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Sample records for latent heat release

  1. Satellite-observed latent heat release in a tropical cyclone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, R. F.; Rodgers, E. B.

    1976-01-01

    Data from the Nimbus 5 electrically scanning microwave radiometer (ESMR) are used to make calculations of the latent heat release (L.H.R.) and the distribution of rainfall rate in a tropical cyclone as it grows from a tropical disturbance to a typhoon. The L.H.R. (calculated over a circular area of 4 deg latitude radius) increases during the development and intensification of the storm from a magnitude of 2.7 X 10 to the 21st power ergs/s (in the disturbance stage) to 8.8 X 10 to the 21st power ergs (typhoon stage). The latter value corresponds to a mean rainfall rate of 2.0 mm hr/s. The more intense the cyclone and the greater the L.H.R., the greater the percentage contribution of the larger rainfall rates to the L.H.R. In the disturbance stage the percentage contribution of rainfall rates less than or minus 6 mm hr/s is typically 8%; for the typhoon stage, the value is 38%. The distribution of rainfall rate as a function of radial distance from the center indicates that as the cyclone intensifies, the higher rainfall rates tend to concentrate toward the center of the circulation.

  2. Retrieved Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Using TRMM Rainfall Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Olson, W. S.; Meneghini, R.; Yang, S.; Simpson, J.; Kummerow, C.; Smith, E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper represents the first attempt to use TRMM rainfall information to estimate the four dimensional latent heating structure over the global tropics for February 1998. The mean latent heating profiles over six oceanic regions (TOGA COARE IFA, Central Pacific, S. Pacific Convergence Zone, East Pacific, Indian Ocean and Atlantic Ocean) and three continental regions (S. America, Central Africa and Australia) are estimated and studied. The heating profiles obtained from the results of diagnostic budget studies over a broad range of geographic locations are used to provide comparisons and indirect validation for the heating algorithm estimated heating profiles. Three different latent heating algorithms, the Goddard Convective-Stratiform (CSH) heating, the Goddard Profiling (GPROF) heating, and the Hydrometeor heating (HH) are used and their results are intercompared. The horizontal distribution or patterns of latent heat release from the three different heating retrieval methods are quite similar. They all can identify the areas of major convective activity (i.e., a well defined ITCZ in the Pacific, a distinct SPCZ) in the global tropics. The magnitude of their estimated latent heating release is also not in bad agreement with each other and with those determined from diagnostic budget studies. However, the major difference among these three heating retrieval algorithms is the altitude of the maximum heating level. The CSH algorithm estimated heating profiles only show one maximum heating level, and the level varies between convective activity from various geographic locations. These features are in good agreement with diagnostic budget studies. By contrast, two maximum heating levels were found using the GPROF heating and HH algorithms. The latent heating profiles estimated from all three methods can not show cooling between active convective events. We also examined the impact of different TMI (Multi-channel Passive Microwave Sensor) and PR (Precipitation Radar

  3. Effect of Melt Superheating Treatment on the Latent Heat Release of Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Junfeng; Dang, Bo; Fan, Dandan; Jian, Zengyun

    2017-03-01

    The accuracy of the baseline evaluation is of importance for calculating the transition enthalpy such as the latent heat of the crystallization. This study demonstrates the modified method of the equivalent non-latent heat baseline, by which the transition enthalpy can be measured accurately according to the transition peak in differential scanning calorimetric curve. With this method, the effect of melt superheating treatment time on the latent heat release upon the solidification of tin is investigated. The results show that the latent heat increases by increasing the treatment time, and is close to a constant when the treatment time is large enough, indicating the homogeneous system. And then, a simple model is established to describe the changes of the crystallization latent heat with the treatment time, which is confirmed by the experimental data of Sn.

  4. Effect of Melt Superheating Treatment on the Latent Heat Release of Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Junfeng; Dang, Bo; Fan, Dandan; Jian, Zengyun

    2016-12-01

    The accuracy of the baseline evaluation is of importance for calculating the transition enthalpy such as the latent heat of the crystallization. This study demonstrates the modified method of the equivalent non-latent heat baseline, by which the transition enthalpy can be measured accurately according to the transition peak in differential scanning calorimetric curve. With this method, the effect of melt superheating treatment time on the latent heat release upon the solidification of tin is investigated. The results show that the latent heat increases by increasing the treatment time, and is close to a constant when the treatment time is large enough, indicating the homogeneous system. And then, a simple model is established to describe the changes of the crystallization latent heat with the treatment time, which is confirmed by the experimental data of Sn.

  5. The role of latent heat release in baroclinic waves - Without beta-effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, C.-M.; Fichtl, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    An attempt is made to understand the role of latent heat release in the development of baroclinic waves by developing the analytical theory of two-level, quasi-geostrophic baroclinic waves proposed by Phillips (1954) without beta effect, for the case of an atmosphere initially saturated with water vapor and subject to pseudo-adiabatic lifting and dry adiabatic subsistence. The saturated atmosphere condition precludes consideration of conditional convective instability. A consideration of disturbances at each level which depends only on the zonal coordinates and time results in a set of differential equations which is linear in all respects except for the latent heating term in the thermodynamic energy equation. A fundamental nonlinearity is present in this model which is due to heating via the release of latent heat when vertical motion is upward.

  6. The effects of latent heat release on the waves with Ekman pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of the effects of the latent heat release on the waves with both upper and lower boundary frictional effects is investigated. The influence of the vertical shear of the basic wind in these models will be investigated. These investigations will shed some light on the method of solution to the problem of including the effect of Ekman pumping on the moist baroclinic waves in the model of Tang and Fichtl.

  7. Cold Heat Release Characteristics of Solidified Oil Droplet-Water Solution Latent Heat Emulsion by Air Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Morita, Shin-Ichi

    The present work investigates the cold heat-release characteristics of the solidified oil droplets (tetradecane, C14H30, freezing point 278.9 K)/water solution emulsion as a latent heat-storage material having a low melting point. An air bubbles-emulsion direct-contact heat exchange method is selected for the cold heat-results from the solidified oil droplet-emulsion layer. This type of direct-contact method results in the high thermal efficiency. The diameter of air bubbles in the emulsion increases as compared with that in the pure water. The air bubbles blown from a nozzle show a strong mixing behavior during rising in the emulsion. The temperature effectiveness, the sensible heat release time and the latent heat release time have been measured as experimental parameters. The useful nondimensional emulsion level equations for these parameters have been derived in terms of the nondimensional emalsion level expressed the emulsion layer dimensions, Reynolds number for air flow, Stefan number and heat capacity ratio.

  8. Latent Heat Release and Mass Loss in Baroclinic Waves on Early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabato, J. S.; Pierrehumbert, R. T.

    2002-12-01

    Interpretation of ancient fluvial features on the surface of Mars requires a better understanding of the Early Mars climate, and baroclinic eddies (or "storms") would be a key feature of the midlatitude atmosphere. Such eddies would affect the climate by transporting heat, transporting CO2, stimulating CO2 precipitation, and modulating cloud formation. We present some preliminary results on baroclinic instability in a hypothetical dense CO2 Early Mars atmosphere, focusing on the novel features arising from this situation. These features include the latent heat release in a deep condensing layer (making for a particularly extreme form of moist baroclinic instability), and pressure alterations due to significant loss of mass in precipitating system. The stability of zonal flows in a two dimensional (x-z) quasigeostrophic model is examined. The model assumes a saturated "cloud" layer above about 2 scale heights (28 km). The zonal mean zonal wind is jet-like in the vertical with the profile /line{u}=αze-(z)/(H). The zonal mean temperature at the surface is constant (280K) and decays adiabatically with height until the saturation pressure is reached. In the condensing layer, the basic state temperature is given by the moist adiabat, Ts=(-a)/(b-ln (p/po). Normal mode calculations are performed in the absence of condensation. Initial value calculations are also performed in which the effect of latent heat release and mass loss accompanying condensation is included. Growth rates for both the normal mode and initial value problem are found as a function of the zonal scale (wavenumber). Various eddy characteristics are discussed.

  9. Latent Heating from TRMM Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, W.; Takayabu, Y. N.; Shige, S.; Lang, S. E.; Olson, W. S.

    2012-12-01

    Rainfall production is a fundamental process within the Earth's hydrological cycle because it represents both a principal forcing term in surface water budgets, and its energetics corollary, latent heating, is the principal source of atmospheric diabatic heating. Latent heat release itself is a consequence of phase changes between the vapor, liquid, and frozen states of water. The properties of the vertical distribution of latent heat release modulate large-scale meridional and zonal circulations within the Tropics - as well as modify the energetic efficiencies of mid-latitude weather systems. This paper highlights the retrieval of latent heat release from satellite measurements generated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite observatory, which was launched in November 1997 as a joint American-Japanese space endeavor. Since then, TRMM measurements have been providing an accurate four-dimensional account of rainfall over the global Tropics and sub-tropics - information which can be used to estimate the space-time structure of latent heating across the Earth's low latitudes. A set of algorithm methodologies has been developed to estimate latent heating based on rain rate profile retrievals obtained from TRMM measurements. These algorithms are briefly described followed by a discussion of the foremost latent heating products that can be generated from them. The investigation then provides an overview of how TRMM-derived latent heating information is currently being used in conjunction with global weather and climate models, concluding with remarks intended to stimulate further research on latent heating retrieval from satellites.

  10. Latent Heating from TRMM Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Smith, E. A.; Adler, R.; Haddad, Z.; Hou, A.; Iguchi, T.; Kakar, R.; Krishnamurti, T.; Kummerow, C.; Lang, S.

    2004-01-01

    Rainfall production is the fundamental variable within the Earth's hydrological cycle because it is both the principal forcing term in surface water budgets and its energetics corollary, latent heating, is the principal source of atmospheric diabatic heating. Latent heat release itself is a consequence of phase changes between the vapor, liquid, and frozen states of water. The properties of the vertical distribution of latent heat release modulate large-scale meridional and zonal circulations within the tropics - as well as modifying the energetic efficiencies of midlatitude weather systems. This paper focuses on the retrieval of latent heat release from satellite measurements generated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite observatory, which was launched in November 1997 as a joint American-Japanese space endeavor. Since then, TRMM measurements have been providing an accurate four-dimensional account of rainfall over the global tropics and sub-tropics, information which can be used to estimate the space-time structure of latent heating across the Earth's low latitudes. The paper examines how the observed TRMM distribution of rainfall has advanced an understanding of the global water and energy cycle and its consequent relationship to the atmospheric general circulation and climate via latent heat release. A set of algorithm methodologies that are being used to estimate latent heating based on rain rate retrievals from the TRMM observations are described. The characteristics of these algorithms and the latent heating products that can be generated from them are also described, along with validation analyses of the heating products themselves. Finally, the investigation provides an overview of how TRMM-derived latent heating information is currently being used in conjunction with global weather and climate models, concluding with remarks intended to stimulate further research on latent heating retrieval from satellites.

  11. The application of satellite data to study the effects of latent heat release on cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, J. H. E.

    1984-01-01

    Generalized energetics were studied for nonlinear inviscid symmetric instability (SI). It was found that the linear theory fails to predict the stability in certain cases where the basic state is transitional between stability and instability. The initial growth of the SI perturbations can be fairly well approximated by linear theory, but the long time nonlinear evaluations will be bonded energetically if the SI region is finite. However, a further extension of the energetics to conditional symmetric instability (CSI) shows that the nonlinear evolution of circulation will energetically depend much more on the precipitation in a complicated way. By treating the latent heat as a source which is implicitly related to the motion field, the existence, uniqueness and stability of steady viscous (CSI) circulations are studied. Viscous CSI circulations are proved to be unique and asymptotically stable when the heat sources are weak and less sensitive to the motion perturbations. By considering the fact that moist updrafts are narrow and using eddy viscosity of 0(1,000 m squared/s) the stability criterion suggests that some frontal rainbands were probably dominated by the CSI mechanism even in their mature quasi-steady stage.

  12. Re-examining the roles of surface heat flux and latent heat release in a "hurricane-like" polar low over the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstad, Erik W.; Bracegirdle, Thomas J.; Zahn, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Polar lows are intense mesoscale cyclones that occur at high latitudes in both hemispheres during winter. Their sometimes evidently convective nature, fueled by strong surface fluxes and with cloud-free centers, have led to some polar lows being referred to as "arctic hurricanes." Idealized studies have shown that intensification by hurricane development mechanisms is theoretically possible in polar winter atmospheres, but the lack of observations and realistic simulations of actual polar lows have made it difficult to ascertain if this occurs in reality. Here the roles of surface heat fluxes and latent heat release in the development of a Barents Sea polar low, which in its cloud structures showed some similarities to hurricanes, are studied with an ensemble of sensitivity experiments, where latent heating and/or surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat were switched off before the polar low peaked in intensity. To ensure that the polar lows in the sensitivity runs did not track too far away from the actual environmental conditions, a technique known as spectral nudging was applied. This was shown to be crucial for enabling comparisons between the different model runs. The results presented here show that (1) no intensification occurred during the mature, postbaroclinic stage of the simulated polar low; (2) surface heat fluxes, i.e., air-sea interaction, were crucial processes both in order to attain the polar low's peak intensity during the baroclinic stage and to maintain its strength in the mature stage; and (3) latent heat release played a less important role than surface fluxes in both stages.

  13. Latent Heating from TRMM Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Smith, E.; Olson, W.

    2005-01-01

    Rainfall production is a fundamental process within the Earth;s hydrological cycle because it represents both a principal forcing term in surface water budgets, and its energetics corollary, latent heating, is the principal source of atmospheric diabatic heating. Latent heat release itself is a consequence of phase changes between the vapor, liquid, and frozen states of water. The properties of the vertical distribution of latent heat release modulate large-scale meridional and zonal circulations with the Tropics - as well as modify the energetic efficiencies of mid-latitude weather systems. This paper highlights the retrieval of observatory, which was launched in November 1997 as a joint American-Japanese space endeavor. Since then, TRMM measurements have been providing an accurate four-dimensional amount of rainfall over the global Tropics and sub-tropics - information which can be used to estimate the spacetime structure of latent heating across the Earth's low latitudes. A set of algorithm methodologies has and continues to be developed to estimate latent heating based on rain rate profile retrievals obtained from TRMM measurements. These algorithms are briefly described followed by a discussion of the foremost latent heating products that can be generate from them. The investigation then provides an overview of how TRMM-derived latent heating information is currently being used in conjunction with global weather and climate models, concluding with remarks intended to stimulate further research on latent heating retrieval from satellites.

  14. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  15. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  16. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America ) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model. Review of other latent heating algorithms will be discussed in the workshop.

  17. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America ) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model. Review of other latent heating algorithms will be discussed in the workshop.

  18. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics Using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in straitform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMXX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM- LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  19. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM rainfall products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2001. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DE 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs. west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in strtaiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  20. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics Using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in straitform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMXX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM- LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  1. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  2. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM rainfall products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2001. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DE 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs. west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in strtaiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  3. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  4. The effect of latent heat release on synoptic-to-planetary wave interactions and its implication for satellite observations: Theoretical modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branscome, Lee E.; Bleck, Rainer

    1989-01-01

    Simple models are being developed to simulate interaction of planetary and synoptic-scale waves incorporating the effects of large-scale topography; eddy heat and momentum fluxes (or nonlinear dynamics); radiative heating/cooling; and latent heat release (precipitation) in synoptic-scale waves. The importance of latent heat release is determined in oceanic storm tracks for temporal variability and time-mean behavior of planetary waves. The model results were compared with available observations of planetary and synoptic-scale wave variability and time-mean circulation. The usefulness of monitoring precipitation in oceanic storm tracks by satellite observing systems was ascertained. The modeling effort includes two different low-order quasi-geostrophic models-time-dependent version and climatological mean version. The modeling also includes a low-order primitive equation model. A time-dependent, multi-level version will be used to validate the two-level Q-G models and examine effects of spherical geometry.

  5. Non-quasi-geostrophic effects in baroclinic waves with latent heat release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtl, G. H.; Tang, C.-M.

    1984-01-01

    A study is conducted for the non-quasi-geostrophic baroclinic wave effects in a saturated atmosphere whose vertical motion is subject to pseudo-adiabatic processes. With respect to the characteristics of energetics for the first-order solution, it is noted that, in the cases of both the dry mode and the first moist mode, the heat transport quantities due to the second-order eddy are small and opposite in sign to their respective transports. The non-quasi-geostrophic effects render the vertical motion field asymmetric in each of the regions involved and enter into the present treatment only as nonlinear terms. The moisture transport terms in the eddy-available potential energy equation is small by comparison to other individual terms in the cyclone scale motion's energetics calculation. This is consistent with the observational results of Smith (1980).

  6. Non-quasi-geostrophic effects in baroclinic waves with latent heat release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtl, G. H.; Tang, C.-M.

    1984-01-01

    A study is conducted for the non-quasi-geostrophic baroclinic wave effects in a saturated atmosphere whose vertical motion is subject to pseudo-adiabatic processes. With respect to the characteristics of energetics for the first-order solution, it is noted that, in the cases of both the dry mode and the first moist mode, the heat transport quantities due to the second-order eddy are small and opposite in sign to their respective transports. The non-quasi-geostrophic effects render the vertical motion field asymmetric in each of the regions involved and enter into the present treatment only as nonlinear terms. The moisture transport terms in the eddy-available potential energy equation is small by comparison to other individual terms in the cyclone scale motion's energetics calculation. This is consistent with the observational results of Smith (1980).

  7. Understanding Latent Heat of Vaporization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linz, Ed

    1995-01-01

    Presents a simple exercise for students to do in the kitchen at home to determine the latent heat of vaporization of water using typical household materials. Designed to stress understanding by sacrificing precision for simplicity. (JRH)

  8. Understanding Latent Heat of Vaporization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linz, Ed

    1995-01-01

    Presents a simple exercise for students to do in the kitchen at home to determine the latent heat of vaporization of water using typical household materials. Designed to stress understanding by sacrificing precision for simplicity. (JRH)

  9. Latent heat of vehicular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Farzad; Berrier, Austin; Habibi, Mohammad; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    We have used the thermodynamic concept of latent heat, where a system loses energy due to a solid-to-liquid phase transition, to study the flow of a group of vehicles moving from rest. During traffic flow, drivers keep a large distance from the car in front of them to ensure safe driving. When a group of cars comes to a stop, for example at a red light, drivers voluntarily induce a "phase transition" from this "liquid phase" to a close-packed "solid phase." This phase transition is motivated by the intuition that maximizing displacement before stopping will minimize the overall travel time. To test the effects of latent heat on flow efficiency, a drone captured the dynamics of cars flowing through an intersection on a Smart Road where the initial spacing between cars at the red light was systematically varied. By correlating the experimental results with the Optimal Velocity Model (OVM), we find that the convention of inducing phase transitions at intersections offers no benefit, as the lag time (latent heat) of resumed flow offsets the initial increase in displacement. These findings suggest that in situations where gridlock is not an issue, drivers should not decrease their spacing during stoppages in order to maximize safety with no loss in flow efficiency.

  10. Retrieved Latent Heating from TRMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Smith, Eric A.; Houze Jr, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The global hydrological cycle is central to the Earth's climate system, with rainfall and the physics of precipitation formation acting as the key links in the cycle. Two-thirds of global rainfall occurs in the tropics with the associated latent heating (LH) accounting for three-fourths of the total heat energy available to the Earth's atmosphere. In addition, fresh water provided by tropical rainfall and its variability exerts a large impact upon the structure and motions of the upper ocean layer. In the last decade, it has been established that standard products of LH from satellite measurements, particularly TRMM measurements, would be a valuable resource for scientific research and applications. Such products would enable new insights and investigations concerning the complexities of convection system life cycles, the diabatic heating controls and feedbacks related to meso-synoptic circulations and their forecasting, the relationship of tropical patterns of LH to the global circulation and climate, and strategies for improving cloud parameterizations in environmental prediction models. The status of retrieved TRMM LH products, TRMM LH inter-comparison and validation project, current TRMM LH applications and critic issues/action items (based on previous five TRMM LH workshops) is presented in this article.

  11. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release and Their Retrieval for TOGA COARE Convective Systems Using a Cloud Resolving Model, SSM/I, and Ship-borne Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Olson, W. S.; Johnson, D.; Ferrier, B.; Kummerow, C.; Adler, R.

    1999-01-01

    Latent heating profiles associated with three (TOGA COARE) Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment active convective episodes (December 10-17 1992; December 19-27 1992; and February 9-13 1993) are examined using the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model and retrieved by using the Goddard Convective and Stratiform Heating (CSH) algorithm . The following sources of rainfall information are input into the CSH algorithm: Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/1), Radar and the GCE model. Diagnostically determined latent heating profiles calculated using 6 hourly soundings are used for validation. The GCE model simulated rainfall and latent heating profiles are in excellent agreement with those estimated by soundings. In addition, the typical convective and stratiform heating structures (or shapes) are well captured by the GCE model. Radar measured rainfall is smaller than that both estimated by the GCE model and SSM/I in all three different COARE IFA periods. SSM/I derived rainfall is more than the GCE model simulated for the December 19-27 and February 9-13 periods, but is in excellent agreement with the GCE model for the December 10-17 period. The GCE model estimated stratiform amount is about 50% for December 19-27, 42% for December 11-17 and 56% for the February 9-13 case. These results are consistent with large-scale analyses. The accurate estimates of stratiform amount is needed for good latent heating retrieval. A higher (lower) percentage of stratiform rain can imply a maximum heating rate at a higher (lower) altitude. The GCE model always simulates more stratiform rain (10 to 20%) than the radar for all three convective episodes. SSM/I derived stratiform amount is about 37% for December 19-27, 48% for December 11-17 and 41% for the February 9-13 case. Temporal variability of CSH algorithm retrieved latent heating profiles using either GCE model simulated or radar estimated rainfall and stratiform amount is in good

  12. Latent heat effects in subsurface heat transport modelling and their impact on palaeotemperature reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottaghy, Darius; Rath, Volker

    2006-01-01

    In cold regions the thermal regime is strongly affected by freezing or melting processes, consuming or releasing large amounts of latent heat. This changes enthalpy by orders of magnitude. We present a numerical approach for the implementation of these effects into a 3-D finite-difference heat transport model. The latent heat effect can be handled by substituting an apparent heat capacity for the volumetric heat capacity of unfrozen soil in the heat transfer equation. The model is verified by the analytical solution of the heat transport equation including phase change. We found significant deviations of temperature profiles when applying the latent heat effect on forward calculations of deep temperature logs. Ground surface temperature histories derived from synthetic data and field data from NE Poland underline the importance of considering freezing processes. In spite of its limitations, the proposed method is appropriate for the study of long-period climatic changes.

  13. Indirectly-heated biomass gasification using latent-heat ballasting of a fluidized reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Stobbe, S.; Oatley, J.; Brown, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this study is to improve heating value and methane content of gas produced from biomass gasification. This project investigates a latent-heat ballasted, indirectly-heated gasifier. The latent-heat ballast consists of metal alloy with melting point close to the desired gasification temperature. The ballast allows a single reactor to sustain pyrolysis without oxygen addition by storing energy during periods of combustion and releasing stored energy during periods of pyrolysis. Tests were performed to evaluate the heat transfer and gasification characteristics of the ballasted reactor.

  14. Targeting latent TGFβ release in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ceco, Ermelinda; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Gardner, Brandon; Miller, Tamari; DeJesus, Adam; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Smith, Lucas R; Barton, Elisabeth R; Molkentin, Jeffery D; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2014-10-22

    Latent transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) binding proteins (LTBPs) bind to inactive TGFβ in the extracellular matrix. In mice, muscular dystrophy symptoms are intensified by a genetic polymorphism that changes the hinge region of LTBP, leading to increased proteolytic susceptibility and TGFβ release. We have found that the hinge region of human LTBP4 was also readily proteolysed and that proteolysis could be blocked by an antibody to the hinge region. Transgenic mice were generated to carry a bacterial artificial chromosome encoding the human LTBP4 gene. These transgenic mice displayed larger myofibers, increased damage after muscle injury, and enhanced TGFβ signaling. In the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the human LTBP4 transgene exacerbated muscular dystrophy symptoms and resulted in weaker muscles with an increased inflammatory infiltrate and greater LTBP4 cleavage in vivo. Blocking LTBP4 cleavage may be a therapeutic strategy to reduce TGFβ release and activity and decrease inflammation and muscle damage in muscular dystrophy.

  15. Latent Heat in Soil Heat Flux Measurements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, the...

  16. Dish-mounted latent heat buffer storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    Dish-mounted latent heat storage subsystems for Rankine, Brayton, and Stirling engines operating at 427 C, 816 C, and 816 C respectively are discussed. Storage requirements definition, conceptual design, media stability and compatibility tests, and thermal performance analyses are considered.

  17. Dish-mounted latent heat buffer storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    Dish-mounted latent heat storage subsystems for Rankine, Brayton, and Stirling engines operating at 427 C, 816 C, and 816 C respectively are discussed. Storage requirements definition, conceptual design, media stability and compatibility tests, and thermal performance analyses are considered.

  18. Oceanic Warm Rain Latent Heating and its Role in the Energy and Water Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, E.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.

    2016-12-01

    Latent heating is an important component in Earth's hydrological and energy cycles, yet prior estimates of latent heating have been derived from sensors with limited sensitivity to warm rain—a ubiquitous component of rainfall over the oceans. The Wisconsin Algorithm for Latent heating and Rainfall Using Satellites (WALRUS) couples cloud resolving model simulations of oceanic warm rain to observations from CloudSat's radar, a space-borne sensor highly sensitive to this rain regime, to generate estimates of the warm rain latent heating processes occurring over the world's oceans. In this presentation, four years of CloudSat data are analyzed with WALRUS to generate oceanic warm rain latent heating distributions across the globe and to provide an estimate of the fractional impact this regime has in the water cycle. Intercomparisons of latent heating structures will be made between different ocean basins and general circulation components to highlight the variable magnitude and vertical distribution worldwide. Additionally, radiative efficiency terms and multiple parameters that provide measures of environmental stability will be composited with latent heating estimates. The importance of the warm rain regime in the energy and water cycles, and the implications of changes in large-scale circulations on the latent heat release, rainfall, and radiative balance, will be discussed.

  19. Retrieving Latent Heat Vertical Structure Using Precipitation and Cloud Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.; Min, Q.; Wu, X.

    2011-12-01

    The latent heat (LH) released from tropical precipitation plays a critical role in driving regional and global atmosphere circulation. However, the vertical distribution of LH is one of most difficult parameters to be measured and has a large uncertainty in both residual diagnostic products and satellite retrievals. Most of current satellite LH products use limited observational information of precipitation and cloud profiles and highly depend on cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations. Our novel approach, distinguishing from existing schemes, is directly using observable precipitation and cloud profiles in combination with phase change partition parameterization of various kinds from the CRM simulations to produce the latent heating profiles. This hybrid latent heat algorithm separately deals with the condensation-evaporation heating (LHc_e), the deposition-sublimation heating (LHd_s) and the freezing-melting heating (LHf_m) for convective rain, stratiform rain, and shallow warm rain. Each component is based on physical processes, such as nucleation and auto conversion, by combining observable precipitation and cloud profiles. Although the proposed algorithm utilizes microphysical parameterizations from a specific CRM, the general LH vertical structure is primarily determined by the precipitation and cloud profiles observable from cloud and precipitation radars available at ground sites or from satellite platforms, and less sensitive to the specific CRM. The self consistency tests of this algorithm show good agreements with the CRM simulated LH at different spatial and temporal scales, even at simultaneous and pixel level. The applications of this algorithm are expected to provide new information for understanding the heating budget in the atmosphere and its impacts on the atmosphere circulations at various spatial and temporal scales.

  20. Determination of the Latent Heats and Triple Point of Perfluorocyclobutane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, A. G.; Strachan, A. N.

    1977-01-01

    Proposes the use of Perfluorocyclobutane in physical chemistry courses to conduct experiments on latent heat, triple point temperatures and pressures, boiling points, and entropy of vaporization. (SL)

  1. Determination of the Latent Heats and Triple Point of Perfluorocyclobutane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, A. G.; Strachan, A. N.

    1977-01-01

    Proposes the use of Perfluorocyclobutane in physical chemistry courses to conduct experiments on latent heat, triple point temperatures and pressures, boiling points, and entropy of vaporization. (SL)

  2. Sensitivity of Latent Heating Profiles to Environmental Conditions: Implications for TRMM and Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) as a part of NASA's Earth System Enterprise is the first mission dedicated to measuring tropical rainfall through microwave and visible sensors, and includes the first spaceborne rain radar. Tropical rainfall comprises two-thirds of global rainfall. It is also the primary distributor of heat through the atmosphere's circulation. It is this circulation that defines Earth's weather and climate. Understanding rainfall and its variability is crucial to understanding and predicting global climate change. Weather and climate models need an accurate assessment of the latent heating released as tropical rainfall occurs. Currently, cloud model-based algorithms are used to derive latent heating based on rainfall structure. Ultimately, these algorithms can be applied to actual data from TRMM. This study investigates key underlying assumptions used in developing the latent heating algorithms. For example, the standard algorithm is highly dependent on a system's rainfall amount and structure. It also depends on an a priori database of model-derived latent heating profiles based on the aforementioned rainfall characteristics. Unanswered questions remain concerning the sensitivity of latent heating profiles to environmental conditions (both thermodynamic and kinematic), regionality, and seasonality. This study investigates and quantifies such sensitivities and seeks to determine the optimal latent heating profile database based on the results. Ultimately, the study seeks to produce an optimized latent heating algorithm based not only on rainfall structure but also hydrometeor profiles.

  3. Sensitivity of Latent Heating Profiles to Environmental Conditions: Implications for TRMM and Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) as a part of NASA's Earth System Enterprise is the first mission dedicated to measuring tropical rainfall through microwave and visible sensors, and includes the first spaceborne rain radar. Tropical rainfall comprises two-thirds of global rainfall. It is also the primary distributor of heat through the atmosphere's circulation. It is this circulation that defines Earth's weather and climate. Understanding rainfall and its variability is crucial to understanding and predicting global climate change. Weather and climate models need an accurate assessment of the latent heating released as tropical rainfall occurs. Currently, cloud model-based algorithms are used to derive latent heating based on rainfall structure. Ultimately, these algorithms can be applied to actual data from TRMM. This study investigates key underlying assumptions used in developing the latent heating algorithms. For example, the standard algorithm is highly dependent on a system's rainfall amount and structure. It also depends on an a priori database of model-derived latent heating profiles based on the aforementioned rainfall characteristics. Unanswered questions remain concerning the sensitivity of latent heating profiles to environmental conditions (both thermodynamic and kinematic), regionality, and seasonality. This study investigates and quantifies such sensitivities and seeks to determine the optimal latent heating profile database based on the results. Ultimately, the study seeks to produce an optimized latent heating algorithm based not only on rainfall structure but also hydrometeor profiles.

  4. Solar Thermoelectricity via Advanced Latent Heat Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Michele L.; Rea, J.; Glatzmaier, Greg C.; Hardin, C.; Oshman, C.; Vaughn, J.; Roark, T.; Raade, J. W.; Bradshaw, R. W.; Sharp, J.; Avery, Azure D.; Bobela, David; Bonner, R.; Weigand, R.; Campo, D.; Parilla, Philip A.; Siegel, N. P.; Toberer, Eric S.; Ginley, David S.

    2016-05-31

    We report on a new modular, dispatchable, and cost-effective solar electricity-generating technology. Solar ThermoElectricity via Advanced Latent heat Storage (STEALS) integrates several state-of-the-art technologies to provide electricity on demand. In the envisioned STEALS system, concentrated sunlight is converted to heat at a solar absorber. The heat is then delivered to either a thermoelectric (TE) module for direct electricity generation, or to charge a phase change material for thermal energy storage, enabling subsequent generation during off-sun hours, or both for simultaneous electricity production and energy storage. The key to making STEALS a dispatchable technology lies in the development of a 'thermal valve,' which controls when heat is allowed to flow through the TE module, thus controlling when electricity is generated. The current project addresses each of the three major subcomponents, (i) the TE module, (ii) the thermal energy storage system, and (iii) the thermal valve. The project also includes system-level and techno- economic modeling of the envisioned integrated system and will culminate in the demonstration of a laboratory-scale STEALS prototype capable of generating 3kWe.

  5. Solar thermoelectricity via advanced latent heat storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, M. L.; Rea, J.; Glatzmaier, G. C.; Hardin, C.; Oshman, C.; Vaughn, J.; Roark, T.; Raade, J. W.; Bradshaw, R. W.; Sharp, J.; Avery, A. D.; Bobela, D.; Bonner, R.; Weigand, R.; Campo, D.; Parilla, P. A.; Siegel, N. P.; Toberer, E. S.; Ginley, D. S.

    2016-05-01

    We report on a new modular, dispatchable, and cost-effective solar electricity-generating technology. Solar ThermoElectricity via Advanced Latent heat Storage (STEALS) integrates several state-of-the-art technologies to provide electricity on demand. In the envisioned STEALS system, concentrated sunlight is converted to heat at a solar absorber. The heat is then delivered to either a thermoelectric (TE) module for direct electricity generation, or to charge a phase change material for thermal energy storage, enabling subsequent generation during off-sun hours, or both for simultaneous electricity production and energy storage. The key to making STEALS a dispatchable technology lies in the development of a "thermal valve," which controls when heat is allowed to flow through the TE module, thus controlling when electricity is generated. The current project addresses each of the three major subcomponents, (i) the TE module, (ii) the thermal energy storage system, and (iii) the thermal valve. The project also includes system-level and techno- economic modeling of the envisioned integrated system and will culminate in the demonstration of a laboratory-scale STEALS prototype capable of generating 3kWe.

  6. Latent Heating Retrievals Using the TRMM Precipitation Radar: A Multi-Seasonal Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, S.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Simpson, J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Rainfall is a key link in the hydrologic cycle and is a primary heat source for the atmosphere. The vertical distribution of latent heat release, which is accompanied by rainfall, modulates the large-scale circulations of the tropics and in turn can impact midlatitude weather. This latent heat release is a consequence of phase changes between vapor, liquid, and solid water. Present largescale weather and climate models can simulate latent heat release only crudely, thus reducing their confidence in predictions on both global and regional scales. This paper represents the first attempt to use NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) rainfall information to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to October 2000. The Goddard Convective-Stratiform. Heating (CSH) algorithm and TRMM precipitation radar data are used for this study. We will examine and compare the latent heating structures between 1997-1998 (winter) ENSO and 1998-2000 (non-ENSO). We will also examine over the tropics. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental; Indian oceans vs west Pacific; Africa vs S. America) will be also examined and compared. In addition, we will examine the relationship between latent heating (max heating level) and SST. The period of interest also coincides with several TRMM field campaigns that recently occurred over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and in the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed Q1 budgets from these experiments could provide a means of validating the retrieved profiles of latent heating from the CSH algorithm.

  7. The effective latent heat of aqueous nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soochan; Taylor, Robert A.; Dai, Lenore; Prasher, Ravi; Phelan, Patrick E.

    2015-06-01

    Nanoparticle suspensions, popularly termed ‘nanofluids’, have been extensively investigated for their thermal and radiative properties (Eastman et al 1996 Mater. Res. Soc. Proc. 457; Keblinski et al 2005 Mater. Today 8 36-44 Barber et al 2011 Nanoscale Res. Lett. 6 1-13 Thomas and Sobhan 2011 Nanoscale Res. Lett. 6 1-21 Taylor et al 2011 Nanoscale Res. Lett. 6 1-11 Fang et al 2013 Nano Lett. 13 1736-42 Otanicar et al 2010 J. Renew. Sustainable Energy 2 03310201-13 Prasher et al 2006 ASME J. Heat Transfer 128 588-95 Shin and Banerjee 2011 ASME J. Heat Transfer 133 1-4 Taylor and Phelan 2009 Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 52 5339-48 Ameen et al 2010 Int. J. Thermophys. 31 1131-44 Lee et al 2014 Appl. Phys. Lett. 104 1-4). Such work has generated great controversy, although it is (arguably) generally accepted today that the presence of nanoparticles rarely leads to useful enhancements in either thermal conductivity or convective heat transfer. On the other hand, there are still examples of unanticipated enhancements to some properties, such as the specific heat of molten salt-based nanofluids reported by Shin and Banerjee (2011 ASME J. Heat Transfer 133 1-4) and the critical heat flux mentioned by Taylor and Phelan (2009 Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 52 5339-48). Another largely overlooked example is the reported effect of nanoparticles on the effective latent heat of vaporization (hfg) of aqueous nanofluids, as reported by Ameen et al (2010 Int. J. Thermophys. 31 1131-44). Through molecular dynamics (MD) modeling supplemented with limited experimental data they found that hfg increases with increasing nanoparticle concentration, for Pt nanoparticles (MD) and Al2O3 nanoparticles (experiments). Here, we extend those exploratory experiments in an effort to determine if hfg of aqueous nanofluids can be manipulated, i.e., increased or decreased by the addition of graphite or silver nanoparticles. Our results to date indicate that, yes, hfg can be substantially impacted, by

  8. Retrieval of Latent Heating from TRMM Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Smith, E. A.; Adler, R. F.; Hou, A. Y.; Meneghini, R.; Simpson, J.; Haddad, Z. S.; Iguchi, T.; Satoh, S.; Kakar, R.; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Kummerow, C. D.; Lang, S.; Nakamura, K.; Nakazawa, T.; Okamoto, K.; Shige, S.; Olson, W. S.; Takayabu, Y.; Tripoli, G. J.; Yang, S.

    2006-01-01

    Precipitation, in driving the global hydrological cycle, strongly influences the behavior of the Earth's weather and climate systems and is central to their variability. Two-thirds of the global rainfall occurs over the Tropics, which leads to its profound effect on the general circulation of the atmosphere. This is because its energetic equivalent, latent heating (LH), is the tropical convective heat engine's primary fuel source as originally emphasized by Riehl and Malkus (1958). At low latitudes, LH stemming from extended bands of rainfall modulates large-scale zonal and meridional circulations and their consequent mass overturnings (e.g., Hartmann et al. 1984; Hack and Schubert 1990). Also, LH is the principal energy source in the creation, growth, vertical structure, and propagation of long-lived tropical waves (e.g., Puri 1987; Lau and Chan 1988). Moreover, the distinct vertical distribution properties of convective and stratiform LH profiles help influence climatic outcomes via their tight control on large-scale circulations (Lau and Peng 1987; Nakazawa 1988; Sui and Lau 1988; Emanuel et al. 1994; Yanai et al. 2000; Sumi and Nakazawa 2002; Schumacher et al. 2004). The purpose of this paper is to describe how LH profiles are being derived from satellite precipitation rate retrievals, focusing on those being made with Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite measurements.

  9. Tropical Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes and Latent Heating Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Zhou, Tiehan; Love, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent satellite determinations of global distributions of absolute gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes in the lower stratosphere show maxima over the summer subtropical continents and little evidence of GW momentum fluxes associated with the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). This seems to be at odds with parameterizations forGWmomentum fluxes, where the source is a function of latent heating rates, which are largest in the region of the ITCZ in terms of monthly averages. The authors have examined global distributions of atmospheric latent heating, cloud-top-pressure altitudes, and lower-stratosphere absolute GW momentum fluxes and have found that monthly averages of the lower-stratosphere GW momentum fluxes more closely resemble the monthly mean cloud-top altitudes rather than the monthly mean rates of latent heating. These regions of highest cloud-top altitudes occur when rates of latent heating are largest on the time scale of cloud growth. This, plus previously published studies, suggests that convective sources for stratospheric GW momentum fluxes, being a function of the rate of latent heating, will require either a climate model to correctly model this rate of latent heating or some ad hoc adjustments to account for shortcomings in a climate model's land-sea differences in convective latent heating.

  10. Tropical Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes and Latent Heating Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Zhou, Tiehan; Love, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent satellite determinations of global distributions of absolute gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes in the lower stratosphere show maxima over the summer subtropical continents and little evidence of GW momentum fluxes associated with the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). This seems to be at odds with parameterizations forGWmomentum fluxes, where the source is a function of latent heating rates, which are largest in the region of the ITCZ in terms of monthly averages. The authors have examined global distributions of atmospheric latent heating, cloud-top-pressure altitudes, and lower-stratosphere absolute GW momentum fluxes and have found that monthly averages of the lower-stratosphere GW momentum fluxes more closely resemble the monthly mean cloud-top altitudes rather than the monthly mean rates of latent heating. These regions of highest cloud-top altitudes occur when rates of latent heating are largest on the time scale of cloud growth. This, plus previously published studies, suggests that convective sources for stratospheric GW momentum fluxes, being a function of the rate of latent heating, will require either a climate model to correctly model this rate of latent heating or some ad hoc adjustments to account for shortcomings in a climate model's land-sea differences in convective latent heating.

  11. A solar air collector with integrated latent heat thermal storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvat, Pavel; Ostry, Milan; Mauder, Tomas; Klimes, Lubomir

    2012-04-01

    Simulations of the behaviour of a solar air collector with integrated latent heat thermal storage were performed. The model of the collector was created with the use of coupling between TRNSYS 17 and MATLAB. Latent heat storage (Phase Change Material - PCM) was integrated with the solar absorber. The model of the latent heat storage absorber was created in MATLAB and the model of the solar air collector itself was created in TRNSYS with the use of TYPE 56. The model of the latent heat storage absorber allows specification of the PCM properties as well as other parameters. The simulated air collector was the front and back pass collector with the absorber in the middle of the air cavity. Two variants were considered for comparison; the light-weight absorber made of sheet metal and the heat-storage absorber with the PCM. Simulations were performed for the climatic conditions of the Czech Republic (using TMY weather data).

  12. High temperature active heat exchanger research for latent heat storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alario, J.; Haslett, R.

    1982-02-01

    An active heat exchange method in a latent heat (salt) thermal energy storage system that prevents a low conductivity solid salt layer from forming on heat transfer surfaces was developed. An evaluation of suitable media with melting points in the temperature range of interest (250 to 400 C) limited the candidates to molten salts from the chloride, hydroxide and nitrate families, based on high storage capacity, good corrosion characteristics and availability in large quantities at reasonable cost. The specific salt recommended for laboratory tests was a choride eutectic (20.5KCL o 24.5NaCL o 55.MgCl2% by wt.), with a nominal melting point of 385 C. Various active heat exchange concepts were given a technical and economic comparison to a passive tube shell design for a reference application (300 MW sub t for 6 hours). Test hardware was then built for the most promising concept: a direct contact heat exchanger in which molten salt droplets are injected into a cooler counter flowing stream of liquid metal carrier fluid (lead/Bismuth).

  13. Sensible and latent heat forced divergent circulations in the West African Monsoon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagos, S.; Zhang, C.

    2008-12-01

    Field properties of divergent circulation are utilized to identify the roles of various diabatic processes in forcing moisture transport in the dynamics of the West African Monsoon and its seasonal cycle. In this analysis, the divergence field is treated as a set of point sources and is partitioned into two sub-sets corresponding to latent heat release and surface sensible heat flux at each respective point. The divergent circulation associated with each set is then calculated from the Poisson's equation using Gauss-Seidel iteration. Moisture transport by each set of divergent circulation is subsequently estimated. The results show different roles of the divergent circulations forced by surface sensible and latent heating in the monsoon dynamics. Surface sensible heating drives a shallow meridional circulation, which transports moisture deep into the continent at the polar side of the monsoon rain band and thereby promotes the seasonal northward migration of monsoon precipitation during the monsoon onset season. In contrast, the circulation directly associated with latent heating is deep and the corresponding moisture convergence is within the region of precipitation. Latent heating also induces dry air advection from the north. Neither effect promotes the seasonal northward migration of precipitation. The relative contributions of the processes associated with latent and sensible heating to the net moisture convergence, and hence the seasonal evolution of monsoon precipitation, depend on the background moisture.

  14. Power generation by exchange of latent heats of phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, S.; Levenson, W.L.

    1981-08-11

    A power system is provided that uses the latent heat of fusion of water to raise the potential energy of a working fluid to a level that upon release generates power, preferably electrical power. The system is self-sustaining except for the energy that is supplied in water entering the system. The inlet water can be at any temperature within its liquid range under atmospheric or super atmospheric pressure, can advantageously contain the sensible waste heat typical of effluent from fossil fuel or nuclear power plants, can be relatively pure or be contaminated as with sewage or be the medium of a colloidal suspension, or consist of marine or other saline waters. In every case, purification of the water by freezing, for example, desalination, is accomplished without additional power consumption. A selected working fluid that boils at a temperature substantially below the freezing point of water is brought in the liquid state into contact with the water or other aqueous medium, causing the water to freeze and the working fluid to vaporize under pressure; the produced ice is removed; a portion of the so-produced ice is admixed with a eutectic forming salt to create a cooling medium at a temperature below the condensation temperature of the cooling fluid; the working-fluid vapors are preferably superheated by inlet aqueous medium and are released from autogenic elevated pressure to drive a turbine. Working fluid vapors are condensed by said cooling medium and returned by pumping into contact with inlet aqueous medium.

  15. The surface latent heat flux anomalies related to major earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Feng; Shen, Xuhui; Kang, Chunli; Xiong, Pan; Hong, Shunying

    2011-12-01

    SLHF (Surface Latent Heat Flux) is an atmospheric parameter, which can describe the heat released by phase changes and dependent on meteorological parameters such as surface temperature, relative humidity, wind speed etc. There is a sharp difference between the ocean surface and the land surface. Recently, many studies related to the SLHF anomalies prior to earthquakes have been developed. It has been shown that the energy exchange enhanced between coastal surface and atmosphere prior to earthquakes can increase the rate of the water-heat exchange, which will lead to an obviously increases in SLHF. In this paper, two earthquakes in 2010 (Haiti earthquake and southwest of Sumatra in Indonesia earthquake) have been analyzed using SLHF data by STD (standard deviation) threshold method. It is shows that the SLHF anomaly may occur in interpolate earthquakes or intraplate earthquakes and coastal earthquakes or island earthquakes. And the SLHF anomalies usually appear 5-6 days prior to an earthquake, then disappear quickly after the event. The process of anomaly evolution to a certain extent reflects a dynamic energy change process about earthquake preparation, that is, weak-strong-weak-disappeared.

  16. A Latent Heat Retrieval and its Effects on the Intensity and Structure Change of Hurricane Guillermo (1997). Part I: The Algorithm and Observations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guimond, Stephen R.; Bourassa, mark A.; Reasor, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    The release of latent heat in clouds is an essential part of the formation and I intensification ohurricanes. The community knows very little about the intensity and structure of latent heating due largely to inadequate observations. In this paper, a new method for retrieving the latent heating field in hurricanes from airborne Dopple radar is presented and fields from rapidly intensifying Hurricane Guillermo (1997) are shown.

  17. A Latent Heat Retrieval and its Effects on the Intensity and Structure Change of Hurricane Guillermo (1997). Part I: The Algorithm and Observations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guimond, Stephen R.; Bourassa, mark A.; Reasor, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    The release of latent heat in clouds is an essential part of the formation and I intensification ohurricanes. The community knows very little about the intensity and structure of latent heating due largely to inadequate observations. In this paper, a new method for retrieving the latent heating field in hurricanes from airborne Dopple radar is presented and fields from rapidly intensifying Hurricane Guillermo (1997) are shown.

  18. Design and simulation of latent heat storage units

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsundar, N.; Stein, E.; Rooz, E.; Bascaran, E.; Lee, T.C. )

    1992-04-01

    This report presents the results of two years of research and development on passive latent heat storage systems. Analytical models have been developed and extended, and a computer code for simulating the performance of a latent heat storage has been developed. The code is intended to be merged into a larger solar energy system simulation code and used for making realistic system studies. Simulation studies using a code which has a flexible and accurate routine for handling the storage subsystem should lead to the development of better systems than those in which storage is added on after the rest of the system has already been selected and optimized.

  19. Design and simulation of latent heat storage units. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsundar, N.; Stein, E.; Rooz, E.; Bascaran, E.; Lee, T.C.

    1992-04-01

    This report presents the results of two years of research and development on passive latent heat storage systems. Analytical models have been developed and extended, and a computer code for simulating the performance of a latent heat storage has been developed. The code is intended to be merged into a larger solar energy system simulation code and used for making realistic system studies. Simulation studies using a code which has a flexible and accurate routine for handling the storage subsystem should lead to the development of better systems than those in which storage is added on after the rest of the system has already been selected and optimized.

  20. Can latent heat safely warm blood? - in vitro testing of a portable prototype blood warmer.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Mark P; Roxby, David

    2007-08-01

    Trauma/retrieval patients are often in shock and hypothermic. Treatment of such patients usually involves restoring their blood volume with transfusion of blood (stored at 2 degrees C - 6 degrees C) and/or crystalloids or colloids (stored at ambient temperature). Rapid infusion of these cold fluids can worsen or even induce hypothermia in these patients. Warming of intravenous fluids at accident sites has traditionally been difficult due to a lack of suitable portable fluid warmers that are not dependent on mains electrical or battery power. If latent heat, the heat released when a liquid solidifies (an inherently temperature limiting process) can warm intravenous fluids, portable devices without a reliance on electrical energy could be used to reduce the incidence of hypothermia in trauma patients. Rapid infusion of red cells into patients was timed to sample typical clinical flow rates. An approved dry heat blood warmer was compared with a prototype blood warmer using a supercooled liquid latent heat storage material, to warm red cells whilst monitoring inlet and outlet temperatures. To determine the effect of warming on red cell integrity compared to the normal storage lesion of blood, extracellular concentrations of potassium, lactate dehydrogenase and haemoglobin were measured in blood which had been warmed after storage at 2 degrees C - 6 degrees C for 1 to 42 days. A prototype latent heat fluid warmer consistently warmed red cells from approximately 4 degrees C to approximately 35 degrees C at typical clinical flow rates. Warming of stored blood with latent heat did not affect red cell integrity more than the approved dry heat blood warmer. Using latent heat as an energy source can satisfactorily warm cold blood or other intravenous fluids to near body temperature, without any adverse affects.

  1. Latent heat and cyclone activity in the South Pacific, 10-18 January 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, B. L.; Vincent, D. G.; Kann, D. M.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    1986-01-01

    This paper examines the heat budget of the tropical South Pacific for the period of January 10-18, 1979 and compares precipitation estimates obtained from the budget equation with those derived from GOES-IR satellite imagery, using data that were part of the total FGGE package. In addition, the relationship between latent heat release and the baroclinic energy conversion is examined for the life cycles of two cyclones which propagated along the South Pacific Convection Zone in that period. It is shown that latent heat plays an important role in the baroclinic energy conversion between potential and kinetic energy through diabatically-induced vertical circulations. For a cyclone where latent heat stays at a high level both spacially and with regard to intensity, there appears to be ample fuel for its intensification. On the other hand, for a filling cyclone, the latent heat impact decreased and the baroclinic conversion fell off rapidly, due to the lack of both potential energy generation and diabatically-induced thermally-direct circulations.

  2. Filled Carbon Nanotubes: Superior Latent Heat Storage Enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-01

    This factsheet describes a rstudy whose technical objective is to demonstrate the feasibility of filled carbon nanotubes (CNT) as latent heat storage enhancers, with potential applications as next generation thermal management fluids in diverse applications in industries ranging from high-demand microelectronic cooling, manufacturing, power generation, transportation, to solar energy storage.

  3. Metal-halide mixtures for latent heat energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K.; Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    Some candidates for alkali metal and alkali halide mixtures suitable for thermal energy storage at temperatures 600 C are identified. A solar thermal system application which offer advantages such as precipitation of salt crystals away from heat transfer surfaces, increased thermal conductivity of phase change materials, corrosion inhibition, and a constant monotectic temperature, independent of mixture concentrations. By using the lighters, metal rich phase as a heat transfer medium and the denser, salt rich phase as a phase change material for latent heat storage, undesirable solidification on the heat transfer surface may be prevented, is presented.

  4. Metal-halide mixtures for latent heat energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K.; Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    Some candidates for alkali metal and alkali halide mixtures suitable for thermal energy storage at temperatures 600 C are identified. A solar thermal system application which offer advantages such as precipitation of salt crystals away from heat transfer surfaces, increased thermal conductivity of phase change materials, corrosion inhibition, and a constant monotectic temperature, independent of mixture concentrations. By using the lighters, metal rich phase as a heat transfer medium and the denser, salt rich phase as a phase change material for latent heat storage, undesirable solidification on the heat transfer surface may be prevented, is presented.

  5. The latent heat of vaporization of supercritical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banuti, Daniel; Raju, Muralikrishna; Hickey, Jean-Pierre; Ihme, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    The enthalpy of vaporization is the energy required to overcome intermolecular attractive forces and to expand the fluid volume against the ambient pressure when transforming a liquid into a gas. It diminishes for rising pressure until it vanishes at the critical point. Counterintuitively, we show that a latent heat is in fact also required to heat a supercritical fluid from a liquid to a gaseous state. Unlike its subcritical counterpart, the supercritical pseudoboiling transition is spread over a finite temperature range. Thus, in addition to overcoming intermolecular attractive forces, added energy simultaneously heats the fluid. Then, considering a transition from a liquid to an ideal gas state, we demonstrate that the required enthalpy is invariant to changes in pressure for 0 < p < 3pcr . This means that the classical pressure-dependent latent heat is merely the equilibrium part of the phase transition. The reduction at higher pressures is compensated by an increase in a nonequilibrium latent heat required to overcome residual intermolecular forces in the real fluid vapor during heating. At supercritical pressures, all of the transition occurs at non-equilibrium; for p -> 0 , all of the transition occurs at equilibrium.

  6. Effect of latent heating on mesoscale vortex development during extreme precipitation: Colorado, September 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Annareli

    From 9-16 September 2013, a slow-moving cut-off low in the southwestern U.S. funneled unseasonal amounts of moisture to the Colorado Front Range, resulting in extreme precipitation and flooding. The heaviest precipitation during the September 2013 event occurred over the northern Colorado Front Range, producing a 7-day total of over 380 mm of rain. The flash flooding caused over $3 billion in damage to property and infrastructure and resulted in eight fatalities. This study will focus on the precipitation and mesoscale features during 11-12 September 2013 in Boulder, CO. During the evening of 11 September, Boulder experienced flash flooding as a result of high rain rates accumulating over 180 mm of rain in 6 hours. From 0400-0700 UTC 12 September, a mesoscale vortex (mesovortex) was observed to travel northwestward towards Boulder. This circulation enhanced upslope flow and was associated with localized deep convection. The mesovortex originated in an area common for the development of a lee vortex known as the Denver Cyclone. We hypothesize that this mesoscale vortex is not associated with lee vortex formation, such as the Denver Cyclone, but developed through the release of latent heat from microphysical process. The Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecast (ARW) model was used to 1) produce a control simulation that properly represented the evolution and processes of interest during the event and 2) test the importance of latent heating to the development and evolution of the mesovortex. The results from various latent heating experiments suggested that the mesovortex did not develop through lee vortex formation and the latent heat released just before and during the mesovortex event was important to its development. Results also showed latent heating affected the flow field, resulting in a positive feedback between the circulation, associated low-level jet, and convection leading to further upslope flow and precipitation development. Further experiments

  7. Latent heat sink in soil heat flux measurements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, the...

  8. The influence of viscous and latent heating on crystal-rich magma flow in a conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Alina J.; Wadge, Geoff; Mühlhaus, Hans B.

    2007-12-01

    The flow dynamics of crystal-rich high-viscosity magma is likely to be strongly influenced by viscous and latent heat release. Viscous heating is observed to play an important role in the dynamics of fluids with temperature-dependent viscosities. The growth of microlite crystals and the accompanying release of latent heat should play a similar role in raising fluid temperatures. Earlier models of viscous heating in magmas have shown the potential for unstable (thermal runaway) flow as described by a Gruntfest number, using an Arrhenius temperature dependence for the viscosity, but have not considered crystal growth or latent heating. We present a theoretical model for magma flow in an axisymmetric conduit and consider both heating effects using Finite Element Method techniques. We consider a constant mass flux in a 1-D infinitesimal conduit segment with isothermal and adiabatic boundary conditions and Newtonian and non-Newtonian magma flow properties. We find that the growth of crystals acts to stabilize the flow field and make the magma less likely to experience a thermal runaway. The additional heating influences crystal growth and can counteract supercooling from degassing-induced crystallization and drive the residual melt composition back towards the liquidus temperature. We illustrate the models with results generated using parameters appropriate for the andesite lava dome-forming eruption at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat. These results emphasize the radial variability of the magma. Both viscous and latent heating effects are shown to be capable of playing a significant role in the eruption dynamics of Soufrière Hills Volcano. Latent heating is a factor in the top two kilometres of the conduit and may be responsible for relatively short-term (days) transients. Viscous heating is less restricted spatially, but because thermal runaway requires periods of hundreds of days to be achieved, the process is likely to be interrupted. Our models show that

  9. Studies of Phase Change Materials and a Latent Heat Storage Unit Used for a Natural Circulation Cooling/Latent Heat Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakitani, Katsumi; Honda, Hiroshi

    Experiments were performed to investigate feasibility of using organic materials as a PCM for a latent heat storage unit of a natural circulation cooling/latent heat storage system. This system was designed to cool a shelter accommodating telecommunication equipment located in subtropical deserts or similar regions without using a power source. Taking into account practical considerations and the results of various experiments regarding the thermodynamic properties, thermal degradation, and corrosiveness to metals, lauric acid and iron was selected for the PCM and the latent heat storage unit material, respectively. Cyclic heating and cooling of the latent heat storage unit undergoing solid-liquid phase change was repeated for more than 430 days. The results showed that the heating-cooling curve was almost unchanged between the early stage and the 1,870th cycle. It was concluded that the latent heat storage unit could be used safely for more than ten years as a component of the cooling system.

  10. Shallow and Deep Latent Heating Modes Over Tropical Oceans Observed with TRMM PR Spectral Latent Heating Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takayabu, Yukari N.; Shige, Shoichi; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Hirota, Nagio

    2010-01-01

    The global hydrological cycle is central to the Earth's climate system, with rainfall and the physics of its formation acting as the key links in the cycle. Two-thirds of global rainfall occurs in the Tropics. Associated with this rainfall is a vast amount of heat, which is known as latent heat. It arises mainly due to the phase change of water vapor condensing into liquid droplets; three-fourths of the total heat energy available to the Earth's atmosphere comes from tropical rainfall. In addition, fresh water provided by tropical rainfall and its variability exerts a large impact upon the structure and motions of the upper ocean layer. Three-dimensional distributions of latent heating estimated from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR)utilizing the Spectral Latent Heating (SLH) algorithm are analyzed. Mass-weighted and vertically integrated latent heating averaged over the tropical oceans is estimated as approx.72.6 J/s (approx.2.51 mm/day), and that over tropical land is approx.73.7 J/s (approx.2.55 mm/day), for 30degN-30degS. It is shown that non-drizzle precipitation over tropical and subtropical oceans consists of two dominant modes of rainfall systems, deep systems and congestus. A rough estimate of shallow mode contribution against the total heating is about 46.7 % for the average tropical oceans, which is substantially larger than 23.7 % over tropical land. While cumulus congestus heating linearly correlates with the SST, deep mode is dynamically bounded by large-scale subsidence. It is notable that substantial amount of rain, as large as 2.38 mm day-1 in average, is brought from congestus clouds under the large-scale subsiding circulation. It is also notable that even in the region with SST warmer than 28 oC, large-scale subsidence effectively suppresses the deep convection, remaining the heating by congestus clouds. Our results support that the entrainment of mid-to-lower-tropospheric dry air, which accompanies the large

  11. Sensible and latent heating of the atmosphere as inferred from DST-6 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, G. F.; Schubert, S. D.; Johnson, W. T.

    1979-01-01

    The average distribution of convective latent heating, boundary layer sensible heat flux, and vertical velocity are determined for the winter 1976 DST period from GLAS model diagnostics. Key features are the regions of intense latent heating over Brazil, Central Africa, and Indonesia; and the regions of strong sensible heating due to air mass modification over the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans.

  12. Intercomparison of Latent Heat Fluxes Over Global Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Nelkin, Eric; Ardizzone, Joe; Atlas, Robert M.; Chou, Ming-Dah

    2003-01-01

    Turbulent fluxes of momentum, moisture, and heat at the air-sea interface are essential for climate studies. Version 2 Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes (GSSTF2) has been derived from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) radiance measurements. This dataset, covering the period July 1987-December 2000 over global oceans, has a spatial resolution of 1 deg x 1 deg lat-long and a temporal resolution of 1 day. Turbulent fluxes are derived from the SSM/I surface winds and surface air humidity, as well as the 2-m air and sea surface temperatures (SST) of the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, using a bulk aerodynamic algorithm based on the surface layer similarity theory. The GSSTF2 bulk flux model, and retrieved daily wind stress, latent heat flux, wind speed, and surface air humidity validate well with ship observations of ten field experiments over the tropical and midlatitude oceans during 1991-99. The global distributions of 1988-2000 annual- and seasonal-mean turbulent fluxes show reasonable patterns related to the atmospheric general circulation and seasonal variations. Latent heat fluxes and related input parameters over global oceans during 1992-93 have been compared among GSSTF1 (version 1), GSSTF2, HOAPS (Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data), NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, and one based on COADS (Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set). Our analyses suggest that the GSSTF2 latent heat flux, surface air humidity, surface wind, and SST are quite realistic compared to the other four flux datasets examined. However, significant differences are found among these five flux datasets. The GSSTF2, available at http://daac.gsfc.nasa.gov/CAMPAIGN_DOCS/hydrology/hd_gsstf2.O.html, is useful for climate studies.

  13. MJO Signals in Latent Heating: Results from TRMM Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Chidong; Ling, Jian; Hagos, Samson; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Steve; Takayabu, Yukari N.; Shige, Shoichi; Katsumata, Masaki; Olson, William S.; L'Ecuyer, Tristan

    2010-01-01

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is the dominant intraseasonal signal in the global tropical atmosphere. Almost all numerical climate models have difficulty to simulate realistic MJO. Four TRMM datasets of latent heating were diagnosed for signals in the MJO. In all four datasets, vertical structures of latent heating are dominated by two components, one deep with its peak above the melting level and one shallow with its peak below. Profiles of the two components are nearly ubiquitous in longitude, allowing a separation of the vertical and zonal/temporal variations when the latitudinal dependence is not considered. All four datasets exhibit robust MJO spectral signals in the deep component as eastward propagating spectral peaks centered at period of 50 days and zonal wavenumber 1, well distinguished from lower- and higher-frequency power and much stronger than the corresponding westward power. The shallow component shows similar but slightly less robust MJO spectral peaks. MJO signals were further extracted from a combination of band-pass (30 - 90 day) filtered deep and shallow components. Largest amplitudes of both deep and shallow components of the MJO are confined to the Indian and western Pacific Oceans. There is a local minimum in the deep components over the Maritime Continent. The shallow components of the MJO differ substantially among the four TRMM datasets in their detailed zonal distributions in the eastern hemisphere. In composites of the heating evolution through the life cycle of the MJO, the shallow components lead the deep ones in some datasets and at certain longitudes. In many respects, the four TRMM datasets agree well in their deep components, but not in their shallow components and the phase relations between the deep and shallow components. These results indicate that caution must be exercised in applications of these latent heating data.

  14. Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection and Interferon-Gamma Release Assays.

    PubMed

    Pai, Madhukar; Behr, Marcel

    2016-10-01

    The identification of individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is useful for both fundamental understanding of the pathogenesis of disease and for clinical and public health interventions (i.e., to prevent progression to disease). Basic research suggests there is a pathogenetic continuum from exposure to infection to disease, and individuals may advance or reverse positions within the spectrum, depending on changes in the host immunity. Unfortunately, there is no diagnostic test that resolves the various stages within the spectrum of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Two main immune-based approaches are currently used for identification of LTBI: the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA). TST can use either the conventional purified protein derivative or more specific antigens. Extensive research suggests that both TST and IGRA represent indirect markers of M. tuberculosis exposure and indicates a cellular immune response to M. tuberculosis. The imperfect concordance between these two tests suggests that neither test is perfect, presumably due to both technical and biological reasons. Neither test can accurately differentiate between LTBI and active TB. Both IGRA and TST have low sensitivity in a variety of immunocompromised populations. Cohort studies have shown that both TST and IGRA have low predictive value for progression from infection to active TB. For fundamental applications, basic research is necessary to identify those at highest risk of disease with a positive TST and/or IGRA. For clinical applications, the identification of such biomarkers can help prioritize efforts to interrupt progression to disease through preventive therapy.

  15. Latent heating and cloud processes in warm fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igel, Adele

    The results of two studies are presented in this thesis. In the first, an extratropical cyclone that crossed the United States on April 9-11 2009 was successfully simulated at high resolution (3km horizontal grid spacing) using the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System. The sensitivity of the associated warm front to increasing pollution levels was then explored by conducting the same experiment with three different background profiles of cloud-nucleating aerosol concentration. To our knowledge, no study has examined the indirect effects of aerosols on warm fronts. First the budgets of ice, cloud water, and rain in the simulation with the lowest aerosol concentrations were examined. The ice mass was found to be produced in equal amounts through vapor deposition and riming and the melting of ice produced ˜75% of the total rain. Conversion of cloud water to rain accounted for the other 25%. When cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations were increased, significant changes were seen in the budget terms, but total precipitation was relatively constant. Vapor deposition onto ice increased, but riming of cloud water decreased such that there was only a small change in the total ice production and hence there was no significant change in melting. These responses can be understood in terms of a buffering effect in which smaller cloud droplets in the mixed phase region lead to both an enhanced Bergeron process and decreased riming efficiencies with increasing aerosol concentrations. Overall, while large changes were seen in the microphysical structure of the frontal cloud, cloud-nucleating aerosols had little impact on the precipitation production of the warm front. The second study addresses the role of latent heating associated with the warm front by assessing the relative contributions of individual cloud processes to latent heating and frontogenesis in both the horizontal and vertical directions. Condensation and cloud droplet nucleation are the

  16. Flat plate solar air heater with latent heat storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touati, B.; Kerroumi, N.; Virgone, J.

    2017-02-01

    Our work contains two parts, first is an experimental study of the solar air heater with a simple flow and forced convection, we can use thatlaste oneit in many engineering's sectors as solardrying, space heating in particular. The second part is a numerical study with ansys fluent 15 of the storage of part of this solar thermal energy produced,using latent heat by using phase change materials (PCM). In the experimental parts, we realize and tested our solar air heater in URER.MS ADRAR, locate in southwest Algeria. Where we measured the solarradiation, ambient temperature, air flow, thetemperature of the absorber, glasses and the outlet temperature of the solar air heater from the Sunrise to the sunset. In the second part, we added a PCM at outlet part of the solar air heater. This PCM store a part of the energy produced in the day to be used in peak period at evening by using the latent heat where the PCMs present a grateful storagesystem.A numerical study of the fusion or also named the charging of the PCM using ANSYS Fluent 15, this code use the method of enthalpies to solve the fusion and solidification formulations. Furthermore, to improve the conjugate heat transfer between the heat transfer fluid (Air heated in solar plate air heater) and the PCM, we simulate the effect of adding fins to our geometry. Also, four user define are write in C code to describe the thermophysicalpropriety of the PCM, and the inlet temperature of our geometry which is the temperature at the outflow of the solar heater.

  17. Environmental Forcing of Super Typhoon Paka's (1997) Latent Heat Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, Edward B.; Olson, William; Halverson, Jeff; Simpson, Joanne; Pierce, Harold

    1999-01-01

    The distribution and intensity of total (i.e., combined stratified and convective processes) rainrate/latent heat release (LHR) were derived for tropical cyclone Paka during the period 9-21 December, 1997 from the F-10, F-11, F-13, and F-14 Defense Meteorological Satellite Special Sensor Microwave/Imager and the Tropical Rain Measurement Mission Microwave Imager observations. These observations were frequent enough to capture three episodes of inner core convective bursts that preceded periods of rapid intensification and a convective rainband (CRB) cycle. During these periods of convective bursts, satellite sensors revealed that the rainrates/LHR: 1) increased within the inner eye wall region; 2) were mainly convectively generated (nearly a 65% contribution), 3) propagated inwards; 4) extended upwards within the middle and upper-troposphere, and 5) became electrically charged. These factors may have caused the eye wall region to become more buoyant within the middle and upper-troposphere, creating greater cyclonic angular momentum, and, thereby, warming the center and intensifying the system. Radiosonde measurements from Kwajalein Atoll and Guam, sea surface temperature observations, and the European Center for Medium Range Forecast analyses were used to examine the necessary and sufficient condition for initiating and maintaining these inner core convective bursts. For example, the necessary conditions such as the atmospheric thermodynamics (i.e., cold tropopause temperatures, moist troposphere, and warm SSTs [greater than 26 deg]) suggested that the atmosphere was ideal for Paka's maximum potential intensity (MPI) to approach super-typhoon strength. Further, Paka encountered weak vertical wind shear (less than 15 m/s ) before interacting with the westerlies on 21 December. The sufficient conditions, on the other hand, appeared to have some influence on Paka's convective burst, but the horizontal moisture flux convergence values in the outer core were weaker than

  18. Effect of Latent Heat of Freezing on Crustal Generation at Ultraslow Spreading Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, N. H.; Warren, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The transition between slow and ultraslow ridge axes occurs at the spreading rate below which steady state molten rock cannot exist above the normal Moho depth of ca. 6 km. The latent heat of basaltic magma freezing within the mantle and the kinematics of the seafloor spreading play significant roles in this transition. Using thermal models, we show that freezing of melt at mantle depths buffers temperature due to latent heat of freezing. This allows steady state crustal magma at lower spreading rates than when all the melt freezes at shallow crustal depths. Two quasi-stable seafloor-spreading patterns are possible: (1) basaltic magma along a narrow axial zone, maintaining a hot, weak axial lid that favors this extension pattern; (2) extension in simple shear over a broad zone with isotherms that are horizontal within the cool lid, favoring extension in simple shear. The statistics of basalt, gabbro, melt-impregnated peridotite, and peridotite dredged from transitional ridge axes indicates that the mode of crustal generation is extremely variable at ultraslow spreading rates. Portions of the easternmost Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) are spreading at 14 mm per year and consist of 90 percent peridotite, whereas the SWIR Oblique Segment has the same spreading rate but only 37 percent peridotite. Overall, the dredge statistics indicate that some, but not all, the latent heat of ascending magmas is released at mantle depth, that both quasi-stable seafloor-spreading geometries occur, and that magma ascent focuses locally along the strike of transitional ridge axes.

  19. Latent heat storage technology and application workshop. Summary report: Session 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. F.

    Latent heat storage technology and application were studied. The economics of short term latent heat storage for application and system configuration were analyzed. Subjects discussed included: state of the art, solar energy stores, residential heating and cooling, and industrial and utility applications.

  20. Including latent and sensible heat fluxes from sea spray in global weather and climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copsey, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Most standard weather and climate models calculate interfacial latent (evaporation) and sensible heat fluxes over the ocean based on parameterisations of atmospheric turbulence, using the wave state only in the calculation of surface roughness length. They ignore latent and sensible heat fluxes generated by sea spray, which is an acceptable assumption at low wind speeds. However at high wind speeds (> 15 m/s) a significant amount of sea spray is generated from the sea surface which, while airborne, cools to an equilibrium temperature, absorbs heat and releases moisture before re-impacting the sea surface. This could impact, for example, the total heat loss from the Southern Ocean (which is anomalously warm in Met Office coupled models) or the accuracy of tropical cyclone forecasts. A modified version of the Fairall sea spray parameterisation scheme has been tested in the Met Office Unified Model including the JULES surface exchange model in both climate and NWP mode. The fast part of the scheme models the temperature change of the droplets to an equilibrium temperature and the slow part of the scheme models the evaporation and heat absorption while the droplets remain airborne. Including this scheme in the model cools and moistens the near surface layers of the atmosphere during high wind events, including tropical cyclones. Sea spray goes on to increase the convection intensity and precipitation near the high wind events in the model.

  1. Wallboard with Latent Heat Storage for Passive Solar Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kedl, R.J.

    2001-05-31

    Conventional wallboard impregnated with octadecane paraffin [melting point-23 C (73.5 F)] is being developed as a building material with latent heat storage for passive solar and other applications. Impregnation was accomplished simply by soaking the wallboard in molten wax. Concentrations of wax in the combined product as high as 35% by weight can be achieved. Scale-up of the soaking process, from small laboratory samples to full-sized 4- by 8-ft sheets, has been successfully accomplished. The required construction properties of wallboard are maintained after impregnation, that is, it can be painted and spackled. Long-term, high-temperature exposure tests and thermal cycling tests showed no tendency of the paraffin to migrate within the wallboard, and there was no deterioration of thermal energy storage capacity. In support of this concept, a computer model was developed to handle thermal transport and storage by a phase change material (PCM) dispersed in a porous media. The computer model was confirmed by comparison with known analytical solutions and also by comparison with temperatures measured in wallboard during an experimentally generated thermal transient. Agreement between the model and known solution was excellent. Agreement between the model and thermal transient was good, only after the model was modified to allow the PCM to melt over a temperature range, rather than at a specific melting point. When the melting characteristics of the PCM (melting point, melting range, and heat of fusion), as determined from a differential scanning calorimeter plot, were used in the model, agreement between the model and transient data was very good. The confirmed computer model may now be used in conjunction with a building heating and cooling code to evaluate design parameters and operational characteristics of latent heat storage wallboard for passive solar applications.

  2. Relating Convective and Stratiform Rain to Latent Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen; Zeng, Xiping; Shige, Shoichi; Takayabu, Yukari

    2010-01-01

    The relationship among surface rainfall, its intensity, and its associated stratiform amount is established by examining observed precipitation data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The results show that for moderate-high stratiform fractions, rain probabilities are strongly skewed toward light rain intensities. For convective-type rain, the peak probability of occurrence shifts to higher intensities but is still significantly skewed toward weaker rain rates. The main differences between the distributions for oceanic and continental rain are for heavily convective rain. The peak occurrence, as well as the tail of the distribution containing the extreme events, is shifted to higher intensities for continental rain. For rainy areas sampled at 0.58 horizontal resolution, the occurrence of conditional rain rates over 100 mm/day is significantly higher over land. Distributions of rain intensity versus stratiform fraction for simulated precipitation data obtained from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations are quite similar to those from the satellite, providing a basis for mapping simulated cloud quantities to the satellite observations. An improved convective-stratiform heating (CSH) algorithm is developed based on two sources of information: gridded rainfall quantities (i.e., the conditional intensity and the stratiform fraction) observed from the TRMM PR and synthetic cloud process data (i.e., latent heating, eddy heat flux convergence, and radiative heating/cooling) obtained from CRM simulations of convective cloud systems. The new CSH algorithm-derived heating has a noticeably different heating structure over both ocean and land regions compared to the previous CSH algorithm. Major differences between the new and old algorithms include a significant increase in the amount of low- and midlevel heating, a downward emphasis in the level of maximum cloud heating by about 1 km, and a larger variance between land and ocean in

  3. Method of testing active latent-heat storage devices based on thermal performance. (ASHRAE standard)

    SciTech Connect

    1985-01-26

    The purpose of this standard is to provide a standard procedure for determining the thermal performance of latent heat thermal energy storage devices used in heating, air-conditioning, and service hot water systems.

  4. Impact of Ridge Induced Latent Heat Advection on Sea Ice Global Heat Budget.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudier, E.; Gosselin, J.

    2008-12-01

    The effects of permeability on ice keel induced latent heat fluxes are examined using pressure ridge density statistics computed from SAR images and a prognostic simulation of forced brine advection through the bottom ice layer. Under pressure gradients generated in the wake of an ice keel sea water is pushed into and brine pumped out of the bottom ice layer. This in turn causes a new thermodynamic equilibrium to be reached. At spring when the ice permeability increases, brine export combined with sea water import translates into an advective heat flow that is balanced by the latent heat absorbed by volume melting of brine channel walls. Sea ice within the sheltered areas behind keels is modelled as an anisotropic heteregeneous mushy layer. The non-linear equation system within each cell is implemented on a finite volume grid and include volume melt of the brine channels from which porosity, water density, temperature and salinity are computed. Outputs from these simulations are then combined with ridge distribution statistics to evaluate the global impact of latent heat absorbed due to volume melting in the wake of ridges. As anticipated, results are highly dependent on permeability, nevertheless, they show that pressure ridge induced melting within the ice is a significant component of the heat budget when compared with melting at the ice water interface. This work underlines needs for further researches to improve our understanding of ice permeability changes during the melt season, it also calls for better tools to extract pressure ridge characteristics from satellite images.

  5. Experimental Investigation of A Heat Pipe-Assisted Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiari, Saeed; Mahdavi, Mahboobe; Qiu, Songgang

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, different operation modes of a latent heat thermal energy storage system assisted by a heat pipe network were studied experimentally. Rubitherm RT55 enclosed by a vertical cylindrical container was used as the Phase Change Material (PCM). The embedded heat pipe network consisting of a primary heat pipe and an array of four secondary heat pipes were employed to transfer heat to the PCM. The primary heat pipe transports heat from the heat source to the heat sink. The secondary heat pipes transfer the extra heat from the heat source to PCM during charging process or retrieve thermal energy from PCM during discharging process. The effects of heat transfer fluid (HTF) flow rate and temperature on the thermal performance of the system were investigated for both charging and discharging processes. It was found that the HTF flow rate has a significant effect on the total charging time of the system. Increasing the HTF flow rate results in a remarkable increase in the system input thermal power. The results also showed that the discharging process is hardly affected by the HTF flow rate but HTF temperature plays an important role in both charging and discharging processes. The authors would like to acknowledge the financial supports by Temple University for the project.

  6. The microphysical contributions to and evolution of latent heating profiles in two MC3E MCSs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinescu, P. J.; Heever, S. C.; Saleeby, S. M.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    The shapes and magnitudes of latent heating profiles have been shown to be different within the convective and stratiform regions of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Properly representing these distinctions has significant implications for the atmospheric responses to latent heating on various scales. This study details (1) the microphysical process contributions to latent heating profiles within MCS convective, stratiform, and anvil regions and (2) the time evolution of these profiles throughout the MCS lifetime, using cloud-resolving model simulations. Simulations of two MCS events that occurred during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) are conducted. Several features of the simulated MCSs are compared to a suite of observations obtained during the MC3E field campaign, and it is concluded that the simulations reasonably reproduce the MCS events. The simulations show that condensation and deposition are the primary contributors to MCS latent warming, as compared to riming and nucleation processes. In terms of MCS latent cooling, sublimation, melting, and evaporation all play significant roles. It is evident that throughout the MCS lifecycle, convective regions demonstrate an approximately linear decrease in the magnitudes of latent heating rates, while latent heating within stratiform regions is associated with transitions between MCS flow regimes. Such information regarding the temporal evolution of latent heating within convective and stratiform MCS regions could be useful in developing parameterizations representing convective organization.

  7. A Retrieval of Tropical Latent Heating Using the 3D Structure of Precipitation Features

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Fiaz; Schumacher, Courtney; Feng, Zhe; Hagos, Samson

    2016-09-01

    Traditionally, radar-based latent heating retrievals use rainfall to estimate the total column-integrated latent heating and then distribute that heating in the vertical using a model-based look-up table (LUT). In this study, we develop a new method that uses size characteristics of radar-observed precipitating echo (i.e., area and mean echo-top height) to estimate the vertical structure of latent heating. This technique (named the Convective-Stratiform Area [CSA] algorithm) builds on the fact that the shape and magnitude of latent heating profiles are dependent on the organization of convective systems and aims to avoid some of the pitfalls involved in retrieving accurate rainfall amounts and microphysical information from radars and models. The CSA LUTs are based on a high-resolution Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) simulation whose domain spans much of the near-equatorial Indian Ocean. When applied to S-PolKa radar observations collected during the DYNAMO/CINDY2011/AMIE field campaign, the CSA retrieval compares well to heating profiles from a sounding-based budget analysis and improves upon a simple rain-based latent heating retrieval. The CSA LUTs also highlight the fact that convective latent heating increases in magnitude and height as cluster area and echo-top heights grow, with a notable congestus signature of cooling at mid levels. Stratiform latent heating is less dependent on echo-top height, but is strongly linked to area. Unrealistic latent heating profiles in the stratiform LUT, viz., a low-level heating spike, an elevated melting layer, and net column cooling were identified and corrected for. These issues highlight the need for improvement in model parameterizations, particularly in linking microphysical phase changes to larger mesoscale processes.

  8. Preparation of fine powdered composite for latent heat storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fořt, Jan; Pomaleski, Marina; Trník, Anton; Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-07-01

    Application of latent heat storage building envelope systems using phase-change materials represents an attractive method of storing thermal energy and has the advantages of high-energy storage density and the isothermal nature of the storage process. This study deals with a preparation of a new type of powdered phase change composite material for thermal energy storage. The idea of a composite is based upon the impregnation of a natural silicate material by a reasonably priced commercially produced pure phase change material and forming the homogenous composite powdered structure. For the preparation of the composite, vacuum impregnation method is used. The particle size distribution accessed by the laser diffraction apparatus proves that incorporation of the organic phase change material into the structure of inorganic siliceous pozzolana does not lead to the clustering of the particles. The compatibility of the prepared composite is characterized by the Fourier transformation infrared analysis (FTIR). Performed DSC analysis shows potential of the developed composite for thermal energy storage that can be easily incorporated into the cement-based matrix of building materials. Based on the obtained results, application of the developed phase change composite can be considered with a great promise.

  9. Preparation of fine powdered composite for latent heat storage

    SciTech Connect

    Fořt, Jan Trník, Anton Pavlíková, Milena Pavlík, Zbyšek; Pomaleski, Marina

    2016-07-07

    Application of latent heat storage building envelope systems using phase-change materials represents an attractive method of storing thermal energy and has the advantages of high-energy storage density and the isothermal nature of the storage process. This study deals with a preparation of a new type of powdered phase change composite material for thermal energy storage. The idea of a composite is based upon the impregnation of a natural silicate material by a reasonably priced commercially produced pure phase change material and forming the homogenous composite powdered structure. For the preparation of the composite, vacuum impregnation method is used. The particle size distribution accessed by the laser diffraction apparatus proves that incorporation of the organic phase change material into the structure of inorganic siliceous pozzolana does not lead to the clustering of the particles. The compatibility of the prepared composite is characterized by the Fourier transformation infrared analysis (FTIR). Performed DSC analysis shows potential of the developed composite for thermal energy storage that can be easily incorporated into the cement-based matrix of building materials. Based on the obtained results, application of the developed phase change composite can be considered with a great promise.

  10. Wallboard with latent heat storage for passive solar applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kedl, R.J.

    1991-05-01

    Conventional wallboard impregnated with octadecane paraffin is being developed as a building material with latent heat storage for passive solar and other applications. Impregnation was accomplished simply by soaking the wallboard in molten wax. Concentrations of wax in the combined product as high as 35% by weight can be achieved. Scale-up of the soaking process, from small laboratory samples to full-sized 4- by 8-ft sheets, has been successfully accomplished. The required construction properties of wallboard are maintained after impregnation, that is, it can be painted and spackled. Long-term, high-temperature exposure tests and thermal cycling tests showed no tendency of the paraffin to migrate within the wallboard, and there was no deterioration of thermal energy storage capacity. In support of this concept, a computer model was developed to handle thermal transport and storage by a phase change material (PCM) dispersed in a porous media. The computer model was confirmed by comparison with known analytical solutions and also by comparison with temperatures measured in wallboard during an experimentally generated thermal transient. Agreement between the model and known solution was excellent. Agreement between the model and thermal transient was good, only after the model was modified to allow the PCM to melt over a temperature range, rather than at a specific melting point. When the melting characteristics of the PCM, as determined from a differential scanning calorimeter plot, were used in the model, agreement between the model and transient data was very good. 11 refs., 25 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Sensible and latent heat flux estimates in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, Charles R.; Weidner, George A.

    1993-01-01

    The assumption has been made that the net annual contribution of water by the processes of deposition and sublimation to the Antarctic Ice Sheet is zero. The U.S. Antarctic Program started installing reliable automatic weather stations on the Antarctic Continent in 1980. The initial units were equipped to measure wind speed, wind direction, air pressure, and air temperature. During the 1983-1984 field season in Antarctica, three units were installed that measured a vertical air temperature difference between the nominal heights of 0.5 m and 3.0 m and relative humidity at a nominal height of 3 m. The measurements of the vertical air temperature difference and the relative humidity are the minimum required to estimate the sensible and latent heat fluxes to the air, while not exceeding the available energy requirements for the weather stations. The estimates of the net annual sublimation and deposition on the Ross Ice Shelf amount to 20 to 80 percent of the annual accumulation. We conclude that the assumption that annual sublimation and deposition are zero is not valid under Antarctic conditions.

  12. Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Anoop

    2013-08-14

    A key technological issue facing the success of future Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSP) plants is creating an economical Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. Current TES systems use either sensible heat in fluids such as oil, or molten salts, or use thermal stratification in a dual-media consisting of a solid and a heat-transfer fluid. However, utilizing the heat of fusion in inorganic molten salt mixtures in addition to sensible heat , as in a Phase change material (PCM)-based TES, can significantly increase the energy density of storage requiring less salt and smaller containers. A major issue that is preventing the commercial use of PCM-based TES is that it is difficult to discharge the latent heat stored in the PCM melt. This is because when heat is extracted, the melt solidifies onto the heat exchanger surface decreasing the heat transfer. Even a few millimeters of thickness of solid material on heat transfer surface results in a large drop in heat transfer due to the low thermal conductivity of solid PCM. Thus, to maintain the desired heat rate, the heat exchange area must be large which increases cost. This project demonstrated that the heat transfer coefficient can be increase ten-fold by using forced convection by pumping a hyper-eutectic salt mixture over specially coated heat exchanger tubes. However,only 15% of the latent heat is used against a goal of 40% resulting in a projected cost savings of only 17% against a goal of 30%. Based on the failure mode effect analysis and experience with pumping salt at near freezing point significant care must be used during operation which can increase the operating costs. Therefore, we conclude the savings are marginal to justify using this concept for PCM-TES over a two-tank TES. The report documents the specialty coatings, the composition and morphology of hypereutectic salt mixtures and the results from the experiment conducted with the active heat exchanger along with the lessons learnt during

  13. The role of latent heat in kinetic energy conversions of South Pacific cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kann, Deirdre M.; Vincent, Dayton G.

    1986-01-01

    The four-dimensional behavior of cyclone systems in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) is analyzed. Three cyclone systems, which occurred during the period from January 10-16, 1979, are examined using the data collected during the first special observing period of the FGGE. The effects of latent heating on the life cycles of the cyclones are investigated. Particular attention is given to the conversions of eddy available potential energy to eddy kinetic energy and of mean kinetic energy to eddy kinetic energy. The net radiation profile, sensible heat flux, total field of vertical motion, and latent heat component were computed. The life cycles of the cyclones are described. It is observed that the latent heating component accounts for nearly all the conversion in the three cyclones, and latent heating within the SPCZ is the major source of eddy kinetic energy for the cyclones.

  14. The role of latent heat in kinetic energy conversions of South Pacific cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kann, Deirdre M.; Vincent, Dayton G.

    1986-01-01

    The four-dimensional behavior of cyclone systems in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) is analyzed. Three cyclone systems, which occurred during the period from January 10-16, 1979, are examined using the data collected during the first special observing period of the FGGE. The effects of latent heating on the life cycles of the cyclones are investigated. Particular attention is given to the conversions of eddy available potential energy to eddy kinetic energy and of mean kinetic energy to eddy kinetic energy. The net radiation profile, sensible heat flux, total field of vertical motion, and latent heat component were computed. The life cycles of the cyclones are described. It is observed that the latent heating component accounts for nearly all the conversion in the three cyclones, and latent heating within the SPCZ is the major source of eddy kinetic energy for the cyclones.

  15. High temperature latent heat thermal energy storage to augment solar thermal propulsion for microsatellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilpin, Matthew R.

    technology for the platform. The use of silicon and boron as high temperature latent heat thermal energy storage materials has been in the background of solar thermal research for decades without a substantial investigation. This is despite a broad agreement in the literature about the performance benefits obtainable from a latent heat mechanisms which provides a high energy storage density and quasi-isothermal heat release at high temperature. In this work, an experimental approach was taken to uncover the practical concerns associated specifically with applying silicon as an energy storage material. A new solar furnace was built and characterized enabling the creation of molten silicon in the laboratory. These tests have demonstrated the basic feasibility of a molten silicon based thermal energy storage system and have highlighted asymmetric heat transfer as well as silicon expansion damage to be the primary engineering concerns for the technology. For cylindrical geometries, it has been shown that reduced fill factors can prevent damage to graphite walled silicon containers at the expense of decreased energy storage density. Concurrent with experimental testing, a cooling model was written using the "enthalpy method" to calculate the phase change process and predict test section performance. Despite a simplistic phase change model, and experimentally demonstrated complexities of the freezing process, results coincided with experimental data. It is thus possible to capture essential system behaviors of a latent heat thermal energy storage system even with low fidelity freezing kinetics modeling allowing the use of standard tools to obtain reasonable results. Finally, a technological road map is provided listing extant technological concerns and potential solutions. Improvements in container design and an increased understanding of convective coupling efficiency will ultimately enable both high temperature latent heat thermal energy storage and a new class of high

  16. Latent Heating Profiles Derived from ARM Radar Observations in MC3E and GoAmazon Field Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Q.; Li, R.; Mu, Z.; Giangrande, S. E.; Wang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Atmosphere latent heating (LH) is released through water phase change processes in the atmosphere. There is a physical connection between LH rate and updraft velocity (ω) inside clouds. In this study, we develop a new LH algorithm based on a quantified LH-ω relationship found in cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations. The self-consistency check with CRM simulations shows that the retrievals correctly replicate the main features of LH profiles, including their total and individual components (i.e. condensation-evaporation heating rate, deposition-sublimation heating rate, and freezing-melting heating rate). Further, the algorithm is applied to real cases from the DOE-ARM MC3E and GoAmazon2014/6 Field Campaigns using available UHF (915 and 1290 MHz) zenith radar retrievals of vertical velocity and rain rate as input. The retrieved LH profiles in the deep convective rains show positive heating throughout the column, the LH profiles in the stratiform rains with well-defined bright-band showing clear dipole patterns with positive heating above and negative cooling below the freezing level. The altitudes of maximum heating in the widespread stratiform regimes are clearly higher than those found within deep convective regions. Overall, these Latent heating rate profiles, as an important geophysical quantity of interest, can provide useful climate diagnostic data, and ultimately, constraints for model-based analyses of large-scale heating distributions.

  17. TRMM Latent Heating Retrieval and Comparisons with Field Campaigns and Large-Scale Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Takayabu, Yukuri; Lang, S.; Shige, S.; Olson, W.; Hou, A.; Jiang, X.; Zhang, C.; Lau, W.; Krishnamurti, T.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Rainfall production is a fundamental process within the Earth's hydrological cycle because it represents both a principal forcing term in surface water budgets, and its energetics corollary, latent heating (LH), is one of the principal sources of atmospheric diabatic heating. Latent heat release itself is a consequence of phase changes between the vapor, liquid, and frozen states of water. The vertical distribution of LH has a strong influence on the atmosphere, controlling large-scale tropical circulations, exciting and modulating tropical waves, maintaining the intensities of tropical cyclones, and even providing the energetics of midlatitude cyclones and other mobile midlatitude weather systems. Moreover, the processes associated with LH result in significant non-linear changes in atmospheric radiation through the creation, dissipation and modulation of clouds and precipitation. Yanai et al. (1973) utilized the meteorological data collected from a sounding network to present a pioneering work on thermodynamic budgets, which are referred to as the apparent heat source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2). Yanai's paper motivated the development of satellite-based LH algorithms and provided a theoretical background for imposing large-scale advective forcing into cloud-resolving models (CRMs). These CRM-simulated LH and Q1 data have been used to generate the look-up tables used in LH algorithms. This paper examines the retrieval, validation, and application of LH estimates based on rain rate quantities acquired from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite (TRMM). TRMM was launched in November 1997 as a joint enterprise between the American and Japanese space agencies -- with overriding goals of providing accurate four-dimensional estimates of rainfall and LH over the global Tropics and subtropics equatorward of 35o. Other literature has acknowledged the achievement of the first goal of obtaining an accurate rainfall climatology. This paper describes the

  18. Using satellite and reanalysis data to evaluate the representation of latent heating in extratropical cyclones in a climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawcroft, Matt; Dacre, Helen; Forbes, Richard; Hodges, Kevin; Shaffrey, Len; Stein, Thorwald

    2016-06-01

    Extratropical cyclones are a key feature of the weather in the extratropics, which climate models need to represent in order to provide reliable projections of future climate. Extratropical cyclones produce significant precipitation and the associated latent heat release can play a major role in their development. This study evaluates the ability of a climate model, HiGEM, to represent latent heating in extratropical cyclones. Remote sensing data is used to investigate the ability of both the climate model and ERA-Interim (ERAI) reanalysis to represent extratropical cyclone cloud features before latent heating itself is assessed. An offline radiance simulator, COSP, and the ISCCP and CloudSat datasets are used to evaluate comparable fields from HiGEM and ERAI. HiGEM is found to exhibit biases in the cloud structure of extratropical cyclones, with too much high cloud produced in the warm conveyor belt region compared to ISCCP. Significant latent heating occurs in this region, derived primarily from HiGEM's convection scheme. ERAI is also found to exhibit biases in cloud structure, with more clouds at lower altitudes than those observed in ISCCP in the warm conveyor belt region. As a result, latent heat release in ERAI is concentrated at lower altitudes. CloudSat indicates that much precipitation may be produced at too low an altitude in both HiGEM and ERAI, particularly ERAI, and neither capture observed variability in precipitation intensity. The potential vorticity structure in composite extratropical cyclones in HiGEM and ERAI is also compared. A more pronounced tropopause ridge evolves in HiGEM on the leading edge of the composite as compared to ERAI. One future area of research to be addressed is what impact these biases in the representation of latent heating have on climate projections produced by HiGEM. The biases found in ERAI indicate caution is required when using reanalyses to study cloud features and precipitation processes in extratropical cyclones or

  19. Using satellite and reanalysis data to evaluate the representation of latent heating in extratropical cyclones in a climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawcroft, Matt; Dacre, Helen; Forbes, Richard; Hodges, Kevin; Shaffrey, Len; Stein, Thorwald

    2017-04-01

    Extratropical cyclones are a key feature of the weather in the extratropics, which climate models need to represent in order to provide reliable projections of future climate. Extratropical cyclones produce significant precipitation and the associated latent heat release can play a major role in their development. This study evaluates the ability of a climate model, HiGEM, to represent latent heating in extratropical cyclones. Remote sensing data is used to investigate the ability of both the climate model and ERA-Interim (ERAI) reanalysis to represent extratropical cyclone cloud features before latent heating itself is assessed. An offline radiance simulator, COSP, and the ISCCP and CloudSat datasets are used to evaluate comparable fields from HiGEM and ERAI. HiGEM is found to exhibit biases in the cloud structure of extratropical cyclones, with too much high cloud produced in the warm conveyor belt region compared to ISCCP. Significant latent heating occurs in this region, derived primarily from HiGEM's convection scheme. ERAI is also found to exhibit biases in cloud structure, with more clouds at lower altitudes than those observed in ISCCP in the warm conveyor belt region. As a result, latent heat release in ERAI is concentrated at lower altitudes. CloudSat indicates that much precipitation may be produced at too low an altitude in both HiGEM and ERAI, particularly ERAI, and neither capture observed variability in precipitation intensity. The potential vorticity structure in composite extratropical cyclones in HiGEM and ERAI is also compared. A more pronounced tropopause ridge evolves in HiGEM on the leading edge of the composite as compared to ERAI. One future area of research to be addressed is what impact these biases in the representation of latent heating have on climate projections produced by HiGEM. The biases found in ERAI indicate caution is required when using reanalyses to study cloud features and precipitation processes in extratropical cyclones or

  20. Latent heat exchange in the boreal and arctic biomes.

    PubMed

    Kasurinen, Ville; Alfredsen, Knut; Kolari, Pasi; Mammarella, Ivan; Alekseychik, Pavel; Rinne, Janne; Vesala, Timo; Bernier, Pierre; Boike, Julia; Langer, Moritz; Belelli Marchesini, Luca; van Huissteden, Ko; Dolman, Han; Sachs, Torsten; Ohta, Takeshi; Varlagin, Andrej; Rocha, Adrian; Arain, Altaf; Oechel, Walter; Lund, Magnus; Grelle, Achim; Lindroth, Anders; Black, Andy; Aurela, Mika; Laurila, Tuomas; Lohila, Annalea; Berninger, Frank

    2014-11-01

    In this study latent heat flux (λE) measurements made at 65 boreal and arctic eddy-covariance (EC) sites were analyses by using the Penman-Monteith equation. Sites were stratified into nine different ecosystem types: harvested and burnt forest areas, pine forests, spruce or fir forests, Douglas-fir forests, broadleaf deciduous forests, larch forests, wetlands, tundra and natural grasslands. The Penman-Monteith equation was calibrated with variable surface resistances against half-hourly eddy-covariance data and clear differences between ecosystem types were observed. Based on the modeled behavior of surface and aerodynamic resistances, surface resistance tightly control λE in most mature forests, while it had less importance in ecosystems having shorter vegetation like young or recently harvested forests, grasslands, wetlands and tundra. The parameters of the Penman-Monteith equation were clearly different for winter and summer conditions, indicating that phenological effects on surface resistance are important. We also compared the simulated λE of different ecosystem types under meteorological conditions at one site. Values of λE varied between 15% and 38% of the net radiation in the simulations with mean ecosystem parameters. In general, the simulations suggest that λE is higher from forested ecosystems than from grasslands, wetlands or tundra-type ecosystems. Forests showed usually a tighter stomatal control of λE as indicated by a pronounced sensitivity of surface resistance to atmospheric vapor pressure deficit. Nevertheless, the surface resistance of forests was lower than for open vegetation types including wetlands. Tundra and wetlands had higher surface resistances, which were less sensitive to vapor pressure deficits. The results indicate that the variation in surface resistance within and between different vegetation types might play a significant role in energy exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere. These results suggest the need

  1. Active heat exchange: System development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alario, J.; Haslett, R.

    1981-03-01

    An active heat exchange method in a latent heat (salt) thermal energy storage system that prevents a low conductivity solid salt layer from forming on heat transfer surfaces was developed. An evaluation of suitable media with melting points in the temperature range of interest (250 to 400 C) limited the candidates to molten salts from the chloride, hydroxide, and nitrate families, based on high storage capacity, good corrosion characteristics, and availability in large quantities at reasonable cost. The specific salt recommended for laboratory tests was a choride eutectic (20.5KCl, 24.5NaCl, 55.0MgCl2 percent by wt.), with a nominal melting point of 385 C.

  2. Measurement of Latent Heat of Melting of Thermal Storage Materials for Dynamic Type Ice Thermal Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hisashi; Okada, Masashi; Nakagawa, Shinji

    In order to measure the latent heat of melting of ice slurries with various solute concentrations, an adiabatic calorimeter was constructed. Ice slurries were made from each aqueous solution of ethanol, ethylene glycol and silane coupling agent. The latent heat of melting of ice made from tap water was measured with the present calorimeter and the uncertainty of the result was one percent. Ice slurries were made both by mixing ice particles made from water with each aqueous solution and by freezing each aqueous solution with stirring in a vessel. The latent heat of melting of these ice slurries was measured with various concentrations of solution. The latent heat of melting decreased as the solute concentration or the freezing point depression increased. The latent heat of ice slurries made from ethanol or ethylene glycol aqueous solution agreed with that of ice made from pure water known already. The latent heat of melting of ice slurries made from silane coupling agent aqueous solution got smaller than that of ice made from pure water as the freezing point depression increased.

  3. Issues of conventional model of transfer of latent heat in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Iwao; Mochizuki, Hidetoshi; Katayama, Arata; Momose, Toshihiko; Fujimaki, Haruyuki

    2017-04-01

    Upper limit of experimental coefficient between the measured transfer of latent heat and the estimated vapour flux in the frame of the conventional model of latent heat transfer in soil was examined by analysing the measured latent heat transfer and temperature gradient in soil under steady-state temperature gradient. To exclude the temperature gradient as an uncertainty factor from the experimental coefficient, the temperature gradients of overall soil and soil pore were included into the vapour fluxes in the atmosphere. The estimated experimental coefficient did not exceed unity, which indicated that both the latent heat transfer and the vapour fluxes in the soil were smaller than those in the atmosphere. The gap that appeared between the experimental coefficient and the product of the tortuosity factor and air-filled porosity implied the existence of an unidentified parameter relevant to characteristic of the circulation of water in soil which is the main mechanism of latent heat transfer in soil. By quantifying this characteristic with simultaneous measurements of the latent heat transfer, distributions of temperature, water content and solute content in various soils under the steady-state condition, the conventional model would be modified, or an alternative model being independent of the conventional model would be developed.

  4. Thermodynamics of latent heat storage in parallel or in series with a heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charach, Chaim; Conti, Massimo

    1995-08-01

    The thermodynamics of a latent heat storage element, connected to a heat source, periodically varying in time, and to a heat engine, is addressed. Two typical modes of operation, referred to as the series and the parallel setups, are considered. They differ with regard to the active phase of the heat source. For the series mode the entire amount of heat transfer fluid (HTF), coming from the source, is first passed through the thermal storage element (TSE) before entering the engine. For the parallel setup only a fraction of the HTF, supplied by the heat source, is delivered directly to the engine, whereas the remaining fraction of HTF is pumped into the TSE to facilitate the exergy storage. The optimal selection of the freezing point of the phase-change material (PCM), the stability of operation of the engine, and the entropy production in the TSE during the heat storage-discharge cycle are considered. The parallel and the series modes of operation are compared for some simplified TSE models. For these models the series setup yields a higher efficiency and stability than the parallel scheme.

  5. Atmospheric Latent Heating Distributions in the Tropics Derived from Satellite Passive Microwave Radiometer Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Hong, Ye; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    1999-06-01

    A method for the remote sensing of three-dimensional latent heating distributions in precipitating tropical weather systems from satellite passive microwave observations is presented. In this method, cloud model simulated hydrometeor/latent heating vertical profiles that have radiative characteristics consistent with a given set of multispectral microwave radiometric observations are composited to create a best estimate of the observed profile. An estimate of the areal coverage of convective precipitation within the radiometer footprint is used as an additional constraint on the contributing model profiles. This constraint leads to more definitive retrieved profiles of precipitation and latent heating in synthetic data tests.The remote sensing method is applied to Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) observations of tropical systems that occurred during the TOGA COARE Intensive Observing Period, and to observations of Hurricane Andrew (1992). Although instantaneous estimates of rain rates are high-biased with respect to coincident radar rain estimates, precipitation patterns are reasonably correlated with radar patterns, and composite rain rate and latent heating profiles show respectable agreement with estimates from forecast models and heat and moisture budget calculations. Uncertainties in the remote sensing estimates of precipitation/latent heating may be partly attributed to the relatively low spatial resolution of the SSM/I and a lack of microwave sensitivity to tenuous anvil cloud, for which upper-tropospheric latent heating rates may be significant. Estimated latent heating distributions in Hurricane Andrew exhibit an upper-level heating maximum that strengthens as the storm undergoes a period of intensification.

  6. Latent Heating Retrievals Using the TRMM Precipitation Radar: A Multi-Seasonal Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Meneghini, B.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Simpson, J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Goddard Convective-Stratiform Heating (CSH) algorithm is used to retrieve profiles of latent heating over the global tropics for a period of several months using TRMM precipitation radar data. The seasonal variation of heating over the tropics is then examined. The period of interest also coincides with several TRMM field campaigns that recently occurred over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and in the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed Q1 budgets from these experiments could provide a means of validating the retrieved profiles of latent heating from the CSH algorithm.

  7. Active latent heat storage with a screw heat exchanger - experimental results for heat transfer and concept for high pressure steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipf, Verena; Willert, Daniel; Neuhäuser, Anton

    2016-05-01

    An innovative active latent heat storage concept was invented and developed at Fraunhofer ISE. It uses a screw heat exchanger (SHE) for the phase change during the transport of a phase change material (PCM) from a cold to a hot tank or vice versa. This separates heat transfer and storage tank in comparison to existing concepts. A test rig has been built in order to investigate the heat transfer coefficients of the SHE during melting and crystallization of the PCM. The knowledge of these characteristics is crucial in order to assess the performance of the latent heat storage in a thermal system. The test rig contains a double shafted SHE, which is heated or cooled with thermal oil. The overall heat transfer coefficient U and the convective heat transfer coefficient on the PCM side hPCM both for charging and discharging have been calculated based on the measured data. For charging, the overall heat transfer coefficient in the tested SHE was Uch = 308 W/m2K and for discharging Udis = 210 W/m2K. Based on the values for hPCM the overall heat transfer coefficients for a larger SHE with steam as heat transfer fluid and an optimized geometry were calculated with Uch = 320 W/m2K for charging and Udis = 243 W/m2K for discharging. For pressures as high as p = 100 bar, an SHE concept has been developed, which uses an organic fluid inside the flight of the SHE as working media. With this concept, the SHE can also be deployed for very high pressure, e.g. as storage in solar thermal power plants.

  8. Modeling conductive heat transfer during high-pressure thawing processes: determination of latent heat as a function of pressure.

    PubMed

    Denys, S; Van Loey, A M; Hendrickx, M E

    2000-01-01

    A numerical heat transfer model for predicting product temperature profiles during high-pressure thawing processes was recently proposed by the authors. In the present work, the predictive capacity of the model was considerably improved by taking into account the pressure dependence of the latent heat of the product that was used (Tylose). The effect of pressure on the latent heat of Tylose was experimentally determined by a series of freezing experiments conducted at different pressure levels. By combining a numerical heat transfer model for freezing processes with a least sum of squares optimization procedure, the corresponding latent heat at each pressure level was estimated, and the obtained pressure relation was incorporated in the original high-pressure thawing model. Excellent agreement with the experimental temperature profiles for both high-pressure freezing and thawing was observed.

  9. Apparent latent heat of evaporation from clothing: attenuation and "heat pipe" effects.

    PubMed

    Havenith, George; Richards, Mark G; Wang, Xiaoxin; Bröde, Peter; Candas, Victor; den Hartog, Emiel; Holmér, Ingvar; Kuklane, Kalev; Meinander, Harriet; Nocker, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Investigating claims that a clothed person's mass loss does not always represent their evaporative heat loss (EVAP), a thermal manikin study was performed measuring heat balance components in more detail than human studies would permit. Using clothing with different levels of vapor permeability and measuring heat losses from skin controlled at 34 degrees C in ambient temperatures of 10, 20, and 34 degrees C with constant vapor pressure (1 kPa), additional heat losses from wet skin compared with dry skin were analyzed. EVAP based on mass loss (E(mass)) measurement and direct measurement of the extra heat loss by the manikin due to wet skin (E(app)) were compared. A clear discrepancy was observed. E(mass) overestimated E(app) in warm environments, and both under and overestimations were observed in cool environments, depending on the clothing vapor permeability. At 34 degrees C, apparent latent heat (lambda(app)) of pure evaporative cooling was lower than the physical value (lambda; 2,430 J/g) and reduced with increasing vapor resistance up to 45%. At lower temperatures, lambda(app) increases due to additional skin heat loss via evaporation of moisture that condenses inside the clothing, analogous to a heat pipe. For impermeable clothing, lambda(app) even exceeds lambda by four times that value at 10 degrees C. These findings demonstrate that the traditional way of calculating evaporative heat loss of a clothed person can lead to substantial errors, especially for clothing with low permeability, which can be positive or negative, depending on the climate and clothing type. The model presented explains human subject data on EVAP that previously seemed contradictive.

  10. [Dynamics of sensible and latent heat fluxes over a temperate desert steppe ecosystem in Inner Mongolia].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo; Zhou, Guang-Sheng; Yang, Fu-Lin

    2010-03-01

    This paper studied the diurnal and seasonal characteristics of sensible and latent heat fluxes over a temperate desert steppe ecosystem in Inner Mongolia, based on the 2008 observation data from eddy covariance tower. The diurnal patterns of sensible and latent heat fluxes over the ecosystem were both single kurtosis, with the maximum value being 319.01 W x m(-2) (on May 30th, 2008) and 425.37 W x m(-2) (on Jun 2nd, 2008), respectively, and occurred at about 12:00-13:30 (local time), which was similar to the diurnal pattern of net radiation but lagged about one hour of the maximum net radiation. The maximum diurnal variations of monthly mean sensible and latent heat fluxes occurred in May and June, and their minimum diurnal variations occurred in January and November, respectively. There was a closer relationship between soil moisture content and precipitation. Surface soil moisture content was most sensitive to precipitation, while the moisture content in deeper soil layers had a lagged response to precipitation. The seasonal dynamics of sensible and latent heat fluxes was similar to that of net radiation, and affected by precipitation. Sensible heat flux was obviously affected by net radiation, but latent heat flux was more sensitive to precipitation and mainly controlled by soil moisture content.

  11. Latent heat in uniaxially stressed KMnF3 ferroelastic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, F. J.; Gallardo, M. C.; Jimenez, J.; del Cerro, J.; Salje, E. K. H.

    2000-05-01

    The influence of weak uniaxial stress on both the latent heat and the coexistence interval of the ferroelastic phase transition of KMnF3 has been measured using a sensitive conduction calorimeter. The latent heat of the sample without stress is 0.129 J g-1 and, in the range of \\mbox{0-12} bar, it increases weakly with the stress. The width of the interval where the latent heat appears increases with stress, with an apparently larger coexistence interval. Heating and cooling processes show different kinetic behaviours. On cooling, the maximum of the differential thermal analysis traces splits into two peaks when a uniaxial stress is applied, which is related to the formation of ferroelastic domain patterns.

  12. Assimilation of remotely sensed latent heat flux in a distributed hydrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuurmans, J. M.; Troch, P. A.; Veldhuizen, A. A.; Bastiaanssen, W. G. M.; Bierkens, M. F. P.

    This paper addresses the question of whether remotely sensed latent heat flux estimates over a catchment can be used to improve distributed hydrological model water balance computations by the process of data assimilation. The data used is a series of NOAA-AVHRR satellite images for the Drentse Aa catchment in the Netherlands for the year 1995. These 1×1 km resolution images are converted into latent heat flux estimates using SEBAL ( Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land [J Hydrol 2000;229:87]). The physically-based distributed model SIMGRO ( SIMulation of GROundwater flow and surface water levels [J Hydrol 1997;192:158]) is used to compute the water balance of the Drentse Aa catchment for that same year. Comparison between model-derived and remotely sensed area-averaged evapotranspiration estimates show good agreement, but spatial analysis of the model latent heat flux estimates indicate systematic underestimation in areas with higher elevation. A constant gain Kalman filter data assimilation algorithm is used to correct the internal state variables of the distributed model whenever remotely sensed latent heat flux estimates are available. It was found that the spatial distribution of model latent heat flux estimates in areas with higher elevation were improved through data assimilation.

  13. Modelling sub-daily latent heat fluxes from a small reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGloin, Ryan; McGowan, Hamish; McJannet, David; Burn, Stewart

    2014-11-01

    Accurate methods of latent heat flux quantification are essential for water management and for use in hydrological and meteorological models. Currently the effect of small lakes in most numerical weather prediction modelling systems is either entirely ignored or crudely parameterized. In order to test methods for modelling hourly latent heat flux from small water bodies, this study compares results from several modelling approaches to values measured by the eddy covariance method at an agricultural reservoir in southeast Queensland, Australia. Mass transfer estimates of LE calculated using the theoretical mass transfer model and using the Tanny et al. (2008) and Sacks et al. (1994) bulk transfer coefficients showed the best relationship with measured values under a range of meteorological conditions. The theoretical model showed the strongest correlation with measured values, while the Tanny et al. (2008) and Sacks et al. (1994) models had regression equation slopes with the closest proximity to 1. Latent heat fluxes estimated using the Granger and Hedstrom (2011) evaporation model, that was specifically developed for use at small reservoirs, showed a poor relationship with measured values, particularly in stable atmospheric conditions. The 1-dimensional hydrodynamics model, DYRESM, was used to obtain predictions of hourly latent heat flux without the use of water surface temperature measurements. DYRESM estimates of latent heat flux showed a slightly worse relationship with measured values than those predicted using the traditional mass transfer models (which used measurements of water surface temperature). However, DYRESM performed considerably better than the Granger and Hedstrom (2011) model.

  14. Numerical study of finned heat pipe-assisted latent heat thermal energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiari, Saeed; Qiu, Songgang; Mahdavi, Mahboobe

    2014-11-01

    In the present study the thermal characteristics of a finned heat pipe-assisted latent heat thermal energy storage system are investigated numerically. A transient two dimensional finite volume based model employing enthalpy-porosity technique is implemented to analyze the performance of a thermal energy storage unit with square container and high melting temperature phase change material. The effects of heat pipe spacing, fin length and numbers as well as the influence of natural convection on the thermal response of the thermal energy storage unit have been studied. The obtained results reveal that the natural convection has considerable effect on the melting process of the phase change material. Increasing the number of heat pipes leads to the increase of melting rate and the decrease of base wall temperature. Also, the increase of fin length results in the decrease of temperature difference within the phase change material in the container, providing more uniform temperature distribution. Furthermore, it is showed that the number of fins does not affect the performance of the system considerably.

  15. Better latent heat and specific heat of stearic acid with magnetite/graphene nanocomposite addition for thermal storage application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andiarto, R.; Nuryadin, M. K.; Taufik, A.; Saleh, R.

    2017-04-01

    In our previous study, the addition of Magnetite (Fe3O4) into Stearic acid (Sa) as an organic phase change material (PCM) shows an enhancement in the latent heat for thermal energy storage applications. The latent heat of the PCM can also be increased by adding graphene material. Therefore, in this research, the thermal properties of Sa have been studied by the sonication method for several different concentrations of Fe3O4/Graphene nanocomposite additions. The structural properties of all of the samples were observed by X-Ray diffraction (XRD). Melting-solidifying behavior and specific heat value were measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The thermal degradation process of all samples was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Based on the DSC results, the presence of Fe3O4/Graphene in the Sa enhances the latent heat up to 20%. The specific heat value of the mixture was also found to be increased as the concentration of Fe3O4/Graphene to Sa increased. The TGA results show a lowered thermal degradation process of the Sa by the addition of the Fe3O4/Graphene which indicates a higher thermal stability of the mixture. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that the addition of Fe3O4/Graphene to Sa improves both the sensible heat and the latent heat of the mixture which are very important for thermal energy storage applications

  16. Cloud-scale simulation study of Typhoon Hagupit (2008) Part I: Microphysical processes of the inner core and three-dimensional structure of the latent heat budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangnan; Wang, Gang; Lin, Wenshi; He, Qihua; Feng, Yerong; Mao, Jiangyu

    2013-02-01

    The Advanced Research WRF (ARW) version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used to conduct simulation experiments with a 3 km resolution for Typhoon Hagupit (2008). The primary results show the following: (1) the control experiment reproduces well the environmental field, track, storm propagation speed, intensity change, latent heating vertical profile of the typhoon inner core area, and wind and precipitation distribution of the typhoon. (2) The average total latent heating profile of the inner core reaches its peak value at a height of 7 km. At heights below 500 m, there is mainly an evaporative cooling effect. From 1 to 4 km, mainly condensation heating is present. Above 10 km, there is mainly a deposition effect. (3) Condensation heating exists principally within the inner flank of the cloud wall. Its maximum height is 2-5 km, and can reach 11 km. Melt cooling takes place in the outer flank of the cloud wall, whereas freeze heating is in the cloud wall, above the zero degree isotherm. (4) The large magnitude of microphysical process conversion rates is attributable to rainwater collected by graupel, melting of graupel, rainwater collected by snow, and water vapor condensation into cloud water. The dominant microphysical processes for releasing latent heat are water vapor condensation into cloud water and depositional growth of snow and cloud ice. The dominant microphysical processes for absorbing latent heat are evaporation of rainwater, sublimation of snow, and melting of graupel.

  17. Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Gorski, Anthony J.; Schertz, William W.

    1982-01-01

    A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

  18. Experimental investigation of the latent heat of vaporization in aqueous nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soochan; Phelan, Patrick E.; Dai, Lenore; Prasher, Ravi; Gunawan, Andrey; Taylor, Robert A.

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports an experimental investigation of the latent heat of vaporization (hfg) in nanofluids. Two different types of nanoparticles, graphite and silver, suspended in deionized water were exposed to a continuous laser beam (130 mW, 532 nm) to generate boiling. The latent heat of vaporization in the nanofluids was determined by the measured vapor mass generation and the heat input. To ensure that the measured hfg values are independent of heating method, the experiments were repeated with an electrically heated hot wire as a primary heat input. These experiments show considerable variation in the hfg of nanofluids. That is, graphite nanofluid exhibits an increased hfg and silver nanofluid shows a decrease in hfg compared to the value for pure water. As such, these results indicate that relatively low mass fractions of nanoparticles can apparently create large changes in hfg.

  19. Experimental investigation of the latent heat of vaporization in aqueous nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soochan; Phelan, Patrick E. Dai, Lenore; Prasher, Ravi; Gunawan, Andrey; Taylor, Robert A.

    2014-04-14

    This paper reports an experimental investigation of the latent heat of vaporization (h{sub fg}) in nanofluids. Two different types of nanoparticles, graphite and silver, suspended in deionized water were exposed to a continuous laser beam (130 mW, 532 nm) to generate boiling. The latent heat of vaporization in the nanofluids was determined by the measured vapor mass generation and the heat input. To ensure that the measured h{sub fg} values are independent of heating method, the experiments were repeated with an electrically heated hot wire as a primary heat input. These experiments show considerable variation in the h{sub fg} of nanofluids. That is, graphite nanofluid exhibits an increased h{sub fg} and silver nanofluid shows a decrease in h{sub fg} compared to the value for pure water. As such, these results indicate that relatively low mass fractions of nanoparticles can apparently create large changes in h{sub fg}.

  20. Moisture and latent heat flux variabilities in the tropical Pacific derived from satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a method of determining latent heat flux and the ocean-atmosphere moisture from sea surface temperature, precipitable water, and surface wind speed data derived from 1980-1983 observations of SMMR aboard Nimbus 7 above tropical Pacific. The observation period included a very intense El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) episode. It was found that, during the early phase of the 1982-1983 ENSO, a surface convergence center moved east leading the anomalous equatorial westerlies. At this center, the low wind and high humidity caused negative (low) latent heat flux anomalies, despite anomalously high sea surface temperatures. Latent heat flux was found to play an important role in the seasonal cooling of the upper ocean, except in areas covered by major surface convergence zones and in areas of ocean upwelling.

  1. Interferon gamma release assay compared with the tuberculin skin test for latent tuberculosis detection in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Worjoloh, Ayaba; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Osmond, Dennis; Freyre, Rachel; Aziz, Natali; Cohan, Deborah

    2011-12-01

    To estimate agreement and correlation between the tuberculin skin test and an interferon gamma release assay for detecting latent tuberculosis (TB) infection in pregnant women. We conducted a cross-sectional study of pregnant women initiating prenatal care at a university-affiliated public hospital between January 5, 2009, and March 15, 2010. Eligible women received a questionnaire about TB history and risk factors as well as the tuberculin skin test and phlebotomy for the interferon gamma release assay. Agreement and correlation between tests were estimated, and different cutoffs for interferon gamma release assay positivity were used to assess effect on agreement. Furthermore, predictors of test positivity and test discordance were evaluated using multivariable analysis. Of the 220 enrolled women, 199 (90.5%) returned for tuberculin skin test evaluation. Over 70% were Hispanic and 65% were born in a country with high TB prevalence. Agreement between the tuberculin skin test and interferon gamma release assay was 77.39 (κ=0.26). This agreement was not significantly changed using different cutoffs for the assay. Birth bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination was associated with tuberculin skin test positivity (odds ratio [OR] 4.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-13.48, P=.01), but not interferon gamma release assay positivity. There were no statistically significant predictors of the tuberculin skin test and interferon gamma release assay result discordance; however, birth in a high-prevalence country was marginally associated with tuberculin skin test-positive and interferon gamma release assay-negative results (OR 2.94, 95% CI 0.86-9.97 P=.08). Comparing the tuberculin skin test and interferon gamma release assay results in pregnancy, concordance and agreement were poor. Given that much is still unknown about the performance of interferon gamma release assays in pregnancy, further research is necessary before the tuberculin skin test is abandoned for screening of

  2. Interferon Gamma Release Assay Compared With Tuberculin Skin Test for Latent Tuberculosis Detection in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Worjoloh, Ayaba; –Maeda, Midori Kato; Osmond, Dennis; Freyre, Rachel; Aziz, Natali; Cohan, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Objective To estimate agreement and correlation between the tuberculin skin test and an interferon gamma release assay for detecting latent tuberculosis (TB) infection in pregnant women. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of pregnant women initiating prenatal care at a university-affiliated public hospital between January 5, 2009 and March 15, 2010. Eligible women received a questionnaire about tuberculosis history and risk factors, as well as the tuberculin skin test and phlebotomy for the interferon gamma release assay. Agreement and correlation between tests were estimated, and different cut-offs for interferon gamma release assay positivity were used to assess effect on agreement. Furthermore, predictors of test positivity and test discordance were evaluated using multivariable analysis. Results Of the 220 enrolled women, 199 (90.5%) returned for tuberculin skin test evaluation. Over 70% were Hispanic and 65% were born in a country with high tuberculosis prevalence. Agreement between tuberculin skin test and interferon gamma release assay was 77.39 (k=0.26). This agreement was not significantly changed using different cut-offs for the assay. Birth bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination was associated with tuberculin skin test positivity (OR 4.33, 95%CI 1.4–13.48, p=0.01), but not interferon gamma release assay positivity. There were no statistically significant predictors of tuberculin skin test and interferon gamma release assay result discordance, however birth in high prevalence country was marginally associated with tuberculin skin test positive and interferon gamma release assay negative results (OR 2.94, 95% CI 0.86–9.97, p=0.08). Conclusion Comparing tuberculin skin test and interferon gamma release assay results in pregnancy, concordance and agreement were poor. Given that much is still unknown about the performance of interferon gamma release assays in pregnancy, further research is necessary before tuberculin skin test is abandoned for

  3. Resveratrol Reactivates Latent HIV through Increasing Histone Acetylation and Activating Heat Shock Factor 1.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaoyun; Pan, Xiaoyan; Xu, Xinfeng; Lin, Jian; Que, Fuchang; Tian, Yuanxin; Li, Lin; Liu, Shuwen

    2017-06-07

    The persistence of latent HIV reservoirs presents a significant challenge to viral eradication. Effective latency reversing agents (LRAs) based on "shock and kill" strategy are urgently needed. The natural phytoalexin resveratrol has been demonstrated to enhance HIV gene expression, although its mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that resveratrol was able to reactivate latent HIV without global T cell activation in vitro. Mode of action studies showed resveratrol-mediated reactivation from latency did not involve the activation of silent mating type information regulation 2 homologue 1 (SIRT1), which belonged to class-3 histone deacetylase (HDAC). However, latent HIV was reactivated by resveratrol mediated through increasing histone acetylation and activation of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). Additionally, synergistic activation of the latent HIV reservoirs was observed under cotreatment with resveratrol and conventional LRAs. Collectively, this research reveals that resveratrol is a natural LRA and shows promise for HIV therapy.

  4. Basic Research on a Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage by Direct Contact Melting and Soldification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Akihiro; Saito, Akio; Utaka, Yoshio; Okuda, Kenichi; Katayama, Kozo

    A basic experimental research on a latent heat thermal energy storage system , utilizing a simple and effective heat exchange mechanism by a direct contact between the phase change material (PCM) and the heat transfer fluid (HTF), was shown. Discharging experiments on direct contact latent heat thermal energy reservoir using n-Eicosane as the PCM and water as the HTF, were performed, based on the conditions obtained in previous report. Then, operating conditions for suitable discharging process were searched from the experimental results (outlet water temperature response and local temperature response in the reservoir). Moreover, solidification mechanisms of PCM, which had been presumed in previous report, were confirmed from these experimental results, and the simple physical model on direct contact heat exchange in the reservoir was proposed. Then, the outlet water temperature response by this model was compared with the experimental results.

  5. Basic Research on a Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage by Direct Contact Melting and Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Akihiro; Saito, Akio; Utaka, Yoshio; Okuda, Kenichi; Katayama, Kozo

    A basic experimental research on a latent heat thermal energy storage system, utilizing a simple and effective heat exchange mechanism by a direct contact between the phase change material (PCM) and the heat transfer fluid (HTF) , was shown. In this report, authors proposed the direct contact latent heat thermal energy storage system using industrial paraffin and n-Eicosane as the PCM, and using water as the HTF. The observations were performed concerning the HTF separation from the solid PCM in the solidification process (heat discharging process), and concerning the water pass formation within the solid PCM. Then, it was confirmed that the system worked effectively by using n-Eicosane as the PCM. And authors discussed the mechanism of direct contact solidification process from experimental results.

  6. Simulation and evaluation of latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigmon, T. W.

    1980-01-01

    The relative value of thermal energy storage (TES) for heat pump storage (heating and cooling) as a function of storage temperature, mode of storage (hotside or coldside), geographic locations, and utility time of use rate structures were derived. Computer models used to simulate the performance of a number of TES/heat pump configurations are described. The models are based on existing performance data of heat pump components, available building thermal load computational procedures, and generalized TES subsystem design. Life cycle costs computed for each site, configuration, and rate structure are discussed.

  7. High-temperature thermocline TES combining sensible and latent heat - CFD modeling and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavattoni, Simone A.; Geissbühler, Lukas; Barbato, Maurizio C.; Zanganeh, Giw; Haselbacher, Andreas; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2017-06-01

    The concept of combined sensible/latent heat thermal energy storage (TES) has been exploited to mitigate an intrinsic thermocline TES systems drawback of heat transfer fluid outflow temperature reduction during discharging. In this study, the combined sensible/latent TES prototype under investigation is constituted by a packed bed of rocks and a small amount of encapsulated phase change material (AlSi12) as sensible heat and latent heat sections respectively. The thermo-fluid dynamics behavior of the combined TES prototype was analyzed by means of a computational fluid dynamics approach. Due to the small value of the characteristic vessel-to-particles diameter ratio, the effect of radial void-fraction variation, also known as channeling, was accounted for. Both the sensible and the latent heat sections of the storage were modeled as porous media under the assumption of local thermal non-equilibrium (LTNE). The commercial code ANSYS Fluent 15.0 was used to solve the model's constitutive conservation and transport equations obtaining a fairly good agreement with reference experimental measurements.

  8. Experimental simulation of latent heat thermal energy storage and heat pipe thermal transport for dish concentrator solar receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, R.; Zimmerman, W. F.; Poon, P. T. Y.

    1981-01-01

    Test results on a modular simulation of the thermal transport and heat storage characteristics of a heat pipe solar receiver (HPSR) with thermal energy storage (TES) are presented. The HPSR features a 15-25 kWe Stirling engine power conversion system at the focal point of a parabolic dish concentrator operating at 827 C. The system collects and retrieves solar heat with sodium pipes and stores the heat in NaF-MgF2 latent heat storage material. The trials were run with a single full scale heat pipe, three full scale TES containers, and an air-cooled heat extraction coil to replace the Stirling engine heat exchanger. Charging and discharging, constant temperature operation, mixed mode operation, thermal inertial, etc. were studied. The heat pipe performance was verified, as were the thermal energy storage and discharge rates and isothermal discharges.

  9. Experimental simulation of latent heat thermal energy storage and heat pipe thermal transport for dish concentrator solar receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, R.; Zimmerman, W. F.; Poon, P. T. Y.

    1981-01-01

    Test results on a modular simulation of the thermal transport and heat storage characteristics of a heat pipe solar receiver (HPSR) with thermal energy storage (TES) are presented. The HPSR features a 15-25 kWe Stirling engine power conversion system at the focal point of a parabolic dish concentrator operating at 827 C. The system collects and retrieves solar heat with sodium pipes and stores the heat in NaF-MgF2 latent heat storage material. The trials were run with a single full scale heat pipe, three full scale TES containers, and an air-cooled heat extraction coil to replace the Stirling engine heat exchanger. Charging and discharging, constant temperature operation, mixed mode operation, thermal inertial, etc. were studied. The heat pipe performance was verified, as were the thermal energy storage and discharge rates and isothermal discharges.

  10. Joseph Black, carbon dioxide, latent heat, and the beginnings of the discovery of the respiratory gases.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2014-06-15

    The discovery of carbon dioxide by Joseph Black (1728-1799) marked a new era of research on the respiratory gases. His initial interest was in alkalis such as limewater that were thought to be useful in the treatment of renal stone. When he studied magnesium carbonate, he found that when this was heated or exposed to acid, a gas was evolved that he called "fixed air" because it had been combined with a solid material. He showed that the new gas extinguished a flame, that it could not support life, and that it was present in gas exhaled from the lung. Within a few years of his discovery, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen were also isolated. Thus arguably Black's work started the avalanche of research on the respiratory gases carried out by Priestley, Scheele, Lavoisier, and Cavendish. Black then turned his attention to heat and he was the first person to describe latent heat, that is the heat added or lost when a liquid changes its state, for example when water changes to ice or steam. Latent heat is a key concept in thermal physiology because of the heat lost when sweat evaporates. Black was a friend of the young James Watt (1736-1819) who was responsible for the development of early steam engines. Watt was puzzled why so much cooling was necessary to condense steam into water, and Black realized that the answer was the latent heat. The resulting improvements in steam engines ushered in the Industrial Revolution.

  11. Latent heating and mixing due to entrainment in tropical deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, Clayton J.

    Recent studies have noted the role of latent heating above the freezing level in reconciling Riehl and Malkus' Hot Tower Hypothesis (HTH) with evidence of diluted tropical deep convective cores. This study evaluates recent modifications to the HTH through Lagrangian trajectory analysis of deep convective cores in an idealized, high-resolution cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulation. A line of tropical convective cells develops within a high-resolution nested grid whose boundary conditions are obtained from a large-domain CRM simulation approaching radiative-convective equilibrium (RCE). Microphysical impacts on latent heating and equivalent potential temperature are analyzed along trajectories ascending within convective regions of the high-resolution nested grid. Changes in equivalent potential temperature along backward trajectories are partitioned into contributions from latent heating due to ice processes and a residual term. This residual term is composed of radiation and mixing. Due to the small magnitude of radiative heating rates in the convective inflow regions and updrafts examined here, the residual term is treated as an approximate representation of mixing within these regions. The simulations demonstrate that mixing with dry air decreases equivalent potential temperature along ascending trajectories below the freezing level, while latent heating due to freezing and vapor deposition increase equivalent potential temperature above the freezing level. The latent heating contributions along trajectories from cloud nucleation, condensation, evaporation, freezing, deposition, and sublimation are also quantified. Finally, the source regions of trajectories reaching the upper troposphere are identified; it is found that two-thirds of backward trajectories with starting points within strong updrafts or downdrafts above 10 km have their origin at levels higher than 2 km AGL. The importance of both boundary layer and mid-level inflow in moist environments is

  12. Daily evapotranspiration estimates by scaling instantaneous latent heat flux derived from a two-source model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Radiometric brightness temperature can be used in energy balance models that estimate sensible and latent heat fluxes of the land surface. However, brightness temperature is usually available only at one time of day when acquired from aircraft, fine-scale satellite platforms, or infrared thermometer...

  13. Effects of Latent Heating on Atmospheres of Brown Dwarfs and Directly Imaged Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xianyu; Showman, Adam P.

    2017-02-01

    The growing number of observations of brown dwarfs (BDs) has provided evidence for strong atmospheric circulation on these objects. Directly imaged planets share similar observations and can be viewed as low-gravity versions of BDs. Vigorous condensate cycles of chemical species in their atmospheres are inferred by observations and theoretical studies, and latent heating associated with condensation is expected to be important in shaping atmospheric circulation and influencing cloud patchiness. We present a qualitative description of the mechanisms by which condensational latent heating influences circulation, and then illustrate them using an idealized general circulation model that includes a condensation cycle of silicates with latent heating and molecular weight effect due to the rainout of the condensate. Simulations with conditions appropriate for typical T dwarfs exhibit the development of localized storms and east–west jets. The storms are spatially inhomogeneous, evolving on a timescale of hours to days and extending vertically from the condensation level to the tropopause. The fractional area of the BD covered by active storms is small. Based on a simple analytic model, we quantitatively explain the area fraction of moist plumes and show its dependence on the radiative timescale and convective available potential energy (CAPE). We predict that if latent heating dominates cloud formation processes, the fractional coverage area of clouds decreases as the spectral type goes through the L/T transition from high to lower effective temperature. This is a natural consequence of the variation of the radiative timescale and CAPE with the spectral type.

  14. The Measurement of the Specific Latent Heat of Fusion of Ice: Two Improved Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, S. Y.; Chun, C. K. W.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests two methods for measuring the specific latent heat of ice fusion for high school physics laboratories. The first method is an ice calorimeter which is made from simple materials. The second method improves the thermal contact and allows for a more accurate measurement. Lists instructions for both methods. (Author/YDS)

  15. The Measurement of the Specific Latent Heat of Fusion of Ice: Two Improved Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, S. Y.; Chun, C. K. W.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests two methods for measuring the specific latent heat of ice fusion for high school physics laboratories. The first method is an ice calorimeter which is made from simple materials. The second method improves the thermal contact and allows for a more accurate measurement. Lists instructions for both methods. (Author/YDS)

  16. Robust estimates of soil moisture and latent heat flux coupling strength obtained from triple collocation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Land surface models (LSMs) are often applied to predict the one-way coupling strength between surface soil moisture (SM) and surface latent heat (LH) flux. However, the ability of LSMs to accurately represent such coupling has not been adequately established. Likewise, the estimation of one-way SM/L...

  17. Sensible and latent heat loss from the body surface of Holstein cows in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Maia, A S C; daSilva, R G; Battiston Loureiro, C M

    2005-09-01

    The general principles of the mechanisms of heat transfer are well known, but knowledge of the transition between evaporative and non-evaporative heat loss by Holstein cows in field conditions must be improved, especially for low-latitude environments. With this aim 15 Holstein cows managed in open pasture were observed in a tropical region. The latent heat loss from the body surface of the animals was measured by means of a ventilated capsule, while convective heat transfer was estimated by the theory of convection from a horizontal cylinder and by the long-wave radiation exchange based on the Stefan-Boltzmann law. When the air temperature was between 10 and 36 degrees C the sensible heat transfer varied from 160 to -30 W m(-2), while the latent heat loss by cutaneous evaporation increased from 30 to 350 W m(-2). Heat loss by cutaneous evaporation accounted for 20-30% of the total heat loss when air temperatures ranged from 10 to 20 degrees C. At air temperatures >30 degrees C cutaneous evaporation becomes the main avenue of heat loss, accounting for approximately 85% of the total heat loss, while the rest is lost by respiratory evaporation.

  18. The role of individual cyclones for atmospheric latent and sensible heat transport into the European Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodemann, H.; Stohl, A.

    2010-12-01

    The bulk of the atmospheric latent heat transport induced by extratropical cyclones is organized in the warm conveyor belt, also known as atmospheric rivers. In order to enhance the process understanding of atmospheric sensible and latent heat transport with these structures into the European Arctic, the magnitude and variability of the energy flux from individual cyclones in this region was studied. We applied a moisture source tracking algorithm embedded in the limited-area numerical weather prediction model (NWP) Climate High-Resolution Model (CHRM) to trace the evaporation sources and transport of water vapour from different latitude bands of the North Atlantic Ocean. September 2002 and December 2006 were chosen as initial analysis periods, since a particularly large number of cyclones (including former hurricanes) traveled within the North Atlantic storm track during these months. The main findings are that latent heat (LH) from more southerly source regions is transported at higher altitudes. Stronger storms draw latent heat from a larger area (further south), and the ensuing precipitation will hence on average originate from further south as well. Most long-range transport of LH occurs in the cold frontal bands. Individual cyclones are the main source of sub-monthly LH flux variability, and can cause up to 4-sigma variation of the mean flux. LH flux is almost permanently net positive (northward), unlike for sensible heat (SH) and other energy fluxes. Most LH that is "permanently" transferred to north of 60°N in the Atlantic storm track originates from directly south of that latitude, implying on average short atmospheric moisture lifetimes, and hence a fast energy turnover. We compare these findings to results from a Lagrangian moisture tracking method based on the FLEXPART model. Remarks with regard to differences in the transport conditions of latent head in such structures along the North American West Coast and the Norwegian West Coast will be made.

  19. Interferon Gamma Release Assays for Latent Tuberculosis: What Are the Sources of Variability?

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Rajiv L.; Pai, Madhukar

    2016-01-01

    Interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) are blood-based tests intended for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). IGRAs offer logistical advantages and are supposed to offer improved specificity over the tuberculin skin test (TST). However, recent serial testing studies of low-risk individuals have revealed higher false conversion rates with IGRAs than with TST. Reproducibility studies have identified various sources of variability that contribute to nonreproducible results. Sources of variability can be broadly classified as preanalytical, analytical, postanalytical, manufacturing, and immunological. In this minireview, we summarize known sources of variability and their impact on IGRA results. We also provide recommendations on how to minimize sources of IGRA variability. PMID:26763969

  20. Helium release from radioisotope heat sources

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.E.; Early, J.W.; Starzynski, J.S.; Land, C.C.

    1984-05-01

    Diffusion of helium in /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuel was characterized as a function of the heating rate and the fuel microstructure. The samples were thermally ramped in an induction furnace and the helium release rates measured with an automated mass spectrometer. The diffusion constants and activation energies were obtained from the data using a simple diffusion model. The release rates of helium were correlated with the fuel microstructure by metallographic examination of fuel samples. The release mechanism consists of four regimes, which are dependent upon the temperature. Initially, the release is controlled by movement of point defects combined with trapping along grain boundaries. This regime is followed by a process dominated by formation and growth of helium bubbles along grain boundaries. The third regime involves volume diffusion controlled by movement of oxygen vacancies. Finally, the release at the highest temperatures follows the diffusion rate of intragranular bubbles. The tendency for helium to be trapped within the grain boundaries diminishes with small grain sizes, slow thermal pulses, and older fuel.

  1. Performance of an interferon-gamma release assay to diagnose latent tuberculosis infection during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lighter-Fisher, Jennifer; Surette, Ann-Marie

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate an interferon (IFN)-gamma release assay in diagnosing latent tuberculosis infection in pregnant adolescents and women at risk for exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This was a prospective study of women and adolescents receiving health care at Bellevue Hospital Outpatient Clinics in New York City. Each patient was assessed for M tuberculosis risk factors, had a tuberculin skin test placed, and an IFN-gamma release assay performed. The concordance between the tuberculin skin test and the IFN-gamma release assay was calculated and the results analyzed according to the likelihood of exposure to M tuberculosis. Mean mitogen IFN-γ levels were used across groups to compare reliability between trimesters and assay performance in pregnant compared with nonpregnant females of childbearing age. A total of 140 pregnant and 140 nonpregnant females were enrolled in the study. The IFN-gamma release assay was highly specific, and IFN-gamma release assay positivity was associated with a greater likelihood of exposure to M tuberculosis. The overall agreement between the tuberculin skin test and IFN-gamma release assay results was 88% for all pregnant patients, corresponding to a κ of 0.452 (confidence interval 0.26-0.64). Interferon-γ release from the mitogen did not appear to have any temporal association with pregnancy trimester in cross-sectional or longitudinal studies. The IFN-gamma release assay performed equally well in pregnant and nonpregnant females. The IFN-gamma release assay performed equally well in each trimester of pregnancy with comparable results to nonpregnant females. Interferon-gamma release assays are much more specific, at least as sensitive, and may be a better predictor of disease progression than the tuberculin skin test. : II.

  2. Extracellular heat shock protein HSP90{beta} secreted by MG63 osteosarcoma cells inhibits activation of latent TGF-{beta}1

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Shigeki; Kulkarni, Ashok B.

    2010-07-30

    Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) is secreted as a latent complex, which consists of latency-associated peptide (LAP) and the mature ligand. The release of the mature ligand from LAP usually occurs through conformational change of the latent complex and is therefore considered to be the first step in the activation of the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway. So far, factors such as heat, pH changes, and proteolytic cleavage are reportedly involved in this activation process, but the precise molecular mechanism is still far from clear. Identification and characterization of the cell surface proteins that bind to LAP are important to our understanding of the latent TGF-{beta} activation process. In this study, we have identified heat shock protein 90 {beta} (HSP90{beta}) from the cell surface of the MG63 osteosarcoma cell line as a LAP binding protein. We have also found that MG63 cells secrete HSP90{beta} into extracellular space which inhibits the activation of latent TGF-{beta}1, and that there is a subsequent decrease in cell proliferation. TGF-{beta}1-mediated stimulation of MG63 cells resulted in the increased cell surface expression of HSP90{beta}. Thus, extracellular HSP90{beta} is a negative regulator for the activation of latent TGF-{beta}1 modulating TGF-{beta} signaling in the extracellular domain. -- Research highlights: {yields} Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) is secreted as a latent complex. {yields} This complex consists of latency-associated peptide (LAP) and the mature ligand. {yields} The release of the mature ligand from LAP is the first step in TGF-{beta} activation. {yields} We identified for the first time a novel mechanism for this activation process. {yields} Heat shock protein 90 {beta} is discovered as a negative regulator for this process.

  3. The partitioning between latent and sensible heat flux at FLUXNET sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, K. B.

    2001-12-01

    The partitioning between ecosystem latent (LE) and sensible (H) heat fluxes is critical for understanding the hydrological cycle, predicting boundary layer development, weather and climate. The FLUXNET network provides a unique opportunity to investigate the partitioning of latent and sensible heat fluxes at the surface over a broad range of vegetation types and climates. This paper focuses on two aspects of surface flux partitioning at more than 20 sites worldwide. The first focus is on the relative partitioning between latent and sensible heat fluxes, or the Bowen ratio, during the warm season. We investigate the Bowen ratio across vegetation types and climates, and suggest controlling climatological and ecological factors. The surface resistance, which is related to the ability of the vegetation to supply available water and is one factor controlling the Bowen ratio, was generally lower at the agricultural and deciduous forest sites compared to coniferous forests. The ratio of the atmospheric humidity deficit to the net radiation (proportional to the climatological resistance), a second important factor controlling the Bowen ratio, was generally lower at sites near large bodies of water or over tundra vegetation, and was greater at more continental sites. The second focus of the study is on the diurnal trends of latent and sensible heat fluxes. We quantify the diurnal pattern of turbulent energy fluxes using the `diurnal centroid', which is an indicator of whether the fluxes peak in the morning or afternoon. The diurnal centroid provides useful signatures of important physiological and climatological factors that control surface fluxes. These factors include stomatal closure, advection, atmospheric stability and vegetation height. Sites with tall vegetation and/or high wind speeds in continental regions with limited affects of advection, a stable and dry atmosphere and weak stomatal sensitivity to atmospheric humidity deficits or water potential tend to have

  4. Heat release rate of wood-plastic composites

    Treesearch

    N. M. Stark; R. H. White; C. M. Clemons

    1997-01-01

    Wood-plastic composites are becoming more important as a material that fulfills recycling needs. In this study, fire performance tests were conducted on several compositions of wood and plastic materials using the Ohio State University rate of heat release apparatus. Test results included five-minute average heat release rate in kW/m2 (HRR avg) and maximum heat release...

  5. Combining Satellite Microwave Radiometer and Radar Observations to Estimate Atmospheric Latent Heating Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.; Shie, Chung-Lin; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    In this study, satellite passive microwave sensor observations from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) are utilized to make estimates of latent + eddy sensible heating rates (Q1-QR) in regions of precipitation. The TMI heating algorithm (TRAIN) is calibrated, or "trained" using relatively accurate estimates of heating based upon spaceborne Precipitation Radar (PR) observations collocated with the TMI observations over a one-month period. The heating estimation technique is based upon a previously described Bayesian methodology, but with improvements in supporting cloud-resolving model simulations, an adjustment of precipitation echo tops to compensate for model biases, and a separate scaling of convective and stratiform heating components that leads to an approximate balance between estimated vertically-integrated condensation and surface precipitation. Estimates of Q1-QR from TMI compare favorably with the PR training estimates and show only modest sensitivity to the cloud-resolving model simulations of heating used to construct the training data. Moreover, the net condensation in the corresponding annual mean satellite latent heating profile is within a few percent of the annual mean surface precipitation rate over the tropical and subtropical oceans where the algorithm is applied. Comparisons of Q1 produced by combining TMI Q1-QR with independently derived estimates of QR show reasonable agreement with rawinsonde-based analyses of Q1 from two field campaigns, although the satellite estimates exhibit heating profile structure with sharper and more intense heating peaks than the rawinsonde estimates. 2

  6. Computational Evaluation of a Latent Heat Energy Storage System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Release; Distribution Unlimited. PA#13098 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Journal Article submitted to Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells. 14. ABSTRACT...A system capable of receiving, absorbing, and converting solar energy was designed for use on a satellite in low Earth orbit. The proposed system, an...fronts the amount of solar irradiation required to fully utilize the phase change material was determined to be between 4 and 5 kW depending on the orbit

  7. Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage: Effect of Metallic Mesh Size on Storage Time and Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuja, S. Z.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2015-11-01

    Use of metallic meshes in latent heat thermal storage system shortens the charging time (total melting of the phase change material), which is favorable in practical applications. In the present study, effect of metallic mesh size on the thermal characteristics of latent heat thermal storage system is investigated. Charging time is predicted for various mesh sizes, and the influence of the amount of mesh material on the charging capacity is examined. An experiment is carried out to validate the numerical predictions. It is found that predictions of the thermal characteristics of phase change material with presence of metallic meshes agree well with the experimental data. High conductivity of the metal meshes enables to transfer heat from the edges of the thermal system towards the phase change material while forming a conduction tree in the system. Increasing number of meshes in the thermal system reduces the charging time significantly due to increased rate of conduction heat transfer in the thermal storage system; however, increasing number of meshes lowers the latent heat storage capacity of the system.

  8. Experimental and numerical study of latent heat thermal energy storage systems assisted by heat pipes for concentrated solar power application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiari, Saeed

    A desirable feature of concentrated solar power (CSP) with integrated thermal energy storage (TES) unit is to provide electricity in a dispatchable manner during cloud transient and non-daylight hours. Latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) offers many advantages such as higher energy storage density, wider range of operating temperature and nearly isothermal heat transfer relative to sensible heat thermal energy storage (SHTES), which is the current standard for trough and tower CSP systems. Despite the advantages mentioned above, LHTES systems performance is often limited by low thermal conductivity of commonly used, low cost phase change materials (PCMs). Research and development of passive heat transfer devices, such as heat pipes (HPs) to enhance the heat transfer in the PCM has received considerable attention. Due to its high effective thermal conductivity, heat pipe can transport large amounts of heat with relatively small temperature difference. The objective of this research is to study the charging and discharging processes of heat pipe-assisted LHTES systems using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and experimental testing to develop a method for more efficient energy storage system design. The results revealed that the heat pipe network configurations and the quantities of heat pipes integrated in a thermal energy storage system have a profound effect on the thermal response of the system. The optimal placement of heat pipes in the system can significantly enhance the thermal performance. It was also found that the inclusion of natural convection heat transfer in the CFD simulation of the system is necessary to have a realistic prediction of a latent heat thermal storage system performance. In addition, the effects of geometrical features and quantity of fins attached to the HPs have been studied.

  9. Utility of an interferon-gamma release assay for latent tuberculosis diagnosis in a case of bullous pemphigoid.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Alfred; Keeling, Douglas N; Hayes, Robert C; Webster, Duncan

    2009-01-01

    With increasing use of immunosuppressive therapy, including tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors, there is concern about infectious complications, including reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Routine testing prior to administration of systemic immunosuppression includes the tuberculin skin test, which lacks sensitivity and specificity and may be difficult to interpret in the presence of extensive cutaneous disease. Treatment of individuals with latent tuberculosis infection is recommended when immunosuppressive medications are to be employed. We report a case in which a diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in a patient with extensive bullous pemphigoid was clarified by the use of an interferon-gamma release assay after equivocal tuberculin skin test results. Interferon-gamma release assays are useful adjuncts to the tuberculin skin test in the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in the setting of extensive cutaneous disease.

  10. Investigation of Sensible and Latent Heat Storage System using various HTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beemkumar, N.; Karthikeyan, A.; Manoj, A.; Keerthan, J. S.; Stallan, Joseph Paul; Amithkishore, P.

    2017-05-01

    The objective of the work is investigating the latent heat storage system by varying heat transfer fluid (HTF). In this experiment, the effect of using different heat transfer fluids on the combined system is studied while using a low melting phase change material (PCM) i.e., paraffin wax. The heat transfer fluids chosen are water (low boiling fluid) and Therminol-66 (High boiling fluid). A comparison is made between the heat transfers by employing both the Heat transfer fluids. In the beginning, water is made to flow as the HTF and the charging process is undertaken followed by the discharging process by utilizing the different encapsulation materials namely, copper, aluminium and brass. These processes are then repeated for therminol-66 as HTF. At the end of the experiment it was concluded that even though therminol-66 enhances the latent heat storage capacity, water offers a higher sensible heat storage capacity, making it a better HTF for low melting PCM. Similar to above said process the experiments can be conducted for high and medium range melting point PCM with variation of HTF.

  11. Extracellular heat shock protein HSP90beta secreted by MG63 osteosarcoma cells inhibits activation of latent TGF-beta1.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shigeki; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2010-07-30

    Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1) is secreted as a latent complex, which consists of latency-associated peptide (LAP) and the mature ligand. The release of the mature ligand from LAP usually occurs through conformational change of the latent complex and is therefore considered to be the first step in the activation of the TGF-beta signaling pathway. So far, factors such as heat, pH changes, and proteolytic cleavage are reportedly involved in this activation process, but the precise molecular mechanism is still far from clear. Identification and characterization of the cell surface proteins that bind to LAP are important to our understanding of the latent TGF-beta activation process. In this study, we have identified heat shock protein 90 beta (HSP90beta) from the cell surface of the MG63 osteosarcoma cell line as a LAP binding protein. We have also found that MG63 cells secrete HSP90beta into extracellular space which inhibits the activation of latent TGF-beta1, and that there is a subsequent decrease in cell proliferation. TGF-beta1-mediated stimulation of MG63 cells resulted in the increased cell surface expression of HSP90beta. Thus, extracellular HSP90beta is a negative regulator for the activation of latent TGF-beta1 modulating TGF-beta signaling in the extracellular domain.

  12. A neural network to retrieve the mesoscale instantaneous latent heat flux over oceans from SSM/I observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourras, D.; Eymard, L.; Liu, W. T.

    2000-01-01

    The turbulent latent and sensible heat fluxes are necessary to study heat budget of the upper ocean or initialize ocean general circulation models. In order to retrieve the latent heat flux from satellite observations authors mostly use a bulk approximation of the flux whose parameters are derived from different instrument. In this paper, an approach based on artificial neural networks is proposed and compared to the bulk method on a global data set and 3 local data sets.

  13. Imprint of the ENSO on rainfall and latent heating variability over the Southern South China Sea from TRMM observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Ke

    2016-04-01

    Analyses of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) datasets revealed a prominent interannual variation in the convective-stratiform rainfall and latent heating over the southern South China Sea (SCS) during the winter monsoon between 1998 and 2010. Although the height of maximum latent heating remained nearly constant at around 7 km in all of the years, the year-to-year changes in the magnitudes of maximum latent heating over the region were noticeable. The interannual variations of the convective- stratiform rainfall and latent heating over the southern SCS were highly anti-correlated with the Niño-3 index, with more (less) rainfall and latent heating during La Niña (El Niño) years. Analysis of the large-scale environment revealed that years of active rainfall and latent heating corresponded to years of large deep convergence and relative humidity at 600 hPa. The moisture budget diagnosis indicated that the interannual variation of humidity at 600 hPa was largely modulated by the vertical moisture advection. The year-to-year changes in rainfall over the southern SCS were mainly caused by the interannual variations of the dynamic component associated with anomalous upward motions in the middle troposphere, while the interannual variations of the thermodynamic component associated with changes in surface specific humidity played a minor role. Larger latent heating over the southern SCS during La Niña years may possibly further enhance the local Hadley circulation over the SCS in the wintertime.

  14. Convective and Stratiform Precipitation Processes and their Relationship to Latent Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Steve; Zeng, Xiping; Shige, Shoichi; Takayabu, Yukari

    2009-01-01

    The global hydrological cycle is central to the Earth's climate system, with rainfall and the physics of its formation acting as the key links in the cycle. Two-thirds of global rainfall occurs in the Tropics. Associated with this rainfall is a vast amount of heat, which is known as latent heat. It arises mainly due to the phase change of water vapor condensing into liquid droplets; three-fourths of the total heat energy available to the Earth's atmosphere comes from tropical rainfall. In addition, fresh water provided by tropical rainfall and its variability exerts a large impact upon the structure and motions of the upper ocean layer. An improved convective -stratiform heating (CSH) algorithm has been developed to obtain the 3D structure of cloud heating over the Tropics based on two sources of information: 1) rainfall information, namely its amount and the fraction due to light rain intensity, observed directly from the Precipitation Radar (PR) on board the TRMM satellite and 2) synthetic cloud physics information obtained from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of cloud systems. The cloud simulations provide details on cloud processes, specifically latent heating, eddy heat flux convergence and radiative heating/cooling, that. are not directly observable by satellite. The new CSH algorithm-derived heating has a noticeably different heating structure over both ocean and land regions compared to the previous CSH algorithm. One of the major differences between new and old algorithms is that the level of maximum cloud heating occurs 1 to 1.5 km lower in the atmosphere in the new algorithm. This can effect the structure of the implied air currents associated with the general circulation of the atmosphere in the Tropics. The new CSH algorithm will be used provide retrieved heating data to other heating algorithms to supplement their performance.

  15. Peptide Synthesis through Cell-Free Expression of Fusion Proteins Incorporating Modified Amino Acids as Latent Cleavage Sites for Peptide Release.

    PubMed

    Liutkus, Mantas; Fraser, Samuel A; Caron, Karine; Stigers, Dannon J; Easton, Christopher J

    2016-05-17

    Chlorinated analogues of Leu and Ile are incorporated during cell-free expression of peptides fused to protein, by exploiting the promiscuity of the natural biosynthetic machinery. They then act as sites for clean and efficient release of the peptides simply by brief heat treatment. Dehydro analogues of Leu and Ile are similarly incorporated as latent sites for peptide release through treatment with iodine under cold conditions. These protocols complement enzyme-catalyzed methods and have been used to prepare calcitonin, gastrin-releasing peptide, cholecystokinin-7, and prolactin-releasing peptide prohormones, as well as analogues substituted with unusual amino acids, thus illustrating their practical utility as alternatives to more traditional chemical peptide synthesis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Copper-Silicon-Magnesium Alloys for Latent Heat Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, P. J.; Withey, E. A.; Coker, E. N.; Kruizenga, A. M.; Andraka, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    The systematic development of microstructure, solidification characteristics, and heat of solidification with composition in copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for thermal energy storage is presented. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to relate the thermal characteristics to microstructural development in the investigated alloys and clarifies the location of one of the terminal three-phase eutectics. Repeated thermal cycling highlights the thermal storage stability of the transformation through multiple melting events. Two near-terminal eutectic alloys display high enthalpies of solidification, relatively narrow melting ranges, and stable transformation hysteresis behaviors suited to thermal energy storage.

  17. Copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for latent heat storage

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, P. J.; Withey, E. A.; Coker, E. N.; Kruizenga, A. M.; Andraka, C. E.

    2016-06-21

    The systematic development of microstructure, solidification characteristics, and heat of solidification with composition in copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for thermal energy storage is presented. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to relate the thermal characteristics to microstructural development in the investigated alloys and clarifies the location of one of the terminal three-phase eutectics. Repeated thermal cycling highlights the thermal storage stability of the transformation through multiple melting events. In conclusion, two near-terminal eutectic alloys display high enthalpies of solidification, relatively narrow melting ranges, and stable transformation hysteresis behaviors suited to thermal energy storage.

  18. Copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for latent heat storage

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, P. J.; Withey, E. A.; Coker, E. N.; Kruizenga, A. M.; Andraka, C. E.

    2016-06-21

    The systematic development of microstructure, solidification characteristics, and heat of solidification with composition in copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for thermal energy storage is presented. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to relate the thermal characteristics to microstructural development in the investigated alloys and clarifies the location of one of the terminal three-phase eutectics. Repeated thermal cycling highlights the thermal storage stability of the transformation through multiple melting events. In conclusion, two near-terminal eutectic alloys display high enthalpies of solidification, relatively narrow melting ranges, and stable transformation hysteresis behaviors suited to thermal energy storage.

  19. A thermodynamic view on latent heat transport, expansion work of water vapor and irreversible moist processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauluis, O.

    2001-05-01

    Three aspects of moist convection are discussed here: the latent heat transport from the Earth's surface to the regions where water vapor condenses, the expansion work performed by water vapor during its ascent, and the irreversible entropy production due to diffusion of water vapor and phase changes. A thermodynamic relationship between these three aspects of moist convection, referred here to as the entropy budget of the water substance, is derived. This relationship is similar to the entropy budget of an imperfect heat engine that produces less work than the corresponding Carnot cycle because of the irreversibility associated with diffusion of water vapor and irreversible phase changes. In addition to behaving as a heat engine, moist convection also acts as an atmospheric dehumidifier that removes water from the atmosphere through condensation and precipitation. In statistical equilibrium, this dehumidification is balanced by a continuous moistening of dry air, associated at the microphysical scales with diffusion of water vapor and irreversible phase changes. The irreversible entropy production due to these moist processes can thus be viewed as the irreversible counterpart to the atmospheric dehumidification. The entropy budget of the water substance thus indicates that there is a competition between how much the latent heat transport behaves as an atmospheric dehumidifier, and how much it behaves as a heat engine. Scaling arguments show that for conditions typical of the tropical atmosphere, the expansion work of water vapor accounts for about one third of the work that would be performed by a corresponding Carnot cycle. This implies that the latent heat transport acts more as an atmospheric dehumidifier than as a heat engine. This also implies that the amount of work performed by moist convection should be much weaker than what has been predicted by earlier theories that assume that convection behaves mostly as a perfect heat engine.

  20. The study of latent heat transport characteristics by solid particles and saccharide solution mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Shin-ichi; Hayamizu, Yasutaka; Inaba, Hideo

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study is the development of latent heat transport system by using the mixture of the minute latent heat storage materials and the saccharine solution as medium. The experimental studies are carried out by the evaluation of viscosity and pressure loss in a pipe. Polyethylene (P.E.) is selected as the dispersed minute material that has closeness density (920kg/m3) of ice (917kg/m3). D-sorbitol and D-xylose solutions are picked as continuum phase of the test mixture. The concentration of D-sorbitol solution is set 48mass% from measured results of saturation solubility and the melting point. 40mass% solution of D-xylose is selected as the other test continuum phase. The non-ion surfactant, EA157 Dai-ichiseiyaku CO. Ltd, is used in order to prevent of dispersed P.E. powder cohere. The pressure loss of test mixture is measured by the straight circular pipe that has smooth inner surface. The measuring length for pressure loss is 1000 mm, and the inner diameter of pipe is 15mm. The accuracy of experiment apparatus for measuring pressure loss is within ±5%. The pressure loss data is estimated by the relationship between the heat transport ratio and the required pump power. It is clarified that the optimum range of mixing ratio exists over 10mass% of latent heat storage material.

  1. Latent Heating Retrieval from TRMM Observations Using a Simplified Thermodynamic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.

    2003-01-01

    A procedure for the retrieval of hydrometeor latent heating from TRMM active and passive observations is presented. The procedure is based on current methods for estimating multiple-species hydrometeor profiles from TRMM observations. The species include: cloud water, cloud ice, rain, and graupel (or snow). A three-dimensional wind field is prescribed based on the retrieved hydrometeor profiles, and, assuming a steady-state, the sources and sinks in the hydrometeor conservation equations are determined. Then, the momentum and thermodynamic equations, in which the heating and cooling are derived from the hydrometeor sources and sinks, are integrated one step forward in time. The hydrometeor sources and sinks are reevaluated based on the new wind field, and the momentum and thermodynamic equations are integrated one more step. The reevalution-integration process is repeated until a steady state is reached. The procedure is tested using cloud model simulations. Cloud-model derived fields are used to synthesize TRMM observations, from which hydrometeor profiles are derived. The procedure is applied to the retrieved hydrometeor profiles, and the latent heating estimates are compared to the actual latent heating produced by the cloud model. Examples of procedure's applications to real TRMM data are also provided.

  2. Metal-halide mixtures for latent heat energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K.; Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    Alkali metal and alkali halide mixtures are identified which may be suitable for thermal energy storage at temperatures above 600 C. The use of metal-halides is appropriate because of their tendency to form two immiscible melts with a density difference, which reduces scale formation and solidification on heat transfer surfaces. Also, the accumulation of phase change material along the melt interface is avoided by the self-dispersing characteristic of some metal-halides, in particular Sr-SrCl2, Ba-BaCl2, and Ba-BaBr2 mixtures. Further advantages lie in their high thermal conductivities, ability to cope with thermal shock, corrosion inhibition, and possibly higher energy densities.

  3. Experimental study on latent heat storage characteristics of W/O emulsion -Supercooling rate of dispersed water drops by direct contact heat exchange-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Shin-ichi; Hayamizu, Yasutaka; Horibe, Akihiko; Haruki, Naoto; Inaba, Hideo

    2013-04-01

    Recently, much attention has been paid to investigate the latent heat storage system. Using of ice heat storage system brings an equalization of electric power demand, because it will solved the electric -power-demand-concentration on day-time of summer by the air conditioning. The flowable latent heat storage material, Oil/Water type emulsion, microencapsulated latent heat material-water mixture or ice slurry, etc., is enable to transport the latent heat in a pipe. The flowable latent heat storage material can realize the pipe size reduction and system efficiency improvement. Supercooling phenomenon of the dispersed latent heat storage material in continuous phase brings the obstruction of latent heat storage. The latent heat storage rates of dispersed water drops in W/O (Water/Oil) emulsion are investigated experimentally in this study. The water drops in emulsion has the diameter within 3 ˜ 25μm, the averaged water drop diameter is 7.3μm and the standard deviation is 2.9μm. The direct contact heat exchange method is chosen as the phase change rate evaluation of water drops in W/O emulsion. The supercooled temperature and the cooling rate are set as parameters of this study. The evaluation is performed by comparison between the results of this study and the past research. The obtained experimental result is shown that the 35K or more degree from melting point brings 100% latent heat storage rate of W/O emulsion. It was clarified that the supercooling rate of dispersed water particles in emulsion shows the larger value than that of the bulk water.

  4. Cold Heat Storage Characteristics of O/W-type Latent Heat Emulsion Including Continuum Phase of Water Treated with a Freezing Point Depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Morita, Shin-Ichi

    This paper deals with flow and cold heat storage characteristics of the oil (tetradecane, C14H30, freezing point 278.9 K, Latent heat 229 kJ/kg)/water emulsion as a latent heat storage material having a low melting point. The test emulsion includes a water-urea solution as a continuum phase. The freezing point depression of the continuum phase permits enhancement of the heat transfer rate of the emulison, due to the large temperature difference between the latent heat storage material and water-urea solution. The velocity of emulsion flow and the inlet temperature of coolant in a coiled double tube heat exchanger are chosen as the experimental parameters. The pressure drop, the heat transfer coefficient of the emulsion in the coiled tube are measured in the temperture region over solid and liquid phase of the latent heat storage material. The finishing time of the cold heat storage is defined experimentally in the range of sensible and latent heat storage. It is clarified that the flow behavior of the emulsion as a non-Newtonian fluid has an important role in cold heat storage. The useful nondimentional correlation equations for the additional pressure loss coefficient, the heat transfer coefficient and the finishing time of the cold heat storage are derived in terms of Dean number and heat capacity ratio.

  5. Spectral Retrieval of Latent Heating Profiles from TRMM PR Data: Comparison of Look-Up Tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shige, Shoichi; Takayabu, Yukari N.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Johnson, Daniel E.; Shie, Chung-Lin

    2003-01-01

    The primary goal of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is to use the information about distributions of precipitation to determine the four dimensional (i.e., temporal and spatial) patterns of latent heating over the whole tropical region. The Spectral Latent Heating (SLH) algorithm has been developed to estimate latent heating profiles for the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) with a cloud- resolving model (CRM). The method uses CRM- generated heating profile look-up tables for the three rain types; convective, shallow stratiform, and anvil rain (deep stratiform with a melting level). For convective and shallow stratiform regions, the look-up table refers to the precipitation top height (PTH). For anvil region, on the other hand, the look- up table refers to the precipitation rate at the melting level instead of PTH. For global applications, it is necessary to examine the universality of the look-up table. In this paper, we compare the look-up tables produced from the numerical simulations of cloud ensembles forced with the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean Response Experiment (COARE) data and the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) data. There are some notable differences between the TOGA-COARE table and the GATE table, especially for the convective heating. First, there is larger number of deepest convective profiles in the TOGA-COARE table than in the GATE table, mainly due to the differences in SST. Second, shallow convective heating is stronger in the TOGA COARE table than in the GATE table. This might be attributable to the difference in the strength of the low-level inversions. Third, altitudes of convective heating maxima are larger in the TOGA COARE table than in the GATE table. Levels of convective heating maxima are located just below the melting level, because warm-rain processes are prevalent in tropical oceanic convective systems. Differences in levels of convective heating maxima probably reflect

  6. Spectral Retrieval of Latent Heating Profiles from TRMM PR Data: Comparison of Look-Up Tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shige, Shoichi; Takayabu, Yukari N.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Johnson, Daniel E.; Shie, Chung-Lin

    2003-01-01

    The primary goal of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is to use the information about distributions of precipitation to determine the four dimensional (i.e., temporal and spatial) patterns of latent heating over the whole tropical region. The Spectral Latent Heating (SLH) algorithm has been developed to estimate latent heating profiles for the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) with a cloud- resolving model (CRM). The method uses CRM- generated heating profile look-up tables for the three rain types; convective, shallow stratiform, and anvil rain (deep stratiform with a melting level). For convective and shallow stratiform regions, the look-up table refers to the precipitation top height (PTH). For anvil region, on the other hand, the look- up table refers to the precipitation rate at the melting level instead of PTH. For global applications, it is necessary to examine the universality of the look-up table. In this paper, we compare the look-up tables produced from the numerical simulations of cloud ensembles forced with the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean Response Experiment (COARE) data and the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) data. There are some notable differences between the TOGA-COARE table and the GATE table, especially for the convective heating. First, there is larger number of deepest convective profiles in the TOGA-COARE table than in the GATE table, mainly due to the differences in SST. Second, shallow convective heating is stronger in the TOGA COARE table than in the GATE table. This might be attributable to the difference in the strength of the low-level inversions. Third, altitudes of convective heating maxima are larger in the TOGA COARE table than in the GATE table. Levels of convective heating maxima are located just below the melting level, because warm-rain processes are prevalent in tropical oceanic convective systems. Differences in levels of convective heating maxima probably reflect

  7. Uncertainty in Tropical Ocean Latent Heat Flux Variability During the Last 25 Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, F. R.; Lu, H.-I.; Bosilovich, M. G.; Miller, T. L.

    2007-01-01

    When averaged over the tropical oceans (30deg N/S), latent heat flux anomalies derived from passive microwave satellite measurements as well as reanalyses and climate models driven with specified seal-surface temperatures show considerable disagreement in their decadal trends. These estimates range from virtually no trend to values over 8.4 W/sq m decade. Satellite estimates also tend to have a larger interannual signal related to El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events than do reanalyses or model simulations. An analysis of wind speed and humidity going into bulk aerodynamic calculations used to derive these fluxes reveals several error sources. Among these are apparent remaining intercalibration issues affecting passive microwave satellite 10 m wind speeds and systematic biases in retrieval of near-surface humidity. Likewise, reanalyses suffer from discontinuities in availability of assimilated data that affect near surface meteorological variables. The results strongly suggest that current latent heat flux trends are overestimated.

  8. Combined Microwave and Sferics Measurements as a Continuous Proxy for Latent Heating in Mesoscale Model Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D. -E.; Morales, C. A.; Weinman, J. A.; Olson, W. S.

    1999-01-01

    Planar rainfall distributions were retrieved from data provided by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) radiometers. Lightning generates Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio noise pulses called sferics. Those pulses propagate over large distances so that they can be continuously monitored with a network of ground based radio receivers. An empirical relationship between the sferics rate and the convective rainfall permitted maps of convective latent heating profiles to be derived continuously from the sferics distributions. Those inferred latent heating rates were assimilated into the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) that depicted an intense winter cyclone that passed over Florida on 2 February 1998. When compared to a 14 hour MM5 rainfall forecast using conventional data, the use of lightning data improved the forecast.

  9. Combined Microwave and Sferics Measurements as a Continuous Proxy for Latent Heating in Mesoscale Model Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.-E.; Morales, C. A.; Weinman, J. A.; Olson, W. S.

    1999-01-01

    Planar rainfall distributions were retrieved from data provided by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) radiometers. Lightning generates Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio noise pulses called sferics. Those pulses propagate over large distances so that they can be continuously monitored with a network of ground based radio receivers. An empirical relationship between the sferics rate and the convective rainfall permitted maps of convective latent heating profiles to be derived continuously from the sferics distributions. Those inferred latent heating rates were assimilated into the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) that depicted an intense winter cyclone that passed over Florida on 2 February 1998. When compared to a 14 hour MM5 rainfall forecast using conventional data, the use of lightning data improved the forecast.

  10. Latent Heat and Sensible Heat Fluxes Simulation in Maize Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safa, B.

    2015-12-01

    Latent Heat (LE) and Sensible Heat (H) flux are two major components of the energy balance at the earth's surface which play important roles in the water cycle and global warming. There are various methods for their estimation or measurement. Eddy covariance is a direct and accurate technique for their measurement. Some limitations lead to prevention of the extensive use of the eddy covariance technique. Therefore, simulation approaches can be utilized for their estimation. ANNs are the information processing systems, which can inspect the empirical data and investigate the relations (hidden rules) among them, and then make the network structure. In this study, multi-layer perceptron neural network trained by the steepest descent Back-Propagation (BP) algorithm was tested to simulate LE and H flux above two maize sites (rain-fed & irrigated) near Mead, Nebraska. Network training and testing was fulfilled using hourly data of including year, local time of day (DTime), leaf area index (LAI), soil water content (SWC) in 10 and 25 cm depths, soil temperature (Ts) in 10 cm depth, air temperature (Ta), vapor pressure deficit (VPD), wind speed (WS), irrigation and precipitation (P), net radiation (Rn), and the fraction of incoming Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) absorbed by the canopy (fPAR), which were selected from days of year (DOY) 169 to 222 for 2001, 2003, 2005, 2007, and 2009. The results showed high correlation between actual and estimated data; the R² values for LE flux in irrigated and rain-fed sites were 0.9576, and 0.9642; and for H flux 0.8001, and 0.8478, respectively. Furthermore, the RMSE values ranged from 0.0580 to 0.0721 W/m² for LE flux and from 0.0824 to 0.0863 W/m² for H flux. In addition, the sensitivity of the fluxes with respect to each input was analyzed over the growth stages. Thus, the most powerful effects among the inputs for LE flux were identified net radiation, leaf area index, vapor pressure deficit, wind speed, and for H

  11. A method to model latent heat for transient analysis using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harder, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    A sample heat transfer analysis is demonstrated which includes the heat of fusion. The method can be used to analyze a system with nonconstant specific heat. The enthalpy is introduced as an independent degree of freedom at each node. The user input consists of a curve of temperature as a function of enthalpy, which may include a constant temperature phase change. The basic NASTRAN heat transfer capability is used to model the effects of latent heat with existing direct matrix output and nonlinear load data cards. Although some user care is required, the numerical stability of the integration is quite good when the given recommendations are followed. The theoretical equations used and the NASTRAN techniques are shown.

  12. Testing for latent tuberculosis infection using interferon gamma release assays in commercial sex workers at an outreach clinic in Birmingham.

    PubMed

    Daly, R; Khatib, N; Larkins, A; Dedicoat, M

    2016-07-01

    This report demonstrates that using interferon gamma release assays to screen for latent tuberculosis infection in female commercial sex workers in an outreach sexual health clinic is feasible and acceptable. Routine interferon gamma release assay use successfully identified high numbers of latent tuberculosis infection. Innovative approaches to treatment and follow up were required to improve treatment adherence in this group. Direct observation of therapy within the sexual health clinic was also feasible. Successful follow up was dependent on the support of outreach workers, interpreters and tuberculosis nurses. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Modeling the Daly Gap: The Influence of Latent Heat Production in Controlling Magma Extraction and Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, B. K.; Ghiorso, M. S.; Bachmann, O.; Dufek, J.

    2011-12-01

    A century-old issue in volcanology is the origin of the gap in chemical compositions observed in magmatic series on ocean islands and arcs - the "Daly Gap". If the gap forms during differentiation from a mafic parent, models that predict the dynamics of magma extraction as a function of chemical composition must simulate a process that results in volumetrically biased, bimodal compositions of erupted magmas. The probability of magma extraction is controlled by magma dynamical processes, which have a complex response to magmatic heat evolution. Heat loss from the magmatic system is far from a simple, monotonic function of time. It is modified by the crystallization sequence, chamber margin heat flux, and is buffered by latent heat production. We use chemical and thermal calculations of MELTS (Ghiorso & Sack, 1995) as input to the physical model of QUANTUM (Dufek & Bachmann, 2010) to predict crystallinity windows of most probable magma extraction. We modeled two case studies: volcanism on Tenerife, Canary Islands, and the Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) of Campi Flegrei, Italy. Both preserve a basanitic to phonolitic lineage and have comparable total alkali concentrations; however, CI has high and Tenerife has low K2O/Na2O. Modeled thermal histories of differentiation for the two sequences contrast strongly. In Tenerife, the rate of latent heat production is almost always greater than sensible heat production, with spikes in the ratio of latent to sensible heats of up to 40 associated with the appearance of Fe-Ti oxides at near 50% crystallization. This punctuated heat production must cause magma temperature change to stall or slow in time. The extended time spent at ≈50% crystallinity, associated with dynamical processes that enhance melt extraction near 50% crystallinity, suggests the magma composition at this interval should be common. In Tenerife, the modeled composition coincides with that of the first peak in the bimodal frequency-composition distribution. In our

  14. Influence of latent heat and thermal diffusion on the growth of nematic liquid crystal nuclei.

    PubMed

    Huisman, B A H; Fasolino, A

    2007-08-01

    The growth of nematic liquid crystal nuclei from an isotropic melt follows a power law behavior with exponent n found experimentally to vary between 1/2 for low quench depths, up to 1 for high quench depths. This behavior has been attributed to the competition between curvature and free energy. We show that curvature cannot account for the low quench depth behavior of the nucleus growth, and attribute this behavior to the diffusion of latent heat. We use a multiscale approach to solve the Landau-Ginzburg order parameter evolution equation coupled to a diffusive heat equation, and discuss this behavior for material parameters experimentally measured for the liquid crystal 8CB.

  15. Experimental analysis of regularly structured composite latent heat storages for temporary cooling of electronic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, Ekkehard; Schmitz, Gerhard

    2013-11-01

    This study presents the experimental investigation of regularly structured Composite Latent Heat Storages. Solid-liquid Phase Change Materials have a low thermal conductivity, resulting in high temperature differences. This drawback is compensated by the combination with specially designed frame-structures made of aluminum to enhance the transport of thermal energy. A prototype is investigated experimentally on a test rig, where the heat load and temperatures are measured while the phase change process is observed optically, and compared to a solid block Phase Change Material.

  16. New latent heat storage system with nanoparticles for thermal management of electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javani, N.; Dincer, I.; Naterer, G. F.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a new passive thermal management system for electric vehicles is developed. A latent heat thermal energy storage with nanoparticles is designed and optimized. A genetic algorithm method is employed to minimize the length of the heat exchanger tubes. The results show that even the optimum length of a shell and tube heat exchanger becomes too large to be employed in a vehicle. This is mainly due to the very low thermal conductivity of phase change material (PCM) which fills the shell side of the heat exchanger. A carbon nanotube (CNT) and PCM mixture is then studied where the probability of nanotubes in a series configuration is defined as a deterministic design parameter. Various heat transfer rates, ranging from 300 W to 600 W, are utilized to optimize battery cooling options in the heat exchanger. The optimization results show that smaller tube diameters minimize the heat exchanger length. Furthermore, finned tubes lead to a higher heat exchanger length due to more heat transfer resistance. By increasing the CNT concentration, the optimum length of the heat exchanger decreases and makes the improved thermal management system a more efficient and competitive with air and liquid thermal management systems.

  17. Eddy covariance measurement of carbon, latent and sensible heat fluxes from western Lake Erie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, C.; Chen, J.; Stepien, C.; Bridgeman, T.; Czajkowski, K. P.; Becker, R.; Chu, H.; yang, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Long-term measurements of sensible and latent heat and carbon dioxide fluxes were performed over a boreal lake in northern American using the direct micrometeorological eddy covariance (EC) technique. Two permanent EC flux stations in western Lake Erie - Crib (41.7167N, 83.2667W, nearest distance from shore is 4.5 km) and Light (41.8314N, 83.2006W, nearest distance from shore > 12 km) sites have been operating since September, 2011. In 2012, in both sites, the sensible heat flux had its minimum in the afternoon (15:00-17:00) and peaked in the early morning (7:00-9:00) in August-November, varied from -4 W m-2 to +30 W m-2. The diurnal amplitude of H was largest in spring and in early fall (30 W m-2 in September) whereas it was smaller in July and August (20 W m-2). The latent heat flux had obvious seasonal pattern in both sites with higher values in the summer, while it did not show obvious daily courses, even did not have the day and night variation in both sites, only one trend from June to October was higher at night than during the daytime in Light site. The maximum latent heat of ~180 W m-2 in summer whereas the minimum -10 W m-2 in winter were observed. The latent heat flux dominated clearly over the sensible heat in spring and summer; that is, the Bowen ratio was less than 1 and most of the energy absorbed by the water was consumed in terms of evapotranspiration. A lookup table method was performed data gap-filling in our aquatic ecosystems in order to obtain the continuously daily, monthly and yearly carbon and water budgets. In 2012, for the annual cumulative total, the evapotranspiration was 820 and 700 mm (about 2000 and 1700 MJ m-2) in Crib and Light sites, respectively, comparing with the annual rainfall of 700 mm. The annual sensible heat was 480 and 300 MJ m-2 in Crib and Light sites, respectively. And there were four and five CO2 uptake months in Crib and Light sites, respectively. The maximum CO2 uptake month was in July in both sites, with -28 and

  18. Comparison of chemical and heating methods to enhance latent fingerprint deposits on thermal paper.

    PubMed

    Bond, John W

    2014-03-01

    A comparison is made of proprietary methods to develop latent fingerprint deposits on the inked side of thermal paper using either chemical treatment (Thermanin) or the application of heat to the paper (Hot Print System). Results with a trial of five donors show that the application of heat produces statistically significantly more fingerprint ridge detail than the chemical treatment for both fingerprint deposits aged up to 4 weeks and for a nine sequence depletion series. Subjecting the thermal paper to heat treatment with the Hot Print System did not inhibit subsequent ninhydrin chemical development of fingerprint deposits on the noninked side of the paper. A further benefit of the application of heat is the rapid development of fingerprint deposits (less than a minute) compared with up to 12 h for the Thermanin chemical treatment.

  19. Evaluation and Application of Satellite-Based Latent Heating Profile Estimation Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Grecu, Mircea; Yang, Song; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, methods for estimating atmospheric latent heating vertical structure from both passive and active microwave remote sensing have matured to the point where quantitative evaluation of these methods is the next logical step. Two approaches for heating algorithm evaluation are proposed: First, application of heating algorithms to synthetic data, based upon cloud-resolving model simulations, can be used to test the internal consistency of heating estimates in the absence of systematic errors in physical assumptions. Second, comparisons of satellite-retrieved vertical heating structures to independent ground-based estimates, such as rawinsonde-derived analyses of heating, provide an additional test. The two approaches are complementary, since systematic errors in heating indicated by the second approach may be confirmed by the first. A passive microwave and combined passive/active microwave heating retrieval algorithm are evaluated using the described approaches. In general, the passive microwave algorithm heating profile estimates are subject to biases due to the limited vertical heating structure information contained in the passive microwave observations. These biases may be partly overcome by including more environment-specific a priori information into the algorithm s database of candidate solution profiles. The combined passive/active microwave algorithm utilizes the much higher-resolution vertical structure information provided by spaceborne radar data to produce less biased estimates; however, the global spatio-temporal sampling by spaceborne radar is limited. In the present study, the passive/active microwave algorithm is used to construct a more physically-consistent and environment-specific set of candidate solution profiles for the passive microwave algorithm and to help evaluate errors in the passive algorithm s heating estimates. Although satellite estimates of latent heating are based upon instantaneous, footprint- scale data, suppression

  20. Computational modeling of latent-heat-storage in PCM modified interior plaster

    SciTech Connect

    Fořt, Jan; Maděra, Jiří; Trník, Anton; Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-06-08

    The latent heat storage systems represent a promising way for decrease of buildings energy consumption with respect to the sustainable development principles of building industry. The presented paper is focused on the evaluation of the effect of PCM incorporation on thermal performance of cement-lime plasters. For basic characterization of the developed materials, matrix density, bulk density, and total open porosity are measured. Thermal conductivity is accessed by transient impulse method. DSC analysis is used for the identification of phase change temperature during the heating and cooling process. Using DSC data, the temperature dependent specific heat capacity is calculated. On the basis of the experiments performed, the supposed improvement of the energy efficiency of characteristic building envelope system where the designed plasters are likely to be used is evaluated by a computational analysis. Obtained experimental and computational results show a potential of PCM modified plasters for improvement of thermal stability of buildings and moderation of interior climate.

  1. Computational modeling of latent-heat-storage in PCM modified interior plaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fořt, Jan; Maděra, Jiří; Trník, Anton; Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-06-01

    The latent heat storage systems represent a promising way for decrease of buildings energy consumption with respect to the sustainable development principles of building industry. The presented paper is focused on the evaluation of the effect of PCM incorporation on thermal performance of cement-lime plasters. For basic characterization of the developed materials, matrix density, bulk density, and total open porosity are measured. Thermal conductivity is accessed by transient impulse method. DSC analysis is used for the identification of phase change temperature during the heating and cooling process. Using DSC data, the temperature dependent specific heat capacity is calculated. On the basis of the experiments performed, the supposed improvement of the energy efficiency of characteristic building envelope system where the designed plasters are likely to be used is evaluated by a computational analysis. Obtained experimental and computational results show a potential of PCM modified plasters for improvement of thermal stability of buildings and moderation of interior climate.

  2. Evaporative cooling: effective latent heat of evaporation in relation to evaporation distance from the skin.

    PubMed

    Havenith, George; Bröde, Peter; den Hartog, Emiel; Kuklane, Kalev; Holmer, Ingvar; Rossi, Rene M; Richards, Mark; Farnworth, Brian; Wang, Xiaoxin

    2013-03-15

    Calculation of evaporative heat loss is essential to heat balance calculations. Despite recognition that the value for latent heat of evaporation, used in these calculations, may not always reflect the real cooling benefit to the body, only limited quantitative data on this is available, which has found little use in recent literature. In this experiment a thermal manikin, (MTNW, Seattle, WA) was used to determine the effective cooling power of moisture evaporation. The manikin measures both heat loss and mass loss independently, allowing a direct calculation of an effective latent heat of evaporation (λeff). The location of the evaporation was varied: from the skin or from the underwear or from the outerwear. Outerwear of different permeabilities was used, and different numbers of layers were used. Tests took place in 20°C, 0.5 m/s at different humidities and were performed both dry and with a wet layer, allowing the breakdown of heat loss in dry and evaporative components. For evaporation from the skin, λeff is close to the theoretical value (2,430 J/g) but starts to drop when more clothing is worn, e.g., by 11% for underwear and permeable coverall. When evaporation is from the underwear, λeff reduction is 28% wearing a permeable outer. When evaporation is from the outermost layer only, the reduction exceeds 62% (no base layer), increasing toward 80% with more layers between skin and wet outerwear. In semi- and impermeable outerwear, the added effect of condensation in the clothing opposes this effect. A general formula for the calculation of λeff was developed.

  3. Persistent unstable atmospheric boundary layer enhances sensible and latent heat loss in a tropical great lake: Lake Tanganyika

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verburg, Piet; Antenucci, Jason P.

    2010-06-01

    Energy fluxes across the surface of lakes regulate heat storage and affect the water balance. Sensible and latent heat fluxes are affected by atmospheric stability, especially for large lakes. We examined the effect of atmospheric stability on the heat fluxes on seasonal time scales at Lake Tanganyika, East Africa, by estimating hourly sensible and latent heat fluxes and net radiation using thermistor chains and meteorological stations. The atmosphere was almost always unstable, in contrast to the atmosphere above North American Great Lakes which is unstable in winter and stable in summer. Persistent atmospheric instability resulted in a 13% and 18% increase in the annual mean heat loss by latent and sensible heat fluxes, respectively, relative to conditions of neutral stability. The persistent unstable atmosphere is caused by a higher water surface temperature compared with air temperature, which we argue is the case in general in (sub)tropical lakes. Low humidity further enhanced the frequency of unstable conditions and enhanced the exchange of heat and vapor from the lake to the atmosphere. The estimated heat fluxes were sensitive to the temporal scale of data inputs and to the local values of parameters such as air density. To our knowledge this is the first paper that demonstrates and quantifies the effect of atmospheric stability on latent and sensible heat fluxes from a lake on an annual basis, using data collected from the lake surface.

  4. Heat release from wood wall assemblies using oxygen consumption method

    Treesearch

    Hao C. Tran; Robert E. White

    1990-01-01

    The concept of heat release rate is gaining acceptance in the evaluation of fire performance of materials and assemblies. However, this concept has not been incorporated into fire endurance testing such as the ASTM E-119 test method. Heat release rate of assemblies can be useful in determining the time at which the assemblies start to contribute to the controlled fire...

  5. Effects of latent heating on driving atmospheric circulation of brown dwarfs and directly imaged giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xianyu; Showman, Adam P.

    2015-12-01

    Growing observations of brown dwarfs (BDs) and directly imaged extrasolar giant planets (EGPs), such as brightness variability and surface maps have provided evidence for strong atmospheric circulation on these worlds. Previous studies that serve to understand the atmospheric circulation of BDs include modeling of convection from the interior and its interactions with stably stratified atmospheres. These models show that such interactions can drive an atmospheric circulation, forming zonal jets and/or vortices. However, these models are dry, not including condensation of various chemical species. Latent heating from condensation of water has previously been shown to play an important role on driving the zonal jets on four giant planets in our solar system. As such, condensation cycles of various chemical species are believed to be an important source in driving the atmospheric circulation of BDs and directly imaged EGPs. Here we present results from three-dimensional simulations for the atmospheres of BDs and EGPs based on a general circulation model that includes the effect of a condensate cycle. Large-scale latent heating and molecular weight effect due to condensation of a single species are treated explicitly. We examine the circulation patterns caused by large-scale latent heating which results from condensation of silicate vapor in hot dwarfs and water vapor in the cold dwarfs. By varying the abundance of condensable vapor and the radiative timescale, we conclude that under normal atmospheric conditions of BDs (hot and thus with relatively short radiative timescale), latent heating alone by silicate vapor is unable to drive a global circulation, leaving a quiescent atmosphere, because of the suppression to moist instability by downward transport of dry air. Models with relatively long radiative timescale, which may be the case for cooler bodies, tend to maintain an active hydrological cycle and develop zonal jets. Once condensation happens, storms driven by

  6. A methodology for mapping forest latent heat flux densities using remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Lars L.; Congalton, Russell G.

    1988-01-01

    Surface temperatures and reflectances of an upper elevation Sierran mixed conifer forest were monitored using the Thematic Mapper Simulator sensor during the summer of 1985 in order to explore the possibility of using remote sensing to determine the distribution of solar energy on forested watersheds. The results show that the method is capable of quantifying the relative energy allocation relationships between the two cover types defined in the study. It is noted that the method also has the potential to map forest latent heat flux densities.

  7. Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions from Satellite Passive Microwave Radiometry. Part 1; Improved Method and Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Yang, Song; Petty, Grant W.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Bell, Thomas L.; Braun, Scott A.; Wang, Yansen; Lang, Stephen E.; Johnson, Daniel E.; hide

    2006-01-01

    A revised Bayesian algorithm for estimating surface rain rate, convective rain proportion, and latent heating profiles from satellite-borne passive microwave radiometer observations over ocean backgrounds is described. The algorithm searches a large database of cloud-radiative model simulations to find cloud profiles that are radiatively consistent with a given set of microwave radiance measurements. The properties of these radiatively consistent profiles are then composited to obtain best estimates of the observed properties. The revised algorithm is supported by an expanded and more physically consistent database of cloud-radiative model simulations. The algorithm also features a better quantification of the convective and nonconvective contributions to total rainfall, a new geographic database, and an improved representation of background radiances in rain-free regions. Bias and random error estimates are derived from applications of the algorithm to synthetic radiance data, based upon a subset of cloud-resolving model simulations, and from the Bayesian formulation itself. Synthetic rain-rate and latent heating estimates exhibit a trend of high (low) bias for low (high) retrieved values. The Bayesian estimates of random error are propagated to represent errors at coarser time and space resolutions, based upon applications of the algorithm to TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) data. Errors in TMI instantaneous rain-rate estimates at 0.5 -resolution range from approximately 50% at 1 mm/h to 20% at 14 mm/h. Errors in collocated spaceborne radar rain-rate estimates are roughly 50%-80% of the TMI errors at this resolution. The estimated algorithm random error in TMI rain rates at monthly, 2.5deg resolution is relatively small (less than 6% at 5 mm day.1) in comparison with the random error resulting from infrequent satellite temporal sampling (8%-35% at the same rain rate). Percentage errors resulting from sampling decrease with increasing rain rate, and sampling errors in

  8. Phase Change Characteristics of a Nanoemulsion as a Latent Heat Storage Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumoto, Koji; Sato, Noriaki; Kawaji, Masahiro; Kawanami, Tsuyoshi; Inamura, Takao

    2014-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the fundamental phase change characteristics of a nanoemulsion using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Tetradecane, which has a slightly higher melting point than water, was utilized as the phase change material for the nanoemulsion. The melting point of the nanoemulsion, the melting peak temperature, and latent heat were examined in detail. Regarding the fundamental phase change characteristics of the nanoemulsion, it was found that its phase change characteristics were strongly affected by the temperature-scanning rate of the DSC. Moreover, it was confirmed that the phase change behavior does not change with repeated solidification and melting.

  9. Combined solar heat and power system with a latent heat storage - system simulations for an economic assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipf, Verena; Neuhäuser, Anton

    2016-05-01

    Decentralized solar combined heat and power (CHP) systems can be economically feasible, especially when they have a thermal storage. In such systems, heat provided by solar thermal collectors is used to generate electricity and useful heat for e.g. industrial processes. For the supply of energy in times without solar irradiation, a thermal storage can be integrated. In this work, the performance of a solar CHP system using an active latent heat storage with a screw heat exchanger is investigated. Annual yield calculations are conducted in order to calculate annual energy gains and, based on them; economic assumptions are used to calculated economic numbers in order to assess the system performance. The energy savings of a solar system, compared to a system with a fossil fuel supply, are calculated. Then the net present value and the dynamic payback are calculated with these savings, the initial investment costs and the operational costs. By interpretation and comparison of these economic numbers, an optimum system design in terms of solar field size and storage size was determined. It has been shown that the utilization of such systems can be economical in remote areas without gas and grid connection. Optimal storage design parameters in terms of the temperature differences in the heat exchanger and the storage capacity have been determined which can further increase the net present value of such system.

  10. Interferon gamma release assays and the NICE 2011 guidelines on the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mujakperuo, Helen R; Thompson, Richard D; Thickett, David R

    2013-08-01

    In this clinical audit, we assessed retrospectively the current practice of respiratory physicians with respect to interferon gamma (IFNγ) release assay (IGRA) testing for tuberculosis (TB), as recommended by the 2011 National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines for the diagnosis and management of TB. All IGRAs requested by respiratory physicians over a 3-year period were identified retrospectively, and both results and clinical indications analysed. Of the total number of IGRAs carried out, 90% formed part of investigations of suspected active TB. However, 89% of the patients had not had a documented Mantoux test and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status was unclear in the 35.2% of patients treated for active TB. Of patients with chest X-rays suggestive of TB, 92.3% were treated for active TB. Of the patients under the age of 35 with reactive IGRAs, 84.6% were treated for active or latent TB and 15.4% had justifiable reasons for not receiving chemoprophylaxis. Based on the results of our audit, IGRAs are commonly being utilised for the investigation of active TB, which is contrary to current guidance.

  11. A Wind-Driven, Hybrid Latent and Sensible Heat Coastal Polynya at Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, D.; Fukamachi, Y.; Watanabe, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Mahoney, A. R.; Eicken, H.; Shimizu, D.; Ohshima, K. I.; Tamura, T.

    2014-12-01

    The nature of the Barrow Coastal Polynya (BCP) formed off the Alaska Coast in winter is examined using mooring data (temperature, salinity, and ocean current), atmospheric re-analysis data (ERA-Interim), and AMSR-E-derived sea-ice concentration and production data (Iwamoto et al., 2014). Previously, the BCP has been considered to be a latent heat polynya formed by predominantly offshore winds resulting in sea-ice divergence. Recently, it has been suggested that the sea-ice production rate in the BCP is suppressed by warm Pacific- or Atlantic-origin waters distributed beneath the BCP (e.g. Itoh et al., 2012). In this study, we focus on the oceanographic conditions such as water mass distribution and ocean current structure beneath the BCP, which have not been fully documented. A mooring was deployed off Barrow, Alaska in the northeast Chukchi Sea (71.23°N, 157.65°W, water depth 55 m) from August 2009 to July 2010. During the freeze-up period from December to May, five BCP events occurred in the same manner; 1) dominant wind parallel to Barrow Canyon, with an offshore component near Barrow, 2) high sea-ice production followed by sudden cessation of ice growth, 3) upwelling of warm (>2 K above freezing point) and saline (>34) Atlantic Water (AW) beneath the BCP, 4) strong up-canyon flow (>100cm/s) associated with density fluctuations. A baroclinic current structure, established after the upwelling, resulted in enhanced vertical shear, promoting vertical mixing. The mixing event and open water formation occurred simultaneously, once sea-ice production had stopped. Thus, mixing events accompanied by ocean heat flux from AW into the surface layer were likely to form/maintain the open water area that is a sensible heat polynya. The transition from a latent to a sensible heat polynya was well reproduced by a pan-Arctic ice-ocean model (COCO). We propose that the BCP is a hybrid latent and sensible heat polynya, with both processes driven by the same offshore wind.

  12. Performance evaluation of solar box cooker assisted with latent heat energy storage system for cooking application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneswaran, V. S.; Kumaresan, G.; Sudhakar, P.; Santosh, R.

    2017-05-01

    Solar cooking is one of the most promising techniques to meet the cooking needs in remote areas where electricity and fuel supplies are meager. Solar box cooker is an efficient device used in solar cooking as it is simple to fabricate, easy to operate and hazard-free. In this context, the performance evaluation of a solar box cooker with varied number of reflectors has been undertaken. It was found that the time consumed for cooking in a box type solar cooker with four reflectors is lesser compared to that of a single reflector and its overall utilization efficiency increases with increase in the cooking mass. Further, a latent heat energy storage system was designed and fabricated to cook the food at off-peak hours of solar radiation. This latent heat energy storage system was combined with the solar box cooker. Oxalic acid dihydrate was used as the phase change material due to its high specific enthalpy and its melting point lying close to the cooking temperature. It was found that the solar box cooker with phase change material could be effectively utilized to cook food during off-peak hours of solar radiation.

  13. Atmospheric net transport of water vapor and latent heat across 70°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovinetto, M. B.; Bromwich, D. H.; Wendler, G.

    1992-01-01

    The annual net atmospheric transports of water vapor and latent heat poleward across 70°S are estimated using the latest compilation of surface mass balance for the Antarctic ice sheet and new estimates of precipitation and evaporation in sectors of the southern oceans and of seaward drifting snow transport in particular sectors of the ice sheet. The mass and energy exchange rates at the ice sheet-atmosphere and ocean-atmosphere interfaces are integrated strictly for areas within that latitude. The estimates of net southward water vapor transport (6.6 ± 1.3 kg m-1 s-1) and latent heat transport (18.9 ± 3.6 MJ m-1 s-1) are larger than reported in all preceding studies, based on atmospheric advection and moisture data collected at stations located between 66°S and 80°S, and are generally in agreement with those based on surface mass balance data and seaward drifting snow transport across the ice terminus which extends between 65°S and 79°S.

  14. Passive and Active Microwave Remote Sensing of Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions in the Tropics from TRMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Yang, Song; Haddad, Ziad S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wang, Yansen; Lang, Stephen E.; Braun, Scott A.; Chiu, Christine; Wang, Jian-Jian

    2002-01-01

    Passive and active microwave remote sensing data are analyzed to identify signatures of precipitation and vertical motion in tropical convection. A database of cloud/radiative model simulations is used to quantify surface rain rates and latent heating profiles that are consistent with these signatures. At satellite footprint-scale (approximately 10 km), rain rate and latent heating estimates are subject to significant random errors, but by averaging the estimates in space and time, random errors are substantially reduced, Bias errors have been minimized by improving the microphysics in the supporting cloud/radiative model simulations, and by imposing a consistent definition of remotely-sensed and model-simulated convective/stratiform rain coverage. Remotely-sensed precipitation and latent heating distributions in the tropics are derived from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and Special Sensor Microwave/ Imager (SSM/ I) sensor data. The prototype Version 6 TRMM passive microwave algorithm typically yields average heating profiles with maxima between 6 and 7 km altitude for organized mesoscale convective systems. Retrieved heating profiles for individual convective systems are compared to coincident estimates based upon a combination of dual-Doppler radar and rawinsonde data. Also, large-scale latent heating distributions are compared to estimates derived from a simpler technique that utilizes observations of surface rain rate and stratiform rain proportion to infer vertical heating structure. Results of these tests will be presented at the conference.

  15. Passive and Active Microwave Remote Sensing of Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions in the Tropics from TRMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Yang, Song; Haddad, Ziad S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wang, Yansen; Lang, Stephen E.; Braun, Scott A.; Chiu, Christine; Wang, Jian-Jian

    2002-01-01

    Passive and active microwave remote sensing data are analyzed to identify signatures of precipitation and vertical motion in tropical convection. A database of cloud/radiative model simulations is used to quantify surface rain rates and latent heating profiles that are consistent with these signatures. At satellite footprint-scale (approximately 10 km), rain rate and latent heating estimates are subject to significant random errors, but by averaging the estimates in space and time, random errors are substantially reduced, Bias errors have been minimized by improving the microphysics in the supporting cloud/radiative model simulations, and by imposing a consistent definition of remotely-sensed and model-simulated convective/stratiform rain coverage. Remotely-sensed precipitation and latent heating distributions in the tropics are derived from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and Special Sensor Microwave/ Imager (SSM/ I) sensor data. The prototype Version 6 TRMM passive microwave algorithm typically yields average heating profiles with maxima between 6 and 7 km altitude for organized mesoscale convective systems. Retrieved heating profiles for individual convective systems are compared to coincident estimates based upon a combination of dual-Doppler radar and rawinsonde data. Also, large-scale latent heating distributions are compared to estimates derived from a simpler technique that utilizes observations of surface rain rate and stratiform rain proportion to infer vertical heating structure. Results of these tests will be presented at the conference.

  16. Spatially resolved heat release rate measurements in turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Ayoola, B.O.; Kaminski, C.F.; Balachandran, R.; Mastorakos, E.; Frank, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Heat release rate is a fundamental property of great importance for the theoretical and experimental elucidation of unsteady flame behaviors such as combustion noise, combustion instabilities, and pulsed combustion. Investigations of such thermoacoustic interactions require a reliable indicator of heat release rate capable of resolving spatial structures in turbulent flames. Traditionally, heat release rate has been estimated via OH or CH radical chemiluminescence; however, chemiluminescence suffers from being a line-of-sight technique with limited capability for resolving small-scale structures. In this paper, we report spatially resolved two-dimensional measurements of a quantity closely related to heat release rate. The diagnostic technique uses simultaneous OH and CH{sub 2}O planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), and the pixel-by-pixel product of the OH and CH{sub 2}O PLIF signals has previously been shown to correlate well with local heat release rates. Results from this diagnostic technique, which we refer to as heat release rate imaging (HR imaging), are compared with traditional OH chemiluminescence measurements in several flames. Studies were performed in lean premixed ethylene flames stabilized between opposed jets and with a bluff body. Correlations between bulk strain rates and local heat release rates were obtained and the effects of curvature on heat release rate were investigated. The results show that the heat release rate tends to increase with increasing negative curvature for the flames investigated for which Lewis numbers are greater than unity. This correlation becomes more pronounced as the flame gets closer to global extinction.

  17. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefrois, R. T.; Knowles, G. R.; Mathur, A. K.; Budimir, J.

    1979-01-01

    Active heat exchange concepts for use with thermal energy storage systems in the temperature range of 250 C to 350 C, using the heat of fusion of molten salts for storing thermal energy are described. Salt mixtures that freeze and melt in appropriate ranges are identified and are evaluated for physico-chemical, economic, corrosive and safety characteristics. Eight active heat exchange concepts for heat transfer during solidification are conceived and conceptually designed for use with selected storage media. The concepts are analyzed for their scalability, maintenance, safety, technological development and costs. A model for estimating and scaling storage system costs is developed and is used for economic evaluation of salt mixtures and heat exchange concepts for a large scale application. The importance of comparing salts and heat exchange concepts on a total system cost basis, rather than the component cost basis alone, is pointed out. The heat exchange concepts were sized and compared for 6.5 MPa/281 C steam conditions and a 1000 MW(t) heat rate for six hours. A cost sensitivity analysis for other design conditions is also carried out.

  18. Dynamical response of nanostructures and Joule heat release.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, V L; Kozub, V I; Muradov, M I

    2011-10-12

    We consider Joule heat release in a quantum wire joining two classical reservoirs under the action of a nonstationary periodic electric field. The rate of heat generation and its spatial distribution is discussed. The heat is spread over the lengths of electron mean free paths in the reservoirs. We find that the total rates of heat generation in both reservoirs that are joined by the nanostructure are the same.

  19. Conceptual design of a latent heat thermal energy storage subsystem for a saturated steam solar receiver and load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilauro, G. F.; Rice, R. E.

    1982-02-01

    The conceptual design of a tube intensive latent heat thermal energy storage (TES) subsystem which utilized a eutectic mixture of sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate as the phase change material (PCM) was developed. The charging and discharging of the unit is accomplished by the same serpentine tube bundle heat exchanger in which heat transfer is augmented by aluminum channels acting as fins. Every tenth channel is made of steel to provide tube support.

  20. Latent heat induced rotation limited aggregation in 2D ice nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bampoulis, Pantelis; Siekman, Martin H.; Kooij, E. Stefan; Lohse, Detlef; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Poelsema, Bene

    2015-07-01

    The basic science responsible for the fascinating shapes of ice crystals and snowflakes is still not understood. Insufficient knowledge of the interaction potentials and the lack of relevant experimental access to the growth process are to blame for this failure. Here, we study the growth of fractal nanostructures in a two-dimensional (2D) system, intercalated between mica and graphene. Based on our scanning tunneling spectroscopy data, we provide compelling evidence that these fractals are 2D ice. They grow while they are in material contact with the atmosphere at 20 °C and without significant thermal contact to the ambient. The growth is studied in situ, in real time and space at the nanoscale. We find that the growing 2D ice nanocrystals assume a fractal shape, which is conventionally attributed to Diffusion Limited Aggregation (DLA). However, DLA requires a low mass density mother phase, in contrast to the actual currently present high mass density mother phase. Latent heat effects and consequent transport of heat and molecules are found to be key ingredients for understanding the evolution of the snow (ice) flakes. We conclude that not the local availability of water molecules (DLA), but rather them having the locally required orientation is the key factor for incorporation into the 2D ice nanocrystal. In combination with the transport of latent heat, we attribute the evolution of fractal 2D ice nanocrystals to local temperature dependent rotation limited aggregation. The ice growth occurs under extreme supersaturation, i.e., the conditions closely resemble the natural ones for the growth of complex 2D snow (ice) flakes and we consider our findings crucial for solving the "perennial" snow (ice) flake enigma.

  1. Materials compatibility in Dish-Stirling solar generators using Cu-Si-Mg eutectic for latent heat storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruizenga, A. M.; Withey, E. A.; Andraka, C. E.; Gibbs, P. J.

    2016-05-01

    Dish-Stirling systems are a strong candidate to meet cost production goals for solar thermal power production. Thermal energy storage improves the capacity factor of thermal power systems; copper-silicon-magnesium eutectic alloys have been investigated as potential latent heat storage materials. This work examines the ability of commercially available plasma spray coatings to serve as protective barriers with these alloys, while highlighting mechanistic insights into materials for latent heat storage systems. Computed tomography was leveraged as a rapid screening tool to assess the presence of localized attack in tested coatings.

  2. Theoretical predictions for latent heats and phase-change temperatures of polycrystalline PCMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medved', Igor; Trník, Anton

    2017-07-01

    We had previously developed a microscopic approach from which it is possible to fit enthalpy jumps and heat capacity peaks of polycrystalline phase-change materials that consists of a large number of grains. It is also possible to determine the corresponding latent heat and phase-change temperature. These results are given in a form of sums over grain diameters that can be evaluated numerically. Therefore, their behavior and dependence on physical parameters are not susceptible to straightforward interpretations. Here we use the results to derive simple formulas for the maximum position (Tmax), height (H), and an asymmetry factor (α) of those heat capacity peaks that are very asymmetric. In addition, we express the phase-change temperature as a simple combination of Tmax, H, α, and the peak's area. We apply our formulas to Rhubitherm 27 as an example PCM for which the heat capacity peak is so asymmetric that it has about 80 % of its total area below its maximum position.

  3. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefrois, R. T.; Mathur, A. K.

    1980-04-01

    Five tasks to select, design, fabricate, test and evaluate candidate active heat exchanger modules for future applications to solar and conventional utility power plants were discussed. Alternative mechanizations of active heat exchange concepts were analyzed for use with heat of fusion phase change materials (PCMs) in the temperature range of 250 to 350 C. Twenty-six heat exchange concepts were reviewed, and eight were selected for detailed assessment. Two candidates were selected for small-scale experimentation: a coated tube and shell heat exchanger and a direct contact reflux boiler. A dilute eutectic mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide was selected as the PCM from over 50 candidate inorganic salt mixtures. Based on a salt screening process, eight major component salts were selected initially for further evaluation. The most attractive major components in the temperature range of 250 to 350 C appeared to be NaNO3, NaNO2, and NaOH. Sketches of the two active heat exchange concepts selected for test are given.

  4. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefrois, R. T.; Mathur, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    Five tasks to select, design, fabricate, test and evaluate candidate active heat exchanger modules for future applications to solar and conventional utility power plants were discussed. Alternative mechanizations of active heat exchange concepts were analyzed for use with heat of fusion phase change materials (PCMs) in the temperature range of 250 to 350 C. Twenty-six heat exchange concepts were reviewed, and eight were selected for detailed assessment. Two candidates were selected for small-scale experimentation: a coated tube and shell heat exchanger and a direct contact reflux boiler. A dilute eutectic mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide was selected as the PCM from over 50 candidate inorganic salt mixtures. Based on a salt screening process, eight major component salts were selected initially for further evaluation. The most attractive major components in the temperature range of 250 to 350 C appeared to be NaNO3, NaNO2, and NaOH. Sketches of the two active heat exchange concepts selected for test are given.

  5. A comparison between latent heat fluxes over grass using a weighing lysimeter and surface renewal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellví, F.; Snyder, R. L.

    2010-02-01

    SummaryAn experiment to study the performance of the hourly sensible ( H) and latent heat ( LE) estimates over grass using surface renewal, SR, analysis was carried out at the University of California West Side Field Station near Five Points (San Joaquin Valley, CA). Hourly eddy covariance, EC, and SR sensible heat fluxes were averaged from their respective half-hourly fluxes. They were used to estimate hourly latent heat flux, LE, by calculating the residual of the energy balance equation, i.e., LE EC = R n - G - H EC and LE SR = R n - G - H SR, where R n is the net radiation; G is the soil heat flux; H is the buoyant sensible heat flux and the H subscripts denote measurements values from the EC and SR methods. Regardless of the weather conditions and time of day, H SR was comparable to H EC; especially from sunrise until the afternoon formation of a capping inversion due to regional advection of sensible heat flux. The main source of energy contributing to LE was ( R n - G). When ( R n - G) was positive, on average, H contributed to 9% of ( R n - G) when data were collected under unstable conditions, but it accounted for 21% under stable conditions . In general, correlation between measured LE using a weighing lysimeter, LE Lys, and LE SR was R2 = 0.97 which was substantially higher than between LE Lys and ( R n - G), R2 = 0.93. In principle, the observed performance can be extrapolated to all irrigated, short, and dense-canopy vegetation that is mostly decoupled from the environment. Because for these surfaces the zero-plane displacement and the aerodynamic surface roughness length can be estimated as a portion (about 0.7 and 0.12, respectively) of the canopy height, using a two dimensional sonic anemometer capable to record high-frequency sonic temperature provides all the input to determine H SR which in conjunction with ( R n - G) is required to estimate LE.

  6. Novel functional materials from renewable lipids: Amphiphilic antimicrobial polymers and latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floros, Michael Christopher

    Vegetable oils represent an ideal and renewable feedstock for the synthesis of a variety of functional materials. However, without financial incentive or unique applications motivating a switch, commercial products continue to be manufactured from petrochemical resources. Two different families of high value, functional materials synthesized from vegetable oils were studied. These materials demonstrate superior and unique performance to comparable petrochemical analogues currently on the market. In the first approach, 3 amphiphilic thermoplastic polytriazoles with differing lipophilic segment lengths were synthesized in a polymerization process without solvents or catalysts. Investigation of monomer structure influence on the resultant functional behaviour of these polymers found distinctive odd/even behaviour reliant on the number of carbon atoms in the monomers. Higher concentrations of triazole groups, due to shorter CH2 chains in the monomeric dialkynes, resulted in more brittle polymers, displaying higher tensile strengths but reduced elongation to break characteristics. These polymers had similar properties to commercial petroleum derived thermoplastics. One polymer demonstrated self-assembled surface microstructuring, and displayed hydrophobic properties. Antimicrobial efficacy of the polymers were tested by applying concentrated bacterial solutions to the surfaces, and near complete inhibition was demonstrated after 4 hours. Scanning electron microscope images of killed bacteria showed extensive membrane damage, consistent with the observed impact of other amphiphilic compounds in literature. These polytriazoles are suited for applications in medical devices and implants, where major concerns over antibiotic resistance are prevalent. In the second approach, a series of symmetric, saturated diester phase change materials (PCMs) were also synthesized with superior latent heat values compared to commercial petrochemical analogues. These diesters exhibit

  7. A Numerical Study of a Double Pipe Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabassum, Tonny

    Solar energy is an intermittent supply source of energy. To efficiently utilize this free renewable energy source some form of thermal energy storage devices are necessary. Phase change materials (PCMs), because of their high energy density storage capacity and near isothermal phase change characteristics, have proven to be promising candidates for latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) devices. Among the various LHTES devices for low temperature residential heating and cooling applications, the shell-and-tube type heat exchanging devices are the most simple to operate and can be easily fabricated. This work numerically investigates the buoyancy driven heat transfer process during melting (charging) of a commercial paraffin wax as PCM filling the annulus of a horizontal double pipe heat exchanger. The heated working fluid (water) is passing through the central tube of the annulus at a sufficiently high flow-rate and thereby maintaining an almost isothermal wall temperature at the inner pipe which is higher than the melting temperature of the PCM. The transient, two-dimensional coupled laminar momentum and energy equations for the model are suitably non-dimensionalized and are solved numerically using the enthalpy-porosity approach. Time-wise evolutions of the flow patterns and temperature distributions are presented through velocity vector fields and isotherm plots. In this study, two types of PCM filled annuli, a plain annulus and a strategically placed longitudinal finned annulus, are studied. The total energy stored, the total liquid fraction and the energy efficiency at different melting times are evaluated for three different operating conditions and the results are compared between the plain and finned annuli. The present study will provide guidelines for system thermal performance and design optimization of the shell-and-tube LHTES devices. .

  8. Role of Sensible and Latent Heat Fluxes from the Ocean in the Genesis of Tropical Cyclone Nargis (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almanza, V. D.; Anthes, R. A.; Chen, S.; Kuo, Y.; Wang, C.; Schreiner, W. S.; Hunt, D.

    2012-12-01

    On May 2, 2008, Tropical Cyclone Nargis killed over 130,000 people in southern Myanmar making it the 8th deadliest cyclone of all time. A better understanding of the mechanisms in the early stages of development of tropical cyclones, such as the role of latent and sensible heat fluxes from the ocean, could help forecast modelers better understand the physics of the cyclogenesis, improve the model forecasts and ultimately gain a greater lead time in detecting and predicting cyclones. We conducted two experiments using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model version 3.3.1 to determine the impact of surface fluxes on the genesis of Cyclone Nargis during a 60-hour forecast. The two experiments included: a control run (CNTRL), where the model forecast had full physics, including sensible and latent heat fluxes from the surface, and a no flux run (NOFLX), which turned off both surface sensible heat and latent heat fluxes. The CNTRL produced a strong cyclone, with a maximum wind of 65 knots (33.4 m/s) and a minimum pressure of 955 hPa. The NOFLX produced a weak cyclone with a maximum wind of 25 knots (12.9 m/s) and a minimum pressure of 1002 hPa. Thus major factors in the genesis of Cyclone Nargis were the surface latent and sensible heat fluxes over the ocean, where the sea-surface temperature was above normal.

  9. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefrois, R. T.

    1980-03-01

    Alternative mechanizations of active heat exchange concepts were analyzed for use with heat of fusion Phase Change Materials (PCM's) in the temperature range of 250 C to 350 C for solar and conventional power plant applications. Over 24 heat exchange concepts were reviewed, and eight were selected for detailed assessment. Two candidates were chosen for small-scale experimentation: a coated tube and shell that exchanger, and a direct contact reflux boiler. A dilute eutectic mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide was selected as the PCM from over fifty inorganic salt mixtures investigated. Preliminary experiments with various tube coatings indicated that a nickel or chrome plating of Teflon or Ryton coating had promise of being successful. An electroless nickel plating was selected for further testing. A series of tests with nickel-plated heat transfer tubes showed that the solidifying sodium nitrate adhered to the tubes and the experiment failed to meet the required discharge heat transfer rate of 10 kW(t). Testing of the reflux boiler is under way.

  10. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefrois, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Alternative mechanizations of active heat exchange concepts were analyzed for use with heat of fusion Phase Change Materials (PCM's) in the temperature range of 250 C to 350 C for solar and conventional power plant applications. Over 24 heat exchange concepts were reviewed, and eight were selected for detailed assessment. Two candidates were chosen for small-scale experimentation: a coated tube and shell that exchanger, and a direct contact reflux boiler. A dilute eutectic mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide was selected as the PCM from over fifty inorganic salt mixtures investigated. Preliminary experiments with various tube coatings indicated that a nickel or chrome plating of Teflon or Ryton coating had promise of being successful. An electroless nickel plating was selected for further testing. A series of tests with nickel-plated heat transfer tubes showed that the solidifying sodium nitrate adhered to the tubes and the experiment failed to meet the required discharge heat transfer rate of 10 kW(t). Testing of the reflux boiler is under way.

  11. Steady-state performance characteristics of latent heat TES/heat pump systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmon, T. W.

    1982-03-01

    Two projects are currently being completed that wholly or in part address various technical issues involved in the implementation of heat pump systems combined with thermal energy storage (TES). The first of these involves the determination of steady state performance characteristics for six generic TES/heat pump configurations and the comparison of the operational performance of these systems with other space heating and cooling TES technologies. Of these latter systems four are commercial or near commerical air conditioner or heat pump coupled TES systems. Steady state performance has been established for all systems. Operational performance and system life cycle cost has been determined for the six generic designs for a limited set of application conditions. The intent of the second project is to establish a reliable method of estimating seasonal energy use by TES/heat pump systems, to utilize this methodology to evaluate a large number of possible system designs, identify a small number of systems that merit more detailed analysis, and, to the extent possible, conduct these detailed studies.

  12. The sensitivity of latent heat flux to the air humidity approximations used in ocean circulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Niiler, Pearn P.

    1990-01-01

    In deriving the surface latent heat flux with the bulk formula for the thermal forcing of some ocean circulation models, two approximations are commonly made to bypass the use of atmospheric humidity in the formula. The first assumes a constant relative humidity, and the second supposes that the sea-air humidity difference varies linearly with the saturation humidity at sea surface temperature. Using climatological fields derived from the Marine Deck and long time series from ocean weather stations, the errors introduced by these two assumptions are examined. It is shown that the errors reach above 100 W/sq m over western boundary currents and 50 W/sq m over the tropical ocean. The two approximations also introduce erroneous seasonal and spatial variabilities with magnitudes over 50 percent of the observed variabilities.

  13. Utilization of the PCM latent heat for energy savings in buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fořt, Jan; Trník, Anton; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2017-07-01

    Increase of the energy consumption for buildings operation creates a great challenge for sustainable development issues. Thermal energy storage systems present promising way to achieve this goal. The latent heat storage systems with high density of thermal storage via utilization of phase change materials (PCMs) enable to improve thermal comfort of buildings and reduce daily temperature fluctuations of interior climate. The presented study is focused on the evaluation of the effect of PCM admixture on thermal performance of a cement-lime plaster. On the basis of the experimentally accessed properties of newly developed plasters, computational modeling is carried out in order to rate the acquired thermal improvement. The calculated results show that incorporation of 24 mass% of paraffinic wax based PCM decreased the energy demand of approx. 14.6%.

  14. Study of the Melting Latent Heat of Semicrystalline PVDF applied to High Gamma Dose Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, Adriana S.M.; Gual, Maritza R.; Faria, Luiz O.; Lima, Claubia P.B.

    2015-07-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) homopolymers [PVDF] homopolymers were irradiated with gamma doses ranging from 0.5 to 2.75 MGy. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and FTIR spectrometry were used in order to study the effects of gamma radiation in the amorphous and crystalline polymer structures. The FTIR data revealed absorption bands at 1730 and 1853 cm{sup -1} which were attributed to the stretch of C=O bonds, at 1715 and 1754 cm{sup -1} which were attributed to the C=C stretching and at 3518, 3585 and 3673 cm{sup -1} which were associated with NH stretch of NH{sub 2} and OH. The melting latent heat (LM) measured by DSC was used to construct an unambiguous relationship with the delivered dose. Regression analyses revealed that the best mathematical function that fits the experimental calibration curve is a 4-degree polynomial function, with an adjusted Rsquare of 0.99817. (authors)

  15. Development of latent fingerprints on thermal paper by the controlled application of heat.

    PubMed

    Bond, John W

    2013-05-01

    Apparatus to produce a spatially and temporally uniform heat source is described and this is used to visualize latent fingerprints deposited onto thermal paper by raising the temperature of the paper. Results show an improvement over previous research when fingerprint deposits are aged or the developed fingerprints faint; visualization being enhanced by the use of a blue LED light source of 465 nm peak wavelength. An investigation of the components in fingerprint sweat likely to affect the solubility and hence color change of the dye present in the thermal paper has shown that polar protic solvents able to donate a proton are favored and a polar amino acid found commonly in eccrine fingerprint sweat (lysine) has been shown able to produce the desired color change. Aged fingerprint deposits on thermal paper from a variety of sources up to 4 years old have been visualized with this technique.

  16. Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions from Satellite Passive Microwave Radiometry. Part 1; Method and Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Yang, Song; Petty, Grant W.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Bell, Thomas L.; Braun, Scott A.; Wang, Yansen; Lang, Stephen E.; Johnson, Daniel E.

    2004-01-01

    A revised Bayesian algorithm for estimating surface rain rate, convective rain proportion, and latent heating/drying profiles from satellite-borne passive microwave radiometer observations over ocean backgrounds is described. The algorithm searches a large database of cloud-radiative model simulations to find cloud profiles that are radiatively consistent with a given set of microwave radiance measurements. The properties of these radiatively consistent profiles are then composited to obtain best estimates of the observed properties. The revised algorithm is supported by an expanded and more physically consistent database of cloud-radiative model simulations. The algorithm also features a better quantification of the convective and non-convective contributions to total rainfall, a new geographic database, and an improved representation of background radiances in rain-free regions. Bias and random error estimates are derived from applications of the algorithm to synthetic radiance data, based upon a subset of cloud resolving model simulations, and from the Bayesian formulation itself. Synthetic rain rate and latent heating estimates exhibit a trend of high (low) bias for low (high) retrieved values. The Bayesian estimates of random error are propagated to represent errors at coarser time and space resolutions, based upon applications of the algorithm to TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) data. Errors in instantaneous rain rate estimates at 0.5 deg resolution range from approximately 50% at 1 mm/h to 20% at 14 mm/h. These errors represent about 70-90% of the mean random deviation between collocated passive microwave and spaceborne radar rain rate estimates. The cumulative algorithm error in TMI estimates at monthly, 2.5 deg resolution is relatively small (less than 6% at 5 mm/day) compared to the random error due to infrequent satellite temporal sampling (8-35% at the same rain rate).

  17. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J.; Kosson, R.; Haslett, R.

    1980-01-01

    Various active heat exchange concepts were identified from among three generic categories: scrapers, agitators/vibrators and slurries. The more practical ones were given a more detailed technical evaluation and an economic comparison with a passive tube-shell design for a reference application (300 MW sub t storage for 6 hours). Two concepts were selected for hardware development: (1) a direct contact heat exchanger in which molten salt droplets are injected into a cooler counterflowing stream of liquid metal carrier fluid, and (2) a rotating drum scraper in which molten salt is sprayed onto the circumference of a rotating drum, which contains the fluid salt is sprayed onto the circumference of a rotating drum, which contains the fluid heat sink in an internal annulus near the surface. A fixed scraper blade removes the solidified salt from the surface which was nickel plated to decrease adhesion forces. In addition to improving performance by providing a nearly constant transfer rate during discharge, these active heat exchanger concepts were estimated to cost at least 25% less than the passive tube-shell design.

  18. Thermal Analysis of Fluidized Bed and Fixed Bed Latent Heat Thermal Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beemkumar, N.; Karthikeyan, A.; Shiva Keshava Reddy, Kota; Rajesh, Kona; Anderson, A.

    2017-05-01

    Thermal energy storage technology is essential because its stores available energy at low cost. Objective of the work is to store the thermal energy in a most efficient method. This work is deal with thermal analysis of fluidized bed and fixed bed latent heat thermal storage (LHTS) system with different encapsulation materials (aluminium, brass and copper). D-Mannitol has been used as phase change material (PCM). Encapsulation material which is in orbicular shape with 4 inch diameter and 2 mm thickness orbicular shaped product is used. Therminol-66 is used as a heat transfer fluid (HTF). Arrangement of encapsulation material is done in two ways namely fluidized bed and fixed bed thermal storage system. Comparison was made between the performance of fixed bed and fluidized bed with different encapsulation material. It is observed that from the economical point of view aluminium in fluidized bed LHTS System has highest efficiency than copper and brass. The thermal energy storage system can be analyzed with fixed bed by varying mass flow rate of oil paves a way to find effective heat energy transfer.

  19. The impact of vertical measurement depth on the information content of soil moisture for latent heat flux estimation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using ground-based soil moisture and latent/sensible heat fluxes observations acquired from the Ameriflux Network, we calculate the mutual information (MI) content between multiple soil moisture variables and evaporative fraction (EF) to examine the existence of information in vertically-integrated ...

  20. An Empirical Orthogonal Function-Based Algorithm for Estimating Terrestrial Latent Heat Flux from Eddy Covariance, Meteorological and Satellite Observations

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Fei; Li, Xianglan; Yao, Yunjun; Liang, Shunlin; Chen, Jiquan; Zhao, Xiang; Jia, Kun; Pintér, Krisztina; McCaughey, J. Harry

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of latent heat flux (LE) based on remote sensing data is critical in characterizing terrestrial ecosystems and modeling land surface processes. Many LE products were released during the past few decades, but their quality might not meet the requirements in terms of data consistency and estimation accuracy. Merging multiple algorithms could be an effective way to improve the quality of existing LE products. In this paper, we present a data integration method based on modified empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis to integrate the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LE product (MOD16) and the Priestley-Taylor LE algorithm of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL) estimate. Twenty-two eddy covariance (EC) sites with LE observation were chosen to evaluate our algorithm, showing that the proposed EOF fusion method was capable of integrating the two satellite data sets with improved consistency and reduced uncertainties. Further efforts were needed to evaluate and improve the proposed algorithm at larger spatial scales and time periods, and over different land cover types. PMID:27472383

  1. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alario, J.; Haslett, R.

    1980-03-01

    Various active heat exchange concepts were identified from among three generic categories: scrapers, agitators/vibrators and slurries. The more practical ones were given a more detailed technical evaluation and an economic comparison with a passive tube-shell design for a reference application. Two concepts selected for hardware development are a direct contact heat exchanger in which molten salt droplets are injected into a cooler counterflowing stream of liquid metal carrier fluid, and a rotating drum scraper in which molten salt is sprayed onto the circumference of a rotating drum, which contains the fluid heat sink in an internal annulus near the surface. A fixed scraper blade removes the solidified salt from the surface which has been nickel plated to decrease adhesion forces. Suitable phase change material (PCM) storage media with melting points in the temperature range of interest (250 C to 400 C) were investigated. The specific salt recommended for laboratory tests was a chloride eutectic (20.5KCl-24/5 NaCl-55.0MgCl 2% by wt.), with a nominal melting point of 385 C.

  2. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J.; Haslett, R.

    1980-01-01

    Various active heat exchange concepts were identified from among three generic categories: scrapers, agitators/vibrators and slurries. The more practical ones were given a more detailed technical evaluation and an economic comparison with a passive tube-shell design for a reference application. Two concepts selected for hardware development are a direct contact heat exchanger in which molten salt droplets are injected into a cooler counterflowing stream of liquid metal carrier fluid, and a rotating drum scraper in which molten salt is sprayed onto the circumference of a rotating drum, which contains the fluid heat sink in an internal annulus near the surface. A fixed scraper blade removes the solidified salt from the surface which has been nickel plated to decrease adhesion forces. Suitable phase change material (PCM) storage media with melting points in the temperature range of interest (250 C to 400 C) were investigated. The specific salt recommended for laboratory tests was a chloride eutectic (20.5KCl-24/5 NaCl-55.0MgCl 2% by wt.), with a nominal melting point of 385 C.

  3. Characterization of Turbulent Latent and Sensible Heat Flux Exchange Between the Atmosphere and Ocean in MERRA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. Brent; Robertson, Franklin R.; Clayson, Carol Anne; Bosilovich, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture across the atmosphere-ocean interface are fundamental components of the Earth s energy and water balance. Characterizing both the spatiotemporal variability and the fidelity of these exchanges of heat and moisture is critical to understanding the global water and energy cycle variations, quantifying atmosphere-ocean feedbacks, and improving model predictability. This study examines the veracity of the recently completed NASA Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) product with respect to its representation of the surface turbulent heat fluxes. A validation of MERRA turbulent heat fluxes and near-surface bulk variables at local, high-resolution space and time scales is achieved by making comparisons to a large suite of direct observations. Both in situ and satellite-observed gridded surface heat flux estimates are employed to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of the surface fluxes with respect to their annual mean climatologies, their seasonal covariability of near-surface bulk parameters, and their representation of extremes. The impact of data assimilation on the near-surface parameters is assessed through evaluation of incremental analysis update tendencies produced by the assimilation procedure. It is found that MERRA turbulent surface heat fluxes are relatively accurate for typical conditions but have systematically weak vertical gradients in moisture and temperature and have a weaker covariability between the near-surface gradients and wind speed than found in observations. This results in an underestimate of the surface latent and sensible heat fluxes over the western boundary current and storm track regions. The assimilation of observations mostly acts to bring MERRA closer to observational products by increasing moisture and temperature near the surface and decreasing the near-surface wind speeds. The major patterns of spatial and temporal variability of the turbulent heat

  4. Characterization of Turbulent Latent and Sensible Heat Flux Exchange Between the Atmosphere and Ocean in MERRA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robert, J. Brent; Robertson, Franklin R.; Clayson, Carol Anne; Bosilovich, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture across the atmosphere-ocean interface are fundamental components of the Earth's energy and water balance. Characterizing both the spatiotemporal variability and the fidelity of these exchanges of heat and moisture is critical to understanding the global water and energy cycle variations, quantifying atmosphere-ocean feedbacks, and improving model predictability. This study examines the veracity of the recently completed NASA Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) product with respect to its representation of the surface turbulent heat fluxes. A validation of MERRA turbulent heat fluxes and near-surface bulk variables at local, high-resolution space and time scales is achieved by making comparisons to a large suite of direct observations. Both in situ and satellite-observed gridded surface heat flux estimates are employed to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of the surface fluxes with respect to their annual mean climatologies, their seasonal covariability of near-surface bulk parameters, and their representation of extremes. The impact of data assimilation on the near-surface parameters is assessed through evaluation of incremental analysis update tendencies produced by the assimilation procedure. It is found that MERRA turbulent surface heat fluxes are relatively accurate for typical conditions but have systematically weak vertical gradients in moisture and temperature and have a weaker covariability between the near-surface gradients and wind speed than found in observations. This results in an underestimate of the surface latent and sensible heat fluxes over the western boundary current and storm track regions. The assimilation of observations mostly acts to bring MERRA closer to observational products by increasing moisture and temperature near the surface and decreasing the near-surface wind speeds. The major patterns of spatial and temporal variability of the turbulent heat

  5. Numerical treatment of nonlinear latent heat boundary conditions at moving interfaces in genuine two dimensional solidification problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckett, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    The proposed method for the treatment of two dimensional solidification problems is based on quasilinearization of the transformed heat conduction equation and latent heat condition at the interface and an iterative sequence in which these are solved simultaneously. Modern algorithms for solving such sparse systems mean that most of the storage advantage of other methods are reduced and the speed of solution can be improved.

  6. Numerical treatment of nonlinear latent heat boundary conditions at moving interfaces in genuine two dimensional solidification problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckett, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    The proposed method for the treatment of two dimensional solidification problems is based on quasilinearization of the transformed heat conduction equation and latent heat condition at the interface and an iterative sequence in which these are solved simultaneously. Modern algorithms for solving such sparse systems mean that most of the storage advantage of other methods are reduced and the speed of solution can be improved.

  7. Hanford production reactor heat releases 1951--1971

    SciTech Connect

    Kannberg, L.D.

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to document and detail the thermal releases from the Hanford nuclear production reactors during the period 1951 through 1971, and to put these releases in historical perspective with respect to changing Columbia River flows and temperatures. This information can also be used as a foundation for further ecological evaluations. When examining Hanford production reactor thermal releases to the Columbia River all related factors affecting the releases and the characteristics of the river should be considered. The major considerations in the present study were the characteristics of the releases themselves (primarily coolant flow rate, temperatures, discharge facilities, period of operation, and level of operation) and the characteristics of the river in that reach (primarily flow rate, temperature and mixing characteristics; the effects of dam construction were also taken into account). In addition, this study addressed ecological effects of thermal releases on aquatic species. Accordingly, this report includes discussion of the reactor cooling system, historical heat releases, thermal mixing and transport studies, hydroelectric power development, and ecologic effects of Hanford production reactor heat releases on salmon and trout. Appendix A contains reactor operating statistics, and Appendix B provide computations of heat added to the Columbia River between Priest Rapids Dam and Richland, Washington.

  8. TRMM Latent Heating Retrieval: Applications and Comparisons with Field Campaigns and Large-Scale Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Takayabu, Yukari N.; Lang, Steve; Shige, Shoichi; Olson, William S.; Hou, Arthur; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Jiang, Xining; Zhang, Chidong; Lau, William K.; Krishnamurti, T.; Waliser, D.; Grecu, M.; Ciesielski, Paul; Johnson, Richard; Houze, Robert A.; Kakar, R.; Nakamura, K.; Braun, S.; Hagos, Samson M.; Oki, R.; Bhardwaj, A.

    2016-05-05

    Yanai et al. (1973) utilized the meteorological data collected from a sounding network to present a pioneering work on thermodynamic budgets, which are referred to as the apparent heat source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2). Latent heating (LH) is one of the most dominant terms in Q1. Yanai’s paper motivated the development of satellite-based LH algorithms and provided a theoretical background for imposing large-scale advective forcing into cloud-resolving models (CRMs). These CRM-simulated LH and Q1 data have been used to generate the look-up tables in Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) LH algorithms. A set of algorithms developed for retrieving LH profiles from TRMM-based rainfall profiles are described and evaluated, including details concerning their intrinsic space-time resolutions. Included in the paper are results from a variety of validation analyses that define the uncertainty of the LH profile estimates. Also, examples of how TRMM-retrieved LH profiles have been used to understand the lifecycle of the MJO and improve the predictions of global weather and climate models as well as comparisons with large-scale analyses are provided. Areas for further improvement of the TRMM products are discussed.

  9. Release of fission gas during transient heating of LWR fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gehl, S.M.

    1982-05-01

    The direct electrical heating technique was used to study fission-gas release and mechanical behavior of irradiated light-water reactor (LWR) fuels during thermal transients. An empirical correlation between fission-gas release and transient temperature history was developed for power-cooling mismatch (PCM) and anticipated transients. Gas release during the refill portion of a design-basis loss of cooling accident was estimated to be less than 1%. Fission-gas release during PCM accidents was found to be controlled by intergranular microcracking and the interlinkage of tunnels on grain edges. For high-gas-release transients, the fractional gas release was shown to be equal to the fractional coverage of grain boundaries by microcracks. Temperature calculations indicated that microcracking causes a significant decrease in the fuel thermal conductivity.

  10. A comparison of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes from aircraft and surface measurements in FIFE 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Robert D.; Smith, Eric A.; Macpherson, J. Ian

    1990-01-01

    Surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat over a tall-grass prairie in central Kansas, as measured by 22 surface stations during FIFE 1987, are compared with values gained indirectly by linear extrapolation of aircraft-measured flux profiles to the surface. The results of 33 such comparisons covering the period 26 June to 13 October 1987 indicate that the sensible heat flux profiles were generally more linear with less scatter in the measurements at each level than were the latent heat flux profiles, the profile extrapolations of sensible heat flux in general underestimate the surface averages by about 30 percent, with slightly better agreement during periods of small flux, and the profile extrapolations of latent heat flux in general underestimate the surface averages by about 15 percent, with overestimates during periods of small fluxes (dry conditions) and overestimates during periods of large fluxes (moist conditions). Possible origins of the differences between the two sets of measurements are discussed, as directions for further research.

  11. Spatial and temporal variations of the fluxes of carbon dioxide and sensible and latent heat over the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desjardins, R. L.; Schuepp, P. H.; Macpherson, J. I.; Buckley, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Airborne measurements of flux densities of carbon dioxide CO2, sensible heat, and latent heat (H2O) obtained over the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) site during three intensive field campaigns in 1987 and one in 1989 are examined to characterize the spatial and temporal variations of CO2 and energy transfer processes. These data were collected by the National Research Council Twin Otter using low-level flight patterns, all flown at constant pressure altitude during relatively clear days. The spatial variations are larger in 1989 than in 1987 and a higher correlation is observed between the fluxes and the surface features. The temporal patterns are easier to characterize with the relatively homogeneous situation of 1987. Functional relationships obtained between fluxes of CO2 and latent heat, CO2 fluxes and greenness index, latent heat fluxes and greenness index, and between sensible heat fluxes and surface air temperature differences are presented for one day in 1987 and one in 1989 as an example of the kind of information that can be obtained from grid flights at constant pressure altitude.

  12. Verification of High Resolution Soil Moisture and Latent Heat in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaniego, L. E.; Warrach-Sagi, K.; Zink, M.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    2012-12-01

    Improving our understanding of soil-land-surface-atmosphere feedbacks is fundamental to make reliable predictions of water and energy fluxes on land systems influenced by anthropogenic activities. Estimating, for instance, which would be the likely consequences of changing climatic regimes on water availability and crop yield, requires of high resolution soil moisture. Modeling it at large-scales, however, is difficult and uncertain because of the interplay between state variables and fluxes and the significant parameter uncertainty of the predicting models. At larger scales, the sub-grid variability of the variables involved and the nonlinearity of the processes complicate the modeling exercise even further because parametrization schemes might be scale dependent. Two contrasting modeling paradigms (WRF/Noah-MP and mHM) were employed to quantify the effects of model and data complexity on soil moisture and latent heat over Germany. WRF/Noah-MP was forced ERA-interim on the boundaries of the rotated CORDEX-Grid (www.meteo.unican.es/wiki/cordexwrf) with a spatial resolution of 0.11o covering Europe during the period from 1989 to 2009. Land cover and soil texture were represented in WRF/Noah-MP with 1×1~km MODIS images and a single horizon, coarse resolution European-wide soil map with 16 soil texture classes, respectively. To ease comparison, the process-based hydrological model mHM was forced with daily precipitation and temperature fields generated by WRF during the same period. The spatial resolution of mHM was fixed at 4×4~km. The multiscale parameter regionalization technique (MPR, Samaniego et al. 2010) was embedded in mHM to be able to estimate effective model parameters using hyper-resolution input data (100×100~km) obtained from Corine land cover and detailed soil texture fields for various horizons comprising 72 soil texture classes for Germany, among other physiographical variables. mHM global parameters, in contrast with those of Noah-MP, were

  13. Aircraft- and tower-based fluxes of carbon dioxide, latent, and sensible heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desjardins, R. L.; Hart, R. L.; Macpherson, J. I.; Schuepp, P. H.; Verma, S. B.

    1992-01-01

    Fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and sensible heat obtained over a grassland ecosystem, during the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), using an aircraft- and two tower-based systems are compared for several days in 1987 and in 1989. The tower-based cospectral estimates of CO2, sensible heat, water vapor, and momentum, expressed as a function of wavenumber K times sampling height z, are relatively similar to the aircraft-based estimates for K x z greater than 0.1. A measurable contribution to the fluxes is observed by tower-based systems at K x z less than 0.01 but not by the aircraft-based system operating at an altitude of approximately 100 m over a 15 x 15 km area. Using all available simultaneous aircraft and tower data, flux estimates by both systems were shown to be highly correlated. As expected from the spatial variations of the greenness index, surface extrapolation of airborne flux estimates tended to lie between those of the two tower sites. The average fluxes obtained, on July 11, 1987, and August 4, 1989, by flying a grid pattern over the FIFE site agreed with the two tower data sets for CO2, but sensible and latent heat were smaller than those obtained by the tower-based systems. However, in general, except for a small underestimation due to the long wavelength contributions and due to flux divergence with height, the differences between the aircraft- and tower-based surface estimates of fluxes appear to be mainly attributable to differences in footprint, that is, differences in the area contributing to the surface flux estimates.

  14. Expression and release of the latent transforming growth factor beta binding protein by hepatocytes from rat liver.

    PubMed

    Roth, S; Schurek, J; Gressner, A M

    1997-06-01

    In very recent studies it was established that transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), likely to be the most relevant fibrogenic cytokine and regulator of cell proliferation, differentiation, and matrix metabolism, is expressed by hepatocytes (parenchymal cell [PC]) and secreted from cultured PC in a latent form incapable of receptor binding. The structural composition of the latent TGF-beta complex secreted by cultured PC is unknown. In some TGF-beta expressing cell types this cytokine is released as a large molecular weight complex containing in addition to the TGF-beta latency associated peptide (LAP) a disulfide bonded latent TGF-beta binding protein (LTBP), of which the existence and function in liver is hitherto unknown. This study is directed to the identification of LTBP expression in rat PC. Cells were isolated from rat liver with the collagenase method and analyzed for LTBP before and during culture under standard conditions using alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP) immunostainings, metabolic labeling, messenger RNA (mRNA) detection (reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction [RT-PCR]) and sequencing, and immunoblotting of gel chromatographically separated cell extracts and conditioned media, respectively. APAAP immunostainings applying a specific polyclonal LTBP-antiserum (ab 39) indicated expression of LTBP in PC of liver in situ and freshly isolated PC but a strong expression in cultured PC. Transcripts of LTBP-1 were detected by RT-PCR and confirmed by sequence analyses. Metabolic labeling of PC with [35S]-Met/Cys followed by immunoprecipitation of cell lysates with LTBP antiserum confirmed the synthesis of the high molecular mass complex of 250 kd containing LTBP with a molecular mass of 160 kd. Latent TGF-beta complexes, associated with LTBP related proteins, could be separated from both extracts and conditioned media of PC by gel filtration chromatography. They confirmed the release of the large latent TGF-beta complex

  15. Effects of latent heat in various cloud microphysics processes on autumn rainstorms with different intensities on Hainan Island, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangnan; Wu, Kailu; Li, Fangzhou; Chen, Youlong; Huang, Yanbin; Feng, YeRong

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we used the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and WRF-3DVAR models to perform a series of simulations of two autumn rainstorms on Hainan Island. The results of neighborhood fractions and Hanssen skill scoring (FSS, HSS) methods show that the control experiments reproduced well two heavy rainfall episodes. Effects of latent heat in various cloud microphysical processes are different at distinct intensities or stages of precipitation. In the absence of any heating effect of deposition, precipitation weakened. The greater was the precipitation, the more significant was the weakening effect. Ascending movement at upper troposphere could be weakened or descending movement at lower troposphere enhanced. With decreases in the strength of precipitation, cloud ice, snow, graupel, and rainwater, increases in latent heat lessened. With weak precipitation, at upper troposphere the rainwater content increased and snow and ice content decreased, whereas at middle troposphere, the ice, snow, and graupel contents increased. Latent heating increased at middle and lower troposphere and decreased at upper troposphere. The absence of any heating effect of freezing had little effect on precipitation. By removing the evaporative cooling of cloud water, the interactions between vertical movement and cloud microphysical processes resulted in a weakening of strong precipitation and an intensification of weak precipitation. However, in the preliminary stages of these two precipitation events, snow, graupel, cloud ice, and rainwater all increased, and precipitation was enhanced in both. In the later stages, strong precipitation systems weakened and weak precipitation systems strengthened. Latent heating first increased and then dropped in strong precipitation systems, whereas they continuously increased in weak precipitation systems.

  16. A Comparison of Latent Heat Fluxes over Global Oceans for Four Flux Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Nelkin, Eric; Ardizzone, Joe; Atlas, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    To improve our understanding of global energy and water cycle variability, and to improve model simulations of climate variations, it is vital to have accurate latent heat fluxes (LHF) over global oceans. Monthly LHF, 10-m wind speed (U10m), 10-m specific humidity (Q10h), and sea-air humidity difference (Qs-Q10m) of GSSTF2 (version 2 Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes) over global Oceans during 1992-93 are compared with those of HOAPS (Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data), NCEP (NCEP/NCAR reanalysis). The mean differences, standard deviations of differences, and temporal correlation of these monthly variables over global Oceans during 1992-93 between GSSTF2 and each of the three datasets are analyzed. The large-scale patterns of the 2yr-mean fields for these variables are similar among these four datasets, but significant quantitative differences are found. The temporal correlation is higher in the northern extratropics than in the south for all variables, with the contrast being especially large for da Silva as a result of more missing ship data in the south. The da Silva has extremely low temporal correlation and large differences with GSSTF2 for all variables in the southern extratropics, indicating that da Silva hardly produces a realistic variability in these variables. The NCEP has extremely low temporal correlation (0.27) and large spatial variations of differences with GSSTF2 for Qs-Q10m in the tropics, which causes the low correlation for LHF. Over the tropics, the HOAPS LHF is significantly smaller than GSSTF2 by approx. 31% (37 W/sq m), whereas the other two datasets are comparable to GSSTF2. This is because the HOAPS has systematically smaller LHF than GSSTF2 in space, while the other two datasets have very large spatial variations of large positive and negative LHF differences with GSSTF2 to cancel and to produce smaller regional-mean differences. Our analyses suggest that the GSSTF2 latent heat flux

  17. Advanced latent heat storage media for high-temperature industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olszewski, M.

    1984-03-01

    Several advanced thermal energy storage (TES) media are being developed for high temperature industrial applications. One of the concepts involves a composite medium consisting of a phase-change carbonate salt supported and immobilized within a submicro sized capillary structure of a particulate ceramic matrix or porous sintered ceramic. Immobilization of the molten salt within the ceramic structure permits operation of the composite pellets, bricks, or other shapes in direct contact with compatible fluids. Energy storage occurs in both sensible and latent forms with the composite providing higher energy storage densities than standard sensible heat storage systems. The second concept centers on the development of a self-encapsulating metallic eutectic. This work focuses on metallic eutectics containing silicon. Starting with a silicon-rich mixture, it is feasible to develop a self-encapsulating pellet by cooling the liquid drops at a controlled rate. A solid of nearly pure silicon will form on the exterior of the pellet leaving a eutectic, phase change media in the interior. The concept are described and information concerning current development activities is presented.

  18. A comparison of small and larger mesoscale latent heat and radiative fluxes: December 6 case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gultepe, I.; Starr, David; Heymsfield, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    Because of the small amounts of water vapor, the potential for rapid changes, and the very cold temperatures in the upper troposphere, moisture measuring instruments face several problems related to calibration and response. Calculations of eddy moisture fluxes are, therefore, subject to significant uncertainty. The purpose of this study is to examine the importance of latent heat (moisture) fluxes due to small and larger mesoscale circulations in comparison to radiative fluxes within cirrus. Scale separation is made at about 1 km because of significant changes in the structures within cirrus. Only observations at warmer than -40 C are used in this study. The EG&G hygrometer that is used for measuring dewpoint temperature (Td) is believed to be fairly accurate down to -40 C. On the other hand, Lyman-Alpha (L-alpha) hygrometer measurements of moisture may include large drift errors. In order to compensate for these drift errors, the L-alpha hygrometer is often calibrated against the EG&G hygrometer. However, large errors ensue for Td measurements at temperatures less than -40 C. The cryogenic hygrometer frost point measurements may be used to calibrate L-alpha measurements at temperatures less than -40 C. In this study, however, measurements obtained by EG&G hygrometer and L-alpha measurements are used for the flux calculations.

  19. Temporal changes in semivariogram of ocean surface latent heat flux under linear trend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. K.; Venkatachalam, P.

    2014-11-01

    One of the ways to study spatio-temporal variability of a process is to consider it as a temporal variation of a spatial process. Semivariogram is a measure of spatial variation in a process. If a process is undergoing a linear trend, then semivariogram parameters such as range, sill and nugget are bound to change. In this paper, a mathematical closed form of range, sill, and nugget and in turn semivariogram were expressed for a process under linear trend. The derived semivariogram was used to study the latent heat flux (LHF) over the Indian Ocean. LHF values depend on sea surface temperature (SST) and wind speed (WS) over ocean surface. Universal kriging (UK) was used to estimate the LHF with WS and SST as covariables. UK coefficients corresponding to covariables were found out for the years 2010, 2020, 2030, 2040 and 2050. In similar line, study has been attempted to see how empirical orthogonal function modes of a spatio-temporal process change with time under linear trend.

  20. Elastocaloric cooling of additive manufactured shape memory alloys with large latent heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Huilong; Simsek, Emrah; Stasak, Drew; Hasan, Naila Al; Qian, Suxin; Ott, Ryan; Cui, Jun; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2017-10-01

    The stress-induced martensitic phase transformation of shape memory alloys (SMAs) is the basis for elastocaloric cooling. Here we employ additive manufacturing to fabricate TiNi SMAs, and demonstrate compressive elastocaloric cooling in the TiNi rods with transformation latent heat as large as 20 J g‑1. Adiabatic compression on as-fabricated TiNi displays cooling ΔT as high as  ‑7.5 °C with recoverable superelastic strain up to 5%. Unlike conventional SMAs, additive manufactured TiNi SMAs exhibit linear superelasticity with narrow hysteresis in stress–strain curves under both adiabatic and isothermal conditions. Microstructurally, we find that there are Ti2Ni precipitates typically one micron in size with a large aspect ratio enclosing the TiNi matrix. A stress transfer mechanism between reversible phase transformation in the TiNi matrix and mechanical deformation in Ti2Ni precipitates is believed to be the origin of the unique superelasticity behavior.

  1. Trends and Variations of Ocean Surface Latent Heat Flux: Results from GSSTF2c Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Si; Chiu, Long S.; Shie, Chung-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Trends and variations of Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes (GSSTF) version 2c (GSSTF2c) latent heat flux (LHF) are examined. This version of LHF takes account of the correction in Earth incidence angle. The trend of global mean LHF for GSSTF2c is much reduced relative to GSSTF version 2b Set 1 and Set 2 for the same period 1988-2008. Temporal increase of GSSTF2c LHF in the two decades is 11.0%, in which 3.1%, 5.8%, and 2.1% are attributed to the increase in wind, the increase in sea surface saturated air humidity, and the decrease in near-surface air humidity, respectively. The first empirical orthogonal function of LHF is a conventional El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) mode. However, the trends in LHF are independent of conventional ENSO phenomena. After removing ENSO signal, the pattern of LHF trends is primarily determined by the pattern of air-sea humidity difference trends.

  2. Seasonal effects of irrigation on land-atmosphere latent heat, sensible heat, and carbon fluxes in semiarid basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yujin; Xie, Zhenghui; Liu, Shuang

    2017-02-01

    Irrigation, which constitutes ˜ 70 % of the total amount of freshwater consumed by the human population, is significantly impacting land-atmosphere fluxes. In this study, using the improved Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) with an active crop model, two high-resolution (˜ 1 km) simulations investigating the effects of irrigation on latent heat (LH), sensible heat (SH), and carbon fluxes (or net ecosystem exchange, NEE) from land to atmosphere in the Heihe River basin in northwestern China were conducted using a high-quality irrigation dataset compiled from 1981 to 2013. The model output and measurements from remote sensing demonstrated the capacity of the developed models to reproduce ecological and hydrological processes. The results revealed that the effects of irrigation on LH and SH are strongest during summer, with a LH increase of ˜ 100 W m-2 and a SH decrease of ˜ 60 W m-2 over intensely irrigated areas. However, the reactions are much weaker during spring and autumn when there is much less irrigation. When the irrigation rate is below 5 mm day-1, the LH generally increases, whereas the SH decreases with growing irrigation rates. However, when the irrigation threshold is in excess of 5 mm day-1, there is no accrued effect of irrigation on the LH and SH. Irrigation produces opposite effects to the NEE during spring and summer. During the spring, irrigation yields more discharged carbon from the land to the atmosphere, increasing the NEE value by 0.4-0.8 gC m-2 day-1, while the summer irrigation favors crop fixing of carbon from atmospheric CO2, decreasing the NEE value by ˜ 0.8 gC m-2 day-1. The repercussions of irrigation on land-atmosphere fluxes are not solely linked to the irrigation amount, and other parameters (especially the temperature) also control the effects of irrigation on LH, SH, and NEE.

  3. Fundamental study of cold heat-storage system of O/W-type emulsion having cold latent-heat-dispersion material. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Inaba, Hideo; Morita, Shinichi; Nozu, Shigeru

    1995-02-01

    This paper deals with thermal properties of an oil (tetradecane, C{sub 14}H{sub 30}, melting point 278.9K)/water emulsion as a latent heat-storage material having a low melting point. The measured results of the physical properties of the test emulsion, that is, thermal conductivity, specific heat, latent heat, and density, are discussed for the temperature region of solid and liquid phases of the dispersion material (tetradecane). It is clarified that Eucken`s equation can be applied to the estimation of the thermal conductivity of the emulsion. Moreover, it is established that tetradecane as the dispersion material exhibits a supercooling phenomenon which influences the thermal properties. Useful correlation equations of the thermal properties for the emulsion were proposed in terms of temperature and concentration ratio of the emulsion constituents.

  4. Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Gorski, A.J.; Schertz, W.W.

    1980-09-29

    A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

  5. Melting and solidification characteristics of a mixture of two types of latent heat storage material in a vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, JikSu; Horibe, Akihiko; Haruki, Naoto; Machida, Akito; Kato, Masashi

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the fundamental melting and solidification characteristics of mannitol, erythritol, and their mixture (70 % by mass mannitol: 30 % by mass erythritol) as potential phase-change materials (PCMs) for latent heat thermal energy storage systems, specifically those pertaining to industrial waste heat, having temperatures in the range of 100-250 °C. The melting point of erythritol and mannitol, the melting peak temperature of their mixture, and latent heat were measured using differential scanning calorimetry. The thermal performance of the mannitol mixture was determined during melting and solidification processes, using a heat storage vessel with a pipe heat exchanger. Our results indicated phase-change (fusion) temperatures of 160 °C for mannitol and 113 and 150 °C for the mannitol mixture. Nondimensional correlation equations of the average heat transfer during the solidification process, as well as the temperature and velocity efficiencies of flowing silicon oil in the pipe and the phase-change material (PCM), were derived using several nondimensional parameters.

  6. The Estimation Surface Latent Heat Flux Over the Ocean and its Relationship to Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Vandemark, Doug; Evans, Keith; Miller, David O.

    1999-01-01

    A new technique combining active and passive remote sensing instruments for the estimation of surface latent heat flux over the ocean is presented. This synergistic method utilizes aerosol lidar backscatter data, multi-channel infrared radiometer data and microwave scatterometer data acquired onboard the NASA P-3B research aircraft during an extended field campaign over the Atlantic ocean in support of the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) in September of 1994. The 10 meter wind speed derived from the scatterometers and the lidar-radiometer inferred near-surface moisture are used to obtain an estimate of the surface flux of moisture via bulk aerodynamic formulae. The results are compared with the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) daily average latent heat flux and show reasonable agreement. However, the SSM/I values are biased high by about 30 W/sq m. In addition, the MABL height, entrainment zone thickness and integrated lidar backscatter intensity are computed from the lidar data and compared with the magnitude of the surface fluxes. The results show that the surface latent heat flux is most strongly correlated with entrainment zone top, bottom and the integrated MABL lidar backscatter, with corresponding correlation coefficients of 0.62, 0.67 and 0.61, respectively.

  7. The Estimation of Surface Latent Heat Flux Over the Ocean and its Relationship to Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Miller, David O.; Schwemmer, Geary

    2000-01-01

    A new technique combining active and passive remote sensing instruments for the estimation of surface latent heat flux over the ocean is presented. This synergistic method uses aerosol lidar backscatter data, multi-channel infrared radiometer data and microwave scatterometer data acquired onboard the NASA P-3B research aircraft during an extended field campaign over the Atlantic ocean in support of the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) in September of 1994. The 10 meter wind speed derived from the scatterometers and the lidar-radiometer inferred near-surface moisture are used to obtain an estimate of the surface flux of moisture via bulk aerodynamic formulae. The results are compared with the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) daily average latent heat flux and show reasonable agreement with an rms error and bias of about 50 and 25 W per square meters, respectively. In addition, the MABL height, entrainment zone thickness and integrated lidar backscatter intensity are computed from the lidar data and compared with the magnitude of the surface fluxes. The results show that the surface latent heat flux is most strongly correlated with entrainment zone top, bottom and the integrated MABL lidar backscatter, with corresponding correlation coefficients of 0.62, 0.67 and 0.61, respectively.

  8. The Estimation of Surface Latent Heat Flux Over the Ocean and its Relationship to Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Miller, David O.; Schwemmer, Geary

    2000-01-01

    A new technique combining active and passive remote sensing instruments for the estimation of surface latent heat flux over the ocean is presented. This synergistic method uses aerosol lidar backscatter data, multi-channel infrared radiometer data and microwave scatterometer data acquired onboard the NASA P-3B research aircraft during an extended field campaign over the Atlantic ocean in support of the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) in September of 1994. The 10 meter wind speed derived from the scatterometers and the lidar-radiometer inferred near-surface moisture are used to obtain an estimate of the surface flux of moisture via bulk aerodynamic formulae. The results are compared with the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) daily average latent heat flux and show reasonable agreement with an rms error and bias of about 50 and 25 W per square meters, respectively. In addition, the MABL height, entrainment zone thickness and integrated lidar backscatter intensity are computed from the lidar data and compared with the magnitude of the surface fluxes. The results show that the surface latent heat flux is most strongly correlated with entrainment zone top, bottom and the integrated MABL lidar backscatter, with corresponding correlation coefficients of 0.62, 0.67 and 0.61, respectively.

  9. The Estimation Surface Latent Heat Flux Over the Ocean and its Relationship to Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Vandemark, Doug; Evans, Keith; Miller, David O.

    1999-01-01

    A new technique combining active and passive remote sensing instruments for the estimation of surface latent heat flux over the ocean is presented. This synergistic method utilizes aerosol lidar backscatter data, multi-channel infrared radiometer data and microwave scatterometer data acquired onboard the NASA P-3B research aircraft during an extended field campaign over the Atlantic ocean in support of the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) in September of 1994. The 10 meter wind speed derived from the scatterometers and the lidar-radiometer inferred near-surface moisture are used to obtain an estimate of the surface flux of moisture via bulk aerodynamic formulae. The results are compared with the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) daily average latent heat flux and show reasonable agreement. However, the SSM/I values are biased high by about 30 W/sq m. In addition, the MABL height, entrainment zone thickness and integrated lidar backscatter intensity are computed from the lidar data and compared with the magnitude of the surface fluxes. The results show that the surface latent heat flux is most strongly correlated with entrainment zone top, bottom and the integrated MABL lidar backscatter, with corresponding correlation coefficients of 0.62, 0.67 and 0.61, respectively.

  10. The Estimation of Surface Latent Heat Flux over the Ocean and its Relationship to Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Vandemark, Doug; Evans, Keith; Miller, David O.; Demoz, Belay B.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A new technique combining active and passive remote sensing instruments for the estimation of surface latent heat flux over the ocean is presented. This synergistic method utilizes aerosol lidar backscatter data, multi-channel infrared radiometer data, and microwave scatterometer data acquired onboard the NASA P-313 research aircraft during an extended field campaign over the Atlantic ocean in support of the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) in September of 1994. The 10 meter wind speed derived from scatterometers and lidar-radiometer inferred near-surface moisture are used to obtain an estimate of the surface flux of moisture via a bulk aerodynamic formula. The results are compared with the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) daily average latent heat flux and show reasonable agreement. However, the SSM/I values are biased low by about 15 W/sq m. In addition, the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) height, entrainment zone thickness and integrated lidar backscatter intensity are computed from the lidar data and compared with the magnitude of the surface fluxes. The results show that the surface latent heat flux is most strongly correlated with entrainment zone depth, MABL height and the integrated MABL lidar backscatter, with corresponding correlation coefficients of 0.39, 0.43 and 0.71, respectively.

  11. Development of approximate method to analyze the characteristics of latent heat thermal energy storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, T.S.; Hoshi, Akira

    1999-07-01

    Third Conference of the Parties to the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP3) held in last December in Kyoto urged the industrialized nation to reduce carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions by 5.2 percent (on the average) below 1990 level until the period between 2008 and 2012 (Kyoto protocol). This implies that even for the most advanced countries like the US, Japan, and EU implementation of drastic policies and overcoming many barriers in market should be necessary. One idea which leads to a path of low carbon intensity is to adopt an energy storage concept. One of the reasons that the efficiency of the conventional energy systems has been relatively low is ascribed to lacking of energy storage subsystem. Most of the past energy systems, for example, air-conditioning system, do not have energy storage part and the system usually operates with low energy efficiency. Firstly, the effect of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions was also examined if the LHTES subsystems were incorporated in all the residential and building air-conditioning systems. Another field of application of the LHTES is of course transportation. Future vehicle will be electric or hybrid vehicle. However, these vehicles will need considerable energy for air-conditioning. The LHTES system will provide enough energy for this purpose by storing nighttime electricity or rejected heat from the radiator or motor. Melting and solidification of phase change material (PCM) in a capsule is of practical importance in latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems which are considered to be very promising to reduce a peak demand of electricity in the summer season and also reduce carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. Two melting modes are involved in melting in capsules. One is close-contact melting between the solid bulk and the capsule wall, and another is natural convection melting in the liquid (melt) region. Close-contact melting processes for a single enclosure have been solved using several

  12. Role for interferon-gamma release assays in latent tuberculosis screening before TNF-α antagonist therapy.

    PubMed

    Lioté, Huguette; Lioté, Frédéric

    2011-07-01

    TNF-α antagonist therapy is associated with a risk of severe, extrapulmonary, disseminated tuberculosis, which is fatal in 10% of cases. The risk of tuberculosis is increased four-fold in patients on TNF-α antagonist therapy. The main risk factors are a history of untreated or inadequately treated primary tuberculosis, recent contact with a tuberculosis patient, and residence in or travel to a high-endemicity region. Infection surveillance agencies throughout the world have issued recommendations to ensure the detection and treatment of latent tuberculosis before TNF-α antagonist initiation. These recommendations have returned the incidence of tuberculosis to the level seen before the introduction of TNF-α antagonists. Nevertheless, there is still room for improvement. Recommendations about latent tuberculosis screening include the use of tuberculin skin tests. However, these tests are positive in individuals vaccinated with the BCG vaccine, which leads to overuse of tuberculosis chemoprophylaxis and, therefore, to unnecessary patient exposure to hepatotoxic effects. Furthermore, tuberculin skin tests may be falsely negative in immunosuppressed patients, leading to underuse of tuberculosis prophylaxis. These shortcomings of tuberculin skin tests have generated interest in interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs). In patients with overt tuberculosis, IGRAs are more sensitive and more specific than tuberculin skin tests. However, the accuracy of IGRAs for diagnosing latent tuberculosis remains unknown, because no reference standard is available. In addition, patients taking immunosuppressant agents to treat systemic disease may exhibit anergia, which complicates the interpretation of IGRAs. Until additional data become available, caution requires that IGRAs be used only when a positive or negative result, as assessed on a case-by-case basis, will help to decide whether tuberculosis chemoprophylaxis is in order. Copyright © 2010 Société française de

  13. Nanovalve-Controlled Cargo Release Activated by Plasmonic Heating

    PubMed Central

    Croissant, Jonas; Zink, Jeffrey I.

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis and operation of a light-operated nanovalve that controls the pore openings of mesoporous silica nanoparticles containing gold cores nanoparticles is described. The nanoparticles, consisting of 20 nm gold cores inside ~150 nm mesoporous silica spheres, were synthesized using a unique one-pot method. The nanovalves are comprised of cucurbit[6]uril rings encircling stalks that are attached to the ~2 nm pore openings. Plasmonic heating of the gold core raises the local temperature and decreases the ring-stalk binding constant, thereby unblocking the pore and releasing the cargo molecules that were preloaded inside. Bulk heating of the suspended particles to 60 °C is required to release the cargo, but no bulk temperature change was observed in the plasmonic heating release experiment. High intensity irradiation caused thermal damage to the silica particles, but low intensity illumination caused a sufficient local temperature increase to operate the valves without damaging the nanoparticles containers. These light-stimulated, thermally activated mechanized nanoparticles demonstrate a new system with potential utility for on-command drug release. PMID:22540671

  14. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System, TRMM Latent Heating and Cloud Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to imiprove the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D GCE model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF will be developed by the end of 2004 and production runs will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. The purpose of this proposal is to augment the current Goddard MMF and other cloud modeling activities. I this talk, I will present: (1) A summary of the second Cloud Modeling Workshop took place at NASA Goddard, (2) A summary of the third TRMM Latent Heating Workshop took place at Nara Japan, (3) A brief discussion on the Goddard research plan of using Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model, and (4) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  15. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System: TRMM Latent Heating and Cloud Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D GCE model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF will be developed by the end of 2004 and production runs will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. The purpose of this proposal is to augment the current Goddard MMF and other cloud modeling activities. In this talk, I will present: (1) A summary of the second Cloud Modeling Workshop took place at NASA Goddard, (2) A summary of the third TRMM Latent Heating Workshop took place at Nara Japan, (3) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  16. Modeling Subducting Slabs: Structural Variations due to Thermal Models, Latent Heat Feedback, and Thermal Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, F. C.

    2001-12-01

    The thermal, mineralogical, and buoyancy structures of thermal-kinetic models of subducting slabs are highly dependent upon a number of parameters, especially if the metastable persistence of olivine in the transition zone is investigated. The choice of starting thermal model for the lithosphere, whether a cooling halfspace (HS) or plate model, can have a significant effect, resulting in metastable wedges of olivine that differ in size by up to two to three times for high values of the thermal parameter (ǎrphi). Moreover, as ǎrphi is the product of the age of the lithosphere at the trench, convergence rate, and dip angle, slabs with similar ǎrphis can show great variations in structures as these constituents change. This is especially true for old lithosphere, as the lithosphere continually cools and thickens with age for HS models, but plate models, with parameters from Parson and Sclater [1977] (PS) or Stein and Stein [1992] (GDH1), achieve a thermal steady-state and constant thickness in about 70 My. In addition, the latent heats (q) of the phase transformations of the Mg2SiO4 polymorphs can also have significant effects in the slabs. Including q feedback in models raises the temperature and reduces the extent of metastable olivine, causing the sizes of the metastable wedges to vary by factors of up to two times. The effects of the choice of thermal model, inclusion and non-inclusion of q feedback, and variations in the constituents of ǎrphi are investigated for several model slabs.

  17. Surface renewal performance to independently estimate sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous crop surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvočarev, K.; Shapland, T. M.; Snyder, R. L.; Martínez-Cob, A.

    2014-02-01

    Surface renewal (SR) analysis is an interesting alternative to eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements. We have applied two recent SR approaches, with different theoretical background, that from Castellví (2004), SRCas, and that from Shapland et al. (2012a,b), SRShap. We have applied both models for sensible (H) and latent (LE) heat flux estimation over heterogeneous crop surfaces. For this, EC equipments, including a sonic anemometer CSAT3 and a krypton hygrometer KH20, were located in two zones of drip irrigated orchards of late and early maturing peaches. The measurement period was June-September 2009. The SRCas is based on similarity concepts for independent estimation of the calibration factor (α), which varies with respect to the atmospheric stability. The SRShap is based on analysis of different ramp dimensions, separating the ones that are flux-bearing from the others that are isotropic. According to the results obtained here, there was a high agreement between the 30-min turbulent fluxes independently derived by EC and SRCas. The SRShap agreement with EC was slightly lower. Estimation of fluxes determined by SRCas resulted in higher values (around 11% for LE) with respect to EC, similarly to previously published works over homogeneous canopies. In terms of evapotranspiration, the root mean square error (RMSE) between EC and SR was only 0.07 mm h-1 (for SRCas) and 0.11 mm h-1 (for SRShap) for both measuring spots. According to the energy balance closure, the SRCas method was as reliable as the EC in estimating the turbulent fluxes related to irrigated agriculture and watershed distribution management, even when applied in heterogeneous cropping systems.

  18. Topography induced spatial variations in diurnal cycles of assimilation and latent heat of Mediterranean forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Tol, C.; Dolman, A. J.; Waterloo, M. J.; Raspor, K.

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study is to explain topography induced spatial variations in the diurnal cycles of assimilation and latent heat of Mediterranean forest. Spatial variations of the fluxes are caused by variations in weather conditions and in vegetation characteristics. Weather conditions reflect short-term effects of climate, whereas vegetation characteristics, through adaptation and acclimation, long-term effects of climate. In this study measurements of plant physiology and weather conditions are used to explain observed differences in the fluxes. A model is used to study which part of the differences in the fluxes is caused by weather conditions and which part by vegetation characteristics. Data were collected at four experimental sub-Mediterranean deciduous forest plots in a heterogeneous terrain with contrasting aspect, soil water availability, humidity and temperature. We used a sun-shade model to scale fluxes from leaf to canopy, and calculated the canopy energy balance. Parameter values were derived from measurements of light interception, leaf chamber photosynthesis, leaf nitrogen content and 13C isotope discrimination in leaf material. Leaf nitrogen content is a measure of photosynthetic capacity, and 13C isotope discrimination of water use efficiency. For validation, sap-flux based measurements of transpiration were used. The model predicted diurnal cycles of transpiration and stomatal conductance, both their magnitudes and differences in afternoon stomatal closure between slopes of different aspect within the confidence interval of the validation data. Weather conditions mainly responsible for the shape of the diurnal cycles, and vegetation parameters for the magnitude of the fluxes. Although the data do not allow for a quantification of the two effects, the differences in vegetation parameters and weather among the plots and the sensitivity of the fluxes to them suggest that the diurnal cycles were more strongly affected by spatial variations in

  19. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System, TRMM Latent Heating and Cloud Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to imiprove the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D GCE model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF will be developed by the end of 2004 and production runs will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. The purpose of this proposal is to augment the current Goddard MMF and other cloud modeling activities. I this talk, I will present: (1) A summary of the second Cloud Modeling Workshop took place at NASA Goddard, (2) A summary of the third TRMM Latent Heating Workshop took place at Nara Japan, (3) A brief discussion on the Goddard research plan of using Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model, and (4) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  20. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System: TRMM Latent Heating and Cloud Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D GCE model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF will be developed by the end of 2004 and production runs will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. The purpose of this proposal is to augment the current Goddard MMF and other cloud modeling activities. In this talk, I will present: (1) A summary of the second Cloud Modeling Workshop took place at NASA Goddard, (2) A summary of the third TRMM Latent Heating Workshop took place at Nara Japan, (3) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  1. A preliminary evaluation of surface latent heat flux as an earthquake precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Zhao, J.; Wang, W.; Ren, H.; Chen, L.; Yan, G.

    2013-06-01

    The relationship between variations in surface latent heat flux (SLHF) and marine earthquakes has been a popular subject of recent seismological studies. So far, there are two key problems: how to identify the abnormal SLHF variations from complicated background signals, and how to ensure that the anomaly results from earthquake. In this paper, we proposed four adjustable parameters for identification, classified the relationship and analyze SLHF changes several months before six marine earthquakes by employing daily SLHF data. Besides, we also quantitatively evaluate the long-term relationship between earthquakes and SLHF anomalies for the six study areas over a 20 yr period preceding each earthquake. The results suggest: (1) before the South Sandwich Islands, Papua, Samoa and Haiti earthquakes, the SLHF variations above their individual background levels have relatively low amplitudes and are difficult to be considered as precursory anomalies; (2) after removing the clustering effect, most of the anomalies prior to these six earthquakes are not temporally related to any earthquake in each study area in time sequence; (3) for each case, apart from Haiti, more than half of studied earthquakes which were moderate even devastating earthquakes (larger than Mw = 5.3) had no precursory variations in SLHF; and (4) the correlation between SLHF and seismic activity depends largely on data accuracy and parameter settings. Before any application of SLHF data on earthquake prediction, we suggest that anomaly-identifying standards should be established based on long-term regional analysis to eliminate subjectivity. Furthermore, other factors which may result in SLHF variations also should be carefully considered.

  2. A preliminary evaluation of surface latent heat flux as an earthquake precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Zhao, J.; Wang, W.; Ren, H.; Chen, L.; Yan, G.

    2013-10-01

    The relationship between variations in surface latent heat flux (SLHF) and marine earthquakes has been a popular subject of recent seismological studies. So far, there are two key problems: how to identify the abnormal SLHF variations from complicated background signals, and how to ensure that the anomaly results from an earthquake. In this paper, we proposed four adjustable parameters for identification, classified the relationship and analyzed SLHF changes several months before six marine earthquakes by employing daily SLHF data. Additionally, we also quantitatively evaluate the long-term relationship between earthquakes and SLHF anomalies for the six study areas over a 20 yr period preceding each earthquake. The results suggest the following: (1) before the South Sandwich Islands, Papua, Samoa and Haiti earthquakes, the SLHF variations above their individual background levels have relatively low amplitudes and are difficult to be considered as precursory anomalies; (2) after removing the clustering effect, most of the anomalies prior to these six earthquakes are not temporally related to any earthquake in each study area in time sequence; (3) for each case, apart from Haiti, more than half of the studied earthquakes, which were moderate and even devastating earthquakes (larger than Mw = 5.3), had no precursory variations in SLHF; and (4) the correlation between SLHF and seismic activity depends largely on data accuracy and parameter settings. Before any application of SLHF data on earthquake prediction, we suggest that anomaly-identifying standards should be established based on long-term regional analysis to eliminate subjectivity. Furthermore, other factors that may result in SLHF variations should also be carefully considered.

  3. Characteristics of Precipitation, Cloud, and Latent Heating Associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K-M.; Wu, H-T.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the evolution of cloud and rainfall structures associated with Madden Julian oscillation (MJO) using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data. Two complementary indices are used to define MJO phases. Joint probability distribution functions (PDFs) of cloud-top temperature and radar echo-top height are constructed for each of the eight MJO phases. The genesis stage of MJO convection over the western Pacific (phases 1 and 2) features a bottom-heavy PDF, characterized by abundant warm rain, low clouds, suppressed deep convection, and higher sea surface temperature (SST). As MJO convection develops (phases 3 and 4), a transition from the bottom-heavy to top-heavy PDF occurs. The latter is associated with the development of mixed-phase rain and middle-to-high clouds, coupled with rapid SST cooling. At the MJO convection peak (phase 5), a top-heavy PDF contributed by deep convection with mixed-phase and ice-phase rain and high echo-top heights (greater than 5 km) dominates. The decaying stage (phases 6 and 7) is characterized by suppressed SST, reduced total rain, increased contribution from stratiform rain, and increased nonraining high clouds. Phase 7, in particular, signals the beginning of a return to higher SST and increased warm rain. Phase 8 completes the MJO cycle, returning to a bottom-heavy PDF and SST conditions similar to phase 1. The structural changes in rain and clouds at different phases of MJO are consistent with corresponding changes in derived latent heating profiles, suggesting the importance of a diverse mix of warm, mixed-phase, and ice-phase rain associated with low-level, congestus, and high clouds in constituting the life cycle and the time scales of MJO.

  4. Assessments of surface latent heat flux associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation in reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yingxia; Hsu, Pang-Chi; Hsu, Huang-Hsiung

    2016-09-01

    To understand the accuracy and uncertainty of surface latent heat flux (LHF) associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), the LHF from each of the six global reanalysis datasets is compared with LHF based on in situ data and the objectively analyzed air-sea flux (OAFlux), in terms of tropical intraseasonal variability. The reanalysis products used in this study include the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Interim Reanalysis (ERA-I), the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), three generations of reanalysis from the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP R1, R2 and CFSR), and the twentieth century reanalysis (20CR). We find that the intraseasonal LHF of the reanalysis products agrees well with the OAFlux over the tropical oceans in terms of patterns, but there is a significant spread in amplitude among the reanalysis products. Both ERA-I and MERRA show smaller biases in the power spectral analysis, while the other reanalysis products (NCEP R1, NCEP R2, CFSR, and 20CR) tend to overestimate the intraseasonal LHF when compared with the TAO buoy products and OAFlux. The role of anomalous LHF in supporting the MJO convection identified by previous TAO buoy data studies is confirmed by the long-term global reanalyses. The feature of increasing LHF accompanied by growing MJO observed in the recent MJO field campaign in the central Indian Ocean (DYNAMO/CINDY2011) is also well captured by the reanalysis products. Among the reanalysis datasets, MERRA has the smallest bias in temporal variability of LHF during the DYNAMO/CINDY2011 period.

  5. Seasonal effects of irrigation on land-atmosphere latent heat, sensible heat and carbon fluxes in semi-arid basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhenghui; Zeng, Yujin

    2017-04-01

    Irrigation, which constitutes 70% of the total amount of fresh water consumed by the human population, is significantly impacting the land-atmosphere fluxes. In this study, using the improved Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM 4.5) with an active crop model, two high resolution ( 1 km) simulations investigating the effects of irrigation on Latent Heat (LH), Sensible Heat (SH) and Carbon Fluxes (or net ecosystem exchange, NEE) from land to atmosphere on the Heihe River Basin in northwestern China were conducted using a high-quality irrigation dataset compiled from 1981 to 2013. The model output and measurements from remote sensing demonstrated the capacity and viability of the developed models to reproduce ecological and hydrological processes. The results revealed the effects of irrigation on LH and SH are strongest during summer with a LH increase of 100 W/m2 and a SH decrease of 60 W/m2 over intensely irrigated areas. However, the reactions are much weaker during spring and autumn when there is much less irrigation. When the irrigation rate below 5 mm/day, the LH generally increases, whereas the SH decreases with growing irrigation rates. However, when the irrigation threshold is in excess of 5 mm/day, there is no accrued effect of irrigation on the LH and SH. Irrigation produces opposite effects to the NEE during spring and summer. During the spring, irrigation yields more discharged carbon from the land to the atmosphere, increasing the NEE value by 0.4-0.8 gC/m2/day, while the summer irrigation favors crop fixing of carbon from atmospheric CO2, decreasing the NEE value by 0.8 gC/m2/day. The repercussions of irrigation on land-atmosphere fluxes are not solely linked to the irrigation amount, and other parameters (especially the temperature) also control the effects of irrigation on LH, SH and NEE. The study indicates that how a land surface model with high spatial resolution can represent crop growing and its effects over basin scale.

  6. Assessment of the performance of the drag and bulk transfer method in estimating sensible and latent heat fluxes in a tropical station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeniyi, Mojisola Oluwayemisi; Ogunsola, Oluseyi E.

    2012-02-01

    The performance of the general bulk formulation in estimating sensible heat flux at Nigerian Micrometeorological Experimental site was assessed. Reliable sensible heat flux was estimated with the use of accurate diurnal values of transfer coefficient of sensible heat. The performances of one α, two β and a modified α formulations in the estimation of latent heat flux were also assessed at the station. The Lee and Pielke ( β), modified Kondo ( α), Jacquemin and Noilhan ( α) and Noilhan and Planton ( β) parameterizations gave good estimation of latent heat flux. The coefficient of determination ( R 2) of the models between measured and estimated values were greater than 0.7. Low diurnal mean absolute error and root mean squared error values were found between measured and estimated fluxes. All the parameterizations gave reliable latent heat flux when diurnal values of transfer coefficients of moisture were used.

  7. Effects of the heat transfer fluid velocity on the storage characteristics of a cylindrical latent heat energy storage system: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogoh, Wilson; Groulx, Dominic

    2012-03-01

    A numerical study of the effects of the thermal fluid velocity on the storage characteristics of a cylindrical latent heat energy storage system (LHESS) was conducted. Due to the low thermal conductivity of phase change materials (PCMs) used in LHESS, fins were added to the system to increase the rate of heat transfer and charging. Finite elements were used to implement the developed numerical method needed to study and solve for the phase change heat transfer (melting of PCM) encountered in a LHESS during charging. The effective heat capacity method was applied in order to account for the large amount of latent energy stored during melting of the PCM and the moving interface between the solid and liquid phases. The effects of the heat transfer fluid (HTF) velocity on the melting rate of the PCM were studied for configurations having between 0 and 18 fins. Results show that the overall heat transfer rate to the PCM increases with an increase in the HTF velocity. However, the effect of the HTF velocity was observed to be small in configurations having very few fins, owing to the large residual thermal resistance offered by the PCM. However, the effect of the HTF velocity becomes more pronounced with addition of fins; since the thermal resistance on the PCM side of the LHESS is significantly reduce by the large number of fins in the system.

  8. Evaluation of Heat Induced Methane Release from Methane Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeman, J.; Elwood-Madden, M.; Phelps, T. J.; Rawn, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    Clathrates, or gas hydrates, structurally are guest gas molecules populating a cavity in a cage of water molecules. Gas hydrates naturally occur on Earth under low temperature and moderate pressure environments including continental shelf, deep ocean, and permafrost sediments. Large quantities of methane are trapped in hydrates, providing significant near-surface reserves of carbon and energy. Thermodynamics predicts that hydrate deposits may be destabilized by reducing the pressure in the system or raising the temperature. However, the rate of methane release due to varying environmental conditions remains relatively unconstrained and complicated by natural feedback effects of clathrate dissociation. In this study, hydrate dissociation in sediment due to localized increases in temperature was monitored and observed at the mesoscale (>20L) in a laboratory environment. Experiments were conducted in the Seafloor Process Simulator (SPS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to simulate heat induced dissociation. The SPS, containing a column of Ottawa sand saturated with water containing 25mg/L Sno-Max to aid nucleation, was pressurized and cooled well into the hydrate stability field. A fiber optic distributed sensing system (DSS) was embedded at four depths in the sediment column. This allowed the temperature strain value (a proxy for temperature) of the system to be measured with high spatial resolution to monitor the clathrate formation/dissociation processes. A heat exchanger embedded in the sediment was heated using hot recirculated ethylene glycol and the temperature drop across the exchanger was measured. These experiments indicate a significant and sustained amount of heat is required to release methane gas from hydrate-bearing sediments. Heat was consumed by hydrate dissociated in a growing sphere around the heat exchanger until steady state was reached. At steady state all heat energy entering the system was consumed in maintaining the temperature profile

  9. Eddy Covariance(EC) Over Snow in a Mountainous Environment to Determine Sensible and Latent Heat and Mass Fluxes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reba, M. L.; Marks, D.; Link, T.; Link, A.

    2004-12-01

    Sensible and latent heat and mass fluxes can represent a significant component of the snowcover energy and mass balance in mountain environments. Though these fluxes are computed in energy balance snow models, few measurements exist for comparison or validation. This research investigates the methodology required and problems associated with the direct measurement of sensible and latent heat flux over snow. The sensible and latent heat and mass fluxes can be determined directly from the turbulent fluctuations measured by fast-response sensors using eddy covariance (EC) theory. The general site considerations and specific weather conditions common to mountain catchments that affect EC data collection over snow is explored. Corrections and post-processing of eddy covariance data is discussed. Examples from established EC measurement sites under adverse and optimal conditions will be presented. The two primary EC study sites are located in southwestern Idaho in a small headwater catchment of the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed, located approximately 80 km southwest of Boise, Idaho. A protected, below canopy site is located within a stand of aspen trees, and an exposed site is located on a ridge over big mountain sagebrush. The study investigates the conditions under which EC instrument systems can be used in mountainous, snow-dominated environments, the processing required to prepare the data for analysis, and several examples of post-processed data collected over snow. This research will improve our understanding of how heat and mass flux from the snowcover may impact water resources under the variable and changing climate conditions so common in the Western US.

  10. Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions from Satellite Passive Microwave Radiometry. Part 2; Evaluation of Estimates Using Independent Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Song; Olson, William S.; Wang, Jian-Jian; Bell, Thomas L.; Smith, Eric A.; Kummerow, Christian D.

    2004-01-01

    Rainfall rate estimates from space-borne k&ents are generally accepted as reliable by a majority of the atmospheric science commu&y. One-of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRh4M) facility rain rate algorithms is based upon passive microwave observations fiom the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). Part I of this study describes improvements in the TMI algorithm that are required to introduce cloud latent heating and drying as additional algorithm products. Here, estimates of surface rain rate, convective proportion, and latent heating are evaluated using independent ground-based estimates and satellite products. Instantaneous, OP5resolution estimates of surface rain rate over ocean fiom the improved TMI algorithm are well correlated with independent radar estimates (r approx. 0.88 over the Tropics), but bias reduction is the most significant improvement over forerunning algorithms. The bias reduction is attributed to the greater breadth of cloud-resolving model simulations that support the improved algorithm, and the more consistent and specific convective/stratiform rain separation method utilized. The bias of monthly, 2.5 deg. -resolution estimates is similarly reduced, with comparable correlations to radar estimates. Although the amount of independent latent heating data are limited, TMI estimated latent heating profiles compare favorably with instantaneous estimates based upon dual-Doppler radar observations, and time series of surface rain rate and heating profiles are generally consistent with those derived from rawinsonde analyses. Still, some biases in profile shape are evident, and these may be resolved with: (a) additional contextual information brought to the estimation problem, and/or; (b) physically-consistent and representative databases supporting the algorithm. A model of the random error in instantaneous, 0.5 deg-resolution rain rate estimates appears to be consistent with the levels of error determined from TMI comparisons to collocated radar

  11. Validity of Five Satellite-Based Latent Heat Flux Algorithms for Semi-arid Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Fei; Chen, Jiquan; Li, Xianglan; Yao, Yunjun; Liang, Shunlin; Liu, Meng; Zhang, Nannan; Guo, Yang; Yu, Jian; Sun, Minmin

    2015-12-09

    Accurate estimation of latent heat flux (LE) is critical in characterizing semiarid ecosystems. Many LE algorithms have been developed during the past few decades. However, the algorithms have not been directly compared, particularly over global semiarid ecosystems. In this paper, we evaluated the performance of five LE models over semiarid ecosystems such as grassland, shrub, and savanna using the Fluxnet dataset of 68 eddy covariance (EC) sites during the period 2000–2009. We also used a modern-era retrospective analysis for research and applications (MERRA) dataset, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Fractional Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR) from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) products; the leaf area index (LAI) from the global land surface satellite (GLASS) products; and the digital elevation model (DEM) from shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM30) dataset to generate LE at region scale during the period 2003–2006. The models were the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer LE (MOD16) algorithm, revised remote sensing based Penman–Monteith LE algorithm (RRS), the Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL), the modified satellite-based Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm (MS-PT), and the semi-empirical Penman LE algorithm (UMD). Direct comparison with ground measured LE showed the PT-JPL and MS-PT algorithms had relative high performance over semiarid ecosystems with the coefficient of determination (R2) ranging from 0.6 to 0.8 and root mean squared error (RMSE) of approximately 20 W/m2. Empirical parameters in the structure algorithms of MOD16 and RRS, and calibrated coefficients of the UMD algorithm may be the cause of the reduced performance of these LE algorithms with R2 ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 and RMSE ranging from 20 to 35 W/m2 for MOD16, RRS and UMD. Sensitivity analysis showed that radiation and vegetation terms were the dominating

  12. Validity of Five Satellite-Based Latent Heat Flux Algorithms for Semi-arid Ecosystems

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Fei; Chen, Jiquan; Li, Xianglan; ...

    2015-12-09

    Accurate estimation of latent heat flux (LE) is critical in characterizing semiarid ecosystems. Many LE algorithms have been developed during the past few decades. However, the algorithms have not been directly compared, particularly over global semiarid ecosystems. In this paper, we evaluated the performance of five LE models over semiarid ecosystems such as grassland, shrub, and savanna using the Fluxnet dataset of 68 eddy covariance (EC) sites during the period 2000–2009. We also used a modern-era retrospective analysis for research and applications (MERRA) dataset, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Fractional Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR) from the moderate resolutionmore » imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) products; the leaf area index (LAI) from the global land surface satellite (GLASS) products; and the digital elevation model (DEM) from shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM30) dataset to generate LE at region scale during the period 2003–2006. The models were the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer LE (MOD16) algorithm, revised remote sensing based Penman–Monteith LE algorithm (RRS), the Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL), the modified satellite-based Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm (MS-PT), and the semi-empirical Penman LE algorithm (UMD). Direct comparison with ground measured LE showed the PT-JPL and MS-PT algorithms had relative high performance over semiarid ecosystems with the coefficient of determination (R2) ranging from 0.6 to 0.8 and root mean squared error (RMSE) of approximately 20 W/m2. Empirical parameters in the structure algorithms of MOD16 and RRS, and calibrated coefficients of the UMD algorithm may be the cause of the reduced performance of these LE algorithms with R2 ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 and RMSE ranging from 20 to 35 W/m2 for MOD16, RRS and UMD. Sensitivity analysis showed that radiation and vegetation terms were the dominating variables

  13. Solar thermoelectricity via advanced latent heat storage: A cost-effective small-scale CSP application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatzmaier, G. C.; Rea, J.; Olsen, M. L.; Oshman, C.; Hardin, C.; Alleman, J.; Sharp, J.; Weigand, R.; Campo, D.; Hoeschele, G.; Parilla, P. A.; Siegel, N. P.; Toberer, E. S.; Ginley, D. S.

    2017-06-01

    We are developing a novel concentrating solar electricity-generating technology that is both modular and dispatchable. Solar ThermoElectricity via Advanced Latent heat Storage (STEALS) uses concentrated solar flux to generate high-temperature thermal energy, which directly converts to electricity via thermoelectric generators (TEGs), stored within a phase-change material (PCM) for electricity generation at a later time, or both allowing for simultaneous charging of the PCM and electricity generation. STEALS has inherent features that drive its cost-competitive scale to be much smaller than current commercial concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Most obvious is modularity of the solid-state TEG, which favors smaller scales in the kilowatt range as compared to CSP steam turbines, which are minimally 50 MWe for commercial power plants. Here, we present techno-economic and market analyses that show STEALS can be a cost-effective electricity-generating technology with particular appeal to small-scale microgrid applications. We evaluated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for STEALS and for a comparable photovoltaic (PV) system with battery storage. For STEALS, we estimated capital costs and the LCOE as functions of the type of PCM including the use of recycled aluminum alloys, and evaluated the cost tradeoffs between plasma spray coatings and solution-based boron coatings that are applied to the wetted surfaces of the PCM subsystem. We developed a probabilistic cost model that accounts for uncertainties in the cost and performance inputs to the LCOE estimation. Our probabilistic model estimated LCOE for a 100-kWe STEALS system that had 5 hours of thermal storage and 8-10 hours of total daily power generation. For these cases, the solar multiple for the heliostat field varied between 1.12 and 1.5. We identified microgrids as a likely market for the STEALS system. We characterized microgrid markets in terms of nominal power, dispatchability, geographic location, and

  14. The use of simple physiological and environmental measures to estimate the latent heat transfer in crossbred Holstein cows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Severino Guilherme Caetano Gonçalves dos; Saraiva, Edilson Paes; Pimenta Filho, Edgard Cavalcanti; Gonzaga Neto, Severino; Fonsêca, Vinicus França Carvalho; Pinheiro, Antônio da Costa; Almeida, Maria Elivania Vieira; de Amorim, Mikael Leal Cabral Menezes

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the heat transfer through cutaneous and respiratory evaporation of dairy cows raised in tropical ambient conditions using simple environmental and physiological measures. Twenty-six lactating crossbred cows (7/8 Holstein-Gir) were used, 8 predominantly white and 18 predominantly black. The environmental variables air temperature, relative humidity, black globe temperature, and wind speed were measured. Respiratory rate and coat surface temperature were measured at 0700, 0900, 1100, 1300, and 1500 h. The environmental and physiological data were used to estimate heat loss by respiratory (ER) and cutaneous evaporation (EC). Results showed that there was variation ( P < 0.01) for respiratory rate depending on the times of the day. The highest values were recorded at 1100, 1300, and 1500 h, corresponding to 66.85 ± 10.20, 66.98 ± 7.80, and 65.65 ± 6.50 breaths/min, respectively. Thus, the amount of heat transferred via respiration ranged from 19.21 to 29.42 W/m2. There was a variation from 31.6 to 38.8 °C for coat surface temperature; these values reflected a range of 55.52 to 566.83 W/m2 for heat transfer via cutaneous evaporation. However, throughout the day, the dissipation of thermal energy through the coat surface accounted for 87.9 % total loss of latent heat, and the remainder (12.1 %) was via the respiratory tract. In conclusion, the predictive models based on respiratory rate and coat surface temperature may be used to estimate the latent heat loss in dairy cows kept confined in tropical ambient conditions.

  15. The use of simple physiological and environmental measures to estimate the latent heat transfer in crossbred Holstein cows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Severino Guilherme Caetano Gonçalves dos; Saraiva, Edilson Paes; Pimenta Filho, Edgard Cavalcanti; Gonzaga Neto, Severino; Fonsêca, Vinicus França Carvalho; Pinheiro, Antônio da Costa; Almeida, Maria Elivania Vieira; de Amorim, Mikael Leal Cabral Menezes

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the heat transfer through cutaneous and respiratory evaporation of dairy cows raised in tropical ambient conditions using simple environmental and physiological measures. Twenty-six lactating crossbred cows (7/8 Holstein-Gir) were used, 8 predominantly white and 18 predominantly black. The environmental variables air temperature, relative humidity, black globe temperature, and wind speed were measured. Respiratory rate and coat surface temperature were measured at 0700, 0900, 1100, 1300, and 1500 h. The environmental and physiological data were used to estimate heat loss by respiratory (ER) and cutaneous evaporation (EC). Results showed that there was variation (P < 0.01) for respiratory rate depending on the times of the day. The highest values were recorded at 1100, 1300, and 1500 h, corresponding to 66.85 ± 10.20, 66.98 ± 7.80, and 65.65 ± 6.50 breaths/min, respectively. Thus, the amount of heat transferred via respiration ranged from 19.21 to 29.42 W/m2. There was a variation from 31.6 to 38.8 °C for coat surface temperature; these values reflected a range of 55.52 to 566.83 W/m2 for heat transfer via cutaneous evaporation. However, throughout the day, the dissipation of thermal energy through the coat surface accounted for 87.9 % total loss of latent heat, and the remainder (12.1 %) was via the respiratory tract. In conclusion, the predictive models based on respiratory rate and coat surface temperature may be used to estimate the latent heat loss in dairy cows kept confined in tropical ambient conditions.

  16. The use of simple physiological and environmental measures to estimate the latent heat transfer in crossbred Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Santos, Severino Guilherme Caetano Gonçalves Dos; Saraiva, Edilson Paes; Pimenta Filho, Edgard Cavalcanti; Gonzaga Neto, Severino; Fonsêca, Vinicus França Carvalho; Pinheiro, Antônio da Costa; Almeida, Maria Elivania Vieira; de Amorim, Mikael Leal Cabral Menezes

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the heat transfer through cutaneous and respiratory evaporation of dairy cows raised in tropical ambient conditions using simple environmental and physiological measures. Twenty-six lactating crossbred cows (7/8 Holstein-Gir) were used, 8 predominantly white and 18 predominantly black. The environmental variables air temperature, relative humidity, black globe temperature, and wind speed were measured. Respiratory rate and coat surface temperature were measured at 0700, 0900, 1100, 1300, and 1500 h. The environmental and physiological data were used to estimate heat loss by respiratory (ER) and cutaneous evaporation (EC). Results showed that there was variation (P < 0.01) for respiratory rate depending on the times of the day. The highest values were recorded at 1100, 1300, and 1500 h, corresponding to 66.85 ± 10.20, 66.98 ± 7.80, and 65.65 ± 6.50 breaths/min, respectively. Thus, the amount of heat transferred via respiration ranged from 19.21 to 29.42 W/m(2). There was a variation from 31.6 to 38.8 °C for coat surface temperature; these values reflected a range of 55.52 to 566.83 W/m(2) for heat transfer via cutaneous evaporation. However, throughout the day, the dissipation of thermal energy through the coat surface accounted for 87.9 % total loss of latent heat, and the remainder (12.1 %) was via the respiratory tract. In conclusion, the predictive models based on respiratory rate and coat surface temperature may be used to estimate the latent heat loss in dairy cows kept confined in tropical ambient conditions.

  17. The Relationship Between Latent Heating, Vertical Velocity, and Precipitation Processes: the Impact of Aerosols on Precipitation in Organized Deep Convective Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, Xiaowen

    2016-01-01

    A high-resolution, two-dimensional cloud-resolving model with spectral-bin microphysics is used to study the impact of aerosols on precipitation processes in both a tropical oceanic and a midlatitude continental squall line with regard to three processes: latent heating (LH), cold pool dynamics, and ice microphysics. Evaporative cooling in the lower troposphere is found to enhance rainfall in low cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration scenarios in the developing stages of a midlatitude convective precipitation system. In contrast, the tropical case produced more rainfall under high CCN concentrations. Both cold pools and low-level convergence are stronger for those configurations having enhanced rainfall. Nevertheless, latent heat release is stronger (especially after initial precipitation) in the scenarios having more rainfall in both the tropical and midlatitude environment. Sensitivity tests are performed to examine the impact of ice and evaporative cooling on the relationship between aerosols, LH, and precipitation processes. The results show that evaporative cooling is important for cold pool strength and rain enhancement in both cases. However, ice microphysics play a larger role in the midlatitude case compared to the tropics. Detailed analysis of the vertical velocity-governing equation shows that temperature buoyancy can enhance updraftsdowndrafts in the middlelower troposphere in the convective core region; however, the vertical pressure gradient force (PGF) is of the same order and acts in the opposite direction. Water loading is small but of the same order as the net PGF-temperature buoyancy forcing. The balance among these terms determines the intensity of convection.

  18. The relationship between latent heating, vertical velocity, and precipitation processes: The impact of aerosols on precipitation in organized deep convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, Xiaowen

    2016-06-01

    A high-resolution, two-dimensional cloud-resolving model with spectral-bin microphysics is used to study the impact of aerosols on precipitation processes in both a tropical oceanic and a midlatitude continental squall line with regard to three processes: latent heating (LH), cold pool dynamics, and ice microphysics. Evaporative cooling in the lower troposphere is found to enhance rainfall in low cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration scenarios in the developing stages of a midlatitude convective precipitation system. In contrast, the tropical case produced more rainfall under high CCN concentrations. Both cold pools and low-level convergence are stronger for those configurations having enhanced rainfall. Nevertheless, latent heat release is stronger (especially after initial precipitation) in the scenarios having more rainfall in both the tropical and midlatitude environment. Sensitivity tests are performed to examine the impact of ice and evaporative cooling on the relationship between aerosols, LH, and precipitation processes. The results show that evaporative cooling is important for cold pool strength and rain enhancement in both cases. However, ice microphysics play a larger role in the midlatitude case compared to the tropics. Detailed analysis of the vertical velocity-governing equation shows that temperature buoyancy can enhance updrafts/downdrafts in the middle/lower troposphere in the convective core region; however, the vertical pressure gradient force (PGF) is of the same order and acts in the opposite direction. Water loading is small but of the same order as the net PGF-temperature buoyancy forcing. The balance among these terms determines the intensity of convection.

  19. Screening for latent TB in patients with rheumatic disorders prior to biologic agents in a 'high-risk' TB population: comparison of two interferon gamma release assays.

    PubMed

    Melath, Sunil; Ismajli, Mediola; Smith, Robin; Patel, Ishita; Steuer, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Patients with rheumatic disorders treated with TNF inhibitors are at increased risk of developing TB. There is no 'gold-standard' for the diagnosis of latent TB prior to initiation of biologic agents. We report our own experience of comparing two interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) in screening for latent TB in a 'high-risk' TB area in patients with rheumatic disorders. The study demonstrated good concordance between the two tests. We believe the additional cost of these assays is justified in high-risk populations prior to biologic agents, with 16% of the current study population with at least one positive IGRA assay.

  20. Prediction of heat release effects on a mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farshchi, M.

    1986-01-01

    A fully second-order closure model for turbulent reacting flows is suggested based on Favre statistics. For diffusion flames the local thermodynamic state is related to single conserved scalar. The properties of pressure fluctuations are analyzed for turbulent flows with fluctuating density. Closure models for pressure correlations are discussed and modeled transport equations for Reynolds stresses, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation, density-velocity correlations, scalar moments and dissipation are presented and solved, together with the mean equations for momentum and mixture fraction. Solutions of these equations are compared with the experimental data for high heat release free mixing layers of fluorine and hydrogen in a nitrogen diluent.

  1. Gas motion through porous objects with nonuniform local distribution of heat-release sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, V. A.; Lutsenko, N. A.

    2008-09-01

    The gas motion through porous objects in the gravity force field with a non-uniform distribution of heat sources, which may arise as a result of natural or man-caused catastrophes (as the damaged power unit of the Chernobyl NPP), is investigated. The influence of different parameters of the heat-releasing zone on the process of cooling of such objects is analyzed with the aid of computational experiment. It is shown that the porous element heating is affected not only by the height of the heat-releasing zone and the heat-release intensity therein but also by the distance of the heat-releasing zone from the element inlet as well as by the width of the heat-releasing zone. The phenomenon of a reduction of the porous element heating with increasing distance of the heat-releasing zone from the porous element inlet is revealed. An ambiguous dependence of the porous object heating on the width of the heat-release zone is identified: at a growth of the heat-releasing zone width, the heating of the element may both increase and decrease depending on the distance of the heat-release zone from the element inlet.

  2. Assimilating Latent Heat Fluxes From Meteorological Geostationary Satellite Data In A Hydrological Model At The Scale of 20000 Km2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roulin, E.

    This paper focuses on the use of evapotranspiration estimated from Meteosat data and from conventional meteorological information in a simple hydrological model at the scale of the river Scheldt and the river Meuse basins in Belgium and France. The radia- tive balance at the ground is computed from infrared and visible counts, radiosound- ing profiles and meteorological information from the synoptic network (Roulin et al., 1996). Latent heat flux is computed using the Monin-Obukhov theory and data of an automatic station. The ratio between latent heat flux and energy balance at the automatic station is used to infer evapotranspiration over the whole area (Gellens- Meulenberghs, 2000). The hydrological model is adapted from a conceptual model onto a grid of cells with 50 km2 area. Seven vegetation covers are represented. Wa- ter from vegetation and two soil buckets is depleted regarding the Penman-Monteith potential evapotranspiration. A simple assimilation scheme of the evapotranspiration from Meteosat is applied for the year 1995. The results are compared with soil mois- ture data gathered during a field campaign in a study area of 2200 km2 by UCL (Auquière et al., 1997).

  3. The effect of differential temperatures on the latent heat in the nucleation of CdSe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Licai; Bai, Zhongchen; Qin, Shuijie; Zhang, Zhengping

    2017-04-01

    This work studied the effect of differential temperatures on the latent heat in the nucleation of CdSe quantum dots (QDs). The result showed that, by the formula of phase change, with increasing the reaction temperature, the latent heat in the nucleation of QDs reduced. CdSe QDs with the size-dispersion from 2.7 to 3.6 nm were synthesized via oleic acid-paraffin liquid system by controlling the reaction temperature from 180 to 220 °C. Synthesized QDs were characterized by UV-vis absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The result of UV-vis absorption spectra showed that with increasing of reaction temperature, the first absorption peak was red-shifted and the size of QD increased. The result of XRD showed that the synthesized QDs were zinc-blende structure. Project supported by the National Natural Science Fund of China (No. 11204046), the International Science and Technology Cooperation Project of China (No. 2014DFA00670) and the Guizhou Province International Science and Technology Cooperation Project of China (No. QKHG[2011]7001)

  4. A diagnostic study of the forcing of the Ferrel cell by eddies, with latent heat effects included

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salustri, G.; Stone, P. H.

    1983-01-01

    A diagnostic study of the forcing of the Ferrel cell by eddy fluxes in the Northern Hemisphere is carried out. The quasi-geostrophic omega equation, and Oort and Rasmusson's (1971) data set, are used. The effects of condensation associated with the large scale motions are introduced to the omega equation by using the quasi-geostrophic moisture conservation equation. Thus, the dry static stability is replaced by a moist static stability, and the forcing of the Ferrel cell by eddy latent heat fluxes as well as sensible heat and momentum fluxes is included. Both effects tend to enhance the forcing of the Ferrel cell. The numerical analysis indicates that the effects are small in January, but in July the maximum vertical velocities are enhanced by about 30 percent.

  5. Optical investigation of heat release and NOx production in combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerman, B. H.; Patel, S.; Dunkley, P.; Bryanston-Cross, P. J.

    2005-08-01

    Two passive optical techniques are described to investigate combustion. Optical Emission Tomography (OET) is used for non-intrusive study of heat release through the detection of chemiluminescence by the hydroxyl radical that is generated in the burning process. The OET technique described here is based on a passive fibre-optic detection system, which allows spatially resolved high-frequency detection of the flame front in a combustion flame, where all fibres detect the emission signals simultaneously. The system withstands the high pressures and temperatures typically encountered in the harsh environments of gas turbine combustors and IC engines. The sensor-array is non-intrusive, low-cost, compact, simple to configure and can be quickly set up around a combustion field. The maximum acquisition rate is 2 kHz. This allows spatially resolved study of the fast phenomena in combustion. Furthermore, the production of NOx is investigated through the emission of green light as a result of adding tri-methyl-borate to a flame. In combustion, the tri-methyl-borate produces green luminescence in locations where NOx would be produced. Combining the green luminescence visualisation with OET detection of the hydroxyl radical allows monitoring of heat release and of NOx production areas, thus giving a means of studying both the burning process and the resulting NOx pollution.

  6. Heat Release Effects on Scaling Laws for Turbulent Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacina, Kathleen M.; Dahm, Werner J. A.

    1996-11-01

    Experiments have long suggested apparent differences in the fundamental scaling laws for turbulent shear flows between reacting and nonreacting flows. These differences result from the density changes produced by exothermic reaction, and are here shown to be similar to the changes produced by free-stream density differences in nonreacting flows. Motivated by this, we show that the fundamental scaling laws can be generalized to predict the changes due to heat release. The bilinear dependence of temperature T(ζ) on an appropriately defined conserved scalar ζ allows the density changes to be related to an equivalent nonreacting flow, in which one of the free-stream fluid temperatures is set to a value determined by the adiabatic flame temperature and the overall stoichiometry. This scaling principle is applied to turbulent jet diffusion flames, and leads to a generalized scaling variable d^+ for both reacting and nonreacting flows; it effectively extends the momentum diameter d^* of Thring & Newby (1952) and Ricou & Spalding (1961) to reacting flows. The resulting predicted effects of heat release show good agreement with all available data from momentum-dominated jet flames. (Supported by GRI Contract No. 5093-260-2728.)

  7. Interferon-gamma release assay versus tuberculin skin test for latent tuberculosis infection among HIV patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Kussen, Gislene Maria Botão; Dalla-Costa, Libera Maria; Rossoni, Andrea; Raboni, Sonia Mara

    2016-01-01

    Patients HIV+ attending in a reference clinic, Southern Brazil. To compare the interferon-gamma-release assay (IGRA - QuantiFERON(®) TB Gold In-Tube) with the tuberculin skin test (TST - PPD-Rt 23) for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients with HIV. Cohort study. Patients were simultaneously submitted to the TST and blood collection for the IGRA. A total of 140 subjects were included. Nine (6.4%) were IGRA+/TST+, 12 (8.6%) were IGRA+/TST-, 4 (3%) were IGRA-/TST+, and 115 (82%) IGRA-/TST-. There was poor agreement between tests (kappa=0.2), and no correlation between these results and CD4+ T lymphocyte counts. During follow-up, one patient with negative results on both tests died from sepsis, and another with discordant results (IGRA+/TST-) exhibited TST seroconversion. Compared to the TST, IGRA showed a sensitivity and specificity of 69% and 90%, respectively. The IGRA detected 8% more positive results than the TST. All patients were followed up for 2 years. The higher accuracy of the IGRA would result in LTBI treatments being administered to patients who would have otherwise been overlooked, decreasing the number of active tuberculosis cases. The long-term survival of HIV carriers requires further evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Latent heat loss and sweat gland histology of male goats in an equatorial semi-arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo Costa, Cíntia Carol; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; Neto, José Domingues Fontenele; Oliveira, Steffan Edward Octávio; de Queiroz, João Paulo Araújo Fernandes

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this work was to quantify the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation of goats in an equatorial semi-arid environment. The latent heat loss from the body surfaces of these ten undefined breed goats was measured using a ventilated capsule in sun and shade and in the three body regions (neck, flank and hindquarters). Skin samples from these three regions were histologically analyzed to relate the quantity of sweat glands, the area of sweat glands and the epithelium thickness of each of these regions to the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation of the examined goats. The epithelium thickness that was measured varied significantly for body regions with different quantities and areas of sweat glands ( P < 0.01). Among the body regions that were examined, the samples from the neck demonstrated the highest epithelium thickness (16.23 ± 0.13 μm). However, the samples of sweat glands from the flank had the biggest area (43330.51 ± 778.71 μm2) and quantity per square centimeter (390 ± 9 cm-2). After the animals were exposed to sun, the flanks lost the greatest amount of heat by cutaneous evaporation (73.03 ± 1.75 W m-2) and possessed the highest surface temperatures (39.47 ± 0.18 °C). The histological characteristics may have influenced the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation that was observed in the flank region after the animals were exposed to sun.

  9. Latent heat loss and sweat gland histology of male goats in an equatorial semi-arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo Costa, Cíntia Carol; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; Neto, José Domingues Fontenele; Oliveira, Steffan Edward Octávio; de Queiroz, João Paulo Araújo Fernandes

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this work was to quantify the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation of goats in an equatorial semi-arid environment. The latent heat loss from the body surfaces of these ten undefined breed goats was measured using a ventilated capsule in sun and shade and in the three body regions (neck, flank and hindquarters). Skin samples from these three regions were histologically analyzed to relate the quantity of sweat glands, the area of sweat glands and the epithelium thickness of each of these regions to the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation of the examined goats. The epithelium thickness that was measured varied significantly for body regions with different quantities and areas of sweat glands (P < 0.01). Among the body regions that were examined, the samples from the neck demonstrated the highest epithelium thickness (16.23 ± 0.13 μm). However, the samples of sweat glands from the flank had the biggest area (43330.51 ± 778.71 μm2) and quantity per square centimeter (390 ± 9 cm-2). After the animals were exposed to sun, the flanks lost the greatest amount of heat by cutaneous evaporation (73.03 ± 1.75 W m-2) and possessed the highest surface temperatures (39.47 ± 0.18 °C). The histological characteristics may have influenced the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation that was observed in the flank region after the animals were exposed to sun.

  10. The Linkages between Latent Heating to Cloud and Precipitation Profiles in WRF Model Simulations of Typhoon Chaba (2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.; Guo, J.; Fu, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Abstract Despite its fundamental role in driving the genesis and evolution of tropical cyclones as well as large scale atmospheric waves including ENSO, monsoon and MJO, the spatial and temporal distribution of latent heating (LH) remains one of the largest uncertainties in weather and climate modeling. With the rapid advance in satellite active sensors such as the TRMM PR, CloudSat CPR and the coming GPM DPR, more comprehensive and reliable observations of cloud and precipitation profiles provide great opportunities to improve the accuracy of estimating LH from space. However, LH is released through the 'processes' of water phase change in the atmosphere while satellite observations provide the estimation of the 'state' of cloud and precipitation, the physical linkages between LH to cloud and precipitation profiles are required to develop next generation physical-based LH algorithms. In this study, we examined the relationships among the condensations heating (LHcon), cloud water content (CWC) and rain rate (Rr) in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulations of typhoon Chaba (2004) under five different microphysical schemes including Purdue Lin, Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model, WSM6, Thompson et al. and Morrison et al. 2-Moment schemes, respectively. Firstly, the LHcon has the highest correlations (~ 0.85 for convective rains) with the term of Rr αCWC which represents the rate of rain formation from auto-conversion and accretion. Although cloud and precipitation, as the ultimate outcomes of water vapor condensation process, also have inherent correlations to LHcon, the connections are significantly weaker than the LHcon - Rr αCWC linkages. Such findings are valid in all selected microphysical schemes in both 2-D CRM (Min et al 2013; Li et al 2013) and 3-D WRF simulations. Secondly, the sensitivity of maximum explained variances of LHcon by Rr αCWC to different microphysical schemes are relatively low. The associated optimal exponential of α is

  11. Use of four-dimensional data assimilation by Newtonian relaxation and latent-heat forcing to improve a mesoscale-model precipitation forecast - A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Wei; Warner, Thomas T.

    1988-01-01

    The Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model was used to study special static-initialization (SI) and dynamic-initialization (DI) techniques designed to improve short-range quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs), as applied to the heavy convective rainfall that occurred in Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas during the May 9-10, 1979 SESAMY IV study period. In the DI procedure, two types of four-dimensional data assimilation (FDDA) procedures were used to incorporate data during a 12-h preforecast period, one using the Newtonian relaxation, the other using latent-heat forcing. It was found that combined use of either the preforecast or in-forecast latent-heat forcing with the Newtonian relaxation produced an improved forecast (relative to a conventional forecast procedure) of rainfall intensity compared to the use of the Newtonian relaxation alone. The use of the experimental SI with prescribed latent heating during the first forecast hour produced greatly improved rainfall rates.

  12. Use of four-dimensional data assimilation by Newtonian relaxation and latent-heat forcing to improve a mesoscale-model precipitation forecast - A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Wei; Warner, Thomas T.

    1988-01-01

    The Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model was used to study special static-initialization (SI) and dynamic-initialization (DI) techniques designed to improve short-range quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs), as applied to the heavy convective rainfall that occurred in Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas during the May 9-10, 1979 SESAMY IV study period. In the DI procedure, two types of four-dimensional data assimilation (FDDA) procedures were used to incorporate data during a 12-h preforecast period, one using the Newtonian relaxation, the other using latent-heat forcing. It was found that combined use of either the preforecast or in-forecast latent-heat forcing with the Newtonian relaxation produced an improved forecast (relative to a conventional forecast procedure) of rainfall intensity compared to the use of the Newtonian relaxation alone. The use of the experimental SI with prescribed latent heating during the first forecast hour produced greatly improved rainfall rates.

  13. Interannual and Decadal Variability of Ocean Surface Latent Heat Flux as Seen from Passive Microwave Satellite Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Jackson, Darren L.; Wick, Gary A.; Roberts, Brent; Miller, Tim L.

    2007-01-01

    Ocean surface turbulent fluxes are critical links in the climate system since they mediate energy exchange between the two fluid systems (ocean and atmosphere) whose combined heat transport determines the basic character of Earth's climate. Deriving physically-based latent and sensible heat fluxes from satellite is dependent on inferences of near surface moisture and temperature from coarser layer retrievals or satellite radiances. Uncertainties in these "retrievals" propagate through bulk aerodynamic algorithms, interacting as well with error properties of surface wind speed, also provided by satellite. By systematically evaluating an array of passive microwave satellite algorithms, the SEAFLUX project is providing improved understanding of these errors and finding pathways for reducing or eliminating them. In this study we focus on evaluating the interannual variability of several passive microwave-based estimates of latent heat flux starting from monthly mean gridded data. The algorithms considered range from those based essentially on SSM/I (e.g. HOAPS) to newer approaches that consider additional moisture information from SSM/T-2 or AMSU-B and lower tropospheric temperature data from AMSU-A. On interannual scales, variability arising from ENSO events and time-lagged responses of ocean turbulent and radiative fluxes in other ocean basins (as well as the extratropical Pacific) is widely recognized, but still not well quantified. Locally, these flux anomalies are of order 10-20 W/sq m and present a relevant "target" with which to verify algorithm performance in a climate context. On decadal time scales there is some evidence from reanalyses and remotely-sensed fluxes alike that tropical ocean-averaged latent heat fluxes have increased 5-10 W/sq m since the early 1990s. However, significant uncertainty surrounds this estimate. Our work addresses the origin of these uncertainties and provides statistics on time series of tropical ocean averages, regional space

  14. The role of water vapor and its associated latent heating in extreme Beaufort coastal storm surge events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyakum, J. R.; Small, D. L.; Atallah, E.; Liu, N.; Kuo, Y.

    2009-12-01

    During the rather limited ice-free season that typically may occur from late July through early October, the Beaufort Sea region is susceptible to extreme windstorms, many of which produce damaging storm surges to low-lying coastal communities. During the most recent years, the ice-free season has lengthened, suggesting an increased vulnerability of coastal communities to cyclogenesis-related windstorms. Therefore, our research focuses on the dynamic and thermodynamic mechanisms responsible for significant surface wind events during the ice-free season in this region. We demonstrate that these storm surge events are often associated with the generation of large-scale atmospheric circulation regomes conducive to North American droughts. Our analysis methodology includes the detailed synoptic-dynamic analysis, including numerical experiments, on a case of an especially long-lived extreme storm surge that occurred in September 1999. We utilize conventional surface and upper-air station data, along with satellite and ground-based water vapor data. We also utilize global and regional reanalysis data to document the synoptic-scale and mesoscale environments associated with the cyclogenesis events. Our numerical experiments with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model include sensitivity testing with COSMIC-derived water vapor data, and sensitivity tests to illustrate the relative roles that latent heating plays in the storm surge event, at various stages in its lifecycle. A particularly important finding of our research on the devastating September 1999 storm surge event is that a relatively rare case of explosive cyclogenesis in the Gulf of Alaska is a key player in this Beaufort storm surge. The deep-tropospheric latent heating during the explosive cyclogenesis generates a dynamic tropopause ridge. This ridge in turn induces surface ridging that contributes to the strong west-northwesterlies associated with the storm surge. This generation of the dynamic

  15. Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-08-15

    Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within

  16. Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S. C.; Torn, M. S.; Fischer, M. L.; Billesbach, D. P.; Berry, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO2 and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km "macrocells" to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO2 exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m-2 yr-1 (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within cover types. Biases in

  17. Latent Heat Flux Estimate Through an Energy Water Balance Model and Land Surface Temperature from Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbari, Chiara; Sobrino, Jose A.; Mancini, Marco; Hidalgo, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Soil moisture plays a key role in the terrestrial water cycle and is responsible for the partitioning of precipitation between runoff and infiltration. Moreover, surface soil moisture controls the redistribution of the incoming solar radiation on land surface into sensible and latent heat fluxes. Recent developments have been made to improve soil moisture dynamics predictions with hydrologic land surface models (LSMs) that compute water and energy balances between the land surface and the low atmosphere. However, most of the time soil moisture is confined to an internal numerical model variable mainly due to its intrinsic space and time variability and to the well known difficulties in assessing its value from remote sensing as from in situ measurements. In order to exploit the synergy between hydrological distributed models and thermal remote sensed data, FEST-EWB, a land surface model that solves the energy balance equation, was developed. In this hydrological model, the energy budget is solved looking for the representative thermodynamic equilibrium temperature (RET) defined as the land surface temperature that closes the energy balance equation. So using this approach, soil moisture is linked to the latent heat flux and then to LST. In this work the relationship between land surface temperature and soil moisture is analysed using LST from AHS (airborne hyperspectral scanner), with a spatial resolution of 2-4 m, LST from MODIS, with a spatial resolution of 1000 m, and thermal infrared radiometric ground measurements that are compared with the thermodynamic equilibrium temperature from the energy water balance model. Moreover soil moisture measurements were carried out during the airborne overpasses and then compared with SM from the hydrological model. An improvement of this well known inverse relationship between soil moisture and land surface temperature is obtained when the thermodynamic approach is used. The analysis of the scale effects of the different

  18. Retrieval of latent heat flux and longwave irradiance at the sea surface from SSM/I and AVHRR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüssel, P.; Schanz, L.; Englisch, G.

    1995-03-01

    A combination of passive microwave measurements from the Special Sensor Microwave / Imager (SSM/I) with infrared imagery from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) is used to derive flux densities of latent heat and longwave radiation at the sea surface. While the AVHRR measurements are used to derive the surface skin temperature of the ocean the SSM/I observations are analysed for the retrieval of the surface wind speed, the near-surface atmospheric humidity and the downwelling longwave irradiance. Radiative transfer calculations are carried out for the simulation of the radiometer signals and for the computation of the radiative fluxes at the sea surface for a large set of globally distributed atmospheric/oceanic situations which have been collected from historical radiosonde and surface observations. The simulations are used for the development of retrieval models and for the estimate of error budgets. Subsequently, the derived techniques are applied to real satellite data and the retrieved fluxes are compared to surface observations from the operational meteorological network as well as from special field measurements which have been taken during the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment and the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. The comparisons demonstrate accuracies of 30 W/m^2 for the latent and longwave fluxes when single satellite soundings are used. Monthly averages of the fluxes can be obtained from the satellite measurements with an accuracy better than 10 W/m^2.

  19. High Temperature Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage to Augment Solar Thermal Propulsion for Microsatellites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-30

    Reduction Another route to optimization simply reduces the mass of the system while leaving the heat exchanger channel length the same. For this model... layers are considered in the model effectively adding more mass to the system producing a sizable sensible heat energy storage component. Additionally, the...must consider the con- vective coupling profile in addition to total PCM mass as demonstrated by STAR-CCM+ models of the conjugate heat transfer system

  20. Usefulness of interferon-γ release assay for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in young children.

    PubMed

    Yun, Ki Wook; Kim, Young Kwang; Kim, Hae Ryun; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lim, In Seok

    2016-06-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in young children may progress to severe active tuberculosis (TB) disease and serve as a reservoir for future transmission of TB disease. There are limited data on interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) performance in young children, which our research aims to address by investigating the usefulness of IGRA for the diagnosis of LTBI. We performed a tuberculin skin test (TST) and IGRA on children who were younger than 18 years and were admitted to Chung-Ang University Hospital during May 2011-June 2015. Blood samples for IGRA were collected, processed, and interpreted according to manufacturer protocol. Among 149 children, 31 (20.8%) and 10 (6.7%) were diagnosed with LTBI and active pulmonary TB, respectively. In subjects lacking contact history with active TB patients, TST and IGRA results were positive in 41.4% (29 of 70) and 12.9% (9 of 70) subjects, respectively. The agreement (kappa) of TST and IGRA was 0.123. The control group, consisting of non-TB-infected subjects, showed no correlation between age and changes in interferon-γ concentration after nil antigen, TB-specific antigen, or mitogen stimulation in IGRAs (P=0.384, P=0.176, and P=0.077, respectively). In serial IGRAs, interferon-γ response to TB antigen increased in IGRA-positive LTBI subjects, but did not change considerably in initially IGRA-negative LTBI or control subjects. The lack of decrease in interferon-γ response in young children indicates that IGRA could be considered for this age group. Serial IGRA tests might accurately diagnose LTBI in children lacking contact history with active TB patients.

  1. Diagnostic potential of interferon-gamma release assay to detect latent tuberculosis infection in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Edathodu, Jameela; Varghese, Bright; Alrajhi, Abdulrahman A; Shoukri, Mohammed; Nazmi, Ahmad; Elgamal, Hazem; Aleid, Hassan; Alrabiah, Fahad; Ashraff, Attia; Mahmoud, Ihab; Al-Hajoj, Sahal

    2017-04-01

    Latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI) is screened by using clinical assessment, tuberculin skin test (TST), chest radiography, and recently by interferon-gamma release assays (IGRA). The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic potential of QuantiFERON(®) -TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT) for diagnosing LTBI in patients planned for kidney transplantation. All adult patients with end-stage renal disease, evaluated for kidney transplantation in a referral center from August 2008 till May 2013, were enrolled, after consenting in a prospective, observational, non-interventional study. LTBI diagnosis was conducted by TST, chest x-ray, and clinical assessment, followed by IGRA by QFT. Overall, 278 patients were enrolled and kidney transplantation was performed in 173 patients. Contributed follow-up was 836.5 patient-years, and TB-free transplant duration was 478.5 patient-years. By standard methods, LTBI was diagnosed in 14 patients. Peri-transplant chemoprophylaxis was given to 53 patients, which included recipients of organs from all deceased donors and living donors with LTBI. QFT was positive in 70 patients, negative in 200 patients, and indeterminate in 8 patients. The agreement between LTBI diagnosis using standard methods and IGRA by QFT was poor (kappa: 0.089+0.046, P-value=.017). Twenty-seven of the QFT-positive patients were transplanted and only one was given isoniazid preventive therapy. None of the transplant recipients developed TB after a median follow-up of 25 months (range 2-58 months, mean 27 months). The agreement of the QFT with standard diagnosis of LTBI in kidney transplant recipients was poor. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Serial interferon-gamma release assays for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in patients treated with immunosuppressive agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong-Hee; Lee, Sung-Won; Chung, Won-Tae; Kim, Byoung-Gwon; Woo, Kwang-Sook; Han, Jin-Yeong; Kim, Jeong-Man

    2011-10-01

    We assessed the efficacy of serial interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients receiving immunosuppressive agents for treatment of rheumatic diseases in Korea. Of 276 patients who underwent consecutive screening with one of two IGRAs [QuantiFERON-TB Gold or QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube], 66 patients were evaluated by the serial IGRA for detection of LTBI during therapy with immunosuppressive agents. Information on clinical diagnosis, medication, previous TB, blood cell count, tuberculin skin test, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) level measured by IGRA was collected. Of the 66 patients, the initial IGRA was positive in 24.2%, negative in 65.2%, and indeterminate in 10.6%. Forty-six patients (69.7%) showed consistent IGRA results during follow-up, and 13 patients (19.7%) had consistently positive results. IGRA conversion rate was 12.1% (8/66) and reversion rate was 4.5% (3/66). Conversion of IGRA results was only observed in ankylosing spondylitis patients, and the median interval between the two tests in patients with conversion was 8.5 months. The mean IFN-γ level in the group of patients with consistently positive IGRA results was higher than that in the group with inconsistently positive results, although this trend was not statistically significant (P=0.293). Indeterminate results were observed most frequently in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. In patients receiving immunosuppressive agents, both IGRA conversions and reversions were observed. Serial IGRA testing may not be needed in patients with a positive initial IGRA result showing high IFN-γ levels, because of high consistency in the test results.

  3. Serial Interferon-gamma Release Assays for the Diagnosis of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in Patients Treated with Immunosuppressive Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Won; Chung, Won-Tae; Kim, Byoung-Gwon; Woo, Kwang-Sook; Han, Jin-Yeong; Kim, Jeong-Man

    2011-01-01

    Background We assessed the efficacy of serial interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients receiving immunosuppressive agents for treatment of rheumatic diseases in Korea. Methods Of 276 patients who underwent consecutive screening with one of two IGRAs [QuantiFERON-TB Gold or QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube], 66 patients were evaluated by the serial IGRA for detection of LTBI during therapy with immunosuppressive agents. Information on clinical diagnosis, medication, previous TB, blood cell count, tuberculin skin test, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) level measured by IGRA was collected. Results Of the 66 patients, the initial IGRA was positive in 24.2%, negative in 65.2%, and indeterminate in 10.6%. Forty-six patients (69.7%) showed consistent IGRA results during follow-up, and 13 patients (19.7%) had consistently positive results. IGRA conversion rate was 12.1% (8/66) and reversion rate was 4.5% (3/66). Conversion of IGRA results was only observed in ankylosing spondylitis patients, and the median interval between the two tests in patients with conversion was 8.5 months. The mean IFN-γ level in the group of patients with consistently positive IGRA results was higher than that in the group with inconsistently positive results, although this trend was not statistically significant (P=0.293). Indeterminate results were observed most frequently in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Conclusions In patients receiving immunosuppressive agents, both IGRA conversions and reversions were observed. Serial IGRA testing may not be needed in patients with a positive initial IGRA result showing high IFN-γ levels, because of high consistency in the test results. PMID:22016681

  4. Usefulness of interferon-γ release assay for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in young children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Kwang; Kim, Hae Ryun; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lim, In Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in young children may progress to severe active tuberculosis (TB) disease and serve as a reservoir for future transmission of TB disease. There are limited data on interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) performance in young children, which our research aims to address by investigating the usefulness of IGRA for the diagnosis of LTBI. Methods We performed a tuberculin skin test (TST) and IGRA on children who were younger than 18 years and were admitted to Chung-Ang University Hospital during May 2011–June 2015. Blood samples for IGRA were collected, processed, and interpreted according to manufacturer protocol. Results Among 149 children, 31 (20.8%) and 10 (6.7%) were diagnosed with LTBI and active pulmonary TB, respectively. In subjects lacking contact history with active TB patients, TST and IGRA results were positive in 41.4% (29 of 70) and 12.9% (9 of 70) subjects, respectively. The agreement (kappa) of TST and IGRA was 0.123. The control group, consisting of non-TB-infected subjects, showed no correlation between age and changes in interferon-γ concentration after nil antigen, TB-specific antigen, or mitogen stimulation in IGRAs (P=0.384, P=0.176, and P=0.077, respectively). In serial IGRAs, interferon-γ response to TB antigen increased in IGRA-positive LTBI subjects, but did not change considerably in initially IGRA-negative LTBI or control subjects. Conclusion The lack of decrease in interferon-γ response in young children indicates that IGRA could be considered for this age group. Serial IGRA tests might accurately diagnose LTBI in children lacking contact history with active TB patients. PMID:27462354

  5. Radio Heating of Lunar Soil to Release Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso; Penanen, Konstantin

    2006-01-01

    A report proposes the development of a system to collect volatile elements and compounds from Lunar soil for use in supporting habitation and processing into rocket fuel. Prior exploratory missions revealed that H2, He, and N2 are present in Lunar soil and there are some indications that water ice may also be present. The proposed system would include a shroud that would be placed on the Lunar surface. Inside the shroud would be a radio antenna aimed downward. The antenna would be excited at a suitably high power and at a frequency chosen to optimize the depth of penetration of radio waves into the soil. The radio waves would heat the soil, thereby releasing volatiles bound to soil particles. The escaping volatiles would be retained by the shroud and collected by condensation in a radiatively cooled vessel connected to the shroud. It has been estimated that through radio-frequency heating at a power of 10 kW for one day, it should be possible to increase the temperature of a soil volume of about 1 cubic m by about 200 C -- an amount that should suffice for harvesting a significant quantity of volatile material.

  6. Spectral Retrieval of Latent Heating Profiles from TRMM PR data. Part 3; Moistening Estimates over Tropical Ocean Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shige, S.; Takayabu, Y.; Tao, W.-K.

    2007-01-01

    The global hydrological cycle is central to the Earth's climate system, with rainfall and the physics of precipitation formation acting as the key links in the cycle. Two-thirds of global rainfall occurs in the tropics with the associated latent heating (LH) accounting for threefourths of the total heat energy available to the Earth's atmosphere. In the last decade, it has been established that standard products of LH from satellite measurements, particularly TRMM measurements, would be a valuable resource for scientific research and applications. Such products would enable new insights and investigations concerning the complexities of convection system life cycles, the diabatic heating controls and feedbacks related to rne-sosynoptic circulations and their forecasting, the relationship of tropical patterns of LH to the global circulation and climate, and strategies for improving cloud parameterizations In environmental prediction models. However, the LH and water vapor profile or budget (called the apparent moisture sink, or Q2) is closely related. This paper presented the development of an algorithm for retrieving Q2 using 'TRMM precipitation radar. Since there is no direct measurement of LH and Q2, the validation of algorithm usually applies a method called consistency check. Consistency checking involving Cloud Resolving Model (CRM)-generated LH and 42 profiles and algorithm-reconstructed is a useful step in evaluating the performance of a given algorithm. In this process, the CRM simulation of a time-dependent precipitation process (multiple-day time series) is used to obtain the required input parameters for a given algorithm. The algorithm is then used to "econsti-LKth"e heating and moisture profiles that the CRM simulation originally produced, and finally both sets of conformal estimates (model and algorithm) are compared each other. The results indicate that discrepancies between the reconstructed and CM-simulated profiles for Q2, especially at low levels

  7. Interlayer-interaction dependence of latent heat in the Heisenberg model on a stacked triangular lattice with competing interactions.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Ryo; Tanaka, Shu

    2013-11-01

    We study the phase transition behavior of a frustrated Heisenberg model on a stacked triangular lattice by Monte Carlo simulations. The model has three types of interactions: the ferromagnetic nearest-neighbor interaction J(1) and antiferromagnetic third nearest-neighbor interaction J(3) in each triangular layer and the ferromagnetic interlayer interaction J([perpendicular]). Frustration comes from the intralayer interactions J(1) and J(3). We focus on the case that the order parameter space is SO(3)×C(3). We find that the model exhibits a first-order phase transition with breaking of the SO(3) and C(3) symmetries at finite temperature. We also discover that the transition temperature increases but the latent heat decreases as J([perpendicular])/J(1) increases, which is opposite to the behavior observed in typical unfrustrated three-dimensional systems.

  8. Applying a simple three-dimensional eddy correlation system for latent and sensible heat flux to contrasting forest canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhofer, Ch.

    1992-06-01

    A simple eddy correlation system is presented that allows on-line calculation of latent and sensible heat fluxes. The system is composed of a three dimensional propeller anemometer, a thermocouple and a capacitance relative humidity sensor. Results from two contrasting sites demonstrate the capability of the system to measure turbulent fluxes under varying conditions. A dry mixed (dominantly coniferous) forest in hilly terrain in Austria is compared to a well irrigated, heavily transpiring, deciduous pecan orchard in the Southwest of the US. The US site shows insufficient closure of the energy balance that is attributed to non-turbulent fluxes under advective conditions in a stable boundary layer (Blanford et al., 1991) while the Austrian site exhibits almost perfect closure with the use of the very same instruments when the boundary layer is convective and advection is negligible.

  9. Comparisons of sensible and latent heat fluxes using surface and aircraft data over adjacent wet and dry surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.; Shaw, W.J.; Baldocchi, D.D.; Crawford, T.L.; Dobosy, R.J.; Meyers, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    In June 1991, a field study of surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over heterogeneous surfaces was carried out near Boardman, Oregon (Doran et al., 1992). The object of the study was to develop improved methods of extrapolating from local measurements of fluxes to area-averaged values suitable for use in general circulation models (GCMs) applied to climate studies. A grid element in a GCM is likely to encompass regions whose fluxes vary significantly from one surface type to another. The problem of integrating these fluxes into a single, representative value for the whole element is not simple, and describing such a flux in terms of flux-gradient relationships, as is often done, presents additional difficulties.

  10. Entropy Budget of an Atmosphere in Radiative-Convective Equilibrium. Part II: Latent Heat Transport and Moist Processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauluis, Olivier; Held, Isaac M.

    2002-01-01

    In moist convection, atmospheric motions transport water vapor from the earth's surface to the regions where condensation occurs. This transport is associated with three other aspects of convection: the latent heat transport, the expansion work performed by water vapor, and the irreversible entropy production due to diffusion of water vapor and phase changes. An analysis of the thermodynamic transformations of atmospheric water yields what is referred to as the entropy budget of the water substance, providing a quantitative relationship between these three aspects of moist convection. The water vapor transport can be viewed as an imperfect heat engine that produces less mechanical work than the corresponding Carnot cycle because of diffusion of water vapor and irreversible phase changes.The entropy budget of the water substance provides an alternative method of determining the irreversible entropy production due to phase changes and diffusion of water vapor. This method has the advantage that it does not require explicit knowledge of the relative humidity or of the molecular flux of water vapor for the estimation of the entropy production. Scaling arguments show that the expansion work of water vapor accounts for a small fraction of the work that would be produced in the absence of irreversible moist processes. It is also shown that diffusion of water vapor and irreversible phase changes can be interpreted as the irreversible counterpart to the continuous dehumidification resulting from condensation and precipitation. This leads to a description of moist convection where it acts more as an atmospheric dehumidifier than as a heat engine.

  11. Assessment and simulation of global terrestrial latent heat flux by synthesis of CMIP5 climate models and surface eddy covariance observations

    Treesearch

    Yunjun Yao; Shunlin Liang; Xianglan Li; Shaomin Liu; Jiquan Chen; Xiaotong Zhang; Kun Jia; Bo Jiang; Xianhong Xie; Simon Munier; Meng Liu; Jian Yu; Anders Lindroth; Andrej Varlagin; Antonio Raschi; Asko Noormets; Casimiro Pio; Georg Wohlfahrt; Ge Sun; Jean-Christophe Domec; Leonardo Montagnani; Magnus Lund; Moors Eddy; Peter D. Blanken; Thomas Grunwald; Sebastian Wolf; Vincenzo Magliulo

    2016-01-01

    The latent heat flux (LE) between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere is a major driver of the globalhydrological cycle. In this study, we evaluated LE simulations by 45 general circulation models (GCMs)in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) by a comparison...

  12. Development of a new thermal environment meter responding both to sensible and latent heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, J. C. A. F.; Gameiro da Silva, M. C.

    2004-05-01

    A new thermal environment meter, simultaneously sensible to the various heat and mass transfer phenomena that participate in the human body thermal balance was developed. Relative to the existing heated sensors that simulate only the sensible heat processes, it adds the capability of evaluating also the effect of evaporative heat losses. It has an ellipsoid shape and is made of ceramic material with porous characteristics to allow the appearance of a uniform humid layer on its external surface. It behaves like a person who adjusts his metabolic rate to ensure a constant deep-body temperature. The inner volume of the sensor is filled with water that is heated to a temperature similar to the deep-body temperature of a person. Evaluation of a given environment is derived after the measured values of the electrical power required to keep the water temperature constant and the loss of weight due to water evaporation on the external surface of the sensor. The developed sensor responds to the same heat transfer mechanisms (convection, radiation, conduction and evaporation), but acts as a type of person who would adjust his metabolic rate in order to keep the deep-body temperature at a constant value whatever the environmental conditions. The calibration of the sensor response, in terms of the standard effective temperature index, was carried out, which makes it a very useful tool for the characterization of thermal environments, especially those where the thermal regulation system needs to use the sweating mechanism.

  13. Development of media for dynamic latent heat storage for the low-temperature range. Part 1: Thermal analyses of selected salt hydrate systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanwischer, H.; Tamme, R.

    1985-01-01

    Phase change temperatures and phase change enthalpies of seventeen salt hydrates, three double salts, and four eutectics were measured thermodynamically and the results reported herein. Good results were obtained, especially for congruently melting salt hydrates. Incongruently melting salt hydrates appear less suitable for heat storage applications. The influence of the second phase - water, acid and hydroxide - to the latent heat is described. From these results, basic values of the working temperatures and storage capabilities of various storage media compositions may be derived.

  14. The role of chemical additives to the phase change process of CaCl2.6H2O to optimize its performance as latent heat energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutjahja, I. M.; U, S. Rahayu A.; Kurniati, Nia; Pallitine, Ivyalentine D.; Kurnia, D.

    2016-08-01

    CaCl2.6H2O is one of salt hydrate based phase change material (PCM) which is suitable for room air-temperature stabilizer because it has the melting temperature just above the human comfort zone temperature (Tm ∼⃒ 29 oC) and a relatively large heat entalphy (AH ∼⃒ 190 kJ/kg). This paper reports the role of the type of chemical additives to PCM CaCl2.6H2O to the phase change process throughout the solidification process or heat release in order to optimize its performance as latent heat energy storage system. In this research we used several kinds of chemical additive, namely SrCl2.6H2O (1.0 wt%), BaCO3 (0.5 wt%), and K2CO3 (0.5 wt%). In terms of its latent time for phase change process the order the effectiveness of those chemical additives are reduced from SrCl2.6H2O, BaCO3and K2CO3. We found that this is also related to their role in suppression supercooling and phase separation effects which occurs during crystallization process of CaCl2.6H2O.

  15. Performance analysis of a latent heat storage system with phase change material for new designed solar collectors in greenhouse heating

    SciTech Connect

    Benli, Hueseyin; Durmus, Aydin

    2009-12-15

    The continuous increase in the level of greenhouse gas emissions and the rise in fuel prices are the main driving forces behind the efforts for more effectively utilize various sources of renewable energy. In many parts of the world, direct solar radiation is considered to be one of the most prospective sources of energy. In this study, the thermal performance of a phase change thermal storage unit is analyzed and discussed. The storage unit is a component of ten pieced solar air collectors heating system being developed for space heating of a greenhouse and charging of PCM. CaCl{sub 2}6H{sub 2}O was used as PCM in thermal energy storage with a melting temperature of 29 C. Hot air delivered by ten pieced solar air collector is passed through the PCM to charge the storage unit. The stored heat is utilized to heat ambient air before being admitted to a greenhouse. This study is based on experimental results of the PCM employed to analyze the transient thermal behavior of the storage unit during the charge and discharge periods. The proposed size of collectors integrated PCM provided about 18-23% of total daily thermal energy requirements of the greenhouse for 3-4 h, in comparison with the conventional heating device. (author)

  16. Evidence for increased latent heat transport during the Cretaceous (Albian) greenhouse warming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ufnar, David F.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Brenner, Richard L.; Witzke, B.J.

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative estimates of increased heat transfer by atmospheric H 2O vapor during the Albian greenhouse warming suggest that the intensified hydrologic cycle played a greater role in warming high latitudes than at present and thus represents a viable alternative to oceanic heat transport. Sphaerosiderite ??18O values in paleosols of the North American Cretaceous Western Interior Basin are a proxy for meteoric ??18O values, and mass-balance modeling results suggest that Albian precipitation rates exceeded modern rates at both mid and high latitudes. Comparison of modeled Albian and modern precipitation minus evaporation values suggests amplification of the Albian moisture deficit in the tropics and moisture surplus in the mid to high latitudes. The tropical moisture deficit represents an average heat loss of ???75 W/m2 at 10??N paleolatitude (at present, 21 W/m2). The increased precipitation at higher latitudes implies an average heat gain of ???83 W/m2 at 45??N (at present, 23 W/m2) and of 19 W/m2 at 75??N (at present, 4 W/m2). These estimates of increased poleward heat transfer by H2O vapor during the Albian may help to explain the reduced equator-to-pole temperature gradients. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  17. Comparison of interferon gamma release assay & tuberculin skin tests for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis in patients on maintenance haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sanjay K; Singh, Urvashi B; Zaidi, Sabahat H; Gupta, Sanjay; Pandey, Ravinder M

    2015-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a common infection in patients on haemodialysis. There is a definite role of treatment of latent TB (LTB) in these patients. However, diagnosis of LTB in these patients by tuberculin skin test (TST) is unreliable. There is suggestion that interferon gamma release assay (IGRA) will be more reliable test for diagnosis of LTB in this setting. Thus, we evaluated value of IGRA and TST for the diagnosis of LTB in patients on dialysis in an Indian setting. Patients with end stage kidney disease on dialysis were included. Patients with active TB were excluded. Each patient was subjected to TST (induration of ≥10 mm was taken as positive) and QuantiFERON TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-GIT) for diagnosis of LTB. A total of 185 patients were included; 129 (69.7%) were males and mean age was 36.7 ± 12.3 yr. Past history of TB was present in 18 (9.7%) patients. One hundred and thirty four (72.4%) patients had scar of BCG vaccination. QFT-GIT test was positive in 66 (36%), TST in 32 (17%) and both in 13 (7%) patients. Of the 66 patients positive with QFT-GIT, only 13 (19.6%) were positive for TST. Of the 32 patients positive with TST, only 13 (40.6%) were positive with QFT-GIT; 100 (54%) patients were negative for both the tests. Overall, 85 (45.9%) patients were positive for either of the two tests. Poor agreement was shown between the two methods. On logistic regression analysis, odds of QFT-GIT to be positive in patients with BCG vaccination was 1.23 and with history of TB 0.99, both being insignificant. odds of tuberculin skin test to be positive in patients with BCG vaccination was 1.04 and with history of TB 0.99, both again being insignificant. Our findings showed that more number of patients (36%) on haemodialysis were positive for QuantiFERON Gold In-Tube test as compared to TST (17%). There was poor agreement between the two tests. No significant effect of BCG vaccination and history of TB in past was observed on both tests.

  18. Infrared and millimetre-wave scintillometry in the suburban environment - Part 2: Large-area sensible and latent heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, H. C.; Evans, J. G.; Grimmond, C. S. B.

    2015-03-01

    A millimetre-wave scintillometer was paired with an infrared scintillometer, enabling estimation of large-area evapotranspiration across northern Swindon, a suburban area in the UK. Both sensible and latent heat fluxes can be obtained using this "two-wavelength" technique, as it is able to provide both temperature and humidity structure parameters, offering a major advantage over conventional single-wavelength scintillometry. The first paper of this two-part series presented the measurement theory and structure parameters. In this second paper, heat fluxes are obtained and analysed. These fluxes, estimated using two-wavelength scintillometry over an urban area, are the first of their kind. Source area modelling suggests the scintillometric fluxes are representative of 5-10 km2. For comparison, local-scale (0.05-0.5 km2) fluxes were measured by an eddy covariance station. Similar responses to seasonal changes are evident at the different scales but the energy partitioning varies between source areas. The response to moisture availability is explored using data from 2 consecutive years with contrasting rainfall patterns (2011-2012). This extensive data set offers insight into urban surface-atmosphere interactions and demonstrates the potential for two-wavelength scintillometry to deliver fluxes over mixed land cover, typically representative of an area 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than for eddy covariance measurements. Fluxes at this scale are extremely valuable for hydro-meteorological model evaluation and assessment of satellite data products.

  19. Infrared and millimetre-wave scintillometry in the suburban environment - Part 2: Large-area sensible and latent heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, H. C.; Evans, J. G.; Grimmond, C. S. B.

    2014-11-01

    A millimetre-wave scintillometer was paired with an infrared scintillometer enabling estimation of large-area evaporation across northern Swindon, a suburban area in the UK. Both sensible and latent heat fluxes can be obtained using this technique, as it is able to provide both temperature and humidity structure parameters, offering a major advantage over conventional single-wavelength scintillometry. The first paper of this two-part series presented the measurement theory and results of the structure parameters. In this second paper, heat fluxes are obtained and analysed. These fluxes, estimated using two-wavelength scintillometry over an urban area, are the first of their kind. Source area modelling suggests the scintillometric fluxes are representative of 5-10 km2. For comparison, local-scale (0.05-0.5 km2) fluxes were measured by an eddy covariance station. Similar responses to seasonal changes are evident at the different scales but the energy partitioning varies between source areas. The response to moisture availability is explored using data from two consecutive years with contrasting rainfall patterns (2011-2012). This extensive dataset offers insight into urban surface-atmosphere interactions and demonstrates the potential for two-wavelength scintillometry to deliver fluxes over mixed land cover, typically representative of an area 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than for eddy covariance measurements. Fluxes at this scale are extremely valuable for hydro-meteorological model evaluation and assessment of satellite data products.

  20. Solar passive ceiling system. Final report. [Passive solar heating system with venetian blind reflectors and latent heat storage in ceiling

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    The construction of a 1200 square foot building, with full basement, built to be used as a branch library in a rural area is described. The primary heating source is a passive solar system consisting of a south facing window system. The system consists of: a set of windows located in the south facing wall only, composed of double glazed units; a set of reflectors mounted in each window which reflects sunlight up to the ceiling (the reflectors are similar to venetian blinds); a storage area in the ceiling which absorbs the heat from the reflected sunlight and stores it in foil salt pouches laid in the ceiling; and an automated curtain which automatically covers and uncovers the south facing window system. The system is totally passive and uses no blowers, pumps or other active types of heat distribution equipment. The building contains a basement which is normally not heated, and the north facing wall is bermed four feet high around the north side.

  1. Burning rate of solid wood measured in a heat release rate calorimeter

    Treesearch

    H. C. Tran; R. H. White

    1992-01-01

    Burning rate is a key factor in modeling fire growth and fire endurance of wood structures. This study investigated the burning rate of selected wood materials as determined by heat release, mass loss and charring rates. Thick samples of redwood, southern pine, red oak and basswood were tested in a heat release rate calorimeter. Results on ignitability and average beat...

  2. Effect of latent heat in boiling water on the synthesis of gold nanoparticles of different sizes by using the Turkevich method.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wenchao; Zhang, Peina; Li, Yijing; Xia, Haibing; Wang, Dayang; Tao, Xutang

    2015-02-02

    The Turkevich method, involving the reduction of HAuCl4 with citrate in boiling water, allows the facile production of monodisperse, quasispherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Although, it is well-known that the size of the AuNPs obtained with the same recipe vary slightly (as little as approximately 4 nm), but noticeably, from one report to another, it has rarely been studied. The present work demonstrates that this size variation can be reconciled by the small, but noticeable, effect that the latent heat in boiling water has on the size of the AuNPs obtained by using the Turkevich method. The increase in latent heat during water boiling caused an approximately 3 nm reduction in the size of the as-prepared AuNPs; this reduction in size is mainly a result of accelerated nucleation driven by the extra heat. It was further demonstrated that, the heating temperature can be utilized as an additional measure to adjust the growth rate of AuNPs during the reduction of HAuCl4 with citrate in boiling water. Therefore, the latent heat of boiling solvents may provide one way to control nucleation and growth in the synthesis of monodisperse nanoparticles.

  3. Performance Maintenance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Using a Latent Heat Storage Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruki, Naoto; Horibe, Akihiko

    2017-07-01

    Recently, there has been considerable interest in various renewable energies. Among them, solar cell production has increased markedly because the photovoltaic is a clean and safe power generation method. The dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) has attracted much attention as an alternative to silicon solar cells due to lower manufacturing costs and plentiful resources for DSSC production. However, the performance of DSSCs has been limited by their durability and low photoelectric conversion efficiency. Temperature control of DSSCs via phase-change materials (PCMs) is expected to improve performance. In this study, DSSCs were heated or cooled with a heat exchanger copper block that was in contact with a PCM (heptadecane), while being irradiated by a solar simulator light source. The durability and photoelectric conversion efficiency of the DSSC improved under PCM temperature control.

  4. Thermal energy storage - overview and specific insight into nitrate salts for sensible and latent heat storage.

    PubMed

    Pfleger, Nicole; Bauer, Thomas; Martin, Claudia; Eck, Markus; Wörner, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is capable to reduce the demand of conventional energy sources for two reasons: First, they prevent the mismatch between the energy supply and the power demand when generating electricity from renewable energy sources. Second, utilization of waste heat in industrial processes by thermal energy storage reduces the final energy consumption. This review focuses mainly on material aspects of alkali nitrate salts. They include thermal properties, thermal decomposition processes as well as a new method to develop optimized salt systems.

  5. Identifying predictors of interferon-γ release assay results in pediatric latent tuberculosis: a protective role of bacillus Calmette-Guerin?: a pTB-NET collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Basu Roy, Robindra; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Altet-Gómez, Neus; Tsolia, Maria; Ruga, Ezia; Velizarova, Svetlana; Kampmann, Beate

    2012-08-15

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) release assays are widely used to diagnose latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in adults, but their performance in children remains incompletely evaluated to date. To investigate factors influencing results of IFN-γ release assays in children using a large European data set. The Pediatric Tuberculosis Network European Trials group pooled and analyzed data from five sites across Europe comprising 1,128 children who were all investigated for latent tuberculosis infection by tuberculin skin test and at least one IFN-γ release assay. Multivariate analyses examined age, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination status, and sex as predictor variables of results. Subgroup analyses included children who were household contacts. A total of 1,093 children had a QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube assay and 382 had a T-SPOT.TB IFN-γ release assay. Age was positively correlated with a positive blood result (QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube: odds ratio [OR], 1.08 per year increasing age [P < 0.0001]; T-SPOT.TB: OR, 1.14 per year increasing age [P < 0.001]). A positive QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube result was shown by 5.5% of children with a tuberculin skin test result less than 5 mm, by 14.8% if less than 10 mm, and by 20.2% if less than 15 mm. Prior BCG vaccination was associated with a negative IFN-γ release assay result (QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube: OR, 0.41 [P < 0.001]; T-SPOT.TB: OR, 0.41 [P < 0.001]). Young age was a predictor of indeterminate IFN-γ release assay results, but indeterminate rates were low (3.6% in children < 5 yr, 1% in children > 5 yr). Our data show that BCG vaccination may be effective in protecting children against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. To restrict use of IFN-γ release assays to children with positive skin tests risks underestimating latent infection.

  6. Effects of anthropogenic heat release upon the urban climate in a Japanese megacity.

    PubMed

    Narumi, Daisuke; Kondo, Akira; Shimoda, Yoshiyuki

    2009-05-01

    This report presents results of investigations of the influence of anthropogenic heat release in Japanese megacity (Keihanshin district) upon the urban climate, using the energy database [Shimoda et al., 1999. Estimation and evaluation of artificial waste heat in urban area. Selected Papers from the Conference ICB-ICUC'99 WCASP-50 WMO/TD no. 1026] as a part of the land-surface boundary conditions of a mesoscale meteorological simulation model. The calculated results related to atmospheric temperature distribution were similar to observed values not only for daily averages but also for amplitudes and phases of diurnal change. To reproduce accurately, it is essential to reproduce urban characteristics such as an urban canopy and anthropogenic heat release in a fine resolution mesh. We attempted an analysis using current data for anthropogenic heat and under uniform heat release conditions, to investigate temporal and spatial characteristics in relation to the influence of anthropogenic heat release on the urban climate. The results of investigation into the influence of anthropogenic heat release on atmospheric temperature using current data indicate that the amount of heat released is lower at night than during the day, but the temperature rise is nearly 3 times greater. Results of investigation into the influence of anthropogenic heat release on wind systems using current data indicate that the onset of land breezes is delayed, particularly in a coastal area. Investigation into the temporal characteristics related to the influence of anthropogenic heat release under uniform heat release conditions showed a maximum influence on temperature during the predawn period.

  7. Thermal Assessment of a Latent-Heat Energy Storage Module During Melting and Freezing for Solar Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos Archibold, Antonio

    Capital investment reduction, exergetic efficiency improvement and material compatibility issues have been identified as the primary techno-economic challenges associated, with the near-term development and deployment of thermal energy storage (TES) in commercial-scale concentrating solar power plants. Three TES techniques have gained attention in the solar energy research community as possible candidates to reduce the cost of solar-generated electricity, namely (1) sensible heat storage, (2) latent heat (tank filled with phase change materials (PCMs) or encapsulated PCMs packed in a vessel) and (3) thermochemical storage. Among these the PCM macro-encapsulation approach seems to be one of the most-promising methods because of its potential to develop more effective energy exchange, reduce the cost associated with the tank and increase the exergetic efficiency. However, the technological barriers to this approach arise from the encapsulation techniques used to create a durable capsule, as well as an assessment of the fundamental thermal energy transport mechanisms during the phase change. A comprehensive study of the energy exchange interactions and induced fluid flow during melting and solidification of a confined storage medium is reported in this investigation from a theoretical perspective. Emphasis has been placed on the thermal characterization of a single constituent storage module rather than an entire storage system, in order to, precisely capture the energy exchange contributions of all the fundamental heat transfer mechanisms during the phase change processes. Two-dimensional, axisymmetric, transient equations for mass, momentum and energy conservation have been solved numerically by the finite volume scheme. Initially, the interaction between conduction and natural convection energy transport modes, in the absence of thermal radiation, is investigated for solar power applications at temperatures (300--400°C). Later, participating thermal radiation

  8. Evaluating the numerical approximation of the atmospheric latent heat flux used by CSIM5 and it's influence on the distribution of sea-ice thickness within the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampone, M. D.

    2009-12-01

    The sea-ice thickness response produced by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Sea Ice Model, Version 5 (CSIM5) to the numerical approximation of the latent heat flux within the stand-alone ice model is evaluated for ice-covered water south of 55 °S latitude. Previous work indicated that the simulated sea-ice environment produced by both coupled and stand-alone versions of the CSIM5 responded strongly to the value of atmospheric specific humidity due to the parameterized numerical approximation of the latent heat flux used by CSIM5. The latent heat approximation used by CSIM5 results in a greater flow of latent heat energy toward the ice surface in response to high atmospheric moisture. In the case of high atmospheric moisture, CSIM5 produced an erroneously thinner ice pack with a lesser extent, indicated by large (> 50 cm), negative model prediction errors. Conversely, model prediction errors for areas of low atmospheric moisture were large (> 200 cm) and positive, indicating a thicker, more extensive ice pack than observed. To reduce the sensitivity of the simulated sea-ice thickness distribution to atmospheric humidity, the CSIM5 approximation of the latent heat flux was modified to better represent the variable nature of the exchange of latent heat energy between the atmosphere and ice surface. This modification is a more reasonable approximation of the latent heat flux, improving the CSIM5 representation of the sea-ice thickness distribution within the Southern Ocean.

  9. Selective peptide inhibitors of antiapoptotic cellular and viral Bcl-2 proteins lead to cytochrome c release during latent Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection.

    PubMed

    Burrer, Christine M; Foight, Glenna W; Keating, Amy E; Chan, Gary C

    2016-01-04

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is associated with B-cell lymphomas including primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease. KSHV establishes latency within B cells by modulating or mimicking the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family of proteins to promote cell survival. Our previous BH3 profiling analysis, a functional assay that assesses the contribution of Bcl-2 proteins towards cellular survival, identified two Bcl-2 proteins, cellular Mcl-1 and viral KsBcl-2, as potential regulators of mitochondria polarization within a latently infected B-cell line, Bcbl-1. In this study, we used two novel peptide inhibitors identified in a peptide library screen that selectively bind KsBcl-2 (KL6-7_Y4eK) or KsBcl-2 and Mcl-1 (MS1) in order to decipher the relative contribution of Mcl-1 and KsBcl-2 in maintaining mitochondrial membrane potential. We found treatment with KL6-7_Y4eK and MS1 stimulated a similar amount of cytochrome c release from mitochondria isolated from Bcbl-1 cells, indicating that inhibition of KsBcl-2 alone is sufficient for mitochondrial outer membrane permiabilzation (MOMP) and thus apoptosis during a latent B cell infection. In turn, this study also identified and provides a proof-of-concept for the further development of novel KsBcl-2 inhibitors for the treatment of KSHV-associated B-cell lymphomas via the targeting of latently infected B cells.

  10. A field study of the effects of inhomogeneities of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, J.C.; Barnes, F.J.; Coulter, R.L.; Crawford, T.L.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, the problem of characterizing turbulent fluxes of heat, momentum, and moisture over inhomogeneous surfaces has received increasing attention. This issue is relevant to the performance of general circulation models (GCMs), in which a single grid element can encompass a variety of surface and topographical features. Although considerable progress has been made in describing the energy balance at a surface partially covered by vegetation, less is known about how to treat adjacent regions of sharply contrasting surface characteristics. One difficulty is the scarcity of suitable data sets with which to study the problem, particularly on scales of tens to hundreds of kilometers.

  11. Towards the development of latent heat storage electrodes for electroporation-based therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, Christopher B.; Mahajan, Roop L.; Rylander, Marissa Nichole; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2012-08-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) capable of storing a large amount of heat upon transitioning from the solid-to-liquid state have been widely used in the electronics and construction industries for mitigating temperature development. Here, we show that they are also beneficial for reducing the peak tissue temperature during electroporation-based therapies. A numerical model is developed of irreversible electroporation (IRE) performed with hollow needle electrodes filled with a PCM. Results indicate that this electrode design can be utilized to achieve large ablation volumes while reducing the probability for thermal damage.

  12. Ventilation during cardiopulmonary bypass: impact on heat shock protein release.

    PubMed

    Beer, L; Szerafin, T; Mitterbauer, A; Kasiri, M M; Debreceni T Palotás, L; Dworschak, M; Roth, G A; Ankersmit, H J

    2014-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), utilized in on-pump coronary artery bypass graft procedures (CABG) induces generalized immune suppression, release of heat shock proteins (HSP), inflammatory markers and apoptosis-specific proteins. We hypothesized that continued mechanical ventilation during cardiopulmonary bypass attenuates immune response and HSP liberation. Thirty patients undergoing conventional coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) operation were randomized into a ventilated on CPB (VG; N.=15) and a non-ventilated CPB group (NVG; N.=15). Blood samples were drawn at the beginning and end of surgery, as well as on the five consecutive postoperative days (POD). Molecular markers were measured by ELISA. Data are given as mean ± (SD). Mann-Whitney-U-test was used for statistical analysis. Serum concentrations of HSP70 were significantly lower in VG compared to NVG on POD-1 (VG: 1629±608 vs. NVG: 5203±2128.6 pg/mL, P<0.001). HSP27 and HSP60 depicted a minor increase in both study groups at the end of surgery without any intergroup differences (HSP27: VG 6207.9±1252.5 vs. NVG 7424.1±2632.5; HSP60: VG 1046.2±478.8 vs. NVG 1223.5±510.1). IL-8 and CK-18 M30 evidenced the highest serum concentrations at the end of surgery (IL-8: VG 119.5±77.9 vs. NVG 148.0±184.55; CK-18 M30: VG 62.1±39.2 vs. NVG 67.5±33.9) with no differences between groups. Decreased ICAM-1 serum concentrations were detected postoperatively, however ICAM-1 concentrations on POD-1 to POD-5 showed slightly elevated concentrations in both study groups with no intergroup differences. Significantly less HSP70 was detectable in patients receiving uninterrupted mechanical lung ventilation on CPB, indicating either different inflammatory response, cellular stress or cell damage between the ventilated and non-ventilated group. These data suggest that continued mechanical ventilation has a modulatory effect on the immune response in patients after CABG surgery.

  13. Effects of the number and distribution of fins on the storage characteristics of a cylindrical latent heat energy storage system: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogoh, Wilson; Groulx, Dominic

    2012-10-01

    A numerical study of the effects of the number and distribution of fins on the storage characteristics of a cylindrical latent heat energy storage system (LHESS) was conducted. Due to the low thermal conductivity of phase change materials (PCMs) used in LHESS, fins were added to the system to increase the rate of heat transfer and charging. Finite elements were used to implement the developed numerical method needed to study and solve for the phase change heat transfer (melting of PCM) encountered in a LHESS during charging. The effective heat capacity method was applied in order to account for the large amount of latent energy stored during melting of the PCM and the moving interface between the solid and liquid phases. The effects of increasing the number and distribution of fins on the melting rate of the PCM were studied for configurations having between 0 and 27 fins for heat transfer fluid (HTF) velocities of 0.05 and 0.5 m/s. Results show that the overall heat transfer rate to the PCM increases with an increase in the number of fins irrespective of the HTF velocity. It was also observed that the total amount of energy stored after 12 h increases nearly linearly with the addition of fins up to 12 fins; further addition of fins increasing the total energy stored by ever smaller amounts.

  14. Estimation of Mesoscale Atmospheric Latent Heating Profiles from TRMM Rain Statistics Utilizing a Simple One-Dimensional Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iacovazzi, Robert A., Jr.; Prabhakara, C.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a model is developed to estimate mesoscale-resolution atmospheric latent heating (ALH) profiles. It utilizes rain statistics deduced from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data, and cloud vertical velocity profiles and regional surface thermodynamic climatologies derived from other available data sources. From several rain events observed over tropical ocean and land, ALH profiles retrieved by this model in convective rain regions reveal strong warming throughout most of the troposphere, while in stratiform rain regions they usually show slight cooling below the freezing level and significant warming above. The mesoscale-average, or total, ALH profiles reveal a dominant stratiform character, because stratiform rain areas are usually much larger than convective rain areas. Sensitivity tests of the model show that total ALH at a given tropospheric level varies by less than +/- 10 % when convective and stratiform rain rates and mesoscale fractional rain areas are perturbed individually by 1 15 %. This is also found when the non-uniform convective vertical velocity profiles are replaced by one that is uniform. Larger variability of the total ALH profiles arises when climatological ocean- and land-surface temperatures (water vapor mixing ratios) are independently perturbed by +/- 1.0 K (+/- 5 %) and +/- 5.0 K (+/- 15 %), respectively. At a given tropospheric level, such perturbations can cause a +/- 25 % variation of total ALH over ocean, and a factor-of-two sensitivity over land. This sensitivity is reduced substantially if perturbations of surface thermodynamic variables do not change surface relative humidity, or are not extended throughout the entire model evaporation layer. The ALH profiles retrieved in this study agree qualitatively with tropical total diabatic heating profiles deduced in earlier studies. Also, from January and July 1999 ALH-profile climatologies generated separately with TRMM Microwave Imager and Precipitation Radar rain

  15. Estimation of Mesoscale Atmospheric Latent Heating Profiles from TRMM Rain Statistics Utilizing a Simple One-Dimensional Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iacovazzi, Robert A., Jr.; Prabhakara, C.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a model is developed to estimate mesoscale-resolution atmospheric latent heating (ALH) profiles. It utilizes rain statistics deduced from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data, and cloud vertical velocity profiles and regional surface thermodynamic climatologies derived from other available data sources. From several rain events observed over tropical ocean and land, ALH profiles retrieved by this model in convective rain regions reveal strong warming throughout most of the troposphere, while in stratiform rain regions they usually show slight cooling below the freezing level and significant warming above. The mesoscale-average, or total, ALH profiles reveal a dominant stratiform character, because stratiform rain areas are usually much larger than convective rain areas. Sensitivity tests of the model show that total ALH at a given tropospheric level varies by less than +/- 10 % when convective and stratiform rain rates and mesoscale fractional rain areas are perturbed individually by 1 15 %. This is also found when the non-uniform convective vertical velocity profiles are replaced by one that is uniform. Larger variability of the total ALH profiles arises when climatological ocean- and land-surface temperatures (water vapor mixing ratios) are independently perturbed by +/- 1.0 K (+/- 5 %) and +/- 5.0 K (+/- 15 %), respectively. At a given tropospheric level, such perturbations can cause a +/- 25 % variation of total ALH over ocean, and a factor-of-two sensitivity over land. This sensitivity is reduced substantially if perturbations of surface thermodynamic variables do not change surface relative humidity, or are not extended throughout the entire model evaporation layer. The ALH profiles retrieved in this study agree qualitatively with tropical total diabatic heating profiles deduced in earlier studies. Also, from January and July 1999 ALH-profile climatologies generated separately with TRMM Microwave Imager and Precipitation Radar rain

  16. Latent heat loss of dairy cows in an equatorial semi-arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Roberto Gomes; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; de Macedo Costa, Leonardo Lelis; de Queiroz, João Paulo A. Fernandes

    2012-09-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate evaporative heat transfer of dairy cows bred in a hot semi-arid environment. Cutaneous ( E S) and respiratory ( E R) evaporation were measured (810 observations) in 177 purebred and crossbred Holstein cows from five herds located in the equatorial semi-arid region, and one herd in the subtropical region of Brazil. Rectal temperature ( T R), hair coat surface temperature ( T S) and respiratory rate ( F R) were also measured. Observations were made in the subtropical region from August to December, and in the semi-arid region from April to July. Measurements were done from 1100 to 1600 hours, after cows remained in a pen exposed to the sun. Environmental variables measured in the same locations as the animals were black globe temperature ( T G), air temperature ( T A), wind speed ( U), and partial air vapour pressure ( P V). Data were analysed by mixed models, using the least squares method. Results showed that average E S and E R were higher in the semi-arid region (117.2 W m-2 and 44.0 W m-2, respectively) than in the subtropical region (85.2 W m-2 and 30.2 W m-2, respectively). Herds and individual cows were significant effects ( P < 0.01) for all traits in the semi-arid region. Body parts did not affect T S and E S in the subtropical region, but was a significant effect ( P < 0.01) in the semi-arid region. The average flank T S (42.8°C) was higher than that of the neck and hindquarters (39.8°C and 41.6°C, respectively). Average E S was higher in the neck (133.3 W m-2) than in the flank (116.2 W m-2) and hindquarters (98.6 W m-2). Coat colour affected significantly both T S and E S ( P < 0.01). Black coats had higher T S and E S in the semi-arid region (41.7°C and 117.2 W m-2, respectively) than white coats (37.2°C and 106.7 W m-2, respectively). Rectal temperatures were almost the same in both subtropical and semi-arid regions. The results highlight the need for improved management methods specific for semi-arid regions.

  17. Improvement of discharge characteristics of latent heat thermal energy storage unit by using carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Fukai, Jun; Oishi, Akira; Kodama, Yoshikazu; Kanou, Makoto; Miyatake, Osamu

    1999-07-01

    Many phase change materials have unacceptably low thermal conductivities. Metal fins, metal honeycombs and metal matrices have been examined to enhance the thermal conductivity of the PCMs. This study proposed an enhancement technique using carbon fibers with high thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers prepared in this study is 220 W/(m{center_dot}K). Paraffin wax (0.26 W/(m{center_dot}K) in solid phase) and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{center_dot}10H{sub 2}O-mixture (0.8 W/(m{center_dot}K) in solid phase) were selected as heat storage media. The fibers were uniformly mixed with th PCM encapsulated in a cylindrical capsule. The effective thermal conductivities of the fibers/PCM composites were measured. Figure A-1 shows the ratio of the effective thermal conductivity of the composite (k{sub c}) to the thermal conductivity of the phase change material (k{sub m}). The figure demonstrates that the fibers essentially enhance the thermal conductivities of paraffin. For paraffin, there is little dependence of the effective thermal conductivity on the fiber length (L{sub f}). Though the k{sub c}/k{sub m} for Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{center_dot}10H{sub 2}O-mixture is lower than that of the paraffin wax, 2% fibers increase the thermal conductivity of the PCM by a factor of about three. This value is almost identical to the thermal conductivity of ice (2.2 W/(m{center_dot}K)). The effect of the carbon fibers on discharge characteristics of a thermal energy storage system was investigated. Capsules containing a carbon fibers/paraffin composite are packed into a thermal energy storage unit. The inlet fluid temperature (T{sub in})and the outlet fluid temperature (T{sub out}) were measured during the discharge process. Figure A-2 shows a typical result of the experiments. Remarkable effect of the fibers is observed after the outlet temperature reaches the phase change temperature ({approx}60 C). That is, the period where the outlet temperature is maintained near the

  18. Latent heat loss of dairy cows in an equatorial semi-arid environment.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Roberto Gomes; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; de Macedo Costa, Leonardo Lelis; de Queiroz, João Paulo A Fernandes

    2012-09-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate evaporative heat transfer of dairy cows bred in a hot semi-arid environment. Cutaneous (E(S)) and respiratory (E(R)) evaporation were measured (810 observations) in 177 purebred and crossbred Holstein cows from five herds located in the equatorial semi-arid region, and one herd in the subtropical region of Brazil. Rectal temperature (T(R)), hair coat surface temperature (T(S)) and respiratory rate (F(R)) were also measured. Observations were made in the subtropical region from August to December, and in the semi-arid region from April to July. Measurements were done from 1100 to 1600 hours, after cows remained in a pen exposed to the sun. Environmental variables measured in the same locations as the animals were black globe temperature (T(G)), air temperature (T(A)), wind speed (U), and partial air vapour pressure (P(V)). Data were analysed by mixed models, using the least squares method. Results showed that average E(S) and E(R) were higher in the semi-arid region (117.2 W m(-2) and 44.0 W m(-2), respectively) than in the subtropical region (85.2 W m(-2) and 30.2 W m(-2), respectively). Herds and individual cows were significant effects (P < 0.01) for all traits in the semi-arid region. Body parts did not affect T(S) and E(S) in the subtropical region, but was a significant effect (P < 0.01) in the semi-arid region. The average flank T(S) (42.8°C) was higher than that of the neck and hindquarters (39.8°C and 41.6°C, respectively). Average E(S) was higher in the neck (133.3 W m(-2)) than in the flank (116.2 W m(-2)) and hindquarters (98.6 W m(-2)). Coat colour affected significantly both T(S) and E(S) (P < 0.01). Black coats had higher T(S) and E(S) in the semi-arid region (41.7°C and 117.2 W m(-2), respectively) than white coats (37.2°C and 106.7 W m(-2), respectively). Rectal temperatures were almost the same in both subtropical and semi-arid regions. The results highlight the need for improved management methods specific

  19. Validation of HOAPS and ERA Interim latent heat fluxes against parameterizations applied to RV Polarstern data for 1995-1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumke, Karl; Kinzel, Julian

    2014-05-01

    Latent heat fluxes (LHF) represent a crucial component of the global energy cycle. As LHF provide one of the upper boundary conditions for the oceanic component of coupled atmosphere-ocean circulation models, it is desirable to rely on one consistent LHF data source with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution. Remotely sensed LHF, particularly the Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data (HOAPS) climatology, are considered to fulfil this criterion. However, the validity of HOAPS LHF needs to be investigated to assess its potential of reliably representing an essential part of the global freshwater cycle. Within this study, a validation of HOAPS-3.0-based LHF at pixel-level resolution for 1995-1997 is performed over the Atlantic basin. A recently developed bulk flux algorithm termed OCEANET (Bumke et al., 2013), derived from turbulence measurements onboard R/V Polarstern by inertial dissipation method, is applied to hourly bulk measurements obtained during 19 Atlantic cruises of R/V Polarstern. Its LHF output serves as the in-situ validation data source, which is supplemented by ERA-Interim reanalysis data. By means of the nearest-neighbor approach, a collocation of HOAPS- to OCEANET- and ERA-Interim data is carried out. Bias analyses suggest that HOAPS LHF are on average significantly underestimated compared to OCEANET and ERA-Interim (-8 W/m²). A sub-division into latitudinal bands resolves absolute biases exceeding -20 W/m² in the tropics. As the minor differences between the HOAPS- and OCEANET-based transfer coefficients lie within the uncertainty range inherent to bulk flux parameterizations, it is suggested that the significant LHF deviations for the most part arise from deviations among the bulk input variables. Investigations of bulk input parameters reveal that the observed negative LHF biases within the HOAPS record are mainly associated with an overrepresentation of air specific humidity for 20°S - 60°N. Latitudinal

  20. Effect of heat release on movement characteristics of shock train in an isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chenlin; Chang, Juntao; Liu, MengMeng; Feng, Shuo; Shi, Wen; Bao, Wen

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the effect of heat release on movement characteristics of shock train is numerically investigated in an isolator. It is found that the combustion heat release has a distinct effect on the shock train movement characteristics in the isolator. With increasing heat release, a shock train gradually forms and then propagates toward isolator entrance. In process of shock train formation, separation bubbles before injection ports entrain the high temperature burning gas into the boundary layer, which causes the shock train to shrink and stretch, and changes in configuration and number of shock waves. At the same time, the system force fluctuates. In addition, the shock train movement is divided into three stages, which have different wall pressure distribution. It is believed that these findings have a help the better understanding of the effect of heat release on the movement characteristics of shock train in an isolator.

  1. Evaluation of three satellite-based latent heat flux algorithms over forest ecosystems using eddy covariance data.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yunjun; Zhang, Yuhu; Zhao, Shaohua; Li, Xianglan; Jia, Kun

    2015-06-01

    We have evaluated the performance of three satellite-based latent heat flux (LE) algorithms over forest ecosystems using observed data from 40 flux towers distributed across the world on all continents. These are the revised remote sensing-based Penman-Monteith LE (RRS-PM) algorithm, the modified satellite-based Priestley-Taylor LE (MS-PT) algorithm, and the semi-empirical Penman LE (UMD-SEMI) algorithm. Sensitivity analysis illustrates that both energy and vegetation terms has the highest sensitivity compared with other input variables. The validation results show that three algorithms demonstrate substantial differences in algorithm performance for estimating daily LE variations among five forest ecosystem biomes. Based on the average Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency and root-mean-squared error (RMSE), the MS-PT algorithm has high performance over both deciduous broadleaf forest (DBF) (0.81, 25.4 W/m(2)) and mixed forest (MF) (0.62, 25.3 W/m(2)) sites, the RRS-PM algorithm has high performance over evergreen broadleaf forest (EBF) (0.4, 28.1 W/m(2)) sites, and the UMD-SEMI algorithm has high performance over both deciduous needleleaf forest (DNF) (0.78, 17.1 W/m(2)) and evergreen needleleaf forest (ENF) (0.51, 28.1 W/m(2)) sites. Perhaps the lower uncertainties in the required forcing data for the MS-PT algorithm, the complicated algorithm structure for the RRS-PM algorithm, and the calibrated coefficients of the UMD-SEMI algorithm based on ground-measured data may explain these differences.

  2. Evaluation of heat shock proteins for discriminating between latent tuberculosis infection and active tuberculosis: A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Seema D; Purohit, Hemant J; Taori, Girdhar M; Daginawala, Hatim F; Kashyap, Rajpal S

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of a latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is of the utmost concern. The available tests, the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the Quantiferon-TB Gold test (QFT-G) cannot discriminate between active TB and LTBI. Therefore, the aim of the study is to identify new biomarkers that can discriminate between active TB and LTBI and can also assess the risk of the individual developing active TB. In total, 55 blood samples were collected, of which 10 samples were from the active TB infection group, 10 were from the high-risk exposure group, 23 were from the low-risk exposure group, and 12 were from healthy controls living in a non-TB endemic area. A panel of heat shock proteins (Hsps), including host Hsp25, Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) Hsp16, were evaluated in all of the collected samples using ELISA. The levels of the host Hsp(s) (Hsp25, Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90) and MTB Hsp16 were significantly (p<0.05) elevated in the active TB group compared to the high-risk exposure group, the low-risk exposure group and the control group. Notably, the levels of the same panel of Hsp(s) were elevated in the high-risk exposure group compared to the low-risk exposure group. On follow-up, out of the 10 high-risk exposure participants, 3 converted into active TB, indicating that this group has the highest risk of developing TB. Thus, the evaluated panel of Hsp(s) can discriminate between LTBI and active TB. They can also identify individuals who are at the highest risk of developing active TB. Because they can be rapidly detected, Hsp(s) have an edge over the existing diagnostic tools for LTBI. The evaluation of these proteins will be useful in designing better diagnostic methods for LTBI.

  3. Comparison between global latent heat flux computed from multisensor (SSM/I and AVHRR) and from in situ data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jourdan, Didier; Gautier, Catherine

    1995-01-01

    Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS) and satellite-derived parameters are input to a similarity theory-based model and treated in completely equivalent ways to compute global latent heat flux (LHF). In order to compute LHF exclusively from satellite measurements, an empirical relationship (Q-W relationship) is used to compute the air mixing ratio from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) precipitable water W and a new one is derived to compute the air temperature also from retrieved W(T-W relationship). First analyses indicate that in situ and satellite LHF computations compare within 40%, but systematic errors increase the differences up to 100% in some regions. By investigating more closely the origin of the discrepancies, the spatial sampling of ship reports has been found to be an important source of error in the observed differences. When the number of in situ data records increases (more than 20 per month), the agreement is about 50 W/sq m rms (40 W/sq m rms for multiyear averages). Limitations of both empirical relationships and W retrieval errors strongly affect the LHF computation. Systematic LHF overestimation occurs in strong subsidence regions and LHF underestimation occurs within surface convergence zones and over oceanic upwelling areas. The analysis of time series of the different parameters in these regions confirms that systematic LHF discrepancies are negatively correlated with the differences between COADS and satellite-derived values of the air mixing ratio and air temperature. To reduce the systematic differences in satellite-derived LHF, a preliminary ship-satellite blending procedure has been developed for the air mixing ratio and air temperature.

  4. Comparison between global latent heat flux computed from multisensor (SSM/I and AVHRR) and from in situ data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jourdan, Didier; Gautier, Catherine

    1995-01-01

    Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS) and satellite-derived parameters are input to a similarity theory-based model and treated in completely equivalent ways to compute global latent heat flux (LHF). In order to compute LHF exclusively from satellite measurements, an empirical relationship (Q-W relationship) is used to compute the air mixing ratio from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) precipitable water W and a new one is derived to compute the air temperature also from retrieved W(T-W relationship). First analyses indicate that in situ and satellite LHF computations compare within 40%, but systematic errors increase the differences up to 100% in some regions. By investigating more closely the origin of the discrepancies, the spatial sampling of ship reports has been found to be an important source of error in the observed differences. When the number of in situ data records increases (more than 20 per month), the agreement is about 50 W/sq m rms (40 W/sq m rms for multiyear averages). Limitations of both empirical relationships and W retrieval errors strongly affect the LHF computation. Systematic LHF overestimation occurs in strong subsidence regions and LHF underestimation occurs within surface convergence zones and over oceanic upwelling areas. The analysis of time series of the different parameters in these regions confirms that systematic LHF discrepancies are negatively correlated with the differences between COADS and satellite-derived values of the air mixing ratio and air temperature. To reduce the systematic differences in satellite-derived LHF, a preliminary ship-satellite blending procedure has been developed for the air mixing ratio and air temperature.

  5. Heat release in the cryogenic system of a superconducting integrated detector and the influence of heat on its operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinev, N. V.; Koshelets, V. P.

    2013-03-01

    Heat release in the cryogenic system of a subterahertz-range superconducting integrated detector at ≈4.2 K is studied, and the influence of the released heat on its main characteristics is estimated. The detector chip mounted on a silicon lens is connected to a bias board by aluminum wires 25 μm in diameter, which are fixed by ultrasonic bonding. They are necessary for setting a bias current through the working components of the detector and represent an integral part of the system. The contact resistance between the wires and contact pads of the microchip is measured. The contact resistance is found to considerably exceed the resistance of the aluminum wire and, hence, makes a major contribution to heat release in the system. A "multipoint contact with one wire" technique is suggested. Tests show its efficiency: the contact resistance decreases considerably compared with the standard approach.

  6. The direct simulation of high-speed mixing-layers without and with chemical heat release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekar, B.; Mukunda, H. S.; Carpenter, M. H.

    1991-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation of high speed reacting and non-reacting flows for H2-air systems is presented. The calculations are made for a convective Mach number of 0.38 with hyperbolic tangent initial profile and finite rate chemical reactions. A higher-order numerical method is used in time accurate mode to time advance the solution to a statistical steady state. About 600 time slices of all the variables are then stored for statistical analysis. It is shown that most of the problems of high-speed combustion with air are characterized by relatively weak heat release. The present study shows that: (1) the convective speed is reduced by heat release by about 10 percent at this convective Mach number M(sub c) = 0.38; (2) the variation of the mean and rms fluctuation of temperature can be explained on the basis of temperature fluctuation between the flame temperature and the ambient; (3) the growth rate with heat release is reduced by 7 percent; and (4) the entrainment is reduced by 25 percent with heat release. These differences are small in comparison with incompressible flow dynamics, and are argued to be due to the reduced importance of heat release in comparison with the large enthalpy gradients resulting from the large-scale vortex dynamics. It is finally suggested that the problems of reduced mixing in high-speed flows are not severely complicated by heat release.

  7. Heat Shock Protein 90 Facilitates Latent HIV Reactivation through Maintaining the Function of Positive Transcriptional Elongation Factor b (p-TEFb) under Proteasome Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiao-Yan; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Chun-Yan; Lin, Jian; Zeng, Xiao-Yun; Ren, Ru-Xia; Wang, Keng; Xun, Tian-Rong; Shai, Yechiel; Liu, Shu-Wen

    2016-12-09

    The persistence of HIV in resting memory CD4(+) T cells at a latent state is considered as the major barrier on the path to achieve a cure for HIV. Proteasome inhibitors (PIs) were previously reported as latency reversing agents (LRAs) but the mechanism underlying this function is yet unclear. Here we demonstrate that PIs reactivate latent HIV ex vivo without global T cell activation, and may facilitate host innate immune responses. Mechanistically, latent HIV reactivation induced by PIs is mediated by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) via the recruitment of the heat shock protein (HSP) 90-positive transcriptional elongation factor b (p-TEFb) complex. Specifically, HSP90 downstream HSF1 gives positive feedback to the reactivation process through binding to cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) and preventing it from undergoing degradation by the proteasome. Overall, these findings suggest proteasome inhibitors as potential latency reversing agents. In addition, HSF1/HSP90 involved in HIV transcription elongation, may serve as therapeutic targets in HIV eradication. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Cold energy release characteristics of an ice/air direct contact heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Akiyoshi; Yanadori, Michio; Iwabuchi, Kunihiko; Kimura, Toshikatsu; Tsubota, Yuji

    1998-12-31

    This paper deals with the cold energy release characteristics of an ice/air direct contact heat exchanger in a refined cold energy conveyance system. Characteristics of the outlet temperature, the humidity, and time history of released heat are examined when the initial height of the ice-cube-packed bed in the heat exchanger is changed. The following are the results obtained in these experiments: (1) Inlet air of 30 C is lowered to about 0 C by passing the air through the heat exchanger, and absolute humidity of the outlet air is reduced to about a quarter of that of the inlet air. (2) There is an optimum height of the ice-cube-packed bed for maximizing the amount of cold energy released. (3) This heat exchange method can supply about twice the amount of cold energy released by an ordinary fin-tube-type heat exchanger even if the air velocity in the heat exchanger is reduced to about 0.38 times that of the fin-tube-type heat exchanger.

  9. Flash-Fire Propensity and Heat-Release Rate Studies of Improved Fire Resistant Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-six improved fire resistant materials were tested for flash-fire propensity and heat release rate properties. The tests were conducted to obtain a descriptive index based on the production of ignitable gases during the thermal degradation process and on the response of the materials under a specific heat load.

  10. Fragmentation of condensed material by isochoric heating and release

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, L.A.

    1983-03-01

    A model is suggested to describe the mechanics of fragmentation when a liquid or solid body disassembles under intense isochoric heating. The model is based on the concept that surface area created in the fragmentation process is governed by an equilibrium balance of the surface energy and a local inertial or kinetic energy. An expression is derived for the resulting fragment size as a function of the initial size, the specific energy deposited, and thermomechanical properties of the material. The theory is applied to calculate the blanket break-up due to neutron heating in the HYLIFE and Cascade Chamber inertial confinement fusion reactors.

  11. Spectral retrieval of latent heating profiles from TRMM PR data: comparisons of lookup tables from two- and three-dimensional simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shige, Shoichi; Takayabu, Yukari N.; Kida, Satoshi; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Zeng, Xiping; L'Ecuyer, Tristan

    2008-12-01

    The Spectral Latent Heating (SLH) algorithm was developed to estimate latent heating profiles for the TRMM PR. The method uses PR information (precipitation top height, precipitation rates at the surface and melting level, and rain type) to select heating profiles from lookup tables. Lookup tables for the three rain types-convective, shallow stratiform, and anvil rain (deep stratiform with a melting level)-were derived from numerical simulations of tropical cloud systems from the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) utilizing a cloud-resolving model (CRM). The two-dimensional ("2D") CRM was used in the previous studies. The availability of exponentially increasing computer capabilities has resulted in three-dimensional ("3D") CRM simulations for multiday periods becoming increasing prevalent. In this study, we compare lookup tables from the 2D and 3D simulations. The lookup table from 3D simulations results in less agreement between the SLH-retrieved heating and sounding-based one for the South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (SCSMEX). The level of SLH-estimated maximum heating is lower than that of the sounding-derived one. This is explained by the fact that the 3D lookup table produces stronger convective heating and weaker stratiform heating above the melting level that 2D counterpart. Condensate generated in and carried over from the convective region is larger in 3D than in 2D, and condensate that is produced by the stratiform region's own upward motion is smaller in 3D than 2D.

  12. Heat changes during transient tension responses to small releases in active frog muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, S H; Ford, L E

    1988-01-01

    Tension and heat production were measured in frog sartorius muscles in response to small shortening ramps (releases) at high and moderate speed. Transient tension responses to fast releases (0.1 to 0.4 mm in 1 or 4 ms) were similar to the tension transients length-clamped single fibers. Tension time courses during releases at 25 mm/s were like fiber responses calculated from the first two phases of the step responses (Ford et al., 1977). We conclude that similar crossbridge transitions produce tension transients observed in whole muscles and single fibers. Heat was absorbed during rapid tension recovery after fast releases and during the later part of releases at 25 mm/s. Variation of heat absorption with release size was compared with that of crossbridge movement predicted by the Huxley-Simmons hypothesis of force generation (Huxley and Simmons, 1971). Agreement between the two supports the conclusion that heat is absorbed by the crossbridge transitions responsible for rapid tension recovery after release. The results indicate that the entropy change of these transitions is positive. PMID:3265639

  13. Effect of fetch length on latent heat flux data accuracy calculated by Bowen ratio energy balance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozníková, Gabriela; Fischer, Milan; Trnka, Miroslav; Orság, Matěj; Kučera, Jiří; Žalud, Zdeněk

    2013-04-01

    Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) is one of the most widely used indirect methods for deriving latent heat (LE) and sensible heat fluxes. The BREB technique relies on net radiation, ground heat flux, and air temperature and humidity gradients measurements. Whilst the first two mentioned can be practically considered as point measurements, the source area of temperature and humidity gradients is at least one order of magnitudes larger. Therefore, the horizontal, homogeneous and extensive area is necessary prerequisite for correct flux determination by BREB method. An ideal fetch for BREB has been reported to be within 10 to 200 times the height of upper measuring level above zero plane displacement. This broad range is a result of different atmospheric stratifications and surface roughness, but the fetch to height ratio 100:1 has become generally acknowledged as a rule of thumb. In this study, data from four different BREB systems above various covers (two poplar plantations, grassland and turf grass field) will be used to calculate and analyse LE for different fetches. Data were recorded in Domanínek near Bystřice nad Pernštejnem in Czech-Moravian highlands where two BREB systems have measured above poplar plantation and turf grass since summer 2008 until present and two more systems have been placed above grassland and another poplar plantation at the beginning of 2011 and have measured until present time. During the measurements changing wind direction limited the fetch of particular BREB systems on the sites. That is why LE calculated for particular fetch lengths will be split into three categories - fetch classes ("good", "medium", and "bad") according to prevailing wind direction and corresponding fetch. These categories will be delimited using the simple footprint model. Fetches with more than 75% of the measured entities coming from the area of interest will be considered as the "good" ones. The "medium" class will contain fetches with 50-75% of the flux

  14. Study of the heat-transfer crisis on heat-release surfaces of annular channels with swirl and transit flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltenko, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    The results of the experimental study of the heat-transfer crisis on heat-release surfaces of annular channels with swirl and transit flow are presented. The experiments were carried out using electric heated annular channels with one and (or) two heat-release surfaces. For the organization of transit flow on a convex heat-release surface, four longitudinal ribs were installed uniformly at its perimeter. Swirl flow was realized using a capillary wound tightly (without gaps) on the ribs. The ratio between swirl and transit flows in the annular gap was varied by applying longitudinal ribs of different height. The experiments were carried out using a closed-type circulatory system. The experimental data were obtained in a wide range of regime parameters. Both water heated to the temperature less than the saturation temperature and water-steam mixture were fed at the inlet of the channels. For the measurement of the temperature of the heat-release surfaces, chromel-copel thermocouples were used. It was shown that the presence of swirl flow on a convex heatrelease surface led to a significant decrease in critical heat flows (CHF) compared to a smooth surface. To increase CHF, it was proposed to use the interaction of swirl flows of the heat carrier. The second swirl flow was transit flow, i.e., swirl flow with the step equal to infinity. It was shown that CHF values for a channel with swirl and transit flow in all the studied range of regime parameters was higher than CHF values for both a smooth annular channel and a channel with swirl. The empirical ratios describing the dependence of CHF on convex and concave heat-release surfaces of annular channels with swirl and transit flow on the geometrical characteristics of channels and the regime parameters were obtained. The experiments were carried out at the pressure p = 3.0-16.0 MPa and the mass velocity ρw = 250-3000 kg/(m2s).

  15. Global patterns of land-atmosphere fluxes of carbon dioxide, latent heat, and sensible heat derived from eddy covariance, satellite, and meteorological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J.; Reichstein, M.

    2012-12-01

    We upscaled FLUXNET observations of carbon dioxide, water and energy fluxes to the global scale using the machine learning technique, Model Tree Ensembles (MTE). We trained MTE to predict site-level gross primary productivity (GPP), terrestrial ecosystem respiration (TER), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), latent energy (LE), and sensible heat (H) based on remote sensing indices, climate and meteorological data, and information on land use. We applied the trained MTEs to generate global flux fields at a 0.5° x 0.5o spatial resolution and a monthly temporal resolution from 1982-2008. Cross-validation analyses revealed good performance of MTE in predicting among-site flux variability with modeling efficiencies (MEf) between 0.64 and 0.84, except for NEE (MEf = 0.32). Performance was also good for predicting seasonal patterns (MEf between 0.84 and 0.89, except for NEE (0.64)). By comparison, predictions of monthly anomalies were weak. Our products are increasingly used to evaluate global land surface models. However, depending on the flux of interest (e.g. gross primary production, terrestrial ecosystem respiration, net ecosystem exchange, evapotranspiration) and the pattern of interest (mean annual map, seasonal cycles, interannual variability, trends) the robustness and uncertainty of these products varies considerably. To avoid pitfalls, this talk also aims at providing an overview of uncertainties associated with these products, and to provide recommendations on the usage for land surface model evaluations. Finally, we present FLUXCOM - an ongoing activity that aims at generating an ensemble of data-driven FLUXNET based products based on diverse approaches.

  16. Global patterns of land-atmosphere fluxes of carbon dioxide, latent heat, and sensible heat derived from eddy covariance, satellite, and meteorological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Martin; Reichstein, Markus; Margolis, Hank A.; Cescatti, Alessandro; Richardson, Andrew D.; Arain, M. Altaf; Arneth, Almut; Bernhofer, Christian; Bonal, Damien; Chen, Jiquan; Gianelle, Damiano; Gobron, Nadine; Kiely, Gerald; Kutsch, Werner; Lasslop, Gitta; Law, Beverly E.; Lindroth, Anders; Merbold, Lutz; Montagnani, Leonardo; Moors, Eddy J.; Papale, Dario; Sottocornola, Matteo; Vaccari, Francesco; Williams, Christopher

    2011-09-01

    We upscaled FLUXNET observations of carbon dioxide, water, and energy fluxes to the global scale using the machine learning technique, model tree ensembles (MTE). We trained MTE to predict site-level gross primary productivity (GPP), terrestrial ecosystem respiration (TER), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), latent energy (LE), and sensible heat (H) based on remote sensing indices, climate and meteorological data, and information on land use. We applied the trained MTEs to generate global flux fields at a 0.5° × 0.5° spatial resolution and a monthly temporal resolution from 1982 to 2008. Cross-validation analyses revealed good performance of MTE in predicting among-site flux variability with modeling efficiencies (MEf) between 0.64 and 0.84, except for NEE (MEf = 0.32). Performance was also good for predicting seasonal patterns (MEf between 0.84 and 0.89, except for NEE (0.64)). By comparison, predictions of monthly anomalies were not as strong (MEf between 0.29 and 0.52). Improved accounting of disturbance and lagged environmental effects, along with improved characterization of errors in the training data set, would contribute most to further reducing uncertainties. Our global estimates of LE (158 ± 7 J × 1018 yr-1), H (164 ± 15 J × 1018 yr-1), and GPP (119 ± 6 Pg C yr-1) were similar to independent estimates. Our global TER estimate (96 ± 6 Pg C yr-1) was likely underestimated by 5-10%. Hot spot regions of interannual variability in carbon fluxes occurred in semiarid to semihumid regions and were controlled by moisture supply. Overall, GPP was more important to interannual variability in NEE than TER. Our empirically derived fluxes may be used for calibration and evaluation of land surface process models and for exploratory and diagnostic assessments of the biosphere.

  17. The Impact of Heat Release in Turbine Film Cooling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    AFIT/GAE/ENY/08-J02 Abstract The Ultra Compact Combustor is a design that integrates a turbine vane into the combustor flow path. Because...of the high fuel-to-air ratio and short combustor flow path, a significant potential exists for unburned fuel to enter the turbine. Using...contemporary turbine cooling vane designs, the injection of oxygen-rich turbine cooling air into a combustor flow containing unburned fuel could result in heat

  18. Evolution features of the surface latent heat flux anomalies over the tropical Pacific associated with two types of ENSO events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Lian-Tong

    2017-09-01

    The present study investigates the features of the surface latent heat flux (LHF) anomalies and their related variables over the tropical Pacific during two types of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events and seeks a possible candidate for the main contributions to the LHF anomalies. During El Niño Modoki and canonical El Niño events, the LHFs show positive anomalies over the equatorial central Pacific and in the areas immediately south of the equatorial eastern Pacific. In addition, the largest magnitudes and widest ranges of positive LHF anomalies for both types of events occur during their mature stages rather than during their developing or decaying phases. Analyses show that the positive LHF anomalies associated with both events are largely affected by the positive sea-air humidity difference anomalies. However, the negative surface wind speed anomalies associated with the canonical El Niño events clearly contribute to the decreases in the positive LHF anomalies over the central Pacific and in the area immediately north of the equatorial eastern Pacific due to the presence of westerly and northerly anomalies, respectively. Moreover, over the equatorial central Pacific and in the area immediately south of the eastern Pacific, the LHF anomalies are mainly influenced by oceanic variables during both types of ENSO events, indicating an atmospheric response to oceanic forcing. In contrast, outside of the area spanning 10° north and south of the equator in the tropical Pacific and with the exception of the southeastern region, the LHF anomalies are greatly influenced by atmospheric variables, suggesting an oceanic response to atmospheric forcing. Distinct differences exist during the mature event phase, with oceanic forcing dominating the equatorial central Pacific during El Niño Modoki events and the area immediately south of the equatorial eastern Pacific during canonical El Niño events. In addition, both types of ENSO events suggest the increasing

  19. Prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection in Sudan: a case–control study comparing interferon-γ release assay and tuberculin skin test

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most people exposed to M. tuberculosis show no evidence of clinical disease. Five to 10% of individuals with latent infection progress to develop overt disease during their life time. Identification of people with latent TB infection will increase case detection rates and may dictate new treatment policies to control tuberculosis. This study aimed to determine LTBI point prevalence in a population from Sudan using two different diagnostic methods: the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the IFN-γ release assay (IGRA). Methods This was a prospective, community-based and case-controlled study. Following informed consent, household contacts (HHCs; n = 98) of smear-positive index cases and Community controls (CCs; 186), were enrolled. Tuberculin skin test (TST), whole blood stimulation with ESAT-6/CFP-10 ± TB7.7 antigens or purified protein derivative (PPD) and IFN-γ levels determination with ELISA were performed. The levels of IFN-γ and TST induration between the CCs and the HHCs were compared using student t-test, Chi-square and Kappa coefficient. Pearson correlation test was used to compare TST and IFN-γ. P levels of <0.05 were considered significant. Results TST induration of ≥ 10 mm gave an LTBI point prevalence of 327 cases/1000 individuals among HHCs compared to 126 cases/1000 individuals among CCs (p = 0.000). PPD-induced IFN-γ release assay gave an LTBI point prevalence of 418 cases/1000 individuals among HHCs compared to 301 cases/1000 individuals among CCs (p =0.06). On the other hand ESAT-6/CFP-10 ± TB7.7-induced IFN-γ gave an LTBI point prevalence of 429 cases/1000 individuals among HHCs compared to 268 cases/1000 individuals among CCs (p = 0.01). IFN-γ productions levels induced by ESAT-6/CPF-10 ± TB7.7 antigens in HHCS and CCs were not significantly different from those induced by PPD (p = 0.7). Conclusion IFN-γ release assay (IGRA) gave higher LTBI point prevalence compared to TST in HHCs and CCs. PPD

  20. The Simulation of the Opposing Fluxes of Latent Heat and CO2 over Various Land-Use Types: Coupling a Gas Exchange Model to a Mesoscale Atmospheric Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyers, Mark; Krüger, Andreas; Werner, Christiane; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Zacharias, Stefan; Kerschgens, Michael

    2011-04-01

    A mesoscale meteorological model (FOOT3DK) is coupled with a gas exchange model to simulate surface fluxes of CO2 and H2O under field conditions. The gas exchange model consists of a C3 single leaf photosynthesis sub-model and an extended big leaf (sun/shade) sub-model that divides the canopy into sunlit and shaded fractions. Simulated CO2 fluxes of the stand-alone version of the gas exchange model correspond well to eddy-covariance measurements at a test site in a rural area in the west of Germany. The coupled FOOT3DK/gas exchange model is validated for the diurnal cycle at singular grid points, and delivers realistic fluxes with respect to their order of magnitude and to the general daily course. Compared to the Jarvis-based big leaf scheme, simulations of latent heat fluxes with a photosynthesis-based scheme for stomatal conductance are more realistic. As expected, flux averages are strongly influenced by the underlying land cover. While the simulated net ecosystem exchange is highly correlated with leaf area index, this correlation is much weaker for the latent heat flux. Photosynthetic CO2 uptake is associated with transpirational water loss via the stomata, and the resulting opposing surface fluxes of CO2 and H2O are reproduced with the model approach. Over vegetated surfaces it is shown that the coupling of a photosynthesis-based gas exchange model with the land-surface scheme of a mesoscale model results in more realistic simulated latent heat fluxes.

  1. Spatially Distributed Eddy-Covariance Measurements of Sensible and Latent Heat Fluxes at a Polygonal Tundra Site on Samoylov Island, Lena River Delta, Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, M.; Bornemann, N.; Boike, J.

    2008-12-01

    The landscape at Samoylov Island is characterized by permafrost and permafrost related processes that create the typical polygonal micro structures of wet tundra landscapes. These micro-morphologic structures strongly affect surface characteristics such as moisture content and vegetation cover. The polygonal structures usually consist of wet centers surrounded by elevated dry rims that vary in size and moisture content. Some structures show well developed rims and small centers, while others are dominated by wet areas. Several polygon centers consist of peat while other form small ponds. A few structures are affected by thermokarst erosion and form complex lake structures. These microscale landscape variations affect the ratio of dry and wet areas on a larger scale. This ratio is critical to sensible and latent heat exchange processes between soil surface and atmosphere. Thus, small scale variations of polygonal landscape features affect larger scale energy balance processes. This work concerns simultaneous eddy-covariance measurements of sensible and latent heat fluxes and their variations due to small scale differences in surface morphology on Samoylov Island. The first eddy-covariance station was erected in spring 2007 on the west side of the island. In summer 2008, a second, mobile eddy-covariance system was constructed to gather parallel flux measurements across the island. The first eddy-system served as the reference station. Three different measurement locations along a west-east transect across the island were established for the mobile system. The first measurement location is dominated by wet polygonal structures, while the second is characterized by dry, well-developed polygon rims. The third location is situated within an area of free water bodies such as small ponds and thermokarst lakes. The measurement period covers six weeks while the interval of data collection at each location was seven days. Hence every measurement location was measured twice by

  2. Nonlinear heat-release/acoustic model for thermoacoustic instability in lean premixed combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Peracchio, A.A.; Proscia, W.M.

    1999-07-01

    Lean premixed combustors, such as those used in industrial gas turbines to achieve low emissions, are often susceptible to thermoacoustic combustion instabilities, which manifest themselves as pressure and heat release oscillations in the combustor. These oscillations can result in increased noise and decreased durability due to vibration and flame motion. A physically based nonlinear parametric model has been developed that captures this instability. It describes the coupling of combustor acoustics with the rate of heat release. The model represents this coupling by accounting for the effect of acoustic pressure fluctuations on the varying fuel/air ratio being delivered to the flame, causing a fluctuating heat release due to both fuel air ratio variations and flame front oscillations. If the phasing of the fluctuating heat release and pressure are proper, an instability results that grows into a limit cycle. The nonlinear nature of the model predicts the onset of the instability and additionally captures the resulting limit cycle. Tests of a lean premixed nozzle at engine scale and engine operating conditions in the UTRC single nozzle rig, conducted under DARPA contract, exhibited instabilities. Parameters from the model were adjusted so that analytical results were consistent with relevant experimental data from this test. The parametric model captures the limit cycle behavior over a range of mean fuel air ratios, showing the instability amplitude (pressure and heat release) to increase and limit cycle frequency to decrease as mean fuel air ratio is reduced.

  3. 75 FR 61521 - NUREG/CR-7010, Cable Heat Release, Ignition, and Spread in Tray Installations During Fire...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... calorimeter to determine their heat of combustion and other properties; to full-scale, in which horizontal... COMMISSION NUREG/CR-7010, Cable Heat Release, Ignition, and Spread in Tray Installations During Fire... Commission has issued for public comment a document entitled: ``NUREG/CR-7010, Cable Heat Release,...

  4. Heat Induced Capsid Disassembly and DNA Release of Bacteriophage λ

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiangyun

    2012-01-01

    Successive structural changes of bacteriophage upon heating were characterized with quantitative experimental methods. In the commonly used Tris-Mg buffer, differential scanning calorimetry measurements first established that the protein capsid of phage melts at 87°C and its genomic DNA melts at 91°C. Interestingly, prior to the capsid melting, DNA was found to escape out of the capsid and subject to DNase digestion above 68°C, as concluded from light scattering, UV absorption, and electron microscopy studies. Further investigations indicated distinct temperature-dependent behaviors of the three phage proteins. Around 68°C, disruption of the tail first occurs and leads to the escape of DNA; above the capsid melting temperature of 87°C, the auxiliary protein gpD of the phage head remains soluble in solution and resists centrifugal sedimentation, whereas the major capsid protein gpE is easily precipitated and likely exists as aggregates. PMID:22808062

  5. Impact of different eddy covariance sensors and set-up on the annual balance of CO2 and fluxes of CH4 and latent heat in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, J. P.; Zona, D.; Gioli, B.; Murphy, P.; Burba, G. G.; Oechel, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    Expanding eddy covariance measurements of CO2 and CH4 fluxes in the Arctic is critical for refining the global C budget. Continuous measurements are particularly challenging because of the remote locations, low power availability, and extreme weather conditions. The necessity for tailoring instrumentation at different sites further complicates the interpretation of results and may add uncertainty to estimates of annual CO2 budgets. We investigated the influence of different sensor combinations on FCO2, latent heat (LE), and FCH4, and assessed the differences in annual FCO2 estimated with different instrumentation at the same sites. Using data from four sites across the North Slope of Alaska, we resolved FCO2 and FCH4 to within 5% using different combinations of open- and closed-path gas analyzers and within 10% using heated and non-heated anemometers. A continuously heated anemometer increased data coverage relative to non-heated anemometers while resulting in comparable annual FCO2, despite over-estimating sensible heat fluxes by 15%. We also implemented an intermittent heating strategy whereby activation only when ice or snow blockage of the transducers was detected. This resulted in comparable data coverage (~ 60%) to the continuously heated anemometer, while avoiding potential over-estimation of sensible heat and gas fluxes. We found good agreement in FCO2 and FCH4 from two closed-path and one open-path gas analyzer, despite the need for large spectral corrections of closed-path fluxes and density and temperature corrections to open-path sensors. However, data coverage was generally greater when using closed-path, especially during cold seasons (36-40% vs 10-14% for the open path), when fluxes from Arctic regions are particularly uncertain and potentially critical to annual C budgets. Measurement of Arctic LE remains a challenge due to strong attenuation along sample tubes, even when heated, that could not be accounted for with spectral corrections.

  6. The effect of fire retardants on the heat-release rate of building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. B.; Inman, L. B.

    1981-07-01

    A method was developed for making up thick cellulosic specimens with thermocouples implanted at various depths to determine the time dependent temperature profiles when exposed to external radiant fluxes. Specimens of alpha cellulose, both untreated and treated with 2 percent by weight of Na2B4O7, were exposed to an applied radiant flux of 3.7 W/sq cm in the heat release rate calorimeter in order to examine the effect of the fire retardants on the heat release rate. The results on a limited number of tests suggest that the char enhancement, produced by the presence of Na2B4O7, reduces the heat release rate mainly by the reduction of the caloric value of the volatile products rather than by the insulating effect of the increased char layer thickness.

  7. Interferon-gamma release assays and tuberculin skin testing for diagnosing latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in at-risk groups in Poland.

    PubMed

    Kruczak, Katarzyna; Mastalerz, Lucyna; Sładek, Krzysztof

    2016-03-01

    The diagnostics of latent tuberculosis infection in Poland using the tuberculin skin test is challenging due to the obligatory Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccinations. Interferon-gamma release assays are still very rarely used for diagnostics. We compared the tuberculin skin test and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test to evaluate the degree of latent tuberculosis infection in at-risk groups for tuberculosis (homeless, close contacts, periodic contacts, nursing-home attendees) and in healthy individuals. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube tests were carried out on 785 individuals from the homeless (n=150), close contacts (n=171), periodic contacts (n=163), nursing-home attendees (n=152), and healthy individuals (n=149). The tuberculin skin test was performed on 129, 156, 147, 148, and 121 participants, respectively. We evaluated the (a) correlation between serum concentrations of interferon gamma and the tuberculin-skin-test induration diameter; (b) between the number of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube-positive results and the tuberculin-skin-test diameter in the studied groups; and (c) agreement between both tests and the kappa coefficient using the tuberculin-skin-test diameters of 5, 10, and 15mm. Larger tuberculin-skin-test induration diameters were associated with elevated serum concentrations of interferon gamma. We found a positive correlation between the number of positive QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube screening results and the tuberculin-skin-test induration diameter. The agreement between QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube and tuberculin-skin-test screening results improved with increasing tuberculin-skin-test induration diameter. Based on measures of tuberculin-skin-test induration diameter alone, it is difficult to diagnose latent tuberculosis infection with certainty. The agreement of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test increases with the tuberculin-skin-test diameter. Tuberculin-skin-test diameters larger than 15mm are more likely to be associated with active infection

  8. Interferon Gamma Release Assay in response to PE35/PPE68 proteins: a promising diagnostic method for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Shima; Pourakbari, Babak; Mamishi, Setareh

    2017-03-01

    Tuberculosis control relies on the identification and preventive treatment of people who are latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). PE/PPE proteins have been reported to elicit CD4 and/or CD8 responses either in the form of whole recombinant proteins or as individual peptides. Very few of the PE and PPE proteins have been previously tested for responses in patients with TB and healthy donors. This is the first study to evaluate the Interferon Gamma Release Assay (IGRA) after stimulation with PE35 and PPE68. The antigen-specific levels of IFN-γ following stimulation with QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube (QFT-G-IT) antigens, and PE35 and PPE68 recombinant proteins were evaluated in 79 children and 102 adults, respectively. Using QFT-G-IT kit, latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) was detected in 26 children (33%) and 41 adults (40%); IGRA following stimulation with PE35 and PPE68 recombinant proteins, was positive, respectively, in 36 (46%) and 32 (40.5%) children, respectively. In addition, 53 adults (52%) had positive results following stimulation with these two proteins. The sensitivity and specificity of IGRA following stimulation with recombinant PE35 in children were 76% and 80%, and following stimulation with recombinant PPE68 in this group, it was 73% and 75%, respectively. Meanwhile, there is no gold standard test for LTBI. Our designed tests using PE35 and PPE68 PE/PPE proteins, two PE/PPE proteins not present in BCG vaccins, which elicit CD4 and/or CD8 responses, might be helpful for rapid diagnosis of TB and improve the detection of LTBI. However, further validation studies to determine the advantage of IGRAs using these proteins, alone or combined, are highly recommended.

  9. Multifractal and statistical analyses of heat release fluctuations in a spark ignition engine.

    PubMed

    Sen, Asok K; Litak, Grzegorz; Kaminski, Tomasz; Wendeker, Mirosław

    2008-09-01

    Using multifractal and statistical analyses, we have investigated the complex dynamics of cycle-to-cycle heat release variations in a spark ignition engine. Three different values of the spark advance angle (Delta beta) are examined. The multifractal complexity is characterized by the singularity spectrum of the heat release time series in terms of the Holder exponent. The broadness of the singularity spectrum gives a measure of the degree of mutifractality or complexity of the time series. The broader the spectrum, the richer and more complex is the structure with a higher degree of multifractality. Using this broadness measure, the complexity in heat release variations is compared for the three spark advance angles (SAAs). Our results reveal that the heat release data are most complex for Delta beta=30 degrees followed in order by Delta beta=15 degrees and 5 degrees. In other words, the complexity increases with increasing SAA. In addition, we found that for all the SAAs considered, the heat release fluctuations behave like an antipersistent or a negatively correlated process, becoming more antipersistent with decreasing SAA. We have also performed a statistical analysis of the heat release variations by calculating the kurtosis of their probability density functions (pdfs). It is found that for the smallest SAA considered, Delta beta=5 degrees, the pdf is nearly Gaussian with a kurtosis of 3.42. As the value of the SAA increases, the pdf deviates from a Gaussian distribution and tends to be more peaked with larger values of kurtosis. In particular, the kurtosis has values of 3.94 and 6.69, for Delta beta=15 degrees and 30 degrees, respectively. A non-Gaussian density function with kurtosis in excess of 3 is indicative of intermittency. A larger value of kurtosis implies a higher degree of intermittency. (c) 2008 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Nucleation of cracks in a perforated heat-releasing material with temperature-dependent elastic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagari, A. R.; Mirsalimov, V. M.

    2012-07-01

    A mathematical model of crack nucleation in a perforated heat-releasing material attenuated by a biperiodic system of cooling cylindrical channels with a circular cross section is constructed. Solving the problem of equilibrium of an isotropic perforated heat-releasing material with temperature-dependent properties containing nucleating cracks is reduced to solving systems of algebraic and nonlinear singular integral equations with a Cauchy-type kernel. The forces in crack nucleation regions are found by using the solution of these equations. The condition of crack emergence is formulated with allowance for the criterion of ultimate stretching of bonds in the material.

  11. The Effect of Spray Initial Conditions on Heat Release and Emissions in LDI CFD Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannetti, Anthony C.; Liu, Nan-Suey; Davoudzadeh, Farhad

    2008-01-01

    The mass and velocity distribution of liquid spray has a primary effect on the combustion heat release process. This heat release process then affects emissions like nitrogen oxides (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO). Computational Fluid Dynamics gives the engineer insight into these processes, but various setup options exist (number of droplet groups, and initial droplet temperature) for spray initial conditions. This paper studies these spray initial condition options using the National Combustion Code (NCC) on a single swirler lean direct injection (LDI) flame tube. Using laminar finite rate chemistry, comparisons are made against experimental data for velocity measurements, temperature, and emissions (NOx, CO).

  12. Modeling drug release from functionalized magnetic nanoparticles actuated by non-heating low frequency magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, Y.; Golovin, D.; Klyachko, N.; Majouga, A.; Kabanov, A.

    2017-02-01

    Various plausible acceleration mechanisms of drug release from nanocarriers composed of a single-domain magnetic nanoparticle core with attached long macromolecule chains activated by low frequency non-heating alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed. The most important system characteristics affecting the AMF exposure impact are determined. Impact of several reasonable mechanisms is estimated analytically or obtained using numerical modeling. Some conditions providing manifold release acceleration as a result from exposure in AMF are found.

  13. Corticosteroids and infliximab impair the performance of interferon-γ release assays used for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Alexander; Gao, Yifang; Allan, Raymond N; Ball, Darran; de Graaf, Hans; Coelho, Tracy; Clifford, Vanessa; Curtis, Nigel; Williams, Anthony; Faust, Saul N; Mansour, Salah; Marshall, Ben; Elkington, Paul; Tebruegge, Marc

    2017-10-01

    The impact of immunosuppression on interferon-γ release assays and novel cytokine biomarkers of TB infection, mycobacteria-specific IL-2, IP-10 and TNF-α responses was investigated in an ex vivo model. Cytokine responses in standard QuantiFERON-TB Gold in-Tube (QFT-GIT) assays were compared with duplicate assays containing dexamethasone or infliximab. Dexamethasone converted QFT-GIT results from positive to negative in 30% of participants. Antigen-stimulated interferon-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α responses were markedly reduced, but IP-10 responses were preserved. Infliximab caused QFT-GIT result conversion in up to 30% of participants and substantial reductions in all cytokine responses. Therefore, corticosteroids and anti-TNF-α agents significantly impair interferon-γ release assay performance. IP-10 may be a more robust TB biomarker than interferon-γ in patients receiving corticosteroids. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. Enhanced Thermal Properties of Novel Latent Heat Thermal Storage Material Through Confinement of Stearic Acid in Meso-Structured Onion-Like Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Junkai; Lv, Mengjiao; Lu, Jinshu; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Zijun; Zhang, Xiongjie; Zhu, Yingying

    2017-08-01

    Meso-structured onion-like silica (MOS), which had a highly ordered, onion-like multilayer; large surface area and pore volume; and highly curved mesopores, were synthesized as a support for stearic acid (SA) to develop a novel shape-stabilized phase change material (SA/MOS). The characterizations of SA/MOS were studied by the analysis technique of scanning electron microscope, infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), and thermal gravimetry analysis (TGA). The results showed that the interaction between the SA and the MOS was physical adsorption and that the MOS had no effect on the crystal structure of the SA. The DSC results suggested that the melting and solidifying temperature of the SA/MOS were 72.7°C and 63.9°C with a melting latent heat of 108.0 J/g and a solidifying latent heat of 126.0 J/g, respectively, and the TGA results indicated that the SA/MOS had a good thermal stability. All of the results demonstrated that the SA/MOS was a promising thermal energy storage material candidate for practical applications.

  15. Americium and plutonium release behavior from irradiated mixed oxide fuel during heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, I.; Suto, M.; Miwa, S.; Hirosawa, T.; Koyama, S.

    2013-06-01

    The release behavior of Pu and Am was investigated under the reducing atmosphere expected in sodium cooled fast reactor severe accidents. Irradiated Pu and U mixed oxide fuels were heated at maximum temperatures of 2773 K and 3273 K. EPMA, γ-ray spectrometry and α-ray spectrometry for released and residual materials revealed that Pu and Am can be released more easily than U under the reducing atmosphere. The respective release rate coefficients for Pu and Am were obtained as 3.11 × 10-4 min-1 and 1.60 × 10-4 min-1 at 2773 K under the reducing atmosphere with oxygen partial pressure less than 0.02 Pa. Results of thermochemical calculations indicated that the main released chemical forms would likely be PuO for Pu and Am for Am under quite low oxygen partial pressure.

  16. Critical heat flux and dynamics of boiling in nanofluids at stepwise heat release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, M. I.; Kuznetsov, D. V.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper results of an experimental study on critical heat flux and dynamics of boiling crisis onset in nanofluids at stepwise heat generation are presented. Freon R21 with three types of nanoparticles - SiO2, Cu and Al2O3 was used as test fluid. Critical heat fluxes and temperatures of boiling initiation were obtained. It was shown that the addition of nanoparticles increased CHF at stepwise heat generation by up to 21%. Under conditions of the experiment transition to film boiling occurred via evaporation fronts. Data on propagation velocity and structure of evaporation fronts were obtained; the spectral analysis of fluctuations of the evaporation front interface was carried out. The characteristic frequencies and amplitudes of interface fluctuations were determined depending on the velocity of evaporation front propagation. It was shown that the addition of nano-sized particles significantly affects development of interface instability and increases the front velocity.

  17. Interaction of Two Micro-slot Flames: Heat Release Rate and Flame Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwana, K.; Kato, S.; Kosugi, A.; Hirasawa, T.; Nakamura, Y.

    2014-11-01

    This paper studies the interaction between two identical micro-slot diffusion flames. Here, we define a micro-slot flame as a slot flame of which the slot width is less than about 1 mm. Because of its smallness, a micro-slot flame has a high heating density and can be used as a small heat source. However, the heat release rate of a single micro-slot flame is limited, and therefore, multiple micro-slot flames may be used to increase total heat release rate. As a first step, this paper considers a situation in which two micro-slot flames are used with certain burner spacing. When two diffusion flames are placed closely, flame shape changes from that of an isolated flame. Studying such flame shape change and resultant change in total heat release rate is the topic of this paper. Experiment is conducted and total heat release rate is measured by integrating CH* chemiluminescence recorded using a CCD camera and an optical filter of the wavelength of 430 nm. Two different burner materials, copper and glass, are tested to study the effect of heat loss to burners. An analytical model is applied to predict flame shape. In addition to the classical Burke-Schumann assumptions, two slot flames are modeled as line sources with zero width, enabling a simple analytical solution for the critical burner spacing at which two flames touch each other. The critical burner spacing is a key parameter that characterizes the interaction between two micro-slot flames. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are then conducted to test the validity of the present theory. CFD results are favorably compared with the theoretical prediction.

  18. Extracellular vesicles released following heat stress induce bystander effect in unstressed populations.

    PubMed

    Bewicke-Copley, Findlay; Mulcahy, Laura Ann; Jacobs, Laura Ann; Samuel, Priya; Akbar, Naveed; Pink, Ryan Charles; Carter, David Raul Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Cells naïve to stress can display the effects of stress, such as DNA damage and apoptosis, when they are exposed to signals from stressed cells; this phenomenon is known as the bystander effect. We previously showed that bystander effect induced by ionising radiation are mediated by extracellular vesicles (EVs). Bystander effect can also be induced by other types of stress, including heat shock, but it is unclear whether EVs are involved. Here we show that EVs released from heat shocked cells are also able to induce bystander damage in unstressed populations. Naïve cells treated with media conditioned by heat shocked cells showed higher levels of DNA damage and apoptosis than cells treated with media from control cells. Treating naïve cells with EVs derived from media conditioned by heat shocked cells also induced a bystander effect when compared to control, with DNA damage and apoptosis increasing whilst the level of cell viability was reduced. We demonstrate that treatment of naïve cells with heat shocked cell-derived EVs leads to greater invasiveness in a trans-well Matrigel assay. Finally, we show that naïve cells treated with EVs from heat-shocked cells are more likely to survive a subsequent heat shock, suggesting that these EVs mediate an adaptive response. We propose that EVs released following stress mediate an intercellular response that leads to apparent stress in neighbouring cells but also greater robustness in the face of a subsequent insult.

  19. Role of buoyancy and heat release in fire modeling, propagation, and instability

    Treesearch

    Shahid M. Mughal; Yousuff M. Hussaini; Scott L. Goodrick; Philip Cunningham

    2007-01-01

    In an investigation of the dynamics of coupled fluid-combustion-buoyancy driven problems, an idealised model formulation is used to investigate the role of buoyancy and heat release in an evolving boundary layer, with particular emphasis on examining underlying fluid dynamics to explain observed phenomena arising in forest fire propagation. The role played by the...

  20. Impact of Dissociation and Sensible Heat Release on Pulse Detonation and Gas Turbine Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    2001-01-01

    A thermodynamic cycle analysis of the effect of sensible heat release on the relative performance of pulse detonation and gas turbine engines is presented. Dissociation losses in the PDE (Pulse Detonation Engine) are found to cause a substantial decrease in engine performance parameters.

  1. Coupling between entropy and unsteady heat release in a thermoacoustic system with a mean flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Zhao, Dan

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the coupling between entropy and unsteady heat release in a one dimensional duct in the presence of a mean flow is considered. As acoustic disturbances impinge on a compact heat source enclosed in the duct, entropy disturbances are generated. The transfer function between the generated entropy waves and oncoming flow velocity fluctuations is deduced by conducting order analysis of the linearized governing equations. The effects of the mean flow are emphasized for different forms of unsteady heat release model. It is shown that there is a strong coupling between entropy, heat release, mean flow and acoustic impedance at the heat source. To validate our theoretical analysis, numerical investigation is conducted by using a low order model. Comparing the theoretical and the low order model's results reveals that a good agreement is observed. It is found that when the mean flow Mach number is not negligible, the term of O(M1) in the identified entropy transfer function is as important as that of O(M0). Neglecting the term of O(M1) may lead to wrong prediction of the entropy waves produced in the system.

  2. Methods Used in Economic Evaluations of Tuberculin Skin Tests and Interferon Gamma Release Assays for the Screening of Latent Tuberculosis Infection: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Koufopoulou, Maria; Sutton, Andrew John; Breheny, Katie; Diwakar, Lavanya

    2016-01-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) provides a constant pool of new active tuberculosis cases; a third of the earth's population is estimated to be infected with LTBI. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the quality and summarize the available evidence from published economic evaluations reporting on the cost-effectiveness of tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) compared with interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) for the screening of LTBI. An extensive systematic review of the published literature was conducted. A two-step process was adopted to identify relevant articles: information was extracted into evidence tables and then analyzed. The quality of the publications was assessed using a 10-item checklist specific for economic evaluations. Twenty-eight studies were identified for inclusion in this review. Most of the studies found IGRAs to be more cost-effective than TSTs; however, the conclusions from the studies varied significantly. Most studies scored highly on the checklist although only one fulfilled all the stipulated criteria. A wide variety of methodological approaches were documented; identified differences included the type of economic evaluation and model, time horizon, perspective, and outcomes measures. The lack of consistent methods across studies makes it difficult to draw any firm conclusions about the most cost-effective option between TSTs and IGRAs. This problem can be solved by improving the quality of economic evaluation studies in the field of LTBI screening, through adherence to quality checklists. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Should all patients undergoing treatment with biologic agents be screened annually for latent tuberculosis infection with an interferon gamma release assay?

    PubMed

    Johnson, M G; Bialas, R W; Hall, R P; Stout, J E

    2016-08-01

    Systemic biologic therapy has become commonplace for the treatment of a variety of inflammatory dermatologic conditions, particularly psoriasis. Screening for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is recommended prior to initiation of systemic biologic agents, and an interferon gamma release assays (IGRA) is often used as the screening modality. Annual screening for LTBI is also recommended for patients while on systemic biologic therapy, but the literature does not clearly support how often screening should be performed. In addition, serial testing with IGRAs, particularly among low-risk populations without any new tuberculosis (TB) exposures, has proven to be unreliable with frequent reversions and conversions. We propose that in low-incidence TB regions, repeat LTBI screening should only be considered for patients on systemic biologic therapy if any new TB exposures occurred since initial LTBI screening was performed prior to starting biologic therapy. This strategy aims to reduce false-positive LTBI testing that can expose patients to hazardous antibiotics and result in the unnecessary interruption of systemic biologic therapy.

  4. Follow-up testing of interferon-gamma release assays are useful in ankylosing spondylitis patients receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha for latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Son, Chang-Nam; Jun, Jae-Bum; Kim, Jong-Heon; Sung, Il-Hoon; Yoo, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2014-08-01

    We evaluated the utility of follow-up interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) for the diagnosis of reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) or new tuberculosis in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNFα). The study participants (n=127) had a negative IGRA screening before receiving anti-TNFα and were evaluated by follow-up IGRA. We retrospectively examined data of the subjects according to age, gender, tuberculosis prophylaxis, concomitant medications, IGRA conversion and anti-TNFα, including type and treatment duration. The median duration of anti-TNFα was 21.5 months, and the median age was 35.3 yr. Of the 127 patients, IGRA conversion was found in 10 patients (7.9%). There was no significant variation between IGRA conversion rate and any risk factors except for age. IGRA conversion rate was not significantly different between AS and rheumatoid arthritis (P=0.12). IGRA conversion was observed in AS patients receiving anti-TNFα in Korea. A follow-up IGRA test can be helpful for identifying LTBI or new tuberculosis in AS patients receiving anti-TNFα.

  5. Impact of heat release on strain rate field in turbulent premixed Bunsen flames

    SciTech Connect

    Coriton, Bruno Rene Leon; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2016-08-10

    The effects of combustion on the strain rate field are investigated in turbulent premixed CH4/air Bunsen flames using simultaneous tomographic PIV and OH LIF measurements. Tomographic PIV provides three-dimensional velocity measurements, from which the complete strain rate tensor is determined. The OH LIF measurements are used to determine the position of the flame surface and the flame-normal orientation within the imaging plane. This combination of diagnostic techniques enables quantification of divergence as well as flame-normal and tangential strain rates, which are otherwise biased using only planar measurements. Measurements are compared in three lean-to-stoichiometric flames that have different amounts of heat release and Damköhler numbers greater than unity. The effects of heat release on the principal strain rates and their alignment relative to the local flame normal are analyzed. The extensive strain rate preferentially aligns with the flame normal in the reaction zone, which has been indicated by previous studies. The strength of this alignment increases with increasing heat release and, as a result, the flame-normal strain rate becomes highly extensive. These effects are associated with the gas expansion normal to the flame surface, which is largest for the stoichiometric flame. In the preheat zone, the compressive strain rate has a tendency to align with the flame normal. Away from the flame front, the flame – strain rate alignment is arbitrary in both the reactants and products. The flame-tangential strain rate is on average positive across the flame front, and therefore the turbulent strain rate field contributes to the enhancement of scalar gradients as in passive scalar turbulence. As a result, increases in heat release result in larger positive values of the divergence as well as flame-normal and tangential strain rates, the tangential strain rate has a weaker dependence on heat release than the flame-normal strain rate and the

  6. Impact of heat release on strain rate field in turbulent premixed Bunsen flames

    SciTech Connect

    Coriton, Bruno Rene Leon; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2016-08-10

    The effects of combustion on the strain rate field are investigated in turbulent premixed CH4/air Bunsen flames using simultaneous tomographic PIV and OH LIF measurements. Tomographic PIV provides three-dimensional velocity measurements, from which the complete strain rate tensor is determined. The OH LIF measurements are used to determine the position of the flame surface and the flame-normal orientation within the imaging plane. This combination of diagnostic techniques enables quantification of divergence as well as flame-normal and tangential strain rates, which are otherwise biased using only planar measurements. Measurements are compared in three lean-to-stoichiometric flames that have different amounts of heat release and Damköhler numbers greater than unity. The effects of heat release on the principal strain rates and their alignment relative to the local flame normal are analyzed. The extensive strain rate preferentially aligns with the flame normal in the reaction zone, which has been indicated by previous studies. The strength of this alignment increases with increasing heat release and, as a result, the flame-normal strain rate becomes highly extensive. These effects are associated with the gas expansion normal to the flame surface, which is largest for the stoichiometric flame. In the preheat zone, the compressive strain rate has a tendency to align with the flame normal. Away from the flame front, the flame – strain rate alignment is arbitrary in both the reactants and products. The flame-tangential strain rate is on average positive across the flame front, and therefore the turbulent strain rate field contributes to the enhancement of scalar gradients as in passive scalar turbulence. As a result, increases in heat release result in larger positive values of the divergence as well as flame-normal and tangential strain rates, the tangential strain rate has a weaker dependence on heat release than the flame-normal strain rate and the

  7. Endogenous opioids released during non-nociceptive environmental stress induce latent pain sensitization Via a NMDA-dependent process.

    PubMed

    Le Roy, Chloé; Laboureyras, Emilie; Gavello-Baudy, Stéphanie; Chateauraynaud, Jérémy; Laulin, Jean-Paul; Simonnet, Guy

    2011-10-01

    Although stress induces analgesia, there is evidence that stressful events may exacerbate pain syndromes. Here, we studied the effects of 1 to 3 prestressful events (days 0, 2, and 7), such as non-nociceptive environmental stress, on inflammatory hyperalgesia induced by a carrageenan injection (day 14) in 1 rat hind paw. Changes in nociceptive threshold were evaluated by the paw pressure vocalization test. The higher the number of stress sessions presented to the rats, the greater was the inflammatory hyperalgesia. Blockade of opioid receptors by naltrexone before each stress inhibited stress-induced analgesia and suppressed the exaggerated inflammatory hyperalgesia. Stressed versus nonstressed animals could be discriminated by their response to a fentanyl ultra-low dose (fULD), that produced hyperalgesia or analgesia, respectively. This pharmacological test permitted the prediction of the pain vulnerability level of prestressed rats because fULD analgesic or hyperalgesic indices were positively correlated with inflammatory hyperalgesic indices (r(2) = .84). In prestressed rats, fULD-induced hyperalgesia and the exaggerated inflammatory hyperalgesia were prevented NMDA receptor antagonists. This study provides some preclinical evidence that pain intensity is not only the result of nociceptive input level but is also dependent on the individual history, especially prior life stress events associated with endogenous opioid release. Based on these preclinical data, it would be of clinical interest to evaluate whether prior stressful events may also affect further pain sensation in humans. Moreover, this preclinical model could be a good tool for evaluating new therapeutic strategies for relieving pain hypersensitivity. Copyright © 2011 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Heating Structures Derived from Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Adler, R.; Haddad, Z.; Hou, A.; Kakar, R.; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Kummerow, C.; Lang, S.; Meneghini, R.; Olson, W.

    2004-01-01

    Rainfall is a key link in the hydrologic cycle and is a primary heat source for the atmosphere. The vertical distribution of latent-heat release, which is accompanied by rainfall, modulates the large-scale circulations of the tropics and in turn can impact midlatitude weather. This latent heat release is a consequence of phase changes between vapor, liquid, and solid water. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), a joint U.S./Japan space project, was launched in November 1997. It provides an accurate measurement of rainfall over the global tropics which can be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of latent heating over the global tropics. The distributions of rainfall and inferred heating can be used to advance our understanding of the global energy and water cycle. This paper describes several different algorithms for estimating latent heating using TRMM observations. The strengths and weaknesses of each algorithm as well as the heating products are also discussed. The validation of heating products will be exhibited. Finally, the application of this heating information to global circulation and climate models is presented.

  9. Interferon-γ release assay for the diagnosis of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in children younger than 5 years: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ge, Long; Ma, Ji-Chun; Han, Min; Li, Jin-Long; Tian, Jin-Hui

    2014-11-01

    Interferon-γ release assays (IGRAs) have been widely used for the diagnosis of latent and active tuberculosis in adults, but their role in diagnosing latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in children younger than 5 years remains unclear. To evaluate the diagnostic performance of IGRAs for LTBI in children younger than 5 years. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Web of Knowledge databases. According to inclusion criteria, the diagnostic studies of IGRAs for LTBI in children younger than 5 years were included. The study quality was assessed using the 14-item Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies instrument. The Meta-Analyst software was used to analyze the data. Seven studies (627 patients) were included. Meta-analysis showed that compared with tuberculin skin test (TST), the pooled sensitivity (Sen), specificity (Spe), positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), accuracy and diagnosis odds ratio (DOR), and summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve of QuantiFERON-TB (values in parentheses are 95% confidence intervals) were 0.841 (0.733-0.911), 0.895 (0.861-0.922), 8.046 (5.953-10.876), 0.192 (0.113-0.326), 0.622 (0.527-0.709), 0.970 (0.946-0.983), 0.891 (0.861-0.916), 50.718 (24.201-106.287), and 0.809 respectively. The pooled Sen, Spe, PLR, NLR, PPV, NPV, accuracy, DOR, and SROC curve of T-SPOT.TB test were 0.931 (0.760-0.983), 0.767 (0.684-0.833), 3.947 (2.854-5.459), 0.095 (0.026-0.354), 0.523 (0.398-0.645), 0.977 (0.914-0.994), 0.806 (0.737-0.860), 65.270 (13.463-316.434), and 0.855, respectively. This meta-analysis showed that the sensitivity and specificity of IGRAs were slightly higher than TST and can be used as supporting tools to detect LTBI in children younger than 5 years. The methodological quality of diagnostic test needs to be improved. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Combustion heat release effects on asymmetric vortex shedding from bluff bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Caleb Nathaniel

    2011-07-01

    This thesis describes an investigation of oscillatory combustion processes due to vortex shedding from bluff body flame holders. The primary objective of this study was to elucidate the influence of combustion process heat release upon the Benard-von Karman (BVK) instability in reacting bluff body wakes. For this purpose, spatial and temporal heat release distributions in bluff body-stabilized combustion of liquid Jet-A fuel with high-temperature, vitiated air were characterized over a wide range of operating conditions. Two methods of fuel injection were investigated. In the first method, referred to as close-coupled fuel injection, the fuel was supplied via discrete liquid jets injected perpendicular to the cross-flowing air stream just upstream of the bluff body trailing edge, thereby limiting fuel and air mixing prior to burning. The fuel was introduced well upstream (˜0.5 m) of the bluff body in the second fuel injection mode, resulting in a well-evaporated and mixed reactants stream. The resulting BVK heat release dynamics were compared between these fuel injection modes in order to investigate their dependence upon the spatial distributions of fuel-air ratio and heat release in the reacting wake. When close-coupled fuel injection was used, the BVK heat release dynamics increased in amplitude with increasing global equivalence ratio, reaching a maximum just before globally rich blow out of the combustion process occurred. This was due to a decrease in fuel entrainment into the near-wake as the fuel spray penetrated further into the cross-flow, which reduced the local heat release and equivalence ratio (indicated by CH* and C2*/CH* chemiluminescence, respectively). As a result, the density gradient across the near-wake reaction zone decreased, resulting in less damping of vorticity due to dilatation. In addition, unburned reactants were entrained into the recirculation zone due to the injection of discrete liquid fuel jets in close proximity to the wake. This

  11. Clean Photothermal Heating and Controlled Release from Near-Infrared Dye Doped Nanoparticles without Oxygen Photosensitization.

    PubMed

    Guha, Samit; Shaw, Scott K; Spence, Graeme T; Roland, Felicia M; Smith, Bradley D

    2015-07-21

    The photothermal heating and release properties of biocompatible organic nanoparticles, doped with a near-infrared croconaine (Croc) dye, were compared with analogous nanoparticles doped with the common near-infrared dyes ICG and IR780. Separate formulations of lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles and liposomes, each containing Croc dye, absorbed strongly at 808 nm and generated clean laser-induced heating (no production of (1)O2 and no photobleaching of the dye). In contrast, laser-induced heating of nanoparticles containing ICG or IR780 produced reactive (1)O2, leading to bleaching of the dye and also decomposition of coencapsulated payload such as the drug doxorubicin. Croc dye was especially useful as a photothermal agent for laser-controlled release of chemically sensitive payload from nanoparticles. Solution state experiments demonstrated repetitive fractional release of water-soluble fluorescent dye from the interior of thermosensitive liposomes. Additional experiments used a focused laser beam to control leakage from immobilized liposomes with very high spatial and temporal precision. The results indicate that fractional photothermal leakage from nanoparticles doped with Croc dye is a promising method for a range of controlled release applications.

  12. Impact of heat release on strain rate field in turbulent premixed Bunsen flames

    DOE PAGES

    Coriton, Bruno Rene Leon; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2016-08-10

    The effects of combustion on the strain rate field are investigated in turbulent premixed CH4/air Bunsen flames using simultaneous tomographic PIV and OH LIF measurements. Tomographic PIV provides three-dimensional velocity measurements, from which the complete strain rate tensor is determined. The OH LIF measurements are used to determine the position of the flame surface and the flame-normal orientation within the imaging plane. This combination of diagnostic techniques enables quantification of divergence as well as flame-normal and tangential strain rates, which are otherwise biased using only planar measurements. Measurements are compared in three lean-to-stoichiometric flames that have different amounts of heatmore » release and Damköhler numbers greater than unity. The effects of heat release on the principal strain rates and their alignment relative to the local flame normal are analyzed. The extensive strain rate preferentially aligns with the flame normal in the reaction zone, which has been indicated by previous studies. The strength of this alignment increases with increasing heat release and, as a result, the flame-normal strain rate becomes highly extensive. These effects are associated with the gas expansion normal to the flame surface, which is largest for the stoichiometric flame. In the preheat zone, the compressive strain rate has a tendency to align with the flame normal. Away from the flame front, the flame – strain rate alignment is arbitrary in both the reactants and products. The flame-tangential strain rate is on average positive across the flame front, and therefore the turbulent strain rate field contributes to the enhancement of scalar gradients as in passive scalar turbulence. As a result, increases in heat release result in larger positive values of the divergence as well as flame-normal and tangential strain rates, the tangential strain rate has a weaker dependence on heat release than the flame-normal strain rate and the

  13. Combustion instability and active control: Alternative fuels, augmentors, and modeling heat release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sammy Ace

    Experimental and analytical studies were conducted to explore thermo-acoustic coupling during the onset of combustion instability in various air-breathing combustor configurations. These include a laboratory-scale 200-kW dump combustor and a 100-kW augmentor featuring a v-gutter flame holder. They were used to simulate main combustion chambers and afterburners in aero engines, respectively. The three primary themes of this work includes: 1) modeling heat release fluctuations for stability analysis, 2) conducting active combustion control with alternative fuels, and 3) demonstrating practical active control for augmentor instability suppression. The phenomenon of combustion instabilities remains an unsolved problem in propulsion engines, mainly because of the difficulty in predicting the fluctuating component of heat release without extensive testing. A hybrid model was developed to describe both the temporal and spatial variations in dynamic heat release, using a separation of variables approach that requires only a limited amount of experimental data. The use of sinusoidal basis functions further reduced the amount of data required. When the mean heat release behavior is known, the only experimental data needed for detailed stability analysis is one instantaneous picture of heat release at the peak pressure phase. This model was successfully tested in the dump combustor experiments, reproducing the correct sign of the overall Rayleigh index as well as the remarkably accurate spatial distribution pattern of fluctuating heat release. Active combustion control was explored for fuel-flexible combustor operation using twelve different jet fuels including bio-synthetic and Fischer-Tropsch types. Analysis done using an actuated spray combustion model revealed that the combustion response times of these fuels were similar. Combined with experimental spray characterizations, this suggested that controller performance should remain effective with various alternative fuels

  14. Residual resistance of 2D and 3D structures and Joule heat release.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, V L; Kozub, V I

    2011-06-22

    We consider a residual resistance and Joule heat release in 2D nanostructures as well as in ordinary 3D conductors. We assume that elastic scattering of conduction electrons by lattice defects is predominant. Within a rather intricate situation in such systems we discuss in detail two cases. (1) The elastic scattering alone (i.e. without regard of inelastic mechanisms of scattering) leads to a transition of the mechanical energy (stored by the electrons under the action of an electric field) into heat in a traditional way. This process can be described by the Boltzmann equation where it is possible to do the configuration averaging over defect positions in the electron-impurity collision term. The corresponding conditions are usually met in metals. (2) The elastic scattering can be considered with the help of the standard electron-impurity collision integral only in combination with some additional averaging procedure (possibly including inelastic scattering or some mechanisms of electron wavefunction phase destruction). This situation is typical for degenerate semiconductors with a high concentration of dopants and conduction electrons. Quite often, heat release can be observed via transfer of heat to the lattice, i.e. via inelastic processes of electron-phonon collisions and can take place at distances much larger than the size of the device. However, a direct heating of the electron system can be registered too by, for instance, local measurements of the current noise or direct measurement of an electron distribution function.

  15. Impact of Cloud Model Microphysics on Passive Microwave Retrievals of Cloud Properties. Part II: Uncertainty in Rain, Hydrometeor Structure, and Latent Heating Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eun-Kyoung; Biggerstaff, Michael I.

    2006-07-01

    The impact of model microphysics on the retrieval of cloud properties based on passive microwave observations was examined using a three-dimensional, nonhydrostatic, adaptive-grid cloud model to simulate a mesoscale convective system over ocean. Two microphysical schemes, based on similar bulk two-class liquid and three-class ice parameterizations, were used to simulate storms with differing amounts of supercooled cloud water typical of both the tropical oceanic environment, in which there is little supercooled cloud water, and midlatitude continental environments in which supercooled cloud water is more plentiful. For convective surface-level rain rates, the uncertainty varied between 20% and 60% depending on which combination of passive and active microwave observations was used in the retrieval. The uncertainty in surface rain rate did not depend on the microphysical scheme or the parameter settings except for retrievals over stratiform regions based on 85-GHz brightness temperatures TB alone or 85-GHz TB and radar reflectivity combined. In contrast, systematic differences in the treatment of the production of cloud water, cloud ice, and snow between the parameterization schemes coupled with the low correlation between those properties and the passive microwave TB examined here led to significant differences in the uncertainty in retrievals of those cloud properties and latent heating. The variability in uncertainty of hydrometeor structure and latent heating associated with the different microphysical parameterizations exceeded the inherent variability in TB cloud property relations. This was true at the finescales of the cloud model as well as at scales consistent with satellite footprints in which the inherent variability in TB cloud property relations are reduced by area averaging.

  16. Heat produces uteroplacental circulatory disturbance in pregnant rats through action of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH).

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Nagase, H; Ogino, K; Hatta, K; Matsuzaki, I

    2000-01-01

    There is some evidence showing an existence of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and opioid peptides, including beta-endorphin (betaEP), in human placenta, whereas physiological roles of the placental peptides in response to stress remain to be elucidated. To clarify the involvement of CRH and opioid system in the uteroplacental circulation in the pregnant rats exposed to heat, we examined the effects of heat and intravenous administration of CRH receptor antagonist alpha-helical CRH (9-41) on the uteroplacental blood flow, as well as blood CRH, and blood and placental betaEP in pregnant rats. Heat did not change uterine blood flow in virgin rats, but reduced uteroplacental blood flow in pregnant rats. The reduced uteroplacental blood flow induced by heat in pregnant rats was reversed by the administration of alpha-helical CRH. Independent of the status of pregnancy, heat increased blood CRH, which was not reversed by alpha-helical CRH. Although heat did not change placental betaEP, alpha-helical CRH reduced blood and placenta betaEP in pregnant rats. These results suggest that the uteroplacental circulatory disturbance caused by heat is mediated by CRH, possibly through the involvement of CRH receptor in rat placenta. The placental opioid system seems unlikely to be involved in the mediation of uteroplacental circulation.

  17. Key Role of Effector Memory CD4+ T Lymphocytes in a Short-Incubation Heparin-Binding Hemagglutinin Gamma Interferon Release Assay for the Detection of Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wyndham-Thomas, Chloé; Corbière, Véronique; Dirix, Violette; Smits, Kaatje; Domont, Fanny; Libin, Myriam; Loyens, Marc; Locht, Camille

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in target populations is one of the current WHO strategies for preventing active tuberculosis (TB) infection and reducing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis reservoir. Therefore, powerful LTBI screening tools are indispensable. A gamma interferon release assay (IGRA) in response to the stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by the latency antigen native heparin-binding hemagglutinin (nHBHA-IGRA) has proven its potential for this purpose. We have evaluated its possible optimization through a reduction of incubation time from 96 to 24 h, while compensating for this by adding interleukin 7 (IL-7) to the medium. We have also investigated the phenotypes of the gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells after both short and long incubation times. One hundred thirty-one nonimmunocompromised patients were recruited from 3 Brussels-based university hospitals. They were divided into 1 of 4 subgroups according to their M. tuberculosis infection status (LTBI, TB infection, undetermined M. tuberculosis infection status, and noninfected controls). The novel 24-h nHBHA-IGRA was performed for all subjects, and a simultaneous 96-h classical HBHA-IGRA was performed for 79 individuals. The results showed a good correlation between the two tests, and the novel 24-h nHBHA-IGRA maintained the principal advantages of the classical test, namely, a high specificity for LTBI diagnosis, an absence of interference of Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination during infancy, and a relative discrimination between LTBI and TB infection. Whereas the commercialized IGRAs show a greater sensitivity for recent than for remote M. tuberculosis infections, the 24-h nHBHA-IGRA appears to have comparable diagnostic powers for recent and remote LTBI. The IFN-γ detected by the 24-h nHBHA-IGRA was mainly secreted by effector memory CD4+ T lymphocytes, a finding suggestive of continuous HBHA presentation during latency. PMID:24391135

  18. The Clinical Usefulness of Tuberculin Skin Test versus Interferon-Gamma Release Assays for Diagnosis of Latent Tuberculosis in HIV Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ayubi, Erfan; Doosti-Irani, Amin; Sanjari Moghaddam, Ali; Sani, Mohadeseh; Nazarzadeh, Milad; Mostafavi, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is becoming increasingly concerning due to the increasing the HIV epidemic, which have increased the risk for reactivation to active tuberculosis (TB) infection. LTBI is diagnosed by tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs). Objectives The aim of the present study was to conduct a meta-analysis of published papers on the agreement (kappa) between TST and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) tests for diagnosis of LTBI in HIV patient. Methods Electronic databases including PubMed/Medline, Elsevier/Scopus and Embase/Ovid were reviewed up Jan. 2016. We performed a random effect model meta-analysis for estimation of pooled Kappa between the two methods of diagnosis. Meta regression was used for assessing potential heterogeneity and Egger’s test was used for assessing small study effect and publication bias. Results The initial search strategy produced 6744 records. Of them, 23 cross-sectional studies met the inclusion criteria and 20 studies entered in meta-analysis. The pooled kappa was and prevalence-adjusted and bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK) were 0.37 (95% CI: 0.28, 0.46) and 0.59 (0.49, 0.69). The discordance of TST-/QFT-GIT+ was more than TST+/QFT-GIT-. Kappa estimate between two tests was linearly associated with age and prevalence index and inversely associated with bias index. Conclusion Fair agreement between TST and QFT-GIT makes it difficult to know whether TST is as useful as the QFT-GIT in HIV-infected patients. The higher discordance of TST-/QFT-GIT+ in compared to TST+/QFT-GIT- can induce the higher sensitivity of QFT-GIT for diagnosis LTBI in HIV patients. Disagreement between two tests can be influenced by error in measurements and prevalence of HIV. PMID:27622293

  19. Screening of latent tuberculosis infection by interferon-γ release assays in rheumatic patients: a systemic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Qiaoling; Zhang, Shu; Ai, Jingwen; Shao, Lingyun; Zhang, Wenhong

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the diagnostic value of interferon-γ release assays (IGRAs) for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients with rheumatic disease before receiving biologic agents. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were used for searching studies concerning the evaluation on the performance of IGRAs [QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G), QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) and T-SPOT.TB] in rheumatic patients before biological therapy. After assessing the quality of all studies included in the review, we summarized the results in subgroups using forest plots and calculated pooled estimates if applicable. The search identified 11 studies with a total sample size of 1940 individuals. Compared with the tuberculin skin test (TST), the pooled agreements in QFT-G/GIT and T-SPOT.TB were 72 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 65, 78 %) and 75 % (95 % CI 67, 83 %), respectively. BCG vaccination was positively correlated with positive rates of TST (pooled odds ratio (OR) 1.64, 95 % CI 1.06, 2.53). Compared with TST, IGRAs were better associated with the presentence of one or more tuberculosis (TB) risk factors. Neither steroid nor disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) significantly affect positive IGRA results. In contrast, TST positivity was significantly impacted by the use of steroid (pooled OR 0.45, 95 % CI 0.30, 0.69), but less significantly by the use of DMARDs (pooled OR 0.78, 95 % CI 0.50, 1.21). In conclusion, in rheumatic patients with previous BCG vaccination or currently on steroid therapy, IGRAs would be the better choice to identify LTBI by decreasing the false-positivity and false-negativity rate compared with conventional TST.

  20. Interferon gamma mRNA quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis: a novel interferon gamma release assay.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunghyun; Kim, Young Keun; Lee, Hyejon; Cho, Jang-Eun; Kim, Hyo Youl; Uh, Young; Kim, Young Mi; Kim, Hyunjung; Cho, Sang-Nae; Jeon, Bo-Young; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2013-01-01

    The interferon gamma (IFN-γ) release assay (IGRA) is widely used as a diagnostic method for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). The QuantiFERON-TB Gold and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-tube (QFT-IT) tests measure plasma IFN-γ levels using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and T-SPOT.TB counts IFN-γ-producing cells using enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay. IFN-γ mRNA was evaluated as an indicator of IGRA in comparison with QFT-IT IFN-γ ELISA in 46 subjects with active TB and in 73 at low risk for TB. Significant IFN-γ mRNA expression was detected from 30 min and peaked 4 h after stimulation with MTB antigens or mitogen. This was defined as the optimal time point for IFN-γ mRNA real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The sensitivities of IFN-γ mRNA real-time PCR and IFN-γ ELISA were 84.8% (39/46) and 89.1% (41/46), respectively (no significant difference). Although the specificities of IFN-γ ELISA was 4.1% higher than that of IFN-γ mRNA real-time PCR (60.3% versus 56.2%), the difference was not statistically significant. The overall agreement between IFN-γ mRNA real-time PCR and IFN-γ ELISA was 79.8% (kappa = 0.475). Whilst there was no difference in the performance of IFN-γ mRNA real-time PCR and IFN-γ ELISA, IFN-γ mRNA real-time PCR was superior to IFN-γ ELISA in terms of the time required for detection of MTB infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Screening for latent tuberculosis infection in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis: discrepancies between tuberculin skin test and interferon-γ release assay results.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Félicie; de Carvalho Bittencourt, Marcelo; Rat, Anne-Christine; Loeuille, Damien; Dintinger, Hervé; Béné, Marie C; Faure, Gilbert; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle

    2013-12-01

    Screening for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is mandatory before initiating biologics in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIA). However, few studies have evaluated the discrepancies between the results of tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-γ release assays (IGRA) in these patients. The purpose of our study was to investigate factors associated with TST and IGRA results in a large cohort of patients with CIA before the introduction of biologics. A total of 563 consecutive patients with CIA (293 rheumatoid arthritis, 270 spondyloarthritis) and eligible for biologics were prospectively enrolled. Demographic, clinical, and biological data were recorded. Risk factors for LTBI were assessed. All patients underwent a TST, a chest radiograph, and an IGRA test (T-SPOT.TB). Agreement between the 2 tests was low (κ = 0.16). The bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) status was significantly associated with discordance between the 2 tests (p = 0.004). The TST positivity rate was 34.8%. Factors associated with a negative TST were female sex (p = 0.02) and immunosuppressive treatment (p = 0.003). The only LTBI risk factor associated with TST positivity was an abnormal chest radiograph (p = 0.02). T-SPOT.TB was positive in 21.7% of patients and indeterminate in 15.6%. Previous active TB and chest radiograph abnormalities were associated with IGRA positivity (p = 0.008 and p = 3.9 × 10(-5), respectively). The BCG vaccination was associated with negative IGRA (p = 3 × 10(-4)). Indeterminate IGRA results were associated with age, C-reactive protein, and immunosuppressive treatment (p = 0.005, 0.007, and 0.004, respectively). Our data support the combined use of T-SPOT.TB and TST in patients with CIA before biologics introduction. However, despite these good diagnostic values, indeterminate results may complicate the use of IGRA.

  2. Effect of immunosuppressive therapy on interferon γ release assay for latent tuberculosis screening in patients with autoimmune diseases: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sunny H; Gao, Qinyan; Tsoi, Kelvin K F; Wu, William K K; Tam, Lai-shan; Lee, Nelson; Chan, Francis K L; Wu, Justin C Y; Sung, Joseph J Y; Ng, Siew C

    2016-01-01

    Interferon γ release assay (IGRA) is commonly used to diagnose latent TB infection (LTBI). Immunosuppressive therapy may affect its performance but data are conflicting. We aimed to determine the effect of immunosuppressive therapy on the performance of IGRA in patients with autoimmune diseases. We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library up to December 2014. We included studies that reported the IGRA results in patients with autoimmune disease with or without immunosuppressive therapy. The pooled effect of immunosuppressive therapy on IGRA was estimated using a Peto fixed-effects model. We included 17 studies with 3197 participants in the meta-analysis. Among the subjects, 71.5% were taking immunosuppressive therapy and 56.7% had received Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination. Compared with patients not on immunosuppressants, patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy were less likely to have a positive IGRA result (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.53 to 0.83, I(2)=23%), especially patients receiving anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) treatment (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.88). The use of immunosuppressive therapy was also associated with a lower rate of positive tuberculin skin test result (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.61). Our meta-analysis showed that IGRA results are negatively affected by immunosuppressive therapy. IGRA alone may not be sufficiently sensitive to diagnose LTBI in patients on immunosuppressive therapy. Patients should preferably be screened for LTBI before initiation of immunosuppressive therapy, especially before anti-TNF therapy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Living donor and recipient screening for latent tuberculosis infection by tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma releasing assay in a country with an intermediate burden of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Song Mi; Park, In-Ah; Kim, Sun-Mi; Park, Su-Jin; Jung, Joo Hee; Kim, Young Hoon; Park, Jae Berm; Hong, Bumsik; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee; Park, Su-Kil; Lee, Sang Koo; Park, Jung Sik; Han, Duck Jong; Kim, Sung-Han

    2013-10-01

    There are few data on donor screening for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) using the tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma releasing assay (IGRA). In South Korea, most renal allografts involve living donors (average, 80%). Hence, we have an opportunity to evaluate donor and recipient screening for LTBI by TST and IGRA. All donors and recipients admitted for kidney transplantation during a 20-month period were evaluated prospectively by using TST and Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assay. The study population consisted of 205 living donor-recipient pairs (≥16 years) including 15 (7%) who yielded indeterminate donor or recipient ELISPOT results. Of the 205 donors, 63 (31%) gave a positive TST ≥5 mm, 33 (16%) a positive TST ≥10 mm, and 96 (47%) a positive ELISPOT. Of the 205 recipients, 9 (5%) gave a positive TST ≥5 mm, 3 (2%) a positive TST ≥10 mm, and 79 (39%) had a positive ELISPOT. Of the 205 donor-recipient pairs, only 59 (29%) gave negative donor and recipient ELISPOT results and 139 (68%) negative donor and recipient TSTs (<5 mm) (P < 0.001). One third of donor-recipient pairs tends to be positive in the TST, and two thirds of the donor-recipient pairs tends to be positive in the ELISPOT. Given the high positive rate of LTBI obtained by screening donors, further studies on the clinical value of solid organ transplant donors with positive TST or ELISPOT and health economics analysis in countries with intermediate burden of TB are needed for policy decisions on isoniazid (INH) prophylaxis.

  4. Activated platelets release sphingosine 1-phosphate and induce hypersensitivity to noxious heat stimuli in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Weth, Daniela; Benetti, Camilla; Rauch, Caroline; Gstraunthaler, Gerhard; Schmidt, Helmut; Geisslinger, Gerd; Sabbadini, Roger; Proia, Richard L.; Kress, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    At the site of injury activated platelets release various mediators, one of which is sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). It was the aim of this study to explore whether activated human platelets had a pronociceptive effect in an in vivo mouse model and whether this effect was based on the release of S1P and subsequent activation of neuronal S1P receptors 1 or 3. Human platelets were prepared in different concentrations (105/μl, 106/μl, 107/μl) and assessed in mice with different genetic backgrounds (WT, S1P1fl/fl, SNS-S1P1−/−, S1P3−/−). Intracutaneous injections of activated human platelets induced a significant, dose-dependent hypersensitivity to noxious thermal stimulation. The degree of heat hypersensitivity correlated with the platelet concentration as well as the platelet S1P content and the amount of S1P released upon platelet activation as measured with LC MS/MS. Despite the significant correlations between S1P and platelet count, no difference in paw withdrawal latency (PWL) was observed in mice with a global null mutation of the S1P3 receptor or a conditional deletion of the S1P1 receptor in nociceptive primary afferents. Furthermore, neutralization of S1P with a selective anti-S1P antibody did not abolish platelet induced heat hypersensitivity. Our results suggest that activated platelets release S1P and induce heat hypersensitivity in vivo. However, the platelet induced heat hypersensitivity was caused by mediators other than S1P. PMID:25954148

  5. Heat release and flame structure measurements of self-excited acoustically-driven premixed methane flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp-Vaughan, Kristin M.; Tuttle, Steven G.; Renfro, Michael W.; King, Galen B.

    2009-10-15

    An open-open organ pipe burner (Rijke tube) with a bluff-body ring was used to create a self-excited, acoustically-driven, premixed methane-air conical flame, with equivalence ratios ranging from 0.85 to 1.05. The feed tube velocities corresponded to Re = 1780-4450. Coupled oscillations in pressure, velocity, and heat release from the flame are naturally encouraged at resonant frequencies in the Rijke tube combustor. This coupling creates sustainable self-excited oscillations in flame front area and shape. The period of the oscillations occur at the resonant frequency of the combustion chamber when the flame is placed {proportional_to}1/4 of the distance from the bottom of the tube. In this investigation, the shape of these acoustically-driven flames is measured by employing both OH planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and chemiluminescence imaging and the images are correlated to simultaneously measured pressure in the combustor. Past research on acoustically perturbed flames has focused on qualitative flame area and heat release relationships under imposed velocity perturbations at imposed frequencies. This study reports quantitative empirical fits with respect to pressure or phase angle in a self-generated pressure oscillation. The OH-PLIF images were single temporal shots and the chemiluminescence images were phase averaged on chip, such that 15 exposures were used to create one image. Thus, both measurements were time resolved during the flame oscillation. Phase-resolved area and heat release variations throughout the pressure oscillation were computed. A relation between flame area and the phase angle before the pressure maximum was derived for all flames in order to quantitatively show that the Rayleigh criterion was satisfied in the combustor. Qualitative trends in oscillating flame area were found with respect to feed tube flow rates. A logarithmic relation was found between the RMS pressure and both the normalized average area and heat release rate

  6. Effects of heat release on the structure and stability of a coflowing, chemically reacting jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahalingam, S.; Cantwell, B. J.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown how linear stability analysis and full simulations can be used to study the stability and structure of reacting flows. The small effect of gravity on steady laminar flame heights can be modeled if allowance is made for the density variations due to heat release. It is found that cold transitional jet simulations yield perturbation growth rates which are consistent with the predictions of the inviscid stability theory.

  7. A fast and powerful release mechanism based on pulse heating of shape memory wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malka, Yoav; Shilo, Doron

    2017-09-01

    This article presents a novel actuator and a new concept for a release mechanism that are especially useful in applications that require fast motion of large masses over long distances. The actuator is based on ultra-fast pulse heating of NiTi wires, which provide a unique combination of large work per volume, short response time and enhanced energy efficiency. The release mechanism utilizes the fast and powerful actuator to form conditions in which the latch (safety pin) moves faster than the deployed device. As a result, the contact between these two masses is disconnected and the resulting friction forces are decreased to approximately zero. The actuator and release mechanism address the two major drawbacks of conventional shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators: slow actuation time and low energy efficiency. Using a dedicated setup, the experimental results validate the disconnection between the masses and map the effects of several variables on the performance of the actuator and release mechanism. In particular, we map the energetic efficiency and find the optimal operating conditions for a successful release using a minimal amount of input energy. At the optimal conditions, the actuator response time and the consumed input energy are smaller by an order of magnitude with respect to performances of previous SMA-based release mechanisms with comparable requirements.

  8. The heat released during catalytic turnover enhances the diffusion of an enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, Clement; Gabizon, Ronen; Wilson, Christian A. M.; Hamadani, Kambiz; Tsekouras, Konstantinos; Marqusee, Susan; Pressé, Steve; Bustamante, Carlos

    2014-12-10

    Recent studies have shown that the diffusivity of enzymes increases in a substrate-dependent manner during catalysis. Although this observation has been reported and characterized for several different systems, the precise origin of this phenomenon is unknown. Calorimetric methods are often used to determine enthalpies from enzyme-catalysed reactions and can therefore provide important insight into their reaction mechanisms. The ensemble averages involved in traditional bulk calorimetry cannot probe the transient effects that the energy exchanged in a reaction may have on the catalyst. Here we obtain single-molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy data and analyse them within the framework of a stochastic theory to demonstrate a mechanistic link between the enhanced diffusion of a single enzyme molecule and the heat released in the reaction. We propose that the heat released during catalysis generates an asymmetric pressure wave that results in a differential stress at the protein-solvent interface that transiently displaces the centre-of-mass of the enzyme (chemoacoustic effect). We find this novel perspective on how enzymes respond to the energy released during catalysis suggests a possible effect of the heat of reaction on the structural integrity and internal degrees of freedom of the enzyme.

  9. Effect of heat release on the stability of compressible reacting mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Dong-Shin; Ferziger, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    Reacting free shear layers are of fundamental importance in many industrial systems including gas turbine combustors and rockets. Efficient propulsion systems are essential for air breathing supersonic ramjets in the high Mach number range. A limiting factor in these engines is the time for fuel and oxidizer to mix in the combustion chamber; for fast mixing, the flow must be vigorously turbulent which requires the laminar flow to be unstable. Understanding the stability characteristics of compressible reacting free shear layers is, therefore, very important and may allow one to control the flow. Low speed shear layers are highly unstable but, as chemical reaction and compressibility effects tend to stabilize them, it is important to investigate the stability of high speed reacting mixing layers. The latter consists of two fluid streams containing fuel and oxidizer respectively, and the conclusions are expected to apply, with quantitative modifications, to other shear flows, e.g., jets. Since low speed reacting cases have been studied earlier, we concentrate on the effects of Mach number and heat release. We are primarily interested in solving the stability problem over a large range of Mach number and heat release. In order to understand the effect of the heat release on the stability of this flow, one must first study the characteristics of the non-reacting flow. Inviscid theory is a reliable guide for understanding stability of compressible shear flows at moderate and large Reynolds numbers and is the basis for this work.

  10. The heat released during catalytic turnover enhances the diffusion of an enzyme.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Clement; Gabizon, Ronen; Wilson, Christian A M; Hamadani, Kambiz; Tsekouras, Konstantinos; Marqusee, Susan; Pressé, Steve; Bustamante, Carlos

    2015-01-08

    Recent studies have shown that the diffusivity of enzymes increases in a substrate-dependent manner during catalysis. Although this observation has been reported and characterized for several different systems, the precise origin of this phenomenon is unknown. Calorimetric methods are often used to determine enthalpies from enzyme-catalysed reactions and can therefore provide important insight into their reaction mechanisms. The ensemble averages involved in traditional bulk calorimetry cannot probe the transient effects that the energy exchanged in a reaction may have on the catalyst. Here we obtain single-molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy data and analyse them within the framework of a stochastic theory to demonstrate a mechanistic link between the enhanced diffusion of a single enzyme molecule and the heat released in the reaction. We propose that the heat released during catalysis generates an asymmetric pressure wave that results in a differential stress at the protein-solvent interface that transiently displaces the centre-of-mass of the enzyme (chemoacoustic effect). This novel perspective on how enzymes respond to the energy released during catalysis suggests a possible effect of the heat of reaction on the structural integrity and internal degrees of freedom of the enzyme.

  11. The heat released during catalytic turnover enhances the diffusion of an enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Clement; Gabizon, Ronen; Wilson, Christian A. M.; Hamadani, Kambiz; Tsekouras, Konstantinos; Marqusee, Susan; Pressé, Steve; Bustamante, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the diffusivity of enzymes increases in a substrate-dependent manner during catalysis1,2. Although this observation has been reported and characterized for several different systems3–10, the precise origin of this phenomenon is unknown. Calorimetric methods are often used to determine enthalpies from enzyme-catalysed reactions and can therefore provide important insight into their reaction mechanisms11,12. The ensemble averages involved in traditional bulk calorimetry cannot probe the transient effects that the energy exchanged in a reaction may have on the catalyst. Here we obtain single-molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy data and analyse them within the framework of a stochastic theory to demonstrate a mechanistic link between the enhanced diffusion of a single enzyme molecule and the heat released in the reaction. We propose that the heat released during catalysis generates an asymmetric pressure wave that results in a differential stress at the protein–solvent interface that transiently displaces the centre-of-mass of the enzyme (chemoacoustic effect). This novel perspective on how enzymes respond to the energy released during catalysis suggests a possible effect of the heat of reaction on the structural integrity and internal degrees of freedom of the enzyme. PMID:25487146

  12. The heat released during catalytic turnover enhances the diffusion of an enzyme

    DOE PAGES

    Riedel, Clement; Gabizon, Ronen; Wilson, Christian A. M.; ...

    2014-12-10

    Recent studies have shown that the diffusivity of enzymes increases in a substrate-dependent manner during catalysis. Although this observation has been reported and characterized for several different systems, the precise origin of this phenomenon is unknown. Calorimetric methods are often used to determine enthalpies from enzyme-catalysed reactions and can therefore provide important insight into their reaction mechanisms. The ensemble averages involved in traditional bulk calorimetry cannot probe the transient effects that the energy exchanged in a reaction may have on the catalyst. Here we obtain single-molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy data and analyse them within the framework of a stochastic theorymore » to demonstrate a mechanistic link between the enhanced diffusion of a single enzyme molecule and the heat released in the reaction. We propose that the heat released during catalysis generates an asymmetric pressure wave that results in a differential stress at the protein-solvent interface that transiently displaces the centre-of-mass of the enzyme (chemoacoustic effect). We find this novel perspective on how enzymes respond to the energy released during catalysis suggests a possible effect of the heat of reaction on the structural integrity and internal degrees of freedom of the enzyme.« less

  13. Species production and heat release rates in two-layered natural gas fires

    SciTech Connect

    Zukoski, E.E.; Morehart, J.H.; Kubota, T.; Toner, S.J. )

    1991-02-01

    A fire burning in an enclosure with restricted ventilation will result in the accumulation of a layer of warm products of combustion mixed with entrained air adjacent to the ceiling. For many conditions, the depth of this layer will extend to occupy a significant fraction of the volume of the room. Eventually, the interface between this vitiated ceiling layer and the uncontaminated environment below will position itself so that a large portion of the combustion processes occur in this vitiated layer. A description is given of experimental work concerning the rates of formation of product species and heat release in a turbulent, buoyant natural gas diffusion flame burning in this two-layered configuration. The enclosure was modeled by placing a hood above a burner so that it accumulated the plume gases, and the unsteady development of the ceiling layer was modeled by the direct addition of air into the upper portion of the hood. Measurements of the composition of these gases allowed the computation of stoichiometries and heat release rates. These investigations showed that the species produced in the flame depend primarily on the stoichiometry of the gases present in the ceiling layer and weakly on the temperature of the layer, but are independent of the fuel pair ratio of the mass transported into the layer by the plume. Heat release rates in the fires were compared to a theoretical limit based on a stoichiometric reaction of fuel and air with excess components left unchanged by the combustion.

  14. Bacterial Infection Elicits Heat Shock Protein 72 Release from Pleural Mesothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Varano della Vergiliana, Julius F.; Lansley, Sally M.; Porcel, Jose M.; Bielsa, Silvia; Brown, Jeremy S.; Creaney, Jenette; Temple, Suzanna E. L.; Waterer, Grant W.; Lee, Y. C. Gary

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) has been implicated in infection-related processes and has been found in body fluids during infection. This study aimed to determine whether pleural mesothelial cells release HSP70 in response to bacterial infection in vitro and in mouse models of serosal infection. In addition, the in vitro cytokine effects of the HSP70 isoform, Hsp72, on mesothelial cells were examined. Further, Hsp72 was measured in human pleural effusions and levels compared between non-infectious and infectious patients to determine the diagnostic accuracy of pleural fluid Hsp72 compared to traditional pleural fluid parameters. We showed that mesothelial release of Hsp72 was significantly raised when cells were treated with live and heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae. In mice, intraperitoneal injection of S. pneumoniae stimulated a 2-fold increase in Hsp72 levels in peritoneal lavage (p<0.01). Extracellular Hsp72 did not induce or inhibit mediator release from cultured mesothelial cells. Hsp72 levels were significantly higher in effusions of infectious origin compared to non-infectious effusions (p<0.05). The data establish that pleural mesothelial cells can release Hsp72 in response to bacterial infection and levels are raised in infectious pleural effusions. The biological role of HSP70 in pleural infection warrants exploration. PMID:23704948

  15. Heat-Induced Release of Epigenetic Silencing Reveals the Concealed Role of an Imprinted Plant Gene

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Diego H.; Paszkowski, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms suppress the transcription of transposons and DNA repeats; however, this suppression can be transiently released under prolonged heat stress. Here we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana imprinted gene SDC, which is silent during vegetative growth due to DNA methylation, is activated by heat and contributes to recovery from stress. SDC activation seems to involve epigenetic mechanisms but not canonical heat-shock perception and signaling. The heat-mediated transcriptional induction of SDC occurs particularly in young developing leaves and is proportional to the level of stress. However, this occurs only above a certain window of absolute temperatures and, thus, resembles a thermal-sensing mechanism. In addition, the re-silencing kinetics during recovery can be entrained by repeated heat stress cycles, suggesting that epigenetic regulation in plants may conserve memory of stress experience. We further demonstrate that SDC contributes to the recovery of plant biomass after stress. We propose that transcriptional gene silencing, known to be involved in gene imprinting, is also co-opted in the specific tuning of SDC expression upon heat stress and subsequent recovery. It is therefore possible that dynamic properties of the epigenetic landscape associated with silenced or imprinted genes may contribute to regulation of their expression in response to environmental challenges. PMID:25411840

  16. Gas dynamics of heat-release-induced waves in supercritical fluids: revisiting the Piston Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorino, Mario Tindaro; Scalo, Carlo

    2016-11-01

    We investigate a gasdynamic approach to the modeling of heat-release-induced compression waves in supercritical fluids. We rely on highly resolved one-dimensional fully compressible Navier-Stokes simulations of CO2 at pseudo-boiling conditions in a closed duct inspired by the experiments of Miura et al.. Near-critical fluids exhibit anomalous variations of thermodynamic variables taken into account by adopting the Peng-Robinson equation of state and Chung's Method. An idealized heat source is applied, away from the boundaries, resulting in the generation of compression waves followed by contact discontinuities bounding a region of hot expanding fluid. For higher heat-release rates such compressions are coalescent with distinct shock-like features (i.e. non-isentropicity and propagation Mach numbers measurably greater than unity) and a non-uniform post-shock state, not present in ideal gas simulations, caused by the highly nonlinear equation of state. Thermoacoustic effects are limited to: (1) a one-way/one-time thermal-to-acoustic energy conversion, and (2) cumulative non-isentropic bulk heating due to the resonating compression waves, resulting in what is commonly referred to as the Piston Effect.

  17. Models to predict both sensible and latent heat transfer in the respiratory tract of Morada Nova sheep under semiarid tropical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Vinícius Carvalho; Saraiva, Edilson Paes; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; Nascimento, Carolina Cardoso Nagib; da Silva, Josinaldo Araújo; Pereira, Walter Esfraim; Filho, Edgard Cavalcanti Pimenta; Almeida, Maria Elivânia Vieira

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to build a prediction model both sensible and latent heat transfer by respiratory tract for Morada Nova sheep under field conditions in a semiarid tropical environment, using easily measured physiological and environmental parameters. Twelve dry Morada Nova ewes with an average of 3 ± 1.2 years old and average body weight of 32.76 ± 3.72 kg were used in a Latin square design 12 × 12 (12 days of records and 12 schedules). Tidal volume, respiratory rate, expired air temperature, and partial vapor pressure of the expired air were obtained from the respiratory facial mask and using a physiological measurement system. Ewes were evaluated from 0700 to 1900 h in each day under shade. A simple nonlinear model to estimate tidal volume as a function of respiratory rate was developed. Equation to estimate the expired air temperature was built, and the ambient air temperature was the best predictor together with relative humidity and ambient vapor pressure. In naturalized Morada Nova sheep, respiratory convection seems to be a mechanism of heat transfer of minor importance even under mild air temperature. Evaporation from the respiratory system increased together with ambient air temperature. At ambient air temperature, up to 35 °C respiratory evaporation accounted 90 % of the total heat lost by respiratory system, on average. Models presented here allow to estimate the heat flow from the respiratory tract for Morada Nova sheep bred in tropical region, using easily measured physiological and environmental traits as respiratory rate, ambient air temperature, and relative humidity.

  18. Models to predict both sensible and latent heat transfer in the respiratory tract of Morada Nova sheep under semiarid tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Vinícius Carvalho; Saraiva, Edilson Paes; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; Nascimento, Carolina Cardoso Nagib; da Silva, Josinaldo Araújo; Pereira, Walter Esfraim; Filho, Edgard Cavalcanti Pimenta; Almeida, Maria Elivânia Vieira

    2016-10-10

    The aim of this study was to build a prediction model both sensible and latent heat transfer by respiratory tract for Morada Nova sheep under field conditions in a semiarid tropical environment, using easily measured physiological and environmental parameters. Twelve dry Morada Nova ewes with an average of 3 ± 1.2 years old and average body weight of 32.76 ± 3.72 kg were used in a Latin square design 12 × 12 (12 days of records and 12 schedules). Tidal volume, respiratory rate, expired air temperature, and partial vapor pressure of the expired air were obtained from the respiratory facial mask and using a physiological measurement system. Ewes were evaluated from 0700 to 1900 h in each day under shade. A simple nonlinear model to estimate tidal volume as a function of respiratory rate was developed. Equation to estimate the expired air temperature was built, and the ambient air temperature was the best predictor together with relative humidity and ambient vapor pressure. In naturalized Morada Nova sheep, respiratory convection seems to be a mechanism of heat transfer of minor importance even under mild air temperature. Evaporation from the respiratory system increased together with ambient air temperature. At ambient air temperature, up to 35 °C respiratory evaporation accounted 90 % of the total heat lost by respiratory system, on average. Models presented here allow to estimate the heat flow from the respiratory tract for Morada Nova sheep bred in tropical region, using easily measured physiological and environmental traits as respiratory rate, ambient air temperature, and relative humidity.

  19. Models to predict both sensible and latent heat transfer in the respiratory tract of Morada Nova sheep under semiarid tropical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Vinícius Carvalho; Saraiva, Edilson Paes; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; Nascimento, Carolina Cardoso Nagib; da Silva, Josinaldo Araújo; Pereira, Walter Esfraim; Filho, Edgard Cavalcanti Pimenta; Almeida, Maria Elivânia Vieira

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to build a prediction model both sensible and latent heat transfer by respiratory tract for Morada Nova sheep under field conditions in a semiarid tropical environment, using easily measured physiological and environmental parameters. Twelve dry Morada Nova ewes with an average of 3 ± 1.2 years old and average body weight of 32.76 ± 3.72 kg were used in a Latin square design 12 × 12 (12 days of records and 12 schedules). Tidal volume, respiratory rate, expired air temperature, and partial vapor pressure of the expired air were obtained from the respiratory facial mask and using a physiological measurement system. Ewes were evaluated from 0700 to 1900 h in each day under shade. A simple nonlinear model to estimate tidal volume as a function of respiratory rate was developed. Equation to estimate the expired air temperature was built, and the ambient air temperature was the best predictor together with relative humidity and ambient vapor pressure. In naturalized Morada Nova sheep, respiratory convection seems to be a mechanism of heat transfer of minor importance even under mild air temperature. Evaporation from the respiratory system increased together with ambient air temperature. At ambient air temperature, up to 35 °C respiratory evaporation accounted 90 % of the total heat lost by respiratory system, on average. Models presented here allow to estimate the heat flow from the respiratory tract for Morada Nova sheep bred in tropical region, using easily measured physiological and environmental traits as respiratory rate, ambient air temperature, and relative humidity.

  20. An eddy covariance system to characterize the atmospheric surface layer and turbulent latent heat fluxes over a debris-covered Himalayan glacier.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litt, Maxime; Steiner, Jakob F.; Stigter, Emmy E.; Immerzeel, Walter; Shea, Joseph Michael

    2017-04-01

    Over debris-covered glaciers, water content variations in the debris layer can drive significant changes in its thermal conductivity and significantly impact melt rates. Since sublimation and evaporation are favoured in high-altitude conditions, e.g., low atmospheric pressure and high wind speeds, they are expected to strongly influence the water balance of the debris-layer. Dedicated latent heat fluxes measurements at the debris surface are essential to characterize the debris heat conductivity in order to assess underlying ice melt. Furthermore, the contribution of the turbulent fluxes in the surface energy balance over debris covered glacier remains uncertain since they are generally evaluated through similarity methods which might not be valid in complex terrain. We present the first results of a 15-day eddy-covariance experiment installed at the end of the monsoon (September-October) on a 3-m tower above the debris-covered Lirung glacier in Nepal. The tower also included measurements of the 4 radiation components. The eddy covariance measurements allowed for the characterization of the turbulence in the atmospheric surface layer, as well as the direct measurements of evaporation, sublimation and turbulent sensible heat fluxes. The experiment helps us to evaluate the contribution of turbulent fluxes to the surface energy balance over this debris-covered glacier, through a precise characterization of the overlying turbulent atmospheric surface layer. It also helps to study the role of the debris-layer water content changes through evaporation and sublimation and its feedback on heat conduction in this layer. The large observed turbulent fluxes play a significant role in the energy balance at the debris surface and significantly influence debris moisture, conductivity and subsequently underlying ice melt.

  1. Liquid-Phase Heat-Release Rates of the Systems Hydrazine-Nitric Acid and Unsymmetrical Dimethylhydrazine-Nitric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somogyi, Dezso; Feiler, Charles E.

    1960-01-01

    The initial rates of heat release produced by the reactions of hydrazine and unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine with nitric acid were determined in a bomb calorimeter under conditions of forced mixing. Fuel-oxidant weight ratio and injection velocity were varied. The rate of heat release apparently depended on the interfacial area between the propellants. Above a narrow range of injection velocities representing a critical amount of interfacial area, the rates reached a maximum and were almost constant with injection velocity. The maximum rate for hydrazine was about 70 percent greater than that for unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine. The total heat released did not vary with mixture ratio over the range studied.

  2. Application of a bubble column for evaporative cooling and a simple procedure for determining the latent heat of vaporization of aqueous salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Francis, M J; Pashley, R M

    2009-07-09

    In this work we have studied the evaporative cooling effect produced in a continuous flow air bubble column, containing water and salt solutions. We have established that, at equilibrium, a significant reduction in temperature is produced in an insulated, continuous flow, bubble column. For example, with a continuous flow of inlet air at 22 degrees C, a water bubble column cools to about 8 degrees C, at steady state equilibrium. The cooling effect observed in a continuous bubble column of concentrated aqueous salt solution could be used for commercial applications, such as for evaporative cooling systems. We have developed a simple method, based on the steady state thermal energy balance developed in a bubble column, to determine the latent heat of vaporization of the liquid in the column. Only the equilibrium temperature of the bubble column, the temperature of the inlet gas and the hydrostatic pressure across the column need to be measured. This analysis has been used to determine the heat of vaporization for water and some concentrated salt solutions.

  3. Acetylcholine released from cholinergic nerves contributes to cutaneous vasodilation during heat stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibasaki, Manabu; Wilson, Thad E.; Cui, Jian; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) contributes to active cutaneous vasodilation during a heat stress in humans. Given that acetylcholine is released from cholinergic nerves during whole body heating, coupled with evidence that acetylcholine causes vasodilation via NO mechanisms, it is possible that release of acetylcholine in the dermal space contributes to cutaneous vasodilation during a heat stress. To test this hypothesis, in seven subjects skin blood flow (SkBF) and sweat rate were simultaneously monitored over three microdialysis membranes placed in the dermal space of dorsal forearm skin. One membrane was perfused with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine (10 microM), the second membrane was perfused with the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; 10 mM) dissolved in the aforementioned neostigmine solution (l-NAME(Neo)), and the third membrane was perfused with Ringer solution as a control site. Each subject was exposed to approximately 20 min of whole body heating via a water-perfused suit, which increased mean body temperature from 36.4 +/- 0.1 to 37.5 +/- 0.1 degrees C (P < 0.05). After the heat stress, SkBF at each site was normalized to its maximum value, identified by administration of 28 mM sodium nitroprusside. Mean body temperature threshold for cutaneous vasodilation was significantly lower at the neostigmine-treated site relative to the other sites (neostigmine: 36.6 +/- 0.1 degrees C, l-NAME(Neo): 37.1 +/- 0.1 degrees C, control: 36.9 +/- 0.1 degrees C), whereas no significant threshold difference was observed between the l-NAME(Neo)-treated and control sites. At the end of the heat stress, SkBF was not different between the neostigmine-treated and control sites, whereas SkBF at the l-NAME(Neo)-treated site was significantly lower than the other sites. These results suggest that acetylcholine released from cholinergic nerves is capable of modulating cutaneous vasodilation via NO synthase mechanisms early in the heat stress but

  4. Acetylcholine released from cholinergic nerves contributes to cutaneous vasodilation during heat stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibasaki, Manabu; Wilson, Thad E.; Cui, Jian; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) contributes to active cutaneous vasodilation during a heat stress in humans. Given that acetylcholine is released from cholinergic nerves during whole body heating, coupled with evidence that acetylcholine causes vasodilation via NO mechanisms, it is possible that release of acetylcholine in the dermal space contributes to cutaneous vasodilation during a heat stress. To test this hypothesis, in seven subjects skin blood flow (SkBF) and sweat rate were simultaneously monitored over three microdialysis membranes placed in the dermal space of dorsal forearm skin. One membrane was perfused with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine (10 microM), the second membrane was perfused with the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; 10 mM) dissolved in the aforementioned neostigmine solution (l-NAME(Neo)), and the third membrane was perfused with Ringer solution as a control site. Each subject was exposed to approximately 20 min of whole body heating via a water-perfused suit, which increased mean body temperature from 36.4 +/- 0.1 to 37.5 +/- 0.1 degrees C (P < 0.05). After the heat stress, SkBF at each site was normalized to its maximum value, identified by administration of 28 mM sodium nitroprusside. Mean body temperature threshold for cutaneous vasodilation was significantly lower at the neostigmine-treated site relative to the other sites (neostigmine: 36.6 +/- 0.1 degrees C, l-NAME(Neo): 37.1 +/- 0.1 degrees C, control: 36.9 +/- 0.1 degrees C), whereas no significant threshold difference was observed between the l-NAME(Neo)-treated and control sites. At the end of the heat stress, SkBF was not different between the neostigmine-treated and control sites, whereas SkBF at the l-NAME(Neo)-treated site was significantly lower than the other sites. These results suggest that acetylcholine released from cholinergic nerves is capable of modulating cutaneous vasodilation via NO synthase mechanisms early in the heat stress but

  5. Near-Infrared-Induced Heating of Confined Water in Polymeric Particles for Efficient Payload Release

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) light-triggered release from polymeric capsules could make a major impact on biological research by enabling remote and spatiotemporal control over the release of encapsulated cargo. The few existing mechanisms for NIR-triggered release have not been widely applied because they require custom synthesis of designer polymers, high-powered lasers to drive inefficient two-photon processes, and/or coencapsulation of bulky inorganic particles. In search of a simpler mechanism, we found that exposure to laser light resonant with the vibrational absorption of water (980 nm) in the NIR region can induce release of payloads encapsulated in particles made from inherently non-photo-responsive polymers. We hypothesize that confined water pockets present in hydrated polymer particles absorb electromagnetic energy and transfer it to the polymer matrix, inducing a thermal phase change. In this study, we show that this simple and highly universal strategy enables instantaneous and controlled release of payloads in aqueous environments as well as in living cells using both pulsed and continuous wavelength lasers without significant heating of the surrounding aqueous solution. PMID:24717072

  6. Near-infrared-induced heating of confined water in polymeric particles for efficient payload release.

    PubMed

    Viger, Mathieu L; Sheng, Wangzhong; Doré, Kim; Alhasan, Ali H; Carling, Carl-Johan; Lux, Jacques; de Gracia Lux, Caroline; Grossman, Madeleine; Malinow, Roberto; Almutairi, Adah

    2014-05-27

    Near-infrared (NIR) light-triggered release from polymeric capsules could make a major impact on biological research by enabling remote and spatiotemporal control over the release of encapsulated cargo. The few existing mechanisms for NIR-triggered release have not been widely applied because they require custom synthesis of designer polymers, high-powered lasers to drive inefficient two-photon processes, and/or coencapsulation of bulky inorganic particles. In search of a simpler mechanism, we found that exposure to laser light resonant with the vibrational absorption of water (980 nm) in the NIR region can induce release of payloads encapsulated in particles made from inherently non-photo-responsive polymers. We hypothesize that confined water pockets present in hydrated polymer particles absorb electromagnetic energy and transfer it to the polymer matrix, inducing a thermal phase change. In this study, we show that this simple and highly universal strategy enables instantaneous and controlled release of payloads in aqueous environments as well as in living cells using both pulsed and continuous wavelength lasers without significant heating of the surrounding aqueous solution.

  7. Inflammatory stress of pancreatic beta cells drives release of extracellular heat shock protein 90α.

    PubMed

    Ocaña, Gail J; Pérez, Liliana; Guindon, Lynette; Deffit, Sarah N; Evans-Molina, Carmella; Thurmond, Debbie C; Blum, Janice S

    2017-02-11

    A major obstacle in predicting and preventing the development of autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) in at-risk individuals is the lack of well-established early biomarkers indicative of ongoing beta cell stress during the pre-clinical phase of disease. Recently, serum levels of the alpha cytoplasmic isoform of heat shock protein (HSP) 90 were shown to be elevated in individuals with new-onset T1D. We therefore hypothesized HSP90α could be released from beta cells in response to cellular stress and inflammation associated with the earliest stages of T1D. Here, human beta cell lines and cadaveric islets released HSP90α in response to stress induced by treatment with a combination of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-γ. Mechanistically, HSP90α release was found to be driven by cytokine-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress mediated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), a pathway that can eventually lead to beta cell apoptosis. Cytokine-induced beta cell HSP90α release and JNK activation were significantly reduced by pre-treating cells with the ER stress-mitigating chemical chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA). HSP90α release by cells may thus be a sensitive indicator of stress during inflammation and a useful tool in assessing therapeutic mitigation of cytokine-induced cell damage linked to autoimmunity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparing interferon-gamma release assays with tuberculin skin test for identifying latent tuberculosis infection that progresses to active tuberculosis: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Auguste, Peter; Tsertsvadze, Alexander; Pink, Joshua; Court, Rachel; McCarthy, Noel; Sutcliffe, Paul; Clarke, Aileen

    2017-03-09

    Timely and accurate identification of people with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is important for controlling Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB). There is no gold standard for diagnosis of LTBI. Screening tests such as interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) and tuberculin skin test (TST) provide indirect and imperfect information. This systematic review compared two types of IGRAs QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-GIT) and T-SPOT.TB with TST for identification of LTBI by predicting progression to a diagnosis of active TB in three subgroups: children, immunocompromised people, and those recently arrived from countries with high TB burden. Cohort studies were eligible for inclusion. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and other databases from December 2009 to June 2015. One reviewer screened studies, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias with cross checking by a second reviewer. Strength of association between test results and incidence of TB was summarised using cumulative incidence ratios (CIRs with 95% CIs). Summary effect measures: the ratio of CIRs (R-CIR) with 95% CIs. R-CIRs, were pooled using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using Chi-squared and I(2) statistics. Seventeen studies, mostly of moderate or high risk of bias (five in children, 10 in immunocompromised people, and two in those recently arrived) were included. In children, while in two studies, there was no significant difference between QFT-GIT and TST (≥5 mm) (pooled R-CIR = 1.11, 95% CI: 0.71, 1.74), two other studies showed QFT-GIT to outperform TST (≥10 mm) in identifying LTBI. In immunocompromised people, IGRA (T-SPOT.TB) was not significant different from TST (≥10 mm) for identifying LTBI, (pooled R-CIR = 1.01, 95% CI: 0.65, 1.58). The forest plot of two studies in recently arrived people from countries with high TB burden demonstrated inconsistent findings (high heterogeneity; I(2) = 92%). Prospective studies comparing IGRA

  9. Comparison of Interferon-γ Release Assay to Two Cut-Off Points of Tuberculin Skin Test to Detect Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Primary Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Fernanda Mattos; do Prado, Thiago Nascimento; Pinheiro, Jair dos Santos; Peres, Renata Lyrio; Lacerda, Thamy Carvalho; Loureiro, Rafaela Borge; Carvalho, Jose Américo; Fregona, Geisa; Dias, Elias Santos; Cosme, Lorrayne Beliqui; Rodrigues, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Riley, Lee Wood; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia

    2014-01-01

    Background An interferon-γ release assay, QuantiFERON-TB (QFT) test, has been introduced an alternative test for the diagnosis of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Here, we compared the performance of QFT with tuberculin skin test (TST) measured at two different cut-off points among primary health care work (HCW) in Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among HCWs in four Brazilian cities with a known history of high incidence of TB. Results of the QFT were compared to TST results based on both ≥5 mm and ≥10 mm as cut-off points. Results We enrolled 632 HCWs. When the cut-off value of ≥10 mm was used, agreement between QFT and TST was 69% (k = 0.31), and when the cut-off of ≥5 mm was chosen, the agreement was 57% (k = 0.22). We investigated possible factors of discordance of TST vs QFT. Compared to the TST−/QFT− group, risk factors for discordance in the TST+/QFT− group with TST cut-off of ≥5 mm included age between 41–45 years [OR = 2.70; CI 95%: 1.32–5.51] and 46–64 years [OR = 2.04; CI 95%: 1.05–3.93], BCG scar [OR = 2.72; CI 95%: 1.40–5.25], and having worked only in primary health care [OR = 2.30; CI 95%: 1.09–4.86]. On the other hand, for the cut-off of ≥10 mm, BCG scar [OR = 2.26; CI 95%: 1.03–4.91], being a household contact of a TB patient [OR = 1.72; CI 95%: 1.01–2.92] and having had a previous TST [OR = 1.66; CI 95%: 1.05–2.62], were significantly associated with the TST+/QFT− group. No statistically significant associations were found among the TST−/QFT+ discordant group with either TST cut-off value. Conclusions Although we identified BCG vaccination to contribute to the discordance at both TST cut-off measures, the current Brazilian recommendation for the initiation of LTBI treatment, based on information gathered from medical history, TST, chest radiograph and physical examination, should not be changed. PMID:25137040

  10. Comparison of interferon-γ release assay to two cut-off points of tuberculin skin test to detect latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in primary health care workers.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Fernanda Mattos; do Prado, Thiago Nascimento; Pinheiro, Jair dos Santos; Peres, Renata Lyrio; Lacerda, Thamy Carvalho; Loureiro, Rafaela Borge; Carvalho, Jose Américo; Fregona, Geisa; Dias, Elias Santos; Cosme, Lorrayne Beliqui; Rodrigues, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Riley, Lee Wood; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia

    2014-01-01

    An interferon-γ release assay, QuantiFERON-TB (QFT) test, has been introduced an alternative test for the diagnosis of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Here, we compared the performance of QFT with tuberculin skin test (TST) measured at two different cut-off points among primary health care work (HCW) in Brazil. A cross-sectional study was carried out among HCWs in four Brazilian cities with a known history of high incidence of TB. Results of the QFT were compared to TST results based on both ≥5 mm and ≥10 mm as cut-off points. We enrolled 632 HCWs. When the cut-off value of ≥10 mm was used, agreement between QFT and TST was 69% (k = 0.31), and when the cut-off of ≥5 mm was chosen, the agreement was 57% (k = 0.22). We investigated possible factors of discordance of TST vs QFT. Compared to the TST-/QFT- group, risk factors for discordance in the TST+/QFT- group with TST cut-off of ≥5 mm included age between 41-45 years [OR = 2.70; CI 95%: 1.32-5.51] and 46-64 years [OR = 2.04; CI 95%: 1.05-3.93], BCG scar [OR = 2.72; CI 95%: 1.40-5.25], and having worked only in primary health care [OR = 2.30; CI 95%: 1.09-4.86]. On the other hand, for the cut-off of ≥10 mm, BCG scar [OR = 2.26; CI 95%: 1.03-4.91], being a household contact of a TB patient [OR = 1.72; CI 95%: 1.01-2.92] and having had a previous TST [OR = 1.66; CI 95%: 1.05-2.62], were significantly associated with the TST+/QFT- group. No statistically significant associations were found among the TST-/QFT+ discordant group with either TST cut-off value. Although we identified BCG vaccination to contribute to the discordance at both TST cut-off measures, the current Brazilian recommendation for the initiation of LTBI treatment, based on information gathered from medical history, TST, chest radiograph and physical examination, should not be changed.

  11. Screening for latent tuberculosis in Norwegian health care workers: high frequency of discordant tuberculin skin test positive and interferon-gamma release assay negative results.

    PubMed

    Gran, Gerd; Aßmus, Jörg; Dyrhol-Riise, Anne Ma

    2013-04-17

    Tuberculosis (TB) presents globally a significant health problem and health care workers (HCW) are at increased risk of contracting TB infection. There is no diagnostic gold standard for latent TB infection (LTBI), but both blood based interferon-gamma release assays (IGRA) and the tuberculin skin test (TST) are used. According to the national guidelines, HCW who have been exposed for TB should be screened and offered preventive anti-TB chemotherapy, but the role of IGRA in HCW screening is still unclear. A total of 387 HCW working in clinical and laboratory departments in three major hospitals in the Western region of Norway with possible exposure to TB were included in a cross-sectional study. The HCW were asked for risk factors for TB and tested with TST and the QuantiFERON®TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT). A logistic regression model analyzed the associations between risk factors for TB and positive QFT or TST. A total of 13 (3.4%) demonstrated a persistent positive QFT, whereas 214 (55.3%) had a positive TST (≥ 6 mm) and 53 (13.7%) a TST ≥ 15 mm. Only ten (4.7%) of the HCW with a positive TST were QFT positive. Origin from a TB-endemic country was the only risk factor associated with a positive QFT (OR 14.13, 95% CI 1.37 - 145.38, p=0.026), whereas there was no significant association between risk factors for TB and TST ≥ 15 mm. The five HCW with an initial positive QFT that retested negative all had low interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) responses below 0.70 IU/ml when first tested. We demonstrate a low prevalence of LTBI in HCW working in hospitals with TB patients in our region. The "IGRA-only" seems like a desirable screening strategy despite its limitations in serial testing, due to the high numbers of discordant TST positive/IGRA negative results in HCW, probably caused by BCG vaccination or boosting due to repetitive TST testing. Thus, guidelines for TB screening in HCW should be updated in order to secure accurate diagnosis of LTBI and offer proper

  12. Effect of Pregnancy on Interferon Gamma Release Assay and Tuberculin Skin Test Detection of Latent TB Infection Among HIV-Infected Women in a High Burden Setting.

    PubMed

    LaCourse, Sylvia M; Cranmer, Lisa M; Matemo, Daniel; Kinuthia, John; Richardson, Barbra A; Horne, David J; John-Stewart, Grace

    2017-05-01

    Peripartum immunologic changes may affect latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) diagnostic performance among HIV-infected women. HIV-infected women were serially tested with tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon gamma release assay [QuantiFERON TB Gold In-tube (QFT)] in pregnancy and 6 weeks postpartum in Kenya. Prevalence, sensitivity and agreement, and correlates of QFT/TST positivity were assessed. Quantitative QFT mitogen and Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen (Mtb-Ag) responses were compared by peripartum stage. Incidence of test conversion at 6 weeks postpartum was evaluated in baseline TST-/QFT- women. Among 100 HIV-infected women, median age was 26 years, median CD4 was 555 cells per cubic millimeter, and 88% were on antiretrovirals. More women were QFT+ than TST+ in both pregnancy (35.4% vs. 13.5%, P = 0.001) and postpartum (29.6% vs. 14.8%, P < 0.001). Among 18 consistently QFT+ women, 8 (44%) converted from TST- to TST+, with improved test agreement postpartum (56.9%, κ = 0.20 to 82.4%, κ = 0.60). Three initially QFT-/TST- women had test conversion (TST+ and/or QFT+), suggesting new infection (incidence 13.4/100 person-years). Mean QFT mitogen (4.46 vs. 7.64 IU/mL, P < 0.001) and Mtb-Ag (1.03 vs. 1.54 IU/mL, P = 0.03) responses were lower among all women retested in pregnancy vs. postpartum, and specifically among persistently QFT+ women (Mtb-Ag: 3.46 vs. 4.48 IU/mL, P = 0.007). QFT indeterminate rate was higher in pregnancy (16%) compared with postpartum (0%) because of lower mitogen response. QFT identified >2-fold more women with LTBI compared with TST in pregnancy and postpartum. Lower QFT Mtb-Ag and mitogen responses in pregnancy compared with postpartum suggest that pregnancy-associated immunologic changes may influence LTBI test performance.

  13. Screening for latent tuberculosis in Norwegian health care workers: high frequency of discordant tuberculin skin test positive and interferon-gamma release assay negative results

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) presents globally a significant health problem and health care workers (HCW) are at increased risk of contracting TB infection. There is no diagnostic gold standard for latent TB infection (LTBI), but both blood based interferon-gamma release assays (IGRA) and the tuberculin skin test (TST) are used. According to the national guidelines, HCW who have been exposed for TB should be screened and offered preventive anti-TB chemotherapy, but the role of IGRA in HCW screening is still unclear. Methods A total of 387 HCW working in clinical and laboratory departments in three major hospitals in the Western region of Norway with possible exposure to TB were included in a cross-sectional study. The HCW were asked for risk factors for TB and tested with TST and the QuantiFERON®TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT). A logistic regression model analyzed the associations between risk factors for TB and positive QFT or TST. Results A total of 13 (3.4%) demonstrated a persistent positive QFT, whereas 214 (55.3%) had a positive TST (≥ 6 mm) and 53 (13.7%) a TST ≥ 15 mm. Only ten (4.7%) of the HCW with a positive TST were QFT positive. Origin from a TB-endemic country was the only risk factor associated with a positive QFT (OR 14.13, 95% CI 1.37 - 145.38, p = 0.026), whereas there was no significant association between risk factors for TB and TST ≥ 15 mm. The five HCW with an initial positive QFT that retested negative all had low interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) responses below 0.70 IU/ml when first tested. Conclusions We demonstrate a low prevalence of LTBI in HCW working in hospitals with TB patients in our region. The “IGRA-only” seems like a desirable screening strategy despite its limitations in serial testing, due to the high numbers of discordant TST positive/IGRA negative results in HCW, probably caused by BCG vaccination or boosting due to repetitive TST testing. Thus, guidelines for TB screening in HCW should be updated in order to

  14. Interferon Gamma Release Assays for the Diagnosis of Latent TB Infection in HIV-Infected Individuals in a Low TB Burden Country

    PubMed Central

    Ní Cheallaigh, Clíona; Fitzgerald, Ian; Grace, Jacinta; Jagjit Singh, Gurmit; El-Eraki, Nahla; Gibbons, Noel; Keane, Joseph; Rogers, Thomas R.; Clarke, Susan; Bergin, Colm

    2013-01-01

    Background Interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) are used to diagnose latent tuberculosis infection. Two IGRAs are commercially available: the Quantiferon TB Gold In Tube (QFT-IT) and the T-SPOT.TB. There is debate as to which test to use in HIV+ individuals. Previous publications from high TB burden countries have raised concerns that the sensitivity of the QFT-IT assay, but not the T-SPOT.TB, may be impaired in HIV+ individuals with low CD4+ T-cell counts. We sought to compare the tests in a low TB burden setting. Methodology/Principal Findings T-SPOT.TB, QFT-IT, and tuberculin skin tests (TST) were performed in HIV infected individuals. Results were related to patient characteristics. McNemar’s test, multivariate regression and correlation analysis were carried out using SPSS (SPSS Inc). 256 HIV infected patients were enrolled in the study. The median CD4+ T-cell count was 338 cells/µL (range 1–1328). 37 (14%) patients had a CD4+ T-cell count of <100 cells/µL. 46/256 (18% ) of QFT-IT results and 28/256 (11%) of T-SPOT.TB results were positive. 6 (2%) of QFT-IT and 18 (7%) of T-SPOT.TB results were indeterminate. An additional 9 (4%) of T-SPOT.TB results were unavailable as tests were not performed due to insufficient cells or clotting of the sample. We found a statistically significant association between lower CD4+ T-cell count and negative QFT-IT results (OR 1.055, p = 0.03), and indeterminate/unavailable T-SPOT.TB results (OR 1.079, p = 0.02). Conclusions/Significance In low TB prevalence settings, the QFT-IT yields more positive and fewer indeterminate results than T-SPOT.TB. Negative results on the QFT-IT and indeterminate/unavailable results on the T-SPOT.TB were more common in individuals with low CD4+ T-cell counts. PMID:23382842

  15. The Significance of Sensitive Interferon Gamma Release Assays for Diagnosis of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in Patients Receiving Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Antagonist Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yu Jung; Woo, Hye In; Jeon, Kyeongman; Koh, Won-Jung; Jang, Dong Kyoung; Cha, Hoon Suk; Koh, Eun Mi; Lee, Nam Yong; Kang, Eun-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Objective We compared two interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs), QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) and T-SPOT.TB, for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients before and while receiving tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antagonist therapy. This study evaluated the significance of sensitive IGRAs for LTBI screening and monitoring. Methods Before starting TNF-α antagonist therapy, 156 consecutive patients with rheumatic diseases were screened for LTBI using QFT-GIT and T-SPOT.TB tests. According to our study protocol, QFT-GIT-positive patients received LTBI treatment. Patients positive by any IGRAs were subjected to follow-up IGRA tests after completing LTBI-treatment and/or during TNF-α antagonist therapy. Results At the initial LTBI screening, 45 (28.9%) and 70 (44.9%) patients were positive by QFT-GIT and T-SPOT.TB, respectively. The agreement rate between IGRA results was 78.8% (k = 0.56; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 0.43 to 0.68). Of 29 patients who were positive only by T-SPOT.TB in the initial screening, 83% (19/23) were persistently positive by T-SPOT.TB, while QFT-GIT testing showed that 36% (9/25) had conversion during TNF-α antagonist therapy. By the end of the follow-up period (218 to 1,264 days), four patients (4/137, 2.9%) developed active tuberculosis (TB) diseases during receiving TNF-α antagonist therapy. Among them, one was Q-T+, one was Q+T-, and the remaining two were Q-T- at the initial screening (Q, QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube; T, T-SPOT.TB; +, positive; -, negative). Two (2/4, 50%) patients with TB reactivation had at least one prior risk factor consistent with previous TB infection. Conclusion This study demonstrated the need to capitalize on sensitive IGRAs to monitor for LTBI in at-risk patients for a more sensitive diagnosis in countries with an intermediate TB burden. PMID:26474294

  16. Inadequate heat release from the human brain during prolonged exercise with hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Nybo, Lars; Secher, Niels H; Nielsen, Bodil

    2002-01-01

    Brain temperature appears to be an important factor affecting motor activity, but it is not known to what extent brain temperature increases during prolonged exercise in humans. Cerebral heat exchange was therefore evaluated in seven males during exercise with and without hyperthermia. Middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA Vmean) was continuously monitored while global cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral energy turnover were determined at the end of the two exercise trials in three subjects. The arterial to venous temperature difference across the brain (v-aDtemp) was determined via thermocouples placed in the internal jugular vein and in the aorta. The jugular venous blood temperature was always higher than that of the arterial blood, demonstrating that heat was released via the CBF during the normothermic as well as the hyperthermic exercise condition. However, heat removal via the jugular venous blood was 30 ± 6 % lower during hyperthermia compared to the control trial. The reduced heat removal from the brain was mainly a result of a 20 ± 6 % lower CBF (22 ± 9 % reduction in MCA Vmean), because the v-aDtemp was not significantly different in the hyperthermic (0.20 ± 0.05 °C) compared to the control trial (0.22 ± 0.05 °C). During hyperthermia, the impaired heat removal via the blood was combined with a 7 ± 2 % higher heat production in the brain and heat was consequently stored in the brain at a rate of 0.20 ± 0.06 J g−1 min−1. The present results indicate that the average brain temperature is at least 0.2 °C higher than that of the body core during exercise with or without hyperthermia. PMID:12456844

  17. Heat-Driven Release of a Drug Molecule From Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaban, Vitaly; Prezhdo, Oleg

    2011-03-01

    Hydrophobicity and ability to absorb light that penetrates through living tissues make carbon nanotubes (CNTs) promising intracellular drug delivery agents. Following insertion of a drug molecule into a CNT, the latter is delivered into a tissue, is heated by near infrared radiation, and releases the drug. In order to assess the feasibility of this scheme, we investigate the rates of energy transfer between CNT, water and the drug molecule, and study the temperature and concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficient of the drug molecule inside CNTs. We use ciprofloxacin (CIP) as a sample drug: direct penetration of CIP through cell membranes is problematic due to its high polarity. The simulations show that a heated CNT rapidly deposits its energy to CIP and water. All estimated timescales for the vibrational energy exchange between CNT, CIP and water are less than 10 ps at 298 K. As the system temperature grows from 278 K to 363 K, the diffusion coefficient of the confined CIP increases 5-7 times, depending on CIP concentration. The diffusion coefficient slightly drops with increasing CIP concentration. This effect is more pronounced at higher temperatures. The simulations support the idea that optical heating of CNTs can assist in releasing encapsulated drugs.

  18. Heat-driven release of a drug molecule from carbon nanotubes: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Savchenko, Timur I; Kovalenko, Sergiy M; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2010-10-28

    Hydrophobicity and the ability to absorb light that penetrates through living tissues make carbon nanotubes (CNTs) promising intracellular drug delivery agents. Following insertion of a drug molecule into a CNT, the latter is delivered into a tissue, is heated by near-infrared radiation, and releases the drug. To assess the feasibility of this scheme, we investigate the rates of energy transfer between CNT, water, and the drug molecule and study the temperature and concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficient of the drug molecule inside CNTs. We use ciprofloxacin (CIP) as a sample drug: direct penetration of CIP through cell membranes is problematic due to its high polarity. The simulations show that a heated CNT rapidly deposits its energy to CIP and water. All estimated time scales for the vibrational energy exchange between CNT, CIP, and water are less than 10 ps at 298 K. As the system temperature grows from 278 to 363 K, the diffusion coefficient of the confined CIP increases 5-7 times, depending on CIP concentration. The diffusion coefficient slightly drops with increasing CIP concentration. This effect is more pronounced at higher temperatures. The simulations support the idea that optical heating of CNTs can assist in releasing encapsulated drugs.

  19. Determination of volatile chemicals released from microwave-heat-susceptor food packaging.

    PubMed

    McNeal, T P; Hollifield, H C

    1993-01-01

    Microwave heat susceptors that convert electromagnetic energy to heat attain high temperatures that make it possible to cook some foods to golden crispness in a microwave oven. Susceptors are typically packaged with foods intended for microwave use, e.g., waffles, pizzas, and french fries. The high temperatures > 302 degrees F used to cook some foods release trace levels of volatile chemicals from metalized polyester film, adhesive, and paper packaging materials; these volatile chemicals may be absorbed by the food. We simulated microwave susceptor cooking conditions and developed protocols by using headspace concentration capillary gas chromatography and mass spectrometry to identify volatile chemicals released from heated susceptors. We purchased a limited, cross-sectional sample of local retail microwave food products packaged with susceptors and used our protocol to analyze 10 different susceptor products. Although more than 140 unique chromatographic peaks were tabulated, only 44 volatile chemicals were identified, including 1,1,1-trichloroethane, benzene, and 2-(2-butoxyethoxy)ethanol, which were derived primarily from the paper and adhesive susceptor components. No one susceptor contained all the identified substances. The standard additions technique was the preferred method for quantitation. Trichloroethane and 2-(2-butoxyethoxy)ethanol were present in several products at 75-122 micrograms/in.2 of susceptor surface area. Benzene was found in 3 susceptors at < or = 0.22 microgram/in.2 levels. Examination indicates that adhesives used in more recent susceptor products were reformulated to remove even this trace level of benzene.

  20. Factors Affecting Release of Heat-Labile Enterotoxin by Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Steven L.; Robertson, Donald C.

    1979-01-01

    Various conditions affecting the release of heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli have been examined. The pH of a defined medium containing three amino acids, M-9 salts, and 0.5% glucose decreased to less than 7.0 in early log phase of growth, and no extracellular LT was detected. Adjustment of the pH at 8 h from 6.0 to 8.0 resulted in a concomitant increase in LT activity in culture supernatants. The release of cell-associated LT was significantly reduced by preincubation with protease inhibitors and increased by preincubation with trypsin. Cell-associated LT was not released by pH adjustment of cells grown at 21°C; however, polymyxin B treatment released a toxin species active in only the pigeon erythrocyte lysate (PEL) assay system. As the growth temperature was increased, polymyxin B released toxin species which exhibited both PEL and Y-1 adrenal tumor cell activity. Polymyxin B extracts of enterotoxigenic E. coli in early log phase grown at 37°C possessed only PEL activity, whereas extracts from cells in late-log and stationary phases had biological activity in both assay systems. Also, LT released by pH adjustment from mid-log to stationary phase was active in both PEL and Y-1 adrenal tumor cell assays. Gel electrophoresis of polymyxin B extracts revealed at least three molecular weight species active in either the PEL (22,000 daltons and 30,000 daltons) or both the PEL and the Y-1 adrenal tumor cell assay (72,000 daltons), depending on the growth temperature. These observations may help to explain the chemical and biological heterogeneity of most LT preparations and facilitate purification of LT by increasing the yield of enterotoxin. PMID:37162

  1. Thermal energy storage – overview and specific insight into nitrate salts for sensible and latent heat storage

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Thomas; Martin, Claudia; Eck, Markus; Wörner, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Summary Thermal energy storage (TES) is capable to reduce the demand of conventional energy sources for two reasons: First, they prevent the mismatch between the energy supply and the power demand when generating electricity from renewable energy sources. Second, utilization of waste heat in industrial processes by thermal energy storage reduces the final energy consumption. This review focuses mainly on material aspects of alkali nitrate salts. They include thermal properties, thermal decomposition processes as well as a new method to develop optimized salt systems. PMID:26199853

  2. Sensitivity of hydrometeor profiles and satellite brightness temperatures to model microphysics for MCSs over land and ocean: Model comparison using EOF analysis and implications for rain and latent heat retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eun-Kyoung

    The impact of model microphysics on the relationships between microphysical variables and derived satellite microwave brightness temperatures (T B's) and on the retrievals of microphysical variables was using a three-dimensional, nonhydrostatic, adaptive-grid cloud model to simulate two mesoscale convective systems, one over land and one over ocean. Four microphysical schemes (each employing 3-ice bulk parameterizations) were compared in both convective and stratiform precipitation using Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis. The validity of the microphysical schemes suggests that over land the model microphysical schemes produce too much reflectivity aloft and too rapid a decrease in reflectivity from the melting level to the surface, and over ocean the simulations produced more graupel and not enough rain. Model microphysics had a noticeable impact on the relations between the hydrometeor structure and TB's. Classified in terms of TB 's, the microphysical schemes produce significantly different mean vertical profiles of cloud water, cloud ice, snow, vertical velocity, and latent heating, especially in stratiform clouds. Vertical velocity and latent heating in simulated stratiform clouds were not well correlated with TB's for any of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) frequencies. Differences in the amount of supercooled cloud water produced in the various schemes accounted for much of the variation in TB relations. The uncertainty in retrieving hydrometeor and latent heating profiles for passive microwave measurements has been examined quantitatively. The four microphysical schemes exhibited analogous uncertainties in retrieving rain and graupel, but very different uncertainties in retrieving cloud water, cloud ice, and snow. The uncertainty in retrieving latent heating appears to be related to the insensitivity of TMI frequencies to cloud water, cloud ice, and snow. Structural differences in hydrometeor and latent heating

  3. Combustion Gases And Heat Release Analysis During Flame And Flameless Combustion Of Wood Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Jozef; Wachter, Igor; Balog, Karol

    2015-06-01

    With the growing prices of fossil fuels, alternative fuels produced of biomass come to the fore. They are made of waste materials derived from the processing of wood and wood materials. The main objective of this study was to analyse the fire-technical characteristics of wood pellets. The study analysed three dust samples acquired from wood pellets made of various types of wood biomass. Wood pellet dust is produced when manipulating with pellets. During this process a potentially hazardous situations may occur. Biomass is chemically composed mostly of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin. During straining of the biomass by heat flux, combustion initiation occurs. Also, there was a change in the composition of material throughout combustion gases production, and the amount of heat generated by a flame or flameless combustion. Measurement of fire characteristics was conducted according to ISO 5660-1 standard using a cone calorimeter. Two samples of wood pellet dust were tested under the heat flux of 35 kW.m-2 and 50 kW.m-2. The process of combustion, the time to ignition, the carbon monoxide concentration and the amount of released heat were observed.

  4. Solar heat storage in phase change material

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, H.J.

    1984-02-28

    The objective of this project was to develop a chemical heat storage system that had a phase change with release of latent heat at about 105/sup 0/F. The primary reason this kind on system was sought was that heat storage capacity of commonly used storage systems do not match the heat collection capacity of open air collectors. In addition to the phase change three other factors were considered: the cost of the material, the amount of heat the system would hold per unit volume, and the rate at which the system released sensible and latent heat. One hundred nineteen tests were made on 32 systems. Only data on six of the more promising are presented. In the six systems, borax was used as the major component with other materials used as nucleating agents toraise the temperature of phase change.

  5. Quantification and attribution of errors in the simulated annual gross primary production and latent heat fluxes by two global land surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianduo; Wang, Ying-Ping; Duan, Qingyun; Lu, Xingjie; Pak, Bernard; Wiltshire, Andy; Robertson, Eddy; Ziehn, Tilo

    2016-09-01

    Differences in the predicted carbon and water fluxes by different global land models have been quite large and have not decreased over the last two decades. Quantification and attribution of the uncertainties of global land surface models are important for improving the performance of global land surface models, and are the foci of this study. Here we quantified the model errors by comparing the simulated monthly global gross primary productivity (GPP) and latent heat flux (LE) by two global land surface models with the model-data products of global GPP and LE from 1982 to 2005. By analyzing model parameter sensitivities within their ranges, we identified about 2-11 most sensitive model parameters that have strong influences on the simulated GPP or LE by two global land models, and found that the sensitivities of the same parameters are different among the plant functional types (PFT). Using parameter ensemble simulations, we found that 15%-60% of the model errors were reduced by tuning only a few (<4) most sensitive parameters for most PFTs, and that the reduction in model errors varied spatially within a PFT or among different PFTs. Our study shows that future model improvement should optimize key model parameters, particularly those parameters relating to leaf area index, maximum carboxylation rate, and stomatal conductance.

  6. Multiple solutions and numerical analysis to the dynamic and stationary models coupling a delayed energy balance model involving latent heat and discontinuous albedo with a deep ocean

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, J. I.; Hidalgo, A.; Tello, L.

    2014-01-01

    We study a climatologically important interaction of two of the main components of the geophysical system by adding an energy balance model for the averaged atmospheric temperature as dynamic boundary condition to a diagnostic ocean model having an additional spatial dimension. In this work, we give deeper insight than previous papers in the literature, mainly with respect to the 1990 pioneering model by Watts and Morantine. We are taking into consideration the latent heat for the two phase ocean as well as a possible delayed term. Non-uniqueness for the initial boundary value problem, uniqueness under a non-degeneracy condition and the existence of multiple stationary solutions are proved here. These multiplicity results suggest that an S-shaped bifurcation diagram should be expected to occur in this class of models generalizing previous energy balance models. The numerical method applied to the model is based on a finite volume scheme with nonlinear weighted essentially non-oscillatory reconstruction and Runge–Kutta total variation diminishing for time integration. PMID:25294969

  7. Multiple solutions and numerical analysis to the dynamic and stationary models coupling a delayed energy balance model involving latent heat and discontinuous albedo with a deep ocean.

    PubMed

    Díaz, J I; Hidalgo, A; Tello, L

    2014-10-08

    We study a climatologically important interaction of two of the main components of the geophysical system by adding an energy balance model for the averaged atmospheric temperature as dynamic boundary condition to a diagnostic ocean model having an additional spatial dimension. In this work, we give deeper insight than previous papers in the literature, mainly with respect to the 1990 pioneering model by Watts and Morantine. We are taking into consideration the latent heat for the two phase ocean as well as a possible delayed term. Non-uniqueness for the initial boundary value problem, uniqueness under a non-degeneracy condition and the existence of multiple stationary solutions are proved here. These multiplicity results suggest that an S-shaped bifurcation diagram should be expected to occur in this class of models generalizing previous energy balance models. The numerical method applied to the model is based on a finite volume scheme with nonlinear weighted essentially non-oscillatory reconstruction and Runge-Kutta total variation diminishing for time integration.

  8. Experimental analysis of the performance of optimized fin structures in a latent heat energy storage test rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Maike; Hübner, Stefan; Reichmann, Carsten; Schönberger, Manfred; Fiß, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Energy storage systems are a key technology for developing a more sustainable energy supply system and lowering overall CO2 emissions. Among the variety of storage technologies, high temperature phase change material (PCM) storage is a promis