant to standard therapies, has been improving survival with acceptable tolerability and adverse events. Adverse hematological events associated with TAS-102 treatment were extensively profiled in the RECOURSE trial, but pulmonary toxicities associated with TAS-102 therapy are distinctly uncommon. In a recent early post-marketing phase vigilance on TAS-102 in Japan, seven cases of pulmonary disease were reported, but patient follow-up in this study was incomplete. Here, we present the first case of interstitial lung disease occurring in association with TAS-102 treatment. A 57-year-old Japanese man who had previously received two standard treatments was admitted in 2014, at which time we administered TAS-102 (110 mg/day) as a third-line chemotherapy. He was safely treated with TAS-102 for the first planned cycle; however, approximately 4 days after receiving the second cycle of TAS-102, he complained of high fever and subsequent dyspnea with severe hypoxemia and went to the emergency room. A chest X-ray revealed diffuse coarse reticular shadows with ground-glass opacity on both lungs. Furthermore, a chest computed tomography scan showed thickening of the bronchovascular bundles with extensive ground-glass opacification and pleural effusions in both lung fields. In addition, a peripheral blood lymphocyte stimulation test with TAS-102 showed higher values compared with control samples. Consequently, we suspected drug-induced interstitial pneumonia, and discontinued treatment. Our patient was given an initial administration of high-dose methylprednisolone (1000 mg/day) for 3 days and oxygen. Our patient was discharged with oral prednisolone (20 mg/day) and improved symptomatically and radiologically. These findings suggest that interstitial pneumonia is a rare complication of TAS-102 chemotherapy, but the possibility of interstitial pneumonia should always be

  18. Phase I Imaging and Pharmacodynamic Trial of CS-1008 in Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ciprotti, Marika; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Lee, Fook-Thean; Lee, Sze-Ting; Gan, Hui K.; McKee, David C.; O'Keefe, Graeme J.; Gong, Sylvia J.; Chong, Geoffrey; Hopkins, Wendie; Chappell, Bridget; Scott, Fiona E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Tse, Archie N.; Jansen, Mendel; Matsumura, Manabu; Kotsuma, Masakatsu; Watanabe, Rira; Venhaus, Ralph; Beckman, Robert A.; Greenberg, Jonathan; Scott, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose CS-1008 (tigatuzumab) is a humanized, monoclonal immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) agonistic antibody to human death receptor 5. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of CS-1008 dose on the biodistribution, quantitative tumor uptake, and antitumor response in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Patients and Methods Patients with mCRC who had received at least one course of chemotherapy were assigned to one of five dosage cohorts and infused with a weekly dose of CS-1008. Day 1 and day 36 doses were trace-labeled with indium-111 (111In), followed by whole-body planar and regional single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging at several time points over the course of 10 days. Results Nineteen patients were enrolled. 111In-CS-1008 uptake in tumor was observed in only 12 patients (63%). 111In-CS-1008 uptake and pharmacokinetics were not affected by dose or repeated drug administration. 111In-CS-1008 biodistribution showed gradual blood-pool clearance and no abnormal uptake in normal tissue. No anti–CS-1008 antibody development was detected. One patient achieved partial response (3.7 months duration), eight patients had stable disease, and 10 patients had progressive disease. Clinical benefit rate (stable disease + partial response) in patients with 111In-CS-1008 uptake in tumor was 58% versus 28% in patients with no uptake. An analysis of individual lesions showed that lesions with antibody uptake were one third as likely to progress as those without antibody uptake (P = .07). Death-receptor–5 expression in archived tumor samples did not correlate with 111In-CS-1008 uptake (P = .5) or tumor response (P = .6). Conclusion Death-receptor–5 imaging with 111In-CS-1008 reveals interpatient and intrapatient heterogeneity of uptake in tumor, is not dose dependent, and is predictive of clinical benefit in the treatment of patients who have mCRC. PMID:26124477

  19. Association between bevacizumab-related hypertension and response to treatment in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dionísio de Sousa, Isabel José; Ferreira, Joana; Rodrigues, Joana; Bonito, Nuno; Jacinto, Paula; Marques, Mariela; Ribeiro, João; Pais, Ana; Gervásio, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Background Bevacizumab has become standard of care as first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), after proving increased response rates and improvement in survival outcomes. Hypertension (HTN) is a common complication of the treatment with bevacizumab and, owing to its close relation with antiangiogenic mechanism, may represent a clinical biomarker to predict the efficacy of the treatment. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate if HTN grades 2 to 3 were correlated with response to treatment with bevacizumab in first line, as well as with improved progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), in a series of patients with mCRC. Methods Retrospective evaluation of clinical records of patients with histologically proven mCRC, treated with bevacizumab as first-line treatment, between January 2008 and December 2013. Results 79 patients were evaluated. 51.9% of patients developed HTN G2-G3 during chemotherapy-bevacizumab treatment. In the group of patients who developed bevacizumab-related HTN, 73.2% showed response to treatment (complete response (CR)+ partial response (PR)) and 97.6% achieved disease control (CR, PR or stable disease) compared to 18.4% of patients with response and 63.2% with disease control in the group that did not (OR 12.08; 95% CI 4.13 to 35.29; p<0.001 responders vs non-responders; OR 20.8; 95% CI 2.56 to 168.91; p 0.005 controlled vs non controlled disease). The median OS was 28 months (22.7–33.3). Significant statistical difference was obtained in PFS between the two groups (p<0.001). In the group that developed bevacizumab-related HTN, the median OS was 33 months (25.7–40.3), and in the group that did not, it was 21 months (16.5–25.5) with no significant statistical difference between the two groups (p 0.114). Conclusions In this subset of patients, HTN G2-3 was predictive of response to treatment with bevacizumab and of PFS but not of OS. PMID:27843607

  20. Bevacizumab plus XELOX as first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: The OBELIX study

    PubMed Central

    Antonuzzo, Lorenzo; Giommoni, Elisa; Pastorelli, Davide; Latiano, Tiziana; Pavese, Ida; Azzarello, Domenico; Aieta, Michele; Pastina, Ilaria; Di Fabio, Francesca; Bertolini, Alessandro; Corsi, Domenico Cristiano; Mogavero, Selene; Angelini, Valentina; Pazzagli, Mario; Di Costanzo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To confirm the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab/XELOX combination for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) in Italy. METHODS: This multicentric, prospective, open-label study included patients with CRC previously untreated with chemotherapy. Patients were administered bevacizumab in combination with XELOX. The primary efficacy end-point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end-points included time to overall response (TOR), duration of response (DOR), time to treatment failure (TTF) and overall survival (OS). The incidence and type of adverse events AEs and severe AEs were evaluated. Also, the mutational status of BRAF and KRAS was assessed by high resolution melting and direct sequencing, and quality of life (QoL) was measured by the EuroQoL EQ-5D questionnaire at baseline and at the last visit. RESULTS: The intention-to-treat population included 197 patients (mean age: 62.3 ± 9.9 years, 56.4% males). At baseline, 16/34 evaluable subjects (47.1%) harbored a KRAS and/or a BRAF mutation; the mean QoL index was 80.2 ± 14.3. First-line therapy was given for 223.7 ± 175.9 d, and after a mean follow-up of 387.7 ± 238.8 d all patients discontinued from the study mainly for disease progression (PD, 45.4%) and AEs (25.4%). Median PFS was 9.7 mo (95%CI: 8.4-10.5) and the median values for secondary end-points were: TOR = 3.9 mo (95%CI: 2.6-4.7), DOR = 8.5 mo (95%CI: 7.3-10.3), TTF = 6.7 mo (95%CI: 6.0-7.7) and OS = 23.2 mo (95%CI: 20.1-27.2). Patients carrying at least one lesion had a lower overall response rate (66.7% vs 88.9%) and a lower probability of achieving complete or partial response than those without mutations, but the difference in relative risk was not statistically significant (P = 0.2). Mean EQ-5D-3L raw index score significantly decreased to 74.9 ± 19.1 at the last visit (signed-rank test, P = 0.0076), but in general the evaluation on QoL perceived by patients was good. CONCLUSION: The efficacy of

  1. Increased risk of hemorrhage in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with bevacizumab

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoqiang; Tian, Xianglong; Yu, Chenyang; Hong, Jie; Fang, Jingyuan; Chen, Haoyan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: As an important antivascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody, bevacizumab has been administrated for the treatment of cancer patients. Hemorrhage, one of the common adverse events of angiogenesis inhibitors, sometimes is also fatal and life-threatening. We aimed at determining the incidence and risk of hemorrhage associated with bevacizumab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Methods: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and the Web of Science databases for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The overall incidence, overall relative risk (RR), and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated by using a random-effects or fixed-effects model based on the heterogeneity of selected trials. Results: A total of 10,555 mCRC patients from 12 RCTs were included in our study. The overall incidence of hemorrhage was 5.8% (95% CI 3.9%–7.8%). Bevacizumab significantly increased the overall risk of hemorrhage with an RR of 1.96 (95% CI 1.27–3.02). The RR of all-grade hemorrhage was 2.39 (95% CI 1.09–5.24) and 1.41 (95% CI 1.01–1.97) for high-grade hemorrhage. The risk of hemorrhage associated with bevacizumab was dose-dependent with an RR of 1.73 (95% CI 1.15–2.61) for 2.5 mg/kg/wk and 4.67 (95% CI 2.36–9.23) for 5 mg/kg/wk. More importantly, the RR of hemorrhage for treatment duration (<= 6 months and > 6 months) based on subgroup analysis was 4.13 (95% CI 2.58–6.61) and 1.43 (95% CI 0.96–2.14), respectively. Conclusion: The addition of bevacizumab to concurrent antineoplastic in patients with mCRC significantly increased the risk of hemorrhage. The dose of bevacizumab may contribute to the risk of hemorrhage. And the 1st 6 months of treatment may be a crucial period when hemorrhagic events occur. PMID:27559943

  2. Immunotherapy of metastatic colorectal cancer with vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor, GcMAF.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Nakazato, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Koga, Yoshihiko

    2008-07-01

    Serum vitamin D binding protein (Gc protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of colorectal cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein is deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be converted to MAF, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) ever discovered, but it produces no side effect in humans. Macrophages treated with GcMAF (100 microg/ml) develop an enormous variation of receptors and are highly tumoricidal to a variety of cancers indiscriminately. Administration of 100 nanogram (ng)/ human maximally activates systemic macrophages that can kill cancerous cells. Since the half-life of the activated macrophages is approximately 6 days, 100 ng GcMAF was administered weekly to eight nonanemic colorectal cancer patients who had previously received tumor-resection but still carried significant amounts of metastatic tumor cells. As GcMAF therapy progressed, the MAF precursor activities of all patients increased and conversely their serum Nagalase activities decreased. Since serum Nagalase is proportional to tumor burden, serum Nagalase activity was used as a prognostic index for time course analysis of GcMAF therapy. After 32-50 weekly administrations of 100 ng GcMAF, all colorectal cancer patients exhibited healthy control levels of the serum Nagalase activity, indicating eradication of metastatic tumor cells. During 7 years after the completion of GcMAF therapy, their serum Nagalase activity did not increase, indicating no recurrence of cancer, which was also supported by the annual CT scans of these patients.

  3. Disparities in survival improvement for metastatic colorectal cancer by race/ethnicity and age in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sineshaw, Helmneh M; Robbins, Anthony S; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies documented significant increase in overall survival for metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) since the late 1990s coinciding with the introduction and dissemination of new treatments. We examined whether this survival increase differed across major racial/ethnic populations and age groups. We identified patients diagnosed with primary metastatic colorectal cancer during 1992-2009 from 13 population-based cancer registries of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, which cover about 14 % of the US population. The 5-year cause-specific survival rates were calculated using SEER*Stat software. From 1992-1997 to 2004-2009, 5-year cause-specific survival rates increased significantly from 9.8 % (95 % CI 9.2-10.4) to 15.7 % (95 % CI 14.7-16.6) in non-Hispanic whites and from 11.4 % (95 % CI 9.4-13.6) to 17.7 % (95 % CI 15.1-20.5) in non-Hispanic Asians, but not in non-Hispanic blacks [from 8.6 % (95 % CI 7.2-10.1) to 9.8 % (95 % CI 8.1-11.8)] or Hispanics [from 14.0 % (95 % CI 11.8-16.3) to 16.4 % (95 % CI 14.0-19.0)]. By age group, survival rates increased significantly for the 20-64-year age group and 65 years or older age group in non-Hispanic whites, although the improvement in the older non-Hispanic whites was substantially smaller. Rates also increased in non-Hispanic Asians for the 20-64-year age group although marginally nonsignificant. In contrast, survival rates did not show significant increases in both younger and older age groups in non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics. Non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, and older patients diagnosed with metastatic CRC have not equally benefitted from the introduction and dissemination of new treatments.

  4. Accomplishments in 2007 in the Management of Curable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amit; Alberts, Steven

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Overview of the Disease IncidencePrognosisCurrent Therapy Standards Colorectal Liver Metastases (CRLM) Resectable TumorsStrategies To Convert Nonresectable Liver Metastases to Resectable StatusSynchronous Colorectal Liver MetastasesPredictors of Survival After Resection of CRLMPeritoneal Carcinomatosis (PC) From Colorectal CancerColorectal Pulmonary Metastases (CRPM)Colorectal Liver Metastases With Extrahepatic DiseaseAccomplishments (or Lack of Accomplishments) During the Year Therapy New Staging SystemPreventive Measures for CRLMSystemic ChemotherapySelective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT)Proposed Definition of Cure From CRLMBasic ScienceWhat Needs To Be Done? Optimizing Patient CareControversies and DisagreementsFuture Directions Comments on ResearchObstacles to Progress PMID:19352462

  5. Expression of trefoil factors and TWIST1 in colorectal cancer and their correlation with metastatic potential and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Yusup, Akram; Huji, Bailikezi; Fang, Cheng; Wang, Fei; Dadihan, Tuerxunjiang; Wang, Hai-Jiang; Upur, Halmurat

    2017-01-01

    AIM To detect the expression of trefoil factors (TFFs) and TWIST1 in colorectal cancer (CRC) and analyze their correlation with metastasis and survival. METHODS This study examined the expression of TFF1, TFF3 and TWIST1 in a total of 75 tumor samples, 47 matched normal samples (15 cm from the lesion margin), 30 metastatic lymph nodes, and 10 liver metastatic cancer samples from patients with CRC. The relationship was then analyzed between the protein expression and different clinical records. TFF1, TFF3, TWIST1,E-cadherin, vimentin and β-catenin mRNA and protein expression levels were measured in colon cancer cell lines with different metastatic potentials (HIEC, HT29, SW620, and LoVo cells), and the correlation of the expression levels with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was discussed. RESULTS It was found that 66.7% (50/75), 78.7% (59/75) and 54.7% (41/75) of tumor tissue samples exhibited positive staining for TFF1, TFF3 and TWIST1 and so did 27.3% (13/47), 100% (47/47) and 17% (8/47) of adjacent normal colorectal tissues. Compared with adjacent normal tissues, significant differences were found in the expression of all three proteins in different cancerous tissues (P < 0.05). Higher expression of TFF3 and TWIST1 was significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.034, P = 0.000), advanced stage (P = 0.031, P = 0.003), and poorer survival (P = 0.042 for the TFF3 group, P = 0.003 for the TWIST1 group). The expression of TFF3 and TWIST1 in cancer cell lines was higher than that in HIEC (a normal human intestinal epithelial cell line)(P < 0.05), and the expression intensity demonstrated a tendency to rise with increased metastatic potential both at the protein and mRNA levels. However, TFF1 expression demonstrated the opposite tendency. It was also observed that the expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin tended to decrease while that of vimentin, TWIST1 and Snail tended to rise with the increase in metastatic potential. CONCLUSION The

  6. ABC-Transporter Expression Does Not Correlate with Response to Irinotecan in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Trumpi, K; Emmink, B L; Prins, A M; van Oijen, M G H; van Diest, P J; Punt, C J A; Koopman, M; Kranenburg, O; Rinkes, I H M Borel

    2015-01-01

    Active efflux of irinotecan by ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-transporters, in particular ABCB1 and ABCG2, is a well-established drug resistance mechanism in vitro and in pre-clinical mouse models, but its relevance in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is unknown. Therefore, we assessed the association between ABC-transporter expression and tumour response to irinotecan in patients with metastatic CRC. Tissue microarrays of a large cohort of metastatic CRC patients treated with irinotecan in a prospective study (CAIRO study; n=566) were analysed for expression of ABCB1 and ABCG2 by immunohistochemistry. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were performed to assess the association of ABC transporter expression with irinotecan response. Gene expression profiles of 17 paired tumours were used to assess the concordance of ABCB1/ABCG2 expression in primary CRC and corresponding metastases. The response to irinotecan was not significantly different between primary tumours with positive versus negative expression of ABCB1 (5.8 vs 5.7 months, p=0.696) or ABCG2 (5.7 vs 6.1 months, p=0.811). Multivariate analysis showed neither ABCB1 nor ABCG2 were independent predictors for progression free survival. There was a mediocre to poor concordance between ABC-transporter expression in paired tumours. In metastatic CRC, ABC-transporter expression in the primary tumour does not predict irinotecan response.

  7. Novel quality indicators for metastatic colorectal cancer management identify significant variations in these measures across treatment centers in Australia.

    PubMed

    Turner, Natalie Heather; Wong, Hui-Li; Field, Kathryn; Wong, Rachel; Shapiro, Jeremy; Yip, Desmond; Nott, Louise; Tie, Jeanne; Kosmider, Suzanne; Tran, Ben; Desai, Jayesh; McKendrick, Joseph; Zimet, Allan; Richardson, Gary; Iddawela, Mahesh; Gibbs, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Defining multidisciplinary quality of care indicators (QCIs) for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) could improve understanding of variations in routine practice care. This may identify areas of below-average performance, which could then be addressed by clinicians to improve the quality of care delivered. This study aimed to define a panel of QCIs in mCRC and, based on these QCIs, to evaluate quality of care across multiple Australian sites. A panel of clinicians with expertise in colorectal cancer defined evidence-based or best practice-based QCIs relevant to the routine multidisciplinary management of mCRC patients through structured consensus discussion. Related data were extracted from the Treatment of Recurrent and Advanced Colorectal Cancer (TRACC) registry, a prospectively maintained database recording comprehensive details on consecutive mCRC patients across multiple Australian hospitals. Variations in QCIs across sites were explored. Of 13 QCIs defined, data related to 10 were reliably extracted from TRACC. Analysis of data on 1276 patients across 10 sites demonstrated low rates of screening for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer in young patients and significant variation in surveillance-detected recurrences, lung resection rates and palliative chemotherapy use. Exploratory analyses suggested correlation between liver resection rates and survival. We have defined a novel set of mCRC QCIs and have demonstrated wide variation in the quality of care of mCRC across multiple Australian sites. With further validation to confirm a direct correlation between QCI and patient outcomes, these QCIs could be applied to improve the quality of care received by all mCRC patients. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Continuation of bevacizumab after first progression in metastatic colorectal cancer (ML18147): a randomised phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Bennouna, Jaafar; Sastre, Javier; Arnold, Dirk; Österlund, Pia; Greil, Richard; Van Cutsem, Eric; von Moos, Roger; Viéitez, Jose Maria; Bouché, Olivier; Borg, Christophe; Steffens, Claus-Christoph; Alonso-Orduña, Vicente; Schlichting, Christoph; Reyes-Rivera, Irmarie; Bendahmane, Belguendouz; André, Thierry; Kubicka, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Bevacizumab plus fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy is standard treatment for first-line and bevacizumab-naive second-line metastatic colorectal cancer. We assessed continued use of bevacizumab plus standard second-line chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer progressing after standard first-line bevacizumab-based treatment. In an open-label, phase 3 study in 220 centres in Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland, patients (aged ≥18 years) with unresectable, histologically confirmed metastatic colorectal cancer progressing up to 3 months after discontinuing first-line bevacizumab plus chemotherapy were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to second-line chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab 2·5 mg/kg per week equivalent (either 5 mg/kg every 2 weeks or 7·5 mg/kg every 3 weeks, intravenously). The choice between oxaliplatin-based or irinotecan-based second-line chemotherapy depended on the first-line regimen (switch of chemotherapy). A combination of a permuted block design and the Pocock and Simon minimisation algorithm was used for the randomisation. The primary endpoint was overall survival, analysed by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00700102. Between Feb 1, 2006, and June 9, 2010, 409 (50%) patients were assigned to bevacizumab plus chemotherapy and 411 (50%) to chemotherapy alone. Median follow-up was 11·1 months (IQR 6·4-15·6) in the bevacizumab plus chemotherapy group and 9·6 months (5·4-13·9) in the chemotherapy alone group. Median overall survival was 11·2 months (95% CI 10·4-12·2) for bevacizumab plus chemotherapy and 9·8 months (8·9-10·7) for chemotherapy alone (hazard ratio 0·81, 95% CI 0·69-0·94; unstratified log-rank test p=0·0062). Grade 3-5 bleeding or haemorrhage (eight [2%] vs one [<1%]), gastrointestinal perforation (seven [2%] vs three [<1

  9. Correlation of bevacizumab-induced hypertension and outcomes of metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with bevacizumab: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jun; Ma, Hong; Huang, Fang; Zhu, Dichao; Bi, Jianping; Ke, Yang; Zhang, Tao

    2013-11-28

    With the wide application of targeted drug therapies, the relevance of prognostic and predictive markers in patient selection has become increasingly important. Bevacizumab is commonly used in combination with chemotherapy in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. However, there are currently no predictive or prognostic biomarkers for bevacizumab. Several clinical studies have evaluated bevacizumab-induced hypertension in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. This meta-analysis was performed to better determine the association of bevacizumab-induced hypertension with outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, and to assess whether bevacizumab-induced hypertension can be used as a prognostic factor in these patients. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis on seven published studies to investigate the relationship between hypertension and outcome of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with bevacizumab. Our primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and overall response rate (ORR). Hazard ratios (HRs) for PFS and OS were extracted from each trial, and the log of the relative risk ratio (RR) was estimated for ORR. The occurrence of bevacizumab-induced hypertension in patients was highly associated with improvements in PFS (HR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.46-0.72; P <0.001), OS (HR = 0.50; 95% CI: 0.37-0.68; P <0.001), and ORR (RR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.07-2.30, P <0.05), as compared to patients without hypertension. Bevacizumab-induced hypertension may represent a prognostic factor in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  10. Correlation of bevacizumab-induced hypertension and outcomes of metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with bevacizumab: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the wide application of targeted drug therapies, the relevance of prognostic and predictive markers in patient selection has become increasingly important. Bevacizumab is commonly used in combination with chemotherapy in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. However, there are currently no predictive or prognostic biomarkers for bevacizumab. Several clinical studies have evaluated bevacizumab-induced hypertension in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. This meta-analysis was performed to better determine the association of bevacizumab-induced hypertension with outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, and to assess whether bevacizumab-induced hypertension can be used as a prognostic factor in these patients. Methods We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis on seven published studies to investigate the relationship between hypertension and outcome of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with bevacizumab. Our primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and overall response rate (ORR). Hazard ratios (HRs) for PFS and OS were extracted from each trial, and the log of the relative risk ratio (RR) was estimated for ORR. Results The occurrence of bevacizumab-induced hypertension in patients was highly associated with improvements in PFS (HR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.46–0.72; P <0.001), OS (HR = 0.50; 95% CI: 0.37–0.68; P <0.001), and ORR (RR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.07–2.30, P <0.05), as compared to patients without hypertension. Conclusions Bevacizumab-induced hypertension may represent a prognostic factor in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:24283603

  11. Cetuximab Plus Oxaliplatin May Not Be Effective Primary Treatment for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In a randomized phase III trial, the addition of the targeted therapy cetuximab to oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy did not prolong survival or time to disease progression of patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

  12. Radiologic features of lumbar spine in ochronosis in late stages.

    PubMed

    Bayindir, Petek; Yilmaz Ovali, Gülgün; Pabuşçu, Yüksel; Temiz, Cüneyt; Duruoz, Tuncay

    2006-07-01

    Ochronosis is a rare hereditary disorder of tyrosine metabolism. Severe degenerative arthritis and spondylosis occur in the later stages of this disease. Radiologic examinations may reveal changes considered almost pathognomonic for ochronosis. We present the radiologic features of the lumbar spine in two ochronotic patients who were diagnosed after radiologic examinations in the late stages of the disease.

  13. Organic Synthesis in the Late Stages of Stellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, S.

    2015-12-01

    Infrared and mm-wave observations have revealed a rapid and continuous synthesis of gas-phase and solid organic compounds in the late stages of stellar evolution. This process gives rise to an amorphous carbonaceous compound of mixed aromatic and aliphatic structure which is probably responsible for the unidentified infrared emission (UIE) bands that emerge during the PN phase.

  14. Late-Stage Fluorination: From Fundamentals to Application

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this brief account, we review work from our lab with a focus on late-stage introduction of fluorine and fluorinated functional groups into small molecules. We attempt to highlight practical developments, which we believe may have potential for industrial applications, and critically reflect on developments that may not yet meet the bar for practical use. PMID:25838756

  15. Fatal posterior revesible leukoencephalopathy syndrome associated coma induced by bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Eryılmaz, Melek Karakurt; Mutlu, Hasan; Salim, Derya Kıvrak; Musri, Fatma Yalçın; Coşkun, Hasan Şenol

    2016-12-01

    Posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a syndrome characterized by headache, hypertension, confusion, visual disturbance, and seizures accompanied by subcortical vasogenic edema, predominantly involving the parietal and occipital lobes. The syndrome is usually described in malignant hypertension, eclampsia, renal failure, immunosuppressive, and cytotoxic chemotherapies. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody that binds to the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been linked to PRES. We carried out review of reports documenting the occurrence of PRES in patients receiving bevacizumab. This literature review was conducted by utilizing PubMed Database. If early diagnosed, PRES is reversible. We present a case of fatal PRES-associated coma induced by bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Profile of trifluridine/tipiracil hydrochloride in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: efficacy, safety, and place in therapy.

    PubMed

    Sunakawa, Yu; Izawa, Naoki; Mizukami, Takuro; Horie, Yoshiki; Hirakawa, Mami; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ogura, Takashi; Tsuda, Takashi; Nakajima, Takako Eguchi

    2017-01-01

    TAS-102, with its robust survival efficacy and feasible toxicity, is one of the standard salvage-line treatments for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). No definitive data are available to determine which drug should be administered first during salvage-line treatment. Therefore, it is imperative that we establish the sequence of administration by considering drug toxicity profiles based on patient characteristics, such as age, performance status, comorbidities, tolerability to previous treatments, and patient preferences. The identification of predictive biomarkers in response to TAS-102 or its toxicity is urgently needed for better patient selection. Moreover, to strengthen efficacy or relieve toxicity, combinations with other agents, which could potentially emerge as standard treatment regimens, have been investigated and compared to existing active regimens for mCRC.

  17. Fluid biopsy for Circulating Tumor Cell identification in Patients with early and late stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; a glimpse into lung cancer biology

    PubMed Central

    Wendel, Marco; Bazhenova, Lyudmila; Boshuizen, Rogier; Kolatkar, Anand; Honnatti, Meghana; Cho, Edward H.; Marrinucci, Dena; Sandhu, Ajay; Perricone, Anthony; Thistlethwaite, Patricia; Bethel, Kelly; Nieva, Jorge; van den Heuvel, Michel; Kuhn, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) counts are an established prognostic marker in metastatic prostate, breast, and colorectal cancer, and recent data suggests a similar role in late stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, due to sensitivity constraints in current enrichment-based CTC detection technologies, there is little published data about CTC prevalence rates and morphologic heterogeneity in early stage NSCLC, or the correlation of CTCs with disease progression and their usability for clinical staging. We investigated CTC counts, morphology, and aggregation in early stage, locally advanced, and metastatic NSCLC patients by using a fluid phase biopsy approach that identifies CTCs without relying on surface receptor-based enrichment and presents them in sufficiently high definition (HD) to satisfy diagnostic pathology image quality requirements. HD-CTCs were analyzed in blood samples from 78 chemotherapy-naïve NSCLC patients. 73% of the total population had a positive HD-CTC count (> 0 CTC in 1 mL of blood) with a median of 4.4 HD-CTCs/mL (range 0–515.6) and a mean of 44.7 (±95.2) HD-CTCs/mL. No significant difference in the medians of HD-CTC counts was detected between stage IV (n=31, range 0–178.2), stage III (n=34, range 0–515.6) and stages I/II (n=13, range 0–442.3). Furthermore, HD-CTCs exhibited a uniformity in terms of molecular and physical characteristics such as fluorescent cytokeratin intensity, nuclear size, frequency of apoptosis and aggregate formation across the spectrum of staging. Our results demonstrate that, despite stringent morphologic inclusion criteria for the definition of HD-CTCs, the HD-CTC assay shows high sensitivity in the detection and characterization of both early and late stage lung cancer CTCs. Larger studies are warranted to investigate the prognostic value of CTC profiling in early stage lung cancer. This finding has implications for the design of larger studies examining screening, therapy, and surveillance in

  18. Fluid biopsy for circulating tumor cell identification in patients with early-and late-stage non-small cell lung cancer: a glimpse into lung cancer biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, Marco; Bazhenova, Lyudmila; Boshuizen, Rogier; Kolatkar, Anand; Honnatti, Meghana; Cho, Edward H.; Marrinucci, Dena; Sandhu, Ajay; Perricone, Anthony; Thistlethwaite, Patricia; Bethel, Kelly; Nieva, Jorge; van den Heuvel, Michel; Kuhn, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) counts are an established prognostic marker in metastatic prostate, breast and colorectal cancer, and recent data suggest a similar role in late stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, due to sensitivity constraints in current enrichment-based CTC detection technologies, there are few published data about CTC prevalence rates and morphologic heterogeneity in early-stage NSCLC, or the correlation of CTCs with disease progression and their usability for clinical staging. We investigated CTC counts, morphology and aggregation in early stage, locally advanced and metastatic NSCLC patients by using a fluid-phase biopsy approach that identifies CTCs without relying on surface-receptor-based enrichment and presents them in sufficiently high definition (HD) to satisfy diagnostic pathology image quality requirements. HD-CTCs were analyzed in blood samples from 78 chemotherapy-naïve NSCLC patients. 73% of the total population had a positive HD-CTC count (>0 CTC in 1 mL of blood) with a median of 4.4 HD-CTCs mL-1 (range 0-515.6) and a mean of 44.7 (±95.2) HD-CTCs mL-1. No significant difference in the medians of HD-CTC counts was detected between stage IV (n = 31, range 0-178.2), stage III (n = 34, range 0-515.6) and stages I/II (n = 13, range 0-442.3). Furthermore, HD-CTCs exhibited a uniformity in terms of molecular and physical characteristics such as fluorescent cytokeratin intensity, nuclear size, frequency of apoptosis and aggregate formation across the spectrum of staging. Our results demonstrate that despite stringent morphologic inclusion criteria for the definition of HD-CTCs, the HD-CTC assay shows high sensitivity in the detection and characterization of both early- and late-stage lung cancer CTCs. Extensive studies are warranted to investigate the prognostic value of CTC profiling in early-stage lung cancer. This finding has implications for the design of extensive studies examining screening, therapy and surveillance in

  19. Effectiveness and safety of monoclonal antibodies for metastatic colorectal cancer treatment: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Bruno; de Jesus, Jose Paulo; de Mello, Eduardo L; Cesar, Daniel; Correia, Mauro M

    2015-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of chemotherapy (CT) for select cases of metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC) has been well established in the literature, however, it provides limited benefits and in many cases constitutes a treatment with high toxicity. The use of specific molecular biological treatments with monoclonal antibodies (MA) has been shown to be relevant, particularly for its potential for increasing the response rate of the host to the tumour, as these have molecular targets present in the cancerous cells and their microenvironment thereby blocking their development. The combination of MA and CT can bring a significant increase in the rate of resectability of metastases, the progression-free survival (PFS), and the global survival (GS) in MCRC patients. Objective To assess the effectiveness and safety of MA in the treatment of MCRC. Methods A systematic review was carried out with a meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing the use of cetuximab, bevacizumab, and panitumumab in the treatment of MCRC. Results Sixteen randomised clinical trials were selected. The quality of the evidence on the question was considered moderate and data from eight randomised clinical trials were included in this meta-analysis. The GS and PFS were greater in the groups which received the MA associated with CT, however, the differences were not statistically significant between the groups (mean of 17.7 months versus 17.1 months; mean difference of 1.09 (CI: 0.10–2.07); p = 0.84; and 7.4 versus 6.9 months. mean difference of 0.76 (CI: 0.08–1.44); p = 0.14 respectively). The meta-analysis was not done for any of the secondary outcomes. Conclusion The addition of MA to CT for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer does not prolong GS and PFS. PMID:26557880

  20. Colorectal cancer metastatic to the brain: analysis of prognostic factors and impact of KRAS mutations on presentation and outcome.

    PubMed

    Nieder, C; Hintz, M; Grosu, A L

    2016-01-01

    Treatment concepts for metastatic colorectal cancer continue to evolve. While the presence of RAS mutations impacts systemic therapy, little is known about the influence of such mutations in patients with brain metastases. Pooled retrospective analysis was conducted of 57 patients with brain metastases from colorectal cancer treated in two different institutions (2005-2013). The only mutations analyzed in a relatively large subgroup were KRAS mutations (14 wild type, 12 mutated). Mutation status was not associated with baseline characteristics such as number or location of metastases, and did not impact prognosis. Three factors were significantly associated with survival in multivariate analysis: Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS), management strategy, and systemic treatment. Median survival was 0.6 months with best supportive care, 3.0 months with initial whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), and 12.7 months if initial treatment included surgery or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), p = 0.0001. The survival difference between the WBRT and surgery/SRS groups was largest in patients with KPS 80-100. Effective local treatment was a prerequisite for improved survival. The only significant prognostic baseline factor was KPS, which forms the basis of the diagnosis-specific graded prognostic assessment (DS-GPA) score. Thus, our results validate the DS-GPA in this patient population. So far, neither this nor other studies suggest a clinically important impact of KRAS mutations beyond their previously reported association with development of brain metastases. Studies focusing on patients who develop brain metastases early during the course of metastatic disease might be warranted, because the influence of different systemic therapies might be larger in this subgroup.

  1. Patients’ self-reported adherence to capecitabine on XELOX treatment in metastatic colorectal cancer: findings from a retrospective cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Nakamoto, Eri; Yokokawa, Takashi; Sugita, Kazuo; Mae, Yutarou; Hagino, Akane; Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Oniyama, Sayaka; Machida, Yoshiaki; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu; Hama, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) has been established as a first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer. Adherence is particularly important with capecitabine to maintain appropriate curative effect. In this study, we monitored the adherence to capecitabine on XELOX treatment and investigated which factors might decrease compliance. Methods The study included 242 consecutive patients who received XELOX treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer between October 2009 and March 2012. Adherence to capecitabine was checked by pharmacists with a patient-reported treatment diary at a pharmaceutical outpatient clinic. Adherence rate was defined as the number of times that a patient took capecitabine in a 14-day cycle/28 prescribed doses. We retrospectively surveyed median relative dose intensities of capecitabine and the factors deteriorating adherence across eight cycles from electronic patient records and examined differences in compliance rates according to age. Results The study included 144 male and 98 female patients. The overadherence rate was 1.5% (n=23). The median adherence rate was 93.5% (n=242) in the first cycle of XELOX treatment, which gradually rose to 96.1% (n=148) in the eighth cycle. The median relative dose intensity of capecitabine was 79.2%. The main factors contributing to decreased adherence to capecitabine were diarrhea (22.5%, 352 instances) and nausea/vomiting (13.8%, 215 instances). The rate of missed dose was 12.1%. Analysis of adherence issues in relation to patient age showed a trend toward worse adherence to capecitabine therapy in the group of patients aged ≥80 years (hazard ratio =3.83; 95% confidence interval 2.48–5.91, P<0.001 versus 70–80 years group and versus <70 years group, chi-square test). Conclusion Patient-reported adherence to capecitabine on XELOX treatment in clinical practice is high but adversely affected by side effects. Patients aged 80 years or more exhibit a significant decrease in

  2. A Japanese post-marketing surveillance of cetuximab (Erbitux®) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Megumi; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Yamaguchi, Kensei; Satoh, Taroh; Ito, Hideyuki; Seriu, Taku; Sakata, Yuh; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2012-04-01

    Cetuximab (Erbitux(®)) was approved for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer in Japan in 2008. To verify information on the safety in practical use of cetuximab, we conducted post-marketing surveillance in accordance with the conditions for approval. All patients to be treated with cetuximab were enrolled by the central enrolment method. Data on treatment status, and incidence and severity of adverse drug reactions were collected. The target number of patients was 1800. A total of 2126 patients were enrolled from 637 institutions. Among 2006 patients analysed, 93.2% received cetuximab as third-line or later treatment. The median duration of treatment was 15.3 weeks, and 11.1% of patients received treatment for >48 weeks. The incidence of adverse drug reactions was 89.6%, of which ≥grade 3 was 21.5%. The incidence of infusion reactions was 5.7% (any grade), with 83.3% of them occurring at the first administration. The incidence of skin disorders was 83.7% (any grade), and the time to event varied for each skin disorder. The incidence of interstitial lung diseases was 1.2% (any grade). Diarrhoea and haematotoxicity scarcely occurred with cetuximab alone. In this surveillance, the incidence and categories of adverse drug reactions are not distinct from previous reports. Although most patients received cetuximab as third-line or later treatment, treatment was maintained with a median duration of 15 weeks. Cetuximab treatment in practical use is considered to be well tolerated and clinically useful in Japanese patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  3. Prognostic value of KRAS genotype in metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC) patients treated with intensive triplet chemotherapy plus bevacizumab (FIr-B/FOx) according to extension of metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bevacizumab (BEV) plus triplet chemotherapy can increase efficacy of first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC), particularly integrated with secondary liver surgery in liver-limited (L-L) patients. The prognostic value of the KRAS genotype in L-L and other or multiple metastatic (O/MM) MCRC patients treated with the FIr-B/FOx regimen was retrospectively evaluated. Methods Tumoral and metastatic samples were screened for KRAS codon 12 and 13 and BRAF mutations by SNaPshot and/or direct sequencing. Fit MCRC patients <75 years were consecutively treated with FIr-B/FOx regimen: weekly 12-h timed flat-infusion/5-fluorouracil (TFI 5-FU) 900 mg/m2, days 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, 16, 22 and 23; irinotecan (CPT-11) 160 mg/m2 plus BEV 5 mg/kg, days 1, 15; oxaliplatin (OXP) 80 mg/m2, days 8, 22; every 4 weeks. MCRC patients were classified as L-L and O/MM. Activity and efficacy were evaluated and compared using log-rank test. Results In all, 59 patients were evaluated: 31 KRAS wild-type (53%), 28 KRAS mutant (47%). At 21.5 months median follow-up, objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were, respectively: KRAS wild-type 90%, 14 months, 38 months; KRAS mutant 67%, 11 months, 20 months. PFS and OS were not significantly different. PFS and OS were significantly different in L-L compared to O/MM evaluable patients. In KRAS wild-type patients, clinical outcome of 12 L-L compared to 18 O/MM was significantly different: PFS 21 versus 12 months and OS 47 versus 28 months, respectively. In KRAS mutant patients, the clinical outcome of 13 L-L compared to 14 O/MM was not significantly different: PFS 11 months equivalently and OS 39 versus 19 months, respectively. Conclusions The KRAS genotype wild-type and mutant does not significantly affect different clinical outcomes for MCRC patients treated with the first-line FIr-B/FOx intensive regimen. KRAS wild-type patients with L-L disease may achieve a significantly

  4. A paradigm shift from one-size-fits-all to tailor-made therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Benjamin A; Marshall, John L; Hartley, Marion; Salem, Mohamed E

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. At least 50% of patients develop metastases, and most of these patients have unresectable tumors. Treatment options for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) include several lines of chemotherapy, salvage surgery, maintenance therapy, and local therapy. For decades, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was the only chemotherapy option for patients with mCRC. This changed markedly over the last decade with the approval of irinotecan, oxaliplatin, capecitabine, humanized monoclonal antibodies that target either vascular endothelial growth factor (bevacizumab, aflibercept, and ramucirumab) or the epidermal growth factor receptor (cetuximab and panitumumab), and, most recently, regorafenib and trifluridine/tipiracil. In this review, we focus on first-line treatments for mCRC. We discuss how results from multiple clinical trials over the last 10 to 20 years confirmed the benefit of adding oxaliplatin and irinotecan to the established 5-FU chemotherapy backbone, and then further defined benefit in certain patient subgroups with the addition of mAbs. Ongoing investigations attempt to illustrate the role of newer molecular and immune therapies in the fight against mCRC. We acknowledge the tremendous advances made in first-line mCRC treatment, admit that we still have a long way to go, and highlight exciting lines of research for patients with mCRC in the burgeoning fields of precision medicine and immunotherapy.

  5. A window of opportunity phase II study of enzastaurin in chemonaive patients with asymptomatic metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Glimelius, B; Lahn, M; Gawande, S; Cleverly, A; Darstein, C; Musib, L; Liu, Y; Spindler, K L; Frödin, J-E; Berglund, A; Byström, P; Qvortrup, C; Jakobsen, A; Pfeiffer, P

    2010-05-01

    Preclinically, protein kinase C and AKT activation can be inhibited by enzastaurin and reduce tumor growth of colorectal cancer cells. In asymptomatic patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), enzastaurin activity was evaluated by measuring the 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) rate in a window study design. Chemonaive patients with asymptomatic mCRC who did not require immediate chemotherapy-induced tumor reduction received a 400-mg thrice daily loading dose of enzastaurin on day 1 of cycle 1, followed by 500 mg once daily for the remaining 28-day cycles. Progression was assessed on the basis of radiographic imaging, rise in carcinoembryonic antigen or lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels or by appearance of clinical symptoms. Twenty-eight patients received daily enzastaurin. The 6-month PFS rate was 28% [95% confidence interval (CI) 13%-45%] and median PFS was 1.9 months (95% CI 1.8-4.5 months). Twelve (43%) patients had stable disease with a median duration of 6.1 months. The survival rate at 20 months was 77% (95% CI 47%-92%). No grade 4 toxicity was reported and grade 3 toxic effects were observed in three patients with one patient showing probable drug-related elevation of liver transaminases. The window design in asymptomatic patients with mCRC can be safely applied to assess the activity and safety of novel cytostatic agents like enzastaurin.

  6. Rural Reversal? Rural-Urban Disparities in Late-stage Cancer Risk in Illinois

    PubMed Central

    McLafferty, Sara; Wang, Fahui

    2009-01-01

    Background Differences in late-stage cancer risk between urban and rural residents are a key component of cancer disparities. Using data from the Illinois State Cancer Registry 1998–2002, we investigate the rural-urban gradient in late-stage cancer risk for four major types of cancer: breast, colorectal, lung and prostate. Methods Multilevel modeling is used to evaluate the role of population composition and area-based contextual factors in accounting for rural-urban variation. Instead of a simple binary rural-urban classification, we use a finer-grained classification that differentiates the densely populated city of Chicago from its suburbs and from smaller metropolitan areas, large towns and rural settings. Results For all four cancers, risk is highest in the most highly urbanized area and decreases as rurality increases, following a J-shaped progression that includes a small upturn in risk in the most isolated rural areas. For some cancers, these geographic disparities are associated with differences in population age and race; for others, the disparities remain after controlling for differences in population composition and ZIP code socioeconomic characteristics and spatial access to health care. Conclusion The observed pattern of urban disadvantage emphasizes the need for more extensive urban-based cancer screening and education programs. PMID:19434667

  7. Treatment monitoring in metastatic colorectal cancer patients by quantification and KRAS genotyping of circulating cell-free DNA

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Andreas W.; Schwerdel, Daniel; Welz, Hanna; Marienfeld, Ralf; Schmidt, Stefan A.; Kleger, Alexander; Ettrich, Thomas J.; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) has continuously improved over the last decade. However, disease monitoring remains underdeveloped and mostly dependent on imaging e.g. RECIST 1.1 criteria. The genetic landscape of individual cancers and subsequently occurring treatment-induced evolution remain neglected in current surveillance strategies. Novel biomarkers demand minimally invasive and repetitive tracking of the cancer mutagenome for therapy stratification and to make prognostic predictions. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a routinely used tumor marker for CRC, does not meet these goals and thus prevents its use as a reliable monitoring tool. A tumor-derived fraction of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA), isolated from blood samples, may bypass the limitations of currently available biomarkers and could be a tool for noninvasive disease monitoring. Here, total cfDNA levels differentiated a cohort of metastatic CRC patients from healthy controls. Furthermore, we correlated cfDNA during chemotherapy of 27 stage IV patients with clinical parameters to establish its prognostic and predictive value. Indeed, cfDNA levels in chemotherapy naive patients correlate with the tumor burden and CEA values at diagnosis and increase upon disease progression during 1st and 2nd line treatment. Moreover, we confirm the possibility of cfDNA-based genotyping of KRAS to early detect the emergence of resistance during chemotherapy. These data indicate that repetitive quantitative and mutational analysis of cfDNA might complement current treatment standards but may have also limited value in some patients. PMID:28328955

  8. Regorafenib with a fluoropyrimidine for metastatic colorectal cancer after progression on multiple 5-FU-containing combination therapies and regorafenib monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Eric I.; Tan, Carlyn; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Lanlan; Yang, Zhaohai; Scicchitano, Angelique; El-Deiry, Wafik S.

    2015-01-01

    We present 2 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who had progressed despite treatment with first-line FOLFOX and second-line FOLFIRI combination chemotherapy regimens. After failing these fluoropyrimidine-based regimens, both patients received additional cytotoxic and targeted therapies with eventual disease progression. These therapies included capecitabine plus dabrafenib and trametinib, regorafenib monotherapy, and regorafenib with panitumumab. After exhausting available options, both patients were offered regorafenib with either 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or capecitabine. These therapies are individually approved for the treatment of colorectal cancer but have not yet been studied in combination. This regimen produced stable disease in both patients with acceptable toxicity. One patient continued therapy for 17 months. Although these patients previously progressed during treatment with regorafenib, capecitabine or 5-FU, the combination had some activity in both cases of refractory metastatic colorectal cancer and may be considered in the palliative setting. In bedside-to-bench cell culture experiments performed after the clinical observations, we observed sensitivity of human colorectal cancer cell lines (N = 4) to single agent regorafenib or 5-FU and evidence of synergy with the combination therapy. Synergistic effects were noted in colorectal cancer cells with KRAS mutation, BRAF mutation, and p53 mutation, as well as mismatch repair deficient cells. Regorafenib suppressed Mcl-1 and Bcl-XL in treated cancer cells that may have contributed to the anticancer efficacy including in combination with 5-FU. The safety and efficacy of regorafenib with 5-FU or capecitabine in combination should be further investigated as a therapy for patients with refractory metastatic colorectal cancer, including individuals who had progressed on regorafenib monotherapy. PMID:26561209

  9. Association of age with survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: analysis from the ARCAD Clinical Trials Program.

    PubMed

    Lieu, Christopher H; Renfro, Lindsay A; de Gramont, Aimery; Meyers, Jeffrey P; Maughan, Timothy S; Seymour, Matthew T; Saltz, Leonard; Goldberg, Richard M; Sargent, Daniel J; Eckhardt, S Gail; Eng, Cathy

    2014-09-20

    This study addressed whether age is prognostic for overall survival (OS) or progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). A total of 20,023 patients from 24 first-line clinical trials in the ARCAD (Aide et Recherche en Cancérologie Digestive) database were analyzed. Primary age effects and interactions with age,sex, performance status (PS), and metastatic site were modeled using Cox proportional hazards stratified by treatment arm within study. Of total patients, 3,051 (15%) were age < or =50 years. Age was prognostic for both OS (P < .001)and PFS (P < .001), with U-shaped risk (i.e., highest risk was evident in youngest and oldest patients). Relative to patients of middle age, the youngest patients experienced 19% (95% CI, 7% to 33%) increased risk of death and 22% (95% CI, 10% to 35%) increased risk of progression. The oldest patients experienced 42% (95% CI, 31% to 54%) increased risk of death and 15% (95% CI, 7% to 24%) increased risk of progression or death. This relationship was more pronounced in the first year of follow-up. Age remained marginally significant for OS (P = .08) when adjusted forPS, sex, and presence of liver, lung, or peritoneal metastases, and age was significant in an adjusted model for PFS (P = .005). The age effect did not differ by site of metastatic disease, year of enrollment, type of therapy received, or biomarker mutational status. Younger and older age are associated with poorer OS and PFS among treated patients with mCRC. Younger and older patients may represent higher-risk populations, and additional studies are warranted.

  10. Molecular characteristics of circulating tumor cells resemble the liver metastasis more closely than the primary tumor in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Onstenk, Wendy; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; Mostert, Bianca; Lalmahomed, Zarina; Bolt-de Vries, Joan B.; van Galen, Anne; Smid, Marcel; Kraan, Jaco; Van, Mai; de Weerd, Vanja; Ramírez-Moreno, Raquel; Biermann, Katharina; Verhoef, Cornelis; Grünhagen, Dirk J.; IJzermans, Jan N.M.; Gratama, Jan W.; Martens, John W.M.; Foekens, John A.; Sleijfer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background CTCs are a promising alternative for metastatic tissue biopsies for use in precision medicine approaches. We investigated to what extent the molecular characteristics of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) resemble the liver metastasis and/or the primary tumor from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Results The CTC profiles were concordant with the liver metastasis in 17/23 patients (74%) and with the primary tumor in 13 patients (57%). The CTCs better resembled the liver metastasis in 13 patients (57%), and the primary tumor in five patients (22%). The strength of the correlations was not associated with clinical parameters. Nine genes (CDH1, CDH17, CDX1, CEACAM5, FABP1, FCGBP, IGFBP3, IGFBP4, and MAPT) displayed significant differential expressions, all of which were downregulated, in CTCs compared to the tissues in the 23 patients. Patients and Methods Patients were retrospectively selected from a prospective study. Using the CellSearch System, CTCs were enumerated and isolated just prior to liver metastasectomy. A panel of 25 CTC-specific genes was measured by RT-qPCR in matching CTCs, primary tumors, and liver metastases. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated and considered as continuous variables with r=1 representing absolute concordance and r= -1 representing absolute discordance. A cut-off of r>0.1 was applied in order to consider profiles to be concordant. Conclusions In the majority of the patients, CTCs reflected the molecular characteristics of metastatic cells better than the primary tumors. Genes involved in cell adhesion and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition were downregulated in the CTCs. Our results support the use of CTC characterization as a liquid biopsy for precision medicine. PMID:27340863

  11. Does KRAS Testing in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Impact Overall Survival? A Comparative Effectiveness Study in a Population-Based Sample

    PubMed Central

    Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Zeng, Chan; Pawloski, Pamala A.; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Richards, C. Sue; Johnson, Monique A.; Kauffman, Tia L.; Webster, Jennifer; Nyirenda, Carsie; Alexander, Gwen L.; Hwang, Clara; Cross, Deanna; McCarty, Catherine A.; Davis, Robert L.; Schwarzkopf, Denise; Williams, Andrew E.; Honda, Stacey; Daida, Yihe; Kushi, Lawrence H.; Delate, Thomas; Goddard, Katrina A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors are approved for treating metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC); KRAS mutation testing is recommended prior to treatment. We conducted a non-inferiority analysis to examine whether KRAS testing has impacted survival in CRC patients. Patients and Methods We included 1186 metastatic CRC cases from seven health plans. A cutpoint of July, 2008, was used to define two KRAS testing time period groups: “pre-testing” (n = 760 cases) and “post-testing” (n = 426 cases). Overall survival (OS) was estimated, and the difference in median OS between the groups was calculated. The lower bound of the one-sided 95% confidence interval (CI) for the difference in survival was used to test the null hypothesis of post-testing inferiority. Multivariable Cox regression models were constructed to adjust for covariates. Results The median unadjusted OS was 15.4 months (95% CI: 14.0–17.5) and 12.8 months (95% CI: 10.0–15.2) in the pre- and post-testing groups, respectively. The OS difference was −2.6 months with one-sided 95% lower confidence bound of −5.13 months, which was less than the non-inferiority margin (−5.0 months, unadjusted p = 0.06), leading to a failure to reject inferiority of OS in the post-testing period. In contrast, in the adjusted analysis, OS non-inferiority was identified in the post-testing period (p = 0.001). Sensitivity analyses using cutpoints before and after July, 2008, also met the criteria for non-inferiority. Conclusion Implementation of KRAS testing did not influence CRC OS. Our data support the use of KRAS testing to guide administration of EGFR inhibitors for treatment of metastatic CRC without diminished OS. PMID:24788807

  12. KRAS Early Testing: Consensus Initiative and Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation for Metastatic Colorectal Patients in an Italian Setting

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Carlo; Pinto, Carmine; Normanno, Nicola; Capussotti, Lorenzo; Cognetti, Francesco; Falcone, Alfredo; Mantovani, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    KRAS testing is relevant for the choice of the most appropriate first-line therapy of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Strategies for preventing unequal access to the test should be implemented, but their relevance in the practice is related to economic sustainability. The study adopted the Delphi technique to reach a consensus on several topics. Issues related to execution of KRAS testing were identified by an expert’s board and proposed to 108 Italian oncologists and pathologists through two subsequent questionnaires. The emerging proposal was evaluated by decision analyses models employed by technology assessment agencies in order to assess cost-effectiveness. Alternative therapeutic strategies included most commonly used chemotherapy regimens alone or in combination with cetuximab or bevacizumab. The survey indicated that time interval for obtaining KRAS test should not exceed 15 days, 10 days being an optimal interval. To assure the access to proper treatment, a useful strategy should be to anticipate the test after radical resection in patients at high risk of relapse. Early KRAS testing in high risk CRC patients generates incremental cost-effectiveness ratios between 6,000 and 13,000 Euro per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained. In extensive sensitivity analyses ICER’s were always below 15,000 Euro per QALY gained, far within the threshold of 60,000 Euro/QALY gained accepted by regulatory institutions in Italy. In metastatic CRC a time interval higher than 15 days for result of KRAS testing limits access to therapeutic choices. Anticipating KRAS testing before the onset of metastatic disease in patients at high risk does not affect the sustainability and cost-effectiveness profile of cetuximab in first-line mCRC. Early KRAS testing may prevent this inequality in high-risk patients, whether they develop metastases, and is a cost-effective strategy. Based on these results, present joined recommendations of Italian societies of Oncology and

  13. Prognostic relevance of KRAS genotype in metastatic colorectal cancer patients unfit for FIr-B/FOx intensive regimen

    PubMed Central

    BRUERA, GEMMA; CANNITA, KATIA; GIORDANO, ALDO VICTOR; VICENTINI, ROBERTO; FICORELLA, CORRADO; RICEVUTO, ENRICO

    2014-01-01

    First-line triplet chemotherapy plus bevacizumab (FIr-B/FOx) can improve efficacy of metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC), KRAS wild-type and mutant. Prognostic relevance of KRAS genotype was evaluated in patients unfit for FIr-B/FOx, treated with conventional medical treatments. Consecutive MCRC patients not eligible for FIr-B/FOx regimen due to age (≥75 years) and/or comorbidities were treated with tailored conventional first-line treatments. KRAS codon 12/13 mutations were screened by direct sequencing. Activity and efficacy were evaluated and compared according to medical treatments, age (non-elderly and elderly ≥65 years), comorbidity stage (Cumulative Illness Rating Scale), metastatic extension (liver-limited and other/multiple metastatic), and KRAS genotype, using log-rank. Selected first line treatments were medical in 37 patients (92.5%), and surgical in 3 patients (7.5%). Medical treatment regimens: triplet, 18 (45%); doublet, 15 (37.5%); mono-therapy, 4 (10%). At median follow-up of 8 months, objective response rate (ORR) was 37%, median progression-free survival (PFS) 7 months, liver metastasectomies 8% (liver-limited disease 37.5%), median overall survival (OS) 13 months. Triplet regimens failed to significantly affect clinical outcome, compared to doublet. According to KRAS genotype, ORR, PFS and OS were, respectively: wild-type 50%, 8 months, 13 months; mutant 25%, 6 months, 9 months. KRAS genotype wild-type compared to mutant significantly affected PFS, while not OS. KRAS c.35 G>A mutation (G12D) significantly affected worse PFS and OS compared to wild-type and/or other mutations. KRAS genotype, specifically the c.35 G>A KRAS mutation, may indicate poor prognosis in MCRC patients unfit for intensive medical treatments. PMID:24715238

  14. Comparative Cost-Effectiveness of Drugs in Early versus Late Stages of Cancer; Review of the Literature and a Case Study in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dvortsin, Evgeni; Gout-Zwart, Judith; Eijssen, Ernst-Lodewijk Marie; van Brussel, Jan; Postma, Maarten J

    2016-01-01

    Many oncological drugs that are being used in the adjuvant setting were first submitted for reimbursement in the metastatic stage, with differences in incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) in both settings having potential implications for reimbursement and pricing. The aim of this study is to identify a possible trend in the cost-effectiveness for the early/adjuvant and late/metastatic stages of oncological drugs through review and case study. We reviewed pairs of cost-effectiveness analyses of the same oncological drug in different stages for Scotland and the Netherlands. The case study in this report was directed at trastuzumab in the Dutch situation. Using a simplified Markov model, the cost-effectiveness in early and late stage of breast cancer was calculated and compared to the findings from the review. Comparable studies were found for cetuximab, bortezomib and bosutinib. Treatments in the late stage were found to be more expensive per QALY by a factor ranging from 1.5 to 12. The case study provided a similar result; late stage treatment was more expensive by a factor 10. Using, for example, a threshold of € 80,000/QALY, the early stage of cetuximab, bosutinib and trastuzumab are deemed cost-effective, while their compared late stage is lifted over the threshold and potentially considered not cost-effective. ICERs of oncological drugs used in different stages are more unfavourable in the late stage than in the early stage. Applying a reasonable threshold may result in early stage treatment being deemed cost-effective while late stage potentially not. Authorities should be aware of this when assessing oncological drugs and interpreting the corresponding ICERs, in the situation where oncological drugs are generally most submitted for reimbursement in the late stage initially.

  15. Comparative Cost-Effectiveness of Drugs in Early versus Late Stages of Cancer; Review of the Literature and a Case Study in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dvortsin, Evgeni; Postma, Maarten J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Many oncological drugs that are being used in the adjuvant setting were first submitted for reimbursement in the metastatic stage, with differences in incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) in both settings having potential implications for reimbursement and pricing. The aim of this study is to identify a possible trend in the cost-effectiveness for the early/adjuvant and late/metastatic stages of oncological drugs through review and case study. Methods We reviewed pairs of cost-effectiveness analyses of the same oncological drug in different stages for Scotland and the Netherlands. The case study in this report was directed at trastuzumab in the Dutch situation. Using a simplified Markov model, the cost-effectiveness in early and late stage of breast cancer was calculated and compared to the findings from the review. Results Comparable studies were found for cetuximab, bortezomib and bosutinib. Treatments in the late stage were found to be more expensive per QALY by a factor ranging from 1.5 to 12. The case study provided a similar result; late stage treatment was more expensive by a factor 10. Using, for example, a threshold of €80,000/QALY, the early stage of cetuximab, bosutinib and trastuzumab are deemed cost-effective, while their compared late stage is lifted over the threshold and potentially considered not cost-effective. Conclusion ICERs of oncological drugs used in different stages are more unfavourable in the late stage than in the early stage. Applying a reasonable threshold may result in early stage treatment being deemed cost-effective while late stage potentially not. Authorities should be aware of this when assessing oncological drugs and interpreting the corresponding ICERs, in the situation where oncological drugs are generally most submitted for reimbursement in the late stage initially. PMID:26800029

  16. Circulating Tumor Cell Count Correlates with Colorectal Neoplasm Progression and Is a Prognostic Marker for Distant Metastasis in Non-Metastatic Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wu, Jen-Chia; Lai-Ming, Jr.; Lu, Si-Hong; Hung, Tsung-Fu; Chiu, Yen-Chi; You, Jeng-Fu; Hsieh, Pao-Shiu; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Chiang, Sum-Fu; Lin, Geng-Ping; Tang, Reiping; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-04-01

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proven as a prognostic marker for metastatic colorectal cancer (m-CRC) patients. However, the currently available techniques for capturing and enumerating CTCs lack of required sensitivity to be applicable as a prognostic marker for non-metastatic patients as CTCs are even more rare. We have developed a microfluidic device utilizing antibody-conjugated non-fouling coating to eliminate nonspecific binding and to promote the multivalent binding of target cells. We then established the correlation of CTC counts and neoplasm progression through applying this platform to capture and enumerate CTCs in 2 mL of peripheral blood from healthy (n = 27), benign (n = 21), non-metastatic (n = 95), and m-CRC (n = 15) patients. The results showed that the CTC counts progressed from 0, 1, 5, to 36. Importantly, after 2-year follow-up on the non-metastatic CRC patients, we found that those who had ≥5 CTCs were 8 times more likely to develop distant metastasis within one year after curable surgery than those who had <5. In conclusion, by employing a sensitive device, CTC counts show good correlation with colorectal neoplasm, thus CTC may be as a simple, independent prognostic marker for the non-metastatic CRC patients who are at high risk of early recurrence.

  17. Circulating Tumor Cell Count Correlates with Colorectal Neoplasm Progression and Is a Prognostic Marker for Distant Metastasis in Non-Metastatic Patients.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wu, Jen-Chia; Lai, Jr-Ming; Lu, Si-Hong; Hung, Tsung-Fu; Chiu, Yen-Chi; You, Jeng-Fu; Hsieh, Pao-Shiu; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Chiang, Sum-Fu; Lin, Geng-Ping; Tang, Reiping; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-04-14

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proven as a prognostic marker for metastatic colorectal cancer (m-CRC) patients. However, the currently available techniques for capturing and enumerating CTCs lack of required sensitivity to be applicable as a prognostic marker for non-metastatic patients as CTCs are even more rare. We have developed a microfluidic device utilizing antibody-conjugated non-fouling coating to eliminate nonspecific binding and to promote the multivalent binding of target cells. We then established the correlation of CTC counts and neoplasm progression through applying this platform to capture and enumerate CTCs in 2 mL of peripheral blood from healthy (n = 27), benign (n = 21), non-metastatic (n = 95), and m-CRC (n = 15) patients. The results showed that the CTC counts progressed from 0, 1, 5, to 36. Importantly, after 2-year follow-up on the non-metastatic CRC patients, we found that those who had ≥5 CTCs were 8 times more likely to develop distant metastasis within one year after curable surgery than those who had <5. In conclusion, by employing a sensitive device, CTC counts show good correlation with colorectal neoplasm, thus CTC may be as a simple, independent prognostic marker for the non-metastatic CRC patients who are at high risk of early recurrence.

  18. Review on TAS-102 development and its use for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mota, Jose Mauricio; Fonseca, Leonardo G; Braghiroli, Maria Ignez; Hoff, Paulo M

    2016-08-01

    TAS-102 is the combination of trifluridine (TFT) with tipiracil (TPI) in a 1:0.5 molar ratio. TFT is a fluoropyrimidine that retains cytotoxic activity in 5-fluorouracil resistant cell lines. Due to TFT short half-life, early clinical development was discouraging. Thereafter, TFT was shown to be promptly degraded by thymidine phosphorylase, also known as platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor, a pro-angiogenic protein and a poor prognosis marker in colorectal cancer. TPI is a specific antagonist of thymidine phosphorylase and led to an increase in TFT serum levels when both agents are combined. Moreover, TPI is a potential anti-angiogenic molecule and could exert antitumor actions per se. TAS-102 was tested in several Phase I studies published in the early 21st century. The best regimen was settled as 70mg/m(2)/day, q12h, orally given at days 1-5 and days 8-13, each 28days. Recently, the first Phase III trial evaluating TAS-102 in refractory colorectal cancer patients was published. The RECOURSE trial demonstrated a survival advantage of the agent over supportive care, and definitely established TAS-102 as a novel strategy in the current armamentarium against colorectal cancer. Here we review the preclinical data regarding TFT and TPI that led to the development of TAS-102, and the set of clinical data that ultimately proved that TAS-102 improved outcomes in colorectal cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Late-stage formation of carbon-fluorine bonds.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Michael G; Ritter, Tobias

    2014-06-01

    In this account, we review work from our lab on the development of methods for carbon-fluorine bond formation, with an emphasis on late-stage fluorination of functionalized small molecules and synthesis of (18) F-labeled molecules for potential use as tracers in positron emission tomography (PET). We attempt to highlight reactions that we feel are of particular practical relevance, as well as areas of research where there is still significant room for advancement.

  20. OPHTHALMIC FINDINGS IN LATE STAGE SJOGREN-LARSSON SYNDROME.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Tavish; Kovach, Jaclyn L

    2017-03-15

    To report spectral domain optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence documentation of late stage macular findings associated with Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome in three adult siblings. Three adult siblings with Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome underwent ophthalmic examination and imaging. Crystalline maculopathy and subretinal deposits, presumably lipofuscin accumulation, with macular atrophy were present in varying degrees in all three adult siblings. In adults with Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome, crystalline retinopathy can progress to macular atrophy and the appearance of lipofuscin accumulation.

  1. Mineralogical variation of the late stage mare basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xunyu; Wu, Yunzhao; Ouyang, Ziyuan; Bugiolacchi, Roberto; Chen, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Cai, Wei; Xu, Aoao; Tang, Zesheng

    2016-10-01

    The last major phases of lunar volcanism occurred mainly in Oceanus Procellarum and Mare Imbrium and produced spectrally unique medium- and high-titanium basalts. The composition and distribution of these basalts provide a record of the late stage thermal evolution of the Moon. To study the spectral and mineralogical variations of the late stage mare basalts, 31 distinct units were mapped employing a range of remote sensing data. Their inferred mineralogical characteristics were studied by analyzing the spectral features of small, fresh craters derived from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) data. The strongest olivine spectral signatures were found around Lichtenberg crater, while the units with the lowest olivine/pyroxene ratio occurred mainly in the southern Kepler crater and some local areas. In Oceanus Procellarum, the olivine/pyroxene ratio decreases progressively from the Lichtenberg crater to the southern units. The northern and southern units within Mare Imbrium have higher olivine/pyroxene ratios than the central ones. The inferred abundance of olivine appears to vary stratigraphically, with the younger flows being more olivine rich. However, the stratigraphically younger units around Euler crater in Mare Imbrium, which present as dark red hues in the integrated band depth image of M3, were found to have lower olivine/pyroxene ratios than the units around Lichtenberg crater (shown as light red hues) in Oceanus Procellarum. It could be interpreted that the late stage mare basalts around Lichtenberg crater originated from a more olivine-rich source than those around Euler crater.

  2. Clinicopathologic characteristics and gene expression analyses of non-KRAS 12/13, RAS-mutated metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Morris, V K; Lucas, F A San; Overman, M J; Eng, C; Morelli, M P; Jiang, Z-Q; Luthra, R; Meric-Bernstam, F; Maru, D; Scheet, P; Kopetz, S; Vilar, E

    2014-10-01

    KRAS mutations in codons 12 and 13 are present in ∼40% of all colorectal cancers (CRC). Activating mutations in codons 61 and 146 of KRAS and in codons 12, 13, and 61 of NRAS also occur but are less frequent. The clinicopathologic features and gene expression profiles of this latter subpopulation of RAS-mutant colorectal tumors have not yet been clearly defined but in general are treated similarly to those with KRAS 12 or 13 mutations. Records of patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) treated at MD Anderson Cancer Center between December 2000 and August 2012 were reviewed for RAS (KRAS or NRAS) and BRAF mutation status, clinical characteristics, and survival outcomes. To study further with an independent cohort, data from The Cancer Genome Atlas were analyzed to define a gene expression signature for patients whose tumors feature these atypical RAS mutations and explore differences with KRAS 12/13-mutated colorectal tumors. Among the 484 patients reviewed, KRAS 12/13, KRAS 61/146, NRAS, and BRAF mutations were detected in 47.7%, 3.0%, 4.1%, and 7.4%, respectively, of patients who were tested for each of these aberrations. Lung metastases were more common in both the KRAS 12/13-mutated and atypical RAS-mutated cohorts relative to patients with RAS/BRAF wild-type tumors. Gene expression analyses revealed similar patterns regardless of the site of RAS mutation, and in silico functional algorithms predicted that KRAS and NRAS mutations in codons 12, 13, 61, and 146 alter the protein function and drive tumorgenesis. Clinicopathologic characteristics, survival outcomes, functional impact, and gene expression profiling were similar between patients with KRAS 12/13 and those with NRAS or KRAS 61/146-mutated mCRC. These clinical and bioinformatic findings support the notion that colorectal tumors driven by these RAS mutations are phenotypically similar. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights

  3. First- and Second-Line Bevacizumab in Addition to Chemotherapy for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A United States–Based Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Daniel A.; Chen, Qiushi; Ayer, Turgay; Howard, David H.; Lipscomb, Joseph; El-Rayes, Bassel F.; Flowers, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The addition of bevacizumab to fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is a standard of care for previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer. Continuation of bevacizumab beyond progression is an accepted standard of care based on a 1.4-month increase in median overall survival observed in a randomized trial. No United States–based cost-effectiveness modeling analyses are currently available addressing the use of bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer. Our objective was to determine the cost effectiveness of bevacizumab in the first-line setting and when continued beyond progression from the perspective of US payers. Methods We developed two Markov models to compare the cost and effectiveness of fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin with or without bevacizumab in the first-line treatment and subsequent fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan with or without bevacizumab in the second-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Model robustness was addressed by univariable and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Health outcomes were measured in life-years and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Results Using bevacizumab in first-line therapy provided an additional 0.10 QALYs (0.14 life-years) at a cost of $59,361. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $571,240 per QALY. Continuing bevacizumab beyond progression provided an additional 0.11 QALYs (0.16 life-years) at a cost of $39,209. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $364,083 per QALY. In univariable sensitivity analyses, the variables with the greatest influence on the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio were bevacizumab cost, overall survival, and utility. Conclusion Bevacizumab provides minimal incremental benefit at high incremental cost per QALY in both the first- and second-line settings of metastatic colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:25691669

  4. First- and second-line bevacizumab in addition to chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer: a United States-based cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Daniel A; Chen, Qiushi; Ayer, Turgay; Howard, David H; Lipscomb, Joseph; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Flowers, Christopher R

    2015-04-01

    The addition of bevacizumab to fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is a standard of care for previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer. Continuation of bevacizumab beyond progression is an accepted standard of care based on a 1.4-month increase in median overall survival observed in a randomized trial. No United States-based cost-effectiveness modeling analyses are currently available addressing the use of bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer. Our objective was to determine the cost effectiveness of bevacizumab in the first-line setting and when continued beyond progression from the perspective of US payers. We developed two Markov models to compare the cost and effectiveness of fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin with or without bevacizumab in the first-line treatment and subsequent fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan with or without bevacizumab in the second-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Model robustness was addressed by univariable and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Health outcomes were measured in life-years and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Using bevacizumab in first-line therapy provided an additional 0.10 QALYs (0.14 life-years) at a cost of $59,361. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $571,240 per QALY. Continuing bevacizumab beyond progression provided an additional 0.11 QALYs (0.16 life-years) at a cost of $39,209. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $364,083 per QALY. In univariable sensitivity analyses, the variables with the greatest influence on the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio were bevacizumab cost, overall survival, and utility. Bevacizumab provides minimal incremental benefit at high incremental cost per QALY in both the first- and second-line settings of metastatic colorectal cancer treatment. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. Long-term outcome of adrenalectomy for metastasis resulting from colorectal cancer with other metastatic sites: A report of 3 cases

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Mamoru; Kim, Ho Min; Ikeda, Masataka; Nishimura, Junichi; Hata, Taishi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis to the adrenal glands is a relatively frequent observation at autopsy of patients that have succumbed to cancer. Long-term disease-free survival has been reported in patients following the resection of solitary adrenal metastasis resulting from colorectal cancer. In addition, following primary resection for colorectal cancer, solitary metastasis to the adrenal glands is rare, even in outpatients at routine follow-ups. Therefore, adrenal metastasis is usually detected in combination with multiple synchronous metastases at other sites in the terminal stages of cancer. Between 1998 and 2002, 3 patients with adrenal metastasis and other synchronous metastatic sites underwent surgery for adrenal metastasis at the Department of Gastroenterological Surgery at Osaka University. The other synchronous metastatic sites observed in the 3 patients consisted of lung and para-aortic lymph nodes. In total, 2 out of the 3 patients experienced long-term disease-free survival for >5 years following surgery and 1 patient underwent curative resection for recurrence of metastases in the liver and right adrenal gland 79 months subsequent to the initial resection for adrenal metastasis. All 3 patients survived for >90 months. In conclusion, aggressive surgical resection for adrenal metastasis and other metastatic sites resulting from colorectal cancer may result in a survival benefit in selected patients. PMID:27602101

  6. Orbital Apex Syndrome Caused by Invasive Aspergillosis as an Adverse Effect of Systemic Chemotherapy for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuji; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Ohuchi, Mayuko; Tokunaga, Ryuma; Shigaki, Hironobu; Kurashige, Junji; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Baba, Yoshifumi; Yoshida, Naoya; Watanabe, Masayuki; Baba, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    Continuous therapy with cytotoxic drugs suppresses humoral immune function and may result in local infection. We present a case of orbital apex syndrome caused by Aspergillus infection during chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. A 74-year-old man with colorectal liver metastases under long-term continuous systemic chemotherapy presented with painful, progressive orbital apex syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging disclosed a small enhancing lesion around the right ethmoid sinus. We initially diagnosed colorectal cancer metastasis and he underwent biopsy via the endoscopic endonasal transethmoid approach. However, pathological examination of the cultured specimen revealed Aspergillus fumigatus. The patient was treated with voriconazole and the orbital apex syndrome resolved after 1 month. Orbital aspergillosis is a life-threatening disease and should be listed as a differential diagnosis of uncommon local infections during continuous chemotherapy. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. Prospective Evaluation of Cetuximab-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Predicts Treatment Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Anna Maria; Ottaiano, Alessandro; Romano, Carmela; Nasti, Guglielmo; Nappi, Anna; De Divitiis, Chiara; Napolitano, Maria; Zanotta, Serena; Casaretti, Rossana; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Avallone, Antonio; Califano, Daniela; Iaffaioli, Rosario Vincenzo; Scala, Stefania

    2016-04-01

    Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody to the EGFR that induces antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) through Fcγ receptors on immune cells. Although SNPs in genes encoding Fcγ receptors are functionally relevant to cetuximab-mediated ADCC in colorectal cancer, a direct correlation between in vitro ADCC and clinical response to cetuximab is not defined. We therefore enrolled 96 consecutive metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients at diagnosis in a study that assessed FcγR status and cetuximab-mediated ADCC. Patients carrying the FcγRIIa H alleles 131H/Hand 131H/R had significantly higher ADCC compared with patients with the 131R/R alleles (P= 0.013). Patients carrying FcγRIIIa genotypes with the V alleles 158V/V and 158V/F displayed higher ADCC compared with patients carrying the 158F/F genotype (P= 0.001). Progression-free survival of patients with an FcγRIIIa 158V allele was significantly longer compared with patients carrying 158F/F (P= 0.05), whereas no significant difference was observed for overall survival. Twenty-eight of 50 mCRC patients with wild-type KRAS received cetuximab. The average ADCC-mediated killing was 30% of assay targets for patients who experienced cetuximab complete or partial response, 21% in patients with stable disease and 9% in patients with progressive disease. To characterize basal natural killer (NK) activity, cytotoxicity was evaluated in 39 of 96 mCRC patients. Patients who responded to first-line treatment had higher NK-cell cytotoxicity. Thus, although limited to this cohort of patients, in vitro cetuximab-mediated ADCC correlated with FcγR polymorphisms and predicted cetuximab responsiveness. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. A comparison of four methods for detecting KRAS mutations in formalin-fixed specimens from metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Mototsugu; Kaneta, Toshikado; Miwa, Keisuke; Ichikawa, Wataru; Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Nagashima, Fumio; Furuse, Junji; Kage, Masayoshi; Akagi, Yoshito; Sasaki, Yasutsuna

    2016-07-01

    There is currently no standard method for the detection of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutation status in colorectal tumors. In the present study, we compared the KRAS mutation detection ability of four methods: direct sequencing, Scorpion-ARMS assaying, pyrosequencing and multi-analyte profiling (Luminex xMAP). We evaluated 73 cases of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) resistant to irinotecan, oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidine that were enrolled in an all-case study of cetuximab. The KRAS mutation detection capacity of the four analytical methods was compared using DNA samples extracted from tumor tissue, and the detection success rate and concordance of the detection results were evaluated. KRAS mutations were detected by direct sequencing, Scorpion-ARMS assays, pyrosequencing and Luminex xMAP at success rates of 93.2%, 97.3%, 95.9% and 94.5%, respectively. The concordance rates of the detection results by Scorpion-ARMS, pyrosequencing and Luminex xMAP with those of direct sequencing were 0.897, 0.923 and 0.900 (κ statistics), respectively. The direct sequencing method could not determine KRAS mutation status in five DNA samples. Of these, Scorpion-ARMS, pyrosequencing and Luminex xMAP successfully detected three, two and one KRAS mutation statuses, respectively. Three cases demonstrated inconsistent results, whereby Luminex xMAP detected mutated KRAS in two samples while wild-type KRAS was detected by the other methods. In the remaining case, direct sequencing detected wild-type KRAS, which was identified as mutated KRAS by the other methods. In conclusion, we confirmed that Scorpion-ARMS, pyrosequencing and Luminex xMAP were equally reliable in detecting KRAS mutation status in mCRC. However, in rare cases, the KRAS status was differentially diagnosed using these methods.

  9. Safety and efficacy of the addition of simvastatin to panitumumab in previously treated KRAS mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Baas, Jara M; Krens, Lisanne L; Bos, Monique M; Portielje, Johanneke E A; Batman, Erdogan; van Wezel, Tom; Morreau, Hans; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Gelderblom, Hans

    2015-09-01

    Panitumumab has proven efficacy in patients with metastatic or locally advanced colorectal cancer patients, provided that they have no activating KRAS mutation in their tumour. Simvastatin blocks the mevalonate pathway and thereby interferes with the post-translational modification of KRAS. We hypothesize that the activity of the RAS-induced pathway in patients with a KRAS mutation might be inhibited by simvastatin. This would theoretically result in increased sensitivity to panitumumab, potentially comparable with tumours with wild-type KRAS. A Simon two-stage design single-arm, phase II study was designed to test the safety and efficacy of the addition of simvastatin to panitumumab in colorectal cancer patients with a KRAS mutation after failing fluoropyrimidine-based, oxaliplatin-based and irinotecan-based therapy. The primary endpoint of this study was the proportion of patients alive and free from progression 11 weeks after the first administration of panitumumab, aiming for at least 40%, which is comparable with, although slightly lower than, that in KRAS wild-type patients in this setting. If this 40% was reached, then the study would continue into the second step up to 46 patients. Explorative correlative analysis for mutations in the KRAS and related pathways was carried out. One of 14 patients was free from progression at the primary endpoint time. The median progression-free survival was 8.4 weeks and the median overall survival status was 19.6 weeks. We conclude that the concept of mutant KRAS phenotype expression modulation with simvastatin was not applicable in the clinic.

  10. A comparison of four methods for detecting KRAS mutations in formalin-fixed specimens from metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    MATSUNAGA, MOTOTSUGU; KANETA, TOSHIKADO; MIWA, KEISUKE; ICHIKAWA, WATARU; FUJITA, KEN-ICHI; NAGASHIMA, FUMIO; FURUSE, JUNJI; KAGE, MASAYOSHI; AKAGI, YOSHITO; SASAKI, YASUTSUNA

    2016-01-01

    There is currently no standard method for the detection of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutation status in colorectal tumors. In the present study, we compared the KRAS mutation detection ability of four methods: direct sequencing, Scorpion-ARMS assaying, pyrosequencing and multi-analyte profiling (Luminex xMAP). We evaluated 73 cases of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) resistant to irinotecan, oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidine that were enrolled in an all-case study of cetuximab. The KRAS mutation detection capacity of the four analytical methods was compared using DNA samples extracted from tumor tissue, and the detection success rate and concordance of the detection results were evaluated. KRAS mutations were detected by direct sequencing, Scorpion-ARMS assays, pyrosequencing and Luminex xMAP at success rates of 93.2%, 97.3%, 95.9% and 94.5%, respectively. The concordance rates of the detection results by Scorpion-ARMS, pyrosequencing and Luminex xMAP with those of direct sequencing were 0.897, 0.923 and 0.900 (κ statistics), respectively. The direct sequencing method could not determine KRAS mutation status in five DNA samples. Of these, Scorpion-ARMS, pyrosequencing and Luminex xMAP successfully detected three, two and one KRAS mutation statuses, respectively. Three cases demonstrated inconsistent results, whereby Luminex xMAP detected mutated KRAS in two samples while wild-type KRAS was detected by the other methods. In the remaining case, direct sequencing detected wild-type KRAS, which was identified as mutated KRAS by the other methods. In conclusion, we confirmed that Scorpion-ARMS, pyrosequencing and Luminex xMAP were equally reliable in detecting KRAS mutation status in mCRC. However, in rare cases, the KRAS status was differentially diagnosed using these methods. PMID:27347117

  11. Tiam1 transgenic mice display increased tumor invasive and metastatic potential of colorectal cancer after 1,2-dimethylhydrazine treatment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li-Na; Zhang, Qing-Ling; Li, Xin; Hua, Xing; Cui, Yan-Mei; Zhang, Nian-Jie; Liao, Wen-Ting; Ding, Yan-Qing

    2013-01-01

    T lymphoma invasion and metastasis 1 (Tiam1) is a potential modifier of tumor development and progression. Our previous study in vitro and in nude mice suggested a promotion role of Tiam1 on invasion and metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC). In the present study, we generated Tiam1/C1199-CopGFP transgenic mice to investigate the tumorigenetic, invasive and metastatic alterations in the colon and rectum of wild-type and Tiam1 transgenic mice under 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) treatment. Transgenic mice were produced by the method of pronuclear microinlectlon. Whole-body fluorescence imaging (Lighttools, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada), PCR, and immunohistochemical techniques (IHC) were applied sequentially to identify the transgenic mice. The carcinogen DMH (20 mg/kg) was used to induce colorectal tumors though intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections once a week for 24 weeks from the age of 4 weeks on Tiam1 transgenic or non-transgenic mice. We successfully generated Tiam1/C1199-CopGFP transgenic mice and induced primary tumors in the intestine of both wild type and Tiam1 transgenic mice by DMH treatment. In addition, Tiam1 transgenic mice developed larger and more aggressive neoplasm than wild-type mice. Moreover, immunohistochemical staining revealed that upregulation of Tiam1 was correlated with increased expression of β-Catenin and Vimentin, and downregulation of E-Cadherin in these mice. Our study has provided in vivo evidence supporting that Tiam1 promotes invasion and metastasis of CRC, most probably through activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, in a Tiam1 transgenic mouse model.

  12. Tiam1 Transgenic Mice Display Increased Tumor Invasive and Metastatic Potential of Colorectal Cancer after 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li-Na; Zhang, Qing-Ling; Li, Xin; Hua, Xing; Cui, Yan-Mei; Zhang, Nian-Jie; Liao, Wen-Ting; Ding, Yan-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Background T lymphoma invasion and metastasis 1 (Tiam1) is a potential modifier of tumor development and progression. Our previous study in vitro and in nude mice suggested a promotion role of Tiam1 on invasion and metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC). In the present study, we generated Tiam1/C1199-CopGFP transgenic mice to investigate the tumorigenetic, invasive and metastatic alterations in the colon and rectum of wild-type and Tiam1 transgenic mice under 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) treatment. Methods Transgenic mice were produced by the method of pronuclear microinlectlon. Whole-body fluorescence imaging (Lighttools, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada), PCR, and immunohistochemical techniques (IHC) were applied sequentially to identify the transgenic mice. The carcinogen DMH (20 mg/kg) was used to induce colorectal tumors though intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections once a week for 24 weeks from the age of 4 weeks on Tiam1 transgenic or non-transgenic mice. Results We successfully generated Tiam1/C1199-CopGFP transgenic mice and induced primary tumors in the intestine of both wild type and Tiam1 transgenic mice by DMH treatment. In addition, Tiam1 transgenic mice developed larger and more aggressive neoplasm than wild-type mice. Moreover, immunohistochemical staining revealed that upregulation of Tiam1 was correlated with increased expression of β-Catenin and Vimentin, and downregulation of E-Cadherin in these mice. Conclusions Our study has provided in vivo evidence supporting that Tiam1 promotes invasion and metastasis of CRC, most probably through activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, in a Tiam1 transgenic mouse model. PMID:24069171

  13. Genetic Diversity of the KIR/HLA System and Outcome of Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treated with Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    De Re, Valli; Caggiari, Laura; De Zorzi, Mariangela; Talamini, Renato; Racanelli, Vito; Andrea, Mario D’; Buonadonna, Angela; Zagonel, Vittorina; Cecchin, Erika; Innocenti, Federico; Toffoli, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore genes of the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) and of the HLA ligand and their relationship with the outcome of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with first-line 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI). Methods A total of 224 mCRC patients were screened for KIR/HLA typing. The determination of the KIR/HLA combinations was based upon the gene content and variants. Genetic associations with complete response (CR), time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated by calculating odds and hazard ratios. Multivariate modeling with prognostic covariates was also performed. Results For CR, the presence of KIR2DL5A, 2DS5, 2DS1, 3DS1, and KIR3DS1/HLA-Bw4-I80 was associated with increased CR rates, with median ORs ranging from 2.1 to 4.3, while the absence of KIR2DS4 and 3DL1 was associated with increased CR rates (OR 3.1). After univariate analysis, patients that underwent resective surgery of tumor, absence of KIR2DS5, and presence of KIR3DL1/HLA-Bw4-I80 showed a significant better OS (HR 1.5 to 2.8). Multivariate analysis identified as parameters independently related to OS the type of treatment (surgery; HR 2.0) and KIR3DL1/HLA-Bw4-I80 genotype (HR for T-I80 2.7 and for no functional KIR/HLA interaction 1.8). For TTP, no association with KIR/HLA genes was observed. Conclusion This study, for the first time, evidences that the genotyping for KIR-HLA pairs are found predictive markers associated with complete response and improves overall survival prediction of FOLFIRI treatment response in metastatic colorectal cancer. These results suggest a role of the KIR/HLA system in patient outcome, and guide new research on the immunogenetics of mCRC through mechanistic studies and clinical validation. PMID:24497922

  14. First-Line Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Interpreting FIRE-3, PEAK, and CALGB/SWOG 80405.

    PubMed

    Elez, Elena; Argilés, Guillem; Tabernero, Josep

    2015-11-01

    The advances made in the therapeutic management of colorectal cancer (CRC) over recent years with the addition of therapies targeting angiogenesis or cell proliferation have positioned bevacizumab, cetuximab, and panitumumab as accepted first-line treatments when combined with FOLFOX or FOLFIRI for RAS wild-type (WT) metastatic CRC. The question has been raised as to the choice of targeted therapy to maximize chances of an optimal outcome. Three studies, the phase III FIRE-3 (AIO KRK-0306), the phase II PEAK, and the recently presented phase III CALGB/SWOG 80405 trial, have addressed this issue face-on, directly comparing the addition of bevacizumab versus cetuximab or panitumumab to FOLFOX/FOLFIRI in terms of efficacy outcomes. None of these studies met their primary endpoint (response rate, progression-free survival or overall survival respectively), meaning we are no closer to being able to categorically define an optimal targeted treatment in the first-line setting for patients with advanced CRC. This led to reflection over study design and further analyses, raising a number of important issues. High-sensitivity analysis of the mutational status of exons identified a population with a "pure" non-RAS-mutated profile showing benefit with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) combinations, particularly in the context of early and greater depth of response. Coherent with a personalized therapeutic approach, the importance of performing individual high-sensitivity extended RAS testing is unequivocal and is currently a requirement in many countries to identify this all-RAS WT population, thus limiting unnecessary exposure and expense in patients unlikely to respond. These three studies, particularly the CALGB/SWOG 80405 trial, mark an important milestone in the roadmap of metastatic CRC treatment, highlighting the need for close analysis to fully exploit the available data.

  15. Prognostic value of the Glasgow Prognostic Score in metastatic colorectal cancer in the era of anti-EGFR therapies.

    PubMed

    Dréanic, Johann; Maillet, Marianne; Dhooge, Marion; Mir, Olivier; Brezault, Catherine; Goldwasser, François; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain

    2013-01-01

    The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), combination of C-reactive protein and albumin, has proven its prognostic value in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients receiving conventional cytotoxic therapy. More recently, anti-EGFR therapies have been validated in mCRC and roll forward the patients' overall survival (OS). We aimed to evaluate the prognostic accuracy of the GPS in patients receiving anti-EGFR therapy in addition to conventional chemotherapy. From January 2007 to February 2012, consecutive mCRC patients who received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy plus cetuximab were included in the present analysis. Patients were eligible for the study if they met the following criteria: advanced pathologically proven MCRC, age >18 years, adequate renal function (creatinine clearance >40 ml/min), C-reactive protein and albumin and performance status evaluation before treatment initiation. A total of 49 patients received cetuximab plus 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy (colon, n = 34; rectum, n = 15) and were treated with a median follow-up of 35 months (16.5-74.7). Median age was 48 years old. In addition to cetuximab, patients received oxaliplatin- (n = 34, 60%) or irinotecan (n = 15, 30%)-based chemotherapy. At time of diagnosis, 55, 29 and 16% of patients had a GPS of 0 (n = 27), 1 (n = 14) and 2 (n = 8), respectively. Fifty-five, 29 and 14 % of patients add one, two or ≥3 metastatic sites, respectively. Considering two groups (GPS = 0 and GPS ≥1), median progression-free survivals were significantly different (p = 0.0084). Median OS in the GPS 0, 1 and 2 groups were 38.2, 14 and 12.1 months, respectively (p = 0.0093). The results of the present study confirm that the GPS is still a simple and effective prognostic factor in the era of cetuximab therapy in mCRC patients.

  16. Functionalized Metallated Cavitands via Imidation and Late-Stage Elaboration

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanchuan

    2015-01-01

    Efficient methods for the preparation of functionalized metallated cavitands are described. Functional groups can be either introduced by an imidation of metal-oxo complexes or by a late-stage elaboration of the imido ligands. By using diversified iminophosphorane (PPh3=NR) reagents, π-conjugated pyrene, redox active ferrocene and polymerizable norbornene moieties were successfully introduced. Furthermore, the iodo and alkynyl groups on the imido ligands are capable of undergoing efficient Sonogashira cross-coupling and copper-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition reactions, thereby providing facile access to complex architectures containing metallated cavitands. PMID:26962300

  17. SEOM clinical guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer 2015.

    PubMed

    Aranda, E; Aparicio, J; Alonso, V; Garcia-Albeniz, X; Garcia-Alfonso, P; Salazar, R; Valladares, M; Vera, R; Vieitez, J M; Garcia-Carbonero, R

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer dead in Spain. About half the patients will eventually develop distant metastases. However, as treatment options are expanding, prognosis has steadily improved over the last decades. Management of advanced CRC should be discussed within an experienced multidisciplinary team to select the most appropriate systemic treatment (chemotherapy and targeted agents) and to integrate surgical or ablative procedures when indicated. Disease site and extent, resectability, tumor biology and gene mutations, clinical presentation, patient preferences, and comorbidities are key factors to design a customized treatment plan. The aim of these guidelines is to provide synthetic recommendations for managing advanced CRC patients.

  18. First-line cetuximab-based chemotherapies for patients with advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Mamoru; Kim, Ho Min; Hata, Tsuyoshi; Sakata, Kazuya; Okuyama, Masaki; Takemoto, Hiroyoshi; Fujii, Hitoshi; Fukuzaki, Takayuki; Morita, Tetsushi; Hata, Taishi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Satoh, Taroh; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Maski

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly occurring cancers worldwide. A burgeoning number of studies have demonstrated that the addition of cetuximab to another standard first-line regimen markedly improves the outcome of CRC treatment. However, at present, the efficacy and safety of cetuximab-based combination chemotherapy has not been well described in Japan. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of first-line chemotherapies that included cetuximab for patients with advanced or metastatic Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) wild-type CRC in Japan. This prospective multicenter observational study was conducted at 13 affiliated medical institutions. A total of 64 patients were enrolled between 2010 and 2013. The patients met the following criteria for eligibility: i) histologically confirmed, advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type CRC; and ii) cetuximab-based chemotherapies administered as a first-line treatment. First-line cetuximab-based treatments were administered as follows: 29 patients (45.3%) received a combination of infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin; 14 patients (21.9%) received a combination of capecitabine and oxaliplatin; and 10 patients (15.6%) received a combination of infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin and irinotecan. The overall response rate (including complete plus partial responses) was 50% (32/64 patients). Initially, 48 lesions were diagnosed as unresectable. Among those, 13 lesions (27.1%) were converted to a resectable status following cetuximab-based combination chemotherapy treatments. The median overall survival time and the progression-free survival time were 1,189 and 359 days, respectively. The most frequent grade 3/4 adverse event was neutropenia, which occurred in 20.3% of the patients. The incidence of grade 3/4 skin toxicity was 17.2% (11/64 patients). Cetuximab-based therapies may represent a promising first-line regimen for patients with advanced or

  19. Monitoring clonal evolution and resistance to EGFR blockade in the blood of metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Siravegna, Giulia; Mussolin, Benedetta; Buscarino, Michela; Corti, Giorgio; Cassingena, Andrea; Crisafulli, Giovanni; Ponzetti, Agostino; Cremolini, Chiara; Amatu, Alessio; Lauricella, Calogero; Lamba, Simona; Hobor, Sebastijan; Avallone, Antonio; Valtorta, Emanuele; Rospo, Giuseppe; Medico, Enzo; Motta, Valentina; Antoniotti, Carlotta; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Veronese, Silvio; Budillon, Alfredo; Montagut, Clara; Racca, Patrizia; Marsoni, Silvia; Falcone, Alfredo; Corcoran, Ryan B.; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Loupakis, Fotios; Siena, Salvatore; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Bardelli, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a genetic disease governed by clonal evolution1. Genotyping CRC tissue is employed for therapeutic purposes but this approach has significant limitations. A tissue sample represents a single snapshot in time, is subjected to selection bias due to tumor heterogeneity, and can be difficult to obtain. We exploited circulating DNA (ctDNA) to genotype colorectal tumors and track clonal evolution during therapies with the anti-EGFR antibodies cetuximab or panitumumab. We identified genomic alterations in KRAS, NRAS, MET, ERBB2, FLT3, EGFR and MAP2K1 in ctDNA of patients with primary or acquired resistance to EGFR blockade. Mutant RAS clones, which rise in blood during EGFR blockade, decline upon withdrawal of anti-EGFR antibodies indicating that clonal evolution continues beyond clinical progression. Pharmacogenomic analysis of CRC cells, which had acquired resistance to cetuximab, reveals that upon antibody withdrawal KRAS clones decay, while the population regains drug sensitivity. ctDNA profiles of patients who benefit from multiple challenging with anti-EGFR antibodies exhibit pulsatile levels of mutant KRAS. These results reveal that the CRC genome adapts dynamically to intermittent drug schedules and provide a molecular explanation for the efficacy of re-challenge therapies based on EGFR blockade. PMID:26030179

  20. A plasma cytokine and angiogenic factor (CAF) analysis for selection of bevacizumab therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Long; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Dong-sheng; Li, Cong; Jin, Ying; Wang, De-shen; Chen, Dong-liang; Qiu, Miao-zhen; Luo, Hui-yan; Wang, Zhi-qiang; Li, Yu-hong; Wang, Feng-hua; Xu, Rui-hua

    2015-01-01

    This study intends to identify biomarkers that could refine the selection of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) for bevacizumab treatment. Pretreatment 36 plasma cytokines and angiogenic factors (CAFs) were first measured by protein microarray analysis in patients who received first-line bevacizumab-containing therapies (discovery cohort, n = 64), and further evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in patients treated on regimens with or without bevacizumab (validation cohort, n = 186). Factor levels were correlated with clinical outcomes, predictive values were assessed using a treatment by marker interaction term in the Cox model. Patients with lower pretreatment levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) or VEGF-A121 gain much more benefit from bevacizumab treatment as measured by progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), while angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) levels negatively correlated with PFS and response rate following bevacizumab (all adjusted interaction P < 0.05). A baseline CAF signature combining these three markers has greater predictive ability than individual markers. Signature-negative patients showed impaired survival following bevacizumab treatment (PFS, 7.3 vs 7.0 months; hazard ratio [HR] 1.03; OS, 29.9 vs 21.1 months, HR 1.33) compared with signature-positive patients (PFS, 6.5 vs 11.9 months, HR 0.52; OS, 28.0 vs 55.3 months, HR 0.67). These promising results warrant further prospective studies. PMID:26620439

  1. Evaluation of prognostic factors in liver-limited metastatic colorectal cancer: a preplanned analysis of the FIRE-1 trial

    PubMed Central

    Giessen, C; Fischer von Weikersthal, L; Laubender, R P; Stintzing, S; Modest, D P; Schalhorn, A; Schulz, C; Heinemann, V

    2013-01-01

    Background: Liver-limited disease (LLD) denotes a specific subgroup of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. Patients and Methods: A total of 479 patients with unresectable mCRC from an irinotecan-based randomised phase III trial were evaluated. Patients with LLD and non-LLD and hepatic resection were differentiated. Based on baseline patient characteristic, prognostic factors for hepatic resection were evaluated. Furthermore, prognostic factors for median overall survival (OS) were estimated via Cox regression in LLD patients. Results: Secondary liver resection was performed in 38 out of 479 patients (resection rate: 7.9%). Prognostic factors for hepatic resection were LLD, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), node-negative primary, alkaline phosphatase (AP) and Karnofsky performance status (PS). Median OS was significantly increased after hepatic resection (48 months), whereas OS in LLD (17 months) and non-LLD (19 months) was comparable in non-resected patients. With the inapplicability of Koehne's risk classification in LLD patients, a new score based on only the independent prognostic factors LDH and white blood cell (WBC) provided markedly improved information on the outcome. Conclusion: Patients undergoing hepatic resection showed favourable long-term survival, whereas non-resected LLD patients and non-LLD patients did not differ with regard to progression-free survival and OS. The LDH levels and WBC count were confirmed as prognostic factors and provide a useful and simple score for OS-related risk stratification also in LLD. PMID:23963138

  2. [Study of circadian rhythms of activity by actometry: preliminary results in 30 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Mormont, M C; De Prins, J; Lévi, F

    1996-03-01

    Activity circadian rhythms were measured non-invasively in 30 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer by wrist actigraphy, and compared with control data. Patients and control subjects were requested to wear the actigraph at home for 2 to 5 days. Control time-series exhibit high activity levels (150 to 350 counts/min) during daytime, followed by low activity levels (0 to 50 counts/min) during the night. In patients, the contrast between daytime activity and nocturnal sleep is noticeably less marked, and a wide inter-patient variability can be observed. This alteration of the rest-activity rhythm in the cancer group was statistically validated by autocorrelation test. Results from the cosinor and he maximal entropy spectral analysis must be interpreted more cautiously, since the prerequisites for these tests may not be fulfilled by actometric time-series. These results indicate that cancer patients may have altered rest-activity circadian rhythms. The significance and prognostic value of such alterations deserve further testing in a larger population. Actigraphy may provide a simple and innovative tool to study the circadian system in cancer patients.

  3. Off-target effects and clinical outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer patients receiving regorafenib: The TRIBUTE analysis.

    PubMed

    Giampieri, Riccardo; Prete, Michela Del; Prochilo, Tiziana; Puzzoni, Marco; Pusceddu, Valeria; Pani, Fabiana; Maccaroni, Elena; Mascia, Roberta; Baleani, Maria Giuditta; Meletani, Tania; Berardi, Rossana; Lanzillo, Anna Maria; Mariotti, Stefano; Zaniboni, Alberto; Cascinu, Stefano; Scartozzi, Mario

    2017-04-05

    Regorafenib is an orally administered multikinase inhibitor indicated for the treatment of heavily pretreated metastatic colorectal cancer patients with good performance status, albeit less than 50% treated patients achieve disease stabilisation or better at the first radiological evaluation. In addition to that a particularly broad spectrum of toxicities (experienced as G3 or more NCI CTCAE graded by 50% of patients treated) have led to reconsider its widespread use in the majority of patients. We retrospectively collected data about the magnitude of off-target effects experienced during the first 8-weeks of regorafenib monotherapy and analysed their correlation with overall survival, progression free survival and disease control rate. Our findings suggest that skin rash (Exp (B): 0.52, p = 0.0133) or hypothyroidism (Exp (B): 0.11, p = 0.0349) were significantly correlated with improved overall survival at multivariate regression analysis. It was also demonstrated a statistically significant role of diarrhea as predictor of improved survival but its independent prognostic role was lost at multivariate analysis (Exp (B): 0.63, p = 0.162). This is the first analysis showing a potential correlation between the onset of these forms of side effects and regorafenib efficacy, however sample size limitations and the retrospective nature of our analysis prevent us from drawing definitive conclusions.

  4. Off-target effects and clinical outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer patients receiving regorafenib: The TRIBUTE analysis

    PubMed Central

    Giampieri, Riccardo; Prete, Michela del; Prochilo, Tiziana; Puzzoni, Marco; Pusceddu, Valeria; Pani, Fabiana; Maccaroni, Elena; Mascia, Roberta; Baleani, Maria Giuditta; Meletani, Tania; Berardi, Rossana; Lanzillo, Anna Maria; Mariotti, Stefano; Zaniboni, Alberto; Cascinu, Stefano; Scartozzi, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Regorafenib is an orally administered multikinase inhibitor indicated for the treatment of heavily pretreated metastatic colorectal cancer patients with good performance status, albeit less than 50% treated patients achieve disease stabilisation or better at the first radiological evaluation. In addition to that a particularly broad spectrum of toxicities (experienced as G3 or more NCI CTCAE graded by 50% of patients treated) have led to reconsider its widespread use in the majority of patients. We retrospectively collected data about the magnitude of off-target effects experienced during the first 8-weeks of regorafenib monotherapy and analysed their correlation with overall survival, progression free survival and disease control rate. Our findings suggest that skin rash (Exp (B): 0.52, p = 0.0133) or hypothyroidism (Exp (B): 0.11, p = 0.0349) were significantly correlated with improved overall survival at multivariate regression analysis. It was also demonstrated a statistically significant role of diarrhea as predictor of improved survival but its independent prognostic role was lost at multivariate analysis (Exp (B): 0.63, p = 0.162). This is the first analysis showing a potential correlation between the onset of these forms of side effects and regorafenib efficacy, however sample size limitations and the retrospective nature of our analysis prevent us from drawing definitive conclusions. PMID:28378839

  5. Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs in Multiple Lines in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kubicka, S.; Falcone, A.; Burkholder, I.; Hacker, U. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background. In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), continuing antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression might provide clinical benefit. We synthesized the available evidence in a meta-analysis. Patients and Methods. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies investigating the use of antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression. Eligible studies were randomized phase II/III trials. Primary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were the impact of continuing antiangiogenic drugs (i) in subgroups, (ii) in different types of compounds targeting the VEGF-axis (monoclonal antibodies versus tyrosine kinase inhibitors), and (iii) on remission rates and prevention of progression. Results. Eight studies (3,668 patients) were included. Continuing antiangiogenic treatment beyond progression significantly improved PFS (HR 0.64; 95%-CI, 0.55–0.75) and OS (HR 0.83; 95%-CI, 0.76–0.89). PFS was significantly improved in all subgroups with comparable HR. OS was improved in all subgroups stratified by age, gender, and ECOG status. The rate of patients achieving at least stable disease was improved with an OR of 2.25 (95%-CI, 1.41–3.58). Conclusions. This analysis shows a significant PFS and OS benefit as well as a benefit regarding disease stabilization when using antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression in mCRC. Future studies should focus on the optimal sequence of administering antiangiogenic drugs. PMID:27656206

  6. Primary Tumor Location as a Predictive Factor for First-line Bevacizumab Effectiveness in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Wen-Zhuo; Liao, Fang-Xin; Jiang, Chang; Kong, Peng-Fei; Yin, Chen-Xi; Yang, Qiong; Qiu, Hui-Juan; Zhang, Bei; Xia, Liang-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Background: Published papers reported contradictory results about the correlation between bevacizumab effectiveness and primary tumor location of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Methods: 740 mCRC patients treated with chemotherapy (CT group) and 244 patients treated with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as first-line setting (CT + B group) were included. Propensity score analyses were used for patients' stratification and matching. Kaplan-Meier curves with log-rank tests were used to detect different overall survival (OS). Results: Patients in CT + B group had similar OS comparing with CT group only when the primary tumor located at right-side colon (20.2 for CT + B versus 19.7 months for CT group, p = 0.269). For left-side colon and rectal cancer patients, significantly longer OS were observed in CT + B than CT group. Conclusion: Our data suggested only patients with left-side colon or rectal cancer could get survival benefit from the addition of bevacizumab to first-line chemotherapy. PMID:28261339

  7. High RBM3 expression is associated with an improved survival and oxaliplatin response in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sorbye, Halfdan; Dragomir, Anca; Pfeiffer, Per; Qvortrup, Camilla; Pontén, Fredrik; Jirström, Karin; Glimelius, Bengt; Eberhard, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Background High expression of the RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) has been shown to correlate, with prolonged survival in several malignant diseases and with the benefit of platinum-based chemotherapy in ovarian cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate RBM3 in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) as a prognostic factor for overall survival and in relation to benefit of first-line chemotherapy. Methods Immunohistochemical staining was conducted and evaluated in tumours from 455 mCRC patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression proportional hazards models were used to access the impact of RBM3 expression on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Results High RBM3 expression, both nuclear and cytoplasmic, was an independent prognostic factor for prolonged OS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.50–0.90 and HR 0.66, 95% CI 0.48–0.91, respectively). PFS was significantly longer in patients with high RBM3 expression who had received first-line oxaliplatin based treatment, compared to those who had received irinotecan based treatment, both regarding nuclear and cytoplasmic expression (p-value 0.020 and 0.022 respectively). Conclusion High RBM3 expression is an independent predictor of prolonged survival in mCRC patients, in particular in patients treated with first-line oxaliplatin based chemotherapy. PMID:28800641

  8. High RBM3 expression is associated with an improved survival and oxaliplatin response in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Siesing, Christina; Sorbye, Halfdan; Dragomir, Anca; Pfeiffer, Per; Qvortrup, Camilla; Pontén, Fredrik; Jirström, Karin; Glimelius, Bengt; Eberhard, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    High expression of the RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) has been shown to correlate, with prolonged survival in several malignant diseases and with the benefit of platinum-based chemotherapy in ovarian cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate RBM3 in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) as a prognostic factor for overall survival and in relation to benefit of first-line chemotherapy. Immunohistochemical staining was conducted and evaluated in tumours from 455 mCRC patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression proportional hazards models were used to access the impact of RBM3 expression on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). High RBM3 expression, both nuclear and cytoplasmic, was an independent prognostic factor for prolonged OS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.50-0.90 and HR 0.66, 95% CI 0.48-0.91, respectively). PFS was significantly longer in patients with high RBM3 expression who had received first-line oxaliplatin based treatment, compared to those who had received irinotecan based treatment, both regarding nuclear and cytoplasmic expression (p-value 0.020 and 0.022 respectively). High RBM3 expression is an independent predictor of prolonged survival in mCRC patients, in particular in patients treated with first-line oxaliplatin based chemotherapy.

  9. CT versus FDG-PET/CT response evaluation in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with irinotecan and cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    Skougaard, Kristin; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Nielsen, Dorte; Schou, Jakob Vasehus; Jensen, Benny Vittrup; Høgdall, Estrid V S; Hendel, Helle Westergren

    2014-01-01

    We compared morphologic computed tomography (CT)-based to metabolic fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT-based response evaluation in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and correlated the findings with survival and KRAS status. From 2006 to 2009, patients were included in a phase II trial and treated with cetuximab and irinotecan every second week. They underwent FDG-PET/CT examination at baseline and after every fourth treatment cycle. Response evaluation was performed prospectively according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST 1.0) and retrospectively according to Positron Emission Tomography Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST). Best overall responses were registered. Sixty-one patients were eligible for response evaluation. Partial response (PR) rate was 18%, stable disease (SD) rate 64%, and progressive disease (PD) rate 18%. Partial metabolic response (PMR) rate was 56%, stable metabolic disease rate 33%, and progressive metabolic disease (PMD) rate 11%. Response agreement was poor, κ-coefficient 0.19. Hazard ratio for overall survival for responders (PR/PMR) versus nonresponders (PD/PMD) was higher for CT- than for FDG-PET/CT evaluation. Within patients with KRAS mutations, none had PR but 44% had PMR. In conclusion, morphologic and metabolic response agreement was poor primarily because a large part of the patients shifted from SD with CT evaluation to PMR when evaluated with FDG-PET/CT. Furthermore, a larger fraction of the patients with KRAS mutations had a metabolic treatment response. PMID:24941936

  10. Clinical value of chip-based digital-PCR platform for the detection of circulating DNA in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sefrioui, David; Sarafan-Vasseur, Nasrin; Beaussire, Ludivine; Baretti, Marina; Gangloff, Alice; Blanchard, France; Clatot, Florian; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Sesboüé, Richard; Frebourg, Thierry; Michel, Pierre; Di Fiore, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    The detection of circulating DNA is considered a promising strategy in cancer patients. Digital PCR has emerged as a sensitive method able to quantify both circulating free and tumour DNA. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the clinical value of a chip-based digital PCR for the detection of circulating DNA. Digital PCR was used in 34 metastatic colorectal cancer patients to detect and quantify circulating free and tumour DNA based on K-ras mutational status. Clinical outcomes were analyzed according to circulating DNA measurements. Digital PCR yielded a detection rate of 69% for circulating tumour DNA. The median concentrations of circulating free and tumour DNA were 20 and 6.8 ng/mL, respectively, with significant correlation between both biomarkers (p<0.001). Median overall survival was 4.8 months in patients with high circulating free DNA (>75% quartile) versus not reached in patients with a low level (<25% quartile) (p=0.029). Moreover, median overall survival was significantly decreased in patients with detectable circulating tumour DNA compared to those without (respectively 11.8 months versus not reached, p=0.04). Chip-based digital PCR is a simple and non-invasive method allowing the efficient detection of circulating DNA. Our results highlight that levels of these circulating markers may have a potential prognostic value. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficacy and safety of aflibercept in metastatic colorectal cancer pretreated with bevacizumab: A report of five cases

    PubMed Central

    Alcaide, Julia; Delgado, Mayte; Legerén, Marta; Jurado, José Miguel; Blancas, Isabel; Pereda, Teresa; López, Jorge; Garrido, Margarita; Sánchez, María J.; García, José L.; Rueda, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Aflibercept is a recombinant fusion protein that acts by inhibiting tumoural angiogenesis. Efficacy data obtained in the VELOUR randomised study has contributed to the approval of aflibercept as a second-line metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treatment following an oxaliplatin-based regimen. The present study reports a case series of five patients with mCRC, who were treated in two centres since 2011 in the Compassionate Use Program for aflibercept. All patients had a KRAS mutation and previously received palliative fluoropyrimidine-oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy with bevacizumab. A doublet with irinotecan combined with aflibercept was administered until progression of disease. The majority of patients received a greater number of aflibercept cycles than the median reported in the VELOUR study (12 vs. 7 cycles), with manageable and reversible toxicity. The most frequent adverse events observed were diarrhoea, neutropenia, fatigue, proteinuria and hypertension. Most cases obtained a progression-free survival greater than the median reported in the VELOUR study (11 vs. 6.9 months) and, in a subgroup of patients previously treated with bevacizumab, and a median survival time of ~47 months was reached from the initial treatment of the disease. The present study contrasts the efficacy and safety results obtained from the pivotal VELOUR trial, and confirms that aflibercept, used in routine clinical practice outside of the clinical trial environment, is active and well-tolerated following bevacizumab treatment. PMID:27899972

  12. Genetic variations in the VEGF pathway as prognostic factors in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Paré-Brunet, L; Sebio, A; Salazar, J; Berenguer-Llergo, A; Río, E; Barnadas, A; Baiget, M; Páez, D

    2015-10-01

    Angiogenesis is a significant biological mechanism in the progression and metastasis of solid tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), its receptors and signaling effectors have a central role in tumor-induced angiogenesis. Genetic variation in the VEGF pathway may impact on tumor angiogenesis and, hence, on clinical cancer outcomes. This study evaluates the influence of common genetic variations within the VEGF pathway in the clinical outcomes of 172 metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with first-line oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. A total of 27 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 16 genes in the VEGF-dependent angionenesis process were genotyped using a dynamic array on the BioMark™ system. After assessing the KRAS mutational status, we found that four SNPs located in three genes (KISS1, KRAS and VEGFR2) were associated with progression-free survival. Five SNPs in three genes (ITGAV, KRAS and VEGFR2) correlated with overall survival. The gene-gene interactions identified in the survival tree analysis support the importance of VEGFR2 rs2071559 and KISS1 rs71745629 in modulating these outcomes. This study provides evidence that functional germline polymorphisms in the VEGF pathway may help to predict outcome in mCRC patients who undergo oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy.

  13. Exploratory biomarker analysis for treatment response in KRAS wild type metastatic colorectal cancer patients who received cetuximab plus irinotecan.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Tae; Ahn, Tae Jin; Lee, Eunjin; Do, In-Gu; Lee, Su Jin; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Kim, Suk Hyeong; Lee, Jeeyun; Kim, Hee Cheol

    2015-10-20

    More than half of the patients selected based on KRAS mutation status fail to respond to the treatment with cetuximab in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We designed a study to identify additional biomarkers that could act as indicators for cetuximab treatment in mCRC. We investigated 58 tumor samples from wild type KRAS CRC patients treated with cetuximab plus irinotecan (CI). We conducted the genotyping for mutations in either BRAF or PIK3CA and profiled comprehensively the expression of 522 kinase genes. BRAF mutation was detected in 5.1 % (3/58) of patients. All 50 patients showed wild type PIK3CA. Gene expression patterns that categorized patients with or without the disease control to CI were compared by supervised classification analysis. PSKH1, TLK2 and PHKG2 were overexpressed significantly in patients with the disease control to IC. The higher expression value of PSKH1 (r = 0.462, p < 0.001) and TLK2 (r = 0.361, p = 0.005) had the significant correlation to prolonged PFS. The result of this work demonstrated that expression nature of kinase genes such as PSKH1, TLK2 and PHKG2 may be informative to predict the efficacy of CI in wild type KRAS CRC. Mutations in either BRAF or PIK3CA were rare subsets in wild type KRAS CRC.

  14. Late-stage accretion of the terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnor, Craig Bruce

    2002-08-01

    I have studied late stage accretion of the terrestrial planets using both analytic and numerical methods, modeling terrestrial planet accretion from a system of planetary embryos using three-dimensional N-body integrations. The simulations are generally successful in producing 1 2 large terrestrial planets (similar to Earth and Venus) and are usually accompanied by a smaller planet. Despite the general successes of the model, simulations of the late stage performed under a broad range of conditions tend to produce large terrestrial planets with eccentricities 2 5 times greater than those of Earth or Venus. My results show that the spin angular momentum states of the planets produced are generally the result of contributions made by the last few large impacts. This suggests that the current angular momentum of the Earth/Moon system may be the result of more than one large impact rather than a single impact. These results also suggest that the proto-Earth may have been rotating rapidly prior to the Moon-forming impact event. I have also examined the damping of terrestrial planet eccentricities via density wave interactions with a remnant gas disk that post-dated the accretionary epoch. My results suggest that the terrestrial planet eccentricities could be reduced from values permitting crossing orbits to the present day values by a remnant disk with gas surface densities of ˜10-3 10 -1 times the minimum mass solar nebula value and characteristic dissipation timescales of 106 107 years.

  15. Impact of Metastasectomy in the Multimodality Approach for BRAF V600E Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: The Mayo Clinic Experience.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benny; Jin, Zhaohui; Truty, Mark J; Smoot, Rory L; Nagorney, David M; Kendrick, Michael L; Kipp, Benjamin R; Grothey, Axel

    2017-09-13

    BRAF V600E mutations are present in 8%-10% of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) and portend poor prognosis. This study investigated the impact of metastasectomy for patients with BRAF V600E mCRC. Subjects, Materials, and Methods . Using prospective clinical and molecular data, patients with BRAF V600E mCRC were analyzed for clinical characteristics and survival. Statistical analyses utilized the Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test, and Cox proportional hazard models. Fifty-two patients were identified between July 1, 2008, and January 4, 2016. Patient characteristics included median age 65 years, 61% female, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≤1, 71% with right-sided tumors, and 28% with liver-limited metastasis. In the first-line setting, 7% (4/52) received fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan (FOLFOXIRI)/bevacizumab (BEV) and 81% were treated with doublet chemotherapy consisting of fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, and BEV. Median overall survival (OS) for all 52 patients was 25 months with median progression-free survival (PFS) of 9.3 months. With median follow-up of 18.3 months, 21 patients underwent metastasectomy with longer OS (29.1 months vs. 22.7 months, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.33; confidence interval [CI], 0.12-0.78; p = .01) and PFS (13.6 months vs. 6.2 months, HR = 0.53, CI, 0.28-0.97; p = .03) compared with the non-metastasectomy cohort. In multivariate analysis, metastasectomy remained significant for improved survival outcomes (HR = 0.52; 95% CI, 0.07-1.02; p = .02). Median disease-free survival after metastasectomy was 9.7 months (95% CI, 5.5-19.5). Two patients remain disease-free at the time of last follow-up, with one patient without relapse for greater than 2 years (28.9 months). Multimodality therapy incorporating metastasectomy for BRAF V600E mCRC should be considered and might be associated with improved overall survival in select patients. BRAF V600E metastatic

  16. Physcion inhibits the metastatic potential of human colorectal cancer SW620 cells in vitro by suppressing the transcription factor SOX2

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yan-tao; Chen, Xue-hong; Gao, Hui; Ye, Jun-li; Wang, Chun-bo

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Physcion, an anthraquinone derivative, exhibits hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and anti-cancer activities. In this study we examined whether and how physcion inhibited metastatic potential of human colorectal cancer cells in vitro. Methods: Human colorectal cancer cell line SW620 was tested. Cell migration and invasion were assessed using a wound healing and Transwell assay, respectively. The expression levels of transcription factor SOX2 in the cells were modulated with shRNA targeting SOX2 and SOX2 overexpressing plasmid. The expression of target molecules involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process and the signaling pathways was determined with Western blots or qRT-PCR. ROS levels were measured using DCF-DA. Results: Physcion (2.5, 5 mol/L) did not affect the cell viability, but dose-dependently inhibited the cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Physcion also inhibited the EMT process in the cells, as evidenced by the increased epithelial marker E-cadherin expression, and by decreased expression of mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, vimentin, fibronectin and α-SMA, as well as transcriptional repressors Snail, Slug and Twist. Physcion suppressed the expression of SOX2, whereas overexpression of SOX2 abrogated the inhibition of physcion on metastatic behaviors. Physcion markedly increased ROS production and phosphorylation of AMPK and GSK3β in the cells, whereas the AMPK inhibitor compound C or the ROS inhibitor NAC abolished the inhibition of physcion on metastatic behaviors. Conclusion: Physcion inhibits the metastatic potential of human colorectal cancer cells in vitro via activating ROS/AMPK/GSK3β signaling pathways and suppressing SOX2. PMID:26707141

  17. Predicting Response to EGFR Inhibitors in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Current Practice and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Veena; Obel, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The identification of KRAS mutational status as a predictive marker of response to antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been one of the most significant and practice-changing recent advances in colorectal cancer research. Recently, data suggesting a potential role for other markers (including BRAF mutations, loss of phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten expression, and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase–AKT pathway mutations) in predicting response to anti-EGFR therapy have emerged. Ongoing clinical trials and correlative analyses are essential to definitively identify predictive markers and develop therapeutic strategies for patients who may not derive benefit from anti-EGFR therapy. This article reviews recent clinical trials supporting the predictive role of KRAS, recent changes to clinical guidelines and pharmaceutical labeling, investigational predictive molecular markers, and newer clinical trials targeting patients with mutated KRAS. PMID:20133499

  18. New Therapeutic Opportunities Based on DNA Mismatch Repair and BRAF Status in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Romain; Svrcek, Magali; Dreyer, Chantal; Cervera, Pascale; Duval, Alex; Pocard, Marc; Fléjou, Jean-François; de Gramont, Aimery; André, Thierry

    2016-03-01

    Recently, colorectal cancer (CRC) subtyping consortium identified four consensus molecular subtypes (CMS1-4). CMS1 is enriched for deficient mismatch repair (dMMR) and BRAF (V600E) tumors. Intriguingly, this subtype has better relapse-free survival but worse overall survival after relapse compared with the other subtypes. Growing evidence is accumulating on the benefit of specific therapeutic strategies such as immune checkpoint inhibition therapy in dMMR tumors and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway targeted therapy in tumors harboring BRAF (V600E) mutation. After reviewing dMMR prognostic value, immune checkpoints as major targets for dMMR carcinomas will be highlighted. Following, BRAF (V600E) prognostic impact will be reviewed and therapeutic strategies with the combination of cytotoxic agents and especially the combinations of BRAF and MAPK inhibitors will be discussed.

  19. Different metastatic pattern according to the KRAS mutational status and site-specific discordance of KRAS status in patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We evaluated the association between a KRAS mutational status and various clinicopathologic features including the metastatic pattern in patients with metastatic or recurrent colorectal cancer (MRCRC). The concordance rates of the KRAS status between primary tumor sites and paired metastatic organs were also analyzed. Methods The KRAS mutational status in codons 12, 13, and 61 from formalin-fixed sections of both primary tumors and related metastases was determined by sequencing analysis. One hundred forty-three Korean patients with MRCRC with available tissues (resection or biopsy) from both primary tumors and related metastatic sites were consecutively enrolled. Results The KRAS mutation rate was 52.4% (75/143) when considering both the primary and metastatic sites. When the relationship between the KRAS status and initial metastatic sites at the time of diagnosis of MRCRC was analyzed, lung metastasis was more frequent as the initial metastatic site in patients with the KRAS mutation than in patients without the KRAS mutation (45.3% vs. 22.1%; P = 0.003). However, liver (37.3% vs. 70.6%; P < 0.001) or distant lymph node metastases (6.7% vs. 19.1%; P = 0.025) were less frequent as the initial metastatic organ in patients with the KRAS mutation than in patients without the KRAS mutation. The discordance rate of KRAS mutational status between primary and paired metastatic sites other than the lung was 12.3% (13/106). Compared with primary tumor sites, the KRAS discordance rate was significantly higher in matched lung metastases [32.4% (12/37)] than in other matched metastatic organs (P = 0.005). Conclusions Organs initially involved by distant metastasis were different according to the KRAS mutational status in MRCRC patients. The concordance rate (87.7%) of the KRAS mutation status at metastatic sites other than the lung was generally high compared with primary tumor sites; however, lung metastasis had a high rate of KRAS discordance (32.4%). PMID

  20. Clinical study of nimotuzumab combined with chemotherapy in the treatment of late stage gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chong-De

    2014-01-01

    To explore the clinical effects of nimotuzumab combined with chemotherapy in the treatment of late gastric cancer. A total of 34 reoccurrence or metastatic patients with late stage gastric cancer who were confirmed by histopathology and/or cytology were selected and randomly divided into observational and control groups, of 17 cases each. Patients in the control group were treated with the standard DCF plan, while patients in observational group additionally received nimotuzumab. The short-term and long-term efficacy and adverse reactions in the 2 groups were followed. The objective response rate (ORR) and disease control rate (DCR) were 64.7% (11/17) and 82.4% (14/17) in observational group and 25.0%(4/16) and 37.5%(6/16) in the control group(ORR and DCR between 2 groups, χ2=5.2412, P=0.0221 and χ2=6.9453, P=0.0084). The median progression-free survival (PFS) time and median overall survival (OS) time were 6.50 months and 12.50 months in observational group and 4.50 months and 8.25 months in the control group (P=0.0212; P=0.0255). The main toxic and side effects in the 2 groups were reduced leukocytes and hemoglobin, gastrointestinal reactions and hair loss and these were relieved after symptomatic treatment and nutrition support therapy. There were no differences in the occurrence of toxic and side effects between the 2 groups. Nimotuzumab combined with DCF plan is effective in treating late stage gastric cancer. A larger scale study is now warranted for confirmation of the findings.

  1. Impact of Hyperglycemia on Survival and Infection-Related Adverse Events in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Who Were Receiving Palliative Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yong Joo; Han, Hye-Suk; Jeong, Yusook; Jeong, Jiwon; Lim, Sung-Nam; Choi, Hyung Jin; Jeon, Hyun-Jung; Oh, Tae-Keun; Lee, Sang-Jeon; Lee, Ki Hyeong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Non-metastatic colorectal cancer patients with diabetes have poor overall survival than those without diabetes. However, the effect of hyperglycemia on survival after diagnosis of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) has not been assessed. Therefore, we assessed the impact of hyperglycemia on the survival and infection-related adverse events (AEs) in patients with metastatic CRC. Materials and Methods We reviewed the records of 206 patients with newly diagnosed metastatic CRC who were treated with palliative chemotherapy from March 2000 to December 2012 at Chungbuk National University Hospital. The mean glucose level of each patient was calculated using all available glucose results. Results The mean glucose levels ranged between 76.8 and 303.5 mg/dL, and patients were categorized into quartiles in accordance to their mean glucose level: group 1 (< 106.7 mg/dL), group 2 (106.7-117.2 mg/dL), group 3 (117.3-142.6 mg/dL), and group 4 (> 142.6 mg/dL). The median overall survival for patients in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 22.6, 20.1, 18.9, and 17.9 months, respectively; however, this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.643). Compared with patients in group 1, those in groups 2, 3, and 4 were at a higher risk of infection-related AEs, according to a multivariate analysis (p=0.002). Conclusion Hyperglycemia was not associated with shorter survival; however, it was associated with infection-related AEs in patients with newly diagnosed metastatic CRC receiving palliative chemotherapy. PMID:25038764

  2. Patellar tendinopathy: late-stage results from surgical treatment☆

    PubMed Central

    Cenni, Marcos Henrique Frauendorf; Silva, Thiago Daniel Macedo; do Nascimento, Bruno Fajardo; de Andrade, Rodrigo Cristiano; Júnior, Lúcio Flávio Biondi Pinheiro; Nicolai, Oscar Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the late-stage results from surgical treatment of patellar tendinopathy (PT), using the Visa score (Victorian Institute of Sport Tendon Study Group) and the Verheyden method. Methods This was a retrospective study in which the postoperative results from 12 patients (14 knees) who were operated between July 2002 and February 2011 were evaluated. The patients included in the study presented patellar tendinopathy that was refractory to conservative treatment, without any other concomitant lesions. Patients who were not properly followed up during the postoperative period were excluded. Results Using the Verheyden method, nine patients were considered to have very good results, two had good results and one had poor results. In relation to Visa, the mean was 92.4 points and only two patients had scores less than 70 points (66 and 55 points). Conclusion When surgical treatment for patellar tendinopathy is correctly indicated, it has good long-term results. PMID:26535202

  3. My daughter's daughter: the tragedy of late stage miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Tara

    2014-04-01

    This article sets out my observations of my daughter's difficult pregnancy and late-stage miscarriage. I share this information to raise awareness that the specialist support for women going through this is not always in place and doesn't fully prepare women for this experience. Even though this can be uncomfortable for maternity professionals, the care that women receive, especially during labour and birth, has a massive impact on them and their families. There are many opportunities for midwives to make a positive difference at this difficult time. My granddaughter, Jess, died at five months gestation and was later confirmed to have Turner Syndrome. Turner Syndrome is a chromosomal abnormality that only affects girls and is related to the partial or complete deletion of the X chromosome. Not all affected girls are miscarried and an estimated one in 2000 girls born in the UK has Turner Syndrome.

  4. The role of image-guided therapy in the management of colorectal cancer metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    de Baere, Thierry; Tselikas, Lambros; Yevich, Steven; Boige, Valérie; Deschamps, Frederic; Ducreux, Michel; Goere, Diane; Nguyen, France; Malka, David

    2017-02-23

    The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) have stressed that the option for treating oligometastatic disease is a strategy of local ablative therapy, the goal of which is to improve disease control. The spectrum of the local ablative therapy toolbox described by the ESMO includes surgical R0 resection, percutaneous ablation and intra-arterial therapies, the choice of treatment being left to the multidisciplinary team. Interventional therapy involving image-guided treatment offers the possibility of less invasive treatments for colorectal cancer metastases in the liver, lung and bone by preserving from toxicity distant healthy organs or even parts of the diseased organs. Oligometastases can be targeted by image-guided puncture for percutaneous ablation by delivering locally, through inserted probes, heat (radiofrequency, microwaves), extreme cold (cryoablation) or electric pulses (electroporation). Radiofrequency (RFA) is the mainstay of percutaneous ablation and provides local control rates of around 90% when metastases are small (<3 cm), located away from hilum and large vessels, and perfectly visible under imaging guidance. The lung provides a specific environment with excellent visibility of the target tumour, and insulation of the tumour by the healthy lung improves thermal delivery. RFA of colorectal lung metastases provides a 5-year overall survival of 56.0%, with a 91.6% control rate for metastases with a diameter <3 cm. These results are comparable to results of surgical series. Non-resectable, non-ablatable liver metastases can be targeted through their preferential arterial vascularisation with hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) or selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) with radioactive microspheres. HAIC with oxaliplatin has demonstrated an impressive response rate when patients who have previously failed intravenous oxaliplatin are rechallenged. The response rate in first-line therapy is around 90%, with conversion to surgery

  5. Correlation of Hypertension and Proteinuria with Outcome in Elderly Bevacizumab-Treated Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Feliu, Jaime; Salud, Antonieta; Safont, Maria J.; García-Girón, Carlos; Aparicio, Jorge; Losa, Ferran; Bosch, Carlos; Escudero, Pilar; Casado, Enrique; Jorge, Monica; Bohn, Uriel; Pérez-Carrión, Ramon; Carmona, Alberto; Custodio, Ana B.; Maurel, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies suggest a relationship between hypertension and outcome in bevacizumab-treated patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We performed a retrospective analysis of two phase II studies (BECA and BECOX) to determine if hypertension and proteinuria predict outcome in elderly patients with mCRC treated with bevacizumab. Patients and Methods Patients ≥70 years of age received either capecitabine 1250 mg/m2 bid days 1–14 + bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg day 1 every 21 days (BECA study) or capecitabine 1000 mg/m2 bid days 1–14 with bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg and oxaliplatin 130 mg/m2 day 1 (BECOX study). The primary objective was to correlate hypertension and proteinuria with overall response rate (ORR), time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS). Secondary objectives included identification of risk factors associated with the development of hypertension and proteinuria and determining whether development of hypertension or proteinuria in the first 2 cycles was related to ORR, disease-control rate (DCR), TTP or OS. Results In total, 127 patients (median age 75.5 years) were included in the study. Hypertension correlated with DCR and OS; proteinuria correlated with ORR and DCR. Proteinuria or hypertension in the first 2 cycles did not correlate with efficacy. Risk factors for hypertension were female gender (odds ratio [OR] 0.241; P = 0.011) and more bevacizumab cycles (OR 1.112; P = 0.002); risk factors for proteinuria were diabetes (OR 3.869; P = 0.006) and more bevacizumab cycles (OR 1.181; P<0.0001). Multivariate analysis identified as having prognostic value: baseline lactate dehydrogenase, haemoglobin, number of metastatic lesions and DCR. Conclusion This analysis of two phase II studies suggests that hypertension is significantly correlated with OS but not with ORR and TTP, whereas proteinuria is correlated with ORR but not with OS and TTP. Both hypertension and proteinuria are associated with the duration of bevacizumab treatment and do

  6. Correlation of hypertension and proteinuria with outcome in elderly bevacizumab-treated patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Feliu, Jaime; Salud, Antonieta; Safont, Maria J; García-Girón, Carlos; Aparicio, Jorge; Losa, Ferran; Bosch, Carlos; Escudero, Pilar; Casado, Enrique; Jorge, Monica; Bohn, Uriel; Pérez-Carrión, Ramon; Carmona, Alberto; Custodio, Ana B; Maurel, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Studies suggest a relationship between hypertension and outcome in bevacizumab-treated patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We performed a retrospective analysis of two phase II studies (BECA and BECOX) to determine if hypertension and proteinuria predict outcome in elderly patients with mCRC treated with bevacizumab. Patients ≥ 70 years of age received either capecitabine 1250 mg/m(2) bid days 1-14 + bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg day 1 every 21 days (BECA study) or capecitabine 1000 mg/m(2) bid days 1-14 with bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg and oxaliplatin 130 mg/m(2) day 1 (BECOX study). The primary objective was to correlate hypertension and proteinuria with overall response rate (ORR), time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS). Secondary objectives included identification of risk factors associated with the development of hypertension and proteinuria and determining whether development of hypertension or proteinuria in the first 2 cycles was related to ORR, disease-control rate (DCR), TTP or OS. In total, 127 patients (median age 75.5 years) were included in the study. Hypertension correlated with DCR and OS; proteinuria correlated with ORR and DCR. Proteinuria or hypertension in the first 2 cycles did not correlate with efficacy. Risk factors for hypertension were female gender (odds ratio [OR] 0.241; P = 0.011) and more bevacizumab cycles (OR 1.112; P = 0.002); risk factors for proteinuria were diabetes (OR 3.869; P = 0.006) and more bevacizumab cycles (OR 1.181; P<0.0001). Multivariate analysis identified as having prognostic value: baseline lactate dehydrogenase, haemoglobin, number of metastatic lesions and DCR. This analysis of two phase II studies suggests that hypertension is significantly correlated with OS but not with ORR and TTP, whereas proteinuria is correlated with ORR but not with OS and TTP. Both hypertension and proteinuria are associated with the duration of bevacizumab treatment and do not represent an independent prognostic factor.

  7. Clinical Application of Liquid Biopsy in Targeted Therapy of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Trojan, Jörg; Klein-Scory, Susanne; Koch, Christine; Schmiegel, Wolff

    2017-01-01

    Background. Colorectal cancers (CRC) shed DNA into blood circulation. There is growing evidence that the analysis of circulating tumor DNA can be effectively used for monitoring of disease, to track tumor heterogeneity and to evaluate response to treatment. Case Presentation. Here, we describe two cases of patients with advanced CRC. The first case is about a patient with no available tissue for analysis of RAS mutation status. Liquid biopsy revealed RAS-wild-type and the therapy with anti-EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) monoclonal antibody cetuximab could be initiated. In the second case, the mutational profile of a patient with initial wild-type RAS-status was continually tracked during the course of treatment. An acquired KRAS exon 3 mutation was detected. The number of KRAS mutated fragments decreased continuously after the discontinuation of the therapy with EGFR-specific antibodies. Conclusion. Liquid biopsy provides a rapid genotype result, which accurately reproduces the current mutation status of tumor tissue. Furthermore, liquid biopsy enables close monitoring of the onset of secondary resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. PMID:28232873

  8. Pathological responses after angiogenesis or EGFR inhibitors in metastatic colorectal cancer depend on the chemotherapy backbone.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, J; Gizzi, M; Pairet, G; Lannoy, V; Lefesvre, P; Gigot, J-F; Hubert, C; Jouret-Mourin, A; Humblet, Y; Canon, J-L; Sempoux, C; Chapaux, X; Danse, E; Tinton, N; Navez, B; Van den Eynde, M

    2015-11-03

    Optimal preoperative treatment before colorectal cancer metastases (CRCM) resection remains unclear. This study evaluated pathological responses (pR) in CRCM resected after chemotherapy alone or combined with angiogenesis or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors. Pathological response was retrospectively evaluated on 264 resected metastases from 99 patients. The proportion of responding metastases after different preoperative treatments was reported and compared. Patient's progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were compared based on pR. The combination of anti-angiogenics with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy resulted in more pR than when they were combined with irinotecan-based chemotherapy (80% vs 50%; P<0.001). Inversely, the combination of EGFR inhibitors with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy seemed to induce fewer pR than when they were combined with irinotecan-based treatment (53% vs 72%; P=0.049). Overall survival at 5 years was improved for patients with a pR in all resected metastases compared with those who did not achieve a pR (68.5% vs 32.6%; P=0.023) and this response was the only factor predicting OS in a multivariate analysis. The chemotherapy partner combined with angiogenesis or EGFR inhibitors influenced pR in resected CRCM. In our exploratory analysis anti-angiogenic/oxaliplatin-based regimens and anti-EGFR/irinotecan-based regimens were associated with the highest pR. Prospective randomised trials should be performed to validate these observations.

  9. Retrospective study on adjuvant chemotherapy after surgical resection of colorectal cancer metastatic to the liver.

    PubMed

    Donato, N; Dario, C; Giovanni, S; Virgilio, B; Paolo, D P; Roberto, L; Gianfranco, P; Mario, L; Daniela, P; Angelo, T

    1994-08-01

    As a means of defining the role of chemotherapy after radical resection of colorectal liver metastases, a follow-up study of consecutive cases referred to three different surgical clinics, between June 1977 and December 1990 was performed. Data were collected from medical records and recorded on standardized forms. Analysis focused on the impact of treatment on survival of the study population by Cox multivariate analysis. One hundred and twenty-four primary colon cancer cases were reviewed and 102 were fully evaluable. Forty of the 102 were given 5FU based chemotherapy. According to multivariate survival analysis, time to hepatic metastasis (synchronous vs metachronous, RR = 0.41, 95%, C.I. = 0.21-0.78; P = 0.007) and sex (female vs male, RR = 0.48, 95% C.I. = 0.25-0.93; P = 0.029) were significantly associated with better survival. The relative risk of dying associated with treatment was 0.53 (95% C.I. = 0.27-1.05; P = 0.0675). This study suggests that chemotherapy may have an impact on survival, although the size of the effect is not precise. Multicentric randomized clinical trials are required to define the risk/benefit profile of adjuvant chemotherapy.

  10. Chemokine-Targeted Mouse Models of Human Primary and Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huanhuan Joyce; Sun, Jian; Huang, Zhiliang; Hou, Harry; Arcilla, Myra; Rakhilin, Nikolai; Joe, Daniel J.; Choi, Jiahn; Gadamsetty, Poornima; Milsom, Jeff; Nandakumar, Govind; Longman, Randy; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Edwards, Robert; Chen, Jonlin; Chen, Kai Yuan; Bu, Pengcheng; Wang, Lihua; Xu, Yitian; Munroe, Robert; Abratte, Christian; Miller, Andrew D.; Gümüş, Zeynep H.; Shuler, Michael; Nishimura, Nozomi; Edelmann, Winfried; Shen, Xiling; Lipkin, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Current orthotopic xenograft models of human colorectal cancer (CRC) require surgery and do not robustly form metastases in the liver, the most common site clinically. CCR9 traffics lymphocytes to intestine and colorectum. We engineered use of the chemokine receptor CCR9 in CRC cell lines and patient-derived cells to create primary gastrointestinal (GI) tumors in immunodeficient mice by tail-vein injection rather than surgery. The tumors metastasize inducibly and robustly to the liver. Metastases have higher DKK4 and NOTCH signaling levels and are more chemoresistant than paired sub-cutaneous xenografts. Using this approach, we generated 17 chemokine-targeted mouse models (CTMMs) that recapitulate the majority of common human somatic CRC mutations. We also show that primary tumors can be modeled in immunocompetent mice by microinjecting CCR9-expressing cancer cell lines into early-stage mouse blastocysts, which induces central immune tolerance. We expect that CTMMs will facilitate investigation of the biology of CRC metastasis and drug screening. PMID:26006007

  11. Clinical Application of Liquid Biopsy in Targeted Therapy of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Trojan, Jörg; Klein-Scory, Susanne; Koch, Christine; Schmiegel, Wolff; Baraniskin, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Background. Colorectal cancers (CRC) shed DNA into blood circulation. There is growing evidence that the analysis of circulating tumor DNA can be effectively used for monitoring of disease, to track tumor heterogeneity and to evaluate response to treatment. Case Presentation. Here, we describe two cases of patients with advanced CRC. The first case is about a patient with no available tissue for analysis of RAS mutation status. Liquid biopsy revealed RAS-wild-type and the therapy with anti-EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) monoclonal antibody cetuximab could be initiated. In the second case, the mutational profile of a patient with initial wild-type RAS-status was continually tracked during the course of treatment. An acquired KRAS exon 3 mutation was detected. The number of KRAS mutated fragments decreased continuously after the discontinuation of the therapy with EGFR-specific antibodies. Conclusion. Liquid biopsy provides a rapid genotype result, which accurately reproduces the current mutation status of tumor tissue. Furthermore, liquid biopsy enables close monitoring of the onset of secondary resistance to anti-EGFR therapy.

  12. Molecular constituents of colorectal cancer metastatic to the liver by imaging infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, James V.; Chen, Zhaomin; Li, Ran; Nystrom, Steven V.; Butke, Ryan; Miller, Barrie; Hitchcock, Charles L.; Allen, Heather C.; Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.

    2015-03-01

    Infrared (IR) imaging spectroscopy of human liver tissue slices has been used to identify and characterize liver metastasis of colorectal origin which was surgically removed from a consenting patient and frozen without formalin fixation or dehydration procedures, so that lipids and water remain in the tissues. First, a k-means clustering analysis, using metrics from the IR spectra, identified groups within the image. The groups were identified as tumor or nontumor regions by comparing to an H and E stain of the same sample after IR imaging. Then, calibrant IR spectra of protein, several fats, glycogen, and polyvinyl alcohol were isolated by differencing spectra from different regions or groups in the image space. Finally, inner products (or scores) of the IR spectra at each pixel in the image with each of the various calibrants were calculated showing how the calibrant molecules vary in tumor and nontumor regions. In this particular case, glycogen and protein changes enable separation of tumor and nontumor regions as shown with a contour plot of the glycogen scores versus the protein scores.

  13. Overview of biomarkers in metastatic colorectal cancer: tumour, blood and patient-related factors.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Stephen J; Karapetis, Christos S; Gibbs, Peter; Pavlakis, Nick; Desai, Jayesh; Michael, Michael; Tebbutt, Niall C; Price, Tim J; Tabernero, Josep

    2013-02-01

    During the last 20 years there have been major therapeutic developments in colorectal cancer (CRC) with the introduction of multiple novel therapeutic agents into routine clinical practice. This has improved survival in both the adjuvant and advanced disease settings. However, improvements have come with substantial increases in expense to the community and potential toxicity to the patient. There has been substantial research to identify tumour factors in CRC that predict treatment response and survival outcomes. This research has identified clinically useful predictive biomarkers to aid clinical decision making, such as the presence or absence of KRAS gene mutations which can determine the benefit of using epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibiting antibodies. However, less attention has been paid to the identification and impact of predictive patient-derived factors such as age, gender and the presence of comorbid conditions or evidence of a systemic inflammatory response. In this article, the current concepts of tumour and patient-related predictive factors in CRC management are reviewed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-term effects of laser-imiquimod combination in the treatment of late-stage melanoma patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, Mark F.; Le, Henry; Li, Xiaosong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2012-03-01

    Topical application of a potent immunological modulator, imiquimod, followed by laser irradiation has been used for the treatment of late-stage melanoma patients. This novel approach, laser-assisted laser immunotherapy (LIT), targets the root course of melanoma, a highly metastatic cancer. We started a phase I clinical trial in 2006 with promising initial outcomes. The laser-imiquimod combination showed significant palliative effects for these patients with multiple treatment cycles. For the returning patients, we found that the recurrent tumors were less aggressive than usually seen in untreated patients. The current protocol uses a light-absorbing dye for selective laser photothermal interaction with a non-invasive treatment mode. It has limitations for patient treatment, particularly for large, deeper tumors, and for patients with dark pigmented skins. This study provides some information on the treated patients (both stage IV and stage IV) during the past several years. We also discuss the future directions of LIT, particularly in the area of photothermal treatment mode with a new approach of interstitial irradiation. The current results in melanoma treatment using LIT indicate that the combination of photothermal therapy and immunological stimulation may hold the key for the treatment of late-stage, metastatic cancers, not only for cutaneous cancers such as melanoma and breast cancer, but also for deep and internal tumors using different operations modes such as interstitial laser irradiation.

  15. Screening and treatment of psychological distress in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: study protocol of the TES trial.

    PubMed

    Schuurhuizen, Claudia S E W; Braamse, Annemarie M J; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Bomhof-Roordink, Hanna; Bosmans, Judith E; Cuijpers, Pim; Hoogendoorn, Adriaan W; Konings, Inge R H M; van der Linden, Mecheline H M; Neefjes, Elisabeth C W; Verheul, Henk M W; Dekker, Joost

    2015-04-17

    Psychological distress occurs frequently in patients with cancer. Psychological distress includes mild and severe forms of both anxious and depressive mood states. Literature indicates that effective management of psychological distress seems to require targeted selection of patients (T), followed by enhanced care (E), and the application of evidence based interventions. Besides, it is hypothesized that delivering care according to the stepped care (S) approach results in an affordable program. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the (cost)-effectiveness of the TES program compared to usual care in reducing psychological distress in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). This study is designed as a cluster randomized trial with 2 treatment arms: TES program for screening and treatment of psychological distress versus usual care. Sixteen hospitals participate in this study, recruiting patients with mCRC. Outcomes are evaluated at the beginning of chemotherapy and after 3, 10, 24, and 48 weeks. Primary outcome is the difference in treatment effect over time in psychological distress, assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Secondary outcomes include quality of life, patient evaluation of care, recognition and management of psychological distress, and societal costs. We created optimal conditions for an effective screening and treatment program for psychological distress in patients with mCRC. This involves targeted selection of patients, followed by enhanced and stepped care. Our approach will be thoroughly evaluated in this study. We expect that our results will contribute to the continuing debate on the (cost-) effectiveness of screening for and treatment of psychological distress in patients with cancer. This trial is registered in the Netherlands Trial Register NTR4034.

  16. In Vivo Efficacy of Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell-Derived NK Cells in the Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Veluchamy, John P.; Lopez-Lastra, Silvia; Spanholtz, Jan; Bohme, Fenna; Kok, Nina; Heideman, Daniëlle A. M.; Verheul, Henk M. W.; Di Santo, James P.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; van der Vliet, Hans J.

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) act by inhibiting EGFR downstream signaling and by eliciting a natural killer (NK) cell-mediated antitumor response. The IgG1 mAb cetuximab has been used for treatment of RASwt metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients, showing limited efficacy. In the present study, we address the potential of adoptive NK cell therapy to overcome these limitations investigating two allogeneic NK cell products, i.e., allogeneic activated peripheral blood NK cells (A-PBNK) and umbilical cord blood stem cell-derived NK cells (UCB-NK). While cetuximab monotherapy was not effective against EGFR− RASwt, EGFR+ RASmut, and EGFR+ BRAFmut cells, A-PBNK were able to initiate lysis of EGFR+ colon cancer cells irrespective of RAS or BRAF status. Cytotoxic effects of A-PBNK (but not UCB-NK) were further potentiated significantly by coating EGFR+ colon cancer cells with cetuximab. Of note, a significantly higher cytotoxicity was induced by UCB-NK in EGFR−RASwt (42 ± 8 versus 67 ± 7%), EGFR+ RASmut (20 ± 2 versus 37 ± 6%), and EGFR+ BRAFmut (23 ± 3 versus 43 ± 7%) colon cancer cells compared to A-PBNK and equaled the cytotoxic efficacy of the combination of A-PBNK and cetuximab. The antitumor efficacy of UCB-NK cells against cetuximab-resistant human EGFR+ RASmut colon cancer cells was further confirmed in an in vivo preclinical mouse model where UCB-NK showed enhanced antitumor cytotoxicity against colon cancer independent of EGFR and RAS status. As UCB-NK have been proven safe in a recently conducted phase I clinical trial in acute myeloid leukemia, a fast translation into clinical proof of concept for mCRC could be considered. PMID:28220124

  17. [Cost-effectiveness analysis of aflibercept in combination with FOLFIRI in the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Pericay, C; Frías, C; Abad, A; Lamas, M J; Echave, M; Oyagüez, I; Rubio, M; Giménez, E; Naoshy, S; Joulain, F

    2014-07-01

    To estimate the incremental cost per life-year gained (LYG) of aflibercept in combination with FOLFIRI as second-line treatment in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients previously treated with oxaliplatin. Based on clinical trial VELOUR results, a three-state Markov model (stable disease, progression and death) with 2-week cycle duration was designed. Transition to health state «progression» implied the interruption of second-line treatment and administration of a third-line treatment (post-second line chemotherapy). Cost estimation included disease management cost (pharmaceutical, adverse event management, administration costs, etc.). Both cost and outcomes were discounted (3% annually). Sensitivity analyses (SA) were performed to test model robustness. Administration of aflibercept + FOLFIRI as second-line treatment provided 1.78 LYG (21 life-months gained). With FOLFIRI 1.43 LYG (17 months) were obtained. The cost of the clinical management of aflibercept + FOLFIRI implied an additional investment of Euros 13,564 compared with FOLFIRI for a lifetime horizon, being total costs for aflibercept + FOLFIRI of Euros 38,346, compared to Euros 24,782 with FOLFIRI. In the cost-effectiveness analysis Euros 38,931/LYG was obtained with aflibercept in combination with FOLFIRI versus FOLFIRI. Aflibercept in combination with FOLFIRI increased overall survival versus FOLFIRI, so it is an effective strategy in the treatment of patients with mCRC. Aflibercept in combination with FOLFIRI is an efficient strategy for second-line mCRC treatment from the National Health System perspective. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthetic lethal interaction of cetuximab with MEK1/2 inhibition in NRAS-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Massaguer, Anna; de Llorens, Rafael; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Brunet, Joan; Salazar, Ramon; Menendez, Javier A.

    2016-01-01

    KRAS mutations are an established predictor of lack of response to EGFR-targeted therapies in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, little is known about the role of the rarer NRAS mutations as a mechanism of primary resistance to the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab in wild-type KRAS mCRC. Using isogenic mCRC cells with a heterozygous knock-in of the NRAS activating mutation Q61K, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism(s) by which mutant NRAS blocks cetuximab from inhibiting mCRC growth. NRASQ61K/+ cells were refractory to cetuximab-induced growth inhibition. Pathway-oriented proteome profiling revealed that cetuximab-unresponsive ERK1/2 phosphorylation was the sole biomarker distinguishing cetuximab-refractory NRASQ61K/+ from cetuximab-sensitive NRAS+/+ cells. We therefore employed four representative MEK1/2 inhibitors (binimetinib, trametinib, selumetinib, and pimasertib) to evaluate the therapeutic value of MEK/ERK signaling in cetuximab-refractory NRAS mutation-induced mCRC. Co-treatment with an ineffective dose of cetuximab augmented, up to more than 1,300-fold, the cytotoxic effects of pimasertib against NRASQ61K/+ cells. Simultaneous combination of MEK1/2 inhibitors with cetuximab resulted in extremely high and dose-dependent synthetic lethal effects, which were executed, at least in part, by exacerbated apoptotic cell death. Dynamic monitoring of real-time cell growth rates confirmed that cetuximab synergistically sensitized NRASQ61K/+ cellsto MEK1/2 inhibition. Our discovery of a synthetic lethal interaction of cetuximab in combination with MEK1/2 inhibition for the NRAS mutant subgroup of mCRC underscores the importance of therapeutic intervention both in the MEK-ERK and EGFR pathways to achieve maximal therapeutic efficacy against NRAS-mutant mCRC tumors. PMID:27636997

  19. Efficacy and safety of Quxie Capsule () in metastatic colorectal cancer: A double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Yang, Yu-Fei; He, Bin; Yi, Dan-Hui; Hao, Jie; Zhang, Da

    2017-08-24

    To verify the efficacy and safety of Quxie Capsule () in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The present study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Sixty patients with mCRC were randomized into two groups at a 1:1 ratio by sealed envelope. The treatment group received conventional therapy combined with Quxie Capsule for 3 months. The control group was treated with conventional therapy combined with placebo for 3 months. Main outcome measures were overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Subgroup analysis was performed according to age, right or left-sided disease, and second-line therapy to determine the differences in PFS and OS between the two groups. Patients were followed up every 3 months until Dec 31st 2016. The median OS was 23 months in the treatment group [95% confidence interval (CI): 15-not calculated] vs. 14 months in the control group (95% CI: 11-22, P=0.060). The OS of the treatment group tended to be longer than that of the control group (P>0.05). In the subgroups of patients <65 years old, left-sided colon, and 2nd-line therapy, the treatment group showed a significant survival benefit compared with the control group (P=0.006, 0.038, 0.013, respectively). There were no significant differences between the two groups in PFS (P>0.05). Safety analysis showed no severe hematological toxicity or liver and renal function injury in the treatment group. Quxie Capsule showed good safety and efficacy, and could prolong the OS of patients with mCRC. (Registration No. ChiCTR-IOR-16009733).

  20. Early detection of poor outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: tumor kinetics evaluated by circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Souza e Silva, Virgílio; Chinen, Ludmilla Thomé Domingos; Abdallah, Emne A; Damascena, Aline; Paludo, Jociana; Chojniak, Rubens; Dettino, Aldo Lourenço Abbade; de Mello, Celso Abdon Lopes; Alves, Vanessa S; Fanelli, Marcello F

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most prevalent cancer worldwide. New prognostic markers are needed to identify patients with poorer prognosis, and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) seem to be promising to accomplish this. Patients and methods A prospective study was conducted by blood collection from patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC), three times, every 2 months in conjunction with image examinations for evaluation of therapeutic response. CTC isolation and counting were performed by Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cells (ISET). Results A total of 54 patients with mCRC with a mean age of 57.3 years (31–82 years) were included. Among all patients, 60% (n=32) were carriers of wild-type KRAS (WT KRAS) tumors and 90% of them (n=29) were exposed to monoclonal antibodies along with systemic treatment. Evaluating CTC kinetics, when we compared the baseline (pretreatment) CTC level (CTC1) with the level at first follow-up (CTC2), we observed that CTC1-positive patients (CTCs above the median), who became negative (CTCs below the median) had a favorable evolution (n=14), with a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 14.7 months. This was higher than that for patients with an unfavorable evolution (CTC1− that became CTC2+; n=13, 6.9 months; P=0.06). Patients with WT KRAS with favorable kinetics had higher PFS (14.7 months) in comparison to those with WT KRAS with unfavorable kinetics (9.4 months; P=0.02). Moreover, patients whose imaging studies showed radiological progression had an increased quantification of CTCs at CTC2 compared to those without progression (P=0.04). Conclusion This study made possible the presentation of ISET as a feasible tool for evaluating CTC kinetics in patients with mCRC, which can be promising in their clinical evaluation. PMID:28008271

  1. Chemotherapy plus bevacizumab versus chemotherapy plus cetuximab as first-line treatment for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Long; Wang, Feng; Li, Zhe-zhen; Ren, Chao; Zhang, Dong-sheng; Zhao, Qi; Lu, Yun-xin; Wang, De-shen; Ju, Huai-qiang; Qiu, Miao-zhen; Wang, Zhi-qiang; Wang, Feng-hua; Xu, Rui-hua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The present observational cohort study was designed to elucidate the efficacy and safety profile of bevacizumab or cetuximab with chemotherapy as the first-line treatment in Chinese patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Clinical data were collected from a single-center registry study where mCRC patients received first-line fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy combined with either bevacizumab (188 patients with KRAS wild-type or mutated tumors) or cetuximab (101 patients with KRAS wild-type tumors) between January 2009 and December 2013. The Kaplan–Meier method was used for survival analysis. Cox proportional hazards model was used for estimating the prognostic and predictive values of clinicopathological characteristics. No statistically significant difference was observed between the bevacizumab and cetuximab groups in terms of median progression-free survival (PFS) (10.6 vs 8.7 months, P = 0.317), median overall survival (OS) (27.7 vs 28.3 months, P = 0.525), or overall response rate (43.1% vs 53.5%, P = 0.108). For the subset of patients with peritoneal dissemination, bevacizumab-based triplet appears to be superior to cetuximab-based triplet as measured by PFS (9.6 vs 6.1 months) and OS (26.3 vs 12.7 months), but not for patients without peritoneal dissemination (PFS, 10.6 vs 9.1 months; OS, 27.9 vs 30.7 months) (all unadjusted and adjusted interaction P < 0.05). Our study suggests that bevacizumab- or cetuximab-based regimens have similar effectiveness as first-line treatment of mCRC in Chinese population. Patients with peritoneal dissemination were likely to gain more benefit from bevacizumab than cetuximab treatment. Future prospective studies are required to further confirm these results. PMID:28002313

  2. Cost-effectiveness of RAS screening before monoclonal antibodies therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer based on FIRE3 Study.

    PubMed

    Wen, Feng; Yang, Yu; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Jing; Tang, Ruilei; Chen, Hongdou; Zheng, Hanrui; Fu, Ping; Li, Qiu

    2015-01-01

    The surprising results published by FIRE-3 revealed that the overall survival (OS) of RAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with Cetuximab(Cmab) and FOLFIRI combination was prolonged to 33.1 months. The substantial increase in testing and treatment costs, however, impose a considerable health burden on patients and society. Hence the study was aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of RAS screening before monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) therapy based on FIRE-3 study. Four groups were analyzed: group 1, patients with KRAS testing treated with Cmab and FOLFIRI; group 2, patients with RAS testing treated with Cmab and FOLFIRI; group 3, patients with KRAS testing treated with bevacizumab(Bmab) and FOLFIRI; group 4, patients with RAS testing treated with Bmab and FOLFIRI. A Markov model comprising 3 health states (progression-free survival, progressive disease and death) was built. The costs were calculated from a Chinese payer perspective, and survival was reported in quality-adjusted life-months (QALMs). Average total lifetime costs ranged from $104,682.44 (RAS-Bmab) to $136,867.44 (RAS-Cmab), while the survival gained varied from 16.88 QALMs in RAS-Bmab to 21.85 QALMs in RAS-Cmab. The cost per QALM was $6,263.86 for RAS-Cmab, $6,145.84 for KRAS-Bmab, $6,201.57 for RAS-Bmab and $6,960.70 for KRAS-Cmab respectively. The KRAS-Cmab strategy was dominated by the other 3 groups. The first-treatment cost of RAS-Cmab was the most influential one to the model. In all, the RAS screening prior to Cmab treatment in mCRC seems to be a cost-effective strategy in the time of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) therapy with the most gained QALMs.

  3. BRAF V600E mutation in metastatic colorectal cancer: Methods of detection and correlation with clinical and pathologic features.

    PubMed

    Roma, Cristin; Rachiglio, Anna Maria; Pasquale, Raffaella; Fenizia, Francesca; Iannaccone, Alessia; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Antinolfi, Giuseppe; Parrella, Paola; Graziano, Paolo; Sabatino, Lina; Colantuoni, Vittorio; Botti, Gerardo; Maiello, Evaristo; Normanno, Nicola

    2016-08-02

    The screening for BRAF V600E mutation is employed in clinical practice for its prognostic and potentially predictive role in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma (mCRC). Little information is available on the sensitivity and specificity of the testing methods to detect this mutation in CRC. By using serial dilution of BRAF mutant DNA with wild type DNA, we found that the sensitivity of allelic discrimination-Real Time PCR was higher than PCR-Sequencing (10% vs 20%). In agreement, the Real Time PCR assay displayed increased analytical sensitivity in detecting the BRAF V600E mutation as compared with PCR-Sequencing in a cohort of 510 consecutive CRCs (21 vs 16 cases). Targeted resequencing demonstrated that all cases negative by PCR-Sequencing had an allelic frequency of the BRAF mutation <20%, thus suggesting tumor heterogeneity. The association of BRAF mutations with clinical and pathological features was assessed next in a cohort of 840 KRAS exon 2 wild type CRC patients screened with the Real Time PCR assay. The BRAF V600E mutation frequency in this cohort was 7.8% that increased to 33.4% in females over 70 y of age with right-sided tumor location. BRAF mutations were also detected in 4.4% of male patients with left-sided tumors and aged <70 y. Fourteen of 61 (22.9%) BRAF V600E mutation bearing patients exhibited microsatellite instability (MSI) as assessed by T17 mononucleotide sequence within intron 8 of HSP110. Our study indicates that Real Time PCR-based assays are more sensitive than PCR-Sequencing to detect the BRAF V600E mutation in CRC and that BRAF mutations screening should not be restricted to selected patients on the basis of the clinical-pathological characteristics.

  4. Association between serum ligands and the skin toxicity of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoki; Yamada, Yasuhide; Furuta, Koh; Nagashima, Kengo; Kubo, Akiko; Sasaki, Yusuke; Shoji, Hirokazu; Honma, Yoshitaka; Iwasa, Satoru; Okita, Natsuko; Takashima, Atsuo; Kato, Ken; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Shimada, Yasuhiro

    2015-05-01

    Skin toxicity is a known clinical signature used to predict the prognosis of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody treatment in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). There are no biological markers to predict skin toxicity before anti-EGFR antibody treatment in mCRC patients. Between August 2008 and August 2011, pretreatment serum samples were obtained from KRAS wild-type (WT) patients who received anti-EGFR antibody treatment. Serum levels of ligands were measured by ELISA. A total of 103 KRAS WT patients were enrolled in the study. Progression-free survival and overall survival of patients with a high grade (grade 2-3) of skin toxicity were significantly longer than those with a low grade (grade 0-1) of skin toxicity (median progression-free survival, 6.4 months vs 2.4 months, P < 0.001; median overall survival, 14.6 months vs 7.1 months, P = 0.006). There were significant differences in distribution of serum levels of epiregulin (EREG), amphiregulin (AREG), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) between groups of low/high grade of skin toxicity (P < 0.048, P < 0.012, P < 0.012, respectively). In addition, serum levels of HGF, EREG, and AREG were inversely proportional to grades of skin toxicity as determined by the Cochran-Armitage test (P = 0.019, P = 0.047, P = 0.021, respectively). Our study indicated that serum levels such as HGF, EREG, and AREG may be significant markers to predict the grade of skin toxicity and the prognosis of anti-EGFR antibody treatment, which contribute to improvement of the management of skin toxicity and survival time in mCRC patients. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of RAS screening before monoclonal antibodies therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer based on FIRE3 Study

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Feng; Yang, Yu; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Jing; Tang, Ruilei; Chen, Hongdou; Zheng, Hanrui; Fu, Ping; Li, Qiu

    2015-01-01

    The surprising results published by FIRE-3 revealed that the overall survival (OS) of RAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with Cetuximab(Cmab) and FOLFIRI combination was prolonged to 33.1 months. The substantial increase in testing and treatment costs, however, impose a considerable health burden on patients and society. Hence the study was aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of RAS screening before monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) therapy based on FIRE-3 study. Four groups were analyzed: group 1, patients with KRAS testing treated with Cmab and FOLFIRI; group 2, patients with RAS testing treated with Cmab and FOLFIRI; group 3, patients with KRAS testing treated with bevacizumab(Bmab) and FOLFIRI; group 4, patients with RAS testing treated with Bmab and FOLFIRI. A Markov model comprising 3 health states (progression-free survival, progressive disease and death) was built. The costs were calculated from a Chinese payer perspective, and survival was reported in quality-adjusted life-months (QALMs). Average total lifetime costs ranged from $104,682.44 (RAS-Bmab) to $136,867.44 (RAS-Cmab), while the survival gained varied from 16.88 QALMs in RAS-Bmab to 21.85 QALMs in RAS-Cmab. The cost per QALM was $6,263.86 for RAS-Cmab, $6,145.84 for KRAS-Bmab, $6,201.57 for RAS-Bmab and $6,960.70 for KRAS-Cmab respectively. The KRAS-Cmab strategy was dominated by the other 3 groups. The first-treatment cost of RAS-Cmab was the most influential one to the model. In all, the RAS screening prior to Cmab treatment in mCRC seems to be a cost-effective strategy in the time of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) therapy with the most gained QALMs. PMID:26418570

  6. Bevacizumab exposure beyond first disease progression in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: analyses of the ARIES observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Grothey, Axel; Flick, E Dawn; Cohn, Allen L; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios S; Bendell, Johanna C; Kozloff, Mark; Roach, Nancy; Mun, Yong; Fish, Susan; Hurwitz, Herbert I

    2014-07-01

    This analysis from Avastin® Registries: Investigation of Effectiveness and Safety (ARIES) examined the association between exposure to bevacizumab after disease progression (PD) and postprogression survival (PPS) in bevacizumab-exposed metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) through the application of time-dependent and time-fixed analytical methods. Patients with mCRC who were treated with first-line bevacizumab and who survived first PD (PD1) were included. A time-dependent Cox regression model was fitted to assess the effect of cumulative bevacizumab exposure on PPS, while controlling for potential confounders. In addition to support findings from previous studies, a modified intent-to-treat (mITT) analysis compared PPS in patients who received bevacizumab beyond disease progression (BBP) with those who did not (No-BBP). Of 1550 patients, 1199 survived PD1 and had a median PPS of 13.4 months. Cumulative bevacizumab exposure was associated with improved PPS (p = 0.0040). After adjusting for confounders, the hazard ratios (HRs) for PPS decreased, on average, by 1.2% (range, 1.1-1.3%) with each additional dose of bevacizumab. In the mITT analysis, the median PPS for BBP (n = 438) was 14.4 months vs 10.6 months with for No-BBP (n = 667). BBP was found to be independently associated with longer PPS in a multivariable Cox regression analysis (HR, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.73-0.97). Protocol-specified adverse events suspected to be associated with bevacizumab occurred in 13.0% of patients with BBP. This analysis supports the observation that bevacizumab exposure after PD1 is associated with longer PPS in mCRC. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Gemcitabine plus S-1 versus cetuximab as a third-line therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer: an observational trial

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ming; Deng, Ting; Han, Rubing; Zhou, Likun; Ba, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim: After failure of oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), there is no effective and low-cost therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine plus S-1 (GS) versus cetuximab as a third-line chemotherapy for mCRC patients. Methods: Patients with previous failure of oxaliplatin, 5-FU, and irinotecan chemotherapy were included. The patients received GS or cetuximab until disease progression or intolerable toxicity occurred. The regimen that was selected by the patient depended on their economic ability. Results: In all, 38 patients were enrolled between October 2009 and October 2012, and the patients were divided into 2 groups of 19 patients each. The median overall survival (OS) was 10 months for the GS group and 6.9 months for the cetuximab group (P = 0.047). The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 79 days and 78 days (P = 0.344), respectively. The disease control rate (DCR) was 42.11% and 47.37%, respectively (P = 0.985). The overall response rate was 0% and 10.52%, respectively (P = 0.169). Adverse events related to chemotherapy were mild to moderate. Only grade 3-4 neutropenia was found in the GS group at a rate of 21.1%. In the cetuximab group, the rash incidence rate was 89.6%, with 1 patient reaching grade 3. Conclusions: GS has benefits in OS compared with cetuximab, and is a promising and safe regimen as a third-line chemotherapy for oxaliplatin- and irinotecan-refractory mCRC with good performance status for mCRC patients. PMID:26885049

  8. Combination of Irinotecan, Oxaliplatin and 5-Fluorouracil as a Rechallenge Regimen for Heavily Pretreated Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Gustavo Dos Santos; Braghiroli, Maria Ignez; Artioli, Michelle; Paterlini, Ana Carolina Carvalho Rocha; Teixeira, Marcela Crosara; Gumz, Brenda Pires; Girardi, Daniel da Motta; Braghiroli, Oddone F M; Costa, Frederico Perego; Hoff, Paulo M

    2017-09-08

    Our objective was to evaluate the benefit of re-exposing patients with refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) to a combination of oxaliplatin, irinotecan and 5-fluorouracil treatment. We retrospectively analysed patients with mCRC who received a combination of oxaliplatin, irinotecan and fluorouracil as a rechallenge regimen after progressing on the same drugs. Both FOLFOXIRI and FOLFIRINOX were used. Toxicity was evaluated for each treatment cycle, and survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 21 patients who were treated between January 2011 and December 2013 were selected for this study. Most of the patients (95.2%) had an ECOG status of 0-1. The median age at diagnosis was 52.1 years (range 36-77 years), and 14 (66.6%) patients had wild-type KRAS. Thirteen patients received FOLFIRINOX, and eight received FOLFOXIRI. Most patients had previously received at least three regimens, with 80% receiving anti-VEGF and 66% anti-EGFR antibodies. The response rate was 38%, and 24% patients had stable disease. The median time to disease progression was 4.0 months (range 1.0-9.1 months), and the median overall survival duration was 8.6 months (range 6.3-11.5 months). Most patients required dose adjustment and treatment delays. One patient experienced grade 5 neutropenic sepsis. Both FOLFIRINOX and FOLFOXIRI are active and potentially feasible rechallenge treatment options for heavily pretreated patients with good performance status. With dose reduction and close monitoring for toxicity, the risk of serious adverse events can be minimised.

  9. p16 Hypermethylation and KRAS Mutation Are Independent Predictors of Cetuximab Plus FOLFIRI Chemotherapy in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Hyun; Park, Kyu Hyun; Shin, Sang Joon; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Nam Kyu; Rha, Sun Young; Roh, Jae Kyung; Ahn, Joong Bae

    2016-01-01

    Hypermethylation of the CpG island of p16(INK4a) occurs in a significant proportion of colorectal cancer (CRC). We aimed to investigate its predictive role in CRC patients treated with 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan (FOLFIRI), and cetuximab. Pyrosequencing was used to identify KRAS mutation and hypermethylation of 6 CpG island loci (p16, p14, MINT1, MINT2, MINT31, and hMLH1) in DNA extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens. Logistic regression and Cox regression were performed for analysis of the relation between methylation status of CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) markers including p16 and clinical outcome. Hypermethylation of the p16 gene was detected in 14 of 49 patients (28.6%) and showed significant association with KRAS mutation (Fisher exact, p=0.01) and CIMP positivity (Fisher exact, p=0.002). Patients with p16-unmethylated tumors had significantly longer time to progression (TTP; median, 9.0 months vs. 3.5 months; log-rank, p=0.001) and overall survival (median, 44.9 months vs. 16.4 months; log-rank, p=0.008) than those with p16-methylated tumors. Patients with both KRAS and p16 aberrancy (n=6) had markedly shortened TTP (median, 2.8 months) compared to those with either KRAS or p16 aberrancy (n=11; median, 8.6 months; p=0.021) or those with neither (n=32; median, 9.0 months; p < 0.0001). In multivariate analysis, KRAS mutation and p16 methylation showed independent association with shorter TTP (KRAS mutation: hazard ratio [HR], 3.21; p=0.017; p16 methylation: HR, 2.97; p=0.027). Hypermethylation of p16 was predictive of clinical outcome in metastatic CRC patients treated with cetuximab and FOLFIRI, irrespective of KRAS mutation.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of capecitabine and bevacizumab maintenance treatment after first-line induction treatment in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Franken, M D; van Rooijen, E M; May, A M; Koffijberg, H; van Tinteren, H; Mol, L; Ten Tije, A J; Creemers, G J; van der Velden, A M T; Tanis, B C; Uyl-de Groot, C A; Punt, C J A; Koopman, M; van Oijen, M G H

    2017-04-01

    Capecitabine and bevacizumab (CAP-B) maintenance therapy has shown to be more effective compared with observation in metastatic colorectal cancer patients achieving stable disease or better after six cycles of first-line capecitabine, oxaliplatin, bevacizumab treatment in terms of progression-free survival. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of CAP-B maintenance treatment. Decision analysis with Markov modelling to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of CAP-B maintenance compared with observation was performed based on CAIRO3 study results (n = 558). An additional analysis was performed in patients with complete or partial response. The primary outcomes were the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) defined as the additional cost per life year (LY) and quality-adjusted life years (QALY) gained, calculated from EQ-5D questionnaires and literature and LYs gained. Univariable sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the influence of input parameters on the ICER, and a probabilistic sensitivity analysis represents uncertainty in model parameters. CAP-B maintenance compared with observation resulted in 0.21 QALYs (0.18LYs) gained at a mean cost increase of €36,845, yielding an ICER of €175,452 per QALY (€204,694 per LY). Varying the difference in health-related quality of life between CAP-B maintenance and observation influenced the ICER most. For patients achieving complete or partial response on capecitabine, oxaliplatin, bevacizumab induction treatment, an ICER of €149,300 per QALY was calculated. CAP-B maintenance results in improved health outcomes measured in QALYs and LYs compared with observation, but also in a relevant increase in costs. Despite the fact that there is no consensus on cost-effectiveness thresholds in cancer treatment, CAP-B maintenance may not be considered cost-effective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. KRAS and BRAF mutation analysis in metastatic colorectal cancer: a cost-effectiveness analysis from a Swiss perspective.

    PubMed

    Blank, Patricia R; Moch, Holger; Szucs, Thomas D; Schwenkglenks, Matthias

    2011-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), such as cetuximab, have led to significant clinical benefits for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients but have also increased treatment costs considerably. Recent evidence associates KRAS and BRAF mutations with resistance to EGFR antibodies. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of predictive testing for KRAS and BRAF mutations, prior to cetuximab treatment of chemorefractory mCRC patients. A life-long Markov simulation model was used to estimate direct medical costs (€) and clinical effectiveness [quality-adjusted life-years (QALY)] of the following strategies: KRAS testing, KRAS testing with subsequent BRAF testing of KRAS wild-types (KRAS/BRAF), cetuximab treatment without testing. Comparison was against no cetuximab treatment (reference strategy). In the testing strategies, cetuximab treatment was initiated if no mutations were detected. Best supportive care was given to all patients. Survival times/utilities were derived from published randomized clinical trials. Costs were assessed from the perspective of the Swiss health system. Average remaining lifetime costs ranged from €3,983 (no cetuximab) to €38,662 (no testing). Cetuximab treatment guided by KRAS/BRAF achieved gains of 0.491 QALYs compared with the reference strategy. The KRAS testing strategy achieved an additional gain of 0.002 QALYs compared with KRAS/BRAF. KRAS/BRAF testing was the most cost-effective approach when compared with the reference strategy (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio: €62,653/QALY). New predictive tests for KRAS and BRAF status are currently being introduced in pathology. Despite substantial costs of predictive testing, it is economically favorable to identify patients with KRAS and BRAF wild-type status. ©2011 AACR

  12. The predictive and prognostic value of the Glasgow Prognostic Score in metastatic colorectal carcinoma patients receiving bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Marianne; Dréanic, Johann; Dhooge, Marion; Mir, Olivier; Brezault, Catherine; Goldwasser, François; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain

    2014-11-01

    The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), based on C-reactive protein and albumin levels, has shown its prognostic value in metastatic colorectal carcinoma (mCRC) patients receiving conventional cytotoxic therapy. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody to vascular epidermal growth factor, improves the overall survival in mCRC. The aim of the present study was to assess the prognostic value of GPS in mCRC patients receiving antivascular epidermal growth factor therapy. From August 2005 to August 2012, consecutive patients with mCRC who received chemotherapy plus bevacizumab were eligible for the present analysis. The clinical stage, C-reactive protein, albumin and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status were recorded at the time of initiation of bevacizumab. Patients received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy plus bevacizumab in accordance with the digestive oncology multidisciplinary staff proposal and in line with the French recommendations for the treatment of mCRC. Eighty patients were eligible (colon n = 59, rectum n = 21), with a median follow-up of 14 months (range 1-58 months). Chemotherapy given with bevacizumab and 5-fluorouracil was oxaliplatin (n = 41, 51%) or irinotecan (n = 27, 34%). At baseline, 56, 31 and 13% of patients had a GPS of 0 (n = 45), 1 (n = 25) and 2 (n = 10), respectively. The median progression-free survival in these groups was 10.1, 6.5 and 5.6 months (P = 0.16), respectively. The median overall survival was 20.1, 11.4 and 6.5 months, respectively (P = 0.004). Our study confirmed the prognostic value of GPS in mCRC patients receiving chemotherapy plus bevacizumab. Given the poor survival observed in patients with an GPS of 2, studies dedicated to these patients could identify optimal treatment modalities.

  13. A randomised, open-label phase II trial of afatinib versus cetuximab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hickish, Tamas; Cassidy, Jim; Propper, David; Chau, Ian; Falk, Stephen; Ford, Hugo; Iveson, Tim; Braun, Michael; Potter, Vanessa; Macpherson, Iain R; Finnigan, Helen; Lee, Chooi; Jones, Hilary; Harrison, Mark

    2014-12-01

    This randomised phase II trial aimed to compare efficacy of the irreversible ErbB family blocker, afatinib, with cetuximab in patients with KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma (mCRC) with progression following oxaliplatin- and irinotecan-based regimens. Efficacy in patients with KRAS mutations was also evaluated. Patients with KRAS wild-type tumours were randomised 2:1 to afatinib (40 mg/day, increasing to 50 mg/day if minimal toxicity) or cetuximab weekly (400 mg/m2 loading dose, then 250 mg/m2/week) according to number of previous chemotherapy lines. All patients with KRAS-mutated tumours received afatinib. Primary end-points were objective response (OR) for the wild-type group and disease control for the KRAS-mutated group. Secondary end-points were progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Patients with KRAS wild-type tumours (n=50) received afatinib (n=36) or cetuximab (n=14). Unconfirmed and confirmed ORs were 3% and 0% for afatinib versus 20% and 13% for cetuximab (odds ratio: 0.122 [P=0.0735] and <0.001, respectively). Median PFS was 46.0 and 144.5 days for afatinib and cetuximab, respectively. Median OS was 355 days with afatinib but not reached for cetuximab. In the KRAS-mutated group (n=41), five (12%) patients achieved confirmed disease control (stable disease; P=0.6394 [comparison versus 10%]); no ORs were reported. Median PFS and OS were 41.0 and 173days, respectively. Most frequent treatment-related adverse events were diarrhoea and rash across groups. The efficacy of afatinib was inferior to cetuximab in patients with KRAS wild-type mCRC. In patients with KRAS-mutated tumours, disease control was modest with afatinib. Afatinib had a manageable safety profile. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of KRAS testing in metastatic colorectal cancer patients in the United States and Germany.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, Arthi; Efrusy, Molly B; Göke, Burkhard; Kirchner, Thomas; Santas, Christopher C; Goldberg, Richard M

    2012-07-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the cost-effectiveness of testing for KRAS mutations before administering EGFR inhibitors such as cetuximab and panitumumab for patients with advanced metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in the United States and Germany. We developed a lifetime Markov model of costs and survival associated with treating mCRC patients to assess the impact of KRAS testing before administering EGFR inhibitor-containing chemotherapy regimens. Overall, combination therapies involving cetuximab plus irinotecan/FOLFIRI had a better life expectancy (25.83 weeks) than cetuximab or panitumumab alone. Use of KRAS testing (assuming KRAS mutant patients receive only irinotecan) was equally effective and saved $12,428 per patient in the United States. When KRAS mutant patients received best supportive care, the life expectancy decreased slightly (24.26 weeks vs. 25.83 weeks) and the costs decreased by $13,501 in the United States and €9,560 in Germany. For patients treated with cetuximab alone, use of KRAS testing to identify mutations lowered costs by $8,040 per patient in the U.S. analysis and €3,856 per patient in the German analysis. For patients treated with panitumumab alone, use of KRAS testing to identify mutations lowered costs by $7,546 per patient in the U.S. analysis and €4,612 per patient in the German analysis. Model results were sensitive to the cost of chemotherapy regimens and the prevalence of KRAS mutations in the population. Under most scenarios, using KRAS testing to select patients for EGFR inhibitor therapy saved $7,500-$12,400 per patient in the United States and €3,900-€9,600 per patient in Germany with equivalent clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  15. Prevalence of KRAS, BRAF, PI3K and EGFR mutations among Asian patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    PHUA, LEE CHENG; NG, HUI WEN; YEO, ANGIE HUI LING; CHEN, ELYA; LO, MICHELLE SHU MEI; CHEAH, PEH YEAN; CHAN, ERIC CHUN YONG; KOH, POH KOON; HO, HAN KIAT

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in oncogenes along the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway have been implicated in the resistance to cetuximab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, the relative significance of these mutations based on their frequencies of occurrence in the Singaporean population remains unclear. In the present study, the prevalence of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and EGFR somatic mutations were determined among Singaporean patients with mCRC. DNA extracted from 45 pairs of surgically resected tumor and normal mucosa samples was subjected to direct sequencing or restriction fragment length polymorphism. Associations of the genetic mutations with various clinicopathological parameters were further explored. Mutations in either codon 12 or 13 of KRAS were confirmed as prominent phenomena among the included Singaporean mCRC patients, at a prevalence comparable with that of Caucasian and patients of other Asian ethnicities [33.3% (90% confidence interval, 21.8–44.9%)]. KRAS mutation was not associated with clinicopathological features, including age, gender and ethnicity of patients, or the tumor site, differentiation and mucinous status. Conversely, the prevalence of BRAF (0%), PI3K (2.2%) and EGFR (0%) mutations were low. The results of the present study indicate that KRAS mutations are prevalent among the studied population, and confirm the low prevalence of BRAF, PI3K and EGFR mutations. KRAS should be prioritized as an investigational gene for future studies of predictive biomarkers of cetuximab response among Singaporean patients with mCRC. PMID:26622882

  16. Imagable 4T1 model for the study of late stage breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Kai; Fang, Min; Alroy, Joseph; Sahagian, G Gary

    2008-01-01

    Background The 4T1 mouse mammary tumor cell line is one of only a few breast cancer models with the capacity to metastasize efficiently to sites affected in human breast cancer. Here we describe two 4T1 cell lines modified to facilitate analysis of tumor growth and metastasis and evaluation of gene function in vivo. New information regarding the involvement of innate and acquired immunity in metastasis and other characteristics of the model relevant to its use in the study of late stage breast cancer are reported. Methods The lines were engineered for stable expression of firefly luciferase to allow tracking and quantitation of the cells in vivo. Biophotonic imaging was used to characterize growth and metastasis of the lines in vivo and an improved gene expression approach was used to characterize the basis for the metastatic phenotype that was observed. Results Growth of cells at the primary site was biphasic with metastasis detected during the second growth phase 5–6 weeks after introduction of the cells. Regression of growth, which occurred in weeks 3–4, was associated with extensive necrosis and infiltration of leukocytes. Biphasic tumor growth did not occur in BALB/c SCID mice indicating involvement of an acquired immune response in the effect. Hematopoiesis in spleen and liver and elevated levels of circulating leukocytes were observed at week 2 and increased progressively until death at week 6–8. Gene expression analysis revealed an association of several secreted factors including colony stimulatory factors, cytokines and chemokines, acute phase proteins, angiogenesis factors and ECM modifying proteins with the 4T1 metastatic phenotype. Signaling pathways likely to be responsible for production of these factors were also identified. Conclusion The production of factors that stimulate angiogenesis and ECM modification and induce hematopoiesis, recruitment and activation of leukocytes suggest that 4T1 tumor cells play a more direct role than previously

  17. The metastatic suppressor NDRG1 inhibits EMT, migration and invasion through interaction and promotion of caveolin-1 ubiquitylation in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mi, L; Zhu, F; Yang, X; Lu, J; Zheng, Y; Zhao, Q; Wen, X; Lu, A; Wang, M; Zheng, M; Ji, J; Sun, J

    2017-03-27

    N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) has been reported to act as a key regulatory molecule in tumor progression-related signaling pathways, especially in tumor metastasis. However, the related mechanism has not been fully discovered yet. Herein we demonstrated that the novel molecule of cell migration and invasion, caveolin-1, has direct interaction with NDRG1 in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Moreover, we discovered that NDRG1 reduces caveolin-1 protein expression through promoting its ubiquitylation and subsequent degradation via the proteasome in CRC cells. In addition, caveolin-1 mediates the suppressive function of NDRG1 in epithelial-mesenchymal transition, migration and invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo. These results help to fulfill the potential mechanisms of NDRG1 in anti-metastatic treatment for human colorectal cancer.Oncogene advance online publication, 27 March 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.74.

  18. Randomized, controlled trial of irinotecan plus infusional, bolus, or oral fluoropyrimidines in first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: results from the BICC-C Study.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Charles S; Marshall, John; Mitchell, Edith; Wierzbicki, Rafal; Ganju, Vinod; Jeffery, Mark; Schulz, Joseph; Richards, Donald; Soufi-Mahjoubi, Raoudha; Wang, Benjamin; Barrueco, José

    2007-10-20

    This phase III study compared the safety and efficacy of the following three different irinotecan-containing regimens in the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: irinotecan plus infusional fluorouracil (FU)/leucovorin (LV) (FOLFIRI), irinotecan plus bolus FU/LV (mIFL), and irinotecan plus oral capecitabine (CapeIRI). A total of 430 previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer patients were randomly assigned to receive FOLFIRI (n = 144), mIFL (n = 141), or CapeIRI (n = 145). Patients were concurrently randomly assigned to a double-blind treatment with celecoxib or placebo. After a protocol amendment, an additional 117 patients were randomly assigned to either FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab (FOLFIRI+Bev; n = 57) or mILF plus bevacizumab (mIFL+Bev; n = 60), whereas the CapeIRI arm was discontinued. The primary study end point was progression-free survival (PFS), with secondary end points of overall survival (OS), response rate, and toxicity. Median PFS was 7.6 months for FOLFIRI, 5.9 months for mIFL (P = .004 for the comparison with FOLFIRI), and 5.8 months for CapeIRI (P = .015). Median OS was 23.1 months for FOLFIRI, 17.6 months for mIFL (P = .09), and 18.9 months for CapeIRI (P = .27). CapeIRI was associated with higher rates of severe vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration. After the amendment to add bevacizumab, the median survival time has not yet been reached for FOLFIRI+Bev and was 19.2 months for mIFL+Bev (P = .007). FOLFIRI+Bev was associated with a higher rate of > or = grade 3 hypertension than mIFL+Bev. FOLFIRI and FOLFIRI+Bev offered superior activity to their comparators and were comparably safe. An infusional schedule of FU should be the preferred irinotecan-based regimen in first-line metastatic colorectal cancer.

  19. Physical function and quality of life in frail and/or elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with capecitabine and bevacizumab: an exploratory analysis.

    PubMed

    Ward, Peter; Hecht, J Randolph; Wang, He-Jing; Dichmann, Richard; Liem, Andre K D; Chan, David; Patel, Ravi; Hu, Edward H L; Tchekmedyian, Neres S; Wainberg, Zev A; Naeim, Arash

    2014-10-01

    Optimal treatment strategies in frail and/or elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer have not been well defined. Using data from a prospective, phase II study of elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with bevacizumab and capecitabine, we explored the differences in functional measure and quality of life (QoL) between patients with ECOG performance status (PS) 1 and 2. Geriatric functional measures included patient reported limitations in ADLs and IADLs, ECOG PS, 3-item recall, hearing acuity, and the "Get up and Go" test. QoL was assessed by means of the FACT-C questionnaire and the EQ-5D questionnaire. The prognostic impact of baseline characteristics on survival was studied using univariate Cox regression analysis. The majority (62%) of the 45 patients had an ECOG PS of 2. The ECOG PS 2 group had more limitations in IADLs, lower baseline QoL, and a lower patient-rated health score. For all participants, QoL significantly improved from baseline to the start of cycle 2 (FACT-C: 99.9 vs. 105.4, p=0.01) and did not deteriorate when baseline scores were compared to when participants went off study (FACT-C: 99.9 vs. 98.6, p=0.59). In the Cox-regression analysis, a positive "Get up and Go" test was prognostic for improved survival (HR=0.31, p=0.01). There is significant heterogeneity in functional measures and quality of life among elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with ECOG PS 1 and 2. The "Get up and Go" test may be a useful prognostic indicator for survival in this population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Phase II study of bevacizumab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin followed by bevacizumab plus erlotinib as first-line therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Alberto; Pericay, Carles; García-Girón, Carlos; Alonso, Vicente; Dueñas, Rosario; Cirera, Luis; Rivera, Fernando; Falcó, Esther; Bustos, Iñaki Alvarez; Salud, Antonieta

    2013-01-01

    This phase II trial investigated the efficacy of an induction regimen of bevacizumab, capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) followed by maintenance therapy with bevacizumab plus erlotinib as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer received intravenous bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg plus oxaliplatin 130 mg/m(2) on day 1 followed by oral capecitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) twice daily on days 1-14 every 3 weeks for six cycles. In the absence of disease progression, patients then received bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg every 3 weeks plus oral erlotinib 150 mg once daily. The primary study endpoint was progression-free survival. In the intention-to-treat population (n = 90), the median progression-free survival was 9.2 [95% confidence interval (CI): 7.9-11.9] months, and the median overall survival was 25.8 (95% CI: 18.0-30.9) months. In the patient subpopulation who received both induction and maintenance therapy (n = 52), median progression-free survival was 11.1 (95% CI: 9.0-15.7) months, and the median overall survival was 29.5 (95% CI: 23.7-36.7) months. KRAS status did not predict efficacy. The most common grade 3/4 adverse events were diarrhea, asthenia, and neutropenia. XELOX-bevacizumab for 6 cycles followed by bevacizumab-erlotinib maintenance therapy has been shown to be a highly active and well-tolerated first-line regimen in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  1. Phase I Escalating-Dose Trial of CAR-T Therapy Targeting CEA(+) Metastatic Colorectal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengcheng; Wang, Zhe; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Meiling; Li, Shiqi; Li, Yunyan; Zhang, Rui; Xiong, Zhouxing; Wei, Zhihao; Shen, Junjie; Luo, Yongli; Zhang, Qianzhen; Liu, Limei; Qin, Hong; Liu, Wei; Wu, Feng; Chen, Wei; Pan, Feng; Zhang, Xianquan; Bie, Ping; Liang, Houjie; Pecher, Gabriele; Qian, Cheng

    2017-05-03

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cells have shown promising efficacy in treatment of hematological malignancies, but its applications in solid tumors need further exploration. In this study, we investigated CAR-T therapy targeting carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA)-positive colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with metastases to evaluate its safety and efficacy. Five escalating dose levels (DLs) (1 × 10(5) to 1 × 10(8)/CAR(+)/kg cells) of CAR-T were applied in 10 CRC patients. Our data showed that severe adverse events related to CAR-T therapy were not observed. Of the 10 patients, 7 patients who experienced progressive disease (PD) in previous treatments had stable disease after CAR-T therapy. Two patients remained with stable disease for more than 30 weeks, and two patients showed tumor shrinkage by positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and MRI analysis, respectively. Decline of serum CEA level was apparent in most patients even in long-term observation. Furthermore, we observed persistence of CAR-T cells in peripheral blood of patients receiving high doses of CAR-T therapy. Importantly, we observed CAR-T cell proliferation especially in patients after a second CAR-T therapy. Taken together, we demonstrated that CEA CAR-T cell therapy was well tolerated in CEA(+) CRC patients even in high doses, and some efficacy was observed in most of the treated patients. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pathological responses after angiogenesis or EGFR inhibitors in metastatic colorectal cancer depend on the chemotherapy backbone

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, J; Gizzi, M; Pairet, G; Lannoy, V; Lefesvre, P; Gigot, J-F; Hubert, C; Jouret-Mourin, A; Humblet, Y; Canon, J-L; Sempoux, C; Chapaux, X; Danse, E; Tinton, N; Navez, B; Van den Eynde, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Optimal preoperative treatment before colorectal cancer metastases (CRCM) resection remains unclear. This study evaluated pathological responses (pR) in CRCM resected after chemotherapy alone or combined with angiogenesis or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors. Methods: Pathological response was retrospectively evaluated on 264 resected metastases from 99 patients. The proportion of responding metastases after different preoperative treatments was reported and compared. Patient's progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were compared based on pR. Results: The combination of anti-angiogenics with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy resulted in more pR than when they were combined with irinotecan-based chemotherapy (80% vs 50% P<0.001). Inversely, the combination of EGFR inhibitors with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy seemed to induce fewer pR than when they were combined with irinotecan-based treatment (53% vs 72% P=0.049). Overall survival at 5 years was improved for patients with a pR in all resected metastases compared with those who did not achieve a pR (68.5% vs 32.6% P=0.023) and this response was the only factor predicting OS in a multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The chemotherapy partner combined with angiogenesis or EGFR inhibitors influenced pR in resected CRCM. In our exploratory analysis anti-angiogenic/oxaliplatin-based regimens and anti-EGFR/irinotecan-based regimens were associated with the highest pR. Prospective randomised trials should be performed to validate these observations. PMID:26461062

  3. LINE-1 methylation shows little intra-patient heterogeneity in primary and synchronous metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Long interspersed nucleotide element 1 (LINE-1) hypomethylation is suggested to play a role in the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). To assess intra-patient heterogeneity of LINE-1 methylation in CRC and to understand its biological relevance in invasion and metastasis, we evaluated the LINE-1 methylation at multiple tumor sites. In addition, the influence of stromal cell content on the measurement of LINE-1 methylation in tumor tissue was analyzed. Methods Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded primary tumor tissue was obtained from 48 CRC patients. Matched adjacent normal colon tissue, lymph node metastases and distant metastases were obtained from 12, 18 and 7 of these patients, respectively. Three different areas were microdissected from each primary tumor and included the tumor center and invasive front. Normal mucosal and stromal cells were also microdissected for comparison with the tumor cells. The microdissected samples were compared in LINE-1 methylation level measured by multicolor MethyLight assay. The assay results were also compared between microdissected and macrodissected tissue samples. Results LINE-1 methylation within primary tumors showed no significant intra-tumoral heterogeneity, with the tumor center and invasive front showing identical methylation levels. Moreover, no difference in LINE-1 methylation was observed between the primary tumor and lymph node and distant metastases from the same patient. Tumor cells showed significantly less LINE-1 methylation compared to adjacent stromal and normal mucosal epithelial cells. Consequently, LINE-1 methylation was significantly lower in microdissected samples compared to macrodissected samples. A trend for less LINE-1 methylation was also observed in more advanced stages of CRC. Conclusions LINE-1 methylation shows little intra-patient tumor heterogeneity, indicating the suitability of its use for molecular diagnosis in CRC. The methylation is relatively stable during CRC progression

  4. Effectiveness and Safety of Intensive Triplet Chemotherapy Plus Bevacizumab, FIr-B/FOx, in Young-Elderly Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cannita, Katia; Giordano, Aldo Victor; Vicentini, Roberto; Ficorella, Corrado; Ricevuto, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Four-drug regimens, such as FIr-B/FOx schedule, can improve efficacy of first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC) patients. The present study specifically evaluates feasibility of FIr-B/FOx first-line intensive regimen in fit young-elderly MCRC patients, representing approximately 40% of overall MCRC patients. Activity, efficacy, and safety were equivalent to overall MCRC patients, not significantly different according to KRAS genotype. Clinical outcome was significantly prolonged in liver-limited compared to other/multiple metastatic disease. Safety evaluation of the individual young-elderly patient showed that limiting toxicity syndromes (LTS) in multiple sites were significantly increased, compared to LTS in single site, with respect to non-elderly patients. PMID:24307987

  5. Bevacizumab plus capecitabine versus capecitabine alone in elderly patients with previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer (AVEX): an open-label, randomised phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, David; Lang, Istvan; Marcuello, Eugenio; Lorusso, Vito; Ocvirk, Janja; Shin, Dong Bok; Jonker, Derek; Osborne, Stuart; Andre, Niko; Waterkamp, Daniel; Saunders, Mark P

    2013-10-01

    Elderly patients are often under-represented in clinical trials of metastatic colorectal cancer. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab plus capecitabine compared with capecitabine alone in elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. For this open-label, randomised phase 3 trial, patients aged 70 years and older with previously untreated, unresectable, metastatic colorectal cancer, who were not deemed to be candidates for oxaliplatin-based or irinotecan-based chemotherapy regimens, were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio via an interactive voice-response system, stratified by performance status and geographical region. Treatment consisted of capecitabine (1000 mg/m(2) orally twice a day on days 1-14) alone or with bevacizumab (7·5 mg/kg intravenously on day 1), given every 3 weeks until disease progression, unacceptable toxic effects, or withdrawal of consent. Efficacy analyses were based on the intention-to-treat population. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00484939. From July 9, 2007, to Dec 14, 2010, 280 patients with a median age of 76 years (range 70-87) were recruited from 40 sites across ten countries. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either bevacizumab plus capecitabine (n=140) or capecitabine only (n=140). Progression-free survival was significantly longer with bevacizumab and capecitabine than with capecitabine alone (median 9·1 months [95% CI 7·3-11·4] vs 5·1 months [4·2-6·3]; hazard ratio 0·53 [0·41-0·69]; p<0·0001). Treatment-related adverse events of grade 3 or worse occurred in 53 (40%) patients in the combination group and 30 (22%) in the capecitabine group, and treatment-related serious adverse events in 19 (14%) and 11 (8%) patients. The most common grade 3 or worse adverse events of special interest for bevacizumab or chemotherapy were hand-foot syndrome (21 [16%] vs nine [7%]), diarrhoea (nine [7%] vs nine [7%]), and venous

  6. Effect of First-Line Chemotherapy Combined With Cetuximab or Bevacizumab on Overall Survival in Patients With KRAS Wild-Type Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Venook, Alan P.; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Innocenti, Federico; Fruth, Briant; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Schrag, Deborah; Greene, Claire; O’Neil, Bert H.; Atkins, James Norman; Berry, Scott; Polite, Blase N.; O’Reilly, Eileen M.; Goldberg, Richard M.; Hochster, Howard S.; Schilsky, Richard L.; Bertagnolli, Monica M.; El-Khoueiry, Anthony B.; Watson, Peter; Benson, Al B.; Mulkerin, Daniel L.; Mayer, Robert J.; Blanke, Charles

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Combining biologic monoclonal antibodies with chemotherapeutic cytotoxic drugs provides clinical benefit to patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer, but the optimal choice of the initial biologic therapy in previously untreated patients is unknown. OBJECTIVE To determine if the addition of cetuximab vsbevacizumab to the combination of leucovorin, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX6) regimen or the combination of leucovorin, fluorouracil, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) regimen is superior as first-line therapy in advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type (wt) colorectal cancer. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Patients (≥18 years) enrolled at community and academic centers throughout the National Clinical Trials Network in the United States and Canada (November 2005-March 2012) with previously untreated advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer whose tumors were KRAS wt chose to take either the mFOLFOX6 regimen or the FOLFIRI regimen as chemotherapy and were randomized to receive either cetuximab (n = 578) or bevacizumab (n = 559). The last date of follow-up was December 15, 2015. INTERVENTIONS Cetuximab vs bevacizumab combined with either mFOLFOX6 or FOLFIRI chemotherapy regimen chosen by the treating physician and patient. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary end point was overall survival. Secondary objectives included progression-free survival and overall response rate, site-reported confirmed or unconfirmed complete or partial response. RESULTS Among 1137 patients (median age, 59 years; 440 [39%] women), 1074 (94%) of patients met eligibility criteria. As of December 15, 2015, median follow-up for 263 surviving patients was 47.4 months (range, 0–110.7 months), and 82% of patients (938 of 1137) experienced disease progression. The median overall survival was 30.0 months in the cetuximab-chemotherapy group and 29.0 months in the bevacizumab-chemotherapy group with a stratified hazard ratio (HR) of 0.88 (95% CI, 0.77–1.01; P = .08). The

  7. [Ethical and legal issues in late stage of dementia].

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Lia

    2008-01-01

    As we enter the 21st century, growth of the elderly population, the costs of care, and the advances of medical science and technology will continue to have an impact on the patient-physician relationship. Transformation of the health care system will also raise ethical issues inherent to changing roles. The special nature of Alzheimer's patients and the natural course of their disease require special care on the part of physicians to meet the ethical challenges and establish medical goals, in conjunction with their patients and their families. In spite of these rapid advances in biomedical sciences, were not sufficiently developed in the most fitness answers, regarding special moral and ethical attitudes, which must be taken into account, in particular when we try to understand the experience of people with dementia. This article explores emerging issues in relation to awareness in dementia and its impact on legal and ethical matters. The different approaches and principles demonstrated in relation to ethical issues are discussed, with an exploration of the concepts of mental capacity, testamentary capacity, power of attorney, court of protection, advance directives, decision making, participation in research and treatment, informed consent and older people driving. The tensions that exist between the imperatives of doing no harm and of maintaining autonomy in addressing legal and ethical issues are highlighted. The review emphasizes the importance of considering competency and awareness as being multi-faceted, to be understood in the context of social interaction, trying to deal with the challenge of protecting, but not overprotecting, people with dementia. Late stage of dementia is a terminal disease where the goal of the care may not be prolongation of life at all costs, but rather achievement: quality of life, dignity and comfort. In the initial late dementia, quality of life is the target, treating medical problems and psychiatric symptoms. The dignity of

  8. Influence of Socioeconomic Status, Comorbidity, and Disability on Late-stage Cancer Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Bo Ram; Kim, So Young; Shin, Dong Wook; Yang, Hyung Kook; Park, Jong Hyock

    2017-08-01

    Understanding factors affecting advanced stage at diagnosis is vital to improve cancer outcomes and overall survival. We investigated the factors affecting later-stage cancer diagnosis. Patients completed self-reported questionnaires. We collected cancer stage data from medical records review. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with later stage cancer at diagnosis by gender. In total, 1,870 cancer patients were included in the study; 55.8% were men, 31.1% had more than one comorbid condition, and 63.5% had disabilities. About half of the patients were smokers, and drank alcohol, and 58.0% were diagnosed at an advanced stage. By cancer type, lung and liver cancers (both genders), prostate (men), colorectal, cervical, and thyroid cancer (women) were more likely to be diagnosed at a later stage. After controlling for socioeconomic factors, comorbidity (odds ratio [OR], 1.48 in men) and disability (OR, 1.64 in men and 1.52 in women) remained significantly associated with late-stage diagnosis. In this nationwide study, using combined information from patients and medical records, we found that male patients with comorbidities or disabilities, and female patients with disabilities were more likely to have advanced stage cancer at diagnosis. Targeted approaches by cancer type and health conditions are recommended.

  9. A Safety and Feasibility Study of an Allogeneic Colon Cancer Cell Vaccine Administered with a Granulocyte–Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor–Producing Bystander Cell Line in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lei; Edil, Barish H.; Soares, Kevin C.; El-Shami, Khaled; Uram, Jennifer N.; Judkins, Carol; Zhang, Zhe; Onners, Beth; Laheru, Daniel; Pardoll, Drew; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Schulick, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite recent advances in earlier detection and improvements in chemotherapy, the 5-year survival rate of patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma remains poor. Immunotherapy is a potentially effective therapeutic approach to the treatment of colorectal carcinoma. Preclinical studies have supported the antitumor activity of immunization with a granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) producing murine colon tumor cell vaccine. Methods A novel colorectal cancer vaccine composed of irradiated, allogeneic human colon cancer cells and GM-CSF-producing bystander cells was developed and tested in combination with a single intravenous low dose of cyclophosphamide in a phase 1 study of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Results A total of nine patients were enrolled onto and treated in this study. Six patients had a history of colorectal adenocarcinoma hepatic metastases and underwent curative metastasectomy, while three other patients had unresectable stage IV disease. This study demonstrates the safety and feasibility of this vaccine administered in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. At last follow-up, the six patients who underwent curative metastasectomy survived longer than 36 months, and four of these six patients were without disease recurrence. Immunologic correlate results suggest that the GM-CSF-producing colon cancer vaccine enhances the production of anti-MUC1 antibodies. Conclusions This vaccine is feasible and safe. Future investigation of the efficacy and antitumor immunity of this vaccine is warranted. PMID:24943235

  10. The expression profile of RNA-binding proteins in primary and metastatic colorectal cancer: relationship of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins with prognosis.

    PubMed

    Hope, Nicholas R; Murray, Graeme I

    2011-03-01

    The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins are a group of RNA-binding proteins with a range of key cellular functions, which are dysregulated in tumorigenesis including regulation of translational and RNA processing. The aims of this study were to define the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein expression profile in primary and metastatic colorectal cancer and to establish the clinicopathologic significance of this expression. A tissue microarray containing 515 primary colorectal cancers, 224 lymph node metastasis of colorectal cancer, and 50 normal colon samples was immunostained for 6 heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein I, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K, and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L displayed the most frequent strong immunoreactivity in primary colorectal tumor samples. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (P < .001) and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (P = .003) showed significant alterations in nuclear expression in tumors compared with normal colonic epithelium, whereas heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (P = .001), heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein I (P < .001), and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (P < .001) all showed significant aberrant cytoplasmic immunoreactivity in tumor cells. There were also significant differences in cytoplasmic immunoreactivity between the primary tumor and the corresponding lymph node metastasis for heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (P = .001), heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein I (P < .001), and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (P = .001). Nuclear heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H (χ(2) = 72.1; P < .001), cytoplasmic heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein I (χ(2) = 28.1; P < .001), and cytoplasmic heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (χ(2) = 13.2; P = .04) all showed significant associations with tumor stage. There was a significant relationship between strong nuclear

  11. Expression of DIAPH1 is up-regulated in colorectal cancer and its down-regulation strongly reduces the metastatic capacity of colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan-Na; Izbicki, Jakob R; König, Alexandra; Habermann, Jens K; Blechner, Christine; Lange, Tobias; Schumacher, Udo; Windhorst, Sabine

    2014-04-01

    In most cases, metastatic colorectal cancer is not curable, thus new approaches are necessary to identify novel targets for colorectal cancer therapy. Actin-binding-proteins (ABPs) directly regulate motility of metastasising tumor cells, and for cortactin an association with colon cancer metastasis has been already shown. However, as its depletion only incompletely inhibits metastasis, additional, more suitable cellular targets have to be identified. Here we analyzed expression of the ABPs, DIAPH1, VASP, N-WASP, and fascin in comparison with cortactin and found that, besides cortactin, DIAPH1 was expressed with the highest frequency (63%) in colorectal cancer. As well as cortactin, DIAPH1 was not detectable in normal colon tissue and expression of both proteins was positively correlated with metastasis of colorectal cancer. To analyse the mechanistic role of DIAPH1 for metastasis of colon carcinoma cells in comparison with cortactin, expression of the proteins was stably down-regulated in the human colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29, HROC-24 and HCT-116. Analysis of metastasis of colon carcinoma cells in SCID mice revealed that depletion of DIAPH1 reduced metastasis 60-fold and depletion of cortactin 16-fold as compared with control cells. Most likely the stronger effect of DIAPH1 depletion on colon cancer metastasis is due to the fact that in vitro knock down of DIAPH1 impaired all steps of metastasis; adhesion, invasion and migration while down-regulation of cortactin only reduced adhesion and invasion. This very strong reducing effect of DIAPH1 depletion on colon carcinoma cell metastasis makes the protein a promising therapeutic target for individualized colorectal cancer therapy. © 2013 UICC.

  12. Wnt3a expression is associated with MMP-9 expression in primary tumor and metastatic site in recurrent or stage IV colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is known to affect in cancer oncogenesis and progression by interacting with the tumor microenvironment. However, the roles of wnt3a and wnt5a in colorectal cancer (CRC) have not been thoroughly studied. In the present study, we investigated the expression of wnt protein and the concordance rate in primary tumor and metastatic sites in CRC. To determine the relationship of wnt proteins with invasion related protein, we also analyzed the association between wnt protein expression and the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). Methods Tumor tissue was obtained from eighty-three paraffin- embedded blocks which were using resected tissue from both the primary tumor and metastatic sites for each patient. We performed immunohistochemical staining for wnt3a, wnt5a, β-catenin, MMP-9 and VEGFR-2. Results Wnt3a, wnt5a, β-catenin, and MMP-9 expression was high; the proteins were found in over 50% of the primary tumors, but the prevalence was lower in tissue from metastatic sites. The concordance rates between the primary tumor and metastatic site were 76.2% for wnt5a and 79.4% for wnt3a and β-catenin, but VEGFR-2 was expressed in 67.4% of the metastatic sites even when not found in the primary tumor. Wnt3a expression in primary tumors was significantly associated with lymph node involvement (p = 0.038) and MMP-9 expression in the primary tumor (p = 0.0387), mesenchyme adjacent to tumor (p = 0.022) and metastatic site (p = 0.004). There was no other relationship in the expression of these proteins. Vascular invasion in primary tumor tissue may be a potential prognostic marker for liver metastasis, but no significant association was observed among the wnt protein, MMP-9, and VEGFR-2 for peritoneal seeding. In survival analysis, β-catenin expression was significantly correlated with overall survival (p = 0.05). Conclusions Wnt3a and wnt5a

  13. Left Versus Right: Does Location Matter for Refractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients in Phase 1 Clinical Trials?

    PubMed

    Arora, Sukeshi Patel; Ketchum, Norma S; Michalek, Joel; Gelfond, Jonathon; Mahalingam, Devalingam

    2017-04-22

    Location of the primary tumor is prognostic and predictive of efficacy with VEGF-inhibitors (I) versus EGFR-I given first-line to metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. However, little is known regarding the effect of location on prognosis and prediction in refractory mCRC. We assessed the efficacy of VEGF-I and EGFR-I in regards to location of the primary tumor in patients with refractory mCRC enrolled in early phase studies. A historical cohort analysis of mCRC patients, including 44 phase I trials our institution, from March 2004 to September 2012. Median Progression free survival (mPFS) and overall survival (mOS) were estimated from Kaplan-Meier curves and groups were statistically compared with the log-rank test. One hundred thirty-nine patients with a median age 59 (33-81). 73.9% received 3+ lines of therapy. All KRAS wild-type patients had received prior EGFR-I. right 20.9%, left 61.9%, and transverse 4.3%. For survival analysis, transverse CRC were included with right. Of the 112 patients, mOS was left (N = 80) 6.6 months versus right (N = 32) 5.9 months, P = 0.18. mPFS was left (n = 86) 2.0 months versus right (N = 35) 2.0 months, P = 0.76. In subgroup analysis, survival was significant for KRAS wild-type patients with left-sided mCRC had mOS of 6.2 months with other agents versus 9.4 months with EGFR-I (P = 0.03). In phase 1 clinical trials, although location alone was not prognostic in heavily pretreated patients, left-sided mCRC had improved survival with EGFR-I. Despite progression on EGFR-I, left-sided KRAS wild mCRC patients should be considered for phase 1 studies of agents targeting growth factor pathways.

  14. In Vivo Efficacy of Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell-Derived NK Cells in the Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Veluchamy, John P; Lopez-Lastra, Silvia; Spanholtz, Jan; Bohme, Fenna; Kok, Nina; Heideman, Daniëlle A M; Verheul, Henk M W; Di Santo, James P; de Gruijl, Tanja D; van der Vliet, Hans J

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) act by inhibiting EGFR downstream signaling and by eliciting a natural killer (NK) cell-mediated antitumor response. The IgG1 mAb cetuximab has been used for treatment of RAS(wt) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients, showing limited efficacy. In the present study, we address the potential of adoptive NK cell therapy to overcome these limitations investigating two allogeneic NK cell products, i.e., allogeneic activated peripheral blood NK cells (A-PBNK) and umbilical cord blood stem cell-derived NK cells (UCB-NK). While cetuximab monotherapy was not effective against EGFR(-) RAS(wt), EGFR(+) RAS(mut), and EGFR(+) BRAF(mut) cells, A-PBNK were able to initiate lysis of EGFR(+) colon cancer cells irrespective of RAS or BRAF status. Cytotoxic effects of A-PBNK (but not UCB-NK) were further potentiated significantly by coating EGFR(+) colon cancer cells with cetuximab. Of note, a significantly higher cytotoxicity was induced by UCB-NK in EGFR(-)RAS(wt) (42 ± 8 versus 67 ± 7%), EGFR(+) RAS(mut) (20 ± 2 versus 37 ± 6%), and EGFR(+) BRAF(mut) (23 ± 3 versus 43 ± 7%) colon cancer cells compared to A-PBNK and equaled the cytotoxic efficacy of the combination of A-PBNK and cetuximab. The antitumor efficacy of UCB-NK cells against cetuximab-resistant human EGFR(+) RAS(mut) colon cancer cells was further confirmed in an in vivo preclinical mouse model where UCB-NK showed enhanced antitumor cytotoxicity against colon cancer independent of EGFR and RAS status. As UCB-NK have been proven safe in a recently conducted phase I clinical trial in acute myeloid leukemia, a fast translation into clinical proof of concept for mCRC could be considered.

  15. Self-Reported Adherence to Trifluridine and Tipiracil Hydrochloride for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Kazuo; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Yokokawa, Takashi; Sugisaki, Takahito; Takiguchi, Tomomi; Aoyama, Takeshi; Suzuki, Kenichi; Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Yamaguchi, Kensei; Inoue, Ayaka; Machida, Yoshiaki; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu; Hama, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    A novel oral agent that consists of trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride (TFTD) has been established as salvage-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Adherence to TFTD is crucial to maintaining appropriate curative effects. This study sought to clarify adherence to TFTD and identify candidate factors deteriorating adherence at our institution. A total of 50 consecutive mCRC patients who received TFTD monotherapy between June 1, 2014 and July 31, 2015 were analyzed in this study. Adherence to TFTD was checked by pharmacists using a self-reported treatment diary and interviewing nonadherents at a pharmaceutical outpatient clinic. The adherence rate was defined as the number of patient intakes per 20 scheduled intakes in one cycle. We retrospectively surveyed the factors from the electronic patient record associated with reduced adherence. We measured relative dose intensity, defined as the dose intensity divided by the initial dose (each in milligrams per square meter per week). Patient characteristics were as follows: males/females, 20/30; median age, 61 years (range, 34-83 years); performance status 0/1, 37/13. Median relative dose intensity of TFTD was 91.0%. Adherence rates were 95.0% for the first cycle of TFTD, 97.3% for the second cycle, 98.0% for the third cycle, and 98.2% for the fourth cycle. Factors associated with deteriorated adherence to TFTD were nausea/vomiting/decreased appetite (27.1%, 23 instances), pain (25.9%, 22 instances), neutropenia (11.8%, 10 instances), and missed dose (4.7%, 4 instances). Increased nonadherence to TFTD was associated with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 1, while increased TFTD adherence in the first cycle was associated with prior regimens ≥4. The high frequency of treatment-related gastrointestinal disorder is the main factor affecting adherence to TFTD. Intensive supportive care in the management of these symptoms could assist adequate adherence to TFTD in mCRC patients.

  16. Anticoagulant therapy for venous thromboembolism detected by Doppler ultrasound in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer receiving bevacizumab

    PubMed Central

    Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Shinozaki, Eiji; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Ozaka, Masato; Ogura, Mariko; Chin, Keisho; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Background Doppler ultrasound imaging is useful for management of venous thromboembolism associated with a subclavicular implantable central venous access system in patients receiving bevacizumab (Bev). We investigated the efficacy and safety of our anticoagulant regimen based on Doppler findings. Methods Patients aged ≤75 years with metastatic colorectal cancer, no history of thromboembolism, and no prior use of Bev received chemotherapy plus Bev. Doppler ultrasound imaging of the deep venous system to detect thrombosis was performed after the first course of Bev and repeated after the third course in patients with asymptomatic thrombosis. Indications for anticoagulant therapy in patients with asymptomatic thrombosis were as follows: enlarging thrombus (E), thrombus >40 mm in diameter (S), thrombus involving the superior vena cava (C), and decreased blood flow (V). Results Among 79 patients enrolled in this study, asymptomatic thrombosis was detected in 56 patients (70.9%) by Doppler ultrasound imaging after the first course of Bev and there was no thrombus in 23 patients (29.1%). Of these 56 patients, 11 (19.6%) received anticoagulant therapy with warfarin, including eight after the first course and three after follow-up imaging. S + V was observed in four of 11 patients (36.4%), as well as V in two (18.2%), S + V + C in one (9.1%), E + S + V in one (9.1%), E + C in one (9.1%), E in one (9.1%), and C in one (9.1%). All patients resumed chemotherapy, including seven who resumed Bev. Improvement or stabilization of thrombi was achieved in ten patients (90.9%). Only one patient had symptomatic thromboembolism. Mild bleeding due to anticoagulant therapy occurred in six patients (54.5%), but there were no treatment-related severe adverse events or deaths. Severe thromboembolism was not observed in the other 68 patients. Conclusion Our anticoagulant protocol for asymptomatic thrombosis detected by Doppler ultrasound imaging was effective at preventing severe

  17. Gene Expression Markers of Efficacy and Resistance to Cetuximab Treatment in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Results from CALGB 80203 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Cushman, Stephanie M.; Jiang, Chen; Hatch, Ace J.; Shterev, Ivo; Sibley, Alexander B.; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Venook, Alan P.; Owzar, Kouros; Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Nixon, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples from CALGB 80203 were analyzed for expression of EGFR axis–related genes to identify prognostic or predictive biomarkers for cetuximab treatment. Patients and Methods Patients (238 total) with first-line metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) were randomized to FOLFOX or FOLFIRI chemotherapy ± cetuximab. qRT-PCR analyses were conducted on tissues from 103 patients at baseline to measure gene expression levels of HER-related genes, including amphiregulin (AREG), betacellulin (BTC), NT5E (CD73), DUSP4, EGF, EGFR, epigen (EPGN), epiregulin (EREG), HBEGF, ERBB2 (HER2), ERBB3 (HER3), ERBB4 (HER4), PHLDA1, and TGFA. The interactions between expression levels and treatment with respect to progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were modeled using multiplicative Cox proportional hazards models. Results High tumor mRNA levels of HER2 [hazard ratio (HR), 0.64; P = 0.002] and EREG (HR, 0.89; P = 0.016) were prognostic markers associated with longer PFS across all patients. HER3 and CD73 expression levels were identified as potential predictive markers of benefit from cetuximab. In KRAS wild-type (WT) tumors, low HER3 expression was associated with longer OS from cetuximab treatment, whereas high HER3 expression was associated with shorter OS from cetuximab treatment (chemo + cetuximab: HR, 1.15; chemo-only: HR, 0.48; Pinteraction = 0.029). High CD73 expression was associated with longer PFS from cetuximab treatment in patients with KRAS-WT (chemo + cetuximab: HR, 0.91; chemo-only: HR, 1.57; Pinteraction = 0.026) and KRAS-mutant (Mut) tumors (chemo + cetuximab: HR, 0.80; chemo-only: HR, 1.29; P = 0.025). Conclusions Gene expression of HER3 and CD73 was identified as a potential predictive marker for cetuximab. These data implicate HER axis signaling and immune modulation as potential mechanisms of cetuximab action and sensitivity. PMID:25520391

  18. Radioembolization as a Treatment Strategy for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer to the Liver: What Can We Learn from the SIRFLOX Trial?

    PubMed

    Sangha, Bippan Singh; Nimeiri, Halla; Hickey, Ryan; Salem, Riad; Lewandowski, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    In the setting of liver metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC), radioembolization with yttrium-90 has been used to treat chemotherapy refractory disease with a growing interest to establish its efficacy in prospective trials combined with first- and second-line chemotherapy. SIRFLOX is an ongoing, multi-center, phase 3 randomized trial comparing first-line chemotherapy alone or in combination with yttrium-90 radioembolization in patients with CRC who have isolated liver metastases or liver-dominant metastases. Preliminary results from SIRFLOX demonstrate that radioembolization combined with first-line chemotherapy is safe and feasible. There was no significant difference in median overall progression-free survival (PFS) between the combined radioembolization-chemotherapy and chemotherapy-only arms (10.7 versus 10.2 months). Although the trial did not meet its primary endpoint of improved median PFS, there was a significant increase in the median hepatic PFS (20.5 versus 12.6 months; p = 0.02) favoring the combination arm. Thus, combining radioembolization with chemotherapy in the first-line setting may be most effective for liver-limited metastatic CRC. Since radioembolization targets liver disease, it is plausible that the trial failed to achieve an improvement in PFS given that 40 % of the SIRFLOX population had extra-hepatic disease. It is also possible that the overall median PFS may be a poor surrogate endpoint, and other endpoints like overall survival still needs to be delineated in this setting. In addition, it is crucial to document improvement or delay in time to deterioration in quality of life symptom endpoints in this population. SIRFLOX is the first of three prospective studies that assess the efficacy of adding radioembolization to first-line chemotherapy, and the combined data from these trials will provide the necessary power for an overall survival analysis. The final results of SIRFLOX will be eagerly awaited to determine if the increased

  19. Influence of pharmacogenomic profiling prior to pharmaceutical treatment in metastatic colorectal cancer on cost effectiveness : a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Frank, Martin; Mittendorf, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) imposes a substantial health burden on individual patients and society. Furthermore, rising costs in oncology cause a growing concern about reimbursement for innovations in this sector. The promise of pharmacogenomic profiling and related stratified therapies in mCRC is to improve treatment efficacy and potentially save costs. Among other examples, the commonly used epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies cetuximab and panitumumab are only effective in patients with kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) wild-type cancers. Hence, the adaptation of predictive biomarker testing might be a valid strategy for healthcare systems worldwide. This study aims to review the clinical and economic evidence supporting pharmacogenomic profiling prior to the administration of pharmaceutical treatment in mCRC. Moreover, key drivers and areas of uncertainty in cost-effectiveness evaluations are analysed. A systematic literature review was conducted to identify studies evaluating the cost effectiveness of predictive biomarkers and the result dependent usage of pharmaceutical agents in mCRC. The application of predictive biomarkers to detect KRAS mutations prior to the administration of EGFR antibodies saved treatment costs and was cost effective in all identified evaluations. However, because of the lack of data regarding cost-effectiveness analyses for predictive biomarker testing, e.g. for first-line treatment, definitive conclusions cannot be stated. Key drivers and areas of uncertainty in current cost-effectiveness analyses are, among others, the consideration of predictive biomarker costs, the characteristics of single predictive biomarkers and the availability of clinical data for the respective pharmaceutical intervention. Especially the cost effectiveness of uridine diphosphate-glucuronyl transferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) mutation analysis prior to irinotecan-based chemotherapy remains unclear. Pharmacogenomic profiling has

  20. Higher metastatic efficiency of KRas G12V than KRas G13D in a colorectal cancer model.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Patricia; Gallardo, Alberto; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Pavón, Miguel Angel; Casanova, Isolda; Trias, Manuel; Mangues, María Antonia; Lopez-Pousa, Antonio; Villaverde, Antonio; Vázquez, Esther; Bardelli, Alberto; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Mangues, Ramón

    2015-02-01

    Although all KRas (protein that in humans is encoded by the KRas gene) point mutants are considered to have a similar prognostic capacity, their transformation and tumorigenic capacities vary widely. We compared the metastatic efficiency of KRas G12V (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog with valine mutation at codon 12) and KRas G13D (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog with aspartic mutation at codon 13) oncogenes in an orthotopic colorectal cancer (CRC) model. Following subcutaneous preconditioning, recombinant clones of the SW48 CRC cell line [Kras wild-type (Kras WT)] expressing the KRas G12V or KRas G13D allele were microinjected in the mouse cecum. The percentage of animals developing lymph node metastasis was higher in KRas G12V than in KRas G13D mice. Microscopic, macroscopic, and visible lymphatic foci were 1.5- to 3.0-fold larger in KRas G12V than in KRas G13D mice (P < 0.05). In the lung, only microfoci were developed in both groups. KRas G12V primary tumors had lower apoptosis (7.0 ± 1.2 vs. 7.4 ± 1.0 per field, P = 0.02), higher tumor budding at the invasion front (1.2 ± 0.2 vs. 0.6 ± 0.1, P = 0.04), and a higher percentage of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4)-overexpressing intravasated tumor emboli (49.8 ± 9.4% vs. 12.8 ± 4.4%, P < 0.001) than KRas G13D tumors. KRas G12V primary tumors showed Akt activation, and β5 integrin, vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), and Serpine-1 overexpression, whereas KRas G13D tumors showed integrin β1 and angiopoietin 2 (Angpt2) overexpression. The increased cell survival, invasion, intravasation, and specific molecular regulation observed in KRas G12V tumors is consistent with the higher aggressiveness observed in patients with CRC expressing this oncogene.

  1. The significance of the C-reactive protein to albumin ratio as a marker for predicting survival and monitoring chemotherapeutic effectiveness in patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Shibutani, Masatsune; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Nagahara, Hisashi; Iseki, Yasuhito; Hirakawa, Kosei; Ohira, Masaichi

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation has been reported to play an important role in cancer progression and various inflammatory markers have been reported to be useful prognostic markers. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the significance of the C-reactive protein to albumin (CRP/ALB) ratio in colorectal cancer patients who received palliative chemotherapy. We performed a retrospective review of 99 patients who underwent palliative chemotherapy for unresectable colorectal cancer between 2005 and 2010. The cutoff value of the CRP/ALB ratio was determined based on a receiver operating characteristics curve analysis. The relationship between the CRP/ALB ratio and survival was assessed. The cutoff value for the CRP/ALB ratio was 0.183. The high pretreatment CRP/ALB ratio group showed significantly worse overall survival. Patients with a high pretreatment CRP/ALB ratio and in whom the CRP/ALB ratio normalized after chemotherapy tended to have better overall survival than those in whom both the pretreatment and posttreatment CRP/ALB ratios were high. The CRP/ALB ratio is a useful marker for predicting survival and monitoring chemotherapeutic effectiveness in patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer.

  2. Successful Multidisciplinary Treatment with Secondary Metastatic Liver Resection after Downsizing by Palliative Second-Line Treatment of Colorectal Cancer: A Curative Option

    PubMed Central

    Wein, Axel; Siebler, Jürgen; Goertz, Ruediger; Wolff, Kerstin; Ostermeier, Nicola; Busse, Dagmar; Kremer, Andreas E.; Koch, Franz; Hagel, Alexander; Farnbacher, Michael; Kammerer, Ferdinand J.; Neurath, Markus F.; Gruetzmann, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prognostic outcome following progression after palliative first-line treatment for patients suffering from metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma is generally poor. Long-term relapse-free survival with palliative second-line treatment may be achieved in only a limited number of individual cases. Case Report A 37-year-old patient presented with bilobar liver metastases of colon cancer confirmed by histology with wild-type K-RAS (exon 2). Due to progressive disease after eight cycles of first-line therapy with FOLFIRI plus cetuximab, second-line chemotherapy with modified FOLFOX4 (mFOLFOX4) plus bevacizumab was initiated. During four cycles of mFOLFOX4 plus bevacizumab (2 months), no higher-grade toxicity occurred. Liver MRI with contrast medium revealed downsizing of the segment II/III metastases, as well as regressive, small, faint, hardly definable lesions in segments VI and IVb. The interdisciplinary tumor board of the University of Erlangen thus decided to perform resection of the liver metastases. Segments II and III were resected, and the liver metastases in segments IVa and VI were excised (R0). Histopathology confirmed three of the R0-resected metastases to be completely necrotic, with residual scarring. As perioperative therapy, four additional cycles of mFOLFOX4 plus bevacizumab were administered postoperatively. No higher-grade toxicity was observed. Three years after the initial diagnosis, the patient is relapse free, professionally fully reintegrated, and has an excellent performance status. Conclusion Patients suffering from metastatic colorectal cancer may benefit from multidisciplinary treatment with secondary metastatic liver resection after downsizing by palliative second-line treatment. In individual cases, patients may even have a curative treatment option, provided that close interdisciplinary collaboration exists. PMID:27489542

  3. Targeting the tumor microenvironment as a potential therapeutic approach in colorectal cancer: Rational and progress.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Afsane; Khazaei, Majid; Hassanian, Seyed Mahdi; ShahidSales, Soodabeh; Joudi-Mashhad, Mona; Maftouh, Mina; Jazayeri, Mir Hadi; Parizade, Mohammad Reza; Ferns, Gordon A; Avan, Amir

    2017-06-02

    Colorectal cancer (CC) is often diagnosed at a late stage when tumor metastasis may have already occurred. Current treatments are often ineffective in metastatic disease, and consequently late diagnosis is often associated with poor outcomes in CC. Alternative strategies are therefore urgently required. An interaction between epithelial cancer cells and their tissue microenvironment is a contributor to metastasis, and therefore recent studies are beginning to focus on the properties of the tumor microenvironment and the mechanism by which the metastatic cells exploit the tumor microenvironment for survival, immune evasion, and growth. We have reviewed the development of the combined therapeutic approaches that have focused on targeting the microenvironment of CC. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Accumulation of MDSC and Th17 Cells in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Predicts the Efficacy of a FOLFOX-Bevacizumab Drug Treatment Regimen.

    PubMed

    Limagne, Emeric; Euvrard, Romain; Thibaudin, Marion; Rébé, Cédric; Derangère, Valentin; Chevriaux, Angélique; Boidot, Romain; Végran, Frédérique; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Vincent, Julie; Bengrine-Lefevre, Leila; Ladoire, Sylvain; Delmas, Dominique; Apetoh, Lionel; Ghiringhelli, François

    2016-09-15

    Host immunity controls the development of colorectal cancer, and chemotherapy used to treat colorectal cancer is likely to recruit the host immune system at some level. Athough preclinical studies have argued that colorectal cancer drugs, such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and oxaliplatin, exert such effects, their combination as employed in the oncology clinic has not been evaluated. Here, we report the results of prospective immunomonitoring of 25 metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with a first-line combination regimen of 5-FU, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab (FOLFOX-bevacizumab), as compared with 20 healthy volunteers. Before this therapy was initiated, T regulatory cells (Treg), Th17, and granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (gMDSC) were increased significantly in mCRC, but only a high level of gMDSC was associated with a poor prognosis. Chemotherapy modulated the Treg/Th17 balance by decreasing Treg and increasing Th17 cell frequency by 15 days after the start of treatment. Increased Th17 frequency was associated with a poor prognosis. FOLFOX-bevacizumab treatment elicited a decrease in gMDSC in 15 of 25 patients and was associated with a better survival outcome. Notably, the gMDSCs that expressed high levels of PD-L1, CD39, and CD73 exerted a robust immunosuppressive activity, relative to other myeloid cells present in blood, which could be reversed by blocking the CD39/CD73 and PD-1/PD-L1 axes. Our work underscores the critical prognostic impact of early modifications in Th17 and gMDSC frequency in mCRC. Furthermore, it provides a clinical rationale to combine FOLFOX-bevacizumab chemotherapy with inhibitors of ATP ectonucleotidases and/or anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies to more effectively treat this disease. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5241-52. ©2016 AACR.

  5. Improving treatment and survival: a population-based study of current outcomes after a hepatic resection in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaydfudim, Victor M; McMurry, Timothy L; Harrigan, Amy M; Friel, Charles M; Stukenborg, George J; Bauer, Todd W; Adams, Reid B; Hedrick, Traci L

    2015-01-01

    Background Population-based studies historically report underutilization of a resection in patients with colorectal metastases to the liver. Recent data suggest limitations of the methods in the historical analysis. The present study examines trends in a hepatic resection and survival among Medicare recipients with hepatic metastases. Methods Medicare recipients with incident colorectal cancer diagnosed between 1991 and 2009 were identified in the SEER(Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results)-Medicare dataset. Patients were stratified into historical (1991–2001) and current (2002–2009) cohorts. Analyses compared treatment, peri-operative outcomes and survival. Results Of 31 574 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer to the liver, 14 859 were in the current cohort treated after 2002 and 16 715 comprised the historical control group. The overall proportion treated with a hepatic resection increased significantly during the study period (P < 0.001) with pre/post change from 6.5% pre-2002 to 7.5% currently (P < 0.001). Over time, haemorrhagic and infectious complications declined (both P ≤ 0.047), but 30-day mortality was similar (3.5% versus 3.9%, P = 0.660). After adjusting for predictors of survival, the use of a hepatic resection [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.40, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.38–0.42, P < 0.001] and treatment after 2002 (HR = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.86–0.90, P < 0.001) were associated with a reduced risk of death. Conclusions Case identification using International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision (ICD-9) codes is imperfect; however, comparison of trends over time suggests an improvement in multimodality therapy and survival in patients with colorectal metastases to the liver. PMID:26353888

  6. Treatment options for non-motor symptoms in late-stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Miguel; Ferreira, Joaquim; Rosa, Mário; Sampaio, Cristina

    2008-03-01

    Late-stage Parkinson's disease is characterised by patients dependent on caregivers for their activities of daily living, even under the best levodopa benefit. Non-motor signs that overcome the well-known motor signs of Parkinson's disease dominate late-stage Parkinson's disease and few systematic data exist for the treatment of these signs. The objective of this study was to review the treatment options for Parkinson's disease dementia, psychosis, falls, bone fractures, joint and skeletal deformities, pain, orthostatic hypotension, gastrointestinal abnormalities and urological dysfunction in late-stage Parkinson's disease. The study analysed the available controlled clinical trials for the above medical conditions. When absent, data from case series and the authors' own experience was considered. Few controlled clinical trials specifically addressed late-stage Parkinson's disease as a target population. There is a need for therapeutic data on the symptoms that most afflict late-stage Parkinson's disease patients.

  7. SVM-T-RFE: a novel gene selection algorithm for identifying metastasis-related genes in colorectal cancer using gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Peng, Sihua; Chen, Jian; Lü, Bingjian; Zhang, Honghe; Lai, Maode

    2012-03-09

    Although metastasis is the principal cause of death cause for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, the molecular mechanisms underlying CRC metastasis are still not fully understood. In an attempt to identify metastasis-related genes in CRC, we obtained gene expression profiles of 55 early stage primary CRCs, 56 late stage primary CRCs, and 34 metastatic CRCs from the expression project in Oncology (http://www.intgen.org/expo/). We developed a novel gene selection algorithm (SVM-T-RFE), which extends support vector machine recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE) algorithm by incorporating T-statistic. We achieved highest classification accuracy (100%) with smaller gene subsets (10 and 6, respectively), when classifying between early and late stage primary CRCs, as well as between metastatic CRCs and late stage primary CRCs. We also compared the performance of SVM-T-RFE and SVM-RFE gene selection algorithms on another large-scale CRC dataset and the five public microarray datasets. SVM-T-RFE bestowed SVM-RFE algorithm in identifying more differentially expressed genes, and achieving highest prediction accuracy using equal or smaller number of selected genes. A fraction of selected genes have been reported to be associated with CRC development or metastasis.

  8. KRAS mutation testing of tumours in adults with metastatic colorectal cancer: a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Westwood, Marie; van Asselt, Thea; Ramaekers, Bram; Whiting, Penny; Joore, Manuela; Armstrong, Nigel; Noake, Caro; Ross, Janine; Severens, Johan; Kleijnen, Jos

    2014-10-01

    Bowel cancer is the third most common cancer in the UK. Most bowel cancers are initially treated with surgery, but around 17% spread to the liver. When this happens, sometimes the liver tumour can be treated surgically, or chemotherapy may be used to shrink the tumour to make surgery possible. Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene (KRAS) mutations make some tumours less responsive to treatment with biological therapies such as cetuximab. There are a variety of tests available to detect these mutations. These vary in the specific mutations that they detect, the amount of mutation they detect, the amount of tumour cells needed, the time to give a result, the error rate and cost. To compare the performance and cost-effectiveness of KRAS mutation tests in differentiating adults with metastatic colorectal cancer whose metastases are confined to the liver and are unresectable and who may benefit from first-line treatment with cetuximab in combination with standard chemotherapy from those who should receive standard chemotherapy alone. Thirteen databases, including MEDLINE and EMBASE, research registers and conference proceedings were searched to January 2013. Additional data were obtained from an online survey of laboratories participating in the UK National External Quality Assurance Scheme pilot for KRAS mutation testing. A systematic review of the evidence was carried out using standard methods. Randomised controlled trials were assessed for quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Diagnostic accuracy studies were assessed using the QUADAS-2 tool. There were insufficient data for meta-analysis. For accuracy studies we calculated sensitivity and specificity together with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Survival data were summarised as hazard ratios and tumour response data were summarised as relative risks, with 95% CIs. The health economic analysis considered the long-term costs and quality-adjusted life-years associated with different tests followed by treatment

  9. New findings on primary and acquired resistance to anti-EGFR therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer: do all roads lead to RAS?

    PubMed

    Bronte, Giuseppe; Silvestris, Nicola; Castiglia, Marta; Galvano, Antonio; Passiglia, Francesco; Sortino, Giovanni; Cicero, Giuseppe; Rolfo, Christian; Peeters, Marc; Bazan, Viviana; Fanale, Daniele; Giordano, Antonio; Russo, Antonio

    2015-09-22

    Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy with the monoclonal antibodies cetuximab and panitumumab is the main targeted treatment to combine with standard chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. Many clinical studies have shown the benefit of the addition of these agents for patients without mutations in the EGFR pathway. Many biomarkers, including KRAS and NRAS mutations, BRAF mutations, PIK3CA mutations, PTEN loss, AREG and EREG expression, and HER-2 amplification have already been identified to select responders to anti-EGFR agents. Among these alterations KRAS and NRAS mutations are currently recognized as the best predictive factors for primary resistance. Liquid biopsy, which helps to isolate circulating tumor DNA, is an innovative method to study both primary and acquired resistance to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies. However, high-sensitivity techniques should be used to enable the identification of a wide set of gene mutations related to resistance.

  10. New findings on primary and acquired resistance to anti-EGFR therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer: do all roads lead to RAS?

    PubMed Central

    Castiglia, Marta; Galvano, Antonio; Passiglia, Francesco; Sortino, Giovanni; Cicero, Giuseppe; Rolfo, Christian; Peeters, Marc; Bazan, Viviana; Fanale, Daniele; Giordano, Antonio; Russo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy with the monoclonal antibodies cetuximab and panitumumab is the main targeted treatment to combine with standard chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. Many clinical studies have shown the benefit of the addition of these agents for patients without mutations in the EGFR pathway. Many biomarkers, including KRAS and NRAS mutations, BRAF mutations, PIK3CA mutations, PTEN loss, AREG and EREG expression, and HER-2 amplification have already been identified to select responders to anti-EGFR agents. Among these alterations KRAS and NRAS mutations are currently recognized as the best predictive factors for primary resistance. Liquid biopsy, which helps to isolate circulating tumor DNA, is an innovative method to study both primary and acquired resistance to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies. However, high-sensitivity techniques should be used to enable the identification of a wide set of gene mutations related to resistance. PMID:26318427

  11. FOLFIRI plus cetuximab versus FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab as first-line treatment for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (FIRE-3): a randomised, open-label, phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Volker; von Weikersthal, Ludwig Fischer; Decker, Thomas; Kiani, Alexander; Vehling-Kaiser, Ursula; Al-Batran, Salah-Eddin; Heintges, Tobias; Lerchenmüller, Christian; Kahl, Christoph; Seipelt, Gernot; Kullmann, Frank; Stauch, Martina; Scheithauer, Werner; Hielscher, Jörg; Scholz, Michael; Müller, Sebastian; Link, Hartmut; Niederle, Norbert; Rost, Andreas; Höffkes, Heinz-Gert; Moehler, Markus; Lindig, Reinhard U; Modest, Dominik P; Rossius, Lisa; Kirchner, Thomas; Jung, Andreas; Stintzing, Sebastian

    2014-09-01

    Cetuximab and bevacizumab have both been shown to improve outcomes in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer when added to chemotherapy regimens; however, their comparative effectiveness when partnered with first-line fluorouracil, folinic acid, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) is unknown. We aimed to compare these agents in patients with KRAS (exon 2) codon 12/13 wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer. In this open-label, randomised, phase 3 trial, we recruited patients aged 18-75 years with stage IV, histologically confirmed colorectal cancer, an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0-2, an estimated life expectancy of greater than 3 months, and adequate organ function, from centres in Germany and Austria. Patients were centrally randomised by fax (1:1) to FOLFIRI plus cetuximab or FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab (using permuted blocks of randomly varying size), stratified according to ECOG performance status, number of metastatic sites, white blood cell count, and alkaline phosphatase concentration. The primary endpoint was objective response analysed by intention to treat. The study has completed recruitment, but follow-up of participants is ongoing. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00433927. Between Jan 23, 2007, and Sept 19, 2012, 592 patients with KRAS exon 2 wild-type tumours were randomly assigned and received treatment (297 in the FOLFIRI plus cetuximab group and 295 in the FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab group). 184 (62·0%, 95% CI 56·2-67·5) patients in the cetuximab group achieved an objective response compared with 171 (58·0%, 52·1-63·7) in the bevacizumab group (odds ratio 1·18, 95% CI 0·85-1·64; p=0·18). Median progression-free survival was 10·0 months (95% CI 8·8-10·8) in the cetuximab group and 10·3 months (9·8-11·3) in the bevacizumab group (hazard ratio [HR] 1·06, 95% CI 0·88-1·26; p=0·55); however, median overall survival was 28·7 months (95% CI 24·0-36·6) in the cetuximab group compared

  12. Human monoclonal antibody 99mTc-88BV59: detection of colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease and immunogenicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Krause, B J; Baum, R P; Staib-Sebler, E; Lorenz, M; Niesen, A; Hör, G

    1997-01-01

    This study presents immunoscintigraphic results in 24 patients suffering from primary colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease after the injection of 1197-1351 MBq technetium-99m labelled totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59. Labelling efficacy of 99mTc-88BV59 ranged from 97% to 99%. Immunoscintigraphy was performed 18-20 h after injection. Scintigraphic findings were compared with those of computed tomography (CT). Patients underwent surgery in order to evaluate immunoscintigraphic findings histologically. Sera of the patients (before injection and 1 and 3 months post infusion) were analysed for the presence of human anti-human antibodies (HAHA). None of the patients showed a HAHA response as assessed by a solid-phase ELISA assay. The antibody scan detected about 25% more lesions than CT. In the detection of extrahepatic disease, the sensitivity of the antibody scan proved to be 68%, whereas the sensitivity of CT was 41%.

  13. The chromatin remodelling component SMARCB1/INI1 influences the metastatic behavior of colorectal cancer through a gene signature mapping to chromosome 22

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background INI1 (Integrase interactor 1), also known as SMARCB1, is the most studied subunit of chromatin remodelling complexes. Its role in colorectal tumorigenesis is not known. Methods We examined SMARCB1/INI1 protein expression in 134 cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) and 60 matched normal mucosa by using tissue microarrays and western blot and categorized the results according to mismatch repair status (MMR), CpG island methylator phenotype, biomarkers of tumor differentiation CDX2, CK20, vimentin and p53. We validated results in two independent data sets and in cultured CRC cell lines. Results Herein, we show that negative SMARCB1/INI1 expression (11% of CRCs) associates with loss of CDX2, poor differentiation, liver metastasis and shorter patients’ survival regardless of the MMR status or tumor stage. Unexpectedly, even CRCs displaying diffuse nuclear INI1 staining (33%) show an adverse prognosis and vimentin over-expression, in comparison with the low expressing group (56%). The negative association of SMARCB1/INI1-lack of expression with a metastatic behavior is enhanced by the TP53 status. By interrogating global gene expression from two independent cohorts of 226 and 146 patients, we confirm the prognostic results and identify a gene signature characterized by SMARCB1/INI1 deregulation. Notably, the top genes of the signature (BCR, COMT, MIF) map on the long arm of chromosome 22 and are closely associated with SMARCB1/INI1. Conclusion Our findings suggest that SMARCB1/INI1-dysregulation and genetic hot-spots on the long arm of chromosome 22 might play an important role in the CRC metastatic behavior and be clinically relevant as novel biomarkers. PMID:24286138

  14. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging predicts survival in patients with liver-predominant metastatic colorectal cancer shortly after selective internal radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Schmeel, Frederic Carsten; Simon, Birgit; Sabet, Amir; Luetkens, Julian Alexander; Träber, Frank; Schmeel, Leonard Christopher; Ezziddin, Samer; Schild, Hans Heinz; Hadizadeh, Dariusch Reza

    2017-03-01

    To investigate whether quantifications of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can predict overall survival (OS) in patients with liver-predominant metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) following selective internal radiation therapy with (90)Yttrium-microspheres (SIRT). Forty-four patients underwent DWI 19 ± 16 days before and 36 ± 10 days after SIRT. Tumour-size and intratumoral minimal ADC (minADC) values were measured for 132 liver metastases on baseline and follow-up DWI. Optimal functional imaging response to treatment was determined by receiver operating characteristics and defined as ≥22 % increase in post-therapeutic minADC. Survival analysis was performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox-regression comparing various variables with potential impact on OS. Median OS was 8 months. The following parameters were significantly associated with median OS: optimal functional imaging response (18 vs. 5 months; p < 0.001), hepatic tumour burden <50 % (8 vs. 5 months; p = 0.018), Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance scale <1 (10 vs. 4 months; p = 0.012) and progressive disease according to Response and Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (8 vs. 3 months; p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, optimal functional imaging response and hepatic tumour burden remained independent predictors of OS. Functional imaging response assessment using minADC changes on DWI may predict survival in CRC shortly after SIRT. • Relative minADC changes may predict survival in liver-predominant metastatic colorectal cancer following SIRT • Intratumoral minADC changes by ≥22 % were best to predict an improved overall survival • Functional imaging response assessment is feasible before anatomic tumour-size changes occur • minADC changes might guide future therapy management in sequential lobar radioembolization approaches.

  15. Balancing risk and benefit for first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: a graphic communication tool for patients and physicians.

    PubMed

    Sanatani, Michael S; Vincent, Mark D

    2007-01-01

    Advances in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer have improved overall survival (OS); however, this might come at the cost of increased toxicity. Health-related quality of life, a significant concern closely related to toxicity and important when discussing palliative therapy, is infrequently assessed and reported in older clinical trials. As the number of tested regimens increases, the question arises on how to best present palliative treatment options. We present a simple way to compare treatment options in terms of potential risks and benefits. The literature was surveyed for reports of first-line systemic chemotherapies for metastatic colorectal cancer. The largest recent reports with detailed toxicity data were selected as representative for a regimen. Toxicity sum of a regimen was calculated as percent occurrences in the study cohort of severe adverse effects: diarrhea, mucositis, neurocutaneous conditions (excluding alopecia), vomiting, and febrile neutropenia. Limitations of toxicity reporting precluded inclusion of other or milder adverse events. Benefits (OS and progression-free survival [PFS]) were plotted graphically as benefit versus toxicity sum. Thirty-four regimens were found. Overall survival, PFS, and toxicity sum ranged from 8.9-24.7 months, 4.9-9.2 months, and 12-70 months, respectively. Weaknesses of our study include omission of some specific toxicities and of symptom control benefit, as well as heterogeneity of trial design and study populations. Furthermore, more recent OS data might reflect the availability of more lines of therapy rather than the effect of the first-line regimen, as comparison with PFS outcomes show. Our comparative tool helps physicians discuss the large number of available options with a patient in order to arrive at the treatment plan most appropriate to the individual and improve informed consent and disclosure, while highlighting limitations in available evidence.

  16. Early tumour shrinkage (ETS) and depth of response (DpR) in the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC).

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Volker; Stintzing, Sebastian; Modest, Dominik P; Giessen-Jung, Clemens; Michl, Marlies; Mansmann, Ulrich R

    2015-09-01

    Response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (RECIST) are used to define degrees of response to anti-tumour agents. In retrospective analyses, early tumour shrinkage (ETS) has been investigated as an alternative early-on-treatment predictor of treatment efficacy with regard to progression-free and overall survival. While cut-off based analysis of ETS facilitates the categorisation of patients into responders and non-responders after a defined period of treatment, depth of response (DpR) serves as a continuous measure, which defines the nadir of tumour response. A systematic literature search for 'early tumour shrinkage' or 'tumour size decrease' in 'metastatic colorectal cancer' reported from January 2000 to July 2014 was performed. The present review summarises available data concerning ETS and DpR and evaluates their potential as predictive markers for the clinical management of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). A total of 10 clinical trials investigated the role of ETS as a marker of clinical outcome in patients with mCRC. In addition, DpR was investigated using the efficacy data from three of these trials. Available data show that ETS differentiates patients with high sensitivity to treatment and more favourable prognosis from a heterogeneous group of patients classified as non-ETS patients. ETS is an early indicator of the potentially achievable response. In contrast, DpR estimates the nadir of tumour response as a continuous measure, which may affect the subsequent disease history, thus translating into superior survival. The concepts of ETS and DpR offer potential as clinical end-points to aid the clinical decision making process and thus further optimise mCRC patient management in the era of tailored therapy approaches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Phase I/II Trial of Labetuzumab Govitecan (Anti-CEACAM5/SN-38 Antibody-Drug Conjugate) in Patients With Refractory or Relapsing Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dotan, Efrat; Cohen, Steven J; Starodub, Alexander N; Lieu, Christopher H; Messersmith, Wells A; Simpson, Pamela S; Guarino, Michael J; Marshall, John L; Goldberg, Richard M; Hecht, J Randolph; Wegener, William A; Sharkey, Robert M; Govindan, Serengulam V; Goldenberg, David M; Berlin, Jordan D

    2017-10-10

    Purpose The objectives were to evaluate dosing schedules of labetuzumab govitecan, an antibody-drug conjugate targeting carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 (CEACAM5) for tumor delivery of 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38), in an expanded phase II trial of patients with relapsed or refractory metastatic colorectal cancer. Patients and Methods Eligible patients with at least one prior irinotecan-containing therapy received labetuzumab govitecan once weekly at 8 and 10 mg/kg, or two times per week at 4 and 6 mg/km on weeks 1 and 2 of 3-week repeated cycles. End points were safety, response, pharmacokinetics, and immunogenicity. Results Eighty-six patients who had undergone a median of five prior therapies (range, one to 13) were each enrolled into one of the four cohorts. On the basis of Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.1, 38% of these patients had a tumor as well as plasma carcinoembryonic antigen reduction from baseline after labetuzumab govitecan treatment; one patient achieved a partial response with a sustained response spanning > 2 years, whereas 42 patients had stable disease as the best overall response. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 3.6 and 6.9 months, respectively. The major toxicities (grade ≥ 3) among all cohorts were neutropenia (16%), leukopenia (11%), anemia (9%), and diarrhea (7%). The antibody-drug conjugate's mean half-life was 16.5 hours for the four cohorts. Anti-drug/anti-antibody antibodies were not detected. The two once-weekly dose schedules, showing comparable toxicity and efficacy, were chosen for further study. Conclusion Monotherapy with labetuzumab govitecan demonstrated a manageable safety profile and therapeutic activity in heavily pretreated patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, all with prior irinotecan therapy. Further studies of labetuzumab govitecan treatment alone or in combination with other therapies in earlier settings are indicated.

  18. Analysis of Clinical End Points of Randomised Trials Including Bevacizumab and Chemotherapy versus Chemotherapy as First-line Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Colloca, G; Venturino, A; Guarneri, D

    2016-10-01

    Progression-free survival is recognised as an appropriate end point for randomised clinical trials of chemotherapy of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, although it is not clear if it is reliable after chemotherapy plus bevacizumab. A literature search of randomised trials of systemic treatment including chemotherapy plus bevacizumab versus chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer was undertaken. For each trial the differences in overall survival and in either time-to-event or response-related end points were calculated. A Spearman test was carried out between the difference in each end point and the difference in survival. For the end points with the higher relationships with overall survival a regression analysis was carried out and R(2) (proportion of variability explained) was reported. Progression-free survival is closely related to overall survival (r=0.817; R(2)=0.706) and this relationship does not seem to be changed by the discontinuation of bevacizumab. The response-related end points have a better overall performance than the other time-to-event end points, even when only phase III trials are considered. In phase III trials, the disease control rate seems to be strongly related to overall survival (r=0.975; R(2)=0.889) and the overall response rate reports a good performance (r=0.866; R(2)=0.484). An open-label design and the timing of disease radiological evaluation do not seem to interfere with the correlation of differences of progression-free survival and overall survival. A validation of the disease control rate and the overall response rate as a surrogate end point of survival at a patient level and a standardised definition of the timing for their measurement are strongly recommended in trials of chemotherapy plus bevacizumab. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Anti-epidermal or anti-vascular endothelial growth factor as first-line metastatic colorectal cancer in modified Glasgow prognostic score 2' patients

    PubMed Central

    Dréanic, Johann; Dhooge, Marion; Barret, Maximilien; Brezault, Catherine; Mir, Olivier; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Background In metastatic colorectal cancer, the modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS) has been approved as an independent prognostic indicator of survival. No data existed on poor prognosis patients treated with molecular-targeted agents. Methods From January 2007 to February 2012, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and poor predictive survival score (mGPS = 2), treated with 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy in addition to an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anti-vascular epidermal growth factor (VEGF) therapy, were included to assess the interest of targeted therapy within mGPS = 2' patients. Results A total of 27 mGPS = 2' patients were included and received a 5-fluorouracil-based systemic chemotherapy in addition to an anti-EGFR treatment (cetuximab; n = 18) or an anti-VEGF treatment (bevacizumab; n = 9). Median follow-up was 12.1 months (interquartile range 4.9–22). Patients were Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) Performance Status 1, 2, and 3 in 66% (n = 18), 26% (n = 7), and 8% (n = 2), respectively. Comparing anti-EGFR and anti-VEGF groups, median progression-free survival was 3.9 and 15.4 months, respectively, and was significantly different (P = 0.046). Conversely, the median overall survival was not significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.15). Conclusion Our study confirmed the poor survival of patients with mGPS = 2 despite the use of targeted therapy and identified the superiority of an anti-VEGF treatment in progression-free survival, without a significant benefit in the overall survival compared with the anti-EGFR therapy. Our results deserved confirmation by a prospective clinical trial. PMID:26401469

  20. Prognostic role of serum concentrations of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: results from the ITACa trial

    PubMed Central

    Scarpi, Emanuela; Maltoni, Paolo; Dorizzi, Romolo M.; Passardi, Alessandro; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca; Cortesi, Pietro; Giannini, Maria Benedetta; Marisi, Giorgia; Amadori, Dino; Lucchesi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Serum levels of C-reactive protein are (CRP) higher in patients with neoplastic conditions and numerous studies have been performed to clarify the etiologic and prognostic role of the high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) in cancer. Our study was conducted on patients enrolled in the prospective randomized “Italian Trial in Advanced Colorectal Cancer (ITACa)” to assess hs-CRP levels and their impact on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Serum samples from 132 ITACa patients were collected at baseline and 2 months after starting first-line chemotherapy. The supernatant was immediately transferred to cryovials and stored at −80°C. After thawing, hs-CRP was measured with the Cobas c501 analyzer. High levels of hs-CRP (≥ 13.1 mg/L) were associated with poorer median PFS (p < 0.0001) and OS (p < 0.0001) than low hs-CRP levels (< 13.1 mg/L). hs-CRP values in 107 patients were evaluated again after 2 months of therapy, revealing that patients with low hs-CRP levels in both baseline and second serum samples had the best median PFS and OS. Our study confirms the prognostic value of hs-CRP in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma. PMID:26848624

  1. Target hepatic artery regional chemotherapy and bevacizumab perfusion in liver metastatic colorectal cancer after failure of first-line or second-line systemic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Zhang, Ji; Cao, Guang; Liu, Peng; Xu, Haifeng; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhu, Xu; Gao, Song; Guo, Jianhai; Zhu, Linzhong; Zhang, Pengjun

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal cancer liver metastasis (CRLM) is a refractory disease after failure of first-line or second-line chemotherapy. Bevacizumab is recommended as first-line therapy for advanced colorectal cancer, but is unproven in CRLM through the hepatic artery. We report favorable outcomes with targeted vessel regional chemotherapy (TVRC) for liver metastatic gastric cancer. TVRC with FOLFOX and bevacizumab perfusion through the hepatic artery was attempted for CRLM for efficacy and safety evaluation. In a single-institution retrospective observational study, 246 patients with CRLM after at least first-line or second-line failure of systemic chemotherapy received TVRC with FOLFOX (i.e. oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-fluorouracil). Of 246 patients, 63 were enrolled into two groups: group 1 (n=30) received bevacizumab and TVRC following tumor progression during previous TVRC treatments; group 2 (n=33) received TVRC plus bevacizumab for CRLM on initiating TVRC. There were no significant differences in the median survival time (14.7 vs. 13.2 months, P=0.367), although the median time to progression was significant (3.3 vs. 5.5 months, P=0.026) between groups. No severe adverse events related to TVRC plus bevacizumab perfusion occurred. Target vessel regional chemotherapy with FOLFOX plus bevacizumab perfusion through the hepatic artery was effective and safe in CRLM. The optimal combination of TVRC and bevacizumab needs further confirmation in future phase II-III clinical trials.

  2. Detection of Circulating Tumor DNA in Early- and Late-Stage Human Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bettegowda, Chetan; Sausen, Mark; Leary, Rebecca J.; Kinde, Isaac; Wang, Yuxuan; Agrawal, Nishant; Bartlett, Bjarne R.; Wang, Hao; Luber, Brandon; Alani, Rhoda M.; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Azad, Nilofer S.; Bardelli, Alberto; Brem, Henry; Cameron, John L.; Lee, Clarence C.; Fecher, Leslie A.; Gallia, Gary L.; Gibbs, Peter; Le, Dung; Giuntoli, Robert L.; Goggins, Michael; Hogarty, Michael D.; Holdhoff, Matthias; Hong, Seung-Mo; Jiao, Yuchen; Juhl, Hartmut H.; Kim, Jenny J.; Siravegna, Giulia; Laheru, Daniel A.; Lauricella, Calogero; Lim, Michael; Lipson, Evan J.; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi; Netto, George J.; Oliner, Kelly S.; Olivi, Alessandro; Olsson, Louise; Riggins, Gregory J.; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Schmidt, Kerstin; Shih, le-Ming; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli Mieko; Siena, Salvatore; Theodorescu, Dan; Tie, Jeanne; Harkins, Timothy T.; Veronese, Silvio; Wang, Tian-Li; Weingart, Jon D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Wood, Laura D.; Xing, Dongmei; Hruban, Ralph H.; Wu, Jian; Allen, Peter J.; Schmidt, C. Max; Choti, Michael A.; Velculescu, Victor E.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Diaz, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    The development of noninvasive methods to detect and monitor tumors continues to be a major challenge in oncology. We used digital polymerase chain reaction–based technologies to evaluate the ability of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) to detect tumors in 640 patients with various cancer types. We found that ctDNA was detectable in >75% of patients with advanced pancreatic, ovarian, colorectal, bladder, gastroesophageal, breast, melanoma, hepatocellular, and head and neck cancers, but in less than 50% of primary brain, renal, prostate, or thyroid cancers. In patients with localized tumors, ctDNA was detected in 73, 57, 48, and 50% of patients with colorectal cancer, gastroesophageal cancer, pancreatic cancer, and breast adenocarcinoma, respectively. ctDNA was often present in patients without detectable circulating tumor cells, suggesting that these two biomarkers are distinct entities. In a separate panel of 206 patients with metastatic colorectal cancers, we showed that the sensitivity of ctDNA for detection of clinically relevant KRAS gene mutations was 87.2% and its specificity was 99.2%. Finally, we assessed whether ctDNA could provide clues into the mechanisms underlying resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor blockade in 24 patients who objectively responded to therapy but subsequently relapsed. Twenty-three (96%) of these patients developed one or more mutations in genes involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Together, these data suggest that ctDNA is a broadly applicable, sensitive, and specific biomarker that can be used for a variety of clinical and research purposes in patients with multiple different types of cancer. PMID:24553385

  3. Meta-analysis comparing maintenance strategies with continuous therapy and complete chemotherapy-free interval strategies in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Wang, Jing; Li, Huihui; Che, Juanjuan; Cao, Bangwei

    2016-05-31

    There is as yet no consensus as to the best choice among the three treatment options (maintenance, complete chemotherapy-free intervals [CFIs], and continuous) for metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). We performed a meta-analysis of six trials (N = 2, 454 patients) to compare the safety and efficacy of those three treatment strategies. Maintenance appeared to offer an advantage over CFI with respect to progression-free survival (PFS) (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.53, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40-0.69). PFS and overall survival (OS) were comparable between the maintenance and continuous strategies (HR: 1.18, 95% CI, 0.96-1.46; HR: 1.05, 95% CI, 0.98-1.27, respectively), as was OS between the maintenance and CFI strategies (HR: 0.84; 95% CI, 0.70-1.00). The incidence of grade 3/4 toxicity, including neutropenia, neuropathy, hand-foot syndrome and fatigue, was lower with maintenance than with continuous therapy. A maintenance regimen utilizing bevacizumab-based doublets appeared to confer a slight advantage over bevacizumab monotherapy with respect to PFS (P = 0.011). Maintenance appeared to reduce cumulative grade 3/4 toxicity as compared to the continuous strategy, while showing comparable efficacy. Bevacizumab-based doublets appeared to be of particular value in patients with metastatic CRC.

  4. Meta-analysis comparing maintenance strategies with continuous therapy and complete chemotherapy-free interval strategies in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Wang, Jing; Li, Huihui; Che, Juanjuan; Cao, Bangwei

    2016-01-01

    There is as yet no consensus as to the best choice among the three treatment options (maintenance, complete chemotherapy-free intervals [CFIs], and continuous) for metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). We performed a meta-analysis of six trials (N = 2, 454 patients) to compare the safety and efficacy of those three treatment strategies. Maintenance appeared to offer an advantage over CFI with respect to progression-free survival (PFS) (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.53, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40–0.69). PFS and overall survival (OS) were comparable between the maintenance and continuous strategies (HR: 1.18, 95% CI, 0.96–1.46; HR: 1.05, 95% CI, 0.98–1.27, respectively), as was OS between the maintenance and CFI strategies (HR: 0.84; 95% CI, 0.70–1.00). The incidence of grade 3/4 toxicity, including neutropenia, neuropathy, hand-foot syndrome and fatigue, was lower with maintenance than with continuous therapy. A maintenance regimen utilizing bevacizumab-based doublets appeared to confer a slight advantage over bevacizumab monotherapy with respect to PFS (P = 0.011). Maintenance appeared to reduce cumulative grade 3/4 toxicity as compared to the continuous strategy, while showing comparable efficacy. Bevacizumab-based doublets appeared to be of particular value in patients with metastatic CRC. PMID:27072579

  5. TIMP-1 is under regulation of the EGF signaling axis and promotes an aggressive phenotype in KRAS-mutated colorectal cancer cells: A potential novel approach to the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Ib J.; Nordgaard, Cathrine; Noer, Julie; Guren, Tormod K.; Glimelius, Bengt; Sorbye, Halfdan; Ikdahl, Tone; Kure, Elin H.; Tveit, Kjell M.; Nielsen, Hans J.

    2016-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that therapeutic antibodies targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) can have efficacy in KRAS wild-type advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. What remains to be ascertained is whether a subgroup of KRAS-mutated CRC patients might not also derive benefit from EGFR inhibitors. Metalloproteinase inhibitor 1 (TIMP-1) is a pleiotropic factor predictive of survival outcome of CRC patients. Levels of TIMP-1 were measured in pre-treatment plasma samples (n = 426) of metastatic CRC patients randomized to Nordic FLOX (5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin) +/− cetuximab (NORDIC VII study). Multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant interaction between plasma TIMP-1 protein levels, KRAS status and treatment with patients bearing KRAS mutated tumors and high TIMP-1 plasma level (> 3rd quartile) showing a significantly longer overall survival if treated with cetuximab (HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.93). To gain mechanistic insights into this association we analyzed a set of five different CRC cell lines. We show here that EGFR signaling induces TIMP-1 expression in CRC cells, and that TIMP-1 promotes a more aggressive behavior, specifically in KRAS mutated cells. The two sets of data, clinical and in vitro, are complementary and support each other, lending strength to our contention that TIMP- 1 plasma levels can identify a subset of patients with KRAS-mutated metastatic CRC that will have benefit from EGFR-inhibition therapy. PMID:27509063

  6. The Late Stages of the Evolution of Massive Stars Seen by Means of Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turatto, M.

    2017-07-01

    The talk illustrates how the core-collapse Supernovae, which emit an enormous amount of energy as radiation and kinetic energy of the ejecta, can provide invaluable information about the very late stages of the progenitors before the explosions.

  7. Impact of Urban Neighborhood Disadvantage on Late Stage Breast Cancer Diagnosis in Virginia.

    PubMed

    DeGuzman, Pam Baker; Cohn, Wendy F; Camacho, Fabian; Edwards, Brandy L; Sturz, Vanessa N; Schroen, Anneke T

    2017-04-01

    Research suggests that residents of inner-city urban neighborhoods have higher rates of late stage cancer diagnosis. Identifying urban neighborhoods with high rates of both concentrated disadvantage and late stage cancer diagnosis may assist health care providers to target screening interventions to reduce disparities. The purposes of this study were to (1) create an index to evaluate concentrated disadvantage (CD) using non-racial measures of poverty, (2) determine the impact of neighborhood CD on late stage breast cancer diagnosis in US cities, and (3) to understand the role of obesity on this relationship. We used census block group- (CBG) level poverty indicators from five Virginia cities to develop the index. Breast cancer cases of women aged 18-65 who lived in the five cities were identified from the 2000-2012 Virginia Cancer Registry. A logistic regression model with random intercept was used to evaluate the impact of disadvantage on late stage breast cancer diagnosis. CBG-level maps were developed to geographically identify neighborhoods with both high rates of CD and late breast cancer staging. Over 900 CBGs and 6000 breast cases were included. Global fit of the concentrated disadvantage model was acceptable. The effect of disadvantage on late stage was significant (OR = 1.0083, p = 0.032). Inner-city poverty impacts risk of late stage breast cancer diagnosis. Area-level obesity is highly correlated with neighborhood poverty (ρ = 0.74, p < 0.0001) but the mediating direct and indirect effects are non-significant. Intervening in these high poverty neighborhoods may help combat disparities in late stage diagnosis for urban poor and for minorities living in these underserved neighborhoods, but more study is needed to understanding the complex relationship between concentrated neighborhood poverty, obesity, and late stage diagnosis.

  8. Determinants of late-stage HIV disease at diagnosis in Singapore, 1996 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Tey, Jeannie S H; Ang, Li Wei; Tay, Joanne; Cutter, Jeffery L; James, Lyn; Chew, Suok Kai; Goh, Kee Tai

    2012-05-01

    The delay in HIV diagnosis has been identified as a significant reason for late presentation to medical care. This research aims to elucidate the significant determinants of late-stage HIV infection in Singapore between 1996 and 2009, after the advent of highly active anti-retroviral therapies. We included 3735 patients infected via sexual mode of transmission from the National HIV Registry diagnosed between 1996 and 2009. Late-stage HIV infection is defined as CD4 count less than 200 mm(3) or AIDS-defining opportunistic infections at fi rst diagnosis or within one year of HIV diagnosis. We determined independent epidemiological risk factors for late-stage HIV infection at first diagnosis using multivariate logistic regression. Multivariate analysis showed that older age corresponded significantly with increasing odds of late-stage HIV infection. Compared to persons diagnosed at 15 to 24 years of age, those diagnosed at age 55 years and above were associated with 5-fold increased likelihood of late-stage infection (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 5.17; 95% CI, 3.21 to 8.33). Chinese ethnicity, singlehood, and non-professional occupations were also significantly associated with late-stage HIV infection. Persons detected in the course of medical care had over 3.5 times the odds of late-stage infection (AOR: 3.55; 95% CI, 2.71 to 4.65). Heterosexual mode of transmission and having sex workers and social escorts as sexual partners, were the other epidemiological risk factors with significant associations. The findings of this study emphasises the need to increase HIV awareness and to encourage early and regular HIV testing among at-risk persons.

  9. Primary care physician supply, insurance type, and late-stage cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Plascak, Jesse J; Fisher, James L; Paskett, Electra D

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the joint effects of insurance type and primary care physician density on stage at diagnosis is essential to elucidating the healthcare access and late-stage cancer relationship. To determine if the relationship between primary care physician density and odds of late-stage cancer are modified by insurance type at diagnosis. Case patients were Ohio adults diagnosed between 1996 and 2008 with cancer of one of the following sites: female breast, cervix, colon/rectum, lung/bronchus, melanoma of the skin, oral cavity and pharynx, or prostate (N=376,425). County-level physician density was obtained from the Ohio Department of Health. Multilevel logistic regression models estimated odds ratios of late-stage cancer diagnosis associated with increases in primary care physician density by insurance type. Analyses were conducted in 2014. Decreases in late-stage diagnosis of cancers of the breast, prostate, melanoma of the skin, oral cavity and pharynx, or lung/bronchus associated with increases in primary care physician density were strongest among those with private insurance, whereas those with Medicare (prostate, oral cavity and pharynx, lung/bronchus), Medicaid (lung/bronchus), uninsured (prostate), and other/unknown (prostate, oral cavity and pharynx, lung/bronchus) did not benefit as greatly, or experienced significant increases in late-stage cancer diagnosis (other/unknown [female breast], Medicaid [melanoma of the skin], and uninsured [colon/rectum]). As primary care physician density increases, those with private insurance consistently benefit the most in terms of late-stage cancer diagnosis, whereas those with several other insurance types experience flatter decreases or significantly higher odds of late-stage cancer diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Phase II randomized study of ISIS 3521 and ISIS 5132 in patients with locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer: a National Cancer Institute of Canada clinical trials group study.

    PubMed

    Cripps, M Christine; Figueredo, Alvaro T; Oza, Amit M; Taylor, Marianne J; Fields, Anthony L; Holmlund, John T; McIntosh, Lynn W; Geary, Richard S; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth A

    2002-07-01

    Because treatment of metastatic colon cancer is noncurative, new treatments are needed. This trial evaluated the antitumor effects of two targeted anticancer agents: (a) ISIS 3521, an antisense inhibitor of the protein kinase C alpha; and (b) ISIS 5132, an antisense inhibitor of c-raf kinase in patients untreated previously with recurrent or metastatic colorectal carcinoma. All patients had colorectal adenocarcinoma with measurable disease and no prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease. Patients were randomized to receive either ISIS 3521 or ISIS 5132 at a dose of 2 mg/kg/day as a continuous i.v. infusion 21 of 28 days. Cycles were repeated as long as progression was not seen, and doses of both agents were modified according to toxic effects. A two-arm study design was used with each study arm considered independently. Steady-state blood levels of both antisense molecules were measured on days 8, 15, and 22 of the first cycle of therapy. Thirty-seven eligible patients were enrolled, and 32 were evaluable for response (17 receiving ISIS 3521 and 15 receiving ISIS 5132). No responses were noted. Four of the patients receiving ISIS 3521 had stable disease, and 5 patients receiving ISIS 5132 were stable. Neither ISIS 5132 nor ISIS 3521given in the dose and schedule studied induced objective responses in untreated colorectal cancer patients.

  11. Clinical significance of UGT1A1 gene polymorphisms on irinotecan-based regimens as the treatment in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minmin; Wang, Zhehai; Guo, Jun; Liu, Jie; Li, Changzheng; Liu, Lin; Shi, Huan; Liu, Liyan; Li, Huihui; Xie, Chao; Zhang, Xia; Sun, Wenwen; Fang, Shu; Bi, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The primary aim of this research was to investigate the association between uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A1 gene polymorphisms and the toxicities of irinotecan-based regimens in Chinese patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Methods The study analyzed the distribution of UGT1A1*28/*6 gene polymorphisms by polymerase chain reaction amplification and pyrosequencing. The adverse reactions and tumor response were evaluated according to National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, Version 3.0, and Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors, Version 1.0, criteria, respectively. The correlation between UGT1A1 gene polymorphisms and severe delayed diarrhea or neutropenia was analyzed. The influences of UGT1A1*6/*28 polymorphisms on response rate and progression-free survival were also analyzed. Survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan–Meier method, and we used the log-rank test to analyze the effect of genotypes on progression-free survival, the logistic regression model for multivariate analysis, and the Cox regression model for multivariate survival analysis. Results A total of 167 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who were treated with irinotecan-based regimens and with detected UGT1A1 gene polymorphisms were enrolled in this research. The rate of UGT1A1*28 homozygous wild-type TA6/6, heterozygous mutant-type TA6/7, and homozygous mutant-type TA7/7 was 65.3% (109/167), 32.3% (54/167), and 2.4% (4/167), respectively; the incidence of UGT1A1*6 wild-type G/G was 67.1% (112/167), heterozygous mutant-type G/A accounted for 28.7% (48/167), and seven cases were homozygous mutant-type A/A (4.2%; 7/167). The incidence of grade 3 or 4 delayed diarrhea in patients carrying UGT1A1*6 (G/A and A/A) was higher than that in the wild-type (G/G) (P=0.021). The rate was significantly lower in patients with the UGT1A1*28 TA6/6 wide-type genotype than those with TA6/7 and TA7/7 mutant-type genotypes (P=0

  12. RAC1b overexpression correlates with poor prognosis in KRAS/BRAF WT metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with first-line FOLFOX/XELOX chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Espinaco, Virginia; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Alonso, Vicente; Escudero, Pilar; Marmol, Maribel; Horndler, Carlos; Ortego, Javier; Gallego, Rosa; Codony-Servat, Jordi; Garcia-Albeniz, Xabier; Jares, Pedro; Castells, Antoni; Lozano, Juan José; Rosell, Rafael; Maurel, Joan

    2014-07-01

    Chemotherapy is the principal treatment in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. RAC1b, a RAC1 spliced variant, is over-expressed in colorectal cancer (CRC), and impairs apoptosis by activation of nuclear-factor-KB. Since RAC1b has been associated with the BRAF(V600E) mutation, associated with poor prognosis in CRC, we evaluated the role of RAC1b expression as a predictor of chemotherapy efficacy in mCRC. We analysed KRAS and BRAF mutation, microsatellite instability and RAC1b expression in 157 mCRC patients treated with FOLFOX/XELOX in first-line therapy. KRAS mutations were detected in 46 patients (34%), 10 patients were BRAF mutant (7%) and 79 were WT for both, KRAS and BRAF (59%). RAC1b overexpression was found in 30 patients (19%). In the multivariate analysis, BRAF mutational status was a poor prognostic factor for overall survival (OS); hazard ratio (HR), 2.78 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.35-5.72; p=0.0057). RAC1b overexpression was a poor survival factor for OS (HR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.2-4.59; p=0.01) and progression-free survival (PFS) (HR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.2-4.78; p=0.01) in KRAS/BRAF WT mCRC patients. RAC1b overexpression constitutes a marker of poor prognosis in KRAS/BRAF WT mCRC patients treated with first-line FOLFOX/XELOX therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Time course of safety and efficacy of aflibercept in combination with FOLFIRI in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who progressed on previous oxaliplatin-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Paul; Ferry, David R; Lakomỳ, Radek; Prausová, Jana; Van Hazel, Guy A; Hoff, Paulo M; Cunningham, David; Arnold, Dirk; Schmoll, Hans J; Moiseyenko, Vladimir M; McKendrick, Joseph J; Ten Tije, Albert J; Vishwanath, Raghu L; Bhargava, Pankaj; Chevalier, Soazig; Macarulla, Teresa; Van Cutsem, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) previously-treated with oxaliplatin benefit significantly from the addition of aflibercept to FOLFIRI in relation to overall survival, progression-free survival and response rate. The results for efficacy and safety over the time course of the VEGF Trap (aflibercept) with irinotecan in colorectal cancer after failure of oxaliplatin regimen trial were analysed based on data from 1226 patients randomised to receive FOLFIRI plus either aflibercept (n=612) or placebo (n=614). Hazard ratios (HR) by 6-month time period were estimated using a piecewise Cox proportional hazard model. Severity of adverse events (AEs) was graded using National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria, version 3.0. The estimated probabilities of survival were 38.5% versus 30.9% at 18 months, 28.0% versus 18.7% at 24 months and 22.3% versus 12.0% at 30 months, for the aflibercept- and placebo-treated arms, respectively. The proportional improvement in the HR over time was consistent with the survival probability results; survival at 24 months was improved by 50% and almost doubled at 30 months. The majority of worst-grade AEs occurred within the first four cycles of treatment and in a small percent of treatment cycles and were mostly reversible. Common chemotherapy- and anti-vascular epithelial growth factor (VEGF)-associated AEs occurred rarely and in a small proportion of cycles with the majority being of single occurrence. The addition of aflibercept to FOLFIRI showed a continued and persistent improvement in overall survival over time in patients with mCRC. Although grade 3-4 AEs were more frequent in the aflibercept arm, they occurred in early treatment cycles and decreased sharply following initial presentation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Safety and Efficacy of Trifluridine/Tipiracil Monotherapy in Clinical Practice for Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Experience at a Single Institution.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Daisuke; Shitara, Kohei; Kawazoe, Akihito; Fukuoka, Shota; Kuboki, Yasutoshi; Bando, Hideaki; Okamoto, Wataru; Kojima, Takashi; Doi, Toshihiko; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Yoshino, Takayuki

    2016-09-01

    The combination drug TAS-102 is a novel oral nucleoside antitumor agent containing trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride, which prevents the degradation of trifluridine. The global phase III RECOURSE trial (Study of TAS-102 in Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Refractory to Standard Chemotherapies) demonstrated that TAS-102 prolonged the survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) whose disease progressed after standard therapies. TAS-102 was first approved in Japan in March 2014, and little is known about its safety and efficacy in clinical practice, especially for mCRC patients with previous regorafenib treatment. We investigated the safety and efficacy of TAS-102 monotherapy in clinical practice for patients with mCRC refractory to standard therapies who were treated from May 2014 to January 2015. A total of 55 patients received TAS-102. The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 0, 1, and 2 in 41.8%, 47.3%, and 10.9% of patients. Of the 55 patients, 32 (58.2%) had been treated with regorafenib before receiving TAS-102. The median progression-free survival and overall survival was 2.0 months and 5.3 months, respectively. Emergency hospitalization was required for 23.6% of the patients during TAS-102 treatment, although most of the events (76.9%) were disease-related. The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were neutropenia (41.8%), leukopenia (27.2%), anemia (23.6%), febrile neutropenia (5.5%), and fatigue (3.6%). The frequency of grade ≥ 3 events was not significantly increased among the patients who had compared with those who had not received regorafenib. The progression-free survival (median 2.1 vs. 2.0 months) and overall survival (median 6.2 vs. 4.7 months) were similar for the 2 subgroups. The safety and efficacy of TAS-102 monotherapy in clinical practice were maintained, irrespective of previous regorafenib treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical utility of circulating DNA analysis for rapid detection of actionable mutations to select metastatic colorectal patients for anti-EGFR treatment.

    PubMed

    Thierry, A R; El Messaoudi, S; Mollevi, C; Raoul, J L; Guimbaud, R; Pezet, D; Artru, P; Assenat, E; Borg, C; Mathonnet, M; De La Fouchardière, C; Bouché, O; Gavoille, C; Fiess, C; Auzemery, B; Meddeb, R; Lopez-Crapez, E; Sanchez, C; Pastor, B; Ychou, M

    2017-09-01

    While tumor-tissue remains the 'gold standard' for genetic analysis in cancer patients, it is challenged with the advent of circulating cell-free tumor DNA (ctDNA) analysis from blood samples. Here, we broaden our previous study on the clinical validation of plasma DNA in metastatic colorectal cancer patients, by evaluating its clinical utility under standard management care. Concordance and data turnaround-time of ctDNA when compared with tumor-tissue analysis were studied in a real-time blinded prospective multicenter clinical study (n = 140 metastatic colorectal patients). Results are presented according to STARD criteria and were discussed in regard with clinical outcomes of patients. Much more mutations were found by ctDNA analysis: 59%, 11.8% and 14.4% of the patients were found KRAS, NRAS and BRAF mutant by ctDNA analysis instead of 44%, 8.8% and 7.2% by tumor-tissue analysis. Median tumor-tissue data turnaround-time was 16 days while 2 days for ctDNA analysis. Discordant samples analysis revealed that use of biopsy, long delay between tumor-tissue and blood collection and resection of the tumor at time of blood draw, tumor site, or type of tissue analyzed seem to affect concordance. Altogether, the clinical data with respect to the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor response (RAS status) and the prognosis (BRAF status) of those discordant patients do not appear contradictory to the mutational status as determined by plasma analysis. Lastly, we present the first distribution profile of the RAS and BRAF hotspot mutations as determined by ctDNA analysis (n = 119), revealing a high proportion of patients with multiple mutations (45% of the population and up to 5 mutations) and only 24% of WT scored patients for both genes. Mutation profile as determined from ctDNA analysis with using various detection thresholds highlights the importance of the test sensitivity. Our study showed that ctDNA could replace tumor-tissue analysis, and also clinical

  16. Efficacy and safety of addition of bevacizumab to FOLFIRI or irinotecan/bolus 5-FU/LV (IFL) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke; Gong, Yinya; Zhang, Qi; Shen, Yanping; Zhou, Taoqi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have paid much attention on the safety of bevacizumab as adjuvant chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. The aim of this meta-analysis was to study the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab in combination with irinotecan, bolus followed by infusional 5-fluorouracil, and leucovorin (FOLFIRI) and, irinotecan, bolus fluorouracil, leucovorin (IFL) for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). An electronic search of related trials was conducted from PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library databases. Risk ratio (RRs) and its 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated by using either DerSimonian–Laird method or Mantel–Haenszel method according to the heterogeneity of included articles. The risk of mortality, therapeutic efficacy, and adverse effect were meta-analyzed. In total, 6 RCTs including 2165 participants (1109 in the treatment group, 1056 in the control group) were included in this meta-analysis. Compared with FOLFIRI-panitumumab/cetuximab, the bevacizumab addition significantly reduced the complete response (CR) rate (RR [95%CI] = 0.31[0.11, 0.89], P = 0.03) and the risk of grade 3/4 adverse event (RR [95%CI] = 0.89[0.80, 0.98], P = 0.01). Compared with FOLFIRI and IFL alone, the addition of bevacizumb significantly increased the partial response (PR) and objective response (OR) rates. Compared with IFL alone, the addition of bevacizumb significantly reduced the mortality risk of PFS (RR [95%CI] = 0.53[0.42, 0.66], P < 0.00001) and OS (RR[95%CI] = 0.70[0.60, 0.82], P < 0.00001), but increased the risk of adverse events (RR[95%CI] = 1.14[1.06, 1.21], P = 0.0002). Combination chemotherapy of bevacizumab plus FOLFIRI or IFL had a relative high efficacy and acceptable safety for treatment of mCRC. PMID:27861344

  17. Radioimmunoscintigraphy of recurrent, metastatic, or occult colorectal cancer with technetium 99m-labeled totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59: results of pivotal, phase III multicenter studies.

    PubMed

    Serafini, A N; Klein, J L; Wolff, B G; Baum, R; Chetanneau, A; Pecking, A; Fischman, A J; Hoover, H C; Wynant, G E; Subramanian, R; Goroff, D K; Hanna, M G

    1998-05-01

    To assess the performance and potential clinical impact of a totally human monoclonal antibody, 88BV59 (HumaSPECT) (INTRACEL, Corp, Rockville, MD), in 202 assessable presurgical patients with recurrent, metastatic, or occult colorectal cancer. 88BV59, labeled with technetium Tc 99m (99mTc) (HumaSPECT-Tc), was injected intravenously, and planar and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) images were obtained 14 to 20 hours postinjection. Surgical and pathologic verification of tumor were used as the standard against which the performance of HumaSPECT-Tc imaging and computed tomography (CT) analysis were evaluated. All patients entered onto the recurrent disease study had at least one tumor site defined on CT. The sensitivity of HumaSPECT-Tc in those CT-positive patients was 87%. The specificity of HumaSPECT-Tc was 57% compared with 17% for CT and the difference was statistically significant (P < .001). The diagnostic information provided by HumaSPECT-Tc significantly (P < .001) improved the accuracy of the identification of resectable and nonresectable disease over that of CT (80% v 62%). HumaSPECT-Tc scans resulted in a significant (P < .001) reduction versus CT in terms of the proportion of patients understaged (27% v 41%) and overstaged (4% v 26%). In patients with occult disease (increasing carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA] titer, negative diagnostic work-up, negative CT), HumaSPECT-Tc correctly identified disease in 15 of 22 (68%) patients. HumaSPECT-Tc images provided additional clinical data that would have affected patient management decisions in 40 of 202 (19.8%) patients. In 365 patients who received 88BV59, only a single detectable human anti-human antibody (HAHA) response (90 ng/mL) at 9 weeks postinfusion was observed. HumaSPECT-Tc can provide important and accurate information about the presence and location of disease in patients with a high clinical suspicion of metastatic or recurrent colorectal cancer and either positive (known disease) or negative

  18. Inhibition of microRNA-21 via locked nucleic acid-anti-miR suppressed metastatic features of colorectal cancer cells through modulation of programmed cell death 4.

    PubMed

    Nedaeinia, Reza; Sharifi, Mohammadreza; Avan, Amir; Kazemi, Mohammad; Nabinejad, Abdolreza; Ferns, Gordon A; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Salehi, Rasoul

    2017-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is among the most lethal of malignancies, due to its propensity to metastatic spread and multifactorial-chemoresistance. The latter property supports the need to identify novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of colorectal cancer. MicroRNAs are endogenous non-coding small RNA molecules that function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Recently, programmed cell death 4 has been identified as a protein that increases during apoptosis. This gene is among the potential targets of miR-21 (OncomiR). Locked nucleic acid-modified oligonucleotides have recently emerged as a potential therapeutic option for targeting microRNAs. The aim of this study was to explore the functional role of locked nucleic acid-anti-miR-21 in the LS174T cell line in vitro and in vivo models. LS174T cells were treated with locked nucleic acid-anti-miR-21 for 24, 48, and 72 h in vitro. The expression of miR-21 and PDCD4 at messenger RNA (mRNA) level was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, while the protein level of PDCD4 was determined by Western blotting. Cell migratory behavior and the cluster-forming ability of cells were assessed before and after therapy. The disseminated tumor cells were assessed in the chick chorioallantoic membrane model by Alu quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Locked nucleic acid-anti-miR-21 was transfected successfully into the LS174T cells and inhibited the expression of miR-21. Locked nucleic acid-anti-miR-21 inhibited the migration and the number of cells forming clusters. Moreover, we found that locked nucleic acid-anti-miR-21 transfection was associated with a significant reduction in metastatic properties as assessed by the in ovo model. Our findings demonstrated the novel therapeutic potential of locked nucleic acid-anti-miR-21 in colon adenocarcinoma with high miR-21 expression.

  19. Clinical effects of a chimeric anti-EpCAM monoclonal antibody in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liljefors, Maria; Nilsson, Bo; Fagerberg, Jan; Ragnhammar, Peter; Mellstedt, Håkan; Frödin, Jan-Erik

    2005-06-01

    The EpCAM antigen is highly expressed on colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cells. Murine anti-EpCAM MAb (anti-EpCAM mMAb) alone or in combination with cytokines may induce clinical responses including long-lasting complete remissions (CR) in patients with metastatic disease. The chimeric variant of anti-EpCAM MAb (anti-EpCAM cMAb) interacts more efficiently with human effector cells (ADCC) than the murine counterpart in the killing of colorectal carcinoma cells in vitro, an important mechanism of action for antibody in vivo. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) augments immune effector cell functions in vivo and may enhance the therapeutic effect of MAbs. In this study, the therapeutic efficacy of the combination of anti-EpCAM cMAb and GM-CSF was evaluated in 24 patients with metastatic CRC. GM-CSF was given s.c. once daily for 10 consecutive days and on day 3, anti-EpCAM cMAb was given i.v. A treatment cycle was repeated every 4th week. Five patients achieved stable disease > 3 months (overall response rate 21%). Responding patients survived significantly longer than non-responding patients (p = 0.030). The frequency of patients with an immediate-type allergic reaction (ITAR) against anti-EpCAM cMAb at the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th treatment cycles was as 13%, 29%, 25% and 19% respectively. Compared to a previous study where anti-EpCAM mMAb was used in a similar treatment regimen, the present protocol did not augment the overall or progression-free survival. The overall response rate was also similar to anti-EpCAM mMAb treated patients (6/22, 27%), but the anti-EpCAM mMAb treatment protocol induced two CR, one MR and three SD. Further studies are warranted to establish the role of EpCAM as a target for antibody therapy, specifically the significance of chimeric or humanized anti-EpCAM MAbs.

  20. Skin toxicity and quality of life in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer during first-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI treatment in a single-arm phase II study.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Josef; Karthaus, Meinolf; Mineur, Laurent; Greil, Richard; Letocha, Henry; Hofheinz, Ralf; Fernebro, Eva; Gamelin, Erick; Baños, Ana; Köhne, Claus-Henning

    2012-09-29

    Integument-related toxicities are common during epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted therapy. Panitumumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody targeting the EGFR that significantly improves progression-free survival when added to chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who have wild-type (WT) KRAS tumours. Primary efficacy and tolerability results from a phase II single-arm study of first-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer have been reported. Here we report additional descriptive tolerability and quality of life data from this trial. Integument-related toxicities and quality of life were analysed; toxicities were graded using modified National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria. Kaplan-Meier estimates of time to and duration of first integument-related toxicity were prepared. Quality of life was measured using EuroQoL EQ-5D and EORTC QLQ-C30. Best overall response was analysed by skin toxicity grade and baseline quality of life. Change in quality of life was analysed by skin toxicity severity. 154 patients were enrolled (WT KRAS n = 86; mutant KRAS n = 59); most (98%) experienced integument-related toxicities (most commonly rash [42%], dry skin [40%] and acne [36%]). Median time to first integument-related toxicity was 8 days; median duration was 334 days. Overall, proportionally more patients with grade 2+ skin toxicity responded (56%) compared with those with grade 0/1 (29%). Mean overall EQ-5D health state index scores (0.81 vs. 0.78), health rating scores (72.5 vs. 71.0) and QLQ-C30 global health status scores (65.8 vs. 66.7) were comparable at baseline vs. safety follow-up (8 weeks after completion), respectively and appeared unaffected by skin toxicity severity. First-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI has acceptable tolerability and appears to have little impact on quality of life, despite the high incidence of integument-related toxicity. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00508404.

  1. Comparison of EORTC criteria and PERCIST for PET/CT response evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with irinotecan and cetuximab.

    PubMed

    Skougaard, Kristin; Nielsen, Dorte; Jensen, Benny Vittrup; Hendel, Helle Westergren

    2013-07-01

    The study aim was to compare European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria with PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) for response evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with a combination of the chemotherapeutic drug irinotecan and the monoclonal antibody cetuximab. From 2006 to 2009, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer were prospectively included in a phase II trial evaluating the combination of irinotecan and cetuximab every second week, as third-line treatment. (18)F-FDG PET/CT was performed between 1 and 14 d before the first treatment and after every fourth treatment cycle until progression was identified by CT with Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Response evaluation with (18)F-FDG PET/CT was retrospectively performed according to both EORTC criteria and PERCIST, classifying the patients into 4 response categories: complete metabolic response (CMR), partial metabolic response (PMR), stable metabolic disease (SMD), and progressive metabolic disease (PMD). Individual best overall metabolic response (BOmR) was registered with both sets of criteria, as well as survival within response categories, and compared. A total of 61 patients and 203 PET/CT scans were eligible for response evaluation. With EORTC criteria, 38 had PMR, 16 had SMD, and 7 had PMD as their BOmR. With PERCIST, 34 had PMR, 20 had SMD, and 7 had PMD as their BOmR. None of the patients had CMR. There was agreement between EORTC criteria and PERCIST in 87% of the patients, and the corresponding κ-coefficient was 0.76. Disagreements were confined to PMR and SMD. Median overall survival (OS) in months with EORTC criteria was 14.2 in the PMR group and 7.2 in the combined SMD + PMD group. With PERCIST, it was 14.5 in the PMR group and 7.9 in the SMD + PMD group. Response evaluation with EORTC criteria and PERCIST gave similar responses and OS outcomes with good agreement on BOmR (κ-coefficient, 0.76) and

  2. Phase I study of dasatinib in combination with capecitabine, oxaliplatin and bevacizumab followed by an expanded cohort in previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Strickler, John H.; McCall, Shannon; Nixon, Andrew B.; Brady, John C.; Pang, Herbert; Rushing, Christel; Cohn, Allen; Starodub, Alexander; Arrowood, Christy; Haley, Sherri; Meadows, Kellen L.; Morse, Michael A.; Uronis, Hope E.; Blobe, Gerard C.; Hsu, S. David; Zafar, S. Yousuf; Hurwitz, Herbert I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Dasatinib inhibits src family kinases and has anti-angiogenic properties. We conducted a phase I study of dasatinib, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab (CapeOx/bevacizumab), with an expansion cohort in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods Patients were enrolled in a dose escalation cohort to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and the recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Using a “3+3” design, twelve patients with advanced solid tumors received dasatinib (50mg twice daily or 70mg daily), capecitabine (850mg/m2 twice daily, days 1-14), oxaliplatin (130mg/m2 on day 1) and bevacizumab (7.5mg/kg on day1), every 3 weeks. Ten patients with previously untreated metastatic CRC were then enrolled in an expansion cohort. Activated src (srcact) expression was measured by immunohistochemistry, using an antibody that selectively recognizes the active conformation of src (clone 28). Results Twenty-two patients were enrolled between June 2009 and May 2011. Two DLTs were observed in the 50mg bid dasatinib cohort, and one DLT was observed in the 70mg daily dasatinib cohort. The MTD and RP2D for dasatinib was 70mg daily. The most common treatment-related adverse events were fatigue (20; 91%) and diarrhea (18; 82%). Biomarker analysis of srcact expression demonstrated that the overall response rate (ORR) was 75% (6/8) for patients with high srcact expression (IHC≥ 2), compared to 0% (0/8) for patients with low srcact expression (IHC 0 or 1); (p =0.007). Conclusions The RP2D of dasatinib is 70 mg daily in combination with CapeOx/bevacizumab. High levels of srcact expression may predict those patients most likely to benefit from dasatinib. PMID:24173967

  3. A phase II, randomized, double blind trial of calcium aluminosilicate clay versus placebo for the prevention of diarrhea in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with irinotecan.

    PubMed

    Kee, Bryan K; Morris, Jeffrey S; Slack, Rebecca S; Crocenzi, Todd; Wong, Lucas; Esparaz, Ben; Overman, Michael; Glover, Katrina; Jones, Desiree; Wen, Sijin; Fisch, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    Calcium aluminosilicate clay (CASAD) is a naturally occurring clay that serves as a cation exchange absorbent. We hypothesized that oral administration of CASAD would reduce the rate of grade 3/4 diarrhea associated with irinotecan use for metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) by adsorbing the SN-38 metabolite. Patients receiving irinotecan-based chemotherapy were randomized equally between CASAD and placebo arms in this multicenter trial in order to assess differences in the proportions of patients with grade 3/4 diarrhea within 6 weeks. Additionally, we compared symptom severity between the two arms using the M.D. Anderson Symptom Inventory. Between May 2009 and May 2012, 100 patients were enrolled. In evaluable patients, 7 of 43 (16 %) on the CASAD arm compared to 3 of 32 (9 %) on the placebo arm experienced grade 3/4 diarrhea (P = 0.70). The rate of any diarrhea among all patients was similar (CASAD arm, 64 % vs. placebo arm, 70 %). The rate of study dropout was 14 % in the CASAD arm and 38 % in the placebo arm (P = 0.01). No differences were found in symptom severity, individual symptom items, and in serious adverse events between the two arms. Compared to placebo, CASAD use was safe but ineffective in preventing diarrhea in metastatic CRC patients treated with irinotecan-containing chemotherapy regimens. There were no distinct signals in terms of patient symptoms between arms, but there was significantly more patient dropout in the placebo arm. Future CASAD trials will focus on the active treatment of diarrhea.

  4. Toxicity and early outcomes of regorafenib in multiply pre-treated metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma-experience from a tertiary cancer centre in India.

    PubMed

    Zanwar, Saurabh; Ostwal, Vikas; Gupta, Sudeep; Sirohi, Bhawna; Toshniwal, Anup; Shetty, Nitin; Banavali, Shripad

    2016-02-01

    Regorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor (MKI) approved for use in multiply pre-treated metastatic colorectal cancers (mCRC). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of regorafenib from India. Records of 23 cases treated with regorafenib at our centre between June 2013 till September 2015 were reviewed. All had received at least two non cross resistant lines of therapy prior to regorafenib. Toxicity was recorded using CTCAE version 4.03. Responses were assessed using RECIST 1.1 criteria. Response evaluation was done every three months or earlier if clinically indicated. Five patients were still on therapy at the time of this report. The median age was 50 years. Thirty-nine percent (9/23) had upfront metastatic disease. Twenty-six percent (6/23) and 39% (9/23) patients had received prior treatment with cetuximab and bevacizumab respectively. Mean duration of regorafenib treatment was 3.8 months. At least one grade III/IV toxicity was noted in 65% (15/23) cases. The most common were handfoot syndrome (HFS) and fatigue seen in 86.9% (20/23) patients. Grade II and III HFS was seen in 65% patients. One patient required stoppage of treatment due to grade III hepatotoxicity. Dose reduction was required for 86.9% (20/23) patients. Best response noted was stable disease in 34.8% (8/23), partial response in 8.7% (2/23) patients and progression in 56.5% (13/23). Median progression free survival was 3 months and median follow-up was 4.5 months. Regorafenib, although an effective treatment strategy in multiply pre-treated mCRC, is associated with significant side effects.

  5. Primary Care Physician Supply, Insurance Type, and Late-Stage Cancer Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Plascak, Jesse J.; Fisher, James L.; Paskett, Electra D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the joint effects of insurance type and primary care physician density on stage at diagnosis is essential to elucidating the healthcare access and late-stage cancer relationship. Purpose To determine if the relationship between primary care physician density and odds of late-stage cancer is modified by insurance type at diagnosis. Methods Case patients were Ohio adults, diagnosed between 1996 and 2008 with cancer of one of the following sites: the female breast, cervix, colon/rectum, lung/bronchus, melanoma of the skin, oral cavity and pharynx, or prostate (N=376,425). County-level physician density was from Ohio Department of Health. Multilevel logistic regression models estimated odds ratios of latestage cancer diagnosis associated with increases in primary care physician density by insurance type. Analyses were conducted in 2014. Results Decreases in late-stage diagnosis of cancers of the breast, prostate, melanoma of the skin, oral cavity and pharynx, or lung/bronchus associated with increases in primary care physician density were strongest among those with private insurance, whereas those with Medicare (prostate, oral cavity and pharynx, lung/bronchus), Medicaid (lung/bronchus), uninsured (prostate), and other/unknown (prostate, oral cavity and pharynx, lung/bronchus) did not benefit as greatly or experienced significant increases in late-stage cancer diagnosis (other/unknown [female breast], Medicaid [melanoma of the skin], and uninsured [colon/rectum]). Conclusions As primary care physician density increases, those with private insurance consistently benefit the most, in terms of late-stage cancer diagnosis, whereas those with several other insurance types experience flatter decreases or significantly higher odds of late-stage cancer diagnosis. PMID:25441233

  6. Genomic markers of panitumumab resistance including ERBB2/ HER2 in a phase II study of KRAS wild-type (wt) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC).

    PubMed

    Barry, Garrett S; Cheang, Maggie C; Chang, Hector Li; Kennecke, Hagen F

    2016-04-05

    A prospective study was conducted to identify biomarkers associated with resistance to panitumumab monotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Patients with previously treated, codon 12/13 KRAS wt, mCRC were prospectively administered panitumumab 6 mg/kg IV q2weeks. Of 34 panitumumab-treated patients, 11 (32%) had progressive disease at 8 weeks and were classified as non-responders. A Nanostring nCounter-based assay identified a 5-gene expression signature (ERBB2, MLPH, IRX3, MYRF, and KLK6) associated with panitumumab resistance (P = 0.001). Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization determined that the HER2 (ERBB2) protein was overexpressed in 4/11 non-responding and 0/21 responding cases (P = 0.035). Two non-responding tumors had ERBB2 gene amplification only, and one demonstrated both ERBB2 amplification and mutation. A non-codon 12/13 KRAS mutation occurred in one panitumumab-resistant patient and was mutually exclusive with ERBB2/HER2 abnormalities. This study identifies a 5-gene signature associated with non-response to single agent panitumumab, including a subgroup of non-responders with evidence of aberrant ERBB2/HER2 signaling. KRAS wt tumors resistant to EGFRi may be identified by gene signature analysis, and the HER2 pathway plays an important role in resistance to therapy.

  7. Impact of tumour RAS/BRAF status in a first-line study of panitumumab + FOLFIRI in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karthaus, Meinolf; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Mineur, Laurent; Letocha, Henry; Greil, Richard; Thaler, Josef; Fernebro, Eva; Oliner, Kelly S; Boedigheimer, Michael; Twomey, Brian; Zhang, Ying; Demonty, Gaston; Köhne, Claus-Henning

    2016-01-01

    Background: To investigate tumour biomarker status and efficacy of first-line panitumumab+FOLFIRI for metastatic colorectal carcinoma (mCRC). Methods: 154 patients received first-line panitumumab + FOLFIRI every 14 days. Primary end point was objective response rate (ORR). Data were analysed by tumour RAS (KRAS/NRAS) and BRAF status, and baseline amphiregulin (AREG) expression. Results: Objective responses occurred more frequently in RAS wild type (WT) (59%) vs RAS mutant (MT) (41%) mCRC and in RAS WT/BRAF WT (68%) vs RAS or BRAF MT (37%) disease. Median response duration was longer in RAS WT (13.0 months) vs RAS MT (5.8 months) (hazard ratio (HR): 0.16). Median progression-free survival was longer in RAS WT vs MT (11.2 vs 7.3 months; HR, 0.37) and was also longer in RAS WT/BRAF WT vs RAS or BRAF MT (13.2 vs 6.9 months; HR, 0.25). Incidence of adverse events was similar regardless of RAS/BRAF status, and no new safety signals were noted. Among patients with RAS WT tumours, ORR was 67% with high AREG expression and 38% with low AREG expression. Conclusions: First-line panitumumab+FOLFIRI was associated with favourable efficacy in patients with RAS WT and RAS WT/BRAF WT vs MT mCRC tumours and was well tolerated. PMID:27764839

  8. Triplet (FOLFOXIRI) versus doublet (FOLFOX or FOLFIRI) backbone chemotherapy as first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Marques, Rui Pedro; Duarte, Gonçalo S; Sterrantino, Carmelo; Pais, Helena Luna; Quintela, António; Martins, Ana Paula; Costa, João

    2017-10-01

    Uncertainty exists regarding the comparative effectiveness of triplet chemotherapy (FOLFOXIRI) as backbone first-line chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) comparing triplet versus doublet chemotherapy (FOLFOX or FOLFIRI) as first-line therapy in mCRC. Methods and reporting followed PRISMA and SAMPL guidelines. Eight RCTs were included, comprising 1732 patients. In pooled analysis, FOLFOXIRI was associated with improvements in efficacy outcomes, notably with a 25% survival increase (95%CI: 10-37%). FOLFOXIRI was also associated with increased toxicity, with a non-significant 25% increase in the risk of patients experiencing grade ≥3 adverse events (95% CI: -3 to 61%) and with a 1.83 (95% CI: 1.62-2.07) increase in the rate ratio of grade ≥3 adverse events. Moderate quality evidence suggests that first-line FOLFOXIRI provides clinically meaningful efficacy benefits in this setting, at the expense of increased toxicity. Further research is warranted to better characterize safety and to evaluate the most beneficial combination with targeted agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A Q-TWiST analysis comparing panitumumab plus best supportive care (BSC) with BSC alone in patients with wild-type KRAS metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Zhao, Z; Barber, B; Sherrill, B; Peeters, M; Wiezorek, J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Panitumumab+best supportive care (BSC) significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) vs BSC alone in patients with chemo-refractory wild-type KRAS metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We applied the quality-adjusted time without symptoms of disease or toxicity (Q-TWiST) analysis to provide an integrated measure of clinical benefit, with the objective of comparing quality-adjusted survival between the two arms. As the trial design allowed patients on BSC alone to receive panitumumab after disease progression, which confounded overall survival (OS), the focus of this analysis was on PFS. Methods: For each treatment group, the time spent in the toxicity (grade 3 or 4 adverse events; TOX), time without symptoms of disease or toxicity (TWiST), and relapse (after disease progression; REL) states were estimated by the product-limit method, and adjusted using utility weights derived from patient-reported EuroQoL 5-dimensions measures. Sensitivity analyses were performed in which utility weights (varying from 0 to 1) were applied to time in the TOX and REL health states. Results: There was a significant difference between groups favouring panitumumab+BSC in quality-adjusted PFS (12.3 weeks vs 5.8 weeks, respectively, P<0.0001) and quality-adjusted OS (P=0.0303). Conclusion: In patients with chemo-refractory wild-type KRAS mCRC, panitumumab+BSC significantly improved quality-adjusted survival compared with BSC alone. PMID:21610704

  10. A Q-TWiST analysis comparing panitumumab plus best supportive care (BSC) with BSC alone in patients with wild-type KRAS metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Zhao, Z; Barber, B; Sherrill, B; Peeters, M; Wiezorek, J

    2011-06-07

    Panitumumab+best supportive care (BSC) significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) vs BSC alone in patients with chemo-refractory wild-type KRAS metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We applied the quality-adjusted time without symptoms of disease or toxicity (Q-TWiST) analysis to provide an integrated measure of clinical benefit, with the objective of comparing quality-adjusted survival between the two arms. As the trial design allowed patients on BSC alone to receive panitumumab after disease progression, which confounded overall survival (OS), the focus of this analysis was on PFS. For each treatment group, the time spent in the toxicity (grade 3 or 4 adverse events; TOX), time without symptoms of disease or toxicity (TWiST), and relapse (after disease progression; REL) states were estimated by the product-limit method, and adjusted using utility weights derived from patient-reported EuroQoL 5-dimensions measures. Sensitivity analyses were performed in which utility weights (varying from 0 to 1) were applied to time in the TOX and REL health states. There was a significant difference between groups favouring panitumumab+BSC in quality-adjusted PFS (12.3 weeks vs 5.8 weeks, respectively, P<0.0001) and quality-adjusted OS (P=0.0303). In patients with chemo-refractory wild-type KRAS mCRC, panitumumab+BSC significantly improved quality-adjusted survival compared with BSC alone.

  11. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of metastatic colorectal cancer: a consensus statement of the Hellenic Society of Medical Oncologists (HeSMO)

    PubMed Central

    Dervenis, Christos; Xynos, Evaghelos; Sotiropoulos, George; Gouvas, Nikolaos; Boukovinas, Ioannis; Agalianos, Christos; Androulakis, Nikolaos; Athanasiadis, Athanasios; Christodoulou, Christos; Chrysou, Evangelia; Emmanouilidis, Christos; Georgiou, Panagiotis; Karachaliou, Niki; Katopodi, Ourania; Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Kyriazanos, Ioannis; Makatsoris, Thomas; Papakostas, Pavlos; Papamichael, Demetris; Pechlivanides, George; Pentheroudakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Sgouros, Joseph; Tekkis, Paris; Triantopoulou, Charina; Tzardi, Maria; Vassiliou, Vassilis; Vini, Louiza; Xynogalos, Spyridon; Ziras, Nikolaos; Souglakos, John

    2016-01-01

    There is discrepancy and failure to adhere to current international guidelines for the management of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) in hospitals in Greece and Cyprus. The aim of the present document is to provide a consensus on the multidisciplinary management of metastastic CRC, considering both special characteristics of our Healthcare System and international guidelines. Following discussion and online communication among the members of an executive team chosen by the Hellenic Society of Medical Oncology (HeSMO), a consensus for metastastic CRC disease was developed. Statements were subjected to the Delphi methodology on two voting rounds by invited multidisciplinary international experts on CRC. Statements reaching level of agreement by ≥80% were considered as having achieved large consensus, whereas statements reaching 60-80% moderate consensus. One hundred and nine statements were developed. Ninety experts voted for those statements. The median rate of abstain per statement was 18.5% (range: 0-54%). In the end of the process, all statements achieved a large consensus. The importance of centralization, care by a multidisciplinary team, adherence to guidelines, and personalization is emphasized. R0 resection is the only intervention that may offer substantial improvement in the oncological outcomes. PMID:27708505

  12. Age-dependent improvement in median and long-term survival in unselected population-based Nordic registries of patients with synchronous metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sorbye, H; Cvancarova, M; Qvortrup, C; Pfeiffer, P; Glimelius, B

    2013-09-01

    In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) trials, median survival has increased from 6 months to above 20 months during the previous decades. Uncertainty exists in how this survival improvement has translated to the general mCRC population. Survival data from patients with synchronous mCRC were collected from the Norwegian (1980-2008), Swedish (1996-2008) and Danish (2001-09) cancer registries. A total of 29 628 patients were identified. From 1980-1985 to 2006-2008, median survival increased from 5 to 10 months for Norwegian patients. Three-year survival increased from 7% to 21% and 5-year survival from 4% to 9%. For patients <60 years, median survival was doubled to 16 months, 3-year survival increased fourfold up to 28% and 5-year survival threefold up to 14%. Similar improvements were seen in Sweden and Denmark. In all countries, the improved outcome was seen especially for younger patients and much less for patients >75 years of age. An increase in median and long-term survival over time was found in unselected population-based registries of patients with synchronous mCRC. The improved outcome in survival was especially seen in younger patients, raising concerns over our ability to adapt available treatment options for elderly patients.

  13. Comparison of the quantification of KRAS mutations by digital PCR and E-ice-COLD-PCR in circulating-cell-free DNA from metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sefrioui, David; Mauger, Florence; Leclere, Laurence; Beaussire, Ludivine; Di Fiore, Frédéric; Deleuze, Jean-François; Sarafan-Vasseur, Nasrin; Tost, Jörg

    2017-02-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (ccfDNA) bears great promise as biomarker for personalized medicine, but ccfDNA is present only at low levels in the plasma or serum of cancer patients. E-ice-COLD-PCR is a recently developed enrichment method to detect and identify mutations present at low-abundance in clinical samples. However, recent studies have shown the importance to accurately quantify low-abundance mutations as clinically important decisions will depend on certain mutation thresholds. The possibility for an enrichment method to accurately quantify the mutation levels remains a point of concern and might limit its clinical applicability. In the present study, we compared the quantification of KRAS mutations in ccfDNA from metastatic colorectal cancer patients by E-ice-COLD-PCR with two digital PCR approaches. For the quantification of mutations by E-ice-COLD-PCR, cell lines with known mutations diluted into WT genomic DNA were used for calibration. E-ice-COLD-PCR and the two digital PCR approaches showed the same range of the mutation level and were concordant for mutation levels below the clinical relevant threshold. E-ice-COLD-PCR can accurately detect and quantify low-abundant mutations in ccfDNA and has a shorter time to results making it compatible with the requirements of analyses in a clinical setting without the loss of quantitative accuracy.

  14. Phase I/II trial of capecitabine and oxaliplatin in combination with bevacizumab and imatinib in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: AIO KRK 0205

    PubMed Central

    Hoehler, T; von Wichert, G; Schimanski, C; Kanzler, S; Moehler, M H; Hinke, A; Seufferlein, T; Siebler, J; Hochhaus, A; Arnold, D; Hallek, M; Hofheinz, R; Hacker, U T

    2013-01-01

    Background: Combined inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta signalling and vascular endothelial growth factor promotes vascular normalisation in preclinical models and may lead to increased delivery of chemotherapy to tumour tissue. This phase I/II trial assessed the safety and efficacy of capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) plus bevacizumab and imatinib in the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Methods: Two dose levels (I/II) were defined: capecitabine 850/1000 mg m−2 twice daily on days 1–14; oxaliplatin 100/130 mg m−2 on day 1; bevacizumab 7.5 mg kg−1 on day 1; imatinib 300 mg day−1 on days 1–21 every 21 days. The primary study endpoint was safety. The phase II secondary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS). Results: Dose level I was chosen for phase II testing because, even though further dose escalation was permitted by the protocol, gastrointestinal toxicities were considered to be clinically significant. A total of 49 patients were evaluated. The 6-month PFS rate was 76%, median PFS was 10.6 months and median overall survival was 23.2 months. Haematological toxicities were generally mild. Sensory neuropathy and diarrhoea were the most common grade 3 toxicities. Conclusion: The combination of XELOX with bevacizumab and imatinib is tolerable and has promising efficacy. PMID:23963139

  15. Assessment of frequency and severity of hypomagnesemia in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with cetuximab, with a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Streb, Joanna; Püsküllüoğlu, Miroslawa; Glanowska, Izabela; Ochenduszko, Sebastian; Konopka, Kamil; Łupkowski, Radoslaw; Michalowska-Kaczmarczyk, Anna; Bochenek-Cibor, Justyna; Majka, Marcin; Krzemieniecki, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Currently, there are a few systemic treatment options for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Targeted therapy used in this setting includes the use of monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab or panitumumab, directed against epidermal growth factor receptor. The aim of the present study was to estimate the frequency and severity of hypomagnesemia among patients with mCRC treated with cetuximab. The data from the Department of Clinical Oncology, University Hospital of Krakow (Krakow, Poland), concerning 52 patients treated between 2009 and 2013 were collected. Of these, 27 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria to enter this retrospective study. The National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 were used to grade the level of hypomagnesemia. In total, 29.6% of all patients experienced hypomagnesemia during treatment, and the majority of cases were grade 1 (22.2%). There was no statistically significant correlation between magnesium (Mg) level and patient age, duration of treatment, localization of primary tumor or metastases, and the number of metastases. However, there was an upward trend in a logistic regression model showing that the risk of developing hypomagnesemia increases with age. Hypomagnesemia is a frequent problem among mCRC patients receiving cetuximab. It is essential to introduce guidelines regarding the monitoring of the Mg level and its supplementation in this group of patients.

  16. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of metastatic colorectal cancer: a consensus statement of the Hellenic Society of Medical Oncologists (HeSMO).

    PubMed

    Dervenis, Christos; Xynos, Evaghelos; Sotiropoulos, George; Gouvas, Nikolaos; Boukovinas, Ioannis; Agalianos, Christos; Androulakis, Nikolaos; Athanasiadis, Athanasios; Christodoulou, Christos; Chrysou, Evangelia; Emmanouilidis, Christos; Georgiou, Panagiotis; Karachaliou, Niki; Katopodi, Ourania; Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Kyriazanos, Ioannis; Makatsoris, Thomas; Papakostas, Pavlos; Papamichael, Demetris; Pechlivanides, George; Pentheroudakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Sgouros, Joseph; Tekkis, Paris; Triantopoulou, Charina; Tzardi, Maria; Vassiliou, Vassilis; Vini, Louiza; Xynogalos, Spyridon; Ziras, Nikolaos; Souglakos, John

    2016-01-01

    There is discrepancy and failure to adhere to current international guidelines for the management of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) in hospitals in Greece and Cyprus. The aim of the present document is to provide a consensus on the multidisciplinary management of metastastic CRC, considering both special characteristics of our Healthcare System and international guidelines. Following discussion and online communication among the members of an executive team chosen by the Hellenic Society of Medical Oncology (HeSMO), a consensus for metastastic CRC disease was developed. Statements were subjected to the Delphi methodology on two voting rounds by invited multidisciplinary international experts on CRC. Statements reaching level of agreement by ≥80% were considered as having achieved large consensus, whereas statements reaching 60-80% moderate consensus. One hundred and nine statements were developed. Ninety experts voted for those statements. The median rate of abstain per statement was 18.5% (range: 0-54%). In the end of the process, all statements achieved a large consensus. The importance of centralization, care by a multidisciplinary team, adherence to guidelines, and personalization is emphasized. R0 resection is the only intervention that may offer substantial improvement in the oncological outcomes.

  17. COLORECTAL CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Kuipers, Ernst J.; Grady, William M.; Lieberman, David; Seufferlein, Thomas; Sung, Joseph J.; Boelens, Petra G.; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer had a low incidence several decades ago. However, it has become a predominant cancer and now accounts for approximately 10% of cancer-related mortality in western countries. The ‘rise’ of colorectal cancer in developed countries can be attributed to the increasingly ageing population, unfavourable modern dietary habits and an increase in risk factors such as smoking, low physical exercise and obesity. New treatments for primary and metastatic colorectal cancer have emerged, providing additional options for patients; these treatments include laparoscopic surgery for primary disease, more-aggressive resection of metastatic disease (such as liver and pulmonary metastases), radiotherapy for rectal cancer and neoadjuvant and palliative chemotherapies. However, these new treatment options have had limited impact on cure rates and long-term survival. For these reasons, and the recognition that colorectal cancer is long preceded by a polypoid precursor, screening programmes have gained momentum. This Primer provides an overview of the current state of art knowledge on the epidemiology and mechanisms of colorectal cancer, as well as on diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27189416

  18. Asymptomatic primary tumour in incurable metastatic colorectal cancer: is there a role for surgical resection prior to systematic therapy or not?

    PubMed Central

    Samalavicius, Narimantas E.; Baltruskeviciene, Edita; Smailyte, Giedre; Skuciene, Marija; Mikelenaite, Rasa; Venslovaite, Rasa; Aleknavicius, Eduardas; Samalavicius, Almantas; Lunevicius, Raimundas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The role of the resection of asymptomatic primary colorectal cancer in patients with incurable disease is questionable. Aim To evaluate the impact of the resection of asymptomatic primary tumour on overall survival in patients with unresectable distant metastases. Material and methods Patients treated in the National Cancer Institute, Lithuania, in the period 2008–2012, were selected retrospectively. The main inclusion criteria were: metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), endoscopically and histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma, without any symptoms for urgent operation, and at least one cycle of palliative chemotherapy administered. Information on patients’ age, gender, tumour histology, localization of the tumour, regional lymph node involvement, number of metastatic sites, surgery and systemic treatment was collected prospectively. Eligible patients for the study were divided into two groups according to the initial treatment – surgery (patients who underwent primary tumour resection) and chemotherapy (patients who received chemotherapy without surgery). The impact of initial treatment strategy, tumour size and site, regional lymph nodes, grade of differentiation of adenocarcinoma and application of biotherapy on overall cumulative survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. To compare survival between groups the log-rank test was used. Cox regression analysis was employed to assess the effects of variables on patient survival. Results The study group consisted of 183 patients: 103 men and 80 women. The median age was 66 years (range: 37–91). There were no notable imbalances with regard to age, gender, number of metastatic sites, metastases (such as pulmonary, peritoneal, liver, metastases into non-regional lymph nodes and other metastases), the number of received cycles of chemotherapy, first line chemotherapy type or biological therapy. Only 27 (14.8%) patients received biological therapy and the majority of them (n = 25, 92

  19. [Correlation analysis between abundance of K-ras mutation in plasma free DNA and its correlation with clinical outcome and prognosis in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Bai, Yan-qing; Liu, Xiao-jing; Wang, Yan; Ge, Fei-jiao; Zhao, Chuan-hua; Fu, Ya-li; Lin, Li; Xu, Jian-ming

    2013-09-01

    To detect K-ras gene mutations in plasma free DNA by peptide nucleic acid clamp PCR assay (PNA-PCR) and nested primer PCR, and to analyze the correlation between K-ras mutations and prognosis in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Peripheral blood was collected and free DNA was extracted from plasma in 106 patients with mCRC. Nested primer PCR and PNA-PCR were used to detect K-ras gene mutation in the plasma free DNA. The patients were divided into three groups by K-ras status: wild-type group (wild-type determined by both methods), low mutation group (mutation by PNA-PCR method, wild-type by nested primer PCR method) and high mutation group (mutation by two methods). The correlation between K-ras mutations and prognosis was analyzed. The mutation rate of K-ras in tumor tissues of the 106 patients was 40.6%. The Mutation rate of K-ras in plasma free DNA detected by PNA-PCR was 31.1%, significantly higher than that of 15.1% detected by nested primer PCR (P = 0.006). The consistent rate of the K-ras status in plasma free DNA detected by PNA-PCR and that in tumor tissue detected by traditional method was up to 83.0%. The median overall survival (OS) of patients of the wild type, low mutation and high mutation groups was 23.5 months, 17.3 months and 13.9 months, respectively (P = 0.002). The median progression-free survival (PFS) of the K-ras wild-type, low mutation and high mutation groups with first-line chemotherapy was 6.8 months, 6.1 months and 3.2 months, respectively (P = 0.002), and the median OS of them were 23.0 months, 15.5 months and 13.9 months, respectively (P = 0.036). The overall response rate (ORR) was improved in the K-ras wide-type patients who received cetuximab combined with chemotherapy as first-line therapy (75.0% vs. 23.4%, P = 0.058). Cetuximab combined with in second-line therapy chemotherapy led to a significant improvement in disease control rate (DCR) ( 100% vs. 35.7%, P < 0.001) as compared with those of chemotherapy alone

  20. Understanding quality-of-life while living with late-stage lung cancer: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Adorno, Gail; Brownell, Gracie

    2014-01-01

    U.S. Veterans have a higher prevalence of advanced lung cancer and poorer survival outcomes compared to the general population; yet, no studies exist which specifically explore the psychosocial and existential quality-of-life (QOL) of late-stage lung cancer among this population. This article presents the perspectives of older veterans (N = 12) living with late-stage lung cancer who were receiving chemotherapy, routine hospice care, or both concurrently. Based on individual interviews, themes associated with loss of functionality, close relationships, and communicative acts contributed to veterans' perceptions of diminished or enhanced QOL while living with advanced disease. An overarching theme, loss of the person I know myself to be, suggests that personhood is an important concept to consider in QOL assessment. While findings suggest that the experiences of older Veterans with late-stage lung cancer are similar to other populations of lung cancer patients, and persons with incurable cancer in general, further research regarding the influence of veteran identity at end-of-life is warranted. Further research is needed which explores the influence of a whole person approach to QOL during life-limiting illness and end-of-life decision-making, particularly while receiving late-stage cancer-directed therapy.

  1. Late-stage [18F]Fluorination: New Solutions to Old Problems

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Allen F.; Topczewski, Joseph J.; Ichiishi, Naoko; Sanford, Melanie S.; Scott, Peter J. H.

    2014-01-01

    The last 2–3 years have seen numerous relationships develop between organometallic chemists, fluorine chemists and PET Centers around the world. These collaborations have led to the development of many new strategies for the late-stage introduction of fluorine-18 into complex bioactive molecules. In this perspective we highlight recent developments and key milestones since 2011. PMID:25379166

  2. Late-stage diversification of biologically active pyridazinones via a direct C-H functionalization strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Fan, Zhoulong; Geng, Kaijun; Xu, Youjun; Zhang, Ao

    2015-01-14

    Divergent C-H functionalization reactions (arylation, carboxylation, olefination, thiolation, acetoxylation, halogenation, naphthylation) using a pyridazinone moiety as an internal directing group were successfully established. This approach offers a late-stage, ortho-selective diversification of a biologically active pyridazinone scaffold. Seven series of novel pyridazinone analogues were synthesized conveniently as the synthetic precursors of potential sortase A (SrtA) inhibitors.

  3. Early- and late-stage ocular complications of herpes zoster ophthalmicus in rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Schaftenaar, Erik; Meenken, Christina; Baarsma, G Seerp; McIntyre, James A; Verjans, Georges M G M; Peters, Remco P H

    2016-03-01

    To describe the spectrum of ocular complications of herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) in rural South Africa. Patients presenting with visual complaints and active or healed HZO at the ophthalmology outpatient department of three hospitals in rural South Africa were included in this study. Demographic and clinical data were collected, and HIV status was determined for all participants. Forty-eight pa