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Sample records for latent heat release

  1. Retrieved Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Using TRMM Rainfall Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Olson, W. S.; Meneghini, R.; Yang, S.; Simpson, J.; Kummerow, C.; Smith, E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper represents the first attempt to use TRMM rainfall information to estimate the four dimensional latent heating structure over the global tropics for February 1998. The mean latent heating profiles over six oceanic regions (TOGA COARE IFA, Central Pacific, S. Pacific Convergence Zone, East Pacific, Indian Ocean and Atlantic Ocean) and three continental regions (S. America, Central Africa and Australia) are estimated and studied. The heating profiles obtained from the results of diagnostic budget studies over a broad range of geographic locations are used to provide comparisons and indirect validation for the heating algorithm estimated heating profiles. Three different latent heating algorithms, the Goddard Convective-Stratiform (CSH) heating, the Goddard Profiling (GPROF) heating, and the Hydrometeor heating (HH) are used and their results are intercompared. The horizontal distribution or patterns of latent heat release from the three different heating retrieval methods are quite similar. They all can identify the areas of major convective activity (i.e., a well defined ITCZ in the Pacific, a distinct SPCZ) in the global tropics. The magnitude of their estimated latent heating release is also not in bad agreement with each other and with those determined from diagnostic budget studies. However, the major difference among these three heating retrieval algorithms is the altitude of the maximum heating level. The CSH algorithm estimated heating profiles only show one maximum heating level, and the level varies between convective activity from various geographic locations. These features are in good agreement with diagnostic budget studies. By contrast, two maximum heating levels were found using the GPROF heating and HH algorithms. The latent heating profiles estimated from all three methods can not show cooling between active convective events. We also examined the impact of different TMI (Multi-channel Passive Microwave Sensor) and PR (Precipitation Radar

  2. The effects of latent heat release on the waves with Ekman pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of the effects of the latent heat release on the waves with both upper and lower boundary frictional effects is investigated. The influence of the vertical shear of the basic wind in these models will be investigated. These investigations will shed some light on the method of solution to the problem of including the effect of Ekman pumping on the moist baroclinic waves in the model of Tang and Fichtl.

  3. Cold Heat Release Characteristics of Solidified Oil Droplet-Water Solution Latent Heat Emulsion by Air Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Morita, Shin-Ichi

    The present work investigates the cold heat-release characteristics of the solidified oil droplets (tetradecane, C14H30, freezing point 278.9 K)/water solution emulsion as a latent heat-storage material having a low melting point. An air bubbles-emulsion direct-contact heat exchange method is selected for the cold heat-results from the solidified oil droplet-emulsion layer. This type of direct-contact method results in the high thermal efficiency. The diameter of air bubbles in the emulsion increases as compared with that in the pure water. The air bubbles blown from a nozzle show a strong mixing behavior during rising in the emulsion. The temperature effectiveness, the sensible heat release time and the latent heat release time have been measured as experimental parameters. The useful nondimensional emulsion level equations for these parameters have been derived in terms of the nondimensional emalsion level expressed the emulsion layer dimensions, Reynolds number for air flow, Stefan number and heat capacity ratio.

  4. Latent Heating from TRMM Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Smith, E. A.; Adler, R.; Haddad, Z.; Hou, A.; Iguchi, T.; Kakar, R.; Krishnamurti, T.; Kummerow, C.; Lang, S.

    2004-01-01

    Rainfall production is the fundamental variable within the Earth's hydrological cycle because it is both the principal forcing term in surface water budgets and its energetics corollary, latent heating, is the principal source of atmospheric diabatic heating. Latent heat release itself is a consequence of phase changes between the vapor, liquid, and frozen states of water. The properties of the vertical distribution of latent heat release modulate large-scale meridional and zonal circulations within the tropics - as well as modifying the energetic efficiencies of midlatitude weather systems. This paper focuses on the retrieval of latent heat release from satellite measurements generated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite observatory, which was launched in November 1997 as a joint American-Japanese space endeavor. Since then, TRMM measurements have been providing an accurate four-dimensional account of rainfall over the global tropics and sub-tropics, information which can be used to estimate the space-time structure of latent heating across the Earth's low latitudes. The paper examines how the observed TRMM distribution of rainfall has advanced an understanding of the global water and energy cycle and its consequent relationship to the atmospheric general circulation and climate via latent heat release. A set of algorithm methodologies that are being used to estimate latent heating based on rain rate retrievals from the TRMM observations are described. The characteristics of these algorithms and the latent heating products that can be generated from them are also described, along with validation analyses of the heating products themselves. Finally, the investigation provides an overview of how TRMM-derived latent heating information is currently being used in conjunction with global weather and climate models, concluding with remarks intended to stimulate further research on latent heating retrieval from satellites.

  5. Latent Heating Structures Derived from TRMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Smith, E. A.; Adler, R.; Hou, A.; Kakar, R.; Krishnamurti, T.; Kummerow, C.; Lang, S.; Olson, W.; Satoh, S.

    2004-01-01

    Rainfall is the fundamental variable within the Earth's hydrological cycle because it is both the main forcing term leading to variations in continental and oceanic surface water budgets. The vertical distribution of latent heat release, which is accompanied with rain, modulates large-scale meridional and zonal circulations within the tropics as well as modifying the energetic efficiency of mid-latitude weather systems. Latent heat release itself is a consequence of phase changes between the vapor, liquid, and frozen states of water.This paper focuses on the retrieval of latent heat release from satellite measurements generated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission 0. The TRMM observatory, whose development was a joint US-Japan space endeavor, was launched in November 1997. TRMM measurements provide an accurate account of rainfall over the global tropics, information which can be .used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of latent heating across the entire tropical and sub-tropical regions. Various algorithm methodologies for estimating latent heating based on rain rate measurements from TRMM observations are described. The strengths and weaknesses of these algorithms, as well as the latent heating products generated by these algorithms, are also discussed along with validation analyses of the products. The investigation paper provides an overview of how TRMM-derived latent heating information is currently being used in conjunction with global weather and climate models, and concludes with remarks designed to stimulate further research on latent heating retrieval

  6. Evaluating Precipitation, Latent Heat Release and Potential Vorticity in Extratropical Cyclones in a High Resolution Climate Model using Reanalysis and Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawcroft, M.; Hodges, K.; Shaffrey, L.; Dacre, H.; Forbes, R.; Stein, T. H. M.

    2015-12-01

    Climate models must be capable of adequately simulating the processes that drive extratropical cyclones if they are to realistically represent their evolution and propagation. One such process which models need to capture is the magnitude and location of latent heat release within cyclones. Precipitation is closely related to column integrated latent heating, but both the magnitude and the (horizontal and vertical) location of the latent heat release in the context of the relative vorticity structure in a cyclone is important as the potential vorticity generation is determined by both of these factors. Here, an evaluation of precipitation and latent heat release in a climate model (HiGEM) is presented. The model is evaluated against a range of remote sensing data and global reanalyses (ERA-Interim) using an innovative storm compositing technique. Many studies compare models to reanalysis, but at the scale of individual weather systems, the latent heat release in global reanalyses may not be strongly constrained by the observations. Remote sensing data that measures processes associated with latent heat release is therefore employed to extend this work. Forward modelled radiances from the model and reanalysis are created using an offline simulator (COSP: CFMIP Offline Simulator Package) to provide fields that can be directly compared to remote sensing data from ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) and CloudSat, in addition to direct comparison of the model and reanalysis data to the GPCP (Global Precipitation Climatology Project) dataset. The potential vorticity structure and evolution of composite extratropical cyclones is then compared in HiGEM and ERA-Interim, with starkly divergent results, which are related to differences in latent heating.

  7. Aerosol-Cloud Interactions Control of Earth Radiation and Latent Heat Release Budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, D.

    2006-08-01

    Aircraft observations and model simulations show that cloud development is strongly modulated by the impact of cloud-aerosol interactions on precipitation forming processes. New insights into the mechanisms by which aerosols dominate the cloud cover of marine shallow clouds suggest that feedbacks between the cloud microstructure and cloud dynamics through precipitation processes play a major role in determining when a solid cloud cover will break up into a field of trade wind cumulus. Cloud-aerosol interactions dominate not only the dynamics of marine shallow clouds, but also the lifetime and the vertical disposition of latent heat of deep convective clouds over ocean and even more strongly over land. Recent coincident satellite measurements of aerosols and cloud properties quantify the aerosol effects on cloud cover and radiative forcing on regional and global scales. The shapes of the satellite retrieved relations between aerosols and cloud properties are consistent with the suggested ways by which aerosols affect clouds via precipitation processes, particularly by affecting the intensity of the cloud vertical air motions and its vertical development.

  8. Re-examining the roles of surface heat flux and latent heat release in a "hurricane-like" polar low over the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstad, Erik W.; Bracegirdle, Thomas J.; Zahn, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Polar lows are intense mesoscale cyclones that occur at high latitudes in both hemispheres during winter. Their sometimes evidently convective nature, fueled by strong surface fluxes and with cloud-free centers, have led to some polar lows being referred to as "arctic hurricanes." Idealized studies have shown that intensification by hurricane development mechanisms is theoretically possible in polar winter atmospheres, but the lack of observations and realistic simulations of actual polar lows have made it difficult to ascertain if this occurs in reality. Here the roles of surface heat fluxes and latent heat release in the development of a Barents Sea polar low, which in its cloud structures showed some similarities to hurricanes, are studied with an ensemble of sensitivity experiments, where latent heating and/or surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat were switched off before the polar low peaked in intensity. To ensure that the polar lows in the sensitivity runs did not track too far away from the actual environmental conditions, a technique known as spectral nudging was applied. This was shown to be crucial for enabling comparisons between the different model runs. The results presented here show that (1) no intensification occurred during the mature, postbaroclinic stage of the simulated polar low; (2) surface heat fluxes, i.e., air-sea interaction, were crucial processes both in order to attain the polar low's peak intensity during the baroclinic stage and to maintain its strength in the mature stage; and (3) latent heat release played a less important role than surface fluxes in both stages.

  9. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  10. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America ) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model. Review of other latent heating algorithms will be discussed in the workshop.

  11. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  12. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics Using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in straitform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMXX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM- LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  13. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM rainfall products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2001. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DE 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs. west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in strtaiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  14. The effect of latent heat release on synoptic-to-planetary wave interactions and its implication for satellite observations: Theoretical modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branscome, Lee E.; Bleck, Rainer

    1989-01-01

    Simple models are being developed to simulate interaction of planetary and synoptic-scale waves incorporating the effects of large-scale topography; eddy heat and momentum fluxes (or nonlinear dynamics); radiative heating/cooling; and latent heat release (precipitation) in synoptic-scale waves. The importance of latent heat release is determined in oceanic storm tracks for temporal variability and time-mean behavior of planetary waves. The model results were compared with available observations of planetary and synoptic-scale wave variability and time-mean circulation. The usefulness of monitoring precipitation in oceanic storm tracks by satellite observing systems was ascertained. The modeling effort includes two different low-order quasi-geostrophic models-time-dependent version and climatological mean version. The modeling also includes a low-order primitive equation model. A time-dependent, multi-level version will be used to validate the two-level Q-G models and examine effects of spherical geometry.

  15. Understanding Latent Heat of Vaporization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linz, Ed

    1995-01-01

    Presents a simple exercise for students to do in the kitchen at home to determine the latent heat of vaporization of water using typical household materials. Designed to stress understanding by sacrificing precision for simplicity. (JRH)

  16. Retrieved Latent Heating from TRMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Smith, Eric A.; Houze Jr, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The global hydrological cycle is central to the Earth's climate system, with rainfall and the physics of precipitation formation acting as the key links in the cycle. Two-thirds of global rainfall occurs in the tropics with the associated latent heating (LH) accounting for three-fourths of the total heat energy available to the Earth's atmosphere. In addition, fresh water provided by tropical rainfall and its variability exerts a large impact upon the structure and motions of the upper ocean layer. In the last decade, it has been established that standard products of LH from satellite measurements, particularly TRMM measurements, would be a valuable resource for scientific research and applications. Such products would enable new insights and investigations concerning the complexities of convection system life cycles, the diabatic heating controls and feedbacks related to meso-synoptic circulations and their forecasting, the relationship of tropical patterns of LH to the global circulation and climate, and strategies for improving cloud parameterizations in environmental prediction models. The status of retrieved TRMM LH products, TRMM LH inter-comparison and validation project, current TRMM LH applications and critic issues/action items (based on previous five TRMM LH workshops) is presented in this article.

  17. The effect of latent heat release on synoptic-to-planetary wave interactions and its implication for satellite observations: Theoretical modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branscome, Lee E.; Bleck, Rainer; Obrien, Enda

    1990-01-01

    The project objectives are to develop process models to investigate the interaction of planetary and synoptic-scale waves including the effects of latent heat release (precipitation), nonlinear dynamics, physical and boundary-layer processes, and large-scale topography; to determine the importance of latent heat release for temporal variability and time-mean behavior of planetary and synoptic-scale waves; to compare the model results with available observations of planetary and synoptic wave variability; and to assess the implications of the results for monitoring precipitation in oceanic-storm tracks by satellite observing systems. Researchers have utilized two different models for this project: a two-level quasi-geostrophic model to study intraseasonal variability, anomalous circulations and the seasonal cycle, and a 10-level, multi-wave primitive equation model to validate the two-level Q-G model and examine effects of convection, surface processes, and spherical geometry. It explicitly resolves several planetary and synoptic waves and includes specific humidity (as a predicted variable), moist convection, and large-scale precipitation. In the past year researchers have concentrated on experiments with the multi-level primitive equation model. The dynamical part of that model is similar to the spectral model used by the National Meteorological Center for medium-range forecasts. The model includes parameterizations of large-scale condensation and moist convection. To test the validity of results regarding the influence of convective precipitation, researchers can use either one of two different convective schemes in the model, a Kuo convective scheme or a modified Arakawa-Schubert scheme which includes downdrafts. By choosing one or the other scheme, they can evaluate the impact of the convective parameterization on the circulation. In the past year researchers performed a variety of initial-value experiments with the primitive-equation model. Using initial

  18. TRMM observations of latent heat distribution over the Indian summer monsoon region and associated dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanyam, Kandula V.; Kishore Kumar, Karanam

    2016-05-01

    The latent heat released/absorbed in the Earth's atmosphere due to phase change of water molecule plays a vital role in various atmospheric processes. It is now well established that the latent heat released in the clouds is the secondary source of energy for driving the atmosphere, the Sun being the primary. In this context, studies on latent heat released in the atmosphere become important to understand the some of the physical processes taking place in the atmosphere. One of the important implications of latent heat release is its role in driving the circulations on various temporal and spatial scales. Realizing the importance of latent heat released in the clouds, a comprehensive study is carried out to understand its role in driving the mesoscale circulation. As Indian summer monsoon (ISM) serves as natural laboratory for studying the clouds and their microphysics, an attempt is made to explore the latent heat distribution over this region using 13 years of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) observations. The observed profiles of latent heating over ISM region showed large spatial and temporal variability in the magnitude thus reflecting the presence of organization of convection on mesoscale. The latent profiles in convective and stratiform regions are segregated to study the differences in their interaction with large-scale environment. Various re-analysis dataset were used to examine the role of latent heating distribution on the mesoscale circulation. The significance of the present study lies in establishing the vertical distribution of latent heating and their impact on the background circulation.

  19. The Temperature Dependence of Water's Latent Heat of Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szedlak, A.; Blanchard, A. V.; Kostinski, A. B.; Cantrell, W. H.

    2009-12-01

    Freezing of water in Earth's atmosphere affects cloud dynamics through the release of the latent heat. The latent heat released is a function of how deeply the cloud water is supercooled before freezing begins - the deeper the supercooling, the less heat is released to the atmosphere. We present new measurements of the temperature dependent latent heat of freezing of water, measured using a Perkin Elmer DSC 7 and a Mettler Toledo Polymer DSC. Both instruments have been calibrated against melting transitions of water, dodecane, undecane,and tetradecane, and both agree within the error of the measurements with values in the literature. However, the two measurements show dramatic differences for the latent heat of freezing of water, which we attribute to the different methods used to extract a heat flux. At higher temperatures our measurements with the Perkin Elmer, which is a power compensation type calorimeter, are comparable to those of Bertolini et al. (1985). At lower temperatures, our measurements diverge from those of Bertolini et al. (1985), which we again attribute to the different principle of operation of the calorimeters. We conclude that temperature gradients within the freezing water play a critical role in the quantity of heat eventually exchanged with the surroundings. Finally, we reconcile the measurements with Kirchhoff's relation, which can be written (∂ΔH/∂T)p = Δcp where ΔH is the enthalpy difference between product and reactant (supercooled water and ice in this case) and Δcp is the difference in their heat capacities. [Bertolini, D., M. Cassettari, and G. Salvetti, Anomalies in the latent-heat of solidification of supercooled water. Chem. Phys. Lett., 119, 553-555, 1985.

  20. Targeting latent TGFβ release in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ceco, Ermelinda; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Gardner, Brandon; Miller, Tamari; DeJesus, Adam; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Smith, Lucas R; Barton, Elisabeth R; Molkentin, Jeffery D; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2014-10-22

    Latent transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) binding proteins (LTBPs) bind to inactive TGFβ in the extracellular matrix. In mice, muscular dystrophy symptoms are intensified by a genetic polymorphism that changes the hinge region of LTBP, leading to increased proteolytic susceptibility and TGFβ release. We have found that the hinge region of human LTBP4 was also readily proteolysed and that proteolysis could be blocked by an antibody to the hinge region. Transgenic mice were generated to carry a bacterial artificial chromosome encoding the human LTBP4 gene. These transgenic mice displayed larger myofibers, increased damage after muscle injury, and enhanced TGFβ signaling. In the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the human LTBP4 transgene exacerbated muscular dystrophy symptoms and resulted in weaker muscles with an increased inflammatory infiltrate and greater LTBP4 cleavage in vivo. Blocking LTBP4 cleavage may be a therapeutic strategy to reduce TGFβ release and activity and decrease inflammation and muscle damage in muscular dystrophy.

  1. Heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels. Latent heat models

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpinsky, E.

    1996-03-01

    Latent heat models were developed to calculate heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels for two cases: (1) heating with a condensable fluid flowing through coils and jackets; (2) vacuum reflux cooling with an overhead condenser. In either case the mathematical treatment, based on macroscopic balances, requires no iterative schemes. In addition to providing heat-transfer coefficients, the models predict flow rates of service fluid through the coils and jackets, estimate the percentage of heat transfer due to latent heat, and compute reflux rates.

  2. Dish-mounted latent heat buffer storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    Dish-mounted latent heat storage subsystems for Rankine, Brayton, and Stirling engines operating at 427 C, 816 C, and 816 C respectively are discussed. Storage requirements definition, conceptual design, media stability and compatibility tests, and thermal performance analyses are considered.

  3. Latent Heating Processes within Tropical Deep Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heever, S. C.; Mcgee, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    It has been suggested that latent heating above the freezing level plays an important role in reconciling Riehl and Malkus' Hot Tower Hypothesis (HTH) with observational evidence of diluted tropical deep convective cores. In this study, recent modifications to the HTH have been evaluated through the use of Lagrangian trajectory analysis of deep convective cores simulated using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), a cloud-resolving model (CRM) with sophisticated microphysical, surface and radiation parameterization schemes. Idealized, high-resolution simulations of a line of tropical convective cells have been conducted. A two-moment microphysical scheme was utilized, and the initial and lateral boundary grid conditions were obtained from a large-domain CRM simulation approaching radiative convective equilibrium. As the tropics are never too far from radiative convective equilibrium, such a framework is useful for investigating the relationships between radiation, thermodynamics and microphysics in tropical convection. Microphysical impacts on latent heating and equivalent potential temperature (θe) have been analyzed along trajectories ascending within convective regions. Changes in θe along backward trajectories are partitioned into contributions from latent heating due to ice processes and a residual term that is shown to be an approximate representation of mixing. It is apparent from the CRM simulations that mixing with dry environmental air decreases θe along ascending trajectories below the freezing level, while latent heating due to freezing and vapor deposition increase θe above the freezing level. The along-trajectory contributions to latent heating from cloud nucleation, condensation, evaporation, freezing, deposition, and sublimation have also been quantified. Finally, the source regions of trajectories reaching the upper troposphere have been identified. The analysis indicates that while much of the air ascending within convective

  4. Latent Heat in Soil Heat Flux Measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, the...

  5. Solar desalination with latent heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Assouad, Y.; Lavan, Z.

    1988-02-01

    Unlike conventional solar stills, the present system utilizes the latent heat of condensation and the sensible heat of the discarded seawater. The performance was optimized analytically and the system is presently under construction in Egypt. The system consists of a humidifier, a solar still or channel, a condenser, and a pond. In the humidifier, ambient air is humidified and heated by a warm brine from the pond. If the brine outlet temperature is higher than the ambient temperature, it goes back to the pond, if not, it is discarded. The solar still is a long glass-covered channel, about 200 meters long.

  6. Retrieving Latent Heat Vertical Structure Using Precipitation and Cloud Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.; Min, Q.; Wu, X.

    2011-12-01

    The latent heat (LH) released from tropical precipitation plays a critical role in driving regional and global atmosphere circulation. However, the vertical distribution of LH is one of most difficult parameters to be measured and has a large uncertainty in both residual diagnostic products and satellite retrievals. Most of current satellite LH products use limited observational information of precipitation and cloud profiles and highly depend on cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations. Our novel approach, distinguishing from existing schemes, is directly using observable precipitation and cloud profiles in combination with phase change partition parameterization of various kinds from the CRM simulations to produce the latent heating profiles. This hybrid latent heat algorithm separately deals with the condensation-evaporation heating (LHc_e), the deposition-sublimation heating (LHd_s) and the freezing-melting heating (LHf_m) for convective rain, stratiform rain, and shallow warm rain. Each component is based on physical processes, such as nucleation and auto conversion, by combining observable precipitation and cloud profiles. Although the proposed algorithm utilizes microphysical parameterizations from a specific CRM, the general LH vertical structure is primarily determined by the precipitation and cloud profiles observable from cloud and precipitation radars available at ground sites or from satellite platforms, and less sensitive to the specific CRM. The self consistency tests of this algorithm show good agreements with the CRM simulated LH at different spatial and temporal scales, even at simultaneous and pixel level. The applications of this algorithm are expected to provide new information for understanding the heating budget in the atmosphere and its impacts on the atmosphere circulations at various spatial and temporal scales.

  7. Determination of the Latent Heats and Triple Point of Perfluorocyclobutane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, A. G.; Strachan, A. N.

    1977-01-01

    Proposes the use of Perfluorocyclobutane in physical chemistry courses to conduct experiments on latent heat, triple point temperatures and pressures, boiling points, and entropy of vaporization. (SL)

  8. Sensitivity of Latent Heating Profiles to Environmental Conditions: Implications for TRMM and Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) as a part of NASA's Earth System Enterprise is the first mission dedicated to measuring tropical rainfall through microwave and visible sensors, and includes the first spaceborne rain radar. Tropical rainfall comprises two-thirds of global rainfall. It is also the primary distributor of heat through the atmosphere's circulation. It is this circulation that defines Earth's weather and climate. Understanding rainfall and its variability is crucial to understanding and predicting global climate change. Weather and climate models need an accurate assessment of the latent heating released as tropical rainfall occurs. Currently, cloud model-based algorithms are used to derive latent heating based on rainfall structure. Ultimately, these algorithms can be applied to actual data from TRMM. This study investigates key underlying assumptions used in developing the latent heating algorithms. For example, the standard algorithm is highly dependent on a system's rainfall amount and structure. It also depends on an a priori database of model-derived latent heating profiles based on the aforementioned rainfall characteristics. Unanswered questions remain concerning the sensitivity of latent heating profiles to environmental conditions (both thermodynamic and kinematic), regionality, and seasonality. This study investigates and quantifies such sensitivities and seeks to determine the optimal latent heating profile database based on the results. Ultimately, the study seeks to produce an optimized latent heating algorithm based not only on rainfall structure but also hydrometeor profiles.

  9. Solar thermoelectricity via advanced latent heat storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, M. L.; Rea, J.; Glatzmaier, G. C.; Hardin, C.; Oshman, C.; Vaughn, J.; Roark, T.; Raade, J. W.; Bradshaw, R. W.; Sharp, J.; Avery, A. D.; Bobela, D.; Bonner, R.; Weigand, R.; Campo, D.; Parilla, P. A.; Siegel, N. P.; Toberer, E. S.; Ginley, D. S.

    2016-05-01

    We report on a new modular, dispatchable, and cost-effective solar electricity-generating technology. Solar ThermoElectricity via Advanced Latent heat Storage (STEALS) integrates several state-of-the-art technologies to provide electricity on demand. In the envisioned STEALS system, concentrated sunlight is converted to heat at a solar absorber. The heat is then delivered to either a thermoelectric (TE) module for direct electricity generation, or to charge a phase change material for thermal energy storage, enabling subsequent generation during off-sun hours, or both for simultaneous electricity production and energy storage. The key to making STEALS a dispatchable technology lies in the development of a "thermal valve," which controls when heat is allowed to flow through the TE module, thus controlling when electricity is generated. The current project addresses each of the three major subcomponents, (i) the TE module, (ii) the thermal energy storage system, and (iii) the thermal valve. The project also includes system-level and techno- economic modeling of the envisioned integrated system and will culminate in the demonstration of a laboratory-scale STEALS prototype capable of generating 3kWe.

  10. The effective latent heat of aqueous nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soochan; Taylor, Robert A.; Dai, Lenore; Prasher, Ravi; Phelan, Patrick E.

    2015-06-01

    Nanoparticle suspensions, popularly termed ‘nanofluids’, have been extensively investigated for their thermal and radiative properties (Eastman et al 1996 Mater. Res. Soc. Proc. 457; Keblinski et al 2005 Mater. Today 8 36-44 Barber et al 2011 Nanoscale Res. Lett. 6 1-13 Thomas and Sobhan 2011 Nanoscale Res. Lett. 6 1-21 Taylor et al 2011 Nanoscale Res. Lett. 6 1-11 Fang et al 2013 Nano Lett. 13 1736-42 Otanicar et al 2010 J. Renew. Sustainable Energy 2 03310201-13 Prasher et al 2006 ASME J. Heat Transfer 128 588-95 Shin and Banerjee 2011 ASME J. Heat Transfer 133 1-4 Taylor and Phelan 2009 Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 52 5339-48 Ameen et al 2010 Int. J. Thermophys. 31 1131-44 Lee et al 2014 Appl. Phys. Lett. 104 1-4). Such work has generated great controversy, although it is (arguably) generally accepted today that the presence of nanoparticles rarely leads to useful enhancements in either thermal conductivity or convective heat transfer. On the other hand, there are still examples of unanticipated enhancements to some properties, such as the specific heat of molten salt-based nanofluids reported by Shin and Banerjee (2011 ASME J. Heat Transfer 133 1-4) and the critical heat flux mentioned by Taylor and Phelan (2009 Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 52 5339-48). Another largely overlooked example is the reported effect of nanoparticles on the effective latent heat of vaporization (hfg) of aqueous nanofluids, as reported by Ameen et al (2010 Int. J. Thermophys. 31 1131-44). Through molecular dynamics (MD) modeling supplemented with limited experimental data they found that hfg increases with increasing nanoparticle concentration, for Pt nanoparticles (MD) and Al2O3 nanoparticles (experiments). Here, we extend those exploratory experiments in an effort to determine if hfg of aqueous nanofluids can be manipulated, i.e., increased or decreased by the addition of graphite or silver nanoparticles. Our results to date indicate that, yes, hfg can be substantially impacted, by

  11. Retrieval of Latent Heating from TRMM Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Smith, E. A.; Adler, R. F.; Hou, A. Y.; Meneghini, R.; Simpson, J.; Haddad, Z. S.; Iguchi, T.; Satoh, S.; Kakar, R.; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Kummerow, C. D.; Lang, S.; Nakamura, K.; Nakazawa, T.; Okamoto, K.; Shige, S.; Olson, W. S.; Takayabu, Y.; Tripoli, G. J.; Yang, S.

    2006-01-01

    Precipitation, in driving the global hydrological cycle, strongly influences the behavior of the Earth's weather and climate systems and is central to their variability. Two-thirds of the global rainfall occurs over the Tropics, which leads to its profound effect on the general circulation of the atmosphere. This is because its energetic equivalent, latent heating (LH), is the tropical convective heat engine's primary fuel source as originally emphasized by Riehl and Malkus (1958). At low latitudes, LH stemming from extended bands of rainfall modulates large-scale zonal and meridional circulations and their consequent mass overturnings (e.g., Hartmann et al. 1984; Hack and Schubert 1990). Also, LH is the principal energy source in the creation, growth, vertical structure, and propagation of long-lived tropical waves (e.g., Puri 1987; Lau and Chan 1988). Moreover, the distinct vertical distribution properties of convective and stratiform LH profiles help influence climatic outcomes via their tight control on large-scale circulations (Lau and Peng 1987; Nakazawa 1988; Sui and Lau 1988; Emanuel et al. 1994; Yanai et al. 2000; Sumi and Nakazawa 2002; Schumacher et al. 2004). The purpose of this paper is to describe how LH profiles are being derived from satellite precipitation rate retrievals, focusing on those being made with Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite measurements.

  12. Tropical Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes and Latent Heating Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Zhou, Tiehan; Love, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent satellite determinations of global distributions of absolute gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes in the lower stratosphere show maxima over the summer subtropical continents and little evidence of GW momentum fluxes associated with the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). This seems to be at odds with parameterizations forGWmomentum fluxes, where the source is a function of latent heating rates, which are largest in the region of the ITCZ in terms of monthly averages. The authors have examined global distributions of atmospheric latent heating, cloud-top-pressure altitudes, and lower-stratosphere absolute GW momentum fluxes and have found that monthly averages of the lower-stratosphere GW momentum fluxes more closely resemble the monthly mean cloud-top altitudes rather than the monthly mean rates of latent heating. These regions of highest cloud-top altitudes occur when rates of latent heating are largest on the time scale of cloud growth. This, plus previously published studies, suggests that convective sources for stratospheric GW momentum fluxes, being a function of the rate of latent heating, will require either a climate model to correctly model this rate of latent heating or some ad hoc adjustments to account for shortcomings in a climate model's land-sea differences in convective latent heating.

  13. Heat Storage Characteristics of Latent-Heat Microcapsule Slurry Using Hot Air Bubbles by Direct-Contact Heat Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Horibe, Akihiko; Kim, Myoung-Jun; Tsukamoto, Hirofumi

    This study deals with the heat storage characteristics of latent-heat microcapsule slurry consisting of a mixture of fine microcapsules packed with latent-heat storage material and water. The heat storage operation for the latent-heat microcapsules was carried out by the direct-contact heat exchange method using hot air bubbles. The latent-heat microcapsule consisted of n-paraffin as a core latent-heat storage material and melamine resin as a coating substance. The relationship between the completion time of latent-heat storage and some parameters was examined experimentally. The nondimensional correlation equations for temperature efficiency, the completion time period of the latent-heat storage process and variation in the enthalpy of air through the microcapsule slurry layer were derived in terms of the ratio of microcapsule slurry layer height to microcapsule diameter, Reynolds number for airflow, Stefan number and modified Stefan number for absolute humidity of flowing air.

  14. The surface latent heat flux anomalies related to major earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Feng; Shen, Xuhui; Kang, Chunli; Xiong, Pan; Hong, Shunying

    2011-12-01

    SLHF (Surface Latent Heat Flux) is an atmospheric parameter, which can describe the heat released by phase changes and dependent on meteorological parameters such as surface temperature, relative humidity, wind speed etc. There is a sharp difference between the ocean surface and the land surface. Recently, many studies related to the SLHF anomalies prior to earthquakes have been developed. It has been shown that the energy exchange enhanced between coastal surface and atmosphere prior to earthquakes can increase the rate of the water-heat exchange, which will lead to an obviously increases in SLHF. In this paper, two earthquakes in 2010 (Haiti earthquake and southwest of Sumatra in Indonesia earthquake) have been analyzed using SLHF data by STD (standard deviation) threshold method. It is shows that the SLHF anomaly may occur in interpolate earthquakes or intraplate earthquakes and coastal earthquakes or island earthquakes. And the SLHF anomalies usually appear 5-6 days prior to an earthquake, then disappear quickly after the event. The process of anomaly evolution to a certain extent reflects a dynamic energy change process about earthquake preparation, that is, weak-strong-weak-disappeared.

  15. Latent heat thermal energy storage for lunar oxygen production

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A.D.; Alexiades, V.; Jacobs, G.; Naney, M.; Olszewski, M.

    1992-08-01

    A necessary component of a solar-based lunar oxygen production system is a thermal energy storage module. We discuss some of the heat transfer and phase change problems associated with the design and operation of such a module based on the latent heat of melting of lunar rock. 12 refs.

  16. Latent heat thermal energy storage for lunar oxygen production

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A.D. , Omer ); Alexiades, V.; Jacobs, G.; Naney, M.; Olszewski, M. )

    1992-01-01

    A necessary component of a solar-based lunar oxygen production system is a thermal energy storage module. We discuss some of the heat transfer and phase change problems associated with the design and operation of such a module based on the latent heat of melting of lunar rock. 12 refs.

  17. Scale effects in the latent heat of melting in nanopores.

    PubMed

    Shin, J-H; Parlange, J-Y; Deinert, M R

    2013-07-28

    The curvature of a liquid vapor interface has long been known to change the equilibrium vapor pressure. It has also been shown that a capillary structure will affect the temperature at which both freezing and vaporization of a substance will occur. However, describing interfacial effects on the latent heat of a phase change has proven more difficult. Here, we present a classical thermodynamic model for how the latent heat of melting changes as the size of the particles undergoing the transition decreases. The scale dependence for the surface tension is taken into consideration using a Tolman length correction. The resulting model is tested by fitting to published experimental data for the latent heat of melting for benzene, heptane, naphthalene, and water contained in nano-porous glass. In all cases the model fits the data with a R(2) ≥ 0.94. PMID:23901997

  18. A Latent Heat Retrieval and its Effects on the Intensity and Structure Change of Hurricane Guillermo (1997). Part I: The Algorithm and Observations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guimond, Stephen R.; Bourassa, mark A.; Reasor, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    The release of latent heat in clouds is an essential part of the formation and I intensification ohurricanes. The community knows very little about the intensity and structure of latent heating due largely to inadequate observations. In this paper, a new method for retrieving the latent heating field in hurricanes from airborne Dopple radar is presented and fields from rapidly intensifying Hurricane Guillermo (1997) are shown.

  19. Studies of Phase Change Materials and a Latent Heat Storage Unit Used for a Natural Circulation Cooling/Latent Heat Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakitani, Katsumi; Honda, Hiroshi

    Experimental and theoretical studies were made of the heat transfer characteristics of a latent heat storage unit used for a natural circulation cooling /latent heat storage system. Heating and cooling curves of the latent heat storage unit undergoing solid-liquid phase change of a PCM (lauric acid) was obtained by using anatural circulation loop of R22 which consisted of an electrically heated evaporater, a water cooled condenser and the latent heat storage unit. The latent heat storage unit showed a heat transfer performance which was high enough for practical use. An approximate theoretical analysis was conducted to investigate transient behavior of the latent heat storage unit. Predictions of the refrigerant and outer surface temperatures during the melting process were in fair agreement with the experimental data, whereas that of the refrigerant temperature during the solidification process was considerably lower than the measurement.

  20. Filled Carbon Nanotubes: Superior Latent Heat Storage Enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-01

    This factsheet describes a rstudy whose technical objective is to demonstrate the feasibility of filled carbon nanotubes (CNT) as latent heat storage enhancers, with potential applications as next generation thermal management fluids in diverse applications in industries ranging from high-demand microelectronic cooling, manufacturing, power generation, transportation, to solar energy storage.

  1. Studies of Phase Change Materials and a Latent Heat Storage Unit Used for a Natural Circulation Cooling/Latent Heat Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakitani, Katsumi; Honda, Hiroshi

    Experiments were performed to investigate feasibility of using organic materials as a PCM for a latent heat storage unit of a natural circulation cooling/latent heat storage system. This system was designed to cool a shelter accommodating telecommunication equipment located in subtropical deserts or similar regions without using a power source. Taking into account practical considerations and the results of various experiments regarding the thermodynamic properties, thermal degradation, and corrosiveness to metals, lauric acid and iron was selected for the PCM and the latent heat storage unit material, respectively. Cyclic heating and cooling of the latent heat storage unit undergoing solid-liquid phase change was repeated for more than 430 days. The results showed that the heating-cooling curve was almost unchanged between the early stage and the 1,870th cycle. It was concluded that the latent heat storage unit could be used safely for more than ten years as a component of the cooling system.

  2. Latent heat sink in soil heat flux measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, the...

  3. Shallow and Deep Latent Heating Modes Over Tropical Oceans Observed with TRMM PR Spectral Latent Heating Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takayabu, Yukari N.; Shige, Shoichi; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Hirota, Nagio

    2010-01-01

    The global hydrological cycle is central to the Earth's climate system, with rainfall and the physics of its formation acting as the key links in the cycle. Two-thirds of global rainfall occurs in the Tropics. Associated with this rainfall is a vast amount of heat, which is known as latent heat. It arises mainly due to the phase change of water vapor condensing into liquid droplets; three-fourths of the total heat energy available to the Earth's atmosphere comes from tropical rainfall. In addition, fresh water provided by tropical rainfall and its variability exerts a large impact upon the structure and motions of the upper ocean layer. Three-dimensional distributions of latent heating estimated from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR)utilizing the Spectral Latent Heating (SLH) algorithm are analyzed. Mass-weighted and vertically integrated latent heating averaged over the tropical oceans is estimated as approx.72.6 J/s (approx.2.51 mm/day), and that over tropical land is approx.73.7 J/s (approx.2.55 mm/day), for 30degN-30degS. It is shown that non-drizzle precipitation over tropical and subtropical oceans consists of two dominant modes of rainfall systems, deep systems and congestus. A rough estimate of shallow mode contribution against the total heating is about 46.7 % for the average tropical oceans, which is substantially larger than 23.7 % over tropical land. While cumulus congestus heating linearly correlates with the SST, deep mode is dynamically bounded by large-scale subsidence. It is notable that substantial amount of rain, as large as 2.38 mm day-1 in average, is brought from congestus clouds under the large-scale subsiding circulation. It is also notable that even in the region with SST warmer than 28 oC, large-scale subsidence effectively suppresses the deep convection, remaining the heating by congestus clouds. Our results support that the entrainment of mid-to-lower-tropospheric dry air, which accompanies the large

  4. MJO Signals in Latent Heating: Results from TRMM Retrievals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chidong; Ling, Jian; Hagos, Samson M.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Steve; Takayabu, Yukari N.; Shige, Shoichi; Katsumata, Masaki; Olson, William S.; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.

    2010-11-01

    Four Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) datasets of latent heating were diagnosed for signals in the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). In all four datasets, vertical structures of latent heating are dominated by two components, one deep with its peak above the melting level and one shallow with its peak below. Profiles of the two components are nearly ubiquitous in longitude, allowing a separation of the vertical and zonal/temporal variations when the latitudinal dependence is not considered. All four datasets exhibit robust MJO spectral signals in the deep component as eastward propagating spectral peaks centered at period of 50 days and zonal wavenumber 1, well distinguished from lower- and higher-frequency power and much stronger than the corresponding westward power. The shallow component shows similar but slightly less robust MJO spectral peaks. MJO signals were further extracted from a combination of band-pass (30 – 90 day) filtered deep and shallow components. Largest amplitudes of both deep and shallow components of the MJO are confined to the Indian and western Pacific Oceans. There is a local minimum in the deep components over the Maritime Continent. The shallow components of the MJO differ substantially among the four TRMM datasets in their detailed zonal distributions in the eastern hemisphere. In composites of the heating evolution through the life cycle of the MJO, the shallow components lead the deep ones in some datasets and at certain longitudes. In many respects, the four TRMM datasets agree well in their deep components, but not in their shallow components and the phase relations between the deep and shallow components. These results indicate that caution must be exercised in applications of these latent heating data.

  5. Sensible and latent heating of the atmosphere as inferred from DST-6 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, G. F.; Schubert, S. D.; Johnson, W. T.

    1979-01-01

    The average distribution of convective latent heating, boundary layer sensible heat flux, and vertical velocity are determined for the winter 1976 DST period from GLAS model diagnostics. Key features are the regions of intense latent heating over Brazil, Central Africa, and Indonesia; and the regions of strong sensible heating due to air mass modification over the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans.

  6. Heat Shock Factor 1 Mediates Latent HIV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiao-Yan; Zhao, Wei; Zeng, Xiao-Yun; Lin, Jian; Li, Min-Min; Shen, Xin-Tian; Liu, Shu-Wen

    2016-01-01

    HSF1, a conserved heat shock factor, has emerged as a key regulator of mammalian transcription in response to cellular metabolic status and stress. To our knowledge, it is not known whether HSF1 regulates viral transcription, particularly HIV-1 and its latent form. Here we reveal that HSF1 extensively participates in HIV transcription and is critical for HIV latent reactivation. Mode of action studies demonstrated that HSF1 binds to the HIV 5′-LTR to reactivate viral transcription and recruits a family of closely related multi-subunit complexes, including p300 and p-TEFb. And HSF1 recruits p300 for self-acetylation is also a committed step. The knockout of HSF1 impaired HIV transcription, whereas the conditional over-expression of HSF1 improved that. These findings demonstrate that HSF1 positively regulates the transcription of latent HIV, suggesting that it might be an important target for different therapeutic strategies aimed at a cure for HIV/AIDS. PMID:27189267

  7. Heat Shock Factor 1 Mediates Latent HIV Reactivation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiao-Yan; Zhao, Wei; Zeng, Xiao-Yun; Lin, Jian; Li, Min-Min; Shen, Xin-Tian; Liu, Shu-Wen

    2016-05-18

    HSF1, a conserved heat shock factor, has emerged as a key regulator of mammalian transcription in response to cellular metabolic status and stress. To our knowledge, it is not known whether HSF1 regulates viral transcription, particularly HIV-1 and its latent form. Here we reveal that HSF1 extensively participates in HIV transcription and is critical for HIV latent reactivation. Mode of action studies demonstrated that HSF1 binds to the HIV 5'-LTR to reactivate viral transcription and recruits a family of closely related multi-subunit complexes, including p300 and p-TEFb. And HSF1 recruits p300 for self-acetylation is also a committed step. The knockout of HSF1 impaired HIV transcription, whereas the conditional over-expression of HSF1 improved that. These findings demonstrate that HSF1 positively regulates the transcription of latent HIV, suggesting that it might be an important target for different therapeutic strategies aimed at a cure for HIV/AIDS.

  8. Environmental Forcing of Super Typhoon Paka's (1997) Latent Heat Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, Edward B.; Olson, William; Halverson, Jeff; Simpson, Joanne; Pierce, Harold

    1999-01-01

    The distribution and intensity of total (i.e., combined stratified and convective processes) rainrate/latent heat release (LHR) were derived for tropical cyclone Paka during the period 9-21 December, 1997 from the F-10, F-11, F-13, and F-14 Defense Meteorological Satellite Special Sensor Microwave/Imager and the Tropical Rain Measurement Mission Microwave Imager observations. These observations were frequent enough to capture three episodes of inner core convective bursts that preceded periods of rapid intensification and a convective rainband (CRB) cycle. During these periods of convective bursts, satellite sensors revealed that the rainrates/LHR: 1) increased within the inner eye wall region; 2) were mainly convectively generated (nearly a 65% contribution), 3) propagated inwards; 4) extended upwards within the middle and upper-troposphere, and 5) became electrically charged. These factors may have caused the eye wall region to become more buoyant within the middle and upper-troposphere, creating greater cyclonic angular momentum, and, thereby, warming the center and intensifying the system. Radiosonde measurements from Kwajalein Atoll and Guam, sea surface temperature observations, and the European Center for Medium Range Forecast analyses were used to examine the necessary and sufficient condition for initiating and maintaining these inner core convective bursts. For example, the necessary conditions such as the atmospheric thermodynamics (i.e., cold tropopause temperatures, moist troposphere, and warm SSTs [greater than 26 deg]) suggested that the atmosphere was ideal for Paka's maximum potential intensity (MPI) to approach super-typhoon strength. Further, Paka encountered weak vertical wind shear (less than 15 m/s ) before interacting with the westerlies on 21 December. The sufficient conditions, on the other hand, appeared to have some influence on Paka's convective burst, but the horizontal moisture flux convergence values in the outer core were weaker than

  9. Latent heat storage technology and application workshop. Summary report: Session 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. F.

    Latent heat storage technology and application were studied. The economics of short term latent heat storage for application and system configuration were analyzed. Subjects discussed included: state of the art, solar energy stores, residential heating and cooling, and industrial and utility applications.

  10. Wallboard with Latent Heat Storage for Passive Solar Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kedl, R.J.

    2001-05-31

    Conventional wallboard impregnated with octadecane paraffin [melting point-23 C (73.5 F)] is being developed as a building material with latent heat storage for passive solar and other applications. Impregnation was accomplished simply by soaking the wallboard in molten wax. Concentrations of wax in the combined product as high as 35% by weight can be achieved. Scale-up of the soaking process, from small laboratory samples to full-sized 4- by 8-ft sheets, has been successfully accomplished. The required construction properties of wallboard are maintained after impregnation, that is, it can be painted and spackled. Long-term, high-temperature exposure tests and thermal cycling tests showed no tendency of the paraffin to migrate within the wallboard, and there was no deterioration of thermal energy storage capacity. In support of this concept, a computer model was developed to handle thermal transport and storage by a phase change material (PCM) dispersed in a porous media. The computer model was confirmed by comparison with known analytical solutions and also by comparison with temperatures measured in wallboard during an experimentally generated thermal transient. Agreement between the model and known solution was excellent. Agreement between the model and thermal transient was good, only after the model was modified to allow the PCM to melt over a temperature range, rather than at a specific melting point. When the melting characteristics of the PCM (melting point, melting range, and heat of fusion), as determined from a differential scanning calorimeter plot, were used in the model, agreement between the model and transient data was very good. The confirmed computer model may now be used in conjunction with a building heating and cooling code to evaluate design parameters and operational characteristics of latent heat storage wallboard for passive solar applications.

  11. Relating Convective and Stratiform Rain to Latent Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen; Zeng, Xiping; Shige, Shoichi; Takayabu, Yukari

    2010-01-01

    The relationship among surface rainfall, its intensity, and its associated stratiform amount is established by examining observed precipitation data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The results show that for moderate-high stratiform fractions, rain probabilities are strongly skewed toward light rain intensities. For convective-type rain, the peak probability of occurrence shifts to higher intensities but is still significantly skewed toward weaker rain rates. The main differences between the distributions for oceanic and continental rain are for heavily convective rain. The peak occurrence, as well as the tail of the distribution containing the extreme events, is shifted to higher intensities for continental rain. For rainy areas sampled at 0.58 horizontal resolution, the occurrence of conditional rain rates over 100 mm/day is significantly higher over land. Distributions of rain intensity versus stratiform fraction for simulated precipitation data obtained from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations are quite similar to those from the satellite, providing a basis for mapping simulated cloud quantities to the satellite observations. An improved convective-stratiform heating (CSH) algorithm is developed based on two sources of information: gridded rainfall quantities (i.e., the conditional intensity and the stratiform fraction) observed from the TRMM PR and synthetic cloud process data (i.e., latent heating, eddy heat flux convergence, and radiative heating/cooling) obtained from CRM simulations of convective cloud systems. The new CSH algorithm-derived heating has a noticeably different heating structure over both ocean and land regions compared to the previous CSH algorithm. Major differences between the new and old algorithms include a significant increase in the amount of low- and midlevel heating, a downward emphasis in the level of maximum cloud heating by about 1 km, and a larger variance between land and ocean in

  12. Study on Latent Heat of Fusion of Ice in Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumano, Hiroyuki; Asaoka, Tatsunori; Saito, Akio; Okawa, Seiji

    In this study, latent heat of fusion of ice in aqueous solutions was measured to understand latent heat of fusion of ice slurries. Propylene glycol, ethylene glycol, ethanol, NaCl and NaNO3 solutions were examined as the aqueous solutions. In the measurement, pure ice was put into the solution, and the temperature variation of the solution due to the melting of the ice was measured. Then, the effective latent heat of fusion was calculated from energy balance equation. When ice melts in solution, the concentration of the solution varies due to the melting of the ice, and dilution heat must be considered. Therefore, the latent heat of fusion of ice in aqueous solutions was predicted by considering the effects of dilution and freezing-point depression. The latent heat of fusion was also measured by differential scanning calorimetry(DSC) to compare the results obtained from the experiments with that obtained by DSC. As the result, it was found that the effective latent heat of fusion of ice decreased with the increase of the concentration of solution, and the effective latent heat of fusion was calculated from latent heat of fusion of pure ice and the effects of freezing-point depression and the dilution heat.

  13. Fluid Latent Heat Storage Material Using Ethanol Water Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, Hidetoshi; Yasunari, Yuki

    Ethanol water mixture has a liquidus line ( or crystallizing line) and a solidus line (or melting line) that are separated, and therefore it can have both liquid and solid phases existing together. With advances in low temperature technology in recent days, ethanol water mixture is attaching more and more attention as an environment-friendly coolant or as a thermal storage material. In the present study, we observed the crystallization process in the mixture and carried out experiments to evaluate fluidity of the mixture, with the objective of utilizing an ethanol water mixture as a coolant or a thermal energy storage material. Crystal formation and growing process within a minute droplet of a binary mixture was modeled. As a result, we found a novel method to produce a fluid latent heat storage material continuously and an apparent coefficient of viscosity show that rotational speed and solid phase fraction have a strong effect on the fluidity of the mixture.

  14. The microphysical contributions to and evolution of latent heating profiles in two MC3E MCSs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinescu, P. J.; Heever, S. C.; Saleeby, S. M.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    The shapes and magnitudes of latent heating profiles have been shown to be different within the convective and stratiform regions of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Properly representing these distinctions has significant implications for the atmospheric responses to latent heating on various scales. This study details (1) the microphysical process contributions to latent heating profiles within MCS convective, stratiform, and anvil regions and (2) the time evolution of these profiles throughout the MCS lifetime, using cloud-resolving model simulations. Simulations of two MCS events that occurred during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) are conducted. Several features of the simulated MCSs are compared to a suite of observations obtained during the MC3E field campaign, and it is concluded that the simulations reasonably reproduce the MCS events. The simulations show that condensation and deposition are the primary contributors to MCS latent warming, as compared to riming and nucleation processes. In terms of MCS latent cooling, sublimation, melting, and evaporation all play significant roles. It is evident that throughout the MCS lifecycle, convective regions demonstrate an approximately linear decrease in the magnitudes of latent heating rates, while latent heating within stratiform regions is associated with transitions between MCS flow regimes. Such information regarding the temporal evolution of latent heating within convective and stratiform MCS regions could be useful in developing parameterizations representing convective organization.

  15. Model of direct contact heat transfer for latent heat energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Cease, M. E.

    1980-05-01

    Direct contact heat transfer is an attractive method to reduce the cost of heat exchange for latent heat thermal energy storage systems. However, current performance information is insufficient to allow an accurate appraisal of its economic and technical feasibility. In a direct contact heat transfer system, an immiscible fluid is bubbled through the storage media and heat is transferred between the phases as the droplets rise. An analytical model is presented for predicting the temperature of the rising droplets from information in the literature. The drop size is calculated from empirical correlations in the jetting formation region and rise velocity is characterized by a creeping-flow surface cell model which accounts for the hindering effects of neighboring droplets. The viscosity of the crystallizing solution in the rise velocity equation is approximated by an expression for concentrated suspensions, where the percentage of solids is taken as the percentage of crystallization. Dispersed phase holdup is predicted with the rise velocity. Calculation of the rate of heat transfer to the dispersed immiscible fluid droplets is based on three different internal hydrodynamic approximations: rigid, internally circulating, and wall-mixed spheres. The predictions of the circulating drop case agree reasonably well in the latent heat region with previous data on a similar system. However, because the model is also sensitive to the estimates used for drop size, continuous phase viscosity, and interfacial tension, the heat transfer mechanism cannot be conclusively identified, and experimental research is required to establish the validity of the model.

  16. Preparation of fine powdered composite for latent heat storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fořt, Jan; Pomaleski, Marina; Trník, Anton; Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-07-01

    Application of latent heat storage building envelope systems using phase-change materials represents an attractive method of storing thermal energy and has the advantages of high-energy storage density and the isothermal nature of the storage process. This study deals with a preparation of a new type of powdered phase change composite material for thermal energy storage. The idea of a composite is based upon the impregnation of a natural silicate material by a reasonably priced commercially produced pure phase change material and forming the homogenous composite powdered structure. For the preparation of the composite, vacuum impregnation method is used. The particle size distribution accessed by the laser diffraction apparatus proves that incorporation of the organic phase change material into the structure of inorganic siliceous pozzolana does not lead to the clustering of the particles. The compatibility of the prepared composite is characterized by the Fourier transformation infrared analysis (FTIR). Performed DSC analysis shows potential of the developed composite for thermal energy storage that can be easily incorporated into the cement-based matrix of building materials. Based on the obtained results, application of the developed phase change composite can be considered with a great promise.

  17. Wallboard with latent heat storage for passive solar applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kedl, R.J.

    1991-05-01

    Conventional wallboard impregnated with octadecane paraffin is being developed as a building material with latent heat storage for passive solar and other applications. Impregnation was accomplished simply by soaking the wallboard in molten wax. Concentrations of wax in the combined product as high as 35% by weight can be achieved. Scale-up of the soaking process, from small laboratory samples to full-sized 4- by 8-ft sheets, has been successfully accomplished. The required construction properties of wallboard are maintained after impregnation, that is, it can be painted and spackled. Long-term, high-temperature exposure tests and thermal cycling tests showed no tendency of the paraffin to migrate within the wallboard, and there was no deterioration of thermal energy storage capacity. In support of this concept, a computer model was developed to handle thermal transport and storage by a phase change material (PCM) dispersed in a porous media. The computer model was confirmed by comparison with known analytical solutions and also by comparison with temperatures measured in wallboard during an experimentally generated thermal transient. Agreement between the model and known solution was excellent. Agreement between the model and thermal transient was good, only after the model was modified to allow the PCM to melt over a temperature range, rather than at a specific melting point. When the melting characteristics of the PCM, as determined from a differential scanning calorimeter plot, were used in the model, agreement between the model and transient data was very good. 11 refs., 25 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Development of composite latent/sensible heat storage media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, R.; Ong, E. T.; Kardas, A.

    1990-12-01

    Results of an on-going program to develop a composite latent-sensible thermal energy storage medium, trade marked CompPhase, are presented. The target application area was periodic kiln energy recovery. The concept is that of a composite salt/ceramic material processed such that the medium maintains its shape and mechanical integrity through the salt melting temperature. As such, the media can be fabricated into a variety of shapes suitable for packed beds, fluidized beds, or direct contact heat exchangers. The properties of ten carbonate salt or eutectic mixtures of carbonate salts were reviewed to select the most appropriate candidates for development. Three salts and two ceramic materials were evaluated in laboratory tests to select the final material, a composite of sodium-barium eutectic/magnesium oxide, for development. Two methods of processing the constituent powders for fabrication into storage pellets were developed, and one method was applied to pellet fabrication by commercial processing equipment. Two different preliminary cost estimates bracketed the expected cost of commercially fabricating storage pellets. Also, two modifications to the material processing method were suggested to reduce costs. Thermal cycling was conducted on laboratory produced experimental pellets and on prototype pellets fabricated by commercial processes. Detailed laboratory tests to determine composite mechanical and thermal properties were conducted. It is concluded that further laboratory, field, and economic studies are required before the concept of composite storage media can be considered fully developed for commercialization.

  19. The role of latent heat in kinetic energy conversions of South Pacific cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kann, Deirdre M.; Vincent, Dayton G.

    1986-01-01

    The four-dimensional behavior of cyclone systems in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) is analyzed. Three cyclone systems, which occurred during the period from January 10-16, 1979, are examined using the data collected during the first special observing period of the FGGE. The effects of latent heating on the life cycles of the cyclones are investigated. Particular attention is given to the conversions of eddy available potential energy to eddy kinetic energy and of mean kinetic energy to eddy kinetic energy. The net radiation profile, sensible heat flux, total field of vertical motion, and latent heat component were computed. The life cycles of the cyclones are described. It is observed that the latent heating component accounts for nearly all the conversion in the three cyclones, and latent heating within the SPCZ is the major source of eddy kinetic energy for the cyclones.

  20. Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Anoop

    2013-08-14

    A key technological issue facing the success of future Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSP) plants is creating an economical Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. Current TES systems use either sensible heat in fluids such as oil, or molten salts, or use thermal stratification in a dual-media consisting of a solid and a heat-transfer fluid. However, utilizing the heat of fusion in inorganic molten salt mixtures in addition to sensible heat , as in a Phase change material (PCM)-based TES, can significantly increase the energy density of storage requiring less salt and smaller containers. A major issue that is preventing the commercial use of PCM-based TES is that it is difficult to discharge the latent heat stored in the PCM melt. This is because when heat is extracted, the melt solidifies onto the heat exchanger surface decreasing the heat transfer. Even a few millimeters of thickness of solid material on heat transfer surface results in a large drop in heat transfer due to the low thermal conductivity of solid PCM. Thus, to maintain the desired heat rate, the heat exchange area must be large which increases cost. This project demonstrated that the heat transfer coefficient can be increase ten-fold by using forced convection by pumping a hyper-eutectic salt mixture over specially coated heat exchanger tubes. However,only 15% of the latent heat is used against a goal of 40% resulting in a projected cost savings of only 17% against a goal of 30%. Based on the failure mode effect analysis and experience with pumping salt at near freezing point significant care must be used during operation which can increase the operating costs. Therefore, we conclude the savings are marginal to justify using this concept for PCM-TES over a two-tank TES. The report documents the specialty coatings, the composition and morphology of hypereutectic salt mixtures and the results from the experiment conducted with the active heat exchanger along with the lessons learnt during

  1. TRMM Latent Heating Retrieval and Comparisons with Field Campaigns and Large-Scale Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Takayabu, Yukuri; Lang, S.; Shige, S.; Olson, W.; Hou, A.; Jiang, X.; Zhang, C.; Lau, W.; Krishnamurti, T.; Waliser, D.; Grecu, M.; Ciesielski, P. E.; Johnson, R. H.; Houze, R.; Kakar, R.; Nakamura, K.; Braun, S.; Hagos, S.; Oki, R.; Bhardwaj, A.

    2012-01-01

    Rainfall production is a fundamental process within the Earth's hydrological cycle because it represents both a principal forcing term in surface water budgets, and its energetics corollary, latent heating (LH), is one of the principal sources of atmospheric diabatic heating. Latent heat release itself is a consequence of phase changes between the vapor, liquid, and frozen states of water. The vertical distribution of LH has a strong influence on the atmosphere, controlling large-scale tropical circulations, exciting and modulating tropical waves, maintaining the intensities of tropical cyclones, and even providing the energetics of midlatitude cyclones and other mobile midlatitude weather systems. Moreover, the processes associated with LH result in significant non-linear changes in atmospheric radiation through the creation, dissipation and modulation of clouds and precipitation. Yanai et al. (1973) utilized the meteorological data collected from a sounding network to present a pioneering work on thermodynamic budgets, which are referred to as the apparent heat source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2). Yanai's paper motivated the development of satellite-based LH algorithms and provided a theoretical background for imposing large-scale advective forcing into cloud-resolving models (CRMs). These CRM-simulated LH and Q1 data have been used to generate the look-up tables used in LH algorithms. This paper examines the retrieval, validation, and application of LH estimates based on rain rate quantities acquired from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite (TRMM). TRMM was launched in November 1997 as a joint enterprise between the American and Japanese space agencies -- with overriding goals of providing accurate four-dimensional estimates of rainfall and LH over the global Tropics and subtropics equatorward of 35o. Other literature has acknowledged the achievement of the first goal of obtaining an accurate rainfall climatology. This paper describes the

  2. Latent heat exchange in the boreal and arctic biomes.

    PubMed

    Kasurinen, Ville; Alfredsen, Knut; Kolari, Pasi; Mammarella, Ivan; Alekseychik, Pavel; Rinne, Janne; Vesala, Timo; Bernier, Pierre; Boike, Julia; Langer, Moritz; Belelli Marchesini, Luca; van Huissteden, Ko; Dolman, Han; Sachs, Torsten; Ohta, Takeshi; Varlagin, Andrej; Rocha, Adrian; Arain, Altaf; Oechel, Walter; Lund, Magnus; Grelle, Achim; Lindroth, Anders; Black, Andy; Aurela, Mika; Laurila, Tuomas; Lohila, Annalea; Berninger, Frank

    2014-11-01

    In this study latent heat flux (λE) measurements made at 65 boreal and arctic eddy-covariance (EC) sites were analyses by using the Penman-Monteith equation. Sites were stratified into nine different ecosystem types: harvested and burnt forest areas, pine forests, spruce or fir forests, Douglas-fir forests, broadleaf deciduous forests, larch forests, wetlands, tundra and natural grasslands. The Penman-Monteith equation was calibrated with variable surface resistances against half-hourly eddy-covariance data and clear differences between ecosystem types were observed. Based on the modeled behavior of surface and aerodynamic resistances, surface resistance tightly control λE in most mature forests, while it had less importance in ecosystems having shorter vegetation like young or recently harvested forests, grasslands, wetlands and tundra. The parameters of the Penman-Monteith equation were clearly different for winter and summer conditions, indicating that phenological effects on surface resistance are important. We also compared the simulated λE of different ecosystem types under meteorological conditions at one site. Values of λE varied between 15% and 38% of the net radiation in the simulations with mean ecosystem parameters. In general, the simulations suggest that λE is higher from forested ecosystems than from grasslands, wetlands or tundra-type ecosystems. Forests showed usually a tighter stomatal control of λE as indicated by a pronounced sensitivity of surface resistance to atmospheric vapor pressure deficit. Nevertheless, the surface resistance of forests was lower than for open vegetation types including wetlands. Tundra and wetlands had higher surface resistances, which were less sensitive to vapor pressure deficits. The results indicate that the variation in surface resistance within and between different vegetation types might play a significant role in energy exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere. These results suggest the need

  3. A model for the latent heat of melting in free standing metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jeong-Heon; Deinert, Mark R.

    2014-04-28

    Nanoparticles of many metals are known to exhibit scale dependent latent heats of melting. Analytical models for this phenomenon have so far failed to completely capture the observed phenomena. Here we present a thermodynamic analysis for the melting of metal nanoparticles in terms of their internal energy and a scale dependent surface tension proposed by Tolman. The resulting model predicts the scale dependence of the latent heat of melting and is confirmed using published data for tin and aluminum.

  4. Using satellite and reanalysis data to evaluate the representation of latent heating in extratropical cyclones in a climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawcroft, Matt; Dacre, Helen; Forbes, Richard; Hodges, Kevin; Shaffrey, Len; Stein, Thorwald

    2016-06-01

    Extratropical cyclones are a key feature of the weather in the extratropics, which climate models need to represent in order to provide reliable projections of future climate. Extratropical cyclones produce significant precipitation and the associated latent heat release can play a major role in their development. This study evaluates the ability of a climate model, HiGEM, to represent latent heating in extratropical cyclones. Remote sensing data is used to investigate the ability of both the climate model and ERA-Interim (ERAI) reanalysis to represent extratropical cyclone cloud features before latent heating itself is assessed. An offline radiance simulator, COSP, and the ISCCP and CloudSat datasets are used to evaluate comparable fields from HiGEM and ERAI. HiGEM is found to exhibit biases in the cloud structure of extratropical cyclones, with too much high cloud produced in the warm conveyor belt region compared to ISCCP. Significant latent heating occurs in this region, derived primarily from HiGEM's convection scheme. ERAI is also found to exhibit biases in cloud structure, with more clouds at lower altitudes than those observed in ISCCP in the warm conveyor belt region. As a result, latent heat release in ERAI is concentrated at lower altitudes. CloudSat indicates that much precipitation may be produced at too low an altitude in both HiGEM and ERAI, particularly ERAI, and neither capture observed variability in precipitation intensity. The potential vorticity structure in composite extratropical cyclones in HiGEM and ERAI is also compared. A more pronounced tropopause ridge evolves in HiGEM on the leading edge of the composite as compared to ERAI. One future area of research to be addressed is what impact these biases in the representation of latent heating have on climate projections produced by HiGEM. The biases found in ERAI indicate caution is required when using reanalyses to study cloud features and precipitation processes in extratropical cyclones or

  5. Variability of the latent heat flux in the Amazon over ten years of use and occupation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, D. N.; Ballester, M. V.; Andrade, R. G.; Victoria, R. L.

    2012-12-01

    An alternative to determine the latent heat flux, which is the amount of energy available for evapotranspiration, is the use of data obtained by remote sensing. Among the models that use these data, the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land - SEBAL (Bastiaanssen et al., 1998) has been increasing and has become widely used because it determines the evapotranspiration from the bullet full of radiation and energy on the surface land, using remote sensing data and a few additional data collected by surface weather station, as wind speed and temperature. This study aimed to evaluate the spatial variability of the latent heat flux according to the change of use and land cover. Thus, the algorithm was used to determine the SEBAL latent heat flux rate defined as the latent heat transferred from the surface due to the evaporation process or obtained by simple evaporation difference between the radiation balance, the heat flow in the soil and latent heat flux: (λET=RN-G-H). Where the value of the latent heat instantaneous flow, ie., its value at the time of satellite passage. To determine the latent heat flux were used Landsat 5 TM orbit and point 231/068 the following dates: 06/08/1999, 11/08/2001, 13/07/2005 and 09/08/2009.The study area is located in the central region of the Rondonia state in the Brazilian Amazon. This region has undergone an accelerated process of land use and soil in the last 30 years, which caused significant replacement of forest areas for other classes land use practices, mainly as grazing and agriculture.The results show that the area where the latent heat flux was greater decreased over ten years in analysis due to reduction of forest areas (Figure 1).These results show the latent heat flux in Rondônia in a very dry period, which is in July and August. Due to the long drought period, the topsoil dries faster and areas that are covered by pastures and agriculture have lower evapotranspiration values due to the root system are smaller and do

  6. Evolution of Latent Heating Profiles in Two MC3E MCSs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleeby, S. M.; Marinescu, P. J.; van den Heever, S. C.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) can be separated into convective and stratiform regions, with each region being associated with characteristic microphysical processes. As such, latent heating that occurs within convective and stratiform regions also has distinct vertical profiles. The latent heating in MCSs plays an important role in the (1) redistribution of energy and moisture from near the Earth's surface to the upper atmosphere, (2) generation of buoyancy forcing for updrafts and downdrafts, and (3) creation of pressure waves that can propagate away from the MCS and alter the surrounding environment. During the various stages of an MCS's lifecycle, the latent heating vertical profiles within the convective and stratiform regions can change. To provide details on these dynamic latent heating profiles, results from two MCS simulations will be presented. Three-dimensional, cloud-resolving model simulations are performed using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to represent two MCS events from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E), which occurred in Spring 2011 in the Southern Great Plains of the United States. Comparisons of simulations against observations demonstrate that both simulations capture many features of the observed MC3E MCS events very well, such as precipitation, cold pool strength, and MCS cloud structure. Precipitation regions within these simulations are broken up into convective and stratiform regions using a convective-stratiform separation algorithm. Region-specific latent heating vertical profiles are assessed both as averages over the simulation and as a function of time. In the middle and upper troposphere, convective region warming from latent heating decreases in magnitude throughout the MCS lifecycle, while stratiform warming increases in magnitude in a more confined region between 4 and 8 kilometers above the surface. In the lower troposphere, cooling from latent heating is dominant in both

  7. [Dynamics of sensible and latent heat fluxes over a temperate desert steppe ecosystem in Inner Mongolia].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo; Zhou, Guang-Sheng; Yang, Fu-Lin

    2010-03-01

    This paper studied the diurnal and seasonal characteristics of sensible and latent heat fluxes over a temperate desert steppe ecosystem in Inner Mongolia, based on the 2008 observation data from eddy covariance tower. The diurnal patterns of sensible and latent heat fluxes over the ecosystem were both single kurtosis, with the maximum value being 319.01 W x m(-2) (on May 30th, 2008) and 425.37 W x m(-2) (on Jun 2nd, 2008), respectively, and occurred at about 12:00-13:30 (local time), which was similar to the diurnal pattern of net radiation but lagged about one hour of the maximum net radiation. The maximum diurnal variations of monthly mean sensible and latent heat fluxes occurred in May and June, and their minimum diurnal variations occurred in January and November, respectively. There was a closer relationship between soil moisture content and precipitation. Surface soil moisture content was most sensitive to precipitation, while the moisture content in deeper soil layers had a lagged response to precipitation. The seasonal dynamics of sensible and latent heat fluxes was similar to that of net radiation, and affected by precipitation. Sensible heat flux was obviously affected by net radiation, but latent heat flux was more sensitive to precipitation and mainly controlled by soil moisture content.

  8. Active latent heat storage with a screw heat exchanger - experimental results for heat transfer and concept for high pressure steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipf, Verena; Willert, Daniel; Neuhäuser, Anton

    2016-05-01

    An innovative active latent heat storage concept was invented and developed at Fraunhofer ISE. It uses a screw heat exchanger (SHE) for the phase change during the transport of a phase change material (PCM) from a cold to a hot tank or vice versa. This separates heat transfer and storage tank in comparison to existing concepts. A test rig has been built in order to investigate the heat transfer coefficients of the SHE during melting and crystallization of the PCM. The knowledge of these characteristics is crucial in order to assess the performance of the latent heat storage in a thermal system. The test rig contains a double shafted SHE, which is heated or cooled with thermal oil. The overall heat transfer coefficient U and the convective heat transfer coefficient on the PCM side hPCM both for charging and discharging have been calculated based on the measured data. For charging, the overall heat transfer coefficient in the tested SHE was Uch = 308 W/m2K and for discharging Udis = 210 W/m2K. Based on the values for hPCM the overall heat transfer coefficients for a larger SHE with steam as heat transfer fluid and an optimized geometry were calculated with Uch = 320 W/m2K for charging and Udis = 243 W/m2K for discharging. For pressures as high as p = 100 bar, an SHE concept has been developed, which uses an organic fluid inside the flight of the SHE as working media. With this concept, the SHE can also be deployed for very high pressure, e.g. as storage in solar thermal power plants.

  9. Fundamental Properties of TBAF Clathrate for Usage as a Latent Heat Storage at a Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushima, Takanari; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Takao, Shingo; Yabe, Akira

    For promotion of further energy conservation, development of a coolant with a higher heat capacity regulated around a room temperature is strongly required. As a candidate of such a new coolant, we employ the clathrate hydrate, i.e., a mixture of Tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride (TBAF) and water. This clathrate hydrate is composed of the micro crystals with an order of 100 μm in dimension. It retains fluidity and melting point at a room temperature of about 25 °C. Moreover, the melting point is able to be controlled between 25 °C and 0 °C by changing the concentration of TBAF. The temperature can be regulated by its latent heat at the melting point. Characteristics such as the latent heat and the crystal structure of the clathrate have been experimentally obtained to confirm the feasibility for its usage as the latent heat storage around a room temperature.

  10. A numerical study of the performance of latent heat storage for solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, A. D.

    1985-12-01

    The structure and theoretical foundation of a simulation code for heat transfer and storage in an idealized storage module which forms part of a Brayton cycle solar power system are described. The underlying physical system is shown, and the advantages, drawbacks, and possible pitfalls of latent heat thermal energy storage are discussed. Some possible designs of a latent heat thermal energy storage module are examined. Preliminary results obtained by using analytical approximations which are crucial to 'homing in' on potential system configurations are reported and examined using the simulation code.

  11. Correlation between the latent heats and cohesive energies of metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starace, Anne K.; Neal, Colleen M.; Cao, Baopeng; Jarrold, Martin F.; Aguado, Andrés; López, José M.

    2008-10-01

    Dissociation energies have been determined for Aln+ clusters (n=25-83) using a new experimental approach that takes into account the latent heat of melting. According to the arguments presented here, the cohesive energies of the solidlike clusters are made up of contributions from the dissociation energies of the liquidlike clusters and the latent heats for melting. The size-dependent variations in the measured dissociation energies of the liquidlike clusters are small and the variations in the cohesive energies of solidlike clusters result almost entirely from variations in the latent heats for melting. To compare with the measured cohesive energies, density-functional theory has been used to search for the global minimum energy structures. Four groups of low energy structures were found: Distorted decahedral fragments, fcc fragments, fcc fragments with stacking faults, and "disordered." For most cluster sizes, the measured and calculated cohesive energies are strongly correlated. The calculations show that the variations in the cohesive energies (and the latent heats) result from a combination of geometric and electronic shell effects. For some clusters an electronic shell closing is responsible for the enhanced cohesive energy and latent heat (e.g., n =37), while for others (e.g., n =44) a structural shell closing is the cause.

  12. Numerical study of finned heat pipe-assisted latent heat thermal energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiari, Saeed; Qiu, Songgang; Mahdavi, Mahboobe

    2014-11-01

    In the present study the thermal characteristics of a finned heat pipe-assisted latent heat thermal energy storage system are investigated numerically. A transient two dimensional finite volume based model employing enthalpy-porosity technique is implemented to analyze the performance of a thermal energy storage unit with square container and high melting temperature phase change material. The effects of heat pipe spacing, fin length and numbers as well as the influence of natural convection on the thermal response of the thermal energy storage unit have been studied. The obtained results reveal that the natural convection has considerable effect on the melting process of the phase change material. Increasing the number of heat pipes leads to the increase of melting rate and the decrease of base wall temperature. Also, the increase of fin length results in the decrease of temperature difference within the phase change material in the container, providing more uniform temperature distribution. Furthermore, it is showed that the number of fins does not affect the performance of the system considerably.

  13. Heat release rate properties of wood-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, D.L.

    1983-07-01

    A background to the present heat release rate calorimetry is presented. Heat release rates and cumulative heat release were measured for 16 different lumber and wood products, using three different heat release rate instruments. The effects of moisture content, exposure heat flux, density of product, and fire retardant on rate of heat release were measured. The three small-scale heat release rate calorimeters were compared, and equations relating the data from each were developed.

  14. Resistance heating releases structural adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glemser, N. N.

    1967-01-01

    Composite adhesive package bonds components together for testing and enables separation when testing is completed. The composite of adhesives, insulation and a heating element separate easily when an electrical current is applied.

  15. Experimental investigation of the latent heat of vaporization in aqueous nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soochan; Phelan, Patrick E. Dai, Lenore; Prasher, Ravi; Gunawan, Andrey; Taylor, Robert A.

    2014-04-14

    This paper reports an experimental investigation of the latent heat of vaporization (h{sub fg}) in nanofluids. Two different types of nanoparticles, graphite and silver, suspended in deionized water were exposed to a continuous laser beam (130 mW, 532 nm) to generate boiling. The latent heat of vaporization in the nanofluids was determined by the measured vapor mass generation and the heat input. To ensure that the measured h{sub fg} values are independent of heating method, the experiments were repeated with an electrically heated hot wire as a primary heat input. These experiments show considerable variation in the h{sub fg} of nanofluids. That is, graphite nanofluid exhibits an increased h{sub fg} and silver nanofluid shows a decrease in h{sub fg} compared to the value for pure water. As such, these results indicate that relatively low mass fractions of nanoparticles can apparently create large changes in h{sub fg}.

  16. Investigation of a eutectic mixture of sodium acetate trihydrate and urea as latent heat storage

    SciTech Connect

    Jing-Hua Li; Gui-En Zhang; Jin-Yun Wang )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the pseudobinary system CH{sub 3}COONa {times} 3H{sub 2}O{bond}CO(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} is studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Its eutectic mixture is found to melt congruently at 30C, its heat of fusion is 200.5 J/g, considering the temperature of phase change and its heat storage capacity. This eutectic mixture is an excellent material for latent heat storage of solar energy.

  17. Melting Heat Transfer Characteristics of Latent Heat Microcapsule-Water Mixed Slurry Flowing in a Pipe with Constant Wall Heat Flux (Experimental Study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Kim, Myoung-Jun; Horibe, Akihiko

    The present experiments have been performed for obtaining the melting heat transfer characteristics of micro-encapsulated solid-liquid phase change material and water mixed slurry flow in a circular tube heated with constant wall heat flux. The phase change material having a low melting point was selected for a domestic cooling system in the present study. The governing parameters were found to be latent heat material concentration,heat,flux,and the slurry velocity. The experimental results revealed that the mean heat transfer coefficient of latent microcapsule slurry was about l.3~l.8 times greater than that of the single phase of water. Moreover the effectiveness of heat transfer coefficient to friction factor had a maximum at latent heat material concentration of 25%.

  18. Basic Research on a Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage by Direct Contact Melting and Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Akihiro; Saito, Akio; Utaka, Yoshio; Okuda, Kenichi; Katayama, Kozo

    A basic experimental research on a latent heat thermal energy storage system, utilizing a simple and effective heat exchange mechanism by a direct contact between the phase change material (PCM) and the heat transfer fluid (HTF) , was shown. In this report, authors proposed the direct contact latent heat thermal energy storage system using industrial paraffin and n-Eicosane as the PCM, and using water as the HTF. The observations were performed concerning the HTF separation from the solid PCM in the solidification process (heat discharging process), and concerning the water pass formation within the solid PCM. Then, it was confirmed that the system worked effectively by using n-Eicosane as the PCM. And authors discussed the mechanism of direct contact solidification process from experimental results.

  19. Basic Research on a Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage by Direct Contact Melting and Soldification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Akihiro; Saito, Akio; Utaka, Yoshio; Okuda, Kenichi; Katayama, Kozo

    A basic experimental research on a latent heat thermal energy storage system , utilizing a simple and effective heat exchange mechanism by a direct contact between the phase change material (PCM) and the heat transfer fluid (HTF), was shown. Discharging experiments on direct contact latent heat thermal energy reservoir using n-Eicosane as the PCM and water as the HTF, were performed, based on the conditions obtained in previous report. Then, operating conditions for suitable discharging process were searched from the experimental results (outlet water temperature response and local temperature response in the reservoir). Moreover, solidification mechanisms of PCM, which had been presumed in previous report, were confirmed from these experimental results, and the simple physical model on direct contact heat exchange in the reservoir was proposed. Then, the outlet water temperature response by this model was compared with the experimental results.

  20. Simulation and evaluation of latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigmon, T. W.

    1980-01-01

    The relative value of thermal energy storage (TES) for heat pump storage (heating and cooling) as a function of storage temperature, mode of storage (hotside or coldside), geographic locations, and utility time of use rate structures were derived. Computer models used to simulate the performance of a number of TES/heat pump configurations are described. The models are based on existing performance data of heat pump components, available building thermal load computational procedures, and generalized TES subsystem design. Life cycle costs computed for each site, configuration, and rate structure are discussed.

  1. Joseph Black, carbon dioxide, latent heat, and the beginnings of the discovery of the respiratory gases.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2014-06-15

    The discovery of carbon dioxide by Joseph Black (1728-1799) marked a new era of research on the respiratory gases. His initial interest was in alkalis such as limewater that were thought to be useful in the treatment of renal stone. When he studied magnesium carbonate, he found that when this was heated or exposed to acid, a gas was evolved that he called "fixed air" because it had been combined with a solid material. He showed that the new gas extinguished a flame, that it could not support life, and that it was present in gas exhaled from the lung. Within a few years of his discovery, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen were also isolated. Thus arguably Black's work started the avalanche of research on the respiratory gases carried out by Priestley, Scheele, Lavoisier, and Cavendish. Black then turned his attention to heat and he was the first person to describe latent heat, that is the heat added or lost when a liquid changes its state, for example when water changes to ice or steam. Latent heat is a key concept in thermal physiology because of the heat lost when sweat evaporates. Black was a friend of the young James Watt (1736-1819) who was responsible for the development of early steam engines. Watt was puzzled why so much cooling was necessary to condense steam into water, and Black realized that the answer was the latent heat. The resulting improvements in steam engines ushered in the Industrial Revolution.

  2. Joseph Black, carbon dioxide, latent heat, and the beginnings of the discovery of the respiratory gases.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2014-06-15

    The discovery of carbon dioxide by Joseph Black (1728-1799) marked a new era of research on the respiratory gases. His initial interest was in alkalis such as limewater that were thought to be useful in the treatment of renal stone. When he studied magnesium carbonate, he found that when this was heated or exposed to acid, a gas was evolved that he called "fixed air" because it had been combined with a solid material. He showed that the new gas extinguished a flame, that it could not support life, and that it was present in gas exhaled from the lung. Within a few years of his discovery, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen were also isolated. Thus arguably Black's work started the avalanche of research on the respiratory gases carried out by Priestley, Scheele, Lavoisier, and Cavendish. Black then turned his attention to heat and he was the first person to describe latent heat, that is the heat added or lost when a liquid changes its state, for example when water changes to ice or steam. Latent heat is a key concept in thermal physiology because of the heat lost when sweat evaporates. Black was a friend of the young James Watt (1736-1819) who was responsible for the development of early steam engines. Watt was puzzled why so much cooling was necessary to condense steam into water, and Black realized that the answer was the latent heat. The resulting improvements in steam engines ushered in the Industrial Revolution. PMID:24682452

  3. Daily evapotranspiration estimates by scaling instantaneous latent heat flux derived from a two-source model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Radiometric brightness temperature can be used in energy balance models that estimate sensible and latent heat fluxes of the land surface. However, brightness temperature is usually available only at one time of day when acquired from aircraft, fine-scale satellite platforms, or infrared thermometer...

  4. The Measurement of the Specific Latent Heat of Fusion of Ice: Two Improved Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, S. Y.; Chun, C. K. W.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests two methods for measuring the specific latent heat of ice fusion for high school physics laboratories. The first method is an ice calorimeter which is made from simple materials. The second method improves the thermal contact and allows for a more accurate measurement. Lists instructions for both methods. (Author/YDS)

  5. Robust estimates of soil moisture and latent heat flux coupling strength obtained from triple collocation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land surface models (LSMs) are often applied to predict the one-way coupling strength between surface soil moisture (SM) and surface latent heat (LH) flux. However, the ability of LSMs to accurately represent such coupling has not been adequately established. Likewise, the estimation of one-way SM/L...

  6. Microphysical Contributions to the Latent Heating Structures of Midlatitude and Tropical Storms and Feedbacks to Storm Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heever, S. C.; Saleeby, S. M.; Herbener, S.; Storer, R. L.; Seigel, R. B.; Igel, A. L.; Sheffield, A. M.; McGee, C. J.; Igel, M. R.; Grant, L. D.; Clavner, M.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Berg, W. K.

    2012-12-01

    Latent heating associated with phase changes is a fundamental cloud process, and is influenced by both the microphysical and dynamical characteristics of the cloud system. As such, the structure of latent heating tends to be a function of the vertical profile, as well as of cloud type. Furthermore, changes to the latent heating can induce significant changes to the intensity of the cloud system, which in turn can have feedbacks on the microphysical processes and precipitation production of such storms. In spite of the importance of latent heating across a broad range of cloud systems, few direct measurements of this field are made routinely on a global basis. Nearly all current large-scale retrieval schemes depend heavily on some form of cloud resolving model simulations. With the development and design of future satellite and radar systems, it is hoped that more direct measurements of latent heat may become possible. However, in the meantime, it appears that one of our most appropriate tools to examine latent heating is cloud resolving models with sophisticated cloud microphysical schemes. The goal of the research to be presented is to examine the variations in the magnitude and distribution of latent heating across a range of different storm types, the role of different microphysical processes in explaining such variations, and the feedbacks between latent heating and dynamics in the organization of such systems. In particular, these characteristics will be examined for extratropical cyclones, squall lines and deep tropical convection. The goal will be achieved by examining a suite of numerical simulations of these storm systems conducted using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Recent developments to the model code allow for the evaluation of the contributions made by each microphysical process to the latent heating throughout the model domain. Insights into the importance of different microphysical processes in explaining the vertical and

  7. A Semi-parametric Multivariate Gap-filling Model for Eddy Covariance Latent Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Chen, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative descriptions of latent heat fluxes are important to study the water and energy exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The eddy covariance approaches have been recognized as the most reliable technique for measuring surface fluxes over time scales ranging from hours to years. However, unfavorable micrometeorological conditions, instrument failures, and applicable measurement limitations may cause inevitable flux gaps in time series data. Development and application of suitable gap-filling techniques are crucial to estimate long term fluxes. In this study, a semi-parametric multivariate gap-filling model was developed to fill latent heat flux gaps for eddy covariance measurements. Our approach combines the advantages of a multivariate statistical analysis (principal component analysis, PCA) and a nonlinear interpolation technique (K-nearest-neighbors, KNN). The PCA method was first used to resolve the multicollinearity relationships among various hydrometeorological factors, such as radiation, soil moisture deficit, LAI, and wind speed. The KNN method was then applied as a nonlinear interpolation tool to estimate the flux gaps as the weighted sum latent heat fluxes with the K-nearest distances in the PCs’ domain. Two years, 2008 and 2009, of eddy covariance and hydrometeorological data from a subtropical mixed evergreen forest (the Lien-Hua-Chih Site) were collected to calibrate and validate the proposed approach with artificial gaps after standard QC/QA procedures. The optimal K values and weighting factors were determined by the maximum likelihood test. The results of gap-filled latent heat fluxes conclude that developed model successful preserving energy balances of daily, monthly, and yearly time scales. Annual amounts of evapotranspiration from this study forest were 747 mm and 708 mm for 2008 and 2009, respectively. Nocturnal evapotranspiration was estimated with filled gaps and results are comparable with other studies

  8. Experimental simulation of latent heat thermal energy storage and heat pipe thermal transport for dish concentrator solar receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, R.; Zimmerman, W. F.; Poon, P. T. Y.

    1981-01-01

    Test results on a modular simulation of the thermal transport and heat storage characteristics of a heat pipe solar receiver (HPSR) with thermal energy storage (TES) are presented. The HPSR features a 15-25 kWe Stirling engine power conversion system at the focal point of a parabolic dish concentrator operating at 827 C. The system collects and retrieves solar heat with sodium pipes and stores the heat in NaF-MgF2 latent heat storage material. The trials were run with a single full scale heat pipe, three full scale TES containers, and an air-cooled heat extraction coil to replace the Stirling engine heat exchanger. Charging and discharging, constant temperature operation, mixed mode operation, thermal inertial, etc. were studied. The heat pipe performance was verified, as were the thermal energy storage and discharge rates and isothermal discharges.

  9. Extracellular heat shock protein HSP90{beta} secreted by MG63 osteosarcoma cells inhibits activation of latent TGF-{beta}1

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Shigeki; Kulkarni, Ashok B.

    2010-07-30

    Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) is secreted as a latent complex, which consists of latency-associated peptide (LAP) and the mature ligand. The release of the mature ligand from LAP usually occurs through conformational change of the latent complex and is therefore considered to be the first step in the activation of the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway. So far, factors such as heat, pH changes, and proteolytic cleavage are reportedly involved in this activation process, but the precise molecular mechanism is still far from clear. Identification and characterization of the cell surface proteins that bind to LAP are important to our understanding of the latent TGF-{beta} activation process. In this study, we have identified heat shock protein 90 {beta} (HSP90{beta}) from the cell surface of the MG63 osteosarcoma cell line as a LAP binding protein. We have also found that MG63 cells secrete HSP90{beta} into extracellular space which inhibits the activation of latent TGF-{beta}1, and that there is a subsequent decrease in cell proliferation. TGF-{beta}1-mediated stimulation of MG63 cells resulted in the increased cell surface expression of HSP90{beta}. Thus, extracellular HSP90{beta} is a negative regulator for the activation of latent TGF-{beta}1 modulating TGF-{beta} signaling in the extracellular domain. -- Research highlights: {yields} Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) is secreted as a latent complex. {yields} This complex consists of latency-associated peptide (LAP) and the mature ligand. {yields} The release of the mature ligand from LAP is the first step in TGF-{beta} activation. {yields} We identified for the first time a novel mechanism for this activation process. {yields} Heat shock protein 90 {beta} is discovered as a negative regulator for this process.

  10. Latent Heat storage characteristics of solid-liquid phase change Heat Storage Microcapsule Slurry by Boiling Heat Transfer under a Vacuum Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Horibe, Akihiko; Haruki, Naoto; Katayama, Masatoshi; Manabe, Ken

    Recently, the new heat transfer medium, which fulfills both functions of heat storage and heat transportation, has been developed in ah eat storage field. Solid-liquid latent heat microcapsule slurry would correspond to the topical medium, so-called functionally thermal fluid. The preset study has clarified the latent heat storage characteristics of microcapsule slurry by making heat transfer enlargement with the help of slurry water pool boiling phenomenon. The paraffin wax at a melting point of 62°C was used as a phase change material which was packed into the microcapsule. The heating surface temperature and concentration of paraffin in the microcapsule slurry was selected as experimental parameters. As a result, the non-dimensional correlation equations of heat storage completion time and heat transfer were derived in terms of non-dimensional parameters.

  11. Combining Satellite Microwave Radiometer and Radar Observations to Estimate Atmospheric Latent Heating Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.; Shie, Chung-Lin; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    In this study, satellite passive microwave sensor observations from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) are utilized to make estimates of latent + eddy sensible heating rates (Q1-QR) in regions of precipitation. The TMI heating algorithm (TRAIN) is calibrated, or "trained" using relatively accurate estimates of heating based upon spaceborne Precipitation Radar (PR) observations collocated with the TMI observations over a one-month period. The heating estimation technique is based upon a previously described Bayesian methodology, but with improvements in supporting cloud-resolving model simulations, an adjustment of precipitation echo tops to compensate for model biases, and a separate scaling of convective and stratiform heating components that leads to an approximate balance between estimated vertically-integrated condensation and surface precipitation. Estimates of Q1-QR from TMI compare favorably with the PR training estimates and show only modest sensitivity to the cloud-resolving model simulations of heating used to construct the training data. Moreover, the net condensation in the corresponding annual mean satellite latent heating profile is within a few percent of the annual mean surface precipitation rate over the tropical and subtropical oceans where the algorithm is applied. Comparisons of Q1 produced by combining TMI Q1-QR with independently derived estimates of QR show reasonable agreement with rawinsonde-based analyses of Q1 from two field campaigns, although the satellite estimates exhibit heating profile structure with sharper and more intense heating peaks than the rawinsonde estimates. 2

  12. Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage: Effect of Metallic Mesh Size on Storage Time and Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuja, S. Z.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2015-11-01

    Use of metallic meshes in latent heat thermal storage system shortens the charging time (total melting of the phase change material), which is favorable in practical applications. In the present study, effect of metallic mesh size on the thermal characteristics of latent heat thermal storage system is investigated. Charging time is predicted for various mesh sizes, and the influence of the amount of mesh material on the charging capacity is examined. An experiment is carried out to validate the numerical predictions. It is found that predictions of the thermal characteristics of phase change material with presence of metallic meshes agree well with the experimental data. High conductivity of the metal meshes enables to transfer heat from the edges of the thermal system towards the phase change material while forming a conduction tree in the system. Increasing number of meshes in the thermal system reduces the charging time significantly due to increased rate of conduction heat transfer in the thermal storage system; however, increasing number of meshes lowers the latent heat storage capacity of the system.

  13. A study on cooling characteristics of clathrate compound as low temperature latent heat storage material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Oh; Kim, Jin Heung; Chung, Nak Kyu

    2007-07-01

    Materials that can store low temperature latent heat are organic/inorganic chemicals, eutectic salt system and clathrate compound. Clathrate compound is the material that host compound in hydrogen bond forms cage and guest compound is included into it and combined. Crystallization of hydrate is generated at higher temperature than that of ice from pure water. And physical properties according to temperature are stable and congruent melting phenomenon is occurred without phase separation and it has relatively high latent heat. But clathrate compound still has supercooling problem occurred in the course of phase change and supercooling should be minimized because it affects efficiency of equipment very much. Therefore, various studies on additives to restrain this or heat storage methods are needed. Supercooling is the phenomenon that low temperature thermal storage material is not crystallized and existed as liquid for some time under phase change temperature. Because phase change into solid is delayed and it is existed as liquid due to this, heat transfer from low temperature thermal storage material is lowered. Therefore it is not crystallized at original phase change temperature and crystallized after cooled as much as supercooling degree and operation time of refrigerator is increased. In this study was investigated the cooling characteristics of the clathrate compound as a low temperature latent heat storage material. And additive was added to clathrate compound and its supercooling restrain effect was studied experimentally.

  14. Imprint of the ENSO on rainfall and latent heating variability over the Southern South China Sea from TRMM observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Ke

    2016-04-01

    Analyses of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) datasets revealed a prominent interannual variation in the convective-stratiform rainfall and latent heating over the southern South China Sea (SCS) during the winter monsoon between 1998 and 2010. Although the height of maximum latent heating remained nearly constant at around 7 km in all of the years, the year-to-year changes in the magnitudes of maximum latent heating over the region were noticeable. The interannual variations of the convective- stratiform rainfall and latent heating over the southern SCS were highly anti-correlated with the Niño-3 index, with more (less) rainfall and latent heating during La Niña (El Niño) years. Analysis of the large-scale environment revealed that years of active rainfall and latent heating corresponded to years of large deep convergence and relative humidity at 600 hPa. The moisture budget diagnosis indicated that the interannual variation of humidity at 600 hPa was largely modulated by the vertical moisture advection. The year-to-year changes in rainfall over the southern SCS were mainly caused by the interannual variations of the dynamic component associated with anomalous upward motions in the middle troposphere, while the interannual variations of the thermodynamic component associated with changes in surface specific humidity played a minor role. Larger latent heating over the southern SCS during La Niña years may possibly further enhance the local Hadley circulation over the SCS in the wintertime.

  15. Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Gorski, Anthony J.; Schertz, William W.

    1982-01-01

    A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

  16. Copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for latent heat storage

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gibbs, P. J.; Withey, E. A.; Coker, E. N.; Kruizenga, A. M.; Andraka, C. E.

    2016-06-21

    The systematic development of microstructure, solidification characteristics, and heat of solidification with composition in copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for thermal energy storage is presented. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to relate the thermal characteristics to microstructural development in the investigated alloys and clarifies the location of one of the terminal three-phase eutectics. Repeated thermal cycling highlights the thermal storage stability of the transformation through multiple melting events. In conclusion, two near-terminal eutectic alloys display high enthalpies of solidification, relatively narrow melting ranges, and stable transformation hysteresis behaviors suited to thermal energy storage.

  17. Copper-Silicon-Magnesium Alloys for Latent Heat Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, P. J.; Withey, E. A.; Coker, E. N.; Kruizenga, A. M.; Andraka, C. E.

    2016-06-01

    The systematic development of microstructure, solidification characteristics, and heat of solidification with composition in copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for thermal energy storage is presented. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to relate the thermal characteristics to microstructural development in the investigated alloys and clarifies the location of one of the terminal three-phase eutectics. Repeated thermal cycling highlights the thermal storage stability of the transformation through multiple melting events. Two near-terminal eutectic alloys display high enthalpies of solidification, relatively narrow melting ranges, and stable transformation hysteresis behaviors suited to thermal energy storage.

  18. A neural network to retrieve the mesoscale instantaneous latent heat flux over oceans from SSM/I observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourras, D.; Eymard, L.; Liu, W. T.

    2000-01-01

    The turbulent latent and sensible heat fluxes are necessary to study heat budget of the upper ocean or initialize ocean general circulation models. In order to retrieve the latent heat flux from satellite observations authors mostly use a bulk approximation of the flux whose parameters are derived from different instrument. In this paper, an approach based on artificial neural networks is proposed and compared to the bulk method on a global data set and 3 local data sets.

  19. Peptide Synthesis through Cell-Free Expression of Fusion Proteins Incorporating Modified Amino Acids as Latent Cleavage Sites for Peptide Release.

    PubMed

    Liutkus, Mantas; Fraser, Samuel A; Caron, Karine; Stigers, Dannon J; Easton, Christopher J

    2016-05-17

    Chlorinated analogues of Leu and Ile are incorporated during cell-free expression of peptides fused to protein, by exploiting the promiscuity of the natural biosynthetic machinery. They then act as sites for clean and efficient release of the peptides simply by brief heat treatment. Dehydro analogues of Leu and Ile are similarly incorporated as latent sites for peptide release through treatment with iodine under cold conditions. These protocols complement enzyme-catalyzed methods and have been used to prepare calcitonin, gastrin-releasing peptide, cholecystokinin-7, and prolactin-releasing peptide prohormones, as well as analogues substituted with unusual amino acids, thus illustrating their practical utility as alternatives to more traditional chemical peptide synthesis. PMID:26918308

  20. The study of latent heat transport characteristics by solid particles and saccharide solution mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Shin-ichi; Hayamizu, Yasutaka; Inaba, Hideo

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study is the development of latent heat transport system by using the mixture of the minute latent heat storage materials and the saccharine solution as medium. The experimental studies are carried out by the evaluation of viscosity and pressure loss in a pipe. Polyethylene (P.E.) is selected as the dispersed minute material that has closeness density (920kg/m3) of ice (917kg/m3). D-sorbitol and D-xylose solutions are picked as continuum phase of the test mixture. The concentration of D-sorbitol solution is set 48mass% from measured results of saturation solubility and the melting point. 40mass% solution of D-xylose is selected as the other test continuum phase. The non-ion surfactant, EA157 Dai-ichiseiyaku CO. Ltd, is used in order to prevent of dispersed P.E. powder cohere. The pressure loss of test mixture is measured by the straight circular pipe that has smooth inner surface. The measuring length for pressure loss is 1000 mm, and the inner diameter of pipe is 15mm. The accuracy of experiment apparatus for measuring pressure loss is within ±5%. The pressure loss data is estimated by the relationship between the heat transport ratio and the required pump power. It is clarified that the optimum range of mixing ratio exists over 10mass% of latent heat storage material.

  1. Latent Heating Retrieval from TRMM Observations Using a Simplified Thermodynamic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.

    2003-01-01

    A procedure for the retrieval of hydrometeor latent heating from TRMM active and passive observations is presented. The procedure is based on current methods for estimating multiple-species hydrometeor profiles from TRMM observations. The species include: cloud water, cloud ice, rain, and graupel (or snow). A three-dimensional wind field is prescribed based on the retrieved hydrometeor profiles, and, assuming a steady-state, the sources and sinks in the hydrometeor conservation equations are determined. Then, the momentum and thermodynamic equations, in which the heating and cooling are derived from the hydrometeor sources and sinks, are integrated one step forward in time. The hydrometeor sources and sinks are reevaluated based on the new wind field, and the momentum and thermodynamic equations are integrated one more step. The reevalution-integration process is repeated until a steady state is reached. The procedure is tested using cloud model simulations. Cloud-model derived fields are used to synthesize TRMM observations, from which hydrometeor profiles are derived. The procedure is applied to the retrieved hydrometeor profiles, and the latent heating estimates are compared to the actual latent heating produced by the cloud model. Examples of procedure's applications to real TRMM data are also provided.

  2. Convective and Stratiform Precipitation Processes and their Relationship to Latent Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Steve; Zeng, Xiping; Shige, Shoichi; Takayabu, Yukari

    2009-01-01

    The global hydrological cycle is central to the Earth's climate system, with rainfall and the physics of its formation acting as the key links in the cycle. Two-thirds of global rainfall occurs in the Tropics. Associated with this rainfall is a vast amount of heat, which is known as latent heat. It arises mainly due to the phase change of water vapor condensing into liquid droplets; three-fourths of the total heat energy available to the Earth's atmosphere comes from tropical rainfall. In addition, fresh water provided by tropical rainfall and its variability exerts a large impact upon the structure and motions of the upper ocean layer. An improved convective -stratiform heating (CSH) algorithm has been developed to obtain the 3D structure of cloud heating over the Tropics based on two sources of information: 1) rainfall information, namely its amount and the fraction due to light rain intensity, observed directly from the Precipitation Radar (PR) on board the TRMM satellite and 2) synthetic cloud physics information obtained from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of cloud systems. The cloud simulations provide details on cloud processes, specifically latent heating, eddy heat flux convergence and radiative heating/cooling, that. are not directly observable by satellite. The new CSH algorithm-derived heating has a noticeably different heating structure over both ocean and land regions compared to the previous CSH algorithm. One of the major differences between new and old algorithms is that the level of maximum cloud heating occurs 1 to 1.5 km lower in the atmosphere in the new algorithm. This can effect the structure of the implied air currents associated with the general circulation of the atmosphere in the Tropics. The new CSH algorithm will be used provide retrieved heating data to other heating algorithms to supplement their performance.

  3. Uncertainty in Tropical Ocean Latent Heat Flux Variability During the Last 25 Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, F. R.; Lu, H.-I.; Bosilovich, M. G.; Miller, T. L.

    2007-01-01

    When averaged over the tropical oceans (30deg N/S), latent heat flux anomalies derived from passive microwave satellite measurements as well as reanalyses and climate models driven with specified seal-surface temperatures show considerable disagreement in their decadal trends. These estimates range from virtually no trend to values over 8.4 W/sq m decade. Satellite estimates also tend to have a larger interannual signal related to El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events than do reanalyses or model simulations. An analysis of wind speed and humidity going into bulk aerodynamic calculations used to derive these fluxes reveals several error sources. Among these are apparent remaining intercalibration issues affecting passive microwave satellite 10 m wind speeds and systematic biases in retrieval of near-surface humidity. Likewise, reanalyses suffer from discontinuities in availability of assimilated data that affect near surface meteorological variables. The results strongly suggest that current latent heat flux trends are overestimated.

  4. Spectral Retrieval of Latent Heating Profiles from TRMM PR Data: Comparison of Look-Up Tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shige, Shoichi; Takayabu, Yukari N.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Johnson, Daniel E.; Shie, Chung-Lin

    2003-01-01

    The primary goal of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is to use the information about distributions of precipitation to determine the four dimensional (i.e., temporal and spatial) patterns of latent heating over the whole tropical region. The Spectral Latent Heating (SLH) algorithm has been developed to estimate latent heating profiles for the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) with a cloud- resolving model (CRM). The method uses CRM- generated heating profile look-up tables for the three rain types; convective, shallow stratiform, and anvil rain (deep stratiform with a melting level). For convective and shallow stratiform regions, the look-up table refers to the precipitation top height (PTH). For anvil region, on the other hand, the look- up table refers to the precipitation rate at the melting level instead of PTH. For global applications, it is necessary to examine the universality of the look-up table. In this paper, we compare the look-up tables produced from the numerical simulations of cloud ensembles forced with the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean Response Experiment (COARE) data and the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) data. There are some notable differences between the TOGA-COARE table and the GATE table, especially for the convective heating. First, there is larger number of deepest convective profiles in the TOGA-COARE table than in the GATE table, mainly due to the differences in SST. Second, shallow convective heating is stronger in the TOGA COARE table than in the GATE table. This might be attributable to the difference in the strength of the low-level inversions. Third, altitudes of convective heating maxima are larger in the TOGA COARE table than in the GATE table. Levels of convective heating maxima are located just below the melting level, because warm-rain processes are prevalent in tropical oceanic convective systems. Differences in levels of convective heating maxima probably reflect

  5. Experimental study on latent heat storage characteristics of W/O emulsion -Supercooling rate of dispersed water drops by direct contact heat exchange-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Shin-ichi; Hayamizu, Yasutaka; Horibe, Akihiko; Haruki, Naoto; Inaba, Hideo

    2013-04-01

    Recently, much attention has been paid to investigate the latent heat storage system. Using of ice heat storage system brings an equalization of electric power demand, because it will solved the electric -power-demand-concentration on day-time of summer by the air conditioning. The flowable latent heat storage material, Oil/Water type emulsion, microencapsulated latent heat material-water mixture or ice slurry, etc., is enable to transport the latent heat in a pipe. The flowable latent heat storage material can realize the pipe size reduction and system efficiency improvement. Supercooling phenomenon of the dispersed latent heat storage material in continuous phase brings the obstruction of latent heat storage. The latent heat storage rates of dispersed water drops in W/O (Water/Oil) emulsion are investigated experimentally in this study. The water drops in emulsion has the diameter within 3 ˜ 25μm, the averaged water drop diameter is 7.3μm and the standard deviation is 2.9μm. The direct contact heat exchange method is chosen as the phase change rate evaluation of water drops in W/O emulsion. The supercooled temperature and the cooling rate are set as parameters of this study. The evaluation is performed by comparison between the results of this study and the past research. The obtained experimental result is shown that the 35K or more degree from melting point brings 100% latent heat storage rate of W/O emulsion. It was clarified that the supercooling rate of dispersed water particles in emulsion shows the larger value than that of the bulk water.

  6. A revised surface resistance parameterisation for estimating latent heat flux from remotely sensed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yi; Wang, Jiemin; Yang, Kun; Ma, Mingguo; Li, Xin; Zhang, Zhihui; Wang, Xufeng

    2012-07-01

    Estimating evapotranspiration (ET) is required for many environmental studies. Remote sensing provides the ability to spatially map latent heat flux. Many studies have developed approaches to derive spatially distributed surface energy fluxes from various satellite sensors with the help of field observations. In this study, remote-sensing-based λE mapping was conducted using a Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) image and an Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) image. The remotely sensed data and field observations employed in this study were obtained from Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (WATER). A biophysics-based surface resistance model was revised to account for water stress and temperature constraints. The precision of the results was validated using 'ground truth' data obtained by eddy covariance (EC) system. Scale effects play an important role, especially for parameter optimisation and validation of the latent heat flux (λE). After considering the footprint of EC, the λE derived from the remote sensing data was comparable to the EC measured value during the satellite's passage. The results showed that the revised surface resistance parameterisation scheme was useful for estimating the latent heat flux over cropland in arid regions.

  7. Cold Heat Storage Characteristics of O/W-type Latent Heat Emulsion Including Continuum Phase of Water Treated with a Freezing Point Depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Morita, Shin-Ichi

    This paper deals with flow and cold heat storage characteristics of the oil (tetradecane, C14H30, freezing point 278.9 K, Latent heat 229 kJ/kg)/water emulsion as a latent heat storage material having a low melting point. The test emulsion includes a water-urea solution as a continuum phase. The freezing point depression of the continuum phase permits enhancement of the heat transfer rate of the emulison, due to the large temperature difference between the latent heat storage material and water-urea solution. The velocity of emulsion flow and the inlet temperature of coolant in a coiled double tube heat exchanger are chosen as the experimental parameters. The pressure drop, the heat transfer coefficient of the emulsion in the coiled tube are measured in the temperture region over solid and liquid phase of the latent heat storage material. The finishing time of the cold heat storage is defined experimentally in the range of sensible and latent heat storage. It is clarified that the flow behavior of the emulsion as a non-Newtonian fluid has an important role in cold heat storage. The useful nondimentional correlation equations for the additional pressure loss coefficient, the heat transfer coefficient and the finishing time of the cold heat storage are derived in terms of Dean number and heat capacity ratio.

  8. Latent Heat and Sensible Heat Fluxes Simulation in Maize Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safa, B.

    2015-12-01

    Latent Heat (LE) and Sensible Heat (H) flux are two major components of the energy balance at the earth's surface which play important roles in the water cycle and global warming. There are various methods for their estimation or measurement. Eddy covariance is a direct and accurate technique for their measurement. Some limitations lead to prevention of the extensive use of the eddy covariance technique. Therefore, simulation approaches can be utilized for their estimation. ANNs are the information processing systems, which can inspect the empirical data and investigate the relations (hidden rules) among them, and then make the network structure. In this study, multi-layer perceptron neural network trained by the steepest descent Back-Propagation (BP) algorithm was tested to simulate LE and H flux above two maize sites (rain-fed & irrigated) near Mead, Nebraska. Network training and testing was fulfilled using hourly data of including year, local time of day (DTime), leaf area index (LAI), soil water content (SWC) in 10 and 25 cm depths, soil temperature (Ts) in 10 cm depth, air temperature (Ta), vapor pressure deficit (VPD), wind speed (WS), irrigation and precipitation (P), net radiation (Rn), and the fraction of incoming Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) absorbed by the canopy (fPAR), which were selected from days of year (DOY) 169 to 222 for 2001, 2003, 2005, 2007, and 2009. The results showed high correlation between actual and estimated data; the R² values for LE flux in irrigated and rain-fed sites were 0.9576, and 0.9642; and for H flux 0.8001, and 0.8478, respectively. Furthermore, the RMSE values ranged from 0.0580 to 0.0721 W/m² for LE flux and from 0.0824 to 0.0863 W/m² for H flux. In addition, the sensitivity of the fluxes with respect to each input was analyzed over the growth stages. Thus, the most powerful effects among the inputs for LE flux were identified net radiation, leaf area index, vapor pressure deficit, wind speed, and for H

  9. A method to model latent heat for transient analysis using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harder, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    A sample heat transfer analysis is demonstrated which includes the heat of fusion. The method can be used to analyze a system with nonconstant specific heat. The enthalpy is introduced as an independent degree of freedom at each node. The user input consists of a curve of temperature as a function of enthalpy, which may include a constant temperature phase change. The basic NASTRAN heat transfer capability is used to model the effects of latent heat with existing direct matrix output and nonlinear load data cards. Although some user care is required, the numerical stability of the integration is quite good when the given recommendations are followed. The theoretical equations used and the NASTRAN techniques are shown.

  10. Modeling the Daly Gap: The Influence of Latent Heat Production in Controlling Magma Extraction and Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, B. K.; Ghiorso, M. S.; Bachmann, O.; Dufek, J.

    2011-12-01

    A century-old issue in volcanology is the origin of the gap in chemical compositions observed in magmatic series on ocean islands and arcs - the "Daly Gap". If the gap forms during differentiation from a mafic parent, models that predict the dynamics of magma extraction as a function of chemical composition must simulate a process that results in volumetrically biased, bimodal compositions of erupted magmas. The probability of magma extraction is controlled by magma dynamical processes, which have a complex response to magmatic heat evolution. Heat loss from the magmatic system is far from a simple, monotonic function of time. It is modified by the crystallization sequence, chamber margin heat flux, and is buffered by latent heat production. We use chemical and thermal calculations of MELTS (Ghiorso & Sack, 1995) as input to the physical model of QUANTUM (Dufek & Bachmann, 2010) to predict crystallinity windows of most probable magma extraction. We modeled two case studies: volcanism on Tenerife, Canary Islands, and the Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) of Campi Flegrei, Italy. Both preserve a basanitic to phonolitic lineage and have comparable total alkali concentrations; however, CI has high and Tenerife has low K2O/Na2O. Modeled thermal histories of differentiation for the two sequences contrast strongly. In Tenerife, the rate of latent heat production is almost always greater than sensible heat production, with spikes in the ratio of latent to sensible heats of up to 40 associated with the appearance of Fe-Ti oxides at near 50% crystallization. This punctuated heat production must cause magma temperature change to stall or slow in time. The extended time spent at ≈50% crystallinity, associated with dynamical processes that enhance melt extraction near 50% crystallinity, suggests the magma composition at this interval should be common. In Tenerife, the modeled composition coincides with that of the first peak in the bimodal frequency-composition distribution. In our

  11. Comparison of chemical and heating methods to enhance latent fingerprint deposits on thermal paper.

    PubMed

    Bond, John W

    2014-03-01

    A comparison is made of proprietary methods to develop latent fingerprint deposits on the inked side of thermal paper using either chemical treatment (Thermanin) or the application of heat to the paper (Hot Print System). Results with a trial of five donors show that the application of heat produces statistically significantly more fingerprint ridge detail than the chemical treatment for both fingerprint deposits aged up to 4 weeks and for a nine sequence depletion series. Subjecting the thermal paper to heat treatment with the Hot Print System did not inhibit subsequent ninhydrin chemical development of fingerprint deposits on the noninked side of the paper. A further benefit of the application of heat is the rapid development of fingerprint deposits (less than a minute) compared with up to 12 h for the Thermanin chemical treatment. PMID:24673413

  12. Comparison of chemical and heating methods to enhance latent fingerprint deposits on thermal paper.

    PubMed

    Bond, John W

    2014-03-01

    A comparison is made of proprietary methods to develop latent fingerprint deposits on the inked side of thermal paper using either chemical treatment (Thermanin) or the application of heat to the paper (Hot Print System). Results with a trial of five donors show that the application of heat produces statistically significantly more fingerprint ridge detail than the chemical treatment for both fingerprint deposits aged up to 4 weeks and for a nine sequence depletion series. Subjecting the thermal paper to heat treatment with the Hot Print System did not inhibit subsequent ninhydrin chemical development of fingerprint deposits on the noninked side of the paper. A further benefit of the application of heat is the rapid development of fingerprint deposits (less than a minute) compared with up to 12 h for the Thermanin chemical treatment.

  13. Helium release from radioisotope heat sources

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.E.; Early, J.W.; Starzynski, J.S.; Land, C.C.

    1984-05-01

    Diffusion of helium in /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuel was characterized as a function of the heating rate and the fuel microstructure. The samples were thermally ramped in an induction furnace and the helium release rates measured with an automated mass spectrometer. The diffusion constants and activation energies were obtained from the data using a simple diffusion model. The release rates of helium were correlated with the fuel microstructure by metallographic examination of fuel samples. The release mechanism consists of four regimes, which are dependent upon the temperature. Initially, the release is controlled by movement of point defects combined with trapping along grain boundaries. This regime is followed by a process dominated by formation and growth of helium bubbles along grain boundaries. The third regime involves volume diffusion controlled by movement of oxygen vacancies. Finally, the release at the highest temperatures follows the diffusion rate of intragranular bubbles. The tendency for helium to be trapped within the grain boundaries diminishes with small grain sizes, slow thermal pulses, and older fuel.

  14. Thermophysical Properties of Fluid Latent Heat Storage Material using Urea-Water Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokamura, Taku; Ohkubo, Hidetoshi; Ashizawa, Kiyonori

    This study is concerned with the measurement of thermophysical properties of a urea-water mixture with the aim of adopting the mixture as a latent heat storage material for air-conditioning systems. The urea-water mixture is made of natural substances and has a good fluidity. The urea concentration in the mixture was controlled by measuring the refractive index of the mixture. Being a multi-component substance, a urea-water solution has a liquid-solid co-existent phase on a phase-diagram. Therefore, the liquidus temperature was measured to establish a relationship between the fraction of the solid-phase and temperature. Furthermore, apparent values of specific heat and coefficient of viscosity were measured in the two-phase region where the solid phase is ice. The apparent specific heat and coefficient of viscosity were measure by using an adiabatic calorimeter and a stirring torque meter respectively. The results revealed that the urea-water mixture can probably be used as a latent heat storage material of good fluidity.

  15. Joule heat release during current flow through a nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantsevich, S. V.; Gurevich, V. L.

    2016-08-01

    Joule heat release during current flow through a fine wire connecting two bulk electrodes (two contacts) is considered. The irreversible heat release symmetric in the absence of electron-phonon coupling becomes asymmetric if this coupling is taken into account. The Joule heat release appears larger in that symmetric contact which lies along the carrier drift velocity.

  16. Evaluation and Application of Satellite-Based Latent Heating Profile Estimation Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Grecu, Mircea; Yang, Song; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, methods for estimating atmospheric latent heating vertical structure from both passive and active microwave remote sensing have matured to the point where quantitative evaluation of these methods is the next logical step. Two approaches for heating algorithm evaluation are proposed: First, application of heating algorithms to synthetic data, based upon cloud-resolving model simulations, can be used to test the internal consistency of heating estimates in the absence of systematic errors in physical assumptions. Second, comparisons of satellite-retrieved vertical heating structures to independent ground-based estimates, such as rawinsonde-derived analyses of heating, provide an additional test. The two approaches are complementary, since systematic errors in heating indicated by the second approach may be confirmed by the first. A passive microwave and combined passive/active microwave heating retrieval algorithm are evaluated using the described approaches. In general, the passive microwave algorithm heating profile estimates are subject to biases due to the limited vertical heating structure information contained in the passive microwave observations. These biases may be partly overcome by including more environment-specific a priori information into the algorithm s database of candidate solution profiles. The combined passive/active microwave algorithm utilizes the much higher-resolution vertical structure information provided by spaceborne radar data to produce less biased estimates; however, the global spatio-temporal sampling by spaceborne radar is limited. In the present study, the passive/active microwave algorithm is used to construct a more physically-consistent and environment-specific set of candidate solution profiles for the passive microwave algorithm and to help evaluate errors in the passive algorithm s heating estimates. Although satellite estimates of latent heating are based upon instantaneous, footprint- scale data, suppression

  17. Computational modeling of latent-heat-storage in PCM modified interior plaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fořt, Jan; Maděra, Jiří; Trník, Anton; Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-06-01

    The latent heat storage systems represent a promising way for decrease of buildings energy consumption with respect to the sustainable development principles of building industry. The presented paper is focused on the evaluation of the effect of PCM incorporation on thermal performance of cement-lime plasters. For basic characterization of the developed materials, matrix density, bulk density, and total open porosity are measured. Thermal conductivity is accessed by transient impulse method. DSC analysis is used for the identification of phase change temperature during the heating and cooling process. Using DSC data, the temperature dependent specific heat capacity is calculated. On the basis of the experiments performed, the supposed improvement of the energy efficiency of characteristic building envelope system where the designed plasters are likely to be used is evaluated by a computational analysis. Obtained experimental and computational results show a potential of PCM modified plasters for improvement of thermal stability of buildings and moderation of interior climate.

  18. Evaporative cooling: effective latent heat of evaporation in relation to evaporation distance from the skin.

    PubMed

    Havenith, George; Bröde, Peter; den Hartog, Emiel; Kuklane, Kalev; Holmer, Ingvar; Rossi, Rene M; Richards, Mark; Farnworth, Brian; Wang, Xiaoxin

    2013-03-15

    Calculation of evaporative heat loss is essential to heat balance calculations. Despite recognition that the value for latent heat of evaporation, used in these calculations, may not always reflect the real cooling benefit to the body, only limited quantitative data on this is available, which has found little use in recent literature. In this experiment a thermal manikin, (MTNW, Seattle, WA) was used to determine the effective cooling power of moisture evaporation. The manikin measures both heat loss and mass loss independently, allowing a direct calculation of an effective latent heat of evaporation (λeff). The location of the evaporation was varied: from the skin or from the underwear or from the outerwear. Outerwear of different permeabilities was used, and different numbers of layers were used. Tests took place in 20°C, 0.5 m/s at different humidities and were performed both dry and with a wet layer, allowing the breakdown of heat loss in dry and evaporative components. For evaporation from the skin, λeff is close to the theoretical value (2,430 J/g) but starts to drop when more clothing is worn, e.g., by 11% for underwear and permeable coverall. When evaporation is from the underwear, λeff reduction is 28% wearing a permeable outer. When evaporation is from the outermost layer only, the reduction exceeds 62% (no base layer), increasing toward 80% with more layers between skin and wet outerwear. In semi- and impermeable outerwear, the added effect of condensation in the clothing opposes this effect. A general formula for the calculation of λeff was developed.

  19. Effects of latent heating on driving atmospheric circulation of brown dwarfs and directly imaged giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xianyu; Showman, Adam P.

    2015-12-01

    Growing observations of brown dwarfs (BDs) and directly imaged extrasolar giant planets (EGPs), such as brightness variability and surface maps have provided evidence for strong atmospheric circulation on these worlds. Previous studies that serve to understand the atmospheric circulation of BDs include modeling of convection from the interior and its interactions with stably stratified atmospheres. These models show that such interactions can drive an atmospheric circulation, forming zonal jets and/or vortices. However, these models are dry, not including condensation of various chemical species. Latent heating from condensation of water has previously been shown to play an important role on driving the zonal jets on four giant planets in our solar system. As such, condensation cycles of various chemical species are believed to be an important source in driving the atmospheric circulation of BDs and directly imaged EGPs. Here we present results from three-dimensional simulations for the atmospheres of BDs and EGPs based on a general circulation model that includes the effect of a condensate cycle. Large-scale latent heating and molecular weight effect due to condensation of a single species are treated explicitly. We examine the circulation patterns caused by large-scale latent heating which results from condensation of silicate vapor in hot dwarfs and water vapor in the cold dwarfs. By varying the abundance of condensable vapor and the radiative timescale, we conclude that under normal atmospheric conditions of BDs (hot and thus with relatively short radiative timescale), latent heating alone by silicate vapor is unable to drive a global circulation, leaving a quiescent atmosphere, because of the suppression to moist instability by downward transport of dry air. Models with relatively long radiative timescale, which may be the case for cooler bodies, tend to maintain an active hydrological cycle and develop zonal jets. Once condensation happens, storms driven by

  20. Phase Change Characteristics of a Nanoemulsion as a Latent Heat Storage Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumoto, Koji; Sato, Noriaki; Kawaji, Masahiro; Kawanami, Tsuyoshi; Inamura, Takao

    2014-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the fundamental phase change characteristics of a nanoemulsion using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Tetradecane, which has a slightly higher melting point than water, was utilized as the phase change material for the nanoemulsion. The melting point of the nanoemulsion, the melting peak temperature, and latent heat were examined in detail. Regarding the fundamental phase change characteristics of the nanoemulsion, it was found that its phase change characteristics were strongly affected by the temperature-scanning rate of the DSC. Moreover, it was confirmed that the phase change behavior does not change with repeated solidification and melting.

  1. A methodology for mapping forest latent heat flux densities using remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Lars L.; Congalton, Russell G.

    1988-01-01

    Surface temperatures and reflectances of an upper elevation Sierran mixed conifer forest were monitored using the Thematic Mapper Simulator sensor during the summer of 1985 in order to explore the possibility of using remote sensing to determine the distribution of solar energy on forested watersheds. The results show that the method is capable of quantifying the relative energy allocation relationships between the two cover types defined in the study. It is noted that the method also has the potential to map forest latent heat flux densities.

  2. Relation between sensible and latent heat fluxes in the Mediterranean and precipitation in the Greek area during winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolis, C. J.; Bartzokas, A.; Katsoulis, B. D.

    2004-11-01

    The variability of sensible and latent heat fluxes in the Mediterranean Sea and their effect on precipitation in the Greek area during the winter months are investigated for the 39 year period 1959-97 by using multivariate statistical methods. First, factor analysis is applied, mainly as a data reduction tool, and then canonical correlation analysis is applied on the factor scores time series of the two pairs, i.e. sensible heat flux-precipitation and latent heat flux-precipitation, to reveal their interrelations. The results show there is a statistically significant relationship between sensible and latent heat fluxes over the western Mediterranean Sea and precipitation in the western windward areas of Greece. The sensible and latent heat fluxes in the western Mediterranean Sea contribute significantly to depression development. The depressions formed advect cold and dry air masses over the western Mediterranean, reinforcing these sensible and latent heat fluxes. Furthermore, these depressions lead to a southerly or southwesterly airflow over Greece. This flow, along with the existence of potential instability, significantly contributes to precipitation formation in the windward areas of western Greece and also in the islands of the eastern Aegean Sea.

  3. Latent heat at the first order phase transition point of SU(3) gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirogane, Mizuki; Ejiri, Shinji; Iwami, Ryo; Kanaya, Kazuyuki; Kitazawa, Masakiyo; WHOT-QCD Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    We calculate the energy gap (latent heat) and pressure gap between the hot and cold phases of the SU(3) gauge theory at the first order deconfining phase transition point. We perform simulations around the phase transition point with the lattice size in the temporal direction Nt=6 , 8 and 12 and extrapolate the results to the continuum limit. We also investigate the spatial volume dependence. The energy density and pressure are evaluated by the derivative method with nonperturabative anisotropy coefficients. We adopt a multipoint reweighting method to determine the anisotropy coefficients. We confirm that the anisotropy coefficients approach the perturbative values as Nt increases. We find that the pressure gap vanishes at all values of Nt when the nonperturbative anisotropy coefficients are used. The spatial volume dependence in the latent heat is found to be small on large lattices. Performing extrapolation to the continuum limit, we obtain Δ ɛ /T4=0.75 ±0.17 and Δ (ɛ -3 p )/T4=0.623 ±0.056 .

  4. A Wind-Driven, Hybrid Latent and Sensible Heat Coastal Polynya at Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, D.; Fukamachi, Y.; Watanabe, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Mahoney, A. R.; Eicken, H.; Shimizu, D.; Ohshima, K. I.; Tamura, T.

    2014-12-01

    The nature of the Barrow Coastal Polynya (BCP) formed off the Alaska Coast in winter is examined using mooring data (temperature, salinity, and ocean current), atmospheric re-analysis data (ERA-Interim), and AMSR-E-derived sea-ice concentration and production data (Iwamoto et al., 2014). Previously, the BCP has been considered to be a latent heat polynya formed by predominantly offshore winds resulting in sea-ice divergence. Recently, it has been suggested that the sea-ice production rate in the BCP is suppressed by warm Pacific- or Atlantic-origin waters distributed beneath the BCP (e.g. Itoh et al., 2012). In this study, we focus on the oceanographic conditions such as water mass distribution and ocean current structure beneath the BCP, which have not been fully documented. A mooring was deployed off Barrow, Alaska in the northeast Chukchi Sea (71.23°N, 157.65°W, water depth 55 m) from August 2009 to July 2010. During the freeze-up period from December to May, five BCP events occurred in the same manner; 1) dominant wind parallel to Barrow Canyon, with an offshore component near Barrow, 2) high sea-ice production followed by sudden cessation of ice growth, 3) upwelling of warm (>2 K above freezing point) and saline (>34) Atlantic Water (AW) beneath the BCP, 4) strong up-canyon flow (>100cm/s) associated with density fluctuations. A baroclinic current structure, established after the upwelling, resulted in enhanced vertical shear, promoting vertical mixing. The mixing event and open water formation occurred simultaneously, once sea-ice production had stopped. Thus, mixing events accompanied by ocean heat flux from AW into the surface layer were likely to form/maintain the open water area that is a sensible heat polynya. The transition from a latent to a sensible heat polynya was well reproduced by a pan-Arctic ice-ocean model (COCO). We propose that the BCP is a hybrid latent and sensible heat polynya, with both processes driven by the same offshore wind.

  5. Combined solar heat and power system with a latent heat storage - system simulations for an economic assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipf, Verena; Neuhäuser, Anton

    2016-05-01

    Decentralized solar combined heat and power (CHP) systems can be economically feasible, especially when they have a thermal storage. In such systems, heat provided by solar thermal collectors is used to generate electricity and useful heat for e.g. industrial processes. For the supply of energy in times without solar irradiation, a thermal storage can be integrated. In this work, the performance of a solar CHP system using an active latent heat storage with a screw heat exchanger is investigated. Annual yield calculations are conducted in order to calculate annual energy gains and, based on them; economic assumptions are used to calculated economic numbers in order to assess the system performance. The energy savings of a solar system, compared to a system with a fossil fuel supply, are calculated. Then the net present value and the dynamic payback are calculated with these savings, the initial investment costs and the operational costs. By interpretation and comparison of these economic numbers, an optimum system design in terms of solar field size and storage size was determined. It has been shown that the utilization of such systems can be economical in remote areas without gas and grid connection. Optimal storage design parameters in terms of the temperature differences in the heat exchanger and the storage capacity have been determined which can further increase the net present value of such system.

  6. Analyzing consistency of interannual variability in air-sea sensible and latent heat fluxes in CMIP5 model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serykh, Ilya; Gulev, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    Surface turbulent heat fluxes are critically important in climate model experiments, since they represent a language of communication of the ocean and atmosphere. Interannual variability of surface turbulent heat fluxes is believed to be the major contributor to the changes in the ocean surface heat balance, at least in mid latitudes. Being relatively well assessed and validated in reanalyses, surface turbulent heat fluxes always were of a lesser attention in diagnostics of climate model experiments. We analysed interannual variability of sensible and latent heat fluxes in historical climate simulations with several CMIP5 models. Variability in surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes in model simulations has been analysed during several last decades (from 1950s to 2005) with the emphasis on different scales of variability (short-term, interannual, decadal). At all scales has been found a little consistency between the changes in turbulent surface fluxes diagnosed by reanalyses and blended data sets (OA-FLUX) on one hand and model simulations on the other. Furthermore, some models (e.g. ECHAM, IPSL) surprisingly demonstrate large regions with negative correlations between sensible and latent heat fluxes, which is not the case in observational data sets (reanalyses and OAFLUX). Interestingly, variability in air temperature and surface humidity (which could be potentially considered as the reason for autocorrelation between sensible and latent fluxes) demonstrates consistency with each other at most scales. Further we discuss potential reasons for the discovered phenomenon.

  7. Passive and Active Microwave Remote Sensing of Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions in the Tropics from TRMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Yang, Song; Haddad, Ziad S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wang, Yansen; Lang, Stephen E.; Braun, Scott A.; Chiu, Christine; Wang, Jian-Jian

    2002-01-01

    Passive and active microwave remote sensing data are analyzed to identify signatures of precipitation and vertical motion in tropical convection. A database of cloud/radiative model simulations is used to quantify surface rain rates and latent heating profiles that are consistent with these signatures. At satellite footprint-scale (approximately 10 km), rain rate and latent heating estimates are subject to significant random errors, but by averaging the estimates in space and time, random errors are substantially reduced, Bias errors have been minimized by improving the microphysics in the supporting cloud/radiative model simulations, and by imposing a consistent definition of remotely-sensed and model-simulated convective/stratiform rain coverage. Remotely-sensed precipitation and latent heating distributions in the tropics are derived from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and Special Sensor Microwave/ Imager (SSM/ I) sensor data. The prototype Version 6 TRMM passive microwave algorithm typically yields average heating profiles with maxima between 6 and 7 km altitude for organized mesoscale convective systems. Retrieved heating profiles for individual convective systems are compared to coincident estimates based upon a combination of dual-Doppler radar and rawinsonde data. Also, large-scale latent heating distributions are compared to estimates derived from a simpler technique that utilizes observations of surface rain rate and stratiform rain proportion to infer vertical heating structure. Results of these tests will be presented at the conference.

  8. Latent heat induced rotation limited aggregation in 2D ice nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Bampoulis, Pantelis; Siekman, Martin H; Kooij, E Stefan; Lohse, Detlef; Zandvliet, Harold J W; Poelsema, Bene

    2015-07-21

    The basic science responsible for the fascinating shapes of ice crystals and snowflakes is still not understood. Insufficient knowledge of the interaction potentials and the lack of relevant experimental access to the growth process are to blame for this failure. Here, we study the growth of fractal nanostructures in a two-dimensional (2D) system, intercalated between mica and graphene. Based on our scanning tunneling spectroscopy data, we provide compelling evidence that these fractals are 2D ice. They grow while they are in material contact with the atmosphere at 20 °C and without significant thermal contact to the ambient. The growth is studied in situ, in real time and space at the nanoscale. We find that the growing 2D ice nanocrystals assume a fractal shape, which is conventionally attributed to Diffusion Limited Aggregation (DLA). However, DLA requires a low mass density mother phase, in contrast to the actual currently present high mass density mother phase. Latent heat effects and consequent transport of heat and molecules are found to be key ingredients for understanding the evolution of the snow (ice) flakes. We conclude that not the local availability of water molecules (DLA), but rather them having the locally required orientation is the key factor for incorporation into the 2D ice nanocrystal. In combination with the transport of latent heat, we attribute the evolution of fractal 2D ice nanocrystals to local temperature dependent rotation limited aggregation. The ice growth occurs under extreme supersaturation, i.e., the conditions closely resemble the natural ones for the growth of complex 2D snow (ice) flakes and we consider our findings crucial for solving the "perennial" snow (ice) flake enigma. PMID:26203037

  9. Latent heat induced rotation limited aggregation in 2D ice nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bampoulis, Pantelis; Siekman, Martin H.; Kooij, E. Stefan; Lohse, Detlef; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Poelsema, Bene

    2015-07-01

    The basic science responsible for the fascinating shapes of ice crystals and snowflakes is still not understood. Insufficient knowledge of the interaction potentials and the lack of relevant experimental access to the growth process are to blame for this failure. Here, we study the growth of fractal nanostructures in a two-dimensional (2D) system, intercalated between mica and graphene. Based on our scanning tunneling spectroscopy data, we provide compelling evidence that these fractals are 2D ice. They grow while they are in material contact with the atmosphere at 20 °C and without significant thermal contact to the ambient. The growth is studied in situ, in real time and space at the nanoscale. We find that the growing 2D ice nanocrystals assume a fractal shape, which is conventionally attributed to Diffusion Limited Aggregation (DLA). However, DLA requires a low mass density mother phase, in contrast to the actual currently present high mass density mother phase. Latent heat effects and consequent transport of heat and molecules are found to be key ingredients for understanding the evolution of the snow (ice) flakes. We conclude that not the local availability of water molecules (DLA), but rather them having the locally required orientation is the key factor for incorporation into the 2D ice nanocrystal. In combination with the transport of latent heat, we attribute the evolution of fractal 2D ice nanocrystals to local temperature dependent rotation limited aggregation. The ice growth occurs under extreme supersaturation, i.e., the conditions closely resemble the natural ones for the growth of complex 2D snow (ice) flakes and we consider our findings crucial for solving the "perennial" snow (ice) flake enigma.

  10. Materials compatibility in Dish-Stirling solar generators using Cu-Si-Mg eutectic for latent heat storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruizenga, A. M.; Withey, E. A.; Andraka, C. E.; Gibbs, P. J.

    2016-05-01

    Dish-Stirling systems are a strong candidate to meet cost production goals for solar thermal power production. Thermal energy storage improves the capacity factor of thermal power systems; copper-silicon-magnesium eutectic alloys have been investigated as potential latent heat storage materials. This work examines the ability of commercially available plasma spray coatings to serve as protective barriers with these alloys, while highlighting mechanistic insights into materials for latent heat storage systems. Computed tomography was leveraged as a rapid screening tool to assess the presence of localized attack in tested coatings.

  11. Novel functional materials from renewable lipids: Amphiphilic antimicrobial polymers and latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floros, Michael Christopher

    Vegetable oils represent an ideal and renewable feedstock for the synthesis of a variety of functional materials. However, without financial incentive or unique applications motivating a switch, commercial products continue to be manufactured from petrochemical resources. Two different families of high value, functional materials synthesized from vegetable oils were studied. These materials demonstrate superior and unique performance to comparable petrochemical analogues currently on the market. In the first approach, 3 amphiphilic thermoplastic polytriazoles with differing lipophilic segment lengths were synthesized in a polymerization process without solvents or catalysts. Investigation of monomer structure influence on the resultant functional behaviour of these polymers found distinctive odd/even behaviour reliant on the number of carbon atoms in the monomers. Higher concentrations of triazole groups, due to shorter CH2 chains in the monomeric dialkynes, resulted in more brittle polymers, displaying higher tensile strengths but reduced elongation to break characteristics. These polymers had similar properties to commercial petroleum derived thermoplastics. One polymer demonstrated self-assembled surface microstructuring, and displayed hydrophobic properties. Antimicrobial efficacy of the polymers were tested by applying concentrated bacterial solutions to the surfaces, and near complete inhibition was demonstrated after 4 hours. Scanning electron microscope images of killed bacteria showed extensive membrane damage, consistent with the observed impact of other amphiphilic compounds in literature. These polytriazoles are suited for applications in medical devices and implants, where major concerns over antibiotic resistance are prevalent. In the second approach, a series of symmetric, saturated diester phase change materials (PCMs) were also synthesized with superior latent heat values compared to commercial petrochemical analogues. These diesters exhibit

  12. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefrois, R. T.; Knowles, G. R.; Mathur, A. K.; Budimir, J.

    1979-01-01

    Active heat exchange concepts for use with thermal energy storage systems in the temperature range of 250 C to 350 C, using the heat of fusion of molten salts for storing thermal energy are described. Salt mixtures that freeze and melt in appropriate ranges are identified and are evaluated for physico-chemical, economic, corrosive and safety characteristics. Eight active heat exchange concepts for heat transfer during solidification are conceived and conceptually designed for use with selected storage media. The concepts are analyzed for their scalability, maintenance, safety, technological development and costs. A model for estimating and scaling storage system costs is developed and is used for economic evaluation of salt mixtures and heat exchange concepts for a large scale application. The importance of comparing salts and heat exchange concepts on a total system cost basis, rather than the component cost basis alone, is pointed out. The heat exchange concepts were sized and compared for 6.5 MPa/281 C steam conditions and a 1000 MW(t) heat rate for six hours. A cost sensitivity analysis for other design conditions is also carried out.

  13. Development of latent fingerprints on thermal paper by the controlled application of heat.

    PubMed

    Bond, John W

    2013-05-01

    Apparatus to produce a spatially and temporally uniform heat source is described and this is used to visualize latent fingerprints deposited onto thermal paper by raising the temperature of the paper. Results show an improvement over previous research when fingerprint deposits are aged or the developed fingerprints faint; visualization being enhanced by the use of a blue LED light source of 465 nm peak wavelength. An investigation of the components in fingerprint sweat likely to affect the solubility and hence color change of the dye present in the thermal paper has shown that polar protic solvents able to donate a proton are favored and a polar amino acid found commonly in eccrine fingerprint sweat (lysine) has been shown able to produce the desired color change. Aged fingerprint deposits on thermal paper from a variety of sources up to 4 years old have been visualized with this technique. PMID:23550933

  14. The sensitivity of latent heat flux to the air humidity approximations used in ocean circulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Niiler, Pearn P.

    1990-01-01

    In deriving the surface latent heat flux with the bulk formula for the thermal forcing of some ocean circulation models, two approximations are commonly made to bypass the use of atmospheric humidity in the formula. The first assumes a constant relative humidity, and the second supposes that the sea-air humidity difference varies linearly with the saturation humidity at sea surface temperature. Using climatological fields derived from the Marine Deck and long time series from ocean weather stations, the errors introduced by these two assumptions are examined. It is shown that the errors reach above 100 W/sq m over western boundary currents and 50 W/sq m over the tropical ocean. The two approximations also introduce erroneous seasonal and spatial variabilities with magnitudes over 50 percent of the observed variabilities.

  15. Development of latent fingerprints on thermal paper by the controlled application of heat.

    PubMed

    Bond, John W

    2013-05-01

    Apparatus to produce a spatially and temporally uniform heat source is described and this is used to visualize latent fingerprints deposited onto thermal paper by raising the temperature of the paper. Results show an improvement over previous research when fingerprint deposits are aged or the developed fingerprints faint; visualization being enhanced by the use of a blue LED light source of 465 nm peak wavelength. An investigation of the components in fingerprint sweat likely to affect the solubility and hence color change of the dye present in the thermal paper has shown that polar protic solvents able to donate a proton are favored and a polar amino acid found commonly in eccrine fingerprint sweat (lysine) has been shown able to produce the desired color change. Aged fingerprint deposits on thermal paper from a variety of sources up to 4 years old have been visualized with this technique.

  16. A Numerical Study of a Double Pipe Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabassum, Tonny

    Solar energy is an intermittent supply source of energy. To efficiently utilize this free renewable energy source some form of thermal energy storage devices are necessary. Phase change materials (PCMs), because of their high energy density storage capacity and near isothermal phase change characteristics, have proven to be promising candidates for latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) devices. Among the various LHTES devices for low temperature residential heating and cooling applications, the shell-and-tube type heat exchanging devices are the most simple to operate and can be easily fabricated. This work numerically investigates the buoyancy driven heat transfer process during melting (charging) of a commercial paraffin wax as PCM filling the annulus of a horizontal double pipe heat exchanger. The heated working fluid (water) is passing through the central tube of the annulus at a sufficiently high flow-rate and thereby maintaining an almost isothermal wall temperature at the inner pipe which is higher than the melting temperature of the PCM. The transient, two-dimensional coupled laminar momentum and energy equations for the model are suitably non-dimensionalized and are solved numerically using the enthalpy-porosity approach. Time-wise evolutions of the flow patterns and temperature distributions are presented through velocity vector fields and isotherm plots. In this study, two types of PCM filled annuli, a plain annulus and a strategically placed longitudinal finned annulus, are studied. The total energy stored, the total liquid fraction and the energy efficiency at different melting times are evaluated for three different operating conditions and the results are compared between the plain and finned annuli. The present study will provide guidelines for system thermal performance and design optimization of the shell-and-tube LHTES devices. .

  17. Dehumidification: Prediction of Condensate Flow Rate for Plate-Fin Tube Heat Exchangers Using the Latent j Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, V.D.; Chen, D.T.; Conklin, J.C.

    1999-03-15

    Condensate flow rate is an important factor in designing dehumidifiers or evaporators. In this paper, the latentj fimtor is used to analyze the dehumidification performance of two plate-fin tube heat exchangers. This latent j factor, analogous to the total j factor, is a flmction of the mass transfa coefllcient, the volumetric air flow rate, and the Schmidt number. This latent j factor did predict condensate flow rate more directly and accurately than any other sensiblej factor method. The Iatentj factor has been used in the present study because the sensible j factor correlations presented in the literature failed to predict the condensate flow rate at high Reynolds numbers. Results show that the latent j i%ctor em be simply correlated as a fhnction of the Reynolds number based on the tube outside diameter and number of rows of the heat exchanger.

  18. Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions from Satellite Passive Microwave Radiometry. Part 1; Method and Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Yang, Song; Petty, Grant W.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Bell, Thomas L.; Braun, Scott A.; Wang, Yansen; Lang, Stephen E.; Johnson, Daniel E.

    2004-01-01

    A revised Bayesian algorithm for estimating surface rain rate, convective rain proportion, and latent heating/drying profiles from satellite-borne passive microwave radiometer observations over ocean backgrounds is described. The algorithm searches a large database of cloud-radiative model simulations to find cloud profiles that are radiatively consistent with a given set of microwave radiance measurements. The properties of these radiatively consistent profiles are then composited to obtain best estimates of the observed properties. The revised algorithm is supported by an expanded and more physically consistent database of cloud-radiative model simulations. The algorithm also features a better quantification of the convective and non-convective contributions to total rainfall, a new geographic database, and an improved representation of background radiances in rain-free regions. Bias and random error estimates are derived from applications of the algorithm to synthetic radiance data, based upon a subset of cloud resolving model simulations, and from the Bayesian formulation itself. Synthetic rain rate and latent heating estimates exhibit a trend of high (low) bias for low (high) retrieved values. The Bayesian estimates of random error are propagated to represent errors at coarser time and space resolutions, based upon applications of the algorithm to TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) data. Errors in instantaneous rain rate estimates at 0.5 deg resolution range from approximately 50% at 1 mm/h to 20% at 14 mm/h. These errors represent about 70-90% of the mean random deviation between collocated passive microwave and spaceborne radar rain rate estimates. The cumulative algorithm error in TMI estimates at monthly, 2.5 deg resolution is relatively small (less than 6% at 5 mm/day) compared to the random error due to infrequent satellite temporal sampling (8-35% at the same rain rate).

  19. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefrois, R. T.; Mathur, A. K.

    1980-04-01

    Five tasks to select, design, fabricate, test and evaluate candidate active heat exchanger modules for future applications to solar and conventional utility power plants were discussed. Alternative mechanizations of active heat exchange concepts were analyzed for use with heat of fusion phase change materials (PCMs) in the temperature range of 250 to 350 C. Twenty-six heat exchange concepts were reviewed, and eight were selected for detailed assessment. Two candidates were selected for small-scale experimentation: a coated tube and shell heat exchanger and a direct contact reflux boiler. A dilute eutectic mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide was selected as the PCM from over 50 candidate inorganic salt mixtures. Based on a salt screening process, eight major component salts were selected initially for further evaluation. The most attractive major components in the temperature range of 250 to 350 C appeared to be NaNO3, NaNO2, and NaOH. Sketches of the two active heat exchange concepts selected for test are given.

  20. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefrois, R. T.; Mathur, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    Five tasks to select, design, fabricate, test and evaluate candidate active heat exchanger modules for future applications to solar and conventional utility power plants were discussed. Alternative mechanizations of active heat exchange concepts were analyzed for use with heat of fusion phase change materials (PCMs) in the temperature range of 250 to 350 C. Twenty-six heat exchange concepts were reviewed, and eight were selected for detailed assessment. Two candidates were selected for small-scale experimentation: a coated tube and shell heat exchanger and a direct contact reflux boiler. A dilute eutectic mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide was selected as the PCM from over 50 candidate inorganic salt mixtures. Based on a salt screening process, eight major component salts were selected initially for further evaluation. The most attractive major components in the temperature range of 250 to 350 C appeared to be NaNO3, NaNO2, and NaOH. Sketches of the two active heat exchange concepts selected for test are given.

  1. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefrois, R. T.

    1980-03-01

    Alternative mechanizations of active heat exchange concepts were analyzed for use with heat of fusion Phase Change Materials (PCM's) in the temperature range of 250 C to 350 C for solar and conventional power plant applications. Over 24 heat exchange concepts were reviewed, and eight were selected for detailed assessment. Two candidates were chosen for small-scale experimentation: a coated tube and shell that exchanger, and a direct contact reflux boiler. A dilute eutectic mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide was selected as the PCM from over fifty inorganic salt mixtures investigated. Preliminary experiments with various tube coatings indicated that a nickel or chrome plating of Teflon or Ryton coating had promise of being successful. An electroless nickel plating was selected for further testing. A series of tests with nickel-plated heat transfer tubes showed that the solidifying sodium nitrate adhered to the tubes and the experiment failed to meet the required discharge heat transfer rate of 10 kW(t). Testing of the reflux boiler is under way.

  2. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefrois, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Alternative mechanizations of active heat exchange concepts were analyzed for use with heat of fusion Phase Change Materials (PCM's) in the temperature range of 250 C to 350 C for solar and conventional power plant applications. Over 24 heat exchange concepts were reviewed, and eight were selected for detailed assessment. Two candidates were chosen for small-scale experimentation: a coated tube and shell that exchanger, and a direct contact reflux boiler. A dilute eutectic mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide was selected as the PCM from over fifty inorganic salt mixtures investigated. Preliminary experiments with various tube coatings indicated that a nickel or chrome plating of Teflon or Ryton coating had promise of being successful. An electroless nickel plating was selected for further testing. A series of tests with nickel-plated heat transfer tubes showed that the solidifying sodium nitrate adhered to the tubes and the experiment failed to meet the required discharge heat transfer rate of 10 kW(t). Testing of the reflux boiler is under way.

  3. The impact of vertical measurement depth on the information content of soil moisture for latent heat flux estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using ground-based soil moisture and latent/sensible heat fluxes observations acquired from the Ameriflux Network, we calculate the mutual information (MI) content between multiple soil moisture variables and evaporative fraction (EF) to examine the existence of information in vertically-integrated ...

  4. A dual-temperature-difference approach to estimate daytime sensible and latent heat fluxes under advective conditions during BEAREX08

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Dual-Temperature-Difference (DTD) approach uses continuous radiometric surface temperature measurements in a two-source (soil + vegetation) energy balance model to solve for the daytime evolution of the sensible and latent heat fluxes. By using the surface-air temperature difference at two time...

  5. An Empirical Orthogonal Function-Based Algorithm for Estimating Terrestrial Latent Heat Flux from Eddy Covariance, Meteorological and Satellite Observations.

    PubMed

    Feng, Fei; Li, Xianglan; Yao, Yunjun; Liang, Shunlin; Chen, Jiquan; Zhao, Xiang; Jia, Kun; Pintér, Krisztina; McCaughey, J Harry

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of latent heat flux (LE) based on remote sensing data is critical in characterizing terrestrial ecosystems and modeling land surface processes. Many LE products were released during the past few decades, but their quality might not meet the requirements in terms of data consistency and estimation accuracy. Merging multiple algorithms could be an effective way to improve the quality of existing LE products. In this paper, we present a data integration method based on modified empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis to integrate the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LE product (MOD16) and the Priestley-Taylor LE algorithm of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL) estimate. Twenty-two eddy covariance (EC) sites with LE observation were chosen to evaluate our algorithm, showing that the proposed EOF fusion method was capable of integrating the two satellite data sets with improved consistency and reduced uncertainties. Further efforts were needed to evaluate and improve the proposed algorithm at larger spatial scales and time periods, and over different land cover types. PMID:27472383

  6. An Empirical Orthogonal Function-Based Algorithm for Estimating Terrestrial Latent Heat Flux from Eddy Covariance, Meteorological and Satellite Observations.

    PubMed

    Feng, Fei; Li, Xianglan; Yao, Yunjun; Liang, Shunlin; Chen, Jiquan; Zhao, Xiang; Jia, Kun; Pintér, Krisztina; McCaughey, J Harry

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of latent heat flux (LE) based on remote sensing data is critical in characterizing terrestrial ecosystems and modeling land surface processes. Many LE products were released during the past few decades, but their quality might not meet the requirements in terms of data consistency and estimation accuracy. Merging multiple algorithms could be an effective way to improve the quality of existing LE products. In this paper, we present a data integration method based on modified empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis to integrate the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LE product (MOD16) and the Priestley-Taylor LE algorithm of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL) estimate. Twenty-two eddy covariance (EC) sites with LE observation were chosen to evaluate our algorithm, showing that the proposed EOF fusion method was capable of integrating the two satellite data sets with improved consistency and reduced uncertainties. Further efforts were needed to evaluate and improve the proposed algorithm at larger spatial scales and time periods, and over different land cover types.

  7. An Empirical Orthogonal Function-Based Algorithm for Estimating Terrestrial Latent Heat Flux from Eddy Covariance, Meteorological and Satellite Observations

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Fei; Li, Xianglan; Yao, Yunjun; Liang, Shunlin; Chen, Jiquan; Zhao, Xiang; Jia, Kun; Pintér, Krisztina; McCaughey, J. Harry

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of latent heat flux (LE) based on remote sensing data is critical in characterizing terrestrial ecosystems and modeling land surface processes. Many LE products were released during the past few decades, but their quality might not meet the requirements in terms of data consistency and estimation accuracy. Merging multiple algorithms could be an effective way to improve the quality of existing LE products. In this paper, we present a data integration method based on modified empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis to integrate the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LE product (MOD16) and the Priestley-Taylor LE algorithm of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL) estimate. Twenty-two eddy covariance (EC) sites with LE observation were chosen to evaluate our algorithm, showing that the proposed EOF fusion method was capable of integrating the two satellite data sets with improved consistency and reduced uncertainties. Further efforts were needed to evaluate and improve the proposed algorithm at larger spatial scales and time periods, and over different land cover types. PMID:27472383

  8. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J.; Kosson, R.; Haslett, R.

    1980-01-01

    Various active heat exchange concepts were identified from among three generic categories: scrapers, agitators/vibrators and slurries. The more practical ones were given a more detailed technical evaluation and an economic comparison with a passive tube-shell design for a reference application (300 MW sub t storage for 6 hours). Two concepts were selected for hardware development: (1) a direct contact heat exchanger in which molten salt droplets are injected into a cooler counterflowing stream of liquid metal carrier fluid, and (2) a rotating drum scraper in which molten salt is sprayed onto the circumference of a rotating drum, which contains the fluid salt is sprayed onto the circumference of a rotating drum, which contains the fluid heat sink in an internal annulus near the surface. A fixed scraper blade removes the solidified salt from the surface which was nickel plated to decrease adhesion forces. In addition to improving performance by providing a nearly constant transfer rate during discharge, these active heat exchanger concepts were estimated to cost at least 25% less than the passive tube-shell design.

  9. Characterization of Turbulent Latent and Sensible Heat Flux Exchange Between the Atmosphere and Ocean in MERRA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robert, J. Brent; Robertson, Franklin R.; Clayson, Carol Anne; Bosilovich, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture across the atmosphere-ocean interface are fundamental components of the Earth's energy and water balance. Characterizing both the spatiotemporal variability and the fidelity of these exchanges of heat and moisture is critical to understanding the global water and energy cycle variations, quantifying atmosphere-ocean feedbacks, and improving model predictability. This study examines the veracity of the recently completed NASA Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) product with respect to its representation of the surface turbulent heat fluxes. A validation of MERRA turbulent heat fluxes and near-surface bulk variables at local, high-resolution space and time scales is achieved by making comparisons to a large suite of direct observations. Both in situ and satellite-observed gridded surface heat flux estimates are employed to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of the surface fluxes with respect to their annual mean climatologies, their seasonal covariability of near-surface bulk parameters, and their representation of extremes. The impact of data assimilation on the near-surface parameters is assessed through evaluation of incremental analysis update tendencies produced by the assimilation procedure. It is found that MERRA turbulent surface heat fluxes are relatively accurate for typical conditions but have systematically weak vertical gradients in moisture and temperature and have a weaker covariability between the near-surface gradients and wind speed than found in observations. This results in an underestimate of the surface latent and sensible heat fluxes over the western boundary current and storm track regions. The assimilation of observations mostly acts to bring MERRA closer to observational products by increasing moisture and temperature near the surface and decreasing the near-surface wind speeds. The major patterns of spatial and temporal variability of the turbulent heat

  10. Characterization of Turbulent Latent and Sensible Heat Flux Exchange Between the Atmosphere and Ocean in MERRA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. Brent; Robertson, Franklin R.; Clayson, Carol Anne; Bosilovich, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture across the atmosphere-ocean interface are fundamental components of the Earth s energy and water balance. Characterizing both the spatiotemporal variability and the fidelity of these exchanges of heat and moisture is critical to understanding the global water and energy cycle variations, quantifying atmosphere-ocean feedbacks, and improving model predictability. This study examines the veracity of the recently completed NASA Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) product with respect to its representation of the surface turbulent heat fluxes. A validation of MERRA turbulent heat fluxes and near-surface bulk variables at local, high-resolution space and time scales is achieved by making comparisons to a large suite of direct observations. Both in situ and satellite-observed gridded surface heat flux estimates are employed to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of the surface fluxes with respect to their annual mean climatologies, their seasonal covariability of near-surface bulk parameters, and their representation of extremes. The impact of data assimilation on the near-surface parameters is assessed through evaluation of incremental analysis update tendencies produced by the assimilation procedure. It is found that MERRA turbulent surface heat fluxes are relatively accurate for typical conditions but have systematically weak vertical gradients in moisture and temperature and have a weaker covariability between the near-surface gradients and wind speed than found in observations. This results in an underestimate of the surface latent and sensible heat fluxes over the western boundary current and storm track regions. The assimilation of observations mostly acts to bring MERRA closer to observational products by increasing moisture and temperature near the surface and decreasing the near-surface wind speeds. The major patterns of spatial and temporal variability of the turbulent heat

  11. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alario, J.; Haslett, R.

    1980-03-01

    Various active heat exchange concepts were identified from among three generic categories: scrapers, agitators/vibrators and slurries. The more practical ones were given a more detailed technical evaluation and an economic comparison with a passive tube-shell design for a reference application. Two concepts selected for hardware development are a direct contact heat exchanger in which molten salt droplets are injected into a cooler counterflowing stream of liquid metal carrier fluid, and a rotating drum scraper in which molten salt is sprayed onto the circumference of a rotating drum, which contains the fluid heat sink in an internal annulus near the surface. A fixed scraper blade removes the solidified salt from the surface which has been nickel plated to decrease adhesion forces. Suitable phase change material (PCM) storage media with melting points in the temperature range of interest (250 C to 400 C) were investigated. The specific salt recommended for laboratory tests was a chloride eutectic (20.5KCl-24/5 NaCl-55.0MgCl 2% by wt.), with a nominal melting point of 385 C.

  12. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J.; Haslett, R.

    1980-01-01

    Various active heat exchange concepts were identified from among three generic categories: scrapers, agitators/vibrators and slurries. The more practical ones were given a more detailed technical evaluation and an economic comparison with a passive tube-shell design for a reference application. Two concepts selected for hardware development are a direct contact heat exchanger in which molten salt droplets are injected into a cooler counterflowing stream of liquid metal carrier fluid, and a rotating drum scraper in which molten salt is sprayed onto the circumference of a rotating drum, which contains the fluid heat sink in an internal annulus near the surface. A fixed scraper blade removes the solidified salt from the surface which has been nickel plated to decrease adhesion forces. Suitable phase change material (PCM) storage media with melting points in the temperature range of interest (250 C to 400 C) were investigated. The specific salt recommended for laboratory tests was a chloride eutectic (20.5KCl-24/5 NaCl-55.0MgCl 2% by wt.), with a nominal melting point of 385 C.

  13. Transient pipe flow derived by periodic heat release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Zun; Celik, Ismail

    The heat release resulting from chemical reactions in a combustor/tail pipe system usually induces an instability in the gas flow. This instability may lead to a stable periodic motion under certain combinations of combustion heat release and combustor geometry. This paper reports a numerical study of the unsteady (periodic) gas flow which is driven by a periodic heat release prescribed empirically. The one-dimensional transient equations of motion and energy are derived by integration from the more general two-dimensional equations. The combustion heat release is added to the energy equation as a source term. These equations are solved using the explicit, predictor-corrector method of MacCormack. Some predictions are compared with measurements. The effects of the wall friction, heat transfer, and the amplitude and frequency of combustion heat release on the velocity and pressure waves are investigated. The results indicate that pulsation amplitude is a strong function of the heat release rate and it shows a maximum near an equivalence ratio value of one, where the heat release is near its maximum; this is in conformity with the experimental data. A method for calculating the natural operation frequency of pulse combustor is suggested.

  14. Verification of High Resolution Soil Moisture and Latent Heat in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaniego, L. E.; Warrach-Sagi, K.; Zink, M.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    2012-12-01

    Improving our understanding of soil-land-surface-atmosphere feedbacks is fundamental to make reliable predictions of water and energy fluxes on land systems influenced by anthropogenic activities. Estimating, for instance, which would be the likely consequences of changing climatic regimes on water availability and crop yield, requires of high resolution soil moisture. Modeling it at large-scales, however, is difficult and uncertain because of the interplay between state variables and fluxes and the significant parameter uncertainty of the predicting models. At larger scales, the sub-grid variability of the variables involved and the nonlinearity of the processes complicate the modeling exercise even further because parametrization schemes might be scale dependent. Two contrasting modeling paradigms (WRF/Noah-MP and mHM) were employed to quantify the effects of model and data complexity on soil moisture and latent heat over Germany. WRF/Noah-MP was forced ERA-interim on the boundaries of the rotated CORDEX-Grid (www.meteo.unican.es/wiki/cordexwrf) with a spatial resolution of 0.11o covering Europe during the period from 1989 to 2009. Land cover and soil texture were represented in WRF/Noah-MP with 1×1~km MODIS images and a single horizon, coarse resolution European-wide soil map with 16 soil texture classes, respectively. To ease comparison, the process-based hydrological model mHM was forced with daily precipitation and temperature fields generated by WRF during the same period. The spatial resolution of mHM was fixed at 4×4~km. The multiscale parameter regionalization technique (MPR, Samaniego et al. 2010) was embedded in mHM to be able to estimate effective model parameters using hyper-resolution input data (100×100~km) obtained from Corine land cover and detailed soil texture fields for various horizons comprising 72 soil texture classes for Germany, among other physiographical variables. mHM global parameters, in contrast with those of Noah-MP, were

  15. Spatial and temporal variations of the fluxes of carbon dioxide and sensible and latent heat over the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desjardins, R. L.; Schuepp, P. H.; Macpherson, J. I.; Buckley, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Airborne measurements of flux densities of carbon dioxide CO2, sensible heat, and latent heat (H2O) obtained over the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) site during three intensive field campaigns in 1987 and one in 1989 are examined to characterize the spatial and temporal variations of CO2 and energy transfer processes. These data were collected by the National Research Council Twin Otter using low-level flight patterns, all flown at constant pressure altitude during relatively clear days. The spatial variations are larger in 1989 than in 1987 and a higher correlation is observed between the fluxes and the surface features. The temporal patterns are easier to characterize with the relatively homogeneous situation of 1987. Functional relationships obtained between fluxes of CO2 and latent heat, CO2 fluxes and greenness index, latent heat fluxes and greenness index, and between sensible heat fluxes and surface air temperature differences are presented for one day in 1987 and one in 1989 as an example of the kind of information that can be obtained from grid flights at constant pressure altitude.

  16. Spatial and temporal variations of the fluxes of carbon dioxide and sensible and latent heat over the FIFE site

    SciTech Connect

    Desjardins, R.L.; Schuepp, P.H.; Macpherson, J.I.; Buckley, D.J. McGill Univ., Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa Agriculture Canada, Centre for Food and Animal Research, Ottawa )

    1992-11-01

    Airborne measurements of flux densities of carbon dioxide CO2, sensible heat, and latent heat (H2O) obtained over the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) site during three intensive field campaigns in 1987 and one in 1989 are examined to characterize the spatial and temporal variations of CO2 and energy transfer processes. These data were collected by the National Research Council Twin Otter using low-level flight patterns, all flown at constant pressure altitude during relatively clear days. The spatial variations are larger in 1989 than in 1987 and a higher correlation is observed between the fluxes and the surface features. The temporal patterns are easier to characterize with the relatively homogeneous situation of 1987. Functional relationships obtained between fluxes of CO2 and latent heat, CO2 fluxes and greenness index, latent heat fluxes and greenness index, and between sensible heat fluxes and surface air temperature differences are presented for one day in 1987 and one in 1989 as an example of the kind of information that can be obtained from grid flights at constant pressure altitude. 20 refs.

  17. Aircraft- and tower-based fluxes of carbon dioxide, latent, and sensible heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desjardins, R. L.; Hart, R. L.; Macpherson, J. I.; Schuepp, P. H.; Verma, S. B.

    1992-01-01

    Fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and sensible heat obtained over a grassland ecosystem, during the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), using an aircraft- and two tower-based systems are compared for several days in 1987 and in 1989. The tower-based cospectral estimates of CO2, sensible heat, water vapor, and momentum, expressed as a function of wavenumber K times sampling height z, are relatively similar to the aircraft-based estimates for K x z greater than 0.1. A measurable contribution to the fluxes is observed by tower-based systems at K x z less than 0.01 but not by the aircraft-based system operating at an altitude of approximately 100 m over a 15 x 15 km area. Using all available simultaneous aircraft and tower data, flux estimates by both systems were shown to be highly correlated. As expected from the spatial variations of the greenness index, surface extrapolation of airborne flux estimates tended to lie between those of the two tower sites. The average fluxes obtained, on July 11, 1987, and August 4, 1989, by flying a grid pattern over the FIFE site agreed with the two tower data sets for CO2, but sensible and latent heat were smaller than those obtained by the tower-based systems. However, in general, except for a small underestimation due to the long wavelength contributions and due to flux divergence with height, the differences between the aircraft- and tower-based surface estimates of fluxes appear to be mainly attributable to differences in footprint, that is, differences in the area contributing to the surface flux estimates.

  18. Aircraft- and tower-based fluxes of carbon dioxide, latent, and sensible heat

    SciTech Connect

    Desjardins, R.L.; Hart, R.L.; Macpherson, J.I.; Schuepp, P.H.; Verma, S.B. Argonne National Lab., IL National Research Council of Canada, Flight Research Lab., Ottawa McGill Univ., Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue Nebraska Univ., Lincoln )

    1992-11-01

    Fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and sensible heat obtained over a grassland ecosystem, during the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), using an aircraft- and two tower-based systems are compared for several days in 1987 and in 1989. The tower-based cospectral estimates of CO2, sensible heat, water vapor, and momentum, expressed as a function of wavenumber K times sampling height z, are relatively similar to the aircraft-based estimates for K x z greater than 0.1. A measurable contribution to the fluxes is observed by tower-based systems at K x z less than 0.01 but not by the aircraft-based system operating at an altitude of approximately 100 m over a 15 x 15 km area. Using all available simultaneous aircraft and tower data, flux estimates by both systems were shown to be highly correlated. As expected from the spatial variations of the greenness index, surface extrapolation of airborne flux estimates tended to lie between those of the two tower sites. The average fluxes obtained, on July 11, 1987, and August 4, 1989, by flying a grid pattern over the FIFE site agreed with the two tower data sets for CO2, but sensible and latent heat were smaller than those obtained by the tower-based systems. However, in general, except for a small underestimation due to the long wavelength contributions and due to flux divergence with height, the differences between the aircraft- and tower-based surface estimates of fluxes appear to be mainly attributable to differences in footprint, that is, differences in the area contributing to the surface flux estimates. 21 refs.

  19. A Comparison of Latent Heat Fluxes over Global Oceans for Four Flux Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Nelkin, Eric; Ardizzone, Joe; Atlas, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    To improve our understanding of global energy and water cycle variability, and to improve model simulations of climate variations, it is vital to have accurate latent heat fluxes (LHF) over global oceans. Monthly LHF, 10-m wind speed (U10m), 10-m specific humidity (Q10h), and sea-air humidity difference (Qs-Q10m) of GSSTF2 (version 2 Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes) over global Oceans during 1992-93 are compared with those of HOAPS (Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data), NCEP (NCEP/NCAR reanalysis). The mean differences, standard deviations of differences, and temporal correlation of these monthly variables over global Oceans during 1992-93 between GSSTF2 and each of the three datasets are analyzed. The large-scale patterns of the 2yr-mean fields for these variables are similar among these four datasets, but significant quantitative differences are found. The temporal correlation is higher in the northern extratropics than in the south for all variables, with the contrast being especially large for da Silva as a result of more missing ship data in the south. The da Silva has extremely low temporal correlation and large differences with GSSTF2 for all variables in the southern extratropics, indicating that da Silva hardly produces a realistic variability in these variables. The NCEP has extremely low temporal correlation (0.27) and large spatial variations of differences with GSSTF2 for Qs-Q10m in the tropics, which causes the low correlation for LHF. Over the tropics, the HOAPS LHF is significantly smaller than GSSTF2 by approx. 31% (37 W/sq m), whereas the other two datasets are comparable to GSSTF2. This is because the HOAPS has systematically smaller LHF than GSSTF2 in space, while the other two datasets have very large spatial variations of large positive and negative LHF differences with GSSTF2 to cancel and to produce smaller regional-mean differences. Our analyses suggest that the GSSTF2 latent heat flux

  20. A comparison of small and larger mesoscale latent heat and radiative fluxes: December 6 case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gultepe, I.; Starr, David; Heymsfield, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    Because of the small amounts of water vapor, the potential for rapid changes, and the very cold temperatures in the upper troposphere, moisture measuring instruments face several problems related to calibration and response. Calculations of eddy moisture fluxes are, therefore, subject to significant uncertainty. The purpose of this study is to examine the importance of latent heat (moisture) fluxes due to small and larger mesoscale circulations in comparison to radiative fluxes within cirrus. Scale separation is made at about 1 km because of significant changes in the structures within cirrus. Only observations at warmer than -40 C are used in this study. The EG&G hygrometer that is used for measuring dewpoint temperature (Td) is believed to be fairly accurate down to -40 C. On the other hand, Lyman-Alpha (L-alpha) hygrometer measurements of moisture may include large drift errors. In order to compensate for these drift errors, the L-alpha hygrometer is often calibrated against the EG&G hygrometer. However, large errors ensue for Td measurements at temperatures less than -40 C. The cryogenic hygrometer frost point measurements may be used to calibrate L-alpha measurements at temperatures less than -40 C. In this study, however, measurements obtained by EG&G hygrometer and L-alpha measurements are used for the flux calculations.

  1. Trends and Variations of Ocean Surface Latent Heat Flux: Results from GSSTF2c Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Si; Chiu, Long S.; Shie, Chung-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Trends and variations of Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes (GSSTF) version 2c (GSSTF2c) latent heat flux (LHF) are examined. This version of LHF takes account of the correction in Earth incidence angle. The trend of global mean LHF for GSSTF2c is much reduced relative to GSSTF version 2b Set 1 and Set 2 for the same period 1988-2008. Temporal increase of GSSTF2c LHF in the two decades is 11.0%, in which 3.1%, 5.8%, and 2.1% are attributed to the increase in wind, the increase in sea surface saturated air humidity, and the decrease in near-surface air humidity, respectively. The first empirical orthogonal function of LHF is a conventional El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) mode. However, the trends in LHF are independent of conventional ENSO phenomena. After removing ENSO signal, the pattern of LHF trends is primarily determined by the pattern of air-sea humidity difference trends.

  2. Fundamental study of cold heat-storage system of O/W-type emulsion having cold latent-heat-dispersion material. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Inaba, Hideo; Morita, Shinichi; Nozu, Shigeru

    1995-02-01

    This paper deals with thermal properties of an oil (tetradecane, C{sub 14}H{sub 30}, melting point 278.9K)/water emulsion as a latent heat-storage material having a low melting point. The measured results of the physical properties of the test emulsion, that is, thermal conductivity, specific heat, latent heat, and density, are discussed for the temperature region of solid and liquid phases of the dispersion material (tetradecane). It is clarified that Eucken`s equation can be applied to the estimation of the thermal conductivity of the emulsion. Moreover, it is established that tetradecane as the dispersion material exhibits a supercooling phenomenon which influences the thermal properties. Useful correlation equations of the thermal properties for the emulsion were proposed in terms of temperature and concentration ratio of the emulsion constituents.

  3. The Estimation of Surface Latent Heat Flux over the Ocean and its Relationship to Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Vandemark, Doug; Evans, Keith; Miller, David O.; Demoz, Belay B.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A new technique combining active and passive remote sensing instruments for the estimation of surface latent heat flux over the ocean is presented. This synergistic method utilizes aerosol lidar backscatter data, multi-channel infrared radiometer data, and microwave scatterometer data acquired onboard the NASA P-313 research aircraft during an extended field campaign over the Atlantic ocean in support of the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) in September of 1994. The 10 meter wind speed derived from scatterometers and lidar-radiometer inferred near-surface moisture are used to obtain an estimate of the surface flux of moisture via a bulk aerodynamic formula. The results are compared with the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) daily average latent heat flux and show reasonable agreement. However, the SSM/I values are biased low by about 15 W/sq m. In addition, the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) height, entrainment zone thickness and integrated lidar backscatter intensity are computed from the lidar data and compared with the magnitude of the surface fluxes. The results show that the surface latent heat flux is most strongly correlated with entrainment zone depth, MABL height and the integrated MABL lidar backscatter, with corresponding correlation coefficients of 0.39, 0.43 and 0.71, respectively.

  4. The Estimation of Surface Latent Heat Flux Over the Ocean and its Relationship to Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Miller, David O.; Schwemmer, Geary

    2000-01-01

    A new technique combining active and passive remote sensing instruments for the estimation of surface latent heat flux over the ocean is presented. This synergistic method uses aerosol lidar backscatter data, multi-channel infrared radiometer data and microwave scatterometer data acquired onboard the NASA P-3B research aircraft during an extended field campaign over the Atlantic ocean in support of the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) in September of 1994. The 10 meter wind speed derived from the scatterometers and the lidar-radiometer inferred near-surface moisture are used to obtain an estimate of the surface flux of moisture via bulk aerodynamic formulae. The results are compared with the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) daily average latent heat flux and show reasonable agreement with an rms error and bias of about 50 and 25 W per square meters, respectively. In addition, the MABL height, entrainment zone thickness and integrated lidar backscatter intensity are computed from the lidar data and compared with the magnitude of the surface fluxes. The results show that the surface latent heat flux is most strongly correlated with entrainment zone top, bottom and the integrated MABL lidar backscatter, with corresponding correlation coefficients of 0.62, 0.67 and 0.61, respectively.

  5. The Estimation Surface Latent Heat Flux Over the Ocean and its Relationship to Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Vandemark, Doug; Evans, Keith; Miller, David O.

    1999-01-01

    A new technique combining active and passive remote sensing instruments for the estimation of surface latent heat flux over the ocean is presented. This synergistic method utilizes aerosol lidar backscatter data, multi-channel infrared radiometer data and microwave scatterometer data acquired onboard the NASA P-3B research aircraft during an extended field campaign over the Atlantic ocean in support of the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) in September of 1994. The 10 meter wind speed derived from the scatterometers and the lidar-radiometer inferred near-surface moisture are used to obtain an estimate of the surface flux of moisture via bulk aerodynamic formulae. The results are compared with the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) daily average latent heat flux and show reasonable agreement. However, the SSM/I values are biased high by about 30 W/sq m. In addition, the MABL height, entrainment zone thickness and integrated lidar backscatter intensity are computed from the lidar data and compared with the magnitude of the surface fluxes. The results show that the surface latent heat flux is most strongly correlated with entrainment zone top, bottom and the integrated MABL lidar backscatter, with corresponding correlation coefficients of 0.62, 0.67 and 0.61, respectively.

  6. Melting and solidification characteristics of a mixture of two types of latent heat storage material in a vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, JikSu; Horibe, Akihiko; Haruki, Naoto; Machida, Akito; Kato, Masashi

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the fundamental melting and solidification characteristics of mannitol, erythritol, and their mixture (70 % by mass mannitol: 30 % by mass erythritol) as potential phase-change materials (PCMs) for latent heat thermal energy storage systems, specifically those pertaining to industrial waste heat, having temperatures in the range of 100-250 °C. The melting point of erythritol and mannitol, the melting peak temperature of their mixture, and latent heat were measured using differential scanning calorimetry. The thermal performance of the mannitol mixture was determined during melting and solidification processes, using a heat storage vessel with a pipe heat exchanger. Our results indicated phase-change (fusion) temperatures of 160 °C for mannitol and 113 and 150 °C for the mannitol mixture. Nondimensional correlation equations of the average heat transfer during the solidification process, as well as the temperature and velocity efficiencies of flowing silicon oil in the pipe and the phase-change material (PCM), were derived using several nondimensional parameters.

  7. Melting and solidification characteristics of a mixture of two types of latent heat storage material in a vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, JikSu; Horibe, Akihiko; Haruki, Naoto; Machida, Akito; Kato, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the fundamental melting and solidification characteristics of mannitol, erythritol, and their mixture (70 % by mass mannitol: 30 % by mass erythritol) as potential phase-change materials (PCMs) for latent heat thermal energy storage systems, specifically those pertaining to industrial waste heat, having temperatures in the range of 100-250 °C. The melting point of erythritol and mannitol, the melting peak temperature of their mixture, and latent heat were measured using differential scanning calorimetry. The thermal performance of the mannitol mixture was determined during melting and solidification processes, using a heat storage vessel with a pipe heat exchanger. Our results indicated phase-change (fusion) temperatures of 160 °C for mannitol and 113 and 150 °C for the mannitol mixture. Nondimensional correlation equations of the average heat transfer during the solidification process, as well as the temperature and velocity efficiencies of flowing silicon oil in the pipe and the phase-change material (PCM), were derived using several nondimensional parameters.

  8. Development of approximate method to analyze the characteristics of latent heat thermal energy storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, T.S.; Hoshi, Akira

    1999-07-01

    Third Conference of the Parties to the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP3) held in last December in Kyoto urged the industrialized nation to reduce carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions by 5.2 percent (on the average) below 1990 level until the period between 2008 and 2012 (Kyoto protocol). This implies that even for the most advanced countries like the US, Japan, and EU implementation of drastic policies and overcoming many barriers in market should be necessary. One idea which leads to a path of low carbon intensity is to adopt an energy storage concept. One of the reasons that the efficiency of the conventional energy systems has been relatively low is ascribed to lacking of energy storage subsystem. Most of the past energy systems, for example, air-conditioning system, do not have energy storage part and the system usually operates with low energy efficiency. Firstly, the effect of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions was also examined if the LHTES subsystems were incorporated in all the residential and building air-conditioning systems. Another field of application of the LHTES is of course transportation. Future vehicle will be electric or hybrid vehicle. However, these vehicles will need considerable energy for air-conditioning. The LHTES system will provide enough energy for this purpose by storing nighttime electricity or rejected heat from the radiator or motor. Melting and solidification of phase change material (PCM) in a capsule is of practical importance in latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems which are considered to be very promising to reduce a peak demand of electricity in the summer season and also reduce carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. Two melting modes are involved in melting in capsules. One is close-contact melting between the solid bulk and the capsule wall, and another is natural convection melting in the liquid (melt) region. Close-contact melting processes for a single enclosure have been solved using several

  9. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System, TRMM Latent Heating and Cloud Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to imiprove the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D GCE model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF will be developed by the end of 2004 and production runs will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. The purpose of this proposal is to augment the current Goddard MMF and other cloud modeling activities. I this talk, I will present: (1) A summary of the second Cloud Modeling Workshop took place at NASA Goddard, (2) A summary of the third TRMM Latent Heating Workshop took place at Nara Japan, (3) A brief discussion on the Goddard research plan of using Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model, and (4) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  10. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System: TRMM Latent Heating and Cloud Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D GCE model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF will be developed by the end of 2004 and production runs will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. The purpose of this proposal is to augment the current Goddard MMF and other cloud modeling activities. In this talk, I will present: (1) A summary of the second Cloud Modeling Workshop took place at NASA Goddard, (2) A summary of the third TRMM Latent Heating Workshop took place at Nara Japan, (3) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  11. A preliminary evaluation of surface latent heat flux as an earthquake precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Zhao, J.; Wang, W.; Ren, H.; Chen, L.; Yan, G.

    2013-10-01

    The relationship between variations in surface latent heat flux (SLHF) and marine earthquakes has been a popular subject of recent seismological studies. So far, there are two key problems: how to identify the abnormal SLHF variations from complicated background signals, and how to ensure that the anomaly results from an earthquake. In this paper, we proposed four adjustable parameters for identification, classified the relationship and analyzed SLHF changes several months before six marine earthquakes by employing daily SLHF data. Additionally, we also quantitatively evaluate the long-term relationship between earthquakes and SLHF anomalies for the six study areas over a 20 yr period preceding each earthquake. The results suggest the following: (1) before the South Sandwich Islands, Papua, Samoa and Haiti earthquakes, the SLHF variations above their individual background levels have relatively low amplitudes and are difficult to be considered as precursory anomalies; (2) after removing the clustering effect, most of the anomalies prior to these six earthquakes are not temporally related to any earthquake in each study area in time sequence; (3) for each case, apart from Haiti, more than half of the studied earthquakes, which were moderate and even devastating earthquakes (larger than Mw = 5.3), had no precursory variations in SLHF; and (4) the correlation between SLHF and seismic activity depends largely on data accuracy and parameter settings. Before any application of SLHF data on earthquake prediction, we suggest that anomaly-identifying standards should be established based on long-term regional analysis to eliminate subjectivity. Furthermore, other factors that may result in SLHF variations should also be carefully considered.

  12. A preliminary evaluation of surface latent heat flux as an earthquake precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Zhao, J.; Wang, W.; Ren, H.; Chen, L.; Yan, G.

    2013-06-01

    The relationship between variations in surface latent heat flux (SLHF) and marine earthquakes has been a popular subject of recent seismological studies. So far, there are two key problems: how to identify the abnormal SLHF variations from complicated background signals, and how to ensure that the anomaly results from earthquake. In this paper, we proposed four adjustable parameters for identification, classified the relationship and analyze SLHF changes several months before six marine earthquakes by employing daily SLHF data. Besides, we also quantitatively evaluate the long-term relationship between earthquakes and SLHF anomalies for the six study areas over a 20 yr period preceding each earthquake. The results suggest: (1) before the South Sandwich Islands, Papua, Samoa and Haiti earthquakes, the SLHF variations above their individual background levels have relatively low amplitudes and are difficult to be considered as precursory anomalies; (2) after removing the clustering effect, most of the anomalies prior to these six earthquakes are not temporally related to any earthquake in each study area in time sequence; (3) for each case, apart from Haiti, more than half of studied earthquakes which were moderate even devastating earthquakes (larger than Mw = 5.3) had no precursory variations in SLHF; and (4) the correlation between SLHF and seismic activity depends largely on data accuracy and parameter settings. Before any application of SLHF data on earthquake prediction, we suggest that anomaly-identifying standards should be established based on long-term regional analysis to eliminate subjectivity. Furthermore, other factors which may result in SLHF variations also should be carefully considered.

  13. Assessments of surface latent heat flux associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation in reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yingxia; Hsu, Pang-Chi; Hsu, Huang-Hsiung

    2016-09-01

    To understand the accuracy and uncertainty of surface latent heat flux (LHF) associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), the LHF from each of the six global reanalysis datasets is compared with LHF based on in situ data and the objectively analyzed air-sea flux (OAFlux), in terms of tropical intraseasonal variability. The reanalysis products used in this study include the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Interim Reanalysis (ERA-I), the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), three generations of reanalysis from the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP R1, R2 and CFSR), and the twentieth century reanalysis (20CR). We find that the intraseasonal LHF of the reanalysis products agrees well with the OAFlux over the tropical oceans in terms of patterns, but there is a significant spread in amplitude among the reanalysis products. Both ERA-I and MERRA show smaller biases in the power spectral analysis, while the other reanalysis products (NCEP R1, NCEP R2, CFSR, and 20CR) tend to overestimate the intraseasonal LHF when compared with the TAO buoy products and OAFlux. The role of anomalous LHF in supporting the MJO convection identified by previous TAO buoy data studies is confirmed by the long-term global reanalyses. The feature of increasing LHF accompanied by growing MJO observed in the recent MJO field campaign in the central Indian Ocean (DYNAMO/CINDY2011) is also well captured by the reanalysis products. Among the reanalysis datasets, MERRA has the smallest bias in temporal variability of LHF during the DYNAMO/CINDY2011 period.

  14. Remotely sensed latent heat fluxes for improving model predictions of soil moisture: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuurmans, J. M.; van Geer, F. C.; Bierkens, M. F. P.

    2010-08-01

    This paper investigates whether the use of remotely sensed latent heat fluxes improves the accuracy of spatially-distributed soil moisture predictions by a hydrological model. By using real data we aim to show the potential and limitations in practice. We use (i) satellite data of both ASTER and MODIS for the same two days in the summer of 2006 that, in association with the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), provides us the spatial distribution of daily ETact and (ii) an operational physically based distributed (25 m×25 m) hydrological model of a small catchment (70 km2) in The Netherlands that simulates the water flow in both the unsaturated and saturated zone. Firstly, model outcomes of ETact are compared to the processed satellite data. Secondly, we perform data assimilation that updates the modelled soil moisture. We show that remotely sensed ETact is useful in hydrological modelling for two reasons. Firstly, in the procedure of model calibration: comparison of modeled and remotely sensed ETact together with the outcomes of our data assimilation procedure points out potential model errors (both conceptual and flux-related). Secondly, assimilation of remotely sensed ETact results in a realistic spatial adjustment of soil moisture, except for the area with forest and deep groundwater levels. As both ASTER and MODIS images were available for the same days, this study provides also an excellent opportunity to compare the worth of these two satellite sources. It is shown that, although ASTER provides much better insight in the spatial distribution of ETact due to its higher spatial resolution than MODIS, they appeared in this study just as useful.

  15. Characteristics of Precipitation, Cloud, and Latent Heating Associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K-M.; Wu, H-T.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the evolution of cloud and rainfall structures associated with Madden Julian oscillation (MJO) using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data. Two complementary indices are used to define MJO phases. Joint probability distribution functions (PDFs) of cloud-top temperature and radar echo-top height are constructed for each of the eight MJO phases. The genesis stage of MJO convection over the western Pacific (phases 1 and 2) features a bottom-heavy PDF, characterized by abundant warm rain, low clouds, suppressed deep convection, and higher sea surface temperature (SST). As MJO convection develops (phases 3 and 4), a transition from the bottom-heavy to top-heavy PDF occurs. The latter is associated with the development of mixed-phase rain and middle-to-high clouds, coupled with rapid SST cooling. At the MJO convection peak (phase 5), a top-heavy PDF contributed by deep convection with mixed-phase and ice-phase rain and high echo-top heights (greater than 5 km) dominates. The decaying stage (phases 6 and 7) is characterized by suppressed SST, reduced total rain, increased contribution from stratiform rain, and increased nonraining high clouds. Phase 7, in particular, signals the beginning of a return to higher SST and increased warm rain. Phase 8 completes the MJO cycle, returning to a bottom-heavy PDF and SST conditions similar to phase 1. The structural changes in rain and clouds at different phases of MJO are consistent with corresponding changes in derived latent heating profiles, suggesting the importance of a diverse mix of warm, mixed-phase, and ice-phase rain associated with low-level, congestus, and high clouds in constituting the life cycle and the time scales of MJO.

  16. (Latent) transforming growth factor beta in liver parenchymal cells, its injury-dependent release, and paracrine effects on rat hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Roth, S; Michel, K; Gressner, A M

    1998-04-01

    Cultured parenchymal liver cells (PC) were recently recognized to contain (latent) transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) while the expression of TGF-beta mRNA remains controversial. This study was designed to analyze PC in different microenvironments (liver in situ, highly purified, isolated, and cultured PC) regarding the qualitative and quantitative content of mature and latent TGF-beta protein (immunostainings, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA], and enzyme-labeled fluorescence [ELF] technique). The results were compared with its gene expression (reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction [RT-PCR]). In all microenvironments, PC contained latent TGF-beta, which was partially activated after cell isolation and culture. The amount of total TGF-beta (mature plus latent) of latency-associated peptide (LAP) and of latent TGF-beta binding protein (LTBP) were shown to decrease during culture. In contrast, TGF-beta2 and TGF-beta3 mRNA and LTBP-1 and -3 mRNA expression were first detectable after culture. Permeabilization of cell membranes in whole liver and of isolated PC with streptolysin O or carbon tetrachloride, respectively, released TGF-beta, a part of which was integrated in the large latent complex as estimated by analytical gel filtration chromatography. The TGF-beta released by damaged PC induces paracrine effects on hepatic stellate cell cultures. It stimulates hyaluronan synthesis and antagonizes the effect of mitogenic factor(s) of PC on [3H]thymidine incorporation. The results strongly suggest that the main part of hepatocellular TGF-beta is not generated by de novo synthesis but from uptake into the liver in vivo. The immunodetection of preexisting mature TGF-beta after isolation of the cells is probably caused by intracellular activation of latent TGF-beta. The injury-dependent discharge of TGF-beta from PC might be an important mechanism for initiation and perpetuation of various forms of chronic human liver diseases.

  17. Validity of Five Satellite-Based Latent Heat Flux Algorithms for Semi-arid Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Fei; Chen, Jiquan; Li, Xianglan; Yao, Yunjun; Liang, Shunlin; Liu, Meng; Zhang, Nannan; Guo, Yang; Yu, Jian; Sun, Minmin

    2015-12-09

    Accurate estimation of latent heat flux (LE) is critical in characterizing semiarid ecosystems. Many LE algorithms have been developed during the past few decades. However, the algorithms have not been directly compared, particularly over global semiarid ecosystems. In this paper, we evaluated the performance of five LE models over semiarid ecosystems such as grassland, shrub, and savanna using the Fluxnet dataset of 68 eddy covariance (EC) sites during the period 2000–2009. We also used a modern-era retrospective analysis for research and applications (MERRA) dataset, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Fractional Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR) from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) products; the leaf area index (LAI) from the global land surface satellite (GLASS) products; and the digital elevation model (DEM) from shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM30) dataset to generate LE at region scale during the period 2003–2006. The models were the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer LE (MOD16) algorithm, revised remote sensing based Penman–Monteith LE algorithm (RRS), the Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL), the modified satellite-based Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm (MS-PT), and the semi-empirical Penman LE algorithm (UMD). Direct comparison with ground measured LE showed the PT-JPL and MS-PT algorithms had relative high performance over semiarid ecosystems with the coefficient of determination (R2) ranging from 0.6 to 0.8 and root mean squared error (RMSE) of approximately 20 W/m2. Empirical parameters in the structure algorithms of MOD16 and RRS, and calibrated coefficients of the UMD algorithm may be the cause of the reduced performance of these LE algorithms with R2 ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 and RMSE ranging from 20 to 35 W/m2 for MOD16, RRS and UMD. Sensitivity analysis showed that radiation and vegetation terms were the dominating

  18. Validity of Five Satellite-Based Latent Heat Flux Algorithms for Semi-arid Ecosystems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Feng, Fei; Chen, Jiquan; Li, Xianglan; Yao, Yunjun; Liang, Shunlin; Liu, Meng; Zhang, Nannan; Guo, Yang; Yu, Jian; Sun, Minmin

    2015-12-09

    Accurate estimation of latent heat flux (LE) is critical in characterizing semiarid ecosystems. Many LE algorithms have been developed during the past few decades. However, the algorithms have not been directly compared, particularly over global semiarid ecosystems. In this paper, we evaluated the performance of five LE models over semiarid ecosystems such as grassland, shrub, and savanna using the Fluxnet dataset of 68 eddy covariance (EC) sites during the period 2000–2009. We also used a modern-era retrospective analysis for research and applications (MERRA) dataset, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Fractional Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR) from the moderate resolutionmore » imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) products; the leaf area index (LAI) from the global land surface satellite (GLASS) products; and the digital elevation model (DEM) from shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM30) dataset to generate LE at region scale during the period 2003–2006. The models were the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer LE (MOD16) algorithm, revised remote sensing based Penman–Monteith LE algorithm (RRS), the Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL), the modified satellite-based Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm (MS-PT), and the semi-empirical Penman LE algorithm (UMD). Direct comparison with ground measured LE showed the PT-JPL and MS-PT algorithms had relative high performance over semiarid ecosystems with the coefficient of determination (R2) ranging from 0.6 to 0.8 and root mean squared error (RMSE) of approximately 20 W/m2. Empirical parameters in the structure algorithms of MOD16 and RRS, and calibrated coefficients of the UMD algorithm may be the cause of the reduced performance of these LE algorithms with R2 ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 and RMSE ranging from 20 to 35 W/m2 for MOD16, RRS and UMD. Sensitivity analysis showed that radiation and vegetation terms were the dominating variables

  19. Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions from Satellite Passive Microwave Radiometry. Part II: Evaluation of Estimates Using Independent Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Song; Olson, William S.; Wang, Jian-Jian; Bell, Thomas L.; Smith, Eric A.; Kummerow, Christian D.

    2006-05-01

    Rainfall rate estimates from spaceborne microwave radiometers are generally accepted as reliable by a majority of the atmospheric science community. One of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) facility rain-rate algorithms is based upon passive microwave observations from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). In Part I of this series, improvements of the TMI algorithm that are required to introduce latent heating as an additional algorithm product are described. Here, estimates of surface rain rate, convective proportion, and latent heating are evaluated using independent ground-based estimates and satellite products. Instantaneous, 0.5°-resolution estimates of surface rain rate over ocean from the improved TMI algorithm are well correlated with independent radar estimates (r ˜0.88 over the Tropics), but bias reduction is the most significant improvement over earlier algorithms. The bias reduction is attributed to the greater breadth of cloud-resolving model simulations that support the improved algorithm and the more consistent and specific convective/stratiform rain separation method utilized. The bias of monthly 2.5°-resolution estimates is similarly reduced, with comparable correlations to radar estimates. Although the amount of independent latent heating data is limited, TMI-estimated latent heating profiles compare favorably with instantaneous estimates based upon dual-Doppler radar observations, and time series of surface rain-rate and heating profiles are generally consistent with those derived from rawinsonde analyses. Still, some biases in profile shape are evident, and these may be resolved with (a) additional contextual information brought to the estimation problem and/or (b) physically consistent and representative databases supporting the algorithm. A model of the random error in instantaneous 0.5°-resolution rain-rate estimates appears to be consistent with the levels of error determined from TMI comparisons with collocated radar. Error

  20. Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions from Satellite Passive Microwave Radiometry. Part 2; Evaluation of Estimates Using Independent Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Song; Olson, William S.; Wang, Jian-Jian; Bell, Thomas L.; Smith, Eric A.; Kummerow, Christian D.

    2004-01-01

    Rainfall rate estimates from space-borne k&ents are generally accepted as reliable by a majority of the atmospheric science commu&y. One-of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRh4M) facility rain rate algorithms is based upon passive microwave observations fiom the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). Part I of this study describes improvements in the TMI algorithm that are required to introduce cloud latent heating and drying as additional algorithm products. Here, estimates of surface rain rate, convective proportion, and latent heating are evaluated using independent ground-based estimates and satellite products. Instantaneous, OP5resolution estimates of surface rain rate over ocean fiom the improved TMI algorithm are well correlated with independent radar estimates (r approx. 0.88 over the Tropics), but bias reduction is the most significant improvement over forerunning algorithms. The bias reduction is attributed to the greater breadth of cloud-resolving model simulations that support the improved algorithm, and the more consistent and specific convective/stratiform rain separation method utilized. The bias of monthly, 2.5 deg. -resolution estimates is similarly reduced, with comparable correlations to radar estimates. Although the amount of independent latent heating data are limited, TMI estimated latent heating profiles compare favorably with instantaneous estimates based upon dual-Doppler radar observations, and time series of surface rain rate and heating profiles are generally consistent with those derived from rawinsonde analyses. Still, some biases in profile shape are evident, and these may be resolved with: (a) additional contextual information brought to the estimation problem, and/or; (b) physically-consistent and representative databases supporting the algorithm. A model of the random error in instantaneous, 0.5 deg-resolution rain rate estimates appears to be consistent with the levels of error determined from TMI comparisons to collocated radar

  1. The use of simple physiological and environmental measures to estimate the latent heat transfer in crossbred Holstein cows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Severino Guilherme Caetano Gonçalves dos; Saraiva, Edilson Paes; Pimenta Filho, Edgard Cavalcanti; Gonzaga Neto, Severino; Fonsêca, Vinicus França Carvalho; Pinheiro, Antônio da Costa; Almeida, Maria Elivania Vieira; de Amorim, Mikael Leal Cabral Menezes

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the heat transfer through cutaneous and respiratory evaporation of dairy cows raised in tropical ambient conditions using simple environmental and physiological measures. Twenty-six lactating crossbred cows (7/8 Holstein-Gir) were used, 8 predominantly white and 18 predominantly black. The environmental variables air temperature, relative humidity, black globe temperature, and wind speed were measured. Respiratory rate and coat surface temperature were measured at 0700, 0900, 1100, 1300, and 1500 h. The environmental and physiological data were used to estimate heat loss by respiratory (ER) and cutaneous evaporation (EC). Results showed that there was variation (P < 0.01) for respiratory rate depending on the times of the day. The highest values were recorded at 1100, 1300, and 1500 h, corresponding to 66.85 ± 10.20, 66.98 ± 7.80, and 65.65 ± 6.50 breaths/min, respectively. Thus, the amount of heat transferred via respiration ranged from 19.21 to 29.42 W/m2. There was a variation from 31.6 to 38.8 °C for coat surface temperature; these values reflected a range of 55.52 to 566.83 W/m2 for heat transfer via cutaneous evaporation. However, throughout the day, the dissipation of thermal energy through the coat surface accounted for 87.9 % total loss of latent heat, and the remainder (12.1 %) was via the respiratory tract. In conclusion, the predictive models based on respiratory rate and coat surface temperature may be used to estimate the latent heat loss in dairy cows kept confined in tropical ambient conditions.

  2. The relationship between latent heating, vertical velocity, and precipitation processes: The impact of aerosols on precipitation in organized deep convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, Xiaowen

    2016-06-01

    A high-resolution, two-dimensional cloud-resolving model with spectral-bin microphysics is used to study the impact of aerosols on precipitation processes in both a tropical oceanic and a midlatitude continental squall line with regard to three processes: latent heating (LH), cold pool dynamics, and ice microphysics. Evaporative cooling in the lower troposphere is found to enhance rainfall in low cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration scenarios in the developing stages of a midlatitude convective precipitation system. In contrast, the tropical case produced more rainfall under high CCN concentrations. Both cold pools and low-level convergence are stronger for those configurations having enhanced rainfall. Nevertheless, latent heat release is stronger (especially after initial precipitation) in the scenarios having more rainfall in both the tropical and midlatitude environment. Sensitivity tests are performed to examine the impact of ice and evaporative cooling on the relationship between aerosols, LH, and precipitation processes. The results show that evaporative cooling is important for cold pool strength and rain enhancement in both cases. However, ice microphysics play a larger role in the midlatitude case compared to the tropics. Detailed analysis of the vertical velocity-governing equation shows that temperature buoyancy can enhance updrafts/downdrafts in the middle/lower troposphere in the convective core region; however, the vertical pressure gradient force (PGF) is of the same order and acts in the opposite direction. Water loading is small but of the same order as the net PGF-temperature buoyancy forcing. The balance among these terms determines the intensity of convection.

  3. Some effects of heat release in premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, I.G.

    1994-03-01

    Numerical and experimental results are presented to illustrate some hydrodynamic effects of heat release in premixed flames. The heat release is represented by a simple model which treats the flame front as a two dimensional line source of volume. The velocity and strain rate induced in the flow field are determined and the numerical solution for the case of a laminar double kernel ignition is obtained. Of primary interest is the strain induced in the reactants between the expanding flame kernels and, for heat release rates typical of hydrocarbon flames, the strain rate at the plane of symmetry midway between the kernels up to 150 s{sup {minus}1}. The effects of kernel size, density ratio across the flame front and laminar burning velocity are studied. For the case of turbulent combustion the velocity induced in the reactant stream is measured in a plane parallel to the flame holder of an open premixed turbulent V-shaped flame. A divergent flow field, with a strain rate of 50 s{sup {minus}1}, is induced by the heat release in the flame zone and the consequences of this for determining the turbulent burning velocity in this and similar systems is reviewed.

  4. Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Gorski, A.J.; Schertz, W.W.

    1980-09-29

    A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

  5. Induction heating and controlled drug release from thermosensitive magnetic microgels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regmi, R.; Bhattarai, S. R.; Sudakar, C.; Wani, A. S.; Cunninghum, R.; Vaishnava, P. P.; Naik, R.; Oupicky, D.; Lawes, G.

    2010-04-01

    Poly-N-isopropyl acrylamide (PNIPAM) is a biocompatible thermosensitive polymer that exhibits reversible volume phase transition from a hydrophilic coil to hydrophobic globule at the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of 32 ^oC. To stimulate conformational change we introduced magnetite nanoparticles (size ˜12 nm) in the PNIPAM matrix. The PNIPAM/magnetite nanoparticles composite was then exposed to an alternating magnetic field at a frequency of 380 kHz to induce heating in the nanoparticles by Neel and Brownian relaxations. We report in vitro controlled release of anti-cancer drug mitoxantrone which was loaded into PNIPAM/magnetite nanoparticles composite, driven solely by the heating induced by the external magnetic field. We found that the drug released reached 4% in only 4 minutes of heating to 50 ^oC. We also present results on dielectric and magnetic anomalies near the LCST of the PNIPAM-Fe3O4 composite.

  6. A diagnostic study of the forcing of the Ferrel cell by eddies, with latent heat effects included

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salustri, G.; Stone, P. H.

    1983-01-01

    A diagnostic study of the forcing of the Ferrel cell by eddy fluxes in the Northern Hemisphere is carried out. The quasi-geostrophic omega equation, and Oort and Rasmusson's (1971) data set, are used. The effects of condensation associated with the large scale motions are introduced to the omega equation by using the quasi-geostrophic moisture conservation equation. Thus, the dry static stability is replaced by a moist static stability, and the forcing of the Ferrel cell by eddy latent heat fluxes as well as sensible heat and momentum fluxes is included. Both effects tend to enhance the forcing of the Ferrel cell. The numerical analysis indicates that the effects are small in January, but in July the maximum vertical velocities are enhanced by about 30 percent.

  7. Nanovalve-controlled cargo release activated by plasmonic heating.

    PubMed

    Croissant, Jonas; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2012-05-01

    The synthesis and operation of a light-operated nanovalve that controls the pore openings of mesoporous silica nanoparticles containing gold nanoparticle cores is described. The nanoparticles, consisting of 20 nm gold cores inside ~150 nm mesoporous silica spheres, were synthesized using a unique one-pot method. The nanovalves consist of cucurbit[6]uril rings encircling stalks that are attached to the ~2 nm pore openings. Plasmonic heating of the gold core raises the local temperature and decreases the ring-stalk binding constant, thereby unblocking the pore and releasing the cargo molecules that were preloaded inside. Bulk heating of the suspended particles to 60 °C is required to release the cargo, but no bulk temperature change was observed in the plasmonic heating release experiment. High-intensity irradiation caused thermal damage to the silica particles, but low-intensity illumination caused a local temperature increase sufficient to operate the valves without damaging the nanoparticle containers. These light-stimulated, thermally activated, mechanized nanoparticles represent a new system with potential utility for on-command drug release.

  8. Latent heat loss and sweat gland histology of male goats in an equatorial semi-arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo Costa, Cíntia Carol; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; Neto, José Domingues Fontenele; Oliveira, Steffan Edward Octávio; de Queiroz, João Paulo Araújo Fernandes

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this work was to quantify the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation of goats in an equatorial semi-arid environment. The latent heat loss from the body surfaces of these ten undefined breed goats was measured using a ventilated capsule in sun and shade and in the three body regions (neck, flank and hindquarters). Skin samples from these three regions were histologically analyzed to relate the quantity of sweat glands, the area of sweat glands and the epithelium thickness of each of these regions to the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation of the examined goats. The epithelium thickness that was measured varied significantly for body regions with different quantities and areas of sweat glands ( P < 0.01). Among the body regions that were examined, the samples from the neck demonstrated the highest epithelium thickness (16.23 ± 0.13 μm). However, the samples of sweat glands from the flank had the biggest area (43330.51 ± 778.71 μm2) and quantity per square centimeter (390 ± 9 cm-2). After the animals were exposed to sun, the flanks lost the greatest amount of heat by cutaneous evaporation (73.03 ± 1.75 W m-2) and possessed the highest surface temperatures (39.47 ± 0.18 °C). The histological characteristics may have influenced the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation that was observed in the flank region after the animals were exposed to sun.

  9. Latent heat loss and sweat gland histology of male goats in an equatorial semi-arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo Costa, Cíntia Carol; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; Neto, José Domingues Fontenele; Oliveira, Steffan Edward Octávio; de Queiroz, João Paulo Araújo Fernandes

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this work was to quantify the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation of goats in an equatorial semi-arid environment. The latent heat loss from the body surfaces of these ten undefined breed goats was measured using a ventilated capsule in sun and shade and in the three body regions (neck, flank and hindquarters). Skin samples from these three regions were histologically analyzed to relate the quantity of sweat glands, the area of sweat glands and the epithelium thickness of each of these regions to the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation of the examined goats. The epithelium thickness that was measured varied significantly for body regions with different quantities and areas of sweat glands (P < 0.01). Among the body regions that were examined, the samples from the neck demonstrated the highest epithelium thickness (16.23 ± 0.13 μm). However, the samples of sweat glands from the flank had the biggest area (43330.51 ± 778.71 μm2) and quantity per square centimeter (390 ± 9 cm-2). After the animals were exposed to sun, the flanks lost the greatest amount of heat by cutaneous evaporation (73.03 ± 1.75 W m-2) and possessed the highest surface temperatures (39.47 ± 0.18 °C). The histological characteristics may have influenced the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation that was observed in the flank region after the animals were exposed to sun.

  10. Latent heat contribution to the direct magnetocaloric effect in Ni-Mn-Ga shape memory alloys with coupled martensitic and magnetic transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero-Flores, R.; Sánchez-Alarcos, V.; Recarte, V.; Pérez-Landazábal, J. I.; Gómez-Polo, C.

    2016-05-01

    We report the direct magnetocaloric response of materials that present a second-order phase transition in the temperature range where a first-order structural transition also occurs. In particular, the influence of the latent heat on the field-induced adiabatic temperature change has been analyzed in a Ni-Mn-Ga alloy with coupled martensitic and magnetic transformations. It is found that discrepancies around 20% arise depending on whether the latent heat is taken into account or not. From the observed results, a general expression for the indirect determination of the adiabatic temperature change, that takes into account the contributions of both the martensitic and magnetic transformations, is proposed and experimentally confirmed. The observed key role of the latent heat allows us to understand why materials with first-order transformations do not present adiabatic temperature changes as higher as those which would correspond to materials undergoing second-order transformations with similar isothermal entropy change.

  11. The Linkages between Latent Heating to Cloud and Precipitation Profiles in WRF Model Simulations of Typhoon Chaba (2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.; Guo, J.; Fu, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Abstract Despite its fundamental role in driving the genesis and evolution of tropical cyclones as well as large scale atmospheric waves including ENSO, monsoon and MJO, the spatial and temporal distribution of latent heating (LH) remains one of the largest uncertainties in weather and climate modeling. With the rapid advance in satellite active sensors such as the TRMM PR, CloudSat CPR and the coming GPM DPR, more comprehensive and reliable observations of cloud and precipitation profiles provide great opportunities to improve the accuracy of estimating LH from space. However, LH is released through the 'processes' of water phase change in the atmosphere while satellite observations provide the estimation of the 'state' of cloud and precipitation, the physical linkages between LH to cloud and precipitation profiles are required to develop next generation physical-based LH algorithms. In this study, we examined the relationships among the condensations heating (LHcon), cloud water content (CWC) and rain rate (Rr) in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulations of typhoon Chaba (2004) under five different microphysical schemes including Purdue Lin, Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model, WSM6, Thompson et al. and Morrison et al. 2-Moment schemes, respectively. Firstly, the LHcon has the highest correlations (~ 0.85 for convective rains) with the term of Rr αCWC which represents the rate of rain formation from auto-conversion and accretion. Although cloud and precipitation, as the ultimate outcomes of water vapor condensation process, also have inherent correlations to LHcon, the connections are significantly weaker than the LHcon - Rr αCWC linkages. Such findings are valid in all selected microphysical schemes in both 2-D CRM (Min et al 2013; Li et al 2013) and 3-D WRF simulations. Secondly, the sensitivity of maximum explained variances of LHcon by Rr αCWC to different microphysical schemes are relatively low. The associated optimal exponential of α is

  12. Usefulness of interferon-γ release assay for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in young children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Kwang; Kim, Hae Ryun; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lim, In Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in young children may progress to severe active tuberculosis (TB) disease and serve as a reservoir for future transmission of TB disease. There are limited data on interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) performance in young children, which our research aims to address by investigating the usefulness of IGRA for the diagnosis of LTBI. Methods We performed a tuberculin skin test (TST) and IGRA on children who were younger than 18 years and were admitted to Chung-Ang University Hospital during May 2011–June 2015. Blood samples for IGRA were collected, processed, and interpreted according to manufacturer protocol. Results Among 149 children, 31 (20.8%) and 10 (6.7%) were diagnosed with LTBI and active pulmonary TB, respectively. In subjects lacking contact history with active TB patients, TST and IGRA results were positive in 41.4% (29 of 70) and 12.9% (9 of 70) subjects, respectively. The agreement (kappa) of TST and IGRA was 0.123. The control group, consisting of non-TB-infected subjects, showed no correlation between age and changes in interferon-γ concentration after nil antigen, TB-specific antigen, or mitogen stimulation in IGRAs (P=0.384, P=0.176, and P=0.077, respectively). In serial IGRAs, interferon-γ response to TB antigen increased in IGRA-positive LTBI subjects, but did not change considerably in initially IGRA-negative LTBI or control subjects. Conclusion The lack of decrease in interferon-γ response in young children indicates that IGRA could be considered for this age group. Serial IGRA tests might accurately diagnose LTBI in children lacking contact history with active TB patients. PMID:27462354

  13. Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-08-15

    Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within

  14. The role of water vapor and its associated latent heating in extreme Beaufort coastal storm surge events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyakum, J. R.; Small, D. L.; Atallah, E.; Liu, N.; Kuo, Y.

    2009-12-01

    During the rather limited ice-free season that typically may occur from late July through early October, the Beaufort Sea region is susceptible to extreme windstorms, many of which produce damaging storm surges to low-lying coastal communities. During the most recent years, the ice-free season has lengthened, suggesting an increased vulnerability of coastal communities to cyclogenesis-related windstorms. Therefore, our research focuses on the dynamic and thermodynamic mechanisms responsible for significant surface wind events during the ice-free season in this region. We demonstrate that these storm surge events are often associated with the generation of large-scale atmospheric circulation regomes conducive to North American droughts. Our analysis methodology includes the detailed synoptic-dynamic analysis, including numerical experiments, on a case of an especially long-lived extreme storm surge that occurred in September 1999. We utilize conventional surface and upper-air station data, along with satellite and ground-based water vapor data. We also utilize global and regional reanalysis data to document the synoptic-scale and mesoscale environments associated with the cyclogenesis events. Our numerical experiments with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model include sensitivity testing with COSMIC-derived water vapor data, and sensitivity tests to illustrate the relative roles that latent heating plays in the storm surge event, at various stages in its lifecycle. A particularly important finding of our research on the devastating September 1999 storm surge event is that a relatively rare case of explosive cyclogenesis in the Gulf of Alaska is a key player in this Beaufort storm surge. The deep-tropospheric latent heating during the explosive cyclogenesis generates a dynamic tropopause ridge. This ridge in turn induces surface ridging that contributes to the strong west-northwesterlies associated with the storm surge. This generation of the dynamic

  15. Evaluation of Heat Induced Methane Release from Methane Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeman, J.; Elwood-Madden, M.; Phelps, T. J.; Rawn, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    Clathrates, or gas hydrates, structurally are guest gas molecules populating a cavity in a cage of water molecules. Gas hydrates naturally occur on Earth under low temperature and moderate pressure environments including continental shelf, deep ocean, and permafrost sediments. Large quantities of methane are trapped in hydrates, providing significant near-surface reserves of carbon and energy. Thermodynamics predicts that hydrate deposits may be destabilized by reducing the pressure in the system or raising the temperature. However, the rate of methane release due to varying environmental conditions remains relatively unconstrained and complicated by natural feedback effects of clathrate dissociation. In this study, hydrate dissociation in sediment due to localized increases in temperature was monitored and observed at the mesoscale (>20L) in a laboratory environment. Experiments were conducted in the Seafloor Process Simulator (SPS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to simulate heat induced dissociation. The SPS, containing a column of Ottawa sand saturated with water containing 25mg/L Sno-Max to aid nucleation, was pressurized and cooled well into the hydrate stability field. A fiber optic distributed sensing system (DSS) was embedded at four depths in the sediment column. This allowed the temperature strain value (a proxy for temperature) of the system to be measured with high spatial resolution to monitor the clathrate formation/dissociation processes. A heat exchanger embedded in the sediment was heated using hot recirculated ethylene glycol and the temperature drop across the exchanger was measured. These experiments indicate a significant and sustained amount of heat is required to release methane gas from hydrate-bearing sediments. Heat was consumed by hydrate dissociated in a growing sphere around the heat exchanger until steady state was reached. At steady state all heat energy entering the system was consumed in maintaining the temperature profile

  16. A 3-year dataset of sensible and latent heat fluxes from the Tibetan Plateau, derived using eddy covariance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Maoshan; Babel, Wolfgang; Chen, Xuelong; Zhang, Lang; Sun, Fanglin; Wang, Binbin; Ma, Yaoming; Hu, Zeyong; Foken, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) has become a focus of strong scientific interest due to its role in the global water cycle and its reaction to climate change. Regional flux estimates of sensible and latent heat are important variables for linking the energy and hydrological cycles at the TP's surface. Within this framework, a 3-year dataset (2008-2010) of eddy covariance measured turbulent fluxes was compiled from four stations on the TP into a standardised workflow: corrections and quality tests were applied using an internationally comparable software package. Second, the energy balance closure ( C EB) was determined and two different closure corrections applied. The four stations (Qomolangma, Linzhi, NamCo and Nagqu) represent different locations and typical land surface types on the TP (high altitude alpine steppe with sparse vegetation, a densely vegetated alpine meadow, and bare soil/gravel, respectively). We show that the C EB differs between each surface and undergoes seasonal changes. Typical differences in the turbulent energy fluxes occur between the stations at Qomolangma, Linzhi and NamCo, while Nagqu is quite similar to NamCo. Specific investigation of the pre-monsoon, the Tibetan Plateau summer monsoon, post-monsoon and winter periods within the annual cycle reinforces these findings. The energy flux of the four sites is clearly influenced by the Tibetan Plateau monsoon. In the pre-monsoon period, sensible heat flux is the major energy source delivering heat to the atmosphere, whereas latent heat flux is greater than sensible heat flux during the monsoon season. Other factors affecting surface energy flux are topography and location. Land cover type also affects surface energy flux. The energy balance residuum indicates a typically observed overall non-closure in winter, while closure (or `turbulent over-closure') is achieved during the Tibetan Plateau summer monsoon at the Nagqu site. The latter seems to depend on ground heat flux, which is higher in the

  17. Comparisons of sensible and latent heat fluxes using surface and aircraft data over adjacent wet and dry surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.; Shaw, W.J. ); Baldocchi, D.D.; Crawford, T.L.; Dobosy, R.J.; Meyers, T.J. . Air Resources Lab. Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Div.)

    1992-01-01

    In June 1991, a field study of surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over heterogeneous surfaces was carried out near Boardman, Oregon (Doran et al., 1992). The object of the study was to develop improved methods of extrapolating from local measurements of fluxes to area-averaged values suitable for use in general circulation models (GCMs) applied to climate studies. A grid element in a GCM is likely to encompass regions whose fluxes vary significantly from one surface type to another. The problem of integrating these fluxes into a single, representative value for the whole element is not simple, and describing such a flux in terms of flux-gradient relationships, as is often done, presents additional difficulties.

  18. Spectral Retrieval of Latent Heating Profiles from TRMM PR data. Part 3; Moistening Estimates over Tropical Ocean Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shige, S.; Takayabu, Y.; Tao, W.-K.

    2007-01-01

    The global hydrological cycle is central to the Earth's climate system, with rainfall and the physics of precipitation formation acting as the key links in the cycle. Two-thirds of global rainfall occurs in the tropics with the associated latent heating (LH) accounting for threefourths of the total heat energy available to the Earth's atmosphere. In the last decade, it has been established that standard products of LH from satellite measurements, particularly TRMM measurements, would be a valuable resource for scientific research and applications. Such products would enable new insights and investigations concerning the complexities of convection system life cycles, the diabatic heating controls and feedbacks related to rne-sosynoptic circulations and their forecasting, the relationship of tropical patterns of LH to the global circulation and climate, and strategies for improving cloud parameterizations In environmental prediction models. However, the LH and water vapor profile or budget (called the apparent moisture sink, or Q2) is closely related. This paper presented the development of an algorithm for retrieving Q2 using 'TRMM precipitation radar. Since there is no direct measurement of LH and Q2, the validation of algorithm usually applies a method called consistency check. Consistency checking involving Cloud Resolving Model (CRM)-generated LH and 42 profiles and algorithm-reconstructed is a useful step in evaluating the performance of a given algorithm. In this process, the CRM simulation of a time-dependent precipitation process (multiple-day time series) is used to obtain the required input parameters for a given algorithm. The algorithm is then used to "econsti-LKth"e heating and moisture profiles that the CRM simulation originally produced, and finally both sets of conformal estimates (model and algorithm) are compared each other. The results indicate that discrepancies between the reconstructed and CM-simulated profiles for Q2, especially at low levels

  19. The simultaneous release by bone explants in culture and the parallel activation of procollagenase and of a latent neutral proteinase that degrades cartilage proteoglycans and denatured collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Vaes, G; Eeckhout, Y; Lenaers-Claeys, G; François-Gillet, C; Druetz, J E

    1978-01-01

    1. A latent neutral proteinase was found in culture media of mouse bone explants. Its accumulation during the cultures is closely parallel to that of procollagenase; both require the presence of heparin in the media. 2. Latent neutral proteinase was activated by several treatments of the media known to activate procollagenase, such as limited proteolysis by trypsin, chymotrypsin, plasmin or kallikrein, dialysis against 3 M-NaSCN at 4 degrees C and prolonged preincubation at 25 degrees C. Its activation often followed that of the procollagenase present in the same media. 3. Activation of neutral proteinase (as does that of procollagenase) by trypsin or plasmin involved two successive steps: the activation of a latent endogenous activator present in the media followed by the activation of neutral proteinase itself by that activator. 4. The proteinase degrades cartilage proteoglycans, denatured collagen (Azocoll) and casein at neutral pH; it is inhibited by EDTA, cysteine or serum. Collagenase is not inhibited by casein or Azocoll and is less resistant to heat or to trypsin than is the proteinase. Partial separation of the two enzymes was achieved by gel filtration of the media but not by fractional (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, by ion exchange or by affinity chromatography on Sepharose-collagen. These fractionations did not activate latent enzymes. 5. Trypsin activation decreases the molecular weight of both latent enzymes (60 000-70 000) by 20 000-30 000, as determined by gel filtration of media after removal of heparin. 6. The latency of both enzymes could be due either to a zymogen or to an enzyme-inhibitor complex. A thermostable inhibitor of both enzymes was found in some media. However, combinations of either enzyme with that inhibitor were not reactivated by trypsin, indicating that this inhibitor is unlikely to be the cause of the latency. PMID:208518

  20. Prediction of heat release effects on a mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farshchi, M.

    1986-01-01

    A fully second-order closure model for turbulent reacting flows is suggested based on Favre statistics. For diffusion flames the local thermodynamic state is related to single conserved scalar. The properties of pressure fluctuations are analyzed for turbulent flows with fluctuating density. Closure models for pressure correlations are discussed and modeled transport equations for Reynolds stresses, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation, density-velocity correlations, scalar moments and dissipation are presented and solved, together with the mean equations for momentum and mixture fraction. Solutions of these equations are compared with the experimental data for high heat release free mixing layers of fluorine and hydrogen in a nitrogen diluent.

  1. Development of media for dynamic latent heat storage for the low-temperature range. Part 1: Thermal analyses of selected salt hydrate systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanwischer, H.; Tamme, R.

    1985-01-01

    Phase change temperatures and phase change enthalpies of seventeen salt hydrates, three double salts, and four eutectics were measured thermodynamically and the results reported herein. Good results were obtained, especially for congruently melting salt hydrates. Incongruently melting salt hydrates appear less suitable for heat storage applications. The influence of the second phase - water, acid and hydroxide - to the latent heat is described. From these results, basic values of the working temperatures and storage capabilities of various storage media compositions may be derived.

  2. Evidence for increased latent heat transport during the Cretaceous (Albian) greenhouse warming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ufnar, David F.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Brenner, Richard L.; Witzke, B.J.

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative estimates of increased heat transfer by atmospheric H 2O vapor during the Albian greenhouse warming suggest that the intensified hydrologic cycle played a greater role in warming high latitudes than at present and thus represents a viable alternative to oceanic heat transport. Sphaerosiderite ??18O values in paleosols of the North American Cretaceous Western Interior Basin are a proxy for meteoric ??18O values, and mass-balance modeling results suggest that Albian precipitation rates exceeded modern rates at both mid and high latitudes. Comparison of modeled Albian and modern precipitation minus evaporation values suggests amplification of the Albian moisture deficit in the tropics and moisture surplus in the mid to high latitudes. The tropical moisture deficit represents an average heat loss of ???75 W/m2 at 10??N paleolatitude (at present, 21 W/m2). The increased precipitation at higher latitudes implies an average heat gain of ???83 W/m2 at 45??N (at present, 23 W/m2) and of 19 W/m2 at 75??N (at present, 4 W/m2). These estimates of increased poleward heat transfer by H2O vapor during the Albian may help to explain the reduced equator-to-pole temperature gradients. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  3. The role of chemical additives to the phase change process of CaCl2.6H2O to optimize its performance as latent heat energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutjahja, I. M.; U, S. Rahayu A.; Kurniati, Nia; Pallitine, Ivyalentine D.; Kurnia, D.

    2016-08-01

    CaCl2.6H2O is one of salt hydrate based phase change material (PCM) which is suitable for room air-temperature stabilizer because it has the melting temperature just above the human comfort zone temperature (Tm ∼⃒ 29 oC) and a relatively large heat entalphy (AH ∼⃒ 190 kJ/kg). This paper reports the role of the type of chemical additives to PCM CaCl2.6H2O to the phase change process throughout the solidification process or heat release in order to optimize its performance as latent heat energy storage system. In this research we used several kinds of chemical additive, namely SrCl2.6H2O (1.0 wt%), BaCO3 (0.5 wt%), and K2CO3 (0.5 wt%). In terms of its latent time for phase change process the order the effectiveness of those chemical additives are reduced from SrCl2.6H2O, BaCO3and K2CO3. We found that this is also related to their role in suppression supercooling and phase separation effects which occurs during crystallization process of CaCl2.6H2O.

  4. Optical investigation of heat release and NOx production in combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerman, B. H.; Bryanston-Cross, P. J.

    2007-10-01

    Two novel optical techniques are presented for non-intrusive, spatially resolved study of combustion, both based on passive Optical Emission Tomography (OET). Firstly, OET is used for non-intrusive study of heat release through the detection of chemiluminescence by the hydroxyl radical that is generated in the burning process. The OET technique presented here is based on a passive fibre-optic detection system, which allows spatially resolved high-frequency detection of the flame front in a combustion flame, where all fibres detect the emission signals simultaneously. The system withstands the high pressures and temperatures typically encountered in the harsh environments of gas turbine combustors and IC engines. The sensor-array is non-intrusive, low-cost, compact, simple to configure and can be quickly set up around a combustion field. The maximum acquisition rate is 2 kHz. This allows spatially resolved study of the fast phenomena in combustion. Furthermore, a method is presented for study of the production of NOx through chemiluminescence from tri-methyl-borate (TMB). In combustion, the tri-methyl-borate produces green luminescence in locations where NOx would be produced. Combining the green luminescence visualisation with UV detection of the hydroxyl radical allows monitoring of heat release and of NOx production areas, thus giving a means of studying both the burning process and the resulting NOx pollution.

  5. Optical investigation of heat release and NOx production in combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerman, B. H.; Patel, S.; Dunkley, P.; Bryanston-Cross, P. J.

    2005-08-01

    Two passive optical techniques are described to investigate combustion. Optical Emission Tomography (OET) is used for non-intrusive study of heat release through the detection of chemiluminescence by the hydroxyl radical that is generated in the burning process. The OET technique described here is based on a passive fibre-optic detection system, which allows spatially resolved high-frequency detection of the flame front in a combustion flame, where all fibres detect the emission signals simultaneously. The system withstands the high pressures and temperatures typically encountered in the harsh environments of gas turbine combustors and IC engines. The sensor-array is non-intrusive, low-cost, compact, simple to configure and can be quickly set up around a combustion field. The maximum acquisition rate is 2 kHz. This allows spatially resolved study of the fast phenomena in combustion. Furthermore, the production of NOx is investigated through the emission of green light as a result of adding tri-methyl-borate to a flame. In combustion, the tri-methyl-borate produces green luminescence in locations where NOx would be produced. Combining the green luminescence visualisation with OET detection of the hydroxyl radical allows monitoring of heat release and of NOx production areas, thus giving a means of studying both the burning process and the resulting NOx pollution.

  6. Performance analysis of a latent heat storage system with phase change material for new designed solar collectors in greenhouse heating

    SciTech Connect

    Benli, Hueseyin; Durmus, Aydin

    2009-12-15

    The continuous increase in the level of greenhouse gas emissions and the rise in fuel prices are the main driving forces behind the efforts for more effectively utilize various sources of renewable energy. In many parts of the world, direct solar radiation is considered to be one of the most prospective sources of energy. In this study, the thermal performance of a phase change thermal storage unit is analyzed and discussed. The storage unit is a component of ten pieced solar air collectors heating system being developed for space heating of a greenhouse and charging of PCM. CaCl{sub 2}6H{sub 2}O was used as PCM in thermal energy storage with a melting temperature of 29 C. Hot air delivered by ten pieced solar air collector is passed through the PCM to charge the storage unit. The stored heat is utilized to heat ambient air before being admitted to a greenhouse. This study is based on experimental results of the PCM employed to analyze the transient thermal behavior of the storage unit during the charge and discharge periods. The proposed size of collectors integrated PCM provided about 18-23% of total daily thermal energy requirements of the greenhouse for 3-4 h, in comparison with the conventional heating device. (author)

  7. Effect of latent heat in boiling water on the synthesis of gold nanoparticles of different sizes by using the Turkevich method.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wenchao; Zhang, Peina; Li, Yijing; Xia, Haibing; Wang, Dayang; Tao, Xutang

    2015-02-01

    The Turkevich method, involving the reduction of HAuCl4 with citrate in boiling water, allows the facile production of monodisperse, quasispherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Although, it is well-known that the size of the AuNPs obtained with the same recipe vary slightly (as little as approximately 4 nm), but noticeably, from one report to another, it has rarely been studied. The present work demonstrates that this size variation can be reconciled by the small, but noticeable, effect that the latent heat in boiling water has on the size of the AuNPs obtained by using the Turkevich method. The increase in latent heat during water boiling caused an approximately 3 nm reduction in the size of the as-prepared AuNPs; this reduction in size is mainly a result of accelerated nucleation driven by the extra heat. It was further demonstrated that, the heating temperature can be utilized as an additional measure to adjust the growth rate of AuNPs during the reduction of HAuCl4 with citrate in boiling water. Therefore, the latent heat of boiling solvents may provide one way to control nucleation and growth in the synthesis of monodisperse nanoparticles.

  8. Thermal energy storage - overview and specific insight into nitrate salts for sensible and latent heat storage.

    PubMed

    Pfleger, Nicole; Bauer, Thomas; Martin, Claudia; Eck, Markus; Wörner, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is capable to reduce the demand of conventional energy sources for two reasons: First, they prevent the mismatch between the energy supply and the power demand when generating electricity from renewable energy sources. Second, utilization of waste heat in industrial processes by thermal energy storage reduces the final energy consumption. This review focuses mainly on material aspects of alkali nitrate salts. They include thermal properties, thermal decomposition processes as well as a new method to develop optimized salt systems.

  9. Solar passive ceiling system. Final report. [Passive solar heating system with venetian blind reflectors and latent heat storage in ceiling

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    The construction of a 1200 square foot building, with full basement, built to be used as a branch library in a rural area is described. The primary heating source is a passive solar system consisting of a south facing window system. The system consists of: a set of windows located in the south facing wall only, composed of double glazed units; a set of reflectors mounted in each window which reflects sunlight up to the ceiling (the reflectors are similar to venetian blinds); a storage area in the ceiling which absorbs the heat from the reflected sunlight and stores it in foil salt pouches laid in the ceiling; and an automated curtain which automatically covers and uncovers the south facing window system. The system is totally passive and uses no blowers, pumps or other active types of heat distribution equipment. The building contains a basement which is normally not heated, and the north facing wall is bermed four feet high around the north side.

  10. A field study of the effects of inhomogeneities of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, J.C.; Barnes, F.J.; Coulter, R.L.; Crawford, T.L.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, the problem of characterizing turbulent fluxes of heat, momentum, and moisture over inhomogeneous surfaces has received increasing attention. This issue is relevant to the performance of general circulation models (GCMs), in which a single grid element can encompass a variety of surface and topographical features. Although considerable progress has been made in describing the energy balance at a surface partially covered by vegetation, less is known about how to treat adjacent regions of sharply contrasting surface characteristics. One difficulty is the scarcity of suitable data sets with which to study the problem, particularly on scales of tens to hundreds of kilometers.

  11. The long-term effect of urbanization and anthropogenic heat release on climate across China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Feng, J.

    2013-12-01

    The human activities impact on the urban heat island (UHI) is directly through anthropogenic heat release, and indirectly through the land use configuration. In this paper, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with the Urban Canopy Model (UCM) is employed to simulate the regional impacts on climate under the two scenarios in China: the underlying surface changes due to urbanization (USCU), and anthropogenic heat release (AHR). Three experiments were performed from January 2000 to February 2010. USCU decreases the summer and winter low cloud cover over most east China, and almost the energy flux increase except that the latent heat and the up solar wave, summer temperature increases obviously, particularly in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei and Yangtze River Delta region with an increase of 1.13°C and 1.22°C; AHR increases the variable change including the low cloud cover and all the energy flux and temperatures; the most striking winter temperature change region occurs also in the Yangtze River Delta region added by 0.63°C. USCU has the greatest impact on the summer precipitation in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region, which has reduced amplitude value of 20.43 percent. The USCU decreases the surface soil humidity and increases the surface soil temperature in most east China. In the three urban agglomerations, summer surface wind increases apparently but winter surface wind reduce obviously affected by USCU. The low pressure level is the south wind with the amplitude less than 1m/s and the two cyclonic vorticity exists in the summer, there is the same wind direction in the winter, but without the apparent cyclonic vorticity and small wind speed under the USCU. In the AHR, the prevailing wind direction is north wind and two rise circulation between 30°N and 40°N in the summer, the principal winter wind direction is south with the same two rise circulation nearby former two latitude. The summer index almost increases under the USCU scenario, but AHR

  12. Thermal Assessment of a Latent-Heat Energy Storage Module During Melting and Freezing for Solar Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos Archibold, Antonio

    Capital investment reduction, exergetic efficiency improvement and material compatibility issues have been identified as the primary techno-economic challenges associated, with the near-term development and deployment of thermal energy storage (TES) in commercial-scale concentrating solar power plants. Three TES techniques have gained attention in the solar energy research community as possible candidates to reduce the cost of solar-generated electricity, namely (1) sensible heat storage, (2) latent heat (tank filled with phase change materials (PCMs) or encapsulated PCMs packed in a vessel) and (3) thermochemical storage. Among these the PCM macro-encapsulation approach seems to be one of the most-promising methods because of its potential to develop more effective energy exchange, reduce the cost associated with the tank and increase the exergetic efficiency. However, the technological barriers to this approach arise from the encapsulation techniques used to create a durable capsule, as well as an assessment of the fundamental thermal energy transport mechanisms during the phase change. A comprehensive study of the energy exchange interactions and induced fluid flow during melting and solidification of a confined storage medium is reported in this investigation from a theoretical perspective. Emphasis has been placed on the thermal characterization of a single constituent storage module rather than an entire storage system, in order to, precisely capture the energy exchange contributions of all the fundamental heat transfer mechanisms during the phase change processes. Two-dimensional, axisymmetric, transient equations for mass, momentum and energy conservation have been solved numerically by the finite volume scheme. Initially, the interaction between conduction and natural convection energy transport modes, in the absence of thermal radiation, is investigated for solar power applications at temperatures (300--400°C). Later, participating thermal radiation

  13. Radio Heating of Lunar Soil to Release Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso; Penanen, Konstantin

    2006-01-01

    A report proposes the development of a system to collect volatile elements and compounds from Lunar soil for use in supporting habitation and processing into rocket fuel. Prior exploratory missions revealed that H2, He, and N2 are present in Lunar soil and there are some indications that water ice may also be present. The proposed system would include a shroud that would be placed on the Lunar surface. Inside the shroud would be a radio antenna aimed downward. The antenna would be excited at a suitably high power and at a frequency chosen to optimize the depth of penetration of radio waves into the soil. The radio waves would heat the soil, thereby releasing volatiles bound to soil particles. The escaping volatiles would be retained by the shroud and collected by condensation in a radiatively cooled vessel connected to the shroud. It has been estimated that through radio-frequency heating at a power of 10 kW for one day, it should be possible to increase the temperature of a soil volume of about 1 cubic m by about 200 C -- an amount that should suffice for harvesting a significant quantity of volatile material.

  14. Improvement of discharge characteristics of latent heat thermal energy storage unit by using carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Fukai, Jun; Oishi, Akira; Kodama, Yoshikazu; Kanou, Makoto; Miyatake, Osamu

    1999-07-01

    Many phase change materials have unacceptably low thermal conductivities. Metal fins, metal honeycombs and metal matrices have been examined to enhance the thermal conductivity of the PCMs. This study proposed an enhancement technique using carbon fibers with high thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers prepared in this study is 220 W/(m{center_dot}K). Paraffin wax (0.26 W/(m{center_dot}K) in solid phase) and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{center_dot}10H{sub 2}O-mixture (0.8 W/(m{center_dot}K) in solid phase) were selected as heat storage media. The fibers were uniformly mixed with th PCM encapsulated in a cylindrical capsule. The effective thermal conductivities of the fibers/PCM composites were measured. Figure A-1 shows the ratio of the effective thermal conductivity of the composite (k{sub c}) to the thermal conductivity of the phase change material (k{sub m}). The figure demonstrates that the fibers essentially enhance the thermal conductivities of paraffin. For paraffin, there is little dependence of the effective thermal conductivity on the fiber length (L{sub f}). Though the k{sub c}/k{sub m} for Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{center_dot}10H{sub 2}O-mixture is lower than that of the paraffin wax, 2% fibers increase the thermal conductivity of the PCM by a factor of about three. This value is almost identical to the thermal conductivity of ice (2.2 W/(m{center_dot}K)). The effect of the carbon fibers on discharge characteristics of a thermal energy storage system was investigated. Capsules containing a carbon fibers/paraffin composite are packed into a thermal energy storage unit. The inlet fluid temperature (T{sub in})and the outlet fluid temperature (T{sub out}) were measured during the discharge process. Figure A-2 shows a typical result of the experiments. Remarkable effect of the fibers is observed after the outlet temperature reaches the phase change temperature ({approx}60 C). That is, the period where the outlet temperature is maintained near the

  15. Latent heat loss of dairy cows in an equatorial semi-arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Roberto Gomes; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; de Macedo Costa, Leonardo Lelis; de Queiroz, João Paulo A. Fernandes

    2012-09-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate evaporative heat transfer of dairy cows bred in a hot semi-arid environment. Cutaneous ( E S) and respiratory ( E R) evaporation were measured (810 observations) in 177 purebred and crossbred Holstein cows from five herds located in the equatorial semi-arid region, and one herd in the subtropical region of Brazil. Rectal temperature ( T R), hair coat surface temperature ( T S) and respiratory rate ( F R) were also measured. Observations were made in the subtropical region from August to December, and in the semi-arid region from April to July. Measurements were done from 1100 to 1600 hours, after cows remained in a pen exposed to the sun. Environmental variables measured in the same locations as the animals were black globe temperature ( T G), air temperature ( T A), wind speed ( U), and partial air vapour pressure ( P V). Data were analysed by mixed models, using the least squares method. Results showed that average E S and E R were higher in the semi-arid region (117.2 W m-2 and 44.0 W m-2, respectively) than in the subtropical region (85.2 W m-2 and 30.2 W m-2, respectively). Herds and individual cows were significant effects ( P < 0.01) for all traits in the semi-arid region. Body parts did not affect T S and E S in the subtropical region, but was a significant effect ( P < 0.01) in the semi-arid region. The average flank T S (42.8°C) was higher than that of the neck and hindquarters (39.8°C and 41.6°C, respectively). Average E S was higher in the neck (133.3 W m-2) than in the flank (116.2 W m-2) and hindquarters (98.6 W m-2). Coat colour affected significantly both T S and E S ( P < 0.01). Black coats had higher T S and E S in the semi-arid region (41.7°C and 117.2 W m-2, respectively) than white coats (37.2°C and 106.7 W m-2, respectively). Rectal temperatures were almost the same in both subtropical and semi-arid regions. The results highlight the need for improved management methods specific for semi-arid regions.

  16. Latent heat loss of dairy cows in an equatorial semi-arid environment.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Roberto Gomes; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; de Macedo Costa, Leonardo Lelis; de Queiroz, João Paulo A Fernandes

    2012-09-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate evaporative heat transfer of dairy cows bred in a hot semi-arid environment. Cutaneous (E(S)) and respiratory (E(R)) evaporation were measured (810 observations) in 177 purebred and crossbred Holstein cows from five herds located in the equatorial semi-arid region, and one herd in the subtropical region of Brazil. Rectal temperature (T(R)), hair coat surface temperature (T(S)) and respiratory rate (F(R)) were also measured. Observations were made in the subtropical region from August to December, and in the semi-arid region from April to July. Measurements were done from 1100 to 1600 hours, after cows remained in a pen exposed to the sun. Environmental variables measured in the same locations as the animals were black globe temperature (T(G)), air temperature (T(A)), wind speed (U), and partial air vapour pressure (P(V)). Data were analysed by mixed models, using the least squares method. Results showed that average E(S) and E(R) were higher in the semi-arid region (117.2 W m(-2) and 44.0 W m(-2), respectively) than in the subtropical region (85.2 W m(-2) and 30.2 W m(-2), respectively). Herds and individual cows were significant effects (P < 0.01) for all traits in the semi-arid region. Body parts did not affect T(S) and E(S) in the subtropical region, but was a significant effect (P < 0.01) in the semi-arid region. The average flank T(S) (42.8°C) was higher than that of the neck and hindquarters (39.8°C and 41.6°C, respectively). Average E(S) was higher in the neck (133.3 W m(-2)) than in the flank (116.2 W m(-2)) and hindquarters (98.6 W m(-2)). Coat colour affected significantly both T(S) and E(S) (P < 0.01). Black coats had higher T(S) and E(S) in the semi-arid region (41.7°C and 117.2 W m(-2), respectively) than white coats (37.2°C and 106.7 W m(-2), respectively). Rectal temperatures were almost the same in both subtropical and semi-arid regions. The results highlight the need for improved management methods specific

  17. Estimation of Mesoscale Atmospheric Latent Heating Profiles from TRMM Rain Statistics Utilizing a Simple One-Dimensional Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iacovazzi, Robert A., Jr.; Prabhakara, C.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a model is developed to estimate mesoscale-resolution atmospheric latent heating (ALH) profiles. It utilizes rain statistics deduced from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data, and cloud vertical velocity profiles and regional surface thermodynamic climatologies derived from other available data sources. From several rain events observed over tropical ocean and land, ALH profiles retrieved by this model in convective rain regions reveal strong warming throughout most of the troposphere, while in stratiform rain regions they usually show slight cooling below the freezing level and significant warming above. The mesoscale-average, or total, ALH profiles reveal a dominant stratiform character, because stratiform rain areas are usually much larger than convective rain areas. Sensitivity tests of the model show that total ALH at a given tropospheric level varies by less than +/- 10 % when convective and stratiform rain rates and mesoscale fractional rain areas are perturbed individually by 1 15 %. This is also found when the non-uniform convective vertical velocity profiles are replaced by one that is uniform. Larger variability of the total ALH profiles arises when climatological ocean- and land-surface temperatures (water vapor mixing ratios) are independently perturbed by +/- 1.0 K (+/- 5 %) and +/- 5.0 K (+/- 15 %), respectively. At a given tropospheric level, such perturbations can cause a +/- 25 % variation of total ALH over ocean, and a factor-of-two sensitivity over land. This sensitivity is reduced substantially if perturbations of surface thermodynamic variables do not change surface relative humidity, or are not extended throughout the entire model evaporation layer. The ALH profiles retrieved in this study agree qualitatively with tropical total diabatic heating profiles deduced in earlier studies. Also, from January and July 1999 ALH-profile climatologies generated separately with TRMM Microwave Imager and Precipitation Radar rain

  18. Evaluation of three satellite-based latent heat flux algorithms over forest ecosystems using eddy covariance data.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yunjun; Zhang, Yuhu; Zhao, Shaohua; Li, Xianglan; Jia, Kun

    2015-06-01

    We have evaluated the performance of three satellite-based latent heat flux (LE) algorithms over forest ecosystems using observed data from 40 flux towers distributed across the world on all continents. These are the revised remote sensing-based Penman-Monteith LE (RRS-PM) algorithm, the modified satellite-based Priestley-Taylor LE (MS-PT) algorithm, and the semi-empirical Penman LE (UMD-SEMI) algorithm. Sensitivity analysis illustrates that both energy and vegetation terms has the highest sensitivity compared with other input variables. The validation results show that three algorithms demonstrate substantial differences in algorithm performance for estimating daily LE variations among five forest ecosystem biomes. Based on the average Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency and root-mean-squared error (RMSE), the MS-PT algorithm has high performance over both deciduous broadleaf forest (DBF) (0.81, 25.4 W/m(2)) and mixed forest (MF) (0.62, 25.3 W/m(2)) sites, the RRS-PM algorithm has high performance over evergreen broadleaf forest (EBF) (0.4, 28.1 W/m(2)) sites, and the UMD-SEMI algorithm has high performance over both deciduous needleleaf forest (DNF) (0.78, 17.1 W/m(2)) and evergreen needleleaf forest (ENF) (0.51, 28.1 W/m(2)) sites. Perhaps the lower uncertainties in the required forcing data for the MS-PT algorithm, the complicated algorithm structure for the RRS-PM algorithm, and the calibrated coefficients of the UMD-SEMI algorithm based on ground-measured data may explain these differences.

  19. Effects of anthropogenic heat release upon the urban climate in a Japanese megacity.

    PubMed

    Narumi, Daisuke; Kondo, Akira; Shimoda, Yoshiyuki

    2009-05-01

    This report presents results of investigations of the influence of anthropogenic heat release in Japanese megacity (Keihanshin district) upon the urban climate, using the energy database [Shimoda et al., 1999. Estimation and evaluation of artificial waste heat in urban area. Selected Papers from the Conference ICB-ICUC'99 WCASP-50 WMO/TD no. 1026] as a part of the land-surface boundary conditions of a mesoscale meteorological simulation model. The calculated results related to atmospheric temperature distribution were similar to observed values not only for daily averages but also for amplitudes and phases of diurnal change. To reproduce accurately, it is essential to reproduce urban characteristics such as an urban canopy and anthropogenic heat release in a fine resolution mesh. We attempted an analysis using current data for anthropogenic heat and under uniform heat release conditions, to investigate temporal and spatial characteristics in relation to the influence of anthropogenic heat release on the urban climate. The results of investigation into the influence of anthropogenic heat release on atmospheric temperature using current data indicate that the amount of heat released is lower at night than during the day, but the temperature rise is nearly 3 times greater. Results of investigation into the influence of anthropogenic heat release on wind systems using current data indicate that the onset of land breezes is delayed, particularly in a coastal area. Investigation into the temporal characteristics related to the influence of anthropogenic heat release under uniform heat release conditions showed a maximum influence on temperature during the predawn period.

  20. Global patterns of land-atmosphere fluxes of carbon dioxide, latent heat, and sensible heat derived from eddy covariance, satellite, and meteorological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Martin; Reichstein, Markus; Margolis, Hank A.; Cescatti, Alessandro; Richardson, Andrew D.; Arain, M. Altaf; Arneth, Almut; Bernhofer, Christian; Bonal, Damien; Chen, Jiquan; Gianelle, Damiano; Gobron, Nadine; Kiely, Gerald; Kutsch, Werner; Lasslop, Gitta; Law, Beverly E.; Lindroth, Anders; Merbold, Lutz; Montagnani, Leonardo; Moors, Eddy J.; Papale, Dario; Sottocornola, Matteo; Vaccari, Francesco; Williams, Christopher

    2011-09-01

    We upscaled FLUXNET observations of carbon dioxide, water, and energy fluxes to the global scale using the machine learning technique, model tree ensembles (MTE). We trained MTE to predict site-level gross primary productivity (GPP), terrestrial ecosystem respiration (TER), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), latent energy (LE), and sensible heat (H) based on remote sensing indices, climate and meteorological data, and information on land use. We applied the trained MTEs to generate global flux fields at a 0.5° × 0.5° spatial resolution and a monthly temporal resolution from 1982 to 2008. Cross-validation analyses revealed good performance of MTE in predicting among-site flux variability with modeling efficiencies (MEf) between 0.64 and 0.84, except for NEE (MEf = 0.32). Performance was also good for predicting seasonal patterns (MEf between 0.84 and 0.89, except for NEE (0.64)). By comparison, predictions of monthly anomalies were not as strong (MEf between 0.29 and 0.52). Improved accounting of disturbance and lagged environmental effects, along with improved characterization of errors in the training data set, would contribute most to further reducing uncertainties. Our global estimates of LE (158 ± 7 J × 1018 yr-1), H (164 ± 15 J × 1018 yr-1), and GPP (119 ± 6 Pg C yr-1) were similar to independent estimates. Our global TER estimate (96 ± 6 Pg C yr-1) was likely underestimated by 5-10%. Hot spot regions of interannual variability in carbon fluxes occurred in semiarid to semihumid regions and were controlled by moisture supply. Overall, GPP was more important to interannual variability in NEE than TER. Our empirically derived fluxes may be used for calibration and evaluation of land surface process models and for exploratory and diagnostic assessments of the biosphere.

  1. Global patterns of land-atmosphere fluxes of carbon dioxide, latent heat, and sensible heat derived from eddy covariance, satellite, and meteorological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J.; Reichstein, M.

    2012-12-01

    We upscaled FLUXNET observations of carbon dioxide, water and energy fluxes to the global scale using the machine learning technique, Model Tree Ensembles (MTE). We trained MTE to predict site-level gross primary productivity (GPP), terrestrial ecosystem respiration (TER), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), latent energy (LE), and sensible heat (H) based on remote sensing indices, climate and meteorological data, and information on land use. We applied the trained MTEs to generate global flux fields at a 0.5° x 0.5o spatial resolution and a monthly temporal resolution from 1982-2008. Cross-validation analyses revealed good performance of MTE in predicting among-site flux variability with modeling efficiencies (MEf) between 0.64 and 0.84, except for NEE (MEf = 0.32). Performance was also good for predicting seasonal patterns (MEf between 0.84 and 0.89, except for NEE (0.64)). By comparison, predictions of monthly anomalies were weak. Our products are increasingly used to evaluate global land surface models. However, depending on the flux of interest (e.g. gross primary production, terrestrial ecosystem respiration, net ecosystem exchange, evapotranspiration) and the pattern of interest (mean annual map, seasonal cycles, interannual variability, trends) the robustness and uncertainty of these products varies considerably. To avoid pitfalls, this talk also aims at providing an overview of uncertainties associated with these products, and to provide recommendations on the usage for land surface model evaluations. Finally, we present FLUXCOM - an ongoing activity that aims at generating an ensemble of data-driven FLUXNET based products based on diverse approaches.

  2. HMGB1 exacerbates bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome via RAGE/NF-κB/HPSE signaling to enhance latent TGF-β release from ECM

    PubMed Central

    He, Long; Sun, Fei; Wang, Yi; Zhu, Jianghui; Fang, Jing; Zhang, Shu; Yu, Qilin; Gong, Quan; Ren, Boxue; Xiang, Xudong; Chen, Zhishui; Ning, Qin; Hu, Jifa; Yang, Ping; Wang, Cong-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), characterized by progressive airflow obstruction, is the main barrier to long-term graft survival after lung transplantation. Despite extensive studies, the mechanisms underlying BOS remain poorly understood, and targeted interventions have not yet been fully developed. In the present study, we employed a mouse model of tracheal transplantation and demonstrated that blockade of HMGB1 alone or combined with heparanase (HPSE) attenuates the development of BOS. It was noted that HMGB1 was first passively released from necrotic/damaged cells as a result of early unavoidable allograft injuries, leading to macrophage infiltration along with HMGB1 active secretion. Mechanistic studies revealed that extracellular HMGB1 acted through its receptor, RAGE, to activate NF-κB, which then bound to the HPSE promoter to transcribe its expression. The enhanced HPSE next released HS-bonded latent TGF-β from myofibroblast ECM by cleaving HS chains to promote the initiation and progression of BOS. Together, our data suggest that HMGB1 and HPSE could be viable targets for prevention and intervention of fibrotic diseases such BOS after lung transplantation. PMID:27347307

  3. The Simulation of the Opposing Fluxes of Latent Heat and CO2 over Various Land-Use Types: Coupling a Gas Exchange Model to a Mesoscale Atmospheric Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyers, Mark; Krüger, Andreas; Werner, Christiane; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Zacharias, Stefan; Kerschgens, Michael

    2011-04-01

    A mesoscale meteorological model (FOOT3DK) is coupled with a gas exchange model to simulate surface fluxes of CO2 and H2O under field conditions. The gas exchange model consists of a C3 single leaf photosynthesis sub-model and an extended big leaf (sun/shade) sub-model that divides the canopy into sunlit and shaded fractions. Simulated CO2 fluxes of the stand-alone version of the gas exchange model correspond well to eddy-covariance measurements at a test site in a rural area in the west of Germany. The coupled FOOT3DK/gas exchange model is validated for the diurnal cycle at singular grid points, and delivers realistic fluxes with respect to their order of magnitude and to the general daily course. Compared to the Jarvis-based big leaf scheme, simulations of latent heat fluxes with a photosynthesis-based scheme for stomatal conductance are more realistic. As expected, flux averages are strongly influenced by the underlying land cover. While the simulated net ecosystem exchange is highly correlated with leaf area index, this correlation is much weaker for the latent heat flux. Photosynthetic CO2 uptake is associated with transpirational water loss via the stomata, and the resulting opposing surface fluxes of CO2 and H2O are reproduced with the model approach. Over vegetated surfaces it is shown that the coupling of a photosynthesis-based gas exchange model with the land-surface scheme of a mesoscale model results in more realistic simulated latent heat fluxes.

  4. Impact of different eddy covariance sensors and set-up on the annual balance of CO2 and fluxes of CH4 and latent heat in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, J. P.; Zona, D.; Gioli, B.; Murphy, P.; Burba, G. G.; Oechel, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    Expanding eddy covariance measurements of CO2 and CH4 fluxes in the Arctic is critical for refining the global C budget. Continuous measurements are particularly challenging because of the remote locations, low power availability, and extreme weather conditions. The necessity for tailoring instrumentation at different sites further complicates the interpretation of results and may add uncertainty to estimates of annual CO2 budgets. We investigated the influence of different sensor combinations on FCO2, latent heat (LE), and FCH4, and assessed the differences in annual FCO2 estimated with different instrumentation at the same sites. Using data from four sites across the North Slope of Alaska, we resolved FCO2 and FCH4 to within 5% using different combinations of open- and closed-path gas analyzers and within 10% using heated and non-heated anemometers. A continuously heated anemometer increased data coverage relative to non-heated anemometers while resulting in comparable annual FCO2, despite over-estimating sensible heat fluxes by 15%. We also implemented an intermittent heating strategy whereby activation only when ice or snow blockage of the transducers was detected. This resulted in comparable data coverage (~ 60%) to the continuously heated anemometer, while avoiding potential over-estimation of sensible heat and gas fluxes. We found good agreement in FCO2 and FCH4 from two closed-path and one open-path gas analyzer, despite the need for large spectral corrections of closed-path fluxes and density and temperature corrections to open-path sensors. However, data coverage was generally greater when using closed-path, especially during cold seasons (36-40% vs 10-14% for the open path), when fluxes from Arctic regions are particularly uncertain and potentially critical to annual C budgets. Measurement of Arctic LE remains a challenge due to strong attenuation along sample tubes, even when heated, that could not be accounted for with spectral corrections.

  5. Heat release in the cryogenic system of a superconducting integrated detector and the influence of heat on its operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinev, N. V.; Koshelets, V. P.

    2013-03-01

    Heat release in the cryogenic system of a subterahertz-range superconducting integrated detector at ≈4.2 K is studied, and the influence of the released heat on its main characteristics is estimated. The detector chip mounted on a silicon lens is connected to a bias board by aluminum wires 25 μm in diameter, which are fixed by ultrasonic bonding. They are necessary for setting a bias current through the working components of the detector and represent an integral part of the system. The contact resistance between the wires and contact pads of the microchip is measured. The contact resistance is found to considerably exceed the resistance of the aluminum wire and, hence, makes a major contribution to heat release in the system. A "multipoint contact with one wire" technique is suggested. Tests show its efficiency: the contact resistance decreases considerably compared with the standard approach.

  6. The direct simulation of high-speed mixing-layers without and with chemical heat release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekar, B.; Mukunda, H. S.; Carpenter, M. H.

    1991-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation of high speed reacting and non-reacting flows for H2-air systems is presented. The calculations are made for a convective Mach number of 0.38 with hyperbolic tangent initial profile and finite rate chemical reactions. A higher-order numerical method is used in time accurate mode to time advance the solution to a statistical steady state. About 600 time slices of all the variables are then stored for statistical analysis. It is shown that most of the problems of high-speed combustion with air are characterized by relatively weak heat release. The present study shows that: (1) the convective speed is reduced by heat release by about 10 percent at this convective Mach number M(sub c) = 0.38; (2) the variation of the mean and rms fluctuation of temperature can be explained on the basis of temperature fluctuation between the flame temperature and the ambient; (3) the growth rate with heat release is reduced by 7 percent; and (4) the entrainment is reduced by 25 percent with heat release. These differences are small in comparison with incompressible flow dynamics, and are argued to be due to the reduced importance of heat release in comparison with the large enthalpy gradients resulting from the large-scale vortex dynamics. It is finally suggested that the problems of reduced mixing in high-speed flows are not severely complicated by heat release.

  7. Flash-Fire Propensity and Heat-Release Rate Studies of Improved Fire Resistant Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-six improved fire resistant materials were tested for flash-fire propensity and heat release rate properties. The tests were conducted to obtain a descriptive index based on the production of ignitable gases during the thermal degradation process and on the response of the materials under a specific heat load.

  8. Modulation of drug release from glyceryl palmitostearate-alginate beads via heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Pongjanyakul, Thaned; Sungthongjeen, Srisagul; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit

    2006-08-17

    Diclofenac calcium alginate (DCA) beads containing glyceryl palmitostearate (GPS) were prepared by ionotropic gelation method. The effect of GPS amount and heat treatment on characteristics of the DCA beads was investigated. Incorporation of GPS into the DCA beads increased particle size and entrapment efficiency of diclofenac sodium (DS), but decreased water uptake in distilled water, and DS release rate. The heat treatment caused the DCA beads to be irregular shape particles and to possess higher water uptake. A slower release rate of DS in distilled water was found because of interaction of DS and alginate polymer matrix, and a restriction of water sorption into the inside region of the beads, which caused by the shrinkage of the beads after heating. However, the heat treatment did not affect particle shape and water uptake in distilled water of the 3%GPS-DCA beads. Differential scanning calorimetric study showed that GPS in the DCA beads was resolidified to different polymorph after cooling. Furthermore, the micro-Raman spectra indicated the existence of DS in the GPS matrix particles in the beads due to the partition of DS into the melted GPS during heat treatment. This led to a decrease in release rate of DS in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer and a change in DS release pattern in distilled water. Thus, not only the calcium alginate matrix, but also the resolidified GPS matrix in the alginate beads controlled the DS release from the 3%GPS-DCA beads with heat treatment.

  9. Heat release effects on the instability of parallel shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegde, U.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of time-dependent heat addition on the linear instablity of shear layers is of considerable interest in understanding the dynamic behavior of reacting flows and combustion-turbulence interactions. The approach is based upon the Bernoulli enthalpy aeroacoustics theory, which utilizes the specific enthalpy and specific entropy as the primary thermodynamic variables. In addition, velocity oscillations are split into Helmoholtz decomposition theorem.

  10. Phase-field model of solid-liquid phase transition with density difference and latent heat in velocity and elastic fields.

    PubMed

    Takae, Kyohei; Onuki, Akira

    2011-04-01

    We present a phase-field model of solid-liquid transitions with inhomogeneous temperature in one-component systems, including hydrodynamics and elasticity. Our model can describe plastic deformations at large elastic strains. We use it to investigate the melting of a solid domain, accounting for the latent heat effect, where there appears a velocity field in liquid and an elastic field in solid. We present simulation results in two dimensions for three cases of melting. First, a solid domain is placed on a heated wall, which melts mostly near the solid-liquid-wall contact region. Second, a solid domain is suspended in a warmer liquid under shear flow, which rotates as a whole because of elasticity and melts gradually. Cooling of the surrounding liquid is accelerated by convection. Third, a solid rod is under high compression in liquid, where slips appear from the solid-liquid interface, leading to a plastic deformation. Subsequently, melting starts in the plastically deformed areas, eventually resulting in the fracture of the rod into pieces. In these phase-transition processes, the interface temperature is kept nearly equal to the coexisting temperature T(cs)(p) away from the heated wall, but this local equilibrium is not attained near the the contact region. We also examine a first-order liquid-liquid phase transition under heating from a boundary in one-component liquids.

  11. Study of the heat-transfer crisis on heat-release surfaces of annular channels with swirl and transit flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltenko, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    The results of the experimental study of the heat-transfer crisis on heat-release surfaces of annular channels with swirl and transit flow are presented. The experiments were carried out using electric heated annular channels with one and (or) two heat-release surfaces. For the organization of transit flow on a convex heat-release surface, four longitudinal ribs were installed uniformly at its perimeter. Swirl flow was realized using a capillary wound tightly (without gaps) on the ribs. The ratio between swirl and transit flows in the annular gap was varied by applying longitudinal ribs of different height. The experiments were carried out using a closed-type circulatory system. The experimental data were obtained in a wide range of regime parameters. Both water heated to the temperature less than the saturation temperature and water-steam mixture were fed at the inlet of the channels. For the measurement of the temperature of the heat-release surfaces, chromel-copel thermocouples were used. It was shown that the presence of swirl flow on a convex heatrelease surface led to a significant decrease in critical heat flows (CHF) compared to a smooth surface. To increase CHF, it was proposed to use the interaction of swirl flows of the heat carrier. The second swirl flow was transit flow, i.e., swirl flow with the step equal to infinity. It was shown that CHF values for a channel with swirl and transit flow in all the studied range of regime parameters was higher than CHF values for both a smooth annular channel and a channel with swirl. The empirical ratios describing the dependence of CHF on convex and concave heat-release surfaces of annular channels with swirl and transit flow on the geometrical characteristics of channels and the regime parameters were obtained. The experiments were carried out at the pressure p = 3.0-16.0 MPa and the mass velocity ρw = 250-3000 kg/(m2s).

  12. The Clinical Usefulness of Tuberculin Skin Test versus Interferon-Gamma Release Assays for Diagnosis of Latent Tuberculosis in HIV Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ayubi, Erfan; Doosti-Irani, Amin; Sanjari Moghaddam, Ali; Sani, Mohadeseh; Nazarzadeh, Milad; Mostafavi, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is becoming increasingly concerning due to the increasing the HIV epidemic, which have increased the risk for reactivation to active tuberculosis (TB) infection. LTBI is diagnosed by tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs). Objectives The aim of the present study was to conduct a meta-analysis of published papers on the agreement (kappa) between TST and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) tests for diagnosis of LTBI in HIV patient. Methods Electronic databases including PubMed/Medline, Elsevier/Scopus and Embase/Ovid were reviewed up Jan. 2016. We performed a random effect model meta-analysis for estimation of pooled Kappa between the two methods of diagnosis. Meta regression was used for assessing potential heterogeneity and Egger’s test was used for assessing small study effect and publication bias. Results The initial search strategy produced 6744 records. Of them, 23 cross-sectional studies met the inclusion criteria and 20 studies entered in meta-analysis. The pooled kappa was and prevalence-adjusted and bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK) were 0.37 (95% CI: 0.28, 0.46) and 0.59 (0.49, 0.69). The discordance of TST-/QFT-GIT+ was more than TST+/QFT-GIT-. Kappa estimate between two tests was linearly associated with age and prevalence index and inversely associated with bias index. Conclusion Fair agreement between TST and QFT-GIT makes it difficult to know whether TST is as useful as the QFT-GIT in HIV-infected patients. The higher discordance of TST-/QFT-GIT+ in compared to TST+/QFT-GIT- can induce the higher sensitivity of QFT-GIT for diagnosis LTBI in HIV patients. Disagreement between two tests can be influenced by error in measurements and prevalence of HIV. PMID:27622293

  13. Sensitivity of IFN-γ Release Assay to Detect Latent Tuberculosis Infection Is Retained in HIV-Infected Patients but Dependent on HIV/AIDS Progression

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Farba; Mbow, Fatou; Fletcher, Helen; Senghor, Cheikh S.; Coulibaly, Koura D.; LeFevre, Andrea M.; Ngom Gueye, Ndeye F.; Dieye, Tandakha; Sow, Papa S.; Mboup, Souleymane; Lienhardt, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Background Detection and treatment of latent TB infection (LTBI) in HIV infected individuals is strongly recommended to decrease morbidity and mortality in countries with high levels of HIV. Objective To assess the validity of a newly developed in-house ELISPOT interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) for the detection of LTBI amongst HIV infected individuals, in comparison with the Tuberculin Skin Test (TST). Methodology/Principal Findings ESAT6/CFP10 (EC) ELISPOT assays were performed, together with a TST, in 285 HIV infected individuals recruited in HIV clinics in Dakar, Senegal, who had no signs of active TB at time of enrolment. Thirty eight of the subjects (13.3%) failed to respond to PHA stimulation and were excluded from the analysis. In the 247 remaining patients, response to PHA did not vary according to CD4 cell count categories (p = 0.51). EC ELISPOT was positive in 125 (50.6%) subjects, while 53 (21.5%) had a positive TST. Concordance between EC ELISPOT and TST was observed in 151 patients (61.1%) (kappa = 0.23). The proportion of subjects with a positive response to the EC ELISPOT assay decreased with declining CD4 counts (p trend = 0.001), but were consistently higher than the proportion of TST responders. In multivariate analysis, the risk of being EC-ELISPOT positive in HIV infected individuals was associated with age, CD4 count and HIV-1 strain. Conclusion Our study indicates that IGRAs using M. tuberculosis specific antigens are likely to retain their validity for the diagnosis of LTBI among HIV positive individuals, but may be impaired by T-cell anergy in severely immuno-suppressed individuals. PMID:18197251

  14. Screening of latent tuberculosis infection by interferon-γ release assays in rheumatic patients: a systemic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Qiaoling; Zhang, Shu; Ai, Jingwen; Shao, Lingyun; Zhang, Wenhong

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the diagnostic value of interferon-γ release assays (IGRAs) for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients with rheumatic disease before receiving biologic agents. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were used for searching studies concerning the evaluation on the performance of IGRAs [QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G), QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) and T-SPOT.TB] in rheumatic patients before biological therapy. After assessing the quality of all studies included in the review, we summarized the results in subgroups using forest plots and calculated pooled estimates if applicable. The search identified 11 studies with a total sample size of 1940 individuals. Compared with the tuberculin skin test (TST), the pooled agreements in QFT-G/GIT and T-SPOT.TB were 72 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 65, 78 %) and 75 % (95 % CI 67, 83 %), respectively. BCG vaccination was positively correlated with positive rates of TST (pooled odds ratio (OR) 1.64, 95 % CI 1.06, 2.53). Compared with TST, IGRAs were better associated with the presentence of one or more tuberculosis (TB) risk factors. Neither steroid nor disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) significantly affect positive IGRA results. In contrast, TST positivity was significantly impacted by the use of steroid (pooled OR 0.45, 95 % CI 0.30, 0.69), but less significantly by the use of DMARDs (pooled OR 0.78, 95 % CI 0.50, 1.21). In conclusion, in rheumatic patients with previous BCG vaccination or currently on steroid therapy, IGRAs would be the better choice to identify LTBI by decreasing the false-positivity and false-negativity rate compared with conventional TST.

  15. Adsorption and release of ofloxacin from acid- and heat-treated halloysite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Junping; Zheng, Yue; Wang, Aiqin

    2014-01-01

    Halloysite nanotube is an ideal vehicle of the controlled release of drugs. In this study, we systematically investigated the effects of acid- and heat-treatments on the physicochemical properties, structure and morphology of halloysite by XRD, FTIR, SEM and TEM. Afterwards, the adsorption and in vitro release properties of halloysite for cationic ofloxacin (OFL) were evaluated. The results indicate that HCl treatment has no influence on the crystal structure of halloysite, whereas it becomes amorphous after calcined at temperature higher than 500 °C. Both acid- and heat-treatments have no evident influence on the tubular structure of halloysite. OFL was adsorbed onto halloysite via electrostatic interaction between protonated OFL and negative halloysite surface, cation exchange as well as electrostatic interaction between the OFL-Al(3+) complexes and the negative halloysite surface. Acid-treatment facilitates the release of the adsorbed OFL compared with the natural halloysite in spite of a slight decrease of adsorption capacity. However, heat-treatment results in a sharp decrease of adsorption capacity for OFL owning to the OFL-promoted dissolution of aluminum and the disappearance of the porous structure. Although heat-treatment also facilitates release of the adsorbed OFL, the amount of OFL released is in fact less than the natural halloysite owing to the very low adsorption capacity. Thus, acid-activation is an effective protocol to improve the adsorption and release of halloysite for cationic drug molecules.

  16. Direct numerical simulations of a reacting mixing layer with chemical heat release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, P. A.; Jou, W.-H.; Metcalfe, R. W.; Riley, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    In order to study the coupling between chemical heat release and fluid dynamics, direct numerical simulations of a chemically reacting mixing layer with heat release are performed. The fully compressible equations as well as an approximate set of equations that is asymptotically valid for low-Mach-number flows are treated. These latter equations have the computational advantage that high-frequency acoustic waves have been filtered out, allowing much larger time steps to be taken in the numerical solution procedure. A detailed derivation of these equations along with an outline of the numerical solution technique is given. Simulation results indicate that the rate of chemical product formed, the thickness of the mixing layer, and the amount of mass entrained into the layer all decrease with increasing rates of heat release.

  17. SP industry calorimeter for rate of heat release measurements up to 10MW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlberg, Martin

    The Swedish National Testing and Research Institute (SP) has installed a 10 MW fire calorimeter for rate of heat release measurements, similar to the one at Factory Mutual Research Corporation (FMRC). It can be used to classify commodities with respect to their fire hazard, to evaluate the efficiency of sprinkler systems, for chemical analysis of the combustion gases from hazardous fires, to produce input data for the fire modelling, etc. A large hood collects the fire gases and leads them into a duct where gas velocity, gas temperature, smoke density, and contents of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide are measured. On the basis of these measurements, mass flow and rate of heat release are calculated. The rate of heat release is calculated according to the oxygen consumption principle. The upper limit for measurements is approximately 10 MW and the lower is 0.1 MW.

  18. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heating in TRMM: Validation and Assimilation in the GEOS Data Assimilation System. [Year 2001 Project Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ming-Hua

    2001-01-01

    I have derived the vertical profiles of apparent heating Q and Q2 by using 3-hourly balloon sounding data from the ARM SGP sounding array for three IOPs in 2000. These IOPs cover the periods from 3/1 to 3/22, from 9/25 to 10/8, and from 11/27 to 12/22. These heating profiles will be collocated with the TRMM heating profiles for validation studies once the TRMM profiles become available to the investigators. I have also produced the objective analyses of Q1, Q2 and forcing fields for the international GCSS Case 3 Intercomparison project. The GSFC CRM participated in study, based on which TRMM heating profiles are derived. I have also studied to assimilate the vertical heating profile by constraining the cloud-base mass flux in the cumulus convection scheme using the CCM3. I first derive the vertical heating profile for each convective plume of unit cloud-base mass flux. The observed heating profile form ARM is then de-convoluted to derive the cloud base mass fluxes of all individual plumes. These fluxes are compared with those derived from the quasi-equilibrium hypothesis. They are shown to improve many other aspects of the model behavior.

  19. Rate of heat release measurements with the Swedish box test (Nordtest NT fire 004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmstedt, G. S.

    A method in which tendency to fire spread and smoke development is determined by gas temperature and smoke intensity measurements in relation to time was examined. The conventional measurement of exhaust gas temperature was tested against a measurement of the rate of heat release, using oxygen consumption calorimetry. Fourteen wall surfaces, including noncombustible materials of different thermal properties, wall linings and wood were used. Slow burning material shows good correlation between temperature measurement and rate of heat release. Fast burning material, however, consumes all the available oxygen and the temperature measurement becomes a measure of the thermal properties of the material.

  20. The Effect of Spray Initial Conditions on Heat Release and Emissions in LDI CFD Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannetti, Anthony C.; Liu, Nan-Suey; Davoudzadeh, Farhad

    2008-01-01

    The mass and velocity distribution of liquid spray has a primary effect on the combustion heat release process. This heat release process then affects emissions like nitrogen oxides (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO). Computational Fluid Dynamics gives the engineer insight into these processes, but various setup options exist (number of droplet groups, and initial droplet temperature) for spray initial conditions. This paper studies these spray initial condition options using the National Combustion Code (NCC) on a single swirler lean direct injection (LDI) flame tube. Using laminar finite rate chemistry, comparisons are made against experimental data for velocity measurements, temperature, and emissions (NOx, CO).

  1. Models to predict both sensible and latent heat transfer in the respiratory tract of Morada Nova sheep under semiarid tropical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Vinícius Carvalho; Saraiva, Edilson Paes; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; Nascimento, Carolina Cardoso Nagib; da Silva, Josinaldo Araújo; Pereira, Walter Esfraim; Filho, Edgard Cavalcanti Pimenta; Almeida, Maria Elivânia Vieira

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to build a prediction model both sensible and latent heat transfer by respiratory tract for Morada Nova sheep under field conditions in a semiarid tropical environment, using easily measured physiological and environmental parameters. Twelve dry Morada Nova ewes with an average of 3 ± 1.2 years old and average body weight of 32.76 ± 3.72 kg were used in a Latin square design 12 × 12 (12 days of records and 12 schedules). Tidal volume, respiratory rate, expired air temperature, and partial vapor pressure of the expired air were obtained from the respiratory facial mask and using a physiological measurement system. Ewes were evaluated from 0700 to 1900 h in each day under shade. A simple nonlinear model to estimate tidal volume as a function of respiratory rate was developed. Equation to estimate the expired air temperature was built, and the ambient air temperature was the best predictor together with relative humidity and ambient vapor pressure. In naturalized Morada Nova sheep, respiratory convection seems to be a mechanism of heat transfer of minor importance even under mild air temperature. Evaporation from the respiratory system increased together with ambient air temperature. At ambient air temperature, up to 35 °C respiratory evaporation accounted 90 % of the total heat lost by respiratory system, on average. Models presented here allow to estimate the heat flow from the respiratory tract for Morada Nova sheep bred in tropical region, using easily measured physiological and environmental traits as respiratory rate, ambient air temperature, and relative humidity.

  2. Heating Structures Derived from Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Adler, R.; Haddad, Z.; Hou, A.; Kakar, R.; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Kummerow, C.; Lang, S.; Meneghini, R.; Olson, W.

    2004-01-01

    Rainfall is a key link in the hydrologic cycle and is a primary heat source for the atmosphere. The vertical distribution of latent-heat release, which is accompanied by rainfall, modulates the large-scale circulations of the tropics and in turn can impact midlatitude weather. This latent heat release is a consequence of phase changes between vapor, liquid, and solid water. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), a joint U.S./Japan space project, was launched in November 1997. It provides an accurate measurement of rainfall over the global tropics which can be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of latent heating over the global tropics. The distributions of rainfall and inferred heating can be used to advance our understanding of the global energy and water cycle. This paper describes several different algorithms for estimating latent heating using TRMM observations. The strengths and weaknesses of each algorithm as well as the heating products are also discussed. The validation of heating products will be exhibited. Finally, the application of this heating information to global circulation and climate models is presented.

  3. Diurnal to annual changes in latent, sensible heat, and CO2 fluxes over a Laurentian Great Lake: A case study in Western Lake Erie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Changliang; Chen, Jiquan; Stepien, Carol A.; Chu, Housen; Ouyang, Zutao; Bridgeman, Thomas B.; Czajkowski, Kevin P.; Becker, Richard H.; John, Ranjeet

    2015-08-01

    To understand the carbon and energy exchange between the lake surface and the atmosphere, direct measurements of latent, sensible heat, and CO2 fluxes were taken using the eddy covariance (EC) technique in Western Lake Erie during October 2011 to September 2013. We found that the latent heat flux (LE) had a marked one-peak seasonal change in both years that differed from the diurnal course and lacked a sinusoidal dynamic common in terrestrial ecosystems. Daily mean LE was 4.8 ± 0.1 and 4.3 ± 0.2 MJ m-2 d-1 in Year 1 and Year 2, respectively. The sensible heat flux (H) remained much lower than the LE, with a daily mean of 0.9 ± 0.1 and 1.1 ± 0.1 MJ m-2 d-1 in Year 1 and Year 2, respectively. As a result, the Bowen ratio was <1 during most of the 2 year period, with the lowest summer value at 0.14. The vapor pressure deficit explained 35% of the variation in half hourly LE, while the temperature difference between the water surface and air explained 65% of the variation in half hourly H. Western Lake Erie acted as a small carbon sink holding -19.0 ± 5.4 and -40.2 ± 13.3 g C m-2 in the first and second summers (May-September) but as an annual source of 77.7 ± 18.6 and 49.5 ± 17.9 g C m-2 yr-1 in Year 1 and Year 2, respectively. The CO2 flux (FCO2) rate varied from -0.45 g C m-2 d-1 to 0.98 g C m-2 d-1. Similar to LE, FCO2 had noticeable diurnal changes during the months that had high chlorophyll a months but not during other months. A significantly negative correlation (P < 0.05) was found between FCO2 and chlorophyll a on monthly fluxes. Three gap-filling methods, including marginal distribution sampling, mean diurnal variation, and monthly mean, were quantitatively assessed, yielding an uncertainty of 4%, 6%, and 10% in LE, H, and FCO2, respectively.

  4. Americium and plutonium release behavior from irradiated mixed oxide fuel during heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, I.; Suto, M.; Miwa, S.; Hirosawa, T.; Koyama, S.

    2013-06-01

    The release behavior of Pu and Am was investigated under the reducing atmosphere expected in sodium cooled fast reactor severe accidents. Irradiated Pu and U mixed oxide fuels were heated at maximum temperatures of 2773 K and 3273 K. EPMA, γ-ray spectrometry and α-ray spectrometry for released and residual materials revealed that Pu and Am can be released more easily than U under the reducing atmosphere. The respective release rate coefficients for Pu and Am were obtained as 3.11 × 10-4 min-1 and 1.60 × 10-4 min-1 at 2773 K under the reducing atmosphere with oxygen partial pressure less than 0.02 Pa. Results of thermochemical calculations indicated that the main released chemical forms would likely be PuO for Pu and Am for Am under quite low oxygen partial pressure.

  5. Comparison of Interferon-γ Release Assay to Two Cut-Off Points of Tuberculin Skin Test to Detect Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Primary Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Fernanda Mattos; do Prado, Thiago Nascimento; Pinheiro, Jair dos Santos; Peres, Renata Lyrio; Lacerda, Thamy Carvalho; Loureiro, Rafaela Borge; Carvalho, Jose Américo; Fregona, Geisa; Dias, Elias Santos; Cosme, Lorrayne Beliqui; Rodrigues, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Riley, Lee Wood; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia

    2014-01-01

    Background An interferon-γ release assay, QuantiFERON-TB (QFT) test, has been introduced an alternative test for the diagnosis of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Here, we compared the performance of QFT with tuberculin skin test (TST) measured at two different cut-off points among primary health care work (HCW) in Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among HCWs in four Brazilian cities with a known history of high incidence of TB. Results of the QFT were compared to TST results based on both ≥5 mm and ≥10 mm as cut-off points. Results We enrolled 632 HCWs. When the cut-off value of ≥10 mm was used, agreement between QFT and TST was 69% (k = 0.31), and when the cut-off of ≥5 mm was chosen, the agreement was 57% (k = 0.22). We investigated possible factors of discordance of TST vs QFT. Compared to the TST−/QFT− group, risk factors for discordance in the TST+/QFT− group with TST cut-off of ≥5 mm included age between 41–45 years [OR = 2.70; CI 95%: 1.32–5.51] and 46–64 years [OR = 2.04; CI 95%: 1.05–3.93], BCG scar [OR = 2.72; CI 95%: 1.40–5.25], and having worked only in primary health care [OR = 2.30; CI 95%: 1.09–4.86]. On the other hand, for the cut-off of ≥10 mm, BCG scar [OR = 2.26; CI 95%: 1.03–4.91], being a household contact of a TB patient [OR = 1.72; CI 95%: 1.01–2.92] and having had a previous TST [OR = 1.66; CI 95%: 1.05–2.62], were significantly associated with the TST+/QFT− group. No statistically significant associations were found among the TST−/QFT+ discordant group with either TST cut-off value. Conclusions Although we identified BCG vaccination to contribute to the discordance at both TST cut-off measures, the current Brazilian recommendation for the initiation of LTBI treatment, based on information gathered from medical history, TST, chest radiograph and physical examination, should not be changed. PMID:25137040

  6. Screening for latent tuberculosis in Norwegian health care workers: high frequency of discordant tuberculin skin test positive and interferon-gamma release assay negative results

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) presents globally a significant health problem and health care workers (HCW) are at increased risk of contracting TB infection. There is no diagnostic gold standard for latent TB infection (LTBI), but both blood based interferon-gamma release assays (IGRA) and the tuberculin skin test (TST) are used. According to the national guidelines, HCW who have been exposed for TB should be screened and offered preventive anti-TB chemotherapy, but the role of IGRA in HCW screening is still unclear. Methods A total of 387 HCW working in clinical and laboratory departments in three major hospitals in the Western region of Norway with possible exposure to TB were included in a cross-sectional study. The HCW were asked for risk factors for TB and tested with TST and the QuantiFERON®TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT). A logistic regression model analyzed the associations between risk factors for TB and positive QFT or TST. Results A total of 13 (3.4%) demonstrated a persistent positive QFT, whereas 214 (55.3%) had a positive TST (≥ 6 mm) and 53 (13.7%) a TST ≥ 15 mm. Only ten (4.7%) of the HCW with a positive TST were QFT positive. Origin from a TB-endemic country was the only risk factor associated with a positive QFT (OR 14.13, 95% CI 1.37 - 145.38, p = 0.026), whereas there was no significant association between risk factors for TB and TST ≥ 15 mm. The five HCW with an initial positive QFT that retested negative all had low interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) responses below 0.70 IU/ml when first tested. Conclusions We demonstrate a low prevalence of LTBI in HCW working in hospitals with TB patients in our region. The “IGRA-only” seems like a desirable screening strategy despite its limitations in serial testing, due to the high numbers of discordant TST positive/IGRA negative results in HCW, probably caused by BCG vaccination or boosting due to repetitive TST testing. Thus, guidelines for TB screening in HCW should be updated in order to

  7. Impact of Dissociation and Sensible Heat Release on Pulse Detonation and Gas Turbine Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    2001-01-01

    A thermodynamic cycle analysis of the effect of sensible heat release on the relative performance of pulse detonation and gas turbine engines is presented. Dissociation losses in the PDE (Pulse Detonation Engine) are found to cause a substantial decrease in engine performance parameters.

  8. Coupling between entropy and unsteady heat release in a thermoacoustic system with a mean flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Zhao, Dan

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the coupling between entropy and unsteady heat release in a one dimensional duct in the presence of a mean flow is considered. As acoustic disturbances impinge on a compact heat source enclosed in the duct, entropy disturbances are generated. The transfer function between the generated entropy waves and oncoming flow velocity fluctuations is deduced by conducting order analysis of the linearized governing equations. The effects of the mean flow are emphasized for different forms of unsteady heat release model. It is shown that there is a strong coupling between entropy, heat release, mean flow and acoustic impedance at the heat source. To validate our theoretical analysis, numerical investigation is conducted by using a low order model. Comparing the theoretical and the low order model's results reveals that a good agreement is observed. It is found that when the mean flow Mach number is not negligible, the term of O(M1) in the identified entropy transfer function is as important as that of O(M0). Neglecting the term of O(M1) may lead to wrong prediction of the entropy waves produced in the system.

  9. Transient thermal analysis of three fast-charging latent heat storage configurations for a space-based power system

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, T.K.; Arimilli, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    A space-based thermal storage application must accept large quantities of heat in a short period of time at an elevated temperature. A model of a lithium hydride phase change energy storage system was used to estimate reasonable physical dimensions for this application which included the use of a liquid metal heat transfer fluid. A finite difference computer code was developed and used to evaluate three methods of enhancing heat transfer in the PCM energy storage system. None of these three methods, inserting thin fins, reticulated nickel, or liquid lithium, significantly improved the system performance. The use of a 95% void fraction reticulated nickel insert was found to increase the storage capacity (total energy stored) of the system slightly with only a small decrease in the system energy density (energy storage/system mass). The addition of 10% liquid lithium was found to cause minor increases in both storage density and storage capacity with the added benefit of reducing the hydrogen pressure of the lithium hydride. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Airborne flux measurements of CO{sub 2}, sensible, and latent heat over the Hudson Bay lowland

    SciTech Connect

    Desjardins, R.L.; Hayhoe, H.N.; MacPherson, J.I.; Schuepp, P.H.

    1994-01-20

    This article describes the results of aerial surveys conducted in 1990 over the Hudson Bay Lowland as part of the Northern Wetlands Study by the National Research Council of Ottawa, Canada. Two aerial runs of approximately 100 kilometers in length were completed from James Bay to the Kinosheo Lake area. Atmospheric research aircraft was used to measure the spatial and temporal variations in carbon dioxide, water, and sensible heat fluxes over the wetlands areas. The data collected as part of this study and interpretation of the results are presented in this paper. 27 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Thermal energy storage – overview and specific insight into nitrate salts for sensible and latent heat storage

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Thomas; Martin, Claudia; Eck, Markus; Wörner, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Summary Thermal energy storage (TES) is capable to reduce the demand of conventional energy sources for two reasons: First, they prevent the mismatch between the energy supply and the power demand when generating electricity from renewable energy sources. Second, utilization of waste heat in industrial processes by thermal energy storage reduces the final energy consumption. This review focuses mainly on material aspects of alkali nitrate salts. They include thermal properties, thermal decomposition processes as well as a new method to develop optimized salt systems. PMID:26199853

  12. Clean Photothermal Heating and Controlled Release From Near Infrared Dye Doped Nanoparticles Without Oxygen Photosensitization

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Samit; Shaw, Scott K.; Spence, Graeme T.; Roland, Felicia M.; Smith, Bradley D.

    2015-01-01

    The photothermal heating and release properties of biocompatible organic nanoparticles, doped with a near-infrared croconaine (Croc) dye, were compared with analogous nanoparticles doped with the common near-infrared dyes ICG and IR780. Separate formulations of lipid-polymer-hybrid nanoparticles and liposomes, each containing Croc dye, absorbed strongly at 808 nm and generated clean laser-induced heating (no production of 1O2 and no photobleaching of the dye). In contrast, laser-induced heating of nanoparticles containing ICG or IR780 produced reactive 1O2 leading to bleaching of the dye and also decomposition of co-encapsulated payload such as the drug Doxorubicin. Croc dye was especially useful as a photothermal agent for laser controlled release of chemically sensitive payload from nanoparticles. Solution state experiments demonstrated repetitive fractional release of water soluble fluorescent dye from the interior of thermosensitive liposomes. Additional experiments used a focused laser beam to control leakage from immobilized liposomes with very high spatial and temporal precision. The results indicate that fractional photothermal leakage from nanoparticles doped with Croc dye is a promising method for a range of controlled release applications. PMID:26149326

  13. Model Scramjet Inlet Unstart Induced by Mass Addition and Heat Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Seong-Kyun; Baccarella, Damiano; McGann, Brendan; Liu, Qili; Wermer, Lydiy; Do, Hyungrok

    2015-11-01

    The inlet unstart phenomena in a model scramjet are investigated at an arc-heated hypersonic wind tunnel. The unstart induced by nitrogen or ethylene jets at low or high enthalpy Mach 4.5 freestream flow conditions are compared. The jet injection pressurizes the downstream flow by mass addition and flow blockage. In case of the ethylene jet injection, heat release from combustion increases the backpressure further. Time-resolved schlieren imaging is performed at the jet and the lip of the model inlet to visualize the flow features during unstart. High frequency pressure measurements are used to provide information on pressure fluctuation at the scramjet wall. In both of the mass and heat release driven unstart cases, it is observed that there are similar flow transient and quasi-steady behaviors of unstart shockwave system during the unstart processes. Combustion driven unstart induces severe oscillatory flow motions of the jet and the unstart shock at the lip of the scramjet inlet after the completion of the unstart process, while the unstarted flow induced by solely mass addition remains relatively steady. The discrepancies between the processes of mass and heat release driven unstart are explained by flow choking mechanism.

  14. Impact of heat release on strain rate field in turbulent premixed Bunsen flames

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Coriton, Bruno Rene Leon; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2016-08-10

    The effects of combustion on the strain rate field are investigated in turbulent premixed CH4/air Bunsen flames using simultaneous tomographic PIV and OH LIF measurements. Tomographic PIV provides three-dimensional velocity measurements, from which the complete strain rate tensor is determined. The OH LIF measurements are used to determine the position of the flame surface and the flame-normal orientation within the imaging plane. This combination of diagnostic techniques enables quantification of divergence as well as flame-normal and tangential strain rates, which are otherwise biased using only planar measurements. Measurements are compared in three lean-to-stoichiometric flames that have different amounts of heatmore » release and Damköhler numbers greater than unity. The effects of heat release on the principal strain rates and their alignment relative to the local flame normal are analyzed. The extensive strain rate preferentially aligns with the flame normal in the reaction zone, which has been indicated by previous studies. The strength of this alignment increases with increasing heat release and, as a result, the flame-normal strain rate becomes highly extensive. These effects are associated with the gas expansion normal to the flame surface, which is largest for the stoichiometric flame. In the preheat zone, the compressive strain rate has a tendency to align with the flame normal. Away from the flame front, the flame – strain rate alignment is arbitrary in both the reactants and products. The flame-tangential strain rate is on average positive across the flame front, and therefore the turbulent strain rate field contributes to the enhancement of scalar gradients as in passive scalar turbulence. As a result, increases in heat release result in larger positive values of the divergence as well as flame-normal and tangential strain rates, the tangential strain rate has a weaker dependence on heat release than the flame-normal strain rate and the

  15. Quantification and attribution of errors in the simulated annual gross primary production and latent heat fluxes by two global land surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Q.; Li, J.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Divergence among the predictions by different global land models has not decreased over the last three assessment reports by the International Panel on Climate Change. Quantification and attribution of the uncertainties of global land surface models are important for the next phase of model improvement and development, is therefore the focus of this study. There are three sources of model uncertainties: model inputs, parameter values and model structure. Here we focus on the errors in model parameters by comparing the differences between the simulated global gross primary productivity (GPP) and latent heat flux (LE) by two global land surface models and model-data products of global GPP and LE from 1982-2005. We found that the performance of simulated annual GPP or LE by both models is most sensitive to 2 to 9 model parameters screened out by Morris method for each plant functional type (PFT). Using ensemble simulations, we applied RS-HDMR method to verify the Morris sensitivity results, and implied that about 60% of the variances of model errors in some PFTs are attributed to the sensitive parameters. We selected the combination of key parameter values that minimized the monthly errors of GPP and LE for each. Our study shows that significant improvement of model predictions can be made through parameter optimization using observations.

  16. Multiple solutions and numerical analysis to the dynamic and stationary models coupling a delayed energy balance model involving latent heat and discontinuous albedo with a deep ocean

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, J. I.; Hidalgo, A.; Tello, L.

    2014-01-01

    We study a climatologically important interaction of two of the main components of the geophysical system by adding an energy balance model for the averaged atmospheric temperature as dynamic boundary condition to a diagnostic ocean model having an additional spatial dimension. In this work, we give deeper insight than previous papers in the literature, mainly with respect to the 1990 pioneering model by Watts and Morantine. We are taking into consideration the latent heat for the two phase ocean as well as a possible delayed term. Non-uniqueness for the initial boundary value problem, uniqueness under a non-degeneracy condition and the existence of multiple stationary solutions are proved here. These multiplicity results suggest that an S-shaped bifurcation diagram should be expected to occur in this class of models generalizing previous energy balance models. The numerical method applied to the model is based on a finite volume scheme with nonlinear weighted essentially non-oscillatory reconstruction and Runge–Kutta total variation diminishing for time integration. PMID:25294969

  17. Multiple solutions and numerical analysis to the dynamic and stationary models coupling a delayed energy balance model involving latent heat and discontinuous albedo with a deep ocean.

    PubMed

    Díaz, J I; Hidalgo, A; Tello, L

    2014-10-01

    We study a climatologically important interaction of two of the main components of the geophysical system by adding an energy balance model for the averaged atmospheric temperature as dynamic boundary condition to a diagnostic ocean model having an additional spatial dimension. In this work, we give deeper insight than previous papers in the literature, mainly with respect to the 1990 pioneering model by Watts and Morantine. We are taking into consideration the latent heat for the two phase ocean as well as a possible delayed term. Non-uniqueness for the initial boundary value problem, uniqueness under a non-degeneracy condition and the existence of multiple stationary solutions are proved here. These multiplicity results suggest that an S-shaped bifurcation diagram should be expected to occur in this class of models generalizing previous energy balance models. The numerical method applied to the model is based on a finite volume scheme with nonlinear weighted essentially non-oscillatory reconstruction and Runge-Kutta total variation diminishing for time integration.

  18. Interannual Variations and Recurrent Seasonal Discrepancies in Land Surface Latent and Sensible Heat Fluxes from Satellite Data and a Land Surface Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, A.; Liang, P.; Jimenez, C.; Moncet, J. L.; Aires, F.; Prigent, C.; Lynch, R.; d'Entremont, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    Interannual variability of land surface latent and sensible heat fluxes has been analyzed at seasonal and sub-seasonal time scales for flux estimates derived from satellite data and from a land surface model. The satellite-derived estimates were produced with a neural network operating on a combination of microwave, visible, and infrared satellite data products. Properties of these flux datasets were assessed by subjective and statistical methods, including comparisons with data from flux towers. The agreement with tower fluxes is closer for the satellite-derived fluxes than for the LSM fluxes with respect to overall temporal variability. For interannual variations of sub-seasonal fluxes, the satellite/NN and LSM fluxes have similar, moderate correlations (~0.4) with the tower fluxes. Driving factors contributing to the interannual variability and recurrent discrepancies between these flux estimates were identified. These factors include the sensitivity of satellite-derived fluxes to the satellite inputs and the responses of modeled fluxes to changes in soil moisture induced by prior precipitation.

  19. Multiple solutions and numerical analysis to the dynamic and stationary models coupling a delayed energy balance model involving latent heat and discontinuous albedo with a deep ocean.

    PubMed

    Díaz, J I; Hidalgo, A; Tello, L

    2014-10-01

    We study a climatologically important interaction of two of the main components of the geophysical system by adding an energy balance model for the averaged atmospheric temperature as dynamic boundary condition to a diagnostic ocean model having an additional spatial dimension. In this work, we give deeper insight than previous papers in the literature, mainly with respect to the 1990 pioneering model by Watts and Morantine. We are taking into consideration the latent heat for the two phase ocean as well as a possible delayed term. Non-uniqueness for the initial boundary value problem, uniqueness under a non-degeneracy condition and the existence of multiple stationary solutions are proved here. These multiplicity results suggest that an S-shaped bifurcation diagram should be expected to occur in this class of models generalizing previous energy balance models. The numerical method applied to the model is based on a finite volume scheme with nonlinear weighted essentially non-oscillatory reconstruction and Runge-Kutta total variation diminishing for time integration. PMID:25294969

  20. A gap-filling model for eddy covariance latent heat flux: Estimating evapotranspiration of a subtropical seasonal evergreen broad-leaved forest as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Ying; Chu, Chia-Ren; Li, Ming-Hsu

    2012-10-01

    SummaryIn this paper we present a semi-parametric multivariate gap-filling model for tower-based measurement of latent heat flux (LE). Two statistical techniques, the principal component analysis (PCA) and a nonlinear interpolation approach were integrated into this LE gap-filling model. The PCA was first used to resolve the multicollinearity relationships among various environmental variables, including radiation, soil moisture deficit, leaf area index, wind speed, etc. Two nonlinear interpolation methods, multiple regressions (MRS) and the K-nearest neighbors (KNNs) were examined with random selected flux gaps for both clear sky and nighttime/cloudy data to incorporate into this LE gap-filling model. Experimental results indicated that the KNN interpolation approach is able to provide consistent LE estimations while MRS presents over estimations during nighttime/cloudy. Rather than using empirical regression parameters, the KNN approach resolves the nonlinear relationship between the gap-filled LE flux and principal components with adaptive K values under different atmospheric states. The developed LE gap-filling model (PCA with KNN) works with a RMSE of 2.4 W m-2 (˜0.09 mm day-1) at a weekly time scale by adding 40% artificial flux gaps into original dataset. Annual evapotranspiration at this study site were estimated at 736 mm (1803 MJ) and 728 mm (1785 MJ) for year 2008 and 2009, respectively.

  1. Satellite evidence for no change in terrestrial latent heat flux in the Three-River Headwaters region of China over the past three decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yunjun; Zhao, Shaohua; Wan, Huawei; Zhang, Yuhu; Jiang, Bo; Jia, Kun; Liu, Meng; Wu, Jinhui

    2016-08-01

    Terrestrial latent heat flux (LE) in the Three-River Headwaters region (TRHR) of China plays an essential role in quantifying the amount of water evaporation and carbon sink over the high altitude Tibetan Plateau (TP). Global warming is expected to accelerate terrestrial hydrological cycle and to increase evaporation. However, direct field observations are lacking in this region and the long-term variability in LE remains uncertain. In this study, we have revised a semi-empirical Penman LE algorithm based on ground eddy covariance (EC) observations from an alpine grass site and provided new satellite-based evidence to assess LE change in the TRHR during 1982-2010. Our results show that the average annual terrestrial LE in the TRHR is about 38.8 W/m 2 and there is no statistically significant change in annual LE from 1982 to 2010. We also found that during the same time period, terrestrial LE over the east region of the TRHR significantly decreased, on average, by 0.7 W/m 2 per decade, which was driven primarily by the surface incident solar radiation ( R s ) limitation, offsetting the increased LE over the west region of the TRHR caused by the increased precipitation ( P) and soil moisture ( SM).

  2. Satellite evidence for no change in terrestrial latent heat flux in the Three-River Headwaters region of China over the past three decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yunjun; Zhao, Shaohua; Wan, Huawei; Zhang, Yuhu; Jiang, Bo; Jia, Kun; Liu, Meng; Wu, Jinhui

    2016-08-01

    Terrestrial latent heat flux (LE) in the Three-River Headwaters region (TRHR) of China plays an essential role in quantifying the amount of water evaporation and carbon sink over the high altitude Tibetan Plateau (TP). Global warming is expected to accelerate terrestrial hydrological cycle and to increase evaporation. However, direct field observations are lacking in this region and the long-term variability in LE remains uncertain. In this study, we have revised a semi-empirical Penman LE algorithm based on ground eddy covariance (EC) observations from an alpine grass site and provided new satellite-based evidence to assess LE change in the TRHR during 1982-2010. Our results show that the average annual terrestrial LE in the TRHR is about 38.8 W/m 2 and there is no statistically significant change in annual LE from 1982 to 2010. We also found that during the same time period, terrestrial LE over the east region of the TRHR significantly decreased, on average, by 0.7 W/m 2 per decade, which was driven primarily by the surface incident solar radiation (R s ) limitation, offsetting the increased LE over the west region of the TRHR caused by the increased precipitation (P) and soil moisture (SM).

  3. Combustion instability and active control: Alternative fuels, augmentors, and modeling heat release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sammy Ace

    Experimental and analytical studies were conducted to explore thermo-acoustic coupling during the onset of combustion instability in various air-breathing combustor configurations. These include a laboratory-scale 200-kW dump combustor and a 100-kW augmentor featuring a v-gutter flame holder. They were used to simulate main combustion chambers and afterburners in aero engines, respectively. The three primary themes of this work includes: 1) modeling heat release fluctuations for stability analysis, 2) conducting active combustion control with alternative fuels, and 3) demonstrating practical active control for augmentor instability suppression. The phenomenon of combustion instabilities remains an unsolved problem in propulsion engines, mainly because of the difficulty in predicting the fluctuating component of heat release without extensive testing. A hybrid model was developed to describe both the temporal and spatial variations in dynamic heat release, using a separation of variables approach that requires only a limited amount of experimental data. The use of sinusoidal basis functions further reduced the amount of data required. When the mean heat release behavior is known, the only experimental data needed for detailed stability analysis is one instantaneous picture of heat release at the peak pressure phase. This model was successfully tested in the dump combustor experiments, reproducing the correct sign of the overall Rayleigh index as well as the remarkably accurate spatial distribution pattern of fluctuating heat release. Active combustion control was explored for fuel-flexible combustor operation using twelve different jet fuels including bio-synthetic and Fischer-Tropsch types. Analysis done using an actuated spray combustion model revealed that the combustion response times of these fuels were similar. Combined with experimental spray characterizations, this suggested that controller performance should remain effective with various alternative fuels

  4. Activated platelets release sphingosine 1-phosphate and induce hypersensitivity to noxious heat stimuli in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Weth, Daniela; Benetti, Camilla; Rauch, Caroline; Gstraunthaler, Gerhard; Schmidt, Helmut; Geisslinger, Gerd; Sabbadini, Roger; Proia, Richard L.; Kress, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    At the site of injury activated platelets release various mediators, one of which is sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). It was the aim of this study to explore whether activated human platelets had a pronociceptive effect in an in vivo mouse model and whether this effect was based on the release of S1P and subsequent activation of neuronal S1P receptors 1 or 3. Human platelets were prepared in different concentrations (105/μl, 106/μl, 107/μl) and assessed in mice with different genetic backgrounds (WT, S1P1fl/fl, SNS-S1P1−/−, S1P3−/−). Intracutaneous injections of activated human platelets induced a significant, dose-dependent hypersensitivity to noxious thermal stimulation. The degree of heat hypersensitivity correlated with the platelet concentration as well as the platelet S1P content and the amount of S1P released upon platelet activation as measured with LC MS/MS. Despite the significant correlations between S1P and platelet count, no difference in paw withdrawal latency (PWL) was observed in mice with a global null mutation of the S1P3 receptor or a conditional deletion of the S1P1 receptor in nociceptive primary afferents. Furthermore, neutralization of S1P with a selective anti-S1P antibody did not abolish platelet induced heat hypersensitivity. Our results suggest that activated platelets release S1P and induce heat hypersensitivity in vivo. However, the platelet induced heat hypersensitivity was caused by mediators other than S1P. PMID:25954148

  5. The heat released during catalytic turnover enhances the diffusion of an enzyme.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Clement; Gabizon, Ronen; Wilson, Christian A M; Hamadani, Kambiz; Tsekouras, Konstantinos; Marqusee, Susan; Pressé, Steve; Bustamante, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the diffusivity of enzymes increases in a substrate-dependent manner during catalysis. Although this observation has been reported and characterized for several different systems, the precise origin of this phenomenon is unknown. Calorimetric methods are often used to determine enthalpies from enzyme-catalysed reactions and can therefore provide important insight into their reaction mechanisms. The ensemble averages involved in traditional bulk calorimetry cannot probe the transient effects that the energy exchanged in a reaction may have on the catalyst. Here we obtain single-molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy data and analyse them within the framework of a stochastic theory to demonstrate a mechanistic link between the enhanced diffusion of a single enzyme molecule and the heat released in the reaction. We propose that the heat released during catalysis generates an asymmetric pressure wave that results in a differential stress at the protein-solvent interface that transiently displaces the centre-of-mass of the enzyme (chemoacoustic effect). This novel perspective on how enzymes respond to the energy released during catalysis suggests a possible effect of the heat of reaction on the structural integrity and internal degrees of freedom of the enzyme. PMID:25487146

  6. The heat released during catalytic turnover enhances the diffusion of an enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Clement; Gabizon, Ronen; Wilson, Christian A. M.; Hamadani, Kambiz; Tsekouras, Konstantinos; Marqusee, Susan; Pressé, Steve; Bustamante, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the diffusivity of enzymes increases in a substrate-dependent manner during catalysis1,2. Although this observation has been reported and characterized for several different systems3–10, the precise origin of this phenomenon is unknown. Calorimetric methods are often used to determine enthalpies from enzyme-catalysed reactions and can therefore provide important insight into their reaction mechanisms11,12. The ensemble averages involved in traditional bulk calorimetry cannot probe the transient effects that the energy exchanged in a reaction may have on the catalyst. Here we obtain single-molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy data and analyse them within the framework of a stochastic theory to demonstrate a mechanistic link between the enhanced diffusion of a single enzyme molecule and the heat released in the reaction. We propose that the heat released during catalysis generates an asymmetric pressure wave that results in a differential stress at the protein–solvent interface that transiently displaces the centre-of-mass of the enzyme (chemoacoustic effect). This novel perspective on how enzymes respond to the energy released during catalysis suggests a possible effect of the heat of reaction on the structural integrity and internal degrees of freedom of the enzyme. PMID:25487146

  7. The heat released during catalytic turnover enhances the diffusion of an enzyme

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Riedel, Clement; Gabizon, Ronen; Wilson, Christian A. M.; Hamadani, Kambiz; Tsekouras, Konstantinos; Marqusee, Susan; Pressé, Steve; Bustamante, Carlos

    2014-12-10

    Recent studies have shown that the diffusivity of enzymes increases in a substrate-dependent manner during catalysis. Although this observation has been reported and characterized for several different systems, the precise origin of this phenomenon is unknown. Calorimetric methods are often used to determine enthalpies from enzyme-catalysed reactions and can therefore provide important insight into their reaction mechanisms. The ensemble averages involved in traditional bulk calorimetry cannot probe the transient effects that the energy exchanged in a reaction may have on the catalyst. Here we obtain single-molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy data and analyse them within the framework of a stochastic theorymore » to demonstrate a mechanistic link between the enhanced diffusion of a single enzyme molecule and the heat released in the reaction. We propose that the heat released during catalysis generates an asymmetric pressure wave that results in a differential stress at the protein-solvent interface that transiently displaces the centre-of-mass of the enzyme (chemoacoustic effect). We find this novel perspective on how enzymes respond to the energy released during catalysis suggests a possible effect of the heat of reaction on the structural integrity and internal degrees of freedom of the enzyme.« less

  8. The heat released during catalytic turnover enhances the diffusion of an enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, Clement; Gabizon, Ronen; Wilson, Christian A. M.; Hamadani, Kambiz; Tsekouras, Konstantinos; Marqusee, Susan; Pressé, Steve; Bustamante, Carlos

    2014-12-10

    Recent studies have shown that the diffusivity of enzymes increases in a substrate-dependent manner during catalysis. Although this observation has been reported and characterized for several different systems, the precise origin of this phenomenon is unknown. Calorimetric methods are often used to determine enthalpies from enzyme-catalysed reactions and can therefore provide important insight into their reaction mechanisms. The ensemble averages involved in traditional bulk calorimetry cannot probe the transient effects that the energy exchanged in a reaction may have on the catalyst. Here we obtain single-molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy data and analyse them within the framework of a stochastic theory to demonstrate a mechanistic link between the enhanced diffusion of a single enzyme molecule and the heat released in the reaction. We propose that the heat released during catalysis generates an asymmetric pressure wave that results in a differential stress at the protein-solvent interface that transiently displaces the centre-of-mass of the enzyme (chemoacoustic effect). We find this novel perspective on how enzymes respond to the energy released during catalysis suggests a possible effect of the heat of reaction on the structural integrity and internal degrees of freedom of the enzyme.

  9. The heat released during catalytic turnover enhances the diffusion of an enzyme.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Clement; Gabizon, Ronen; Wilson, Christian A M; Hamadani, Kambiz; Tsekouras, Konstantinos; Marqusee, Susan; Pressé, Steve; Bustamante, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the diffusivity of enzymes increases in a substrate-dependent manner during catalysis. Although this observation has been reported and characterized for several different systems, the precise origin of this phenomenon is unknown. Calorimetric methods are often used to determine enthalpies from enzyme-catalysed reactions and can therefore provide important insight into their reaction mechanisms. The ensemble averages involved in traditional bulk calorimetry cannot probe the transient effects that the energy exchanged in a reaction may have on the catalyst. Here we obtain single-molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy data and analyse them within the framework of a stochastic theory to demonstrate a mechanistic link between the enhanced diffusion of a single enzyme molecule and the heat released in the reaction. We propose that the heat released during catalysis generates an asymmetric pressure wave that results in a differential stress at the protein-solvent interface that transiently displaces the centre-of-mass of the enzyme (chemoacoustic effect). This novel perspective on how enzymes respond to the energy released during catalysis suggests a possible effect of the heat of reaction on the structural integrity and internal degrees of freedom of the enzyme.

  10. Heat-pipe effect on the transport of gaseous radionuclides released from a nuclear waste container

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, W.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Lee, W.W.L.

    1990-11-01

    When an unsaturated porous medium is subjected to a temperature gradient and the temperature is sufficiently high, vadose water is heated and vaporizes. Vapor flows under its pressure gradient towards colder regions where it condenses. Vaporization and condensation produce a liquid saturation gradient, creating a capillary pressure gradient inside the porous medium. Condensate flows towards the hot end under the influence of a capillary pressure gradient. This is a heat pipe in an unsaturated porous medium. We study analytically the transport of gaseous species released from a spent-fuel waste package, as affected by a time-dependent heat pipe in an unsaturated rock. For parameter values typical of a potential repository in partially saturated fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain, we found that a heat pipe develops shortly after waste is buried, and the heat-pipe`s spatial extent is time-dependent. Water vapor movements produced by the heat pipe can significantly affect the migration of gaseous radionuclides. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Combustion heat release effects on asymmetric vortex shedding from bluff bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Caleb Nathaniel

    2011-07-01

    This thesis describes an investigation of oscillatory combustion processes due to vortex shedding from bluff body flame holders. The primary objective of this study was to elucidate the influence of combustion process heat release upon the Benard-von Karman (BVK) instability in reacting bluff body wakes. For this purpose, spatial and temporal heat release distributions in bluff body-stabilized combustion of liquid Jet-A fuel with high-temperature, vitiated air were characterized over a wide range of operating conditions. Two methods of fuel injection were investigated. In the first method, referred to as close-coupled fuel injection, the fuel was supplied via discrete liquid jets injected perpendicular to the cross-flowing air stream just upstream of the bluff body trailing edge, thereby limiting fuel and air mixing prior to burning. The fuel was introduced well upstream (˜0.5 m) of the bluff body in the second fuel injection mode, resulting in a well-evaporated and mixed reactants stream. The resulting BVK heat release dynamics were compared between these fuel injection modes in order to investigate their dependence upon the spatial distributions of fuel-air ratio and heat release in the reacting wake. When close-coupled fuel injection was used, the BVK heat release dynamics increased in amplitude with increasing global equivalence ratio, reaching a maximum just before globally rich blow out of the combustion process occurred. This was due to a decrease in fuel entrainment into the near-wake as the fuel spray penetrated further into the cross-flow, which reduced the local heat release and equivalence ratio (indicated by CH* and C2*/CH* chemiluminescence, respectively). As a result, the density gradient across the near-wake reaction zone decreased, resulting in less damping of vorticity due to dilatation. In addition, unburned reactants were entrained into the recirculation zone due to the injection of discrete liquid fuel jets in close proximity to the wake. This

  12. Near-Infrared-Induced Heating of Confined Water in Polymeric Particles for Efficient Payload Release

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) light-triggered release from polymeric capsules could make a major impact on biological research by enabling remote and spatiotemporal control over the release of encapsulated cargo. The few existing mechanisms for NIR-triggered release have not been widely applied because they require custom synthesis of designer polymers, high-powered lasers to drive inefficient two-photon processes, and/or coencapsulation of bulky inorganic particles. In search of a simpler mechanism, we found that exposure to laser light resonant with the vibrational absorption of water (980 nm) in the NIR region can induce release of payloads encapsulated in particles made from inherently non-photo-responsive polymers. We hypothesize that confined water pockets present in hydrated polymer particles absorb electromagnetic energy and transfer it to the polymer matrix, inducing a thermal phase change. In this study, we show that this simple and highly universal strategy enables instantaneous and controlled release of payloads in aqueous environments as well as in living cells using both pulsed and continuous wavelength lasers without significant heating of the surrounding aqueous solution. PMID:24717072

  13. Liquid-Phase Heat-Release Rates of the Systems Hydrazine-Nitric Acid and Unsymmetrical Dimethylhydrazine-Nitric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somogyi, Dezso; Feiler, Charles E.

    1960-01-01

    The initial rates of heat release produced by the reactions of hydrazine and unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine with nitric acid were determined in a bomb calorimeter under conditions of forced mixing. Fuel-oxidant weight ratio and injection velocity were varied. The rate of heat release apparently depended on the interfacial area between the propellants. Above a narrow range of injection velocities representing a critical amount of interfacial area, the rates reached a maximum and were almost constant with injection velocity. The maximum rate for hydrazine was about 70 percent greater than that for unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine. The total heat released did not vary with mixture ratio over the range studied.

  14. Analysis of leaf area index in the ECMWF land surface model and impact on latent heat and carbon fluxes: Application to West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarlan, L.; Balsamo, G.; Lafont, S.; Beljaars, A.; Calvet, J. C.; Mougin, E.

    2008-12-01

    A new version of the land surface model of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (Carbon-TESSEL, or CTESSEL) includes a vegetation growth model. This study describes a leaf area index (LAI) data assimilation system (LDAS) based on CTESSEL and satellite LAI for operational Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) predictions. The LDAS is evaluated over West Africa. A preliminary experiment shows a significant impact of the LAI on the CTESSEL NEE. The LAI is compared to two satellite products: the predicted annual cycle is delayed over the Sahel and savannah, and the LAI values differ from the satellite products. Preliminary to their use in the LDAS, the LAI products are rescaled to the CTESSEL predictions. The LDAS simulations are confronted to measurements of biomass and LAI for a site in Mali. The LAI analysis is shown to improve the predicted biomass and the annual cycles of the water (latent heat flux, or LE) and carbon (NEE) fluxes. Afterward, the LDAS is run over West Africa with the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer products (2001-2005). The analysis of LAI shows a limited impact on LE, but it impacts strongly on NEE. Finally, the CTESSEL NEE are compared to two other models' outputs (simple biosphere (SIB) and Carnegie-Ames-Stanford (CASA)). The order of magnitude of the three data sets agrees well, and the shift in annual cycle of CTESSEL is reduced by the LDAS. It is concluded that a LAI data assimilation system is essential for NEE prediction at seasonal and interannual timescales, while a LAI satellite-based climatology may be sufficient for accurate LE predictions.

  15. Nonlinear traveling waves in a two-layer system with heat release/consumption at the interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simanovskii, Ilya B.; Viviani, Antonio; Dubois, Frank; Legros, Jean-Claude

    2016-06-01

    The influence of an interfacial heat release and heat consumption on nonlinear convective flows, developed under the joint action of buoyant and thermocapillary effects in a laterally heated two-layer system with periodic boundary conditions, is investigated. Regimes of traveling waves and modulated traveling waves have been obtained. It is found that rather intensive heat sinks at the interface can lead to the change of the direction of the waves' propagation.

  16. Acetylcholine released from cholinergic nerves contributes to cutaneous vasodilation during heat stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibasaki, Manabu; Wilson, Thad E.; Cui, Jian; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) contributes to active cutaneous vasodilation during a heat stress in humans. Given that acetylcholine is released from cholinergic nerves during whole body heating, coupled with evidence that acetylcholine causes vasodilation via NO mechanisms, it is possible that release of acetylcholine in the dermal space contributes to cutaneous vasodilation during a heat stress. To test this hypothesis, in seven subjects skin blood flow (SkBF) and sweat rate were simultaneously monitored over three microdialysis membranes placed in the dermal space of dorsal forearm skin. One membrane was perfused with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine (10 microM), the second membrane was perfused with the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; 10 mM) dissolved in the aforementioned neostigmine solution (l-NAME(Neo)), and the third membrane was perfused with Ringer solution as a control site. Each subject was exposed to approximately 20 min of whole body heating via a water-perfused suit, which increased mean body temperature from 36.4 +/- 0.1 to 37.5 +/- 0.1 degrees C (P < 0.05). After the heat stress, SkBF at each site was normalized to its maximum value, identified by administration of 28 mM sodium nitroprusside. Mean body temperature threshold for cutaneous vasodilation was significantly lower at the neostigmine-treated site relative to the other sites (neostigmine: 36.6 +/- 0.1 degrees C, l-NAME(Neo): 37.1 +/- 0.1 degrees C, control: 36.9 +/- 0.1 degrees C), whereas no significant threshold difference was observed between the l-NAME(Neo)-treated and control sites. At the end of the heat stress, SkBF was not different between the neostigmine-treated and control sites, whereas SkBF at the l-NAME(Neo)-treated site was significantly lower than the other sites. These results suggest that acetylcholine released from cholinergic nerves is capable of modulating cutaneous vasodilation via NO synthase mechanisms early in the heat stress but

  17. Solar heat storage in phase change material

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, H.J.

    1984-02-28

    The objective of this project was to develop a chemical heat storage system that had a phase change with release of latent heat at about 105/sup 0/F. The primary reason this kind on system was sought was that heat storage capacity of commonly used storage systems do not match the heat collection capacity of open air collectors. In addition to the phase change three other factors were considered: the cost of the material, the amount of heat the system would hold per unit volume, and the rate at which the system released sensible and latent heat. One hundred nineteen tests were made on 32 systems. Only data on six of the more promising are presented. In the six systems, borax was used as the major component with other materials used as nucleating agents toraise the temperature of phase change.

  18. Glutaraldehyde release from heat-polymerized acrylic resins after disinfection and chemical and mechanical polishing.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Iara Augusta; Andrade, Vanessa Gomes; Bonato, Pierina Sueli; Raimundo, Lariça Barbosa; Herzog, Daniella Silva; Borie, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the release of glutaraldehyde from heat-polymerized acrylic resins subjected to disinfection followed by chemical and mechanical polishing. Ninety disc-shaped specimens (15 x 4 mm), 30 per resin (Lucitone 550, QC-20 and Classico), were made and assigned to 2 groups according to the type of polishing. One side of each specimen was not polished and the other was either mechanically (n = 45) or chemically (n = 45) polished, and immersed in water at 50 °C for 1 h to allow the release of intrinsic substances and then kept in distilled water for 7 days. The specimens were disinfected by immersion in 2% glutaraldehyde for 10 min. After this period, 3 specimens from each group were immersed in water for 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 min. For the 15-, 30-, 60-min immersions, 4 water exchanges were done at the end of period. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to detect and quantify the glutaraldehyde released after each period. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and multiple comparisons were done by Tukey's and Scheffé's tests (α = 0.05). No glutaraldehyde release was observed from the specimens with chemical polishing at any of the immersion periods, while the mechanically polished specimens released glutaraldehyde. In the groups with water exchanges, Lucitone released more disinfectant in the 15-min period (0.040 μg/mL), Classico in the 30-min (0.021 μg/mL) and 60-min (0.018 μg/mL) periods, and QC-20 the same amount (-1.760 μg/mL) in all periods. In the groups without water exchanges, Lucitone released the highest amount of disinfectant (-1.370 μg/mL), differing significantly from QC-20 (0022 g/mL) and Classico (0019 g/mL), which were similar. The findings of this showed that chemically polished specimens from the 3 resin brands did not release glutaraldehyde after different periods of immersion, while glutaraldehyde release was observed from the mechanically polished specimens, especially from those made of

  19. Rotating magnetic macrospheres as heating mechanism for remote controlled drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, Franziska; Andrä, Wilfried; Heide, Rainer; Werner, Christoph; Bellemann, Matthias Erich

    2007-04-01

    A permanent magnetic macrosphere (diameter: 5 mm) spherically seated in an oil bearing inside an experimental capsule (comparable to a hard gelatine capsule size 2) is turned by a rotating magnetic field ( H ⩽ 5 kA/m; frequency ν⩽500 Hz) and causes a temperature rise up to about 60 °C. In order to find further possible improvements, the experimental results were compared to theoretical expectations. First experiments using improved thermal isolation yielded temperatures of about 100 °C. The heating can be used as a mechanism to remotely release drugs in the gastrointestinal tract.

  20. Measuring the Heats of Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, James L.; Tegart, Tracy L.

    1994-01-01

    Uses common equipment (tea kettle and vacuum bottles) to precisely measure the specific heat, latent heat of fusion, and latent heat of vaporization of water. Provides descriptions for all three experiments. (MVL)

  1. Combustion Gases And Heat Release Analysis During Flame And Flameless Combustion Of Wood Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Jozef; Wachter, Igor; Balog, Karol

    2015-06-01

    With the growing prices of fossil fuels, alternative fuels produced of biomass come to the fore. They are made of waste materials derived from the processing of wood and wood materials. The main objective of this study was to analyse the fire-technical characteristics of wood pellets. The study analysed three dust samples acquired from wood pellets made of various types of wood biomass. Wood pellet dust is produced when manipulating with pellets. During this process a potentially hazardous situations may occur. Biomass is chemically composed mostly of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin. During straining of the biomass by heat flux, combustion initiation occurs. Also, there was a change in the composition of material throughout combustion gases production, and the amount of heat generated by a flame or flameless combustion. Measurement of fire characteristics was conducted according to ISO 5660-1 standard using a cone calorimeter. Two samples of wood pellet dust were tested under the heat flux of 35 kW.m-2 and 50 kW.m-2. The process of combustion, the time to ignition, the carbon monoxide concentration and the amount of released heat were observed.

  2. A chlorine disinfectant for excess argon released from K-felsspar during step heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, T. Mark; Heizler, Matthew T.; Lovera, Oscar M.; Chen, Wenji; Grove, Marty

    1994-05-01

    The release of excess 40Ar ( 40Ar E) from virtually all alkali feldspars at low temperatures ( < 800°C) during 40Ar/39Ar step-heating experiments obscures potentially valuable age and thermal history information. We report a method that takes advantage of the differential release of 40Ar E between contiguous isothermal heating steps, due to the decrepitation of fluid inclusions, and which permits derivation of a correction for the contaminating argon. Differences in age and Cl/K between successive temperature pairs commonly yield a single, well-correlated array on a Δ( 40Ar∗/K) versus Δ( Cl/K) plot that identifies the Cl-correlated composition of 40Ar E ( 40Ar E/Cl) affecting that sample. Eighteen of the twenty K-feldspar samples we have measured yield a single 40Ar E/Cl component, that varies from 1.1 × 10 -3 to 4.2 × 10 -6, making possible recovery of otherwise unobtainable thermochronological information. The upper bound on the 40Ar E/Cl distribution of ˜ 10 -3 may reflect Ar saturation of pore fluids, or the maximum duration between deuteric alteration and cooling below Ar closure in K-feldspar.

  3. Measurements of the heat release rate integral in turbulent premixed stagnation flames with particle image velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yung-Cheng; Kim, Munki; Han, Jeongjae; Yun, Sangwook; Yoon, Youngbin

    2008-08-15

    A new definition of turbulent consumption speed is proposed in this work that is based on the heat release rate integral, rather than the mass burning rate integral. Its detailed derivation and the assumptions involved are discussed in a general context that applies to all properly defined reaction progress variables. The major advantage of the proposed definition is that it does not require the thin-flame assumption, in contrast to previous definitions. Experimental determination of the local turbulent displacement speed, S{sub D}, and the local turbulent consumption speed, S{sub C}, is also demonstrated with the particle image velocimetry technique in three turbulent premixed stagnation flames. The turbulence intensity of these flames is of the same order of the laminar burning velocity. Based on the current data, a model equation for the local mean heat release rate is proposed. The relationship between S{sub D} and S{sub C} is discussed along with a possible modeling approach for the turbulent displacement speed. (author)

  4. Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of flame heat release rate

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, P.H.; Najm, H.N.

    1997-12-12

    Local heat release rate represents one of the most interesting experimental observables in the study of unsteady reacting flows. The direct measure of burning or heat release rate as a field variable is not possible. Numerous experimental investigations have relied on inferring this type of information as well as flame front topology from indirect measures which are presumed to be correlated. A recent study has brought into question many of the commonly used flame front marker and burning rate diagnostics. This same study found that the concentration of formyl radical offers the best possibility for measuring flame burning rate. However, primarily due to low concentrations, the fluorescence signal level from formyl is too weak to employ this diagnostic for single-pulse measurements of turbulent reacting flows. In this paper the authors describe and demonstrate a new fluorescence-based reaction front imaging diagnostic suitable for single-shot applications. The measurement is based on taking the pixel-by-pixel product of OH and CH{sub 2}O planar laser-induced fluorescence images to yield an image closely related to a reaction rate. The spectroscopic and collisional processes affecting the measured signals are discussed and the foundation of the diagnostic, as based on laminar and unsteady flame calculations, is presented. The authors report the results of applying this diagnostic to the study of a laminar premixed flame subject to an interaction with an isolated line-vortex pair.

  5. Generalized Latent Trait Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moustaki, Irini; Knott, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discusses a general model framework within which manifest variables with different distributions in the exponential family can be analyzed with a latent trait model. Presents a unified maximum likelihood method for estimating the parameters of the generalized latent trait model and discusses the scoring of individuals on the latent dimensions.…

  6. Latent Regression Analysis.

    PubMed

    Tarpey, Thaddeus; Petkova, Eva

    2010-07-01

    Finite mixture models have come to play a very prominent role in modelling data. The finite mixture model is predicated on the assumption that distinct latent groups exist in the population. The finite mixture model therefore is based on a categorical latent variable that distinguishes the different groups. Often in practice distinct sub-populations do not actually exist. For example, disease severity (e.g. depression) may vary continuously and therefore, a distinction of diseased and not-diseased may not be based on the existence of distinct sub-populations. Thus, what is needed is a generalization of the finite mixture's discrete latent predictor to a continuous latent predictor. We cast the finite mixture model as a regression model with a latent Bernoulli predictor. A latent regression model is proposed by replacing the discrete Bernoulli predictor by a continuous latent predictor with a beta distribution. Motivation for the latent regression model arises from applications where distinct latent classes do not exist, but instead individuals vary according to a continuous latent variable. The shapes of the beta density are very flexible and can approximate the discrete Bernoulli distribution. Examples and a simulation are provided to illustrate the latent regression model. In particular, the latent regression model is used to model placebo effect among drug treated subjects in a depression study. PMID:20625443

  7. Myocardial ischaemia and the inflammatory response: release of heat shock protein 70 after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Dybdahl, B; Slørdahl, S A; Waage, A; Kierulf, P; Espevik, T; Sundan, A

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To test the hypothesis that heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 may be released into the circulation after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) by exploring the kinetics of Hsp70 release and the relations between Hsp70 and markers of inflammation and myocardial damage in AMI. Design: Blood samples from 24 patients were prospectively collected through to the first day after AMI. Hsp70, interleukin (IL) 6, IL-8, and IL-10 in serum were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: Median Hsp70 concentrations in AMI patients measured at arrival, six hours thereafter, and the following morning were 686, 868, and 607 pg/ml, respectively. These concentrations were all significantly different from those of the control patients with angina with a median serum Hsp70 concentration of 306 pg/ml. Peak Hsp70 correlated with creatine kinase (CK) MB (r  =  0.62, p < 0.01) and cardiac troponin T (r  =  0.58, p < 0.01). Furthermore, serum Hsp70 correlated with IL-6 and IL-8 at six hours (r  =  0.60, p < 0.01 and r  =  0.59, p < 0.01, respectively). Conclusions: In this study, Hsp70 was rapidly released into the circulation after AMI. Circulating Hsp70 is suggested as a marker of myocardial damage. In addition, Hsp70 may have a role in the inflammatory response after AMI. PMID:15710705

  8. Performance of Interferon-Gamma and IP-10 Release Assays for Diagnosing Latent Tuberculosis Infections in Patients with Concurrent Malaria in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Drabe, Camilla H; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Helleberg, Marie; Nyagonde, Nyagonde; Rose, Michala V; Francis, Filbert; Theilgaard, Ola P; Asbjørn, Jens; Amos, Ben; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Ruhwald, Morten; Ravn, Pernille

    2016-04-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used to detect cellular immune recognition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis The chemokine IFN-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) is an alternative diagnostic biomarker to IFN-γ. Several conditions interfere with IGRA test performance. We aimed to assess the possible influence of Plasmodium falciparum infection on the IGRA test QuantiFERON-TB GOLD® In-Tube (QFT) test and an in-house IP-10 release assay. In total, 241 Tanzanian adults were included; 184 patients with uncomplicated malaria (88 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] coinfected) and 57 HIV-infected patients without malaria infection. Malaria was treated with artemether-lumefantrine (Coartem®). QFT testing was performed before initiation of malaria treatment and at days 7 and 42. In total, 172 patients completed follow-up. IFN-γ and IP-10 was measured in QFT supernatants. We found that during malaria infection IFN-γ and IP-10 levels in the unstimulated samples were elevated, mitogen responsiveness was impaired, and CD4 cell counts were decreased. These alterations reverted after malaria treatment. Concurrent malaria infection did not affect QFT test results, whereas there were more indeterminate IP-10 results during acute malaria infection. We suggest that IGRA and IP-10 release assay results of malaria patients should be interpreted with caution and that testing preferably should be postponed until after malaria treatment.

  9. Towards Measurement of the Time-resolved Heat Release of Protein Conformation Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puchalla, Jason; Adamek, Daniel; Austin, Robert

    2004-01-01

    We present a way to observe time-resolved heat release using a laminar flow diffusional mixer coupled with a highly sensitive infrared camera which measures the temperature change of the solvent. There are significant benefits to the use of laminar flow mixers for time-resolved calorimetry: (1) The thermal signal can be made position and time- stationary to allow for signal integration; (2) Extremely small volumes (nl/s) of sample are required for a measurement; (3) The same mixing environment can be observed spectroscopically to obtain state occupation information; (4) The mixer allows one to do out of equilibrium dynamic studies. The hope is that these measurements will allow us probe the non-equilibrium thermodynamics as a protein moves along a free energy trajectory from one state to another.

  10. Different assay conditions for detecting the production and release of heat-labile and heat-stable toxins in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Letícia B; Ozaki, Christiane Y; Horton, Denise S P Q; Menezes, Caroline A; Silva, Anderson; Fernandes, Irene; Magnoli, Fabio C; Vaz, Tania M I; Guth, Beatriz E C; Piazza, Roxane M F

    2013-12-02

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) produce heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable enterotoxins (ST). Despite that, the mechanism of action of both toxins are well known, there is great controversy in the literature concerning the in vitro production and release of LT and, for ST, no major concerns have been discussed. Furthermore, the majority of published papers describe the use of only one or a few ETEC isolates to define the production and release of these toxins, which hinders the detection of ETEC by phenotypic approaches. Thus, the present study was undertaken to obtain a better understanding of ST and LT toxin production and release under laboratory conditions. Accordingly, a collection of 90 LT-, ST-, and ST/LT-producing ETEC isolates was used to determine a protocol for toxin production and release aimed at ETEC detection. For this, we used previously raised anti-LT antibodies and the anti-ST monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies described herein. The presence of bile salts and the use of certain antibiotics improved ETEC toxin production/release. Triton X-100, as chemical treatment, proved to be an alternative method for toxin release. Consequently, a common protocol that can increase the production and release of LT and ST toxins could facilitate and enhance the sensitivity of diagnostic tests for ETEC using the raised and described antibodies in the present work.

  11. Extracellular Release and Signaling by Heat Shock Protein 27: Role in Modifying Vascular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Batulan, Zarah; Pulakazhi Venu, Vivek Krishna; Li, Yumei; Koumbadinga, Geremy; Alvarez-Olmedo, Daiana Gisela; Shi, Chunhua; O’Brien, Edward R.

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is traditionally viewed as an intracellular chaperone protein with anti-apoptotic properties. However, recent data indicate that a number of heat shock proteins, including HSP27, are also found in the extracellular space where they may signal via membrane receptors to alter gene transcription and cellular function. Therefore, there is increasing interest in better understanding how HSP27 is released from cells, its levels and composition in the extracellular space, and the cognate cell membrane receptors involved in effecting cell signaling. In this paper, the knowledge to date, as well as some emerging paradigms about the extracellular function of HSP27 is presented. Of particular interest is the role of HSP27 in attenuating atherogenesis by modifying lipid uptake and inflammation in the plaque. Moreover, the abundance of HSP27 in serum is an emerging new biomarker for ischemic events. Finally, HSP27 replacement therapy may represent a novel therapeutic opportunity for chronic inflammatory disorders, such as atherosclerosis. PMID:27507972

  12. Performance and efficiency evaluation and heat release study of a direct-injection stratified-charge rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, H. L.; Addy, H. E.; Bond, T. H.; Lee, C. M.; Chun, K. S.

    1987-01-01

    A computer simulation which models engine performance of the Direct Injection Stratified Charge (DISC) rotary engines was used to study the effect of variations in engine design and operating parameters on engine performance and efficiency of an Outboard Marine Corporation (OMC) experimental rotary combustion engine. Engine pressure data were used in a heat release analysis to study the effects of heat transfer, leakage, and crevice flows. Predicted engine data were compared with experimental test data over a range of engine speeds and loads. An examination of methods to improve the performance of the rotary engine using advanced heat engine concepts such as faster combustion, reduced leakage, and turbocharging is also presented.

  13. Low effective activation energies for oxygen release from metal oxides: evidence for mass-transfer limits at high heating rates.

    PubMed

    Jian, Guoqiang; Zhou, Lei; Piekiel, Nicholas W; Zachariah, Michael R

    2014-06-01

    Oxygen release from metal oxides at high temperatures is relevant to many thermally activated chemical processes, including chemical-looping combustion, solar thermochemical cycles and energetic thermite reactions. In this study, we evaluated the thermal decomposition of nanosized metal oxides under rapid heating (~10(5) K s(-1)) with time-resolved mass spectrometry. We found that the effective activation-energy values that were obtained using the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa isoconversional method are much lower than the values found at low heating rates, indicating that oxygen transport might be rate-determining at a high heating rate.

  14. LATENT LIFE OF ARTERIES.

    PubMed

    Carrel, A

    1910-07-23

    When a segment of artery, killed by heat, formalin or glycerin is transplanted, it undergoes a rapid degeneration. Its muscle fibers disappear while the tissue of the host reacts by building a new wall of connective tissue. When the transplanted vessel has been preserved in a condition of latent life, no degeneration of the wall occurs, or the wall undergoes only partial degeneration. The muscle fibers can keep their normal appearance, even for a long time after the operation. It is, therefore, demonstrated that arteries can be preserved outside of the body in a condition of unmanifested actual life. The best method of preservation consists of placing the vessels, immersed in vaselin, in an ice box, the temperature of which is slightly above the freezing point. From a surgical standpoint, the transplantation of preserved vessels can be used with some safety. When the arteries were kept in defibrinated blood or vaselin and in cold storage, the proportion of positive results was 75 and 80 per cent., and this can probably be increased. PMID:19867337

  15. Latent Variable Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borsboom, Denny

    2008-01-01

    This paper formulates a metatheoretical framework for latent variable modeling. It does so by spelling out the difference between observed and latent variables. This difference is argued to be purely epistemic in nature: We treat a variable as "observed" when the inference from data structure to variable structure can be made with certainty and as…

  16. Latent myofascial trigger points.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hong-You; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2011-10-01

    A latent myofascial trigger point (MTP) is defined as a focus of hyperirritability in a muscle taut band that is clinically associated with local twitch response and tenderness and/or referred pain upon manual examination. Current evidence suggests that the temporal profile of the spontaneous electrical activity at an MTP is similar to focal muscle fiber contraction and/or muscle cramp potentials, which contribute significantly to the induction of local tenderness and pain and motor dysfunctions. This review highlights the potential mechanisms underlying the sensory-motor dysfunctions associated with latent MTPs and discusses the contribution of central sensitization associated with latent MTPs and the MTP network to the spatial propagation of pain and motor dysfunctions. Treating latent MTPs in patients with musculoskeletal pain may not only decrease pain sensitivity and improve motor functions, but also prevent latent MTPs from transforming into active MTPs, and hence, prevent the development of myofascial pain syndrome.

  17. Effect of chemical heat release in a temporally evolving mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higuera, F. J.; Moser, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations of a temporally evolving mixing layer with an exothermic infinitely fast diffusion flame between two unmixed reactants have been carried out in the limit of zero Mach number to study the effect of the heat release on the early stages of the evolution of the flow. Attention has been directed to relatively large values of the oxidizer-to-fuel mass stoichiometric ratio typical of hydrocarbon flames, and initial vorticity distributions thicker than the temperature and species distributions have been chosen to mimic the situation at the outlet of a jet. The results show that, during the stages of the evolution covered by the present simulations, enhancement of combustion occurs by local stretching of the flame without much augmentation of its area. The rate of product generation depends strongly on the initial conditions, which suggests the possibility of controlling the combustion by acting on the flow. Rollup and vortex amalgamation still occur in these reacting flows but are very much affected by the production of new vorticity by baroclinic torques. These torques lead to counter rotating vortex pairs around the flame and, more importantly, in thin layers of light fluid that leave the vicinity of the flame when the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability begins to develop. Propelled by the vortex pairs, these layers wind around, split on reaching high pressure regions, and originate new vortex pairs in a process that ends up building large-scale vortices with a vorticity distribution more complex than for a constant density fluid.

  18. Impact of anthropogenic heat release on regional climate in three vast urban agglomerations in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jinming; Wang, Jun; Yan, Zhongwei

    2014-03-01

    We simulated the impact of anthropogenic heat release (AHR) on the regional climate in three vast city agglomerations in China using the Weather Research and Forecasting model with nested high-resolution modeling. Based on energy consumption and high-quality land use data, we designed two scenarios to represent no-AHR and current-AHR conditions. By comparing the results of the two numerical experiments, changes of surface air temperature and precipitation due to AHR were quantified and analyzed. We concluded that AHR increases the temperature in these urbanized areas by about 0.5°C—1°C, and this increase is more pronounced in winter than in other seasons. The inclusion of AHR enhances the convergence of water vapor over urbanized areas. Together with the warming of the lower troposphere and the enhancement of ascending motions caused by AHR, the average convective available potential energy in urbanized areas is increased. Rainfall amounts in summer over urbanized areas are likely to increase and regional precipitation patterns to be altered to some extent.

  19. Stabilizing Alginate Confinement and Polymer Coating of CO-Releasing Molecules Supported on Iron Oxide Nanoparticles To Trigger the CO Release by Magnetic Heating.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Hajo; Winkler, Felix; Kunz, Peter; Schmidt, Annette M; Hamacher, Alexandra; Kassack, Matthias U; Janiak, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Maghemite (Fe2O3) iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) were synthesized, modified with covalent surface-bound CO-releasing molecules of a tri(carbonyl)-chlorido-phenylalaninato-ruthenium(II) complex (CORM), and coated with a dextran polymer. The time- and temperature-dependent CO release from this CORM-3 analogue was followed by a myoglobin assay. A new measurement method for the myoglobin assay was developed, based on confining "water-soluble" polymer-coated Dextran500k@CORM@IONP particles in hollow spheres of nontoxic and easily prepared calcium alginate. Dropping a mixture of Dextran500k@CORM@IONP and sodium alginate into a CaCl2 solution leads to stable hollow spheres of Ca(2+) cross-linked alginate which contain the Dextran500k@CORM@IONP particles. This "alginate-method" (i) protects CORM-3 analogues from rapid CO-displacement reactions with a protein, (ii) enables a spatial separation of the CORM from its surrounding myoglobin assay with the alginate acting as a CO-permeable membrane, and (iii) allows the use of substances with high absorptivity (such as iron oxide nanoparticles) in the myoglobin assay without interference in the optical path of the UV cell. Embedding the CORM@IONP nanoparticles in the alginate vessel represents a compartmentation of the reactive component and allows for close contact with, yet facile separation from, the surrounding myoglobin assay. The half-life of the CO release from Dextran500k@CORM@IONP particles surrounded by alginate was determined to be 890 ± 70 min at 20 °C. An acceleration of the CO release occurs at higher temperature with a half-life of 172 ± 27 min at 37 °C and 45 ± 7 min at 50 °C. The CO release can be triggered in an alternating current magnetic field (31.7 kA m(-1), 247 kHz, 39.9 mT) through local magnetic heating of the susceptible iron oxide nanoparticles. With magnetic heating at 20 °C in the bulk solution, the half-life of CO release from Dextran500k@CORM@IONP particles decreased to 155 ± 18 min

  20. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Houze, Robert, A., Jr.; Zeng, Xiping

    2013-03-14

    were compared with three reanalyses (MERRA, ERA-Interim and CFSR). Although the MMF tends to produce a higher precipitation rate over some topical regions, it actually well captures the variations in the zonal and meridional means. Among the three reanalyses, ERA-Interim seems to have values close to those of the satellite retrievals especially for GPCP. It is interesting to note that the MMF obtained the best results in the rain forest of Africa even better than those of CFSR and ERA-Interim, when compared to CMORPH. MERRA fails to capture the precipitation in this region. We are now collaborating with Steve Rutledge (CSU) to validate the model results for AMMA 6. MC3E and the diurnal variation of precipitation processes The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) was a joint field campaign between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. It took place in central Oklahoma during the period April 22 _ June 6, 2011. Some of its major objectives involve the use of CRMs in precipitation science such as: (1) testing the fidelity of CRM simulations via intensive statistical comparisons between simulated and observed cloud properties and latent heating fields for a variety of case types, (2) establishing the limits of CRM space-time integration capabilities for quantitative precipitation estimates, and (3) supporting the development and refinement of physically-based GMI, DPR, and DPR-GMI combined retrieval algorithms using ground-based GPM GV Ku-Ka band radar and CRM simulations. The NASA unified WRF model (nu-WRF) was used for real time forecasts during the field campaign, and ten precipitation events were selected for post mission simulations. These events include well-organized squall lines, scattered storms and quasi-linear storms. A paper focused on the diurnal variation of precipitation will be

  1. Solar heating system

    DOEpatents

    Schreyer, James M.; Dorsey, George F.

    1982-01-01

    An improved solar heating system in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75.degree. to 180.degree. F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing and releasing heat for distribution.

  2. Improved solar heating systems

    DOEpatents

    Schreyer, J.M.; Dorsey, G.F.

    1980-05-16

    An improved solar heating system is described in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75 to 180/sup 0/F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing ad releasing heat for distribution.

  3. Multimethod latent class analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nussbeck, Fridtjof W.; Eid, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Correct and, hence, valid classifications of individuals are of high importance in the social sciences as these classifications are the basis for diagnoses and/or the assignment to a treatment. The via regia to inspect the validity of psychological ratings is the multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) approach. First, a latent variable model for the analysis of rater agreement (latent rater agreement model) will be presented that allows for the analysis of convergent validity between different measurement approaches (e.g., raters). Models of rater agreement are transferred to the level of latent variables. Second, the latent rater agreement model will be extended to a more informative MTMM latent class model. This model allows for estimating (i) the convergence of ratings, (ii) method biases in terms of differential latent distributions of raters and differential associations of categorizations within raters (specific rater bias), and (iii) the distinguishability of categories indicating if categories are satisfyingly distinct from each other. Finally, an empirical application is presented to exemplify the interpretation of the MTMM latent class model. PMID:26441714

  4. Latent fingerprint matching.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anil K; Feng, Jianjiang

    2011-01-01

    Latent fingerprint identification is of critical importance to law enforcement agencies in identifying suspects: Latent fingerprints are inadvertent impressions left by fingers on surfaces of objects. While tremendous progress has been made in plain and rolled fingerprint matching, latent fingerprint matching continues to be a difficult problem. Poor quality of ridge impressions, small finger area, and large nonlinear distortion are the main difficulties in latent fingerprint matching compared to plain or rolled fingerprint matching. We propose a system for matching latent fingerprints found at crime scenes to rolled fingerprints enrolled in law enforcement databases. In addition to minutiae, we also use extended features, including singularity, ridge quality map, ridge flow map, ridge wavelength map, and skeleton. We tested our system by matching 258 latents in the NIST SD27 database against a background database of 29,257 rolled fingerprints obtained by combining the NIST SD4, SD14, and SD27 databases. The minutiae-based baseline rank-1 identification rate of 34.9 percent was improved to 74 percent when extended features were used. In order to evaluate the relative importance of each extended feature, these features were incrementally used in the order of their cost in marking by latent experts. The experimental results indicate that singularity, ridge quality map, and ridge flow map are the most effective features in improving the matching accuracy.

  5. Numerical simulations on influence of urban land cover expansion and anthropogenic heat release on urban meteorological environment in Pearl River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning; Wang, Xuemei; Chen, Yan; Dai, Wei; Wang, Xueyuan

    2015-08-01

    Urbanization is an extreme way in which human being changes the land use/land cover of the earth surface, and anthropogenic heat release occurs at the same time. In this paper, the anthropogenic heat release parameterization scheme in the Weather Research and Forecasting model is modified to consider the spatial heterogeneity of the release; and the impacts of land use change and anthropogenic heat release on urban boundary layer structure in the Pearl River Delta, China, are studied with a series of numerical experiments. The results show that the anthropogenic heat release contributes nearly 75 % to the urban heat island intensity in our studied period. The impact of anthropogenic heat release on near-surface specific humidity is very weak, but that on relative humidity is apparent due to the near-surface air temperature change. The near-surface wind speed decreases after the local land use is changed to urban type due to the increased land surface roughness, but the anthropogenic heat release leads to increases of the low-level wind speed and decreases above in the urban boundary layer because the anthropogenic heat release reduces the boundary layer stability and enhances the vertical mixing.

  6. Release and degradation of anthocyanins and phenolics from blueberry pomace during thermal acid hydrolysis and dry heating.

    PubMed

    Bener, Mustafa; Shen, Yixiao; Apak, Reşat; Finley, John W; Xu, Zhimin

    2013-07-10

    In this study, blueberry pomace was soaked in pH 1, 4, or 7 solution for 10 min followed by boiling hydrolysis. Nine anthocyanins and 11 other phenolic compounds were released after acid hydrolysis. The highest anthocyanin release (4.70 mg/g) was achieved by boiling at pH 1 for 15 min followed by 3.94 mg/g at pH 4 and 3.46 mg/g at pH 7. Phenolics were released more quickly than anthocyanins during boiling. The change of antioxidant activity of the pomace during boiling was correlated with the total phenolic content but not anthocyanin content. The degradation rate of anthocyanins during boiling eventually surpassed the release rate from the pomace. Protocatechuic acid and catechin continuously increased during heating. Dry heat resulted in continuous degradation of anthocyanins and other phenolics in the pomace. The reduction in antioxidant activity of the pomace during dry heating was correlated with both the phenolic and anthocyanin contents.

  7. Latent palmprint matching.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anil K; Feng, Jianjiang

    2009-06-01

    The evidential value of palmprints in forensic applications is clear as about 30 percent of the latents recovered from crime scenes are from palms. While biometric systems for palmprint-based personal authentication in access control type of applications have been developed, they mostly deal with low-resolution (about 100 ppi) palmprints and only perform full-to-full palmprint matching. We propose a latent-to-full palmprint matching system that is needed in forensic applications. Our system deals with palmprints captured at 500 ppi (the current standard in forensic applications) or higher resolution and uses minutiae as features to be compatible with the methodology used by latent experts. Latent palmprint matching is a challenging problem because latent prints lifted at crime scenes are of poor image quality, cover only a small area of the palm, and have a complex background. Other difficulties include a large number of minutiae in full prints (about 10 times as many as fingerprints), and the presence of many creases in latents and full prints. A robust algorithm to reliably estimate the local ridge direction and frequency in palmprints is developed. This facilitates the extraction of ridge and minutiae features even in poor quality palmprints. A fixed-length minutia descriptor, MinutiaCode, is utilized to capture distinctive information around each minutia and an alignment-based minutiae matching algorithm is used to match two palmprints. Two sets of partial palmprints (150 live-scan partial palmprints and 100 latent palmprints) are matched to a background database of 10,200 full palmprints to test the proposed system. Despite the inherent difficulty of latent-to-full palmprint matching, rank-1 recognition rates of 78.7 and 69 percent, respectively, were achieved in searching live-scan partial palmprints and latent palmprints against the background database.

  8. Release behavior of non-network proteins and its relationship to the structure of heat-induced soy protein gels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Hua, Yufei; Chen, Yeming; Kong, Xiangzhen; Zhang, Caimeng

    2015-04-29

    Heat-induced soy protein gels were prepared by heating protein solutions at 12%, 15% ,or 18% for 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 h. The release of non-network proteins from gel slices was conducted in 10 mM pH 7.0 sodium phosphate buffer. SDS-PAGE and diagonal electrophoresis demonstrated that the released proteins consisted of undenatured AB subunits and denatured proteins including monomers of A polypeptides, disulfide bond linked dimers, trimers, and polymers of A polypeptides, and an unidentified 15 kDa protein. SEC-HPLC analysis of non-network proteins revealed three major protein peaks, with molecular weights of approximately 253.9, 44.8, and 9.7 kDa. The experimental data showed that the time-dependent release of the three fractions from soy protein gels fit Fick's second law. An increasing protein concentration or heating time resulted in a decrease in diffusion coefficients of non-network proteins. A power law expression was used to describe the relationship between non-network protein diffusion coefficient and molecular weight, for which the exponent (α) shifted to higher value with an increase in protein concentration or heating time, indicating that a more compact gel structure was formed.

  9. Smoothing HCCI heat release with vaporization-cooling-induced thermal stratification using ethanol.

    SciTech Connect

    Dec, John E.; Sjoberg, Carl-Magnus G.

    2010-12-01

    Ethanol and ethanol/gasoline blends are being widely considered as alternative fuels for light-duty automotive applications. At the same time, HCCI combustion has the potential to provide high efficiency and ultra-low exhaust emissions. However, the application of HCCI is typically limited to low and moderate loads because of unacceptably high heat-release rates (HRR) at higher fueling rates. This work investigates the potential of lowering the HCCI HRR at high loads by using partial fuel stratification to increase the in-cylinder thermal stratification. This strategy is based on ethanol's high heat of vaporization combined with its true single-stage ignition characteristics. Using partial fuel stratification, the strong fuel-vaporization cooling produces thermal stratification due to variations in the amount of fuel vaporization in different parts of the combustion chamber. The low sensitivity of the autoignition reactions to variations of the local fuel concentration allows the temperature variations to govern the combustion event. This results in a sequential autoignition event from leaner and hotter zones to richer and colder zones, lowering the overall combustion rate compared to operation with a uniform fuel/air mixture. The amount of partial fuel stratification was varied by adjusting the fraction of fuel injected late to produce stratification, and also by changing the timing of the late injection. The experiments show that a combination of 60-70% premixed charge and injection of 30-40 % of the fuel at 80{sup o}CA before TDC is effective for smoothing the HRR. With CA50 held fixed, this increases the burn duration by 55% and reduces the maximum pressure-rise rate by 40%. Combustion stability remains high but engine-out NO{sub x} has to be monitored carefully. For operation with strong reduction of the peak HRR, ISNO{sub x} rises to around 0.20 g/kWh for an IMEP{sub g} of 440 kPa. The single-cylinder HCCI research engine was operated naturally aspirated

  10. The effectiveness of organic PCM based on lauric acid from coconut oil and inorganic PCM based on salt hydrate CaCl2.6H2o as latent heat energy storage system in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    U, Sri Rahayu A.; Putri, Widya A.; Sutjahja, I. M.; Kurnia, D.; Wonorahardjo, S.

    2016-08-01

    A latent heat energy storage system utilizing phase change materials (PCM) is an alternative strategy to reduce the use of Air Conditioning (AC) system in big cities in Indonesia in order for energy conservation in the future. In this research we used two kinds of materials, namely organic PCM based on lauric acid from coconut oil (CO) and inorganic PCM based on salt hydrate CaCl2.6H2O, because they have thermophysical parameters suitable for human's thermal comfort application in the building. The CO which contained more than 50% lauric acid has the melting temperature (Tm ) of about 26 °C and heat entalphy (ΔH) around 103 kJ/kg, while CaCl2.6H2O has the melting point of 29 °C and heat entalphy of 190 kJ/kg. In this paper we report the effectiveness of those two kinds of PCM in reducing the air temperature as one of some criteria for human's thermal comfort. The experiments were performed in a close and adiabatic room and the time-temperature measurements were done automatically using Arduino microcontroller and LM35 temperature sensor connected to the PC.

  11. Assessment of Heat Resistance of Bacterial Spores from Food Product Isolates by Fluorescence Monitoring of Dipicolinic Acid Release

    PubMed Central

    Kort, Remco; O'Brien, Andrea C.; van Stokkum, Ivo H. M.; Oomes, Suus J. C. M.; Crielaard, Wim; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.; Brul, Stanley

    2005-01-01

    This study is aimed at the development and application of a convenient and rapid optical assay to monitor the wet-heat resistance of bacterial endospores occurring in food samples. We tested the feasibility of measuring the release of the abundant spore component dipicolinic acid (DPA) as a probe for heat inactivation. Spores were isolated from the laboratory type strain Bacillus subtilis 168 and from two food product isolates, Bacillus subtilis A163 and Bacillus sporothermodurans IC4. Spores from the lab strain appeared much less heat resistant than those from the two food product isolates. The decimal reduction times (D values) for spores from strains 168, A163, and IC4 recovered on Trypticase soy agar were 1.4, 0.7, and 0.3 min at 105°C, 120°C, and 131°C, respectively. The estimated Z values were 6.3°C, 6.1°C, and 9.7°C, respectively. The extent of DPA release from the three spore crops was monitored as a function of incubation time and temperature. DPA concentrations were determined by measuring the emission at 545 nm of the fluorescent terbium-DPA complex in a microtiter plate fluorometer. We defined spore heat resistance as the critical DPA release temperature (Tc), the temperature at which half the DPA content has been released within a fixed incubation time. We found Tc values for spores from Bacillus strains 168, A163, and IC4 of 108°C, 121°C, and 131°C, respectively. On the basis of these observations, we developed a quantitative model that describes the time and temperature dependence of the experimentally determined extent of DPA release and spore inactivation. The model predicts a DPA release rate profile for each inactivated spore. In addition, it uncovers remarkable differences in the values for the temperature dependence parameters for the rate of spore inactivation, DPA release duration, and DPA release delay. PMID:16000762

  12. Numerical Study on the Heat Release Distributions of a Supersonic Combustor with Three-Dimensional "Swallowtail" Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun; Sun, Xiaofeng; Yao, Xuanyu; Jiang, Zonglin

    Hypersonic air-breathing propulsion has been a focus technology in hypersonic aviation in the past decades [1]. Three-dimensional cavity may act as the flame holder of a Scramjet engine in air-breathing hypersonic propulsion. An interesting three-dimensional cavity is "swallowtail" cavity which has a special inner shape like a swallowtail. With three-dimensional cavity in supersonic chamber, threedimensional vortexes may be organized optimally, and the exchange of mass, momentum and energy between cavity flow and supersonic flow may be enhanced to provide better performance of mixing and combustion[2]. Also, three-dimensional cavity may avoid the sharp heat release in local region of chamber and suppress the subsonic combustion oscillation induced by the cavity in a supersonic combustor. It is necessary to study the heat release distribution of a supersonic combustor with three-dimensional cavity.

  13. On numerical model of time-dependent processes in three-dimensional porous heat-releasing objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsenko, Nickolay A.

    2016-10-01

    The gas flows in the gravity field through porous objects with heat-releasing sources are investigated when the self-regulation of the flow rate of the gas passing through the porous object takes place. Such objects can appear after various natural or man-made disasters (like the exploded unit of the Chernobyl NPP). The mathematical model and the original numerical method, based on a combination of explicit and implicit finite difference schemes, are developed for investigating the time-dependent processes in 3D porous energy-releasing objects. The advantage of the numerical model is its ability to describe unsteady processes under both natural convection and forced filtration. The gas cooling of 3D porous objects with different distribution of heat sources is studied using computational experiment.

  14. The Effects of Fuel Stratification and Heat Release Rate Shaping in Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DelVescovo, Dan A.

    Low temperature combustion strategies have demonstrated high thermal efficiency with low emissions of pollutants, including oxides of nitrogen and particulate matter. One such combustion strategy, called Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI), which involves the port injection of a low reactivity fuel such as gasoline, ethanol, or natural gas, and a direct injection of a high reactivity fuel, such as diesel, has demonstrated excellent control over the heat release event due to the introduction of in-cylinder stratification of equivalence ratio and reactivity. The RCCI strategy is inherently fuel flexible, however the direct injection strategy needs to be tailored to the combination of premixed and direct injected fuels. Experimental results demonstrate that, when comparing different premixed fuels, matching combustion phasing with premixed mass percentage or SOI timing is not sufficient to retain baseline efficiency and emissions results. If the bulk characteristics of the heat release event can be matched, however, then the efficiency and emissions can be maintained. A 0-D methodology for predicting the required fuel stratification for a desired heat release for kinetically-controlled stratified-charge combustion strategies is proposed and validated with 3-D reacting and non-reacting CFD simulations performed with KIVA3Vr2 in this work. Various heat release rate shapes, phasing, duration, and premixed and DI fuel chemistries are explored using this analysis. This methodology provides a means by which the combustion process of a stratified-charge, kinetically-controlled combustion strategy could be optimized for any fuel combination, assuming that the fuel chemistry is well characterized.

  15. Changes in body core temperatures and heat balance after an abrupt release of lower body negative pressure in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Minoru; Shido, Osamu

    1994-03-01

    Changes in body core temperature ( T cor) and heat balance after an abrupt release of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) were investigated in 5 volunteers under the following conditions: (1) an ambient temperature ( T a) of 20 °C or (2) 35 °C, and (3) T a of 25 °C with a leg skin temperature of 30°C or (4) 35°C. The leg skin temperature was controlled with water perfusion devices wound around the legs. Rectal ( T re), tympanic ( T ty) and esophageal ( T es) temperatures, skin temperatures (7 sites) and oxygen consumption were measured. The intensity of LBNP was adjusted so that the amount of blood pooled in the legs was the same under all conditions. When a thermal balance was attained during LBNP, application of LBNP was suddenly halted. The skin temperatures increased significantly after the release of LBNP under all conditions, while oxygen consumption hardly changed. The release of LBNP caused significant falls in T cor s under conditions (1) and (3), but lowered T cor s very slightly under conditions (2) and (4). The changes in T es were always more rapid and greater than those of T ty and T re. The falls in T ty and T re appeared to be explained by changes in heat balance, whereas the sharp drop of T es could not be explained especially during the first 8 min after the release of LBNP. The results suggest that a fall in T cor after a release of LBNP is attributed to an increase in heat loss due to reflexive skin vasodilation and is dependent on the temperature of venous blood returning from the lower body. It is presumed that T es may not be an appropriate indicator for T cor when venous return changes rapidly.

  16. The pH effect of solvent in silanization on fluoride released and mechanical properties of heat-cured acrylic resin containing fluoride-releasing filler.

    PubMed

    Nakornchai, Natha; Arksornnukit, Mansuang; Kamonkhantikul, Krid; Takahashi, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an acidic-adjusted pH of solvent in silanization on the amount of fluoride released and mechanical properties of heat-cured acrylic resin containing a silanized fluoride-releasing filler. The experimental groups were divided into 4 groups; non-silanized, acidic-adjusted pH, non-adjusted pH, and no filler as control. For fluoride measurement, each specimen was placed in deionized water which was changed every day for 7 days, every week for 7 weeks and measured. The flexural strength and flexural modulus were evaluated after aging for 48 h, 1, and 2 months. Two-way ANOVA indicated significant differences among groups, storage times, and its interaction in fluoride measurement and flexural modulus. For flexural strength, there was significant difference only among groups. Acidic-adjusted pH of solvent in silanization enhanced the amount of fluoride released from acrylic resin, while non-adjusted pH of solvent exhibited better flexural strength of acrylic resin. PMID:27252000

  17. The pH effect of solvent in silanization on fluoride released and mechanical properties of heat-cured acrylic resin containing fluoride-releasing filler.

    PubMed

    Nakornchai, Natha; Arksornnukit, Mansuang; Kamonkhantikul, Krid; Takahashi, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an acidic-adjusted pH of solvent in silanization on the amount of fluoride released and mechanical properties of heat-cured acrylic resin containing a silanized fluoride-releasing filler. The experimental groups were divided into 4 groups; non-silanized, acidic-adjusted pH, non-adjusted pH, and no filler as control. For fluoride measurement, each specimen was placed in deionized water which was changed every day for 7 days, every week for 7 weeks and measured. The flexural strength and flexural modulus were evaluated after aging for 48 h, 1, and 2 months. Two-way ANOVA indicated significant differences among groups, storage times, and its interaction in fluoride measurement and flexural modulus. For flexural strength, there was significant difference only among groups. Acidic-adjusted pH of solvent in silanization enhanced the amount of fluoride released from acrylic resin, while non-adjusted pH of solvent exhibited better flexural strength of acrylic resin.

  18. Two-time correlation of heat release rate and spectrum of combustion noise from turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu

    2015-09-01

    The spectral characteristics of combustion noise are dictated by the temporal correlation of the overall change of heat release rate fluctuations which has not received sufficient attention in prior studies. In this work, the two-time correlation of the volumetric heat release rate fluctuations within the flame brush and its role in modeling combustion noise spectrum are investigated by analyzing direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of turbulent premixed V-flames. This two-time correlation can be well represented by Gaussian-type functions and it captures the slow global variation of the fluctuating heat release rate and hence the low-frequency noise sources of unsteady combustion. The resulting correlation model is applied to predict the far-field noise spectrum from test open flames, and different reference time scales are used to scale this correlation from the DNS data to the test flames. The comparison between predictions and measurements indicates that the correlation models of all reference time scales are capable of reproducing the essential spectral shape including the low- and high-frequency dependencies. Reasonable agreement in the peak frequency, peak sound pressure level, and the Strouhal number scaling of peak frequency is also achieved for two turbulent time scales. A promising convective time scale shows great potential for characterizing the spectral features, yet its predictive capabilities are to be further verified through a longer DNS signal of a bounded flame configuration.

  19. Characteristics of cyclic heat release variability in the transition from spark ignition to HCCI in a gasoline engine

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Asok K; Litak, Grzegorz; Edwards, Kevin Dean; FINNEY, Charles E A; Daw, C Stuart; Wagner, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    We study selected examples of previously published cyclic heat-release measurements from a single-cylinder gasoline engine as stepwise valve timing adjustments were made to shift from spark ignited (SI) combustion to homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). Wavelet analysis of the time series, combined with conventional statistics and multifractal analysis, revealed previously undocumented features in the combustion variability as the shift occurred. In the spark-ignition combustion mode, the heat-release variations were very small in amplitude and exhibited more persistent low-frequency oscillations with intermittent high-frequency bursts. In the HCCI combustion mode, the amplitude of the heat-release variations again was small and involved mainly low-frequency oscillations. At intermediate states between SI and HCCI, a wide range of very large-amplitude oscillations occurred, including both persistent low-frequency periodicities and intermittent high-frequency bursts. It appears from these results that real-time wavelet decomposition of engine cylinder pressure measurements may be useful for on-board tracking of SI HCCI combustion regime shifts.

  20. Neuronal Serotonin Release Triggers the Heat Shock Response in C. elegans in the Absence of Temperature Increase

    PubMed Central

    Tatum, Marcus C.; Ooi, Felicia K.; Chikka, Madhusudana Rao; Chauve, Laetitia; Martinez-Velazquez, Luis A.; Steinbusch, Harry W.M.; Morimoto, Richard I.; Prahlad, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Cellular mechanisms aimed at repairing protein damage and maintaining homeostasis, widely understood to be triggered by the damage itself, have recently been shown to be under cell nonautonomous control in the metazoan C. elegans. The heat shock response (HSR) is one such conserved mechanism, activated by cells upon exposure to proteotoxic conditions such as heat. Previously, we had shown that this conserved cytoprotective response is regulated by the thermosensory neuronal circuitry of C. elegans. Here, we investigate the mechanisms and physiological relevance of neuronal control. Results By combining optogenetic methods with live visualization of the dynamics of the heat shock transcription factor (HSF1), we show that excitation of the AFD thermosensory neurons is sufficient to activate HSF1 in another cell, even in the absence of temperature increase. Excitation of the AFD thermosensory neurons enhances serotonin release. Serotonin release elicited by direct optogenetic stimulation of serotonergic neurons activates HSF1 and upregulates molecular chaperones through the metabotropic serotonin receptor SER-1. Consequently, excitation of serotonergic neurons alone can suppress protein misfolding in C. elegans peripheral tissue. Conclusions These studies imply that thermosensory activity coupled to serotonergic signaling is sufficient to activate the protective HSR prior to frank proteotoxic damage. The ability of neurosensory release of serotonin to control cellular stress responses and activate HSF1 has powerful implications for the treatment of protein conformation diseases. PMID:25557666

  1. Coupling between hydrodynamics, acoustics, and heat release in a self-excited unstable combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvazinski, Matthew E.; Huang, Cheng; Sankaran, Venkateswaran; Feldman, Thomas W.; Anderson, William E.; Merkle, Charles L.; Talley, Douglas G.

    2015-04-01

    The unsteady gas dynamic field in a closed combustor is determined by the nonlinear interactions between chamber acoustics, hydrodynamics, and turbulent combustion that can energize these modes. These interactions are studied in detail using hybrid RANS/large eddy simulations (RANS = Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes) of a non-premixed, high-pressure laboratory combustor that produces self-excited longitudinal instabilities. The main variable in the study is the relative acoustic length between the combustion chamber and the tube that injects oxidizer into the combustor. Assuming a half-wave (closed-closed) combustion chamber, the tube lengths approximately correspond to quarter-, 3/8-, and half-wave resonators that serve to vary the phasing between the acoustic modes in the tube and the combustion chamber. The simulation correctly predicts the relatively stable behavior measured with the shortest tube and the very unstable behavior measured with the intermediate tube. Unstable behavior is also predicted for the longest tube, a case for which bifurcated stability behavior was measured in the experiment. In the first (stable) configuration, fuel flows into the combustor uninterrupted, and heat release is spatially continuous with a flame that remains attached to the back step. In the second (unstable) configuration, a cyclic process is apparent comprising a disruption in the fuel flow, subsequent detachment of the flame from the back step, and accumulation of fuel in the recirculation zone that ignites upon arrival of a compression wave reflected from the downstream boundary of the combustion chamber. The third case (mixed stable/unstable) shares features with both of the other cases. The major difference between the two cases predicted to be unstable is that, in the intermediate length tube, a pressure wave reflection inside the tube pushes unburnt fuel behind the back step radially outward, leading to a post-coupled reignition mechanism, while in the case of the

  2. Estimates of helium gas release in 238PuO 2 fuel particles for radioisotope heat sources and heater units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel

    2000-06-01

    Release data of noble gases (Xe and Kr) from small-grain (7-40 μm), large-grain (⩾300 μm), and monocrystal UO 2 fuel particles, during isothermal irradiation up to 6.4 at.% and 2030 K are reviewed and their applicability to estimate helium release from 238PuO 2 fuel particles (⩾300 μm in diameter) is examined. Coated 238PuO 2 particles have recently been proposed for use in radioisotope power systems and heater units employed in planetary exploration missions. These fuel particles are intentionally sized and designed to prevent any adverse radiological effect and retain the helium gas generated by the radioactive decay of 238Pu, a desired feature for some planetary missions. Results suggest that helium release from large-grain (⩾300 μm) particles of K could be <7% at 1723 K, <0.6% at 1042 K, and even less for polycrystalline particles fabricated using sol-gel processes. Results also suggest that helium release from small-grain plutonia particles at 1723 K could be >80% but less than 7% at 1042 K, which is in general agreement with the experiments conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory more than two decades ago. In these experiments, the helium gas release from small-grain (7-40 μm) 238PuO 2 fuel pellets has been measured during steady-state heating at temperatures up to 1886 K and ramp heating to 1723 K.

  3. Latent Toxoplasmosis and Human

    PubMed Central

    Dalimi, A; Abdoli, A

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is one of the most common parasitic diseases worldwide. Although estimated that one third of the world's population are infected with Toxoplasma gondii, but the most common form of the disease is latent (asymptomatic). On the other hand, recent findings indicated that latent toxoplasmosis is not only unsafe for human, but also may play various roles in the etiology of different mental disorders. This paper reviews new findings about importance of latent toxoplasmosis (except in immunocompromised patients) in alterations of behavioral parameters and also its role in the etiology of schizophrenia and depressive disorders, obsessive–compulsive disorder, Alzheimer's diseases and Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, headache and or migraine, mental retardation and intelligence quotients, suicide attempt, risk of traffic accidents, sex ratio and some possible mechanisms of T. gondii that could contribute in the etiology of these alterations. PMID:23133466

  4. Latent toxoplasmosis and human.

    PubMed

    Dalimi, A; Abdoli, A

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is one of the most common parasitic diseases worldwide. Although estimated that one third of the world's population are infected with Toxoplasma gondii, but the most common form of the disease is latent (asymptomatic). On the other hand, recent findings indicated that latent toxoplasmosis is not only unsafe for human, but also may play various roles in the etiology of different mental disorders. This paper reviews new findings about importance of latent toxoplasmosis (except in immunocompromised patients) in alterations of behavioral parameters and also its role in the etiology of schizophrenia and depressive disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, Alzheimer's diseases and Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, headache and or migraine, mental retardation and intelligence quotients, suicide attempt, risk of traffic accidents, sex ratio and some possible mechanisms of T. gondii that could contribute in the etiology of these alterations.

  5. Use of multi-platform and frequency remote sensing data for mapping latent and sensible heat flux over the Gourma Region in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, L.; Entekhabi, D.; Salvucci, G.; Sun, J.

    2010-12-01

    A new approach to the estimation of key unknown parameters of water and energy balance equation (moisture and heat diffusion equation) and the closure function which links these two equations is introduced. Parameters of the system (water balance and energy balance) are estimated by developing objective functions that link atmospheric forcing (precipitation and incident radiation), surface state and unknown parameters. This approach is based on conditional averaging of heat and moisture diffusion equations on land surface temperature and moisture states respectively. Based on conditional averaging, a single objective function is posed that measures the moisture and temperature dependent errors solely in terms of observed forcings (e.g. precipitation, radiation) and surface states (moisture and temperature). This objective function can be minimized with respect to parameters to identify evaporation and drainage models and estimate water and energy balance flux components. The uncertainty of the estimated parameters (and associated statistical confidence limits) is obtained through the inverse of Hessian of the objective function which is an approximation of the covariance matrix. The accuracy of this method has previously been examined through the use of synthetic data and field data. In this presentation the proposed methodology is applied to the arid sahara-sahelian climate of Gourma region in West Africa. Evaporative fraction as a function of soil moisture (EF(s)), neutral turbulent heat Coefficient (CH) as a function of vegetation phenology and Drainage as a function of soil moisture are obtained using the proposed methodology.

  6. Experimental study of unsteady heat release in an unstable single element Lean Direct Injection (LDI) gas turbine combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanan, Varun S.

    In an effort to curb emissions from gas turbine engines, many low emission engine concepts have been developed. Among the most promising of these is the LDI (Lean Direct Injection). These systems operate at relatively low equivalence ratios close to blowout and are prone to instabilities. Combustion instabilities can reduce the life of the combustor by causing large pressure fluctuations and enhanced heat release to the walls of the combustor and reduce the efficiency of the engines. The understanding of combustion instabilities is vital to the implementation of such systems. Combustion instabilities are studied in an self-excited single element gas turbine combustor that uses an LDI element for fuel injection at elevetaed chamber pressures. The LDI combustor uses a swirler to ensure mixing of the air and the fuel and expansion of the swirl through a pressure swirl venturi to create a swirl stabilized flame. This project aims to study the heat release modes that occur in the combustor through measurement of light emissions from the flame using photodiodes that are sensitive to wavelengths of light produced by the flame. These are used along with high frequency pressure transducers. The focus is on the flame behavior in the diverging section of the venturi where the swirl is expanded and the flame starts since optic access cannot be obtained in this section. The use of photodiodes also facilitates the study of hydrodynamic modes that occur in the combustor alongside the thermoacoustics. A section which could accommodate the photodiodes was designed and installed on the LDI test rig in the Gas Turbine Cell at Maurice J Zucrow Propulsion Labs at Purdue University. The combustor was tested with this section and dynamic data was obtained from the pressure transducers and the photodiodes for a range of inlet air temperatures and range of equivalence ratios for each inlet air temperature. The dominant instability modes in both sets of data were analyzed and are presented

  7. Study of Cold Heat Energy Release Characteristics of Flowing Ice Water Slurry in a Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Horibe, Akihiko; Ozaki, Koichi; Yokota, Maki

    This paper has dealt with melting heat transfer characteristics of ice water slurry in an inside tube of horizontal double tube heat exchanger in which a hot water circulated in an annular gap between the inside and outside tubes. Two kinds of heat exchangers were used; one is made of acrylic resin tube for flow visualization and the other is made of stainless steel tube for melting heat transfer measurement. The result of flow visualization revealed that ice particles flowed along the top of inside tube in the ranges of small ice packing factor and low ice water slurry velocity, while ice particles diffused into the whole of tube and flowed like a plug built up by ice particles for large ice packing factor and high velocity. Moreover, it was found that the flowing ice plug was separated into numbers of small ice clusters by melting phenomenon. Experiments of melting heat transfer were carried out under some parameters of ice packing factor, ice water slurry flow rate and hot water temperature. Consequently, the correlation equation of melting heat transfer was derived as a function of those experimental parameters.

  8. Latent Semantic Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumais, Susan T.

    2004-01-01

    Presents a literature review that covers the following topics related to Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA): (1) LSA overview; (2) applications of LSA, including information retrieval (IR), information filtering, cross-language retrieval, and other IR-related LSA applications; (3) modeling human memory, including the relationship of LSA to other…

  9. Latent Variable Interaction Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacker, Randall E.

    2002-01-01

    Used simulation to study two different approaches to latent variable interaction modeling with continuous observed variables: (1) a LISREL 8.30 program and (2) data analysis through PRELIS2 and SIMPLIS programs. Results show that parameter estimation was similar but standard errors were different. Discusses differences in ease of implementation.…

  10. Measuring Latent Quantities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Roderick P.

    2011-01-01

    A distinction is proposed between measures and predictors of latent variables. The discussion addresses the consequences of the distinction for the true-score model, the linear factor model, Structural Equation Models, longitudinal and multilevel models, and item-response models. A distribution-free treatment of calibration and…

  11. National Athletic Trainers' Association Releases New Guidelines for Exertional Heat Illnesses: What School Nurses Need to Know.

    PubMed

    VanScoy, Rachel M; DeMartini, Julie K; Casa, Douglas J

    2016-05-01

    Exertional heat illnesses (EHI) occur in various populations and settings. Within a school setting, there are student athletes who take part in physical activity where the risk of EHI is increased. The National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) released an updated position statement on EHI in September of 2015. This article is a summary of the position statement. The sports medicine team, including school nurses and athletic trainers, provides quality health care to these physically active individuals. Thus, it is important for school nurses to understand the prevention, recognition, and treatment of EHI. PMID:26941054

  12. National Athletic Trainers' Association Releases New Guidelines for Exertional Heat Illnesses: What School Nurses Need to Know.

    PubMed

    VanScoy, Rachel M; DeMartini, Julie K; Casa, Douglas J

    2016-05-01

    Exertional heat illnesses (EHI) occur in various populations and settings. Within a school setting, there are student athletes who take part in physical activity where the risk of EHI is increased. The National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) released an updated position statement on EHI in September of 2015. This article is a summary of the position statement. The sports medicine team, including school nurses and athletic trainers, provides quality health care to these physically active individuals. Thus, it is important for school nurses to understand the prevention, recognition, and treatment of EHI.

  13. The Heat Release Ratio and Performance Test at a Small-Scale RDF-5 Bubbling Fluidized Bed Boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Hou-Peng; Chyang, Chien-Song; Yang, Chyh-Sen; Juch, Ching-I.; Lo, Kuo-Chao; Lee, Hom-Ti

    Design and operation of boilers using biomass or waste present a number of challenges. It is also well known that the flue gas emissions are strongly dependent on the fuel. Consequently, it is a major challenge to be able to control and maintain all emissions and combustion behavior under their designated limits for all fuel combinations required. Lately, the constant substantial rise in the price of fossil fuels has resulted with RDF (refuse derived fuel) technology becoming more valuable for generating heat in various types of boilers. A small-scale bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) RDF-fired boiler with a steam capacity of 4 ton/hr was developed by ITRI. In this paper, heat release in the fluidized bed region was calculated and the performance testing for this demonstration boiler including the items of bed temperature distribution, flue gas emissions, and the ash characteristics is analyzed and discussed. Finally, a series fuel flexibility tests were conducted in the RDF-5 BFBB.

  14. Small heat shock proteins can release light dependence of tobacco seed during germination.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyun Jo; Park, Soo Min; Kim, Keun Pill; Suh, Mi Chung; Lee, Mi Ok; Lee, Seong-Kon; Xinli, Xia; Hong, Choo Bong

    2015-03-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) function as ATP-independent molecular chaperones, and although the production and function of sHSPs have often been described under heat stress, the expression and function of sHSPs in fundamental developmental processes, such as pollen and seed development, have also been confirmed. Seed germination involves the breaking of dormancy and the resumption of embryo growth that accompany global changes in transcription, translation, and metabolism. In many plants, germination is triggered simply by imbibition of water; however, different seeds require different conditions in addition to water. For small-seeded plants, like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), light is an important regulator of seed germination. The facts that sHSPs accumulate during seed development, sHSPs interact with various client proteins, and seed germination accompanies synthesis and/or activation of diverse proteins led us to investigate the role of sHSPs in seed germination, especially in the context of light dependence. In this study, we have built transgenic tobacco plants that ectopically express sHSP, and the effect was germination of the seeds in the dark. Administering heat shock to the seeds also resulted in the alleviation of light dependence during seed germination. Subcellular localization of ectopically expressed sHSP was mainly observed in the cytoplasm, whereas heat shock-induced sHSPs were transported to the nucleus. We hypothesize that ectopically expressed sHSPs in the cytoplasm led the status of cytoplasmic proteins involved in seed germination to function during germination without additional stimulus and that heat shock can be another signal that induces seed germination. PMID:25604531

  15. Small heat shock proteins can release light dependence of tobacco seed during germination.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyun Jo; Park, Soo Min; Kim, Keun Pill; Suh, Mi Chung; Lee, Mi Ok; Lee, Seong-Kon; Xinli, Xia; Hong, Choo Bong

    2015-03-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) function as ATP-independent molecular chaperones, and although the production and function of sHSPs have often been described under heat stress, the expression and function of sHSPs in fundamental developmental processes, such as pollen and seed development, have also been confirmed. Seed germination involves the breaking of dormancy and the resumption of embryo growth that accompany global changes in transcription, translation, and metabolism. In many plants, germination is triggered simply by imbibition of water; however, different seeds require different conditions in addition to water. For small-seeded plants, like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), light is an important regulator of seed germination. The facts that sHSPs accumulate during seed development, sHSPs interact with various client proteins, and seed germination accompanies synthesis and/or activation of diverse proteins led us to investigate the role of sHSPs in seed germination, especially in the context of light dependence. In this study, we have built transgenic tobacco plants that ectopically express sHSP, and the effect was germination of the seeds in the dark. Administering heat shock to the seeds also resulted in the alleviation of light dependence during seed germination. Subcellular localization of ectopically expressed sHSP was mainly observed in the cytoplasm, whereas heat shock-induced sHSPs were transported to the nucleus. We hypothesize that ectopically expressed sHSPs in the cytoplasm led the status of cytoplasmic proteins involved in seed germination to function during germination without additional stimulus and that heat shock can be another signal that induces seed germination.

  16. Small Heat Shock Proteins Can Release Light Dependence of Tobacco Seed during Germination1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hyun Jo; Park, Soo Min; Kim, Keun Pill; Suh, Mi Chung; Lee, Mi Ok; Lee, Seong-Kon; Xinli, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) function as ATP-independent molecular chaperones, and although the production and function of sHSPs have often been described under heat stress, the expression and function of sHSPs in fundamental developmental processes, such as pollen and seed development, have also been confirmed. Seed germination involves the breaking of dormancy and the resumption of embryo growth that accompany global changes in transcription, translation, and metabolism. In many plants, germination is triggered simply by imbibition of water; however, different seeds require different conditions in addition to water. For small-seeded plants, like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), light is an important regulator of seed germination. The facts that sHSPs accumulate during seed development, sHSPs interact with various client proteins, and seed germination accompanies synthesis and/or activation of diverse proteins led us to investigate the role of sHSPs in seed germination, especially in the context of light dependence. In this study, we have built transgenic tobacco plants that ectopically express sHSP, and the effect was germination of the seeds in the dark. Administering heat shock to the seeds also resulted in the alleviation of light dependence during seed germination. Subcellular localization of ectopically expressed sHSP was mainly observed in the cytoplasm, whereas heat shock-induced sHSPs were transported to the nucleus. We hypothesize that ectopically expressed sHSPs in the cytoplasm led the status of cytoplasmic proteins involved in seed germination to function during germination without additional stimulus and that heat shock can be another signal that induces seed germination. PMID:25604531

  17. Novel analytical method to measure formaldehyde release from heated hair straightening cosmetic products: Impact on risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Galli, Corrado Lodovico; Bettin, Federico; Metra, Pierre; Fidente, Paola; De Dominicis, Emiliano; Marinovich, Marina

    2015-08-01

    Hair straightening cosmetic products may contain formaldehyde (FA). In Europe, FA is permitted for use in personal care products at concentrations ⩽ 0.2g/100g. According to the Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel products are safe when formalin (a 37% saturated solution of FA in water) concentration does not exceed 0.2g/100g (0.074 g/100g calculated as FA). The official method of reference does not discriminate between "free" FA and FA released into the air after heating FA donors. The method presented here captures and collects the FA released into the air from heated cosmetic products by derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and final analysis by UPLC/DAD instrument. Reliable data in terms of linearity, recovery, repeatability and sensitivity are obtained. On a total of 72 market cosmetic products analyzed, 42% showed FA concentrations very close to or above the threshold value (0.074 g/100g calculated as FA) suggested by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review committee, whereas 11 products, negative using the official method of reference, were close to or above the threshold value (0.074 g/100g calculated as FA). This may pose a health problem for occasional users and professional hair stylists.

  18. Latent effects decision analysis

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, J. Arlin; Werner, Paul W.

    2004-08-24

    Latent effects on a system are broken down into components ranging from those far removed in time from the system under study (latent) to those which closely effect changes in the system. Each component is provided with weighted inputs either by a user or from outputs of other components. A non-linear mathematical process known as `soft aggregation` is performed on the inputs to each component to provide information relating to the component. This information is combined in decreasing order of latency to the system to provide a quantifiable measure of an attribute of a system (e.g., safety) or to test hypotheses (e.g., for forensic deduction or decisions about various system design options).

  19. Thermally Stable, Latent Olefin Metathesis Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Renee M.; Fedorov, Alexey; Keitz, Benjamin K.

    2011-01-01

    Highly thermally stable N-aryl,N-alkyl N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ruthenium catalysts were designed and synthesized for latent olefin metathesis. These catalysts showed excellent latent behavior toward metathesis reactions, whereby the complexes were inactive at ambient temperature and initiated at elevated temperatures, a challenging property to achieve with second generation catalysts. A sterically hindered N-tert-butyl substituent on the NHC ligand of the ruthenium complex was found to induce latent behavior toward cross-metathesis reactions, and exchange of the chloride ligands for iodide ligands was necessary to attain latent behavior during ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). Iodide-based catalysts showed no reactivity toward ROMP of norbornene-derived monomers at 25 °C, and upon heating to 85 °C gave complete conversion of monomer to polymer in less than 2 hours. All of the complexes were very stable to air, moisture, and elevated temperatures up to at least 90 °C, and exhibited a long catalyst lifetime in solution at elevated temperatures. PMID:22282652

  20. Reactivation of latent melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A B; Ali, N

    1990-09-01

    Reports of melioidosis in residents of European countries are rare. We describe a case of reactivation of latent melioidosis in a United Kingdom resident. The case demonstrates the lack of clinical response to chemotherapy despite proven in vitro sensitivity of the organism to the drugs used. It is important to consider melioidosis as a cause of septicaemic illness in patients who have travelled to, or been resident in South-East Asia.

  1. Reactivation of latent melioidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, A. B.; Ali, N.

    1990-01-01

    Reports of melioidosis in residents of European countries are rare. We describe a case of reactivation of latent melioidosis in a United Kingdom resident. The case demonstrates the lack of clinical response to chemotherapy despite proven in vitro sensitivity of the organism to the drugs used. It is important to consider melioidosis as a cause of septicaemic illness in patients who have travelled to, or been resident in South-East Asia. PMID:2235805

  2. Numerical study of an underground heat tube

    SciTech Connect

    Sulaiman, F.

    1989-01-01

    The energy consumption of the air-to-air heat pump can be reduced, especially in winter, by using the soil as a heat source. A system of buried tube through which air is passed, has great potential in supplying higher temperature air than the ambient air, to the outside heat exchanger of the heat pump. Heat transfer from the soil to the tube, including the possibility of formation of ice lenses around the tube, was investigated over a period of time in a cold season. Models of ice formation were developed in two types of tube, the circular tube and the square tube. Latent heat released due to the formation of ice were included in the models. Computer simulation utilizing finite difference equations were developed, using the explicit method, where forward differences were used in time and central differences were used in space. The numerical results show the effects of increasing the moisture content of the soil, increasing the air flow rate in the tube, and the release of latent heat when soil freezes. The formation of ice around the tube played a significant role in achieving a stabilized output air temperature at a short time.

  3. Peach latent mosaic viroid: not so latent.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ricardo; Delgado, Sonia; Rodio, María-Elena; Ambrós, Silvia; Hernández, Carmen; Serio, Francesco D I

    2006-07-01

    SUMMARY Taxonomy: Peach latent mosaic viroid (PLMVd) is the type species of the genus Pelamoviroid within the family Avsunviroidae of chloroplastic viroids with hammerhead ribozymes. Physical properties: A small circular RNA of 336-351 nt (differences in size result from the absence or presence of certain insertions) adopting a branched conformation stabilized by a pseudoknot between two kissing loops. This particular conformation is most likely responsible for the insolubility of PLMVd in highly saline conditions (in which other viroids adopting a rod-like conformation are soluble). Both polarity strands are able to form hammerhead structures and to self-cleave during replication as predicted by these ribozymes. Biological properties: Although most infections occur without conspicuous symptoms, certain PLMVd isolates induce leaf mosaics, blotches and in the most extreme cases albinism (peach calico, PC), flower streaking, delays in foliation, flowering and ripening, deformations and decolorations of fruits, which usually present cracked sutures and enlarged roundish stones, bud necrosis, stem pitting and premature ageing of the trees, which also adopt a characteristic growing pattern (open habit). The molecular determinant for PC has been mapped at a 12-14-nt insertion that folds into a hairpin capped by a U-rich loop present only in certain variants. PLMVd is horizontally transmitted by the propagation of infected buds and to a lesser extent by pruning tools and aphids, but not by pollen; the viroid is not vertically transmitted through seed. Interesting features: This provides a suitable system for studying how a minimal non-protein-coding catalytic RNA replicates (subverting a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase to transcribe an RNA template), moves, interferes with the metabolism of its host (inciting specific symptoms and a defensive RNA silencing response) and evolves following a quasi-species model characterized by a complex spectrum of variants.

  4. Study on Fuel Cell Network System Considering Reduction in Fuel Cell Capacity Using Load Leveling and Heat Release Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Shin'ya; Kudo, Kazuhiko

    Reduction in fuel cell capacity linked to a fuel cell network system is considered. When the power demand of the whole network is small, some of the electric power generated by the fuel cell is supplied to a water electrolysis device, and hydrogen and oxygen gases are generated. Both gases are compressed with each compressor and they are stored in cylinders. When the electric demand of the whole network is large, both gases are supplied to the network, and fuel cells are operated by these hydrogen and oxygen gases. Furthermore, an optimization plan is made to minimize the quantity of heat release of the hot water piping that connects each building. Such an energy network is analyzed assuming connection of individual houses, a hospital, a hotel, a convenience store, an office building, and a factory. Consequently, compared with the conventional system, a reduction of 46% of fuel cell capacity is expected.

  5. Latent heat characteristics of biobased oleochemical carbonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oleochemical carbonates represent biobased materials that can be readily prepared through a carbonate interchange reaction between renewably available C10-C18 fatty alcohols. Although these carbonates have commercial use in cosmetics and lubricant applications, they have not been examined as phase ...

  6. Latent semantic analysis.

    PubMed

    Evangelopoulos, Nicholas E

    2013-11-01

    This article reviews latent semantic analysis (LSA), a theory of meaning as well as a method for extracting that meaning from passages of text, based on statistical computations over a collection of documents. LSA as a theory of meaning defines a latent semantic space where documents and individual words are represented as vectors. LSA as a computational technique uses linear algebra to extract dimensions that represent that space. This representation enables the computation of similarity among terms and documents, categorization of terms and documents, and summarization of large collections of documents using automated procedures that mimic the way humans perform similar cognitive tasks. We present some technical details, various illustrative examples, and discuss a number of applications from linguistics, psychology, cognitive science, education, information science, and analysis of textual data in general. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:683-692. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1254 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The author has declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26304272

  7. Latent semantic analysis.

    PubMed

    Evangelopoulos, Nicholas E

    2013-11-01

    This article reviews latent semantic analysis (LSA), a theory of meaning as well as a method for extracting that meaning from passages of text, based on statistical computations over a collection of documents. LSA as a theory of meaning defines a latent semantic space where documents and individual words are represented as vectors. LSA as a computational technique uses linear algebra to extract dimensions that represent that space. This representation enables the computation of similarity among terms and documents, categorization of terms and documents, and summarization of large collections of documents using automated procedures that mimic the way humans perform similar cognitive tasks. We present some technical details, various illustrative examples, and discuss a number of applications from linguistics, psychology, cognitive science, education, information science, and analysis of textual data in general. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:683-692. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1254 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The author has declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  8. Latent Supervised Learning

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Susan; Kosorok, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    A new machine learning task is introduced, called latent supervised learning, where the goal is to learn a binary classifier from continuous training labels which serve as surrogates for the unobserved class labels. A specific model is investigated where the surrogate variable arises from a two-component Gaussian mixture with unknown means and variances, and the component membership is determined by a hyperplane in the covariate space. The estimation of the separating hyperplane and the Gaussian mixture parameters forms what shall be referred to as the change-line classification problem. A data-driven sieve maximum likelihood estimator for the hyperplane is proposed, which in turn can be used to estimate the parameters of the Gaussian mixture. The estimator is shown to be consistent. Simulations as well as empirical data show the estimator has high classification accuracy. PMID:24319303

  9. Radio-frequency triggered heating and drug release using doxorubicin-loaded LSMO nanoparticles for bimodal treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Vaishnavi M; Bodas, Dhananjay; Dhoble, Deepa; Ghormade, Vandana; Paknikar, Kishore

    2016-09-01

    Radio-frequency responsive nanomaterials combined with drugs for simultaneous hyperthermia and drug delivery are potential anti-cancer agents. In this study, chitosan coated La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 nanoparticles (C-LSMO NPs) were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Under low radio-frequency (365kHz, RF), C-LSMO NPs (90nm) showed good colloidal stability (+22mV), superparamagnetic nature (15.4 emu/g) and heating capacity (57.4W/g SAR value). Chitosan facilitated doxorubicin entrapment (76%) resulted in DC-LSMO NPs that showed drug release upon a 5min RF exposure. MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cells responded to a 5min RF exposure in the presence of bimodal DC-LSMO NPs with a significant decrease in viability to 73% and 88% (Pearson correlation, r=1, P<0.01) respectively, as compared to hyperthermia alone. Internalization of DC-LSMO NPs via the endosomal pathway led to an efficient localization of doxorubicin within the cell nucleus. The ensuing DNA damage, heat shock protein induction, and caspase production triggered apoptotic cell death. Moreover, DC-LSMO NPs successfully restricted the migration of metastatic MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. These data suggest that DC-LSMO NPs are potential bimodal therapeutic agents for cancer treatment and hold promise against disease recurrence and drug resistance. PMID:27337564

  10. Thermophysical and heat transfer properties of phase change material candidate for waste heat transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaizawa, Akihide; Maruoka, Nobuhiro; Kawai, Atsushi; Kamano, Hiroomi; Jozuka, Tetsuji; Senda, Takeshi; Akiyama, Tomohiro

    2008-05-01

    A waste heat transportation system trans-heat (TH) system is quite attractive that uses the latent heat of a phase change material (PCM). The purpose of this paper is to study the thermophysical properties of various sugars and sodium acetate trihydrate (SAT) as PCMs for a practical TH system and the heat transfer property between PCM selected and heat transfer oil, by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) and a heat storage tube. As a result, erythritol, with a large latent heat of 344 kJ/kg at melting point of 117°C, high decomposition point of 160°C and excellent chemical stability under repeated phase change cycles was found to be the best PCM among them for the practical TH system. In the heat release experiments between liquid erythritol and flowing cold oil, we observed foaming phenomena of encapsulated oil, in which oil droplet was coated by solidification of PCM.

  11. A Magnetically Responsive Polydiacetylene Precursor for Latent Fingerprint Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joosub; Lee, Chan Woo; Kim, Jong-Man

    2016-03-01

    A magnetically responsive diacetylene (DA) powder was developed for the visualization of latent fingerprints. A mixture of the DA and magnetite nanoparticles, applied to a surface containing latent fingermarks, becomes immobilized along the ridge patterns of the fingerprints when a magnetic field is applied. Alignment along the ridge structures is a consequence of favorable hydrophobic interactions occurring between the long alkyl chains in the DAs and the lipid-rich, sebaceous latent fingermarks. UV irradiation of the DA-magnetite composite immobilized on the latent fingerprint results in the generation of blue-colored PDAs. Heat treatment of the blue-colored image promotes a blue-to-red transition as well as fluorescence turn-on. A combination of the aligned pale brown-colored monomeric state, UV irradiation generated blue-colored PDA state, as well as the heat treatment generated red-colored and fluorescent PDA state enables efficient visual imaging of a latent fingerprint, which is deposited on various colored solid surfaces.

  12. Cyclic ADP-Ribose and Heat Regulate Oxytocin Release via CD38 and TRPM2 in the Hypothalamus during Social or Psychological Stress in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jing; Amina, Sarwat; Liang, Mingkun; Akther, Shirin; Yuhi, Teruko; Nishimura, Tomoko; Tsuji, Chiharu; Tsuji, Takahiro; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Hashii, Minako; Furuhara, Kazumi; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Zhao, Yong Juan; Lee, Hon Cheung; Tominaga, Makoto; Lopatina, Olga; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic oxytocin (OT) is released into the brain by cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) with or without depolarizing stimulation. Previously, we showed that the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) that seems to trigger OT release can be elevated by β-NAD(+), cADPR, and ADP in mouse oxytocinergic neurons. As these β-NAD(+) metabolites activate warm-sensitive TRPM2 cation channels, when the incubation temperature is increased, the [Ca(2+)]i in hypothalamic neurons is elevated. However, it has not been determined whether OT release is facilitated by heat in vitro or hyperthermia in vivo in combination with cADPR. Furthermore, it has not been examined whether CD38 and TRPM2 exert their functions on OT release during stress or stress-induced hyperthermia in relation to the anxiolytic roles and social behaviors of OT under stress conditions. Here, we report that OT release from the isolated hypothalami of male mice in culture was enhanced by extracellular application of cADPR or increasing the incubation temperature from 35°C to 38.5°C, and simultaneous stimulation showed a greater effect. This release was inhibited by a cADPR-dependent ryanodine receptor inhibitor and a nonspecific TRPM2 inhibitor. The facilitated release by heat and cADPR was suppressed in the hypothalamus isolated from CD38 knockout mice and CD38- or TRPM2-knockdown mice. In the course of these experiments, we noted that OT release differed markedly between individual mice under stress with group housing. That is, when male mice received cage-switch stress and eliminated due to their social subclass, significantly higher levels of OT release were found in subordinates compared with ordinates. In mice exposed to anxiety stress in an open field, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) OT level increased transiently at 5 min after exposure, and the rectal temperature also increased from 36.6°C to 37.8°C. OT levels in the CSF of mice with lipopolysaccharide-induced fever (+0.8°C) were higher than

  13. Cyclic ADP-Ribose and Heat Regulate Oxytocin Release via CD38 and TRPM2 in the Hypothalamus during Social or Psychological Stress in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jing; Amina, Sarwat; Liang, Mingkun; Akther, Shirin; Yuhi, Teruko; Nishimura, Tomoko; Tsuji, Chiharu; Tsuji, Takahiro; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Hashii, Minako; Furuhara, Kazumi; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Zhao, Yong Juan; Lee, Hon Cheung; Tominaga, Makoto; Lopatina, Olga; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic oxytocin (OT) is released into the brain by cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) with or without depolarizing stimulation. Previously, we showed that the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) that seems to trigger OT release can be elevated by β-NAD+, cADPR, and ADP in mouse oxytocinergic neurons. As these β-NAD+ metabolites activate warm-sensitive TRPM2 cation channels, when the incubation temperature is increased, the [Ca2+]i in hypothalamic neurons is elevated. However, it has not been determined whether OT release is facilitated by heat in vitro or hyperthermia in vivo in combination with cADPR. Furthermore, it has not been examined whether CD38 and TRPM2 exert their functions on OT release during stress or stress-induced hyperthermia in relation to the anxiolytic roles and social behaviors of OT under stress conditions. Here, we report that OT release from the isolated hypothalami of male mice in culture was enhanced by extracellular application of cADPR or increasing the incubation temperature from 35°C to 38.5°C, and simultaneous stimulation showed a greater effect. This release was inhibited by a cADPR-dependent ryanodine receptor inhibitor and a nonspecific TRPM2 inhibitor. The facilitated release by heat and cADPR was suppressed in the hypothalamus isolated from CD38 knockout mice and CD38- or TRPM2-knockdown mice. In the course of these experiments, we noted that OT release differed markedly between individual mice under stress with group housing. That is, when male mice received cage-switch stress and eliminated due to their social subclass, significantly higher levels of OT release were found in subordinates compared with ordinates. In mice exposed to anxiety stress in an open field, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) OT level increased transiently at 5 min after exposure, and the rectal temperature also increased from 36.6°C to 37.8°C. OT levels in the CSF of mice with lipopolysaccharide-induced fever (+0.8°C) were higher than those

  14. Predicting Latent Class Scores for Subsequent Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Janne; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Budtz-Jorgensen, Esben; Larsen, Klaus Groes

    2012-01-01

    Latent class regression models relate covariates and latent constructs such as psychiatric disorders. Though full maximum likelihood estimation is available, estimation is often in three steps: (i) a latent class model is fitted without covariates; (ii) latent class scores are predicted; and (iii) the scores are regressed on covariates. We propose…

  15. Arabidopsis HIT4, a regulator involved in heat-triggered reorganization of chromatin and release of transcriptional gene silencing, relocates from chromocenters to the nucleolus in response to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-Chin; Wu, Jia-Rong; Hsu, Yi-Ju; Wu, Shaw-Jye

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis HIT4 is known to mediate heat-induced decondensation of chromocenters and release from transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) with no change in the level of DNA methylation. It is unclear whether HIT4 and MOM1, a well-known DNA methylation-independent transcriptional silencer, have overlapping regulatory functions. A hit4-1/mom1 double mutant strain was generated. Its nuclear morphology and TGS state were compared with those of wild-type, hit4-1, and mom1 plants. Fluorescent protein tagging was employed to track the fates of HIT4, hit4-1 and MOM1 in vivo under heat stress. HIT4- and MOM1-mediated TGS were distinguishable. Both HIT4 and MOM1 were localized normally to chromocenters. Under heat stress, HIT4 relocated to the nucleolus, whereas MOM1 dispersed with the chromocenters. hit4-1 was able to relocate to the nucleolus under heat stress, but its relocation was insufficient to trigger the decompaction of chromocenters. The hypersensitivity to heat associated with the impaired reactivation of TGS in hit4-1 was not alleviated by mom1-induced release from TGS. HIT4 delineates a novel and MOM1-independent TGS regulation pathway. The involvement of a currently unidentified component that links HIT4 relocation and the large-scale reorganization of chromatin, and which is essential for heat tolerance in plants is hypothesized.

  16. Arabidopsis HIT4, a regulator involved in heat-triggered reorganization of chromatin and release of transcriptional gene silencing, relocates from chromocenters to the nucleolus in response to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-Chin; Wu, Jia-Rong; Hsu, Yi-Ju; Wu, Shaw-Jye

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis HIT4 is known to mediate heat-induced decondensation of chromocenters and release from transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) with no change in the level of DNA methylation. It is unclear whether HIT4 and MOM1, a well-known DNA methylation-independent transcriptional silencer, have overlapping regulatory functions. A hit4-1/mom1 double mutant strain was generated. Its nuclear morphology and TGS state were compared with those of wild-type, hit4-1, and mom1 plants. Fluorescent protein tagging was employed to track the fates of HIT4, hit4-1 and MOM1 in vivo under heat stress. HIT4- and MOM1-mediated TGS were distinguishable. Both HIT4 and MOM1 were localized normally to chromocenters. Under heat stress, HIT4 relocated to the nucleolus, whereas MOM1 dispersed with the chromocenters. hit4-1 was able to relocate to the nucleolus under heat stress, but its relocation was insufficient to trigger the decompaction of chromocenters. The hypersensitivity to heat associated with the impaired reactivation of TGS in hit4-1 was not alleviated by mom1-induced release from TGS. HIT4 delineates a novel and MOM1-independent TGS regulation pathway. The involvement of a currently unidentified component that links HIT4 relocation and the large-scale reorganization of chromatin, and which is essential for heat tolerance in plants is hypothesized. PMID:25329561

  17. Latent variable models with nonparametric interaction effects of latent variables.

    PubMed

    Song, Xinyuan; Lu, Zhaohua; Feng, Xiangnan

    2014-05-10

    Renal disease is one of the common complications of diabetes, especially for Asian populations. Moreover, cardiovascular and renal diseases share common risk factors. This paper proposes a latent variable model with nonparametric interaction effects of latent variables for a study based on the Hong Kong Diabetes Registry, which was established in 1995 as part of a continuous quality improvement program at the Prince of Wales Hospital in Hong Kong. Renal outcome (outcome latent variable) is regressed in terms of cardiac function and diabetes (explanatory latent variables) through an additive structural equation formulated using a series of unspecified univariate and bivariate smooth functions. The Bayesian P-splines approach, along with a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm, is proposed to estimate smooth functions, unknown parameters, and latent variables in the model. The performance of the developed methodology is demonstrated via a simulation study. The effect of the nonparametric interaction of cardiac function and diabetes on renal outcome is investigated using the proposed methodology. PMID:24338916

  18. Latent TGF-[beta] structure and activation

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Minlong; Zhu, Jianghai; Wang, Rui; Chen, Xing; Mi, Lizhi; Walz, Thomas; Springer, Timothy A.

    2011-09-16

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta} is stored in the extracellular matrix as a latent complex with its prodomain. Activation of TGF-{beta}1 requires the binding of {alpha}v integrin to an RGD sequence in the prodomain and exertion of force on this domain, which is held in the extracellular matrix by latent TGF-{beta} binding proteins. Crystals of dimeric porcine proTGF-{beta}1 reveal a ring-shaped complex, a novel fold for the prodomain, and show how the prodomain shields the growth factor from recognition by receptors and alters its conformation. Complex formation between {alpha}v{beta}6 integrin and the prodomain is insufficient for TGF-{beta}1 release. Force-dependent activation requires unfastening of a 'straitjacket' that encircles each growth-factor monomer at a position that can be locked by a disulphide bond. Sequences of all 33 TGF-{beta} family members indicate a similar prodomain fold. The structure provides insights into the regulation of a family of growth and differentiation factors of fundamental importance in morphogenesis and homeostasis.

  19. Latent fingermark pore area reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Buckley, K; Sutton, R

    2008-08-01

    The study of the reproducibility of friction ridge pore detail in fingermarks is a measure of their usefulness in personal identification. Pore area in latent prints developed using cyanoacrylate and ninhydrin were examined and measured by photomicrography using appropriate software tools. The data were analysed statistically and the results showed that pore area is not reproducible in developed latent prints, using either of the development techniques. The results add further support to the lack of reliability of pore area in personal identification. PMID:18617339

  20. Indexing by Latent Semantic Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deerwester, Scott; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes a new method for automatic indexing and retrieval called latent semantic indexing (LSI). Problems with matching query words with document words in term-based information retrieval systems are discussed, semantic structure is examined, singular value decomposition (SVD) is explained, and the mathematics underlying the SVD model is…

  1. Recovery of heat shock-triggered released apoplastic Ca2+ accompanied by pectin methylesterase activity is required for thermotolerance in soybean seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui-Chen; Hsu, Shih-Feng; Luo, Dan-Li; Chen, Shiang-Jiuun; Huang, Wen-Dar; Lur, Huu-Sheng; Jinn, Tsung-Luo

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in response to heat shock (HS) is essential for thermotolerance. The effect of a Ca2+ chelator, EGTA, was investigated before a lethal HS treatment in soybean (Glycine max) seedlings with acquired thermotolerance induced by preheating. Such seedlings became non-thermotolerant with EGTA treatment. The addition of Ca2+, Sr2+ or Ba2+ to the EGTA-treated samples rescued the seedlings from death by preventing the increased cellular leakage of electrolytes, amino acids, and sugars caused by EGTA. It was confirmed that EGTA did not affect HSP accumulation and physiological functions but interfered with the recovery of HS-released Ca2+ concentration which was required for thermotolerance. Pectin methylesterase (PME, EC 3.1.1.11), a cell wall remodelling enzyme, was activated in response to HS, and its elevated activity caused an increased level of demethylesterified pectin which was related to the recovery of the HS-released Ca2+ concentration. Thus, the recovery of HS-released Ca2+ in Ca2+-pectate reconstitution through PME activity is required for cell wall remodelling during HS in soybean which, in turn, retains plasma membrane integrity and co-ordinates with HSPs to confer thermotolerance. PMID:20444907

  2. A solar-thermal energy harvesting scheme: enhanced heat capacity of molten HITEC salt mixed with Sn/SiO(x) core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chih-Chung; Chang, Wen-Chih; Hu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Zhiming M; Lu, Ming-Chang; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrated enhanced solar-thermal storage by releasing the latent heat of Sn/SiO(x) core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a eutectic salt. The microstructures and chemical compositions of Sn/SiO(x) core-shell NPs were characterized. In situ heating XRD provides dynamic crystalline information about the Sn/SiO(x) core-shell NPs during cyclic heating processes. The latent heat of ∼29 J g(-1) for Sn/SiO(x) core-shell NPs was measured, and 30% enhanced heat capacity was achieved from 1.57 to 2.03 J g(-1) K(-1) for the HITEC solar salt without and with, respectively, a mixture of 5% Sn/SiO(x) core-shell NPs. In addition, an endurance cycle test was performed to prove a stable operation in practical applications. The approach provides a method to enhance energy storage in solar-thermal power plants.

  3. Diabatic heating fields and the generation of available potential energy during FGGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salstein, David A.; Rosen, Richard D.; Baker, Wayman E.; Kalnay, Eugenia

    1986-01-01

    Global diabatic heating is estimated using fields of directly computed heating components, in particular those due to shortwave radiation, longwave radiation, sensible heating, and latent heating produced every 6 hours. The role of average fields of diabatic heating in the generation of available potential energy is examined. It is observed that latent heating is most significant in generating available potential energy.

  4. Latent Growth Modeling for Logistic Response Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Jaehwa; Harring, Jeffrey R.; Hancock, Gregory R.

    2009-01-01

    Throughout much of the social and behavioral sciences, latent growth modeling (latent curve analysis) has become an important tool for understanding individuals' longitudinal change. Although nonlinear variations of latent growth models appear in the methodological and applied literature, a notable exclusion is the treatment of growth following…

  5. A Multicomponent Latent Trait Model for Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Embretson, Susan E.; Yang, Xiangdong

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a noncompensatory latent trait model, the multicomponent latent trait model for diagnosis (MLTM-D), for cognitive diagnosis. In MLTM-D, a hierarchical relationship between components and attributes is specified to be applicable to permit diagnosis at two levels. MLTM-D is a generalization of the multicomponent latent trait…

  6. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide augments febrile-range hyperthermia-induced heat shock protein 70 expression and extracellular release in human THP1 cells.

    PubMed

    Tulapurkar, Mohan E; Ramarathnam, Aparna; Hasday, Jeffrey D; Singh, Ishwar S

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, a devastating and often lethal complication of severe infection, is characterized by fever and dysregulated inflammation. While infections activate the inflammatory response in part through Toll-like receptors (TLRs), fever can partially activate the heat shock response with generation of heat shock proteins (HSPs). Since extracellular HSPs, especially HSP70 (eHSP70), are proinflammatory TLR agonists, we investigated how exposure to the TLR4 agonist, bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and febrile range hyperthermia (FRH; 39.5°C) modify HSP70 expression and extracellular release. Using differentiated THP1 cells, we found that concurrent exposure to FRH and LPS as well as TLR2 and TLR3 agonists synergized to activate expression of inducible HSP72 (HSPA1A) mRNA and protein via a p38 MAP kinase-requiring mechanism. Treatment with LPS for 6 h stimulated eHSP70 release; levels of eHSP70 released at 39.5°C were higher than at 37°C roughly paralleling the increase in intracellular HSP72 in the 39.5°C cells. By contrast, 6 h exposure to FRH in the absence of LPS failed to promote eHSP70 release. Release of eHSP70 by LPS-treated THP1 cells was inhibited by glibenclamide, but not brefeldin, indicating that eHSP70 secretion occurred via a non-classical protein secretory mechanism. Analysis of eHSP70 levels in exosomes and exosome-depleted culture supernatants from LPS-treated THP1 cells using ELISA demonstrated similar eHSP70 levels in unfractionated and exosome-depleted culture supernatants, indicating that LPS-stimulated eHSP70 release did not occur via the exosome pathway. Immunoblot analysis of the exosome fraction of culture supernatants from these cells showed constitutive HSC70 (HSPA8) to be the predominant HSP70 family member present in exosomes. In summary, we have shown that LPS stimulates macrophages to secrete inducible HSP72 via a non-classical non-exosomal pathway while synergizing with FRH exposure to increase both intracellular and secreted levels

  7. Tuberculosis Infection and Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Active tuberculosis (TB) has a greater burden of TB bacilli than latent TB and acts as an infection source for contacts. Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is the state in which humans are infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis without any clinical symptoms, radiological abnormality, or microbiological evidence. TB is transmissible by respiratory droplet nucleus of 1–5 µm in diameter, containing 1–10 TB bacilli. TB transmission is affected by the strength of the infectious source, infectiousness of TB bacilli, immunoresistance of the host, environmental stresses, and biosocial factors. Infection controls to reduce TB transmission consist of managerial activities, administrative control, engineering control, environmental control, and personal protective equipment provision. However, diagnosis and treatment for LTBI as a national TB control program is an important strategy on the precondition that active TB is not missed. Therefore, more concrete evidences for LTBI management based on clinical and public perspectives are needed. PMID:27790271

  8. [Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults].

    PubMed

    Maioli, M; Puddu, L; Pes, G M

    2006-01-01

    Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a disorder with onset after age 30, insulin independence for at least 6 months after diagnosis, and the presence of circulating pancreatic islet autoantibodies. The prevalence of LADA varies substantially across ethnic groups and ranges approximately from 1% to 10% among patients with type 2 diabetes. In this review we discuss the nomenclature, diagnostic criteria, immunologic and genetic markers, metabolic alterations and therapy of this form of diabetes.

  9. 75 FR 61521 - NUREG/CR-7010, Cable Heat Release, Ignition, and Spread in Tray Installations During Fire...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... conducted range from micro-scale, in which very small (5 mg) samples of cable materials were burned in a calorimeter to determine their heat of combustion and other properties; to full-scale, in which horizontal... furnace, and intermediate-scale calorimetry involving a single tray of cables underneath a bank of...

  10. Determination of toxic α-dicarbonyl compounds, glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and diacetyl, released to the headspace of lipid commodities upon heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yaping; Hengel, Matt; Pan, Canping; Seiber, James N; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2013-02-01

    Toxic α-dicarbonyl compounds, glyoxal, 2-methylglyoxal, and diacetyl, released from the headspace from butter, margarine, safflower oil, beef fat, and cheese heated at 100 and 200 °C were analyzed by gas chromatography as quinoxaline derivatives. Total amounts of α-dicarbonyl compounds ranged from 40.5 ng/g (butter) to 331.2 ng/g (beef fat) at 100 °C and from 302.4 ng/g (safflower oil) to 4521.5 ng/g (margarine) at 200 °C. The total amount of α-dicarbonyl compounds increased approximately 55- and 15-fold in the headspace of heated butter and margarine, respectively, when the temperature was increased from 100 to 200 °C. However, only slight differences associated with temperature variation were observed in the cases of safflower oil and beef fat (1.3- and 1.1-fold, respectively). Diacetyl was found in the highest amounts among all samples, ranging from 13.9 ± 0.3 ng/g (butter) to 2835.7 ng/g (cheese) at 100 °C and from 112.5 ± 102 ng/g (safflower oil) to 2274.5 ± 442.6 ng/g (margarine) at 200 °C, followed by methylglyoxal, ranging from 13.0 ± 0.5 to 112.7 ± 10.1 ng/g (cheese) at 100 °C and from 34.7 ± 5.0 ng/g (safflower oil) to 1790 ± 372.3 ng/g (margarine) at 200 °C. Much less glyoxal formed, in amounts ranging from 13.6 ± 0.7 ng/g (butter) to 53.4 ± 11.2 ng/g (beef fat) at both temperatures. The amounts of α-dicarbonyl compounds released into the vapor phase from lipid commodities during heating were satisfactorily analyzed.

  11. Roles of Clathrate Hydrates in Crustal Heating and Volatile Storage/Release on Earth, Mars, and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargel, J. S.; Beget, J.; Furfaro, R.; Prieto-Ballesteros, O.; Palmero-Rodriguez, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Clathrate hydrates are stable through much of the Solar System. These materials and hydrate-like amorphous associations of water with N2, CO, CH4, CO2, O2 and other molecules could, in fact, constitute the bulk of the non-rock components of some icy satellites, comets, and Kuiper Belt Objects. CO2 clathrate is thermodynamically stable at the Martian South Pole surface and could form a significant fraction of both Martian polar caps and icy permafrost distributed across one-third of the Martian surface. CH4 clathrate is the largest clathrate material in Earth's permafrost and cold seafloor regions, and it may be a major volatile reservoir on Mars, too. CO2 clathrate is less abundant on Earth but it might store most of Mars' CO2 inventory and thus may be one of the critical components in the climate system of that planet, just as CH4 clathrate is for Earth. These ice-like phases not only store biologically, geologically, and climatologically important gases, but they also are natural thermal insulators. Thus, they retard the conductive flow of geothermal heat, and thick accumulations of them can modify geotherms, cause brines to exist where otherwise they would not, and induce low-grade metamorphism of upper crustal rocks underlying the insulating bodies. This mechanism of crustal heating may be especially important in assisting hydrogeologic activity on Mars, gas-rich carbonaceous asteroids, icy satellites, and Kuiper Belt Objects. These worlds, compared to Earth, are comparatively energy starved and frozen but may partly make up for their deficit of joules by having large accumulations of joule-conserving hydrates. Thick, continuous layers of clathrate may seal in gases and produce high gas fugacities in aquifers underlying the clathrates, thus producing gas-rich reservoirs capable of erupting violently. This may have happened repeatedly in Earth history, with global climatic consequences for abrupt climate change. We have hypothesized that such eruptions may have

  12. Variability of mesospheric diurnal tides and tropospheric diurnal heating during 1997-1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, R. S.; Riggin, D. M.; Ortland, D. A.; Nesbitt, S. W.; Vincent, R. A.

    2007-10-01

    This study focuses on interannual variations of diurnal tropospheric heating and the response in the mesosphere observed by radars and predicted by a model. The work is prompted by reports of interannual variability in amplitudes of tidal variables at low latitudes. Diurnal tides observed at Hawaii and Christmas Island exhibit a pronounced ``spike'' in amplitude from late 1997 to early 1998. It has been speculated that this variability may be linked to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation phenomenon. We examine diurnal solar heating due to water vapor absorption, and diurnal latent heat release due to deep convection between 1988 and 2005. Both of these heating drives exhibit anomalously higher amplitudes in the tropical central and eastern Pacific during 1997-1998. The altered heating patterns result in a stronger forcing of the migrating diurnal tide by water vapor heating, and excitation of several weaker nonmigrating modes by latent heating. A primitive equation model is used to evaluate how these drives contribute to diurnal winds in the mesosphere. Anomalous water vapor heating results in about 15% increases in model meridional wind amplitudes over climatological values at subtropical latitudes between 300°E and the Greenwich meridian. While the timing of the model amplitude enhancements is consistent with observations at Hawaii, the observed increases are significantly stronger. Our study indicates that water vapor heating is the larger contributor to tidal enhancement observed during 1997-1998.

  13. Cytochrome c Is Released in a Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Manner and Is Degraded via Caspase-Like Proteases in Tobacco Bright-Yellow 2 Cells en Route to Heat Shock-Induced Cell Death1

    PubMed Central

    Vacca, Rosa Anna; Valenti, Daniela; Bobba, Antonella; Merafina, Riccardo Sandro; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia

    2006-01-01

    To gain some insight into the mechanism of plant programmed cell death, certain features of cytochrome c (cyt c) release were investigated in heat-shocked tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright-Yellow 2 cells in the 2- to 6-h time range. We found that 2 h after heat shock, cyt c is released from intact mitochondria into the cytoplasm as a functionally active protein. Such a release did not occur in the presence of superoxide anion dismutase and catalase, thus showing that it depends on reactive oxygen species (ROS). Interestingly, ROS production due to xanthine plus xanthine oxidase results in cyt c release in sister control cultures. Maximal cyt c release was found 2 h after heat shock; later, activation of caspase-3-like protease was found to increase with time. Activation of this protease did not occur in the presence of ROS scavenger enzymes. The released cyt c was found to be progressively degraded in a manner prevented by either the broad-range caspase inhibitor (zVAD-fmk) or the specific inhibitor of caspase-3 (AC-DEVD-CHO), which have no effect on cyt c release. In the presence of these inhibitors, a significant increase in survival of the cells undergoing programmed cell death was found. We conclude that ROS can trigger release of cyt c, but do not cause cell death, which requires caspase-like activation. PMID:16531480

  14. Efficient Heat Storage Materials: Metallic Composites Phase-Change Materials for High-Temperature Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    HEATS Project: MIT is developing efficient heat storage materials for use in solar and nuclear power plants. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun’s not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. MIT is designing nanostructured heat storage materials that can store a large amount of heat per unit mass and volume. To do this, MIT is using phase change materials, which absorb a large amount of latent heat to melt from solid to liquid. MIT’s heat storage materials are designed to melt at high temperatures and conduct heat well—this makes them efficient at storing and releasing heat and enhances the overall efficiency of the thermal storage and energy-generation process. MIT’s low-cost heat storage materials also have a long life cycle, which further enhances their efficiency.

  15. Toward Surface-Enhanced Raman Imaging of Latent Fingerprints

    SciTech Connect

    Connatser, Raynella M; Prokes, Sharka M.; Glembocki, Orest; Schuler, Rebecca A.; Gardner, Charles W.; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Lewis, Linda A

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to light or heat, or simply a dearth of fingerprint material, renders some latent fingerprints undetectable using conventional methods. We begin to address such elusive fingerprints using detection targeting photo- and thermally stable fingerprint constituents: surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). SERS can give descriptive vibrational spectra of amino acids, among other robust fingerprint constituents, and good sensitivity can be attained by improving metal-dielectric nanoparticle substrates. With SERS chemical imaging, vibrational bands intensities recreate a visual of fingerprint topography. The impact of nanoparticle synthesis route, dispersal methodology-deposition solvent, and laser wavelength are discussed, as are data from enhanced vibrational spectra of fingerprint components. SERS and Raman chemical images of fingerprints and realistic contaminants are shown. To our knowledge, this represents the first SERS imaging of fingerprints. In conclusion, this work progresses toward the ultimate goal of vibrationally detecting latent prints that would otherwise remain undetected using traditional development methods.

  16. Mapping regional distribution of land surface heat fluxes on the southern side of the central Himalayas using TESEBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amatya, Pukar Man; Ma, Yaoming; Han, Cunbo; Wang, Binbin; Devkota, Lochan Prasad

    2016-05-01

    Recent scientific studies based on large-scale climate model have highlighted the importance of the heat release from the southern side of the Himalayas for the development of South Asian Summer Monsoon. However, studies related to land surface heat fluxes are nonexistent on the southern side. In this study, we test the feasibility of deriving land surface heat fluxes on the central Himalayan region using Topographically Enhanced Surface Energy Balance System (TESEBS), which is forced by MODIS land surface products and Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) meteorological data. The model results were validated using the first eddy covariance measurement system established in the southern side of the central Himalayas. The derived land surface heat fluxes were close to the field measurements with mean bias of 15.97, -19.89, 8.79, and -20.39 W m-2 for net radiation flux, ground heat flux, sensible heat flux, and latent heat flux respectively. Land surface heat fluxes show strong contrast in pre monsoon, summer monsoon, post monsoon, and winter seasons and different land surface states among the different physiographic regions. In the central Himalayas, the latent heat flux is the dominant consumer of available energy for all physiographic regions except for the High Himalaya where the sensible heat flux is high.

  17. Latent IBP Compound Dirichlet Allocation.

    PubMed

    Archambeau, Cedric; Lakshminarayanan, Balaji; Bouchard, Guillaume

    2015-02-01

    We introduce the four-parameter IBP compound Dirichlet process (ICDP), a stochastic process that generates sparse non-negative vectors with potentially an unbounded number of entries. If we repeatedly sample from the ICDP we can generate sparse matrices with an infinite number of columns and power-law characteristics. We apply the four-parameter ICDP to sparse nonparametric topic modelling to account for the very large number of topics present in large text corpora and the power-law distribution of the vocabulary of natural languages. The model, which we call latent IBP compound Dirichlet allocation (LIDA), allows for power-law distributions, both, in the number of topics summarising the documents and in the number of words defining each topic. It can be interpreted as a sparse variant of the hierarchical Pitman-Yor process when applied to topic modelling. We derive an efficient and simple collapsed Gibbs sampler closely related to the collapsed Gibbs sampler of latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA), making the model applicable in a wide range of domains. Our nonparametric Bayesian topic model compares favourably to the widely used hierarchical Dirichlet process and its heavy tailed version, the hierarchical Pitman-Yor process, on benchmark corpora. Experiments demonstrate that accounting for the power-distribution of real data is beneficial and that sparsity provides more interpretable results. PMID:26353244

  18. Information-Theoretic Latent Distribution Modeling: Distinguishing Discrete and Continuous Latent Variable Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markon, Kristian E.; Krueger, Robert F.

    2006-01-01

    Distinguishing between discrete and continuous latent variable distributions has become increasingly important in numerous domains of behavioral science. Here, the authors explore an information-theoretic approach to latent distribution modeling, in which the ability of latent distribution models to represent statistical information in observed…

  19. Optimization-Based Model Fitting for Latent Class and Latent Profile Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Guan-Hua; Wang, Su-Mei; Hsu, Chung-Chu

    2011-01-01

    Statisticians typically estimate the parameters of latent class and latent profile models using the Expectation-Maximization algorithm. This paper proposes an alternative two-stage approach to model fitting. The first stage uses the modified k-means and hierarchical clustering algorithms to identify the latent classes that best satisfy the…

  20. Semi-Nonparametric Methods for Detecting Latent Non-Normality: A Fusion of Latent Trait and Ordered Latent Class Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, J. Eric; Mehta, Paras D.; Aggen, Steven H.; Kubarych, Thomas S.; Neale, Michael C.

    2006-01-01

    Ordered latent class analysis (OLCA) can be used to approximate unidimensional latent distributions. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the method of OLCA in detecting non-normality of an unobserved continuous variable (i.e., a common factor) used to explain the covariation between dichotomous item-level responses. Using simulation,…

  1. A Vernacular for Linear Latent Growth Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Gregory R.; Choi, Jaehwa

    2006-01-01

    In its most basic form, latent growth modeling (latent curve analysis) allows an assessment of individuals' change in a measured variable X over time. For simple linear models, as with other growth models, parameter estimates associated with the a construct (amount of X at a chosen temporal reference point) and b construct (growth in X per unit…

  2. Insidious Structural Errors in Latent Variable Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohlmann, John T.

    1993-01-01

    Nonlinear relationships and latent variable assumptions can lead to serious specification errors in structural models. A quadratic relationship, described by a linear structural model with a latent variable, is shown to have less predictive validity than a simple manifest variable regression model. Advocates the use of simpler preliminary…

  3. Latent Memory for Sensitization in "Aplysia"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philips, Gary T.; Tzvetkova, Ekaterina I.; Marinesco, Stephane; Carew, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    In the analysis of memory it is commonly observed that, even after a memory is apparently forgotten, its latent presence can still be revealed in a subsequent learning task. Although well established on a behavioral level, the mechanisms underlying latent memory are not well understood. To begin to explore these mechanisms, we have used "Aplysia,"…

  4. Consequences of Fitting Nonidentified Latent Class Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abar, Beau; Loken, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Latent class models are becoming more popular in behavioral research. When models with a large number of latent classes relative to the number of manifest indicators are estimated, researchers must consider the possibility that the model is not identified. It is not enough to determine that the model has positive degrees of freedom. A well-known…

  5. Treatment of lactating dairy cows with gonadotropin-releasing hormone before first insemination during summer heat stress.

    PubMed

    Voelz, B E; Rocha, L; Scortegagna, F; Stevenson, J S; Mendonça, L G D

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of the experiments were to compare ovarian responses, pregnancy per artificial insemination, and pattern of insemination of 2 estrus detection-based presynchronization protocols before first artificial insemination (AI) during heat stress. In experiment 1, primiparous lactating dairy cows (n=1,358) from 3 dairies were assigned randomly to 2 treatments at 60±3 (±SD) DIM (study d 0): (1) treatment with 100 µg of GnRH on study d 0 (Gpresynch), or (2) no treatment on study d 0 (control). In experiment 2, multiparous lactating dairy cows (n=1,971) from 3 dairies were assigned randomly to 2 treatments at 49±3 (±SD) DIM (study d 0), similar to experiment 1. In both experiments, PGF2α injections were administered 14 d apart starting on study d 7 for all cows. Cows not inseminated after detection of estrus were submitted to a timed artificial insemination protocol at study d 35. In a subgroup of cows from 2 dairies, concentrations of progesterone were determined from blood samples collected on study d 0 and 7. Furthermore, ovaries were examined by ultrasonography on study d -14, 0, and 7 to determine cyclic status and ovulation in response to GnRH treatment. In experiment 1, progesterone concentration was not different on d 0, but progesterone was increased for Gpresynch compared with control cows on study d 7 (3.6±0.3 vs. 2.7±0.4 ng/mL), respectively. Ovulation risk from study d 0 to 7 was increased for Gpresynch compared with control (50.6 vs. 15.2%). Control cows were inseminated at a faster rate than Gpresynch cows [adjusted hazard ratio (AHR)=0.89, 95% confidence interval=0.80 to 1.00], and the interaction between treatment and dairy affected pregnancy per artificial insemination at 36 and 94 d post-artificial insemination. In experiment 2, concentrations of progesterone did not differ on study d 0 or 7, despite ovulation risk from study d 0 to 7 being greater in Gpresynch than control cows (46.9 vs. 23.8%). The interaction between treatment and

  6. Epstein–Barr virus latent genes

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Myung-Soo; Kieff, Elliott

    2015-01-01

    Latent Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection has a substantial role in causing many human disorders. The persistence of these viral genomes in all malignant cells, yet with the expression of limited latent genes, is consistent with the notion that EBV latent genes are important for malignant cell growth. While the EBV-encoded nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and latent membrane protein-2A (LMP-2A) are critical, the EBNA-leader proteins, EBNA-2, EBNA-3A, EBNA-3C and LMP-1, are individually essential for in vitro transformation of primary B cells to lymphoblastoid cell lines. EBV-encoded RNAs and EBNA-3Bs are dispensable. In this review, the roles of EBV latent genes are summarized. PMID:25613728

  7. Latent classiness and other mixtures.

    PubMed

    Neale, Michael C

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this article is to laud Lindon Eaves' role in the development of mixture modeling in genetic studies. The specification of models for mixture distributions was very much in its infancy when Professor Eaves implemented it in his own FORTRAN programs, and extended it to data collected from relatives such as twins. It was his collaboration with the author of this article which led to the first implementation of mixture distribution modeling in a general-purpose structural equation modeling program, Mx, resulting in a 1996 article on linkage analysis in Behavior Genetics. Today, the popularity of these methods continues to grow, encompassing methods for genetic association, latent class analysis, growth curve mixture modeling, factor mixture modeling, regime switching, marginal maximum likelihood, genotype by environment interaction, variance component twin modeling in the absence of zygosity information, and many others. This primarily historical article concludes with some consideration of some possible future developments. PMID:24477932

  8. A calibration test for latent fingerprint development on thermal paper.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Caroline A; Bond, John W

    2014-11-01

    A calibration test is described for monitoring the operation of equipment used to develop latent fingerprints on thermal paper by the application of either controlled or uncontrolled heat. A working solution of a water/glycerol emulsion and butylene glycol is applied to thermal paper by means of either a vinyl stamp and pad, or a marker pen. Varying the amount of butylene glycol enables the thermal paper to change color at different temperatures between approximately 40 and 60°C, which is below the normal color change temperature of the paper. The described test may be used to verify the correct operation, at different temperatures, of a controlled heat source during and after fingerprint development (such as the Hot Print System) or to monitor the paper temperature with an uncontrolled heat source (such as a warm air blower), thereby avoiding unintentional coloring of the entire paper surface.

  9. Limits of the lab: diagnosing "latent gonorrhea," 1872-1910.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Elliott

    2013-01-01

    One of the most heatedly contested disease entities in turn-of-the-century medicine was "latent gonorrhea," a condition first discussed in an 1872 paper published by the German-born gynecologist Emil Noeggerath. Although none of the bacteriological discoveries of the next few decades-including the isolation of the gonococcus in 1879-provided much evidence of its existence, by the 1890s most Western physicians and medical scientists had nonetheless come to believe that latent gonorrhea was a real, diagnosable disease. While in the wake of its resolution, leading gynecologists contended that laboratory science had cleared up the controversy over latent gonorrhea, in reality it was through more "traditional" diagnostic methods (especially the taking of case histories) that Noeggerath's once-debatable theory gained acceptance. As such, this episode challenges the idea that turn-of-the-century Western medicine witnessed a "laboratory revolution," and that with the rise of bacteriology "the clinic" no longer informed the processes by which doctors defined and diagnosed disease.

  10. Latent fingermark development using low-vacuum vaporization of ninhydrin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chieh; Yang, Chao-Kai; Liao, Jeh-Shane; Wang, Sheng-Meng

    2015-12-01

    The vacuum technique is a method of vaporizing a solid material to its gas phase, helping deposit reagents gently on target surfaces to develop latent fingermarks. However, this application is rarely reported in the literature. In this study, a homemade fume hood with a built-in vacuum control system and programmable heating system designed by the Taiwan Criminal Investigation Bureau is introduced. Factors that affect the instrument's performance in developing fingermarks are discussed, including the quantity of chemicals for vaporization, heating program arrangement, and paper of different materials. The results show that fingermarks are effectively developed by vaporizing solid ninhydrin. This would be an alternative application in selecting a solvent-free method for protecting the environment and reducing health hazards in the lab. In terms of the heating program, the result indicates that under a low-vacuum condition (50 mTorr), 80-90 °C is a suitable temperature range for ninhydrin vaporization, allowing ninhydrin to be vaporized without bumping and waste. In terms of the performance on different material papers, this instrument demonstrates its capacity by developing latent fingermarks on thermal paper without discoloration or damaging the original writing, and the same results are also observed on Taiwan and United States banknotes. However, a coherent result could be hardly obtained using the same vaporization setting because different banknotes have their own surface features and water absorption ability or other unique factors may influence the effect of ninhydrin deposition. This study provides a reliable application for developing latent fingermarks without using solvents, and it is also expected to contribute to environmental protection along with the trend of green chemistry technology.

  11. Latent fingermark development using low-vacuum vaporization of ninhydrin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chieh; Yang, Chao-Kai; Liao, Jeh-Shane; Wang, Sheng-Meng

    2015-12-01

    The vacuum technique is a method of vaporizing a solid material to its gas phase, helping deposit reagents gently on target surfaces to develop latent fingermarks. However, this application is rarely reported in the literature. In this study, a homemade fume hood with a built-in vacuum control system and programmable heating system designed by the Taiwan Criminal Investigation Bureau is introduced. Factors that affect the instrument's performance in developing fingermarks are discussed, including the quantity of chemicals for vaporization, heating program arrangement, and paper of different materials. The results show that fingermarks are effectively developed by vaporizing solid ninhydrin. This would be an alternative application in selecting a solvent-free method for protecting the environment and reducing health hazards in the lab. In terms of the heating program, the result indicates that under a low-vacuum condition (50 mTorr), 80-90 °C is a suitable temperature range for ninhydrin vaporization, allowing ninhydrin to be vaporized without bumping and waste. In terms of the performance on different material papers, this instrument demonstrates its capacity by developing latent fingermarks on thermal paper without discoloration or damaging the original writing, and the same results are also observed on Taiwan and United States banknotes. However, a coherent result could be hardly obtained using the same vaporization setting because different banknotes have their own surface features and water absorption ability or other unique factors may influence the effect of ninhydrin deposition. This study provides a reliable application for developing latent fingermarks without using solvents, and it is also expected to contribute to environmental protection along with the trend of green chemistry technology. PMID:26451774

  12. The partition of energy associated with tropical heat sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva-Dias, P. L.; Paegle, J. N.

    1985-01-01

    Data sets derived from observations during the First GARP Global Experiment (FGGE) have permitted the study of the behavior of the tropical atmosphere to an extent not possible before. The present summary discusses characteristics of the tropical atmosphere which may be a result of tropical heating. It is shown that the meridional component of the divergent wind is of the same order of magnitude an he rotational meridional wind for the planetary tropical scales. Furthermore, the first and second internal modes dominate over most of the tropics, and it is shown that gravity and Kelvin codes are the main contributors to the total tropical divergence. Comparison with averaged station precipitation data and heating estimates obtained from Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Science (GLAS)/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) show good correspondence between areas with maximum internal mode energy and regions with pronounced latent heat release.

  13. Orientation field estimation for latent fingerprint enhancement.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianjiang; Zhou, Jie; Jain, Anil K

    2013-04-01

    Identifying latent fingerprints is of vital importance for law enforcement agencies to apprehend criminals and terrorists. Compared to live-scan and inked fingerprints, the image quality of latent fingerprints is much lower, with complex image background, unclear ridge structure, and even overlapping patterns. A robust orientation field estimation algorithm is indispensable for enhancing and recognizing poor quality latents. However, conventional orientation field estimation algorithms, which can satisfactorily process most live-scan and inked fingerprints, do not provide acceptable results for most latents. We believe that a major limitation of conventional algorithms is that they do not utilize prior knowledge of the ridge structure in fingerprints. Inspired by spelling correction techniques in natural language processing, we propose a novel fingerprint orientation field estimation algorithm based on prior knowledge of fingerprint structure. We represent prior knowledge of fingerprints using a dictionary of reference orientation patches. which is constructed using a set of true orientation fields, and the compatibility constraint between neighboring orientation patches. Orientation field estimation for latents is posed as an energy minimization problem, which is solved by loopy belief propagation. Experimental results on the challenging NIST SD27 latent fingerprint database and an overlapped latent fingerprint database demonstrate the advantages of the proposed orientation field estimation algorithm over conventional algorithms.

  14. Chemokine-containing exosomes are released from heat-stressed tumor cells via lipid raft-dependent pathway and act as efficient tumor vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Taoyong; Guo, Jun; Yang, Mingjin; Zhu, Xuhui; Cao, Xuetao

    2011-02-15

    Exosomes derived from dendritic cells or tumor cells are a population of nanometer-sized membrane vesicles that can induce specific antitumor immunity. During investigation of the effects of hyperthermia on antitumor immune response, we found that exosomes derived from heat-stressed tumor cells (HS-TEX) could chemoattract and activate dendritic cells (DC) and T cells more potently than that by conventional tumor-derived exosomes. We show that HS-TEX contain chemokines, such as CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, and CCL20, and the chemokine-containing HS-TEX are functionally competent in chemoattracting CD11c(+) DC and CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cells both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the production of chemokine-containing HS-TEX could be inhibited by ATP inhibitor, calcium chelator, and cholesterol scavenger, indicating that the mobilization of chemokines into exosomes was ATP- and calcium-dependent and via a lipid raft-dependent pathway. We consistently found that the intracellular chemokines could be enriched in lipid rafts after heat stress. Accordingly, intratumoral injection of HS-TEX could induce specific antitumor immune response more efficiently than that by tumor-derived exosomes, thus inhibiting tumor growth and prolonging survival of tumor-bearing mice more significantly. Therefore, our results demonstrate that exosomes derived from HS-TEX represent a kind of efficient tumor vaccine and can chemoattract and activate DC and T cells, inducing more potent antitumor immune response. Release of chemokines through exosomes via lipid raft-dependent pathway may be a new method of chemokine exocytosis.

  15. Predictive Inference Using Latent Variables with Covariates*

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Lynne Steuerle; Junker, Brian; Taylor, Lowell J.; Black, Dan A.

    2014-01-01

    Plausible Values (PVs) are a standard multiple imputation tool for analysis of large education survey data that measures latent proficiency variables. When latent proficiency is the dependent variable, we reconsider the standard institutionally-generated PV methodology and find it applies with greater generality than shown previously. When latent proficiency is an independent variable, we show that the standard institutional PV methodology produces biased inference because the institutional conditioning model places restrictions on the form of the secondary analysts’ model. We offer an alternative approach that avoids these biases based on the mixed effects structural equations (MESE) model of Schofield (2008). PMID:25231627

  16. Development of a coal/water-slurry-fueled diesel engine for industrial cogeneration: Task 6. 0 Determination of accurate heat release diagrams and mechanical efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Nydick, S.E.

    1987-02-01

    Purpose of the program was to foster the long-range development of a coal/water slurry fuel-fired, slow-speed, two-stroke diesel engine for efficient and economical power generation in the 8 to 30 MW range for use in industrial cogeneration applications. This report contains the results of Task 6 of the program, a detailed analysis of heat release diagrams and determination of the mechanical efficiency for a single-cylinder, slow-speed diesel test engine when operated on coal/water slurry and diesel fuels. A digitized technique was utilized to determine the cylinder pressure history. The results of the program showed that the averages of previously reported thermal efficiency values for operation on coal/water slurry fuels were very accurate determinations. In addition, the slight differences in thermal efficiency between diesel and slurry operation are most likely related to changes in the mechanical efficiency resulting from degradation of the piston ring/cylinder liner interface rather than changes in combustion efficiency. Our previous prediction that, at 50% water content, the efficiency of a coal/water slurry engine is comparable to a diesel engine, has been confirmed experimentally and explained analytically.

  17. Electric field triggering the spin reorientation and controlling the absorption and release of heat in the induced multiferroic compound EuTiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Ranke, P. J. von Ribeiro, P. O.; Alho, B. P.; Alvarenga, T. S. T.; Nobrega, E. P.; Caldas, A.; Sousa, V. S. R. de; Lopes, P. H. O.; Oliveira, N. A. de; Gama, S.; Carvalho, A. Magnus G.

    2015-12-28

    We report remarkable results due to the coupling between the magnetization and the electric field induced polarization in EuTiO{sub 3}. Using a microscopic model Hamiltonian to describe the three coupled sublattices, Eu-(spin-up), Eu-(spin-down), and Ti-(moment), the spin flop and spin reorientation phase transitions were described with and without the electric-magnetic coupling interaction. The external electric field can be used to tune the temperature of the spin reorientation phase transition T{sub SR} = T{sub SR}(E). When the T{sub SR} is tuned around the EuTiO{sub 3}—Néel temperature (T{sub N} = 5.5 K), an outstanding effect emerges in which EuTiO{sub 3} releases heat under magnetic field change. The electric field controlling the spin reorientation transition and the endo-exothermic processes are discussed through the microscopic interactions model parameters.

  18. Reactivation of Latent Viruses in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Tyring, S. K.; Lugg, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    Reactivation of latent viruses is an important health risk for people working and living in physically isolated extreme environments such as Antarctica and space. Preflight quarantine does not significantly reduce the risk associated with latent viruses, however, pharmaceutical countermeasures are available for some viruses. The molecular basis of latency is not fully understood, but physical and psychosocial stresses are known to initiate the reactivation of latent viruses. Presumably, stress induced changes in selected hormones lead to alterations in the cell- mediated immune (CMI) response resulting in increased shedding of latent viruses. Limited access to space makes the use of ground-based analogs essential. The Australian Antarctic stations serve as a good stress model and simulate many aspects of space flight. Closed environmental chambers have been used to simulate space flight since the Skylab missions and have also proven to be a valuable analog of selected aspects of space flight.

  19. Greedy learning of binary latent trees.

    PubMed

    Harmeling, Stefan; Williams, Christopher K I

    2011-06-01

    Inferring latent structures from observations helps to model and possibly also understand underlying data generating processes. A rich class of latent structures is the latent trees, i.e., tree-structured distributions involving latent variables where the visible variables are leaves. These are also called hierarchical latent class (HLC) models. Zhang and Kocka proposed a search algorithm for learning such models in the spirit of Bayesian network structure learning. While such an approach can find good solutions, it can be computationally expensive. As an alternative, we investigate two greedy procedures: the BIN-G algorithm determines both the structure of the tree and the cardinality of the latent variables in a bottom-up fashion. The BIN-A algorithm first determines the tree structure using agglomerative hierarchical clustering, and then determines the cardinality of the latent variables as for BIN-G. We show that even with restricting ourselves to binary trees, we obtain HLC models of comparable quality to Zhang's solutions (in terms of cross-validated log-likelihood), while being generally faster to compute. This claim is validated by a comprehensive comparison on several data sets. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our methods are able to estimate interpretable latent structures on real-world data with a large number of variables. By applying our method to a restricted version of the 20 newsgroups data, these models turn out to be related to topic models, and on data from the PASCAL Visual Object Classes (VOC) 2007 challenge, we show how such treestructured models help us understand how objects co-occur in images. For reproducibility of all experiments in this paper, all code and data sets (or links to data) are available at http://people.kyb.tuebingen.mpg.de/harmeling/code/ltt-1.4.tar.

  20. Heat Waves Are Health Threats

    MedlinePlus

    ... heat syncope (fainting), heat exhaustion, as well as heat stroke," he said in a hospital news release. "Various classes of medications including beta blockers, as well as diuretics, can ... to heat-related illnesses," Glatter said. But young, healthy people ...

  1. Latent phenotypes pervade gene regulatory circuits

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Latent phenotypes are non-adaptive byproducts of adaptive phenotypes. They exist in biological systems as different as promiscuous enzymes and genome-scale metabolic reaction networks, and can give rise to evolutionary adaptations and innovations. We know little about their prevalence in the gene expression phenotypes of regulatory circuits, important sources of evolutionary innovations. Results Here, we study a space of more than sixteen million three-gene model regulatory circuits, where each circuit is represented by a genotype, and has one or more functions embodied in one or more gene expression phenotypes. We find that the majority of circuits with single functions have latent expression phenotypes. Moreover, the set of circuits with a given spectrum of functions has a repertoire of latent phenotypes that is much larger than that of any one circuit. Most of this latent repertoire can be easily accessed through a series of small genetic changes that preserve a circuit’s main functions. Both circuits and gene expression phenotypes that are robust to genetic change are associated with a greater number of latent phenotypes. Conclusions Our observations suggest that latent phenotypes are pervasive in regulatory circuits, and may thus be an important source of evolutionary adaptations and innovations involving gene regulation. PMID:24884746

  2. Turbulence-induced pressure fluctuations in snow and their effect on heat and moisture transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huwald, H.; Higgins, C. W.; Drake, S.; Nolin, A. W.; Parlange, M. B.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate measurement of the heat and moisture flux components of the energy budget of a snow pack is difficult, and to date no generally satisfying solutions exist. In particular, little quantitative knowledge exists on heat and water vapor exchange associated to dynamically driven air movement in the snow pack as a consequence of atmospheric turbulence. This so-called wind-pumping constitutes a mechanism for forced release of saturated air form the snow pack and thus determines evaporation or sublimation rates from the snow and consequently affects the turbulent latent heat flux. A unique experiment and measurement system has been developed and deployed in the field to investigate and quantify the influence of atmospheric turbulence on heat and moisture transport across the snow-air interface. To this end, high-frequency measurements of 3-dimensional wind components, air temperature, and water vapor fluctuations above the snow surface were taken simultaneously together with differential air pressure fluctuations at several depths in the snow pack. The analysis addresses changes in frequency, amplitude, and penetration depth of the pressure fluctuations with depth, and the relationship of turbulence intensity to attenuation characteristics of the pressure within the snow pack. Finally, the study aims at understanding how turbulence-induced air pressure dynamics within the snow pack impacts on the heat budget of the snow pack and the turbulent sensible and latent heat flux above the snow surface.

  3. External stimulation-controllable heat-storage ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Tokoro, Hiroko; Yoshikiyo, Marie; Imoto, Kenta; Namai, Asuka; Nasu, Tomomichi; Nakagawa, Kosuke; Ozaki, Noriaki; Hakoe, Fumiyoshi; Tanaka, Kenji; Chiba, Kouji; Makiura, Rie; Prassides, Kosmas; Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Commonly available heat-storage materials cannot usually store the energy for a prolonged period. If a solid material could conserve the accumulated thermal energy, then its heat-storage application potential is considerably widened. Here we report a phase transition material that can conserve the latent heat energy in a wide temperature range, T<530 K and release the heat energy on the application of pressure. This material is stripe-type lambda-trititanium pentoxide, λ-Ti3O5, which exhibits a solid–solid phase transition to beta-trititanium pentoxide, β-Ti3O5. The pressure for conversion is extremely small, only 600 bar (60 MPa) at ambient temperature, and the accumulated heat energy is surprisingly large (230 kJ L−1). Conversely, the pressure-produced beta-trititanium pentoxide transforms to lambda-trititanium pentoxide by heat, light or electric current. That is, the present system exhibits pressure-and-heat, pressure-and-light and pressure-and-current reversible phase transitions. The material may be useful for heat storage, as well as in sensor and switching memory device applications. PMID:25962982

  4. The Latent Structure of Dictionaries.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Lamarre, Philippe; Massé, Alexandre Blondin; Lopes, Marcos; Lord, Mélanie; Marcotte, Odile; Harnad, Stevan

    2016-07-01

    How many words-and which ones-are sufficient to define all other words? When dictionaries are analyzed as directed graphs with links from defining words to defined words, they reveal a latent structure. Recursively removing all words that are reachable by definition but that do not define any further words reduces the dictionary to a Kernel of about 10% of its size. This is still not the smallest number of words that can define all the rest. About 75% of the Kernel turns out to be its Core, a "Strongly Connected Subset" of words with a definitional path to and from any pair of its words and no word's definition depending on a word outside the set. But the Core cannot define all the rest of the dictionary. The 25% of the Kernel surrounding the Core consists of small strongly connected subsets of words: the Satellites. The size of the smallest set of words that can define all the rest-the graph's "minimum feedback vertex set" or MinSet-is about 1% of the dictionary, about 15% of the Kernel, and part-Core/part-Satellite. But every dictionary has a huge number of MinSets. The Core words are learned earlier, more frequent, and less concrete than the Satellites, which are in turn learned earlier, more frequent, but more concrete than the rest of the Dictionary. In principle, only one MinSet's words would need to be grounded through the sensorimotor capacity to recognize and categorize their referents. In a dual-code sensorimotor/symbolic model of the mental lexicon, the symbolic code could do all the rest through recombinatory definition. PMID:27424842

  5. Chick heat-shock protein of Mr = 90,000, free or released from progesterone receptor, is in a dimeric form.

    PubMed

    Radanyi, C; Renoir, J M; Sabbah, M; Baulieu, E E

    1989-02-15

    A monoclonal antibody (BF4) has been used to characterize and purify the heat-shock protein of Mr approximately 90,000 (hsp 90) present in the chick oviduct. In low salt cytosol, the sedimentation coefficient of hsp 90 is approximately 6.8 S, the Stokes radius approximately 7.1 nm, and the calculated Mr approximately 204,000, thus suggesting a dimeric structure. In 0.4 M KCl cytosol, only slightly smaller values were determined (approximately 6.5 S, approximately 6.8 nm, and approximately 187,000). Following purification by ion exchange and immunoaffinity chromatography, hsp 90 migrated as a single silver-stained band at Mr approximately 90,000 in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, while the sedimentation coefficient 6.2 S, the Stokes radius approximately 6.8 nm, and the Mr approximately 178,000 confirmed the dimeric structure. However, in both antigen or antibody excess conditions, only one molecule of monoclonal antibody could be bound to the hsp 90 dimer. Whether steric hindrance in a homodimer or the presence of two different 90-kDa proteins in a heterodimer explains this result cannot yet be decided. The dimer is not dissociated by high salt (1 M KCl) or the chaotropic agent (0.5 M NaSCN), but is disrupted by 4 M urea, suggesting a stabilization of the structure by hydrogen bonds. The molybdate-stabilized progesterone receptor hetero-oligomer form of approximately 8 S sedimentation coefficient was purified, and its hsp 90 component was then released by salt treatment. It was found to sediment at approximately 5.8 S and have a Stokes radius approximately 7.1 nm, giving Mr approximately 174,000. This observation is consistent with a previous report suggesting from specific activity determination, scanning of polyacrylamide gels, and cross-linking experiments that each purified nontransformed progesterone receptor molecule includes one progesterone binding unit per two 90-kDa protein molecules (Renoir, J. M., Buchou, T., Mester, J

  6. Evaluating temperature and fuel stratification for heat-release rate control in a reactivity-controlled compression-ignition engine using optical diagnostics and chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Musculus, Mark P. B.; Kokjohn, Sage L.; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2015-04-23

    We investigated the combustion process in a dual-fuel, reactivity-controlled compression-ignition (RCCI) engine using a combination of optical diagnostics and chemical kinetics modeling to explain the role of equivalence ratio, temperature, and fuel reactivity stratification for heat-release rate control. An optically accessible engine is operated in the RCCI combustion mode using gasoline primary reference fuels (PRF). A well-mixed charge of iso-octane (PRF = 100) is created by injecting fuel into the engine cylinder during the intake stroke using a gasoline-type direct injector. Later in the cycle, n-heptane (PRF = 0) is delivered through a centrally mounted diesel-type common-rail injector. This injection strategy generates stratification in equivalence ratio, fuel blend, and temperature. The first part of this study uses a high-speed camera to image the injection events and record high-temperature combustion chemiluminescence. Moreover, the chemiluminescence imaging showed that, at the operating condition studied in the present work, mixtures in the squish region ignite first, and the reaction zone proceeds inward toward the center of the combustion chamber. The second part of this study investigates the charge preparation of the RCCI strategy using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of a fuel tracer under non-reacting conditions to quantify fuel concentration distributions prior to ignition. The fuel-tracer PLIF data show that the combustion event proceeds down gradients in the n-heptane distribution. The third part of the study uses chemical kinetics modeling over a range of mixtures spanning the distributions observed from the fuel-tracer fluorescence imaging to isolate the roles of temperature, equivalence ratio, and PRF number stratification. The simulations predict that PRF number stratification is the dominant factor controlling the ignition location and growth rate of the reaction zone. Equivalence ratio has a smaller, but still significant

  7. Latent Curve Models and Latent Change Score Models Estimated in R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghisletta, Paolo; McArdle, John J.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years the use of the latent curve model (LCM) among researchers in social sciences has increased noticeably, probably thanks to contemporary software developments and the availability of specialized literature. Extensions of the LCM, like the the latent change score model (LCSM), have also increased in popularity. At the same time, the R…

  8. Urban warming in the 2013 summer heat wave in eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Yan, Zhongwei; Quan, Xiao-Wei; Feng, Jinming

    2016-06-01

    The impact of urban warming during the 2013 July-August extreme heat wave event across the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) in China was assessed. Using a newly developed high-resolution, land-use dataset, urban stations were identified from a total of 101 stations in the YRD. The difference between urban and non-urban/rural stations indicates that urban warming reached 1.22 °C in the 2013 summer heat wave. The new land-use dataset was then input to the Weather Research and Forecasting model to further understand the dynamical/physical processes of the urban warming during the heat wave. The model-simulated urban warming is ~1.5 °C. Impacts of urbanization on near-surface temperature had strong diurnal variation, reaching a peak at 19:00 LST, around sunset. In the daytime, urban warming was mainly caused by enhanced sensible heat fluxes and longwave radiation from the surface. Because of reduced latent heat flux and increased heat capacity, urban ground stored much more heat than rural ground during the daytime, which is later released as sensible heat flux from the surface at night, leading to the nocturnal urban warming. The simulation results also suggest a positive feedback between urban warming and heat wave intensity, which makes the heat wave more intense in urban than rural areas and the urban warming during the extreme heat wave stronger than its climatological mean.

  9. Primary Energy Efficiency Analysis of Different Separate Sensible and Latent Cooling Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Separate Sensible and Latent cooling (SSLC) has been discussed in open literature as means to improve air conditioning system efficiency. The main benefit of SSLC is that it enables heat source optimization for the different forms of loads, sensible vs. latent, and as such maximizes the cycle efficiency. In this paper I use a thermodynamic analysis tool in order to analyse the performance of various SSLC technologies including: multi-evaporators two stage compression system, vapour compression system with heat activated desiccant dehumidification, and integrated vapour compression with desiccant dehumidification. A primary coefficient of performance is defined and used to judge the performance of the different SSLC technologies at the design conditions. Results showed the trade-off in performance for different sensible heat factor and regeneration temperatures.

  10. Processes involved in the development of latent fingerprints using the cyanoacrylate fuming method.

    PubMed

    Lewis, L A; Smithwick, R W; Devault, G L; Bolinger, B; Lewis, S A

    2001-03-01

    Chemical processes involved in the development of latent fingerprints using the cyanoacrylate fuming method have been studied. Two major types of latent prints have been investigated-clean and oily prints. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been used as a tool for determining the morphology of the polymer developed separately on clean and oily prints after cyanoacrylate fuming. A correlation between the chemical composition of an aged latent fingerprint, prior to development, and the quality of a developed fingerprint has been observed in the morphology. The moisture in the print prior to fuming has been found to be more important than the moisture in the air during fuming for the development of a useful latent print. In addition, the amount of time required to develop a high quality latent print has been found to be within 2 min. The cyanoacrylate polymerization process is extremely rapid. When heat is used to accelerate the fuming process, typically a period of 2 min is required to develop the print. The optimum development time depends upon the concentration of cyanoacrylate vapors within the enclosure.

  11. Latent heat solar collection and storage: application to agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Benard, C.; Gobin, D.

    1981-01-01

    The experimental results presented here have been obtained on a solar chicken breeder built in the Peruvian mountains. This installation is made of adobe and part of its roof is a solar collection-storage system consisting of two tanks of paraffin-wax located below glass panes. 4 refs.

  12. Recombination Enhances HIV-1 Envelope Diversity by Facilitating the Survival of Latent Genomic Fragments in the Plasma Virus Population.

    PubMed

    Immonen, Taina T; Conway, Jessica M; Romero-Severson, Ethan O; Perelson, Alan S; Leitner, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    HIV-1 is subject to immune pressure exerted by the host, giving variants that escape the immune response an advantage. Virus released from activated latent cells competes against variants that have continually evolved and adapted to host immune pressure. Nevertheless, there is increasing evidence that virus displaying a signal of latency survives in patient plasma despite having reduced fitness due to long-term immune memory. We investigated the survival of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments by simulating within-host HIV-1 sequence evolution and the cycling of viral lineages in and out of the latent reservoir. Our model incorporates a detailed mutation process including nucleotide substitution, recombination, latent reservoir dynamics, diversifying selection pressure driven by the immune response, and purifying selection pressure asserted by deleterious mutations. We evaluated the ability of our model to capture sequence evolution in vivo by comparing our simulated sequences to HIV-1 envelope sequence data from 16 HIV-infected untreated patients. Empirical sequence divergence and diversity measures were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those of our simulated HIV-1 populations, suggesting that our model invokes realistic trends of HIV-1 genetic evolution. Moreover, reconstructed phylogenies of simulated and patient HIV-1 populations showed similar topological structures. Our simulation results suggest that recombination is a key mechanism facilitating the persistence of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments in the productively infected cell population. Recombination increased the survival probability of latent virus forms approximately 13-fold. Prevalence of virus with latent fragments in productively infected cells was observed in only 2% of simulations when we ignored recombination, while the proportion increased to 27% of simulations when we allowed recombination. We also found that the selection pressures exerted by different fitness

  13. Recombination enhances HIV-1 envelope diversity by facilitating the survival of latent genomic fragments in the plasma virus population

    SciTech Connect

    Immonen, Taina T.; Conway, Jessica M.; Romero-Severson, Ethan O.; Perelson, Alan S.; Leitner, Thomas; Kouyos, Roger Dimitri

    2015-12-22

    HIV-1 is subject to immune pressure exerted by the host, giving variants that escape the immune response an advantage. Virus released from activated latent cells competes against variants that have continually evolved and adapted to host immune pressure. Nevertheless, there is increasing evidence that virus displaying a signal of latency survives in patient plasma despite having reduced fitness due to long-term immune memory. We investigated the survival of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments by simulating within-host HIV-1 sequence evolution and the cycling of viral lineages in and out of the latent reservoir. Our model incorporates a detailed mutation process including nucleotide substitution, recombination, latent reservoir dynamics, diversifying selection pressure driven by the immune response, and purifying selection pressure asserted by deleterious mutations. We evaluated the ability of our model to capture sequence evolution in vivo by comparing our simulated sequences to HIV-1 envelope sequence data from 16 HIV-infected untreated patients. Empirical sequence divergence and diversity measures were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those of our simulated HIV-1 populations, suggesting that our model invokes realistic trends of HIV-1 genetic evolution. Moreover, reconstructed phylogenies of simulated and patient HIV-1 populations showed similar topological structures. Our simulation results suggest that recombination is a key mechanism facilitating the persistence of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments in the productively infected cell population. Recombination increased the survival probability of latent virus forms approximately 13-fold. Prevalence of virus with latent fragments in productively infected cells was observed in only 2% of simulations when we ignored recombination, while the proportion increased to 27% of simulations when we allowed recombination. We also found that the selection pressures exerted by different fitness

  14. Intractable diarrhoea of infancy and latent otomastoiditis.

    PubMed Central

    Salazar de Sousa, J; da Silva, A; da Costa Ribeiro, V

    1980-01-01

    In 16 infants with intractable diarrhoea, latent otomastoiditis was found in 9 (3 at necropsy and 6 at myringotomy-antrotomy). In 5 of the 6 operated group, surgery was followed by a striking cessation of the diarrhoea and with weight gain. It is concluded that (1) latent otomastoiditis may be a perpetuating factor in intractable diarrhoea; (2) myringotomy-antrotomy should be considered if other forms of treatment have failed, and especially if there is leucocytosis; (3) mastoiditis with diffuse osteitis seems to be associated with a poor prognosis. PMID:7458392

  15. Learning Minimal Latent Directed Information Polytrees.

    PubMed

    Etesami, Jalal; Kiyavash, Negar; Coleman, Todd

    2016-09-01

    We propose an approach for learning latent directed polytrees as long as there exists an appropriately defined discrepancy measure between the observed nodes. Specifically, we use our approach for learning directed information polytrees where samples are available from only a subset of processes. Directed information trees are a new type of probabilistic graphical models that represent the causal dynamics among a set of random processes in a stochastic system. We prove that the approach is consistent for learning minimal latent directed trees. We analyze the sample complexity of the learning task when the empirical estimator of mutual information is used as the discrepancy measure. PMID:27391682

  16. Estimates of zonally averaged tropical diabatic heating in AMIP GCM simulations. PCMDI report No. 25

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, J.S.

    1995-07-01

    An understanding of the processess that generate the atmospheric diabatic heating rates is basic to an understanding of the time averaged general circulation of the atmosphere and also circulation anomalies. Knowledge of the sources and sinks of atmospheric heating enables a fuller understanding of the nature of the atmospheric circulation. An actual assesment of the diabatic heating rates in the atmosphere is a difficult problem that has been approached in a number of ways. One way is to estimate the total diabatic heating by estimating individual components associated with the radiative fluxes, the latent heat release, and sensible heat fluxes. An example of this approach is provided by Newell. Another approach is to estimate the net heating rates from consideration of the balance required of the mass and wind variables as routinely observed and analyzed. This budget computation has been done using the thermodynamic equation and more recently done by using the vorticity and thermodynamic equations. Schaak and Johnson compute the heating rates through the integration of the isentropic mass continuity equation. The estimates of heating arrived at all these methods are severely handicapped by the uncertainties in the observational data and analyses. In addition the estimates of the individual heating components suffer an additional source of error from the parameterizations used to approximate these quantities.

  17. Thermal energy storage heat exchanger: Molten salt heat exchanger design for utility power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferarra, A.; Yenetchi, G.; Haslett, R.; Kosson, R.

    1977-01-01

    Sizing procedures are presented for latent heat thermal energy storage systems that can be used for electric utility off-peak energy storage, solar power plants and other preliminary design applications.

  18. Evaluating temperature and fuel stratification for heat-release rate control in a reactivity-controlled compression-ignition engine using optical diagnostics and chemical kinetics modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Musculus, Mark P. B.; Kokjohn, Sage L.; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2015-04-23

    We investigated the combustion process in a dual-fuel, reactivity-controlled compression-ignition (RCCI) engine using a combination of optical diagnostics and chemical kinetics modeling to explain the role of equivalence ratio, temperature, and fuel reactivity stratification for heat-release rate control. An optically accessible engine is operated in the RCCI combustion mode using gasoline primary reference fuels (PRF). A well-mixed charge of iso-octane (PRF = 100) is created by injecting fuel into the engine cylinder during the intake stroke using a gasoline-type direct injector. Later in the cycle, n-heptane (PRF = 0) is delivered through a centrally mounted diesel-type common-rail injector. This injectionmore » strategy generates stratification in equivalence ratio, fuel blend, and temperature. The first part of this study uses a high-speed camera to image the injection events and record high-temperature combustion chemiluminescence. Moreover, the chemiluminescence imaging showed that, at the operating condition studied in the present work, mixtures in the squish region ignite first, and the reaction zone proceeds inward toward the center of the combustion chamber. The second part of this study investigates the charge preparation of the RCCI strategy using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of a fuel tracer under non-reacting conditions to quantify fuel concentration distributions prior to ignition. The fuel-tracer PLIF data show that the combustion event proceeds down gradients in the n-heptane distribution. The third part of the study uses chemical kinetics modeling over a range of mixtures spanning the distributions observed from the fuel-tracer fluorescence imaging to isolate the roles of temperature, equivalence ratio, and PRF number stratification. The simulations predict that PRF number stratification is the dominant factor controlling the ignition location and growth rate of the reaction zone. Equivalence ratio has a smaller, but still

  19. A solar-thermal energy harvesting scheme: enhanced heat capacity of molten HITEC salt mixed with Sn/SiOx core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chih-Chung; Chang, Wen-Chih; Hu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Zhiming M.; Lu, Ming-Chang; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrated enhanced solar-thermal storage by releasing the latent heat of Sn/SiOx core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a eutectic salt. The microstructures and chemical compositions of Sn/SiOx core-shell NPs were characterized. In situ heating XRD provides dynamic crystalline information about the Sn/SiOx core-shell NPs during cyclic heating processes. The latent heat of ~29 J g-1 for Sn/SiOx core-shell NPs was measured, and 30% enhanced heat capacity was achieved from 1.57 to 2.03 J g-1 K-1 for the HITEC solar salt without and with, respectively, a mixture of 5% Sn/SiOx core-shell NPs. In addition, an endurance cycle test was performed to prove a stable operation in practical applications. The approach provides a method to enhance energy storage in solar-thermal power plants.We demonstrated enhanced solar-thermal storage by releasing the latent heat of Sn/SiOx core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a eutectic salt. The microstructures and chemical compositions of Sn/SiOx core-shell NPs were characterized. In situ heating XRD provides dynamic crystalline information about the Sn/SiOx core-shell NPs during cyclic heating processes. The latent heat of ~29 J g-1 for Sn/SiOx core-shell NPs was measured, and 30% enhanced heat capacity was achieved from 1.57 to 2.03 J g-1 K-1 for the HITEC solar salt without and with, respectively, a mixture of 5% Sn/SiOx core-shell NPs. In addition, an endurance cycle test was performed to prove a stable operation in practical applications. The approach provides a method to enhance energy storage in solar-thermal power plants. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental results are included for the following: SEM images of the HITEC molten salt with and without a mixture of Sn/SiOx core-shell NPs; statistical diameter distribution of pure Sn and Sn/SiOx core-shell NPs; the HAADF image and EDS linescan profile of a Sn/SiOx core-shell NP; XRD analysis for Sn NPs annealing at different heating

  20. Latent Fingerprint Matching: Performance Gain via Feedback from Exemplar Prints.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sunpreet S; Liu, Eryun; Cao, Kai; Jain, Anil K

    2014-12-01

    Latent fingerprints serve as an important source of forensic evidence in a court of law. Automatic matching of latent fingerprints to rolled/plain (exemplar) fingerprints with high accuracy is quite vital for such applications. However, latent impressions are typically of poor quality with complex background noise which makes feature extraction and matching of latents a significantly challenging problem. We propose incorporating top-down information or feedback from an exemplar to refine the features extracted from a latent for improving latent matching accuracy. The refined latent features (e.g. ridge orientation and frequency), after feedback, are used to re-match the latent to the top K candidate exemplars returned by the baseline matcher and resort the candidate list. The contributions of this research include: (i) devising systemic ways to use information in exemplars for latent feature refinement, (ii) developing a feedback paradigm which can be wrapped around any latent matcher for improving its matching performance, and (iii) determining when feedback is actually necessary to improve latent matching accuracy. Experimental results show that integrating the proposed feedback paradigm with a state-of-the-art latent matcher improves its identification accuracy by 0.5-3.5 percent for NIST SD27 and WVU latent databases against a background database of 100k exemplars.

  1. Latent Fingerprint Matching: Performance Gain via Feedback from Exemplar Prints.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sunpreet S; Liu, Eryun; Cao, Kai; Jain, Anil K

    2014-12-01

    Latent fingerprints serve as an important source of forensic evidence in a court of law. Automatic matching of latent fingerprints to rolled/plain (exemplar) fingerprints with high accuracy is quite vital for such applications. However, latent impressions are typically of poor quality with complex background noise which makes feature extraction and matching of latents a significantly challenging problem. We propose incorporating top-down information or feedback from an exemplar to refine the features extracted from a latent for improving latent matching accuracy. The refined latent features (e.g. ridge orientation and frequency), after feedback, are used to re-match the latent to the top K candidate exemplars returned by the baseline matcher and resort the candidate list. The contributions of this research include: (i) devising systemic ways to use information in exemplars for latent feature refinement, (ii) developing a feedback paradigm which can be wrapped around any latent matcher for improving its matching performance, and (iii) determining when feedback is actually necessary to improve latent matching accuracy. Experimental results show that integrating the proposed feedback paradigm with a state-of-the-art latent matcher improves its identification accuracy by 0.5-3.5 percent for NIST SD27 and WVU latent databases against a background database of 100k exemplars. PMID:26353151

  2. Latent Tuberculosis in Pregnancy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Malhamé, Isabelle; Cormier, Maxime; Sugarman, Jordan; Schwartzman, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background In countries with low tuberculosis (TB) incidence, immigrants from higher incidence countries represent the major pool of individuals with latent TB infection (LTBI). The antenatal period represents an opportunity for immigrant women to access the medical system, and hence for potential screening and treatment of LTBI. However, such screening and treatment during pregnancy remains controversial. Objectives In order to further understand the prevalence, natural history, screening and management of LTBI in pregnancy, we conducted a systematic literature review addressing the screening and treatment of LTBI, in pregnant women without known HIV infection. Methods A systematic review of 4 databases (Embase, Embase Classic, Medline, Cochrane Library) covering articles published from January 1st 1980 to April 30th 2014. Articles in English, French or Spanish with relevant information on prevalence, natural history, screening tools, screening strategies and treatment of LTBI during pregnancy were eligible for inclusion. Articles were excluded if (1) Full text was not available (2) they were case series or case studies (3) they focused exclusively on prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of active TB (4) the study population was exclusively HIV-infected. Results Of 4,193 titles initially identified, 208 abstracts were eligible for review. Of these, 30 articles qualified for full text review and 22 were retained: 3 cohort studies, 2 case-control studies, and 17 cross-sectional studies. In the USA, the estimated prevalence of LTBI ranged from 14 to 48% in women tested, and tuberculin skin test (TST) positivity was associated with ethnicity. One study suggested that incidence of active TB was significantly increased during the 180 days postpartum (Incidence rate ratio, 1.95 (95% CI 1.24–3.07). There was a high level of adherence with both skin testing (between 90–100%) and chest radiography (93–100%.). In three studies from low incidence settings, concordance

  3. Multicomponent Implant Releasing Dexamethasone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Several inflammatory conditions are usually treated with corticosteroids. There are various problems like side effects with traditional applications of steroids, e.g. topical, or systemic routes. Local drug delivery systems have been studied and developed to gain more efficient administration with fewer side effects. Earlier, we reported on developing Dexamethasone (DX) releasing biodegradable fibers. However, their drug release properties were not satisfactory in terms of onset of drug release. Thus, we assessed the development of multicomponent (MC) implant to enhance earlier drug release from such biodegradable fibers. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and 2 wt-% and 8 wt-% DX were compounded and extruded with twin-screw extruder to form of fibers. Some of the fibers were sterilized to obtain a change in drug release properties. Four different fiber classes were studied: 2 wt-%, 8 wt-%, sterilized 2 wt-%, and sterilized 8 wt-%. 3×4 different DX-releasing fibers were then heat-pressed to form one multicomponent rod. Half of the rods where sterilized. Drug release was measured from initial fibers and multicomponent rods using a UV/VIS spectrometer. Shear strength and changes in viscosity were also measured. Drug release studies showed that drug release commenced earlier from multicomponent rods than from component fibers. Drug release from multicomponent rods lasted from day 30 to day 70. The release period of sterilized rods extended from day 23 to day 57. When compared to the original component fibers, the drug release from MC rods commenced earlier. The initial shear strength of MC rods was 135 MPa and decreased to 105 MPa during four weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer solution. Accordingly, heat pressing has a positive effect on drug release. After four weeks in hydrolysis, no disintegration was observed.

  4. Incorporation of cooling-induced crystallization into a 2-dimensional axisymmetric conduit heat flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heptinstall, David; Bouvet de Maisonneuve, Caroline; Neuberg, Jurgen; Taisne, Benoit; Collinson, Amy

    2016-04-01

    Heat flow models can bring new insights into the thermal and rheological evolution of volcanic 3 systems. We shall investigate the thermal processes and timescales in a crystallizing, static 4 magma column, with a heat flow model of Soufriere Hills Volcano (SHV), Montserrat. The latent heat of crystallization is initially computed with MELTS, as a function of pressure and temperature for an andesitic melt (SHV groundmass starting composition). Three fractional crystallization simulations are performed; two with initial pressures of 34MPa (runs 1 & 2) and one of 25MPa (run 3). Decompression rate was varied between 0.1MPa/° C (runs 1 & 3) and 0.2MPa/° C (run 2). Natural and experimental matrix glass compositions are accurately reproduced by all MELTS runs. The cumulative latent heat released for runs 1, 2 and 3 differs by less than 9% (8.69E5 J/kg*K, 9.32E5 J/kg*K, and 9.49E5 J/kg*K respectively). The 2D axisymmetric conductive cooling simulations consider a 30m-diameter conduit that extends from the surface to a depth of 1500m (34MPa). The temporal evolution of temperature is closely tracked at depths of 10m, 750m and 1400m in the centre of the conduit, at the conduit walls, and 20m from the walls into the host rock. Following initial cooling by 7-15oC at 10m depth inside the conduit, the magma temperature rebounds through latent heat release by 32-35oC over 85-123 days to a maximum temperature of 1002-1005oC. At 10m depth, it takes 4.1-9.2 years for the magma column to cool by 108-131oC and crystallize to 75wt%, at which point it cannot be easily remobilized. It takes 11-31.5 years to reach the same crystallinity at 750-1400m depth. We find a wide range in cooling timescales, particularly at depths of 750m or greater, attributed to the initial run pressure and the dominant latent heat producing crystallizing phase, Albite-rich Plagioclase Feldspar. Run 1 is shown to cool fastest and run 3 cool the slowest, with surface emissivity having the strongest cooling

  5. Latent TGF-β-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Ian B.; Horiguchi, Masahito; Zilberberg, Lior; Dabovic, Branka; Hadjiolova, Krassimira; Rifkin, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    The LTBPs (or latent transforming growth factor β binding proteins) are important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) that interact with fibrillin microfibrils and have a number of different roles in microfibril biology. There are four LTBPs isoforms in the human genome (LTBP-1, -2, -3, and -4), all of which appear to associate with fibrillin and the biology of each isoform is reviewed here. The LTBPs were first identified as forming latent complexes with TGFβ by covalently binding the TGFβ propeptide (LAP) via disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum. LAP in turn is cleaved from the mature TGFβ precursor in the trans golgi network but LAP and TGFβ remain strongly bound through non-covalent interactions. LAP, TGFβ, and LTBP together form the large latent complex (LLC). LTBPs were originally thought to primarily play a role in maintaining TGFβ latency and targeting the latent growth factor to the extracellular matrix (ECM), but it has also been shown that LTBP-1 participates in TGFβ activation by integrins and may also regulate activation by proteases and other factors. LTBP-3 appears to have a role in skeletal formation including tooth development. As well as having important functions in TGFβ regulation, TGFβ-independent activities have recently been identified for LTBP-2 and LTBP-4 in stabilizing microfibril bundles and regulating elastic fiber assembly. PMID:25960419

  6. Generalized Structured Component Analysis with Latent Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Ho, Moon-Ho Ringo; Lee, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) is a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, researchers may often be interested in examining the interaction effects of latent variables. However, GSCA has been geared only for the specification and testing of the main effects of variables. Thus, an extension of GSCA…

  7. Confirmatory Measurement Model Comparisons Using Latent Means.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millsap, Roger E.; Everson, Howard

    1991-01-01

    Use of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) with nonzero latent means in testing six different measurement models from classical test theory is discussed. Implications of the six models for observed mean and covariance structures are described, and three examples of the use of CFA in testing the models are presented. (SLD)

  8. The Trait in Latent Trait Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Michael V.

    Significant to a latent trait or item response theory analysis of a mental test is the determination of exactly what is being quantified. The following are practical problems to be considered in the formulation of a good theory: (1) deciding whether two tests measure the same trait or traits; (2) analyzing the relative contributions of a pair of…

  9. Immune Function and Reactivation of Latent Viruses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butel, Janet S.

    1999-01-01

    A major concern associated with long-duration space flight is the possibility of infectious diseases posing an unacceptable medical risk to crew members. One major hypothesis addressed in this project is that space flight will cause alterations in the immune system that will allow latent viruses that are endogenous in the human population to reactivate and shed to higher levels than normal, which may affect the health of crew members. The second major hypothesis being examined is that the effects of space flight will alter the mucosal immune system, the first line of defense against many microbial infections, including herpesviruses, polyomaviruses, and gastroenteritis viruses, rendering crew members more susceptible to virus infections across the mucosa. We are focusing the virus studies on the human herpesviruses and polyomaviruses, important pathogens known to establish latent infections in most of the human population. Both primary infection and reactivation from latent infection with these groups of viruses (especially certain herpesviruses) can cause a variety of illnesses that result in morbidity and, occasionally, mortality. Both herpesviruses and polyomaviruses have been associated with human cancer, as well. Effective vaccines exist for only one of the eight known human herpesviruses and available antivirals are of limited use. Whereas normal individuals display minimal consequences from latent viral infections, events which alter immune function (such as immunosuppressive therapy following solid organ transplantation) are known to increase the risk of complications as a result of viral reactivations.

  10. Extended Generalized Linear Latent and Mixed Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segawa, Eisuke; Emery, Sherry; Curry, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    The generalized linear latent and mixed modeling (GLLAMM framework) includes many models such as hierarchical and structural equation models. However, GLLAMM cannot currently accommodate some models because it does not allow some parameters to be random. GLLAMM is extended to overcome the limitation by adding a submodel that specifies a…

  11. Forensic Chemistry: The Revelation of Latent Fingerprints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, J. Brent

    2015-01-01

    The visualization of latent fingerprints often involves the use of a chemical substance that creates a contrast between the fingerprint residues and the surface on which the print was deposited. The chemical-aided visualization techniques can be divided into two main categories: those that chemically react with the fingerprint residue and those…

  12. Detection of latent prints by Raman imaging

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Linda Anne; Connatser, Raynella Magdalene; Lewis, Sr., Samuel Arthur

    2011-01-11

    The present invention relates to a method for detecting a print on a surface, the method comprising: (a) contacting the print with a Raman surface-enhancing agent to produce a Raman-enhanced print; and (b) detecting the Raman-enhanced print using a Raman spectroscopic method. The invention is particularly directed to the imaging of latent fingerprints.

  13. Experimental Investigation of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for spacecraft thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments. Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. This can result in a decreased turndown ratio for the radiator and a reduced system mass. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents an overview of the results of this investigation from the past three years.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2011-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for spacecraft thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments. Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. This can result in a decreased turndown ratio for the radiator and a reduced system mass. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents an overview of the results of this investigation from the past three years.

  15. A Note on Cluster Effects in Latent Class Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, David; Keller, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the effects of clustering in latent class analysis. A comprehensive simulation study is conducted, which begins by specifying a true multilevel latent class model with varying within- and between-cluster sample sizes, varying latent class proportions, and varying intraclass correlations. These models are then estimated under…

  16. Stochastic Approximation Methods for Latent Regression Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Davier, Matthias; Sinharay, Sandip

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an application of a stochastic approximation expectation maximization (EM) algorithm using a Metropolis-Hastings (MH) sampler to estimate the parameters of an item response latent regression model. Latent regression item response models are extensions of item response theory (IRT) to a latent variable model with covariates…

  17. A General Approach to Defining Latent Growth Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Axel; Steyer, Rolf; Mueller, Horst

    2012-01-01

    We present a 3-step approach to defining latent growth components. In the first step, a measurement model with at least 2 indicators for each time point is formulated to identify measurement error variances and obtain latent variables that are purged from measurement error. In the second step, we use contrast matrices to define the latent growth…

  18. Fingerprint Minutiae from Latent and Matching Tenprint Images

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Fingerprint Minutiae from Latent and Matching Tenprint Images (PC database for purchase)   NIST Special Database 27 contains latent fingerprints from crime scenes and their matching rolled fingerprint mates. This database can be used to develop and test new fingerprint algorithms, test commercial and research AFIS systems, train latent examiners, and promote the ANSI/NIST file format standard.

  19. Bayesian Semiparametric Structural Equation Models with Latent Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Mingan; Dunson, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Structural equation models (SEMs) with latent variables are widely useful for sparse covariance structure modeling and for inferring relationships among latent variables. Bayesian SEMs are appealing in allowing for the incorporation of prior information and in providing exact posterior distributions of unknowns, including the latent variables. In…

  20. Atmospheric diabatic heating and summertime circulation in Asia—Africa area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiping; Chineke, Theo Chidiezie; Liu, Xin; Wu, Guoxiong

    2001-03-01

    Utilizing data from NCEP/ NCAR reanalysis, the summertime atmospheric diabatic heating due to different physical processes is investigated over the Sahara desert, the Tibetan Plateau, and the Bay of Bengal. Atmospheric circulation systems in summer over these three areas are also studied. Thermal adaptation theory is employed to explain the relationship between the circulation and the atmospheric diabatic heating. Over the Sahara desert, heating resulting from the surface sensible heat flux dominates the near-surface layer, while radiative cooling is dominant upward from the boundary layer. There is positive vorticity in the shallow boundary layer and negative vorticity in the middle and upper troposphere. Downward motion prevails over the Sahara desert, except in the shallow near—surface layer where weak ascent exists in summer. Over the Tibetan Plateau, strong vertical diffusion resulting from intense surface sensible heat flux to the overlying atmosphere contributes most to the boundary layer heating, condensation associated with large—scale ascent is another contributor to the lower layer heating. Latent heat release accompanying deep convection is critical in offsetting longwave radiative cooling in the middle and upper troposphere. The overall diabatic heating is positive in the whole troposphere in summer, with the most intense heating located in the boundary layer. Convergence and positive vorticity occur in the shallow near—surface layer and divergence and negative vorticity exist deeply in the middle and upper troposphere. Accordingly, upward motion prevails over the Plateau in summer, with the most intense rising occurring near the ground surface. Over the Bay of Bengal, summertime latent heat release associated with deep convection exceeds longwave radiative cooling, resulting in intense heating in almost the whole troposphere. The strongest heating over the Bay of Bengal is located around 400 hPa, resulting in the most intense rising occurring

  1. Modeling Nonlinear Change via Latent Change and Latent Acceleration Frameworks: Examining Velocity and Acceleration of Growth Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Kevin; Zhang, Zhiyong; Hamagami, Fumiaki; Mazzocco, Michele

    2013-01-01

    We propose the use of the latent change and latent acceleration frameworks for modeling nonlinear growth in structural equation models. Moving to these frameworks allows for the direct identification of "rates of change" and "acceleration" in latent growth curves--information available indirectly through traditional growth curve models when change…

  2. Two Studies of Specification Error in Models for Categorical Latent Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, David; Depaoli, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the problem of specification error in 2 models for categorical latent variables; the latent class model and the latent Markov model. Specification error in the latent class model focuses on the impact of incorrectly specifying the number of latent classes of the categorical latent variable on measures of model adequacy as…

  3. Blocking of potentiation of latent inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hall, Geoffrey; Rodriguez, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    We present a theory of latent inhibition based on the Pearce-Hall (Pearce & Hall, 1980) model for classical conditioning. Its central features are (1) that the associability of a stimulus declines as it comes to predict its consequences and (2) that nonreinforced exposure to a stimulus engages an associative learning process that makes the stimulus an accurate predictor of its consequences (in this case, the occurrence of no event). A formalization of this theory is shown to accommodate the finding that preexposure in compound with another cue can potentiate latent inhibition to the target cue. It further predicts that preexposure to the added cue will eliminate the potentiation effect. An experiment using rats and the flavor-aversion procedure confirmed this prediction.

  4. Multistage sampling for latent variable models.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Duncan C

    2007-12-01

    I consider the design of multistage sampling schemes for epidemiologic studies involving latent variable models, with surrogate measurements of the latent variables on a subset of subjects. Such models arise in various situations: when detailed exposure measurements are combined with variables that can be used to assign exposures to unmeasured subjects; when biomarkers are obtained to assess an unobserved pathophysiologic process; or when additional information is to be obtained on confounding or modifying variables. In such situations, it may be possible to stratify the subsample on data available for all subjects in the main study, such as outcomes, exposure predictors, or geographic locations. Three circumstances where analytic calculations of the optimal design are possible are considered: (i) when all variables are binary; (ii) when all are normally distributed; and (iii) when the latent variable and its measurement are normally distributed, but the outcome is binary. In each of these cases, it is often possible to considerably improve the cost efficiency of the design by appropriate selection of the sampling fractions. More complex situations arise when the data are spatially distributed: the spatial correlation can be exploited to improve exposure assignment for unmeasured locations using available measurements on neighboring locations; some approaches for informative selection of the measurement sample using location and/or exposure predictor data are considered.

  5. Clinical implication of latent myofascial trigger point.

    PubMed

    Celik, Derya; Mutlu, Ebru Kaya

    2013-08-01

    Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are hyperirritable points located within a taut band of skeletal muscle or fascia, which cause referred pain, local tenderness and autonomic changes when compressed. There are fundamental differences between the effects produced by the two basic types of MTrPs (active and latent). Active trigger points (ATrPs) usually produce referred pain and tenderness. In contrast, latent trigger points (LTrPs) are foci of hyperirritability in a taut band of muscle, which are clinically associated with a local twitch response, tenderness and/or referred pain upon manual examination. LTrPs may be found in many pain-free skeletal muscles and may be "activated" and converted to ATrPs by continuous detrimental stimuli. ATrPs can be inactivated by different treatment strategies; however, they never fully disappear but rather convert to the latent form. Therefore, the diagnosis and treatment of LTrPs is important. This review highlights the clinical implication of LTrPs.

  6. Visualization of latent fingerprint corrosion of metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bond, John W

    2008-07-01

    Chemical reactions between latent fingerprints and a variety of metal surfaces are investigated by heating the metal up to temperatures of approximately 600 degrees C after deposition of the fingerprint. Ionic salts present in the fingerprint residue corrode the metal surface to produce an image of the fingerprint that is both durable and resistant to cleaning of the metal. The degree of fingerprint enhancement appears independent of the elapsed time between deposition and heating but is very dependent on both the composition of the metal and the level of salt secretion by the fingerprint donor. Results are presented that show practical applications for the enhancement to fingerprints deposited in arson crime scenes, contaminated by spray painting, or deposited on brass cartridge cases prior to discharge. The corrosion of the metal surface is further exploited by the demonstration of a novel technique for fingerprint enhancement based on the electrostatic charging of the metal and then the preferential adherence of a metallic powder to the corroded part of the metal surface.

  7. Anthropogenic heat flux estimation from space: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysoulakis, Nektarios; Heldens, Wieke; Gastellu-Etchegorry, Jean-Philippe; Grimmond, Sue; Feigenwinter, Christian; Lindberg, Fredrik; Del Frate, Fabio; Klostermann, Judith; Mitraka, Zina; Esch, Thomas; Albitar, Ahmad; Gabey, Andrew; Parlow, Eberhard; Olofson, Frans

    2016-04-01

    While Earth Observation (EO) has made significant advances in the study of urban areas, there are several unanswered science and policy questions to which it could contribute. To this aim the recently launched Horizon 2020 project URBANFLUXES (URBan ANthrpogenic heat FLUX from Earth observation Satellites) investigates the potential of EO to retrieve anthropogenic heat flux, as a key component in the urban energy budget. The anthropogenic heat flux is the heat flux resulting from vehicular emissions, space heating and cooling of buildings, industrial processing and the metabolic heat release by people. Optical, thermal and SAR data from existing satellite sensors are used to improve the accuracy of the radiation balance spatial distribution calculation, using also in-situ reflectance measurements of urban materials are for calibration. EO-based methods are developed for estimating turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes, as well as urban heat storage flux and anthropogenic heat flux spatial patterns at city scale and local scale by employing an energy budget closure approach. Independent methods and models are engaged to evaluate the derived products and statistical analyses provide uncertainty measures as well. Ultimate goal of the URBANFLUXES is to develop a highly automated method for estimating urban energy budget components to use with Copernicus Sentinel data, enabling its integration into applications and operational services. Thus, URBANFLUXES prepares the ground for further innovative exploitation of European space data in scientific activities (i.e. Earth system modelling and climate change studies in cities) and future and emerging applications (i.e. sustainable urban planning) by exploiting the improved data quality, coverage and revisit times of the Copernicus data. The URBANFLUXES products will therefore have the potential to support both sustainable planning strategies to improve the quality of life in cities, as well as Earth system models to

  8. Microwave selective thermal development of latent fingerprints on porous surfaces: potentialities of the method and preliminary experimental results.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Roberto; Veronesi, Paolo; Leonelli, Cristina

    2013-09-01

    The thermal development of latent fingerprints on paper surfaces is a simple, safe, and chemicals-free method, based on the faster heating of the substrate underlying the print residue. Microwave heating is proposed for the first time for the development of latent fingerprints on cellulose-based substrate, in order to add to the thermal development mechanism the further characteristic of being able to heat the fingerprint residues to a different extent with respect to the substrate, due to the intrinsic difference in their dielectric properties. Numerical simulation was performed to confirm and highlight the selectivity of microwaves, and preliminary experimental results point out the great potentialities of this technique, which allowed developing both latent sebaceous-rich and latent eccrine-rich fingerprints on different porous surfaces, in less than 30 sec time with an applied output power of 500 W. Microwaves demonstrated more effectiveness in the development of eccrine-rich residues, aged up to 12 weeks.

  9. Crystallization, sublimation, and gas release in the interior of a porous comet nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prialnik, Dina

    1992-01-01

    A numerical code is developed for evolutionary calculations of the thermal structure and composition of a porous comet nucleus made of water ice, in amorphous or crystalline form, other volatiles, dust, and gases trapped in amorphous ice. Bulk evaporation, crystallization, gas release, and free (Knudsen) flow of gases through the pores are taken into account. The numerical scheme yields exact conservation laws for mass and energy. The code is used to study the effect of bulk evaporation of ice in the interior of a comet nucleus during crystallization. It is found that evaporation controls the temperature distribution; the vapor prevents cooling of the crystallized layer of ice, by recondensation and release of latent heat. Thus high temperatures are maintained below the surface of the nucleus and down to depths of tens or hundreds of meters, even at large heliocentric distances, as long as crystallization goes on. Gas trapped in the ice and released during the phase transition flows both toward the interior and toward the surface and out of the nucleus. The progress of crystallization is largely determined by the contribution of gas fluxes to heat transfer.

  10. Vasopeptidase-activated latent ligands of the histamine receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Gera, Lajos; Roy, Caroline; Charest-Morin, Xavier; Marceau, François

    2013-11-01

    Whether peptidases present in vascular cells can activate prodrugs active on vascular cells has been tested with 2 potential latent ligands of the histamine H1 receptor (H1R). First, a peptide consisting of the antihistamine cetirizine (CTZ) condensed at the N-terminus of ε-aminocaproyl-bradykinin (εACA-BK) was evaluated for an antihistamine activity that could be revealed by degradation of the peptide part of the molecule. CTZ-εACA-BK had a submicromolar affinity for the BK B2 receptor (B2R; IC50 of 590 nM, [(3)H]BK binding competition), but a non-negligible affinity for the human H1 receptor (H1R; IC50 of 11 μM for [(3)H]pyrilamine binding). In the human isolated umbilical vein, a system where both endogenous B2R and H1R mediate strong contractions, CTZ-εACA-BK exerted mild antagonist effects on histamine-induced contraction that were not modified by omapatrilat or by a B2R antagonist that prevents endocytosis of the BK conjugate. Cells expressing recombinant ACE or B2R incubated with CTZ-εACA-BK did not release a competitor of [(3)H]pyrilamine binding to H1Rs. Thus, there is no evidence that CTZ-εACA-BK can release free cetirizine in biological environments. The second prodrug was a blocked agonist, L-alanyl-histamine, potentially activated by aminopeptidase N (APN). This compound did not compete for [(3)H]pyrilamine binding to H1Rs. The human umbilical vein contractility assay responded to L-alanyl-histamine (EC50 54.7 μM), but the APN inhibitor amastatin massively (17-fold) reduced its apparent potency. Amastatin did not influence the potency of histamine as a contractile agent. One of the 2 tested latent H1R ligands, L-alanyl-histamine, supported the feasibility of pro-drug activation by vascular ectopeptidases.

  11. Association of autophagy-related IRGM polymorphisms with latent versus active tuberculosis infection in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanjun; Li, Qian; Peng, Jing; Zhu, Yaowu; Wang, Feng; Wang, Chunyu; Wang, Xiong

    2016-03-01

    The autophagy-related immunity-related GTPase family M protein, IRGM, plays an important role in the defense against tuberculosis (TB) infection. IRGM polymorphisms are associated with TB infection susceptibility, and recent studies demonstrate host genetic differences between active and latent TB. Here, we investigated the association between IRGM polymorphisms and TB infection type in a Chinese population. We recruited 268 and 321 patients with confirmed or latent TB, respectively, and 475 TB-free healthy controls. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs10065172, rs10051924, and rs13361189 within IRGM were genotyped using TaqMan-based assays. Interferon-gamma release levels were tested by T-SPOT. rs10065172 (P = 0.024, OR 0.67 (95% CI 0.48-0.95)), rs10051924 (P = 0.01, OR 0.64 (95% CI 0.46-0.90)), and rs13361189 (P = 0.055, OR 0.72 (95% CI 0.51-1.01)) were associated with a protective role against latent TB progression. Haplotype analysis showed that TCC was protective for latent TB (P = 0.022, OR 0.74 (95% CI 0.57-0.96)) whereas TTC conferred a higher risk of active TB. Additionally, patients with the rs10065172 TT genotype had a higher response to TB specific antigens. Thus, IRGM polymorphism differences between latent and active TB suggests that genetic differences in autophagy might partly affect host TB infection status. PMID:26980495

  12. Latent Viruses: A Space Travel Hazard??

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, P. D.; Peng, R. S.; Pierson, D.; Lednicky, J.; Butel, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    A major issue associated with long-duration space flight is the possibility of infectious disease causing an unacceptable medical risk to crew members. Our proposal is designed to gain information that addresses several issues outlined in the Immunology/Infectious disease critical path. The major hypothesis addressed is that space flight causes alterations in the immune system that may allow latent viruses which are endogenous in the human population to reactivate and shed to higher levels than normal which can affect the health of crew members during a long term space-flight mission. We will initially focus our studies on the human herpesviruses and human polyomaviruses which are important pathogens known to establish latent infections in the human population. Both primary infection and reactivation from latent infection with this group of viruses can cause a variety of illnesses that result in morbidity and occasionally mortality of infected individuals. Effective vaccines exist for only one of the eight known human herpesviruses and the vaccine itself can still reactivate from latent infection. Available antivirals are of limited use and are effective against only a few of the human herpesviruses. Although most individuals display little if any clinical consequences from latent infection, events which alter immune function such as immunosuppressive therapy following solid organ transplantation are known to increase the risk of developing complications as a result of latent virus reactivation. This proposal will measure both the frequency and magnitude of viral shedding and genome loads in the blood from humans participating in activities that serve as ground based models of space flight conditions. Our initial goal is to develop sensitive quantitative competitive PCR- based assays (QC-PCR) to detect the herpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and the polyomaviruses SV40, BKV, and JCV. Using these assays we will establish baseline patterns of viral genome load in

  13. Targeting the latent reservoir to achieve functional HIV cure

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Daniele C.; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2016-01-01

    While highly active anti-retroviral therapy has greatly improved the lives of HIV-infected individuals, current treatments are unable to completely eradicate the virus. This is due to the presence of HIV latently infected cells which harbor transcriptionally silent HIV. Latent HIV does not replicate or produce viral proteins, thereby preventing efficient targeting by anti-retroviral drugs. Strategies to target the HIV latent reservoir include viral reactivation, enhancing host defense mechanisms, keeping latent HIV silent, and using gene therapy techniques to knock out or reactivate latent HIV. While research into each of these areas has yielded promising results, currently no one mechanism eradicates latent HIV. Instead, combinations of these approaches should be considered for a potential HIV functional cure. PMID:27303638

  14. Studies on the development of latent fingerprints by the method of solid-medium ninhydrin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruiqin; Lian, Jie

    2014-09-01

    A new series of fingerprint developing membrane were prepared using ninhydrin as the developing agent, and pressure-sensitive emulsifiers as the encapsulated chemicals. The type of emulsifier, plastic film, concentration of the developing agent, modifying ions and thickness of the membrane were studied in order to get the optimized fingerprint developing effect. The membrane can be successfully applied to both latent sweat fingerprints and blood fingerprint on many different surfaces. The sensitivity of the method toward the latent sweat fingerprint is 0.1 mg/L amino acid. The membrane can be applied to both porous and non-porous surfaces. Fingerprints that are difficult to develop on surfaces such as leather, glass and heat-sensitive paper using traditional chemical methods can be successfully developed with this membrane. PMID:25047220

  15. Studies on the development of latent fingerprints by the method of solid-medium ninhydrin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruiqin; Lian, Jie

    2014-09-01

    A new series of fingerprint developing membrane were prepared using ninhydrin as the developing agent, and pressure-sensitive emulsifiers as the encapsulated chemicals. The type of emulsifier, plastic film, concentration of the developing agent, modifying ions and thickness of the membrane were studied in order to get the optimized fingerprint developing effect. The membrane can be successfully applied to both latent sweat fingerprints and blood fingerprint on many different surfaces. The sensitivity of the method toward the latent sweat fingerprint is 0.1 mg/L amino acid. The membrane can be applied to both porous and non-porous surfaces. Fingerprints that are difficult to develop on surfaces such as leather, glass and heat-sensitive paper using traditional chemical methods can be successfully developed with this membrane.

  16. On updating problems in latent semantic indexing

    SciTech Connect

    Zha, H.; Simon, H.D.

    1999-10-01

    The authors develop new SVD-updating algorithms for three types of updating problems arising from latent semantic indexing (LSI) for information retrieval to deal with rapidly changing text document collections. They also provide theoretical justification for using a reduced-dimension representation of the original document collection in the updating process. Numerical experiments using several standard text document collections show that the new algorithms give higher (interpolated) average precisions that the existing algorithms, and the retrieval accuracy is comparable to that obtained using the complete document collection.

  17. On updating problems in latent semantic indexing

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, H.D.; Zha, H.

    1997-11-01

    The authors develop new SVD-updating algorithms for three types of updating problems arising from Latent Semantic Indexing (LSI) for information retrieval to deal with rapidly changing text document collections. They also provide theoretical justification for using a reduced-dimension representation of the original document collection in the updating process. Numerical experiments using several standard text document collections show that the new algorithms give higher (interpolated) average precisions than the existing algorithms and the retrieval accuracy is comparable to that obtained using the complete document collection.

  18. Bayesian Analysis of Multivariate Latent Curve Models with Nonlinear Longitudinal Latent Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Xin-Yuan; Lee, Sik-Yum; Hser, Yih-Ing

    2009-01-01

    In longitudinal studies, investigators often measure multiple variables at multiple time points and are interested in investigating individual differences in patterns of change on those variables. Furthermore, in behavioral, social, psychological, and medical research, investigators often deal with latent variables that cannot be observed directly…

  19. Dimensionality of the Latent Structure and Item Selection via Latent Class Multidimensional IRT Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartolucci, F.; Montanari, G. E.; Pandolfi, S.

    2012-01-01

    With reference to a questionnaire aimed at assessing the performance of Italian nursing homes on the basis of the health conditions of their patients, we investigate two relevant issues: dimensionality of the latent structure and discriminating power of the items composing the questionnaire. The approach is based on a multidimensional item…

  20. Functional networks underlying latent inhibition learning in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Puga, Frank; Barrett, Douglas W; Bastida, Christel C; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    2007-10-15

    The present study reports the first comprehensive map of brain networks underlying latent inhibition learning and the first application of structural equation modeling to cytochrome oxidase data. In latent inhibition, repeated exposure to a stimulus results in a latent form of learning that inhibits subsequent associations with that stimulus. As neuronal energy demands to form learned associations changes, so does the induction of the respiratory enzyme cytochrome oxidase. Therefore, cytochrome oxidase can be used as an endpoint metabolic marker of the effects of experience on regional brain metabolic capacity. Quantitative cytochrome oxidase histochemistry was used to map brain regions in mice trained on a tone-footshock fear conditioning paradigm with either tone preexposure (latent inhibition), conditioning only (acquisition), conditioning followed by tone alone (extinction), or no handling or conditioning (naive). The ventral cochlear nucleus, medial geniculate, CA1 hippocampus, and perirhinal cortex showed modified metabolic capacity due to latent inhibition. Structural equation modeling was used to determine the causal influences in an anatomical network of these regions and others thought to mediate latent inhibition, including the accumbens and entorhinal cortex. An uncoupling of ascending influences between auditory regions was observed in latent inhibition. There was also a reduced influence on the accumbens from the perirhinal cortex in both latent inhibition and extinction. The results suggest a specific network with a neural mechanism of latent inhibition that appears to involve sensory gating, as evidenced by modifications in metabolic capacity and effective connectivity between auditory regions and reduced perirhinal cortex influence on the accumbens.

  1. Energy-Storage Modules for Active Solar Heating and Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    34 page report describes a melting salt hydrate that stores 12 times as much heat as rocks and other heavy materials. Energy is stored mostly as latent heat; that is, heat that can be stored and recovered without any significant change in temperature. Report also describes development, evaluation and testing of permanently sealed modules containing salt hydrate mixture.

  2. A Framework for Reproducible Latent Fingerprint Enhancements

    PubMed Central

    Carasso, Alfred S.

    2014-01-01

    Photoshop processing1 of latent fingerprints is the preferred methodology among law enforcement forensic experts, but that appproach is not fully reproducible and may lead to questionable enhancements. Alternative, independent, fully reproducible enhancements, using IDL Histogram Equalization and IDL Adaptive Histogram Equalization, can produce better-defined ridge structures, along with considerable background information. Applying a systematic slow motion smoothing procedure to such IDL enhancements, based on the rapid FFT solution of a Lévy stable fractional diffusion equation, can attenuate background detail while preserving ridge information. The resulting smoothed latent print enhancements are comparable to, but distinct from, forensic Photoshop images suitable for input into automated fingerprint identification systems, (AFIS). In addition, this progressive smoothing procedure can be reexamined by displaying the suite of progressively smoother IDL images. That suite can be stored, providing an audit trail that allows monitoring for possible loss of useful information, in transit to the user-selected optimal image. Such independent and fully reproducible enhancements provide a valuable frame of reference that may be helpful in informing, complementing, and possibly validating the forensic Photoshop methodology. PMID:26601028

  3. A Framework for Reproducible Latent Fingerprint Enhancements.

    PubMed

    Carasso, Alfred S

    2014-01-01

    Photoshop processing of latent fingerprints is the preferred methodology among law enforcement forensic experts, but that appproach is not fully reproducible and may lead to questionable enhancements. Alternative, independent, fully reproducible enhancements, using IDL Histogram Equalization and IDL Adaptive Histogram Equalization, can produce better-defined ridge structures, along with considerable background information. Applying a systematic slow motion smoothing procedure to such IDL enhancements, based on the rapid FFT solution of a Lévy stable fractional diffusion equation, can attenuate background detail while preserving ridge information. The resulting smoothed latent print enhancements are comparable to, but distinct from, forensic Photoshop images suitable for input into automated fingerprint identification systems, (AFIS). In addition, this progressive smoothing procedure can be reexamined by displaying the suite of progressively smoother IDL images. That suite can be stored, providing an audit trail that allows monitoring for possible loss of useful information, in transit to the user-selected optimal image. Such independent and fully reproducible enhancements provide a valuable frame of reference that may be helpful in informing, complementing, and possibly validating the forensic Photoshop methodology.

  4. Visualization of latent fingerprint corrosion of brass.

    PubMed

    Bond, John W

    2009-09-01

    Visualization of latent fingerprint deposits on metals by enhancing the fingerprint-induced corrosion is now an established technique. However, the corrosion mechanism itself is less well understood. Here, we describe the apparatus constructed to measure the spatial variation (DeltaV) in applied potential (V) over the surface of brass disks corroded by latent fingerprint deposits. Measurement of DeltaV for potential of 1400 V has enabled visualization of fingerprint ridges and characteristics in terms of this potential difference with DeltaV typically of a few volts. This visualization is consistent with the formation of a Schottky barrier at the brass-corrosion product junction. Measurement of the work function of the corroded brass of up to 4.87 +/- 0.03 eV supports previous results that suggested that the corrosion product is composed of p-type copper oxides. A model for the galvanic corrosion of brass by ionic salts present in fingerprint deposits is proposed that is consistent with these experimental results.

  5. A Framework for Reproducible Latent Fingerprint Enhancements.

    PubMed

    Carasso, Alfred S

    2014-01-01

    Photoshop processing of latent fingerprints is the preferred methodology among law enforcement forensic experts, but that appproach is not fully reproducible and may lead to questionable enhancements. Alternative, independent, fully reproducible enhancements, using IDL Histogram Equalization and IDL Adaptive Histogram Equalization, can produce better-defined ridge structures, along with considerable background information. Applying a systematic slow motion smoothing procedure to such IDL enhancements, based on the rapid FFT solution of a Lévy stable fractional diffusion equation, can attenuate background detail while preserving ridge information. The resulting smoothed latent print enhancements are comparable to, but distinct from, forensic Photoshop images suitable for input into automated fingerprint identification systems, (AFIS). In addition, this progressive smoothing procedure can be reexamined by displaying the suite of progressively smoother IDL images. That suite can be stored, providing an audit trail that allows monitoring for possible loss of useful information, in transit to the user-selected optimal image. Such independent and fully reproducible enhancements provide a valuable frame of reference that may be helpful in informing, complementing, and possibly validating the forensic Photoshop methodology. PMID:26601028

  6. Heating the Ice-Covered Lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica - Decadal Trends in Heat Content, Ice Thickness, and Heat Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooseff, M. N.; Priscu, J. C.; Doran, P. T.; Chiuchiolo, A.; Obryk, M.

    2014-12-01

    Lakes integrate landscape processes and climate conditions. Most of the permanently ice-covered lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica are closed basin, receiving glacial melt water from streams for 10-12 weeks per year. Lake levels rise during the austral summer are balanced by sublimation of ice covers (year-round) and evaporation of open water moats (summer only). Vertical profiles of water temperature have been measured in three lakes in Taylor Valley since 1988. Up to 2002, lake levels were dropping, ice covers were thickening, and total heat contents were decreasing. These lakes have been gaining heat since the mid-2000s, at rates as high as 19.5x1014 cal/decade). Since 2002, lake levels have risen substantially (as much as 2.5 m), and ice covers have thinned (1.5 m on average). Analyses of lake ice thickness, meteorological conditions, and stream water heat loads indicate that the main source of heat to these lakes is from latent heat released when ice-covers form during the winter. An aditional source of heat to the lakes is water inflows from streams and direct glacieal melt. Mean lake temperatures in the past few years have stabilized or cooled, despite increases in lake level and total heat content, suggesting increased direct inflow of meltwater from glaciers. These results indicate that McMurdo Dry Valley lakes are sensitive indicators of climate processes in this polar desert landscape and demonstrate the importance of long-term data sets when addressing the effects of climate on ecosystem processes.

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Sester, Martina; Zhang, Wenhong; Lange, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    In clinical practice, latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is defined by the presence of an M. tuberculosis-specific immune response in the absence of active tuberculosis. Targeted testing of individuals from risk groups with the tuberculin skin test or an interferon-γ release assay is currently the best method to identify those with the highest risk for progression to tuberculosis. Positive predictive values of the immunodiagnostic tests are substantially influenced by the type of test, the age of the person who is tested, the prevalence of tuberculosis in the society and the risk group to which the person belongs. As a general rule, testing should only be offered when preventive chemotherapy will be accepted in the case of a positive test result. Preventive chemotherapy can effectively protect individuals at risk from the development of tuberculosis, although at least 3 months of combination therapy or up to 9 months of monotherapy are required, and overall acceptance rate is low. Improvements of the current generation of immunodiagnostic tests could substantially lower the number of individuals that need to be treated to prevent a case of tuberculosis. If shorter treatment regimens were equally effective than those currently recommended, acceptance of preventive chemotherapy could be much improved.

  8. Modeling HIV persistence, the latent reservoir, and viral blips

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Libin; Perelson, Alan S.

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 eradication from infected individuals has not been achieved with the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for a prolonged period of time. The cellular reservoir for HIV-1 in resting memory CD4+ T cells remains a major obstacle to viral elimination. The reservoir does not decay significantly over long periods of time but is able to release replication-competent HIV-1 upon cell activation. Residual ongoing viral replication may likely occur in many patients because low levels of virus can be detected in plasma by sensitive assays and transient episodes of viremia, or HIV-1 blips, are often observed in patients even with successful viral suppression for many years. Here we review our current knowledge of the factors contributing to viral persistence, the latent reservoir, and blips, and mathematical models developed to explore them and their relationships. We show how mathematical modeling can help improve our understanding of HIV-1 dynamics in patients on HAART and of the quantitative events underlying HIV-1 latency, reservoir stability, low-level viremic persistence, and emergence of intermittent viral blips. We also discuss treatment implications related to these studies. PMID:19539630

  9. Recombination enhances HIV-1 envelope diversity by facilitating the survival of latent genomic fragments in the plasma virus population

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Immonen, Taina T.; Conway, Jessica M.; Romero-Severson, Ethan O.; Perelson, Alan S.; Leitner, Thomas; Kouyos, Roger Dimitri

    2015-12-22

    HIV-1 is subject to immune pressure exerted by the host, giving variants that escape the immune response an advantage. Virus released from activated latent cells competes against variants that have continually evolved and adapted to host immune pressure. Nevertheless, there is increasing evidence that virus displaying a signal of latency survives in patient plasma despite having reduced fitness due to long-term immune memory. We investigated the survival of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments by simulating within-host HIV-1 sequence evolution and the cycling of viral lineages in and out of the latent reservoir. Our model incorporates a detailed mutation processmore » including nucleotide substitution, recombination, latent reservoir dynamics, diversifying selection pressure driven by the immune response, and purifying selection pressure asserted by deleterious mutations. We evaluated the ability of our model to capture sequence evolution in vivo by comparing our simulated sequences to HIV-1 envelope sequence data from 16 HIV-infected untreated patients. Empirical sequence divergence and diversity measures were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those of our simulated HIV-1 populations, suggesting that our model invokes realistic trends of HIV-1 genetic evolution. Moreover, reconstructed phylogenies of simulated and patient HIV-1 populations showed similar topological structures. Our simulation results suggest that recombination is a key mechanism facilitating the persistence of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments in the productively infected cell population. Recombination increased the survival probability of latent virus forms approximately 13-fold. Prevalence of virus with latent fragments in productively infected cells was observed in only 2% of simulations when we ignored recombination, while the proportion increased to 27% of simulations when we allowed recombination. We also found that the selection pressures exerted by different

  10. Two-Pipe Heat-Transfer Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Device like heat pipe transports heat over long distance with negligible loss in temperature, though with considerably smaller total weight. Uses no pumps or other mechanical means to move working fluid: Instead converts part of available thermal energy to kinetic energy upon vaporization. Vapor carries thermal energy in form of latent heat of vaporization. Delivers thermal energy with drop in temperature of only fraction of degree from source sink.

  11. Immunocytochemical localization of latent transforming growth factor-beta1 activation by stimulated macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chong, H.; Vodovotz, Y.; Cox, G. W.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta) is secreted in a latent form consisting of mature TGF-beta noncovalently associated with its amino-terminal propeptide, which is called latency associated peptide (LAP). Biological activity depends upon the release of TGF-beta from the latent complex following extracellular activation, which appears to be the key regulatory mechanism controlling TGF-beta action. We have identified two events associated with latent TGF-beta (LTGF-beta) activation in vivo: increased immunoreactivity of certain antibodies that specifically detect TGF-beta concomitant with decreased immunoreactivity of antibodies to LAP. Macrophages stimulated in vitro with interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide reportedly activate LTGF-beta via cell membrane-bound protease activity. We show through dual immunostaining of paraformaldehyde-fixed macrophages that such physiological TGF-beta activation is accompanied by a loss of LAP immunoreactivity with concomitant revelation of TGF-beta epitopes. The induction of TGF-beta immunoreactivity colocalized with immunoreactive betaglycan/RIII in activated macrophages, suggesting that LTGF-beta activation occurs on the cell surface. Confocal microscopy of metabolically active macrophages incubated with antibodies to TGF-beta and betaglycan/RIII prior to fixation supported the localization of activation to the cell surface. The ability to specifically detect and localize LTGF-beta activation provides an important tool for studies of its regulation.

  12. A Bayesian Semiparametric Latent Variable Model for Mixed Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahrmeir, Ludwig; Raach, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a latent variable model (LVM) for mixed ordinal and continuous responses, where covariate effects on the continuous latent variables are modelled through a flexible semiparametric Gaussian regression model. We extend existing LVMs with the usual linear covariate effects by including nonparametric components for nonlinear…

  13. A Latent Class Approach to Estimating Test-Score Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Ark, L. Andries; van der Palm, Daniel W.; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a general framework for single-administration reliability methods, such as Cronbach's alpha, Guttman's lambda-2, and method MS. This general framework was used to derive a new approach to estimating test-score reliability by means of the unrestricted latent class model. This new approach is the latent class reliability…

  14. Nonlinear Latent Curve Models for Multivariate Longitudinal Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blozis, Shelley A.; Conger, Katherine J.; Harring, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    Latent curve models have become a useful approach to analyzing longitudinal data, due in part to their allowance of and emphasis on individual differences in features that describe change. Common applications of latent curve models in developmental studies rely on polynomial functions, such as linear or quadratic functions. Although useful for…

  15. An Importance Sampling EM Algorithm for Latent Regression Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Davier, Matthias; Sinharay, Sandip

    2007-01-01

    Reporting methods used in large-scale assessments such as the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) rely on latent regression models. To fit the latent regression model using the maximum likelihood estimation technique, multivariate integrals must be evaluated. In the computer program MGROUP used by the Educational Testing Service for…

  16. Higher-Order Item Response Models for Hierarchical Latent Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Hung-Yu; Wang, Wen-Chung; Chen, Po-Hsi; Su, Chi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Many latent traits in the human sciences have a hierarchical structure. This study aimed to develop a new class of higher order item response theory models for hierarchical latent traits that are flexible in accommodating both dichotomous and polytomous items, to estimate both item and person parameters jointly, to allow users to specify…

  17. Modeling Heterogeneity of Latent Growth Depending on Initial Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Andreas G.; Muthen, Bengt O.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, a heterogeneous latent growth curve model for modeling heterogeneity of growth rates is proposed. The suggested model is an extension of a conventional growth curve model and a complementary tool to mixed growth modeling. It allows the modeling of heterogeneity of growth rates as a continuous function of latent initial status and…

  18. A Simplified Estimation of Latent State--Trait Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagemann, Dirk; Meyerhoff, David

    2008-01-01

    The latent state-trait (LST) theory is an extension of the classical test theory that allows one to decompose a test score into a true trait, a true state residual, and an error component. For practical applications, the variances of these latent variables may be estimated with standard methods of structural equation modeling (SEM). These…

  19. Nonlinear and Quasi-Simplex Patterns in Latent Growth Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianconcini, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    In the SEM literature, simplex and latent growth models have always been considered competing approaches for the analysis of longitudinal data, even if they are strongly connected and both of specific importance. General dynamic models, which simultaneously estimate autoregressive structures and latent curves, have been recently proposed in the…

  20. Latent Structure of Motor Abilities in Pre-School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vatroslav, Horvat

    2011-01-01

    The theoretical and practical knowledge which have so far been acquired through work with pre-school children pointed to the conclusion that the structures of the latent dimensions of the motor abilities differ greatly from such a structure, in pre-school children and adults alike. Establishing the latent structure of the motor abilities in…

  1. Transforming Selected Concepts into Dimensions in Latent Semantic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmos, Ricardo; Jorge-Botana, Guillermo; León, José Antonio; Escudero, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a new approach for transforming the latent representation derived from a Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) space into one where dimensions have nonlatent meanings. These meanings are based on lexical descriptors, which are selected by the LSA user. The authors present three analyses that provide examples of the utility of this…

  2. A Review of the Latent and Manifest Benefits (LAMB) Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Juanita; Waters, Lea

    2012-01-01

    The latent and manifest benefits (LAMB) scale (Muller, Creed, Waters & Machin, 2005) was designed to measure the latent and manifest benefits of employment and provide a single scale to test Jahoda's (1981) and Fryer's (1986) theories of unemployment. Since its publication in 2005 there have been 13 studies that have used the scale with 5692…

  3. On the Utilization of Sample Weights in Latent Variable Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, David; Ferguson, Aaron J.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the use of sample weights in latent variable models in the case where a simple random sample is drawn from a population containing a mixture of strata through a bootstrap simulation study. Results show that ignoring weights can lead to serious bias in latent variable model parameters and reveal the advantages of using sample weights. (SLD)

  4. Use of Latent Profile Analysis in Studies of Gifted Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mammadov, Sakhavat; Ward, Thomas J.; Cross, Jennifer Riedl; Cross, Tracy L.

    2016-01-01

    To date, in gifted education and related fields various conventional factor analytic and clustering techniques have been used extensively for investigation of the underlying structure of data. Latent profile analysis is a relatively new method in the field. In this article, we provide an introduction to latent profile analysis for gifted education…

  5. Evaluating Intercept-Slope Interactions in Latent Growth Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Ronghua; Willson, Victor L.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of misspecifying intercept-covariate interactions in a 4 time-point latent growth model were the focus of this investigation. The investigation was motivated by school growth studies in which students' entry-level skills may affect their rate of growth. We studied the latent interaction of intercept and a covariate in predicting growth…

  6. The Latent Variable Approach as Applied to Transitive Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouwmeester, Samantha; Vermunt, Jeroen K.; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the limitations of hypothesis testing using (quasi-) experiments in the study of cognitive development and suggest latent variable modeling as a viable alternative to experimentation. Latent variable models allow testing a theory as a whole, incorporating individual differences with respect to developmental processes or abilities in the…

  7. Gene Variants Associated with Antisocial Behaviour: A Latent Variable Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Mary Jane; Lin, Haiqun; Fernandez, Thomas V.; Lee, Maria; Yrigollen, Carolyn M.; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Katsovich, Liliya; Olds, David L.; Grigorenko, Elena L.; Leckman, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine if a latent variable approach might be useful in identifying shared variance across genetic risk alleles that is associated with antisocial behaviour at age 15 years. Methods: Using a conventional latent variable approach, we derived an antisocial phenotype in 328 adolescents utilizing data from a…

  8. Spurious Latent Classes in the Mixture Rasch Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexeev, Natalia; Templin, Jonathan; Cohen, Allan S.

    2011-01-01

    Mixture Rasch models have been used to study a number of psychometric issues such as goodness of fit, response strategy differences, strategy shifts, and multidimensionality. Although these models offer the potential for improving understanding of the latent variables being measured, under some conditions overextraction of latent classes may…

  9. Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI): a real host defence or a permanent threat?

    PubMed

    Sanduzzi, Alessandro; Ponticiello, Antonio; Bocchino, Marialuisa; Perna, Francesco; Vatrella, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    Screening of latent infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (LTBI) and treatment of positive subjects is the key point in the prevention of TB; such a strategy should be performed mainly among individuals with risk of progression. Progression from LTBI to active TB is highest both in recent contacts of patients with active TB, and in immunocompromised subjects. Therefore, LTBI could either be considered a permanent host defence or, seen from the opposite point of view, it could represent a long-lasting threat if the efficiency of the immune system declines over a lifetime. Interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) show better sensitivity and specificity than the Mantoux test. PMID:27668896

  10. A latent classification of male batterers.

    PubMed

    Mauricio, Anne M; Lopez, Frederick G

    2009-01-01

    Regression latent class analysis was used to identify batterer subgroups with distinct violence patterns and to examine associations between class membership and adult attachment orientations as well as antisocial and borderline personality disorders. Results supported three batterer subgroups, with classes varying on frequency and severity of violence. The high-level violence class represented 40% of batterers, and both anxious and avoidant adult attachment orientations as well as borderline personality characteristics predicted membership in this class. The moderate-level violence class represented 35% of the batterers, and adult anxious attachment orientation was associated with membership in this class. The low-level violence class represented 25% of the sample and reported significantly less violence than other classes. Neither adult attachment orientations nor personality disorders predicted membership in this class.

  11. Diagnosis of latent forms of labyrinthine affections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaslilyeva, V. P.

    1980-01-01

    Features and significance of individual vestibular symptoms for the diagnosis of latent labyrinthitis and limited forms of labyrinthine affections offering considerable difficulties are discussed. Vestibular symptoms are indistinct. In case of the negative fistular symptom the greatest significance is acquired by the study of posture nystagmus according to the results of electronystagmograms, changes of tonic reactions and statics, as well as data of experimental vestibular tests. The necessity of evaluation of all the vestibular symptoms from the point of view of their vector characteristics and in a complex of evidence obtained by otoneurological examination of the patient is emphasized. Delicate topic and differential diagnosis of vestibular disturbances is of great importance and significance in the choice of the conservative or surgical method of treatment.

  12. Latent laser-induced graphitization of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, V. V.; Gololobov, V. M.; Konov, V. I.

    2016-03-01

    Basic features and mechanism of femtosecond laser graphitization of diamond surface were studied in the two regimes of irradiation: (1) by an intensive (>10 J/cm2) single shot and (2) by a train of pulses with near-threshold intensity (~1-10 J/cm2). Special attention was paid to the so-called accumulative regime, when multipulse laser treatment results in prolonged delay of an appearance of crystal modification of the crystal. The light absorption mechanisms dominating in each regime are discussed. The experiments with fundamental (800 nm), second (400 nm) and third (266 nm) harmonics of Ti-sapphire laser (100 fs) have revealed that thermally stimulated processes play an essential role in latent diamond graphitization.

  13. Teacher’s Corner: Latent Curve Models and Latent Change Score Models Estimated in R

    PubMed Central

    Ghisletta, Paolo; McArdle, John J.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the use of the Latent Curve Model (LCM) among researchers in social sciences has increased noticeably, probably thanks to contemporary software developments and to the availability of specialized literature. Extensions of the LCM, like the the Latent Change Score Model (LCSM), have also increased in popularity. At the same time, the R statistical language and environment, which is open source and runs on several operating systems, is becoming a leading software for applied statistics. We show how to estimate both the LCM and LCSM with the sem, lavaan, and OpenMx packages of the R software. We also illustrate how to read in, summarize, and plot data prior to analyses. Examples are provided on data previously illustrated by Ferrer, Hamagami, & McArdle, 2004. The data and all scripts used here are available on the first author’s website. PMID:25505366

  14. ENDOGENOUS ANALGESIA, DEPENDENCE, AND LATENT PAIN SENSITIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bradley K; Corder, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous activation of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides relief from acute pain. Recent studies have established that tissue inflammation produces latent pain sensitization (LS) that is masked by spinal MOR signaling for months, even after complete recovery from injury and re-establishment of normal pain thresholds. Disruption with MOR inverse agonists reinstates pain and precipitates cellular, somatic and aversive signs of physical withdrawal; this phenomenon requires N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated activation of calcium-sensitive adenylyl cyclase type 1 (AC1). In this review, we present a new conceptual model of the transition from acute to chronic pain, based on the delicate balance between LS and endogenous analgesia that develops after painful tissue injury. First, injury activates pain pathways. Second, the spinal cord establishes MOR constitutive activity (MORCA) as it attempts to control pain. Third, over time, the body becomes dependent on MORCA, which paradoxically sensitizes pain pathways. Stress or injury escalates opposing inhibitory and excitatory influences on nociceptive processing as a pathological consequence of increased endogenous opioid tone. Pain begets MORCA begets pain vulnerability in a vicious cycle. The final result is a silent insidious state characterized by the escalation of two opposing excitatory and inhibitory influences on pain transmission: LS mediated by AC1 (which maintains accelerator), and pain inhibition mediated by MORCA (which maintains the brake). This raises the prospect that opposing homeostatic interactions between MORCA analgesia and latent NMDAR–AC1-mediated pain sensitization create a lasting vulnerability to develop chronic pain. Thus, chronic pain syndromes may result from a failure in constitutive signaling of spinal MORs and a loss of endogenous analgesic control. An overarching long-term therapeutic goal of future research is to alleviate chronic pain by either: a) facilitating endogenous opioid

  15. Latent Herpes Viral Reactivation in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Stowe, R.

    2008-01-01

    Latent viruses are ubiquitous and reactivate during stressful periods with and without symptoms. Latent herpes virus reactivation is used as a tool to predict changes in the immune status in astronauts and to evaluate associated health risks. Methods: Viral DNA was detected by real time polymerase chain reaction in saliva and urine from astronauts before, during and after short and long-duration space flights. Results and Discussion: EpsteinBarr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivated, and viral DNA was shed in saliva (EBV and VZV) or urine (CMV). EBV levels in saliva during flight were 10fold higher than baseline levels. Elevations in EBV specific CD8+ T-cells, viral antibody titers, and specific cytokines were consistent with viral reactivation. Intracellular levels of cytokines were reduced in EBVspecific Tcells. CMV, rarely present in urine of healthy individuals, was shed in urine of 27% of astronauts during all phases of spaceflight. VZV, not found in saliva of asymptomatic individuals, was found in saliva of 50% of astronauts during spaceflight and 35 days after flight. VZV recovered from astronaut saliva was found to be live, infectious virus. DNA sequencing demonstrated that the VZV recovered from astronauts was from the common European strain of VZV. Elevation of stress hormones accompanied viral reactivation indicating involvement of the hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal and sympathetic adrenal-medullary axes in the mechanism of viral reactivation in astronauts. A study of 53 shingles patients found that all shingles patients shed VZV DNA in their saliva and the VZV levels correlated with the severity of the disease. Lower VZV levels in shingles patients were similar to those observed in astronauts. We proposed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective assay to detect VZV in saliva of patients with suspected shingles. Early detection of VZV infection allows early medical intervention.

  16. Latent Virus Reactivation in Space Shuttle Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Crucian, B. E.; Stowe, R. P.; Sams, C.; Castro, V. A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2011-01-01

    Latent virus reactivation was measured in 17 astronauts (16 male and 1 female) before, during, and after short-duration Space Shuttle missions. Blood, urine, and saliva samples were collected 2-4 months before launch, 10 days before launch (L-10), 2-3 hours after landing (R+0), 3 days after landing (R+14), and 120 days after landing (R+120). Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA was measured in these samples by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) DNA was measured in the 381 saliva samples and cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in the 66 urine samples collected from these subjects. Fourteen astronauts shed EBV DNA in 21% of their saliva samples before, during, and after flight, and 7 astronauts shed VZV in 7.4% of their samples during and after flight. It was interesting that shedding of both EBV and VZV increased during the flight phase relative to before or after flight. In the case of CMV, 32% of urine samples from 8 subjects contained DNA of this virus. In normal healthy control subjects, EBV shedding was found in 3% and VZV and CMV were found in less than 1% of the samples. The circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol measured before, during, and after space flight did not show any significant difference between flight phases. These data show that increased reactivation of latent herpes viruses may be associated with decreased immune system function, which has been reported in earlier studies as well as in these same subjects (data not reported here).

  17. Laser interrogation of latent vehicle registration number

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, R.E. |; Pelkey, G.E.; Grant, P.; Whipple, R.E.; Andresen, B.D.

    1994-09-01

    A recent investigation involved automobile registration numbers as important evidentiary specimens. In California, as in most states, small, thin metallic decals are issued to owners of vehicles each year as the registration is renewed. The decals are applied directly to the license plate of the vehicle and typically on top of the previous year`s expired decal. To afford some degree of security, the individual registration decals have been designed to tear easily; they cannot be separated from each other, but can be carefully removed intact from the metal license plate by using a razor blade. In September 1993, the City of Livermore Police Department obtained a blue 1993 California decal that had been placed over an orange 1992 decal. The two decals were being investigated as possible evidence in a case involving vehicle registration fraud. To confirm the suspicion and implicate a suspect, the department needed to known the registration number on the bottom (completely covered) 1992 decal. The authors attempted to use intense and directed light to interrogate the colored stickers. Optical illumination using a filtered white-light source partially identified the latent number. However, the most successful technique used a tunable dye laser pumped by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. By selectively tuning the wavelength and intensity of the dye laser, backlit illumination of the decals permitted visualization of the underlying registration number through the surface of the top sticker. With optimally-tuned wavelength and intensity, 100% accuracy was obtained in identifying the sequence of latent characters. The advantage of optical techniques is their completely nondestructive nature, thus preserving the evidence for further interrogation or courtroom presentation.

  18. Using Data Augmentation to Obtain Standard Errors and Conduct Hypothesis Tests in Latent Class and Latent Transition Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanza, Stephanie T.; Collins, Linda M.; Schafer, Joseph L.; Flaherty, Brian P.

    2005-01-01

    Latent class analysis (LCA) provides a means of identifying a mixture of subgroups in a population measured by multiple categorical indicators. Latent transition analysis (LTA) is a type of LCA that facilitates addressing research questions concerning stage-sequential change over time in longitudinal data. Both approaches have been used with…

  19. A Bayesian Model for the Estimation of Latent Interaction and Quadratic Effects When Latent Variables Are Non-Normally Distributed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelava, Augustin; Nagengast, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Structural equation models with interaction and quadratic effects have become a standard tool for testing nonlinear hypotheses in the social sciences. Most of the current approaches assume normally distributed latent predictor variables. In this article, we present a Bayesian model for the estimation of latent nonlinear effects when the latent…

  20. Development, Testing, and Failure Mechanisms of a Replicative Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Hansen, Scott; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2010-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments such as Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. One advantage that PCM's have over evaporators in this scenario is that they do not use a consumable. Wax PCM units have been baselined for the Orion thermal control system and also provide risk mitigation for the Altair Lander. However, the use of water as a PCM has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. An ice PCM heat exchanger that replicates the thermal energy storage capacity of an existing wax PCM unit was fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion are investigated. This paper presents the results to date of this investigation. Nomenclature