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Sample records for latent nuclear antigen

  1. Tissue Specificity of the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latent Nuclear Antigen (LANA/orf73) Promoter in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Joseph H.; Hines-Boykin, Rebecca; Ash, John D.; Dittmer, Dirk P.

    2002-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV-8) is a human-oncogenic herpesvirus. Cells from KSHV-associated tumors, such as Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), are of endothelial and B-cell origin, respectively. KSHV persists indefinitely in these cell lineages during latent infection. Indeed, cellular latency is a hallmark of all herpesviruses that is intimately linked to their pathogenesis. We previously characterized the promoter for the KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen LANA/orf73. LANA is required for latent episome maintenance and has also been implicated in oncogenesis. Hence, regulation of LANA expression is critical to KSHV persistence. We find that a region extending to bp −1299 upstream of the LANA transcription start site is able to drive lacZ-reporter gene expression in several lines of transgenic mice. In agreement with KSHV's natural tropism, we detected reporter gene expression in CD19-positive B cells but not in CD3-positive T cells. We also detected expression in the kidney and, at a lower level, in the liver. In contrast to KS tumors, transgene expression was localized to kidney tubular epithelium rather than vascular endothelial cells. This suggests that our promoter fragment contains all cis-regulatory elements sufficient for B-cell specificity but not those required for endothelial specificity. Alternatively, while the trans-acting factors required for LANA expression in B cells are evolutionarily conserved, those that regulate endothelial cell-specific expression are unique to humans. Our in vivo studies address a conundrum in KSHV biology: in culture, KSHV is able to infect a variety of cell types indiscriminately, while in healthy latent carriers KSHV is found in B lymphocytes. The transgenic-mouse experiments reported here suggest that tissue-restricted LANA gene expression could explain B-cell-specific viral persistence. PMID:12368345

  2. DNA-PK/Ku complex binds to latency-associated nuclear antigen and negatively regulates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latent replication

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Seho; Lim, Chunghun; Lee, Jae Young; Song, Yoon-Jae; Park, Junsoo; Choe, Joonho; Seo, Taegun

    2010-04-16

    During latent infection, latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) plays important roles in episomal persistence and replication. Several host factors are associated with KSHV latent replication. Here, we show that the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), Ku70, and Ku86 bind the N-terminal region of LANA. LANA was phosphorylated by DNA-PK and overexpression of Ku70, but not Ku86, impaired transient replication. The efficiency of transient replication was significantly increased in the HCT116 (Ku86 +/-) cell line, compared to the HCT116 (Ku86 +/+) cell line, suggesting that the DNA-PK/Ku complex negatively regulates KSHV latent replication.

  3. Pulmonary responses to pathogen-specific antigens in latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Jarvela, Jessica R; Tuscano, Lori; Lee, Hung; Silver, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used ELISPOT to quantify frequencies of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and peripheral blood T cells capable of producing IFNγ in response to PPD, antigen 85B, and Mtb-specific antigens CFP-10 and ESAT-6 in individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and Mtb-naïve controls. Compared to peripheral blood, BAL cells of LTBI subjects displayed significant enrichment for T cells responding to PPD, antigen 85B, and CFP-10, but not to ESAT-6. Baseline BAL cells of LTBI subjects displayed significant production of Mig (CXCL9) in response to PPD, antigen 85B, and CFP-10 as well. These findings suggest that enrichment for Mtb-specific T cells within BAL is not unique to active pulmonary tuberculosis and may, to the contrary, contribute to protection from re-infection in Mtb immune individuals.

  4. T Helper Cell Tolerance to Ubiquitous Nuclear Antigens

    PubMed Central

    NAKKEN, BRITT; DAVIS, KAREN E.; PAN, ZIJIAN; BACHMANN, MICHAEL; FARRIS, A. DARISE

    2007-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are characterized by the development of anti-nuclear autoantibodies. In order to understand the immunologic events leading to the development of such antibodies, knowledge of mechanisms of immune tolerance to nuclear antigens is required. By utilizing adoptive T cell transfer strategies with transgenic mouse models expressing nuclear neo-self antigens, T cell tolerance to the lupus-related nuclear antigens human La and nRNP A has been demonstrated. These findings also indicate the existence in normal animals of autoreactive B cells continuously presenting nuclear antigen, suggesting that nuclear antigens are not sequestered from the immune system. Investigations of CD4+ T cell tolerance to non-nuclear antigens have revealed a number of mechanisms that protect the host from autoreactivity, including autoreactive T cell deletion, regulatory T cell development and anergy induction. Recent studies using T cell receptor and neo-self nuclear antigen transgenic mice are revealing the importance of such mechanisms in maintaining tolerance to nuclear antigens. Mechanisms of tolerogenic antigen presentation, identification of tolerogenic antigen source(s), and the pathways leading to loss of tolerance to nuclear antigens in systemic autoimmune disease states are currently being sought. PMID:14629620

  5. Structure and Function of Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Verma, S. C.; Lan, K.

    2011-01-01

    Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) encoded by open reading frame 73 (ORF73) is the major latent protein expressed in all forms of KSHV-associated malignancies. LANA is a large (222–234 kDa) nuclear protein that interacts with various cellular as well as viral proteins. LANA has been classified as an oncogenic protein as it dysregulates various cellular pathways including tumor suppressor pathways associated with pRb and p53 and can transform primary rat embryo fibroblasts in cooperation with the cellular oncogene Hras. It associates with GSK-3β, an important modulator of Wnt signaling pathway leading to the accumulation of cytoplasmic β-catenin, which upregulates Tcf/Lef regulated genes after entering into the nucleus. LANA also blocks the expression of RTA, the reactivation transcriptional activator, which is critical for the latency to lytic switch, and thus helps in maintaining viral latency. LANA tethers the viral episomal DNA to the host chromosomes by directly binding to its cognate binding sequence within the TR region of the genome through its C terminus and to the nucleosomes through the N terminus of the molecule. Tethering to the host chromosomes helps in efficient partitioning of the viral episomes in the dividing cells. Disruptions of LANA expression led to reduction in the episomal copies of the viral DNA, supporting its role in persistence of the viral DNA. The functions known so far suggest that LANA is a key player in KSHV-mediated pathogenesis. PMID:17089795

  6. A Mycobacterium tuberculosis Dormancy Antigen Differentiates Latently Infected Bacillus Calmette–Guérin-vaccinated Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Delfina; Rovetta, Ana I.; Hernández Del Pino, Rodrigo E.; Amiano, Nicolás O.; Pasquinelli, Virginia; Pellegrini, Joaquín M.; Tateosian, Nancy L.; Rolandelli, Agustín; Gutierrez, Marisa; Musella, Rosa M.; Palmero, Domingo J.; Gherardi, María M.; Iovanna, Juan; Chuluyan, H. Eduardo; García, Verónica E.

    2015-01-01

    IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs) are better indicators of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection than the tuberculin skin test (TST) in Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG)-vaccinated populations. However, IGRAs do not discriminate active and latent infections (LTBI) and no gold standard for LTBI diagnosis is available. Thus, since improved tests to diagnose M. tuberculosis infection are required, we assessed the efficacy of several M. tuberculosis latency antigens. BCG-vaccinated healthy donors (HD) and tuberculosis (TB) patients were recruited. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube, TST and clinical data were used to differentiate LTBI. IFN-γ production against CFP-10, ESAT-6, Rv2624c, Rv2626c and Rv2628 antigens was tested in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. LTBI subjects secreted significantly higher IFN-γ levels against Rv2626c than HD. Additionally, Rv2626c peptide pools to which only LTBI responded were identified, and their cumulative IFN-γ response improved LTBI discrimination. Interestingly, whole blood stimulation with Rv2626c allowed the discrimination between active and latent infections, since TB patients did not secrete IFN-γ against Rv2626c, in contrast to CFP-10 + ESAT-6 stimulation that induced IFN-γ response from both LTBI and TB patients. ROC analysis confirmed that Rv2626c discriminated LTBI from HD and TB patients. Therefore, since only LTBI recognizes specific epitopes from Rv2626c, this antigen could improve LTBI diagnosis, even in BCG-vaccinated people. PMID:26425695

  7. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen: a proteomics view.

    PubMed

    Naryzhny, S N

    2008-11-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a cell cycle marker protein, is well known as a DNA sliding clamp for DNA polymerase delta and as an essential component for eukaryotic chromosomal DNA replication and repair. Due to its mobility inside nuclei, PCNA is dynamically presented in a soluble or chromatin-associated form. The heterogeneity and specific modifications of PCNA may reflect its multiple functions and the presence of many binding partners in the cell. The recent proteomics approaches applied to characterizing PCNA interactions revealed multiple PCNA partners with a wide spectrum of activity and unveiled the possible existence of new PCNA functions. Since more than 100 PCNA-interacting proteins and several PCNA modifications have already been reported, a proteomics point of view seems exactly suitable to better understand the role of PCNA in cellular functions.

  8. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 specifically induces expression of the B-cell activation antigen CD23

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F.; Gregory, C.D.; Rowe, M.; Rickinson, A.B.; Wang, D.; Birkenbach, M.; Kikutani, H.; Kishimoto, T.; Kieff, E.

    1987-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of EBV-negative Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells includes some changes similar to those seen in normal B lymphocytes that have been growth transformed by EBV. The role of individual EBV genes in this process was evaluated by introducing each of the viral genes that are normally expressed in EBV growth-transformed and latently infected lymphoblasts into an EBV-negative BL cell line, using recombinant retrovirus-mediated transfer. Clones of cells were derived that stably express the EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1), EBNA-2, EBNA-3, EBNA-leader protein, or EBV latent membrane protein (LMP). These were compared with control clones infected with the retrovirus vector. All 10 clones converted to EBNA-2 expression differed from control clones or clones expressing other EBV proteins by growth in tight clumps and by markedly increased expression of one particular surface marker of B-cell activation, CD23. Other activation antigens were unaffected by EBNA-2 expression, as were markers already expressed on the parent BL cell line. The results indicate that EBNA-2 is a specific direct or indirect trans-activator of CD23. This establishes a link between an EBV gene and cell gene expression. Since CD23 has been implicated in the transduction of B-cell growth signals, its specific induction by EBNA-2 could be important in EBV induction of B-lymphocyte transformation.

  9. The EBV Latent Antigen 3C Inhibits Apoptosis through Targeted Regulation of Interferon Regulatory Factors 4 and 8

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Lu, Jie; Cai, Qiliang; Saha, Abhik; Jha, Hem Chandra; Dzeng, Richard Kuo; Robertson, Erle S.

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is linked to a broad spectrum of B-cell malignancies. EBV nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is an encoded latent antigen required for growth transformation of primary human B-lymphocytes. Interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) and 8 (IRF8) are transcription factors of the IRF family that regulate diverse functions in B cell development. IRF4 is an oncoprotein with anti-apoptotic properties and IRF8 functions as a regulator of apoptosis and tumor suppressor in many hematopoietic malignancies. We now demonstrate that EBNA3C can contribute to B-cell transformation by modulating the molecular interplay between cellular IRF4 and IRF8. We show that EBNA3C physically interacts with IRF4 and IRF8 with its N-terminal domain in vitro and forms a molecular complex in cells. We identified the Spi-1/B motif of IRF4 as critical for EBNA3C interaction. We also demonstrated that EBNA3C can stabilize IRF4, which leads to downregulation of IRF8 by enhancing its proteasome-mediated degradation. Further, si-RNA mediated knock-down of endogenous IRF4 results in a substantial reduction in proliferation of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), as well as augmentation of DNA damage-induced apoptosis. IRF4 knockdown also showed reduced expression of its targeted downstream signalling proteins which include CDK6, Cyclin B1 and c-Myc all critical for cell proliferation. These studies provide novel insights into the contribution of EBNA3C to EBV-mediated B-cell transformation through regulation of IRF4 and IRF8 and add another molecular link to the mechanisms by which EBV dysregulates cellular activities, increasing the potential for therapeutic intervention against EBV-associated cancers. PMID:23658517

  10. Formation of nanometer-size wires using infiltration into latent nuclear tracks

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.; Felter, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    Nanometer-size wires having a cross-sectional dimension of less than 8 nm with controllable lengths and diameters are produced by infiltrating latent nuclear or ion tracks formed in trackable materials with atomic species. The trackable materials and atomic species are essentially insoluble in each other, thus the wires are formed by thermally driven, self-assembly of the atomic species during annealing, or re-crystallization, of the damage in the latent tracks. Unlike conventional ion track lithography, the inventive method does not require etching of the latent tracks.

  11. Epstein–Barr virus latent antigens EBNA3C and EBNA1 modulate epithelial to mesenchymal transition of cancer cells associated with tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Nivedita; Gandhi, Jaya; Robertson, Erle S.; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition is an important mechanism in cancer invasiveness and metastasis. We had previously reported that cancer cells expressing Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) latent viral antigens EBV nuclear antigen EBNA3C and/ or EBNA1 showed higher motility and migration potential and had a propensity for increased metastases when tested in nude mice model. We now show that both EBNA3C and EBNA1 can modulate cellular pathways critical for epithelial to mesenchymal transition of cancer cells. Our data confirms that presence of EBNA3C or EBNA1 result in upregulation of transcriptional repressor Slug and Snail, up-regulation of intermediate filament of mesenchymal origin vimentin, upregulation of transcription factor TCF8/ZEB1, downregulation as well as disruption of tight junction zona occludens protein ZO-1, downregulation of cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin, and nuclear translocation of β-catenin. We further show that the primary tumors as well as metastasized lesions derived from EBV antigen-expressing cancer cells in nude mice model display EMT markers expression pattern suggesting their greater propensity to mesenchymal transition. PMID:25501510

  12. Prediction of nuclear proteins using nuclear translocation signals proposed by probabilistic latent semantic indexing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Identification of subcellular localization in proteins is crucial to elucidate cellular processes and molecular functions in a cell. However, given a tremendous amount of sequence data generated in the post-genomic era, determining protein localization based on biological experiments can be expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, developing prediction systems to analyze uncharacterised proteins efficiently has played an important role in high-throughput protein analyses. In a eukaryotic cell, many essential biological processes take place in the nucleus. Nuclear proteins shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm based on recognition of nuclear translocation signals, including nuclear localization signals (NLSs) and nuclear export signals (NESs). Currently, only a few approaches have been developed specifically to predict nuclear localization using sequence features, such as putative NLSs. However, it has been shown that prediction coverage based on the NLSs is very low. In addition, most existing approaches only attained prediction accuracy and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) around 54%~70% and 0.250~0.380 on independent test set, respectively. Moreover, no predictor can generate sequence motifs to characterize features of potential NESs, in which biological properties are not well understood from existing experimental studies. Results In this study, first we propose PSLNuc (Protein Subcellular Localization prediction for Nucleus) for predicting nuclear localization in proteins. First, for feature representation, a protein is represented by gapped-dipeptides and the feature values are weighted by homology information from a smoothed position-specific scoring matrix. After that, we incorporate probabilistic latent semantic indexing (PLSI) for feature reduction. Finally, the reduced features are used as input for a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. In addition to PSLNuc, we further identify gapped-dipeptide signatures for putative NLSs and NESs

  13. Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 2A exacerbates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and enhances antigen presentation function

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Rhoda A.; Miller, Stephen D.; Longnecker, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. The cause of MS is still unknown but epidemiological and immunological studies have implicated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which infects B cells, as a possible etiological agent involved in disease. Of particular interest is EBV latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) because previous studies have demonstrated that LMP2A enhances the expansion and differentiation of B cells upon antigen stimulation, revealing a potential contribution of this protein in autoimmunity. Since B cells are thought to contribute to MS, we examined the role of LMP2A in the animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In this model, transgenic mice in which B cells express LMP2A show increased severity and incidence of disease. This difference was not due to lymphocyte recruitment into the CNS or differences in T cell activation, rather, we show that LMP2A enhances antigen presentation function. PMID:22616025

  14. Potential cellular functions of Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1) of Epstein-Barr Virus.

    PubMed

    Westhoff Smith, Danielle; Sugden, Bill

    2013-01-16

    Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1) is a multifunctional protein encoded by EBV. EBNA1's role in maintaining EBV in latently proliferating cells, by mediating EBV genome synthesis and nonrandom partitioning to daughter cells, as well as regulating viral gene transcription, is well characterized. Less understood are the roles of EBNA1 in affecting the host cell to provide selective advantages to those cells that harbor EBV. In this review we will focus on the interactions between EBNA1 and the host cell that may provide EBV-infected cells selective advantages beyond the maintenance of EBV.

  15. Coexistent Malnutrition Is Associated with Perturbations in Systemic and Antigen-Specific Cytokine Responses in Latent Tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Munisankar, Saravanan; Bhootra, Yukthi; Kumar, Nathalla Pavan; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Babu, Subash

    2016-04-01

    Malnutrition, as defined by low body mass index (BMI), is a major risk factor for the development of active tuberculosis (TB), although the biological basis underlying this susceptibility remains poorly characterized. To verify whether malnutrition affects the systemic and antigen-specific cytokine levels in individuals with latent TB (LTB), we examined circulating and TB antigen-stimulated levels of cytokines in individuals with LTB and low BMI (LBMI) and compared them with those in individuals with LTB and normal BMI (NBMI). Coexistent LBMI with LTB was characterized by diminished circulating levels of type 1 (gamma interferon [IFN-γ] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]), type 2 (interleukin-4 [IL-4]), type 17 (IL-22), and other proinflammatory (IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-6) cytokines but elevated levels of other type 2 (IL-5 and IL-13) and regulatory (IL-10 and transforming growth factor beta [TGF-β]) cytokines. In addition, LBMI with LTB was associated with diminished TB antigen-induced IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1α, and IL-1β levels. Finally, there was a significant positive correlation between BMI values and TNF-α and IL-1β levels and a significant negative correlation between BMI values and IL-2, IL-10, and TGF-β levels in individuals with LTB. Therefore, our data reveal that latent TB with a coexistent low BMI is characterized by diminished protective cytokine responses and heightened regulatory cytokine responses, providing a potential biological mechanism for the increased risk of developing active TB.

  16. Effect of isoniazid on antigen-specific interferon-γ secretion in latent tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Martha; Cruz-Hervert, Pablo; Guio, Heinner; Carranza, Claudia; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Canizales, Sergio; Molina, Susana; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Téllez, Norma; Montero-Campos, Rogelio; Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Mongua-Rodriguez, Norma; Sifuentes-Osornio, Jose; Ponce-de Leon, Alfredo; Sada, Eduardo; Young, Douglas B.; Wilkinson, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of persons with latent tuberculosis (TB) infection at greatest risk of reactivation is an important component of TB control and elimination strategies. Biomarkers evaluating the effectiveness of treatment of latent TB infection have not yet been identified. This information would enhance control efforts and assist the evaluation of new treatment regimes. We designed a two-group, two-arm, randomised clinical study of tuberculin skin test-positive participants: 26 with documented contact with TB patients and 34 with non-documented contact. Participants in each group were randomly assigned to the immediate- or deferred-isoniazid treatment arms. Assays of in vitro interferon (IFN)-γ secretion in response to recombinant Rv1737 and overlapping synthetic peptide pools from various groups of immunodominant proteins were performed. During isoniazid therapy, a significant increase from baseline in the proportion of IFN-γ responders to the 10-kDa culture filtrate protein, Rv2031, Rv0849, Rv1986, Rv2659c, Rv2693c and the recombinant Rv1737 protein was observed (p⩽0.05). The peptide pool of Rv0849 and Rv1737 recombinant proteins induced the highest percentage of IFN-γ responders after isoniazid therapy. The in vitro IFN-γ responses to these proteins might represent useful markers to evaluate changes associated with treatment of latent TB infection. PMID:25359354

  17. Induction of the autoantigen proliferating cell nuclear antigen in T lymphocytes by a mycobacterial antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Haftel, H M; Chang, Y; Hinderer, R; Hanash, S M; Holoshitz, J

    1994-01-01

    Mycobacteria have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. To determine the potential effect of mycobacterial antigens on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we analyzed PBMC incubated with the acetone-precipitable fraction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (APMT) for changes in cellular protein expression. Two-dimensional gel analysis showed induction of a 36-kD polypeptide identified as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a known autoantigen, after incubation with AP-MT. PCNA plays a role in cell proliferation and is expressed as a late growth regulated factor. However, its synthesis in response to AP-MT was induced as an early event. The early induction of PCNA was regulated at a posttranscriptional level and was restricted to T cells. Treatment of PBMC with known T cell mitogens, namely PHA, anti-CD3 antibodies, and staphylococcal superantigens failed to induce an early PCNA increase. The distinct characteristics of the AP-MT effect on PCNA expression suggest a separate mechanism of induction in response to AP-MT, compared with the late increase observed in response to mitogens. The induction of PCNA in response to mycobacterial antigens may represent a pathogenically relevant mechanism in autoimmunity. Images PMID:7929811

  18. Nuclear lamins and peripheral nuclear antigens during fertilization and embryogenesis in mice and sea urchins

    SciTech Connect

    Schatten, G.; Schatten, H.; Simerly, C.; Maul, G.G.; Chaly, N.

    1985-07-01

    Nuclear structural changes during fertilization and embryogenesis in mice and sea urchins are traced using four antibodies. The oocytes from virgin female mice, morulae and blastocytes from mated females, and gametes from the sea urchin Lytechnius variegatis are studied using mouse monoclonal antibodies to nuclear lamin A/C, monoclonal antibody to P1, human autoimmune antibodies to lamin A/C, and to lamin B. The mouse fertilization data reveal no lamins on the oocyte; however, lamins are present on the pronuclei, and chromosomes are found on the oocytes and pronuclei. It is detected that on the sea urchin sperm the lamins are reduced to acrosomal and centriolar fossae and peripheral antigens are around the sperm nucleus. The mouse sperm bind lamin antibodies regionally and do not contain antigens. Lamins and antigens are observed on both pronuclei and chromosomes during sea urchin fertilization. Mouse embryogenesis reveals that lamin A/C is not recognized at morula and blastocyst stages; however, lamin B stains are retained. In sea urchin embryogenesis lamin recognition is lost at the blastrula, gastrula, and plutei stages. It is noted that nuclear lamins lost during spermatogenesis are restored at fertilization and peripheral antigens are associated with the surface of chromosomes during meiosis and mitosis and with the periphery of the pronuclei and nuclei during interphase. 32 references.

  19. Nuclear lamins and peripheral nuclear antigens during fertilization and embryogenesis in mice and sea urchins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, G.; Schatten, H.; Simerly, C.; Maul, G. G.; Chaly, N.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear structural changes during fertilization and embryogenesis in mice and sea urchins are traced using four antibodies. The oocytes from virgin female mice, morulae and blastocytes from mated females, and gametes from the sea urchin Lytechnius variegatis are studied using mouse monoclonal antibodies to nuclear lamin A/C, monoclonal antibody to P1, human autoimmune antibodies to lamin A/C, and to lamin B. The mouse fertilization data reveal no lamins on the oocyte; however, lamins are present on the pronuclei, and chromosomes are found on the oocytes and pronuclei. It is detected that on the sea urchin sperm the lamins are reduced to acrosomal and centriolar fossae and peripheral antigens are around the sperm nucleus. The mouse sperm bind lamin antibodies regionally and do not contain antigens. Lamins and antigens are observed on both pronuclei and chromosomes during sea urchin fertilization. Mouse embryogenesis reveals that lamin A/C is not recognized at morula and blastocyst stages; however, lamin B stains are retained. In sea urchin embryogenesis lamin recognition is lost at the blastrula, gastrula, and plutei stages. It is noted that nuclear lamins lost during spermatogenesis are restored at fertilization and peripheral antigens are associated with the surface of chromosomes during meiosis and mitosis and with the periphery of the pronuclei and nuclei during interphase.

  20. Antibodies against lytic and latent Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus antigens and lymphoma in the European EpiLymph case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Benavente, Y; Mbisa, G; Labo, N; Casabonne, D; Becker, N; Maynadie, M; Foretova, L; Cocco, P L; Nieters, A; Staines, A; Bofetta, P; Brennan, P; Whitby, D; de Sanjosé, S

    2011-01-01

    Background: Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus is associated with primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease. Methods: Seropositivity to lytic and latent Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) antigens were examined in 2083 lymphomas and 2013 controls from six European countries. Results: Antibodies against KSHV latent and lytic antigens were detectable in 4.5% and 3.4% of controls, respectively, and 3.6% of cases (P>0.05). The KSHV seropositivity was associated with splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) (odds ratio (OR)=4.11, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.57–10.83) and multiple myeloma (OR=0.31, 95% CI=0.11–0.85). Conclusion: The KSHV is unlikely to contribute importantly to lymphomagenesis among immunocompetent subjects. However, the observed association with SMZL may underline a chronic antigen mechanism in its aetiology. PMID:21952625

  1. Nuclear Sm antigens in the sperm of different organisms.

    PubMed

    Delgado, F; Brito, M; Concha, I I; Schroeder, R; Burzio, L O

    1994-08-01

    Immunoblot analysis of sperm protein from several species revealed the presence of polypeptides recognised by anti-Sm sera obtained from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Immunoreactive polypeptides in human, bull, mouse and rat sperm were identified as protein B', B and D as compared with the Sm polypeptides of HeLa cells. In the sperm of rooster, the teleost fish Cyprinus carpio and the mussel Choromytilus chorus, the immunoreactive polypeptide profile was more complex. To ascertain the sperm origin of the Sm antigens, immunolocalisation with anti-Sm serum was carried out. The results demonstrated that in all the species studied staining was confined to the sperm nucleus, confirming that some polypeptides of the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex are present in the gamete.

  2. HLA-DR antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus: association with specificity of autoantibody responses to nuclear antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, J S; Klippel, J H; Penner, E; Reichlin, M; Steinberg, A D; Chused, T M; Scherak, O; Graninger, W; Hartter, E; Zielinski, C C

    1987-01-01

    HLA-DR antigens and autoantibodies to the nuclear or cytoplasmic antigens Ro/SSA, La/SSB, Sm, and RNP were determined in North American and Austrian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Analysis of the association of antibodies to these ribonucleic acid (RNA)-protein antigens with HLA-DR antigens showed that HLA-DR3 was related to the presence of anti-Ro/SSA or anti-La/SSB, or both. In contrast, anti-Sm or anti-RNP, or both were associated with HLA-DR4. HLA-DR5 was associated with absence of these autoantibodies. The data extend evidence for the complexity and heterogeneity of SLE. Moreover, they indicate that, in SLE, genes linked to those coding for HLA-DR antigens, are related to the specificity of autoantibody responses rather than to the primary immunological abnormalities of this disorder. PMID:3498447

  3. Localization of latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) on mitotic chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Rahayu, Retno; Ohsaki, Eriko; Omori, Hiroko; Ueda, Keiji

    2016-09-15

    In latent infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), viral gene expression is extremely limited and copy numbers of viral genomes remain constant. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is known to have a role in maintaining viral genome copy numbers in growing cells. Several studies have shown that LANA is localized in particular regions on mitotic chromosomes, such as centromeres/pericentromeres. We independently examined the distinct localization of LANA on mitotic chromosomes during mitosis, using super-resolution laser confocal microscopy and correlative fluorescence microscopy–electron microscopy (FM-EM) analyses. We found that the majority of LANA were not localized at particular regions such as telomeres/peritelomeres, centromeres/pericentromeres, and cohesion sites, but at the bodies of condensed chromosomes. Thus, LANA may undergo various interactions with the host factors on the condensed chromosomes in order to tether the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes and realize faithful viral genome segregation during cell division. - Highlights: • This is the first report showing LANA dots on mitotic chromosomes by fluorescent microscopy followed by electron microscopy. • LANA dots localized randomly on condensed chromosomes other than centromere/pericentromere and telomere/peritelomre. • Cellular mitotic checkpoint should not be always involved in the segregation of KSHV genomes in the latency.

  4. Modulation of Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 2-dependent transcription by protein arginine methyltransferase 5

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Fang, Jia-Shih; Chen, Ling-Chih; Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-Wen

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► Catalytic active PRMT5 substantially binds to the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 augments the EBNA2-dependent transcription. ► PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 enhances the promoter occupancy of EBNA2 on its target promoters. -- Abstract: Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) 2 features an Arginine–Glycine repeat (RG) domain at amino acid positions 335–360, which is a known target for protein arginine methyltransferaser 5 (PRMT5). In this study, we performed protein affinity pull-down assays to demonstrate that endogenous PRMT5 derived from lymphoblastoid cells specifically associated with the protein bait GST-E2 RG. Transfection of a plasmid expressing PRMT5 induced a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in EBNA2-dependent transcription of both the LMP1 promoter in AKATA cells, which contain the EBV genome endogenously, and a Cp-Luc reporter plasmid in BJAB cells, which are EBV negative. Furthermore, we showed that there was a 2-fold enrichment of EBNA2 occupancy in target promoters in the presence of exogenous PRMT5. Taken together, we show that PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of EBNA2 RG domain to coordinate with EBNA2-mediated transcription. This modulation suggests that PRMT5 may play a role in latent EBV infection.

  5. The Functional Response of B Cells to Antigenic Stimulation: A Preliminary Report of Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    du Plessis, Willem J.; Kleynhans, Léanie; du Plessis, Nelita; Stanley, Kim; Malherbe, Stephanus T.; Maasdorp, Elizna; Ronacher, Katharina; Chegou, Novel N.; Walzl, Gerhard; Loxton, Andre G.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) remains a successful pathogen, causing tuberculosis disease numbers to constantly increase. Although great progress has been made in delineating the disease, the host-pathogen interaction is incompletely described. B cells have shown to function as both effectors and regulators of immunity via non-humoral methods in both innate and adaptive immune settings. Here we assessed specific B cell functional interaction following stimulation with a broad range of antigens within the LTBI milieu. Our results indicate that B cells readily produce pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (including IL-1β, IL-10, IL-17, IL-21 and TNF-α) in response to stimulation. TLR4 and TLR9 based stimulations achieved the greatest secreted cytokine-production response and BCG stimulation displayed a clear preference for inducing IL-1β production. We also show that the cytokines produced by B cells are implicated strongly in cell-mediated communication and that plasma (memory) B cells (CD19+CD27+CD138+) is the subset with the greatest contribution to cytokine production. Collectively our data provides insight into B cell responses, where they are implicated in and quantifies responses from specific B cell phenotypes. These findings warrant further functional B cell research with a focus on specific B cell phenotypes under conditions of active TB disease to further our knowledge about the contribution of various cell subsets which could have implications for future vaccine development or refined B cell orientated treatment in the health setting. PMID:27050308

  6. Epstein-Barr virus latent genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Myung-Soo; Kieff, Elliott

    2015-01-23

    Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection has a substantial role in causing many human disorders. The persistence of these viral genomes in all malignant cells, yet with the expression of limited latent genes, is consistent with the notion that EBV latent genes are important for malignant cell growth. While the EBV-encoded nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and latent membrane protein-2A (LMP-2A) are critical, the EBNA-leader proteins, EBNA-2, EBNA-3A, EBNA-3C and LMP-1, are individually essential for in vitro transformation of primary B cells to lymphoblastoid cell lines. EBV-encoded RNAs and EBNA-3Bs are dispensable. In this review, the roles of EBV latent genes are summarized.

  7. Surface swarming motility by Pectobacterium atrosepticum is a latent phenotype that requires O antigen and is regulated by quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Steven D; Hale, Nicola; Chung, Jade C S; Hodgkinson, James T; Spring, David R; Welch, Martin

    2013-11-01

    We describe a previously cryptic phenotype associated with the opportunistic phytopathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pca): surface swarming. We found that when Pca was spotted onto plates containing <0.5% (w/v) agar, the culture produced copious amounts of extracellular matrix material containing highly motile cells. Once produced, this 'slime layer' spread rapidly across the plate either as an advancing front or as tendrils. Transposon mutagenesis was used to identify mutants that were affected in swarming. Hypo-swarmer mutants mostly carried insertions in a horizontally acquired island (HAI5), which encodes a cluster of genes involved in O antigen biosynthesis. Hyper-swarmer mutants mostly carried insertions in hexY, a known antagonist of the class I flagellar master regulator, FlhD4C2. In addition, we found that the nucleoid protein, histone-like nuclear structuring protein 2 (H-NS2), also regulated swarming behaviour. A mutant in which hns2 was overexpressed displayed a hyper-swarming phenotype, whereas a mutant in which the hns2 ORF was inactivated had a hypo-swarming phenotype. Swarming was also regulated by quorum sensing (QS) and by the carbon source being utilized. We show, using a range of epistasis experiments, that optimal swarming requires both motility and O antigen biosynthesis, and that H-NS2 and QS both promote swarming through their effects on motility.

  8. Nuclear localization of Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Sato, Yuko; Watanabe, Daisuke; Ito, Hideki; Shimonohara, Nozomi; Tsuji, Takahiro; Nakajima, Noriko; Suzuki, Yoshio; Matsuo, Koma; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Sata, Tetsutaro; Katano, Harutaka

    2010-03-15

    To clarify whether mutations in the large T gene encoded by Merkel cell polyomavirus affect the expression and function of large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma cases, we investigated the expression of large T antigen in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemistry using a rabbit polyclonal antibody revealed that large T antigen was expressed in the nuclei of Merkel cell carcinoma cells with Merkel cell polyomavirus infection. Deletion mutant analyses identified an Arg-Lys-Arg-Lys sequence (amino acids 277-280) as a nuclear localization signal in large T antigen. Sequence analyses revealed that there were no mutations in the nuclear localization signal in any of the eleven Merkel cell polyomavirus strains examined. Furthermore, stop codons were not observed in the upstream of the nuclear localization signal in any of the Merkel cell carcinoma cases examined. These data suggest that the nuclear localization signal is highly conserved and functional in Merkel cell carcinoma cases.

  9. CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Responses to Latent Antigen EBNA-1 and Lytic Antigen BZLF-1 during Persistent Lymphocryptovirus Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Leskowitz, R. M.; Zhou, X. Y.; Villinger, F.; Fogg, M. H.; Kaur, A.; Lieberman, P. M.; Wang, F.

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection leads to lifelong viral persistence through its latency in B cells. EBV-specific T cells control reactivations and prevent the development of EBV-associated malignancies in most healthy carriers, but infection can sometimes cause chronic disease and malignant transformation. Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) is the only viral protein consistently expressed during all forms of latency and in all EBV-associated malignancies and is a promising target for a therapeutic vaccine. Here, we studied the EBNA-1-specific immune response using the EBV-homologous rhesus lymphocryptovirus (rhLCV) infection in rhesus macaques. We assessed the frequency, phenotype, and cytokine production profiles of rhLCV EBNA-1 (rhEBNA-1)-specific T cells in 15 rhesus macaques and compared them to the lytic antigen of rhLCV BZLF-1 (rhBZLF-1). We were able to detect rhEBNA-1-specific CD4+ and/or CD8+ T cells in 14 of the 15 animals screened. In comparison, all 15 animals had detectable rhBZLF-1 responses. Most peptide-specific CD4+ T cells exhibited a resting phenotype of central memory (TCM), while peptide-specific CD8+ T cells showed a more activated phenotype, belonging mainly to the effector cell subset. By comparing our results to the human EBV immune response, we demonstrate that the rhLCV model is a valid system for studying chronic EBV infection and for the preclinical development of therapeutic vaccines. PMID:23698300

  10. Expression of B7 (CD80) and CD40 antigens and the CD40 ligand in Hodgkin's disease is independent of latent Epstein—Barr virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Murray, P G; Oates, J; Reynolds, G M; Crocker, J; Young, L S

    1995-01-01

    Aim—To examine the expression of CD40 and B7 (CD80) antigens and the CD40 ligand in Hodgkin's disease. Methods—Antigen and ligand expression was studied in 17 cases of Hodgkin's disease using immunohistochemistry. The study included 11 cases of Hodgkin's disease in which latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection could be demonstrated within tumour cells by in situ hybridisation for the EBV encoded early RNAs (EBERs). Results—In all cases, irrespective of EBV status, Reed-Sternberg cells and their variants (HRS cells) showed strong expression of both B7 and CD40 antigens. CD40 ligand expression was not shown in HRS cells but was confined to a subset of small lymphocytes some of which were seen to be in intimate contact with HRS cells. Paraffin wax sections from a further 60 cases of Hodgkin's disease were examined for CD40 and EBER expression alone. The CD40 antigen was identified in HRS cells in all of these cases irrespective of EBER expression. Conclusions—As CD40 and B7 expression are features of professional antigen presenting cells, these results provide further evidence that HRS cells may have antigen presenting properties and that this may contribute to the characteristic recruitment and activation of non-malignant lymphocytes which is a feature of Hodgkin's disease. The ability of HRS cells to activate Th cells may in turn contribute to their own survival through the induction of the gp39/CD40 pathway. Images PMID:16695980

  11. Small molecule and peptide-mediated inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Young; Song, Kyung-A; Kieff, Elliott; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence that targeting EBNA1 dimer, an EBV onco-antigen, can be achievable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small molecule and a peptide as EBNA1 dimerization inhibitors identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both inhibitors associated with EBNA1 and blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also, prevented its dimerization, and repressed viral gene transcription. -- Abstract: Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with human B cell lymphomas and certain carcinomas. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)'s DNA binding domain (DBD)/dimerization domain (DD)-mediated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Homodimerization of EBNA1 is essential for EBNA1 DNA binding and transactivation. In this study, we characterized a novel small molecule EBNA1 inhibitor EiK1, screened from the previous high throughput screening (HTS). The EiK1 compound specifically inhibited the EBNA1-dependent, OriP-enhanced transcription, but not EBNA1-independent transcription. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Biacore assay revealed that EiK1 associates with EBNA1 amino acid 459-607 DBD/DD. Consistent with the SPR data, in vitro gel shift assays showed that EiK1 suppressed the activity of EBNA1 binding to the cognate familial repeats (FR) sequence, but not control RBP-J{kappa} binding to the J{kappa} site. Subsequently, a cross-linker-mediated in vitro multimerization assay and EBNA1 homodimerization-dependent yeast two-hybrid assay showed that EiK1 significantly inhibited EBNA1 dimerization. In an attempt to identify more highly specific peptide inhibitors, small peptides encompassing the EBNA1 DBD/DD were screened for inhibition of EBNA1 DBD-mediated DNA binding function. The small peptide P85, covering EBNA1 a.a. 560-574, significantly blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity in vitro, prevented dimerization in vitro and in vivo, associated with

  12. Salivary production of IgA and IgG to human herpes virus 8 latent and lytic antigens by patients in whom Kaposi's sarcoma has regressed.

    PubMed

    Mbopi-Keou, Francois-Xavier; Legoff, Jerome; Piketty, Christophe; Hocini, Hakim; Malkin, Jean-Elie; Inoue, Naoki; Scully, Crispian M; Porter, Stephen R; Teo, Chong-Gee; Belec, Laurent

    2004-01-23

    IgG and IgA antibodies with specificities to a latent and a lytic antigen of human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) were detectable in the saliva and serum of eight patients whose Kaposi's sarcoma had regressed, seven of whom were HIV-1 infected. The measurement of antibody-specific activity and secretion rate, and the detection of secretory IgA all indicate anti-HHV-8 antibody activity in saliva. The specific humoral responses possibly influence mucosal replication of HHV-8, and in turn, that of HIV.

  13. Antigenic variation in African trypanosomes: the importance of chromosomal and nuclear context in VSG expression control.

    PubMed

    Glover, Lucy; Hutchinson, Sebastian; Alsford, Sam; McCulloch, Richard; Field, Mark C; Horn, David

    2013-12-01

    African trypanosomes are lethal human and animal parasites that use antigenic variation for evasion of host adaptive immunity. To facilitate antigenic variation, trypanosomes dedicate approximately one third of their nuclear genome, including many minichromosomes, and possibly all sub-telomeres, to variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes and associated sequences. Antigenic variation requires transcription of a single VSG by RNA polymerase I (Pol-I), with silencing of other VSGs, and periodic switching of the expressed gene, typically via DNA recombination with duplicative translocation of a new VSG to the active site. Thus, telomeric location, epigenetic controls and monoallelic transcription by Pol-I at an extranucleolar site are prominent features of VSGs and their expression, with telomeres, chromatin structure and nuclear organization all making vitally important contributions to monoallelic VSG expression control and switching. We discuss VSG transcription, recombination and replication control within this chromosomal and sub-nuclear context.

  14. Epigenotypes of latent herpesvirus genomes.

    PubMed

    Minarovits, J

    2006-01-01

    Epigenotypes are modified cellular or viral genotypes which differ in transcriptional activity in spite of having an identical (or nearly identical) DNA sequence. Restricted expression of latent, episomal herpesvirus genomes is also due to epigenetic modifications. There is no virus production (lytic viral replication, associated with the expression of all viral genes) in tight latency. In vitro experiments demonstrated that DNA methylation could influence the activity of latent (and/or crucial lytic) promoters of prototype strains belonging to the three herpesvirus subfamilies (alpha-, beta-, and gamma-herpesviruses). In vivo, however, DNA methylation is not a major regulator of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1, a human alpha-herpesvirus) latent gene expression in neurons of infected mice. In these cells, the promoter/enhancer region of latency-associated transcripts (LATs) is enriched with acetyl histone H3, suggesting that histone modifications may control HSV-1 latency in terminally differentiated, quiescent neurons. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, a human gamma-herpesvirus) is associated with a series of neoplasms. Latent, episomal EBV genomes are subject to host cell-dependent epigenetic modifications (DNA methylation, binding of proteins and protein complexes, histone modifications). The distinct viral epigenotypes are associated with distinct EBV latency types, i.e., cell type-specific usage of latent EBV promoters controlling the expression of latent, growth transformation-associated EBV genes. The contribution of major epigenetic mechanisms to the regulation of latent EBV promoters is variable. DNA methylation contributes to silencing of Wp and Cp (alternative promoters for transcripts coding for the nuclear antigens EBNA 1-6) and LMP1p, LMP2Ap, and LMP2Bp (promoters for transcripts encoding transmembrane proteins). DNA methylation does not control, however, Qp (a promoter for EBNA1 transcripts only) in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), although in vitro

  15. Analysis of speckled fluorescent antinuclear antibody test antisera using electrofocused nuclear antigens.

    PubMed

    Okarma, T B; Krueger, J A; Holman, H R

    1982-08-01

    Antibodies to different components of the extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) have been thought to be serological markers for clinical subsets of rheumatic diseases. However, incomplete characterization and standardization of antigenic components such as ribonucleoprotein (RNP), Sm, and SS-B (Ha), and the multiplicity of autoantibodies produced by different patients have confounded correlations between autoantibody specificity and disease subsets. This study describes the preparative separation of the antigens Sm, RNP, and Ss-B (Ha) by electrofocusing and their use in a rocket electrophoretic assay that in one step identifies and quantifies the multiple reactivities of patient sera exhibiting the speckled FANA pattern. Preparative electrofocusing generates milligram quantities of these antigens with retention of their immunologic and biochemical characteristics, facilitating further study of their biological properties and relationships to disease subsets.

  16. Regulation and autoregulation of the promoter for the latency-associated nuclear antigen of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Joseph H; Orvis, Joshua; Kim, Jong Wook; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Renne, Rolf; Dittmer, Dirk P

    2004-04-16

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) or human herpesvirus 8 has been established as the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma and certain AIDS-associated lymphomas. KSHV establishes latent infection in these tumors, invariably expressing high levels of the viral latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) protein. LANA is necessary and sufficient to maintain the KSHV episome. It also modulates viral and cellular transcription and has been implicated directly in oncogenesis because of its ability to bind to the p53 and pRb tumor suppressor proteins. Previously, we identified the LANA promoter (LANAp) and showed that it was positively regulated by LANA itself. Here, we present a detailed mutational analysis and define cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors for the core LANAp. We found that a downstream promoter element, TATA box, and GC box/Sp1 site at -29 are all individually required for activity. This architecture places LANAp into the small and unusual group of eukaryotic promoters that contain both the downstream promoter element and TATA element but lack a defined initiation site. Furthermore, we demonstrate that LANA regulates its own promoter via its C-terminal domain and does bind to a defined site within the core promoter.

  17. Conserved cell cycle regulatory properties within the amino terminal domain of the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Nikhil; Knight, Jason S.; Robertson, Erle S. . E-mail: erle@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2006-03-15

    The gammaherpesviruses Rhesus lymphocryptovirus (LCV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are closely related phylogenetically. Rhesus LCV efficiently immortalizes Rhesus B cells in vitro. However, despite a high degree of conservation between the Rhesus LCV and EBV genomes, Rhesus LCV fails to immortalize human B cells in vitro. This species restriction may, at least in part, be linked to the EBV nuclear antigens (EBNAs) and latent membrane proteins (LMPs), known to be essential for B cell transformation. We compared specific properties of EBNA3C, a well-characterized and essential EBV protein, with its Rhesus counterpart to determine whether EBNA3C phenotypes which contribute to cell cycle regulation are conserved in the Rhesus LCV. We show that both EBNA3C and Rhesus EBNA3C bind to a conserved region of mammalian cyclins, regulate pRb stability, and modulate SCF{sup Skp2}-dependent ubiquitination. These results suggest that Rhesus LCV restriction from human B cell immortalization is independent of the conserved cell cycle regulatory functions of the EBNA3C protein.

  18. Magnesium Presence Prevents Removal of Antigenic Nuclear-Associated Proteins from Bovine Pericardium for Heart Valve Engineering.

    PubMed

    Dalgliesh, Ailsa J; Liu, Zhi Zhao; Griffiths, Leigh G

    2017-03-10

    Current heart valve prostheses are associated with significant complications, including aggressive immune response, limited valve life expectancy, and inability to grow in juvenile patients. Animal derived "tissue" valves undergo glutaraldehyde fixation to mask tissue antigenicity; however, chronic immunological responses and associated calcification still commonly occur. A heart valve formed from an unfixed bovine pericardium (BP) extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold, in which antigenic burden has been eliminated or significantly reduced, has potential to overcome deficiencies of current bioprostheses. Decellularization and antigen removal methods frequently use sequential solutions extrapolated from analytical chemistry approaches to promote solubility and removal of tissue components from resultant ECM scaffolds. However, the extent to which such prefractionation strategies may inhibit removal of antigenic tissue components has not been explored. We hypothesize that presence of magnesium in prefractionation steps causes DNA precipitation and reduces removal of nuclear-associated antigenic proteins. Keeping all variables consistent bar the addition or absence of magnesium (2 mM magnesium chloride hexahydrate), residual BP ECM scaffold antigenicity and removed antigenicity were assessed, along with residual and removed DNA content, ECM morphology, scaffold composition, and recellularization potential. Furthermore, we used proteomic methods to determine the mechanism by which magnesium presence or absence affects scaffold residual antigenicity. This study demonstrates that absence of magnesium from antigen removal solutions enhances solubility and subsequent removal of antigenic nuclear-associated proteins from BP. We therefore conclude that the primary mechanism of action for magnesium removal during antigen removal processes is avoidance of DNA precipitation, facilitating solubilization and removal of nuclear-associated antigenic proteins. Future studies are

  19. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunostaining in breast carcinoma and its relationship to clinical and pathological variables.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, S; Jain, R; Rusia, U; Gupta, R L

    1997-01-01

    Tumour proliferative activity of 74 breast lesions was assessed by determining mitotic index and immunostaining for proliferative cell nuclear antigen using Peroxidase antiperoxidase method. The indices were correlated with histomorphology and clinical stage of the disease. Positively stained nuclei and mitotic figures were counted per 1000 cells to calculate Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) and mitotic index respectively. Sixty four cases stained positive for PCNA. The index ranged between 0 to 98. PCNA index was significantly low in benign lesions as compared to malignant lesions (p < 0.0002). There was a linear correlation between the mitotic index and PCNA index. PCNA index also showed significant correlation with tumour size and histologic grade; however, it had no correlation with axillary lymph node status.

  20. Expression patterns of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in trichloroacetic acid peeled skin.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Uede, Koji; Yonei, Nozomi; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2007-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether trichloroacetic acid (TCA) peeling induces cellular proliferation in human skin using an immunohistochemical method. A 40% TCA peel resulted in a greater number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive cells in the whole epidermis as compared with 60% TCA or phenol peels. This finding suggests that long-term and frequent TCA peelings of low concentration would require special attention for unexpected cutaneous lesions such as skin tumors.

  1. Identification of a nuclear export signal in the KSHV latent protein LANA2 mediating its export from the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz-Fontela, C.; Collado, M.; Rodriguez, E.; Garcia, M.A.; Alvarez-Barrientos, A.; Arroyo, J.; Nombela, C.; Rivas, C. . E-mail: mdcrivas@farm.ucm.es

    2005-11-15

    LANA2 is a latent protein detected in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-infected B cells that inhibits p53-dependent transcriptional transactivation and apoptosis and PKR-dependent apoptosis, suggesting an important role in the transforming activity of the virus. It has been reported that LANA2 localizes into the nucleus of both KSHV-infected B cells and transiently transfected HeLa cells. In this study, we show that LANA2 is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that requires a Rev-type nuclear export signal located in the C-terminus to direct the protein to the cytoplasm, through an association with the export receptor CRM1. In addition, a functional protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt phosphorylation motif partially overlapping with the nuclear export signal was identified. Nuclear exclusion of LANA2 was negatively regulated by the phosphorylation of threonine 564 by Akt. The ability of LANA2 to shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm has implications for the function of this viral protein.

  2. Constitutive expression of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNAs and nuclear antigen during latency and after induction of Epstein-Barr virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, R; Fischer, D K; Heston, L; Miller, G

    1985-01-01

    We examined the fate of two major products of latency as Epstein-Barr virus was induced to replicate. We studied a superinducible clone of HR-1 cells in the presence and absence of induction by phorbol ester, and we analyzed the X50-7 line with and without superinfection by an HR-1 viral variant which disrupts latency. The two methods of induction yielded qualitatively similar results. After induction, there was abundant synthesis of viral transcripts, amplification of viral DNA, and the appearance of many new viral polypeptides. Nonetheless, there were no changes in the cytoplasmic abundance of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNAs and no alteration in the level of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen mRNA or polypeptide. Thus, under conditions in which numerous other Epstein-Barr virus gene products are activated, the two major latent gene products are expressed at a constitutive level. Expression of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNAs and nuclear antigen must therefore be regulated in a manner completely different from expression of replicative functions. Images PMID:2981344

  3. Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus latency associated nuclear antigen protein release the G2/M cell cycle blocks by modulating ATM/ATR mediated checkpoint pathway.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Sahu, Sushil Kumar; Mohanty, Suchitra; Chakrabarti, Sudipta; Maji, Santanu; Reddy, R Rajendra; Jha, Asutosh K; Goswami, Chandan; Kundu, Chanakya N; Rajasubramaniam, Shanmugam; Verma, Subhash C; Choudhuri, Tathagata

    2014-01-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infects the human population and maintains latency stage of viral life cycle in a variety of cell types including cells of epithelial, mesenchymal and endothelial origin. The establishment of latent infection by KSHV requires the expression of an unique repertoire of genes among which latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA) plays a critical role in the replication of the viral genome. LANA regulates the transcription of a number of viral and cellular genes essential for the survival of the virus in the host cell. The present study demonstrates the disruption of the host G2/M cell cycle checkpoint regulation as an associated function of LANA. DNA profile of LANA expressing human B-cells demonstrated the ability of this nuclear antigen in relieving the drug (Nocodazole) induced G2/M checkpoint arrest. Caffeine suppressed nocodazole induced G2/M arrest indicating involvement of the ATM/ATR. Notably, we have also shown the direct interaction of LANA with Chk2, the ATM/ATR signalling effector and is responsible for the release of the G2/M cell cycle block.

  4. Characterization of the nuclear localization signal of the hepatitis delta virus antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Carolina; Freitas, Natalia; Cunha, Celso

    2008-01-05

    The delta antigen (HDAg) is the only protein encoded by the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) RNA genome. The HDAg contains an RNA binding domain, a dimerization domain, and a nuclear localization signal (NLS). The nuclear import of HDV RNPs is thought to be one of the first tasks of the HDAg during the HDV replication cycle. Using c-myc-PK fusions with several regions of the HDAg in transfection assays in Huh7 cells, we found that the HDAg NLS consists of a single stretch of 10 amino acids, EGAPPAKRAR, located in positions 66-75. Deletion and mutation analysis of this region showed that both the acidic glutamic acid residue at position 66 and the basic arginine residue at position 75 are essential for promoting nuclear import.

  5. Assay Development and High-Throughput Screening for Inhibitors of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus N-Terminal Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen Binding to Nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, Chantal; Moerke, Nathan J; Faloon, Patrick; Kaye, Kenneth M

    2014-07-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has a causative role in several human malignancies, especially in immunocompromised hosts. KSHV latently infects tumor cells and persists as an extrachromosomal episome (plasmid). KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) mediates KSHV episome persistence. LANA binds specific KSHV sequence to replicate viral DNA. In addition, LANA tethers KSHV genomes to mitotic chromosomes to efficiently segregate episomes to daughter nuclei after mitosis. N-terminal LANA (N-LANA) binds histones H2A and H2B to attach to chromosomes. Currently, there are no specific inhibitors of KSHV latent infection. To enable high-throughput screening (HTS) of inhibitors of N-LANA binding to nucleosomes, here we develop, miniaturize, and validate a fluorescence polarization (FP) assay that detects fluorophore-labeled N-LANA peptide binding to nucleosomes. We also miniaturize a counterscreen to identify DNA intercalators that nonspecifically inhibit N-LANA binding to nucleosomes, and also develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to assess N-LANA binding to nucleosomes in the absence of fluorescence. HTS of libraries containing more than 350,000 compounds identified multiple compounds that inhibited N-LANA binding to nucleosomes. No compounds survived all counterscreens, however. More complex small-molecule libraries will likely be necessary to identify specific inhibitors of N-LANA binding to histones H2A and H2B; these assays should prove useful for future screens.

  6. Insights into native epitopes of proliferating cell nuclear antigen using recombinant DNA protein products

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding full-length human proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was used to generate a panel of in vitro translated labeled protein products with COOH-terminal deletions and to construct a set of fusion proteins with COOH- and NH2-terminal deletions. A rabbit antiserum raised against an NH2-terminal peptide, a well- characterized murine monoclonal antibody (mAb), and 14 human lupus sera with autoantibody to PCNA were analyzed for their reactivity with the constructs using both immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting techniques. The rabbit antiserum reacted in immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting with constructs containing the appropriate NH2-terminal sequence and mAb reacted with a sequence from the midregion of PCNA. These experimentally induced antibodies also reacted with 15-mer synthetic peptides in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In contrast, none of the lupus sera reacted with synthetic peptides in ELISA. 9 of the 14 lupus sera also failed to react in Western immunoblotting with any recombinant fusion protein, although they all immunoprecipitated in vitro translated full-length protein. Four of the nine had variable patterns of immunoprecipitation with shorter constructs. The remaining five lupus sera were able to immunoprecipitate translation products as well as Western blot recombinant fusion proteins. From analysis of the patterns of reactivity of human lupus sera, it was deduced that the apparent heterogeneity of human autoantibodies to PCNA could be explained by immune response to highly conformational epitopes. These observations demonstrate that there might be special features in "native" epitopes of intranuclear antigens that are recognized by autoantibodies, and that these special features of native epitopes might not be present in prepared antigen used for experimental immunization. These features may be related to protein folding or to association of the antigen with other intranuclear proteins or nucleic acids, as

  7. Targeting endogenous nuclear antigens by electrotransfer of monoclonal antibodies in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Guillaume; Sibler, Annie-Paule; Desplancq, Dominique; Oulad-Abdelghani, Mustapha; Vigneron, Marc; Gannon, Julian; Van Regenmortel, Marc H.; Weiss, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies are valuable tools for functional studies in vitro, but their use in living cells remains challenging because they do not naturally cross the cell membrane. Here, we present a simple and highly efficient method for the intracytoplasmic delivery of any antibody into cultured cells. By following the fate of monoclonal antibodies that bind to nuclear antigens, it was possible to image endogenous targets and to show that inhibitory antibodies are able to induce cell growth suppression or cell death. Our electrotransfer system allowed the cancer cells we studied to be transduced without loss of viability and may have applications for a variety of intracellular immuno-interventions. PMID:23765067

  8. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen in the cytoplasm interacts with components of glycolysis and cancer.

    PubMed

    Naryzhny, Stanislav N; Lee, Hoyun

    2010-10-22

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is involved in a wide range of functions in the nucleus. However, a substantial amount of PCNA is also present in the cytoplasm, although their function is unknown. Here we show, through Far-Western blotting and mass spectrometry, that PCNA is associated with several cytoplasmic oncoproteins, including elongation factor, malate dehydrogenase, and peptidyl-prolyl isomerase. Surprisingly, PCNA is also associated with six glycolytic enzymes that are involved in the regulation of steps 4-9 in the glycolysis pathway.

  9. Antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens. Has technological drift affected clinical interpretation?

    PubMed

    Lock, R J; Unsworth, D J

    2001-03-01

    Precipitating antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens are important in the diagnosis of connective tissue diseases. Disease associations are defined using gel based techniques. Alternative technologies have been introduced, including passive haemagglutination, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, and western blotting. This leader contains a review of the literature on the clinical usefulness of these assays, together with knowledge gained from personal experience. Using the example of systemic lupus erythematosus, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of the assays for disease is discussed, as is their differences in performance. The conclusion drawn is that disease specificity is method dependent. Validation and audit of performance of the method selected by the investigation laboratory is essential.

  10. Autoantibodies against nuclear, nucleolar, and mitochondrial antigens in systemic sclerosis (scleroderma).

    PubMed

    Reimer, G

    1990-02-01

    One of the most characteristic serologic features of systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) is the occurrence of autoantibodies against nuclear and most notably against nucleolar antigens. This humoral autoimmune response is one of best studied immunologic phenomena in scleroderma. Detailed molecular information on the structure and function, as well as on reactive epitopes of autoantigens targeted by specific serum antibodies, has been revealed by clinical, immunologic, and biochemic studies in several laboratories. Autoantigens such as DNA topoisomerase I (Scl-70), centromere proteins, RNA polymerase I, U3 RNP-associated fibrillarin, PM-Scl, and 7-2 RNP antigens were shown to be specific targets of scleroderma patients and were observed to have clinical correlates within the scleroderma disease spectrum. Therefore, autoantibodies in scleroderma are not only valuable diagnostic tools but also prognosticators of the disease. Although autoantibodies in scleroderma do not appear to play a pathogenetic role in the disease process, the knowledge of the structure and function of their reactive antigens may help in answering questions concerning the etiology of the disease.

  11. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of crustacean proliferating cell nuclear antigen

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-Miranda, Jesus S.; Cardona-Felix, Cesar S.; Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A.; de-la-Re-Vega, Enrique; De la Mora, Eugenio; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.; Brieba, Luis G.

    2012-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a member of the sliding clamp family of proteins, interacts specifically with DNA replication and repair proteins through a small peptide motif called the PCNA-interacting protein or PIP box. PCNA is recognized as one of the key proteins involved in DNA metabolism. In the present study, the recombinant PCNA from Litopenaeus vannamei (LvPCNA) was heterologously overexpressed and purified using metal ion-affinity chromatography. Crystals suitable for diffraction grew overnight using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. LvPCNA crystals belong to space group C2 with unit-cell parameters a = 144.6, b = 83.4, c = 74.3 Å, β = 117.6°. One data set was processed to 3 Å resolution, with an overall R meas of 0.09 and a completeness of 93.3%. Initial phases were obtained by molecular replacement using a homology model of LvPCNA as the search model. Refinement and structural analysis are underway. This report is the first successful crystallographic analysis of a marine crustacean decapod shrimp (L. vannamei) proliferating cell nuclear antigen. PMID:23143251

  12. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of crustacean proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Miranda, Jesus S; Cardona-Felix, Cesar S; Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A; de-la-Re-Vega, Enrique; De la Mora, Eugenio; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Brieba, Luis G

    2012-11-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a member of the sliding clamp family of proteins, interacts specifically with DNA replication and repair proteins through a small peptide motif called the PCNA-interacting protein or PIP box. PCNA is recognized as one of the key proteins involved in DNA metabolism. In the present study, the recombinant PCNA from Litopenaeus vannamei (LvPCNA) was heterologously overexpressed and purified using metal ion-affinity chromatography. Crystals suitable for diffraction grew overnight using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. LvPCNA crystals belong to space group C2 with unit-cell parameters a=144.6, b=83.4, c=74.3 Å, β=117.6°. One data set was processed to 3 Å resolution, with an overall Rmeas of 0.09 and a completeness of 93.3%. Initial phases were obtained by molecular replacement using a homology model of LvPCNA as the search model. Refinement and structural analysis are underway. This report is the first successful crystallographic analysis of a marine crustacean decapod shrimp (L. vannamei) proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

  13. A Latent Markov Modelling Approach to the Evaluation of Circulating Cathodic Antigen Strips for Schistosomiasis Diagnosis Pre- and Post-Praziquantel Treatment in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Koukounari, Artemis; Donnelly, Christl A.; Moustaki, Irini; Tukahebwa, Edridah M.; Kabatereine, Narcis B.; Wilson, Shona; Webster, Joanne P.; Deelder, André M.; Vennervald, Birgitte J.; van Dam, Govert J.

    2013-01-01

    Regular treatment with praziquantel (PZQ) is the strategy for human schistosomiasis control aiming to prevent morbidity in later life. With the recent resolution on schistosomiasis elimination by the 65th World Health Assembly, appropriate diagnostic tools to inform interventions are keys to their success. We present a discrete Markov chains modelling framework that deals with the longitudinal study design and the measurement error in the diagnostic methods under study. A longitudinal detailed dataset from Uganda, in which one or two doses of PZQ treatment were provided, was analyzed through Latent Markov Models (LMMs). The aim was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of Circulating Cathodic Antigen (CCA) and of double Kato-Katz (KK) faecal slides over three consecutive days for Schistosoma mansoni infection simultaneously by age group at baseline and at two follow-up times post treatment. Diagnostic test sensitivities and specificities and the true underlying infection prevalence over time as well as the probabilities of transitions between infected and uninfected states are provided. The estimated transition probability matrices provide parsimonious yet important insights into the re-infection and cure rates in the two age groups. We show that the CCA diagnostic performance remained constant after PZQ treatment and that this test was overall more sensitive but less specific than single-day double KK for the diagnosis of S. mansoni infection. The probability of clearing infection from baseline to 9 weeks was higher among those who received two PZQ doses compared to one PZQ dose for both age groups, with much higher re-infection rates among children compared to adolescents and adults. We recommend LMMs as a useful methodology for monitoring and evaluation and treatment decision research as well as CCA for mapping surveys of S. mansoni infection, although additional diagnostic tools should be incorporated in schistosomiasis elimination programs. PMID:24367250

  14. Structural basis for the regulation of nuclear import of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) by phosphorylation of the nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Ryohei; Hirano, Hidemi; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2017-02-26

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is expressed in every EBV-positive tumor and is essential for the maintenance, replication, and transcription of the EBV genome in the nucleus of host cells. EBNA1 is a serine phosphoprotein, and it has been shown that phosphorylation of S385 in the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of EBNA1 increases the binding affinity to the nuclear import adaptor importin-α1 as well as importin-α5, and stimulates nuclear import of EBNA1. To gain insights into how phosphorylation of the EBNA1 NLS regulates nuclear import, we have determined the crystal structures of two peptide complexes of importin-α1: one with S385-phosphorylated EBNA1 NLS peptide, determined at 2.0 Å resolution, and one with non-phosphorylated EBNA1 NLS peptide, determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The structures show that EBNA1 NLS binds to the major and minor NLS-binding sites of importin-α1, and indicate that the binding affinity of the EBNA1 NLS to the minor NLS-binding site could be enhanced by phosphorylation of S385 through electrostatic interaction between the phosphate group of phospho-S385 and K392 of importin-α1 (corresponding to R395 of importin-α5) on armadillo repeat 8.

  15. Analysis of a cDNA clone expressing a human autoimmune antigen: full-length sequence of the U2 small nuclear RNA-associated B antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Habets, W.J.; Sillekens, P.T.G.; Hoet, M.H.; Schalken, J.A.; Roebroek, A.J.M.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Van de Ven, W.J.M.; Van Venrooij, W.J.

    1987-04-01

    A U2 small nuclear RNA-associated protein, designated B'', was recently identified as the target antigen for autoimmune sera from certain patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other rheumatic diseases. Such antibodies enabled them to isolate cDNA clone lambdaHB''-1 from a phage lambdagt11 expression library. This clone appeared to code for the B'' protein as established by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected mRNA. The identity of clone lambdaHB''-1 was further confirmed by partial peptide mapping and analysis of the reactivity of the recombinant antigen with monospecific and monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the 1015-base-pair cDNA insert of clone lambdaHB''-1 revealed a large open reading frame of 800 nucleotides containing the coding sequence for a polypeptide of 25,457 daltons. In vitro transcription of the lambdaHB''-1 cDNA insert and subsequent translation resulted in a protein product with the molecular size of the B'' protein. These data demonstrate that clone lambdaHB''-1 contains the complete coding sequence of this antigen. The deduced polypeptide sequence contains three very hydrophilic regions that might constitute RNA binding sites and/or antigenic determinants. These findings might have implications both for the understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases as well as for the elucidation of the biological function of autoimmune antigens.

  16. Cytoplasmic proliferating cell nuclear antigen connects glycolysis and cell survival in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ohayon, Delphine; De Chiara, Alessia; Chapuis, Nicolas; Candalh, Céline; Mocek, Julie; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Haddaoui, Lamya; Ifrah, Norbert; Hermine, Olivier; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Frachet, Philippe; Bouscary, Didier; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a scaffolding protein involved in DNA replication, has been described as a key element in survival of mature neutrophil granulocytes, which are non-proliferating cells. Herein, we demonstrated an active export of PCNA involved in cell survival and chemotherapy resistance. Notably, daunorubicin-resistant HL-60 cells (HL-60R) have a prominent cytosolic PCNA localization due to increased nuclear export compared to daunorubicin-sensitive HL-60 cells (HL-60S). By interacting with nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), a protein involved in NAD biosynthesis, PCNA coordinates glycolysis and survival, especially in HL-60R cells. These cells showed a dramatic increase in intracellular NAD+ concentration as well as glycolysis including increased expression and activity of hexokinase 1 and increased lactate production. Furthermore, this functional activity of cytoplasmic PCNA was also demonstrated in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Our data uncover a novel pathway of nuclear export of PCNA that drives cell survival by increasing metabolism flux. PMID:27759041

  17. A novel mechanism for regulating the activity of proliferating cell nuclear antigen by a small protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuo; Huang, Richard Y-C; Yopp, Daniel C; Hileman, Travis H; Santangelo, Thomas J; Hurwitz, Jerard; Hudgens, Jeffrey W; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-05-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) forms a trimeric ring that associates with and influences the activity of many proteins participating in DNA metabolic processes and cell cycle progression. Previously, an uncharacterized small protein, encoded by TK0808 in the archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis, was shown to stably interact with PCNA in vivo. Here, we show that this protein, designated Thermococcales inhibitor of PCNA (TIP), binds to PCNA in vitro and inhibits PCNA-dependent activities likely by preventing PCNA trimerization. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis, the interacting regions of PCNA and TIP were identified. Most proteins bind to PCNA via a PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) motif that interacts with the inter domain connecting loop (IDCL) on PCNA. TIP, however, lacks any known PCNA-interacting motif, suggesting a new mechanism for PCNA binding and regulation of PCNA-dependent activities, which may support the development of a new subclass of therapeutic biomolecules for inhibiting PCNA.

  18. Structure and biochemical characterization of proliferating cellular nuclear antigen from a parasitic protozoon

    SciTech Connect

    Cardona-Felix, Cesar S.; Lara-Gonzalez, Samuel; Brieba, Luis G.

    2012-02-08

    Proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a toroidal-shaped protein that is involved in cell-cycle control, DNA replication and DNA repair. Parasitic protozoa are early-diverged eukaryotes that are responsible for neglected diseases. In this work, a PCNA from a parasitic protozoon was identified, cloned and biochemically characterized and its crystal structure was determined. Structural and biochemical studies demonstrate that PCNA from Entamoeba histolytica assembles as a homotrimer that is able to interact with and stimulate the activity of a PCNA-interacting peptide-motif protein from E. histolytica, EhDNAligI. The data indicate a conservation of the biochemical mechanisms of PCNA-mediated interactions between metazoa, yeast and parasitic protozoa.

  19. Identification of HLA-A*0201-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope from proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Li, Hui-Zhong; Liu, Jun-Jie; Guo, Zhen; Zhang, Bao-Fu; Chen, Fei-Fei; Pei, Dong-Sheng; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2011-02-01

    Peptide-based immunotherapy strategies appear promising as an approach to successfully induce an antitumor immune response and prolong survival in patients with various cancers. Protein antigens and their specific epitopes are formulation targets for anti-tumor vaccines. Bioinformatical approaches to predict major histocompatibility complex binding peptides can facilitate the resource-consuming effort of T cell epitope identification. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen including Ki-67 and PCNA, associated with the proliferation process of the cell, seems to be an attractive new target for tumor-specific immunotherapy. In this study, we predicted seven HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL candidate epitope of Ki-67 and eight epitope of PCNA by computer algorithm SYFPEITHI, BIMAS, and IEDB_ANN. Subsequently, biological functions of these peptides were tested by experiments in vitro. We found Ki-67((280-288)) (LQGETQLLV) had the strongest binding-affinity with HLA-A*0201. Further study revealed that Ki-67((280-288)) increased the frequency of IFN-γ-producing T cells compared to a negative peptide. Because Ki-67 was broadly expressed in most advanced malignant tumors, indicating a potential anti-tumor application in the future.

  20. Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 3 (EBNA3) Proteins Regulate EBNA2 Binding to Distinct RBPJ Genomic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Anqi; Welch, Rene; Zhao, Bo; Ta, Tram; Keleş, Sündüz

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Latent infection of B lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in vitro results in their immortalization into lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs); this latency program is controlled by the EBNA2 viral transcriptional activator, which targets promoters via RBPJ, a DNA binding protein in the Notch signaling pathway. Three other EBNA3 proteins (EBNA3A, EBNA3B, and EBNA3C) interact with RBPJ to regulate cell gene expression. The mechanism by which EBNAs regulate different genes via RBPJ remains unclear. Our chromatin immunoprecipitation with deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis of the EBNA3 proteins analyzed in concert with prior EBNA2 and RBPJ data demonstrated that EBNA3A, EBNA3B, and EBNA3C bind to distinct, partially overlapping genomic locations. Although RBPJ interaction is critical for EBNA3A and EBNA3C growth effects, only 30 to 40% of EBNA3-bound sites colocalize with RBPJ. Using LCLs conditional for EBNA3A or EBNA3C activity, we demonstrate that EBNA2 binding at sites near EBNA3A- or EBNA3C-regulated genes is specifically regulated by the respective EBNA3. To investigate EBNA3 binding specificity, we identified sequences and transcription factors enriched at EBNA3A-, EBNA3B-, and EBNA3C-bound sites. This confirmed the prior observation that IRF4 is enriched at EBNA3A- and EBNA3C-bound sites and revealed IRF4 enrichment at EBNA3B-bound sites. Using IRF4-negative BJAB cells, we demonstrate that IRF4 is essential for EBNA3C, but not EBNA3A or EBNA3B, binding to specific sites. These results support a model in which EBNA2 and EBNA3s compete for distinct subsets of RBPJ sites to regulate cell genes and where EBNA3 subset specificity is determined by interactions with other cell transcription factors. IMPORTANCE Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent gene products cause human cancers and transform B lymphocytes into immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines in vitro. EBV nuclear antigens (EBNAs) and membrane proteins constitutively activate pathways important for

  1. The Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus Latency-associated Nuclear Antigen DNA Binding Domain Dorsal Positive Electrostatic Patch Facilitates DNA Replication and Episome Persistence.

    PubMed

    Li, Shijun; Tan, Min; Juillard, Franceline; Ponnusamy, Rajesh; Correia, Bruno; Simas, J Pedro; Carrondo, Maria A; McVey, Colin E; Kaye, Kenneth M

    2015-11-20

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has a causative role in several human malignancies. KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) mediates persistence of viral episomes in latently infected cells. LANA mediates KSHV DNA replication and segregates episomes to progeny nuclei. The structure of the LANA DNA binding domain was recently solved, revealing a positive electrostatic patch opposite the DNA binding surface, which is the site of BET protein binding. Here we investigate the functional role of the positive patch in LANA-mediated episome persistence. As expected, LANA mutants with alanine or glutamate substitutions in the central, peripheral, or lateral portions of the positive patch maintained the ability to bind DNA by EMSA. However, all of the substitution mutants were deficient for LANA DNA replication and episome maintenance. Mutation of the peripheral region generated the largest deficiencies. Despite these deficiencies, all positive patch mutants concentrated to dots along mitotic chromosomes in cells containing episomes, similar to LANA. The central and peripheral mutants, but not the lateral mutants, were reduced for BET protein interaction as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation. However, defects in BET protein binding were independent of episome maintenance function. Overall, the reductions in episome maintenance closely correlated with DNA replication deficiencies, suggesting that the replication defects account for the reduced episome persistence. Therefore, the electrostatic patch exerts a key role in LANA-mediated DNA replication and episome persistence and may act through a host cell partner(s) other than a BET protein or by inducing specific structures or complexes.

  2. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen, p53 and micro vessel density: Grade II vs. Grade III astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Malhan, Priya; Husain, Nuzhat; Bhalla, Shalini; Gupta, Rakesh K; Husain, Mazhar

    2010-01-01

    Histological classification and grading are prime procedures in the management of patients with astrocytoma, providing vital data for therapeutic decision making and prognostication. However, it has limitations in assessing biological tumor behavior. This can be overcome by using newer immunohistochemical techniques. This study was carried out to compare proliferative indices using proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), extent of p53 expression and micro vessel morphometric parameters in patients with low grade and anaplastic astrocytoma. Twenty-five patients, each of grade II and grade III astrocytoma were evaluated using monoclonal antibodies to PCNA, p53 protein and factor VIII related antigen. PCNA, p53-labeling indices were calculated along with micro vessel morphometric analysis using Biovis Image plus Software. Patients with grade III astrocytoma had higher PCNA and p53 labeling indices as compared with grade II astrocytoma (29.14 plus/minus 9.87% vs. 16.84 plus/minus 6.57%, p 0.001; 18.18 plus/minus 6.14% vs. 6.14 plus/minus 7.23%, p 0.001, respectively). Micro vessel percentage area of patients with grade III astrocytoma was also (4.26 plus/minus 3.70 vs. 1.05 plus/minus 0.56, p 0.001), higher along with other micro vessel morphometric parameters. Discordance between histology and one or more IHC parameters was seen in 5/25 (20%) of patients with grade III astrocytoma and 9/25 (36%) of patients with grade II disease. PCNA and p53 labeling indices were positively correlated with Pearson's correlation, p less than 0.001 for both). Increased proliferative fraction, genetic alterations and neovascularization mark biological aggressiveness in astrocytoma. Immunohistochemical evaluation scores over meet the challenge of accurate prognostication of this potentially fatal malignancy.

  3. Nuclear export signal-interacting protein forms complexes with lamin A/C-Nups to mediate the CRM1-independent nuclear export of large hepatitis delta antigen.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng; Jiang, Jia-Yin; Chang, Shin C; Tsay, Yeou-Guang; Chen, Mei-Ru; Chang, Ming-Fu

    2013-02-01

    Nuclear export is an important process that not only regulates the functions of cellular factors but also facilitates the assembly of viral nucleoprotein complexes. Chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1) that mediates the transport of proteins bearing the classical leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) is the best-characterized nuclear export receptor. Recently, several CRM1-independent nuclear export pathways were also identified. The nuclear export of the large form of hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg-L), a nucleocapsid protein of hepatitis delta virus (HDV), which contains a CRM1-independent proline-rich NES, is mediated by the host NES-interacting protein (NESI). The mechanism of the NESI protein in mediating nuclear export is still unknown. In this study, NESI was characterized as a highly glycosylated membrane protein. It interacted and colocalized well in the nuclear envelope with lamin A/C and nucleoporins. Importantly, HDAg-L could be coimmunoprecipitated with lamin A/C and nucleoporins. In addition, binding of the cargo HDAg-L to the C terminus of NESI was detected for the wild-type protein but not for the nuclear export-defective HDAg-L carrying a P205A mutation [HDAg-L(P205A)]. Knockdown of lamin A/C effectively reduced the nuclear export of HDAg-L and the assembly of HDV. These data indicate that by forming complexes with lamin A/C and nucleoporins, NESI facilitates the CRM1-independent nuclear export of HDAg-L.

  4. A binding site for the transcription factor Grainyhead/Nuclear transcription factor-1 contributes to regulation of the Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Y; Yamagishi, M; Nishimoto, Y; Taguchi, O; Matsukage, A; Yamaguchi, M

    1999-12-03

    The Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter contains multiple transcriptional regulatory elements, including upstream regulatory element (URE), DNA replication-related element, E2F recognition sites, and three common regulatory factor for DNA replication and DNA replication-related element-binding factor genes recognition sites. In nuclear extracts of Drosophila embryos, we detected a protein factor, the URE-binding factor (UREF), that recognizes the nucleotide sequence 5'-AAACCAGTTGGCA located within URE. Analyses in Drosophila Kc cells and transgenic flies revealed that the UREF-binding site plays an important role in promoter activity both in cultured cells and in living flies. A yeast one-hybrid screen using URE as a bait allowed isolation of a cDNA encoding a transcription factor, Grainyhead/nuclear transcription factor-1 (GRH/NTF-1). The nucleotide sequence required for binding to GRH was indistinguishable from that for UREF detected in embryo nuclear extracts. Furthermore, a specific antibody to GRH reacted with UREF in embryo nuclear extracts. From these results we conclude that GRH is identical to UREF. Although GRH has been thought to be involved in regulation of differentiation-related genes, this study demonstrates, for the first time, involvement of a GRH-binding site in regulation of the DNA replication-related proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene.

  5. The clinical utility of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuangshuang; Yang, Junsheng; Li, Jinpeng; Song, Jinlong

    2016-06-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) has been suggested as a potential diagnostic biomarker for early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, its prognostic significance in HCC remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the expression and significance of PCNA in HCC and then analyzed the role of PCNA in clinical outcomes. Our findings show that the expression intensity of PCNA is much higher in HCC tissues than that in paracarcinoma tissues and associated with AFP, albumin, tumor number, clinical grade, vascular invasion, and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (all p < 0.000). Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that high PCNA expression was associated with poor disease-free survival (DFS) (p < 0.000) and overall survival (OS) (p < 0.000) in a training cohort of 76 HCC patients. Multiple Cox regression analysis indicated PCNA acts as an independent predictor for DFS (p = 0.002) and OS (p = 0.004) in HCC patients. Along with pathological results, our systematic review also identified the expression of PCNA was closely associated with DFS and OS (both p < 0.000). In conclusion, this study suggested that PCNA is increased in HCC patients and is indeed a novel unfavorable biomarker for prognostic prediction for patients with this deadly disease.

  6. Prognostic value of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in parotid gland cancer.

    PubMed

    Stenner, Markus; Demgensky, Ariane; Molls, Christoph; Hardt, Aline; Luers, Jan C; Grosheva, Maria; Huebbers, Christian U; Klussmann, Jens P

    2012-04-01

    Although cell proliferation is related to tumour aggressiveness and prognosis, there are few studies describing the expression of proliferative markers in salivary gland cancer. Our aim was to assess the long-term prognostic value of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in a large group of histologically different salivary gland cancers. We analysed the expression of PCNA in 159 patients with parotid gland cancer by means of immunohistochemistry. The mean follow-up time was 56.6 months. A high expression of PCNA showed a significant correlation to the patients' pathological lymph node stage (p = 0.004). A high PCNA expression significantly indicated a poor 5-year disease-free (p = 0.046) and overall survival rate (p = 0.018). The PCNA expression was the only prognostic factor for a worse 5-year disease-free and overall survival in acinic cell carcinomas (p = 0.004, p = 0.022). The correlation between PCNA expression and survival probabilities of salivary gland cancer might make proliferation markers helpful tools in patient follow-up, prognosis and targeted therapy in salivary gland cancer in future.

  7. Targeting proliferating cell nuclear antigen and its protein interactions induces apoptosis in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Rebekka; Misund, Kristine; Holien, Toril; Bachke, Siri; Gilljam, Karin M; Våtsveen, Thea K; Rø, Torstein B; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Sundan, Anders; Otterlei, Marit

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a hematological cancer that is considered incurable despite advances in treatment strategy during the last decade. Therapies targeting single pathways are unlikely to succeed due to the heterogeneous nature of the malignancy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a multifunctional protein essential for DNA replication and repair that is often overexpressed in cancer cells. Many proteins involved in the cellular stress response interact with PCNA through the five amino acid sequence AlkB homologue 2 PCNA-interacting motif (APIM). Thus inhibiting PCNA's protein interactions may be a good strategy to target multiple pathways simultaneously. We initially found that overexpression of peptides containing the APIM sequence increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to contemporary therapeutics. Here we have designed a cell-penetrating APIM-containing peptide, ATX-101, that targets PCNA and show that it has anti-myeloma activity. We found that ATX-101 induced apoptosis in multiple myeloma cell lines and primary cancer cells, while bone marrow stromal cells and primary healthy lymphocytes were much less sensitive. ATX-101-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent and cell cycle phase-independent. ATX-101 also increased multiple myeloma cells' sensitivity against melphalan, a DNA damaging agent commonly used for treatment of multiple myeloma. In a xenograft mouse model, ATX-101 was well tolerated and increased the anti-tumor activity of melphalan. Therefore, targeting PCNA by ATX-101 may be a novel strategy in multiple myeloma treatment.

  8. Ribonucleotide reductase activity is coupled to DNA synthesis via proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Salguero, Israel; Guarino, Estrella; Shepherd, Marianne E A; Deegan, Tom D; Havens, Courtney G; MacNeill, Stuart A; Walter, Johannes C; Kearsey, Stephen E

    2012-04-24

    Synthesis of deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) is required for both DNA replication and DNA repair and is catalyzed by ribonucleotide reductases (RNR), which convert ribonucleotides to their deoxy forms [1, 2]. Maintaining the correct levels of dNTPs for DNA synthesis is important for minimizing the mutation rate [3-7], and this is achieved by tight regulation of RNR [2, 8, 9]. In fission yeast, RNR is regulated in part by a small protein inhibitor, Spd1, which is degraded in S phase and after DNA damage to allow upregulation of dNTP supply [10-12]. Spd1 degradation is mediated by the activity of the CRL4(Cdt2) ubiquitin ligase complex [5, 13, 14]. This has been reported to be dependent on modulation of Cdt2 levels, which are cell cycle regulated, peaking in S phase, and which also increase after DNA damage in a checkpoint-dependent manner [7, 13]. We show here that Cdt2 level fluctuations are not sufficient to regulate Spd1 proteolysis and that the key step in this event is the interaction of Spd1 with the polymerase processivity factor proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), complexed onto DNA. This mechanism thus provides a direct link between DNA synthesis and RNR regulation.

  9. Repression of the Drosophila proliferating-cell nuclear antigen gene promoter by zerknuellt protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Hirose, Fumiko; Nishida, Yasuyoshi; Matsukage, Akio )

    1991-10-01

    A 631-bp fragment containing the 5{prime}-flanking region of the Drosophila melanogaster proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene was placed upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene of a CAT vector. A transient expression assay of CAT activity in Drosophila Kc cells transfected with this plasmid and a set of 5{prime}-deletion derivatives revealed that the promoter function resided within a 192-bp region. Cotransfection with a zerknuellt (zen)-expressing plasmid specifically repressed CAT expression. However, cotransfection with expression plasmids for a nonfunctional zen mutation, even skipped, or bicoid showed no significant effect on CAT expression. RNase protection analysis revealed that the repression by zen was at the transcription step. The target sequence of zen was mapped within the 34-bp region of the PCNA gene promoter, even though it lacked zen protein-binding sites. Transgenic flies carrying the PCNA gene regulatory region fused with lacZ were established. These results indicate that zen indirectly represses PCNA gene expression, probably by regulating the expression of some transcription factor(s) that binds to the PCNA gene promoter.

  10. Three proliferating cell nuclear antigen homologues from Metallosphaera sedula form a head-to-tail heterotrimer

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Fumiya; Hirakawa, Hidehiko; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a sliding clamp that plays a key role in DNA metabolism. Genome sequence analysis has revealed that some crenarchaea possess three PCNA genes in their genome, but it has been reported that three PCNAs do not always form a unique heterotrimer composed of one of each molecule. The thermoacidophilic archaeon, Metallosphaera sedula, has three PCNA homologue genes. Here, we demonstrated that the three PCNA homologues, MsePCNA1, MsePCNA2 and MsePCNA3, exclusively form a heterotrimer in a stepwise fashion; MsePCNA1 and MsePCNA2 form a heterodimer, and then MsePCNA3 binds to the heterodimer. We determined that the dissociation constants between MsePCNA1 and MsePCNA2, and between MsePCNA3 and the MsePCNA1:MsePCNA2 heterodimer are 0.29 and 43 nM, respectively. Moreover, the MsePCNA1, MsePCNA2 and MsePCNA3 heterotrimer stimulated M. sedula DNA ligase 1 activity, suggesting that the heterotrimer works as a DNA sliding clamp in the organism. The stable and stepwise heterotrimerization of M. sedula PCNA homologues would be useful to generate functional protein-based materials such as artificial multi-enzyme complexes, functional hydrogels and protein fibres, which have recently been achieved by protein self-assembly. PMID:27228945

  11. Characterization of X-ray-induced immunostaining of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in human diploid fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Masahiko; Sasaki, Takehito; Takasaki, Yoshinari

    1996-01-01

    The repair of X-ray-induced DNA damage related to the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was characterized in human diploid fibroblasts by an indirect immunofluorescence method. PCNA staining induced by X rays was lost after DNase I treatment but not after RNase treatment. The staining was not induced when ATP was depleted or the temperature was lowered to 0{degrees}C during the X irradiation. When cells were incubated at 37{degrees}C after X irradiation, PCNA staining diminished gradually and was almost entirely absent 12-15 h later. On the other hand, PCNA staining persisted during aphidicolin treatment even 20 h after X irradiation. Induction of PCNA staining was not affected by the aphidicolin treatment. Cycloheximide treatment did not affect induction of the staining either, but did inhibit the disappearance of the staining. There was no difference in the staining pattern and time course of PCNA staining after X irradiation between normal and xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XP-A) cells. These results imply that PCNA-dependent, aphidicolin-sensitive DNA polymerases may be involved in repair of X-ray-induced DNA damage in vivo, but the repair initiation step could be different from that of nucleotide excision repair initiated by XP proteins. 39 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) as a direct downstream target gene of Hoxc8

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Hyehyun; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Bok, Jinwoong; Chung, Hyun Joo; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2010-02-19

    Hoxc8 is a member of Hox family transcription factors that play crucial roles in spatiotemporal body patterning during embryogenesis. Hox proteins contain a conserved 61 amino acid homeodomain, which is responsible for recognition and binding of the proteins onto Hox-specific DNA binding motifs and regulates expression of their target genes. Previously, using proteome analysis, we identified Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) as one of the putative target genes of Hoxc8. Here, we asked whether Hoxc8 regulates Pcna expression by directly binding to the regulatory sequence of Pcna. In mouse embryos at embryonic day 11.5, the expression pattern of Pcna was similar to that of Hoxc8 along the anteroposterior body axis. Moreover, Pcna transcript levels as well as cell proliferation rate were increased by overexpression of Hoxc8 in C3H10T1/2 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Characterization of 2.3 kb genomic sequence upstream of Pcna coding region revealed that the upstream sequence contains several Hox core binding sequences and one Hox-Pbx binding sequence. Direct binding of Hoxc8 proteins to the Pcna regulatory sequence was verified by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Taken together, our data suggest that Pcna is a direct downstream target of Hoxc8.

  13. Ribosome Protein L4 is essential for Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 function

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chih-Lung; Liu, Cheng-Der; You, Ren-In; Ching, Yung-Hao; Liang, Jun; Ke, Liangru; Chen, Ya-Lin; Chen, Hong-Chi; Hsu, Hao-Jen; Liou, Je-Wen; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1)-mediated origin of plasmid replication (oriP) DNA episome maintenance is essential for EBV-mediated tumorigenesis. We have now found that EBNA1 binds to Ribosome Protein L4 (RPL4). RPL4 shRNA knockdown decreased EBNA1 activation of an oriP luciferase reporter, EBNA1 DNA binding in lymphoblastoid cell lines, and EBV genome number per lymphoblastoid cell line. EBV infection increased RPL4 expression and redistributed RPL4 to cell nuclei. RPL4 and Nucleolin (NCL) were a scaffold for an EBNA1-induced oriP complex. The RPL4 N terminus cooperated with NCL-K429 to support EBNA1 and oriP-mediated episome binding and maintenance, whereas the NCL C-terminal K380 and K393 induced oriP DNA H3K4me2 modification and promoted EBNA1 activation of oriP-dependent transcription. These observations provide new insights into the mechanisms by which EBV uses NCL and RPL4 to establish persistent B-lymphoblastoid cell infection. PMID:26858444

  14. A small protein inhibits proliferating cell nuclear antigen by breaking the DNA clamp

    PubMed Central

    Altieri, Amanda S.; Ladner, Jane E.; Li, Zhuo; Robinson, Howard; Sallman, Zahur F.; Marino, John P.; Kelman, Zvi

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) forms a trimeric ring that encircles duplex DNA and acts as an anchor for a number of proteins involved in DNA metabolic processes. PCNA has two structurally similar domains (I and II) linked by a long loop (inter-domain connector loop, IDCL) on the outside of each monomer of the trimeric structure that makes up the DNA clamp. All proteins that bind to PCNA do so via a PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) motif that binds near the IDCL. A small protein, called TIP, binds to PCNA and inhibits PCNA-dependent activities although it does not contain a canonical PIP motif. The X-ray crystal structure of TIP bound to PCNA reveals that TIP binds to the canonical PIP interaction site, but also extends beyond it through a helix that relocates the IDCL. TIP alters the relationship between domains I and II within the PCNA monomer such that the trimeric ring structure is broken, while the individual domains largely retain their native structure. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) confirms the disruption of the PCNA trimer upon addition of the TIP protein in solution and together with the X-ray crystal data, provides a structural basis for the mechanism of PCNA inhibition by TIP. PMID:27141962

  15. Asymmetric Arginine dimethylation of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 promotes DNA targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Henrik; Barth, Stephanie; Mamiani, Alfredo; Zimber-Strobl, Ursula; West, Michelle J.; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Graesser, Friedrich A.

    2010-02-20

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) growth-transforms B-lymphocytes. The virus-encoded nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) is essential for transformation and activates gene expression by association with DNA-bound transcription factors such as RBPJkappa (CSL/CBF1). We have previously shown that EBNA2 contains symmetrically dimethylated Arginine (sDMA) residues. Deletion of the RG-repeat results in a reduced ability of the virus to immortalise B-cells. We now show that the RG repeat also contains asymmetrically dimethylated Arginines (aDMA) but neither non-methylated (NMA) Arginines nor citrulline residues. We demonstrate that only aDMA-containing EBNA2 is found in a complex with DNA-bound RBPJkappa in vitro and preferentially associates with the EBNA2-responsive EBV C, LMP1 and LMP2A promoters in vivo. Inhibition of methylation in EBV-infected cells results in reduced expression of the EBNA2-regulated viral gene LMP1, providing additional evidence that methylation is a prerequisite for DNA-binding by EBNA2 via association with the transcription factor RBPJkappa.

  16. Comparative analyses of the two proliferating cell nuclear antigens from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus kodakarensis.

    PubMed

    Kuba, Yumani; Ishino, Sonoko; Yamagami, Takeshi; Tokuhara, Masahiro; Kanai, Tamotsu; Fujikane, Ryosuke; Daiyasu, Hiromi; Atomi, Haruyuki; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2012-11-01

    The DNA sliding clamp is a multifunctional protein involved in cellular DNA transactions. In Archaea and Eukaryota, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is the sliding clamp. The ring-shaped PCNA encircles double-stranded DNA within its central hole and tethers other proteins on DNA. The majority of Crenarchaeota, a subdomain of Archaea, have multiple PCNA homologues, and they are capable of forming heterotrimeric rings for their functions. In contrast, most organisms in Euryarchaeota, the other major subdomain, have a single PCNA forming a homotrimeric ring structure. Among the Euryarchaeota whose genome is sequenced, Thermococcus kodakarensis is the only species with two genes encoding PCNA homologues on its genome. We cloned the two genes from the T. kodakarensis genome, and the gene products, PCNA1 and PCNA2, were characterized. PCNA1 stimulated the DNA synthesis reactions of the two DNA polymerases, PolB and PolD, from T. kodakarensis in vitro. PCNA2, however, only had an effect on PolB. We were able to disrupt the gene for PCNA2, whereas gene disruption for PCNA1 was not possible, suggesting that PCNA1 is essential for DNA replication. The sensitivities of the Δpcna2 mutant strain to ultraviolet irradiation (UV), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and mitomycin C (MMC) were indistinguishable from those of the wild-type strain.

  17. A novel mechanism for regulating the activity of proliferating cell nuclear antigen by a small protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuo; Huang, Richard Y.-C.; Yopp, Daniel C.; Hileman, Travis H.; Santangelo, Thomas J.; Hurwitz, Jerard; Hudgens, Jeffrey W.; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) forms a trimeric ring that associates with and influences the activity of many proteins participating in DNA metabolic processes and cell cycle progression. Previously, an uncharacterized small protein, encoded by TK0808 in the archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis, was shown to stably interact with PCNA in vivo. Here, we show that this protein, designated Thermococcales inhibitor of PCNA (TIP), binds to PCNA in vitro and inhibits PCNA-dependent activities likely by preventing PCNA trimerization. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis, the interacting regions of PCNA and TIP were identified. Most proteins bind to PCNA via a PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) motif that interacts with the inter domain connecting loop (IDCL) on PCNA. TIP, however, lacks any known PCNA-interacting motif, suggesting a new mechanism for PCNA binding and regulation of PCNA-dependent activities, which may support the development of a new subclass of therapeutic biomolecules for inhibiting PCNA. PMID:24728986

  18. Validating the disruption of proliferating cell nuclear antigen interactions in the development of targeted cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Shanna J.; Hickey, Robert J.; Malkas, Linda H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human DNA replication and repair is a highly coordinated process involving the specifically timed actions of numerous proteins and enzymes. Many of these proteins require interaction with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) for activation within the process. The interdomain connector loop (IDCL) of PCNA provides a docking site for many of those proteins, suggesting that this region is critically important in the regulation of cellular function. Previous work in this laboratory has demonstrated that a peptide mimicking a specific region of the IDCL (caPeptide) has the ability to disrupt key protein-protein interactions between PCNA and its binding partners, thereby inhibiting DNA replication within the cells. In this study, we confirm the ability of the caPeptide to disrupt DNA replication function using both intact cell and in vitro DNA replication assays. Further, we were able to demonstrate that treatment with caPeptide results in a decrease of polymerase δ activity that correlates with the observed decrease in DNA replication. We have also successfully developed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay to validate the disruption of the PCNA-pol δ interaction with caPeptide. PMID:26889573

  19. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunostaining--a prognostic factor in ovarian cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, H.; Nasim, M. M.; Sarraf, C. E.; Alison, M. R.; Love, S.; Lambert, H. E.; Price, P.

    1995-01-01

    The measurement of tumour cell proliferation is becoming increasingly recognised in defining prognostic groups. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunolocalisation can be used as an index of cell proliferation and may define the extent of departure from normal growth control. The monoclonal antibody PC10 stains PCNA in archival paraffin-embedded tissue. This study investigates its potential as a prognostic marker in early and advanced ovarian cancer. A three-stage immunoperoxidase technique was developed to detect the monoclonal antibody PC10. Archival paraffin-embedded tissue from 19 stage I ovarian tumours (13 malignant and six borderline) and 79 advanced (stage IIb-IV) ovarian tumours (patients entered into the Third North-West Thames Ovarian Cancer Trial) was immunostained with PC10. PC10 immunostaining was performed successfully in 91.8% of cases. The PC10 labelling index (PC10 LI) ranged from 1.5% to 88% with a mean value of 47.4%. Stage I borderline tumours had significantly lower PCNA labelling indexes than stage I malignant tumours (P < 0.048). In advanced disease there was an inverse correlation between PC10 and overall survival, and in those patients who underwent good debulking surgery (37 patients with disease < 2 cm diameter) a low PC10 value (< 36.5%) correlated with improved survival (log-rank trend test for survival, chi 2 = 5.75, P = 0.017). PCNA immunostaining defines a good prognostic subgroup in adequately debulked patients with ovarian cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:7841053

  20. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen prevents trinucleotide repeat expansions by promoting repeat deletion and hairpin removal

    PubMed Central

    Beaver, Jill M.; Lai, Yanhao; Rolle, Shantell J.; Liu, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    DNA base lesions and base excision repair (BER) within trinucleotide repeat (TNR) tracts modulate repeat instability through the coordination among the key BER enzymes DNA polymerase β, flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and DNA ligase I (LIG I). However, it remains unknown whether BER cofactors can also alter TNR stability. In this study, we discovered that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a cofactor of BER, promoted CAG repeat deletion and removal of a CAG repeat hairpin during BER in a duplex CAG repeat tract and CAG hairpin loop, respectively. We showed that PCNA stimulated LIG I activity on a nick across a small template loop during BER in a duplex (CAG)20 repeat tract promoting small repeat deletions. Surprisingly, we found that during BER in a hairpin loop, PCNA promoted reannealing of the upstream flap of a double-flap intermediate, thereby facilitating the formation of a downstream flap and stimulating FEN1 cleavage activity and hairpin removal. Our results indicate that PCNA plays a critical role in preventing CAG repeat expansions by modulating the structures of dynamic DNA via cooperation with BER enzymes. We provide the first evidence that PCNA prevents CAG repeat expansions during BER by promoting CAG repeat deletion and removal of a TNR hairpin. PMID:27793507

  1. Validating the disruption of proliferating cell nuclear antigen interactions in the development of targeted cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shanna J; Hickey, Robert J; Malkas, Linda H

    2016-01-01

    Human DNA replication and repair is a highly coordinated process involving the specifically timed actions of numerous proteins and enzymes. Many of these proteins require interaction with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) for activation within the process. The interdomain connector loop (IDCL) of PCNA provides a docking site for many of those proteins, suggesting that this region is critically important in the regulation of cellular function. Previous work in this laboratory has demonstrated that a peptide mimicking a specific region of the IDCL (caPeptide) has the ability to disrupt key protein-protein interactions between PCNA and its binding partners, thereby inhibiting DNA replication within the cells. In this study, we confirm the ability of the caPeptide to disrupt DNA replication function using both intact cell and in vitro DNA replication assays. Further, we were able to demonstrate that treatment with caPeptide results in a decrease of polymerase δ activity that correlates with the observed decrease in DNA replication. We have also successfully developed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay to validate the disruption of the PCNA-pol δ interaction with caPeptide.

  2. A small protein inhibits proliferating cell nuclear antigen by breaking the DNA clamp

    DOE PAGES

    Altieri, Amanda S.; Ladner, Jane E.; Li, Zhuo; ...

    2016-05-03

    Here, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) forms a trimeric ring that encircles duplex DNA and acts as an anchor for a number of proteins involved in DNA metabolic processes. PCNA has two structurally similar domains (I and II) linked by a long loop (inter-domain connector loop, IDCL) on the outside of each monomer of the trimeric structure that makes up the DNA clamp. All proteins that bind to PCNA do so via a PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) motif that binds near the IDCL. A small protein, called TIP, binds to PCNA and inhibits PCNA-dependent activities although it does not contain amore » canonical PIP motif. The X-ray crystal structure of TIP bound to PCNA reveals that TIP binds to the canonical PIP interaction site, but also extends beyond it through a helix that relocates the IDCL. TIP alters the relationship between domains I and II within the PCNA monomer such that the trimeric ring structure is broken, while the individual domains largely retain their native structure. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) confirms the disruption of the PCNA trimer upon addition of the TIP protein in solution and together with the X-ray crystal data, provides a structural basis for the mechanism of PCNA inhibition by TIP.« less

  3. A small protein inhibits proliferating cell nuclear antigen by breaking the DNA clamp

    SciTech Connect

    Altieri, Amanda S.; Ladner, Jane E.; Li, Zhuo; Robinson, Howard; Sallman, Zahur F.; Marino, John P.; Kelman, Zvi

    2016-05-03

    Here, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) forms a trimeric ring that encircles duplex DNA and acts as an anchor for a number of proteins involved in DNA metabolic processes. PCNA has two structurally similar domains (I and II) linked by a long loop (inter-domain connector loop, IDCL) on the outside of each monomer of the trimeric structure that makes up the DNA clamp. All proteins that bind to PCNA do so via a PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) motif that binds near the IDCL. A small protein, called TIP, binds to PCNA and inhibits PCNA-dependent activities although it does not contain a canonical PIP motif. The X-ray crystal structure of TIP bound to PCNA reveals that TIP binds to the canonical PIP interaction site, but also extends beyond it through a helix that relocates the IDCL. TIP alters the relationship between domains I and II within the PCNA monomer such that the trimeric ring structure is broken, while the individual domains largely retain their native structure. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) confirms the disruption of the PCNA trimer upon addition of the TIP protein in solution and together with the X-ray crystal data, provides a structural basis for the mechanism of PCNA inhibition by TIP.

  4. A small protein inhibits proliferating cell nuclear antigen by breaking the DNA clamp

    SciTech Connect

    Altieri, Amanda S.; Ladner, Jane E.; Li, Zhuo; Robinson, Howard; Sallman, Zahur F.; Marino, John P.; Kelman, Zvi

    2016-05-03

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) forms a trimeric ring that encircles duplex DNA and acts as an anchor for a number of proteins involved in DNA metabolic processes. PCNA has two structurally similar domains (I and II) linked by a long loop (inter-domain connector loop, IDCL) on the outside of each monomer of the trimeric structure that makes up the DNA clamp. All proteins that bind to PCNA do so via a PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) motif that binds near the IDCL. A small protein, called TIP, binds to PCNA and inhibits PCNA-dependent activities although it does not contain a canonical PIP motif. The X-ray crystal structure of TIP bound to PCNA reveals that TIP binds to the canonical PIP interaction site, but also extends beyond it through a helix that relocates the IDCL. TIP alters the relationship between domains I and II within the PCNA monomer such that the trimeric ring structure is broken, while the individual domains largely retain their native structure. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) confirms the disruption of the PCNA trimer upon addition of the TIP protein in solution and together with the X-ray crystal data, provides a structural basis for the mechanism of PCNA inhibition by TIP.

  5. The presence of antibodies against extractable nuclear antigens in serum: a comparison of immunoblotting versus radial immunodiffusion.

    PubMed

    Uyttenbroeck, W; Cooreman, W; Scharpe, S

    1993-01-01

    A commercial immunoblotting kit has recently been introduced to determine auto-antibodies against extractable nuclear antigens. We compared this new test with radial immunodiffusion for its usefulness in the routine laboratory procedures of a general hospital. Antigen preparation in immunoblotting includes a protein denaturation step prior to electrophoretic separation of the different proteins. In this way antigenic determinants that depend heavily on the protein superstructure are lost. In theory, auto-antibodies against these epitopes may be missed. In our series of 100 samples that had tested positively for antinuclear antibodies, radial immunodiffusion was able to detect one SSA positive sample that was negative by immunoblotting. However, 47 samples positive in immunoblotting, 37 positive for UBP, seven for anti-SSA, are for anti-Jo-1, one for anti-RNP and one for anti-Sm were missed by radial immunodiffusion. Most of these samples had low antinuclear antibody titres (1/80 or 1/160).

  6. The rate of nuclear cytoplasmic protein transport is determined by the casein kinase II site flanking the nuclear localization sequence of the SV40 T-antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Rihs, H P; Jans, D A; Fan, H; Peters, R

    1991-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated [Rihs, H.-P. and Peters, R. (1989) EMBO J., 8, 1479-1484] that the nuclear transport of recombinant proteins in which short fragments of the SV40 T-antigen are fused to the amino terminus of Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase is dependent on both the nuclear localization sequence (NLS, T-antigen residues 126-132) and a phosphorylation-site-containing sequence (T-antigen residues 111-125). While the NLS determines the specificity, the rate of transport is controlled by the phosphorylation-site-containing sequence. The present study furthers this observation and examines the role of the various phosphorylation sites. Purified, fluorescently labeled recombinant proteins were injected into the cytoplasm of Vero or hepatoma (HTC) cells and the kinetics of nuclear transport measured by laser microfluorimetry. By replacing serine and threonine residues known to be phosphorylated in vivo, we identified the casein kinase II (CK-II) site S111/S112 to be the determining factor in the enhancement of the transport. Either of the residues 111 or 112 was sufficient to elicit the maximum transport enhancement. The other phosphorylation sites (S120, S123, T124) had no influence on the transport rate. Examination of the literature suggested that many proteins harboring a nuclear localization sequence also contain putative CK-II sites at a distance of approximately 10-30 amino acid residues from the NLS. CK-II has been previously implicated in the transmission of growth signals to the nucleus. Our results suggest that CK-II may exert this role by controlling the rate of nuclear protein transport. Images PMID:1848177

  7. Nuclear accumulation of epidermal growth factor receptor and acceleration of G1/S stage by Epstein-Barr-encoded oncoprotein latent membrane protein 1

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Yongguang; Song Xing; Deng Xiyun; Xie Daxin; Lee, Leo M.; Liu Yiping; Li Wei; Li Lili; Deng Lin; Wu Qiao; Gong Jianping; Cao Ya . E-mail: ycao98@public.cs.hn.cn

    2005-02-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is considered to be the major oncogenic protein of EBV-encoded proteins and has always been the core of the oncogenic mechanism of EBV. Advanced studies on nuclear translocation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family have greatly improved our knowledge of the biological function of cell surface receptors. In this study, we used the Tet-on LMP1 HNE2 cell line as a cell model, which is a dual-stable LMP1-integrated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell line and the expression of LMP1 which could be regulated by the Tet system. We found that LMP1 could regulate the nuclear accumulation of EGFR in a dose-dependent manner quantitatively and qualitatively. We also demonstrated that the nuclear localization sequence of EGFR played some roles in the location of the protein within the nucleus under LMP1 regulation and EGFR in the nucleus could bind to the promoters of cyclinD1 and cyclinE, respectively. We further demonstrated that EGFR is involved in the acceleration of the G1/S phase transition by LMP1 through binding to cyclinD1 and cyclinE directly. These findings provided a novel view that the acceleration of LMP1 on the G1/S transition via the nuclear accumulation of EGFR was critical in the process of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  8. Small-molecule targeting of proliferating cell nuclear antigen chromatin association inhibits tumor cell growth.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zongqing; Wortman, Matthew; Dillehay, Kelsey L; Seibel, William L; Evelyn, Chris R; Smith, Shanna J; Malkas, Linda H; Zheng, Yi; Lu, Shan; Dong, Zhongyun

    2012-06-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a potential anticancer target, forms a homotrimer and is required for DNA replication and numerous other cellular processes. The purpose of this study was to identify novel small molecules that modulate PCNA activity to affect tumor cell proliferation. An in silico screen of a compound library against a crystal structure of PCNA and a subsequent structural similarity search of the ZINC chemical database were carried out to derive relevant docking partners. Nine compounds, termed PCNA inhibitors (PCNA-Is), were selected for further characterization. PCNA-I1 selectively bound to PCNA trimers with a dissociation constant (K(d)) of ~0.2 to 0.4 μM. PCNA-Is promoted the formation of SDS-refractory PCNA trimers. PCNA-I1 dose- and time-dependently reduced the chromatin-associated PCNA in cells. Consistent with its effects on PCNA trimer stabilization, PCNA-I1 inhibited the growth of tumor cells of various tissue types with an IC(50) of ~0.2 μM, whereas it affected the growth of nontransformed cells at significantly higher concentrations (IC(50), ~1.6 μM). Moreover, uptake of BrdU was dose-dependently reduced in cells treated with PCNA-I1. Mechanistically the PCNA-Is mimicked the effect of PCNA knockdown by siRNA, inducing cancer cell arrest at both the S and G(2)/M phases. Thus, we have identified a class of compounds that can directly bind to PCNA, stabilize PCNA trimers, reduce PCNA association with chromatin, and inhibit tumor cell growth by inducing a cell cycle arrest. They are valuable tools in studying PCNA function and may be useful for future PCNA-targeted cancer therapy.

  9. Oncogenic role of KIAA0101 interacting with proliferating cell nuclear antigen in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Masayo; Takehara, Akio; Matsuda, Koichi; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Ohigashi, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Osamu; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Imai, Kohzoh; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2007-03-15

    To isolate novel diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer, we earlier did expression profile analysis of pancreatic cancer cells using a genome-wide cDNA microarray combined with microdissection. Among dozens of trans-activated genes in pancreatic cancer cells, this study focused on KIAA0101 whose overexpression in pancreatic cancer cells was validated by immunohistochemical analysis. KIAA0101 was previously identified as p15(PAF) [proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-associated factor] to bind with PCNA; however, its function remains unknown. To investigate for the biological significance of KIAA0101 overexpression in cancer cells, we knocked down KIAA0101 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) in pancreatic cancer cells and found that the reduced expression by siRNA caused drastic attenuation of their proliferation as well as significant decrease in DNA replication rate. Concordantly, exogenous overexpression of KIAA0101 enhanced cancer cell growth, and NIH3T3 derivative cells expressing KIAA0101 revealed in vivo tumor formation, implying its growth-promoting and oncogenic property. We also showed that the expression of KIAA0101 was regulated tightly by the p53-p21 pathway. To consider the KIAA0101/PCNA interaction as a therapeutic target, we designed the cell-permeable 20-amino-acid dominant-negative peptide and found that it could effectively inhibit the KIAA0101/PCNA interaction and resulted in the significant growth suppression of cancer cells. Our results clearly implicated that suppression of the KIAA0101 and PCNA oncogenic activity, or the inhibition of KIAA0101/PCNA interaction, is likely to be a promising strategy to develop novel cancer therapeutic drugs.

  10. Isolation and characterization of proliferating cell nuclear antigen from the dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huan; Hou, Yubo; Lin, Senjie

    2006-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a co-factor of DNA polymerases delta and epsilon, is essential for DNA replication and repair. Understanding the structure and expression characteristics of this gene in dinoflagellates would enable us to gain insights into how the cell cycle in these enigmatic eukaryotes is regulated and whether this gene can be a growth marker of these ecologically important organisms. We analyzed pcna and its encoded protein from Pfiesteria piscicida (Ppi_PCNA). Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RNA ligase mediated-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLM-RACE) methods, Ppi_pcna cDNA was isolated; it contained a coding region for 258 amino acid residues (aa) preceded by various 5'- and 3'-untranslated ends. The deduced protein length was similar to that of typical vertebrate and plant PCNA. PCR using genomic DNA as the template yielded multiple products whose sequences revealed multiple copies of pcna in tandem repeats separated by an unknown sequence. Using real-time PCR, we estimated 41+/-7 copies of this gene in each P. piscicida cell. Reverse transcription real-time PCR indicated a similar pcna mRNA level between the exponential and the stationary growth phases. Western blot analysis revealed a slightly higher PCNA level (<2-fold) in the exponential than in the stationary growth phases. We conclude that (1) P. piscicida possesses a typical eukaryote PCNA; (2) unlike in other eukaryotes, pcna in P. piscicida occurs in multiple copies arranged in tandem; and (3) regulation of P. piscicida PCNA probably lies in post-translational modification.

  11. Structure of a mutant form of proliferating cell nuclear antigen that blocks translesion DNA synthesis †

    PubMed Central

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Ramaswamy, S.; Hingorani, Manju M.; Washington, M. Todd

    2009-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a homotrimeric protein that functions as a sliding clamp during DNA replication. Several mutant forms of PCNA that block translesion DNA synthesis have been identified in genetic studies in yeast. One such mutant protein (encoded by the rev6-1 allele) is a glycine to serine substitution at residue 178, located at the subunit interface of PCNA. To better understand how this substitution interferes with translesion synthesis, we have determined the X-ray crystal structure of the G178S PCNA mutant protein. This substitution has little effect on the structure of the domain in which the substitution occurs. Instead, significant, local structural changes are observed in the adjacent subunit. The most notable difference between mutant and wild-type structures is in a single, extended loop (comprising amino acid residues 105-110), which we call loop J. In the mutant protein structure, loop J adopts a very different conformation in which the atoms of the protein backbone have moved by as much as 6.5 Å from their positions in the wild-type structure. To better understand the functional consequences of this structural change, we have examined the ability of this mutant protein to stimulate nucleotide incorporation by DNA polymerase eta (pol η). Steady state kinetic studies show that while wild-type PCNA stimulates incorporation by pol η opposite an abasic site, the mutant PCNA protein actually inhibits incorporation opposite this DNA lesion. These results show that the position of loop J in PCNA plays an essential role in facilitating translesion synthesis. PMID:19053247

  12. Modelling the structure of full-length Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mushtaq; Gatherer, Derek; Wilson, Joanna B

    2014-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus is a clinically important human virus associated with several cancers and is the etiologic agent of infectious mononucleosis. The viral nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA1) is central to the replication and propagation of the viral genome and likely contributes to tumourigenesis. We have compared EBNA1 homologues from other primate lymphocryptoviruses and found that the central glycine/alanine repeat (GAr) domain as well as predicted cellular protein (USP7 and CK2) binding sites are present in homologues in the Old World primates, but not the marmoset, suggesting that these motifs may have co-evolved. Using the resolved structure of the C-terminal one-third of EBNA1 (homodimerization and DNA binding domain), we have gone on to develop monomeric and dimeric models in silico of the full-length protein. The C-terminal domain is predicted to be structurally highly similar between homologues, indicating conserved function. Zinc could be stably incorporated into the model, bonding with two N-terminal cysteines predicted to facilitate multimerisation. The GAr contains secondary structural elements in the models, while the protein binding regions are unstructured, irrespective of the prediction approach used and sequence origin. These intrinsically disordered regions may facilitate the diversity observed in partner interactions. We hypothesize that the structured GAr could mask the disordered regions, thereby protecting the protein from default degradation. In the dimer conformation, the C-terminal tails of each monomer wrap around a proline-rich protruding loop of the partner monomer, providing dimer stability, a feature which could be exploited in therapeutic design.

  13. Zinc Coordination Is Required for and Regulates Transcription Activation by Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen 1

    PubMed Central

    Aras, Siddhesh; Singh, Gyanendra; Johnston, Kenneth; Foster, Timothy; Aiyar, Ashok

    2009-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1) is essential for Epstein-Barr virus to immortalize naïve B-cells. Upon binding a cluster of 20 cognate binding-sites termed the family of repeats, EBNA1 transactivates promoters for EBV genes that are required for immortalization. A small domain, termed UR1, that is 25 amino-acids in length, has been identified previously as essential for EBNA1 to activate transcription. In this study, we have elucidated how UR1 contributes to EBNA1's ability to transactivate. We show that zinc is necessary for EBNA1 to activate transcription, and that UR1 coordinates zinc through a pair of essential cysteines contained within it. UR1 dimerizes upon coordinating zinc, indicating that EBNA1 contains a second dimerization interface in its amino-terminus. There is a strong correlation between UR1-mediated dimerization and EBNA1's ability to transactivate cooperatively. Point mutants of EBNA1 that disrupt zinc coordination also prevent self-association, and do not activate transcription cooperatively. Further, we demonstrate that UR1 acts as a molecular sensor that regulates the ability of EBNA1 to activate transcription in response to changes in redox and oxygen partial pressure (pO2). Mild oxidative stress mimicking such environmental changes decreases EBNA1-dependent transcription in a lymphoblastoid cell-line. Coincident with a reduction in EBNA1-dependent transcription, reductions are observed in EBNA2 and LMP1 protein levels. Although these changes do not affect LCL survival, treated cells accumulate in G0/G1. These findings are discussed in the context of EBV latency in body compartments that differ strikingly in their pO2 and redox potential. PMID:19521517

  14. Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C regulated genes in lymphoblastoid cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Mar, Jessica C.; Maruo, Seiji; Lee, Sungwook; Gewurz, Benjamin E.; Johannsen, Eric; Holton, Kristina; Rubio, Renee; Takada, Kenzo; Quackenbush, John; Kieff, Elliott

    2011-01-01

    EBV nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is an essential transcription factor for EBV transformed lymphoblast cell line (LCL) growth. To identify EBNA3C-regulated genes in LCLs, microarrays were used to measure RNA abundances in each of three different LCLs that conditionally express EBNA3C fused to a 4-OH-Tamoxifen–dependent estrogen receptor hormone binding domain (EBNA3CHT). At least three RNAs were assayed for each EBNA3CHT LCL under nonpermissive conditions, permissive conditions, and nonpermissive conditions with wild-type EBNA3C transcomplementation. Using a two-way ANOVA model of EBNA3C levels, we identified 550 regulated genes that were at least 1.5-fold up- or down-regulated with false discovery rates < 0.01. EBNA3C-regulated genes overlapped significantly with genes regulated by EBNA2 and EBNA3A consistent with coordinated effects on cell gene transcription. Of the 550 EBNA3C-regulated genes, 106 could be placed in protein networks. A seeded Bayesian network analysis of the 80 most significant EBNA3C-regulated genes suggests that RAC1, LYN, and TNF are upstream of other EBNA3C-regulated genes. Gene set enrichment analysis found enrichment for MAP kinase signaling, cytokine–cytokine receptor interactions, JAK-STAT signaling, and cell adhesion molecules, implicating these pathways in EBNA3C effects on LCL growth or survival. EBNA3C significantly up-regulated the CXCL12 ligand and its CXCR4 receptor and increased LCL migration. CXCL12 up-regulation depended on EBNA3C's interaction with the cell transcription factor, RBPJ, which is essential for LCL growth. EBNA3C also up-regulated MYC 1.3-fold and down-regulated CDKN2A exons 2 and 3, shared by p16 and p14, 1.4-fold, with false discovery rates < 5 × 10−4. PMID:21173222

  15. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C targets p53 and modulates its transcriptional and apoptotic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Fuming; Saha, Abhik; Murakami, Masanao; Kumar, Pankaj; Knight, Jason S.; Cai Qiliang; Choudhuri, Tathagata; Robertson, Erle S.

    2009-06-05

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is one of the most commonly mutated genes in human cancers and the corresponding encoded protein induces apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest at the G1/S checkpoint in response to DNA damage. To date, previous studies have shown that antigens encoded by human tumor viruses such as SV40 large T antigen, adenovirus E1A and HPV E6 interact with p53 and disrupt its functional activity. In a similar fashion, we now show that EBNA3C, one of the EBV latent antigens essential for the B-cell immortalization in vitro, interacts directly with p53. Additionally, we mapped the interaction of EBNA3C with p53 to the C-terminal DNA-binding and the tetramerization domain of p53, and the region of EBNA3C responsible for binding to p53 was mapped to the N-terminal domain of EBNA3C (residues 130-190), previously shown to interact with a number of important cell-cycle components, specifically SCF{sup Skp2}, cyclin A, and cMyc. Furthermore, we demonstrate that EBNA3C substantially represses the transcriptional activity of p53 in luciferase based reporter assays, and rescues apoptosis induced by ectopic p53 expression in SAOS-2 (p53{sup -/-}) cells. Interestingly, we also show that the DNA-binding ability of p53 is diminished in the presence of EBNA3C. Thus, the interaction between the p53 and EBNA3C provides new insights into the mechanism(s) by which the EBNA3C oncoprotein can alter cellular gene expression in EBV associated human cancers.

  16. Berberine inhibits the proliferation of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells via an Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Huan; Zhang, Yaqian; Guo, Wei; Long, Cong; Wang, Jingchao; Liu, Limei; Sun, Xiaoping

    2017-04-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a malignancy derived from the epithelial cells of the nasopharynx cavity, and is closely associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. In addition to NPC, EBV causes various human malignancies, such as gastric cancer, hematological tumors and lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas. Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) encoded by EBV is indispensable for replication, partition, transcription and maintenance of viral genomes. Berberine, a naturally occurring isoquinoline alkaloid, shows anti-inflammatory, anticholinergic, antioxidative, and anticancer activities. In the present study, the antitumor effect of berberine was studied. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assays were performed to demonstrate whether the proliferation of EBV-positive NPC cells was inhibited by berberine. Flow cytometric results revealed that berberine induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Quantitative-PCR and western blotting results indicated that berberine decreased the expression of EBNA1 at both the mRNA and protein levels in the EBV-positive NPC cells. The function of EBNA1 promoter Qp which is to drive EBNA1 transcription in type Ⅱ latent infection was strongly suppressed by berberine. Overexpression of EBNA1 attenuated this inhibitory effect. Berberine also suppressed the activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 which is a new therapeutic target in a series of malignancies, including NPC. Viral titer experiments demonstrated that berberine decreased the production of virions in HONE1 and HK1-EBV cells. In a mouse xenograft model of NPC induced by HONE1 cells, berberine significantly inhibited tumor formation. Altogether, these results indicate that berberine decreases the expression of EBNA1 and exhibits an antitumor effect against NPC both in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Carotenoids suppress proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cyclin D1 expression in oral carcinogenic models.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsin-Chung; Chien, Hsin; Liao, Chia-Hui; Yang, Yi-Yuan; Huang, Shih-Yi

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemopreventive effect of carotenoids on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cyclin D(1) expression in betel (Areca catechu) quid extract (BQE)-induced hamster oral cancer and human KB cell models, respectively. In the in vivo animal study, 41 hamsters were divided into six groups and treated with 0.3 ml of 0.5% 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benz[a]-anthracene, BQE, alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein and mixed carotenoids for 12 weeks. After treatment, the pouches were excised and graded using an immunohistochemical assay of PCNA. In the in vitro cell experiment, KB cells were cultured, and the inhibitory effect of carotenoids (beta-carotene, lycopene and lutein) on cell proliferation was evaluated. Cyclin D(1) and PCNA were evaluated in terms of cell differentiation. In the results, most of the animal lesions showed no overexpression of PCNA. However, in dysplastic lesions, PCNA expressions by the beta-carotene, lutein, lycopene, mixed and vitamin E groups were less than that of the control group. In papilloma lesions, PCNA expressions by the beta-carotene, mixed and vitamin E groups were less severe than that of the control group. PCNA expression by the vitamin E-treated group was less severe than that of the control group. No carcinoma was found in the lycopene or mixed groups. In the cell study, all carotenoids exerted a significant inhibitory effect on KB cell proliferation. Although lycopene suppressed KB cell proliferation at the G(0)/G(1) phase with a significant decrease in PCNA expression, beta-carotene and lutein possessed less of an inhibitory effect and even exhibited elevated cell proliferation at the G(2)/M phase. These results indicate that different carotenoids present various suppressive abilities against PCNA and cyclin D(1) expressions in cell proliferation. In conclusion, carotenoids suppressed the carcinogenesis of induced hamster oral cancer and a cancer cell line by acting as a

  18. Expression of alpha V integrin is modulated by Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C and the metastasis suppressor Nm23-H1 through interaction with the GATA-1 and Sp1 transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhuri, Tathagata; Verma, Subhash C.; Lan, Ke; Robertson, Erle S. . E-mail: erle@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2006-07-20

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a lymphotrophic herpesvirus infecting most of the world's population. It is associated with a number of human lymphoid and epithelial tumors and lymphoproliferative diseases in immunocompromised patients. A subset of latent EBV antigens is required for immortalization of primary B-lymphocytes. The metastatic suppressor Nm23-H1 which is downregulated in human invasive breast carcinoma reduces the migration and metastatic activity of breast carcinoma cells when expressed from a heterologous promoter. Interestingly, the EBV nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) reverses these activities of Nm23-H1. The alpha V integrins recognize a variety of ligands for signaling and are involved in cell migration and proliferation and also serve as major receptors for extracellular-matrix-mediated cell adhesion and migration. The goal of this study was to determine if Nm23-H1 and EBNA3C can modulate alpha V integrin expression and downstream activities. The results of our studies indicate that Nm23-H1 downregulates alpha V intregrin expression in a dose responsive manner. In contrast, EBNA3C can upregulate alpha V integrin expression. Furthermore, the study showed that the association of the Sp1 and GATA transcription factors with Nm23-H1 is required for modulation of the alpha V integrin activity. Thus, these results suggest a direct correlation between the alpha V integrin expression and the interaction of Nm23-H1 with EBNA3C.

  19. Interference of fisetin with targets of the nuclear factor-κB signal transduction pathway activated by Epstein-Barr virus encoded latent membrane protein 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Liang, Hong-Ying; Li, Ming-Yong; Lin, Chun-Yan; Shi, Meng-Jie; Zhang, Xiu-Juan

    2014-01-01

    Fisetin is an effective compound extracted from lacquer which has been used in the treatment of various diseases. Preliminary data indicate that it also exerts specific anti-cancer effects. However, the manner in which fisetin regulates cancer growth remains unknown. In this study, we elucidated interference of fisetin with targets of the nuclear factorκB signal transduction pathway activated by Epstein-Barr virus encoding latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1)in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells, Results showed that fisetin inhibited the survival rate of CNE-LMP1 cells and NF-κB activation caused by LMP1. Fisetin also suppressed nuclear translocation of NF-κB (p65) and IκBα phosphorylation, while inhibiting CyclinD1, all key targets of the NF-κB signal transduction pathway. It was suggested that interference effects of fisetin with signal transduction activated by LMP1 encoded by the Epstein-Barr virus may play an important role in its anticancer potential.

  20. Methyl jasmonate downregulates expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and induces apoptosis in human neuroblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tong, Qiang-Song; Jiang, Guo-Song; Zheng, Li-Duan; Tang, Shao-Tao; Cai, Jia-Bin; Liu, Yuan; Zeng, Fu-Qing; Dong, Ji-Hua

    2008-07-01

    Recent evidence indicates that methyl jasmonate, a plant stress hormone, exhibits anticancer activity on human cancer cells. Whether methyl jasmonate could inhibit the growth of human neuroblastoma cells still, however, remains largely unknown. In this study, administration of methyl jasmonate to cultured neuroblastoma cell lines, SK-N-SH and BE(2)-C, resulted in a decrease of cell viability in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner as demonstrated by MTT colorimetry and colony formation assay. The results from RT-PCR indicated that the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, but not of cyclin D1, was downregulated by methyl jasmonate. Accordingly, the cell cycle of methyl jasmonate-treated neuroblastoma cells was arrested at the G0/G1 phase. Moreover, incubation of SK-N-SH and BE(2)-C cells with methyl jasmonate resulted in characteristic changes of apoptosis, as demonstrated by acridine orange-ethidium bromide (AO/EB) staining, Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometry. Moreover, methyl jasmonate decreased the expression of the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein and survivin, critical members of the inhibitors of apoptosis protein family, in neuroblastoma cells. These findings indicate that methyl jasmonate suppresses the growth of cultured human neuroblastoma cells associated with downregulation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and induces apoptosis accompanied by downregulation of the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein and survivin, which lays the groundwork for further investigation into the mechanisms of methyl jasmonate-mediated anticancer activities.

  1. Human SHPRH is a ubiquitin ligase for Mms2-Ubc13-dependent polyubiquitylation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Unk, Ildiko; Hajdú, Ildikó; Fátyol, Károly; Szakál, Barnabás; Blastyák, András; Bermudez, Vladimir; Hurwitz, Jerard; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya; Haracska, Lajos

    2006-11-28

    Human SHPRH gene is located at the 6q24 chromosomal region, and loss of heterozygosity in this region is seen in a wide variety of cancers. SHPRH is a member of the SWI/SNF family of ATPases/helicases, and it possesses a C(3)HC(4) RING motif characteristic of ubiquitin ligase proteins. In both of these features, SHPRH resembles the yeast Rad5 protein, which, together with Mms2-Ubc13, promotes replication through DNA lesions via an error-free postreplicational repair pathway. Genetic evidence in yeast has indicated a role for Rad5 as a ubiquitin ligase in mediating the Mms2-Ubc13-dependent polyubiquitylation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Here we show that SHPRH is a functional homolog of Rad5. Similar to Rad5, SHPRH physically interacts with the Rad6-Rad18 and Mms2-Ubc13 complexes, and we show that SHPRH protein is a ubiquitin ligase indispensable for Mms2-Ubc13-dependent polyubiquitylation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Based on these observations, we predict a role for SHPRH in promoting error-free replication through DNA lesions. Such a role for SHPRH is consistent with the observation that this gene is mutated in a number of cancer cell lines, including those from melanomas and ovarian cancers, which raises the strong possibility that SHPRH function is an important deterrent to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in humans.

  2. IFN-γ/TNF-α ratio in response to immuno proteomically identified human T-cell antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis - The most suitable surrogate biomarker for latent TB infection.

    PubMed

    Prabhavathi, Maddineni; Pathakumari, Balaji; Raja, Alamelu

    2015-08-01

    The enormous reservoir of latent TB infection (LTBI) poses a major hurdle for global TB control. The existing Tuberculin skin test (TST) and IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs) are found to be suboptimal for LTBI diagnosis. Previously we had taken an immunoproteomic approach and identified 10 protein fractions (contains 16 proteins), which are solely recognized by LTBI. In a cohort of 40 pulmonary TB patients (PTB) and 35 healthy household contacts (HHC), IFN-γ and TNF-α response were measured against 16 antigens by using 1:10 diluted whole blood assay. Among all the antigens, IFN-γ response to Rv2626c has shown positivity of 88.57% in HHC and 7.5% in PTB group. IFN-γ response to combination of Rv2626c + Rv3716c has demonstrated 100% positivity in HHC and 17.5% positivity in PTB respectively. Compared to individual cytokines (i.e. IFN-γ and TNF-α), ratio of IFN-γ/TNF-α has shown promising results for diagnosis of LTBI. IFN-γ/TNF-α ratio against Rv3716c and TrxC has exhibited a positivity of 94.29% in HHC and 5% in PTB group. Accession of Rv2626c and Rv3716c may improve the diagnostic performance of existing QFT-GIT. Independent of QFT-GIT assay, ratio of IFN-γ/TNF-α in response to either Rv3716c or TrxC may acts as suitable surrogate biomarker for LTBI.

  3. Differential requirement for proliferating cell nuclear antigen in 5' and 3' nick-directed excision in human mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuangli; Presnell, Steven R; Yuan, Fenghua; Zhang, Yanbin; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2004-04-23

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is involved in mammalian mismatch repair at a step prior to or at mismatch excision, but the molecular mechanism of this process is not fully understood. To examine the role of PCNA in mismatch-provoked and nick-directed excision, orientation-specific mismatch removal of heteroduplexes with a pre-existing nick was monitored in human nuclear extracts supplemented with the PCNA inhibitor protein p21. We show here that, whereas 3' nick-directed mismatch excision was completely inhibited by low concentrations of p21 or a p21 C-terminal fusion protein, 5' nick-directed excision was only partially blocked under the same conditions. No further reduction of the 5' excision was detected when a much higher concentration of p21 C-terminal protein was used. These results suggest the following. (i) There is a differential requirement for PCNA in 3' and 5' nick-directed excision; and (ii) 5' nick-directed excision is conducted by a manner either dependent on or independent of PCNA. Our in vitro reconstitution experiments indeed identified a 5' nick-directed excision pathway that is dependent on PCNA, hMutSalpha, and a partially purified fraction from a HeLa nuclear extract.

  4. Differentiation between antibodies to protamines and somatic nuclear antigens by means of a comparative fluorescence study on swollen nuclei of spermatozoa and somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Samuel, T

    1978-05-01

    The indirect immunofluorescence test on swollen nuclei of rat thymocytes, chicken red blood cells and human and salmon spermatozoa was found to be an easy and satisfactory method for the discrimination between antibodies to sperm-specific nuclear antigens and somatic nuclear antigens. This study shows that nuclear antibodies present in the sera of vasectomized men and in rabbit antisera to human protamines are directed against the human sperm-specific nuclear antigens (protamines), and that they may cross-react with salmon protamine. These sera do not react with somatic nuclear antigens. This comparative fluorescence study and a complement fixation study, performed with sera from diabetic patients, proved that the administration of insulin retard (protamine-zinc-insulin) may lead to the formation of antibodies to the fish protamine. These antibodies may reveal a weak cross reaction with human protamines. The results obtained in this study also prove that the nuclei of chicken red blood cells and human sperm do not contain, or contain very small amounts of, histone fraction H1, and that salmon sperm nuclei do not contain any of the histone fractions, and suggest that the nuclei of mature human spermatozoa contain smaller amounts of histones in comparison to somatic cell nuclei.

  5. The latency-associated nuclear antigen of Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus induces B cell hyperplasia and lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Fakhari, Farnaz D.; Jeong, Joseph H.; Kanan, Yogita; Dittmer, Dirk P.

    2006-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a human lymphotropic herpesvirus. It is implicated in B cell neoplasias such as primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman disease in AIDS patients. The KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is consistently expressed in all KSHV-associated tumor cells and was shown to bind the tumor suppressor proteins p53 and pRb. To test LANA’s contribution to lymphomagenesis in vivo we generated transgenic mice expressing LANA under the control of its own promoter, which is B cell specific. All of the transgenic mice developed splenic follicular hyperplasia due to an expansion of IgM+IgD+ B cells and showed increased germinal center formation. We also observed lymphomas, implying that LANA can activate B cells and provide the first step toward lymphomagenesis. PMID:16498502

  6. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) contributes to the high-order structure and stability of heterochromatin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xin; Ren, Yue; Kath, Morgan

    2016-12-16

    Heterochromatin plays important roles in the structure, maintenance, and function of the eukaryotic genome. It is associated with special histone modifications and specialized non-histone proteins and assumes a more compact structure than euchromatin. Genes embedded in heterochromatin are generally transcriptionally silent. It was found previously that several mutations of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a DNA replication processivity factor, reduce transcriptional silencing at heterochromatin loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the notion that PCNA plays a role in transcriptional silencing was recently questioned because of a potential problem concerning the silencing assays used in prior studies. To determine if PCNA is a bona fide contributor to heterochromatin-mediated transcriptional silencing, we examined the effects of PCNA mutations on heterochromatin structure. We found evidence implicating PCNA in the maintenance of the high-order structure and stability of heterochromatin, which indicates a role of DNA replication in heterochromatin maintenance.

  7. Generation of an intrabody-based reagent suitable for imaging endogenous proliferating cell nuclear antigen in living cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Freund, Guillaume; Desplancq, Dominique; Stoessel, Audrey; Weinsanto, Robin; Sibler, Annie-Paule; Robin, Gautier; Martineau, Pierre; Didier, Pascal; Wagner, Jérôme; Weiss, Etienne

    2014-09-01

    Intrabodies, when expressed in cells after genetic fusion to fluorescent proteins, are powerful tools to study endogenous protein dynamics inside cells. However, it remains challenging to determine the conditions for specific imaging and precise labelling of the target antigen with such intracellularly expressed antibody fragments. Here, we show that single-chain Fv (scFv) antibody fragments can be generated that specifically recognize proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) when expressed in living cancer cells. After selection by phage display, the anti-PCNA scFvs were screened in vitro after being tagged with dimeric glutathione-S-transferase. Anti-PCNA scFvs of increased avidity were further engineered by mutagenesis with sodium bisulfite and error-prone PCR, such that they were almost equivalent to conventional antibodies in in vitro assays. These intrabodies were then rendered bifunctional by fusion to a C-terminal fragment of p21 protein and could thereby readily detect PCNA bound to chromatin in cells. Finally, by linking these optimized peptide-conjugated scFvs to an enhanced green fluorescent protein, fluorescent intrabody-based reagents were obtained that allowed the fate of PCNA in living cells to be examined. The approach described may be applicable to other scFvs that can be solubly expressed in cells, and it provides a unique means to recognize endogenous proteins in living cells with high accuracy.

  8. Current Concepts and Future Directions for the Assessment of Autoantibodies to Cellular Antigens Referred to as Anti-Nuclear Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Michael; Meroni, Pier-Luigi; Bossuyt, Xavier; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2014-01-01

    The detection of autoantibodies that target intracellular antigens, commonly termed anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), is a serological hallmark in the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARD). Different methods are available for detection of ANA and all bearing their own advantages and limitations. Most laboratories use the indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assay based on HEp-2 cell substrates. Due to the subjectivity of this diagnostic platform, automated digital reading systems have been developed during the last decade. In addition, solid phase immunoassays using well characterized antigens have gained widespread adoption in high throughput laboratories due to their ease of use and open automation. Despite all the advances in the field of ANA detection and its contribution to the diagnosis of SARD, significant challenges persist. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the current status on ANA testing including automated IIF reading systems and solid phase assays and suggests an approach to interpretation of results and discusses meeting the problems of assay standardization and other persistent challenges. PMID:24868563

  9. Current concepts and future directions for the assessment of autoantibodies to cellular antigens referred to as anti-nuclear antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Michael; Meroni, Pier-Luigi; Bossuyt, Xavier; Fritzler, Marvin J

    2014-01-01

    The detection of autoantibodies that target intracellular antigens, commonly termed anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), is a serological hallmark in the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARD). Different methods are available for detection of ANA and all bearing their own advantages and limitations. Most laboratories use the indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assay based on HEp-2 cell substrates. Due to the subjectivity of this diagnostic platform, automated digital reading systems have been developed during the last decade. In addition, solid phase immunoassays using well characterized antigens have gained widespread adoption in high throughput laboratories due to their ease of use and open automation. Despite all the advances in the field of ANA detection and its contribution to the diagnosis of SARD, significant challenges persist. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the current status on ANA testing including automated IIF reading systems and solid phase assays and suggests an approach to interpretation of results and discusses meeting the problems of assay standardization and other persistent challenges.

  10. Flow cytometry in the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and the value of myeloid nuclear differentiation antigen (MNDA).

    PubMed

    Bellos, Frauke; Kern, Wolfgang

    2014-09-25

    Background: Confirming diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is often challenging. Standard diagnostic methods are cytomorphology (CM) and cytogenetics (CG). Multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) is upcoming in MDS diagnostic work up, comparability and investigator experience are critical. Myeloid nuclear differentiation antigen (MNDA) in myelomonocytic cells might be expressed more weakly in patients with MDS. The analysis of MNDA may thus improve diagnostic capabilities of MFC in MDS. Methods: Staining methods and antibody combinations for MFC in MDS are outlined, giving details for interpretation of results in regard to dyspoiesis. MFC results are correlated with CM and CG and with survival data. Use of myeloid nuclear differentiation antigen (MNDA) in MDS diagnostics was evaluated in 239 patients with MDS, AML, other cytopenic conditions and in 30 negative controls. Results: Strong correlation between findings in CM and MFC was found; MFC results correlated well with those of CG. Patients with higher grades of dysplasia in MFC had shorter overall survival. Percentages of granulocytes and monocytes with diminished MNDA expression (%dimG, %dimM) were higher in patients with MDS and AML. Mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of MNDA in monocytes was lower in MDS and AML. Cut-off values for %dimG (12%) and %dimM (22%) as well as for MFI in monocytes (72) were defined discriminating between MDS and non-MDS. Conclusion: MFC adds significant information on dyspoiesis in the diagnostic work up for MDS and provides prognostic information. MNDA expression can be assessed by MFC and may facilitate evaluation of dyspoiesis when added to MDS MFC panels. © 2014 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  11. Highly specific antibody to Rous sarcoma virus src gene product recognizes nuclear and nucleolar antigens in human cells.

    PubMed Central

    David-Pfeuty, T; Nouvian-Dooghe, Y

    1995-01-01

    An antiserum to the Rous sarcoma virus-transforming protein pp60v-src, raised in rabbits immunized with the bacterially produced protein alpha p60 serum (M. D. Resh and R. L. Erikson, J. Cell Biol. 100:409-417, 1985) previously reported to detect very specifically a novel population of pp60v-src and pp60c-src molecules associated with juxtareticular nuclear membranes in normal and Rous sarcoma virus-infected cells of avian and mammalian origin, was used here to investigate by immunofluorescence microscopy localization patterns of Src molecules in human cell lines, either normal or derived from spontaneous tumors. We found that the alpha p60 serum reveals nuclear and nucleolar concentrations of antigens in all the human cell lines tested and in two rat and mouse hepatoma cell lines derived from adult tumorous tissues but not in any established rat and mouse cell lines either untransformed or transformed by the src and ras oncogenes. Both the nuclear and nucleolar stainings can be totally extinguished by preincubation of the serum with highly purified chicken c-Src. We show also that the partitioning of the alpha p60-reactive proteins among the whole nucleus and the nucleolus depends mostly on two different parameters: the position in the cell cycle and the degree of cell confluency. Our observations raise the attractive possibility that, in differentiated cells, pp60c-src and related proteins might be involved not only in mediating the transduction of mitogenic signals at the plasma membrane level but also in controlling progression through the cell cycle and entry in mitosis by interacting with cell division cycle regulatory components at the nuclear level. PMID:7853507

  12. Epidermal growth factor receptor protects proliferating cell nuclear antigen from cullin 4A protein-mediated proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yuan-Hung; Ho, Po-Chun; Wang, Shao-Chun

    2012-08-03

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an essential component for DNA synthesis upon growth stimulation. It has been shown that phosphorylation of PCNA at Tyr-211 by the EGF receptor (EGFR) protects PCNA from polyubiquitylation and degradation, whereas blocking phosphorylation induces ubiquitylation-mediated degradation of the chromatin-bound, but not the -unbound, PCNA, and suppresses cell proliferation. However, the ubiquitin E3 ligase linking growth signaling to the proteolysis of PCNA and the underlying regulatory mechanism remain to be identified. Here we show that, in the absence of Tyr-211 phosphorylation, PCNA is subject to polyubiquitylation at Lys-164 by the CUL4A E3 ligase, resulting in the degradation of PCNA. Mutation of Lys-164 to arginine prevents PCNA ubiquitylation and rescues the degradation of the K164R/Y211F PCNA double mutant. Activation of EGFR inhibits the interaction of PCNA with CUL4A, whereas inhibition of EGFR leads to increased CUL4A-PCNA interaction and CUL4A-dependent ubiquitin-mediated degradation of PCNA. Substitution of endogenous PCNA with the Y211F mutant PCNA conveys enhanced sensitization to EGFR inhibition. Our findings identify CUL4A as the ubiquitin ligase linking the down-regulation of cell surface receptor tyrosine kinase to the nuclear DNA replication machinery in cancer cells.

  13. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen as a molecular biomarker for spermatogenesis in PTU-induced hypothyroidism of rats.

    PubMed

    Tousson, Ehab; Ali, Ehab M M; Ibrahim, Wafaa; Mansour, Mohammed A

    2011-07-01

    The thyroid hormone has few serious effects on the testes except during the neonatal stage. There is little knowledge concerning the prolonged effect of thyroid hormone deficiency throughout the rat's life span and its effect on spermatogenesis. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a nuclear matrix protein, which is essential for multiple cell cycle pathways. Here we used PCNA immunohistochemistry as a marker to differentiate between the testes of control and hypothyroid rats. About 20 rats were equally divided into 2 groups; the first group was the control group, while the second group was the experimental group in which rats were fed 0.05% 6-n-propyl thiouracil (PTU) in drinking water for 6 weeks. Immunohistochemistry, using an antibody against PCNA, showed at least 3 differences in the pattern of PCNA immunoreactivity (PCNA-ir). First, PCNA-ir was not detected in Sertoli and Leydig cells in the testes of control rats and detected in some of the hypothyroid rats. Second, in the control group more than 96% of spermatogonia were PCNA-positive cells; however, hypothyroidism caused the reduction to approximately 25% PCNA staining in spermatogonia. The third difference was in the abnormal distribution of spermatogonia seen in the hypothyroid rat testis, not in the control one. These results suggest that prepubertal hypothyroidism affects the proliferation of spermatogenic cells leading to impaired spermatogenesis and that PCNA index is a useful marker for assessing germ cell kinetics and spermatogenesis in prepubertal hypothyroidism.

  14. Ribosomal Protein S6 Interacts with the Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ▿

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wuguo; Dittmer, Dirk P.

    2011-01-01

    The latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is central to the maintenance of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and to the survival of KSHV-carrying tumor cells. In an effort to identify interaction partners of LANA, we purified authentic high-molecular-weight complexes of LANA by conventional chromatography followed by immunoprecipitation from the BC-3 cell line. This is the first analysis of LANA-interacting partners that is not based on forced ectopic expression of LANA. Subsequent tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis identified many of the known LANA-interacting proteins. We confirmed LANA's interactions with histones. Three classes of proteins survived our stringent four-step purification procedure (size, heparin, anion, and immunoaffinity chromatography): two heat shock proteins (Hsp70 and Hsp96 precursor), signal recognition particle 72 (SRP72), and 10 different ribosomal proteins. These proteins are likely involved in structural interactions within LANA high-molecular-weight complexes. Here, we show that ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) interacts with LANA. This interaction is mediated by the N-terminal domain of LANA and does not require DNA or RNA. Depletion of RPS6 from primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells dramatically decreases the half-life of full-length LANA. The fact that RPS6 has a well-established nuclear function beyond its role in ribosome assembly suggests that RPS6 (and by extension other ribosomal proteins) contributes to the extraordinary stability of LANA. PMID:21734034

  15. Two cell-cycle regulated SET-domain proteins interact with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, Cécile; Sozzani, Rosangela; Glab, Nathalie; Domenichini, Séverine; Perennes, Claudette; Cella, Rino; Kondorosi, Eva; Bergounioux, Catherine

    2006-08-01

    The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) functions as a sliding clamp for DNA polymerase, and is thus a key actor in DNA replication. It is also involved in DNA repair, maintenance of heterochromatic regions throughout replication, cell cycle regulation and programmed cell death. Identification of PCNA partners is therefore necessary for understanding these processes. Here we identify two Arabidopsis SET-domain proteins that interact with PCNA: ATXR5 and ATXR6. A truncated ATXR5Deltaex2, incapable of interacting with PCNA, also occurs in planta. ATXR6, upregulated during the S phase, is upregulated by AtE2F transcription factors, suggesting that it is required for S-phase progression. The two proteins differ in their subcellular localization: ATXR5 has a dual localization in plastids and in the nucleus, whereas ATXR6 is solely nuclear. This indicates that the two proteins may play different roles in plant cells. However, overexpression of either ATXR5 or ATXR6 causes male sterility because of the degeneration of defined cell types. Taken together, our results suggest that both proteins may play a role in the cell cycle or DNA replication, and that the activity of ATXR5 may be regulated via its subcellular localization.

  16. Multifaceted Histone H3 Methylation and Phosphorylation Readout by the Plant Homeodomain Finger of Human Nuclear Antigen Sp100C.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojie; Zhao, Dan; Xiong, Xiaozhe; He, Zhimin; Li, Haitao

    2016-06-10

    The decoding of histone post-translational modifications by chromatin-binding modules ("readers") constitutes one major mechanism of epigenetic regulation. Nuclear antigen Sp100 (SPECKLED, 100 kDa), a constitutive component of the promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies, plays key roles in intrinsic immunity and transcriptional repression. Sp100C, a splicing isoform specifically up-regulated upon interferon stimulation, harbors a unique tandem plant homeodomain (PHD) finger and bromodomain at its C terminus. Combining structural, quantitative binding, and cellular co-localization studies, we characterized Sp100C PHD finger as an unmethylated histone H3 Lys(4) (H3K4me0) reader that tolerates histone H3 Thr(3) phosphorylation (H3T3ph), histone H3 Lys(9) trimethylation (H3K9me3), and histone H3 Ser(10) phosphorylation (H3S10ph), hallmarks associated with the mitotic chromosome. In contrast, whereas H3K4me0 reader activity is conserved in Sp140, an Sp100C paralog, the multivalent tolerance of H3T3ph, H3K9me3, and H3S10ph was lost for Sp140. The complex structure determined at 2.1 Å revealed a highly coordinated lysine ϵ-amine recognition sphere formed by an extended N-terminal motif for H3K4me0 readout. Interestingly, reader pocket rigidification by disulfide bond formation enhanced H3K4me0 binding by Sp100C. An additional complex structure solved at 2.7 Å revealed that H3T3ph is recognized by the arginine residue, Arg(713), that is unique to the PHD finger of Sp100C. Consistent with a restrictive cellular role of Sp100C, these results establish a direct chromatin targeting function of Sp100C that may regulate transcriptional gene silencing and promyelocytic leukemia nuclear body-mediated intrinsic immunity in response to interferon stimulation.

  17. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen is a novel inhibitory ligand for the natural cytotoxicity receptor NKp44.

    PubMed

    Rosental, Benyamin; Brusilovsky, Michael; Hadad, Uzi; Oz, Dafna; Appel, Michael Y; Afergan, Fabian; Yossef, Rami; Rosenberg, Lior Ann; Aharoni, Amir; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Campbell, Kerry S; Braiman, Alex; Porgador, Angel

    2011-12-01

    NK cells play an important role in the early immune response to cancer. The NKp44 activating receptor is the only natural cytotoxicity receptor that is expressed exclusively by primate NK cells, yet its cellular ligands remain largely unknown. Proliferating cell nuclear Ag (PCNA) is overexpressed in cancer cells. In this study, we show that the NKp44 receptor recognizes PCNA. Their interaction inhibits NK cell function through NKp44/ITIM. The physical interaction of NKp44 and PCNA is enabled by recruitment of target cell PCNA to the NK immunological synapse. We demonstrate that PCNA promotes cancer survival by immune evasion through inhibition of NKp44-mediated NK cell attack.

  18. Transcription of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen 1 promoter Qp is repressed by transforming growth factor-beta via Smad4 binding element in human BL cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, C L; Tsai, C N; Chung, P J; Chen, J L; Sun, C M; Chen, R H; Hong, J H; Chang, Y S

    2000-11-10

    In Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected BL cells, the oncogenic EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA 1) gene is directed from the latent promoter Qp. Yeast one-hybrid screen analysis using the -50 to -37 sequence of Qp as the bait was carried out to identify transcriptional factors that may control Qp activity. Results showed that Smad4 binds the -50 to -37 sequence of Qp, indicating that this promoter is potentially regulated by TGF-beta. The association of Smad4 with Qp was further confirmed by supershift of EMSA complexes using Smad4-specific antibody. The transfection of a Qp reporter construct in two EBV(+) BL cell lines, Rael and WW2, showed that Qp activity is repressed in response to the TGF-beta treatment. This repression involves the interaction of a Smad3/Smad4 complex and the transcriptional repressor TGIF, as determined by cotransfection assay and coimmunoprecipitation analysis. Results suggest that TGF-beta may transcriptionally repress Qp through the Smad4-binding site in human BL cells.

  19. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen Inhibits Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression by Disrupting Enhanceosome Assembly through Binding with the Regulatory Factor X Complex

    PubMed Central

    Thakker, Suhani; Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Gupta, Namrata; Challa, Shanthan; Cai, Qiliang

    2015-01-01

    a novel mechanism used by KSHV to downregulate the expressions of MHC-II genes. IMPORTANCE Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is the causative agent of multiple human malignancies. It establishes a lifelong latent infection and persists in infected cells without being detected by the host's immune surveillance system. Only a limited number of viral proteins are expressed during latency, and these proteins play a significant role in suppressing both the innate and adaptive immunities of the host. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is one of the major proteins expressed during latent infection. Here, we show that LANA blocks MHC-II gene expression to subvert the host immune system by disrupting the MHC-II enhanceosome through binding with RFX transcription factors. Therefore, this study identifies a novel mechanism utilized by KSHV LANA to deregulate MHC-II gene expression, which is critical for CD4+ T cell responses in order to escape host immune surveillance. PMID:25740990

  20. Stable transfection of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 2 in lymphoma cells containing the EBV P3HR1 genome induces expression of B-cell activation molecules CD21 and CD23.

    PubMed Central

    Cordier, M; Calender, A; Billaud, M; Zimber, U; Rousselet, G; Pavlish, O; Banchereau, J; Tursz, T; Bornkamm, G; Lenoir, G M

    1990-01-01

    A set of B-cell activation molecules, including the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) receptor CR2 (CD21) and the B-cell activation antigen CD23 (Blast2/Fc epsilon RII), is turned on by infecting EBV-negative B-lymphoma cell lines with immortalizing strains of the viruslike B95-8 (BL/B95 cells). This up regulation may represent one of the mechanisms involved in EBV-mediated B-cell immortalization. The P3HR1 nonimmortalizing strain of the virus, which is deleted for the entire Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) protein open reading frame, is incapable of inducing the expression of CR2 and CD23, suggesting a crucial role for EBNA2 in the activation of these molecules. In addition, lymphoma cells containing the P3HR1 genome (BL/P3HR1 cells) do not express the viral latent membrane protein (LMP), which is regularly expressed in cells infected with immortalizing viral strains. Using electroporation, we have transfected the EBNA2 gene cloned in an episomal vector into BL/P3HR1 cells and have obtained cell clones that stably express the EBNA2 protein. In these clones, EBNA2 expression was associated with an increased amount of CR2 and CD23 steady-state RNAs. Of the three species of CD23 mRNAs described, the Fc epsilon RIIa species was preferentially expressed in these EBNA2-expressing clones. An increased cell surface expression of CR2 but not of CD23 was observed, and the soluble form of CD23 molecule (SCD23) was released. We were, however, not able to detect any expression of LMP in these cell clones. These data demonstrate that EBNA2 gene is able to complement P3HR1 virus latent functions to induce the activation of CR2 and CD23 expression, and they emphasize the role of EBNA2 protein in the modulation of cellular gene implicated in B-cell proliferation and hence in EBV-mediated B-cell immortalization. Nevertheless, EBNA2 expression in BL/P3HR1 cells is not able to restore the level of CR2 and CD23 expression observed in BL/B95 cells, suggesting that other cellular or viral

  1. Humoral markers of active Epstein-Barr virus infection associate with anti-extractable nuclear antigen autoantibodies and plasma galectin-3 binding protein in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, N S; Nielsen, C T; Houen, G; Jacobsen, S

    2016-12-01

    We investigated if signs of active Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus infections associate with certain autoantibodies and a marker of type I interferon activity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. IgM and IgG plasma levels against Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse and cytomegalovirus pp52 were applied as humoral markers of ongoing/recently active Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus infections, respectively. Plasma galectin-3 binding protein served as a surrogate marker of type I interferon activity. The measurements were conducted in 57 systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 29 healthy controls using ELISAs. Regression analyses and univariate comparisons were performed for associative evaluation between virus serology, plasma galectin-3 binding protein and autoantibodies, along with other clinical and demographic parameters. Plasma galectin-3 binding protein concentrations were significantly higher in systemic lupus erythematosus patients (P = 0.009) and associated positively with Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse-directed antibodies and the presence of autoantibodies against extractable nuclear antigens in adjusted linear regressions (B = 2.02 and 2.02, P = 0.02 and P = 0.002, respectively). Furthermore, systemic lupus erythematosus patients with anti-extractable nuclear antigens had significantly higher antibody levels against Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse (P = 0.02). Our study supports a link between active Epstein-Barr virus infections, positivity for anti-extractable nuclear antigens and increased plasma galectin-3 binding protein concentrations/type I interferon activity in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

  2. Phosphorylation at tyrosine 114 of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) is required for adipogenesis in response to high fat diet

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Yuan-Hung; Ho, Po-Chun; Chen, Min-Shan; Hugo, Eric; Ben-Jonathan, Nira; Wang, Shao-Chun

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) is phosphorylated at Y114. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phospho-Y114 of PCNA is not required for cell proliferation for normal growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MCE during adipogenesis is abolished in the lack of the phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homozygous Y114F mice are resistant to high fat diet induced obesity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results shed light on the interface between proliferation and differentiation. -- Abstract: Clonal proliferation is an obligatory component of adipogenesis. Although several cell cycle regulators are known to participate in the transition between pre-adipocyte proliferation and terminal adipocyte differentiation, how the core DNA synthesis machinery is coordinately regulated in adipogenesis remains elusive. PCNA (Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen) is an indispensable component for DNA synthesis during proliferation. Here we show that PCNA is subject to phosphorylation at the highly conserved tyrosine residue 114 (Y114). Replacing the Y114 residue with phenylalanine (Y114F), which is structurally similar to tyrosine but cannot be phosphorylated, does not affect normal animal development. However, when challenged with high fat diet, mice carrying homozygous Y114F alleles (PCNA{sup F/F}) are resistant to adipose tissue enlargement in comparison to wild-type (WT) mice. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) harboring WT or Y114F mutant PCNA proliferate at similar rates. However, when subjected to adipogenesis induction in culture, PCNA{sup F/F} MEFs are not able to re-enter the cell cycle and fail to form mature adipocytes, while WT MEFs undergo mitotic clonal expansion in response to the adipogenic stimulation, accompanied by enhanced Y114 phosphorylation of PCNA, and differentiate to mature adipocytes. Consistent with the function of Y114 phosphorylation in clonal proliferation in adipogenesis, fat tissues isolated from WT

  3. Thioredoxin (Trxo1) interacts with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and its overexpression affects the growth of tobacco cell culture.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Aingeru; Ortiz-Espín, Ana; Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; Carbonero, Pilar; Pallardó, Federico Vicente; Sevilla, Francisca; Jiménez, Ana

    2017-04-01

    Thioredoxins (Trxs), key components of cellular redox regulation, act by controlling the redox status of many target proteins, and have been shown to play an essential role in cell survival and growth. The presence of a Trx system in the nucleus has received little attention in plants, and the nuclear targets of plant Trxs have not been conclusively identified. Thus, very little is known about the function of Trxs in this cellular compartment. Previously, we studied the intracellular localization of PsTrxo1 and confirmed its presence in mitochondria and, interestingly, in the nucleus under standard growth conditions. In investigating the nuclear function of PsTrxo1 we identified proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) as a PsTrxo1 target by means of affinity chromatography techniques using purified nuclei from pea leaves. Such protein-protein interaction was corroborated by dot-blot and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays, which showed that both proteins interact in the nucleus. Moreover, PsTrxo1 showed disulfide reductase activity on previously oxidized recombinant PCNA protein. In parallel, we studied the effects of PsTrxo1 overexpression on Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (TBY-2) cell cultures. Microscopy and flow-cytometry analysis showed that PsTrxo1 overexpression increases the rate of cell proliferation in the transformed lines, with a higher percentage of the S phase of the cell cycle at the beginning of the cell culture (days 1 and 3) and at the G2/M phase after longer times of culture (day 9), coinciding with an upregulation of PCNA protein. Furthermore, in PsTrxo1 overexpressed cells there is a decrease in the total cellular glutathione content but maintained nuclear GSH accumulation, especially at the end of the culture, which is accompanied by a higher mitotic index, unlike non-overexpressing cells. These results suggest that Trxo1 is involved in the cell cycle progression of TBY-2 cultures, possibly through its link with cellular PCNA

  4. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 transactivates the long terminal repeat of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Scala, G; Quinto, I; Ruocco, M R; Mallardo, M; Ambrosino, C; Squitieri, B; Tassone, P; Venuta, S

    1993-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected subjects show a high incidence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. This suggests that EBV may function as a cofactor that affects HIV-1 activation and may play a major role in the progression of AIDS. To test this hypothesis, we generated two EBV-negative human B-cell lines that stably express the EBNA2 gene of EBV. These EBNA2-positive cell lines were transiently transfected with plasmids that carry either the wild type or deletion mutants of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. There was a consistently higher HIV-1 LTR activation in EBNA2-expressing cells than in control cells, which suggested that EBNA2 proteins could activate the HIV-1 promoter, possibly by inducing nuclear factors binding to HIV-1 cis-regulatory sequences. To test this possibility, we used CAT-based plasmids carrying deletions of the NF-kappa B (pNFA-CAT), Sp1 (pSpA-CAT), or TAR (pTAR-CAT) region of the HIV-1 LTR and retardation assays in which nuclear proteins from EBNA2-expressing cells were challenged with oligonucleotides encompassing the NF-kappa B or Sp1 region of the HIV-1 LTR. We found that both the NF-kappa B and the Sp1 sites of the HIV-1 LTR are necessary for EBNA2 transactivation and that increased expression resulted from the induction of NF-kappa B-like factors. Moreover, experiments with the TAR-deleted pTAR-CAT and with the tat-expressing pAR-TAT plasmids indicated that endogenous Tat-like proteins could participate in EBNA2-mediated activation of the HIV-1 LTR and that EBNA2 proteins can synergize with the viral tat transactivator. Transfection experiments with plasmids expressing the EBNA1, EBNA3, and EBNALP genes did not cause a significant HIV-1 LTR activation. Thus, it appears that among the latent EBV genes tested, EBNA2 was the only EBV gene active on the HIV-1 LTR. The transactivation function of EBNA2 was also observed in the HeLa epithelial cell line

  5. International recommendations for the assessment of autoantibodies to cellular antigens referred to as anti-nuclear antibodies.

    PubMed

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Damoiseaux, Jan; Kallenberg, Cees; Sack, Ulrich; Witte, Torsten; Herold, Manfred; Bossuyt, Xavier; Musset, Lucille; Cervera, Ricard; Plaza-Lopez, Aresio; Dias, Carlos; Sousa, Maria José; Radice, Antonella; Eriksson, Catharina; Hultgren, Olof; Viander, Markku; Khamashta, Munther; Regenass, Stephan; Andrade, Luis Eduardo Coelho; Wiik, Allan; Tincani, Angela; Rönnelid, Johan; Bloch, Donald B; Fritzler, Marvin J; Chan, Edward K L; Garcia-De La Torre, I; Konstantinov, Konstantin N; Lahita, Robert; Wilson, Merlin; Vainio, Olli; Fabien, Nicole; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Meroni, Pierluigi; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are fundamental for the diagnosis of autoimmune diseases, and have been determined by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IIFA) for decades. As the demand for ANA testing increased, alternative techniques were developed challenging the classic IIFA. These alternative platforms differ in their antigen profiles, sensitivity and specificity, raising uncertainties regarding standardisation and interpretation of incongruent results. Therefore, an international group of experts has created recommendations for ANA testing by different methods. Two groups of experts participated in this initiative. The European autoimmunity standardization initiative representing 15 European countries and the International Union of Immunologic Societies/World Health Organization/Arthritis Foundation/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention autoantibody standardising committee. A three-step process followed by a Delphi exercise with closed voting was applied. Twenty-five recommendations for determining ANA (1-13), anti-double stranded DNA antibodies (14-18), specific antibodies (19-23) and validation of methods (24-25) were created. Significant differences between experts were observed regarding recommendations 24-25 (p<0.03). Here, we formulated recommendations for the assessment and interpretation of ANA and associated antibodies. Notably, the roles of IIFA as a reference method, and the importance of defining nuclear and cytoplasmic staining, were emphasised, while the need to incorporate alternative automated methods was acknowledged. Various approaches to overcome discrepancies between methods were suggested of which an improved bench-to-bedside communication is of the utmost importance. These recommendations are based on current knowledge and can enable harmonisation of local algorithms for testing and evaluation of ANA and related autoantibodies. Last but not least, new more appropriate terminologies have been suggested.

  6. Replication protein A and proliferating cell nuclear antigen coordinate DNA polymerase selection in 8-oxo-guanine repair.

    PubMed

    Maga, Giovanni; Crespan, Emmanuele; Wimmer, Ursula; van Loon, Barbara; Amoroso, Alessandra; Mondello, Chiara; Belgiovine, Cristina; Ferrari, Elena; Locatelli, Giada; Villani, Giuseppe; Hübscher, Ulrich

    2008-12-30

    The adenine misincorporated by replicative DNA polymerases (pols) opposite 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G) is removed by a specific glycosylase, leaving the lesion on the DNA. Subsequent incorporation of C opposite 8-oxo-G on the resulting 1-nt gapped DNA is essential for the removal of the 8-oxo-G to prevent G-C to T-A transversion mutations. By using model DNA templates, purified DNA pols beta and lambda and knockout cell extracts, we show here that the auxiliary proteins replication protein A and proliferating cell nuclear antigen act as molecular switches to activate the DNA pol lambda- dependent highly efficient and faithful repair of A:8-oxo-G mismatches in human cells and to repress DNA pol beta activity. By using an immortalized human fibroblast cell line that has the potential to induce cancer in mice, we show that the development of a tumoral phenotype in these cells correlated with a differential expression of DNA pols lambda and beta.

  7. Post-translational modifications of proliferating cell nuclear antigen: A key signal integrator for DNA damage response (Review).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiong; Chang, Yuxiao; Yang, Jin; Wei, Quanfang

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that the post-translational modifications of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) may be crucial in influencing the cellular choice between different pathways, such as the cell cycle checkpoint, DNA repair or apoptosis pathways, in order to maintain genomic stability. DNA damage leads to replication stress and the subsequent induction of PCNA modification by small ubiquitin (Ub)-related modifiers and Ub, which has been identified to affect multiple biological processes of genomic DNA. Thus far, much has been learned concerning the behavior of modified PCNA as a key signal integrator in response to DNA damage. In humans and yeast, modified PCNA activates DNA damage bypass via an error-prone or error-free pathway to prevent the breakage of DNA replication forks, which may potentially induce double-strand breaks and subsequent chromosomal rearrangements. However, the exact mechanisms by which these pathways work and by what means the modified PCNA is involved in these processes remain elusive. Thus, the improved understanding of PCNA modification and its implications for DNA damage response may provide us with more insight into the mechanisms by which human cells regulate aberrant recombination events, and cancer initiation and development. The present review focuses on the post-translational modifications of PCNA and its important functions in mediating mammalian cellular response to different types of DNA damage.

  8. Changes in expression of p53, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and bcl-2 in recurrent laryngeal cancer after radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, B-J; Wang, S-G; Roh, H-J; Goh, E-K; Chon, K-M; Park, D-Y

    2006-07-01

    The biological changes in recurrent laryngeal cancer following radiotherapy are not fully understood. The authors investigated differences in the expression of p53, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and bcl-2 in laryngeal cancer specimens before radiotherapy and in recurrent laryngeal cancer specimens following radiotherapy in the same patients. The authors investigated the expression of p53, PCNA and bcl-2 by immunohistochemical stain in 30 specimens from 15 patients with primary laryngeal cancer and recurrent laryngeal cancer after radiotherapy. The expression of p53 protein was significantly different in laryngeal cancer before radiotherapy (4/15, 26.7 per cent) compared with recurrent laryngeal cancer after radiotherapy (8/15, 53.3 per cent) (p<0.05). The PCNA index was also significantly different in laryngeal cancer specimens before radiotherapy (mean, 11.9 per cent) compared with recurrent laryngeal cancer after radiotherapy (mean, 18.0 per cent) (p<0.05). However, there was no statistically significant alteration of bcl-2 expression in primary compared with recurrent laryngeal cancer. The expression of p53 and PCNA increased in recurrent laryngeal cancers after radiotherapy, compared with that in laryngeal cancers before radiotherapy. Recurrent laryngeal cancers arising following radiotherapy became biologically aggressive.

  9. Induction of p53-dependent activation of the human proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene in chromatin by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Shan, Bin; Xu, Jin; Zhuo, Ying; Morris, Cindy A; Morris, Gilbert F

    2003-11-07

    A human fibroblast cell line with conditional p53 expression displayed a p53-dependent increase in both the protein and mRNA levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). The combination of p53 induction and IR cooperated to activate a transiently expressed human PCNA promoter-reporter gene via a p53-responsive element. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays with antibodies specific for p53 or p300/CREB-binding protein revealed specific p53-dependent enrichment of PCNA promoter sequences in immunoprecipitates of sheared chromatin prepared from irradiated cells. Maximal and specific association of acetylated histone H4 with the PCNA promoter also depended on p53 induction and exposure to IR. These data demonstrate p53 binding to a target site in the PCNA promoter, recruitment of p300/CREB-binding protein, and localized acetylation of histone H4 in an IR-dependent manner. These molecular events are likely to play a role in mediating activation of PCNA gene expression by p53 during the cellular response to DNA damage. The analyses indicate that the combination of p53 induction and IR activate the PCNA gene via mechanisms similar to that of p21/wild-type p53-activated factor but to a lesser extent. This differential regulation of PCNA and p21/wild-type p53-activated factor may establish the proper ratio of the two proteins to coordinate DNA repair with cell cycle arrest.

  10. Direct role for proliferating cell nuclear antigen in substrate recognition by the E3 ubiquitin ligase CRL4Cdt2.

    PubMed

    Havens, Courtney G; Shobnam, Nadia; Guarino, Estrella; Centore, Richard C; Zou, Lee; Kearsey, Stephen E; Walter, Johannes C

    2012-03-30

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase Cullin-ring ligase 4-Cdt2 (CRL4(Cdt2)) is emerging as an important cell cycle regulator that targets numerous proteins for destruction in S phase and after DNA damage, including Cdt1, p21, and Set8. CRL4(Cdt2) substrates contain a "PIP degron," which consists of a canonical proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) interaction motif (PIP box) and an adjacent basic amino acid. Substrates use their PIP box to form a binary complex with PCNA on chromatin and the basic residue to recruit CRL4(Cdt2) for substrate ubiquitylation. Using Xenopus egg extracts, we identify an acidic residue in PCNA that is essential to support destruction of all CRL4(Cdt2) substrates. This PCNA residue, which adjoins the basic amino acid of the bound PIP degron, is dispensable for substrate binding to PCNA but essential for CRL4(Cdt2) recruitment to chromatin. Our data show that the interaction of CRL4(Cdt2) with substrates requires molecular determinants not only in the substrate degron but also on PCNA. The results illustrate a potentially general mechanism by which E3 ligases can couple ubiquitylation to the formation of protein-protein interactions.

  11. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-binding protein C1orf124 is a regulator of translesion synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Gargi; Leung, Justin Wai-Chung; Nair, Binoj C; Fong, Ka-Wing; Chen, Junjie

    2012-10-05

    DNA damage-induced proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) ubiquitination serves as the key event mediating post-replication repair. Post-replication repair involves either translesion synthesis (TLS) or damage avoidance via template switching. In this study, we have identified and characterized C1orf124 as a regulator of TLS. C1orf124 co-localizes and interacts with unmodified and mono-ubiquitinated PCNA at UV light-induced damage sites, which require the PIP box and UBZ domain of C1orf124. C1orf124 also binds to the AAA-ATPase valosin-containing protein via its SHP domain, and cellular resistance to UV radiation mediated by C1orf124 requires its interactions with valosin-containing protein and PCNA. Interestingly, C1orf124 binds to replicative DNA polymerase POLD3 and PDIP1 under normal conditions but preferentially associates with TLS polymerase η (POLH) upon UV damage. Depletion of C1orf124 compromises PCNA monoubiquitination, RAD18 chromatin association, and RAD18 localization to UV damage sites. Thus, C1orf124 acts at multiple steps in TLS, stabilizes RAD18 and ubiquitinated PCNA at damage sites, and facilitates the switch from replicative to TLS polymerase to bypass DNA lesion.

  12. The immunohistochemical expression of p21WAF1/Cip1 and Proliferating cell nuclear antigen in laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Izumaru, S; Sakamoto, K; Miyajima, Y; Nakashima, T

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the significance of the expression of p21WAF1/Cip1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in human laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. Forty-eight patients (25 supraglottic, 23 glottic) who had undergone operations between 1998 and 2003 were included in this study. The Envision immunohistochemistry method was utilized to stain these tissue specimens. The results showed that the immunostaining of p21WAF1/Cip1 do not show any correlation with differentiation, N stage, metastasis, survival, recurrence or the laryngeal site of involvement. A significant inverse correlation was detected between p21WAF1/Cip1 and the T stage. In contrast, the percentage of PCNA labelled cells showed a significant correlation with the T stage, but not with other clinicopathological parameters. There were differences in the expression of p21WAF1/Cip1 and PCNA between the supraglottic and the glottic carcinomas. In conclusion, our findings suggest that p21WAF1/Cip1 and PCNA may play an important role in the progression of carcinoma of the supraglottic larynx.

  13. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3A protein regulates CDKN2B transcription via interaction with MIZ-1.

    PubMed

    Bazot, Quentin; Deschamps, Thibaut; Tafforeau, Lionel; Siouda, Maha; Leblanc, Pascal; Harth-Hertle, Marie L; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Lotteau, Vincent; Kempkes, Bettina; Tommasino, Massimo; Gruffat, Henri; Manet, Evelyne

    2014-09-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 3 family of protein is critical for the EBV-induced primary B-cell growth transformation process. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen we identified 22 novel cellular partners of the EBNA3s. Most importantly, among the newly identified partners, five are known to play direct and important roles in transcriptional regulation. Of these, the Myc-interacting zinc finger protein-1 (MIZ-1) is a transcription factor initially characterized as a binding partner of MYC. MIZ-1 activates the transcription of a number of target genes including the cell cycle inhibitor CDKN2B. Focusing on the EBNA3A/MIZ-1 interaction we demonstrate that binding occurs in EBV-infected cells expressing both proteins at endogenous physiological levels and that in the presence of EBNA3A, a significant fraction of MIZ-1 translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Moreover, we show that a trimeric complex composed of a MIZ-1 recognition DNA element, MIZ-1 and EBNA3A can be formed, and that interaction of MIZ-1 with nucleophosmin (NPM), one of its coactivator, is prevented by EBNA3A. Finally, we show that, in the presence of EBNA3A, expression of the MIZ-1 target gene, CDKN2B, is downregulated and repressive H3K27 marks are established on its promoter region suggesting that EBNA3A directly counteracts the growth inhibitory action of MIZ-1.

  14. Molecular modeling and expression of the Litopenaeus vannamei proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) after white spot syndrome virus shrimp infection.

    PubMed

    de-la-Re-Vega, Enrique; Muhlia-Almazan, Adriana; Arvizu-Flores, Aldo A; Islas-Osuna, Maria A; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria; Brieba, Luis G; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R

    2011-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is the eukaryotic sliding clamp that tethers DNA polymerase to DNA during replication. The full-length cDNA of the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei PCNA (LvPCNA) was cloned and encoded a protein of 260 amino acids that is highly similar to other Crustacean PCNAs. The theoretical shrimp PCNA structure has all the domains that are necessary for its interaction with template DNA and DNA polymerase. RT-PCR analysis showed that LvPCNA is expressed mainly in muscle and hemocytes and much less in hepatopancreas and gills. LvPCNA mRNA levels are not statistically different in muscle from healthy and challenged shrimp with the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). In contrast, the mRNA levels of the viral DNA polymerase show a biphasic pattern with expression at 6 h post-infection and later at 24 and 48 h. These results suggest that in shrimp muscle LvPCNA levels are steadily kept to allow viral replication and that WSSV DNA polymerase (WSSV-DNApol) is more responsive towards later stages of infection. More knowledge of the DNA replication machinery would result in a better understanding of the mechanism and components of viral replication, since the WSSV genome does not have all the components required for assembly of a fully functional replisome.

  15. Immunohistochemical distribution of heat shock protein 70 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in mouse placenta at different gestational stages.

    PubMed

    Ozaydin, Tugba; Sur, Emrah; Oznurlu, Yasemin; Celik, Ilhami; Uluisik, Deniz

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate immunohistochemical distribution of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the mouse placenta at different gestational stages. For this purpose a total of 18 Swiss albino female mice at 12-14 weeks of age were used. Females were sacrificed on days 3 (early), 10 (mid-), and 17 (late) of pregnancy and the implantation sites of the pregnant uterus were sampled. The sections were made transversely through the central region of the implantation site and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histological examination. PCNA and Hsp70 was stained immunohistochemically. Since the definitive placenta was not still formed on day 3 of pregnancy, Hsp70 and PCNA positivity were evaluated in only luminal epithelium and decidual-stromal cells. On days 10 and 17 of pregnancy, Hsp70 and PCNA positivity were evaluated in labyrinth zone, junctional zone and decidual layer of placenta. Hsp70 expression was observed trophoblast cells and decidual cells and was relatively constant throughout the pregnancy. This protein was strongly labeled in the trophoblast cells; while decidual cells were displayed moderate staining. In early pregnant mouse uteri, PCNA was mainly localized in decidual-stromal cells. The trophoblast cells and decidual cells displayed highly proliferative activity at the midgestational period. However there was a significant decrease in the percentage of PCNA positive cells in late gestation.

  16. Boron inhibits the proliferating cell nuclear antigen index, molybdenum containing proteins and ameliorates oxidative stress in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Hina; Ali, Shakir

    2013-01-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignancy and the main cause of mortality in patients with chronic liver diseases. This study reports the inhibitory effect of boron on HCC induced in rats by administering thioacetamide (TAA) (0.03%) in drinking water for 400days. Boron (4mg/kg body weight) was administered orally after induction of carcinoma. Treatment was continued for 122days, and cell proliferation, histology and biochemistry of treated and control group of rats were studied. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation, which increased in rats exposed to carcinogen, significantly decreased after boron treatment. PCNA index decreased from 80 in HCC rats to 32 after boron treatment. In the control group, it was 20. Boron caused a dose-dependent decrease in carcinogen-induced [(3)H]-thymidine uptake by the rat hepatocyte. It could partially reverse the activity of selected biochemical indicators of hepatic damage, oxidative stress, selenium and serum retinol, which are depleted in liver cancer, and improved overall health of animal. The study implicates the elevated levels of mammalian molybdenum Fe-S containing flavin hydroxylases, which increase the free radical production and oxidative stress, consequently causing increased hepatic cell proliferation in HCC, and reports boron to ameliorate these changes in liver cancer.

  17. Structural insights into the adaptation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) from Haloferax volcanii to a high-salt environment

    SciTech Connect

    Morgunova, Ekaterina; Gray, Fiona C.; MacNeill, Stuart A.; Ladenstein, Rudolf

    2009-10-01

    The crystal structure of PCNA from the halophilic archaeon H. volcanii reveals specific features of the charge distribution on the protein surface that reflect adaptation to a high-salt environment and suggests a different type of interaction with DNA in halophilic PCNAs. The sliding clamp proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays vital roles in many aspects of DNA replication and repair in eukaryotic cells and in archaea. Realising the full potential of archaea as a model for PCNA function requires a combination of biochemical and genetic approaches. In order to provide a platform for subsequent reverse genetic analysis, PCNA from the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii was subjected to crystallographic analysis. The gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and the protein was purified by affinity chromatography and crystallized by the vapour-diffusion technique. The structure was determined by molecular replacement and refined at 3.5 Å resolution to a final R factor of 23.7% (R{sub free} = 25%). PCNA from H. volcanii was found to be homotrimeric and to resemble other homotrimeric PCNA clamps but with several differences that appear to be associated with adaptation of the protein to the high intracellular salt concentrations found in H. volcanii cells.

  18. Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3A protein regulates CDKN2B transcription via interaction with MIZ-1

    PubMed Central

    Bazot, Quentin; Deschamps, Thibaut; Tafforeau, Lionel; Siouda, Maha; Leblanc, Pascal; Harth-Hertle, Marie L.; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Lotteau, Vincent; Kempkes, Bettina; Tommasino, Massimo; Gruffat, Henri; Manet, Evelyne

    2014-01-01

    The Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 3 family of protein is critical for the EBV-induced primary B-cell growth transformation process. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen we identified 22 novel cellular partners of the EBNA3s. Most importantly, among the newly identified partners, five are known to play direct and important roles in transcriptional regulation. Of these, the Myc-interacting zinc finger protein-1 (MIZ-1) is a transcription factor initially characterized as a binding partner of MYC. MIZ-1 activates the transcription of a number of target genes including the cell cycle inhibitor CDKN2B. Focusing on the EBNA3A/MIZ-1 interaction we demonstrate that binding occurs in EBV-infected cells expressing both proteins at endogenous physiological levels and that in the presence of EBNA3A, a significant fraction of MIZ-1 translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Moreover, we show that a trimeric complex composed of a MIZ-1 recognition DNA element, MIZ-1 and EBNA3A can be formed, and that interaction of MIZ-1 with nucleophosmin (NPM), one of its coactivator, is prevented by EBNA3A. Finally, we show that, in the presence of EBNA3A, expression of the MIZ-1 target gene, CDKN2B, is downregulated and repressive H3K27 marks are established on its promoter region suggesting that EBNA3A directly counteracts the growth inhibitory action of MIZ-1. PMID:25092922

  19. Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen stabilizes intracellular activated Notch by targeting the Sel10 protein.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ke; Verma, Subhash C; Murakami, Masanao; Bajaj, Bharat; Kaul, Rajeev; Robertson, Erle S

    2007-10-09

    Deregulation of the evolutionarily conserved Notch signaling is highly correlated with oncogenesis. Intracellular activated Notch (ICN) is a protooncogene linked to the transcription activation of a number of cellular genes involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation, and proliferation. Stability of ICN is tightly regulated by the Sel10-mediated ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Sel10 can function as a negative regulator of Notch and exhibits activities of a tumor-suppressor protein. This article shows that the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) directly interacts with Sel10 and forms a complex in KSHV-infected cells. This results in suppression of ICN ubiquitination and degradation. The carboxyl terminus of LANA interacts with the F-box and WD40 domains of Sel10 and competes with ICN for binding to Sel10. This elevated level of ICN is also critical for maintaining the enhanced proliferation of KSHV-infected tumor cells. These findings describe a mechanism by which the KSHV-encoded LANA protein regulates ubiquitination of ICN mediated by the F-box component of the E3 ligase Sel10, leading to proliferation of the virus-infected cells.

  20. The MutSα-Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Interaction in Human DNA Mismatch Repair*S⃞♦

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pohlhaus, Timothy J.; Chen, Sihong; Hura, Gregory L.; Dzantiev, Leonid; Beese, Lorena S.; Modrich, Paul

    2008-01-01

    We have examined the interaction parameters, conformation, and functional significance of the human MutSα· proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) complex in mismatch repair. The two proteins associate with a 1:1 stoichiometry and a KD of 0.7 μm in the absence or presence of heteroduplex DNA. PCNA does not influence the affinity of MutSα for a mismatch, and mismatch-bound MutSα binds PCNA. Small angle x-ray scattering studies have established the molecular parameters of the complex, which are consistent with an elongated conformation in which the two proteins associate in an end-to-end fashion in a manner that does not involve an extended unstructured tether, as has been proposed for yeast MutSα and PCNA (Shell, S. S., Putnam, C. D., and Kolodner, R. D. (2007) Mol. Cell26 ,565 -57817531814). MutSα variants lacking the PCNA interaction motif are functional in 3′- or 5′-directed mismatch-provoked excision, but display a partial defect in 5′-directed mismatch repair. This finding is consistent with the modest mutability conferred by inactivation of the MutSα PCNA interaction motif and suggests that interaction of the replication clamp with other repair protein(s) accounts for the essential role of PCNA in MutSα-dependent mismatch repair. PMID:18326858

  1. Human DNA polymerase β, but not λ, can bypass a 2-deoxyribonolactone lesion together with proliferating cell nuclear antigen

    PubMed Central

    Crespan, Emmanuele; Pasi, Emanuela; Imoto, Shuhei; Hübscher, Ulrich; Greenberg, Marc M.; Maga, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The C1′-oxidized lesion 2-deoxyribonolactone (L) is induced by free radical attack of DNA. This lesion is mutagenic, inhibits base excision repair, and can lead to strand scission. In double stranded DNA L is repaired by long-patch base excision repair, but it induces replication fork arrest in a single-strand template. Translesion synthesis requires a specialized DNA polymerase (Pol). In E. coli, Pol V is responsible for bypassing L, while in yeast Pol ζ has been shown to be required for efficient bypass. Very little is known about the identity of human Pols capable of bypassing L. For instance, the activity of family X enzymes has never been investigated. We examined the ability of different family X Pols: Pols β, λ and TdT from human cells and Pol IV from S. cerevisiae to act on DNA containing an isolated 2-deoxyribonolactone, as well as when the lesion comprises the 5′-component of a tandem lesion. We show that Pol β, but not Pol λ, can bypass a single L lesion in the template, and its activity is increased by the auxiliary protein proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), while both enzymes were completely blocked by a tandem lesion. Yeast Pol IV was able to bypass the single L and the tandem lesion but with little nucleotide insertion specificity. Finally, L did not affect the polymerization activity of the template-independent enzyme TdT. PMID:23101935

  2. Crystal structure of the shrimp proliferating cell nuclear antigen: structural complementarity with WSSV DNA polymerase PIP-box.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Miranda, Jesus S; Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A; Arvizu-Flores, Aldo A; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D; Stojanoff, Vivian; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Brieba, Luis G; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication requires processivity factors that allow replicative DNA polymerases to extend long stretches of DNA. Some DNA viruses encode their own replicative DNA polymerase, such as the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) that infects decapod crustaceans but still require host replication accessory factors. We have determined by X-ray diffraction the three-dimensional structure of the Pacific white leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (LvPCNA). This protein is a member of the sliding clamp family of proteins, that binds DNA replication and DNA repair proteins through a motif called PIP-box (PCNA-Interacting Protein). The crystal structure of LvPCNA was refined to a resolution of 3 Å, and allowed us to determine the trimeric protein assembly and details of the interactions between PCNA and the DNA. To address the possible interaction between LvPCNA and the viral DNA polymerase, we docked a theoretical model of a PIP-box peptide from the WSSV DNA polymerase within LvPCNA crystal structure. The theoretical model depicts a feasible model of interaction between both proteins. The crystal structure of shrimp PCNA allows us to further understand the mechanisms of DNA replication processivity factors in non-model systems.

  3. Crystal Structure of the Shrimp Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen: Structural Complementarity with WSSV DNA Polymerase PIP-Box

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-Miranda, Jesus S.; Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A.; Arvizu-Flores, Aldo A.; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D.; Stojanoff, Vivian; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Brieba, Luis G.; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication requires processivity factors that allow replicative DNA polymerases to extend long stretches of DNA. Some DNA viruses encode their own replicative DNA polymerase, such as the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) that infects decapod crustaceans but still require host replication accessory factors. We have determined by X-ray diffraction the three-dimensional structure of the Pacific white leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (LvPCNA). This protein is a member of the sliding clamp family of proteins, that binds DNA replication and DNA repair proteins through a motif called PIP-box (PCNA-Interacting Protein). The crystal structure of LvPCNA was refined to a resolution of 3 Å, and allowed us to determine the trimeric protein assembly and details of the interactions between PCNA and the DNA. To address the possible interaction between LvPCNA and the viral DNA polymerase, we docked a theoretical model of a PIP-box peptide from the WSSV DNA polymerase within LvPCNA crystal structure. The theoretical model depicts a feasible model of interaction between both proteins. The crystal structure of shrimp PCNA allows us to further understand the mechanisms of DNA replication processivity factors in non-model systems. PMID:24728082

  4. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in brain tumors, and its prognostic role in ependymomas: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, D; Chiò, A; Giordana, M T; Pezzulo, T; Vigliani, M C

    1993-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)/cyclin is currently often investigated immunohistochemically in tumors as a marker of cell proliferation, but many problems remain open concerning its reliability as a prognostic factor. PCNA has been studied in a series of 123 brain tumors using the monoclonal antibody PC10. A clear intra- and inter-tumor variability of PCNA-positive nuclei has been found, but taking into account the tumor areas with the highest number of positive nuclei, a positive correlation between this number and the histological malignancy of tumors has been demonstrated. The staining intensity of nuclei was variable; very-intensely positive nuclei, counted separately, are hypothesized to represent nuclei in S-phase of the cell cycle. In ependymomas the investigation included a quantitative statistical analysis. The number of PCNA-positive nuclei correlated with cell density and mitotic index, but only very intensely positive nuclei showed a significant statistical correlation with survival. In spite of the many possibilities of wrong interpretation of PCNA expression, the most important of which is its deregulation, the method is useful in the practice for prognostic purposes. Its important advantages are the possibility of a retrospective application and a visual analysis of the proliferation potential of tumors.

  5. Regulation of DNA replication and repair proteins through interaction with the front side of proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Jónsson, Z O; Hindges, R; Hübscher, U

    1998-01-01

    The DNA polymerase accessory factor proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) has been caught in interaction with an ever increasing number of proteins. To characterize the sites and functions of some of these interactions, we constructed four mutants of human PCNA and analysed them in a variety of assays. By targeting loops on the surface of the PCNA trimer and changing three or four residues at a time to alanine, we found that a region including part of the domain-connecting loop of PCNA and loops on one face of the trimer, close to the C-termini, is involved in binding to all of the following proteins: DNA polymerase delta, replication factor C, the flap endonuclease Fen1, the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and DNA ligase I. An inhibition of DNA ligation caused by the interaction of PCNA with DNA ligase I was found, and we show that DNA ligase I and Fen1 can inhibit DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase delta/PCNA. We demonstrate that PCNA must be located below a 5' flap on a forked template to stimulate Fen1 activity, and considering the interacting region on PCNA for Fen1, this suggests an orientation for PCNA during DNA replication with the C-termini facing forwards, in the direction of DNA synthesis. PMID:9545252

  6. PSL, a nuclear cell-cycle associated antigen is increased during retinoic acid-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Barque, J P; Lagaye, S; Ladoux, A; Della Valle, V; Abita, J P; Larsen, C J

    1987-09-30

    PSL(p55) is a nuclear 55kD antigen present in various mammalian cell systems, which has been first identified by use of human autoimmune antibodies (Barque et al. 1983, EMBO J. 2, 743). It has been shown to be associated with interphase chromatine and to be synthesized in during the S phase of the cell cycle. In this work, we have analysed the status of PSL in promyelocytic HL-60 human cells in exponential or stationary growth, or undergoing granulocytic differentiation in presence of Retinoic acid. By use of 2-dimensional electrophoresis, PSL was found to be composed of two acidic proteins designated p55A and p55B. Unexpectedly, estimated 10-20 fold higher amounts of each species were found in cells treated for 5 days with 10(-6)M Retinoic acid, than in asynchronously growing cells or resting cells. Moreover, the p55A protein was phosphorylated during the process. On the basis of these results, PSL appears to be involved in some steps of the granulocytic differentiation process.

  7. The change of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and apoptosis of the MM46 mammary cancer cells of the mouse after single high-dose irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michiya; Okamoto, Ken; Namikawa, Tsutomu; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Araki, Keijiro

    2005-09-01

    The effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on tumor cells were elucidated by immunohistochemical examination of changes in the level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. In addition, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling method was used to examine the level of apoptosis in mouse MM46 tumor cells after a single high dose of irradiation (30 Gy, 6 MeV). A significant decrease in the number of tumor cells compared to controls was observed on the 3rd, 7th, and 14th days following irradiation, but not on the 1st day. Consistent with these results, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling index of irradiated cells decreased significantly on the 3rd, 7th, and 14th days following irradiation, but not on the 1st day. By comparison, the regrowth area on day 14 only showed no difference compared to the control group. The apoptotic index increased on the 7th and 14th day after irradiation, but at a lower rate than the observed decrease in the level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. We speculate that the major mechanism of single high-dose radiation effect is inhibition of DNA synthesis.

  8. Cancer Specific Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen as a Novel Diagnostic Marker for the Detection of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-01

    CELLS(BIOLOGY), *ANTIGENS, *MAMMARY GLANDS, *BREAST CANCER, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), DETECTION, PEPTIDES, ENZYMES, PROTEINS , DIAGNOSIS(MEDICINE), PATIENTS, BLOOD SERUM, IMMUNOASSAY, GELS, ELECTROPHORESIS, SENSE ORGANS, ESTROGENS.

  9. Effects of the myeloid cell nuclear differentiation antigen on the proliferation, apoptosis and migration of osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chengliang; Liu, Chuanju; Dong, Jun; Li, Dong; Li, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Despite improvements over the past two decades, the outcome for patients with advanced osteosarcoma remains poor. Targeted therapies have emerged as promising treatment options for various malignancies. However, effective targeted cancer therapies require the identification of key molecules in the pathogenesis of cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of the myeloid cell nuclear differentiation antigen (MNDA), a member of the interferon-inducible p200 (IFI-200) family, as a therapeutic target for osteosarcoma by analyzing the baseline expression of MNDA in human osteosarcoma cells and determining the effect of MNDA overexpression on the proliferation and apoptosis profiles and migration/invasion ability in osteosarcoma cells. To this end, MNDA mRNA abundance in wild-type sarcoma osteogenic (Saos-2) cells was analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, proliferation/apoptosis profiles and migration/invasion capacity in Saos-2 cells overexpressing a green fluorescence protein (GFP)-human MNDA fusion protein. Saos-2 cells found to be overexpressing GFP alone were assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, flow cytometric analysis and Matrigel Transwell migration assay. The results demonstrated that MNDA mRNA was significantly less abundant in wild-type Saos-2 cells compared with human monocyte-like U-937 cells and MNDA overexpression effectively inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis and reduced migration/invasiveness in Saos-2 cells compared with GFP overexpression alone. Preliminary observations suggested that MNDA potentially serves as a novel therapeutic target for osteosarcoma.

  10. The prognostic implications of macrophages expressing proliferating cell nuclear antigen in breast cancer depend on immune context.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Michael J; Wolf, Denise; Mukhtar, Rita A; Tandon, Vickram; Yau, Christina; Au, Alfred; Baehner, Frederick; van't Veer, Laura; Berry, Donald; Esserman, Laura J

    2013-01-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are recruited from the circulation to the tumor site, and can undergo a spectrum of phenotypic changes, with two contrasting activation states described in the literature: the M1 and M2 phenotypes. We previously identified a population of TAMs that express proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and are associated with high grade, hormone receptor negative breast cancers and poor outcomes. In the present exploratory study we again found that high PCNA(+) TAM counts in pre-treatment tumor biopsies (102 invasive breast cancer cases from the I-SPY 1 Trial, a prospective neoadjuvant trial with serial core biopsies and gene array data) were associated with high grade, hormone receptor negativity, and decreased recurrence free survival. We explored the association of these PCNA(+) TAMs with the expression of M1 and M2 related genes and, contrary to expectation, observed that high PCNA(+) TAM levels were associated with more M1- than M2-related genes. An immune gene signature, derived from cytotoxic T cell and MHC Class II genes (Tc/ClassII), was developed and we found that high PCNA(+) TAM counts, in the context of a low Tc/ClassII signature score, were associated with significantly worse recurrence free survival in all cases and in hormone receptor negative only cases. We observed similar results using a gene signature-proxy for PCNA(+) TAMs in a larger independent set of 425 neoadjuvant-treated breast cancer cases. The results of this exploratory study indicate that high numbers of PCNA(+) TAMs, in the absence of an anti-tumor immune microenvironment (as indicated by a low Tc/ClassII signature score), are associated with poor outcomes in breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This, along with the observation that PCNA(+) TAMs were associated predominantly with M1-related genes, may provide new insights into the role of the immune microenvironment in breast cancer.

  11. Combined blockade of AKT/mTOR pathway inhibits growth of human hemangioma via downregulation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Ou, J M; Qui, M-K; Dai, Y-X; Dong, Q; Shen, J; Dong, P; Wang, X-F; Liu, Y-B; Fei, Z-W

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway plays a crucial role in the tumorigenesis and progression of multiple tumors, and has been shown to be important therapeutic targets for cancer. The present study aimed to explore the role and molecular mechanisms of AKT/mTOR pathway in human hemangioma (HA). Twenty-five cases of human HA tissues were collected. The expression of AKT, mTOR and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) proteins was evaluated using semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry in biopsy samples in different phases of HA. AKT/mTOR pathway was blocked by recombinant small hairpin RNA adenovirus vector rAd5-AKT+mTOR (rAd5-Am), used for infecting proliferating phase HA-derived endothelial cells (HDEC). The expression of AKT, mTOR and PCNA was detected by Real-time PCR and Western blot assays. Cell proliferative activities were determined by MTT assay, and cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. As a consequence, the expression of AKT, mTOR and PCNA was significantly increased in proliferative phase HA, while that was decreased in involutive phase. Combined blockade of AKT/mTOR pathway by rAd5-Am diminished cell proliferative activities, and induced cell apoptosis and cycle arrest with the decreased expression of AKT, mTOR and PCNA in proliferative phase HDEC. In conclusion, the activity of AKT/mTOR pathway was increased in proliferative phase HA, while it was decreased in involutive phase. Combined blockade of AKT/mTOR pathway might suppress cell proliferation via down-regulation of PCNA expression, and induce apoptosis and cycle arrest in proliferative phase HDEC, suggesting that AKT/mTOR pathway might represent the important therapeutic targets for human HA.

  12. Phosphorylation at tyrosine 114 of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) is required for adipogenesis in response to high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yuan-Hung; Ho, Po-Chun; Chen, Min-Shan; Hugo, Eric; Ben-Jonathan, Nira; Wang, Shao-Chun

    2013-01-04

    Clonal proliferation is an obligatory component of adipogenesis. Although several cell cycle regulators are known to participate in the transition between pre-adipocyte proliferation and terminal adipocyte differentiation, how the core DNA synthesis machinery is coordinately regulated in adipogenesis remains elusive. PCNA (Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen) is an indispensable component for DNA synthesis during proliferation. Here we show that PCNA is subject to phosphorylation at the highly conserved tyrosine residue 114 (Y114). Replacing the Y114 residue with phenylalanine (Y114F), which is structurally similar to tyrosine but cannot be phosphorylated, does not affect normal animal development. However, when challenged with high fat diet, mice carrying homozygous Y114F alleles (PCNA(F/F)) are resistant to adipose tissue enlargement in comparison to wild-type (WT) mice. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) harboring WT or Y114F mutant PCNA proliferate at similar rates. However, when subjected to adipogenesis induction in culture, PCNA(F/F) MEFs are not able to re-enter the cell cycle and fail to form mature adipocytes, while WT MEFs undergo mitotic clonal expansion in response to the adipogenic stimulation, accompanied by enhanced Y114 phosphorylation of PCNA, and differentiate to mature adipocytes. Consistent with the function of Y114 phosphorylation in clonal proliferation in adipogenesis, fat tissues isolated from WT mice contain significantly more adipocytes than those isolated from PCNA(F/F) mice. This study identifies a critical role for PCNA in adipose tissue development, and for the first time identifies a role of the core DNA replication machinery at the interface between proliferation and differentiation.

  13. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen is protected from degradation by forming a complex with MutT Homolog2.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yu; Cai, Jian-Ping; Tu, Bo; Wu, Lipeng; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Xiangyu; Li, Lian; McNutt, Michael A; Feng, Jingnan; He, Qihua; Yang, Yang; Wang, Haiying; Sekiguchi, Mutsuo; Zhu, Wei-Guo

    2009-07-17

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) has been demonstrated to interact with multiple proteins involved in several metabolic pathways such as DNA replication and repair. However, there have been fewer reports about whether these PCNA-binding proteins influence stability of PCNA. Here, we observed a physical interaction between PCNA and MutT homolog2 (MTH2), a new member of the MutT-related proteins that hydrolyzes 8-oxo-7,8-dihydrodeoxyguanosine triphosphate (8-oxo-dGTP). In several unstressed human cancer cell lines and in normal human fibroblast cells, PCNA and MTH2 formed a complex and their mutual binding fragments were confirmed. It was intriguing that PCNA and MTH2 were dissociated dependent on acetylation of PCNA, which in turn induced degradation of PCNA in response to UV irradiation, but not in response to other forms of DNA-damaging stress. To further explore the link between dissociation of PCNA-MTH2 and degradation of PCNA, RNAi against MTH2 was performed to mimic the dissociated status of PCNA to evaluate changes in the half-life of PCNA. Knockdown of MTH2 significantly promoted degradation of PCNA, suggesting that the physiological interaction of PCNA-MTH2 may confer protection from degradation for PCNA, whereas UV irradiation accelerates PCNA degradation by inducing dissociation of PCNA-MTH2. Moreover, secondary to degradation of PCNA, UV-induced inhibition of DNA synthesis or cell cycle progression was enhanced. Collectively, our data demonstrate for the first time that PCNA is protected by this newly identified partner molecule MTH2, which is related to DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression.

  14. A site-selective, irreversible inhibitor of the DNA replication auxiliary factor proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA).

    PubMed

    Evison, Benjamin J; Actis, Marcelo L; Wu, Sean Z; Shao, Youming; Heath, Richard J; Yang, Lei; Fujii, Naoaki

    2014-11-15

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) assumes an indispensable role in supporting cellular DNA replication and repair by organizing numerous protein components of these pathways via a common PCNA-interacting sequence motif called a PIP-box. Given the multifunctional nature of PCNA, the selective inhibition of PIP-box-mediated interactions may represent a new strategy for the chemosensitization of cancer cells to existing DNA-directed therapies; however, promiscuous blockage of these interactions may also be universally deleterious. To address these possibilities, we utilized a chemical strategy to irreversibly block PIP-box-mediated interactions. Initially, we identified and validated PCNA methionine 40 (M40) and histidine 44 (H44) as essential residues for PCNA/PIP-box interactions in general and, more specifically, for efficient PCNA loading onto chromatin within cells. Next, we created a novel small molecule incorporating an electrophilic di-chloro platinum moiety that preferentially alkylated M40 and H44 residues. The compound, designated T2Pt, covalently cross-linked wild-type but not M40A/H44A PCNA, irreversibly inhibited PCNA/PIP-box interactions, and mildly alkylated plasmid DNA in vitro. In cells, T2Pt persistently induced cell cycle arrest, activated ATR-Chk1 signaling and modestly induced DNA strand breaks, features typical of cellular replication stress. Despite sustained activation of the replication stress response by the compound and its modestly genotoxic nature, T2Pt demonstrated little activity in clonogenic survival assays as a single agent, yet sensitized cells to cisplatin. The discovery of T2Pt represents an original effort directed at the development of irreversible PCNA inhibitors and sets the stage for the discovery of analogues more selective for PCNA over other cellular nucleophiles.

  15. A Peptide mimicking a region in proliferating cell nuclear antigen specific to key protein interactions is cytotoxic to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shanna J; Gu, Long; Phipps, Elizabeth A; Dobrolecki, Lacey E; Mabrey, Karla S; Gulley, Pattie; Dillehay, Kelsey L; Dong, Zhongyun; Fields, Gregg B; Chen, Yun-Ru; Ann, David; Hickey, Robert J; Malkas, Linda H

    2015-02-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a highly conserved protein necessary for proper component loading during the DNA replication and repair process. Proteins make a connection within the interdomain connector loop of PCNA, and much of the regulation is a result of the inherent competition for this docking site. If this target region of PCNA is modified, the DNA replication and repair process in cancer cells is potentially altered. Exploitation of this cancer-associated region has implications for targeted breast cancer therapy. In the present communication, we characterize a novel peptide (caPeptide) that has been synthesized to mimic the sequence identified as critical to the cancer-associated isoform of PCNA. This peptide is delivered into cells using a nine-arginine linking mechanism, and the resulting peptide (R9-cc-caPeptide) exhibits cytotoxicity in a triple-negative breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-436, while having less of an effect on the normal counterparts (MCF10A and primary breast epithelial cells). The novel peptide was then evaluated for cytotoxicity using various in vivo techniques, including ATP activity assays, flow cytometry, and clonogenetic assays. This cytotoxicity has been observed in other breast cancer cell lines (MCF7 and HCC1937) and other forms of cancer (pancreatic and lymphoma). R9-cc-caPeptide has also been shown to block the association of PCNA with chromatin. Alanine scanning of the peptide sequence, combined with preliminary in silico modeling, gives insight to the disruptive ability and the molecular mechanism of action of the therapeutic peptide in vivo.

  16. Proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression in the intestine of Salmo trutta trutta naturally infected with an acanthocephalan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Changes in the production of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a 36 kd protein involved in protein synthesis, within intestinal epithelia can provide an early indication of deviations to normal functioning. Inhibition or stimulation of cell proliferation and PCNA can be determined through immunohistochemical staining of intestinal tissue. Changes in the expression of PCNA act as an early warning system of changes to the gut and this application has not been applied to the fields of aquatic parasitology and fish health. The current study set out to determine whether a population of wild brown trout, Salmo trutta trutta (L.) harbouring an infection of the acanthocephalan Dentitruncus truttae Sinzar, 1955 collected from Lake Piediluco in Central Italy also effected changes in the expression of PCNA. Methods A total of 29 brown trout were investigated, 19 of which (i.e. 65.5%) were found to harbour acanthocephalans (5–320 worms fish-1). Histological sections of both uninfected and infected intestinal material were immunostained for PCNA. Results The expression of PCNA was observed in the epithelial cells in the intestinal crypts and within the mast cells and fibroblasts in the submucosa layer which is consistent with its role in cell proliferation and DNA synthesis. The number of PCNA-positive cells in both the intestinal epithelium and the submucosa layer in regions close to the point of parasite attachment were significantly higher than the number observed in uninfected individuals and in infected individuals in zones at least 0.7 cm from the point of parasite attachment (ANOVA, p < 0.05). Conclusions An infection of the acanthocephalan D. truttae within the intestinal tract of S. t. trutta effected a significant increase in the number of PCNA positive cells (mast cells and fibroblasts) at the site of parasite attachment when compared to the number of positive cells found in uninfected conspecifics and in tissue zones away from the point

  17. Expression of apoptosis and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the cardiac conduction system of crib death (SIDS).

    PubMed

    Matturri, L; Ottaviani, G; Lavezzi, A M; Turconi, P; Cazzullo, A; Rossi, L

    2001-07-01

    Aim of this study is to determine the expression of apoptosis and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) in the cardiac conduction system in crib death and explained death (ED) cases. Postnatal morphogenesis of the conducting tissue is an important part of its normal development. In the atrio-ventricular node (AVN) and His bundle (HB) it consists of degeneration, cell death and replacing in an orderly programmed way. However, its nature and its relation to crib death is not yet fully explained. Apoptosis and PCNA were investigated in 8 heart conduction systems of infants dying of crib death and in 3 conduction systems of infants dying of ED as controls. The cardiac conduction system was removed in two blocks: the first included the sino-atrial node (SAN) and the crista terminalis, the second contained the atrio-ventricular node (AVN), His bundle (HB), bifurcation, and bundle branches. In the conduction systems as well as in the common myocardium the PCNA Labeling Index (PCNA-LI) was found to be negative in all cases. The apoptotic indices (AI) in SIDS and in ED were found to have no statistically significant differences (p>0.05). The SAN, in both groups, showed an AI similar to the one detected in common myocardium. In almost all cases, TUNEL labeling was detected in peripheral region of the AVN, close to the atrial myocardium. The AI was higher in the AVN, HB and the initial tract of bundle branches than in the common myocardium (p<0.05; Student's t test).

  18. p53, c-myc p62 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Korkolopoulou, P; Oates, J; Kittas, C; Crocker, J

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate the immunohistochemical expression of p53 protein in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) and its relation to that of c-myc p62 oncoprotein and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). METHODS--Paraffin wax embedded tissue from 90 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (72 B cell and 18 T cell) was stained immunohistochemically for p53 protein, c-myc p62 oncoprotein, and PCNA using the monoclonal antibodies DO7, c-myc 1-9 E10, and PC-10, respectively. RESULTS--Of the non-Hodgkin's lymphomas studied, 55 (61%) stained positively for p53 protein. The proportion of positive cases increased from low grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and was higher in tumours of T cell origin. The percentage of positive cells (labelling index or LI) was significantly lower in low grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, but no difference was established between intermediate and high grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In a large proportion of low grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma the LI was below 1%. c-myc p62 immunoreactivity was identified in all cases. A significant positive correlation was established between p53 LI and c-myc p62 LI (rs = 0.453) as well as between p53 LI and PCNA LI (rs = 0.338). CONCLUSIONS--p53 immunoreactivity was present in about half the cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and was related to the grade of malignancy and possibly to the B or T cell origin of the tumour. It was also associated with the proliferation state as expressed by PCNA LI and c-myc p62 expression, indicating that the expression of these three cell cycle-related genes might be interrelated. Images PMID:7907610

  19. Low power laser irradiation stimulates cell proliferation via proliferating cell nuclear antigen and Ki-67 expression during tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2015-03-01

    Low power laser irradiation (LPLI) is becoming an increasingly popular and fast growing therapeutic modality in dermatology to treat various ailments without any reported side effects. In the present study an attempt was made to investigate the proliferative potential of red laser light during tissue repair in Swiss albino mice. To this end, full thickness excisional wounds of diameter 15 mm created on mice were exposed to single dose of Helium-Neon laser (632.8 nm; 7 mW; 4.02 mWcm-2; Linear polarization) at 2 Jcm-2 and 10 Jcm-2 along with un-illuminated controls. The granulation tissues from all the respective experimental groups were harvested on day 10 post-wounding following euthanization. Subsequently, tissue regeneration potential of these laser doses under study were evaluated by monitoring proliferating cell nuclear antigen and Ki-67 following the laser treatment and comparing it with the un-illuminated controls. The percentages of Ki-67 or PCNA positive cells were determined by counting positive nuclei (Ki-67/PCNA) and total nuclei in five random fields per tissue sections. Animal wounds treated with single exposure of the 2 Jcm-2 indicated significant elevation in PCNA (P<0.01) and Ki-67 (P<0.05 compared to un-illuminated control and P<0.01 compared to 10 Jcm-2) expression as compared to other tested experimental groups as evidenced by the microscopy results in the study. In summary, the findings of the present study have clearly demonstrated the regulation of cell proliferation by LPLI via PCNA and Ki-67 expression during tissue regeneration.

  20. Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Has an Association with Prognosis and Risks Factors of Cancer Patients: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qiongying; Zhang, Juan; Yi, Yuexiong; Huang, Yue; Wang, Yong; Wang, Yijun; Zhang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is reported as a famous marker in various tumors. A couple of articles have been published about the clinical function of PCNA on cancer progression; however, these results are conflicting in some degree. Thus, it is crucial to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify their real actions. Here, we took cervical cancer and glioma as example and then pooled hazard ratios (HRs) or odds ratios (ORs) with 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CIs). In the present study, the PCNA expression in cervical cancer and gliomas patients was both correlated with 5-year-overall survival (OS) (HR = 4.41, 95 % CI 2.71-7.17, p = 0.000; HR = 4.40, 95 % CI 3.00-6.47, p = 0.000; respectively). In addition, a fixed effect model revealed a significant association between PCNA and FIGO stage (OR = 4.48, 95 % CI 3.48-5.77, p = 0.000) or WHO grade (OR = 5.64, 95 % CI 4.15-7.68, p = 0.000), rather than age (OR = 1.01, 95 % CI 0.71-1.43, p = 0.957; OR = 1.00, 95 % CI 0.80-1.24, p = 0.989; respectively). No heterogeneity was observed across all studies. According to funnel plot, no publication bias was reported. In conclusion, our systematic review suggests that PCNA expression is significantly associated with poor 5-year survival, advanced stage or higher WHO grade, which might be suggested as a useful prognostic and diagnostic biomarker, or an effective therapy target in cervical cancer, gliomas, or even more cancers.

  1. Generalized Latent Trait Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moustaki, Irini; Knott, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discusses a general model framework within which manifest variables with different distributions in the exponential family can be analyzed with a latent trait model. Presents a unified maximum likelihood method for estimating the parameters of the generalized latent trait model and discusses the scoring of individuals on the latent dimensions.…

  2. Sequence Variation Analysis of Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 Gene in the Virus Associated Lymphomas of Northern China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lingling; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Liu, Song; Liu, Xia; Sun, Zhifu; Luo, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is the only viral protein expressed in all EBV-positive tumors as it is essential for the maintenance, replication and transcription of the virus genome. According to the polymorphism of residue 487 in EBNA1 gene, EBV isolates can be classified into five subtypes: P-ala, P-thr, V-val, V-leu and V-pro. Whether these EBNA1 subtypes contribute to different tissue tropism of EBV and are consequently associated with certain malignancies remain to be determined. To elucidate the relationship, one hundred and ten EBV-positive lymphoma tissues of different types from Northern China, a non-NPC endemic area, were tested for the five subtypes by nested-PCR and DNA sequencing. In addition, EBV type 1 and type 2 classification was typed by using standard PCR assays across type-specific regions of the EBNA3C genes. Four EBNA1 subtypes were identified: V-val (68.2%, 75/110), P-thrV (15.5%, 17/110), V-leuV (3.6%, 4/110) and P-ala (10.9%, 12/110). The distribution of the EBNA1 subtypes in the four lymphoma groups was not significantly different (p = 0.075), neither was that of the EBV type 1/type 2 (p = 0.089). Compared with the previous data of gastric carcinoma (GC), nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and throat washing (TW) from healthy donors, the distribution of EBNA1 subtypes in lymphoma differed significantly (p = 0.016), with a little higher frequency of P-ala subtype. The EBV type distribution between lymphoma and the other three groups was significantly different (p = 0.000, p = 0.000, p = 0.001, respectively). The proportion of type 1 and type 2 mixed infections was higher in lymphoma than that in GC, NPC and TW. In lymphomas, the distribution of EBNA1 subtypes in the three EBV types was not significantly different (p = 0.546). These data suggested that the variation patterns of EBNA1 gene may be geographic-associated rather than tumor-specific and the role of EBNA1 gene variations in tumorigenesis needs more extensive and

  3. Molecular recognition of the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen-threonine conjugate by adhesion/growth regulatory galectin-3: nuclear magnetic resonance studies and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Yongye, Austin B; Calle, Luis; Ardá, Ana; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Martínez-Mayorga, Karina; Cudic, Mare

    2012-09-18

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular modeling methods have been strategically combined to elucidate the molecular recognition features of the binding of threonine O-linked Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) antigen to chimera-type avian galectin-3 (CG-3). Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR experiments revealed the highest intensities for the H4 protons of both the β-D-Galp and α-D-GalpNAc moieties, with 100 and 71% of relative STD, respectively. The methyl protons of the threonine residue exhibited a small STD effect, <15%, indicating that the interaction of the amino acid with the protein is rather transient. Two-dimensional transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy NMR experiments and molecular modeling suggested some differences in conformer populations between the free and bound states. A dynamic binding mode for the TF antigen-CG-3 complex consisting of two poses has been deduced. In one pose, intermolecular interactions were formed between the terminal threonine residue and the receptor. In the second pose, intermolecular interactions involved the internal GalpNAc. The difference in the trend of some shifts in the heteronuclear single-quantum coherence titration spectra indicates some disparities in the binding interactions of CG-3 with lactose and TF antigen. The results obtained from this model of the avian orthologue of human galectin-3 will allow detailed interspecies comparison to give sequence deviations in phylogeny a structural and functional meaning. Moreover, the results indicate that the peptide scaffold presenting TF antigen could be relevant for binding and thus provides a possible route for the design of galectin-3 inhibitors with improved affinity and selectivity.

  4. Simultaneous cytoplasmic and nuclear protein expression of melanoma antigen-A family and NY-ESO-1 cancer-testis antigens represents an independent marker for poor survival in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Laban, Simon; Atanackovic, Djordje; Luetkens, Tim; Knecht, Rainald; Busch, Chia-Jung; Freytag, Marcus; Spagnoli, Giulio; Ritter, Gerd; Hoffmann, Thomas K; Knuth, Alexander; Sauter, Guido; Wilczak, Waldemar; Blessmann, Marco; Borgmann, Kerstin; Muenscher, Adrian; Clauditz, Till S

    2014-09-01

    The prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients remains poor. The identification of high-risk subgroups is needed for the development of custom-tailored therapies. The expression of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) has been linked to a worse prognosis in other cancer types; however, their prognostic value in HNSCC is unclear because only few patients have been examined and data on CTA protein expression are sparse. A tissue microarray consisting of tumor samples from 453 HNSCC patients was evaluated for the expression of CTA proteins using immunohistochemistry. Frequency of expression and the subcellular expression pattern (nuclear, cytoplasmic, or both) was recorded. Protein expression of melanoma antigen (MAGE)-A family CTA, MAGE-C family CTA and NY-ESO-1 was found in approximately 30, 7 and 4% of tumors, respectively. The subcellular expression pattern in particular had a marked impact on the patients' prognosis. Median overall survival (OS) of patients with (i) simultaneous cytoplasmic and nuclear expression compared to (ii) either cytoplasmic or nuclear expression and (iii) negative patients was 23.0 versus 109.0 versus 102.5 months, for pan-MAGE (p < 0.0001), 46.6 versus 50.0 versus 109.0 for MAGE-A3/A4 (p = 0.0074) and 13.3 versus 50.0 versus 100.2 months for NY-ESO-1 (p = 0.0019). By multivariate analysis, these factors were confirmed as independent markers for poor survival. HNSCC patients showing protein expression of MAGE-A family members or NY-ESO-1 represent a subgroup with an extraordinarily poor survival. The development of immunotherapeutic strategies targeting these CTA may, therefore, be a promising approach to improve the outcome of HNSCC patients.

  5. Measurement of Phenotype and Absolute Number of Circulating Heparin-Binding Hemagglutinin, ESAT-6 and CFP-10, and Purified Protein Derivative Antigen-Specific CD4 T Cells Can Discriminate Active from Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Barkham, Timothy M. S.; Tang, Wenying; Kemeny, David M.; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Wang, Yee T.

    2014-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used as adjunctive tests for the evaluation of suspected cases of active tuberculosis (TB). However, a positive test does not differentiate latent from active TB. We investigated whether flow cytometric measurement of novel combinations of intracellular cytokines and surface makers on CD4 T cells could differentiate between active and latent TB after stimulation with Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific proteins. Blood samples from 60 patients referred to the Singapore Tuberculosis Control Unit for evaluation for active TB or as TB contacts were stimulated with purified protein derivative (PPD), ESAT-6 and CFP-10, or heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA). The CD4 T cell cytokine response (IFN-γ, interleukin-2 [IL-2], interleukin-17A [IL-17A], interleukin-22 [IL-22], granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) and surface marker expression (CD27, CXCR3, and CD154) were then measured. We found that the proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T cells, defined as CD154+ TNF-α+ cells that were negative for CD27 and positive for GM-CSF, gave the strongest discrimination between subjects with latent and those with active TB (area under the receiver operator characteristic [ROC] curve of 0.9277; P < 0.0001). Also, the proportions and absolute numbers of HBHA-specific CD4 T cells were significantly higher in those with latent TB infection, particularly CD154+ TNF-α+ IFN-γ+ IL-2+ and CD154+ TNF-α+ CXCR3+. Finally, we found that the ratio of ESAT-6- and CFP-10-responding to HBHA-responding CD4 T cells was significantly different between the two study populations. In conclusion, we found novel markers of M. tuberculosis-specific CD4 cells which differentiate between active and latent TB. PMID:25520147

  6. Cyclosporine A inhibits colorectal cancer proliferation probably by regulating expression levels of c-Myc, p21(WAF1/CIP1) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Masuo, Takashige; Okamura, Shinichi; Zhang, Yajing; Mori, Masatomo

    2009-11-18

    The present study investigated the role of calcineurin (CaN) in the proliferation of human colorectal cancers. CaN activity and protein expression were increased in human colorectal cancers. Nuclear transcription factor NFAT, a physiological substrate for CaN, was activated in human colon cancer specimen as well as in the human colon cancer cell lines. CaN inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) reduced cell growth in these cell lines. CsA decreased the expressions of c-Myc and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) but also increased p21(WAF1/CIP1) expression. Our results suggest that CaN promotes colorectal cancer proliferation probably by regulating levels of c-Myc, p21(WAF1/CIP1), and PCNA.

  7. Comparative analysis of the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, p53, bax, and bcl-2 in oral lichen planus and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Fernando Augusto Cervantes Garcia; Paradella, Thaís Cachuté; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Rosa, Luiz Eduardo Blumer

    2009-10-01

    Several epidemiologic studies have shown the malignant transformation potential of oral lichen planus; however, this potential is subject of much controversy. To evaluate the expression of proteins related to the cell proliferation and apoptosis processes in oral lichen planus, we compared oral lichen planus with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Twenty-four cases of each lesion were submitted according to streptavidin-biotin technique to evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, p53, bax, and bcl-2 proteins. chi(2) test showed no statistically significant differences between the expression of p53, bax, and bcl-2 in oral lichen planus and oral squamous cell carcinoma (P > .05). However, the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen was significantly lower in oral lichen planus than in oral squamous cell carcinoma (P < .05). No statistically significant differences between the expression of p53, bax, and bcl-2 in oral lichen planus and oral squamous cell carcinoma were observed, which may be an evidence of the potential of malignant transformation of oral lichen planus.

  8. Immunohistochemical determination of nuclear antigens by colour image analysis: application for labelling index, estrogen and progesterone receptor status in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rostagno, P; Birtwisle, I; Ettore, F; Courdi, A; Gioanni, J; Namer, M; Caldani, C

    1994-12-01

    The immunohistochemical evaluation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labelling index, estrogen (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status was carried out on the automated computer-assisted image analysis station BIOCOM 500. Special software has been developed to measure nuclear antigens using the immunoperoxidase method with the Harris hematoxylin counterstain. The analysis was based on the different light adsorption spectra of the chromogen diaminobenzidine and Harris's hematoxylin coloration when exposed to light of differing wavelengths. The results obtained by image analysis were compared to previously validated methods. The thymidine labelling index performed by manual procedures and BrdU incorporation performed by image analysis were comparable (linear correlation coefficient r = 0.76, P < 0.001). Comparison of image analysis and dextran coated charcoal assay for ER and PR content revealed excellent sensitivities and specificities (linear correlation coefficient r = 0.87, P < 0.001 for ER and r = 0.93, P < 0.001 for PR). These data suggest that automated image analysis offers a reliable and reproducible procedure for measuring nuclear antigens.

  9. RFHVMn ORF73 is structurally related to the KSHV ORF73 latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) and is expressed in retroperitoneal fibromatosis (RF) tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Burnside, Kellie L.; Ryan, Jonathan T.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Gregory Bruce, A.; Thouless, Margaret E.; Tsai, Che-Chung; Rose, Timothy M. . E-mail: trose@u.washington.edu

    2006-10-10

    Retroperitoneal fibromatosis herpesvirus (RFHV), the macaque homolog of the human rhadinovirus, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), was first identified in retroperitoneal fibromatosis (RF) tumor lesions of macaques with simian AIDS. We cloned and sequenced the ORF73 latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of RFHVMn from the pig-tailed macaque. RFHVMn LANA is structurally analogous to KSHV ORF73 LANA and contains an N-terminal serine-proline-rich region, a large internal glutamic acidic-rich repeat region and a conserved C-terminal domain. RFHVMn LANA reacts with monoclonal antibodies specific for a glutamic acid-proline dipeptide motif and a glutamic acid-glutamine-rich motif in the KSHV LANA repeat region. Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence analysis revealed that RFHVMn LANA is a nuclear antigen which is highly expressed in RF spindloid tumor cells. These data suggest that RFHV LANA is an ortholog of KSHV LANA and will function similarly to maintain viral latency and play a role in tumorigenicity in macaques.

  10. Myeloid cell nuclear differentiation antigen is expressed in a subset of marginal zone lymphomas and is useful in the differential diagnosis with follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Ryan A; Monabati, Ahmad; Vyas, Monika; Roncador, Giovanna; Gualco, Gabriela; Bacchi, Carlos E; Younes, Sheren F; Natkunam, Yasodha; Freud, Aharon G

    2014-08-01

    The diagnosis of marginal zone lymphomas (MZL) is challenged by the lack of specific markers that distinguish them from other low-grade non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas. Myeloid cell nuclear differentiation antigen (MNDA) is a nuclear protein that labels myelomonocytic cells as well as B lymphocytes that localize to the marginal zone areas of splenic white pulp. We evaluated MNDA expression in a large series of B-cell lymphomas to assess the sensitivity and specificity of this antigen for the characterization of MZL. A total of 440 tissue sections containing extramedullary B-cell lymphomas and 216 bone marrow biopsies containing atypical or neoplastic lymphoid infiltrates were stained for MNDA by immunohistochemistry. Among the extramedullary lymphoma cases, approximately 67% of nodal MZL, 61% of extranodal MZL, and 24% of splenic MZL expressed MNDA. MNDA was also infrequently expressed in other B-cell neoplasms including mantle cell lymphoma (6%), chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (13%), follicular lymphoma (FL) (4%), lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (25%), and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (3%). In contrast, MNDA was only expressed in 2.3% of all bone marrow biopsies involved by lymphoid infiltrates, including 2 cases of FL and one case of MZL. Collectively, these data support the inclusion of MNDA in the diagnostic evaluation of extramedullary B-cell lymphomas, particularly those in which the differential diagnosis is between low-grade FL and MZL.

  11. EGCG debilitates the persistence of EBV latency by reducing the DNA binding potency of nuclear antigen 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ya-Lin; Tsai, Hsing-Lyn; Peng, Chih-Wen

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two cell-based reporter platforms were established for screening of EBNA1 inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG acts as an inhibitor to block EBNA1 binding with the cognate oriP sequence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG debilitates EBNA1-dependent transcription enhancement and episome maintenance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG impairs persistence of EBV latency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG is a potent anti-EBV agent for targeting the latent cascade of EBV. -- Abstract: Because the expression of EBNA1 is prevalent in all EBV-associated tumors, it has become one of the most attractive drug targets for the discovery of anti-EBV compounds. In a cell-based reporter system, EBNA1 consistently upregulated the transcription of an oriP-Luc mini-EBV episome by 6- to 8-fold. The treatment of cells with 50 {mu}M EGCG effectively blocked the binding of EBNA1 to oriP-DNA both in vivo and in vitro, which led to the abrogation of EBNA1-dependent episome maintenance and transcriptional enhancement. Importantly, the anti-EBNA1 effects caused by EGCG ultimately impaired the persistence of EBV latent infection. Our data suggest that the inhibition of EBNA1 activity by EGCG could be a promising starting point for the development of new protocols for anti-EBV therapy.

  12. Latent Period of Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Irisawa, H

    1961-10-27

    The latent period of relaxation of molluscan myocardium due to anodal current is much longer than that of contraction. Although the rate and the grade of relaxation are intimately related to both the stimulus condition and the muscle tension, the latent period of relaxation remains constant, except when the temperature of the bathing fluid is changed.

  13. Identifying Patient-Specific Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen-1 Genetic Variation and Potential Autoreactive Targets Relevant to Multiple Sclerosis Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tschochner, Monika; Leary, Shay; Cooper, Don; Strautins, Kaija; Chopra, Abha; Clark, Hayley; Choo, Linda; Dunn, David; James, Ian; Carroll, William M.; Kermode, Allan G.; Nolan, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection represents a major environmental risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS), with evidence of selective expansion of Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen-1 (EBNA1)-specific CD4+ T cells that cross-recognize MS-associated myelin antigens in MS patients. HLA-DRB1*15-restricted antigen presentation also appears to determine susceptibility given its role as a dominant risk allele. In this study, we have utilised standard and next-generation sequencing techniques to investigate EBNA-1 sequence variation and its relationship to HLA-DR15 binding affinity, as well as examining potential cross-reactive immune targets within the central nervous system proteome. Methods Sanger sequencing was performed on DNA isolated from peripheral blood samples from 73 Western Australian MS cases, without requirement for primary culture, with additional FLX 454 Roche sequencing in 23 samples to identify low-frequency variants. Patient-derived viral sequences were used to predict HLA-DRB1*1501 epitopes (NetMHCII, NetMHCIIpan) and candidates were evaluated for cross recognition with human brain proteins. Results EBNA-1 sequence variation was limited, with no evidence of multiple viral strains and only low levels of variation identified by FLX technology (8.3% nucleotide positions at a 1% cut-off). In silico epitope mapping revealed two known HLA-DRB1*1501-restricted epitopes (‘AEG’: aa 481–496 and ‘MVF’: aa 562–577), and two putative epitopes between positions 502–543. We identified potential cross-reactive targets involving a number of major myelin antigens including experimentally confirmed HLA-DRB1*15-restricted epitopes as well as novel candidate antigens within myelin and paranodal assembly proteins that may be relevant to MS pathogenesis. Conclusions This study demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining autologous EBNA-1 sequences directly from buffy coat samples, and confirms divergence of these sequences from standard laboratory strains

  14. The cell proliferation-associated antigen of antibody Ki-67: a very large, ubiquitous nuclear protein with numerous repeated elements, representing a new kind of cell cycle-maintaining proteins

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The antigen defined by mAb Ki-67 is a human nuclear protein the expression of which is strictly associated with cell proliferation and which is widely used in routine pathology as a "proliferation marker" to measure the growth fraction of cells in human tumors. Ki-67 detects a double band with apparent molecular weights of 395 and 345 kD in immunoblots of proteins from proliferating cells. We cloned and sequenced the full length cDNA, identified two differentially spliced isoforms of mRNA with open reading frames of 9,768 and 8,688 bp encoding for this cell proliferation-associated protein with calculated molecular weights of 358,761 D and 319,508 D, respectively. New mAbs against a bacterially expressed part and a synthetic polypeptide deduced from the isolated cDNA react with the native Ki-67 antigen, thus providing a circle of evidence that we have cloned the authentic Ki-67 antigen cDNA. The central part of the Ki-67 antigen cDNA contains a large 6,845-bp exon with 16 tandemly repeated 366-bp elements, the "Ki-67 repeats", each including a highly conserved new motif of 66 bp, the "Ki-67 motif", which encodes for the epitope detected by Ki-67. Computer analysis of the nucleic acid and the deduced amino acid sequence of the Ki-67 antigen confirmed that the cDNA encodes for a nuclear and short-lived protein without any significant homology to known sequences. Ki-67 antigen-specific antisense oligonucleotides inhibit the proliferation of IM-9 cell line cells, indicating that the Ki-67 antigen may be an absolute requirement for maintaining cell proliferation. We conclude that the Ki-67 antigen defines a new category of cell cycle-associated nuclear nonhistone proteins. PMID:8227122

  15. Latent fingerprint matching.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anil K; Feng, Jianjiang

    2011-01-01

    Latent fingerprint identification is of critical importance to law enforcement agencies in identifying suspects: Latent fingerprints are inadvertent impressions left by fingers on surfaces of objects. While tremendous progress has been made in plain and rolled fingerprint matching, latent fingerprint matching continues to be a difficult problem. Poor quality of ridge impressions, small finger area, and large nonlinear distortion are the main difficulties in latent fingerprint matching compared to plain or rolled fingerprint matching. We propose a system for matching latent fingerprints found at crime scenes to rolled fingerprints enrolled in law enforcement databases. In addition to minutiae, we also use extended features, including singularity, ridge quality map, ridge flow map, ridge wavelength map, and skeleton. We tested our system by matching 258 latents in the NIST SD27 database against a background database of 29,257 rolled fingerprints obtained by combining the NIST SD4, SD14, and SD27 databases. The minutiae-based baseline rank-1 identification rate of 34.9 percent was improved to 74 percent when extended features were used. In order to evaluate the relative importance of each extended feature, these features were incrementally used in the order of their cost in marking by latent experts. The experimental results indicate that singularity, ridge quality map, and ridge flow map are the most effective features in improving the matching accuracy.

  16. Application of linear discriminant analysis in performance evaluation of extractable nuclear antigen immunoassay systems in the screening and diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Pi, David; de Badyn, Monika Hudoba; Nimmo, Mike; White, Rick; Pal, Jason; Wong, Patrick; Phoon, Carmen; O'Connor, Deidre; Pi, Steven; Shojania, Kam

    2012-10-01

    This study applied a linear discriminant analysis model to evaluate the performance of 2 types of commercially available extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) immunoassays for the screening and diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) in a large tertiary hospital reference laboratory: (1) an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and (2) a multiplex bead-based immunoassay (MPBI). The results of the study showed both ENA immunoassays had comparable sensitivity for the detection of SARDs compared with the antinuclear antigen immunofluorescence (ANA-IF) method (ANA-IF: 85.6%, ENA-ELISA: 91.5%, ENA-MPBI: 83.1%, pairwise comparisons with ANA-IF: P > .05). However, both ENA immunoassays offered improved specificity compared with the ANA-IF (ANA-IF: 24.2%; ENA-ELISA: 39.8%; ENA-MPBI: 53.1%; pairwise comparison with ANA-IF: P < .001). The use of a more specific screening immunoassay with comparable sensitivity to ANA-IF is important in a tertiary hospital with high prevalence of non-SARD immune diseases. Diagnostic performance of the ENA/dsDNA components by the MPBI and ELISA methods did not differ significantly (area under the curve [AUC], 81.0% vs 83.0%, respectively, P > .05), but the key ENA/dsDNA variables contributing to the discriminating power of the assays for the diagnosis of specific SARDs were reagent/method dependent.

  17. Human serum antibodies to a major defined epitope of human herpesvirus 8 small viral capsid antigen.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, R; De Paoli, P; Schulz, T F; Dillner, J

    1999-04-01

    The major antibody-reactive epitope of the small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) was defined by use of overlapping peptides. Strong IgG reactivity was found among approximately 50% of 44 human immunodeficiency virus-positive or -negative patients with Kaposi's sarcoma and 13 subjects who were seropositive by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) for the latent HHV-8 nuclear antigen. Only 1 of 106 subjects seronegative for both lytic and latent HHV-8 antigens and 10 of 81 subjects IFA-seropositive only for the lytic HHV-8 antigen had strong IgG reactivity to this epitope. Among 534 healthy Swedish women, only 1.3% were strongly seropositive. Comparison of the peptide-based and purified sVCA protein-based ELISAs found 55% sensitivity and 98% specificity. However, only 1 of 452 serum samples from healthy women was positive in both tests. In conclusion, the defined sVCA epitope was a specific, but not very sensitive, serologic marker of active HHV-8 infection. Such infection appears to be rare among Swedish women, even with sexual risk-taking behavior.

  18. Freshwater acclimation induces stress responses and expression of branchial Na+/K(+)-ATPase and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in Takifugu niphobles.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cheng-Hao; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2013-08-01

    Almost the whole life cycle of the grass puffer (Takifugu niphobles) occurs in seawater (SW), but it is also sometimes found in fresh water (FW) rivers. This study aims to evaluate the effects of FW exposure on the stress, osmoregulatory, and physiological responses of the grass puffer. The grass puffers were captured from a local wetland and acclimated to SW (35‰) or FW in the laboratory. In the stress responses, plasma glucose concentrations and the abundances of hepatic and branchial heat shock proteins were higher in the FW group than in the SW group. FW acclimation led to a significant increase in the protein abundance and the specific activity of branchial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA). Immunochemical staining showed that the NKA immunoreactive (NKIR) cells of the FW and SW puffer were distributed mainly in gill filaments. Although the number of NKIR cells was similar in the two groups, the protein levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) of nuclear fractions were elevated in the gills of the FW puffer. The induction of gill PCNA might contribute to cell proliferation which would maintain the amount of NKIR cells or repair DNA when exposed to FW, an osmotically stressful environment. Hence, activation of stress responses would provide the osmoprotection associated with FW adaptation of the grass puffer. Changes of branchial NKA expression and activity for osmoregulatory adjustment were required for stable blood osmolality and muscle water content. Based on our findings, the grass puffer was suggested to be a euryhaline teleost with SW preference.

  19. Complex alternative cytoplasmic protein isoforms of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen 1 generated through noncanonical translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Toptan, Tuna; Fonseca, Lidia; Kwun, Hyun Jin; Chang, Yuan; Moore, Patrick S

    2013-03-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency associated-nuclear antigen 1 (LANA1) protein is constitutively expressed in all KSHV-infected cells, as well as in all forms of KSHV-associated malignancies. LANA1 is a multifunctional KSHV oncoprotein containing multiple repeat sequences that is important for viral episome maintenance and the regulation of cellular and viral gene expression. We characterize here multiple LANA1 isoforms and show that ∼50% of LANA1 is naturally generated as N-terminally truncated shoulder proteins that are detected on SDS-PAGE as faster-migrating shoulder bands designated LANA1(S). Higher-molecular-weight LANA1(S) isoforms initiate downstream at noncanonical sites within the N-terminal region, whereas lower-molecular-weight LANA1(S) isoforms initiate downstream within the central repeat 1 domain. LANA1(S) proteins lack an N-terminal nuclear localization signal motif, and some isoforms differ from full-length, canonical LANA1 by localizing to perinuclear and cytoplasmic sites. Although LANA1 has until now been assumed to be solely active in the nucleus, this finding indicates that this major KSHV oncoprotein may have cytoplasmic activities as well. KSHV overcomes its limited genetic coding capacity by generating alternatively initiated protein isoforms that may have distinct biological functions.

  20. pRb2/p130, vascular endothelial growth factor, p27(KIP1), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in hepatocellular carcinoma: their clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Claudio, Pier Paolo; Russo, Giuseppe; Kumar, Christine A C Y; Minimo, Corrado; Farina, Antonio; Tutton, Steve; Nuzzo, Gennaro; Giuliante, Felice; Angeloni, Giulia; Maria, Vellone; Vecchio, Fabio Maria; Campli, Cristiana Di; Giordano, Antonio

    2004-05-15

    Hepatocarcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer, with more than one million fatalities occurring annually worldwide. Multiple risk factors are associated with HCC disease etiology, the highest incidence being in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus, although other factors such as genetic makeup and environmental exposure are involved. Multiple genetic alterations including the activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes are required for malignancy in human cancers and are correlated with increased stages of carcinogenesis and further tumor progression. In this study of 21 HCC patients, we analyzed pRb2/p130, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), p27((KIP1)), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen as potential HCC molecular biomarkers. In our sample set, we found that p27((KIP1)) was absent. Univariate survival analysis showed that proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression (diffuse staining >50% of positive cells in tumor) was confirmed as a significant HCC prognostic biomarker for determining patient survival agreeing with previous studies (P = 0.0126, log-rank test). Lower pRb2/p130 expression was associated to a borderline P value of inverse correlation with tumor malignancy and to a positive correlation with respect to the time from HCC diagnosis (Spearman coefficient = 0.568; P < 0.05). Conversely, higher VEGF expression was associated with a poor survival (P = 0.0257, log-rank test). We demonstrate for the first time that pRb2/p130 is inversely correlated with VEGF expression and tumor aggressiveness (P < 0.05) in p27((KIP1))-negative HCC patients. pRb2/p130 and VEGF expression are independent from tumor staging, suggesting their possible role as independent prognostic molecular biomarkers in HCC. Furthermore, we have evidence that VEGF together with pRb2/p130 may act as new HCC biomarkers in a p27((KIP1))-independent manner. Additional studies with larger numbers of patient data would allow the

  1. Potentiation of latent inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Gabriel; Hall, Geoffrey

    2008-07-01

    Rats were given exposure either to an odor (almond) or a compound of odor plus taste (almond plus saline), prior to training in which the odor served as the conditioned stimulus. It was found, for both appetitive and aversive procedures, that conditioning was retarded by preexposure (a latent inhibition effect), and the extent of the retardation was greater in rats preexposed to the compound (i.e., latent inhibition to the odor was potentiated by the presence of the taste). In contrast, the presence of the taste during conditioning itself overshadowed learning about the odor. We argue that the presence of the salient taste in compound with the odor enhances the rate of associative learning, producing a rapid loss in the associability of the odor. This loss of associability will generate both overshadowing and the potentiation of latent inhibition that is observed after preexposure to the compound.

  2. Reactivity with A monoclonal antibody to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 defines a subset of aggressive breast cancers in the absence of the EBV genome.

    PubMed

    Murray, Paul G; Lissauer, David; Junying, Jia; Davies, Gillian; Moore, Sukhjinder; Bell, Andrew; Timms, Judith; Rowlands, David; McConkey, Christopher; Reynolds, Gary M; Ghataura, Suk; England, David; Caroll, Rebecca; Young, Lawrence S

    2003-05-01

    Previous studies have suggested that common breast cancers are associated with EBV. We used a highly sensitive quantitative real-time PCR method to screen whole tumor sections of breast cancers for the presence of the EBV genome. EBV DNA was detected in 19 of 92 (21%) tumors, but viral load was very low in positive samples (mean = 1.1 copy EBV/1000 cells, maximum = 7.1 copies EBV/1000 cells). Importantly, quantitative real-time PCR failed to detect the EBV genome in microdissected tumor cells from any case. Using a monoclonal antibody (2B4-1) reactive against the EBV nuclear antigen-1, we noted strong staining of tumor nuclei in a proportion of those breast cancers that had tested negative for the presence of the EBV genome. Because nuclear staining with the 2B4-1 antibody was previously observed more frequently in poor prognosis breast cancers, we examined a larger series of breast cancers with complete clinical follow-up. Strong punctate staining of tumor cell nuclei was observed in 47 of 153 (31%) breast cancers; 2B4-1-positive tumors were significantly more likely to be ER-negative (P < 0.0001), to be of higher grade (P = 0.001) and larger (P = 0.03), to involve more regional lymph nodes (P = 0.01), and to have higher Nottingham Prognostic Index scores (P = 0.0003). Conclusions are: (a) EBV can be regularly detected in whole sections of breast cancers but viral copy number is very low; (b) in these cases, tumor cells do not harbor virus; and (c) reactivity with the monoclonal antibody 2B4-1 is detectable in the absence of the EBV genome and is strongly associated with ER-negative breast tumors and with prognostically unfavorable disease. Additional studies should be directed to the identification of this protein and to elucidation of its role in breast cancer.

  3. Deviating the level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in Trypanosoma brucei elicits distinct mechanisms for inhibiting proliferation and cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Valenciano, Ana L; Ramsey, Aaron C; Mackey, Zachary B

    2015-01-01

    The DNA replication machinery is spatially and temporally coordinated in all cells to reproduce a single exact copy of the genome per division, but its regulation in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is not well characterized. We characterized the effects of altering the levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a key component of the DNA replication machinery, in bloodstream form T. brucei. This study demonstrated that tight regulation of TbPCNA levels was critical for normal proliferation and DNA replication in the parasite. Depleting TbPCNA mRNA reduced proliferation, severely diminished DNA replication, arrested the synthesis of new DNA and caused the parasites to accumulated in G2/M. Attenuating the parasite by downregulating TbPCNA caused it to become hypersensitive to hydroxyurea. Overexpressing TbPCNA in T. brucei arrested proliferation, inhibited DNA replication and prevented the parasite from exiting G2/M. These results indicate that distinct mechanisms of cell cycle arrest are associated with upregulating or downregulating TbPCNA. The findings of this study validate deregulating intra-parasite levels of TbPCNA as a potential strategy for therapeutically exploiting this target in bloodstream form T. brucei.

  4. Rapamycin disrupts cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase/p21/proliferating cell nuclear antigen complexes and cyclin D1 reverses rapamycin action by stabilizing these complexes.

    PubMed

    Law, Mary; Forrester, Elizabeth; Chytil, Anna; Corsino, Patrick; Green, Gail; Davis, Bradley; Rowe, Thomas; Law, Brian

    2006-01-15

    Rapamycin and its derivatives are promising anticancer agents, but the exact mechanisms by which these drugs induce cell cycle arrest and inhibit tumor growth are unknown. A biochemical analysis of human mammary tumor cell lines indicated that rapamycin-induced antiproliferative effects correlated with down-regulation of cellular p21 levels and the levels of p21 in cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 2 and 4 complexes. Cyclin D1 overexpression reversed rapamycin action and this reversal correlated with increased levels of cellular p21, higher levels of p21 associated with Cdk2, and stabilization of cyclin D1/Cdk2/p21/proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) complexes. Experiments using a novel cyclin D1-Cdk2 fusion protein or a kinase-dead mutant of the fusion protein indicated that reversal of rapamycin action required not only the formation of complexes with p21 and PCNA but also complex-associated kinase activity. Similar results were observed in vivo. The rapamycin derivative RAD001 (everolimus) inhibited the growth of mouse mammary tumors, which correlated with the disruption of cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes. The potential implications of these results with respect to the use of rapamycin derivatives in breast cancer therapy are discussed.

  5. Identification of small molecule proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) inhibitor that disrupts interactions with PIP-box proteins and inhibits DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Inoue, Akira; Hishiki, Asami; Fujikawa, Yoshihiro; Connelly, Michele; Evison, Benjamin; Shao, Youming; Heath, Richard; Kuraoka, Isao; Rodrigues, Patrick; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Kawanishi, Masanobu; Sato, Mamoru; Yagi, Takashi; Fujii, Naoaki

    2012-04-20

    We have discovered that 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3) inhibits binding of a PIP-box sequence peptide to proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein by competing for the same binding site, as evidenced by the co-crystal structure of the PCNA-T3 complex at 2.1 Å resolution. Based on this observation, we have designed a novel, non-peptide small molecule PCNA inhibitor, T2 amino alcohol (T2AA), a T3 derivative that lacks thyroid hormone activity. T2AA inhibited interaction of PCNA/PIP-box peptide with an IC(50) of ~1 μm and also PCNA and full-length p21 protein, the tightest PCNA ligand protein known to date. T2AA abolished interaction of PCNA and DNA polymerase δ in cellular chromatin. De novo DNA synthesis was inhibited by T2AA, and the cells were arrested in S-phase. T2AA inhibited growth of cancer cells with induction of early apoptosis. Concurrently, Chk1 and RPA32 in the chromatin are phosphorylated, suggesting that T2AA causes DNA replication stress by stalling DNA replication forks. T2AA significantly inhibited translesion DNA synthesis on a cisplatin-cross-linked template in cells. When cells were treated with a combination of cisplatin and T2AA, a significant increase in phospho(Ser(139))histone H2AX induction and cell growth inhibition was observed.

  6. Involvement of the interaction between p21 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen for the maintenance of G2/M arrest after DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Ando, T; Kawabe, T; Ohara, H; Ducommun, B; Itoh, M; Okamoto, T

    2001-11-16

    Although a major effect of p21, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, is considered to be exerted during G(1) phase of the cell cycle, p21 gene knock-out studies suggested its involvement in G(2)/M checkpoint as well. Here we demonstrate evidence that p21 is required for the cell cycle arrest at G(2) upon DNA damage. We found that expression of wild-type p21 (p21(WT)), not mutant p21 (p21(PCNA-)) lacking the interaction with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), caused G(2) cell cycle arrest in p53-deficient DLD1 colon cancer cell line after the DNA damage by treatment with cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II). We also found that p21(WT) was associated with Cdc2/cyclin B1 together with PCNA. Furthermore, coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that PCNA interacted with Cdc25C at the G(2)/M transition, and this interaction was abolished when p21(WT) was expressed presumably due to the competition between p21(WT) and Cdc25C in the binding to PCNA. These findings suggest that p21 plays a regulatory role in the maintenance of cell cycle arrest at G(2) by blocking the interaction of Cdc25C with PCNA.

  7. Short-interfering RNA-mediated silencing of proliferating cell nuclear antigen inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Hao, H; Xin, T; Nancai, Y; Yanxia, W; Qian, L; Wei, M; Yandong, Y; Hanju, H

    2008-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an important protein for DNA polymerase delta in the nucleus, and shown to have a fundamental role in cellular proliferation. It is overexpressed to support cell growth in cervical carcinoma. To study its role in stress response, we design and use short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to inhibit PCNA expression in HeLa cells and validate its effect on cell proliferation. In this study, three PCNA-shRNA expression vectors are constructed and introduced into HeLa cells, and the cell cycle is analyzed by flow cytometry. Apoptotic cell is detected by single cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay), and caspase cleavage is studied also. Expression of PCNA is assessed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Upon transient transfection with plasmid encoding shRNA, it is found that expression of PCNA decreased in shRNA-transfected cells, downregulation of PCNA inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in HeLa cells. PCNA downregulation also increase cell population in the G0-G1 phase. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that shRNA can inhibit the DNA replication and induce apoptosis in HeLa cells effectively and, therefore, could be used as a new potential anticancer tool for therapy of human cervical carcinoma.

  8. Expression of epstein-barr virus nuclear antigen 1 is associated with enhanced expression of CD25 in the Hodgkin cell line L428.

    PubMed

    Kube, D; Vockerodt, M; Weber, O; Hell, K; Wolf, J; Haier, B; Grässer, F A; Müller-Lantzsch, N; Kieff, E; Diehl, V; Tesch, H

    1999-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus is associated with several human malignancies including Burkitt's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and Hodgkin's disease (HD). To examine the effect of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) in the pathogenesis of HD, we transfected the gene into the HD cell line L428. EBNA-1 expression was associated with significantly enhanced CD25 expression (interleukin 2 [IL-2]-receptor alpha chain) in transient and stably transfected L428 cells but did not affect the expression of IL-2 receptor beta and gamma chains. There was no up-regulation of the B-cell activation molecules CD23, CD30, CD39, CD40, CD44, CD71, and CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1) or enhanced production of IL-6, IL-10, lymphotoxin alpha, and the soluble form of CD25. Stable EBNA-1-expressing L428 cells were nontumorigenic in SCID mice but showed enhanced lymphoma development in nonobese diabetic-SCID mice compared to mock-transfected cells.

  9. Identification of Small Molecule Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) Inhibitor That Disrupts Interactions with PIP-box Proteins and Inhibits DNA Replication*

    PubMed Central

    Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Inoue, Akira; Hishiki, Asami; Fujikawa, Yoshihiro; Connelly, Michele; Evison, Benjamin; Shao, Youming; Heath, Richard; Kuraoka, Isao; Rodrigues, Patrick; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Kawanishi, Masanobu; Sato, Mamoru; Yagi, Takashi; Fujii, Naoaki

    2012-01-01

    We have discovered that 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine (T3) inhibits binding of a PIP-box sequence peptide to proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein by competing for the same binding site, as evidenced by the co-crystal structure of the PCNA-T3 complex at 2.1 Å resolution. Based on this observation, we have designed a novel, non-peptide small molecule PCNA inhibitor, T2 amino alcohol (T2AA), a T3 derivative that lacks thyroid hormone activity. T2AA inhibited interaction of PCNA/PIP-box peptide with an IC50 of ∼1 μm and also PCNA and full-length p21 protein, the tightest PCNA ligand protein known to date. T2AA abolished interaction of PCNA and DNA polymerase δ in cellular chromatin. De novo DNA synthesis was inhibited by T2AA, and the cells were arrested in S-phase. T2AA inhibited growth of cancer cells with induction of early apoptosis. Concurrently, Chk1 and RPA32 in the chromatin are phosphorylated, suggesting that T2AA causes DNA replication stress by stalling DNA replication forks. T2AA significantly inhibited translesion DNA synthesis on a cisplatin-cross-linked template in cells. When cells were treated with a combination of cisplatin and T2AA, a significant increase in phospho(Ser139)histone H2AX induction and cell growth inhibition was observed. PMID:22383522

  10. Pro-recombination Role of Srs2 Protein Requires SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier) but Is Independent of PCNA (Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen) Interaction.

    PubMed

    Kolesar, Peter; Altmannova, Veronika; Silva, Sonia; Lisby, Michael; Krejci, Lumir

    2016-04-01

    Srs2 plays many roles in DNA repair, the proper regulation and coordination of which is essential. Post-translational modification by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is one such possible mechanism. Here, we investigate the role of SUMO in Srs2 regulation and show that the SUMO-interacting motif (SIM) of Srs2 is important for the interaction with several recombination factors. Lack of SIM, but not proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-interacting motif (PIM), leads to increased cell death under circumstances requiring homologous recombination for DNA repair. Simultaneous mutation of SIM in asrs2ΔPIMstrain leads to a decrease in recombination, indicating a pro-recombination role of SUMO. Thus SIM has an ambivalent function in Srs2 regulation; it not only mediates interaction with SUMO-PCNA to promote the anti-recombination function but it also plays a PCNA-independent pro-recombination role, probably by stimulating the formation of recombination complexes. The fact that deletion of PIM suppresses the phenotypes of Srs2 lacking SIM suggests that proper balance between the anti-recombination PCNA-bound and pro-recombination pools of Srs2 is crucial. Notably, sumoylation of Srs2 itself specifically stimulates recombination at the rDNA locus.

  11. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01) causes redistribution of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and abrogates cisplatin-induced S-phase arrest in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Bunch, R T; Eastman, A

    1997-07-01

    A variety of agents, such as caffeine, have been shown to abrogate the DNA damage-dependent G2 checkpoint and enhance cytotoxicity. However, these agents are too toxic for clinical use. We have reported that the potent protein kinase inhibitor 7-hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01) at nontoxic doses abrogates the G2 arrest caused by the DNA-damaging agent cisplatin. Here, using Chinese hamster ovary cells, we show that cisplatin causes predominantly an S-phase arrest; UCN-01 abrogates this S-phase arrest, causing progression of cells to G2 and, subsequently, apoptotic cell death. In searching for an explanation for this accelerate DNA synthesis, we discovered that UCN-01 caused translocation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) to the detergent-insoluble, DNA-bound fraction. PCNA acts as a sliding clamp for DNA polymerase delta. Sequestering of PCNA by p21waf1/cip1 is required for p53-dependent G1 arrest in damaged cells. However, the S-phase arrest occurs independently of p53 and p21waf1/cip1. Our results suggest that PCNA is also a component of this S-phase checkpoint, despite the fact that CHO cells are defective for p53, and no increase in p21waf1/cip1 was observed. The mechanism by which PCNA is sequestered in the absence of p21waf1/cip1 and the mechanism by which UCN-01 disrupts this sequestration remain to be elucidated.

  12. Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen (cyclin) gene: structure, expression during development, and specific binding of homeodomain proteins to its 5'-flanking region.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, M; Nishida, Y; Moriuchi, T; Hirose, F; Hui, C C; Suzuki, Y; Matsukage, A

    1990-01-01

    The genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila melanogaster proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) (cyclin) were isolated and sequenced. The coding sequence for a 260-amino-acid residue polypeptide was interrupted by a single short intron of 60 base pairs (bp), and about 70% of the deduced amino acid sequence of the Drosophila PCNA was identical to the rat and human PCNA polypeptides, with conserved unique repeats of leucine in the C-terminal region. Genomic Southern blot hybridization analysis indicates the presence of a single gene for PCNA per genome. The PCNA mRNA was detected at a high level in adult ovaries, unfertilized eggs, and early embryos and at low levels in the other developmental stages. The major transcription initiation site (cap site) was localized at 89 bp upstream from the ATG codon. Neither a TATA box nor a CAAT box was found within the 600-bp region upstream of the cap site. Clusters of 10 bp of sequence similar to the binding sites for Drosophila proteins containing homeodomains were found in the region from -127 to -413. DNase I footprint analysis revealed that the Drosophila homeodomain proteins coded by even-skipped and zerknüllt genes can specifically bind to these sites. These results suggest that the expression of the PCNA gene is under the control of genes coding for homeodomain proteins. Images PMID:1968224

  13. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C interact with p73: Interplay between a viral oncoprotein and cellular tumor suppressor.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Sushil Kumar; Mohanty, Suchitra; Kumar, Amit; Kundu, Chanakya N; Verma, Subhash C; Choudhuri, Tathagata

    2014-01-05

    The p73 protein has structural and functional homology with the tumor suppressor p53, which plays an important role in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. The p73 locus encodes both a tumor suppressor (TAp73) and a putative oncogene (ΔNp73). p73 May play a significant role in p53-deficient lymphomas infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV produces an asymptomatic infection in the majority of the global population, but it is associated with several human B-cell malignancies. The EBV-encoded Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is thought to disrupt the cell cycle checkpoint by interacting directly with p53 family proteins. Doxorubicin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, induces apoptosis through p53 and p73 signaling such that the lowΔNp73 level promotes the p73-mediated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. In this report, we investigated the mechanism by which EBV infection counters p73α-induced apoptosis through EBNA3C.

  14. Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C interact with p73: Interplay between a viral oncoprotein and cellular tumor suppressor

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Sushil Kumar; Mohanty, Suchitra; Kumar, Amit; Kundu, Chanakya N.; Verma, Subhash C.; Choudhuri, Tathagata

    2014-01-05

    The p73 protein has structural and functional homology with the tumor suppressor p53, which plays an important role in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. The p73 locus encodes both a tumor suppressor (TAp73) and a putative oncogene (ΔNp73). p73 May play a significant role in p53-deficient lymphomas infected with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). EBV produces an asymptomatic infection in the majority of the global population, but it is associated with several human B-cell malignancies. The EBV-encoded Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is thought to disrupt the cell cycle checkpoint by interacting directly with p53 family proteins. Doxorubicin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, induces apoptosis through p53 and p73 signaling such that the lowΔNp73 level promotes the p73-mediated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. In this report, we investigated the mechanism by which EBV infection counters p73α-induced apoptosis through EBNA3C. - Highlights: • EBV-encoded EBNA3C suppresses doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in B-cell lymphomas. • EBNA3C binds to p73 to suppress its apoptotic effect. • EBNA3C maintains latency by regulating downstream mitochondrial pathways.

  15. Heat shock factor 1 upregulates transcription of Epstein-Barr Virus nuclear antigen 1 by binding to a heat shock element within the BamHI-Q promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Feng-Wei; Wu, Xian-Rui; Liu, Wen-Ju; Liao, Yi-Ji; Lin, Sheng; Zong, Yong-Sheng; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Mai, Shi-Juan; Xie, Dan

    2011-12-20

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is essential for maintenance of the episome and establishment of latency. In this study, we observed that heat treatment effectively induced EBNA1 transcription in EBV-transformed B95-8 and human LCL cell lines. Although Cp is considered as the sole promoter used for the expression of EBNA1 transcripts in the lymphoblastoid cell lines, the RT-PCR results showed that the EBNA1 transcripts induced by heat treatment arise from Qp-initiated transcripts. Using bioinformatics, a high affinity and functional heat shock factor 1 (HSF1)-binding element within the - 17/+4 oligonucleotide of the Qp was found, and was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Moreover, heat shock and exogenous HSF1 expression induced Qp activity in reporter assays. Further, RNA interference-mediated HSF1 gene silencing attenuated heat-induced EBNA1 expression in B95-8 cells. These results provide evidence that EBNA1 is a new target for the transcription factor HSF1.

  16. Trigonella foenum (Fenugreek) Induced Apoptosis in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Line, HepG2, Mediated by Upregulation of p53 and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Mahmoud I. M.; Ibrahim, Mohamed M.; El-Gaaly, Gehan A.; Sultan, Ahmed S.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide and most current therapies are of limited efficacy. Trigonella foenum (Fenugreek) is a traditional herbal plant with antitumor activity, although the mechanisms of its activity remain unclear. Herein, a crude methanol extract was prepared from Fenugreek seeds (FCE) and its anticancer mechanism was evaluated, using HepG2 cell line. Growth-inhibitory effect and apoptosis induction of HepG2 cells were evidenced by MTT assay, cell morphology alteration, apoptosis enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometric analysis, caspase-3 activity, and expression of p53, proapoptotic protein, Bax, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) after (100∼500 μg/mL) FCE treatment for 48 h. Furthermore, FCE was analyzed by Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS). Our results revealed that FCE treatment for 48 h showed a cytotoxic effect and apoptosis induction in a dose-dependent manner that was mediated by upregulation of p53, Bax, PCNA, and caspase-3 activation in HepG2 cells. GC-MS analysis of FCE showed the presence of fourteen bioactive compounds such as Terpenoids and Flavonoids, including two main constituents with anticancer activity, Squalene and Naringenin (27.71% and 24.05%), respectively. Our data introduced FCE as a promising nontoxic herbal with therapeutic potential to induce apoptosis in HepG2 cells through p53, Bax, and PCNA upregulation in caspase-3 dependent manner. PMID:26557712

  17. DNA polymerases BI and D from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus both bind to proliferating cell nuclear antigen with their C-terminal PIP-box motifs.

    PubMed

    Tori, Kazuo; Kimizu, Megumi; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2007-08-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is the sliding clamp that is essential for the high processivity of DNA synthesis during DNA replication. Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon, has at least two DNA polymerases, polymerase BI (PolBI) and PolD. Both of the two DNA polymerases interact with the archaeal P. furiosus PCNA (PfuPCNA) and perform processive DNA synthesis in vitro. This phenomenon, in addition to the fact that both enzymes display 3'-5' exonuclease activity, suggests that both DNA polymerases work in replication fork progression. We demonstrated here that both PolBI and PolD functionally interact with PfuPCNA at their C-terminal PIP boxes. The mutant PolBI and PolD enzymes lacking the PIP-box sequence do not respond to the PfuPCNA at all in an in vitro primer extension reaction. This is the first experimental evidence that the PIP-box motif, located at the C termini of the archaeal DNA polymerases, is actually critical for PCNA binding to form a processive DNA-synthesizing complex.

  18. Replication factor C is a more effective proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) opener than the checkpoint clamp loader, Rad24-RFC.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jennifer A; Marzahn, Melissa R; O'Donnell, Mike; Bloom, Linda B

    2012-01-13

    Clamp loaders from all domains of life load clamps onto DNA. The clamp tethers DNA polymerases to DNA to increase the processivity of synthesis as well as the efficiency of replication. Here, we investigated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) binding and opening by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae clamp loader, replication factor C (RFC), and the DNA damage checkpoint clamp loader, Rad24-RFC, using two separate fluorescence intensity-based assays. Analysis of PCNA opening by RFC revealed a two-step reaction in which RFC binds PCNA before opening PCNA rather than capturing clamps that have transiently and spontaneously opened in solution. The affinity of RFC for PCNA is about an order of magnitude lower in the absence of ATP than in its presence. The affinity of Rad24-RFC for PCNA in the presence of ATP is about an order magnitude weaker than that of RFC for PCNA, similar to the RFC-PCNA interaction in the absence of ATP. Importantly, fewer open clamp loader-clamp complexes are formed when PCNA is bound by Rad24-RFC than when bound by RFC.

  19. Human liver nucleolar antigens.

    PubMed

    Busch, R K; Busch, H

    1981-10-01

    In an extension of previous studies on the antigens in rat liver nucleoli (R. K. Busch, R. C. Reddy, D. H. Henning, and H. Busch, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 160, 185 (1979); R. K. Busch and H. Busch, Tumori 63, 347 (1977); F. M. Davis, R. K. Busch, L. C. Yeoman, and H. Busch, Cancer Res. 38, 1906 (1978), rabbit antibodies were elicited to human liver nucleoli isolated by the sucrose--Mg2+ method (10). Fluorescent nucleoli were found in liver cryostat sections treated with rabbit anti-human liver nucleolar antibodies followed by fluorescein-conjugated goat anti-rabbit antibodies. In HeLa cells, fluorescence was distributed throughout the nucleus and in a nuclear network but was not localized to the nucleolus. In placental cryostat sections, an overall nuclear fluorescence was observed with some localization to nucleoli. Immunodiffusion analysis revealed two immunoprecipitin bands which appeared to be liver specific. Other immunoprecipitin bands were common to liver, placenta, and HeLa nuclear extracts. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis revealed two liver-specific antigens, one migrating to the cathode and the other to the anode Other rockets exhibited identity to antigens of other nuclear extracts. These results demonstrate the presence of human liver nucleolar-specific antigens which were not found in the HeLa and placental cells.

  20. Latent Variable Interaction Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacker, Randall E.

    2002-01-01

    Used simulation to study two different approaches to latent variable interaction modeling with continuous observed variables: (1) a LISREL 8.30 program and (2) data analysis through PRELIS2 and SIMPLIS programs. Results show that parameter estimation was similar but standard errors were different. Discusses differences in ease of implementation.…

  1. Latent Semantic Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumais, Susan T.

    2004-01-01

    Presents a literature review that covers the following topics related to Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA): (1) LSA overview; (2) applications of LSA, including information retrieval (IR), information filtering, cross-language retrieval, and other IR-related LSA applications; (3) modeling human memory, including the relationship of LSA to other…

  2. Allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells suppress NF-κB and Ets-1 DNA binding activity, and inhibit phosphorylated NF-κB p65 nuclear localization in CD4+ T-cells.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Ryuichi; Kawakami, Fumitaka; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Obata, Fumiya; Kubo, Makoto

    2014-08-01

    CD8+ T-cells of asymptomatic HIV-1 carriers (AC) suppress human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC-I)-restricted and -unrestricted manner. In order to investigate the mechanism of MHC-I-unrestricted CD8+ T-cell-mediated HIV-1 suppression, we previously established allo-antigen stimulated CD8+T-cells from HIV-1-uninfected donors. These allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells suppressed HIV-1 replication in acutely infected autologous CD4+ T-cells when directly co-cultured. To elucidate the mechanism of HIV-1 replication suppression, we analyzed DNA-binding activity and phosphorylation of transcriptional factors associated with HIV-1 replication by electrophoresis mobility shift assay and Western blotting. When CD4+ T-cells were cultured with allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells, the reduction of NF-κB and Ets-1 DNA-binding activity was observed. Nuclear localization of NF-κB p65 and Ets-1 was suppressed in CD4+ T-cells. Although NF-κB p65 and Ets-1 are known to be regulated by protein kinase A (PKA), no difference was observed in the expression and phosphorylation of the PKA catalytic subunit in CD4+ T-cells cultured with PHA-treated CD8+ T-cells or allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells. Cyclic AMP is also known to enter through gap junctions, but the suppression of HIV-1 replication mediated by allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells was not affected by the gap junction inhibitor. The nuclear transport of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (Ser276) was inhibited only in CD4+ T-cells cultured with allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells. Our results indicate that allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells suppress the transcriptional activity of NF-κB p65 or Ets-1 in an antigen-nonspecific manner, and inhibit the nuclear transport of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (Ser276).

  3. In vivo dynamics of EBNA1-oriP interaction during latent and lytic replication of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Daikoku, Tohru; Kudoh, Ayumi; Fujita, Masatoshi; Sugaya, Yutaka; Isomura, Hiroki; Tsurumi, Tatsuya

    2004-12-24

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is required for maintenance of the viral genome DNA during the latent phase of EBV replication but continues to be synthesized after the induction of viral productive replication. An EBV genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that EBNA1 constantly binds to oriP of the EBV genome during not only latent but also lytic infection. Although the total levels of EBNA1 proved constant throughout the latter, the levels of the oriP-bound form were increased as lytic infection proceeded. EBV productive DNA replication occurs at discrete sites in nuclei, called replication compartments, where viral replication proteins are clustered. Confocal laser microscopic analyses revealed that whereas EBNA1 was distributed broadly in nuclei as fine punctate dots during the latent phase of infection, the protein became redistributed to the viral replication compartments and localized as distinct spots within and/or nearby the compartments after the induction of lytic replication. Taking these findings into consideration, oriP regions of the EBV genome might be organized by EBNA1 into replication domains that may set up scaffolding for lytic replication and transcription.

  4. Cyclosporin A promotes proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression and migration of human cytotrophoblast cells via the mitgen-activated protein kinase-3/1-mediated nuclear factor-κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song-Cun; Yu, Min; Li, Yan-Hong; Piao, Hai-Lan; Tang, Chuan-Lin; Sun, Chan; Zhu, Rui; Li, Ming Qing; Jin, Li-Ping; Li, Da-Jin; Du, Mei-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that cyclosporin A (CsA) promotes the proliferation and migration of human trophoblasts via the mitgen-activated protein kinase-3/1 (MAPK3/1) pathway. In the present study, we further investigated the role of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in the CsA-induced trophoblast proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression and migration, and its relationship to MAPK3/1 signal. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the expression of PCNA in trophoblasts. The migration of human primary trophoblasts was determined by wound-healing assay and transwell migration assay. Western blot analysis was performed to evaluate the activation of NF-κB p65 and NF-κB inhibitory protein I-κB in human trophoblasts. We found that treatment with CsA promotes PCNA expression and migration of human trophoblast in a dose-associated manner. Blocking of the MAPK3/1 signal abrogated the enhanced PCNA expression and migration in trophoblasts by CsA. In addition, CsA increased the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and the inhibitor I-κB in human trophoblasts in a time-related manner. Pretreatment with MAPK3/1 inhibitor U0126 abrogated the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and I-κB. Accordingly, the CsA-induced enhancement of PCNA expression and migration in trophoblasts was also decreased. This CsA-induced enhancement in the expression and migration of trophoblasts was abolished by pretreatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a specific NF-κB inhibitor. Thus, our results suggest that CsA promotes PCNA expression and migration of human trophoblasts via MAPK-mediated NF-κB activation.

  5. Latent effects decision analysis

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, J. Arlin; Werner, Paul W.

    2004-08-24

    Latent effects on a system are broken down into components ranging from those far removed in time from the system under study (latent) to those which closely effect changes in the system. Each component is provided with weighted inputs either by a user or from outputs of other components. A non-linear mathematical process known as `soft aggregation` is performed on the inputs to each component to provide information relating to the component. This information is combined in decreasing order of latency to the system to provide a quantifiable measure of an attribute of a system (e.g., safety) or to test hypotheses (e.g., for forensic deduction or decisions about various system design options).

  6. G-quadruplex-interacting compounds alter latent DNA replication and episomal persistence of KSHV

    PubMed Central

    Madireddy, Advaitha; Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Loosbroock, Christopher P.; Robertson, Erle S.; Schildkraut, Carl L.; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) establishes life-long latent infection by persisting as an extra-chromosomal episome in the infected cells and by maintaining its genome in dividing cells. KSHV achieves this by tethering its epigenome to the host chromosome by latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA), which binds in the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral genome. Sequence analysis of the TR, a GC-rich DNA element, identified several potential Quadruplex G-Rich Sequences (QGRS). Since quadruplexes have the tendency to obstruct DNA replication, we used G-quadruplex stabilizing compounds to examine their effect on latent DNA replication and the persistence of viral episomes. Our results showed that these G-quadruplex stabilizing compounds led to the activation of dormant origins of DNA replication, with preferential bi-directional pausing of replications forks moving out of the TR region, implicating the role of the G-rich TR in the perturbation of episomal DNA replication. Over time, treatment with PhenDC3 showed a loss of viral episomes in the infected cells. Overall, these data show that G-quadruplex stabilizing compounds retard the progression of replication forks leading to a reduction in DNA replication and episomal maintenance. These results suggest a potential role for G-quadruplex stabilizers in the treatment of KSHV-associated diseases. PMID:26837574

  7. Down-regulation of tumor suppressor gene PTEN, overexpression of p53, plus high proliferating cell nuclear antigen index predict poor patient outcome of hepatocellular carcinoma after resection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tsung-Hui; Wang, Chih-Chi; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Chen, Chao-Long; Hung, Chao-Hung; Chen, Chien-Hung; Wang, Jing-Houng; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Lee, Chuan-Mo; Changchien, Chi-Sin; Tai, Ming-Hong

    2007-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate the interaction of two tumor suppressor genes PTEN and p53 and their relationship with cell cycle protein proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 124 resected HCC paraffin specimens were collected from 1987 to 1999 for immunohistochemistry. Expression of PTEN, p53 and PCNA in HCC were analyzed for clinicopathologic correlation. The study revealed decreased or absent PTEN immunostaining (PTEN down-regulation) in 42.7% and positive p53 (p53+) immunostaining in 41.9% of HCC. There was a positive correlation between PTEN down-regulation and p53 (+) (P=0.001). PTEN down-regulation or p53 (+) correlated with increased HCC dedifferentiation, advanced pathologic stages and high PCNA labeling index (LI) of tumors (P<0.05). Patients with either PTEN down-regulation, p53 (+), or high PCNA LI had shorter survival and higher recurrence rates than patients with intact PTEN expression, p53 (-), or low PCNA LI respectively (P<0.05). By combining the three genes, patients with all PTEN down-regulation (+)/p53 (+)/high PCNA LI had the shortest overall survival (P<0.001) and the highest recurrence rates (P<0.001), followed by patients with two, one and none of three events accordingly. Combination of PTEN/p53/PCNA represented an independent prognostic factor for tumor recurrence and disease-specific survival (P<0.05). In conclusion, the down-regulated PTEN expression and p53 over-expression are involved in the pathogenesis of HCC. They correlate with high PCNA expression, HCC de-differentiation and advanced HCC stages. A combination of the three genes predicts patient outcome more powerfully than any of the individual genes.

  8. CRL4Cdt2 E3 ubiquitin ligase and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) cooperate to degrade thymine DNA glycosylase in S phase.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Etsuko; Dar, Ashraf; Dutta, Anindya

    2014-08-15

    Thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) is an essential enzyme playing multiple roles in base excision repair, transcription regulation, and DNA demethylation. TDG mediates the cytotoxicity of the anti-cancer chemotherapeutic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) by prolonging S phase, generating DNA strand breaks, and inducing DNA damage signaling. During S phase of the cell cycle, TDG is degraded via the proteasomal pathway. Here we show that CRL4(Cdt2) E3 ubiquitin ligase promotes ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TDG in S phase in a reaction that is dependent on the interaction of TDG with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). siRNA-mediated depletion of PCNA or components of CRL4(Cdt2), specifically cullin4A/B or substrate adaptor Cdt2, stabilizes TDG in human cells. Mutations in the PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) motif of TDG that disrupt the interaction of TDG with PCNA or change critical basic residues essential for the action of the PIP degron prevent the ubiquitination and degradation of TDG. Thus physical interaction of TDG with PCNA through the PIP degron is required for targeting TDG to the CRL4(Cdt2) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Compared with forced expression of wild type TDG, CRL4(Cdt2)- resistant TDG (ΔPIP) slows cell proliferation and slightly increases the toxicity of 5-FU. Thus, CRL4(Cdt2)-dependent degradation of TDG occurs in S phase because of the requirement for TDG to interact with chromatin-loaded PCNA, and this degradation is important for preventing toxicity from excess TDG.

  9. Assessment of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and its relationship with proinflammatory cytokines and parameters of disease activity in multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Tsirakis, G; Pappa, C A; Kaparou, M; Katsomitrou, V; Hatzivasili, A; Alegakis, T; Xekalou, A; Stathopoulos, E N; Alexandrakis, M G

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant plasma cell disease. Several proinflammatory cytokines produced by malignant plasma cells and bone marrow (BM) stromal cells are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. We evaluated serum levels of the proinflammatory cytokines Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-8 (IL-8), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), in MM patients before treatment, and determined its significance in tumor progression. We also analyzed the correlation between measured parameters with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Forty-four MM patients and 20 healthy controls were studied. Serum levels of the proinflammatory cytokines were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), whereas PCNA value in the BM was determined by immunohistochemistry staining. The mean concentrations of the measured cytokines were significantly different among the three stages of disease, with higher values in advanced disease stage. Furthermore, patients with MM had significantly higher serum levels of the measured cytokines than in controls. A positive correlation was found between IL-6 with IL-1β, IL-8 and MIP-1α. Similarly, IL-8 and MIP-1α were positively correlated with markers of disease activity such as β2 microglobulin and LDH. The proliferation index, determined by PCNA immunostaining, was higher in advanced disease stage. Furthermore PCNA value correlated significantly with β2 microglobulin, LDH and the levels of the measured cytokines. Our results showed that the proliferative activity, as measured with PCNA, increases in parallel with disease stage. The positive correlation between PCNA and other measured mediators supports the involvement of these factors in the biology of myeloma cell growth and can be used as markers of disease activity and as possible therapeutic targets.

  10. Y-box-binding protein-1 expression is not correlated with p53 expression but with proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Takashi; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Yashima, Yasunori; Gu, Chundong; Morita, Masaru; Sugio, Kenji; Kohno, Kimitoshi; Yasumoto, Kosei

    2005-01-01

    Transcription factor Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1), which binds to the inverted CCAAT box, is not only involved in the transcription of various genes, but also in cell proliferation and DNA repair. The aim of this study was to detect YB-1 and p53 expression and their relationship to proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, and to evaluate the relationship between their expression levels and the prognosis of patients with NSCLC. Positive expressions of YB-1, p53 and PCNA were detected in NSCLC cells in 43 (45.7%), 33 (35.0%) and 45 (47.9%) out of 94 patients, respectively. No significant differences were observed between YB-1 expression and the patients' gender, age at surgery, pathological stage, pathological T status, pathological N status, or pathological M status. The mean PCNA-labelling index (LI) for cells was 40.7+/-2.6. Also, a significant correlation between YB-1 and PCNA-LI was found (p<0.01), but none was found between p53 expression and PCNA. The positive expression of YB-1 was associated with squamous cell carcinoma and large cell carcinoma, compared with adenocarcinomas (p<0.01), and higher levels of PCNA-LI were associated with large cell carcinoma compared with adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinoma (p<0.01). These results suggest that YB-1 expression is correlated with PCNA expression in NSCLC. In addition, the DNA repair pathway and tumor proliferation mediated by YB-1 linking to PCNA may be responsible for controlling the growth of NSCLC.

  11. Prognostic value and clinicopathological significance of proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in gastric cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Songcheng; Li, Zhan; Huang, Jinyu; Miao, Zhifeng; Zhang, Junyan; Lu, Chunyang; Xu, Hao; Xu, Huimian

    2017-01-01

    Background The prognostic significance of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression in gastric cancer has long been assessed, yet results remain controversial. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to assess the prognostic value and clinicopathological significance of PCNA in gastric cancer. Methods A systematic literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to investigate the correlations between PCNA expression and clinicopathological features, overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS). Results A total of 19 studies involving 2,852 participants were included in our analysis. The pooled HR indicated that high PCNA expression was significantly associated with poor OS (HR 1.66, 95% CI 1.32–2.08) and DFS (HR 1.81, 95% CI 1.40–2.36). Subgroup analysis revealed that the association between PCNA and OS was also significant in Asian and European patients. In addition, the pooled ORs showed that high PCNA expression was significantly associated with deeper tumor invasion (OR 2.37, 95% CI 1.71–3.27), lymph node metastasis (OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.85–3.35), and advanced stage cancer (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.36–2.63). Conclusion Our meta-analysis indicates that high PCNA expression might be a prognosticator of poor survival and a promising therapeutic target for gastric cancer patients. PMID:28138255

  12. Latency-associated nuclear antigen of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) upregulates survivin expression in KSHV-Associated B-lymphoma cells and contributes to their proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jie; Verma, Subhash C; Murakami, Masanao; Cai, Qiliang; Kumar, Pankaj; Xiao, Bingyi; Robertson, Erle S

    2009-07-01

    Survivin is a master regulator of cell proliferation and cell viability and is highly expressed in most human tumors. The molecular network linked to survivin expression in tumors has not been completely elucidated. In this study, we show that latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), a multifunctional protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) that is found in Kaposi's sarcoma tumors, upregulates survivin expression and increases the proliferation of KSHV-infected B cells. Analysis of pathway-specific gene arrays showed that survivin expression was highly upregulated in BJAB cells expressing LANA. The mRNA levels of survivin were also upregulated in HEK 293 and BJAB cells expressing LANA. Similarly, protein levels of survivin were significantly higher in LANA-expressing, as well as KSHV-infected, cells. Survivin promoter activity assays identified GC/Sp1 and p53 cis-acting elements within the core promoter region as being important for LANA activity. Gel mobility shift assays revealed that LANA forms a complex with Sp1 or Sp1-like proteins bound to the GC/Sp1 box of the survivin promoter. In addition, a LANA/p53 complex bound to the p53 cis-acting element within the survivin promoter, indicating that upregulation of survivin expression can also occur through suppression of p53 function. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry analyses revealed that survivin expression was upregulated in KSHV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma tissue, suggesting that LANA plays an important role in the upregulation of survivin expression in KSHV-infected endothelial cells. Knockdown of survivin expression by lentivirus-delivered small hairpin RNA resulted in loss of cell proliferation in KSHV-infected cells. Therefore, upregulation of survivin expression in KSHV-associated human cells contributes to their proliferation.

  13. Extracellular-signal regulated kinase 8 of Trypanosoma brucei uniquely phosphorylates its proliferating cell nuclear antigen homolog and reveals exploitable properties

    PubMed Central

    Valenciano, Ana L.; Knudsen, Giselle M.; Mackey, Zachary B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Trypanosoma brucei subspecies T. brucei gambiense and T. brucei rhodesiense are vector-borne pathogens that cause sleeping sickness also known as Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), which is fatal if left untreated. The drugs that treat HAT are ineffective and cause toxic side effects. One strategy for identifying safer and more effective HAT drugs is to therapeutically exploit essential gene targets in T. brucei. Genes that make up a basic mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) network are present in T. brucei. Tb927.10.5140 encodes an essential MAPK that is homologous to the human extracellular-signal regulated kinase 8 (HsERK8) which forms a tight complex with the replication factor proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) to stabilize intracellular PCNA levels. Here we demonstrate that (TbPCNA) is uniquely phos-phorylated on serine (S) and threonine (T) residues in T. brucei and that TbERK8 phosphorylates TbPCNA at each of these residues. The ability of an ERK8 homolog to phosphorylate a PCNA homolog is a novel biochemical property that is first demonstrated here in T. brucei and may be unique to this pathogen. We demonstrate that the potent HsERK8 inhibitor Ro318220, has an IC50 for TbERK8 that is several hundred times higher than its reported IC50 for HsERK8. This indicated that the active sites of TbERK8 and HsERK8 can be selectively inhibited, which provides a rational basis for discovering inhibitors that specifically target this essential parasite MAPK to kill the parasite. PMID:27589575

  14. [PSA variations in persons with latent prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Stamatiou, K; Danciu, M; Karakos, C; Sofras, F

    2008-01-01

    The introduction and common use of serum PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) has been demonstrated a useful index on latent prostate cancer diagnostic but in the same time has increased surgical intervention on histological forms with no eventual future evolution. Benign comportment of latent carcinomas being well known in advance, we correlated in vitro serum PSA from latent tumors, with the samples from a control group (prostates without signs of malignization). Levels of PSA were slightly elevated compared to age norms, mainly in cases with a large coexistent hypertrophy. Our reduced sample does not stand any statistic analysis, but this observation could eventually explain increased diagnostic and hyper-treatment of non-important carcinomas from a clinical point of view.

  15. Advancement of Latent Trait Theory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    latent trait theory further, and include more varieties of situations. I [51 Investigation of ways of bridging across mathematical psychology and...five years on various topics in Latent Trait Theory, including more general topics such as the method of moments as the least squares solution for...response theory." The address described as (3) in the above list was a one hour special lecture overviewing latent trait models. There were more than two

  16. Learning multimodal latent attributes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yanwei; Hospedales, Timothy M; Xiang, Tao; Gong, Shaogang

    2014-02-01

    The rapid development of social media sharing has created a huge demand for automatic media classification and annotation techniques. Attribute learning has emerged as a promising paradigm for bridging the semantic gap and addressing data sparsity via transferring attribute knowledge in object recognition and relatively simple action classification. In this paper, we address the task of attribute learning for understanding multimedia data with sparse and incomplete labels. In particular, we focus on videos of social group activities, which are particularly challenging and topical examples of this task because of their multimodal content and complex and unstructured nature relative to the density of annotations. To solve this problem, we 1) introduce a concept of semilatent attribute space, expressing user-defined and latent attributes in a unified framework, and 2) propose a novel scalable probabilistic topic model for learning multimodal semilatent attributes, which dramatically reduces requirements for an exhaustive accurate attribute ontology and expensive annotation effort. We show that our framework is able to exploit latent attributes to outperform contemporary approaches for addressing a variety of realistic multimedia sparse data learning tasks including: multitask learning, learning with label noise, N-shot transfer learning, and importantly zero-shot learning.

  17. A Latent Transition Model with Logistic Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Hwan; Walls, Theodore A.; Park, Yousung

    2007-01-01

    Latent transition models increasingly include covariates that predict prevalence of latent classes at a given time or transition rates among classes over time. In many situations, the covariate of interest may be latent. This paper describes an approach for handling both manifest and latent covariates in a latent transition model. A Bayesian…

  18. Vpx-containing Dendritic Cell Vaccine Vectors Induce CTLs and Reactivate Latent HIV-1 in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Thomas D.; Miller, Elizabeth A.; Bhardwaj, Nina; Landau, Nathaniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Eradication of HIV-1 from an infected individual requires a means of inducing production of virus from latently infected cells and stimulating an immune response against the infected cells. We report the development of lentiviral vectors that transduce dendritic cells (DCs) to both induce production of virus from latently infected cells and stimulate antigen-specific CTLs. The vectors package Vpx, a lentiviral accessory protein that counteracts the SAMHD1-mediated block to DC transduction, allowing for long-term expression of vector-encoded proteins. The vectors encode influenza or HIV-1-derived epitopes fused via a self-cleaving peptide to CD40L that releases the peptide into the endoplasmic reticulum for entry into the antigen presentation pathway. Expression of CD40L caused transduced DCs to mature and produce Th1-skewing cytokines. The DCs presented antigen to CD8 T cells, enhancing antigen-specific CTLs. Coculture of the transduced DCs with latently infected cells induced high level virus production, an effect that was mediated by TNF-α. The ability of a DC vaccine to reactivate latent HIV-1 and stimulate an adaptive immune response provides a means to reduce the size of the latent reservoir in patients. This strategy can also be applied to develop DC vaccines for other diseases. PMID:25567537

  19. Epstein-Barr Virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) confers resistance to apoptosis in EBV-positive B-lymphoma cells through up-regulation of survivin

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Jie; Murakami, Masanao; Verma, Subhash C.; Cai Qiliang; Haldar, Sabyasachi; Kaul, Rajeev; Wasik, Mariusz A.; Middeldorp, Jaap; Robertson, Erle S.

    2011-02-05

    Resistance to apoptosis is an important component of the overall mechanism which drives the tumorigenic process. EBV is a ubiquitous human gamma-herpesvirus which preferentially establishes latent infection in viral infected B-lymphocytes. EBNA1 is typically expressed in most forms of EBV-positive malignancies and is important for replication of the latent episome in concert with replication of the host cells. Here, we investigate the effects of EBNA1 on survivin up-regulation in EBV-infected human B-lymphoma cells. We present evidence which demonstrates that EBNA1 forms a complex with Sp1 or Sp1-like proteins bound to their cis-element at the survivin promoter. This enhances the activity of the complex and up-regulates survivin. Knockdown of survivin and EBNA1 showed enhanced apoptosis in infected cells and thus supports a role for EBNA1 in suppressing apoptosis in EBV-infected cells. Here, we suggest that EBV encoded EBNA1 can contribute to the oncogenic process by up-regulating the apoptosis suppressor protein, survivin in EBV-associated B-lymphoma cells.

  20. LATENT LIFE OF ARTERIES.

    PubMed

    Carrel, A

    1910-07-23

    When a segment of artery, killed by heat, formalin or glycerin is transplanted, it undergoes a rapid degeneration. Its muscle fibers disappear while the tissue of the host reacts by building a new wall of connective tissue. When the transplanted vessel has been preserved in a condition of latent life, no degeneration of the wall occurs, or the wall undergoes only partial degeneration. The muscle fibers can keep their normal appearance, even for a long time after the operation. It is, therefore, demonstrated that arteries can be preserved outside of the body in a condition of unmanifested actual life. The best method of preservation consists of placing the vessels, immersed in vaselin, in an ice box, the temperature of which is slightly above the freezing point. From a surgical standpoint, the transplantation of preserved vessels can be used with some safety. When the arteries were kept in defibrinated blood or vaselin and in cold storage, the proportion of positive results was 75 and 80 per cent., and this can probably be increased.

  1. Understanding Latent Heat of Vaporization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linz, Ed

    1995-01-01

    Presents a simple exercise for students to do in the kitchen at home to determine the latent heat of vaporization of water using typical household materials. Designed to stress understanding by sacrificing precision for simplicity. (JRH)

  2. Predicting Latent Class Scores for Subsequent Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Janne; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Budtz-Jorgensen, Esben; Larsen, Klaus Groes

    2012-01-01

    Latent class regression models relate covariates and latent constructs such as psychiatric disorders. Though full maximum likelihood estimation is available, estimation is often in three steps: (i) a latent class model is fitted without covariates; (ii) latent class scores are predicted; and (iii) the scores are regressed on covariates. We propose…

  3. Immune parameters differentiating active from latent tuberculosis infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yeon; Jung, Young Won; Jeong, Ina; Joh, Joon-Sung; Sim, Soo Yeon; Choi, Boram; Jee, Hyeon-Gun; Lim, Dong-Gyun

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis remains a highly prevalent infectious disease worldwide. Identification of the immune parameters that differentiate active disease from latent infection will facilitate the development of efficient control measures as well as new diagnostic modalities for tuberculosis. Here, we investigated the cytokine production profiles of monocytes and CD4(+) T lymphocytes upon encountering mycobacterial antigens. In addition, cytokines and lipid mediators with immune-modulating activities were examined in plasma samples ex vivo. Comparison of these parameters in active tuberculosis patients and healthy subjects with latent infection revealed that, active tuberculosis was associated with diminished Th1-type cytokine secretion from CD4(+) T cells and less augmented inflammatory cytokine secretion from monocytes induced by IFN-γ than that in latent tuberculosis infection. In addition, a higher plasma concentration of lipoxin A4 and lower ratio of prostaglandin E2 to lipoxin A4 were observed in active cases than in latent infections. These findings have implications for preparing new therapeutic strategies and for differential diagnosis of the two types of tuberculosis infection.

  4. The central repeat domain 1 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency associated-nuclear antigen 1 (LANA1) prevents cis MHC class I peptide presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwun, Hyun Jin; Ramos da Silva, Suzane; Qin Huilian; Ferris, Robert L.; Tan Rusung; Chang Yuan; Moore, Patrick S.

    2011-04-10

    KSHV LANA1, a latent protein expressed during chronic infection to maintain a viral genome, inhibits major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) peptide presentation in cis as a means of immune evasion. Through deletional cloning, we localized this function to the LANA1 central repeat 1 (CR1) subregion. Other CR subregions retard LANA1 translation and proteasomal processing but do not markedly inhibit LANA1 peptide processing by MHC I. Inhibition of proteasomal processing ablates LANA1 peptide presentation. Direct expression of LANA1 within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) overcomes CR1 inhibition suggesting that CR1 acts prior to translocation of cytoplasmic peptides into the ER. By physically separating CR1 from other subdomains, we show that LANA1 evades MHC I peptide processing by a mechanism distinct from other herpesviruses including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Although LANA1 and EBV EBNA1 are functionally similar, they appear to use different mechanisms to evade host cytotoxic T lymphocyte surveillance.

  5. Latent geometry of bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsak, Maksim; Papadopoulos, Fragkiskos; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2017-03-01

    Despite the abundance of bipartite networked systems, their organizing principles are less studied compared to unipartite networks. Bipartite networks are often analyzed after projecting them onto one of the two sets of nodes. As a result of the projection, nodes of the same set are linked together if they have at least one neighbor in common in the bipartite network. Even though these projections allow one to study bipartite networks using tools developed for unipartite networks, one-mode projections lead to significant loss of information and artificial inflation of the projected network with fully connected subgraphs. Here we pursue a different approach for analyzing bipartite systems that is based on the observation that such systems have a latent metric structure: network nodes are points in a latent metric space, while connections are more likely to form between nodes separated by shorter distances. This approach has been developed for unipartite networks, and relatively little is known about its applicability to bipartite systems. Here, we fully analyze a simple latent-geometric model of bipartite networks and show that this model explains the peculiar structural properties of many real bipartite systems, including the distributions of common neighbors and bipartite clustering. We also analyze the geometric information loss in one-mode projections in this model and propose an efficient method to infer the latent pairwise distances between nodes. Uncovering the latent geometry underlying real bipartite networks can find applications in diverse domains, ranging from constructing efficient recommender systems to understanding cell metabolism.

  6. Apple latent spherical virus vectors for reliable and effective virus-induced gene silencing among a broad range of plants including tobacco, tomato, Arabidopsis thaliana, cucurbits, and legumes

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Aki; Yamagata, Kousuke; Sugai, Tomokazu; Takahashi, Yukari; Sugawara, Emiko; Tamura, Akihiro; Yaegashi, Hajime; Yamagishi, Noriko; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Isogai, Masamichi; Takahashi, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2009-04-10

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) vectors were evaluated for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of endogenous genes among a broad range of plant species. ALSV vectors carrying partial sequences of a subunit of magnesium chelatase (SU) and phytoene desaturase (PDS) genes induced highly uniform knockout phenotypes typical of SU and PDS inhibition on model plants such as tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana, and economically important crops such as tomato, legume, and cucurbit species. The silencing phenotypes persisted throughout plant growth in these plants. In addition, ALSV vectors could be successfully used to silence a meristem gene, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and disease resistant N gene in tobacco and RCY1 gene in A. thaliana. As ALSV infects most host plants symptomlessly and effectively induces stable VIGS for long periods, the ALSV vector is a valuable tool to determine the functions of interested genes among a broad range of plant species.

  7. Gastric carcinoma: monoclonal epithelial malignant cells expressing Epstein-Barr virus latent infection protein.

    PubMed Central

    Imai, S; Koizumi, S; Sugiura, M; Tokunaga, M; Uemura, Y; Yamamoto, N; Tanaka, S; Sato, E; Osato, T

    1994-01-01

    In 1000 primary gastric carcinomas, 70 (7.0%) contained Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genomic sequences detected by PCR and Southern blots. The positive tumors comprised 8 of 9 (89%) undifferentiated lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas, 27 of 476 (5.7%) poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas, and 35 of 515 (6.8%) moderately to well-differentiated adenocarcinomas. In situ EBV-encoded small RNA 1 hybridization and hematoxylin/eosin staining in adjacent sections showed that the EBV was present in every carcinoma cell but was not significantly present in lymphoid stroma and in normal mucosa. Two-color immunofluorescence and hematoxylin/eosin staining in parallel sections revealed that every keratin-positive epithelial malignant cell expressed EBV-determined nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) but did not significantly express CD45+ infiltrating leukocytes. A single fused terminal fragment was detected in each of the EBNA1-expressing tumors, thereby suggesting that the EBV-carrying gastric carcinomas represent clonal proliferation of cells infected with EBV. The carcinoma cells had exclusively EBNA1 but not EBNA2, -3A, -3B, and -3C; leader protein; and latent membrane protein 1 because of methylation. The patients with EBV-carrying gastric carcinoma had elevated serum EBV-specific antibodies. The EBV-specific cellular immunity was not significantly reduced; however, the cytotoxic T-cell target antigens were not expressed. These findings strongly suggest a causal relation between a significant proportion of gastric carcinoma and EBV, and the virus-carrying carcinoma cells may evade immune surveillance. Images PMID:8090780

  8. Indexing by Latent Semantic Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deerwester, Scott; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes a new method for automatic indexing and retrieval called latent semantic indexing (LSI). Problems with matching query words with document words in term-based information retrieval systems are discussed, semantic structure is examined, singular value decomposition (SVD) is explained, and the mathematics underlying the SVD model is…

  9. Estimation in Latent Trait Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigdon, Steven E.; Tsutakawa, Robert K.

    Estimation of ability and item parameters in latent trait models is discussed. When both ability and item parameters are considered fixed but unknown, the method of maximum likelihood for the logistic or probit models is well known. Discussed are techniques for estimating ability and item parameters when the ability parameters or item parameters…

  10. Euphorbia Kansui Reactivates Latent HIV

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Daniele C.; Fujinaga, Koh; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2016-01-01

    While highly active anti-retroviral therapy has greatly improved the lives of HIV infected individuals, these treatments are unable to eradicate the virus. Current approaches to reactivate the virus have been limited by toxicity, lack of an orally available therapy, and limited responses in primary CD4+ T cells and in clinical trials. The PKC agonist ingenol, purified from Euphorbia plants, is a potent T cell activator and reactivates latent HIV. Euphorbia kansui itself has been used for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine to treat ascites, fluid retention, and cancer. We demonstrate that an extract of this plant, Euphorbia kansui, is capable of recapitulating T cell activation induced by the purified ingenol. Indeed, Euphorbia kansui induced expression of the early T cell activation marker CD69 and P-TEFb in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, Euphorbia kansui reactivated latent HIV in a CD4+ T cell model of latency and in HIV+ HAART suppressed PBMC. When combined with the other latency reversing agents, the effective dose of Euphorbia kansui required to reactive HIV was reduced 10-fold and resulted in synergistic reactivation of latent HIV. We conclude that Euphorbia Euphorbia kansui reactivates latent HIV and activates CD4+ T cells. When used in combination with a latency reversing agent, the effective dose of Euphorbia kansui is reduced; which suggests its application as a combination strategy to reactivate latent HIV while limiting the toxicity due to global T cell activation. As a natural product, which has been used in traditional medicine for thousands of years, Euphorbia kansui is attractive as a potential treatment strategy, particularly in resource poor countries with limited treatment options. Further clinical testing will be required to determine its safety with current anti-retroviral therapies. PMID:27977742

  11. A Latent Class Model for Rating Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rost, Jurgen

    1985-01-01

    A latent class model for rating data is presented which provides an alternative to the latent trait approach of analyzing test data. It is the analog of Andrich's binomial Rasch model for Lazarsfeld's latent class analysis (LCA). Response probabilities for rating categories follow a binomial distribution and depend on class-specific item…

  12. Latent Growth Modeling for Logistic Response Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Jaehwa; Harring, Jeffrey R.; Hancock, Gregory R.

    2009-01-01

    Throughout much of the social and behavioral sciences, latent growth modeling (latent curve analysis) has become an important tool for understanding individuals' longitudinal change. Although nonlinear variations of latent growth models appear in the methodological and applied literature, a notable exclusion is the treatment of growth following…

  13. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3A promotes cellular proliferation by repression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1.

    PubMed

    Tursiella, Melissa L; Bowman, Emily R; Wanzeck, Keith C; Throm, Robert E; Liao, Jason; Zhu, Junjia; Sample, Clare E

    2014-10-01

    Latent infection by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is highly associated with the endemic form of Burkitt lymphoma (eBL), which typically limits expression of EBV proteins to EBNA-1 (Latency I). Interestingly, a subset of eBLs maintain a variant program of EBV latency - Wp-restricted latency (Wp-R) - that includes expression of the EBNA-3 proteins (3A, 3B and 3C), in addition to EBNA-1. In xenograft assays, Wp-R BL cell lines were notably more tumorigenic than their counterparts that maintain Latency I, suggesting that the additional latency-associated proteins expressed in Wp-R influence cell proliferation and/or survival. Here, we evaluated the contribution of EBNA-3A. Consistent with the enhanced tumorigenic potential of Wp-R BLs, knockdown of EBNA-3A expression resulted in abrupt cell-cycle arrest in G0/G1 that was concomitant with conversion of retinoblastoma protein (Rb) to its hypophosphorylated state, followed by a loss of Rb protein. Comparable results were seen in EBV-immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), consistent with the previous observation that EBNA-3A is essential for sustained growth of these cells. In agreement with the known ability of EBNA-3A and EBNA-3C to cooperatively repress p14(ARF) and p16(INK4a) expression, knockdown of EBNA-3A in LCLs resulted in rapid elevation of p14(ARF) and p16I(NK4a). By contrast, p16(INK4a) was not detectably expressed in Wp-R BL and the low-level expression of p14(ARF) was unchanged by EBNA-3A knockdown. Amongst other G1/S regulatory proteins, only p21(WAF1/CIP1), a potent inducer of G1 arrest, was upregulated following knockdown of EBNA-3A in Wp-R BL Sal cells and LCLs, coincident with hypophosphorylation and destabilization of Rb and growth arrest. Furthermore, knockdown of p21(WAF1/CIP1) expression in Wp-R BL correlated with an increase in cellular proliferation. This novel function of EBNA-3A is distinct from the functions previously described that are shared with EBNA-3C, and likely contributes to the

  14. Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 3A Promotes Cellular Proliferation by Repression of the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1

    PubMed Central

    Tursiella, Melissa L.; Bowman, Emily R.; Wanzeck, Keith C.; Throm, Robert E.; Liao, Jason; Zhu, Junjia; Sample, Clare E.

    2014-01-01

    Latent infection by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is highly associated with the endemic form of Burkitt lymphoma (eBL), which typically limits expression of EBV proteins to EBNA-1 (Latency I). Interestingly, a subset of eBLs maintain a variant program of EBV latency - Wp-restricted latency (Wp-R) - that includes expression of the EBNA-3 proteins (3A, 3B and 3C), in addition to EBNA-1. In xenograft assays, Wp-R BL cell lines were notably more tumorigenic than their counterparts that maintain Latency I, suggesting that the additional latency-associated proteins expressed in Wp-R influence cell proliferation and/or survival. Here, we evaluated the contribution of EBNA-3A. Consistent with the enhanced tumorigenic potential of Wp-R BLs, knockdown of EBNA-3A expression resulted in abrupt cell-cycle arrest in G0/G1 that was concomitant with conversion of retinoblastoma protein (Rb) to its hypophosphorylated state, followed by a loss of Rb protein. Comparable results were seen in EBV-immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), consistent with the previous observation that EBNA-3A is essential for sustained growth of these cells. In agreement with the known ability of EBNA-3A and EBNA-3C to cooperatively repress p14ARF and p16INK4a expression, knockdown of EBNA-3A in LCLs resulted in rapid elevation of p14ARF and p16INK4a. By contrast, p16INK4a was not detectably expressed in Wp-R BL and the low-level expression of p14ARF was unchanged by EBNA-3A knockdown. Amongst other G1/S regulatory proteins, only p21WAF1/CIP1, a potent inducer of G1 arrest, was upregulated following knockdown of EBNA-3A in Wp-R BL Sal cells and LCLs, coincident with hypophosphorylation and destabilization of Rb and growth arrest. Furthermore, knockdown of p21WAF1/CIP1 expression in Wp-R BL correlated with an increase in cellular proliferation. This novel function of EBNA-3A is distinct from the functions previously described that are shared with EBNA-3C, and likely contributes to the proliferation of

  15. Latent period in clinical radiation myelopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, T.E.; Higgins, E.M.; El-Mahdi, A.M.

    1984-07-01

    Seventy-seven papers containing data on more than 300 cases of radiation myelopathy have been analyzed. The data suggest that the latent periods are similar in the cervical and thoracic levels of the spinal cord and are bimodally distributed. Myelopathy of lumbar cord apparently has a shorter latent period. As in controlled animal experiments, the latent period decreases with increasing dose. Furthermore, the variation in latent periods also decreases with dose. It is also seen that retreated patients and pediatric or adolescent patients have greatly reduced latent periods. The implications of these findings as they compare with the animal data are discussed.

  16. Impaired Cytokine but Enhanced Cytotoxic Marker Expression in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Induced CD8+ T Cells in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes and Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Moideen, Kadar; George, Parakkal Jovvian; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Babu, Subash

    2016-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a risk factor for tuberculosis among individuals with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. To explore the influence of DM on CD8(+) T-cell responses during latent M. tuberculosis infection, we estimated the cytokine and cytotoxic marker expression pattern in individuals with latent M. tuberculosis infection with DM and those with latent M. tuberculosis infection without DM. Among individuals with latent M. tuberculosis infection, those with DM had diminished frequencies of CD8(+) T-helper type 1 (Th1), Th2, and Th17 cells following stimulation by M. tuberculosis antigen and enhanced frequencies of CD8(+) T cells expressing cytotoxic markers, compared with those without DM. Thus, our results suggest that coincident DM modulates CD8(+) T-cell function during latent M. tuberculosis infection.

  17. The life span of major histocompatibility complex-peptide complexes influences the efficiency of presentation and immunogenicity of two class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes in the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 4

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the reactivity to two human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA) A11-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes derived from amino acids 416-424 (IVTDFSVIK, designated IVT) and 399-408 (AVFDRKSVAK, designated AVF) of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen (EBNA) 4. A strong predominance of CTL clones specific for the IVT epitope was demonstrated in polyclonal cultures generated by stimulation of lymphocytes from the EBV-seropositive donor BK with the autologous B95.8 virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL). This was not due to intrinsic differences of CTL efficiency since clones specific for the two epitopes lysed equally well A11- positive phytohemagglutinin blasts and LCLs pulsed with the relevant synthetic peptide. Irrespective of the endogenous levels of EBNA4 expression, untreated LCLs were lysed more efficiently by the IVT- specific effectors, suggesting that a higher density of A11-IVT complexes is presented at the cell surface. In accordance, 10-50-fold higher amounts of IVT peptides were found in high-performance liquid chromatography fractions of acid extracts corresponding to an abundance of about 350-12,800 IVT and 8-760 AVF molecules per cell. Peptide- mediated competition of CTL sensitization, transport assays in streptolysin-O permeabilized cells, and induction of A11 expression in the transporter associated with antigen presentation-deficient T2/A11 transfectant demonstrated that the IVT and AVF peptides bind with similar affinities to A11, are translocated with equal efficiency to the endoplasmic reticulum, and form complexes of comparable stability over a wide range of temperature and pH conditions. A rapid surface turnover of A11 molecules containing the AVF peptide was demonstrated in metabolically active T2/A11 cells corresponding to a half-life of approximately 3.5 as compared to approximately 2 h for molecules induced at 26 degrees C in the absence of exogenous peptides and >12 h for IVT

  18. Incidence of persistent viraemia and latent feline leukaemia virus infection in cats with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Stützer, Bianca; Simon, Karin; Lutz, Hans; Majzoub, Monir; Hermanns, Walter; Hirschberger, Johannes; Sauter-Louis, Carola; Hartmann, Katrin

    2011-02-01

    In the past, feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) infection, and also latent FeLV infection, were commonly associated with lymphoma and leukaemia. In this study, the prevalence of FeLV provirus in tumour tissue and bone marrow in FeLV antigen-negative cats with these tumours was assessed. Seventy-seven diseased cats were surveyed (61 antigen-negative, 16 antigen-positive). Blood, bone marrow, and tumour samples were investigated by two polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays detecting deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences of the long terminal repeats (LTR) and the envelope (env) region of the FeLV genome. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed in bone marrow and tumour tissue. None of the antigen-negative cats with lymphoma was detectably infected with latent FeLV. The prevalence of FeLV viraemia in cats with lymphoma was 20.8%. This suggests that causes other than FeLV play a role in tumorigenesis, and that latent FeLV infection is unlikely to be responsible for most feline lymphomas and leukaemias.

  19. Evaluation of a new ELISA for the detection of specific IgG to the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1).

    PubMed

    Schenk, Birgit I; Michel, Patrik O; Enders, Gisela; Thilo, Niklas; Radtke, Martina; Oker-Blom, Christian; Franke, Dieter

    2007-01-01

    Diagnosis of acute primary Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infection is predominantly performed by serology. Detection of specific antibodies to defined EBV antigens is considered state of the art. Antibodies to EBNA-1 are not produced early in primary infection and a positive EBNA-1 serology is a sign of past infection. Therefore EBNA-1 serology plays a crucial role for EBV routine diagnosis. In the present study the quantitative EBV EBNA-1-IgG-ELISA PKS medac was evaluated regarding its suitability for routine diagnosis. Using clinically and diagnostically defined serum samples (141 from seronegative, 111 from acute infected, and 52 from individuals with past infection) as well as 100 sera from healthy blood donors the diagnostic performance of the assay was investigated. Furthermore, precision, performance of the single-point quantitation (SPQ), and suitability of the assay for automation were evaluated. Compared to the pre-definition of the serum panel a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 99.6% was found. The measurement of the blood donor sera resulted in an anti-EBNA-1 IgG prevalence of 93% and an agreement of 99% with the results of a commercial ELISA used as reference. Regarding intra-assay variation, interassay variation (performed manually and automatically), and person-to-person variation a coefficient of variation < 10% was found with reactive samples. A good dilution linearity (r2 = 0.961), an excellent correlation of SPQ vs. the calibration curve (r2 = 0.997), and between the results of manually vs. automatically performed test runs (r2 > 0.995) was found. The evaluation has shown that the assay meets the demands of routine diagnosis very well.

  20. Tuberculosis Infection and Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Active tuberculosis (TB) has a greater burden of TB bacilli than latent TB and acts as an infection source for contacts. Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is the state in which humans are infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis without any clinical symptoms, radiological abnormality, or microbiological evidence. TB is transmissible by respiratory droplet nucleus of 1–5 µm in diameter, containing 1–10 TB bacilli. TB transmission is affected by the strength of the infectious source, infectiousness of TB bacilli, immunoresistance of the host, environmental stresses, and biosocial factors. Infection controls to reduce TB transmission consist of managerial activities, administrative control, engineering control, environmental control, and personal protective equipment provision. However, diagnosis and treatment for LTBI as a national TB control program is an important strategy on the precondition that active TB is not missed. Therefore, more concrete evidences for LTBI management based on clinical and public perspectives are needed. PMID:27790271

  1. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) interacts with a meiosis-specific RecA homologues, Lim15/Dmc1, but does not stimulate its strand transfer activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Fumika N.; Koshiyama, Akiyo; Namekawa, Satoshi H.; Ishii, Satomi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Sugawara, Hiroko; Nara, Takayuki Y.; Sakaguchi, Kengo . E-mail: kengo@rs.noda.tus.ac.jp; Sawado, Tomoyuki

    2007-01-26

    PCNA is a multi-functional protein that is involved in various nuclear events. Here we show that PCNA participates in events occurring during early meiotic prophase. Analysis of protein-protein interactions using surface plasmon resonance indicates that Coprinus cinereus PCNA (CoPCNA) specifically interacts with a meiotic specific RecA-like factor, C. cinereus Lim15/Dmc1 (CoLim15) in vitro. The binding efficiency increases with addition of Mg{sup 2+} ions, while ATP inhibits the interaction. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that the CoLim15 protein interacts with the CoPCNA protein in vitro and in the cell extracts. Despite the interaction between these two factors, no enhancement of CoLim15-dependent strand transfer activity by CoPCNA was found in vitro. We propose that the interaction between Lim15/Dmc1 and PCNA mediates the recombination-associated DNA synthesis during meiosis.

  2. Latent heat of vehicular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Farzad; Berrier, Austin; Habibi, Mohammad; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    We have used the thermodynamic concept of latent heat, where a system loses energy due to a solid-to-liquid phase transition, to study the flow of a group of vehicles moving from rest. During traffic flow, drivers keep a large distance from the car in front of them to ensure safe driving. When a group of cars comes to a stop, for example at a red light, drivers voluntarily induce a "phase transition" from this "liquid phase" to a close-packed "solid phase." This phase transition is motivated by the intuition that maximizing displacement before stopping will minimize the overall travel time. To test the effects of latent heat on flow efficiency, a drone captured the dynamics of cars flowing through an intersection on a Smart Road where the initial spacing between cars at the red light was systematically varied. By correlating the experimental results with the Optimal Velocity Model (OVM), we find that the convention of inducing phase transitions at intersections offers no benefit, as the lag time (latent heat) of resumed flow offsets the initial increase in displacement. These findings suggest that in situations where gridlock is not an issue, drivers should not decrease their spacing during stoppages in order to maximize safety with no loss in flow efficiency.

  3. The non-canonical protein binding site at the monomer-monomer interface of yeast proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) regulates the Rev1-PCNA interaction and Polζ/Rev1-dependent translesion DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neeru M; Kochenova, Olga V; Shcherbakova, Polina V

    2011-09-23

    Rev1 and DNA polymerase ζ (Polζ) are involved in the tolerance of DNA damage by translesion synthesis (TLS). The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), the auxiliary factor of nuclear DNA polymerases, plays an important role in regulating the access of TLS polymerases to the primer terminus. Both Rev1 and Polζ lack the conserved hydrophobic motif that is used by many proteins for the interaction with PCNA at its interdomain connector loop. We have previously reported that the interaction of yeast Polζ with PCNA occurs at an unusual site near the monomer-monomer interface of the trimeric PCNA. Using GST pull-down assays, PCNA-coupled affinity beads pull-down and gel filtration chromatography, we show that the same region is required for the physical interaction of PCNA with the polymerase-associated domain (PAD) of Rev1. The interaction is disrupted by the pol30-113 mutation that results in a double amino acid substitution at the monomer-monomer interface of PCNA. Genetic analysis of the epistatic relationship of the pol30-113 mutation with an array of DNA repair and damage tolerance mutations indicated that PCNA-113 is specifically defective in the Rev1/Polζ-dependent TLS pathway. Taken together, the data suggest that Polζ and Rev1 are unique among PCNA-interacting proteins in using the novel binding site near the intermolecular interface of PCNA. The new mode of Rev1-PCNA binding described here suggests a mechanism by which Rev1 adopts a catalytically inactive configuration at the replication fork.

  4. Functional interaction between the Fanconi Anemia D2 protein and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) via a conserved putative PCNA interaction motif.

    PubMed

    Howlett, Niall G; Harney, Julie A; Rego, Meghan A; Kolling, Frederick W; Glover, Thomas W

    2009-10-16

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare recessive disease characterized by congenital abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. The FA proteins and the familial breast cancer susceptibility gene products, BRCA1 and FANCD1/BRCA2, function cooperatively in the FA-BRCA pathway to repair damaged DNA and to prevent cellular transformation. Activation of this pathway occurs via the mono-ubiquitination of the FANCD2 protein, targeting it to nuclear foci where it co-localizes with FANCD1/BRCA2, RAD51, and PCNA. The regulation of the mono-ubiquitination of FANCD2, as well as its function in DNA repair remain poorly understood. In this study, we have further characterized the interaction between the FANCD2 and PCNA proteins. We have identified a highly conserved, putative FANCD2 PCNA interaction motif (PIP-box), and demonstrate that mutation of this motif disrupts FANCD2-PCNA binding and precludes the mono-ubiquitination of FANCD2. Consequently, the FANCD2 PIP-box mutant protein fails to correct the mitomycin C hypersensitivity of FA-D2 patient cells. Our results suggest that PCNA may function as a molecular platform to facilitate the mono-ubiquitination of FANCD2 and activation of the FA-BRCA pathway.

  5. Icariin inhibits oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells by suppressing activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanwu; Liu, Kai; Yan, Mengtong; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Yadi; Ren, Liqun

    2016-03-01

    Icariin, a flavonoid isolated from the traditional Chinese herbal medicine Epimedium brevicornum Maxim, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory, anti‑oxidant and anti-atherosclerotic activities in vivo and in vitro. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of icariin on oxidized low‑density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the possible underlying mechanism. VSMCs were cultured and pre‑treated with various concentrations of icariin (0, 10, 20 or 40 µm) prior to stimulation by ox‑LDL (50 µg/ml). Cell proliferation was evaluated by an MTT assay. Flow cytometry was used to study the influence of icariin on the cell cycle. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression and phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 were detected by western blot analysis. The results indicated that icariin significantly inhibited ox‑LDL‑induced proliferation of VSMCs and phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Furthermore, icariin also blocked the ox‑LDL‑induced cell‑cycle progression at G1/S‑interphase and downregulated the expression of PCNA in VSMCs. In conclusion, the present study indicated for the first time that icariin reduced the amount of ox‑LDL‑induced proliferation of VSMCs through suppression of PCNA expression and inactivation of ERK1/2.

  6. Modulatory Effect of Taurine on 7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)Anthracene-Induced Alterations in Detoxification Enzyme System, Membrane Bound Enzymes, Glycoprotein Profile and Proliferative Cell Nuclear Antigen in Rat Breast Tissue.

    PubMed

    Vanitha, Manickam Kalappan; Baskaran, Kuppusamy; Periyasamy, Kuppusamy; Selvaraj, Sundaramoorthy; Ilakkia, Aruldoss; Saravanan, Dhiravidamani; Venkateswari, Ramachandran; Revathi Mani, Balasundaram; Anandakumar, Pandi; Sakthisekaran, Dhanapal

    2016-08-01

    The modulatory effect of taurine on 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced breast cancer in rats was studied. DMBA (25 mg/kg body weight) was administered to induce breast cancer in rats. Protein carbonyl levels, activities of membrane bound enzymes (Na(+) /K(+) ATPase, Ca(2+) ATPase, and Mg(2+) ATPase), phase I drug metabolizing enzymes (cytochrome P450, cytochrome b5, NADPH cytochrome c reductase), phase II drug metabolizing enzymes (glutathione-S-transferase and UDP-glucuronyl transferase), glycoprotein levels, and proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were studied. DMBA-induced breast tumor bearing rats showed abnormal alterations in the levels of protein carbonyls, activities of membrane bound enzymes, drug metabolizing enzymes, glycoprotein levels, and PCNA protein expression levels. Taurine treatment (100 mg/kg body weight) appreciably counteracted all the above changes induced by DMBA. Histological examination of breast tissue further supported our biochemical findings. The results of the present study clearly demonstrated the chemotherapeutic effect of taurine in DMBA-induced breast cancer.

  7. Notch1, Notch2, and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen 2 signaling differentially affects proliferation and survival of Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells.

    PubMed

    Kohlhof, Hella; Hampel, Franziska; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Burtscher, Helmut; Weidle, Ulrich H; Hölzel, Michael; Eick, Dirk; Zimber-Strobl, Ursula; Strobl, Lothar J

    2009-05-28

    The canonical mode of transcriptional activation by both the Epstein-Barr viral protein, Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2), and an activated Notch receptor (Notch-IC) requires their recruitment to RBPJ, suggesting that EBNA2 uses the Notch pathway to achieve B-cell immortalization. To gain further insight into the biologic equivalence between Notch-IC and EBNA2, we performed a genome-wide expression analysis, revealing that Notch-IC and EBNA2 exhibit profound differences in the regulation of target genes. Whereas Notch-IC is more potent in regulating genes associated with differentiation and development, EBNA2 is more potent in inducing viral and cellular genes involved in proliferation, survival, and chemotaxis. Because both EBNA2 and Notch-IC induced the expression of cell cycle-associated genes, we analyzed whether Notch1-IC or Notch2-IC can replace EBNA2 in B-cell immortalization. Although Notch-IC could drive quiescent B cells into the cell cycle, B-cell immortalization was not maintained, partially due to an increased apoptosis rate in Notch-IC-expressing cells. Expression analysis revealed that both EBNA2 and Notch-IC induced the expression of proapoptotic genes, but only in EBNA2-expressing cells were antiapoptotic genes strongly up-regulated. These findings suggest that Notch signaling in B cells and B-cell lymphomas is only compatible with proliferation if pathways leading to antiapototic signals are active.

  8. Recognition of distinct HLA-DQA1 promoter elements by a single nuclear factor containing Jun and Fos or antigenically related proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Neve Ombra, M; Autiero, M; DeLerma Barbaro, A; Barretta, R; Del Pozzo, G; Guardiola, J

    1993-01-01

    The activity of MHC class II promoters depends upon conserved regulatory signals one of which, the extended X-box, contains in its X2 subregion a sequence related to the cAMP response element, CRE and to the TPA response element, TRE. Accordingly, X2 is recognized by the AP-1 factor and by other c-Jun or c-Fos containing heterodimers. We report that the X-box dependent promoter activity of the HLA-DQA1 gene is down-modulated by an array of DNA elements each of which represented twice either in an invertedly or directly repeated orientation. In this frame, we describe a nuclear binding factor, namely DBF, promiscuously interacting with two of these additional signals, delta and sigma, and with a portion of the X-box, namely the X-core, devoid of X2. The presence of a single factor recognizing divergent DNA sequences was indicated by the finding that these activities were co-eluted from a heparin-Sepharose column and from DNA affinity columns carrying different DNA binding sites as ligands. Competition experiments made with oligonucleotides representing wild type and mutant DNA elements showed that each DNA element specifically inhibited the binding of the others, supporting the contention that DBF is involved in recognition of different targets. Furthermore, we found that DBF also exhibits CRE/TRE binding activity and that this activity can be competed out by addition of an excess of sigma, delta and X-core oligonucleotides. Anti-Jun peptide and anti-Fos peptide antibodies blocked not only the binding activity of DBF, but also its X-core and sigma binding; this blockade was removed by the addition of the Jun or Fos peptides against which the antibodies had been raised. In vitro synthesized Jun/Fos was able to bind to all these boxes, albeit with seemingly different affinities. The cooperativity of DBF interactions may explain the modulation of the X-box dependent promoter activity mediated by the accessory DNA elements described here. Images PMID:8493100

  9. Latent Heating from TRMM Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, W.; Takayabu, Y. N.; Shige, S.; Lang, S. E.; Olson, W. S.

    2012-12-01

    Rainfall production is a fundamental process within the Earth's hydrological cycle because it represents both a principal forcing term in surface water budgets, and its energetics corollary, latent heating, is the principal source of atmospheric diabatic heating. Latent heat release itself is a consequence of phase changes between the vapor, liquid, and frozen states of water. The properties of the vertical distribution of latent heat release modulate large-scale meridional and zonal circulations within the Tropics - as well as modify the energetic efficiencies of mid-latitude weather systems. This paper highlights the retrieval of latent heat release from satellite measurements generated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite observatory, which was launched in November 1997 as a joint American-Japanese space endeavor. Since then, TRMM measurements have been providing an accurate four-dimensional account of rainfall over the global Tropics and sub-tropics - information which can be used to estimate the space-time structure of latent heating across the Earth's low latitudes. A set of algorithm methodologies has been developed to estimate latent heating based on rain rate profile retrievals obtained from TRMM measurements. These algorithms are briefly described followed by a discussion of the foremost latent heating products that can be generated from them. The investigation then provides an overview of how TRMM-derived latent heating information is currently being used in conjunction with global weather and climate models, concluding with remarks intended to stimulate further research on latent heating retrieval from satellites.

  10. Bayesian variable selection for latent class models.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Joyee; Herring, Amy H; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria

    2011-09-01

    In this article, we develop a latent class model with class probabilities that depend on subject-specific covariates. One of our major goals is to identify important predictors of latent classes. We consider methodology that allows estimation of latent classes while allowing for variable selection uncertainty. We propose a Bayesian variable selection approach and implement a stochastic search Gibbs sampler for posterior computation to obtain model-averaged estimates of quantities of interest such as marginal inclusion probabilities of predictors. Our methods are illustrated through simulation studies and application to data on weight gain during pregnancy, where it is of interest to identify important predictors of latent weight gain classes.

  11. Estimating and Interpreting Latent Variable Interactions: A Tutorial for Applying the Latent Moderated Structural Equations Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslowsky, Julie; Jager, Justin; Hemken, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Latent variables are common in psychological research. Research questions involving the interaction of two variables are likewise quite common. Methods for estimating and interpreting interactions between latent variables within a structural equation modeling framework have recently become available. The latent moderated structural equations (LMS)…

  12. Optimization-Based Model Fitting for Latent Class and Latent Profile Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Guan-Hua; Wang, Su-Mei; Hsu, Chung-Chu

    2011-01-01

    Statisticians typically estimate the parameters of latent class and latent profile models using the Expectation-Maximization algorithm. This paper proposes an alternative two-stage approach to model fitting. The first stage uses the modified k-means and hierarchical clustering algorithms to identify the latent classes that best satisfy the…

  13. Semi-Nonparametric Methods for Detecting Latent Non-Normality: A Fusion of Latent Trait and Ordered Latent Class Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, J. Eric; Mehta, Paras D.; Aggen, Steven H.; Kubarych, Thomas S.; Neale, Michael C.

    2006-01-01

    Ordered latent class analysis (OLCA) can be used to approximate unidimensional latent distributions. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the method of OLCA in detecting non-normality of an unobserved continuous variable (i.e., a common factor) used to explain the covariation between dichotomous item-level responses. Using simulation,…

  14. The Latent Structure of Autistic Traits: A Taxometric, Latent Class and Latent Profile Analysis of the Adult Autism Spectrum Quotient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Richard J.; Dubey, Indu; Smith, Danielle; Ropar, Danielle; Tunney, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Autistic traits are widely thought to operate along a continuum. A taxometric analysis of Adult Autism Spectrum Quotient data was conducted to test this assumption, finding little support but identifying a high severity taxon. To understand this further, latent class and latent profile models were estimated that indicated the presence of six…

  15. A 116-kDa phytoglycoprotein inhibits aberrant crypt foci formation through modulation of manganese superoxide dismutase, inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, nuclear factor-kappa B, activator protein-1, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine/dextran sodium sulfate-treated ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sei-Jung; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2008-11-01

    The 116-kDa Ulmus davidiana Nakai (UDN) glycoprotein is a naturally occurring phytoglycoprotein found in the stem of UDN. In this study, we investigated the chemopreventive effect of UDN glycoprotein on inflammation-mediated colorectal carcinogenesis induced by 10 mg/kg 1,2-dimethylhydrazine and 2% dextran sodium sulfate in ICR mice. Consumption of UDN glycoprotein (0.01 and 0.02%) significantly reduced the frequency of colonic aberrant crypt foci, the expression of colonic proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and the release of plasma lactate dehydrogenase without any cytotoxic activity at the initiation stage of colorectal carcinogenesis in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine/dextran sodium sulfate-treated mice. In addition, UDN glycoprotein has antioxidative effects on the formation of plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and on the production of plasma inducible nitric oxide, accompanying the normalizing effects on the activity of colonic antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase) in the mice. UDN glycoprotein intake also remarkably attenuated the expression of inflammation-related factors (inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2) and the DNA-binding activity of redox-sensitive transcription factors (nuclear factor-kappa B and activator protein-1) in the mice. Collectively, the results suggest that UDN glycoprotein has chemopreventive potential at the initiation stage of colorectal cancer by reducing the factors responsible for oxidative stress, inflammation, and carcinogenesis.

  16. Cognitive Diagnosis Using Latent Trait Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    This paper discusses the competency space approach to diagnosing misconceptions, skill, and knowledge acquisition. In some approaches that combine misconceptions, skill, and knowledge acquisition, the latent ability theta is used more or less as an insignificant element, but in the competency space approach, a multidimensional latent space is…

  17. Latent Heating from TRMM Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Smith, E.; Olson, W.

    2005-01-01

    Rainfall production is a fundamental process within the Earth;s hydrological cycle because it represents both a principal forcing term in surface water budgets, and its energetics corollary, latent heating, is the principal source of atmospheric diabatic heating. Latent heat release itself is a consequence of phase changes between the vapor, liquid, and frozen states of water. The properties of the vertical distribution of latent heat release modulate large-scale meridional and zonal circulations with the Tropics - as well as modify the energetic efficiencies of mid-latitude weather systems. This paper highlights the retrieval of observatory, which was launched in November 1997 as a joint American-Japanese space endeavor. Since then, TRMM measurements have been providing an accurate four-dimensional amount of rainfall over the global Tropics and sub-tropics - information which can be used to estimate the spacetime structure of latent heating across the Earth's low latitudes. A set of algorithm methodologies has and continues to be developed to estimate latent heating based on rain rate profile retrievals obtained from TRMM measurements. These algorithms are briefly described followed by a discussion of the foremost latent heating products that can be generate from them. The investigation then provides an overview of how TRMM-derived latent heating information is currently being used in conjunction with global weather and climate models, concluding with remarks intended to stimulate further research on latent heating retrieval from satellites.

  18. Introduction to Latent Class Analysis with Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porcu, Mariano; Giambona, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Latent class analysis (LCA) is a statistical method used to group individuals (cases, units) into classes (categories) of an unobserved (latent) variable on the basis of the responses made on a set of nominal, ordinal, or continuous observed variables. In this article, we introduce LCA in order to demonstrate its usefulness to early adolescence…

  19. A Vernacular for Linear Latent Growth Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Gregory R.; Choi, Jaehwa

    2006-01-01

    In its most basic form, latent growth modeling (latent curve analysis) allows an assessment of individuals' change in a measured variable X over time. For simple linear models, as with other growth models, parameter estimates associated with the a construct (amount of X at a chosen temporal reference point) and b construct (growth in X per unit…

  20. Latent Memory for Sensitization in "Aplysia"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philips, Gary T.; Tzvetkova, Ekaterina I.; Marinesco, Stephane; Carew, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    In the analysis of memory it is commonly observed that, even after a memory is apparently forgotten, its latent presence can still be revealed in a subsequent learning task. Although well established on a behavioral level, the mechanisms underlying latent memory are not well understood. To begin to explore these mechanisms, we have used "Aplysia,"…

  1. Consequences of Fitting Nonidentified Latent Class Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abar, Beau; Loken, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Latent class models are becoming more popular in behavioral research. When models with a large number of latent classes relative to the number of manifest indicators are estimated, researchers must consider the possibility that the model is not identified. It is not enough to determine that the model has positive degrees of freedom. A well-known…

  2. A small molecule inhibitor of monoubiquitinated Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) inhibits repair of interstrand DNA cross-link, enhances DNA double strand break, and sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Akira; Kikuchi, Sotaro; Hishiki, Asami; Shao, Youming; Heath, Richard; Evison, Benjamin J; Actis, Marcelo; Canman, Christine E; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Fujii, Naoaki

    2014-03-07

    Small molecule inhibitors of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)/PCNA interacting protein box (PIP-Box) interactions, including T2 amino alcohol (T2AA), inhibit translesion DNA synthesis. The crystal structure of PCNA in complex with T2AA revealed that T2AA bound to the surface adjacent to the subunit interface of the homotrimer of PCNA in addition to the PIP-box binding cavity. Because this site is close to Lys-164, which is monoubiquitinated by RAD18, we postulated that T2AA would affect monoubiquitinated PCNA interactions. Binding of monoubiquitinated PCNA and a purified pol η fragment containing the UBZ and PIP-box was inhibited by T2AA in vitro. T2AA decreased PCNA/pol η and PCNA/REV1 chromatin colocalization but did not inhibit PCNA monoubiquitination, suggesting that T2AA hinders interactions of pol η and REV1 with monoubiquitinated PCNA. Interstrand DNA cross-links (ICLs) are repaired by mechanisms using translesion DNA synthesis that is regulated by monoubiquitinated PCNA. T2AA significantly delayed reactivation of a reporter plasmid containing an ICL. Neutral comet analysis of cells receiving T2AA in addition to cisplatin revealed that T2AA significantly enhanced formation of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by cisplatin. T2AA promoted colocalized foci formation of phospho-ATM and 53BP1 and up-regulated phospho-BRCA1 in cisplatin-treated cells, suggesting that T2AA increases DSBs. When cells were treated by cisplatin and T2AA, their clonogenic survival was significantly less than that of those treated by cisplatin only. These findings show that the inhibitors of monoubiquitinated PCNA chemosensitize cells by inhibiting repair of ICLs and DSBs.

  3. Comparison of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, thyroid transcription factor-1, Ki-67, p63, p53 and high-molecular weight cytokeratin expressions in papillary thyroid carcinoma, follicular carcinoma, and follicular adenoma.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ayca; Etit, Demet; Bayol, Umit; Altinel, Deniz; Tan, Sedat

    2011-04-01

    The searching of the reliable and repeatable immunohistochemical markers in the differential diagnosis of the thyroid's differentiated follicular epithelial neoplasms has been continuing. Recently, the studies have majored on immunohistochemical markers such as high-molecular weight cytokeratin (HMW-CK), galectin-3, cytokeratin 19, and p27. We aimed to evaluate the differences of the expressions of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), Ki-67, p63, p53, and HMW-CK among the papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs), follicular carcinomas (FCs), and follicular adenomas (FAs). Thirty-nine patients with the diagnoses of the PTC, FC, and FA in the archives of the Izmir Tepecik Training and Research Hospital Pathology Laboratory registries in between 2004 and 2009 were included in the study. Immunohistochemical stains for PCNA, TTF-1, Ki-67, p63, p53, and HMW-CK were applied. The results were analyzed statistically by using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) for Windows 16.0 program (SPSS Inc., IBM, Somers, New York, USA). In all 3 groups, all tumors showed PCNA and TTF-1 positivity. Ki-67 proliferation index varied in a wide range in all groups. Although it was not statistically significant, 19 of 39 tumors (7 PTCs, 2 FCs, and 10 FAs) were stained with p63. The results of the immunoreactivity seen in PTCs with p53 (41.2%) and HMW-CK (52.9%) were statistically significant. The tumors in the other 2 groups (FC and FA) showed no reactivity with HMW-CK. Although the differential diagnosis of the thyroid follicular neoplasms are based on the histologic and cytomorphological criteria, p53 and HMW-CK positivity might be undertaken in favor of the diagnosis of the PTC.

  4. Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) as a potential therapy for rheumatoid arthritis: radiobiological studies at RA-1 Nuclear Reactor in a model of antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Trivillin, Verónica A; Bruno, Leandro J; Gatti, David A; Stur, Mariela; Garabalino, Marcela A; Hughes, Andrea Monti; Castillo, Jorge; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Wentzeis, Luis; Scolari, Hugo; Schwint, Amanda E; Feldman, Sara

    2016-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune pathology characterized by the proliferation and inflammation of the synovium. Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS), a binary treatment modality that combines the preferential incorporation of boron carriers to target tissue and neutron irradiation, was proposed to treat the pathological synovium in arthritis. In a previous biodistribution study, we showed the incorporation of therapeutically useful boron concentrations to the pathological synovium in a model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in rabbits, employing two boron compounds approved for their use in humans, i.e., decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) and boronophenylalanine (BPA). The aim of the present study was to perform low-dose BNCS studies at the RA-1 Nuclear Reactor in the same model. Neutron irradiation was performed post intra-articular administration of BPA or GB-10 to deliver 2.4 or 3.9 Gy, respectively, to synovium (BNCS-AIA). AIA and healthy animals (no AIA) were used as controls. The animals were followed clinically for 2 months. At that time, biochemical, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological studies were performed. BNCS-AIA animals did not show any toxic effects, swelling or pain on palpation. In BNCS-AIA, the post-treatment levels of TNF-α decreased in four of six rabbits and IFN-γ levels decreased in five of six rabbits. In all cases, MRI images of the knee joint in BNCS-AIA resembled those of no AIA, with no necrosis or periarticular effusion. Synovial membranes of BNCS-AIA were histologically similar to no AIA. BPA-BNCS and GB-10-BNCS, even at low doses, would be therapeutically useful for the local treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Effects of resveratrol on ARPE-19 cell proliferation and migration via regulating the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, P21, P27 and p38MAPK/MMP-9

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiao-Ning; Wang, Wen-Jie; Chen, Jian; Zhou, Qing; Qu, Yi-Xin; Liu, Xiao-Yong; Xu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore whether resveratrol (Res) can inhibit human retinal pigment epithelial cell (ARPE-19 cell) proliferation and migration, and to research the molecular mechanisms. METHODS ARPE-19 cells were pretreated with various concentrations at 0, 50, 100, 150, 200 and 300 µmol/L of Res, and with 0 µmol/L Res as the control for 24, 48 and 72h. The cell proliferation, apoptosis and migration were measured with cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry, and wound-healing and Transwell assays, respectively. The expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), P21 and P27, as well as matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38MAPK) was identified by Western blot. RESULTS Cell proliferation was effectively inhibited by Res (P<0.05). When pretreated with Res, cells arrested in S-phase increased remarkably (P<0.05), but the apoptosis ratios showed no significant difference between the treatment and control groups (P>0.05). Cell migration was suppressed by Res both in wound-healing assay and Transwell migration assay (P<0.05). Decreases of PCNA, MMP-9 and p38MAPK, as well as increases of P21 and P27 were detected by Western blot (P<0.05). CONCLUSION Res can inhibit APRE-19 cell proliferation and migration in a concentration-dependent manner with up-regulation of the expression of P21 and P27, and down-regulation of PCNA, MMP-9 and p38MAPK. PMID:28003970

  6. Mechanistic Control of Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (CEACAM1) Splice Isoforms by the Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonuclear Proteins hnRNP L, hnRNP A1, and hnRNP M*

    PubMed Central

    Dery, Kenneth J.; Gaur, Shikha; Gencheva, Marieta; Yen, Yun; Shively, John E.; Gaur, Rajesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 (CEACAM1) is expressed in a variety of cell types and is implicated in carcinogenesis. Alternative splicing of CEACAM1 pre-mRNA generates two cytoplasmic domain splice variants characterized by the inclusion (L-isoform) or exclusion (S-isoform) of exon 7. Here we show that the alternative splicing of CEACAM1 pre-mRNA is regulated by novel cis elements residing in exon 7. We report the presence of three exon regulatory elements that lead to the inclusion or exclusion of exon 7 CEACAM1 mRNA in ZR75 breast cancer cells. Heterologous splicing reporter assays demonstrated that the maintenance of authentic alternative splicing mechanisms were independent of the CEACAM1 intron sequence context. We show that forced expression of these exon regulatory elements could alter CEACAM1 splicing in HEK-293 cells. Using RNA affinity chromatography, three members of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein family (hnRNP L, hnRNP A1, and hnRNP M) were identified. RNA immunoprecipitation of hnRNP L and hnRNP A1 revealed a binding motif located central and 3′ to exon 7, respectively. Depletion of hnRNP A1 or L by RNAi in HEK-293 cells promoted exon 7 inclusion, whereas overexpression led to exclusion of the variable exon. By contrast, overexpression of hnRNP M showed exon 7 inclusion and production of CEACAM1-L mRNA. Finally, stress-induced cytoplasmic accumulation of hnRNP A1 in MDA-MB-468 cells dynamically alters the CEACAM1-S:CEACAM1:L ratio in favor of the l-isoform. Thus, we have elucidated the molecular factors that control the mechanism of splice-site recognition in the alternative splicing regulation of CEACAM1. PMID:21398516

  7. Fusion of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1-derived glycine-alanine repeat to trans-dominant HIV-1 Gag increases inhibitory activities and survival of transduced cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Diana; Wild, Jens; Ludwig, Christine; Asbach, Benedikt; Notka, Frank; Wagner, Ralf

    2008-06-01

    Trans-dominant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag derivatives have been shown to efficiently inhibit late steps of HIV-1 replication in vitro by interfering with Gag precursor assembly, thus ranking among the interesting candidates for gene therapy approaches. However, efficient antiviral activities of corresponding transgenes are likely to be counteracted in particular by cell-mediated host immune responses toward the transgene-expressing cells. To decrease this potential immunogenicity, a 24-amino acid Gly-Ala (GA) stretch derived from Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA1) and known to overcome proteasomal degradation was fused to a trans-dominant Gag variant (sgD1). To determine the capacity of this fusion polypeptide to repress viral replication, PM-1 cells were transduced with sgD1 and GAsgD1 transgenes, using retroviral gene transfer. Challenge of stably transfected permissive cell lines with various viral strains indicated that N-terminal GA fusion even enhanced the inhibitory properties of sgD1. Further studies revealed that the GA stretch increased protein stability by blocking proteasomal degradation of Gag proteins. Immunization of BALB/c mice with a DNA vaccine vector expressing sgD1 induced substantial Gag-specific immune responses that were, however, clearly diminished in the presence of GA. Furthermore, recognition of cells expressing the GA-fused transgene by CD8(+) T cells was drastically reduced, both in vitro and in vivo, resulting in prolonged survival of the transduced cells in recipient mice.

  8. Stable interaction between the human proliferating cell nuclear antigen loader complex Ctf18-replication factor C (RFC) and DNA polymerase {epsilon} is mediated by the cohesion-specific subunits, Ctf18, Dcc1, and Ctf8.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takeshi; Takano, Ryuji; Takeo, Satoshi; Taniguchi, Rina; Ogawa, Kaori; Ohashi, Eiji; Tsurimoto, Toshiki

    2010-11-05

    One of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen loader complexes, Ctf18-replication factor C (RFC), is involved in sister chromatid cohesion. To examine its relationship with factors involved in DNA replication, we performed a proteomics analysis of Ctf18-interacting proteins. We found that Ctf18 interacts with a replicative DNA polymerase, DNA polymerase ε (pol ε). Co-immunoprecipitation with recombinant Ctf18-RFC and pol ε demonstrated that their binding is direct and mediated by two distinct interactions, one weak and one stable. Three subunits that are specifically required for cohesion in yeast, Ctf18, Dcc1, and Ctf8, formed a trimeric complex (18-1-8) and together enabled stable binding with pol ε. The C-terminal 23-amino acid stretch of Ctf18 was necessary for the trimeric association of 18-1-8 and was required for the stable interaction. The weak interaction was observed with alternative loader complexes including Ctf18-RFC(5), which lacks Dcc1 and Ctf8, suggesting that the common loader structures, including the RFC small subunits (RFC2-5), are responsible for the weak interaction. The two interaction modes, mediated through distinguishable structures of Ctf18-RFC, both occurred through the N-terminal half of pol ε, which includes the catalytic domain. The addition of Ctf18-RFC or Ctf18-RFC(5) to the DNA synthesis reaction caused partial inhibition and stimulation, respectively. Thus, Ctf18-RFC has multiple interactions with pol ε that promote polymorphic modulation of DNA synthesis. We propose that their interaction alters the DNA synthesis mode to enable the replication fork to cooperate with the establishment of cohesion.

  9. Variable Assessment in Latent Class Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Q.; Ip, E. H.

    2014-01-01

    The latent class model provides an important platform for jointly modeling mixed-mode data — i.e., discrete and continuous data with various parametric distributions. Multiple mixed-mode variables are used to cluster subjects into latent classes. While the mixed-mode latent class analysis is a powerful tool for statisticians, few studies are focused on assessing the contribution of mixed-mode variables in discriminating latent classes. Novel measures are derived for assessing both absolute and relative impacts of mixed-mode variables in latent class analysis. Specifically, the expected posterior gradient and the Kolmogorov variation of the posterior distribution, as well as related properties are studied. Numerical results are presented to illustrate the measures. PMID:24910486

  10. Latent inhibition in human adults without masking.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Martha; Arcediano, Francisco; Miller, Ralph R

    2003-09-01

    Latent inhibition refers to attenuated responding to Cue X observed when the X-outcome pairings are preceded by X-alone presentations. It has proven difficult to obtain in human adults unless the preexposure (X-alone) presentations are embedded within a masking (i.e., distracting) task. The authors hypothesized that the difficulty in obtaining latent inhibition with unmasked tasks is related to the usual training procedures, in which the preexposure and conditioning experiences are separated by a set of instructions. Experiment 1 reports latent inhibition without masking in a task in which preexposure and conditioning occur without interruption. Experiments 2 and 3 demonstrate that this attenuation in responding to target Cue X does not pass a summation test for conditioned inhibition and is context specific, thereby confirming that it is latent inhibition. Experiments 3 and 4 confirm that introducing instructions between preexposure and conditioning disrupts latent inhibition.

  11. Latent Heating from TRMM Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Smith, E. A.; Adler, R.; Haddad, Z.; Hou, A.; Iguchi, T.; Kakar, R.; Krishnamurti, T.; Kummerow, C.; Lang, S.

    2004-01-01

    Rainfall production is the fundamental variable within the Earth's hydrological cycle because it is both the principal forcing term in surface water budgets and its energetics corollary, latent heating, is the principal source of atmospheric diabatic heating. Latent heat release itself is a consequence of phase changes between the vapor, liquid, and frozen states of water. The properties of the vertical distribution of latent heat release modulate large-scale meridional and zonal circulations within the tropics - as well as modifying the energetic efficiencies of midlatitude weather systems. This paper focuses on the retrieval of latent heat release from satellite measurements generated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite observatory, which was launched in November 1997 as a joint American-Japanese space endeavor. Since then, TRMM measurements have been providing an accurate four-dimensional account of rainfall over the global tropics and sub-tropics, information which can be used to estimate the space-time structure of latent heating across the Earth's low latitudes. The paper examines how the observed TRMM distribution of rainfall has advanced an understanding of the global water and energy cycle and its consequent relationship to the atmospheric general circulation and climate via latent heat release. A set of algorithm methodologies that are being used to estimate latent heating based on rain rate retrievals from the TRMM observations are described. The characteristics of these algorithms and the latent heating products that can be generated from them are also described, along with validation analyses of the heating products themselves. Finally, the investigation provides an overview of how TRMM-derived latent heating information is currently being used in conjunction with global weather and climate models, concluding with remarks intended to stimulate further research on latent heating retrieval from satellites.

  12. Improving knowledge management systems with latent semantic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sebok, A.; Plott, C.; LaVoie, N.

    2006-07-01

    Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) offers a technique for improving lessons learned and knowledge management systems. These systems are expected to become more widely used in the nuclear industry, as experienced personnel leave and are replaced by younger, less-experienced workers. LSA is a machine learning technology that allows searching of text based on meaning rather than predefined keywords or categories. Users can enter and retrieve data using their own words, rather than relying on constrained language lists or navigating an artificially structured database. LSA-based tools can greatly enhance the usability and usefulness of knowledge management systems and thus provide a valuable tool to assist nuclear industry personnel in gathering and transferring worker expertise. (authors)

  13. Analysis of latent tracks for MeV protons in CR-39

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, S.; Borghesi, M.; Romagnani, L.; Takahashi, S.; Zayats, A.; Malka, V.; Fritzler, S.; Schiavi, A.

    2007-02-01

    For protons of energy up to a few MeV, the temporal evolution of etched latent tracks in CR-39 nuclear track detector has been numerically modeled by assuming that the electronic energy loss of the protons governs the latent track formation. The technique is applied in order to obtain the energy spectrum of high intensity laser driven proton beams, with high accuracy. The precise measurement of the track length and areal track density have been achieved by scanning short etched, highly populated CR-39 employing atomic force microscope.

  14. Phase I trial of recombinant modified vaccinia ankara encoding Epstein-Barr viral tumor antigens in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Hui, Edwin P; Taylor, Graham S; Jia, Hui; Ma, Brigette B Y; Chan, Stephen L; Ho, Rosalie; Wong, Wai-Lap; Wilson, Steven; Johnson, Benjamin F; Edwards, Ceri; Stocken, Deborah D; Rickinson, Alan B; Steven, Neil M; Chan, Anthony T C

    2013-03-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with several malignancies including nasopharyngeal carcinoma, a high incidence tumor in Chinese populations, in which tumor cells express the two EBV antigens EB nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) and latent membrane protein 2 (LMP2). Here, we report the phase I trial of a recombinant vaccinia virus, MVA-EL, which encodes an EBNA1/LMP2 fusion protein designed to boost T-cell immunity to these antigens. The vaccine was delivered to Hong Kong patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma to determine a safe and immunogenic dose. The patients, all in remission more than 12 weeks after primary therapy, received three intradermal MVA-EL vaccinations at three weekly intervals, using five escalating dose levels between 5 × 10(7) and 5 × 10(8) plaque-forming unit (pfu). Blood samples were taken during prescreening, immediately before vaccination, one week afterward and at intervals up to one year later. Immunogenicity was tested by IFN-γ ELIspot assays using complete EBNA1 and LMP2 15-mer peptide mixes and known epitope peptides relevant to patient MHC type. Eighteen patients were treated, three per dose level one to four and six at the highest dose, without dose-limiting toxicity. T-cell responses to one or both vaccine antigens were increased in 15 of 18 patients and, in many cases, were mapped to known CD4 and CD8 epitopes in EBNA1 and/or LMP2. The range of these responses suggested a direct relationship with vaccine dose, with all six patients at the highest dose level giving strong EBNA1/LMP2 responses. We concluded that MVA-EL is both safe and immunogenic, allowing the highest dose to be forwarded to phase II studies examining clinical benefit.

  15. Orientation field estimation for latent fingerprint enhancement.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianjiang; Zhou, Jie; Jain, Anil K

    2013-04-01

    Identifying latent fingerprints is of vital importance for law enforcement agencies to apprehend criminals and terrorists. Compared to live-scan and inked fingerprints, the image quality of latent fingerprints is much lower, with complex image background, unclear ridge structure, and even overlapping patterns. A robust orientation field estimation algorithm is indispensable for enhancing and recognizing poor quality latents. However, conventional orientation field estimation algorithms, which can satisfactorily process most live-scan and inked fingerprints, do not provide acceptable results for most latents. We believe that a major limitation of conventional algorithms is that they do not utilize prior knowledge of the ridge structure in fingerprints. Inspired by spelling correction techniques in natural language processing, we propose a novel fingerprint orientation field estimation algorithm based on prior knowledge of fingerprint structure. We represent prior knowledge of fingerprints using a dictionary of reference orientation patches. which is constructed using a set of true orientation fields, and the compatibility constraint between neighboring orientation patches. Orientation field estimation for latents is posed as an energy minimization problem, which is solved by loopy belief propagation. Experimental results on the challenging NIST SD27 latent fingerprint database and an overlapped latent fingerprint database demonstrate the advantages of the proposed orientation field estimation algorithm over conventional algorithms.

  16. Recent advances in testing for latent TB.

    PubMed

    Schluger, Neil W; Burzynski, Joseph

    2010-12-01

    After more than a century of relying on skin testing for the diagnosis of latent TB infection, clinicians now have access to blood-based diagnostics in the form of interferon γ release assays (IGRAs). These tests are generally associated with higher sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of latent TB infection. This article reviews the indications for testing and treatment of latent TB infection in the overall context of a TB control program and describes how IGRAs might be used in specific clinical settings and populations, including people having close contact with an active case of TB, the foreign born, and health-care workers.

  17. Extraction of latent images from printed media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeyev, Vladislav; Fedoseev, Victor

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we propose an automatic technology for extraction of latent images from printed media such as documents, banknotes, financial securities, etc. This technology includes image processing by adaptively constructed Gabor filter bank for obtaining feature images, as well as subsequent stages of feature selection, grouping and multicomponent segmentation. The main advantage of the proposed technique is versatility: it allows to extract latent images made by different texture variations. Experimental results showing performance of the method over another known system for latent image extraction are given.

  18. Immunogenicity of 60 novel latency-related antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Vidal, Mᵃdel Mar; Latorre, Irene; Franken, Kees L. C. M.; Díaz, Jéssica; de Souza-Galvão, Maria Luiza; Casas, Irma; Maldonado, José; Milà, Cèlia; Solsona, Jordi; Jimenez-Fuentes, M. Ángeles; Altet, Neus; Lacoma, Alícia; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan; Ausina, Vicente; Prat, Cristina; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Domínguez, José

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our work here was to evaluate the immunogenicity of 60 mycobacterial antigens, some of which have not been previously assessed, notably a novel series of in vivo-expressed Mycobacterium tuberculosis (IVE-TB) antigens. We enrolled 505 subjects and separated them in individuals with and without latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) vs. patients with active tuberculosis (TB). Following an overnight and 7 days stimulation of whole blood with purified recombinant M. tuberculosis antigens, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) levels were determined by ELISA. Several antigens could statistically significantly differentiate the groups of individuals. We obtained promising antigens from all studied antigen groups [dormancy survival regulon (DosR regulon) encoded antigens; resuscitation-promoting factors (Rpf) antigens; IVE-TB antigens; reactivation associated antigens]. Rv1733, which is a probable conserved transmembrane protein encoded in DosR regulon, turned out to be very immunogenic and able to discriminate between the three defined TB status, thus considered a candidate biomarker. Rv2389 and Rv2435n, belonging to Rpf family and IVE-TB group of antigens, respectively, also stood out as LTBI biomarkers. Although more studies are needed to support our findings, the combined use of these antigens would be an interesting approach to TB immunodiagnosis candidates. PMID:25339944

  19. Retrieved Latent Heating from TRMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Smith, Eric A.; Houze Jr, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The global hydrological cycle is central to the Earth's climate system, with rainfall and the physics of precipitation formation acting as the key links in the cycle. Two-thirds of global rainfall occurs in the tropics with the associated latent heating (LH) accounting for three-fourths of the total heat energy available to the Earth's atmosphere. In addition, fresh water provided by tropical rainfall and its variability exerts a large impact upon the structure and motions of the upper ocean layer. In the last decade, it has been established that standard products of LH from satellite measurements, particularly TRMM measurements, would be a valuable resource for scientific research and applications. Such products would enable new insights and investigations concerning the complexities of convection system life cycles, the diabatic heating controls and feedbacks related to meso-synoptic circulations and their forecasting, the relationship of tropical patterns of LH to the global circulation and climate, and strategies for improving cloud parameterizations in environmental prediction models. The status of retrieved TRMM LH products, TRMM LH inter-comparison and validation project, current TRMM LH applications and critic issues/action items (based on previous five TRMM LH workshops) is presented in this article.

  20. Identification of a negative regulatory cis-element in the enhancer core region of the prostate-specific antigen promoter: implications for intersection of androgen receptor and nuclear factor-kappaB signalling in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cinar, Bekir; Yeung, Fan; Konaka, Hiroyuki; Mayo, Marty W; Freeman, Michael R; Zhau, Haiyen E; Chung, Leland W K

    2004-01-01

    The NF-kappaB (nuclear factor-kappaB) transcription factors mediate activation of a large number of gene promoters containing diverse kappaB-site sequences. Here, PSA (prostate-specific antigen) was used as an AR (androgen receptor)-responsive gene to examine the underlying mechanism by which the NF-kappaB p65 transcription factor down-regulates the transcriptional activity of AR in cells. We observed that activation of NF-kappaB by TNFalpha (tumour necrosis factor alpha) inhibited both basal and androgen-stimulated PSA expression, and that this down-regulation occurred at the promoter level, as confirmed by the super-repressor IkappaBalpha (S32A/S36A), a dominant negative inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Using a linker-scanning mutagenesis approach, we identified a cis -element, designated XBE (X-factor-binding element), in the AREc (androgen response element enhancer core) of the PSA promoter, which negatively regulated several AR-responsive promoters, including that of PSA. When three copies of XBE in tandem were juxtaposed to GRE4 (glucocorticoid response element 4), a 4-6-fold reduction of inducible GRE4 activity was detected in three different cell lines, LNCaP, ARCaP-AR and PC3-AR. Bioinformatics and molecular biochemical studies indicated that XBE is a kappaB-like element that binds specifically to the NF-kappaB p65 subunit; consistent with these observations, only NF-kappaB p65, but not the NF-kappaB p50 subunit, was capable of inhibiting AR-mediated PSA promoter transactivation in LNCaP cells. In addition, our data also showed that AR binds to XBE, as well as to the kappaB consensus site, and that the transfection of AR inhibits the kappaB-responsive promoter in transient co-transfection assays. Collectively, these data indicate that cross-modulation between AR and NF-kappaB p65 transcription factors may occur by a novel mechanism involving binding to a common cis -DNA element. PMID:14715080

  1. Latent Work and Latent Heat of the Liquid/Vapor Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    latent heat and latent work of liquid/vapor phase transformation for variously constrained thermodynamic processes . thermodynamics, phase...1. Introduction 1 2. Latent Heat and Work of Thermodynamic Process 3 3. Equations of Phase Equilibrium 5 4. Vaporization/Condensation under Fixed...between the phase in the process of vaporization/condensation. Thermodynamical identities allow one to express p, T, and µ in terms of the derivatives of

  2. Reactivation of Latent Viruses in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Tyring, S. K.; Lugg, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    Reactivation of latent viruses is an important health risk for people working and living in physically isolated extreme environments such as Antarctica and space. Preflight quarantine does not significantly reduce the risk associated with latent viruses, however, pharmaceutical countermeasures are available for some viruses. The molecular basis of latency is not fully understood, but physical and psychosocial stresses are known to initiate the reactivation of latent viruses. Presumably, stress induced changes in selected hormones lead to alterations in the cell- mediated immune (CMI) response resulting in increased shedding of latent viruses. Limited access to space makes the use of ground-based analogs essential. The Australian Antarctic stations serve as a good stress model and simulate many aspects of space flight. Closed environmental chambers have been used to simulate space flight since the Skylab missions and have also proven to be a valuable analog of selected aspects of space flight.

  3. Habituation, latent inhibition, and extinction.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Wesley P; Todd, Travis P; Bucci, David J; Leaton, Robert N

    2015-06-01

    In two conditioned suppression experiments with a latent inhibition (LI) design, we measured the habituation of rats in preexposure, their LI during conditioning, and then extinction over days. In the first experiment, lick suppression, the preexposed group (PE) showed a significant initial unconditioned response (UR) to the target stimulus and significant long-term habituation (LTH) of that response over days. The significant difference between the PE and nonpreexposed (NPE) groups on the first conditioning trial was due solely to the difference in their URs to the conditioned stimulus (CS)-a habituated response (PE) and an unhabituated response (NPE). In the second experiment, bar-press suppression, little UR to the target stimulus was apparent during preexposure, and no detectable LTH. Thus, there was no difference between the PE and NPE groups on the first conditioning trial. Whether the UR to the CS confounds the interpretation of LI (Exp. 1) or not (Exp. 2) can only be known if the UR is measured. In both experiments, LI was observed in acquisition. Also in both experiments, rats that were preexposed and then conditioned to asymptote were significantly more resistant to extinction than were the rats not preexposed. This result contrasts with the consistently reported finding that preexposure either produces less resistance to extinction or has no effect on extinction. The effect of stimulus preexposure survived conditioning to asymptote and was reflected directly in extinction. These two experiments provide a cautionary procedural note for LI experiments and have shown an unexpected extinction effect that may provide new insights into the interpretation of LI.

  4. A Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpesvirus 8 ORF50 deletion mutant is defective for reactivation of latent virus and DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yiyang; AuCoin, David P; Huete, Alicia Rodriguez; Cei, Sylvia A; Hanson, Lisa J; Pari, Gregory S

    2005-03-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (also called human herpesvirus type 8 [HHV8]) latently infects a number of cell types. Reactivation of latent virus can occur by treatment with the phorbol ester tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA) or with the transfection of plasmids expressing the lytic switch activator protein K-Rta, the gene product of ORF50. K-Rta expression is sufficient for the activation of the entire lytic cycle and the transactivation of viral genes necessary for DNA replication. In addition, recent evidence has suggested that K-Rta may participate directly in the initiation of lytic DNA synthesis. We have now generated a recombinant HHV8 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) with a large deletion within the ORF50 locus. This BAC, BAC36Delta50, failed to produce infectious virus upon treatment with TPA and was defective for DNA synthesis. Expression of K-Rta in trans in BAC36Delta50-containing cells was able to abolish both defects. Real-time PCR revealed that K-bZIP, ORF40/41, and K8.1 were not expressed when BAC36Delta50-containing cells were induced with TPA. However, the mRNA levels of ORF57 were over fivefold higher in TPA-treated BAC36Delta50-containing cells than those observed in similarly treated wild-type BAC-containing cells. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis showed that while the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) was expressed in the mutant BAC-containing cells, ORF59 and K8.1 expression was not detected in TPA-induced BAC36Delta50-containing cells. These results showed that K-Rta is essential for lytic viral reactivation and transactivation of viral genes contributing to DNA replication.

  5. Latent Curve Models and Latent Change Score Models Estimated in R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghisletta, Paolo; McArdle, John J.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years the use of the latent curve model (LCM) among researchers in social sciences has increased noticeably, probably thanks to contemporary software developments and the availability of specialized literature. Extensions of the LCM, like the the latent change score model (LCSM), have also increased in popularity. At the same time, the R…

  6. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  7. Chronic stress, leukocyte subpopulations, and humoral response to latent viruses

    SciTech Connect

    McKinnon, W.; Weisse, C.S.; Reynolds, C.P.; Bowles, C.A.; Baum, A. )

    1989-01-01

    Psychological stress has been shown to affect immune system status and function, but most studies of this relationship have focused on acute stress and/or laboratory situations. The present study compared total numbers of leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations (determined by flow cytometry) and antibody titers to latent and nonlatent viruses among a group of chronically stressed individuals living near the damaged Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant with those of a demographically comparable control group. Urinary catecholamine and cortisol levels were also examined. Residents of the TMI area exhibited greater numbers of neutrophils, which were positively correlated with epinephrine levels. The TMI group also exhibited fewer B lymphocytes, T-suppressor/cytotoxic lymphocytes, and natural killer cells. Antibody titers to herpes simplex were significantly different across groups as well, whereas titers to nonlatent rubella virus as well as IgG and IgM levels were comparable.

  8. A potential alpha-helix motif in the amino terminus of LANA encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is critical for nuclear accumulation of HIF-1alpha in normoxia.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qiliang; Murakami, Masanao; Si, Huaxin; Robertson, Erle S

    2007-10-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a ubiquitously expressed transcriptional regulator involved in induction of numerous genes associated with angiogenesis and tumor growth. Kaposi's sarcoma, associated with increased angiogenesis, is a highly vascularized, endothelial cell-derived tumor. Previously, we have shown that the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) targets the HIF-1alpha suppressors von Hippel-Lindau protein and p53 for degradation via its suppressor of cytokine signaling-box motif, which recruits the EC5S ubiquitin complex. Here we further show that HIF-1alpha was aberrantly accumulated in KSHV latently infected primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells, as well as HEK293 cells infected with KSHV, and also show that a potential alpha-helical amino-terminal domain of LANA was important for HIF-1alpha nuclear accumulation in normoxic conditions. Moreover, we have now determined that this association was dependent on the residues 46 to 89 of LANA and the oxygen-dependent degradation domain of HIF-1alpha. Introduction of specific small interfering RNA against LANA into PEL cells also resulted in a diminished nuclear accumulation of HIF-1alpha. Therefore, these data show that LANA can function not only as an inhibitor of HIF-1alpha suppressor proteins but can also induce nuclear accumulation of HIF-1alpha during KSHV latent infection.

  9. Tensor Decompositions for Learning Latent Variable Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-08

    of a tensor, 2011. arXiv:1004.4953. [CSC+12] S. B. Cohen, K. Stratos, M. Collins, D. P. Foster, and L. Ungar . Spectral learning of latent-variable...12] P. S. Dhillon, J. Rodu, M. Collins, D. P. Foster, and L. H. Ungar . Spectral dependency parsing with latent variables. In EMNLP-CoNLL, 2012. [DS07...Foster, J. Rodu, and L. H. Ungar . Spectral dimensionality reduction for HMMs, 2012. arXiv:1203.6130. [GvL96] G. H. Golub and C. F. van Loan. Matrix

  10. Intractable diarrhoea of infancy and latent otomastoiditis.

    PubMed Central

    Salazar de Sousa, J; da Silva, A; da Costa Ribeiro, V

    1980-01-01

    In 16 infants with intractable diarrhoea, latent otomastoiditis was found in 9 (3 at necropsy and 6 at myringotomy-antrotomy). In 5 of the 6 operated group, surgery was followed by a striking cessation of the diarrhoea and with weight gain. It is concluded that (1) latent otomastoiditis may be a perpetuating factor in intractable diarrhoea; (2) myringotomy-antrotomy should be considered if other forms of treatment have failed, and especially if there is leucocytosis; (3) mastoiditis with diffuse osteitis seems to be associated with a poor prognosis. PMID:7458392

  11. Association of autophagy-related IRGM polymorphisms with latent versus active tuberculosis infection in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanjun; Li, Qian; Peng, Jing; Zhu, Yaowu; Wang, Feng; Wang, Chunyu; Wang, Xiong

    2016-03-01

    The autophagy-related immunity-related GTPase family M protein, IRGM, plays an important role in the defense against tuberculosis (TB) infection. IRGM polymorphisms are associated with TB infection susceptibility, and recent studies demonstrate host genetic differences between active and latent TB. Here, we investigated the association between IRGM polymorphisms and TB infection type in a Chinese population. We recruited 268 and 321 patients with confirmed or latent TB, respectively, and 475 TB-free healthy controls. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs10065172, rs10051924, and rs13361189 within IRGM were genotyped using TaqMan-based assays. Interferon-gamma release levels were tested by T-SPOT. rs10065172 (P = 0.024, OR 0.67 (95% CI 0.48-0.95)), rs10051924 (P = 0.01, OR 0.64 (95% CI 0.46-0.90)), and rs13361189 (P = 0.055, OR 0.72 (95% CI 0.51-1.01)) were associated with a protective role against latent TB progression. Haplotype analysis showed that TCC was protective for latent TB (P = 0.022, OR 0.74 (95% CI 0.57-0.96)) whereas TTC conferred a higher risk of active TB. Additionally, patients with the rs10065172 TT genotype had a higher response to TB specific antigens. Thus, IRGM polymorphism differences between latent and active TB suggests that genetic differences in autophagy might partly affect host TB infection status.

  12. Neural antigen-specific autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Raffaele; Lennon, Vanda A

    2012-07-01

    Neural-specific autoantibodies have been documented and their diagnostic utility validated in diseases affecting the neuraxis from cerebral cortex to the somatic, autonomic, and enteric nervous system and skeletal muscle. These neurological disorders occur both idiopathically and in a paraneoplastic context. Molecular identification of the antigens has expedited development of confirmatory and high-throughput tests for serum and cerebrospinal fluid, which permit early diagnosis and reveal the underlying molecular pathogenic mechanisms. The autoantibodies are classifiable on the basis of antigen location: intracellular (nuclear or cytoplasmic) or plasma membrane. Immunohistopathological studies of patients' biopsied and autopsied tissues suggest that effector T cells mediate the autoimmune neurological disorders for which defining autoantibodies recognize intracellular antigens. Antigens within intact cells are inaccessible to circulating antibody, and the associated neurological deficits rarely improve with antibody-depleting therapies. Tumoricidal therapies may arrest neurological progression, but symptom reversal is rare. In contrast, autoantibodies specific for plasma membrane antigens have pathogenic potential, and the associated neurological deficits are often amenable to antibody-depleting immunotherapy, such as plasma exchange and anti-B-cell monoclonal antibody therapy. These reversible neurological disorders are frequently misdiagnosed as neurodegenerative. The focus of this review is the immunobiology, pathophysiology, and clinical spectrum of autoimmune neurological disorders accompanied by neural-specific IgGs.

  13. Role for a region of helically unstable DNA within the Epstein-Barr virus latent cycle origin of DNA replication oriP in origin function

    SciTech Connect

    Polonskaya, Zhanna; Benham, Craig J.; Hearing, Janet . E-mail: jhearing@ms.cc.sunysb.edu

    2004-10-25

    The minimal replicator of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent cycle origin of DNA replication oriP is composed of two binding sites for the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and flanking inverted repeats that bind the telomere repeat binding factor TRF2. Although not required for minimal replicator activity, additional binding sites for EBNA-1 and TRF2 and one or more auxiliary elements located to the right of the EBNA-1/TRF2 sites are required for the efficient replication of oriP plasmids. Another region of oriP that is predicted to be destabilized by DNA supercoiling is shown here to be an important functional component of oriP. The ability of DNA fragments of unrelated sequence and possessing supercoiled-induced DNA duplex destabilized (SIDD) structures, but not fragments characterized by helically stable DNA, to substitute for this component of oriP demonstrates a role for the SIDD region in the initiation of oriP-plasmid DNA replication.

  14. Distinct Effector Memory CD4+ T Cell Signatures in Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection, BCG Vaccination and Clinically Resolved Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Adekambi, Toidi; Ibegbu, Chris C.; Kalokhe, Ameeta S.; Yu, Tianwei; Ray, Susan M.; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2012-01-01

    Two billion people worldwide are estimated to be latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and are at risk for developing active tuberculosis since Mtb can reactivate to cause TB disease in immune-compromised hosts. Individuals with latent Mtb infection (LTBI) and BCG-vaccinated individuals who are uninfected with Mtb, harbor antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells. However, the differences between long-lived memory CD4+ T cells induced by latent Mtb infection (LTBI) versus BCG vaccination are unclear. In this study, we characterized the immune phenotype and functionality of antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells in healthy BCG-vaccinated individuals who were either infected (LTBI) or uninfected (BCG) with Mtb. Individuals were classified into LTBI and BCG groups based on IFN-γ ELISPOT using cell wall antigens and ESAT-6/CFP-10 peptides. We show that LTBI individuals harbored high frequencies of late-stage differentiated (CD45RA−CD27−) antigen-specific effector memory CD4+ T cells that expressed PD-1. In contrast, BCG individuals had primarily early-stage (CD45RA−CD27+) cells with low PD-1 expression. CD27+ and CD27− as well as PD-1+ and PD-1− antigen-specific subsets were polyfunctional, suggesting that loss of CD27 expression and up-regulation of PD-1 did not compromise their capacity to produce IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2. PD-1 was preferentially expressed on CD27− antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, indicating that PD-1 is associated with the stage of differentiation. Using statistical models, we determined that CD27 and PD-1 predicted LTBI versus BCG status in healthy individuals and distinguished LTBI individuals from those who had clinically resolved Mtb infection after anti-tuberculosis treatment. This study shows that CD4+ memory responses induced by latent Mtb infection, BCG vaccination and clinically resolved Mtb infection are immunologically distinct. Our data suggest that differentiation into CD27−PD-1+ subsets in LTBI is driven by Mtb

  15. CD4 and CD8 T cell responses to tumour-associated Epstein-Barr virus antigens in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaorong; Gudgeon, Nancy H; Hui, Edwin P; Jia, Hui; Qun, Xue; Taylor, Graham S; Barnardo, Martin C N M; Lin, C Kit; Rickinson, Alan B; Chan, Anthony T C

    2008-07-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated tumour common in Southern Chinese populations, is a potentially important target for T cell-based immunotherapy. The tumour cells are HLA class I- and II-positive and express a limited subset of EBV latent proteins, namely the nuclear antigen EBNA1 and the latent membrane proteins LMP2 and (in some cases) LMP1. To ask whether the tumour develops in the presence of a potentially protective host response or in its absence, we set out to determine the prevailing levels of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell memory to these proteins in NPC patients at tumour diagnosis. We first screened healthy Chinese donors against Chinese strain EBNA1, LMP1 and LMP2 sequences in Elispot assays of interferon-gamma release and identified the immunodominant CD4+ and CD8+ epitope peptides presented by common Chinese HLA alleles. Then, comparing 60 patients with >70 healthy controls on peptide epitope mini-panels, we found that T cell memory to CD4 epitopes in all three proteins was unimpaired in the blood of patients at diagnosis. In most cases NPC patients also showed detectable responses to CD8 epitopes relevant to their HLA type, the one consistent exception being the absence in patients of a B*4001-restricted response to LMP2. We infer that NPC arises in patients whose prevailing levels of T cell memory to tumour-associated EBV proteins is largely intact; the therapeutic goal must therefore be to re-direct the existing memory repertoire more effectively against antigen-expressing tumour cells.

  16. Antigen injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Leprosy is caused by the organism Mycobacterium leprae . The leprosy test involves injection of an antigen just under ... if your body has a current or recent leprosy infection. The injection site is labeled and examined ...

  17. Immune Function and Reactivation of Latent Viruses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butel, Janet S.

    1999-01-01

    A major concern associated with long-duration space flight is the possibility of infectious diseases posing an unacceptable medical risk to crew members. One major hypothesis addressed in this project is that space flight will cause alterations in the immune system that will allow latent viruses that are endogenous in the human population to reactivate and shed to higher levels than normal, which may affect the health of crew members. The second major hypothesis being examined is that the effects of space flight will alter the mucosal immune system, the first line of defense against many microbial infections, including herpesviruses, polyomaviruses, and gastroenteritis viruses, rendering crew members more susceptible to virus infections across the mucosa. We are focusing the virus studies on the human herpesviruses and polyomaviruses, important pathogens known to establish latent infections in most of the human population. Both primary infection and reactivation from latent infection with these groups of viruses (especially certain herpesviruses) can cause a variety of illnesses that result in morbidity and, occasionally, mortality. Both herpesviruses and polyomaviruses have been associated with human cancer, as well. Effective vaccines exist for only one of the eight known human herpesviruses and available antivirals are of limited use. Whereas normal individuals display minimal consequences from latent viral infections, events which alter immune function (such as immunosuppressive therapy following solid organ transplantation) are known to increase the risk of complications as a result of viral reactivations.

  18. Dish-mounted latent heat buffer storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    Dish-mounted latent heat storage subsystems for Rankine, Brayton, and Stirling engines operating at 427 C, 816 C, and 816 C respectively are discussed. Storage requirements definition, conceptual design, media stability and compatibility tests, and thermal performance analyses are considered.

  19. Generalized Structured Component Analysis with Latent Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Ho, Moon-Ho Ringo; Lee, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) is a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, researchers may often be interested in examining the interaction effects of latent variables. However, GSCA has been geared only for the specification and testing of the main effects of variables. Thus, an extension of GSCA…

  20. CICATRIZATION OF WOUNDS : XI. LATENT PERIOD.

    PubMed

    Carrel, A; du Noüy, P L

    1921-09-30

    1. The latent period of cicatrization varies generally from 5 to 7 days. 2. It stops abruptly and contraction starts with its maximum velocity. 3. The formula of du Noüy applies to the beginning of the contraction period as well as to the subsequent periods.

  1. Detection of latent prints by Raman imaging

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Linda Anne [Andersonville, TN; Connatser, Raynella Magdalene [Knoxville, TN; Lewis, Sr., Samuel Arthur

    2011-01-11

    The present invention relates to a method for detecting a print on a surface, the method comprising: (a) contacting the print with a Raman surface-enhancing agent to produce a Raman-enhanced print; and (b) detecting the Raman-enhanced print using a Raman spectroscopic method. The invention is particularly directed to the imaging of latent fingerprints.

  2. An Introduction to Latent Semantic Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landauer, Thomas K; Foltz, Peter W.; Laham, Darrell

    1998-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the theory and implementation of Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA), a theory and method for extracting and representing the contextual-usage meaning of words by statistical computations applied to a large corpus of text. Gives an overview of applications and modeling of human knowledge to which LSA has been applied. (SR)

  3. Essay Assessment with Latent Semantic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Tristan

    2003-01-01

    Latent semantic analysis (LSA) is an automated, statistical technique for comparing the semantic similarity of words or documents. In this article, I examine the application of LSA to automated essay scoring. I compare LSA methods to earlier statistical methods for assessing essay quality, and critically review contemporary essay-scoring systems…

  4. Forensic Chemistry: The Revelation of Latent Fingerprints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, J. Brent

    2015-01-01

    The visualization of latent fingerprints often involves the use of a chemical substance that creates a contrast between the fingerprint residues and the surface on which the print was deposited. The chemical-aided visualization techniques can be divided into two main categories: those that chemically react with the fingerprint residue and those…

  5. Component Latent Trait Models for Test Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Embretson, Susan Whitely

    Latent trait models are presented that can be used for test design in the context of a theory about the variables that underlie task performance. Examples of methods for decomposing and testing hypotheses about the theoretical variables in task performance are given. The methods can be used to determine the processing components that are involved…

  6. Thermally Stable, Latent Olefin Metathesis Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Renee M.; Fedorov, Alexey; Keitz, Benjamin K.

    2011-01-01

    Highly thermally stable N-aryl,N-alkyl N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ruthenium catalysts were designed and synthesized for latent olefin metathesis. These catalysts showed excellent latent behavior toward metathesis reactions, whereby the complexes were inactive at ambient temperature and initiated at elevated temperatures, a challenging property to achieve with second generation catalysts. A sterically hindered N-tert-butyl substituent on the NHC ligand of the ruthenium complex was found to induce latent behavior toward cross-metathesis reactions, and exchange of the chloride ligands for iodide ligands was necessary to attain latent behavior during ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). Iodide-based catalysts showed no reactivity toward ROMP of norbornene-derived monomers at 25 °C, and upon heating to 85 °C gave complete conversion of monomer to polymer in less than 2 hours. All of the complexes were very stable to air, moisture, and elevated temperatures up to at least 90 °C, and exhibited a long catalyst lifetime in solution at elevated temperatures. PMID:22282652

  7. Extended Generalized Linear Latent and Mixed Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segawa, Eisuke; Emery, Sherry; Curry, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    The generalized linear latent and mixed modeling (GLLAMM framework) includes many models such as hierarchical and structural equation models. However, GLLAMM cannot currently accommodate some models because it does not allow some parameters to be random. GLLAMM is extended to overcome the limitation by adding a submodel that specifies a…

  8. Latent mnemonic strengths are latent: a comment on Mickes, Wixted, and Wais (2007).

    PubMed

    Rouder, Jeffrey N; Pratte, Michael S; Morey, Richard D

    2010-06-01

    Mickes, Wixted, and Wais (2007) proposed a simple test of latent strength variability in recognition memory. They asked participants to rate their confidence using either a 20-point or a 99-point strength scale and plotted distributions of the resulting ratings. They found 25% more variability in ratings for studied than for new items, which they interpreted as providing evidence that latent mnemonic strength distributions are 25% more variable for studied than for new items. We show here that this conclusion is critically dependent on assumptions--so much so that these assumptions determine the conclusions. In fact, opposite conclusions, such that study does not affect the variability of latent strength, may be reached by making different but equally plausible assumptions. Because all measurements of mnemonic strength variability are critically dependent on untestable assumptions, all are arbitrary. Hence, there is no principled method for assessing the relative variability of latent mnemonic strength distributions.

  9. Generation of specific cytotoxic T cells with a fragment of the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded p63/latent membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Thorley-Lawson, D A; Israelsohn, E S

    1987-01-01

    Human B lymphocytes, transformed by the herpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus, are known to express a characteristic antigen(s) recognized by the cellular immune response. This structure has been termed lymphocyte-determined membrane antigen. Because of the significance of this structure in controlling Epstein-Barr virus infection in vivo, the molecular nature of lymphocyte-determined membrane antigen has been long sought. In this paper, we show that a sequence of 10 amino acids (residues 43-53) from the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded membrane protein p63/latent membrane protein can induce Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T cells and, therefore, bears at least one of the lymphocyte-determined membrane antigenic determinants. PMID:3037547

  10. Reactions of latent prints exposed to blood.

    PubMed

    Praska, Nicole; Langenburg, Glenn

    2013-01-10

    We explored whether an undeveloped latent print (fingermark) exposed to blood and later developed by enhancement with blood reagents such as amido black (AB) or leucocrystal violet (LCV) could appear as a genuine blood mark. We examined three different experimental conditions. In Experiment I, fingermark residue only was tested, as a control to confirm that fingermark residue alone does not react with the blood reagents AB and LCV. Experiment II investigated whether latent fingermarks exposed to blood dilutions could be treated with AB or LCV and subsequently appear as a genuine blood mark enhanced with AB or LCV. Experiment III tested whether latent fingermarks exposed to whole blood could be processed with AB or LCV and subsequently appear as a genuine blood mark enhanced with AB or LCV. The present study found that indeed, fingermark residue alone does not react with the blood reagents AB and LCV. In Experiment II, an interaction occurred between the fingermark residue and the diluted blood that caused the ridges to appear a red color. In the present study, this interaction is called a faux blood mark. While the faux blood mark phenomenon occurred most often following exposure to diluted blood, it did not occur consistently, and a predictable pattern could not be established. However, the reaction occurred more frequently following extended fingermark residue drying times. Faux blood marks are distinguishable from genuine blood marks prior to enhancement with blood reagents. Following treatment with blood reagents, it became increasingly difficult to determine whether the enhanced mark was a genuine blood print or a latent fingermark exposed to diluted blood. Latent fingermarks exposed to whole blood often resulted in a void prior to enhancement, but following treatment with blood reagents, were difficult to distinguish from a genuine blood mark enhanced with blood reagents.

  11. A Latent Variable Approach to the Simple View of Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kershaw, Sarah; Schatschneider, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The present study utilized a latent variable modeling approach to examine the Simple View of Reading in a sample of students from 3rd, 7th, and 10th grades (N = 215, 188, and 180, respectively). Latent interaction modeling and other latent variable models were employed to investigate (a) the functional form of the relationship between decoding and…

  12. The latent cytomegalovirus decreases telomere length by microcompetition

    PubMed Central

    Javaherian, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Reduced telomere length has been associated with aging and age-related diseases. Latent infection with the Cytomegalovirus (CMV) induces telomere shortening in the infected cells. Latent CMV infection may cause reduced telomere length via GABP transcription factor deficiency, according to the Microcompetition Theory. Microcompetition and viral-induced transcription factor deficiency is important since most people harbor a latent viral infection.

  13. Bayesian Semiparametric Structural Equation Models with Latent Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Mingan; Dunson, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Structural equation models (SEMs) with latent variables are widely useful for sparse covariance structure modeling and for inferring relationships among latent variables. Bayesian SEMs are appealing in allowing for the incorporation of prior information and in providing exact posterior distributions of unknowns, including the latent variables. In…

  14. Skills Diagnosis Using IRT-Based Continuous Latent Trait Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, William

    2007-01-01

    This article summarizes the continuous latent trait IRT approach to skills diagnosis as particularized by a representative variety of continuous latent trait models using item response functions (IRFs). First, several basic IRT-based continuous latent trait approaches are presented in some detail. Then a brief summary of estimation, model…

  15. Modeling Interaction Effects in Latent Growth Curve Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Fuzhong; Duncan, Terry E.; Acock, Alan

    2000-01-01

    Presents an extension of the method of estimating interaction effects among latent variables to latent growth curve models developed by K. Joreskog and F. Yang (1996). Illustrates the procedure and discusses results in terms of practical and statistical problems associated with interaction analyses in latent curve models and structural equation…

  16. Stochastic Approximation Methods for Latent Regression Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Davier, Matthias; Sinharay, Sandip

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an application of a stochastic approximation expectation maximization (EM) algorithm using a Metropolis-Hastings (MH) sampler to estimate the parameters of an item response latent regression model. Latent regression item response models are extensions of item response theory (IRT) to a latent variable model with covariates…

  17. Using Latent Class Analysis To Set Academic Performance Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Richard S.

    The use of latent class analysis for establishing student performance standards was studied. Latent class analysis (LCA) is an established procedure for investigating the latent structure of a set of data. LCA presumes that groups, classes, or respondents differ qualitatively from one another, and that these differences account for all of the…

  18. Fingerprint Minutiae from Latent and Matching Tenprint Images

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Fingerprint Minutiae from Latent and Matching Tenprint Images (PC database for purchase)   NIST Special Database 27 contains latent fingerprints from crime scenes and their matching rolled fingerprint mates. This database can be used to develop and test new fingerprint algorithms, test commercial and research AFIS systems, train latent examiners, and promote the ANSI/NIST file format standard.

  19. A General Approach to Defining Latent Growth Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Axel; Steyer, Rolf; Mueller, Horst

    2012-01-01

    We present a 3-step approach to defining latent growth components. In the first step, a measurement model with at least 2 indicators for each time point is formulated to identify measurement error variances and obtain latent variables that are purged from measurement error. In the second step, we use contrast matrices to define the latent growth…

  20. Modeling Nonlinear Change via Latent Change and Latent Acceleration Frameworks: Examining Velocity and Acceleration of Growth Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Kevin; Zhang, Zhiyong; Hamagami, Fumiaki; Mazzocco, Michele

    2013-01-01

    We propose the use of the latent change and latent acceleration frameworks for modeling nonlinear growth in structural equation models. Moving to these frameworks allows for the direct identification of "rates of change" and "acceleration" in latent growth curves--information available indirectly through traditional growth…

  1. Two Studies of Specification Error in Models for Categorical Latent Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, David; Depaoli, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the problem of specification error in 2 models for categorical latent variables; the latent class model and the latent Markov model. Specification error in the latent class model focuses on the impact of incorrectly specifying the number of latent classes of the categorical latent variable on measures of model adequacy as…

  2. The algebraic theory of latent projectors in lambda matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denman, E. D.; Leyva-Ramos, J.; Jeon, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    Multivariable systems such as a finite-element model of vibrating structures, control systems, and large-scale systems are often formulated in terms of differential equations which give rise to lambda matrices. The present investigation is concerned with the formulation of the algebraic theory of lambda matrices and the relationship of latent roots, latent vectors, and latent projectors to the eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and eigenprojectors of the companion form. The chain rule for latent projectors and eigenprojectors for the repeated latent root or eigenvalues is given.

  3. Binding of antibodies to the extractable nuclear antigens SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La is induced on the surface of human keratinocytes by ultraviolet light (UVL): Implications for the pathogenesis of photosensitive cutaneous lupus

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, F.; Kashihara-Sawami, M.; Lyons, M.B.; Norris, D.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the non-histone nucleoprotein antigens SS-A/Ro, SS-B/La, and RNP are highly associated with photosensitive cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE). In order to better understand the potential mechanisms of ultraviolet (UV) light on photosensitivity in patients with cutaneous LE, we designed immunopathologic in vitro and in vivo experiments to evaluate the effects of UV on the binding of such autoantibodies to the surface of human keratinocytes, one major target of immunologic damage in photosensitive LE. Short-term 2% paraformaldehyde fixation of suspensions of cultured human keratinocytes previously incubated with monospecific antiserum probes enabled the detection of ENA expression on the cell surface by flow-cytometry analysis. UVB light (280-320 nm) induced the binding of monospecific antibody probes for SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La on keratinocytes in a dose-dependent pattern with maximal induction observed at the dose of 200 mJ/cm2 UVB. Binding of SS-A/Ro, SS-B/La, and RNP antibody was augmented strongly, but binding of anti-Sm was very weak. In contrast, UVA (320-400 nm) light had no effect on the induction of binding of these antibody probes. Identical results were seen by standard immunofluorescence techniques. Hydroxyurea-treated keratinocytes showed similar induction of those antigens by UVB irradiation, which suggested that ENA expression on cultured keratinocytes by UVB were cell-cycle independent. Tunicamycin, an inhibitor of glycosylation of proteins, reduced UVB light effect on the SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La antigen's expression. These in vitro FACS analyses revealed that ENA augmentation on the keratinocyte cell surface was dose dependent, UVB dependent, glycosylation dependent, and cell-cycle independent. In vivo ENA augmentation on the keratinocyte surface was examined in suction blister epidermal roofs.

  4. Blocking of potentiation of latent inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hall, Geoffrey; Rodriguez, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    We present a theory of latent inhibition based on the Pearce-Hall (Pearce & Hall, 1980) model for classical conditioning. Its central features are (1) that the associability of a stimulus declines as it comes to predict its consequences and (2) that nonreinforced exposure to a stimulus engages an associative learning process that makes the stimulus an accurate predictor of its consequences (in this case, the occurrence of no event). A formalization of this theory is shown to accommodate the finding that preexposure in compound with another cue can potentiate latent inhibition to the target cue. It further predicts that preexposure to the added cue will eliminate the potentiation effect. An experiment using rats and the flavor-aversion procedure confirmed this prediction.

  5. Epstein–Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 trans-activates miR-155 transcription through the NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gatto, Graziana; Rossi, Annalisa; Rossi, Daniela; Kroening, Sven; Bonatti, Stefano; Mallardo, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    The Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-encoded latent membrane protein-1 (LMP1), a functional homologue of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, substantially contributes to EBV's oncogenic potential by activating nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). miR-155 is an oncogenic miRNA critical for B-cell maturation and immunoglobulin production in response to antigen. We report that miR-155 expression is much higher in EBV-immortalized B cells than in EBV-negative B cells. LMP1, but not LMP2, up-regulated the expression of miR-155, when transfected in EBV-negative B cells. We analyzed two putative NF-κB binding sites in the miR-155 promoter; both sites recruited NF-κB complex, in nuclear extract from EBV-immortalized cells. The exogenous expression of LMP1, in EBV-negative background, is temporally correlated to induction of p65 with binding on both NF-κB sites and with miR-155 overexpression. The induction of p65 binding together with increased RNA polymerase II binding, confirms that LMP1-mediated activation of miR-155 occurs transcriptionally. In reporter assays, miR-155 promoter lacking NF-κB binding sites was no longer activated by LMP1 expression and an intact AP1 site is needed to attain maximum activation. Finally, we demonstrate that LMP1-mediated activation of miR-155 in an EBV-negative background correlates with reduction of protein PU.1, which is a possible miR target. PMID:18940871

  6. Fine structure of A and M antigens from Brucella biovars.

    PubMed

    Meikle, P J; Perry, M B; Cherwonogrodzky, J W; Bundle, D R

    1989-09-01

    Brucella A and M epitopes were found on single O-polysaccharide chains of all biotype strains of this species. Lipopolysaccharides from the type and reference strains of five of the six Brucella species, B. abortus, B. melitensis, B. suis, B. canis, and B. neotomae, were extracted and purified. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, in conjunction with silver staining and immunoblotting developed by monoclonal antibodies, showed bands characteristic of A, M, or mixed A and M antigens. The A antigen previously described as an exclusively alpha 1,2-linked homopolymer of 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-D-mannopyranose was shown by 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to possess a fine structure consistent with the low-frequency occurrence of alpha 1, 3-linked 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-D-mannopyranose residues. This feature was previously attributed only to the M antigen, which is also a homopolymer of the same sugar. B. melitensis biotype 3 and B. suis biotype 4 lipopolysaccharides showed characteristics of mixed A and M antigens. Immunoabsorption of these O polysaccharides on a column of immobilized A-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody enriched polymer chains with A-antigen characteristics but did not eliminate M epitopes. Composite A- and M-antigen characteristics resulted from O polysaccharides in which the frequency of alpha 1,3 linkages, and hence, M-antigen characteristics, varied. All biotypes assigned as A+ M- expressed one or two alpha 1,3-linked residues per polysaccharide O chain. M antigens (M+ A-) also possessed a unique M epitope as well as a tetrasaccharide determinant common to A-antigen structures. B. canis and B. abortus 45/20, both rough strains, expressed low-molecular-weight A antigen.

  7. Diagnostic Antigens of Leishmania.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-31

    braziliensis (MHOM/BR/75/M2903), L. chagasi (MJOM/BR/82/BA-2,C 1), L. donovani (MHOMiEt/67iHU3), Leishmania guyanensis (MIHOMJBR/75/M4147), L. infantum (IPT-1...comparative test to a variety of other recombinant Leishmania antigens including L. chagasi hsp70, L. braziliensis hsp83/90, L. braziliensis eIF4A, L...34 4. AD CONTRACT NO: DAMD17-92-C-2082 EC•£ 2 j 994 ’i, L TITLE: DIAGNOSTIC ANTIGENS OF LEISHMANIA L PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven G. Reed, Ph.D

  8. The latent class multitrait-multimethod model.

    PubMed

    Oberski, Daniel L; Hagenaars, Jacques A P; Saris, Willem E

    2015-12-01

    A latent class multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) model is proposed to estimate random and systematic measurement error in categorical survey questions while making fewer assumptions than have been made so far in such evaluations, allowing for possible extreme response behavior and other nonmonotone effects. The method is a combination of the MTMM research design of Campbell and Fiske (1959), the basic response model for survey questions of Saris and Andrews (1991), and the latent class factor model of Vermunt and Magidson (2004, pp. 227-230). The latent class MTMM model thus combines an existing design, model, and method to allow for the estimation of the degree to and manner in which survey questions are affected by systematic measurement error. Starting from a general form of the response function for a survey question, we present the MTMM experimental approach to identification of the response function's parameters. A "trait-method biplot" is introduced as a means of interpreting the estimates of systematic measurement error, whereas the quality of the questions can be evaluated by item information curves and the item information function. An experiment from the European Social Survey is analyzed and the results are discussed, yielding valuable insights into the functioning of a set of example questions on the role of women in society in 2 countries.

  9. Latent common genetic components of obesity traits

    PubMed Central

    Harders, R; Luke, A; Zhu, X; Cooper, RS

    2008-01-01

    Background Obesity is rapidly becoming a global epidemic. Unlike many complex human diseases, obesity is defined not just by a single trait or phenotype, but jointly by measures of anthropometry and metabolic status. Methods We applied maximum likelihood factor analysis to identify common latent factors underlying observed covariance in multiple obesity-related measures. Both the genetic components and the mode of inheritance of the common factors were evaluated. A total of 1775 participants from 590 families for whom measures on obesity-related traits were available were included in this study. Results The average age of participants was 37 years, 39% of the participants were obese (body mass index ≥ 30.0 kg/m2) and 26% were overweight (body mass index 25.0 - 29.9 kg/m2). Two latent common factors jointly accounting for over 99% of the correlations among obesity-related traits were identified. Complex segregation analysis of the age and sex-adjusted latent factors provide evidence for a Mendelian mode of inheritance of major genetic effect with heritability estimates of 40.4% and 47.5% for the first and second factors, respectively. Conclusions These findings provide a support for multivariate-based approach for investigating pleiotropic effects on obesity-related traits which can be applied in both genetic linkage and association mapping. PMID:18936762

  10. Factors associated with latent fingerprint exclusion determinations.

    PubMed

    Ulery, Bradford T; Hicklin, R Austin; Roberts, Maria Antonia; Buscaglia, JoAnn

    2017-02-22

    Exclusion is the determination by a latent print examiner that two friction ridge impressions did not originate from the same source. The concept and terminology of exclusion vary among agencies. Much of the literature on latent print examination focuses on individualization, and much less attention has been paid to exclusion. This experimental study assesses the associations between a variety of factors and exclusion determinations. Although erroneous exclusions are more likely to occur on some images and for some examiners, they were widely distributed among images and examiners. Measurable factors found to be associated with exclusion rates include the quality of the latent, value determinations, analysis minutia count, comparison difficulty, and the presence of cores or deltas. An understanding of these associations will help explain the circumstances under which errors are more likely to occur and when determinations are less likely to be reproduced by other examiners; the results should also lead to improved effectiveness and efficiency of training and casework quality assurance. This research is intended to assist examiners in improving the examination process and provide information to the broader community regarding the accuracy, reliability, and implications of exclusion decisions.

  11. Hetero-organic thymus antigens.

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, L V; Gnezditskaya, E V

    1985-01-01

    The use of sera containing antibodies to tissue-specific antigens of highly specialized organs (skeletal muscles, heart, skin, excretory glands) enabled us to detect, by immunofluorescence, cells capable of synthesizing analogous antigens (i.e. hetero-organic thymus antigens) in human and animal thymus. Detection of hetero-organic antigens in the thymus is the basis for the hypothesis that natural immunological tolerance to tissue self antigens is formed within the thymus in the course of T-lymphocyte maturation, with thymus antigens taking part in the process.

  12. The impact of HLA class I and EBV latency-II antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells on the pathogenesis of EBV(+) Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jones, K; Wockner, L; Brennan, R M; Keane, C; Chattopadhyay, P K; Roederer, M; Price, D A; Cole, D K; Hassan, B; Beck, K; Gottlieb, D; Ritchie, D S; Seymour, J F; Vari, F; Crooks, P; Burrows, S R; Gandhi, M K

    2016-02-01

    In 40% of cases of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latency-II antigens [EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)/latent membrane protein (LMP)1/LMP2A] are present (EBV(+) cHL) in the malignant cells and antigen presentation is intact. Previous studies have shown consistently that HLA-A*02 is protective in EBV(+) cHL, yet its role in disease pathogenesis is unknown. To explore the basis for this observation, gene expression was assessed in 33 cHL nodes. Interestingly, CD8 and LMP2A expression were correlated strongly and, for a given LMP2A level, CD8 was elevated markedly in HLA-A*02(-) versus HLA-A*02(+) EBV(+) cHL patients, suggesting that LMP2A-specific CD8(+) T cell anti-tumoral immunity may be relatively ineffective in HLA-A*02(-) EBV(+) cHL. To ascertain the impact of HLA class I on EBV latency antigen-specific immunodominance, we used a stepwise functional T cell approach. In newly diagnosed EBV(+) cHL, the magnitude of ex-vivo LMP1/2A-specific CD8(+) T cell responses was elevated in HLA-A*02(+) patients. Furthermore, in a controlled in-vitro assay, LMP2A-specific CD8(+) T cells from healthy HLA-A*02 heterozygotes expanded to a greater extent with HLA-A*02-restricted compared to non-HLA-A*02-restricted cell lines. In an extensive analysis of HLA class I-restricted immunity, immunodominant EBNA3A/3B/3C-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were stimulated by numerous HLA class I molecules, whereas the subdominant LMP1/2A-specific responses were confined largely to HLA-A*02. Our results demonstrate that HLA-A*02 mediates a modest, but none the less stronger, EBV-specific CD8(+) T cell response than non-HLA-A*02 alleles, an effect confined to EBV latency-II antigens. Thus, the protective effect of HLA-A*02 against EBV(+) cHL is not a surrogate association, but reflects the impact of HLA class I on EBV latency-II antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell hierarchies.

  13. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissues or other specimens, using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular m...

  14. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells.

  15. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissue using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular methodology is chosen ...

  16. Comparison of interferon-γ-, interleukin (IL)-17- and IL-22-expressing CD4 T cells, IL-22-expressing granulocytes and proinflammatory cytokines during latent and active tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Cowan, J; Pandey, S; Filion, L G; Angel, J B; Kumar, A; Cameron, D W

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the role and expression of T helper type 17 (Th17) cells and Th17 cytokines in human tuberculosis. We show that the basal proportion of interferon (IFN)-γ-, interleukin (IL)-17- and IL-22-expressing CD4(+) T cells and IL-22-expressing granulocytes in peripheral blood were significantly lower in latently infected healthy individuals and active tuberculosis patients compared to healthy controls. In contrast, CD4(+) T cells expressing IL-17, IL-22 and IFN-γ were increased significantly following mycobacterial antigens stimulation in both latent and actively infected patients. Interestingly, proinflammatory IFN-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α were increased following antigen stimulation in latent infection. Similarly, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-8, IL-22 and TNF-α were increased in the serum of latently infected individuals, whereas IL-6 and TNF-α were increased significantly in actively infected patients. Overall, we observed differential induction of IL-17-, IL-22- and IFN-γ-expressing CD4(+) T cells, IL-22-expressing granulocytes and proinflammatory cytokines in circulation and following antigenic stimulation in latent and active tuberculosis.

  17. Identification of novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis CD4 T-cell antigens via high throughput proteome screening

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Kaustuv; Jing, Lichen; Russell, Ronnie M.; Davies, D. Huw; Hermanson, Gary; Molina, Douglas M.; Liang, Xiaowu; Sherman, David R.; Kwok, William W.; Yang, Junbao; Kenneth, John; Ahamed, Syed F.; Chandele, Anmol; Kaja, Murali-Krishna; Koelle, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Elicitation of CD4 IFN-gamma T cell responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a rational vaccine strategy to prevent clinical tuberculosis. Diagnosis of MTB infection is based on T-cell immune memory to MTB antigens. The MTB proteome contains over four thousand open reading frames (ORFs). We conducted a pilot antigen identification study using 164 MTB proteins and MTB-specific T-cells expanded in vitro from 12 persons with latent MTB infection. Enrichment of MTB-reactive T-cells from PBMC used cell sorting or an alternate system compatible with limited resources. MTB proteins were used as single antigens or combinatorial matrices in proliferation and cytokine secretion readouts. Overall, our study found that 44 MTB proteins were antigenic, including 27 not previously characterized as CD4 T-cell antigens. Antigen truncation, peptide, NTM homology, and HLA class II tetramer studies confirmed malate synthase G (encoded by gene Rv1837) as a CD4 T-cell antigen. This simple, scalable system has potential utility for the identification of candidate MTB vaccine and biomarker antigens. PMID:25857935

  18. Ranunculus latent virus: a strain of artichoke latent virus or a new macluravirus infecting artichoke?

    PubMed

    Ciuffo, M; Testa, M; Lenzi, R; Turina, M

    2011-06-01

    An elongated virus was isolated from artichoke crops in Liguria, and a 700-bp fragment was amplified by RT-PCR using oligonucleotides to detect members of the family Potyviridae. Comparison of fragment sequences showed 98% identity at the nucleotide level with the ranunculus isolate of the macluravirus Ranunculus latent virus (RaLV). RaLV was then detected by DAS-ELISA in symptomatic and asymptomatic artichoke plants from Liguria, Sardinia and Latium. The sequence of a 5.5-kb region was assembled from a cDNA library, and a 500-bp NIa fragment showed 80% identity to Artichoke latent virus.

  19. Latent Viruses: A Space Travel Hazard??

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, P. D.; Peng, R. S.; Pierson, D.; Lednicky, J.; Butel, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    A major issue associated with long-duration space flight is the possibility of infectious disease causing an unacceptable medical risk to crew members. Our proposal is designed to gain information that addresses several issues outlined in the Immunology/Infectious disease critical path. The major hypothesis addressed is that space flight causes alterations in the immune system that may allow latent viruses which are endogenous in the human population to reactivate and shed to higher levels than normal which can affect the health of crew members during a long term space-flight mission. We will initially focus our studies on the human herpesviruses and human polyomaviruses which are important pathogens known to establish latent infections in the human population. Both primary infection and reactivation from latent infection with this group of viruses can cause a variety of illnesses that result in morbidity and occasionally mortality of infected individuals. Effective vaccines exist for only one of the eight known human herpesviruses and the vaccine itself can still reactivate from latent infection. Available antivirals are of limited use and are effective against only a few of the human herpesviruses. Although most individuals display little if any clinical consequences from latent infection, events which alter immune function such as immunosuppressive therapy following solid organ transplantation are known to increase the risk of developing complications as a result of latent virus reactivation. This proposal will measure both the frequency and magnitude of viral shedding and genome loads in the blood from humans participating in activities that serve as ground based models of space flight conditions. Our initial goal is to develop sensitive quantitative competitive PCR- based assays (QC-PCR) to detect the herpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and the polyomaviruses SV40, BKV, and JCV. Using these assays we will establish baseline patterns of viral genome load in

  20. Targeting the latent reservoir to achieve functional HIV cure

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Daniele C.; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2016-01-01

    While highly active anti-retroviral therapy has greatly improved the lives of HIV-infected individuals, current treatments are unable to completely eradicate the virus. This is due to the presence of HIV latently infected cells which harbor transcriptionally silent HIV. Latent HIV does not replicate or produce viral proteins, thereby preventing efficient targeting by anti-retroviral drugs. Strategies to target the HIV latent reservoir include viral reactivation, enhancing host defense mechanisms, keeping latent HIV silent, and using gene therapy techniques to knock out or reactivate latent HIV. While research into each of these areas has yielded promising results, currently no one mechanism eradicates latent HIV. Instead, combinations of these approaches should be considered for a potential HIV functional cure. PMID:27303638

  1. On updating problems in latent semantic indexing

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, H.D.; Zha, H.

    1997-11-01

    The authors develop new SVD-updating algorithms for three types of updating problems arising from Latent Semantic Indexing (LSI) for information retrieval to deal with rapidly changing text document collections. They also provide theoretical justification for using a reduced-dimension representation of the original document collection in the updating process. Numerical experiments using several standard text document collections show that the new algorithms give higher (interpolated) average precisions than the existing algorithms and the retrieval accuracy is comparable to that obtained using the complete document collection.

  2. On updating problems in latent semantic indexing

    SciTech Connect

    Zha, H.; Simon, H.D.

    1999-10-01

    The authors develop new SVD-updating algorithms for three types of updating problems arising from latent semantic indexing (LSI) for information retrieval to deal with rapidly changing text document collections. They also provide theoretical justification for using a reduced-dimension representation of the original document collection in the updating process. Numerical experiments using several standard text document collections show that the new algorithms give higher (interpolated) average precisions that the existing algorithms, and the retrieval accuracy is comparable to that obtained using the complete document collection.

  3. Impaired Cytokine Responses to Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients.

    PubMed

    Draborg, Anette Holck; Sandhu, Noreen; Larsen, Nanna; Lisander Larsen, Janni; Jacobsen, Søren; Houen, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed cytokine responses against latent and lytic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and healthy controls (HCs) to obtain an overview of the distinctive immune regulatory response in SLE patients and to expand the previously determined impaired EBV-directed T-cell response. The concentrations of 14 cytokines (IL2, IL4, IL5, IL6, IL10, IL12, IL17, IL18, IL1β, IFNγ, TNFα, TNFβ, TGFβ, and GM-CSF) were quantified upon stimulation of whole blood with latent state antigen EBNA1, lytic cycle antigen EBV-EA/D, and the superantigen SEB. To avoid results affected by lack of lymphocytes, we focused on SLE patients with normal levels. Decreased induction of IL12, IFNγ, IL17, and IL6 upon EBNA1 stimulation and that of IFNγ, IL6, TNFβ, IL1β, and GM-CSF upon EBV-EA/D stimulation were detected in SLE patients compared to HCs. IFNγ responses, especially, were shown to be reduced. Induction of several cytokines was furthermore impaired in SLE patients upon SEB stimulation, but no difference was observed in basic levels. Results substantiate the previously proposed impaired regulation of the immune response against latent and lytic cycle EBV infection in SLE patients without lymphopenia. Furthermore, results indicate general dysfunction of leukocytes and their cytokine regulations in SLE patients.

  4. Dimensionality of the Latent Structure and Item Selection via Latent Class Multidimensional IRT Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartolucci, F.; Montanari, G. E.; Pandolfi, S.

    2012-01-01

    With reference to a questionnaire aimed at assessing the performance of Italian nursing homes on the basis of the health conditions of their patients, we investigate two relevant issues: dimensionality of the latent structure and discriminating power of the items composing the questionnaire. The approach is based on a multidimensional item…

  5. Bayesian Analysis of Multivariate Latent Curve Models with Nonlinear Longitudinal Latent Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Xin-Yuan; Lee, Sik-Yum; Hser, Yih-Ing

    2009-01-01

    In longitudinal studies, investigators often measure multiple variables at multiple time points and are interested in investigating individual differences in patterns of change on those variables. Furthermore, in behavioral, social, psychological, and medical research, investigators often deal with latent variables that cannot be observed directly…

  6. Determination of the Latent Heats and Triple Point of Perfluorocyclobutane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, A. G.; Strachan, A. N.

    1977-01-01

    Proposes the use of Perfluorocyclobutane in physical chemistry courses to conduct experiments on latent heat, triple point temperatures and pressures, boiling points, and entropy of vaporization. (SL)

  7. Power generation by exchange of latent heats of phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, S.; Levenson, W.L.

    1981-08-11

    A power system is provided that uses the latent heat of fusion of water to raise the potential energy of a working fluid to a level that upon release generates power, preferably electrical power. The system is self-sustaining except for the energy that is supplied in water entering the system. The inlet water can be at any temperature within its liquid range under atmospheric or super atmospheric pressure, can advantageously contain the sensible waste heat typical of effluent from fossil fuel or nuclear power plants, can be relatively pure or be contaminated as with sewage or be the medium of a colloidal suspension, or consist of marine or other saline waters. In every case, purification of the water by freezing, for example, desalination, is accomplished without additional power consumption. A selected working fluid that boils at a temperature substantially below the freezing point of water is brought in the liquid state into contact with the water or other aqueous medium, causing the water to freeze and the working fluid to vaporize under pressure; the produced ice is removed; a portion of the so-produced ice is admixed with a eutectic forming salt to create a cooling medium at a temperature below the condensation temperature of the cooling fluid; the working-fluid vapors are preferably superheated by inlet aqueous medium and are released from autogenic elevated pressure to drive a turbine. Working fluid vapors are condensed by said cooling medium and returned by pumping into contact with inlet aqueous medium.

  8. The ongoing challenge of latent tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Esmail, H.; Barry, C. E.; Young, D. B.; Wilkinson, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    The global health community has set itself the task of eliminating tuberculosis (TB) as a public health problem by 2050. Although progress has been made in global TB control, the current decline in incidence of 2% yr−1 is far from the rate needed to achieve this. If we are to succeed in this endeavour, new strategies to reduce the reservoir of latently infected persons (from which new cases arise) would be advantageous. However, ascertainment of the extent and risk posed by this group is poor. The current diagnostics tests (tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assays) poorly predict who will develop active disease and the therapeutic options available are not optimal for the scale of the intervention that may be required. In this article, we outline a basis for our current understanding of latent TB and highlight areas where innovation leading to development of novel diagnostic tests, drug regimens and vaccines may assist progress. We argue that the pool of individuals at high risk of progression may be significantly smaller than the 2.33 billion thought to be immune sensitized by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and that identifying and targeting this group will be an important strategy in the road to elimination. PMID:24821923

  9. Latent TGF-[beta] structure and activation

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Minlong; Zhu, Jianghai; Wang, Rui; Chen, Xing; Mi, Lizhi; Walz, Thomas; Springer, Timothy A.

    2011-09-16

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta} is stored in the extracellular matrix as a latent complex with its prodomain. Activation of TGF-{beta}1 requires the binding of {alpha}v integrin to an RGD sequence in the prodomain and exertion of force on this domain, which is held in the extracellular matrix by latent TGF-{beta} binding proteins. Crystals of dimeric porcine proTGF-{beta}1 reveal a ring-shaped complex, a novel fold for the prodomain, and show how the prodomain shields the growth factor from recognition by receptors and alters its conformation. Complex formation between {alpha}v{beta}6 integrin and the prodomain is insufficient for TGF-{beta}1 release. Force-dependent activation requires unfastening of a 'straitjacket' that encircles each growth-factor monomer at a position that can be locked by a disulphide bond. Sequences of all 33 TGF-{beta} family members indicate a similar prodomain fold. The structure provides insights into the regulation of a family of growth and differentiation factors of fundamental importance in morphogenesis and homeostasis.

  10. Nonparametric Bayes Stochastically Ordered Latent Class Models

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongxia; O’Brien, Sean; Dunson, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Latent class models (LCMs) are used increasingly for addressing a broad variety of problems, including sparse modeling of multivariate and longitudinal data, model-based clustering, and flexible inferences on predictor effects. Typical frequentist LCMs require estimation of a single finite number of classes, which does not increase with the sample size, and have a well-known sensitivity to parametric assumptions on the distributions within a class. Bayesian nonparametric methods have been developed to allow an infinite number of classes in the general population, with the number represented in a sample increasing with sample size. In this article, we propose a new nonparametric Bayes model that allows predictors to flexibly impact the allocation to latent classes, while limiting sensitivity to parametric assumptions by allowing class-specific distributions to be unknown subject to a stochastic ordering constraint. An efficient MCMC algorithm is developed for posterior computation. The methods are validated using simulation studies and applied to the problem of ranking medical procedures in terms of the distribution of patient morbidity. PMID:22505787

  11. A Framework for Reproducible Latent Fingerprint Enhancements.

    PubMed

    Carasso, Alfred S

    2014-01-01

    Photoshop processing of latent fingerprints is the preferred methodology among law enforcement forensic experts, but that appproach is not fully reproducible and may lead to questionable enhancements. Alternative, independent, fully reproducible enhancements, using IDL Histogram Equalization and IDL Adaptive Histogram Equalization, can produce better-defined ridge structures, along with considerable background information. Applying a systematic slow motion smoothing procedure to such IDL enhancements, based on the rapid FFT solution of a Lévy stable fractional diffusion equation, can attenuate background detail while preserving ridge information. The resulting smoothed latent print enhancements are comparable to, but distinct from, forensic Photoshop images suitable for input into automated fingerprint identification systems, (AFIS). In addition, this progressive smoothing procedure can be reexamined by displaying the suite of progressively smoother IDL images. That suite can be stored, providing an audit trail that allows monitoring for possible loss of useful information, in transit to the user-selected optimal image. Such independent and fully reproducible enhancements provide a valuable frame of reference that may be helpful in informing, complementing, and possibly validating the forensic Photoshop methodology.

  12. Representing Documents via Latent Keyphrase Inference

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jialu; Ren, Xiang; Shang, Jingbo; Cassidy, Taylor; Voss, Clare R.; Han, Jiawei

    2017-01-01

    Many text mining approaches adopt bag-of-words or n-grams models to represent documents. Looking beyond just the words, i.e., the explicit surface forms, in a document can improve a computer’s understanding of text. Being aware of this, researchers have proposed concept-based models that rely on a human-curated knowledge base to incorporate other related concepts in the document representation. But these methods are not desirable when applied to vertical domains (e.g., literature, enterprise, etc.) due to low coverage of in-domain concepts in the general knowledge base and interference from out-of-domain concepts. In this paper, we propose a data-driven model named Latent Keyphrase Inference (LAKI) that represents documents with a vector of closely related domain keyphrases instead of single words or existing concepts in the knowledge base. We show that given a corpus of in-domain documents, topical content units can be learned for each domain keyphrase, which enables a computer to do smart inference to discover latent document keyphrases, going beyond just explicit mentions. Compared with the state-of-art document representation approaches, LAKI fills the gap between bag-of-words and concept-based models by using domain keyphrases as the basic representation unit. It removes dependency on a knowledge base while providing, with keyphrases, readily interpretable representations. When evaluated against 8 other methods on two text mining tasks over two corpora, LAKI outperformed all. PMID:28229132

  13. Mitochondrial genetic effects on latent class variables associated with susceptibility to alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Lease, Loren R; Winnier, Deidre A; Williams, Jeff T; Dyer, Thomas D; Almasy, Laura; Mahaney, Michael C

    2005-12-30

    We report the results of statistical genetic analyses of data from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism prepared for the Genetic Analysis Workshop 14 to detect and characterize maternally inherited mitochondrial genetic effects on variation in latent class psychiatric/behavioral variables employed in the diagnosis of alcoholism. Using published extensions to variance decomposition methods for statistical genetic analysis of continuous and discrete traits we: 1) estimated the proportion of the variance in each trait due to the effects of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), 2) tested for pleiotropy, both mitochondrial genetic and residual additive genetic, between trait pairs, and 3) evaluated whether the simultaneous estimation of mitochondrial genetic effects on these traits improves our ability to detect and localize quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the nuclear genome. After correction for multiple testing, we find significant (p < 0.009) mitochondrial genetic contributions to the variance for two latent class variables. Although we do detect significant residual additive genetic correlations between the two traits, there is no evidence of a residual mitochondrial genetic correlation between them. Evidence for autosomal QTL for these traits is improved when linkage screens are conditioned on significant mitochondrial genetic effects. We conclude that mitochondrial genes may contribute to variation in some latent class psychiatric/behavioral variables associated with alcoholism.

  14. Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of STAT6 Is Induced by Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus for Viral Latency

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liming; Li, Yuhong; Feng, Yanling; Xu, Jianqing; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Zhenghong; Robertson, Erle S.; Cai, Qiliang

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence implies that STAT6 plays an important role in both the adaptive and innate immune responses to virus infection. Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic γ-herpesvirus agent associated with several human malignancies, including Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphomas (PELs). Previously, we demonstrated that KSHV blocks IL-4-induced STAT6 phosphorylation and retains a basal IL-13/STAT6 constitutive activation for cell survival and proliferation. However, the mechanism by which KSHV regulates STAT6 remains largely unknown. Here, we found that KSHV-encoded LANA interacts with STAT6 and promotes nuclear localization of STAT6 independent of the tyrosine 641-phosphorylation state. Moreover, nuclear localization of STAT6 is also dramatically increased in KS tissue. The latent antigen LANA induces serine protease-mediated cleavage of STAT6 in the nucleus, where the cleaved STAT6 lacking transactivation domain functions as a dominant-negative regulator to repress transcription of Replication and Transcription Activator (RTA) and in turn shut off viral lytic replication. Blockade of STAT6 by small interference RNA dramatically enhances expression of RTA, and in turn reduces KSHV-infected endothelial cell growth and colony formation. Taken together, these results suggest that nuclear localization and cleavage of STAT6 is important for modulating the viral latency and pathogenesis of KSHV. PMID:28099521

  15. Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of STAT6 Is Induced by Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus for Viral Latency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Zhu, Caixia; Wei, Fang; Gao, Shujun; Zhang, Liming; Li, Yuhong; Feng, Yanling; Tong, Yin; Xu, Jianqing; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Zhenghong; Robertson, Erle S; Cai, Qiliang

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence implies that STAT6 plays an important role in both the adaptive and innate immune responses to virus infection. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic γ-herpesvirus agent associated with several human malignancies, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphomas (PELs). Previously, we demonstrated that KSHV blocks IL-4-induced STAT6 phosphorylation and retains a basal IL-13/STAT6 constitutive activation for cell survival and proliferation. However, the mechanism by which KSHV regulates STAT6 remains largely unknown. Here, we found that KSHV-encoded LANA interacts with STAT6 and promotes nuclear localization of STAT6 independent of the tyrosine 641-phosphorylation state. Moreover, nuclear localization of STAT6 is also dramatically increased in KS tissue. The latent antigen LANA induces serine protease-mediated cleavage of STAT6 in the nucleus, where the cleaved STAT6 lacking transactivation domain functions as a dominant-negative regulator to repress transcription of Replication and Transcription Activator (RTA) and in turn shut off viral lytic replication. Blockade of STAT6 by small interference RNA dramatically enhances expression of RTA, and in turn reduces KSHV-infected endothelial cell growth and colony formation. Taken together, these results suggest that nuclear localization and cleavage of STAT6 is important for modulating the viral latency and pathogenesis of KSHV.

  16. Modulation of MicroRNA Cluster miR-183-96-182 Expression by Epstein-Barr Virus Latent Membrane Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Oussaief, Lassad; Fendri, Ali; Chane-Woon-Ming, Béatrice; Poirey, Remy; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Joab, Irène

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic human herpesvirus involved in the pathogenesis of Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) and various other lymphoproliferative disorders. In BL, EBV protein expression is restricted to EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1), but small noncoding RNAs such as EBV-encoded small RNAs (EBERs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) can also be detected. miRNAs play major roles in crucial processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and cell death. It has recently become clear that alterations in the expression profile of miRNAs contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of malignancies. During latent infection, EBV expresses 25 viral pre-miRNAs and modulates the expression of specific cellular miRNAs, such as miR-155 and miR-146, which potentially play a role in oncogenesis. Here, we established the small-RNA expression profiles of three BL cell lines. Using large-scale sequencing coupled to Northern blotting and real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analysis validation, we demonstrated the differential expression of some cellular and viral miRNAs. High-level expression of the miR-183-96-182 cluster and EBV miR-BamHI A rightward transcript (miR-BART) cluster was significantly associated with EBV type I latency. This expression was not affected by viral reactivation since transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) stimulation did not significantly change the miRNA profiles. However, using several approaches, including de novo infection with a mutant virus, we present evidence that the expression of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) triggered downregulation of the expression of the miR-183-96-182 cluster. We further show that this effect involves the Akt signaling pathway. IMPORTANCE In addition to expressing their own miRNAs, herpesviruses also impact the expression levels of cellular miRNAs. This regulation can be either positive or negative and usually results in the perturbation of pathways to create a cellular environment that is more

  17. Higher-Order Item Response Models for Hierarchical Latent Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Hung-Yu; Wang, Wen-Chung; Chen, Po-Hsi; Su, Chi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Many latent traits in the human sciences have a hierarchical structure. This study aimed to develop a new class of higher order item response theory models for hierarchical latent traits that are flexible in accommodating both dichotomous and polytomous items, to estimate both item and person parameters jointly, to allow users to specify…

  18. Developments in Latent Trait Theory: Models, Technical Issues, and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Hambleton, Ronald K.

    1978-01-01

    Topics concerning latent trait theory are addressed: (1) dimensionality of latent space, local independence, and item characteristic curves; (2) models--equations, parameter estimation, testing assumptions, and goodness of fit, (3) applications test developments, item bias, tailored testing and equating; and (4) advantages over classical…

  19. Gene Variants Associated with Antisocial Behaviour: A Latent Variable Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Mary Jane; Lin, Haiqun; Fernandez, Thomas V.; Lee, Maria; Yrigollen, Carolyn M.; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Katsovich, Liliya; Olds, David L.; Grigorenko, Elena L.; Leckman, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine if a latent variable approach might be useful in identifying shared variance across genetic risk alleles that is associated with antisocial behaviour at age 15 years. Methods: Using a conventional latent variable approach, we derived an antisocial phenotype in 328 adolescents utilizing data from a…

  20. Locally Dependent Latent Trait Model and the Dutch Identity Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ip, Edward H.

    2002-01-01

    Proposes a class of locally dependent latent trait models for responses to psychological and educational tests. Focuses on models based on a family of conditional distributions, or kernel, that describes joint multiple item responses as a function of student latent trait, not assuming conditional independence. Also proposes an EM algorithm for…

  1. A Review of the Latent and Manifest Benefits (LAMB) Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Juanita; Waters, Lea

    2012-01-01

    The latent and manifest benefits (LAMB) scale (Muller, Creed, Waters & Machin, 2005) was designed to measure the latent and manifest benefits of employment and provide a single scale to test Jahoda's (1981) and Fryer's (1986) theories of unemployment. Since its publication in 2005 there have been 13 studies that have used the scale with 5692…

  2. The Least-Squares Estimation of Latent Trait Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatsuoka, Kikumi

    This paper presents a new method for estimating a given latent trait variable by the least-squares approach. The beta weights are obtained recursively with the help of Fourier series and expressed as functions of item parameters of response curves. The values of the latent trait variable estimated by this method and by maximum likelihood method…

  3. A Latent Class Approach to Estimating Test-Score Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Ark, L. Andries; van der Palm, Daniel W.; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a general framework for single-administration reliability methods, such as Cronbach's alpha, Guttman's lambda-2, and method MS. This general framework was used to derive a new approach to estimating test-score reliability by means of the unrestricted latent class model. This new approach is the latent class reliability…

  4. Use of Latent Profile Analysis in Studies of Gifted Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mammadov, Sakhavat; Ward, Thomas J.; Cross, Jennifer Riedl; Cross, Tracy L.

    2016-01-01

    To date, in gifted education and related fields various conventional factor analytic and clustering techniques have been used extensively for investigation of the underlying structure of data. Latent profile analysis is a relatively new method in the field. In this article, we provide an introduction to latent profile analysis for gifted education…

  5. A Bayesian Semiparametric Latent Variable Model for Mixed Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahrmeir, Ludwig; Raach, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a latent variable model (LVM) for mixed ordinal and continuous responses, where covariate effects on the continuous latent variables are modelled through a flexible semiparametric Gaussian regression model. We extend existing LVMs with the usual linear covariate effects by including nonparametric components for nonlinear…

  6. Spurious Latent Classes in the Mixture Rasch Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexeev, Natalia; Templin, Jonathan; Cohen, Allan S.

    2011-01-01

    Mixture Rasch models have been used to study a number of psychometric issues such as goodness of fit, response strategy differences, strategy shifts, and multidimensionality. Although these models offer the potential for improving understanding of the latent variables being measured, under some conditions overextraction of latent classes may…

  7. A Simplified Estimation of Latent State--Trait Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagemann, Dirk; Meyerhoff, David

    2008-01-01

    The latent state-trait (LST) theory is an extension of the classical test theory that allows one to decompose a test score into a true trait, a true state residual, and an error component. For practical applications, the variances of these latent variables may be estimated with standard methods of structural equation modeling (SEM). These…

  8. The Impact of Noninvariant Intercepts in Latent Means Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Tiffany A.

    2013-01-01

    Latent means methods such as multiple-indicator multiple-cause (MIMIC) and structured means modeling (SMM) allow researchers to determine whether or not a significant difference exists between groups' factor means. Strong invariance is typically recommended when interpreting latent mean differences. The extent of the impact of noninvariant…

  9. Latent Structure of Motor Abilities in Pre-School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vatroslav, Horvat

    2011-01-01

    The theoretical and practical knowledge which have so far been acquired through work with pre-school children pointed to the conclusion that the structures of the latent dimensions of the motor abilities differ greatly from such a structure, in pre-school children and adults alike. Establishing the latent structure of the motor abilities in…

  10. An Importance Sampling EM Algorithm for Latent Regression Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Davier, Matthias; Sinharay, Sandip

    2007-01-01

    Reporting methods used in large-scale assessments such as the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) rely on latent regression models. To fit the latent regression model using the maximum likelihood estimation technique, multivariate integrals must be evaluated. In the computer program MGROUP used by the Educational Testing Service for…

  11. PROC LCA: A SAS Procedure for Latent Class Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanza, Stephanie T.; Collins, Linda M.; Lemmon, David R.; Schafer, Joseph L.

    2007-01-01

    Latent class analysis (LCA) is a statistical method used to identify a set of discrete, mutually exclusive latent classes of individuals based on their responses to a set of observed categorical variables. In multiple-group LCA, both the measurement part and structural part of the model can vary across groups, and measurement invariance across…

  12. Conducting Confirmatory Latent Class Analysis Using M"plus"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, W. Holmes; Bronk, Kendall Cotton

    2011-01-01

    Latent class analysis (LCA) is an increasingly popular tool that researchers can use to identify latent groups in the population underlying a sample of responses to categorical observed variables. LCA is most commonly used in an exploratory fashion whereby no parameters are specified a priori. Although this exploratory approach is reasonable when…

  13. Nonlinear and Quasi-Simplex Patterns in Latent Growth Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianconcini, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    In the SEM literature, simplex and latent growth models have always been considered competing approaches for the analysis of longitudinal data, even if they are strongly connected and both of specific importance. General dynamic models, which simultaneously estimate autoregressive structures and latent curves, have been recently proposed in the…

  14. The Latent Variable Approach as Applied to Transitive Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouwmeester, Samantha; Vermunt, Jeroen K.; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the limitations of hypothesis testing using (quasi-) experiments in the study of cognitive development and suggest latent variable modeling as a viable alternative to experimentation. Latent variable models allow testing a theory as a whole, incorporating individual differences with respect to developmental processes or abilities in the…

  15. Transforming Selected Concepts into Dimensions in Latent Semantic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmos, Ricardo; Jorge-Botana, Guillermo; León, José Antonio; Escudero, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a new approach for transforming the latent representation derived from a Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) space into one where dimensions have nonlatent meanings. These meanings are based on lexical descriptors, which are selected by the LSA user. The authors present three analyses that provide examples of the utility of this…

  16. Interaction of Adenovirus E1A with the HHV8 Promoter of Latent Genes: E1A Proteins are Able to Activate the HHV-8 LANAp in MV3 Reporter Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koehler-Hansner, Karin; Flore, Ornella; Opalka, Bertram; Hengge, Ulrich R

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is associated with Kaposi’s sarcoma, body cavity-based lymphoma, and Castleman’s disease. Adenoviral (Ad) E1A proteins regulate the activity of cellular and viral promoters/enhancers and transcription factors and can suppress tumorigenicity of human cancers. As (i) HHV-8 and Ad may co-exist in immunocompromised patients and (ii) E1A might be considered as therapeutic transgene for HHV-8-associated neoplasms we investigated whether the promoter of the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANAp) controlling expression of vCyclin, vFLIP, and LANA proteins required for latent type infection is regulated by E1A. Transfection experiments in MV3 melanoma cells revealed activation of the LANAp by Ad5 E1A constructs containing an intact N terminus (aa 1-119). In particular, an Ad12 E1A mutant, Spm2, lacking six consecutive alanine residues in the “spacer” region activated the HHV-8 promoter about 15-fold compared to vector controls. In summary, we report the activation of the LANAp by E1A as a novel interaction of E1A with a viral promoter. These data may have relevance for the management of viral infections in immunocompromised patients. A role for E1A as a therapeutic in this context remains to be defined. PMID:19440465

  17. Interaction of Adenovirus E1A with the HHV8 Promoter of Latent Genes: E1A Proteins are Able to Activate the HHV-8 LANAp in MV3 Reporter Cells.

    PubMed

    Koehler-Hansner, Karin; Flore, Ornella; Opalka, Bertram; Hengge, Ulrich R

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, body cavity-based lymphoma, and Castleman's disease. Adenoviral (Ad) E1A proteins regulate the activity of cellular and viral promoters/enhancers and transcription factors and can suppress tumorigenicity of human cancers. As (i) HHV-8 and Ad may co-exist in immunocompromised patients and (ii) E1A might be considered as therapeutic transgene for HHV-8-associated neoplasms we investigated whether the promoter of the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANAp) controlling expression of vCyclin, vFLIP, and LANA proteins required for latent type infection is regulated by E1A. Transfection experiments in MV3 melanoma cells revealed activation of the LANAp by Ad5 E1A constructs containing an intact N terminus (aa 1-119). In particular, an Ad12 E1A mutant, Spm2, lacking six consecutive alanine residues in the "spacer" region activated the HHV-8 promoter about 15-fold compared to vector controls. In summary, we report the activation of the LANAp by E1A as a novel interaction of E1A with a viral promoter. These data may have relevance for the management of viral infections in immunocompromised patients. A role for E1A as a therapeutic in this context remains to be defined.

  18. Reactivation of latent HIV-1 by new semi-synthetic ingenol esters

    SciTech Connect

    Pandeló José, Diego; Bartholomeeusen, Koen; Delveccio da Cunha, Rodrigo; Abreu, Celina Monteiro; Glinski, Jan; Barbizan Ferreira da Costa, Thais; Bacchi Rabay, Ana Flávia Mello; Pianowski Filho, Luiz Francisco; Dudycz, Lech W.; Ranga, Udaykumar; Peterlin, Boris Matija; Pianowski, Luiz Francisco; Tanuri, Amilcar; Aguiar, Renato Santana

    2014-08-15

    The ability of HIV to establish long-lived latent infection is mainly due to transcriptional silencing of viral genome in resting memory T lymphocytes. Here, we show that new semi-synthetic ingenol esters reactivate latent HIV reservoirs. Amongst the tested compounds, 3-caproyl-ingenol (ING B) was more potent in reactivating latent HIV than known activators such as SAHA, ingenol 3,20-dibenzoate, TNF-α, PMA and HMBA. ING B activated PKC isoforms followed by NF-κB nuclear translocation. As virus reactivation is dependent on intact NF-κB binding sites in the LTR promoter region ING B, we have shown that. ING B was able to reactivate virus transcription in primary HIV-infected resting cells up to 12 fold and up to 25 fold in combination with SAHA. Additionally, ING B promoted up-regulation of P-TEFb subunits CDK9/Cyclin T1. The role of ING B on promoting both transcription initiation and elongation makes this compound a strong candidate for an anti-HIV latency drug combined with suppressive HAART. - Highlights: • 3-caproyl-ingenol (ING B) reactivates latent HIV better than SAHA, ingenol 3,20-dibenzoate, TNF-α, PMA and HMBA. • ING B promotes PKC activation and NF-kB translocation to the nucleus. • ING B activates virus transcription of B and non-B subtypes of HIV-1. • ING B activates HIV transcription in infected primary resting CD4+ T cells. • ING B induces higher levels of P-TEFb components in human primary cells.

  19. Antigen 85A and mycobacterial DNA-binding protein 1 are targets of immunoglobulin G in individuals with past tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Osada-Oka, Mayuko; Tateishi, Yoshitaka; Hirayama, Yukio; Ozeki, Yuriko; Niki, Mamiko; Kitada, Seigo; Maekura, Ryoji; Tsujimura, Kunio; Koide, Yukio; Ohara, Naoya; Yamamoto, Taro; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Matsumoto, Sohkichi

    2013-01-01

    Development of accurate methods for predicting progression of tuberculosis (TB) from the latent state is recognized as vitally important in controlling TB, because a majority of cases develop from latent infections. Past TB that has never been treated has a higher risk of progressing than does latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in patients who have previously received treatment. Antibody responses against 23 kinds of M. tuberculosis proteins in individuals with past TB who had not been medicated were evaluated. These individuals had significantly higher concentrations of antibodies against Antigen 85A and mycobacterial DNA-binding protein 1 (MDP1) than did those with active TB and uninfected controls. In addition, immunohistochemistry revealed colocalization of tubercle bacilli, antigen 85 and MDP1 inside tuberculous granuloma lesions in an asymptomatic subject, showing that M. tuberculosis in lesions expresses both antigen 85 and MDP1. Our study suggests the potential usefulness of measuring antibody responses to antigen 85A and MDP1 for assessing the risk of TB progression.

  20. LOCALIZATION OF ANTIGEN IN TISSUE CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Coons, Albert H.; Leduc, Elizabeth H.; Kaplan, Melvin H.

    1951-01-01

    The fate of three proteins, crystalline hen's egg albumin, crystalline bovine plasma albumin, and human plasma γ-globulin, was traced after intravenous injection into mice. This was done by preparing frozen sections of quick-frozen tissue, allowing what foreign protein might be present in the section to react with homologous antibody labelled with fluorescein, and examining the section under the fluorescence microscope. By this means, which employs the serological specificity of the protein as a natural "marker," all three of these proteins were found in the cells of the reticulo-endothelial system, the connective tissue, the vascular endothelium, the lymphocytes of spleen and lymph node, and the epithelium of the kidney tubules, the liver, and in very small amounts in the adrenal. The central nervous system was not studied. All three persisted longest in the reticulo-endothelial system and the connective tissue, and in the doses employed egg white (10 mg.) was no longer detectable after 1 day, bovine albumin (10 mg.) after 2 days, and human γ-globulin (4 mg.) after 6 days, although in a somewhat higher dose (10 mg.) human γ-globulin persisted longer than 8 days. Egg albumin differed from the others in not being detectable in the cells of the renal glomerulus. It was found that each of the three proteins was present in the nuclei of each cell type enumerated above, often in higher concentration than in the cytoplasm. Further, some of the nuclei not only contained antigen, soon after injection, but were also surrounded by a bright ring associated with the nuclear membrane. By means of photographic records under the fluorescence microscope of sections stained for antigen, and direct observation under the light microscope of the same field subsequently stained with hematoxylin and eosin, it could be determined that the antigen was not adsorbed to chromatin or nucleoli, but was apparently in solution in the nuclear sap. PMID:14803641

  1. Latent immunoglobulin G (Gm) allotypes: occurrence in the cerebrospinal fluid in some neuropathological states.

    PubMed

    Salier, J P; Goust, J M; Link, H; Pandey, J P; Daveau, M; Fudenberg, H H

    1983-08-01

    Gm allotypes were detected and quantitated by radioimmunoassay (RIA) in paired serum and CSF samples from patients suffering from various neurological diseases. Of 115 patients with neurological disorders (65 MS and 50 others), seven subjects displayed one or two allotypes in their CSF which were absent in serum. The Gm phenotype in the patient's serum allowed us to infer the genotype without the need of familial data. A comparison of the regression curves obtained in RIA from the unexpected allotype in CSF and the counterpart in a normal serum pool argued for an identity of the Gm antigen carried by both inhibitory molecules. The unexpected allotype(s) in CSF can be considered as the product of a latent Gm gene which may be activated by either immune perturbations due to the disease per se or some particular immune regulations in the central nervous system.

  2. Diagnosis of latent forms of labyrinthine affections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaslilyeva, V. P.

    1980-01-01

    Features and significance of individual vestibular symptoms for the diagnosis of latent labyrinthitis and limited forms of labyrinthine affections offering considerable difficulties are discussed. Vestibular symptoms are indistinct. In case of the negative fistular symptom the greatest significance is acquired by the study of posture nystagmus according to the results of electronystagmograms, changes of tonic reactions and statics, as well as data of experimental vestibular tests. The necessity of evaluation of all the vestibular symptoms from the point of view of their vector characteristics and in a complex of evidence obtained by otoneurological examination of the patient is emphasized. Delicate topic and differential diagnosis of vestibular disturbances is of great importance and significance in the choice of the conservative or surgical method of treatment.

  3. Pretreatment of Latent Prints for Laser Development.

    PubMed

    Menzel, E R

    1989-06-01

    The pretreatment procedures for laser detection of latent fingerprints is reviewed. The general features of laser detection and the operational aspects of the examination of physical evidence for laser fingerprint detection are enumerated in the initial sections. The literature review is divided into various pretreatment approaches. Cited studies prior to 1981 are primarily concerned with the demonstration of the viability of laser fingerprint detection, whereas work post-1981 addresses issues of compatibility with the traditional methods of fingerprint development, examination of difficult surfaces, and the routine implementation of laser detection by law enforcement agencies. Related topics of research, review articles, conference reports, case examinations, the research support climate, and future trends are also briefly addressed.

  4. Latent profile approach to duration of stalking.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Katja; Häkkänen-Nyholm, Helinä; Sheridan, Lorraine; Roberts, Karl; Tolvanen, Asko

    2010-07-01

    Stalking behavior and victim-stalker relationship are often the principal known factors in a stalking case. Thus, they are of great importance when trying to identify factors contributing to stalking duration. The present study aims to identify distinct subgroups of stalking victims based on measures of behavioral stalking dimensions. These victim subgroups, stalking dimensions, and victim-stalker relationship are examined in relation to stalking duration. Using a sample of 137 university students, latent profile analysis (LPA) revealed five distinct victim subgroups based on stalker behavior dimensions: surveillance, low-profile, social lurker, wide scope, and baseline stalkers. The subgroups were significantly related to stalking duration and explained a considerable amount of the variance along with the stalking dimensions and victim-stalker relationship. Connections to stalking literature and utility of person-orientated methods in stalking research are discussed.

  5. Targeting latent TGFβ release in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ceco, Ermelinda; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Gardner, Brandon; Miller, Tamari; DeJesus, Adam; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Smith, Lucas R; Barton, Elisabeth R; Molkentin, Jeffery D; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2014-10-22

    Latent transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) binding proteins (LTBPs) bind to inactive TGFβ in the extracellular matrix. In mice, muscular dystrophy symptoms are intensified by a genetic polymorphism that changes the hinge region of LTBP, leading to increased proteolytic susceptibility and TGFβ release. We have found that the hinge region of human LTBP4 was also readily proteolysed and that proteolysis could be blocked by an antibody to the hinge region. Transgenic mice were generated to carry a bacterial artificial chromosome encoding the human LTBP4 gene. These transgenic mice displayed larger myofibers, increased damage after muscle injury, and enhanced TGFβ signaling. In the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the human LTBP4 transgene exacerbated muscular dystrophy symptoms and resulted in weaker muscles with an increased inflammatory infiltrate and greater LTBP4 cleavage in vivo. Blocking LTBP4 cleavage may be a therapeutic strategy to reduce TGFβ release and activity and decrease inflammation and muscle damage in muscular dystrophy.

  6. Latent Herpes Viral Reactivation in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Stowe, R.

    2008-01-01

    Latent viruses are ubiquitous and reactivate during stressful periods with and without symptoms. Latent herpes virus reactivation is used as a tool to predict changes in the immune status in astronauts and to evaluate associated health risks. Methods: Viral DNA was detected by real time polymerase chain reaction in saliva and urine from astronauts before, during and after short and long-duration space flights. Results and Discussion: EpsteinBarr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivated, and viral DNA was shed in saliva (EBV and VZV) or urine (CMV). EBV levels in saliva during flight were 10fold higher than baseline levels. Elevations in EBV specific CD8+ T-cells, viral antibody titers, and specific cytokines were consistent with viral reactivation. Intracellular levels of cytokines were reduced in EBVspecific Tcells. CMV, rarely present in urine of healthy individuals, was shed in urine of 27% of astronauts during all phases of spaceflight. VZV, not found in saliva of asymptomatic individuals, was found in saliva of 50% of astronauts during spaceflight and 35 days after flight. VZV recovered from astronaut saliva was found to be live, infectious virus. DNA sequencing demonstrated that the VZV recovered from astronauts was from the common European strain of VZV. Elevation of stress hormones accompanied viral reactivation indicating involvement of the hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal and sympathetic adrenal-medullary axes in the mechanism of viral reactivation in astronauts. A study of 53 shingles patients found that all shingles patients shed VZV DNA in their saliva and the VZV levels correlated with the severity of the disease. Lower VZV levels in shingles patients were similar to those observed in astronauts. We proposed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective assay to detect VZV in saliva of patients with suspected shingles. Early detection of VZV infection allows early medical intervention.

  7. Laser interrogation of latent vehicle registration number

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, R.E. |; Pelkey, G.E.; Grant, P.; Whipple, R.E.; Andresen, B.D.

    1994-09-01

    A recent investigation involved automobile registration numbers as important evidentiary specimens. In California, as in most states, small, thin metallic decals are issued to owners of vehicles each year as the registration is renewed. The decals are applied directly to the license plate of the vehicle and typically on top of the previous year`s expired decal. To afford some degree of security, the individual registration decals have been designed to tear easily; they cannot be separated from each other, but can be carefully removed intact from the metal license plate by using a razor blade. In September 1993, the City of Livermore Police Department obtained a blue 1993 California decal that had been placed over an orange 1992 decal. The two decals were being investigated as possible evidence in a case involving vehicle registration fraud. To confirm the suspicion and implicate a suspect, the department needed to known the registration number on the bottom (completely covered) 1992 decal. The authors attempted to use intense and directed light to interrogate the colored stickers. Optical illumination using a filtered white-light source partially identified the latent number. However, the most successful technique used a tunable dye laser pumped by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. By selectively tuning the wavelength and intensity of the dye laser, backlit illumination of the decals permitted visualization of the underlying registration number through the surface of the top sticker. With optimally-tuned wavelength and intensity, 100% accuracy was obtained in identifying the sequence of latent characters. The advantage of optical techniques is their completely nondestructive nature, thus preserving the evidence for further interrogation or courtroom presentation.

  8. Latent Virus Reactivation in Space Shuttle Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Crucian, B. E.; Stowe, R. P.; Sams, C.; Castro, V. A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2011-01-01

    Latent virus reactivation was measured in 17 astronauts (16 male and 1 female) before, during, and after short-duration Space Shuttle missions. Blood, urine, and saliva samples were collected 2-4 months before launch, 10 days before launch (L-10), 2-3 hours after landing (R+0), 3 days after landing (R+14), and 120 days after landing (R+120). Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA was measured in these samples by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) DNA was measured in the 381 saliva samples and cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in the 66 urine samples collected from these subjects. Fourteen astronauts shed EBV DNA in 21% of their saliva samples before, during, and after flight, and 7 astronauts shed VZV in 7.4% of their samples during and after flight. It was interesting that shedding of both EBV and VZV increased during the flight phase relative to before or after flight. In the case of CMV, 32% of urine samples from 8 subjects contained DNA of this virus. In normal healthy control subjects, EBV shedding was found in 3% and VZV and CMV were found in less than 1% of the samples. The circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol measured before, during, and after space flight did not show any significant difference between flight phases. These data show that increased reactivation of latent herpes viruses may be associated with decreased immune system function, which has been reported in earlier studies as well as in these same subjects (data not reported here).

  9. Sensory Intolerance: Latent Structure and Psychopathologic Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Steven; Conelea, Christine A.; McKay, Dean; Crowe, Katherine B.; Abramowitz, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sensory intolerance refers to high levels of distress evoked by everyday sounds (e.g., sounds of people chewing) or commonplace tactile sensations (e.g., sticky or greasy substances). Sensory intolerance may be associated with obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms, OC-related phenomena, and other forms of psychopathology. Sensory intolerance is not included as a syndrome in current diagnostic systems, although preliminary research suggests that it might be a distinct syndrome. Objectives First, to investigate the latent structure of sensory intolerance in adults; that is, to investigate whether it is syndrome-like in nature, in which auditory and tactile sensory intolerance co-occur and are associated with impaired functioning. Second, to investigate the psychopathologic correlates of sensory intolerance. In particular, to investigate whether sensory intolerance is associated with OC-related phenomena, as suggested by previous research. Method A sample of 534 community-based participants were recruited via Amazon.com’s Mechanical Turk program. Participants completed measures of sensory intolerance, OC-related phenomena, and general psychopathology. Results Latent class analysis revealed two classes of individuals: Those who were intolerant of both auditory and tactile stimuli (n = 150), and those who were relatively undisturbed by auditory or tactile stimuli (n = 384). Sensory intolerant individuals, compared to those who were comparatively sensory tolerant, had greater scores on indices of general psychopathology, more severe OC symptoms, a higher likelihood of meeting caseness criteria for OC disorder, elevated scores on measures of OC-related dysfunctional beliefs, a greater tendency to report OC-related phenomena (e.g., a greater frequency of tics), and more impairment on indices of social and occupational functioning. Sensory intolerant individuals had significantly higher scores on OC symptoms even after controlling for general psychopathology

  10. ENDOGENOUS ANALGESIA, DEPENDENCE, AND LATENT PAIN SENSITIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bradley K; Corder, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous activation of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides relief from acute pain. Recent studies have established that tissue inflammation produces latent pain sensitization (LS) that is masked by spinal MOR signaling for months, even after complete recovery from injury and re-establishment of normal pain thresholds. Disruption with MOR inverse agonists reinstates pain and precipitates cellular, somatic and aversive signs of physical withdrawal; this phenomenon requires N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated activation of calcium-sensitive adenylyl cyclase type 1 (AC1). In this review, we present a new conceptual model of the transition from acute to chronic pain, based on the delicate balance between LS and endogenous analgesia that develops after painful tissue injury. First, injury activates pain pathways. Second, the spinal cord establishes MOR constitutive activity (MORCA) as it attempts to control pain. Third, over time, the body becomes dependent on MORCA, which paradoxically sensitizes pain pathways. Stress or injury escalates opposing inhibitory and excitatory influences on nociceptive processing as a pathological consequence of increased endogenous opioid tone. Pain begets MORCA begets pain vulnerability in a vicious cycle. The final result is a silent insidious state characterized by the escalation of two opposing excitatory and inhibitory influences on pain transmission: LS mediated by AC1 (which maintains accelerator), and pain inhibition mediated by MORCA (which maintains the brake). This raises the prospect that opposing homeostatic interactions between MORCA analgesia and latent NMDAR–AC1-mediated pain sensitization create a lasting vulnerability to develop chronic pain. Thus, chronic pain syndromes may result from a failure in constitutive signaling of spinal MORs and a loss of endogenous analgesic control. An overarching long-term therapeutic goal of future research is to alleviate chronic pain by either: a) facilitating endogenous opioid

  11. A cytoplasmically anchored nuclear protein interferes specifically with the import of nuclear proteins but not U1 snRNA

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    A cytoplasmically anchored mutant SV40 T antigen, FS T antigen, was shown previously to interfere specifically with the nuclear import of a heterologous nuclear protein, adenovirus 5 fiber protein, in cultured monkey cells (Schneider, J., C. Schindewolf, K. van Zee, and E. Fanning. 1988. Cell. 54:117-125; van Zee, K., F. Appel, and E. Fanning. 1991. Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:5137-5146). In this report, we demonstrate that FS T antigen also interferes with the nuclear import of adenovirus E1A and a peptide-albumin conjugate bearing multiple copies of the T antigen nuclear localization signal, but not with the import of U1 snRNA. A kinetic analysis indicates that nuclear import of the albumin- peptide conjugate is inhibited only when high intracellular concentrations of FS T antigen are reached. After microinjection into the cytoplasm of cultured cells, purified FS T antigen protein does not accumulate at the nuclear periphery, but rather is distributed in a punctate pattern throughout the cytoplasm. These data support a model in which cytoplasmic anchoring of FS T antigen enables the mutant protein to sequester and titrate out a cellular factor which is required for nuclear protein but not U1 snRNA import. PMID:8468344

  12. A Probability Distribution over Latent Causes, in the Orbitofrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Niv, Yael; Norman, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) has been implicated in both the representation of “state,” in studies of reinforcement learning and decision making, and also in the representation of “schemas,” in studies of episodic memory. Both of these cognitive constructs require a similar inference about the underlying situation or “latent cause” that generates our observations at any given time. The statistically optimal solution to this inference problem is to use Bayes' rule to compute a posterior probability distribution over latent causes. To test whether such a posterior probability distribution is represented in the OFC, we tasked human participants with inferring a probability distribution over four possible latent causes, based on their observations. Using fMRI pattern similarity analyses, we found that BOLD activity in the OFC is best explained as representing the (log-transformed) posterior distribution over latent causes. Furthermore, this pattern explained OFC activity better than other task-relevant alternatives, such as the most probable latent cause, the most recent observation, or the uncertainty over latent causes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our world is governed by hidden (latent) causes that we cannot observe, but which generate the observations we see. A range of high-level cognitive processes require inference of a probability distribution (or “belief distribution”) over the possible latent causes that might be generating our current observations. This is true for reinforcement learning and decision making (where the latent cause comprises the true “state” of the task), and for episodic memory (where memories are believed to be organized by the inferred situation or “schema”). Using fMRI, we show that this belief distribution over latent causes is encoded in patterns of brain activity in the orbitofrontal cortex, an area that has been separately implicated in the representations of both states and schemas. PMID:27466328

  13. Immune recognition of protein antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Laver, W.G.; Air, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 33 papers. Some of the titles are: Antigenic Structure of Influenze Virus Hemagglutinin; Germ-line and Somatic Diversity in the Antibody Response to the Influenza Virus A/PR/8/34 Hemagglutinin; Recognition of Cloned Influenza A Virus Gene Products by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes; Antigenic Structure of the Influenza Virus N2 Neuraminidase; and The Molecular and Genetic Basis of Antigenic Variation in Gonococcal Pillin.

  14. Epstein-barr virus (EBV) in healthy carriers: Distribution of genotypes and 30 bp deletion in latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) oncogene.

    PubMed

    Correa, Rita Mariel; Fellner, María Dolores; Alonio, Lidia Virginia; Durand, Karina; Teyssié, Angélica R; Picconi, María Alejandra

    2004-08-01

    There are two types of Epstein Barr virus (EBV): EBV-1 and EBV-2, distinguished by genomic polymorphism in the genes encoding the nuclear antigens (EBNA-2, -3A, -3B, -3C). Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) is an EBV protein with known oncogenic properties. Different variants had been described; among them, a 30 base pair (bp) deletion (del-LMP-1) had been reported in benign and malignant pathologies, but there is little information about its frequency in healthy populations. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of the EBV genotypes and the 30 bp deletion frequency, in EBV healthy carriers from Argentina. Analysis of EBNA-3C and LMP-1 genes were done by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by Southern blot hybridization on DNA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from blood bank donors. EBV-1 was present in 75.9% of samples, EBV-2 in 14.6%, and co-infections with both types in 6.5%. The deleted LMP-1 variant was found in 7.4% of analyzed samples, corresponding 3.2% to deleted variant alone and 4.2% to co-infections with non-deleted form. The non-deleted variant was found in 64.6% whereas in the remaining 28%, no PCR product was detected. These results showed that EBV-1 was the more prevalent type in healthy carriers of Argentina, similar to reports from others countries. A predominance of the non-deleted LMP-1 variant was observed. The presence of co-infections with both types and variants demonstrated that healthy individuals may also harbor multiple EBV infections.

  15. A Bayesian Model for the Estimation of Latent Interaction and Quadratic Effects When Latent Variables Are Non-Normally Distributed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelava, Augustin; Nagengast, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Structural equation models with interaction and quadratic effects have become a standard tool for testing nonlinear hypotheses in the social sciences. Most of the current approaches assume normally distributed latent predictor variables. In this article, we present a Bayesian model for the estimation of latent nonlinear effects when the latent…

  16. Using Data Augmentation to Obtain Standard Errors and Conduct Hypothesis Tests in Latent Class and Latent Transition Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanza, Stephanie T.; Collins, Linda M.; Schafer, Joseph L.; Flaherty, Brian P.

    2005-01-01

    Latent class analysis (LCA) provides a means of identifying a mixture of subgroups in a population measured by multiple categorical indicators. Latent transition analysis (LTA) is a type of LCA that facilitates addressing research questions concerning stage-sequential change over time in longitudinal data. Both approaches have been used with…

  17. A central role for HSC70 in regulating antigen trafficking and MHC class II presentation.

    PubMed

    Deffit, Sarah N; Blum, Janice S

    2015-12-01

    Cells rely on multiple intracellular trafficking pathways to capture antigens for proteolysis. The resulting peptides bind to MHC class II molecules to promote CD4(+) T cell recognition. Endocytosis enhances the capture of extracellular and cell surface bound antigens for processing and presentation, while autophagy pathways shunt cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens for presentation in the context of MHC class II molecules. Understanding how physiological changes and cellular stress alter antigen trafficking and the repertoire of peptides presented by class II molecules remains challenging, yet important in devising novel approaches to boost immune responses to pathogens and tumors. An abundant, constitutively expressed cytoplasmic chaperone, HSC70 plays a central role in modulating antigen transport within cells to control MHC class II presentation during nutrient stress. HSC70 may serve as a molecular switch to modulate endocytic and autophagy pathways, impacting the source of antigens delivered for MHC class II presentation during cellular stress.

  18. Supervised Semantic Classification for Nuclear Proliferation Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsavai, Raju; Cheriyadat, Anil M; Gleason, Shaun Scott

    2010-01-01

    Existing feature extraction and classification approaches are not suitable for monitoring proliferation activity using high-resolution multi-temporal remote sensing imagery. In this paper we present a supervised semantic labeling framework based on the Latent Dirichlet Allocation method. This framework is used to analyze over 120 images collected under different spatial and temporal settings over the globe representing three major semantic categories: airports, nuclear, and coal power plants. Initial experimental results show a reasonable discrimination of these three categories even though coal and nuclear images share highly common and overlapping objects. This research also identified several research challenges associated with nuclear proliferation monitoring using high resolution remote sensing images.

  19. Nuclear rights - nuclear wrongs

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, E.F.; Miller, F.D.; Paul, J.; Ahrens, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. The titles are: Three Ways to Kill Innocent Bystanders: Some Conundrums Concerning the Morality of War; The International Defense of Liberty; Two Concepts of Deterrence; Nuclear Deterrence and Arms Control; Ethical Issues for the 1980s; The Moral Status of Nuclear Deterrent Threats; Optimal Deterrence; Morality and Paradoxical Deterrence; Immoral Risks: A Deontological Critique of Nuclear Deterrence; No War Without Dictatorship, No Peace Without Democracy: Foreign Policy as Domestic Politics; Marxism-Leninism and its Strategic Implications for the United States; Tocqueveille War.

  20. Additive Manufacturing and High-Performance Computing: a Disruptive Latent Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Bruce

    2015-03-01

    This presentation will discuss the relationship between recent advances in Additive Manufacturing (AM) technology, High-Performance Computing (HPC) simulation and design capabilities, and related advances in Uncertainty Quantification (UQ), and then examines their impacts upon national and international security. The presentation surveys how AM accelerates the fabrication process, while HPC combined with UQ provides a fast track for the engineering design cycle. The combination of AM and HPC/UQ almost eliminates the engineering design and prototype iterative cycle, thereby dramatically reducing cost of production and time-to-market. These methods thereby present significant benefits for US national interests, both civilian and military, in an age of austerity. Finally, considering cyber security issues and the advent of the ``cloud,'' these disruptive, currently latent technologies may well enable proliferation and so challenge both nuclear and non-nuclear aspects of international security.

  1. Data on the interexaminer variation of minutia markup on latent fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Ulery, Bradford T; Hicklin, R Austin; Roberts, Maria Antonia; Buscaglia, JoAnn

    2016-09-01

    The data in this article supports the research paper entitled "Interexaminer variation of minutia markup on latent fingerprints" [1]. The data in this article describes the variability in minutia markup during both analysis of the latents and comparison between latents and exemplars. The data was collected in the "White Box Latent Print Examiner Study," in which each of 170 volunteer latent print examiners provided detailed markup documenting their examinations of latent-exemplar pairs of prints randomly assigned from a pool of 320 pairs. Each examiner examined 22 latent-exemplar pairs; an average of 12 examiners marked each latent.

  2. In vivo disruption of latent HSV by designer endonuclease therapy.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Martine; Madden, Emily A; Loprieno, Michelle; DeSilva Feelixge, Harshana S; Stensland, Laurence; Huang, Meei-Li; Greninger, Alexander L; Roychoudhury, Pavitra; Niyonzima, Nixon; Nguyen, Thuy; Magaret, Amalia; Galleto, Roman; Stone, Daniel; Jerome, Keith R

    2016-09-08

    A large portion of the global population carries latent herpes simplex virus (HSV), which can periodically reactivate, resulting in asymptomatic shedding or formation of ulcerative lesions. Current anti-HSV drugs do not eliminate latent virus from sensory neurons where HSV resides, and therefore do not eliminate the risk of transmission or recurrent disease. Here, we report the ability of HSV-specific endonucleases to induce mutations of essential HSV genes both in cultured neurons and in latently infected mice. In neurons, viral genomes are susceptible to endonuclease-mediated mutagenesis, regardless of the time of treatment after HSV infection, suggesting that both HSV lytic and latent forms can be targeted. Mutagenesis frequency after endonuclease exposure can be increased nearly 2-fold by treatment with a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Using a mouse model of latent HSV infection, we demonstrate that a targeted endonuclease can be delivered to viral latency sites via an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector, where it is able to induce mutation of latent HSV genomes. These data provide the first proof-of-principle to our knowledge for the use of a targeted endonuclease as an antiviral agent to treat an established latent viral infection in vivo.

  3. Tropical Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes and Latent Heating Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Zhou, Tiehan; Love, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent satellite determinations of global distributions of absolute gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes in the lower stratosphere show maxima over the summer subtropical continents and little evidence of GW momentum fluxes associated with the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). This seems to be at odds with parameterizations forGWmomentum fluxes, where the source is a function of latent heating rates, which are largest in the region of the ITCZ in terms of monthly averages. The authors have examined global distributions of atmospheric latent heating, cloud-top-pressure altitudes, and lower-stratosphere absolute GW momentum fluxes and have found that monthly averages of the lower-stratosphere GW momentum fluxes more closely resemble the monthly mean cloud-top altitudes rather than the monthly mean rates of latent heating. These regions of highest cloud-top altitudes occur when rates of latent heating are largest on the time scale of cloud growth. This, plus previously published studies, suggests that convective sources for stratospheric GW momentum fluxes, being a function of the rate of latent heating, will require either a climate model to correctly model this rate of latent heating or some ad hoc adjustments to account for shortcomings in a climate model's land-sea differences in convective latent heating.

  4. In vivo disruption of latent HSV by designer endonuclease therapy

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Emily A.; Loprieno, Michelle; Feelixge, Harshana S. DeSilva; Stensland, Laurence; Huang, Meei-Li; Greninger, Alexander L.; Nguyen, Thuy; Magaret, Amalia; Galleto, Roman

    2016-01-01

    A large portion of the global population carries latent herpes simplex virus (HSV), which can periodically reactivate, resulting in asymptomatic shedding or formation of ulcerative lesions. Current anti-HSV drugs do not eliminate latent virus from sensory neurons where HSV resides, and therefore do not eliminate the risk of transmission or recurrent disease. Here, we report the ability of HSV-specific endonucleases to induce mutations of essential HSV genes both in cultured neurons and in latently infected mice. In neurons, viral genomes are susceptible to endonuclease-mediated mutagenesis, regardless of the time of treatment after HSV infection, suggesting that both HSV lytic and latent forms can be targeted. Mutagenesis frequency after endonuclease exposure can be increased nearly 2-fold by treatment with a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Using a mouse model of latent HSV infection, we demonstrate that a targeted endonuclease can be delivered to viral latency sites via an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector, where it is able to induce mutation of latent HSV genomes. These data provide the first proof-of-principle to our knowledge for the use of a targeted endonuclease as an antiviral agent to treat an established latent viral infection in vivo. PMID:27642635

  5. The multistage vaccine H56 boosts the effects of BCG to protect cynomolgus macaques against active tuberculosis and reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Philana Ling; Dietrich, Jes; Tan, Esterlina; Abalos, Rodolfo M; Burgos, Jasmin; Bigbee, Carolyn; Bigbee, Matthew; Milk, Leslie; Gideon, Hannah P; Rodgers, Mark; Cochran, Catherine; Guinn, Kristi M; Sherman, David R; Klein, Edwin; Janssen, Christopher; Flynn, JoAnne L; Andersen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    It is estimated that one-third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Infection typically remains latent, but it can reactivate to cause clinical disease. The only vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), is largely ineffective, and ways to enhance its efficacy are being developed. Of note, the candidate booster vaccines currently under clinical development have been designed to improve BCG efficacy but not prevent reactivation of latent infection. Here, we demonstrate that administering a multistage vaccine that we term H56 in the adjuvant IC31 as a boost to vaccination with BCG delays and reduces clinical disease in cynomolgus macaques challenged with M. tuberculosis and prevents reactivation of latent infection. H56 contains Ag85B and ESAT-6, which are two of the M. tuberculosis antigens secreted in the acute phase of infection, and the nutrient stress-induced antigen Rv2660c. Boosting with H56/IC31 resulted in efficient containment of M. tuberculosis infection and reduced rates of clinical disease, as measured by clinical parameters, inflammatory markers, and improved survival of the animals compared with BCG alone. Boosted animals showed reduced pulmonary pathology and extrapulmonary dissemination, and protection correlated with a strong recall response against ESAT-6 and Rv2660c. Importantly, BCG/H56-vaccinated monkeys did not reactivate latent infection after treatment with anti-TNF antibody. Our results indicate that H56/IC31 boosting is able to control late-stage infection with M. tuberculosis and contain latent tuberculosis, providing a rationale for the clinical development of H56.

  6. Novel antigen delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Maria; Berardinis, Piergiuseppe De

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the “E2 scaffold” of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  7. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen A A A What's in this article? ... en español Muestra de materia fecal: antígeno de H. pylori What It Is Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) bacteria ...

  8. Optical properties of drug metabolites in latent fingermarks

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yao; Ai, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Drug metabolites usually have structures of split-ring resonators (SRRs), which might lead to negative permittivity and permeability in electromagnetic field. As a result, in the UV-vis region, the latent fingermarks images of drug addicts and non drug users are inverse. The optical properties of latent fingermarks are quite different between drug addicts and non-drug users. This is a technic superiority for crime scene investigation to distinguish them. In this paper, we calculate the permittivity and permeability of drug metabolites using tight-binding model. The latent fingermarks of smokers and non-smokers are given as an example. PMID:26838730

  9. Optical properties of drug metabolites in latent fingermarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yao; Ai, Qing

    2016-02-01

    Drug metabolites usually have structures of split-ring resonators (SRRs), which might lead to negative permittivity and permeability in electromagnetic field. As a result, in the UV-vis region, the latent fingermarks images of drug addicts and non drug users are inverse. The optical properties of latent fingermarks are quite different between drug addicts and non-drug users. This is a technic superiority for crime scene investigation to distinguish them. In this paper, we calculate the permittivity and permeability of drug metabolites using tight-binding model. The latent fingermarks of smokers and non-smokers are given as an example.

  10. Bayesian Estimation in the One-Parameter Latent Trait Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    3 MASSACHUSETTS LNIV AMHERST LAB OF PSYCHOMETRIC AND -- ETC F/G 12/1 BAYESIAN ESTIMATION IN THE ONE-PARA1ETER LATENT TRAIT MODEL. (U) MAR 80 H...TEST CHART VVNN lfl’ ,. [’ COD BAYESIAN ESTIMATION IN THE ONE-PARAMETER LATENT TRAIT MODEL 0 wtHAR IHARAN SWA I NATHAN AND JANICE A. GIFFORD Research...block numbef) latent trait theory Bayesain estimation 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reveso aide If neceaar and identlfy by Nock mambe) ,-When several

  11. Eliminate background interference from latent fingerprints using ultraviolet multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Xu, Xiaojing; Wang, Guiqiang

    2014-02-01

    Fingerprints are the most important evidence in crime scene. The technology of developing latent fingerprints is one of the hottest research areas in forensic science. Recently, multispectral imaging which has shown great capability in fingerprints development, questioned document detection and trace evidence examination is used in detecting material evidence. This paper studied how to eliminate background interference from non-porous and porous surface latent fingerprints by rotating filter wheel ultraviolet multispectral imaging. The results approved that background interference could be removed clearly from latent fingerprints by using multispectral imaging in ultraviolet bandwidth.

  12. Latent Herpes Viruses Reactivation in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Satish K.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2008-01-01

    Space flight has many adverse effects on human physiology. Changes in multiple systems, including the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, neurovestibular, endocrine, and immune systems have occurred (12, 32, 38, 39). Alterations in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (12), nutritional needs (31), renal stone formation (40), and microbial flora (2) have also been reported. Evidence suggests that the magnitude of some changes may increase with time in space. A variety of changes in immunity have been reported during both short (.16 days) and long (>30 days) space missions. However, it is difficult to determine the medical significance of these immunological changes in astronauts. Astronauts are in excellent health and in superb physical condition. Illnesses in astronauts during space flight are not common, are generally mild, and rarely affect mission objectives. In an attempt to clarify this issue, we identified the latent herpes viruses as medically important indicators of the effects of space flight on immunity. This chapter demonstrates that space flight leads to asymptomatic reactivation of latent herpes viruses, and proposes that this results from marked changes in neuroendocrine function and immunity caused by the inherent stressfullness of human space flight. Astronauts experience uniquely stressful environments during space flight. Potential stressors include confinement in an unfamiliar, crowded environment, isolation, separation from family, anxiety, fear, sleep deprivation, psychosocial issues, physical exertion, noise, variable acceleration forces, increased radiation, and others. Many of these are intermittent and variable in duration and intensity, but variable gravity forces (including transitions from launch acceleration to microgravity and from microgravity to planetary gravity) and variable radiation levels are part of each mission and contribute to a stressful environment that cannot be duplicated on Earth. Radiation outside the Earth

  13. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-07-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure.

  14. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, A R; Strick, N; Baker, L; Krugman, S

    1982-01-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bond adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure. Images PMID:6956871

  15. Evaluation of cytokine and chemokine response elicited by Rv2204c and Rv0753c to detect latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Pathakumari, Balaji; Prabhavathi, Maddineni; Raja, Alamelu

    2015-12-01

    Latent TB infection (LTBI) is one of the major contributing factors for the high incidence of TB in India that in turn significantly contributes to the pool of active TB. Hence, identification and treatment of LTBI is of utmost importance. Currently, no specific diagnostic test is available for LTBI. Earlier, in our immunoproteomic analysis, we identified Rv2204c and Rv0753c protein-containing fractions induced significantly higher interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) response in LTBI than in active TB. In this study, we evaluated cytokine and chemokine response against M. tuberculosis antigens for improving LTBI identification. Two M. tb proteins Rv2204c and Rv0753c were cloned, over expressed in E. coli and purified by affinity chromatography. Antigen-specific immune response was evaluated in 39 pulmonary TB patients (PTB) and 35 healthy house-hold contacts (HHC). After whole blood culture for 6 days, the secretion of cytokines and chemokines were quantified in culture supernatants using Enzyme Linked Immune Sorbent Assay (ELISA). Antigen specific cytokines such as interferon gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, IL-12p40 and chemokines like monocyte chemotactic proteins MCP-1, MCP-2 were significantly higher in HHC than PTB. In contrast to other cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF)-α response was significantly increased in PTB compared with HHC. Both Rv2204c and Rv0753c antigen specific IFN-γ response showed 86% positivity in HHC; whereas in PTB, these antigens showed 18% and 21% positivity respectively. Rv2204c antigen-specific IFN-γ/TNF-α response displayed maximum positivity of 91% in HHC and minimum positivity of 10% (4/39) in PTB. Rv2204c and Rv0753c specific IFN-γ and IFN-γ/TNF-α responses showed the most promising accuracy in identifying LTBI.

  16. T cell responses to DosR and Rpf proteins in actively and latently infected individuals from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Riaño, Felipe; Arroyo, Leonar; París, Sara; Rojas, Mauricio; Friggen, Annemieke H; van Meijgaarden, Krista E; Franken, Kees L M C; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; García, Luis F; Barrera, Luis F

    2012-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis DosR regulon-encoded proteins elicit strong immune T-cell responses in individuals with latent tuberculosis (LTBI). Also, resuscitation (Rpf) proteins can induce such responses. However, variations in the immunogenicity of the DosR and Rpf proteins have been observed in European and African populations, and no data are published from other geographic areas. In Colombian LTBI and patients with recently diagnosed PTB, we therefore studied the immune response to DosR, Rpf, stress, and nominal antigens from Mtb, in 7-day stimulated cultures. Three DosR (Rv1737c, Rv2029c, Rv2628c) and 2 Rpf (Rv0867 and Rv2389c) antigens were recognized most prominently on the basis of the net IFNγ production (DosR) or the percentage of responding individuals (Rpf). Results show that the selected DosR antigens induced a higher proportion of CD4-T cells producing IFNγ from LTBI, compared to pulmonary TB patients (PTB), while there were no differences in the proportion of CD8-T cells. An increased frequency of CD4, but not CD8 T-cells with a CD45RO(+)CD27(+) phenotype was observed in LTBI in response to Rv2029c, Rv0867c, and Rv2389c, compared to PTB. The levels of cytokines and chemokines in the supernatants of stimulated cells, showed that the DosR and Rpf antigens induced higher levels of IFNγ in cultures from LTBI compared to PTB, although the induced pattern of cytokines and chemokines was also antigen dependent. In summary, our results are consistent with the significant immunogenicity of Mtb DosR and Rpf antigens in LTBI individuals, and confirm and extend previously reported data from other TB affected human populations.

  17. Solar thermoelectricity via advanced latent heat storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, M. L.; Rea, J.; Glatzmaier, G. C.; Hardin, C.; Oshman, C.; Vaughn, J.; Roark, T.; Raade, J. W.; Bradshaw, R. W.; Sharp, J.; Avery, A. D.; Bobela, D.; Bonner, R.; Weigand, R.; Campo, D.; Parilla, P. A.; Siegel, N. P.; Toberer, E. S.; Ginley, D. S.

    2016-05-01

    We report on a new modular, dispatchable, and cost-effective solar electricity-generating technology. Solar ThermoElectricity via Advanced Latent heat Storage (STEALS) integrates several state-of-the-art technologies to provide electricity on demand. In the envisioned STEALS system, concentrated sunlight is converted to heat at a solar absorber. The heat is then delivered to either a thermoelectric (TE) module for direct electricity generation, or to charge a phase change material for thermal energy storage, enabling subsequent generation during off-sun hours, or both for simultaneous electricity production and energy storage. The key to making STEALS a dispatchable technology lies in the development of a "thermal valve," which controls when heat is allowed to flow through the TE module, thus controlling when electricity is generated. The current project addresses each of the three major subcomponents, (i) the TE module, (ii) the thermal energy storage system, and (iii) the thermal valve. The project also includes system-level and techno- economic modeling of the envisioned integrated system and will culminate in the demonstration of a laboratory-scale STEALS prototype capable of generating 3kWe.

  18. Photoacoustic and Colorimetric Visualization of Latent Fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Song, Kai; Huang, Peng; Yi, Chenglin; Ning, Bo; Hu, Song; Nie, Liming; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Nie, Zhihong

    2015-12-22

    There is a high demand on a simple, rapid, accurate, user-friendly, cost-effective, and nondestructive universal method for latent fingerprint (LFP) detection. Herein, we describe a combination imaging strategy for LFP visualization with high resolution using poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride)-b-polystyrene (PSMA-b-PS) functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNPs). This general approach integrates the merits of both colorimetric imaging and photoacoustic imaging. In comparison with the previous methods, our strategy is single-step and does not require the signal amplification by silver staining. The PSMA-b-PS functionalized GNPs have good stability, tunable color, and high affinity for universal secretions (proteins/polypeptides/amino acids), which makes our approach general and flexible for visualizing LFPs on different substrates (presumably with different colors) and from different people. Moreover, the unique optical property of GNPs enables the photoacoustic imaging of GNPs-deposited LFPs with high resolution. This allows observation of level 3 hyperfine features of LFPs such as the pores and ridge contours by photoacoustic imaging. This technique can potentially be used to identify chemicals within LFP residues. We believe that this dual-modality imaging of LFPs will find widespread use in forensic investigations and medical diagnostics.

  19. Latent learning in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Laplaza, Luis M; Gerlai, Robert

    2010-04-02

    The zebrafish may represent an excellent compromise between system complexity and practical simplicity for behavioral brain research. It may be particularly appropriate for large scale screening studies whose aim is to identify mutants with altered phenotypes or novel compounds with particular efficacy. For example, the zebrafish may have utility in the analysis of the biological mechanisms of learning and memory. Although learning and memory have been extensively studied and hundreds of underlying molecular mechanisms have been identified, this number may represent only the fraction of genes involved in these complex brain functions. Thus large scale mutagenesis screens may have utility. In order for such screens to succeed, appropriate screening paradigms must be developed. The first step in this research is the characterization of learning and memory capabilities of zebrafish and the development of automatable tasks. Here we show that zebrafish is capable of latent learning, i.e. can acquire memory of their environment after being allowed to explore it. For example, we found experimental zebrafish that experienced an open left tunnel or an open right tunnel of a maze during the unrewarded exploration phase of the test to show the appropriate side bias during a probe trial when they had to swim to a group of conspecifics (the reward). Given that exploration of the maze does not require the presence of the experimenter and the probe trial, during which the subjects are video-recorded and their memory is tested, is short, we argue that the paradigm has utility in high-throughput screening.

  20. Latent Class Analysis Variable Selection1

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Nema; Raftery, Adrian E.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a method for selecting variables in latent class analysis, which is the most common model-based clustering method for discrete data. The method assesses a variable’s usefulness for clustering by comparing two models, given the clustering variables already selected. In one model the variable contributes information about cluster allocation beyond that contained in the already selected variables, and in the other model it does not. A headlong search algorithm is used to explore the model space and select clustering variables. In simulated datasets we found that the method selected the correct clustering variables, and also led to improvements in classification performance and in accuracy of the choice of the number of classes. In two real datasets, our method discovered the same group structure with fewer variables. In a dataset from the International HapMap Project consisting of 639 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 210 members of different groups, our method discovered the same group structure with a much smaller number of SNPs. PMID:20827439

  1. Solar Thermoelectricity via Advanced Latent Heat Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Michele L.; Rea, J.; Glatzmaier, Greg C.; Hardin, C.; Oshman, C.; Vaughn, J.; Roark, T.; Raade, J. W.; Bradshaw, R. W.; Sharp, J.; Avery, Azure D.; Bobela, David; Bonner, R.; Weigand, R.; Campo, D.; Parilla, Philip A.; Siegel, N. P.; Toberer, Eric S.; Ginley, David S.

    2016-05-31

    We report on a new modular, dispatchable, and cost-effective solar electricity-generating technology. Solar ThermoElectricity via Advanced Latent heat Storage (STEALS) integrates several state-of-the-art technologies to provide electricity on demand. In the envisioned STEALS system, concentrated sunlight is converted to heat at a solar absorber. The heat is then delivered to either a thermoelectric (TE) module for direct electricity generation, or to charge a phase change material for thermal energy storage, enabling subsequent generation during off-sun hours, or both for simultaneous electricity production and energy storage. The key to making STEALS a dispatchable technology lies in the development of a 'thermal valve,' which controls when heat is allowed to flow through the TE module, thus controlling when electricity is generated. The current project addresses each of the three major subcomponents, (i) the TE module, (ii) the thermal energy storage system, and (iii) the thermal valve. The project also includes system-level and techno- economic modeling of the envisioned integrated system and will culminate in the demonstration of a laboratory-scale STEALS prototype capable of generating 3kWe.

  2. Retrieval of Latent Heating from TRMM Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Smith, E. A.; Adler, R. F.; Hou, A. Y.; Meneghini, R.; Simpson, J.; Haddad, Z. S.; Iguchi, T.; Satoh, S.; Kakar, R.; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Kummerow, C. D.; Lang, S.; Nakamura, K.; Nakazawa, T.; Okamoto, K.; Shige, S.; Olson, W. S.; Takayabu, Y.; Tripoli, G. J.; Yang, S.

    2006-01-01

    Precipitation, in driving the global hydrological cycle, strongly influences the behavior of the Earth's weather and climate systems and is central to their variability. Two-thirds of the global rainfall occurs over the Tropics, which leads to its profound effect on the general circulation of the atmosphere. This is because its energetic equivalent, latent heating (LH), is the tropical convective heat engine's primary fuel source as originally emphasized by Riehl and Malkus (1958). At low latitudes, LH stemming from extended bands of rainfall modulates large-scale zonal and meridional circulations and their consequent mass overturnings (e.g., Hartmann et al. 1984; Hack and Schubert 1990). Also, LH is the principal energy source in the creation, growth, vertical structure, and propagation of long-lived tropical waves (e.g., Puri 1987; Lau and Chan 1988). Moreover, the distinct vertical distribution properties of convective and stratiform LH profiles help influence climatic outcomes via their tight control on large-scale circulations (Lau and Peng 1987; Nakazawa 1988; Sui and Lau 1988; Emanuel et al. 1994; Yanai et al. 2000; Sumi and Nakazawa 2002; Schumacher et al. 2004). The purpose of this paper is to describe how LH profiles are being derived from satellite precipitation rate retrievals, focusing on those being made with Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite measurements.

  3. Latent Dirichlet allocation models for image classification.

    PubMed

    Rasiwasia, Nikhil; Vasconcelos, Nuno

    2013-11-01

    Two new extensions of latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA), denoted topic-supervised LDA (ts-LDA) and class-specific-simplex LDA (css-LDA), are proposed for image classification. An analysis of the supervised LDA models currently used for this task shows that the impact of class information on the topics discovered by these models is very weak in general. This implies that the discovered topics are driven by general image regularities, rather than the semantic regularities of interest for classification. To address this, ts-LDA models are introduced which replace the automated topic discovery of LDA with specified topics, identical to the classes of interest for classification. While this results in improvements in classification accuracy over existing LDA models, it compromises the ability of LDA to discover unanticipated structure of interest. This limitation is addressed by the introduction of css-LDA, an LDA model with class supervision at the level of image features. In css-LDA topics are discovered per class, i.e., a single set of topics shared across classes is replaced by multiple class-specific topic sets. The css-LDA model is shown to combine the labeling strength of topic-supervision with the flexibility of topic-discovery. Its effectiveness is demonstrated through an extensive experimental evaluation, involving multiple benchmark datasets, where it is shown to outperform existing LDA-based image classification approaches.

  4. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  5. Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging of Latent Fingerprints and Associated Forensic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsoching; Schultz, Zachary D.; Levin, Ira W.

    2011-01-01

    Fingerprints reflecting a specific chemical history, such as exposure to explosives, are clearly distinguished from overlapping, and interfering latent fingerprints using infrared spectroscopic imaging techniques and multivariate analysis. PMID:19684917

  6. A solar air collector with integrated latent heat thermal storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvat, Pavel; Ostry, Milan; Mauder, Tomas; Klimes, Lubomir

    2012-04-01

    Simulations of the behaviour of a solar air collector with integrated latent heat thermal storage were performed. The model of the collector was created with the use of coupling between TRNSYS 17 and MATLAB. Latent heat storage (Phase Change Material - PCM) was integrated with the solar absorber. The model of the latent heat storage absorber was created in MATLAB and the model of the solar air collector itself was created in TRNSYS with the use of TYPE 56. The model of the latent heat storage absorber allows specification of the PCM properties as well as other parameters. The simulated air collector was the front and back pass collector with the absorber in the middle of the air cavity. Two variants were considered for comparison; the light-weight absorber made of sheet metal and the heat-storage absorber with the PCM. Simulations were performed for the climatic conditions of the Czech Republic (using TMY weather data).

  7. Latent error detection: A golden two hours for detection.

    PubMed

    Saward, Justin R E; Stanton, Neville A

    2017-03-01

    Undetected error in safety critical contexts generates a latent condition that can contribute to a future safety failure. The detection of latent errors post-task completion is observed in naval air engineers using a diary to record work-related latent error detection (LED) events. A systems view is combined with multi-process theories to explore sociotechnical factors associated with LED. Perception of cues in different environments facilitates successful LED, for which the deliberate review of past tasks within two hours of the error occurring and whilst remaining in the same or similar sociotechnical environment to that which the error occurred appears most effective. Identified ergonomic interventions offer potential mitigation for latent errors; particularly in simple everyday habitual tasks. It is thought safety critical organisations should look to engineer further resilience through the application of LED techniques that engage with system cues across the entire sociotechnical environment, rather than relying on consistent human performance.

  8. Motivational control of latent inhibition in flavor preference conditioning.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Burgos, David; González, Felisa; Hall, Geoffrey

    2013-09-01

    In three experiments, rats given pairings of a neutral flavor with sucrose showed a preference for that flavor when subsequently allowed to choose between it and water. Preexposure to the flavor produced a latent inhibition effect (reduced the size of the preference) when the rats were hungry during the test (Experiments 1 and 2). Rats that were not hungry during the test failed to show latent inhibition (Experiments 1-3). Experiment 3 confirmed that sucrose-flavor pairings were capable of producing a preference even in nonhungry rats. It is argued that the preference shown by rats that are hungry on test depends on a flavor-nutrient association, a form of learning that is susceptible to latent inhibition in the same way as standard conditioning procedures are. The failure to obtain latent inhibition in nonhungry rats suggests that the preference obtained in these conditions depends on a different form of learning that is less susceptible to the effects of stimulus exposure.

  9. Protection from latent inhibition provided by a conditioned inhibitor.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Bridget L; Wheeler, Daniel S; Urcelay, Gonzalo P; Miller, Ralph R

    2009-10-01

    Two conditioned suppression experiments with rats investigated the influence on latent inhibition of compounding a Pavlovian conditioned inhibitor with the target cue during preexposure treatment. Results were compared with those of subjects that received conventional latent inhibition training, no preexposure, or preexposure to the target cue in compound with a neutral stimulus. In Experiment 1, greater attenuation of the latent inhibition effect was observed in subjects that received target preexposure in compound with a Pavlovian conditioned inhibitor relative to subjects that received preexposure with a neutral stimulus or to the target alone. In Experiment 2, this protection from latent inhibition was attenuated if the excitor that was used to train the conditioned inhibitor was extinguished between preexposure and target training. The results are consistent with an account offered by the extended comparator hypothesis.

  10. Treatment: Latent TB Infection (LTBI) and TB Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  11. A developmental study of latent absolute pitch memory.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Müllensiefen, Daniel; Stewart, Lauren

    2017-03-01

    The ability to recall the absolute pitch level of familiar music (latent absolute pitch memory) is widespread in adults, in contrast to the rare ability to label single pitches without a reference tone (overt absolute pitch memory). The present research investigated the developmental profile of latent absolute pitch (AP) memory and explored individual differences related to this ability. In two experiments, 288 children from 4 to12 years of age performed significantly above chance at recognizing the absolute pitch level of familiar melodies. No age-related improvement or decline, nor effects of musical training, gender, or familiarity with the stimuli were found in regard to latent AP task performance. These findings suggest that latent AP memory is a stable ability that is developed from as early as age 4 and persists into adulthood.

  12. Localized Dictionaries Based Orientation Field Estimation for Latent Fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Xiao Yang; Jianjiang Feng; Jie Zhou

    2014-05-01

    Dictionary based orientation field estimation approach has shown promising performance for latent fingerprints. In this paper, we seek to exploit stronger prior knowledge of fingerprints in order to further improve the performance. Realizing that ridge orientations at different locations of fingerprints have different characteristics, we propose a localized dictionaries-based orientation field estimation algorithm, in which noisy orientation patch at a location output by a local estimation approach is replaced by real orientation patch in the local dictionary at the same location. The precondition of applying localized dictionaries is that the pose of the latent fingerprint needs to be estimated. We propose a Hough transform-based fingerprint pose estimation algorithm, in which the predictions about fingerprint pose made by all orientation patches in the latent fingerprint are accumulated. Experimental results on challenging latent fingerprint datasets show the proposed method outperforms previous ones markedly.

  13. Antigenic variation in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Prucca, Cesar G; Lujan, Hugo D

    2009-12-01

    Giardia lamblia undergoes antigenic variation, both in vitro and within the intestines of infected individuals. Variant-specific surface proteins (VSPs) cover the entire surface of the trophozoites and are the main antigens recognized by the host. Only 1 of about 200 VSP genes encoded by the Giardia genome is expressed on the surface of individual Giardia cells at any time; however, VSP antigen switching occurs spontaneously. In the recent year, significant advances in the knowledge of the antigen switching process have been achieved, which strongly suggests that antigenic variation in Giardia is regulated at the post-transcriptional level by a mechanism similar to RNA interference (RNAi). Several enzymes of the RNAi pathway are directly involved in VSP mRNA silencing and/or translational repression. Although several questions remain regarding how individual VSP antigens are selected for expression on the parasite surface, it is clear that an epigenetic mechanism is involved. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of this fascinating mechanism, analyse conflicting information regarding the structure of VSPs as it relates to the host's immune response, and highlight the major issues that need to be resolved to fully understand antigenic variation in this important pathogen.

  14. Serospecific antigens of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Otten, S; Iyer, S; Johnson, W; Montgomery, R

    1986-01-01

    Serospecific antigens isolated by EDTA extraction from four serogroups of Legionella pneumophila were analyzed for their chemical composition, molecular heterogeneity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and immunological properties. The antigens were shown to be lipopolysaccharides and to differ from the lipopolysaccharides of other gram-negative bacteria. The serospecific antigens contained rhamnose, mannose, glucosamine, and two unidentified sugars together with 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate, phosphate, and fatty acids. The fatty acid composition was predominantly branched-chain acids with smaller amounts of 3-hydroxymyristic acid. The antigens contain periodate-sensitive groups; mannosyl residues were completely cleaved by periodate oxidation. Hydrolysis of the total lipopolysaccharide by acetic acid resulted in the separation of a lipid A-like material that cross-reacted with the antiserum to lipid A from Salmonella minnesota but did not comigrate with it on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. None of the four antigens contained heptose. All of the antigen preparations showed endotoxicity when tested by the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. The results of this study indicate that the serogroup-specific antigens of L. pneumophila are lipopolysaccharides containing an unusual lipid A and core structure and different from those of other gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:3017918

  15. Latent-failure risk estimates for computer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, William R.; Folsom, Rolfe A.; Green, Owen R.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that critical computer controls employing unmonitored safety circuits are unsafe. Analysis supporting this result leads to two additional, important conclusions: (1) annual maintenance checks of safety circuit function do not, as widely believed, eliminate latent failure risk; (2) safety risk remains even if multiple, series-connected protection circuits are employed. Finally, it is shown analytically that latent failure risk is eliminated when continuous monitoring is employed.

  16. A Flexible Latent Class Approach to Estimating Test-Score Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Palm, Daniël W.; van der Ark, L. Andries; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2014-01-01

    The latent class reliability coefficient (LCRC) is improved by using the divisive latent class model instead of the unrestricted latent class model. This results in the divisive latent class reliability coefficient (DLCRC), which unlike LCRC avoids making subjective decisions about the best solution and thus avoids judgment error. A computational…

  17. K99 surface antigen of Escherichia coli: antigenic characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Isaacson, R E

    1978-01-01

    K99 prepared by acid precipitation hemagglutinated guinea pig erythrocytes, whereas K99 prepared by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex did not. K99 purified by either procedure hemagglutinated horse erythrocytes. K99 prepared by acid precipitation contained a second antigen not presnet in the K99 prepared by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex. This antigen could be detected by immunoprecipitation with some, but not all, sera prepared against K99-positive Escherichia coli strains. It was assumed that this second antigen is not K99 and is responsible for the guinea pig erythrocyte hemagglutination reaction. Furthermore, the second antigen has an isoelectric point of 4.2, which has been reported by Morris and co-workers to be the isoelectric point of K99. Images PMID:83300

  18. Latent class instrumental variables: a clinical and biostatistical perspective.

    PubMed

    Baker, Stuart G; Kramer, Barnett S; Lindeman, Karen S

    2016-01-15

    In some two-arm randomized trials, some participants receive the treatment assigned to the other arm as a result of technical problems, refusal of a treatment invitation, or a choice of treatment in an encouragement design. In some before-and-after studies, the availability of a new treatment changes from one time period to this next. Under assumptions that are often reasonable, the latent class instrumental variable (IV) method estimates the effect of treatment received in the aforementioned scenarios involving all-or-none compliance and all-or-none availability. Key aspects are four initial latent classes (sometimes called principal strata) based on treatment received if in each randomization group or time period, the exclusion restriction assumption (in which randomization group or time period is an instrumental variable), the monotonicity assumption (which drops an implausible latent class from the analysis), and the estimated effect of receiving treatment in one latent class (sometimes called efficacy, the local average treatment effect, or the complier average causal effect). Since its independent formulations in the biostatistics and econometrics literatures, the latent class IV method (which has no well-established name) has gained increasing popularity. We review the latent class IV method from a clinical and biostatistical perspective, focusing on underlying assumptions, methodological extensions, and applications in our fields of obstetrics and cancer research.

  19. Latent class instrumental variables: A clinical and biostatistical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Stuart G.; Kramer, Barnett S.; Lindeman, Karen S.

    2015-01-01

    In some two-arm randomized trials, some participants receive the treatment assigned to the other arm as a result of technical problems, refusal of a treatment invitation, or a choice of treatment in an encouragement design. In some before-and-after studies, the availability of a new treatment changes from one time period to this next. Under assumptions that are often reasonable, the latent class instrumental variable (IV) method estimates the effect of treatment received in the aforementioned scenarios involving all-or-none compliance and all-or-none availability. Key aspects are four initial latent classes (sometimes called principal strata) based on treatment received if in each randomization group or time period, the exclusion restriction assumption (in which randomization group or time period is an instrumental variable), the monotonicity assumption (which drops an implausible latent class from the analysis), and the estimated effect of receiving treatment in one latent class (sometimes called efficacy, the local average treatment effect, or the complier average causal effect). Since its independent formulations in the biostatistics and econometrics literatures, the latent class IV method (which has no well-established name) has gained increasing popularity. We review the latent class IV method from a clinical and biostatistical perspective, focusing on underlying assumptions, methodological extensions, and applications in our fields of obstetrics and cancer research. PMID:26239275

  20. Cultured Vestibular Ganglion Neurons Demonstrate Latent HSV1 Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Roehm, Pamela C.; Camarena, Vladimir; Nayak, Shruti; Gardner, James B.; Wilson, Angus; Mohr, Ian; Chao, Moses V.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Vestibular neuritis is a common cause of both acute and chronic vestibular dysfunction. Multiple pathologies have been hypothesized to be the causative agent of vestibular neuritis; however, whether herpes simplex type I (HSV1) reactivation occurs within the vestibular ganglion has not been demonstrated previously by experimental evidence. We developed an in vitro system to study HSV1 infection of vestibular ganglion neurons (VGNs) using a cell culture model system. Study design basic science study. Results Lytic infection of cultured rat VGNs was observed following low viral multiplicity of infection (MOI). Inclusion of acyclovir suppressed lytic replication and allowed latency to be established. Upon removal of acyclovir, latent infection was confirmed with reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and by RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization for the latency-associated transcript (LAT). 29% cells in latently infected cultures were LAT positive. The lytic IPC27 transcript was not detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Reactivation of HSV1 occurred at a high frequency in latently infected cultures following treatment with trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deactylase inhibitor. Conclusions VGNs can be both lytically and latently infected with HSV1. Furthermore, latently infected VGNs can be induced to reactivate using TSA. This demonstrates that reactivation of latent HSV1 infection in the vestibular ganglion can occur in a cell culture model, and suggests that reactivation of HSV1 infection a plausible etiologic mechanism of vestibular neuritis. PMID:21898423

  1. Comparing the context specificity of extinction and latent inhibition.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ralph R; Laborda, Mario A; Polack, Cody W; Miguez, Gonzalo

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to a cue alone either before (i.e., latent inhibition treatment) or after (i.e., extinction) the cue is paired with an unconditioned stimulus results in attenuated conditioned responding to the cue. Here we report two experiments in which potential parallels between the context specificity of the effects of extinction and latent inhibition treatments were directly compared in a lick suppression preparation with rats. The reversed ordering of conditioning and nonreinforcement in extinction and latent inhibition designs allowed us to examine the effect of training order on the context specificity of what is learned given phasic reinforcement and nonreinforcement of a target cue. Experiment 1 revealed that when conditioned-stimulus (CS) conditioning and CS nonreinforcement were administered in the same context, both extinction and latent inhibition treatments had reduced impacts on test performance, relative to excitatory conditioning when testing occurred outside the treatment context. Similarly, Experiment 2 showed that when conditioning was administered in one context and nonreinforcement was administered in a second context, the effects of both extinction and latent inhibition treatments were attenuated when testing occurred in a neutral context, relative to the context in which the CS was nonreinforced. The observed context specificity of extinction and latent inhibition treatments has been previously reported in both cases, but not in a single experiment under otherwise identical conditions. The results of the two experiments convergently suggest that memory of nonreinforcement becomes context dependent after a cue is both reinforced and nonreinforced, independent of the order of training.

  2. A study of latent hardening behavior in aluminum single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Mingzhang; Lin Shi; Li Chenghua; Xiao Jimei; Wang Zhongguang

    1996-11-15

    In order to obtain a better understanding or a complete description of plastic properties of polycrystals, especially in polycrystal modelling viewpoint, investigations on latent hardening behavior of single crystals have been performed in a great number. Recently, however, Wu et al. have pointed out that the definition of the yield stress of latent system using the conventional back extrapolation is ambiguous in terms of determining the latent hardening moduli because the initial rapid work-hardening of the transient zone is neglected. They proposed a more precise measure of the yield stress of latent system based on the decrease of the tangent modulus from the linear elastic modulus, and showed that the latent hardening, which would not plus the initial work-hardening of the transient zone, is actually lower than that obtained from the backward extrapolation. Thus, in their opinion, it is considered that the hardening behavior of latent system (such as the directionality, the effects of relative orientation and prestrain) need be newly or further studied in detail. Single crystals of aluminum have been grown with high purity to investigate this behavior.

  3. Comparing Context Specificity of Extinction and Latent Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ralph R.; Laborda, Mario A.; Polack, Cody W.; Miguez, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to a cue alone either before (i.e., latent inhibition treatment) or after (i.e., extinction) the cue is paired with an unconditioned stimulus (US) results in attenuated conditioned responding to the cue. Here we report two experiments in which potential parallels between the context specificity of the effects of extinction and latent inhibition treatments were directly compared in a lick suppression preparation with rats. The reversed ordering of conditioning and nonreinforcement in extinction and latent inhibition designs allowed us to examine the effect of training order on the context specificity of what is learned given phasic reinforcement and nonreinforcement of a target cue. Experiment 1 found that when CS conditioning and CS nonreinforcement were administered in the same context, both extinction and latent inhibition treatments had reduced impact on test performance relative to excitatory conditioning when testing occurred outside the treatment context. Similarly, Experiment 2 found that when conditioning was administered in one context and nonreinforcement was administered in a second context, the effects of both extinction and latent inhibition treatments were attenuated when testing occurred in a neutral context relative to the context in which the CS was nonreinforced. The observed context specificity of extinction and latent inhibition treatments have both been previously reported, but not in a single experiment under otherwise identical conditions. The results of the two experiments convergently suggest that memory of nonreinforcement becomes context dependent after a cue is both reinforced and nonreinforced independent of the order of training. PMID:26100525

  4. Gamma interferon expression during acute and latent nervous system infection by herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, E M; Hinton, D R; Chen, J; Openshaw, H

    1995-01-01

    This study was initiated to evaluate a role for gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. At the acute stage of infection in mice, HSV-1 replication in trigeminal ganglia and brain stem tissue was modestly but consistently enhanced in mice from which IFN-gamma was by ablated monoclonal antibody treatment and in mice genetically lacking the IFN-gamma receptor (Rgko mice). As determined by reverse transcriptase PCR, IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor alpha transcripts were present in trigeminal ganglia during both acute and latent HSV-1 infection. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected initially in trigeminal ganglia at day 5 after HSV-1 inoculation, and these cells persisted for 6 months into latency. The T cells were focused around morphologically normal neurons that showed no signs of active infection, but many of which expressed HSV-1 latency-associated transcripts. Secreted IFN-gamma was present up to 6 months into latency in areas of the T-cell infiltration. By 9 months into latency, both the T-cell infiltrate and IFN-gamma expression had cleared, although there remained a slight increase in macrophage levels in trigeminal ganglia. In HSV-1-infected brain stem tissue, T cells and IFN-gamma expression were present at 1 month but were gone by 6 months after infection. Our hypothesis is that the persistence of T cells and the sustained IFN-gamma expression occur in response to an HSV-1 antigen(s) in the nervous system. This hypothesis is consistent with a new model of HSV-1 latency which suggests that limited HSV-1 antigen expression occurs during latency (M. Kosz-Vnenchak, J. Jacobson, D.M. Coen, and D.M. Knipe, J. Virol. 67:5383-5393, 1993). We speculate that prolonged secretion of IFN-gamma during latency may modulate a reactivated HSV-1 infection. PMID:7609058

  5. The structure of bradyzoite-specific enolase from Toxoplasma gondii reveals insights into its dual cytoplasmic and nuclear functions.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jiapeng; Mouveaux, Thomas; Light, Samuel H; Minasov, George; Anderson, Wayne F; Tomavo, Stanislas; Ngô, Huân M

    2015-03-01

    In addition to catalyzing a central step in glycolysis, enolase assumes a remarkably diverse set of secondary functions in different organisms, including transcription regulation as documented for the oncogene c-Myc promoter-binding protein 1. The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii differentially expresses two nuclear-localized, plant-like enolases: enolase 1 (TgENO1) in the latent bradyzoite cyst stage and enolase 2 (TgENO2) in the rapidly replicative tachyzoite stage. A 2.75 Å resolution crystal structure of bradyzoite enolase 1, the second structure to be reported of a bradyzoite-specific protein in Toxoplasma, captures an open conformational state and reveals that distinctive plant-like insertions are located on surface loops. The enolase 1 structure reveals that a unique residue, Glu164, in catalytic loop 2 may account for the lower activity of this cyst-stage isozyme. Recombinant TgENO1 specifically binds to a TTTTCT DNA motif present in the cyst matrix antigen 1 (TgMAG1) gene promoter as demonstrated by gel retardation. Furthermore, direct physical interactions of both nuclear TgENO1 and TgENO2 with the TgMAG1 gene promoter are demonstrated in vivo using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. Structural and biochemical studies reveal that T. gondii enolase functions are multifaceted, including the coordination of gene regulation in parasitic stage development. Enolase 1 provides a potential lead in the design of drugs against Toxoplasma brain cysts.

  6. The structure of bradyzoite-specific enolase from Toxoplasma gondii reveals insights into its dual cytoplasmic and nuclear functions

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Jiapeng; Mouveaux, Thomas; Light, Samuel H.; Minasov, George; Anderson, Wayne F.; Tomavo, Stanislas; Ngô, Huân M.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to catalyzing a central step in glycolysis, enolase assumes a remarkably diverse set of secondary functions in different organisms, including transcription regulation as documented for the oncogene c-Myc promoter-binding protein 1. The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii differentially expresses two nuclear-localized, plant-like enolases: enolase 1 (TgENO1) in the latent bradyzoite cyst stage and enolase 2 (TgENO2) in the rapidly replicative tachyzoite stage. A 2.75 Å resolution crystal structure of bradyzoite enolase 1, the second structure to be reported of a bradyzoite-specific protein in Toxoplasma, captures an open conformational state and reveals that distinctive plant-like insertions are located on surface loops. The enolase 1 structure reveals that a unique residue, Glu164, in catalytic loop 2 may account for the lower activity of this cyst-stage isozyme. Recombinant TgENO1 specifically binds to a TTTTCT DNA motif present in the cyst matrix antigen 1 (TgMAG1) gene promoter as demonstrated by gel retardation. Furthermore, direct physical interactions of both nuclear TgENO1 and TgENO2 with the TgMAG1 gene promoter are demonstrated in vivo using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. Structural and biochemical studies reveal that T. gondii enolase functions are multifaceted, including the coordination of gene regulation in parasitic stage development. Enolase 1 provides a potential lead in the design of drugs against Toxoplasma brain cysts. PMID:25760592

  7. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    PubMed

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  8. Incorporating comorbidities into latent treatment pattern mining for clinical pathways.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhengxing; Dong, Wei; Ji, Lei; He, Chunhua; Duan, Huilong

    2016-02-01

    In healthcare organizational settings, the design of a clinical pathway (CP) is challenging since patients following a particular pathway may have not only one single first-diagnosis but also several typical comorbidities, and thus it requires different disciplines involved to put together their partial knowledge about the overall pathway. Although many data mining techniques have been proposed to discover latent treatment information for CP analysis and reconstruction from a large volume of clinical data, they are specific to extract nontrivial information about the therapy and treatment of the first-diagnosis. The influence of comorbidities on adopting essential treatments is crucial for a pathway but has seldom been explored. This study proposes to extract latent treatment patterns that characterize essential treatments for both first-diagnosis and typical comorbidities from the execution data of a pathway. In particular, we propose a generative statistical model to extract underlying treatment patterns, unveil the latent associations between diagnosis labels (including both first-diagnosis and comorbidities) and treatments, and compute the contribution of comorbidities in these patterns. The proposed model extends latent Dirichlet allocation with an additional layer for diagnosis modeling. It first generates a set of latent treatment patterns from diagnosis labels, followed by sampling treatments from each pattern. We verify the effectiveness of the proposed model on a real clinical dataset containing 12,120 patient traces, which pertain to the unstable angina CP. Three treatment patterns are discovered from data, indicating latent correlations between comorbidities and treatments in the pathway. In addition, a possible medical application in terms of treatment recommendation is provided to illustrate the potential of the proposed model. Experimental results indicate that our approach can discover not only meaningful latent treatment patterns exhibiting

  9. Nuclear attitudes and reactions: associations with depression, drug use, and quality of life

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, M.D.

    1986-05-01

    For 40 years the world has lived with the threat of nuclear war and, recently, with the possibility of nuclear power plant accidents. Although virtually every generation must confront various national or international crises, the threat of nuclear war is unprecedented in its destructive potential. This study is an attempt to assess attitudes and amount of distress associated with the ever-present threat of nuclear war and the possibility of accidents at nuclear power plants. The Nuclear Attitudes Questionnaire (NAQ) consists of 15 items and was administered to 722 young adults who have grown up in the nuclear age. The items were found to reflect four latent factors of nuclear concern, nuclear support, fear of the future, and nuclear denial, all of which in turn represent a second-order construct of nuclear anxiety. Women reported significantly more nuclear concern, less nuclear support, more fear of the future, and less nuclear denial than did men. In latent-variable models, nuclear anxiety was found to be significantly associated with less purpose in life, less life satisfaction, more powerlessness, more depression, and more drug use. It is concluded that the threat of nuclear war and accidents is significantly related to psychological distress and may disturb normal maturational development.

  10. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  11. Latent Virus Reactivation: From Space to Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Satish K.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Gilden, Donald H.; Tyring, Stephen K.; Castro, Victoria A.; Ott, C. Mark; Pierson, Duane L.

    2010-01-01

    Reactivation of latent viruses is a recognized consequence of decreased immunity. More recently viral reactivation has been identified as an important in vivo indicator of clinically relevant immune changes. Viral reactivation can be determined quickly and easily by the presence of virus in saliva and other body fluids. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a highly sensitive and specific molecular method to detect the presence of specific viral DNA. Studies in astronauts demonstrated that herpes simplex virus type 1(HSV-1), Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivate at rates above normal during and after spaceflight in response to moderately decreased T-cell immunity. This technology was expanded to patients on Earth beginning with human immune deficiency virus (HIV) immuno-compromised patients. The HIV patients shed EBV in saliva at rates 9-fold higher than observed in astronauts demonstrating that the level of EBV shedding reflects the severity of impaired immunity. Whereas EBV reactivation is not expected to produce serious effects in astronauts on missions of 6 months or less, VZV reactivation in astronauts could produce shingles. Reactivation of live, infectious VZV in astronauts with no symptoms was demonstrated in astronauts during and after spaceflight. We applied our technology to study VZV-induced shingles in patients. In a study of 54 shingles patients, we showed salivary VZV was present in every patient on the day antiviral (acyclovir) treatment was initiated. Pain and skin lesions decreased with antiviral treatment. Corresponding decreases in levels of VZV were also observed and accompanied recovery. Although the level of VZV in shingles patients before the treatment was generally higher than those found in astronauts, lower range of VZV numbers in shingles patients overlapped with astronaut s levels. This suggests a potential risk of shingles to astronauts resulting from reactivation of VZV. In

  12. The effective latent heat of aqueous nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soochan; Taylor, Robert A.; Dai, Lenore; Prasher, Ravi; Phelan, Patrick E.

    2015-06-01

    Nanoparticle suspensions, popularly termed ‘nanofluids’, have been extensively investigated for their thermal and radiative properties (Eastman et al 1996 Mater. Res. Soc. Proc. 457; Keblinski et al 2005 Mater. Today 8 36-44 Barber et al 2011 Nanoscale Res. Lett. 6 1-13 Thomas and Sobhan 2011 Nanoscale Res. Lett. 6 1-21 Taylor et al 2011 Nanoscale Res. Lett. 6 1-11 Fang et al 2013 Nano Lett. 13 1736-42 Otanicar et al 2010 J. Renew. Sustainable Energy 2 03310201-13 Prasher et al 2006 ASME J. Heat Transfer 128 588-95 Shin and Banerjee 2011 ASME J. Heat Transfer 133 1-4 Taylor and Phelan 2009 Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 52 5339-48 Ameen et al 2010 Int. J. Thermophys. 31 1131-44 Lee et al 2014 Appl. Phys. Lett. 104 1-4). Such work has generated great controversy, although it is (arguably) generally accepted today that the presence of nanoparticles rarely leads to useful enhancements in either thermal conductivity or convective heat transfer. On the other hand, there are still examples of unanticipated enhancements to some properties, such as the specific heat of molten salt-based nanofluids reported by Shin and Banerjee (2011 ASME J. Heat Transfer 133 1-4) and the critical heat flux mentioned by Taylor and Phelan (2009 Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 52 5339-48). Another largely overlooked example is the reported effect of nanoparticles on the effective latent heat of vaporization (hfg) of aqueous nanofluids, as reported by Ameen et al (2010 Int. J. Thermophys. 31 1131-44). Through molecular dynamics (MD) modeling supplemented with limited experimental data they found that hfg increases with increasing nanoparticle concentration, for Pt nanoparticles (MD) and Al2O3 nanoparticles (experiments). Here, we extend those exploratory experiments in an effort to determine if hfg of aqueous nanofluids can be manipulated, i.e., increased or decreased by the addition of graphite or silver nanoparticles. Our results to date indicate that, yes, hfg can be substantially impacted, by

  13. Expeditious chemoenzymatic synthesis of CD52 glycopeptide antigens

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Xingyu; Ju, Tongzhong; Cummings, Richard D.; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2013-01-01

    CD52 is a GPI-anchored glycopeptide antigen found on sperm cells and human lymphocytes. Recent structural studies indicate that sperm-associated CD52 antigen carries both a complex type N-glycan and an O-glycan on the polypeptide backbone. To facilitate functional and immunological studies of distinct CD52 glycoforms, we report in this paper the first chemoenzymatic synthesis of homogeneous CD52 glycoforms carrying both N- and O-glycans. The synthetic strategy consists of two key steps: monosaccharide primers GlcNAc and GalNAc were first installed at the pre-determined N- and O-glycosylation sites by a facile solid-phase peptide synthesis, and then the N- and O-glycans were extended by respective enzymatic glycosylations. It was found that the endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation allowed efficient attachment of an intact N-glycan in a single step at the N-glycosylation site, while the recombinant human T-synthase could independently extend the O-linked GalNAc to form the core 1 O-glycan. This chemoenzymatic approach is highly convergent and permits easy construction of various homogeneous CD52 glycoforms from a common polypeptide precursor. In addition, the introduction of a latent thiol group in the form of protected cysteamine at the C-terminus of the CD52 glycoforms will enable site-specific conjugation to a carrier protein to provide immunogens for generating CD52 glycoform-specific antibodies for functional studies. PMID:20848033

  14. Expeditious chemoenzymatic synthesis of CD52 glycopeptide antigens.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Xinyu; Ju, Tongzhong; Cummings, Richard D; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2010-11-21

    CD52 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycopeptide antigen found on sperm cells and human lymphocytes. Recent structural studies indicate that sperm-associated CD52 antigen carries both a complex type N-glycan and an O-glycan on the polypeptide backbone. To facilitate functional and immunological studies of distinct CD52 glycoforms, we report in this paper the first chemoenzymatic synthesis of homogeneous CD52 glycoforms carrying both N- and O-glycans. The synthetic strategy consists of two key steps: monosaccharide primers GlcNAc and GalNAc were first installed at the pre-determined N- and O-glycosylation sites by a facile solid-phase peptide synthesis, and then the N- and O-glycans were extended by respective enzymatic glycosylations. It was found that the endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation allowed efficient attachment of an intact N-glycan in a single step at the N-glycosylation site, while the recombinant human T-synthase could independently extend the O-linked GalNAc to form the core 1 O-glycan. This chemoenzymatic approach is highly convergent and permits easy construction of various homogeneous CD52 glycoforms from a common polypeptide precursor. In addition, the introduction of a latent thiol group in the form of protected cysteamine at the C-terminus of the CD52 glycoforms will enable site-specific conjugation to a carrier protein to provide immunogens for generating CD52 glycoform-specific antibodies for functional studies.

  15. Impact of Latent Infection Treatment in Indigenous Populations

    PubMed Central

    Yuhara, Lucia Suemi; Sacchi, Flávia Patussi Correia; Croda, Julio

    2013-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to identify risk factors associated with latent tuberculosis (TB), examine the development of active disease among contacts, and assess the effectiveness of treating latent infection in indigenous Brazilians from January 2006 to December 2011. This was a retrospective study consisting of 1,371 tuberculosis contacts, 392 of whom underwent treatment for latent infection. Morbidity-from-TB data were obtained from the Information System for Disease Notification (SINAN) database, and the contacts’ data were collected from the clinical records using forms employed by Special Department of Indigenous Health (SESAI) multidisciplinary teams, according to SESAI’s instructions. The variables that were associated with latent infection among the contacts were age (odds ratio [OR]: 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02–1.04) and close contact with a smear-positive index case (OR: 2.26, 95% CI: 1.59–3.22). The variables associated with the development of active TB among the contacts were a tuberculin skin test (TST) ≥10 mm (relative risk [RR]: 1.12, 95% CI: 1.07–1.17), age (RR: 1.01, 95% CI: 1.00–1.03), and treatment of latent infection (RR: 0.03, 95% CI: 0.01–0.27). The estimated number of latent infection treatments needed to prevent one case of active TB among the contacts was 51 treatments (95% CI: 33–182). In contacts with TST ≥10 mm, 10 (95% CI: 6–19) latent infection treatments were necessary to prevent one case of active TB. Age and close contact with a smear-positive index case were associated with latent TB. Screening with TST is a high priority among individuals contacting smear-positive index cases. Age and TST are associated with the development of active TB among contacts, and treatment of latent infection is an effective measure to control TB in indigenous communities. PMID:23936264

  16. Study of noninvasive detection of latent fingerprints using UV laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-xia; Cao, Jing; Niu, Jie-qing; Huang, Yun-gang; Mao, Lin-jie; Chen, Jing-rong

    2011-06-01

    Latent fingerprints present a considerable challenge in forensics, and noninvasive procedure that captures a digital image of the latent fingerprints is significant in the field of criminal investigation. The capability of photography technologies using 266nm UV Nd:YAG solid state laser as excitation light source to provide detailed images of unprocessed latent fingerprints is demonstrated. Unprocessed latent fingerprints were developed on various non-absorbent and absorbing substrates. According to the special absorption, reflection, scattering and fluorescence characterization of the various residues in fingerprints (fatty acid ester, protein, and carbosylic acid salts etc) to the UV light to weaken or eliminate the background disturbance and increase the brightness contrast of fingerprints with the background, and using 266nm UV laser as excitation light source, fresh and old latent fingerprints on the surface of four types of non-absorbent objects as magazine cover, glass, back of cellphone, wood desktop paintwork and two types of absorbing objects as manila envelope, notebook paper were noninvasive detected and appeared through reflection photography and fluorescence photography technologies, and the results meet the fingerprint identification requirements in forensic science.

  17. Learning From Hidden Traits: Joint Factor Analysis and Latent Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Fu, Xiao; Sidiropoulos, Nicholas D.

    2017-01-01

    Dimensionality reduction techniques play an essential role in data analytics, signal processing and machine learning. Dimensionality reduction is usually performed in a preprocessing stage that is separate from subsequent data analysis, such as clustering or classification. Finding reduced-dimension representations that are well-suited for the intended task is more appealing. This paper proposes a joint factor analysis and latent clustering framework, which aims at learning cluster-aware low-dimensional representations of matrix and tensor data. The proposed approach leverages matrix and tensor factorization models that produce essentially unique latent representations of the data to unravel latent cluster structure -- which is otherwise obscured because of the freedom to apply an oblique transformation in latent space. At the same time, latent cluster structure is used as prior information to enhance the performance of factorization. Specific contributions include several custom-built problem formulations, corresponding algorithms, and discussion of associated convergence properties. Besides extensive simulations, real-world datasets such as Reuters document data and MNIST image data are also employed to showcase the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  18. A Magnetically Responsive Polydiacetylene Precursor for Latent Fingerprint Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joosub; Lee, Chan Woo; Kim, Jong-Man

    2016-03-09

    A magnetically responsive diacetylene (DA) powder was developed for the visualization of latent fingerprints. A mixture of the DA and magnetite nanoparticles, applied to a surface containing latent fingermarks, becomes immobilized along the ridge patterns of the fingerprints when a magnetic field is applied. Alignment along the ridge structures is a consequence of favorable hydrophobic interactions occurring between the long alkyl chains in the DAs and the lipid-rich, sebaceous latent fingermarks. UV irradiation of the DA-magnetite composite immobilized on the latent fingerprint results in the generation of blue-colored PDAs. Heat treatment of the blue-colored image promotes a blue-to-red transition as well as fluorescence turn-on. A combination of the aligned pale brown-colored monomeric state, UV irradiation generated blue-colored PDA state, as well as the heat treatment generated red-colored and fluorescent PDA state enables efficient visual imaging of a latent fingerprint, which is deposited on various colored solid surfaces.

  19. An extended crystal plasticity model for latent hardening in polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargmann, Swantje; Svendsen, Bob; Ekh, Magnus

    2011-12-01

    In this contribution, a computational approach to modeling size-dependent self- and latent hardening in polycrystals is presented. Latent hardening is the hardening of inactive slip systems due to active slip systems. We focus attention on the investigation of glide system interaction, latent hardening and excess dislocation development. In particular, latent hardening results in a transition to patchy slip as a first indication and expression of the development of dislocation microstructures. To this end, following Nye (Acta Metall 1:153-162, 1953), Kondo (in Proceedings of the second Japan national congress for applied mechanics. Science Council of Japan, Tokyo, pp. 41-47, 1953), and many others, local deformation incompatibility in the material is adopted as a measure of the density of geometrically necessary dislocations. Their development results in additional energy being stored in the material, leading to additional kinematic-like hardening effects. A large-deformation model for latent hardening is introduced. This approach is based on direct exploitation of the dissipation principle to derive all field relations and (sufficient) forms of the constitutive relations as based on the free energy density and dissipation potential. The numerical implementation is done via a dual-mixed finite element method. A numerical example for polycrystals is presented.

  20. Variation in amino acid and lipid composition of latent fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Croxton, Ruth S; Baron, Mark G; Butler, David; Kent, Terry; Sears, Vaughn G

    2010-06-15

    The enhancement of latent fingerprints, both at the crime scene and in the laboratory using an array of chemical, physical and optical techniques, permits their use for identification. Despite the plethora of techniques available, there are occasions when latent fingerprints are not successfully enhanced. An understanding of latent fingerprint chemistry and behaviour will aid the improvement of current techniques and the development of novel ones. In this study the amino acid and fatty acid content of 'real' latent fingerprints collected on a non-porous surface was analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Squalene was also quantified in addition. Hexadecanoic acid, octadecanoic acid and cis-9-octadecenoic acid were the most abundant fatty acids in all samples. There was, however, wide variation in the relative amounts of each fatty acid in each sample. It was clearly demonstrated that touching sebum-rich areas of the face immediately prior to fingerprint deposition resulted in a significant increase in the amount of fatty acids and squalene deposited in the resulting 'groomed' fingerprints. Serine was the most abundant amino acid identified followed by glycine, alanine and aspartic acid. The significant quantitative differences between the 'natural' and 'groomed' fingerprint samples seen for fatty acids were not observed in the case of the amino acids. This study demonstrates the variation in latent fingerprint composition between individuals and the impact of the sampling protocol on the quantitative analysis of fingerprints.

  1. Quality control in QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube for screening latent tuberculosis infection in health care workers.

    PubMed

    Igari, Hidetoshi; Watanabe, Akira; Ichimura, Yasunori; Sakurai, Takayuki; Taniguchi, Toshibumi; Ishiwada, Naruhiko

    2017-04-01

    QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube has been used for screening latent tuberculosis infection in newly employed health care workers in Japan. There have been a few studies concerning quality control. We retrospectively analysed QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube results in a hospital in Japan. Interferon-γ values in three blood collection tubes for QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube were analysed in association with the positivity rate. The data set consisted of health care workers aged 20-29 years during the 7 years between 2010 and 2016. The yearly QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube positivity rate was 0.9%, 16.4%, 3.0%, 39.3%, 2.8%, 0.9% and 1.5%, and was extremely high in 2011 and 2013. The interferon-γ values in the tuberculosis antigen tube were elevated in these two years, as indicated by higher median and wider interquartile range. The interferon-γ value in the negative control tube was also higher in 2011. The higher interferon-γ values in collection tubes (tuberculosis antigen tube and/or negative control tube) resulted in higher QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube positivity rate. The distribution of interferon-γ in tuberculosis antigen tube and negative control tube, as evaluated by median and interquartile range, proved to be an effective index for the quality control of QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube.

  2. Common antigen structures of HL-A antigens

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Y.; Tanigaki, N.; Yagi, Y.; Pressman, D.

    1973-01-01

    Antigenic determinants recognizable by rabbits were found to be present on the molecular fragments (48,000 Daltons) which were obtained by papain-solubilization of the membrane fractions of cultured human lymphoid cells and which carried the HL-A determinants. Results were obtained which suggest that these antigenic determinants are present in common on these molecular fragments carrying HL-A determinants regardless of their HL-A specificity and are restricted to the molecular fragments which carry HL-A determinants. The study was made by use of radioimmune methods involving the binding of radioiodine-labelled soluble HL-A antigen preparations by anti-HL-A alloantisera and by rabbit antisera raised against the membrane fractions of cultured human lymphoid cells. PMID:4119543

  3. Effective expansion of forkhead box P3⁺ regulatory T cells via early secreted antigenic target 6 and antigen 85 complex B from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying-E; Du, Zhong-Ren; Cai, Ying-Mu; Peng, Wen-Guang; Zheng, Gao-Zhe; Zheng, Geng-Long; Wu, Li-Biao; Li, Ke

    2015-04-01

    The expansion of CD4+ CD25+ forkhead box (FOX)P3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells has been observed in patients with Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis; however, the mechanism of expansion remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of the early secreted antigenic target 6(ESAT‑6) and antigen 85 complex B (Ag85B) from M. tuberculosis on Treg cell expansion. To investigate the sensitivity of peripheral blood cultures to the M. tuberculosis ESAT‑6 and Ag85B antigens, the proportion of circulating CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg cells was determined using flow cytometry and the levels of FOXP3 mRNA were determined using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The mRNA levels of FOXP3 and the proportion of circulating CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg cells were increased in multiplicitous drug‑resistant tuberculosis patients compared with those in healthy controls and patients with latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI) (P<0.001). The mycobacterial antigens ESAT‑6 and Ag85B increased the expansion of the CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg cells and the mRNA levels of FOXP3 in healthy controls and LTBI patients compared with the effect of Bacillus Calmette‑Guerin (P<0.05). Additionally, the mRNA levels of FOXP3 were elevated in the LTBI patients following stimulations with the mycobacterial antigens (P=0.012). Therefore, the M. tuberculosis antigens ESAT‑6 and Ag85B induced CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg‑cell expansion, particularly in patients with LTBI. These findings indicated that CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg cells may have a primary role in the failure of the host immune system to eradicate M. tuberculosis.

  4. How does antigen retrieval work?

    PubMed

    Leong, Trishe Y-M; Leong, Anthony S-Y

    2007-03-01

    The introduction of antigen retrieval has enabled immunohistology to become an integral component of morphologic diagnosis, routinely employed in cancer diagnosis, and for the identification of therapeutic and prognostic markers. The mechanism of antigen retrieval, however, remains speculative with the key to our understanding embedded in the actions of formaldehyde on proteins. One commonly held concept is that heat primarily breaks down protein cross-linkages that occur with aldehyde fixation, thus "unmasking" protein epitopes of interest. Enzymatic pretreatment is also thought to have a similar action whereas such "breakages" are the result of extremely rapid molecular movement induced by microwaves and ultrasound. The formation of rigid cagelike calcium complexes during formaldehyde fixation is another suggested mechanism of antigen masking requiring chelating agents for reversal. A more recent suggestion for the antigen retrieval phenomenon has evoked the Mannich reaction, which occurs with the cross-linking of some proteins. Such cross-linkages can be hydrolyzed by heat or alkalis so that the process of antigen retrieval may be the simple removal of such cross-linked proteins that are sterically interfering with the binding of antibodies to linear protein epitopes in the tissue section. We are clearly not yet in possession of all the answers to the problem.

  5. Development of latent fingermarks from rocks and stones.

    PubMed

    Hefetz, Ido; Cohen, Amit; Cohen, Yaron; Chaikovsky, Alan

    2014-09-01

    Since the beginning of recorded history, stones have been used in the commission of crimes due to their widespread availability. Stones can be used as a lethal weapon that sometimes might be the only evidence in a serious case. The common perception, even in professional fingermark circles, is that stones do not yield identifiable latent fingermarks. The authors of this research paper examined the feasibility of developing fingermarks from seven types of stones using three latent fingermark techniques: magnetic powder, cyanoacrylate fuming, and ninhydrin. The paper will demonstrate that by classifying stones and rocks according to their natural properties (porosity, permeability, and the nature of surface area), even application of the simplest development techniques can produce good results. In conclusion, chert and limestone yielded the most qualitative and quantitative results using magnetic powder. The time factor is also important in recovering latent fingermarks on stones and rocks.

  6. A combined feature latent semantic model for scene classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yue; Wang, Runsheng

    2009-10-01

    Due to vast growth of image databases, scene image classification methods have become increasingly important in computer vision areas. We propose a new scene image classification framework based on combined feature and a latent semantic model which is based on the Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) in the statistical text literature. Here the model is applied to visual words representation for images. We use Gibbs sampling for parameter estimation and use several different numbers of topics at the same time to obtain the latent topic representation of images. We densely extract multi-scale patches from images and get the combined feature on these patches. Our method is unsupervised. It can also well represent semantic characteristic of images. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach by comparing it to those used in previous work in this area. Experiments were conducted on three often used image databases, and our method got better results than the others.

  7. A cautionary note on testing latent variable models

    PubMed Central

    Ropovik, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The article tackles the practice of testing latent variable models. The analysis covered recently published studies from 11 psychology journals varying in orientation and impact. Seventy-five studies that matched the criterion of applying some of the latent modeling techniques were reviewed. Results indicate the presence of a general tendency to ignore the model test (χ2) followed by the acceptance of approximate fit hypothesis without detailed model examination yielding relevant empirical evidence. Due to reduced sensitivity of such a procedure to confront theory with data, there is an almost invariable tendency to accept the theoretical model. This absence of model test consequences, manifested in frequently unsubstantiated neglect of evidence speaking against the model, thus implies the perilous question of whether such empirical testing of latent structures (the way it is widely applied) makes sense at all. PMID:26594192

  8. Rare Earth Fluorescent Nanomaterials for Enhanced Development of Latent Fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Li, Ming; Yu, Aoyang; Wu, Jian; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-12-30

    The most commonly found fingerprints at crime scenes are latent and, thus, an efficient method for detecting latent fingerprints is very important. However, traditional developing techniques have drawbacks such as low developing sensitivity, high background interference, complicated operation, and high toxicity. To tackle this challenge, we have synthesized two kinds of rare earth fluorescent nanomaterials, including the fluoresce red-emitting YVO4:Eu nanocrystals and green-emitting LaPO4:Ce,Tb nanobelts, and then used them as fluorescent labels for the development of latent fingerprints with high sensitivity, high contrast, high selectivity, high efficiency, and low background interference, on various substrates including noninfiltrating materials, semi-infiltrating materials, and infiltrating materials.

  9. Latent Tuberculosis in Pregnancy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Malhamé, Isabelle; Cormier, Maxime; Sugarman, Jordan; Schwartzman, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background In countries with low tuberculosis (TB) incidence, immigrants from higher incidence countries represent the major pool of individuals with latent TB infection (LTBI). The antenatal period represents an opportunity for immigrant women to access the medical system, and hence for potential screening and treatment of LTBI. However, such screening and treatment during pregnancy remains controversial. Objectives In order to further understand the prevalence, natural history, screening and management of LTBI in pregnancy, we conducted a systematic literature review addressing the screening and treatment of LTBI, in pregnant women without known HIV infection. Methods A systematic review of 4 databases (Embase, Embase Classic, Medline, Cochrane Library) covering articles published from January 1st 1980 to April 30th 2014. Articles in English, French or Spanish with relevant information on prevalence, natural history, screening tools, screening strategies and treatment of LTBI during pregnancy were eligible for inclusion. Articles were excluded if (1) Full text was not available (2) they were case series or case studies (3) they focused exclusively on prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of active TB (4) the study population was exclusively HIV-infected. Results Of 4,193 titles initially identified, 208 abstracts were eligible for review. Of these, 30 articles qualified for full text review and 22 were retained: 3 cohort studies, 2 case-control studies, and 17 cross-sectional studies. In the USA, the estimated prevalence of LTBI ranged from 14 to 48% in women tested, and tuberculin skin test (TST) positivity was associated with ethnicity. One study suggested that incidence of active TB was significantly increased during the 180 days postpartum (Incidence rate ratio, 1.95 (95% CI 1.24–3.07). There was a high level of adherence with both skin testing (between 90–100%) and chest radiography (93–100%.). In three studies from low incidence settings, concordance

  10. Treatment guidelines for latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) has been established as valid for patients at high risk for developing active tuberculosis. Treatment of LTBI is also considered an important strategy for eliminating tuberculosis (TB) in Japan. In recent years, interferon-gamma release assays have come into widespread use; isoniazid (INH) preventive therapy for HIV patients has come to be recommended worldwide; and there have been increases in both types of biologics used in the treatment of immune diseases as well as the diseases susceptible to treatment. In light of the above facts, the Prevention Committee and the Treatment Committee of the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis have jointly drafted these guidelines. In determining subjects for LTBI treatment, the following must be considered: 1) risk of TB infection/ development; 2) infection diagnosis; 3) chest image diagnosis; 4) the impact of TB development; 5) the possible manifestation of side effects; and 6) the prospects of treatment completion. LTBI treatment is actively considered when relative risk is deemed 4 or higher, including risk factors such as the following: HIV/AIDS, organ transplants (immunosuppressant use), silicosis, dialysis due to chronic renal failure, recent TB infection (within 2 years), fibronodular shadows in chest radiographs (untreated old TB), the use of biologics, and large doses of corticosteroids. Although the risk is lower, the following risk factors require consideration of LTBI treatment when 2 or more of them are present: use of oral or inhaled corticosteroids, use of other immunosuppressants, diabetes, being underweight, smoking, gastrectomy, and so on. In principle, INH is administered for a period of 6 or 9 months. When INH cannot be used, rifampicin is administered for a period of 4 or 6 months. It is believed that there are no reasons to support long-term LTBI treatment for immunosuppressed patients in Japan, where the risk of infection is not considered markedly high

  11. Measurement of Latent Cognitive Abilities Involved in Concept Identification Learning

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Michael L.; Brown, Gregory G.; Gur, Ruben C.; Moore, Tyler M.; Patt, Virginie M.; Nock, Matthew K.; Naifeh, James A.; Heeringa, Steven; Ursano, Robert J.; Stein, Murray B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We used cognitive and psychometric modeling techniques to evaluate the construct validity and measurement precision of latent cognitive abilities measured by a test of concept identification learning: the Penn Conditional Exclusion Test (PCET). Method Item response theory parameters were embedded within classic associative- and hypothesis-based Markov learning models and fitted to 35,553 Army soldiers' PCET data from the Army Study To Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS). Results Data were consistent with a hypothesis-testing model with multiple latent abilities— abstraction and set shifting. Latent abstraction ability was positively correlated with number of concepts learned, and latent set shifting ability was negatively correlated with number of perseverative errors, supporting the construct validity of the two parameters. Abstraction was most precisely assessed for participants with abilities ranging from one-and-a-half standard deviations below the mean to the mean itself. Measurement of set shifting was acceptably precise only for participants making a high number of perseverative errors. Conclusions The PCET precisely measures latent abstraction ability in the Army STARRS sample, especially within the range of mildly impaired to average ability. This precision pattern is ideal for a test developed to measure cognitive impairment as opposed to cognitive strength. The PCET also measures latent set shifting ability, but reliable assessment is limited to the impaired range of ability reflecting that perseverative errors are rare among cognitively healthy adults. Integrating cognitive and psychometric models can provide information about construct validity and measurement precision within a single analytical framework. PMID:26147832

  12. Activation of latent HIV using drug-loaded nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kovochich, Michael; Marsden, Matthew D; Zack, Jerome A

    2011-04-05

    Antiretroviral therapy is currently only capable of controlling HIV replication rather than completely eradicating virus from patients. This is due in part to the establishment of a latent virus reservoir in resting CD4+ T cells, which persists even in the presence of HAART. It is thought that forced activation of latently infected cells could induce virus production, allowing targeting of the cell by the immune response. A variety of molecules are able to stimulate HIV from latency. However no tested purging strategy has proven capable of eliminating the infection completely or preventing viral rebound if therapy is stopped. Hence novel latency activation approaches are required. Nanoparticles can offer several advantages over more traditional drug delivery methods, including improved drug solubility, stability, and the ability to simultaneously target multiple different molecules to particular cell or tissue types. Here we describe the development of a novel lipid nanoparticle with the protein kinase C activator bryostatin-2 incorporated (LNP-Bry). These particles can target and activate primary human CD4+ T-cells and stimulate latent virus production from human T-cell lines in vitro and from latently infected cells in a humanized mouse model ex vivo. This activation was synergistically enhanced by the HDAC inhibitor sodium butyrate. Furthermore, LNP-Bry can also be loaded with the protease inhibitor nelfinavir (LNP-Bry-Nel), producing a particle capable of both activating latent virus and inhibiting viral spread. Taken together these data demonstrate the ability of nanotechnological approaches to provide improved methods for activating latent HIV and provide key proof-of-principle experiments showing how novel delivery systems may enhance future HIV therapy.

  13. Interexaminer variation of minutia markup on latent fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Ulery, Bradford T; Hicklin, R Austin; Roberts, Maria Antonia; Buscaglia, JoAnn

    2016-07-01

    Latent print examiners often differ in the number of minutiae they mark during analysis of a latent, and also during comparison of a latent with an exemplar. Differences in minutia counts understate interexaminer variability: examiners' markups may have similar minutia counts but differ greatly in which specific minutiae were marked. We assessed variability in minutia markup among 170 volunteer latent print examiners. Each provided detailed markup documenting their examinations of 22 latent-exemplar pairs of prints randomly assigned from a pool of 320 pairs. An average of 12 examiners marked each latent. The primary factors associated with minutia reproducibility were clarity, which regions of the prints examiners chose to mark, and agreement on value or comparison determinations. In clear areas (where the examiner was "certain of the location, presence, and absence of all minutiae"), median reproducibility was 82%; in unclear areas, median reproducibility was 46%. Differing interpretations regarding which regions should be marked (e.g., when there is ambiguity in the continuity of a print) contributed to variability in minutia markup: especially in unclear areas, marked minutiae were often far from the nearest minutia marked by a majority of examiners. Low reproducibility was also associated with differences in value or comparison determinations. Lack of standardization in minutia markup and unfamiliarity with test procedures presumably contribute to the variability we observed. We have identified factors accounting for interexaminer variability; implementing standards for detailed markup as part of documentation and focusing future training efforts on these factors may help to facilitate transparency and reduce subjectivity in the examination process.

  14. HLA antigens and Berger's disease.

    PubMed

    Bignon, J D; Houssin, A; Soulillou, J P; Denis, J; Guimbretiere, J; Guenel, J

    1980-07-01

    We have studied the frequencies of HLA-A, -B antigens in 73 Berger's disease patients, plus HLA-DR antigens in 35 of them, and compared the percentages of antigens frequencies with those of a local and national panel. This study does not confirm the positive associations with HLA-Bw35 or HLA-B12 which have been previously reported. The HLA-DR typing only showed increased frequency of blanks in the patients (P smaller than 0.01, but no significant corr.P). Patients with Berger's disease and renal failure have a higher (but still not significant) HLA-Bw35 frequency than those without renal failure. The reasons for the discrepancy between our group and others are analysed.

  15. A coarse to fine minutiae-based latent palmprint matching.

    PubMed

    Liu, Eryun; Jain, Anil K; Tian, Jie

    2013-10-01

    With the availability of live-scan palmprint technology, high resolution palmprint recognition has started to receive significant attention in forensics and law enforcement. In forensic applications, latent palmprints provide critical evidence as it is estimated that about 30 percent of the latents recovered at crime scenes are those of palms. Most of the available high-resolution palmprint matching algorithms essentially follow the minutiae-based fingerprint matching strategy. Considering the large number of minutiae (about 1,000 minutiae in a full palmprint compared to about 100 minutiae in a rolled fingerprint) and large area of foreground region in full palmprints, novel strategies need to be developed for efficient and robust latent palmprint matching. In this paper, a coarse to fine matching strategy based on minutiae clustering and minutiae match propagation is designed specifically for palmprint matching. To deal with the large number of minutiae, a local feature-based minutiae clustering algorithm is designed to cluster minutiae into several groups such that minutiae belonging to the same group have similar local characteristics. The coarse matching is then performed within each cluster to establish initial minutiae correspondences between two palmprints. Starting with each initial correspondence, a minutiae match propagation algorithm searches for mated minutiae in the full palmprint. The proposed palmprint matching algorithm has been evaluated on a latent-to-full palmprint database consisting of 446 latents and 12,489 background full prints. The matching results show a rank-1 identification accuracy of 79.4 percent, which is significantly higher than the 60.8 percent identification accuracy of a state-of-the-art latent palmprint matching algorithm on the same latent database. The average computation time of our algorithm for a single latent-to-full match is about 141 ms for genuine match and 50 ms for impostor match, on a Windows XP desktop system with 2

  16. Development of latent fingerprint by ZnO deposition.

    PubMed

    Yu, I-Heng; Jou, Shyankay; Chen, Chin-Min; Wang, Kuang-Chuan; Pang, Lei-Jang; Liao, Jeh Shane

    2011-04-15

    Vacuum metal deposition (VMD) utilizing sequential Au and Zn depositions has been an effective technique to develop latent fingerprint on plastic surfaces. A simplified vacuum deposition process was conducted to develop fingerprint in this study. While pure ZnO was thermally evaporated in a vacuum system, ZnO could condense on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surface. Direct deposition of ZnO, without applying Au seeding, yielded normal development of latent fingerprint. The development of aged fingerprint by ZnO deposition was more effective than that by Au/Zn VMD.

  17. Design and simulation of latent heat storage units

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsundar, N.; Stein, E.; Rooz, E.; Bascaran, E.; Lee, T.C. )

    1992-04-01

    This report presents the results of two years of research and development on passive latent heat storage systems. Analytical models have been developed and extended, and a computer code for simulating the performance of a latent heat storage has been developed. The code is intended to be merged into a larger solar energy system simulation code and used for making realistic system studies. Simulation studies using a code which has a flexible and accurate routine for handling the storage subsystem should lead to the development of better systems than those in which storage is added on after the rest of the system has already been selected and optimized.

  18. Design and simulation of latent heat storage units. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsundar, N.; Stein, E.; Rooz, E.; Bascaran, E.; Lee, T.C.

    1992-04-01

    This report presents the results of two years of research and development on passive latent heat storage systems. Analytical models have been developed and extended, and a computer code for simulating the performance of a latent heat storage has been developed. The code is intended to be merged into a larger solar energy system simulation code and used for making realistic system studies. Simulation studies using a code which has a flexible and accurate routine for handling the storage subsystem should lead to the development of better systems than those in which storage is added on after the rest of the system has already been selected and optimized.

  19. Multimodal visual dictionary learning via heterogeneous latent semantic sparse coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chenxiao; Ding, Guiguang; Zhou, Jile; Guo, Yuchen; Liu, Qiang

    2014-11-01

    Visual dictionary learning as a crucial task of image representation has gained increasing attention. Specifically, sparse coding is widely used due to its intrinsic advantage. In this paper, we propose a novel heterogeneous latent semantic sparse coding model. The central idea is to bridge heterogeneous modalities by capturing their common sparse latent semantic structure so that the learned visual dictionary is able to describe both the visual and textual properties of training data. Experiments on both image categorization and retrieval tasks demonstrate that our model shows superior performance over several recent methods such as K-means and Sparse Coding.

  20. Latent Semantic Analysis of the Languages of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Ryan Anthony

    We use Latent Semantic Analysis as a basis to study the languages of life. Using this approach we derive techniques to discover latent relationships between organisms such as significant motifs and evolutionary features. Doubly Singular Value Decomposition is defined and the significance of this adaptation is demonstrated by finding a phylogeny of twenty prokaryotes. Minimal Killer Words are used to define families of organisms from negative information. The application of these words makes it possible to automatically retrieve the coding frame of a sequence from any organism.

  1. PROC LCA: A SAS Procedure for Latent Class Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Stephanie T; Collins, Linda M; Lemmon, David R; Schafer, Joseph L

    2007-01-01

    Latent class analysis (LCA) is a statistical method used to identify a set of discrete, mutually exclusive latent classes of individuals based on their responses to a set of observed categorical variables. In multiple-group LCA, both the measurement part and structural part of the model can vary across groups, and measurement invariance across groups can be empirically tested. LCA with covariates extends the model to include predictors of class membership. In this article, we introduce PROC LCA, a new SAS procedure for conducting LCA, multiple-group LCA, and LCA with covariates. The procedure is demonstrated using data on alcohol use behavior in a national sample of high school seniors.

  2. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  3. Nuclear Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Anne

    1984-01-01

    "Nuclear Winter" was recently coined to describe the climatic and biological effects of a nuclear war. These effects are discussed based on models, simulations, scenarios, and projections. Effects on human populations are also considered. (JN)

  4. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  5. Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, G.F.

    1991-08-20

    This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

  6. Nuclear Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, J. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Trends in and factors related to the nuclear industry and nuclear fuel production are discussed. Topics addressed include nuclear reactors, survival of the U.S. uranium industry, production costs, budget cuts by the Department of Energy and U.S. Geological survey for resource studies, mining, and research/development activities. (JN)

  7. Antigenic determinants and functional domains in core antigen and e antigen from hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Salfeld, J; Pfaff, E; Noah, M; Schaller, H

    1989-01-01

    The precore/core gene of hepatitis B virus directs the synthesis of two polypeptides, the 21-kilodalton subunit (p21c) forming the viral nucleocapsid (serologically defined as core antigen [HBcAg]) and a secreted processed protein (p17e, serologically defined as HBe antigen [HBeAg]). Although most of their primary amino acid sequences are identical, HBcAg and HBeAg display different antigenic properties that are widely used in hepatitis B virus diagnosis. To locate and to characterize the corresponding determinants, segments of the core gene were expressed in Escherichia coli and probed with a panel of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blots, and competition assays. Three distinct major determinants were characterized. The single conformational determinant responsible for HBc antigenicity in the assembled core (HBc) and a linear HBe-related determinant (HBe1) were both mapped to an overlapping hydrophilic sequence around amino acid 80; a second HBe determinant (HBe2) was assigned to a location in the vicinity of amino acid 138 but found to require for its antigenicity the intramolecular participation of the extended sequence between amino acids 10 and 140. It is postulated that HBcAg and HBeAg share common basic three-dimensional structure exposing the common linear determinant HBe1 but that they differ in the presentation of two conformational determinants that are either introduced (HBc) or masked (HBe2) in the assembled core. The simultaneous presentation of HBe1 and HBc, two distinctly different antigenic determinants with overlapping amino acid sequences, is interpreted to indicate the presence of slightly differently folded, stable conformational states of p21c in the hepatitis B virus nucleocapsid. Images PMID:2463383

  8. Epstein-Barr Virus Essential Antigen EBNA3C Attenuates H2AX Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Hem C.; AJ, Mahadesh Prasad; Saha, Abhik; Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Lu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent antigen EBNA3C is implicated in B-cell immortalization and linked to several B-cell malignancies. Deregulation of H2AX can induce genomic instability with increased chromosomal aberrations, which ultimately leads to tumorigenesis. Here we demonstrated that EBNA3C can attenuate H2AX expression at the transcript and protein levels. A reduction of total H2AX levels was clearly observed upon infection of primary B cells with wild-type EBV but not with EBNA3C knockout recombinant EBV. H2AX also interacted with EBNA3C through its N-terminal domain (residues 1 to 100). Furthermore, H2AX mutated at Ser139 failed to interact with EBNA3C. Luciferase-based reporter assays also revealed that the binding domain of EBNA3C is sufficient for transcriptional inhibition of the H2AX promoter. EBNA3C also facilitated H2AX degradation through recruitment of components of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. We further demonstrated that knockdown of H2AX in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) led to the upregulation of the Bub1 oncoprotein and downregulated expression of p53. Overall, our study provides additional insights into EBV-associated B-cell lymphomas, which are linked to the regulation of the DNA damage response system in infected cells. The importance of these insights are as follows: (i) EBNA3C downregulates H2AX expression at the protein and transcript levels in epithelial cells, B cells, and EBV-transformed LCLs, (ii) EBNA3C binds with wild-type H2AX but not with the Ser139 mutant of H2AX, (iii) the N terminus (residues 1 to 100) of EBNA3C is critical for binding to H2AX, (iv) localization of H2AX is predominantly nuclear in the presence of EBNA3C, and (v) H2AX knocked down in LCLs led to enhanced expression of Bub1 and downregulation of the tumor suppressor p53, which are both important for driving the oncogenic process. PMID:24429368

  9. Human Leukemia-Associated Anti-Nuclear Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Klein, George; Steiner, Melita; Wiener, Francis; Klein, Eva

    1974-01-01

    A brilliant, coarsely granular nuclear antigen was detected by anti-complement immunofluorescence in the nuclei of acute myeloid leukemia myeloblasts. Designated as LANA (leukemia-associated nuclear antigen), the reactivity differs from that of the Epstein-Barr-virus-determined nuclear antigen (EBNA) in immunological specificity and morphological appearance, although it is visualized by the same method. Serum from acute myeloid leukemia patients gave positive reactions in 73% of the cases. In acute lymphatic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphatic leukemia, and Burkitt's lymphoma the sera were positive in 35, 14, 19, and 24%, respectively. Two of five polycythemia and two of eleven myeloma sera were also positive. Among 61 healthy controls, 58 were negative, whereas three showed a diffuse nuclear staining with a different pattern. Among 24 carcinoma patients, 18 were negative, whereas six gave a nuclear staining with a different, diffuse pattern. Sera from 20 patients who had recovered from infectious mononucleosis were all negative. In addition to the blasts of acute myeloid leukemia, a similar reactivity was seen with two Epstein-Barr virus DNA and EBNA-negative African lymphoma biopsies and in a short-lived tissue culture line derived from one of them. LANA could be a fetal or tissue-specific antigen, a virally determined antigen, or a specific form of anti-nuclear reactivity. Images PMID:4595570

  10. Latent simian varicella virus reactivates in monkeys treated with tacrolimus with or without exposure to irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Ravi; Traina-Dorge, Vicki; Wellish, Mary; Deharo, Eileen; Singletary, Morgan L; Ribka, Erin P; Sanford, Robert; Gilden, Don

    2010-01-01

    Simian varicella virus (SVV) infection of primates resembles human varicellazoster virus (VZV) infection. After primary infection, SVV becomes latent in ganglia and reactivates after immunosuppression or social and environmental stress. Herein, natural SVV infection was established in 5 cynomolgus macaques (cynos) and 10 African green (AG) monkeys. Four cynos were treated with the immunosuppressant tacrolimus (80 to 300 μg/kg/day) for 4 months and 1 was untreated (group 1). Four AG monkeys were exposed to a single dose (200 cGy) of x-irradiation (group 2), and 4 other AG monkeys were irradiated and treated with tacrolimus for 4 months (group 3); the remaining 2 AG monkeys were untreated. Zoster rash developed 1 to 2 weeks after tacrolimus treatment in 3 of 4 monkeys in group 1, 6 weeks after irradiation in 1 of 4 monkeys in group 2, and 1 to 2 weeks after irradiation in all 4 monkeys in group 3. All monkeys were euthanized 1 to 4 months after immunosuppression. SVV antigens were detected immunohistochemically in skin biopsies as well as in lungs of most monkeys. Low copy number SVV DNA was detected in ganglia from all three groups of monkeys, including controls. RNA specific for SVV ORFs 61, 63, and 9 was detected in ganglia from one immunosuppressed monkey in group 1. SVV antigens were detected in multiple ganglia from all immunosuppressed monkeys in every group, but not in controls. These results indicate that tacrolimus treatment produced reactivation in more monkeys than irradiation and tacrolimus and irradiation increased the frequency of SVV reactivation as compared to either treatment alone. PMID:20822371

  11. Gallium-68 Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Michael S; Iravani, Amir

    2017-04-01

    The role of gallium-68 ((68)Ga) prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET imaging is evolving and finding its place in the imaging armamentarium for prostate cancer (PCa). Despite the progress of conventional imaging strategies, significant limitations remain, including identification of small-volume disease and assessment of bone. Clinical studies have demonstrated that (68)Ga-PSMA is a promising tracer for detection of PCa metastases, even in patients with low prostate-specific antigen. To provide an accurate interpretation of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/computed tomography, nuclear medicine specialists and radiologists should be familiar with physiologic (68)Ga-PSMA uptake, common variants, patterns of locoregional and distant spread of PCa, and inherent pitfalls.

  12. Assessment of latent tuberculosis infection in Takayasu arteritis with tuberculin skin test and Quantiferon-TB Gold test.

    PubMed

    Karadag, Omer; Aksu, Kenan; Sahin, Abdurrahman; Zihni, Figen Yargucu; Sener, Burcin; Inanc, Nevsun; Kalyoncu, Umut; Aydin, Sibel Zehra; Ascioglu, Sibel; Ocakci, Pinar Talu; Bilgen, Sule Apras; Keser, Gokhan; Inal, Vedat; Direskeneli, Haner; Calguneri, Meral; Ertenli, Ihsan; Kiraz, Sedat

    2010-09-01

    A possible relationship between Takayasu arteritis (TA) and tuberculosis (TB) has been suggested. An increased frequency of tuberculin skin test (TST) was observed in TA patients. Quantiferon-TB Gold test (QFT) is a new in vitro assay measuring interferon-gamma response to M. tuberculosis antigens and helpful in diagnosing latent TB infection. The aim of this study was to investigate latent TB infection among TA patients by the use of both TST and QFT Gold test. Ninety-four (male/female: 7/87) TA patients fulfilling ACR 1990 TA criteria from three different university hospitals in Turkey and 107 control subjects without inflammatory diseases were included in the study. Data about medical history (TA and TB) were collected for both groups. TST and QFT were performed. TST values > or =5 mm for TA patients and > or =15 mm for controls was accepted as TST positivity. Even though TA group was older (40 +/- 12 vs. 32 +/- 8, P < 0.001), there was no significant difference between TA patients and controls regarding demographic characteristics. Six TA patients and one control had a history of previous TB infection (P = 0.054). Although TST positivity was higher in TA group [55 patients (62.5%) vs. 24 controls (41.4%), P = 0.008], QFT positivity was similar between two groups [21 patients (22.3%) vs. 24 controls (22.4%), P > 0.05]. QFT was negative in two of six TA patients with previous TB history. Rate of latent TB infection in TA patients measured with QFT is no more than controls. QFT seems to be a good and favorable test compared with TST in detecting LTBI in TA.

  13. Blueberry latent virus: An Amalgam of the Totiviridae and Partitiviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new, symptomless virus was identified in blueberry. The dsRNA genome of the virus, provisionally named Blueberry latent virus (BBLV), codes for two putative proteins and lacks a movement protein, a property only shared with cryptic viruses. More than 35 isolates of the virus from different cultiv...

  14. Validity Measures in the Context of Latent Trait Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    Test validity is a concept that has often been ignored in the context of latent trait models and in modern test theory, particularly as it relates to computerized adaptive testing. Some considerations about the validity of a test and of a single item are proposed. This paper focuses on measures that are population-free and that will provide local…

  15. A Latent Trait Model for Differential Strategies in Cognitive Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    Some cognitive psychologists, who have tried to approach psychometric theories, say that the psychometric approach does not provide them with theories and methods with which they can deal with differential strategies. In this paper, a general latent trait model for differential strategies in cognitive processes is proposed which includes three…

  16. Filled Carbon Nanotubes: Superior Latent Heat Storage Enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-01

    This factsheet describes a rstudy whose technical objective is to demonstrate the feasibility of filled carbon nanotubes (CNT) as latent heat storage enhancers, with potential applications as next generation thermal management fluids in diverse applications in industries ranging from high-demand microelectronic cooling, manufacturing, power generation, transportation, to solar energy storage.

  17. New Developments in Latent Variable Panel Analyses of Longitudinal Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Todd D.; Preacher, Kristopher J.; Selig, James P.; Card, Noel A.

    2007-01-01

    We review fundamental issues in one traditional structural equation modeling (SEM) approach to analyzing longitudinal data--cross-lagged panel designs. We then discuss a number of new developments in SEM that are applicable to analyzing panel designs. These issues include setting appropriate scales for latent variables, specifying an appropriate…

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of the Alfalfa latent virus

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jonathan; Postnikova, Olga A.

    2015-01-01

    The first complete genome sequence of the Alfalfa latent carlavirus (ALV) was obtained by primer walking and Illumina RNA sequencing. The virus differs substantially from the Czech ALV isolate and the Pea streak virus isolate from Wisconsin. The absence of a clear nucleic acid-binding protein indicates ALV divergence from other carlaviruses. PMID:25883281

  19. Symmetry Breaking Analysis of Prism Adaptation's Latent Aftereffect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Till D.; Blau, Julia J. C.; Turvey, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of prism adaptation on movement is typically reduced when the movement at test (prisms off) differs on some dimension from the movement at training (prisms on). Some adaptation is latent, however, and only revealed through further testing in which the movement at training is fully reinstated. Applying a nonlinear attractor dynamic model…

  20. Mediation Analysis in a Latent Growth Curve Modeling Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Soest, Tilmann; Hagtvet, Knut A.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents several longitudinal mediation models in the framework of latent growth curve modeling and provides a detailed account of how such models can be constructed. Logical and statistical challenges that might arise when such analyses are conducted are also discussed. Specifically, we discuss how the initial status (intercept) and…