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Sample records for latently infected cell

  1. Dual-color HIV reporters trace a population of latently infected cells and enable their purification.

    PubMed

    Calvanese, Vincenzo; Chavez, Leonard; Laurent, Timothy; Ding, Sheng; Verdin, Eric

    2013-11-01

    HIV latency constitutes the main barrier for clearing HIV infection from patients. Our inability to recognize and isolate latently infected cells hinders the study of latent HIV. We engineered two HIV-based viral reporters expressing different fluorescent markers: one HIV promoter-dependent marker for productive HIV infection, and a second marker under a constitutive promoter independent of HIV promoter activity. Infection of cells with these viruses allows the identification and separation of latently infected cells from uninfected and productively infected cells. These reporters are sufficiently sensitive and robust for high-throughput screening to identify drugs that reactivate latent HIV. These reporters can be used in primary CD4 T lymphocytes and reveal a rare population of latently infected cells responsive to physiological stimuli. In summary, our HIV-1 reporters enable visualization and purification of latent-cell populations and open up new perspectives for studies of latent HIV infection.

  2. Dual-Color HIV Reporters Trace a Population of Latently Infected Cells and Enable Their Purification

    PubMed Central

    Calvanese, Vincenzo; Chavez, Leonard; Laurent, Timothy; Ding, Sheng; Verdin, Eric

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY HIV latency constitutes the main barrier for clearing HIV infection from patients. Our inability to recognize and isolate latently infected cells hinders the study of latent HIV. We engineered two HIV-based viral reporters expressing different fluorescent markers: one HIV promoter-dependent marker for productive HIV infection, and a second marker under a constitutive promoter independent of HIV promoter activity. Infection of cells with these viruses allows the identification and separation of latently-infected cells from uninfected and productively infected cells. These reporters are sufficiently sensitive and robust for high-throughput screening to identify drugs that reactivate latent HIV. These reporters can be used in primary CD4 T lymphocytes and reveal a rare population of latently infected cells responsive to physiological stimuli. In summary, our HIV-1 reporters enable visualization and purification of latent cell populations and open up new perspectives for studies of latent HIV infection. PMID:24074592

  3. HIV–1 Infects Multipotent Progenitor Cells Causing Cell Death and Establishing Latent Cellular Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Christoph C.; Onafuwa–Nuga, Adewunmi; McNamara, Lucy A.; Riddell, James; Bixby, Dale; Savona, Michael R.; Collins, Kathleen L.

    2010-01-01

    HIV causes a chronic infection characterized by depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes and development of opportunistic infections. Despite drugs that inhibit viral spread, HIV has been difficult to cure because of uncharacterized reservoirs of infected cells that are resistant to highly active antiretroviral therapy and the immune response. Here we used CD34+ cells from infected people as well as in vitro studies of wild type HIV to demonstrate infection and killing of CD34+ multipotent hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). In some HPCs, we detected latent infection that stably persisted in cell culture until viral gene expression was activated by differentiation factors. A novel reporter HIV that directly detects latently infected cells in vitro confirmed the presence of distinct populations of active and latently infected HPCs. These findings have important implications for understanding HIV bone marrow pathology and the mechanisms by which HIV causes persistent infection. PMID:20208541

  4. IFITM1 targets HIV-1 latently infected cells for antibody-dependent cytolysis

    PubMed Central

    Raposo, Rui André Saraiva; de Mulder Rougvie, Miguel; Brailey, Phillip M.; Cabido, Vinicius D.; Zdinak, Paul M.; Thomas, Allison S.; Beckerle, Greta A.; Jones, Richard B.; Nixon, Douglas F.

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 persistence in latent reservoirs during antiretroviral therapy (ART) is the main obstacle to virus eradication. To date, there is no marker that adequately identifies latently infected CD4+ T cells in vivo. Using a well-established ex vivo model, we generated latently infected CD4+ T cells and identified interferon-induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1), a transmembrane antiviral factor, as being overexpressed in latently infected cells. By targeting IFITM1, we showed the efficient and specific killing of a latently infected cell line and CD4+ T cells from ART-suppressed patients through antibody-dependent cytolysis. We hypothesize that IFITM1 could mark natural reservoirs, identifying an immune target for killing of latently infected cells. These novel insights could be explored to develop clinical therapeutic approaches to effectively eradicate HIV-1. PMID:28097226

  5. The Role of Latently Infected B Cells in CNS Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Ana Citlali; Horwitz, Marc Steven

    2015-01-01

    The onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) is caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Among the environmental factors, it is believed that previous infection with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) may contribute in the development of MS. EBV has been associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematous, and cancers like Burkitt’s lymphoma. EBV establishes a life-long latency in B cells with occasional reactivation of the virus throughout the individual’s life. The role played by B cells in MS pathology has been largely studied, yet is not clearly understood. In MS patients, Rituximab, a novel treatment that targets CD20+ B cells, has proven to have successful results in diminishing the number of relapses in remitting relapsing MS; however, the mechanism of how this drug acts has not been clearly established. In this review, we analyze the evidence of how B cells latently infected with EBV might be altering the immune system response and helping in the development of MS. We will also discuss how animal models, such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (γHV-68), can be used as powerful tools in the study of the relationship between EBV, MS, and B cells. PMID:26579121

  6. Peripheral Vγ9Vδ2 T Cells Are a Novel Reservoir of Latent HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Sarabia, Natalia; Archin, Nancie M; Bateson, Rosalie; Dahl, Noelle P; Crooks, Amanda M; Kuruc, JoAnn D; Garrido, Carolina; Margolis, David M

    2015-10-01

    Eradication of HIV infection will require the identification of all cellular reservoirs that harbor latent infection. Despite low or lack of CD4 receptor expression on Vδ2 T cells, infection of these cells has previously been reported. We found that upregulation of the CD4 receptor may render primary Vδ2 cells target for HIV infection in vitro and we propose that HIV-induced immune activation may allow infection of γδ T cells in vivo. We assessed the presence of latent HIV infection by measurements of DNA and outgrowth assays within Vδ2 cells in 18 aviremic patients on long-standing antiretroviral therapy. In 14 patients we recovered latent but replication-competent HIV from highly purified Vδ2 cells demonstrating that peripheral Vδ2 T cells are a previously unrecognized reservoir in which latent HIV infection is unexpectedly frequent.

  7. Proliferation of latently infected CD4(+) T cells carrying replication-competent HIV-1: Potential role in latent reservoir dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hosmane, Nina N; Kwon, Kyungyoon J; Bruner, Katherine M; Capoferri, Adam A; Beg, Subul; Rosenbloom, Daniel I S; Keele, Brandon F; Ho, Ya-Chi; Siliciano, Janet D; Siliciano, Robert F

    2017-04-03

    A latent reservoir for HIV-1 in resting CD4(+) T lymphocytes precludes cure. Mechanisms underlying reservoir stability are unclear. Recent studies suggest an unexpected degree of infected cell proliferation in vivo. T cell activation drives proliferation but also reverses latency, resulting in productive infection that generally leads to cell death. In this study, we show that latently infected cells can proliferate in response to mitogens without producing virus, generating progeny cells that can release infectious virus. Thus, assays relying on one round of activation underestimate reservoir size. Sequencing of independent clonal isolates of replication-competent virus revealed that 57% had env sequences identical to other isolates from the same patient. Identity was confirmed by full-genome sequencing and was not attributable to limited viral diversity. Phylogenetic and statistical analysis suggested that identical sequences arose from in vivo proliferation of infected cells, rather than infection of multiple cells by a dominant viral species. The possibility that much of the reservoir arises by cell proliferation presents challenges to cure.

  8. Proliferation of latently infected CD4+ T cells carrying replication-competent HIV-1: Potential role in latent reservoir dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hosmane, Nina N.; Kwon, Kyungyoon J.; Bruner, Katherine M.; Capoferri, Adam A.; Rosenbloom, Daniel I.S.; Keele, Brandon F.; Ho, Ya-Chi

    2017-01-01

    A latent reservoir for HIV-1 in resting CD4+ T lymphocytes precludes cure. Mechanisms underlying reservoir stability are unclear. Recent studies suggest an unexpected degree of infected cell proliferation in vivo. T cell activation drives proliferation but also reverses latency, resulting in productive infection that generally leads to cell death. In this study, we show that latently infected cells can proliferate in response to mitogens without producing virus, generating progeny cells that can release infectious virus. Thus, assays relying on one round of activation underestimate reservoir size. Sequencing of independent clonal isolates of replication-competent virus revealed that 57% had env sequences identical to other isolates from the same patient. Identity was confirmed by full-genome sequencing and was not attributable to limited viral diversity. Phylogenetic and statistical analysis suggested that identical sequences arose from in vivo proliferation of infected cells, rather than infection of multiple cells by a dominant viral species. The possibility that much of the reservoir arises by cell proliferation presents challenges to cure. PMID:28341641

  9. Short Communication: Preferential Killing of HIV Latently Infected CD4(+) T Cells by MALT1 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongmei; He, Hui; Gong, Leyi; Fu, Mingui; Wang, Tony T

    2016-02-01

    We report that the addition of an host paracaspase MALT1 inhibitor, MI-2, to HIV latently infected ACH-2, Jurkat E4, and J-LAT cells accelerated cell death in the presence of cell stimuli or the protein kinase C agonist, bryostatin 1. MI-2-mediated cell death correlated with the induction of the cellular RNase MCPIP1 and requires the presence of viral component(s). Altogether, the combination of MI-2 and bryostatin 1 displays selective killing of HIV latently infected CD4(+) T cells.

  10. Short Communication: Preferential Killing of HIV Latently Infected CD4+ T Cells by MALT1 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongmei; He, Hui; Gong, Leyi; Fu, Mingui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report that the addition of an host paracaspase MALT1 inhibitor, MI-2, to HIV latently infected ACH-2, Jurkat E4, and J-LAT cells accelerated cell death in the presence of cell stimuli or the protein kinase C agonist, bryostatin 1. MI-2-mediated cell death correlated with the induction of the cellular RNase MCPIP1 and requires the presence of viral component(s). Altogether, the combination of MI-2 and bryostatin 1 displays selective killing of HIV latently infected CD4+ T cells. PMID:26728103

  11. Selective retention of herpes simplex virus-specific T cells in latently infected human trigeminal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Verjans, Georges M. G. M.; Hintzen, Rogier Q.; van Dun, Jessica M.; Poot, Angelique; Milikan, Johannes C.; Laman, Jon D.; Langerak, Anton W.; Kinchington, Paul R.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2007-01-01

    Primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) results in lifelong latent infections of neurons in sensory ganglia such as the trigeminal ganglia (TG). It has been postulated that T cells retained in TG inhibit reactivation of latent virus. The acquisition of TG specimens of individuals within hours after death offered the unique opportunity to characterize the phenotype and specificity of TG-resident T cells in humans. High numbers of activated CD8+ T cells expressing a late effector memory phenotype were found to reside in latently infected TG. The T cell infiltrate was oligoclonal, and T cells selectively clustered around HSV-1 but not VZV latently infected neurons. Neuronal damage was not observed despite granzyme B expression by the neuron-interacting CD8+ T cells. The TG-resident T cells, mainly CD8+ T cells, were directed against HSV-1 and not to VZV, despite neuronal expression of VZV proteins. The results implicate that herpesvirus latency in human TG is associated with a local, persistent T cell response, comprising activated late effector memory CD8+ T cells that appear to control HSV-1 latency by noncytolytic pathways. In contrast, T cells do not seem to be directly involved in controlling VZV latency in human TG. PMID:17360672

  12. Application of a nanoflare probe specific to a latency associated transcript for isolation of KHV latently infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Aimee N.; Putman, Timothy; Sullivan, Christopher; Jin, Ling

    2015-01-01

    One of the unique features of herpesvirus infection is latent infection following an initial exposure, which is characterized by viral genome persistence in a small fraction of cells within the latently infected tissue. Investigation of the mechanisms of herpesvirus latency has been very challenging in tissues with only a small fraction of cells that are latently infected. Cyprinid herpesvirus 3, also known as koi herpesvirus (KHV), is an important and deadly pathogen of koi and common carp, Cyprinus carpio. Acute infection can cause up to 100% mortality in exposed fish, and fish that survive the infection become latently infected. KHV becomes latent in a small percentage of B lymphocytes and can reactivate under stressful conditions. During latency, KHV ORF6 transcript is expressed in the latently infected B lymphocytes. In order to study KHV latent infection in cells that are only latently infected, a nanoflare probe specific to ORF6 RNA was used to separate KHV latently infected cells from total peripheral white blood cells (WBC). Using the ORF6 nanoflare probe, less than 1% of peripheral WBC was isolated from KHV latently infected koi. When this enriched population of WBC was examined by real-time PCR specific for KHV, it was estimated that about 1 to 2 copies of viral genome persists in the sorted cells. In addition, KHV ORF6 transcript was shown to be the major transcript expressed during latency by RNA-seq analysis. This study demonstrated that an RNA nanoflare probe could be used to enrich latently infected cells, which can subsequently be used to investigate the molecular mechanisms of KHV latency. PMID:26087404

  13. Expression of herpes simplex virus 1 microRNAs in cell culture models of quiescent and latent infection.

    PubMed

    Jurak, Igor; Hackenberg, Michael; Kim, Ju Youn; Pesola, Jean M; Everett, Roger D; Preston, Chris M; Wilson, Angus C; Coen, Donald M

    2014-02-01

    To facilitate studies of herpes simplex virus 1 latency, cell culture models of quiescent or latent infection have been developed. Using deep sequencing, we analyzed the expression of viral microRNAs (miRNAs) in two models employing human fibroblasts and one using rat neurons. In all cases, the expression patterns differed from that in productively infected cells, with the rat neuron pattern most closely resembling that found in latently infected human or mouse ganglia in vivo.

  14. Psychological stress compromises CD8+ T cell control of latent herpes simplex virus type 1 infections.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael L; Sheridan, Brian S; Bonneau, Robert H; Hendricks, Robert L

    2007-07-01

    Recurrent HSV-1 ocular disease results from reactivation of latent virus in trigeminal ganglia, often following immunosuppression or exposure to a variety of psychological or physical stressors. HSV-specific CD8+ T cells can block HSV-1 reactivation from latency in ex vivo trigeminal ganglia cultures through production of IFN-gamma. In this study, we establish that either CD8+ T cell depletion or exposure to restraint stress permit HSV-1 to transiently escape from latency in vivo. Restraint stress caused a reduction of TG-resident HSV-specific CD8+ T cells and a functional compromise of those cells that survive. Together, these effects of stress resulted in an approximate 65% reduction of cells capable of producing IFN-gamma in response to reactivating virus. Our findings demonstrate persistent in vivo regulation of latent HSV-1 by CD8+ T cells, and strongly support the concept that stress induces HSV-1 reactivation from latency at least in part by compromising CD8+ T cell surveillance of latently infected neurons.

  15. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This “shock” approach is then followed by “kill” of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  16. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells.

  17. Photodynamic therapy induced production of cytokines by latent Epstein Barr virus infected epithelial tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koon, H. K.; Lo, K. W.; Lung, M. L.; Chang, C. K. C.; Wong, R. N. S.; Mak, N. K.

    2007-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a method to treat cancer or non-cancer diseases by activation of the light-sensitive photosensitizers. Epstein Barr virus (EBV) has been implicated in the development of certain cancers such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma and B cell lymphoma. This study aims to examine the effects of EBV infection on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in cells after the photosensitizer Zn-BC-AM PDT treatment. Epithelial tumor cell lines HONE-1 and latent EBV-infected HONE-1 (EBV-HONE-1) cells were used in this study. Cells were treated with the photosensitizer Zn-BC-AM for 24 hours before light irradiation. RT-PCR and quantitative ELISA methods were used for the evaluation of mRNA expression and production of cytokines, respectively. Results show that Zn-BC-AM PDT increases the production of IL-1a and IL-1b in EBV-HONE-1. Over a 10-fold increase in the production of IL-6 was observed in the culture supernatant of Zn-BC-AM PDT-treated HONE-1 cells. PDT-induced IL-6 production was observed in HONE-1 cells. EBV-HONE-1 has a higher background level of IL-8 production than the HONE-1. The production of IL-8 was suppressed in EBV-HONE-1cells after Zn-BC-AM PDT. Our results indicate that the response of HONE-1 cells to Zn-BC-AM PDT depends on the presence of latent EBV infection. Since IL-8 is a cytokine with angiogenic activity, Zn-BC-AM PDT may exert an anti-angiogenic effect through the suppression of IL-8 production by the EBV-infected cells.

  18. Mycobacterium-Host Cell Relationships in Granulomatous Lesions in a Mouse Model of Latent Tuberculous Infection.

    PubMed

    Ufimtseva, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a dangerous infectious disease characterized by a tight interplay between mycobacteria and host cells in granulomatous lesions (granulomas) during the latent, asymptomatic stage of infection. Mycobacterium-host cell relationships were analyzed in granulomas obtained from various organs of BALB/c mice with chronic TB infection caused by in vivo exposure to the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. Acid-fast BCG-mycobacteria were found to be morphologically and functionally heterogeneous (in size, shape, and replication rates in colonies) in granuloma macrophages, dendritic cells, and multinucleate Langhans giant cells. Cord formation by BCG-mycobacteria in granuloma cells has been observed. Granuloma macrophages retained their ability to ingest damaged lymphocytes and thrombocytes in the phagosomes; however, their ability to destroy BCG-mycobacteria contained in these cells was compromised. No colocalization of BCG-mycobacteria and the LysoTracker dye was observed in the mouse cells. Various relationships between granuloma cells and BCG-mycobacteria were observed in different mice belonging to the same line. Several mice totally eliminated mycobacterial infection. Granulomas in the other mice had mycobacteria actively replicating in cells of different types and forming cords, which is an indicator of mycobacterial virulence and, probably, a marker of the activation of tuberculous infection in animals.

  19. Impaired Cytokine but Enhanced Cytotoxic Marker Expression in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Induced CD8+ T Cells in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes and Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Moideen, Kadar; George, Parakkal Jovvian; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Babu, Subash

    2016-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a risk factor for tuberculosis among individuals with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. To explore the influence of DM on CD8(+) T-cell responses during latent M. tuberculosis infection, we estimated the cytokine and cytotoxic marker expression pattern in individuals with latent M. tuberculosis infection with DM and those with latent M. tuberculosis infection without DM. Among individuals with latent M. tuberculosis infection, those with DM had diminished frequencies of CD8(+) T-helper type 1 (Th1), Th2, and Th17 cells following stimulation by M. tuberculosis antigen and enhanced frequencies of CD8(+) T cells expressing cytotoxic markers, compared with those without DM. Thus, our results suggest that coincident DM modulates CD8(+) T-cell function during latent M. tuberculosis infection.

  20. Infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells transmit latent varicella zoster virus infection to the guinea pig enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lin; Wang, Mingli; Chen, Jason J; Gershon, Michael D; Gershon, Anne A

    2014-10-01

    Latent wild-type (WT) and vaccine (vOka) varicella zoster virus (VZV) are found in the human enteric nervous system (ENS). VZV also infects guinea pig enteric neurons in vitro, establishes latency and can be reactivated. We therefore determined whether lymphocytes infected in vitro with VZV secrete infectious virions and can transfer infection in vivo to the ENS of recipient guinea pigs. T lymphocytes (CD3-immunoreactive) were preferentially infected following co-culture of guinea pig or human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with VZV-infected HELF. VZV proliferated in the infected T cells and expressed immediate early and late VZV genes. Electron microscopy confirmed that VZV-infected T cells produced encapsulated virions. Extracellular virus, however, was pleomorphic, suggesting degradation occurred prior to release, which was confirmed by the failure of VZV-infected T cells to secrete infectious virions. Intravenous injection of WT- or vOka-infected PBMCs, nevertheless, transmitted VZV to recipient animals (guinea pig > human lymphocytes). Two days post-inoculation, lung and liver, but not gut, contained DNA and transcripts encoding ORFs 4, 40, 66 and 67. Twenty-eight days after infection, gut contained DNA and transcripts encoding ORFs 4 and 66 but neither DNA nor transcripts could any longer be found in lung or liver. In situ hybridization revealed VZV DNA in enteric neurons, which also expressed ORF63p (but not ORF68p) immunoreactivity. Observations suggest that VZV infects T cells, which can transfer VZV to and establish latency in enteric neurons in vivo. Guinea pigs may be useful for studies of VZV pathogenesis in the ENS.

  1. Infected Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Transmit Latent Varicella Zoster Virus Infection to the Guinea Pig Enteric Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lin; Wang, Mingli; Chen, Jason J.; Gershon, Michael D.; Gershon, Anne A.

    2014-01-01

    Latent wild-type (WT) and vaccine (vOka) varicella-zoster virus (VZV) are found in the human enteric nervous system (ENS). VZV also infects guinea pig enteric neurons in vitro, establishes latency and can be reactivated. We therefore determined whether lymphocytes infected in vitro with VZV secrete infectious virions and can transfer infection in vivo to the ENS of recipient guinea pigs. T lymphocytes (CD3-immunoreactive) were preferentially infected following co-culture of guinea pig or human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with VZV-infected HELF. VZV proliferated in the infected T cells and expressed immediate early and late VZV genes. Electron microscopy confirmed that VZV-infected T cells produced encapsulated virions. Extracellular virus, however, was pleomorphic, suggesting degradation occurred prior to release, which was confirmed by the failure of VZV-infected T cells to secrete infectious virions. Intravenous injection of WT- or vOka-infected PBMCs, nevertheless, transmitted VZV to recipient animals (guinea pig > human lymphocytes). Two days post-inoculation, lung and liver, but not gut, contained DNA and transcripts encoding ORFs 4, 40, 66 and 67. Twenty-eight days after infection, gut contained DNA and transcripts encoding ORFs 4 and 66 but neither DNA nor transcripts could any longer be found in lung or liver. In situ hybridization revealed VZV DNA in enteric neurons, which also expressed ORF63p (but not ORF68p) immunoreactivity. Observations suggest that VZV infects T cells, which can transfer VZV to and establish latency in enteric neurons in vivo. Guinea pigs may be useful for studies of VZV pathogenesis in the ENS. PMID:24965252

  2. Control of human cytomegalovirus gene expression by differential histone modifications during lytic and latent infection of a monocytic cell line.

    PubMed

    Ioudinkova, Elena; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Rynditch, Alla; De Conto, Flora; Motta, Federica; Covan, Silvia; Pinardi, Federica; Razin, Sergey V; Chezzi, Carlo

    2006-12-15

    Non-differentiated THP-1 cells can be infected by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) Towne strain, which persists in these cells in a non-active (latent) form without undergoing a productive cycle. The same cells become permissive for HCMV lytic infection after induction of cell differentiation by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. We used this cellular model to study the possible role of histone modifications in the control of HCMV latency. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation with antibodies against histone H3 acetylated or dimethylated in position K9, we demonstrated that in lytically infected cells the HCMV enhancer was associated with heavy acetylated but not dimethylated H3. In the case of latent infection, the HCMV enhancer was associated with neither acetylated nor dimethylated H3. HCMV genes encoding DNA polymerase (early), pp65 (early-late) and pp150 (late) proteins were associated preferentially with acetylated H3 in lytically infected cells and with dimethylated H3 in latently infected cells. These data strongly suggest that K9 methylation of H3 is involved in HCMV gene repression, while association of the above genes with acetylated histones is likely to be necessary for active transcription. It can be postulated that the same histone modifications are used to mark active and repressed genes in both cellular and viral chromatin.

  3. Stochastic modelling of the eradication of the HIV-1 infection by stimulation of latently infected cells in patients under highly active anti-retroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Taltavull, Daniel; Vieiro, Arturo; Alarcón, Tomás

    2016-10-01

    HIV-1 infected patients are effectively treated with highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). Whilst HAART is successful in keeping the disease at bay with average levels of viral load well below the detection threshold of standard clinical assays, it fails to completely eradicate the infection, which persists due to the emergence of a latent reservoir with a half-life time of years and is immune to HAART. This implies that life-long administration of HAART is, at the moment, necessary for HIV-1-infected patients, which is prone to drug resistance and cumulative side effects as well as imposing a considerable financial burden on developing countries, those more afflicted by HIV, and public health systems. The development of therapies which specifically aim at the removal of this latent reservoir has become a focus of much research. A proposal for such therapy consists of elevating the rate of activation of the latently infected cells: by transferring cells from the latently infected reservoir to the active infected compartment, more cells are exposed to the anti-retroviral drugs thus increasing their effectiveness. In this paper, we present a stochastic model of the dynamics of the HIV-1 infection and study the effect of the rate of latently infected cell activation on the average extinction time of the infection. By analysing the model by means of an asymptotic approximation using the semi-classical quasi steady state approximation (QSS), we ascertain that this therapy reduces the average life-time of the infection by many orders of magnitudes. We test the accuracy of our asymptotic results by means of direct simulation of the stochastic process using a hybrid multi-scale Monte Carlo scheme.

  4. Gastric carcinoma: monoclonal epithelial malignant cells expressing Epstein-Barr virus latent infection protein.

    PubMed Central

    Imai, S; Koizumi, S; Sugiura, M; Tokunaga, M; Uemura, Y; Yamamoto, N; Tanaka, S; Sato, E; Osato, T

    1994-01-01

    In 1000 primary gastric carcinomas, 70 (7.0%) contained Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genomic sequences detected by PCR and Southern blots. The positive tumors comprised 8 of 9 (89%) undifferentiated lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas, 27 of 476 (5.7%) poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas, and 35 of 515 (6.8%) moderately to well-differentiated adenocarcinomas. In situ EBV-encoded small RNA 1 hybridization and hematoxylin/eosin staining in adjacent sections showed that the EBV was present in every carcinoma cell but was not significantly present in lymphoid stroma and in normal mucosa. Two-color immunofluorescence and hematoxylin/eosin staining in parallel sections revealed that every keratin-positive epithelial malignant cell expressed EBV-determined nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) but did not significantly express CD45+ infiltrating leukocytes. A single fused terminal fragment was detected in each of the EBNA1-expressing tumors, thereby suggesting that the EBV-carrying gastric carcinomas represent clonal proliferation of cells infected with EBV. The carcinoma cells had exclusively EBNA1 but not EBNA2, -3A, -3B, and -3C; leader protein; and latent membrane protein 1 because of methylation. The patients with EBV-carrying gastric carcinoma had elevated serum EBV-specific antibodies. The EBV-specific cellular immunity was not significantly reduced; however, the cytotoxic T-cell target antigens were not expressed. These findings strongly suggest a causal relation between a significant proportion of gastric carcinoma and EBV, and the virus-carrying carcinoma cells may evade immune surveillance. Images PMID:8090780

  5. Tuberculosis Infection and Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Active tuberculosis (TB) has a greater burden of TB bacilli than latent TB and acts as an infection source for contacts. Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is the state in which humans are infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis without any clinical symptoms, radiological abnormality, or microbiological evidence. TB is transmissible by respiratory droplet nucleus of 1–5 µm in diameter, containing 1–10 TB bacilli. TB transmission is affected by the strength of the infectious source, infectiousness of TB bacilli, immunoresistance of the host, environmental stresses, and biosocial factors. Infection controls to reduce TB transmission consist of managerial activities, administrative control, engineering control, environmental control, and personal protective equipment provision. However, diagnosis and treatment for LTBI as a national TB control program is an important strategy on the precondition that active TB is not missed. Therefore, more concrete evidences for LTBI management based on clinical and public perspectives are needed. PMID:27790271

  6. Modulation of mycobacterial-specific Th1 and Th17 cells in latent tuberculosis by coincident hookworm infection.

    PubMed

    George, Parakkal Jovvian; Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Kumaran, Paramasivam Paul; Chandrasekaran, Vedachalam; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2013-05-15

    Hookworm infections and tuberculosis (TB) are coendemic in many parts of the world. It has been suggested that infection with helminth parasites could suppress the predominant Th1 (IFN-γ-mediated) response needed to control Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and enhance susceptibility to infection and/or disease. To determine the role of coincident hookworm infection on responses at steady-state and on M. tuberculosis-specific immune responses in latent TB (LTB), we examined the cellular responses in individuals with LTB with or without concomitant hookworm infection. By analyzing the expression of Th1, Th2, and Th17 subsets of CD4(+) T cells, we were able to demonstrate that the presence of coincident hookworm infection significantly diminished both spontaneously expressed and M. tuberculosis-specific mono- and dual-functional Th1 and Th17 cells. Hookworm infection, in contrast, was associated with expanded frequencies of mono- and dual-functional Th2 cells at both steady-state and upon Ag stimulation. This differential induction of CD4(+) T cell subsets was abrogated upon mitogen stimulation. Additionally, coincident hookworm infection was associated with increased adaptive T regulatory cells but not natural regulatory T cells in LTB. Finally, the CD4(+) T cell cytokine expression pattern was also associated with alterations in the systemic levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Thus, coincident hookworm infection exerts a profound inhibitory effect on protective Th1 and Th17 responses in LTB and may predispose toward the development of active tuberculosis in humans.

  7. Latent cytomegalovirus infection enhances anti-tumour cytotoxicity through accumulation of NKG2C+ NK cells in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Bigley, A B; Rezvani, K; Shah, N; Sekine, T; Balneger, N; Pistillo, M; Agha, N; Kunz, H; O'Connor, D P; Bollard, C M; Simpson, R J

    2016-08-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection markedly expands NKG2C+/NKG2A- NK cells, which are potent killers of infected cells expressing human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-E. As HLA-E is also over-expressed in several haematological malignancies and CMV has been linked to a reduced risk of leukaemic relapse, we determined the impact of latent CMV infection on NK cell cytotoxicity against four tumour target cell lines with varying levels of HLA-E expression. NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 (leukaemia origin) and U266 (multiple myeloma origin) target cells was strikingly greater in healthy CMV-seropositive donors than seronegative donors and was associated strongly with target cell HLA-E and NK cell NKG2C expression. NK cell cytotoxicity against HLA-E transfected lymphoma target cells (221.AEH) was ∼threefold higher with CMV, while NK cell cytotoxicity against non-transfected 721.221 cells was identical between the CMV groups. NK cell degranulation (CD107a(+) ) and interferon (IFN)-γ production to 221.AEH cells was localized almost exclusively to the NKG2C subset, and antibody blocking of NKG2C completely eliminated the effect of CMV on NK cell cytotoxicity against 221.AEH cells. Moreover, 221.AEH feeder cells and interleukin (IL)-15 were found to expand NKG2C(+) /NKG2A(-) NK cells preferentially from CMV-seronegative donors and increase NK cell cytotoxicity against HLA-E(+) tumour cell lines. We conclude that latent CMV infection enhances NK cell cytotoxicity through accumulation of NKG2C(+) NK cells, which may be beneficial in preventing the initiation and progression of haematological malignancies characterized by high HLA-E expression.

  8. Reactivation Kinetics of HIV-1 and Susceptibility of Reactivated Latently Infected CD4+ T Cells to HIV-1-Specific CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Walker-Sperling, Victoria E. K.; Cohen, Valerie J.; Tarwater, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The “shock and kill” model of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) eradication involves the induction of transcription of HIV-1 genes in latently infected CD4+ T cells, followed by the elimination of these infected CD4+ T cells by CD8+ T cells or other effector cells. CD8+ T cells may also be needed to control the spread of new infection if residual infected cells are present at the time combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is discontinued. In order to determine the time frame needed for CD8+ T cells to effectively prevent the spread of HIV-1 infection, we examined the kinetics of HIV transcription and virus release in latently infected cells reactivated ex vivo. Isolated resting, primary CD4+ T cells from HIV-positive (HIV+) subjects on suppressive regimens were found to upregulate cell-associated HIV-1 mRNA within 1 h of stimulation and produce extracellular virus as early as 6 h poststimulation. In spite of the rapid kinetics of virus production, we show that CD8+ T cells from 2 out of 4 viremic controllers were capable of effectively eliminating reactivated autologous CD4+ cells that upregulate cell-associated HIV-1 mRNA. The results have implications for devising strategies to prevent rebound viremia due to reactivation of rare latently infected cells that persist after potentially curative therapy. IMPORTANCE A prominent HIV-1 cure strategy termed “shock and kill” involves the induction of HIV-1 transcription in latently infected CD4+ T cells with the goal of elimination of these cells by either the cytotoxic T lymphocyte response or other immune cell subsets. However, the cytotoxic T cell response may also be required after curative treatment if residual latently infected cells remain. The kinetics of HIV-1 reactivation indicate rapid upregulation of cell-associated HIV-1 mRNA and a 5-h window between transcription and virus release. Thus, HIV-specific CD8+ T cell responses likely have a very short time frame to eliminate

  9. Distinct Effector Memory CD4+ T Cell Signatures in Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection, BCG Vaccination and Clinically Resolved Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Adekambi, Toidi; Ibegbu, Chris C.; Kalokhe, Ameeta S.; Yu, Tianwei; Ray, Susan M.; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2012-01-01

    Two billion people worldwide are estimated to be latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and are at risk for developing active tuberculosis since Mtb can reactivate to cause TB disease in immune-compromised hosts. Individuals with latent Mtb infection (LTBI) and BCG-vaccinated individuals who are uninfected with Mtb, harbor antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells. However, the differences between long-lived memory CD4+ T cells induced by latent Mtb infection (LTBI) versus BCG vaccination are unclear. In this study, we characterized the immune phenotype and functionality of antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells in healthy BCG-vaccinated individuals who were either infected (LTBI) or uninfected (BCG) with Mtb. Individuals were classified into LTBI and BCG groups based on IFN-γ ELISPOT using cell wall antigens and ESAT-6/CFP-10 peptides. We show that LTBI individuals harbored high frequencies of late-stage differentiated (CD45RA−CD27−) antigen-specific effector memory CD4+ T cells that expressed PD-1. In contrast, BCG individuals had primarily early-stage (CD45RA−CD27+) cells with low PD-1 expression. CD27+ and CD27− as well as PD-1+ and PD-1− antigen-specific subsets were polyfunctional, suggesting that loss of CD27 expression and up-regulation of PD-1 did not compromise their capacity to produce IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2. PD-1 was preferentially expressed on CD27− antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, indicating that PD-1 is associated with the stage of differentiation. Using statistical models, we determined that CD27 and PD-1 predicted LTBI versus BCG status in healthy individuals and distinguished LTBI individuals from those who had clinically resolved Mtb infection after anti-tuberculosis treatment. This study shows that CD4+ memory responses induced by latent Mtb infection, BCG vaccination and clinically resolved Mtb infection are immunologically distinct. Our data suggest that differentiation into CD27−PD-1+ subsets in LTBI is driven by Mtb

  10. Intensification of Antiretroviral Therapy with a CCR5 Antagonist in Patients with Chronic HIV-1 Infection: Effect on T Cells Latently Infected

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo, Alejandro; Hernández-Novoa, Beatriz; Abad, María; Madrid, Nadia; Dahl, Viktor; Rubio, Rafael; Moreno, Ana M.; Dronda, Fernando; Casado, José Luis; Navas, Enrique; Pérez-Elías, María Jesús; Zamora, Javier; Palmer, Sarah; Muñoz, Eduardo; Muñoz-Fernández, María Ángeles; Moreno, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Objective The primary objective was to assess the effect of MVC intensification on latently infected CD4+ T cells in chronically HIV-1-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. Methods We performed an open-label pilot phase II clinical trial involving chronically HIV-1-infected patients receiving stable antiretroviral therapy whose regimen was intensified with 48 weeks of maraviroc therapy. We analyzed the latent reservoir, the residual viremia and episomal 2LTR DNA to examine the relationship between these measures and the HIV-1 latent reservoir, immune activation, lymphocyte subsets (including effector and central memory T cells), and markers associated with bacterial translocation. Results Overall a non significant reduction in the size of the latent reservoir was found (p = 0.068). A mean reduction of 1.82 IUPM was observed in 4 patients with detectable latent reservoir at baseline after 48 weeks of intensification. No effect on plasma residual viremia was observed. Unexpectedly, all the patients had detectable 2LTR DNA circles at week 24, while none of them showed those circles at the end of the study. No changes were detected in CD4+ or CD8+ counts, although a significant decrease was found in the proportion of HLA-DR+/CD38+ CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. LPS and sCD14 levels increased. Conclusions Intensification with MVC was associated with a trend to a decrease in the size of the latent HIV-1 reservoir in memory T cells. No impact on residual viremia was detected. Additional studies with larger samples are needed to confirm the results. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00795444 PMID:22174752

  11. Differences between Mycobacterium-Host Cell Relationships in Latent Tuberculous Infection of Mice Ex Vivo and Mycobacterial Infection of Mouse Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ufimtseva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The search for factors that account for the reproduction and survival of mycobacteria, including vaccine strains, in host cells is the priority for studies on tuberculosis. A comparison of BCG-mycobacterial loads in granuloma cells obtained from bone marrow and spleens of mice with latent tuberculous infection and cells from mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophage cultures infected with the BCG vaccine in vitro has demonstrated that granuloma macrophages each normally contained a single BCG-Mycobacterium, while those acutely infected in vitro had increased mycobacterial loads and death rates. Mouse granuloma cells were observed to produce the IFNγ, IL-1α, GM-CSF, CD1d, CD25, CD31, СD35, and S100 proteins. None of these activation markers were found in mouse cell cultures infected in vitro or in intact macrophages. Lack of colocalization of lipoarabinomannan-labeled BCG-mycobacteria with the lysosomotropic LysoTracker dye in activated granuloma macrophages suggests that these macrophages were unable to destroy BCG-mycobacteria. However, activated mouse granuloma macrophages could control mycobacterial reproduction in cells both in vivo and in ex vivo culture. By contrast, a considerable increase in the number of BCG-mycobacteria was observed in mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophages after BCG infection in vitro, when no expression of the activation-related molecules was detected in these cells.

  12. Modeling the Effects of Vorinostat In Vivo Reveals both Transient and Delayed HIV Transcriptional Activation and Minimal Killing of Latently Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R; Elliott, Julian H; Perelson, Alan S

    2015-10-01

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recent clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Furthermore, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.

  13. Modeling the effects of vorinostat in vivo reveals both transient and delayed HIV transcriptional activation and minimal killing of latently infected cells

    DOE PAGES

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H.; ...

    2015-10-23

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recentmore » clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Lastly, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.« less

  14. Modeling the effects of vorinostat in vivo reveals both transient and delayed HIV transcriptional activation and minimal killing of latently infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2015-10-23

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recent clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Lastly, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.

  15. Evidence that herpes simplex virus DNA derived from quiescently infected cells in vitro, and latently infected cells in vivo, is physically damaged

    PubMed Central

    Millhouse, Scott; Su, Ying-Hsiu; Zhang, Xianchao; Wang, Xiaohe; Song, Benjamin P.; Zhu, Li; Oppenheim, Emily; Fraser, Nigel W.; Block, Timothy M.

    2010-01-01

    Using PCR and alkaline gel electrophoresis, we show that, compared with DNA derived from virions used to establish infection, herpes simplex virus DNA derived from quiescently infected rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells in culture accumulates alkaline-labile lesions. That is, compared with equivalent amounts of virion DNA, viral DNA from nerve growth factor-differentiated long-term infected cells in culture is consistently 3 to 10 times more refractory to amplification by PCR. Despite using equal mole amounts of DNA isolated from quiescently infected cells (determined by quantitative Southern blots), DNA from quiescently infected cells could not be detected by PCR under conditions in which the virion-derived DNA was easily detected. Refractoriness to PCR was confirmed by analysis with a ligation-mediated PCR technique. The refractoriness was not the result of genomic circularization. The refractoriness was, however, related to the time that the quiescently infected cells had been maintained in culture. The refractoriness to PCR was taken as an indication that the viral DNA was damaged. This hypothesis was confirmed by showing that viral DNA from quiescently infected PC12 cells accumulated alkaline-labile DNA lesions, as determined by alkaline gel electrophoresis. The phenomenon was not limited to tissue culture, because viral DNA derived from the ganglia of latently infected mice is also 3 to 10 times more refractory to amplification than are equivalent amounts of virion-derived genomes. Taken together, these results represent the first evidence that herpes simplex virus DNA is physically damaged as a function of long-term infection. Implications for viral reactivation and pathogenesis are discussed. PMID:20874012

  16. Circulating herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1)-specific CD8+ T cells do not access HSV-1 latently infected trigeminal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Therapeutic vaccines can be designed to enhance existing T cell memory populations for increased protection against re-infection. In the case of herpes simplex virus type 1, recurrent disease results from reactivation of latent virus in sensory ganglia, which is controlled in part by a ganglia-resident HSV-specific memory CD8+ T cell population. Thus, an important goal of a therapeutic HSV-1 vaccine would be to enhance this population. Methods HSV-1-infected mice were treated with TAK-779 to block CCR5- and CXCR3-mediated CD8+ T cell migration during both acute and latent infections. Additionally, HSV-1-specific CD8+ T cells were transferred into HSV-1 latently infected mice to mimic the effect of a therapeutic vaccine, and their migration into trigeminal ganglia (TG) was traced during steady-state latency, or during recovery of the TG-resident memory CD8+ T cell population following stress-, and corticosterone-induced depletion and HSV-1 reactivation from latency. Bromodeoxy uridine (BrdU) incorporation measured cell proliferation in vivo. Results TAK-779 treatment during acute HSV-1 infection reduced the number of infiltrating CD8+ T cells but did not alter the number of viral genome copies. TAK-779 treatment during HSV latency did not affect the size of the TG-resident memory CD8+ T cell population. Transferred HSV-specific CD8+ T cells failed to access latently infected TG during steady-state latency, or during recovery of the TG resident HSV-specific CD8+ T cell population following exposure of latently infected mice to stress and corticosterone. Recovery of the HSV-specific CD8+ T cell population after stress and corticosterone treatment occurred with homeostatic levels of cell division and did not require CD4+ T cell help. Conclusions Our findings are consistent with the notion that the CD8+ T cells in latently infected TG are a tissue-resident memory (Trm) population that is maintained without replenishment from the periphery, and that when this

  17. CD8+ T Cells Play a Bystander Role in Mice Latently Infected with Herpes Simplex Virus 1

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Kevin R.; Gate, David; Matundan, Harry H.; Ghiasi, Yasamin N.; Town, Terrence

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Based on an explant reactivation model, it has been proposed that CD8+ T cells maintain latency in trigeminal ganglia (TG) of mice latently infected with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) [T. Liu, K. M. Khanna, X. Chen, D. J. Fink, and R. L. Hendricks, J Exp Med 191:1459–1466, 2000, doi:10.1084/jem.191.9.1459; K. M. Khanna, R. H. Bonneau, P. R. Kinchington, and R. L. Hendricks, Immunity 18:593-603, 2003, doi:10.1016/S1074-7613(03)00112-2]. In those studies, BALB/c mice were ocularly infected with an avirulent HSV-1 strain (RE) after corneal scarification. However, in our studies, we typically infect mice with a virulent HSV-1 strain (McKrae) that does not require corneal scarification. Using a combination of knockout mice, adoptive transfers, and depletion studies, we recently found that CD8α+ dendritic cells (DCs) contribute to HSV-1 latency and reactivation in TG of ocularly infected mice (K. R. Mott, S. J. Allen, M. Zandian, B. Konda, B. G. Sharifi, C. Jones, S. L. Wechsler, T. Town, and H. Ghiasi, PLoS One 9:e93444, 2014, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0093444). This suggested that CD8+ T cells might not be the major regulators of HSV-1 latency in the mouse TG. To investigate this iconoclastic possibility, we used a blocking CD8 antibody and CD8+ T cells in reactivated TG explants from mice latently infected with (i) the avirulent HSV-1 strain RE following corneal scarification or (ii) the virulent HSV-1 strain McKrae without corneal scarification. Independently of the strain or approach, our results show that CD8α+ DCs, not CD8+ T cells, drive latency and reactivation. In addition, adoptive transfer of CD8+ T cells from wild-type (wt) mice to CD8α−/− mice did not restore latency to the level for wt mice or wt virus. In the presence of latency-associated transcript (LAT(+); wt virus), CD8+ T cells seem to play a bystander role in the TG. These bystander T cells highly express PD-1, most likely due to the presence of CD8α+ DCs. Collectively, these

  18. Functional profile of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in latently infected individuals and patients with active TB.

    PubMed

    Marín, Nancy D; París, Sara C; Rojas, Mauricio; García, Luis F

    2013-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most important infectious diseases around the world. Several studies have focused on the identification of correlates of protection against TB. Most of them have concentrated on the study of IFN-γ due to its robust association with protection against TB. However, given the complexity of the immune response elicited after Mtb infection, other cytokines should also be considered. In the present study, we evaluated Th1 and Th17 responses and their association with the protection or development of active disease. Therefore, non infected individuals (nonTBi), latently infected individuals (LTBi) and patients with active TB (ATB) were studied. The evaluation of the number of cytokine producing cells by ELISPOT showed a higher number of IFN-γ-producing cells in ATB patients, but no differences were found regarding the number of IL-17 producing cells among studied groups. The evaluation of IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α and IL-17 producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells at 1 day and 6 days of stimulation with mycobacterial antigens suggests the presence of functional signatures associated with latency or active TB. The results presented herein suggest the possible use of the evaluation of Th1-type cytokines, such as IFN-γ and/or TNF-α, as a correlate of protection against TB; however, these results need to be validated for other groups.

  19. Epstein-Barr virus latently infected cells are selectively deleted in simulated-microgravity cultures.

    PubMed

    Long, J P; Hughes, J H

    2001-04-01

    Rotating-wall vessels (RWVs) allow for the cultivation of cells in simulated microgravity. Previously, we showed that the cultivation of lymphoblastoid cells in simulated microgravity results in the suppression of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation. To determine if the suppression generated by simulated microgravity could be reversed by changing to static culture conditions, cells were cultured in an RRWV for 5 d, and then switched to static conditions. Following the switch to static conditions, viral reactivation remained suppressed (significantly lower) relative to static control cultures over a 4-d period. Additionally, experiments were conducted to determine if chemical treatment could induce viral reactivation in cells from simulated-microgravity cultures. Cells were cultured in static flask cultures and in simulated microgravity in RWVs for 4-7 d. The cells were then transferred to 50-cm3 tubes, and treated with 3 mM n-butyrate for 48 h, or 18 ng/ml of phorbol ester, viz., 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13 acetate (TPA) for either 2 or 48 h, under static conditions. Although EBV was inducible, the cells from simulated-microgravity cultures treated with n-butyrate displayed significantly lower levels of viral-antigen expression compared with the treated cells from static cultures. Also, incubation with TPA for 2-3 h, but not for 48 h, reactivated EBV in cells from RWV cultures. In contrast, EBV was inducible in cells from static cultures treated for either 2-3 or 48 h with TPA. TPA reactivation of EBV following a 2-3-h period of treatment indicates that the protein kinase C signal-transduction pathway is not impaired in lymphoblastoid cells cultured in simulated microgravity. However, the exposure of B-lymphoblastoid cells from simulated-microgravity cultures to TPA for more than 3-4 h triggered a lytic event (apoptosis or necrosis), which prevented replication of the virus. Thus, EBV-infected cells in simulated microgravity were negatively selected in the

  20. Attenuated Listeria monocytogenes Vectors Overcome Suppressive Plasma Factors During HIV Infection to Stimulate Myeloid Dendritic Cells to Promote Adaptive Immunity and Reactivation of Latent Virus

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Elizabeth A.; Spadaccia, Meredith R.; Norton, Thomas; Demmler, Morgan; Gopal, Ramya; O'Brien, Meagan; Landau, Nathaniel; Dubensky, Thomas W.; Lauer, Peter; Brockstedt, Dirk G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract HIV-1 infection is characterized by myeloid dendritic cell (DC) dysfunction, which blunts the responsiveness to vaccine adjuvants. We previously showed that nonviral factors in HIV-seropositive plasma are partially responsible for mediating this immune suppression. In this study we investigated recombinant Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) vectors, which naturally infect and potently activate DCs from seronegative donors, as a means to overcome DC dysfunction associated with HIV infection. Monocyte-derived DCs were cocultured with plasma from HIV-infected donors (HIV-moDCs) to induce a dysregulated state and infected with an attenuated, nonreplicative vaccine strain of Lm expressing full length clade B consensus gag (KBMA Lm-gag). Lm infection stimulated cytokine secretion [interleukin (IL)-12p70, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and IL-6] and Th-1 skewing of allogeneic naive CD4 T cells by HIV-moDCs, in contrast to the suppressive effects observed by HIV plasma on moDCs on toll-like receptor ligand stimulation. Upon coculture of “killed” but metabolically active (KBMA) Lm-gag-infected moDCs from HIV-infected donors with autologous cells, expansion of polyfunctional, gag-specific CD8+ T cells was observed. Reactivation of latent proviruses by moDCs following Lm infection was also observed in models of HIV latency in a TNF-α-dependent manner. These findings reveal the unique ability of Lm vectors to contend with dysregulation of HIV-moDCs, while simultaneously possessing the capacity to activate latent virus. Concurrent stimulation of innate and adaptive immunity and disruption of latency may be an approach to reduce the pool of latently infected cells during HIV infection. Further study of Lm vectors as part of therapeutic vaccination and eradication strategies may advance this evolving field. PMID:25376024

  1. The integrase cofactor LEDGF/p75 associates with Iws1 and Spt6 for postintegration silencing of HIV-1 gene expression in latently infected cells.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Annabelle; Ségéral, Emmanuel; Naughtin, Monica; Abdouni, Ahmed; Charmeteau, Bénédicte; Cheynier, Rémi; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Emiliani, Stéphane

    2015-01-14

    The persistence of a latent reservoir containing transcriptionally silent, but replication-competent, integrated provirus is a serious challenge to HIV eradication. HIV integration is under the control of LEDGF/p75, the cellular cofactor of viral integrase. Investigating possible postintegration roles for LEDGF/p75, we find that LEDGF/p75 represses HIV expression in latently infected cells. LEDGF/p75 associated with two proteins involved in the control of gene expression and chromatin structure, Spt6 and Iws1, to form a stable complex. Iws1 plays a role in the establishment of latent infection, whereas Spt6 functions to recruit Iws1 and LEDGF/p75 to the silenced provirus and maintains histone occupancy at the HIV promoter. In latently infected cells, depletion of the complex results in reactivation of HIV expression Altogether, our results indicate that a complex containing LEDGF/p75, Iws1, and Spt6 participates in regulating postintegration steps of HIV latency.

  2. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus genome and latent infection gene expression in normal epithelia, epithelial dysplasia, and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kentaro; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; de Rivera, Michelle Wendoline Garcia-Niño; Hoshino, Miyako; Sakashita, Hideaki; Yamada, Tsutomu; Inoue, Harumi; Miyazaki, Yuji; Nozaki, Tadashige; González-López, Blanca Silvia; Ide, Fumio; Kusama, Kaoru

    2016-03-01

    A relationship between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and cancer of lymphoid and epithelial tissues such as Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), gastric carcinoma, and oral cancer has been reported. EBV is transmitted orally and infects B cells and epithelial cells. However, it has remained uncertain whether EBV plays a role in carcinogenesis of oral mucosal tissue. In the present study, we detected the EBV genome and latent EBV gene expression in normal mucosal epithelia, epithelial dysplasia, and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) to clarify whether EBV is involved in carcinogenesis of the oral cavity. We examined 333 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples (morphologically normal oral mucosa 30 samples, gingivitis 32, tonsillitis 17, oral epithelial dysplasia 83, OSCC 150, and NPC 21). EBV latent infection genes (EBNA-2, LMP-1) were detected not only in OSCC (50.2 %, 10.7 %) but also in severe epithelial dysplasia (66.7 %, 44.4 %), mild to moderate epithelial dysplasia (43.1 %, 18.5 %), gingivitis (78.1 %, 21.9 %), and normal mucosa (83.3 %, 23.3 %). Furthermore, the intensity of EBV latent infection gene expression (EBER, LMP-1) was significantly higher in severe epithelial dysplasia (94.4 %, 72.2 %) than in OSCC (34.7 %, 38.7 %). These results suggest that EBV latent infection genes and their increased expression in severe epithelial dysplasia might play an important role in the dysplasia-carcinoma sequence in the oral cavity.

  3. The role of LAT in increased CD8+ T cell exhaustion in trigeminal ganglia of mice latently infected with herpes simplex virus 1.

    PubMed

    Allen, Sariah J; Hamrah, Pedram; Gate, David; Mott, Kevin R; Mantopoulos, Dimosthenis; Zheng, Lixin; Town, Terrence; Jones, Clinton; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Freeman, Gordon J; Sharpe, Arlene H; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Ahmed, Rafi; Wechsler, Steven L; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2011-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is a classic example of latent viral infection in humans and experimental animal models. The HSV-1 latency-associated transcript (LAT) plays a major role in the HSV-1 latency reactivation cycle and thus in recurrent disease. Whether the presence of LAT leads to generation of dysfunctional T cell responses in the trigeminal ganglia (TG) of latently infected mice is not known. To address this issue, we used LAT-positive [LAT(+)] and LAT-deficient [LAT(-)] viruses to evaluate the effect of LAT on CD8 T cell exhaustion in TG of latently infected mice. The amount of latency as determined by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) of viral DNA in total TG extracts was 3-fold higher with LAT(+) than with LAT(-) virus. LAT expression and increased latency correlated with increased mRNA levels of CD8, PD-1, and Tim-3. PD-1 is both a marker for exhaustion and a primary factor leading to exhaustion, and Tim-3 can also contribute to exhaustion. These results suggested that LAT(+) TG contain both more CD8(+) T cells and more CD8(+) T cells expressing the exhaustion markers PD-1 and Tim-3. This was confirmed by flow cytometry analyses of expression of CD3/CD8/PD-1/Tim-3, HSV-1, CD8(+) T cell pentamer (specific for a peptide derived from residues 498 to 505 of glycoprotein B [gB(498-505)]), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The functional significance of PD-1 and its ligands in HSV-1 latency was demonstrated by the significantly reduced amount of HSV-1 latency in PD-1- and PD-L1-deficient mice. Together, these results may suggest that both PD-1 and Tim-3 are mediators of CD8(+) T cell exhaustion and latency in HSV-1 infection.

  4. Ets-1 is required for the activation of VEGFR3 during latent Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Kimberley D; Morris, Valerie A; Wu, David; Barcy, Serge; Lagunoff, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the etiologic agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), is present in the predominant tumor cells of KS, the spindle cells. Spindle cells express markers of lymphatic endothelium and, interestingly, KSHV infection of blood endothelial cells reprograms them to a lymphatic endothelial cell phenotype. KSHV-induced reprogramming requires the activation of STAT3 and phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI3)/AKT through the activation of cellular receptor gp130. Importantly, KSHV-induced reprogramming is specific to endothelial cells, indicating that there are additional host genes that are differentially regulated during KSHV infection of endothelial cells that contribute to lymphatic reprogramming. We found that the transcription factor Ets-1 is highly expressed in KS spindle cells and is upregulated during KSHV infection of endothelial cells in culture. The KSHV latent vFLIP gene is sufficient to induce Ets-1 expression in an NF-κB-dependent fashion. Ets-1 is required for KSHV-induced expression of VEGFR3, a lymphatic endothelial-cell-specific receptor important for lymphangiogenesis, and Ets-1 activates the promoter of VEGFR3. Ets-1 knockdown does not alter the expression of another lymphatic-specific gene, the podoplanin gene, but does inhibit the expression of VEGFR3 in uninfected lymphatic endothelium, indicating that Ets-1 is a novel cellular regulator of VEGFR3 expression. Knockdown of Ets-1 affects the ability of KSHV-infected cells to display angiogenic phenotypes, indicating that Ets-1 plays a role in KSHV activation of endothelial cells during latent KSHV infection. Thus, Ets-1 is a novel regulator of VEGFR3 and is involved in the induction of angiogenic phenotypes by KSHV.

  5. Latent infection of myeloid progenitors by human cytomegalovirus protects cells from FAS-mediated apoptosis through the cellular IL-10/PEA-15 pathway.

    PubMed

    Poole, Emma; Lau, Jonathan C H; Sinclair, John

    2015-08-01

    Latent infection of primary CD34(+) progenitor cells by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) results in their increased survival in the face of pro-apoptotic signals. For instance, we have shown previously that primary myeloid cells are refractory to FAS-mediated killing and that cellular IL-10 (cIL-10) is an important survival factor for this effect. However, how cIL-10 mediates this protection is unclear. Here, we have shown that cIL-10 signalling leading to upregulation of the cellular factor PEA-15 mediates latency-associated protection of CD34(+) progenitor cells from the extrinsic death pathway.

  6. Enhancing Virion Tethering by BST2 Sensitizes Productively and Latently HIV-infected T cells to ADCC Mediated by Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Tram N. Q.; Lukhele, Sabelo; Dallaire, Frédéric; Perron, Gabrielle; Cohen, Éric A.

    2016-01-01

    Binding of anti-HIV antibodies (Abs) to envelope (Env) glycoproteins on infected cells can mark them for elimination via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). BST2, a type I interferon (IFN)-stimulated restriction factor that anchors nascent Env-containing virions at the surface of infected cells has been shown to enhance ADCC functions. In a comprehensive analysis of ADCC potency by neutralizing anti-HIV Abs (NAbs), we show in this study that NAbs are capable of mediating ADCC against HIV-infected T cells with 3BNC117, PGT126 and PG9 being most efficient. We demonstrate that HIV-induced BST2 antagonism effectively attenuates Ab binding and ADCC responses mediated by all classes of NAbs that were tested. Interestingly, IFNα treatment can reverse this effect in a BST2-dependent manner. Importantly, while reactivated latent T cell lines display some susceptibility to ADCC mediated by broadly NAbs, inactivating BST2 viral countermeasures and/or exogenous IFNα augment their elimination. Overall, our findings support the notion that NAbs can induce ADCC. They highlight that while BST2 antagonism by HIV promotes ADCC evasion, strategies aimed at restoring BST2 restriction could improve anti-HIV responses and potentially provide a means to eliminate reactivated cells in latent reservoirs. PMID:27853288

  7. Glucocorticosteroids trigger reactivation of human cytomegalovirus from latently infected myeloid cells and increase the risk for HCMV infection in D+R+ liver transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, Ellen; Sauviller, Sarah; Lau, Betty; Kesteleyn, Bart; Griffiths, Paul; Burroughs, Andrew; Emery, Vincent; Sinclair, John

    2015-01-01

    Graft rejection in transplant patients is managed clinically by suppressing T-cell function with immunosuppressive drugs such as prednisolone and methylprednisolone. In such immunocompromised hosts, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an important opportunistic pathogen and can cause severe morbidity and mortality. Currently, the effect of glucocorticosteroids (GCSs) on the HCMV life cycle remains unclear. Previous reports showed enhanced lytic replication of HCMV in vitro in the presence of GCSs. In the present study, we explored the implications of steroid exposure on latency and reactivation. We observed a direct effect of several GCSs used in the clinic on the activation of a quiescent viral major immediate-early promoter in stably transfected THP-1 monocytic cells. This activation was prevented by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist Ru486 and by shRNA-mediated knockdown of the GR. Consistent with this observation, prednisolone treatment of latently infected primary monocytes resulted in HCMV reactivation. Analysis of the phenotype of these cells showed that treatment with GCSs was correlated with differentiation to an anti-inflammatory macrophage-like cell type. On the basis that these observations may be pertinent to HCMV reactivation in post-transplant settings, we retrospectively evaluated the incidence, viral kinetics and viral load of HCMV in liver transplant patients in the presence or absence of GCS treatment. We observed that combination therapy of baseline prednisolone and augmented methylprednisolone, upon organ rejection, significantly increased the incidence of HCMV infection in the intermediate risk group where donor and recipient are both HCMV seropositive (D+R+) to levels comparable with the high risk D+R− group. PMID:25312585

  8. Glucocorticosteroids trigger reactivation of human cytomegalovirus from latently infected myeloid cells and increase the risk for HCMV infection in D+R+ liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Ellen; Sauviller, Sarah; Lau, Betty; Kesteleyn, Bart; Griffiths, Paul; Burroughs, Andrew; Emery, Vincent; Sinclair, John; Van Loock, Marnix

    2015-01-01

    Graft rejection in transplant patients is managed clinically by suppressing T-cell function with immunosuppressive drugs such as prednisolone and methylprednisolone. In such immunocompromised hosts, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an important opportunistic pathogen and can cause severe morbidity and mortality. Currently, the effect of glucocorticosteroids (GCSs) on the HCMV life cycle remains unclear. Previous reports showed enhanced lytic replication of HCMV in vitro in the presence of GCSs. In the present study, we explored the implications of steroid exposure on latency and reactivation. We observed a direct effect of several GCSs used in the clinic on the activation of a quiescent viral major immediate-early promoter in stably transfected THP-1 monocytic cells. This activation was prevented by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist Ru486 and by shRNA-mediated knockdown of the GR. Consistent with this observation, prednisolone treatment of latently infected primary monocytes resulted in HCMV reactivation. Analysis of the phenotype of these cells showed that treatment with GCSs was correlated with differentiation to an anti-inflammatory macrophage-like cell type. On the basis that these observations may be pertinent to HCMV reactivation in post-transplant settings, we retrospectively evaluated the incidence, viral kinetics and viral load of HCMV in liver transplant patients in the presence or absence of GCS treatment. We observed that combination therapy of baseline prednisolone and augmented methylprednisolone, upon organ rejection, significantly increased the incidence of HCMV infection in the intermediate risk group where donor and recipient are both HCMV seropositive (D+R+) to levels comparable with the high risk D+R- group.

  9. Immune parameters differentiating active from latent tuberculosis infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yeon; Jung, Young Won; Jeong, Ina; Joh, Joon-Sung; Sim, Soo Yeon; Choi, Boram; Jee, Hyeon-Gun; Lim, Dong-Gyun

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis remains a highly prevalent infectious disease worldwide. Identification of the immune parameters that differentiate active disease from latent infection will facilitate the development of efficient control measures as well as new diagnostic modalities for tuberculosis. Here, we investigated the cytokine production profiles of monocytes and CD4(+) T lymphocytes upon encountering mycobacterial antigens. In addition, cytokines and lipid mediators with immune-modulating activities were examined in plasma samples ex vivo. Comparison of these parameters in active tuberculosis patients and healthy subjects with latent infection revealed that, active tuberculosis was associated with diminished Th1-type cytokine secretion from CD4(+) T cells and less augmented inflammatory cytokine secretion from monocytes induced by IFN-γ than that in latent tuberculosis infection. In addition, a higher plasma concentration of lipoxin A4 and lower ratio of prostaglandin E2 to lipoxin A4 were observed in active cases than in latent infections. These findings have implications for preparing new therapeutic strategies and for differential diagnosis of the two types of tuberculosis infection.

  10. CD4+ T cell polyfunctional profile in HIV-TB coinfection are similar between individuals with latent and active TB infection.

    PubMed

    Canaday, David H; Sridaran, Sankar; Van Epps, Puja; Aung, Htin; Burant, Christopher J; Nsereko, Mary; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Betts, Michael R; Toossi, Zahra

    2015-07-01

    CD4+ T cell counts of HIV-infected individuals with pulmonary TB (PTB) are higher than with other opportunistic infections suggesting that progression to PTB is not merely due to T cell depletion but also dysfunction. There are limited data examining T cell functional signatures in human HIV-TB co-infection particularly in PTB which accounts for about 80% of active TB disease overall. We examined a cohort of HIV-infected anti-retroviral naïve individuals in Kampala, Uganda, a TB endemic area using multiparametric flow cytometry analysis to determine IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-17, and TNF-α production in CD4+ memory T cell subsets. The cytokine frequency and polyfunctionality profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-specific CD4+ T cells in HIV-infected persons with latent TB infection (LTBI) or PTB is comparable. This similarity suggests that LTBI may represent a smoldering state of persistent MTB replication rather than dormant infection. This may be a contributory mechanism to the significantly increased risk of progression to PTB in this population.

  11. Early and sustained expression of latent and host modulating genes in coordinated transcriptional program of KSHV productive primary infection of human primary endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Min; Zhou, Fu-Chun; Ye, Feng-Chun; Pan, Hong-Yi; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Coordinated expression of viral genes in primary infection is essential for successful infection of host cells. We examined the expression profiles of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) transcripts in productive primary infection of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells by whole-genome reverse-transcription real-time quantitative PCR. The latent transcripts were expressed early and sustained at high levels throughout the infection while the lytic transcripts were expressed in the order of immediate early, early, and lytic transcripts, all of which culminated before the production of infectious virions. Significantly, transcripts encoding genes with host modulating functions, including mitogenic and cell cycle-regulatory, immune-modulating, and anti-apoptotic genes, were expressed before those encoding viral structure and replication genes, and sustained at high levels throughout the infection, suggesting KSHV manipulation of host environment to facilitate infection. The KSHV transcriptional program in a primary infection defined in this study should provide a basis for further investigation of virus–cell interactions. PMID:16154170

  12. The Expression of Human Cytomegalovirus MicroRNA MiR-UL148D during Latent Infection in Primary Myeloid Cells Inhibits Activin A-triggered Secretion of IL-6

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Betty; Poole, Emma; Krishna, Benjamin; Sellart, Immaculada; Wills, Mark R.; Murphy, Eain; Sinclair, John

    2016-01-01

    The successful establishment and maintenance of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency is dependent on the expression of a subset of viral genes. Whilst the exact spectrum and functions of these genes are far from clear, inroads have been made for protein-coding genes. In contrast, little is known about the expression of non-coding RNAs. Here we show that HCMV encoded miRNAs are expressed de novo during latent infection of primary myeloid cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that miR-UL148D, one of the most highly expressed viral miRNAs during latent infection, directly targets the cellular receptor ACVR1B of the activin signalling axis. Consistent with this, we observed upregulation of ACVR1B expression during latent infection with a miR-UL148D deletion virus (ΔmiR-UL148D). Importantly, we observed that monocytes latently infected with ΔmiR-UL148D are more responsive to activin A stimulation, as demonstrated by their increased secretion of IL-6. Collectively, our data indicates miR-UL148D inhibits ACVR1B expression in latently infected cells to limit proinflammatory cytokine secretion, perhaps as an immune evasion strategy or to postpone cytokine-induced reactivation until conditions are more favourable. This is the first demonstration of an HCMV miRNA function during latency in primary myeloid cells, implicating that small RNA species may contribute significantly to latent infection. PMID:27491954

  13. Immunological and pharmacological strategies to reactivate HIV-1 from latently infected cells: a possibility for HIV-1 paediatric patients?

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bonet, M; Clemente, M I; Serramía, M J; Moreno, S; Muñoz, E; Muñoz-Fernández, M A

    2015-07-01

    The limitations to establishing a viral reservoir facilitated by early cART in children could play a critical role in achieving natural control of viral replication upon discontinuation of cART, which could be defined as 'functional cure'. Viral reservoirs could provide a persistent source of recrudescent viraemia after withdrawal of cART, despite temporary remission of HIV-1 infection, as observed in the 'Mississippi baby'. Intensification of cART has been proposed as a strategy to control residual replication and to diminish the reservoirs. The effects of cART intensification with maraviroc persisted after discontinuation of the drug in HIV-1-infected adults. However, in HIV-1-infected children, the emergence of CXCR4-using variants occurs very early, and the use of CCR5 antagonists in these children as intensification therapy may not be the best alternative. New treatments to eradicate HIV-1 are focused on the activation of viral production from latently infected cells to purge and clear HIV-1 reservoirs. This strategy involves the use of a wide range of small molecules called latency-reversing agents (LRAs). Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) such as givinostat, belinostat and panobinostat, and class I-selective HDACis that include oxamflatin, NCH-51 and romidepsin, are the most advanced in clinical testing for HIV-1 LRAs. Panobinostat and romidepsin show an efficient reactivation profile in J89GFP cells, a lymphocyte HIV-1 latently infected cell line considered a relevant model to study post-integration HIV-1 latency and reactivation. Clinical trials with panobinostat and romidepsin have been performed in children with other pathologies and it could be reasonable to design a clinical trial using these drugs in combination with cART in HIV-1-infected children.

  14. Regulatory B cells inhibit cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity and elimination of infected CD4 T cells after in vitro reactivation of HIV latent reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Siewe, Basile; Wallace, Jennillee; Rygielski, Sonya; Stapleton, Jack T; Martin, Jeffrey; Deeks, Steven G; Landay, Alan

    2014-01-01

    During HIV infection, IL-10/IL-10 receptor and programmed death-1 (PD-1)/programmed death-1-ligand (PD-L1) interactions have been implicated in the impairment of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity. Despite antiretroviral therapy (ART), attenuated anti-HIV CTL functions present a major hurdle towards curative measures requiring viral eradication. Therefore, deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying impaired CTL is crucial before HIV viral eradication is viable. The generation of robust CTL activity necessitates interactions between antigen-presenting cells (APC), CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We have shown that in vitro, IL-10hiPD-L1hi regulatory B cells (Bregs) directly attenuate HIV-specific CD8+-mediated CTL activity. Bregs also modulate APC and CD4+ T cell function; herein we characterize the Breg compartment in uninfected (HIVNEG), HIV-infected "elite controllers" (HIVEC), ART-treated (HIVART), and viremic (HIVvir), subjects, and in vitro, assess the impact of Bregs on anti-HIV CTL generation and activity after reactivation of HIV latent reservoirs using suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). We find that Bregs from HIVEC and HIVART subjects exhibit comparable IL-10 expression levels significantly higher than HIVNEG subjects, but significantly lower than HIVVIR subjects. Bregs from HIVEC and HIVART subjects exhibit comparable PD-L1 expression, significantly higher than in HIVVIR and HIVNEG subjects. SAHA-treated Breg-depleted PBMC from HIVEC and HIVART subjects, displayed enhanced CD4+ T-cell proliferation, significant upregulation of antigen-presentation molecules, increased frequency of CD107a+ and HIV-specific CD8+ T cells, associated with efficient elimination of infected CD4+ T cells, and reduction in integrated viral DNA. Finally, IL-10-R and PD-1 antibody blockade partially reversed Breg-mediated inhibition of CD4+ T-cell proliferation. Our data suggest that, possibly, via an IL-10 and PD-L1 synergistic mechanism; Bregs likely inhibit APC function

  15. Comparison of interferon-γ-, interleukin (IL)-17- and IL-22-expressing CD4 T cells, IL-22-expressing granulocytes and proinflammatory cytokines during latent and active tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Cowan, J; Pandey, S; Filion, L G; Angel, J B; Kumar, A; Cameron, D W

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the role and expression of T helper type 17 (Th17) cells and Th17 cytokines in human tuberculosis. We show that the basal proportion of interferon (IFN)-γ-, interleukin (IL)-17- and IL-22-expressing CD4(+) T cells and IL-22-expressing granulocytes in peripheral blood were significantly lower in latently infected healthy individuals and active tuberculosis patients compared to healthy controls. In contrast, CD4(+) T cells expressing IL-17, IL-22 and IFN-γ were increased significantly following mycobacterial antigens stimulation in both latent and actively infected patients. Interestingly, proinflammatory IFN-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α were increased following antigen stimulation in latent infection. Similarly, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-8, IL-22 and TNF-α were increased in the serum of latently infected individuals, whereas IL-6 and TNF-α were increased significantly in actively infected patients. Overall, we observed differential induction of IL-17-, IL-22- and IFN-γ-expressing CD4(+) T cells, IL-22-expressing granulocytes and proinflammatory cytokines in circulation and following antigenic stimulation in latent and active tuberculosis.

  16. Detection of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) -specific cell-mediated immune responses in guinea pigs during latent HSV-2 genital infection.

    PubMed

    Perry, Clarice L; Banasik, Brianne N; Gorder, Summer R; Xia, Jingya; Auclair, Sarah; Bourne, Nigel; Milligan, Gregg N

    2016-12-01

    Genital infections with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) are a source of considerable morbidity and are a health concern for newborns exposed to virus during vaginal delivery. Additionally, HSV-2 infection diminishes the integrity of the vaginal epithelium resulting in increased susceptibility of individuals to infection with other sexually transmitted pathogens. Understanding immune protection against HSV-2 primary infection and immune modulation of virus shedding events following reactivation of the virus from latency is important for the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. Although the murine model of HSV-2 infection is useful for understanding immunity following immunization, it is limited by the lack of spontaneous reactivation of HSV-2 from latency. Genital infection of guinea pigs with HSV-2 accurately models the disease of humans including the spontaneous reactivation of HSV-2 from latency and provides a unique opportunity to examine virus-host interactions during latency. Although the guinea pig represents an accurate model of many human infections, relatively few reagents are available to study the immunological response to infection. To analyze the cell-mediated immune response of guinea pigs at extended periods of time after establishment of HSV-2 latency, we have modified flow-cytometry based proliferation assays and IFN-γ ELISPOT assays to detect and quantify HSV-specific cell-mediated responses during latent infection of guinea pigs. Here we demonstrate that a combination of proliferation and ELISPOT assays can be used to quantify and characterize effecter function of virus-specific immune memory responses during HSV-latency.

  17. T cell responses to DosR and Rpf proteins in actively and latently infected individuals from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Riaño, Felipe; Arroyo, Leonar; París, Sara; Rojas, Mauricio; Friggen, Annemieke H; van Meijgaarden, Krista E; Franken, Kees L M C; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; García, Luis F; Barrera, Luis F

    2012-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis DosR regulon-encoded proteins elicit strong immune T-cell responses in individuals with latent tuberculosis (LTBI). Also, resuscitation (Rpf) proteins can induce such responses. However, variations in the immunogenicity of the DosR and Rpf proteins have been observed in European and African populations, and no data are published from other geographic areas. In Colombian LTBI and patients with recently diagnosed PTB, we therefore studied the immune response to DosR, Rpf, stress, and nominal antigens from Mtb, in 7-day stimulated cultures. Three DosR (Rv1737c, Rv2029c, Rv2628c) and 2 Rpf (Rv0867 and Rv2389c) antigens were recognized most prominently on the basis of the net IFNγ production (DosR) or the percentage of responding individuals (Rpf). Results show that the selected DosR antigens induced a higher proportion of CD4-T cells producing IFNγ from LTBI, compared to pulmonary TB patients (PTB), while there were no differences in the proportion of CD8-T cells. An increased frequency of CD4, but not CD8 T-cells with a CD45RO(+)CD27(+) phenotype was observed in LTBI in response to Rv2029c, Rv0867c, and Rv2389c, compared to PTB. The levels of cytokines and chemokines in the supernatants of stimulated cells, showed that the DosR and Rpf antigens induced higher levels of IFNγ in cultures from LTBI compared to PTB, although the induced pattern of cytokines and chemokines was also antigen dependent. In summary, our results are consistent with the significant immunogenicity of Mtb DosR and Rpf antigens in LTBI individuals, and confirm and extend previously reported data from other TB affected human populations.

  18. KSHV miRNAs decrease expression of lytic genes in latently infected PEL and endothelial cells by targeting host transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Plaisance-Bonstaff, Karlie; Choi, Hong Seok; Beals, Tyler; Krueger, Brian J; Boss, Isaac W; Gay, Lauren A; Haecker, Irina; Hu, Jianhong; Renne, Rolf

    2014-10-23

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) microRNAs are encoded in the latency-associated region. Knockdown of KSHV miR-K12-3 and miR-K12-11 increased expression of lytic genes in BC-3 cells, and increased virus production from latently infected BCBL-1 cells. Furthermore, iSLK cells infected with miR-K12-3 and miR-K12-11 deletion mutant viruses displayed increased spontaneous reactivation and were more sensitive to inducers of reactivation than cells infected with wild type KSHV. Predicted binding sites for miR-K12-3 and miR-K12-11 were found in the 3'UTRs of the cellular transcription factors MYB, Ets-1, and C/EBPα, which activate RTA, the KSHV replication and transcription activator. Targeting of MYB by miR-K12-11 was confirmed by cloning the MYB 3'UTR downstream from the luciferase reporter. Knockdown of miR‑K12-11 resulted in increased levels of MYB transcript, and knockdown of miR-K12-3 increased both C/EBPα and Ets-1 transcripts. Thus, miR-K12-11 and miR-K12-3 contribute to maintenance of latency by decreasing RTA expression indirectly, presumably via down-regulation of MYB, C/EBPα and Ets-1, and possibly other host transcription factors.

  19. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Revaccination of Adults with Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Induces Long-Lived BCG-Reactive NK Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Suliman, Sara; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Johnson, John L; Hughes, Jane E; Smit, Erica; Murphy, Melissa; Toefy, Asma; Lerumo, Lesedi; Hopley, Christiaan; Pienaar, Bernadette; Chheng, Phalkun; Nemes, Elisa; Hoft, Daniel F; Hanekom, Willem A; Boom, W Henry; Hatherill, Mark; Scriba, Thomas J

    2016-08-15

    One third of the global population is estimated to be latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis We performed a phase I randomized controlled trial of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) before revaccination with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in healthy, tuberculin skin test-positive (≥15-mm induration), HIV-negative South African adults. We hypothesized that preclearance of latent bacilli with IPT modulates BCG immunogenicity following revaccination. Frequencies and coexpression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-17, and/or IL-22 in CD4 T cells and IFN-γ-expressing CD8 T, γδ T, CD3(+)CD56(+) NKT-like, and NK cells in response to BCG were measured using whole blood intracellular cytokine staining and flow cytometry. We analyzed 72 participants who were revaccinated with BCG after IPT (n = 33) or without prior IPT (n = 39). IPT had little effect on frequencies or cytokine coexpression patterns of M. tuberculosis- or BCG-specific responses. Revaccination transiently boosted BCG-specific Th1 cytokine-expressing CD4, CD8, and γδ T cells. Despite high frequencies of IFN-γ-expressing BCG-reactive CD3(+)CD56(+) NKT-like cells and CD3(-)CD56(dim) and CD3(-)CD56(hi) NK cells at baseline, BCG revaccination boosted these responses, which remained elevated up to 1 y after revaccination. Such BCG-reactive memory NK cells were induced by BCG vaccination in infants, whereas in vitro IFN-γ expression by NK cells upon BCG stimulation was dependent on IL-12 and IL-18. Our data suggest that isoniazid preclearance of M. tuberculosis bacilli has little effect on the magnitude, persistence, or functional attributes of lymphocyte responses boosted by BCG revaccination. Our study highlights the surprising durability of BCG-boosted memory NKT-like and NK cells expressing antimycobacterial effector molecules, which may be novel targets for tuberculosis vaccines.

  20. Human Cytomegalovirus miR-UL148D Facilitates Latent Viral Infection by Targeting Host Cell Immediate Early Response Gene 5

    PubMed Central

    Li, Limin; Li, Donghai; Liu, Fenyong; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency remain incompletely understood. Here, we showed that a HCMV-encoded miRNA, miR-UL148D, robustly accumulates during late stages of experimental latent HCMV infection in host cells and promotes HCMV latency by modulating the immediate early response gene 5 (IER5)-cell division cycle 25B (CDC25B) axis in host cells. miR-UL148D inhibited IER5 expression by directly targeting the three-prime untranslated region(3’UTR) of IER5 mRNA and thus rescued CDC25B expression during the establishment of viral latency. Infection with NR-1ΔmiR-UL148D, a derivative of the HCMV clinical strain NR-1 with a miR-UL148D knockout mutation, resulted in sustained induction of IER5 expression but decreased CDC25B expression in host cells. Mechanistically, we further showed that CDC25B plays an important role in suppressing HCMV IE1 and lytic gene transcription by activating cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK-1). Both gain-of-function and lose-of-function assays demonstrated that miR-UL148D promotes HCMV latency by helping maintain CDC25B activity in host cells. These results provide a novel mechanism through which a HCMV miRNA regulates viral latency. PMID:27824944

  1. HIV-1 integration landscape during latent and active infection

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Lillian; Silva, Israel T.; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Rosales, Rafael A.; Parrish, Erica H.; Learn, Gerald H.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Czartoski, Julie L.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Lehmann, Clara; Klein, Florian; Caskey, Marina; Walker, Bruce D.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Jankovic, Mila; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The barrier to curing HIV-1 is thought to reside primarily in CD4+ T cells containing silent proviruses. To characterize these latently infected cells, we studied the integration profile of HIV-1 in viremic progressors, individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy, and viremic controllers. Clonally expanded T cells represented the majority of all integrations and increased during therapy. However, none of the 75 expanded T cell clones assayed contained intact virus. In contrast, the cells bearing single integration events decreased in frequency over time on therapy, and the surviving cells were enriched for HIV-1 integration in silent regions of the genome. Finally, there was a strong preference for integration into, or in close proximity to Alu repeats, which were also enriched in local hotspots for integration. The data indicate that dividing clonally expanded T cells contain defective proviruses, and that the replication competent reservoir is primarily found in CD4+ T cells that remain relatively quiescent. PMID:25635456

  2. RNA-guided endonuclease provides a therapeutic strategy to cure latent herpesviridae infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbin; Quake, Stephen R

    2014-09-09

    Latent viral infection is a persistent cause of human disease. Although standard antiviral therapies can suppress active viral replication, no existing treatment can effectively eradicate latent infection and therefore a cure is lacking for many prevalent viral diseases. The prokaryotic immune system clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas evolved as a natural response to phage infections, and we demonstrate here that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be adapted for antiviral treatment in human cells by specifically targeting the genomes of latent viral infections. Patient-derived cells from a Burkitt's lymphoma with latent Epstein-Barr virus infection showed dramatic proliferation arrest and a concomitant decrease in viral load after exposure to a CRISPR/Cas9 vector targeted to the viral genome.

  3. RNA-guided endonuclease provides a therapeutic strategy to cure latent herpesviridae infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianbin; Quake, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Latent viral infection is a persistent cause of human disease. Although standard antiviral therapies can suppress active viral replication, no existing treatment can effectively eradicate latent infection and therefore a cure is lacking for many prevalent viral diseases. The prokaryotic immune system clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas evolved as a natural response to phage infections, and we demonstrate here that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be adapted for antiviral treatment in human cells by specifically targeting the genomes of latent viral infections. Patient-derived cells from a Burkitt’s lymphoma with latent Epstein–Barr virus infection showed dramatic proliferation arrest and a concomitant decrease in viral load after exposure to a CRISPR/Cas9 vector targeted to the viral genome. PMID:25157128

  4. Acute exercise preferentially redeploys NK-cells with a highly-differentiated phenotype and augments cytotoxicity against lymphoma and multiple myeloma target cells. Part II: impact of latent cytomegalovirus infection and catecholamine sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bigley, Austin B; Rezvani, Katayoun; Pistillo, Mira; Reed, Justin; Agha, Nadia; Kunz, Hawley; O'Connor, Daniel P; Sekine, Takuya; Bollard, Catherine M; Simpson, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    We showed previously that acute exercise is associated with a preferential redeployment of highly-differentiated NK-cells and increased cytotoxicity against HLA-expressing tumor cell lines during exercise recovery. In this part II study, we retrospectively analyzed these findings in the context of latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and performed additional experiments to explore potential mechanisms underpinning the marked reduction in NK-cell redeployment with exercise in CMV-seropositive individuals. We show here that latent CMV infection impairs NK-cell mobilization with exercise, only when the intensity of the exercise bout exceeds the individual blood lactate threshold (BLT). This impaired mobilization is associated with increased proportions of poorly exercise-responsive NK-cell subsets (NKG2C+/KIR-, NKG2C+/NKG2A-, and NKG2C+/CD57+) and decreased NK-cell β(2)-adrenergic receptor (AR) expression in those with CMV. As a result, NK-cell production of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in response to in vitro isoproterenol (synthetic β-agonist) stimulation was drastically lower in those with CMV (6.0 vs. 20.3pmol/mL, p<0.001) and correlated highly with the proportion of NKG2C+/CD57+ NK-cells (R(2)=0.97). Moreover, NK-cell cytotoxic activity (NKCA) against the K562 (36.6% vs. 22.7%, p<0.05), U266 (23.6% vs. 15.9%, p<0.05), and 221.AEH (41.3% vs. 13.3%, p<0.001) cell lines was increased at baseline in those infected with CMV; however, latent CMV infection abated the post-exercise increase in NKCA as a result of decreased NK-cell mobilization. Additionally, NKCA per cell against the U266 (0.24 vs. 0.12, p<0.01), RPMI-8226 (0.17 vs. 0.11, p<0.05), and 221.AEH (0.18 vs. 0.11, p<0.05) cell lines was increased 1h post-exercise (relative to baseline) in CMV-seronegative subjects, but not in those infected with CMV. Collectively, these data indicate that latent CMV infection may compromise NK-cell mediated immunosurveillance after acute exercise due to an increased proportion of

  5. The Effect of Latent Toxoplasma gondii Infection on the Immune Response in HIV-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Beran, Ondrej; Kodym, Petr; Maly, Marek; Davidova, Alzbeta; Reinvartova, Gabriela; Jilich, David; Holub, Michal; Rozsypal, Hanus

    2015-01-01

    A relationship between latent toxoplasmosis and the immune system during HIV disease is poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this follow-up study was to characterize immunological parameters in HIV-infected patients with latent toxoplasmosis and noninfected individuals. A total of 101 HIV-infected patients were enrolled in the study. The patients were classified into two groups based on anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies: a group of 55 toxoplasma-positive persons (TP) and a group of 46 toxoplasma-negative persons (TN). Absolute counts of several lymphocyte subsets decreased in the TP group, namely, T cells (p = 0.007), B cells (p = 0.002), NK cells (p = 0.009), CD4 T cells (p = 0.028), and CD8 T cells (p = 0.004). On the other hand, the percentage of CD8 T cells expressing CD38 and HLA-DR significantly increased during the follow-up in the TP group (p = 0.003, p = 0.042, resp.) as well as the intensity of CD38 and HLA-DR expression (MFI) on CD8 T cells (p = 0.001, p = 0.057, resp.). In the TN group, analysis of the kinetics of immunological parameters revealed no significant changes over time. In conclusion, the results suggest that latent T. gondii infection modulates the immune response during HIV infection.

  6. Latent Tuberculosis Infection: Myths, Models, and Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Noton K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of this review is to present the current state of knowledge on human latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) based on clinical studies and observations, as well as experimental in vitro and animal models. Several key terms are defined, including “latency,” “persistence,” “dormancy,” and “antibiotic tolerance.” Dogmas prevalent in the field are critically examined based on available clinical and experimental data, including the long-held beliefs that infection is either latent or active, that LTBI represents a small population of nonreplicating, “dormant” bacilli, and that caseous granulomas are the haven for LTBI. The role of host factors, such as CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, T regulatory cells, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and gamma interferon (IFN-γ), in controlling TB infection is discussed. We also highlight microbial regulatory and metabolic pathways implicated in bacillary growth restriction and antibiotic tolerance under various physiologically relevant conditions. Finally, we pose several clinically important questions, which remain unanswered and will serve to stimulate future research on LTBI. PMID:25184558

  7. T-Cell Immunophenotyping Distinguishes Active From Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Katrina M.; Whitworth, Hilary S.; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J.; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S.; Kapembwa, Moses S.; Kon, Onn M.; Sampson, Robert D.; Taylor, Graham P.; Lalvani, Ajit

    2013-01-01

    Background. Changes in the phenotype and function of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in response to stage of infection may allow discrimination between active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection. Methods. A prospective comparison of M. tuberculosis-specific cellular immunity in subjects with active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection, with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to measure CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subset phenotype and secretion of interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Results. Frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ cells secreting IFN-γ-only, TNF-α-only and dual IFN-γ/TNF-α were greater in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection. All M. tuberculosis-specific CD4+ subsets, with the exception of IL-2-only cells, switched from central to effector memory phenotype in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection, accompanied by a reduction in IL-7 receptor α (CD127) expression. The frequency of PPD-specific CD4+ TNF-α-only-secreting T cells with an effector phenotype accurately distinguished active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection with an area under the curve of 0.99, substantially more discriminatory than measurement of function alone. Conclusions. Combined measurement of T-cell phenotype and function defines a highly discriminatory biomarker of tuberculosis disease activity. Unlocking the diagnostic and monitoring potential of this combined approach now requires validation in large-scale prospective studies. PMID:23966657

  8. The immunology of human cytomegalovirus latency: could latent infection be cleared by novel immunotherapeutic strategies?

    PubMed

    Wills, Mark R; Poole, Emma; Lau, Betty; Krishna, Ben; Sinclair, John H

    2015-03-01

    While the host immune response following primary human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is generally effective at stopping virus replication and dissemination, virus is never cleared by the host and like all herpesviruses, persists for life. At least in part, this persistence is known to be facilitated by the ability of HCMV to establish latency in myeloid cells in which infection is essentially silent with, importantly, a total lack of new virus production. However, although the viral transcription programme during latency is much suppressed, a number of viral genes are expressed during latent infection at the protein level and many of these have been shown to have profound effects on the latent cell and its environment. Intriguingly, many of these latency-associated genes are also expressed during lytic infection. Therefore, why the same potent host immune responses generated during lytic infection to these viral gene products are not recognized during latency, thereby allowing clearance of latently infected cells, is far from clear. Reactivation from latency is also a major cause of HCMV-mediated disease, particularly in the immune compromised and immune naive, and is also likely to be a major source of virus in chronic subclinical HCMV infection which has been suggested to be associated with long-term diseases such as atherosclerosis and some neoplasias. Consequently, understanding latency and why latently infected cells appear to be immunoprivileged is crucial for an understanding of the pathogenesis of HCMV and may help to design strategies to eliminate latent virus reservoirs, at least in certain clinical settings.

  9. The Herpes Simplex Virus Latency-Associated Transcript Gene Is Associated with a Broader Repertoire of Virus-Specific Exhausted CD8+ T Cells Retained within the Trigeminal Ganglia of Latently Infected HLA Transgenic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Dervillez, Xavier; Khan, Arif A.; Chentoufi, Aziz A.; Chilukuri, Sravya; Shukr, Nora; Fazli, Yasmin; Ong, Nicolas N.; Afifi, Rasha E.; Osorio, Nelson; Geertsema, Roger; Nesburn, Anthony B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Persistent pathogens, such as herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), have evolved a variety of immune evasion strategies to avoid being detected and destroyed by the host's immune system. A dynamic cross talk appears to occur between the HSV-1 latency-associated transcript (LAT), the only viral gene that is abundantly transcribed during latency, and the CD8+ T cells that reside in HSV-1 latently infected human and rabbit trigeminal ganglia (TG). The reactivation phenotype of TG that are latently infected with wild-type HSV-1 or with LAT-rescued mutant (i.e., LAT+ TG) is significantly higher than TG latently infected with LAT-null mutant (i.e., LAT− TG). Whether LAT promotes virus reactivation by selectively shaping a unique repertoire of HSV-specific CD8+ T cells in LAT+ TG is unknown. In the present study, we assessed the frequency, function, and exhaustion status of TG-resident CD8+ T cells specific to 40 epitopes derived from HSV-1 gB, gD, VP11/12, and VP13/14 proteins, in human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A*0201) transgenic rabbits infected ocularly with LAT+ versus LAT– virus. Compared to CD8+ T cells from LAT– TG, CD8+ T cells from LAT+ TG (i) recognized a broader selection of nonoverlapping HSV-1 epitopes, (ii) expressed higher levels of PD-1, TIM-3, and CTLA-4 markers of exhaustion, and (iii) produced less tumor necrosis factor alpha, gamma interferon, and granzyme B. These results suggest a novel immune evasion mechanism by which the HSV-1 LAT may contribute to the shaping of a broader repertoire of exhausted HSV-specific CD8+ T cells in latently infected TG, thus allowing for increased viral reactivation. IMPORTANCE A significantly larger repertoire of dysfunctional (exhausted) HSV-specific CD8+ T cells were found in the TG of HLA transgenic rabbits latently infected with wild-type HSV-1 or with LAT-rescued mutant (i.e., LAT+ TG) than in a more restricted repertoire of functional HSV-specific CD8+ T cells in the TG of HLA transgenic rabbits latently

  10. Treatment guidelines for latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) has been established as valid for patients at high risk for developing active tuberculosis. Treatment of LTBI is also considered an important strategy for eliminating tuberculosis (TB) in Japan. In recent years, interferon-gamma release assays have come into widespread use; isoniazid (INH) preventive therapy for HIV patients has come to be recommended worldwide; and there have been increases in both types of biologics used in the treatment of immune diseases as well as the diseases susceptible to treatment. In light of the above facts, the Prevention Committee and the Treatment Committee of the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis have jointly drafted these guidelines. In determining subjects for LTBI treatment, the following must be considered: 1) risk of TB infection/ development; 2) infection diagnosis; 3) chest image diagnosis; 4) the impact of TB development; 5) the possible manifestation of side effects; and 6) the prospects of treatment completion. LTBI treatment is actively considered when relative risk is deemed 4 or higher, including risk factors such as the following: HIV/AIDS, organ transplants (immunosuppressant use), silicosis, dialysis due to chronic renal failure, recent TB infection (within 2 years), fibronodular shadows in chest radiographs (untreated old TB), the use of biologics, and large doses of corticosteroids. Although the risk is lower, the following risk factors require consideration of LTBI treatment when 2 or more of them are present: use of oral or inhaled corticosteroids, use of other immunosuppressants, diabetes, being underweight, smoking, gastrectomy, and so on. In principle, INH is administered for a period of 6 or 9 months. When INH cannot be used, rifampicin is administered for a period of 4 or 6 months. It is believed that there are no reasons to support long-term LTBI treatment for immunosuppressed patients in Japan, where the risk of infection is not considered markedly high

  11. Analysis of cell-to-cell and long-distance movement of apple latent spherical virus in infected plants using green, cyan, and yellow fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tsubasa; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) expressing green, cyan, and yellow fluorescent proteins (GFP, CFP, and YFP) was constructed and used to analyze the local and systemic movement of the virus in infected plants. In Chenopodium quinoa plants inoculated with GFP-ALSV, the infection foci first appeared as small fluorescent spots 2-3 days post inoculation (dpi). The GFP spots expanded as rings from 5 dpi, then fused to each other, and most fluorescence faded out at 10-12 dpi. In upper uninoculated leaves, GFP fluorescence was first observed 6-7 dpi on the basal area of mature leaves and on the entire area of young developing leaves. The appearance of fluorescent flecks on young leaves was first found on and near the class III and IV veins. ALSV labeled with two different fluorescent proteins (CFP-ALSV and YFP-ALSV) were used to investigate the distribution of identical, but differently labeled viruses in mixed infection. Fluorescence from CFP and YFP was in each case observed in separate areas in both inoculated and upper uninoculated leaves, indicating that populations of identical, but differently labeled viruses were replicated and distributed in discrete areas of infected leaves.

  12. Latent Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection Does Not Induce Apoptosis in Human Trigeminal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Lindemann, Anja; Sinicina, Inga; Strupp, Michael; Brandt, Thomas; Hüfner, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) can establish lifelong latency in human trigeminal ganglia. Latently infected ganglia contain CD8+ T cells, which secrete granzyme B and are thus capable of inducing neuronal apoptosis. Using immunohistochemistry and single-cell reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), higher frequency and transcript levels of caspase-3 were found in HSV-1-negative compared to HSV-1-positive ganglia and neurons, respectively. No terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay-positive neurons were detected. The infiltrating T cells do not induce apoptosis in latently infected neurons. PMID:25762734

  13. Measurement of Phenotype and Absolute Number of Circulating Heparin-Binding Hemagglutinin, ESAT-6 and CFP-10, and Purified Protein Derivative Antigen-Specific CD4 T Cells Can Discriminate Active from Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Barkham, Timothy M. S.; Tang, Wenying; Kemeny, David M.; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Wang, Yee T.

    2014-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used as adjunctive tests for the evaluation of suspected cases of active tuberculosis (TB). However, a positive test does not differentiate latent from active TB. We investigated whether flow cytometric measurement of novel combinations of intracellular cytokines and surface makers on CD4 T cells could differentiate between active and latent TB after stimulation with Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific proteins. Blood samples from 60 patients referred to the Singapore Tuberculosis Control Unit for evaluation for active TB or as TB contacts were stimulated with purified protein derivative (PPD), ESAT-6 and CFP-10, or heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA). The CD4 T cell cytokine response (IFN-γ, interleukin-2 [IL-2], interleukin-17A [IL-17A], interleukin-22 [IL-22], granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) and surface marker expression (CD27, CXCR3, and CD154) were then measured. We found that the proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T cells, defined as CD154+ TNF-α+ cells that were negative for CD27 and positive for GM-CSF, gave the strongest discrimination between subjects with latent and those with active TB (area under the receiver operator characteristic [ROC] curve of 0.9277; P < 0.0001). Also, the proportions and absolute numbers of HBHA-specific CD4 T cells were significantly higher in those with latent TB infection, particularly CD154+ TNF-α+ IFN-γ+ IL-2+ and CD154+ TNF-α+ CXCR3+. Finally, we found that the ratio of ESAT-6- and CFP-10-responding to HBHA-responding CD4 T cells was significantly different between the two study populations. In conclusion, we found novel markers of M. tuberculosis-specific CD4 cells which differentiate between active and latent TB. PMID:25520147

  14. Impact of Latent Infection Treatment in Indigenous Populations

    PubMed Central

    Yuhara, Lucia Suemi; Sacchi, Flávia Patussi Correia; Croda, Julio

    2013-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to identify risk factors associated with latent tuberculosis (TB), examine the development of active disease among contacts, and assess the effectiveness of treating latent infection in indigenous Brazilians from January 2006 to December 2011. This was a retrospective study consisting of 1,371 tuberculosis contacts, 392 of whom underwent treatment for latent infection. Morbidity-from-TB data were obtained from the Information System for Disease Notification (SINAN) database, and the contacts’ data were collected from the clinical records using forms employed by Special Department of Indigenous Health (SESAI) multidisciplinary teams, according to SESAI’s instructions. The variables that were associated with latent infection among the contacts were age (odds ratio [OR]: 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02–1.04) and close contact with a smear-positive index case (OR: 2.26, 95% CI: 1.59–3.22). The variables associated with the development of active TB among the contacts were a tuberculin skin test (TST) ≥10 mm (relative risk [RR]: 1.12, 95% CI: 1.07–1.17), age (RR: 1.01, 95% CI: 1.00–1.03), and treatment of latent infection (RR: 0.03, 95% CI: 0.01–0.27). The estimated number of latent infection treatments needed to prevent one case of active TB among the contacts was 51 treatments (95% CI: 33–182). In contacts with TST ≥10 mm, 10 (95% CI: 6–19) latent infection treatments were necessary to prevent one case of active TB. Age and close contact with a smear-positive index case were associated with latent TB. Screening with TST is a high priority among individuals contacting smear-positive index cases. Age and TST are associated with the development of active TB among contacts, and treatment of latent infection is an effective measure to control TB in indigenous communities. PMID:23936264

  15. Transcriptional profiling of Marek's disease virus genes during cytolytic and latent infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease of chicken is caused by a highly cell-associated alpha-herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). MDV replicates in chicken lymphocytes and establishes a latent infection within CD4+ T cells. The expression analysis of limited viral transcripts ha...

  16. T cells increase before zoster and PD-1 expression increases at the time of zoster in immunosuppressed nonhuman primates latently infected with simian varicella virus.

    PubMed

    James, Stephanie F; Traina-Dorge, Vicki; Deharo, Eileen; Wellish, Mary; Palmer, Brent E; Gilden, Don; Mahalingam, Ravi

    2014-06-01

    Like varicella zoster virus in humans, simian varicella virus (SVV) becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis and reactivates in immunosuppressed monkeys. Five rhesus macaques were inoculated with SVV; 142 days later (latency), four monkeys were immunosuppressed, and T cells were analyzed for naïve, memory, and effector phenotypes and expression of programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1; T cell exhaustion). All T cell subsets decreased during immunosuppression and except for CD8 effectors, peaked 2 weeks before zoster. Compared to before immunosuppression, PD-1 expression increased at reactivation. Increased T cells before zoster is likely due to virus reactivation.

  17. Discriminating Active Tuberculosis from Latent Tuberculosis Infection by flow cytometric measurement of CD161-expressing T cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qianting; Xu, Qian; Chen, Qi; Li, Jin; Zhang, Mingxia; Cai, Yi; Liu, Haiying; Zhou, Yiping; Deng, Guofang; Deng, Qunyi; Zhou, Boping; Kornfeld, Hardy; Chen, Xinchun

    2015-01-01

    Interferon-gamma Release Assays (IGRAs) significantly increases the possibility for early diagnosis of tuberculosis, but IGRAs alone cannot discriminate active TB from LTBI. Therefore, fast and reliable discrimination of active tuberculosis, especially bacteriology negative tuberculosis, from LTBI is a great necessity. Here we established an assay based on flow cytometric multiparameter assay assessing expression of CD161 along with CD3, CD4, and CD8, whereby a set of indices formulated by the percentages of CD3+CD161+, CD3+CD4+CD161+ and CD3+CD8+CD161+ T cells multiplied with lymphocyte/monocyte ratio were established. Application of the CD3+CD8+CD161+ index to compare a cohort of active tuberculosis with a cohort of LTBI or health control yielded 0.7662 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.6559–0.8552) or 0.7922 (95%  CI 0.6846–0.8763) for sensitivity and 0.9048 (95%  CI 0.8209–0.9580) or 0.8939 (95% CI 0.8392–0.9349) for specificity when the TB cohort was AFB+; the corresponding results were 0.7481 (95%  CI 0.6648–0.8198) or 0.7557 (95%  CI 0.6730–0.8265) for sensitivity and 0.8571 (95%  CI 0.7637–0.9239) or 0.8603 (95%  CI 0.8008–0.9075) for specificity when the TB cohort was AFB−. Our results reveal that in combination with IGRAs, CD161-based indices provide a novel, fast diagnostic solution addressing the limitation of current tuberculosis diagnostics. PMID:26643453

  18. HIV gene expression from intact proviruses positioned in bacterial artificial chromosomes at integration sites previously identified in latently infected T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eipers, Peter G.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Morrow, Casey D.

    2011-02-05

    HIV integration predominantly occurs in introns of transcriptionally active genes. To study the impact of the integration site on HIV gene expression, a complete HIV-1 provirus (with GFP as a fusion with Nef) was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) at three sites previously identified in latent T cells of patients: topoisomerase II (Top2A), DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), or basic leucine transcription factor 2 (BACH2). Transfection of BAC-HIV into 293 T cells resulted in a fourfold difference in production of infectious HIV-1. Cell lines were established that contained BAC-Top2A, BAC-DNMT1, or BAC-BACH2, but only BAC-DNMT1 spontaneously produced virus, albeit at a low level. Stimulation with TNF-{alpha} resulted in virus production from four of five BAC-Top2A and all BAC-DNMT1 cell lines, but not from the BAC-BACH2 lines. The results of these studies highlight differences between integration sites identified in latent T cells to support virus production and reactivation from latency.

  19. Microscopic Analyses of Latent and Visible Monilinia fructicola Infections in Nectarines

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Benitez, Carlos; Melgarejo, Paloma; De Cal, Antonieta; Fontaniella, Blanca

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the histologic features of a latent Monilinia fructicola infection and brown rot in infected fruit. This report informs on the results of an investigation whose aim was to analyze the microanatomy of nectarines with a latent and visible M. fructicola infection. Mature nectarines were inoculated with an M. fructicola isolate and incubated at 25°C for 0, 24, 48, 72, or 96 hours in the dark. For investigating the latent infection process, the inoculated nectarines were first incubated at 25°C for 24 hours in the dark and then incubated at 4°C for 72, 144, 216, and 288 hours in the dark. At the end of the incubation, samples of nectarine tissue were excised from the inoculation points and prepared for light and transmission electron microscopic examinations. No signs of disease were seen on the surface of nectarines with a latent infection over the 288-hour incubation period. When the tissue samples were microscopically examined, M. fructicola colonized the stomata and this stomatal colonization progressively increased over time and was associated with gradual collapse of the epidermal cells and colonization of the subepidermis. In nectarines with visible brown rot, the disease usually appeared after 24 hours on the surface and in the uppermost layers of epidermal cells, which began to collapse after 48 hours. Subsequently, the diseased tissues of the nectarines displayed (a) colonization of the epidermis and mesocarp by M. fructicola with thin and thick hyphae, (b) collapse and disruption of epidermal and mesocarpic cells, (c) lysogenic cavities in the subepidermis and mesocarp, (d) degradation of the cuticle and epidermis, and (e) M. fructicola sporulation. M. fructicola is active during latent infections because slow and progressive colonization of nectarine subcuticular cells by the fungus occurs. PMID:27494620

  20. Comparison of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test with the tuberculin skin test for detecting latent tuberculosis infection prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Moon, S M; Lee, S-O; Choi, S-H; Kim, Y S; Woo, J H; Yoon, D H; Suh, C; Kim, D-Y; Lee, J-H; Lee, Je-H; Lee, K-H; Kim, S-H

    2013-02-01

    A total of 244 patients including 100 (41%) autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients and 144 (59%) allogeneic HCT recipients were enrolled over a 28-month period. During the study period, no prophylaxis for latent tuberculosis (TB) infection was administrated. Of these, 201 (82%) had Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) scars or prior histories of BCG vaccination. The tuberculin skin test (TST) and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) test were performed simultaneously in all 244 patients. TST indurations were ≥ 5 mm in 39 of these patients (15%), and in 25 (10%) indurations were ≥ 10 mm. In addition, 40 (16%) had positive QFT-GIT outcomes, and 34 (14%) indeterminate outcomes. If the 34 patients with indeterminate QFT-GIT results were excluded from the overall agreement analysis, the agreement between the TST results (induration size ≥ 5 mm) and the QFT-GIT results in the 210 patients with clear QFT results was poor (κ = 0.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.06 to 0.24), as it was for the patients with indurations ≥ 10 mm (κ = 0.15, 95% CI -0.004 to 0.31). During follow up, 2 patients developed TB after HCT. The incidence of TB in the patients with positive QFT-GIT outcomes was 2.80 per 100 person-years (95% CI 0.07-15.81), whereas among those with positive TST (≥ 5 mm) results, it was 0 per 100 person-years (95% CI 0-8.00). However, this finding should be cautiously interpreted because of the relatively short follow up and the fact that the sample size of the study cohort did not have adequate power. In conclusion, our data show that, although the frequencies of positive outcomes in the 2 TB screening tests were similar, the overall agreement between the TST and the QFT-GIT test was poor, regardless of BCG vaccination history.

  1. Syphilis superinfection activates expression of human immunodeficiency virus I in latently infected rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, C. K.; Hughes, M. A.; Hsu, P. L.; Mahoney, S.; Duvic, M.; Sell, S.

    1991-01-01

    Superinfection of latently human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected rabbits with either Treponema pallidum or Shope fibroma virus (SFV) activates HIV expression. In addition, HIV-infected rabbits demonstrate prolonged cutaneous lesions (chancres) after intracutaneous challenge with T. pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis. Rabbits were infected by intravenous inoculation of 3 x 10(7) human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type III (HTLV-III)/B10 (HIV-1)-infected H9 (human) cells. Five weeks after initial infection, integrated HIV-1-specific DNA sequences were detected in the DNA of the peripheral blood lymphocytes of only one of eight rabbits using polymerase chain reactions (PCR); human DNA could not be detected at this time. Furthermore HIV infection could not be demonstrated by either seroconversion or PCR during the next 6 months. All HIV-infected rabbits remained clinically healthy and had normal white blood cell counts. Six months after HIV infection, four HIV-infected and two noninfected controls were superinfected with 10(6) T. pallidum in eight skin sites in the shaved skin of the back, and four infected and two control animals were challenged with an intradermal injection with SFV. After infection with either syphilis or SFV, the DNA from the white blood cells of all eight HIV-infected rabbits contained HIV sequences, and HIV sequences were demonstrated in dermal mononuclear cells of the syphilitic lesions by in situ hybridization. The SFV-induced tumors were rejected normally in the HIV-infected rabbits, but four of the four rabbits challenged with T. pallidum had delayed development of cutaneous lesions and three of four demonstrated larger and more prolonged lesions. White blood counts, mitogen responses, and interleukin-2 production remained within normal limits, and seroconversion for HIV was not detected. Three of four rabbits in a second group, challenged with T. pallidum 4 months after HIV-inoculation, also had delayed healing of syphilitic

  2. Integrated systems biology analysis of KSHV latent infection reveals viral induction and reliance on peroxisome mediated lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sychev, Zoi E; Hu, Alex; DiMaio, Terri A; Gitter, Anthony; Camp, Nathan D; Noble, William S; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro; Lagunoff, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Kaposi's Sarcoma associated Herpesvirus (KSHV), an oncogenic, human gamma-herpesvirus, is the etiological agent of Kaposi's Sarcoma the most common tumor of AIDS patients world-wide. KSHV is predominantly latent in the main KS tumor cell, the spindle cell, a cell of endothelial origin. KSHV modulates numerous host cell-signaling pathways to activate endothelial cells including major metabolic pathways involved in lipid metabolism. To identify the underlying cellular mechanisms of KSHV alteration of host signaling and endothelial cell activation, we identified changes in the host proteome, phosphoproteome and transcriptome landscape following KSHV infection of endothelial cells. A Steiner forest algorithm was used to integrate the global data sets and, together with transcriptome based predicted transcription factor activity, cellular networks altered by latent KSHV were predicted. Several interesting pathways were identified, including peroxisome biogenesis. To validate the predictions, we showed that KSHV latent infection increases the number of peroxisomes per cell. Additionally, proteins involved in peroxisomal lipid metabolism of very long chain fatty acids, including ABCD3 and ACOX1, are required for the survival of latently infected cells. In summary, novel cellular pathways altered during herpesvirus latency that could not be predicted by a single systems biology platform, were identified by integrated proteomics and transcriptomics data analysis and when correlated with our metabolomics data revealed that peroxisome lipid metabolism is essential for KSHV latent infection of endothelial cells.

  3. Integrated systems biology analysis of KSHV latent infection reveals viral induction and reliance on peroxisome mediated lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sychev, Zoi E.; Hu, Alex; Lagunoff, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi’s Sarcoma associated Herpesvirus (KSHV), an oncogenic, human gamma-herpesvirus, is the etiological agent of Kaposi’s Sarcoma the most common tumor of AIDS patients world-wide. KSHV is predominantly latent in the main KS tumor cell, the spindle cell, a cell of endothelial origin. KSHV modulates numerous host cell-signaling pathways to activate endothelial cells including major metabolic pathways involved in lipid metabolism. To identify the underlying cellular mechanisms of KSHV alteration of host signaling and endothelial cell activation, we identified changes in the host proteome, phosphoproteome and transcriptome landscape following KSHV infection of endothelial cells. A Steiner forest algorithm was used to integrate the global data sets and, together with transcriptome based predicted transcription factor activity, cellular networks altered by latent KSHV were predicted. Several interesting pathways were identified, including peroxisome biogenesis. To validate the predictions, we showed that KSHV latent infection increases the number of peroxisomes per cell. Additionally, proteins involved in peroxisomal lipid metabolism of very long chain fatty acids, including ABCD3 and ACOX1, are required for the survival of latently infected cells. In summary, novel cellular pathways altered during herpesvirus latency that could not be predicted by a single systems biology platform, were identified by integrated proteomics and transcriptomics data analysis and when correlated with our metabolomics data revealed that peroxisome lipid metabolism is essential for KSHV latent infection of endothelial cells. PMID:28257516

  4. Vpx-containing Dendritic Cell Vaccine Vectors Induce CTLs and Reactivate Latent HIV-1 in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Thomas D.; Miller, Elizabeth A.; Bhardwaj, Nina; Landau, Nathaniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Eradication of HIV-1 from an infected individual requires a means of inducing production of virus from latently infected cells and stimulating an immune response against the infected cells. We report the development of lentiviral vectors that transduce dendritic cells (DCs) to both induce production of virus from latently infected cells and stimulate antigen-specific CTLs. The vectors package Vpx, a lentiviral accessory protein that counteracts the SAMHD1-mediated block to DC transduction, allowing for long-term expression of vector-encoded proteins. The vectors encode influenza or HIV-1-derived epitopes fused via a self-cleaving peptide to CD40L that releases the peptide into the endoplasmic reticulum for entry into the antigen presentation pathway. Expression of CD40L caused transduced DCs to mature and produce Th1-skewing cytokines. The DCs presented antigen to CD8 T cells, enhancing antigen-specific CTLs. Coculture of the transduced DCs with latently infected cells induced high level virus production, an effect that was mediated by TNF-α. The ability of a DC vaccine to reactivate latent HIV-1 and stimulate an adaptive immune response provides a means to reduce the size of the latent reservoir in patients. This strategy can also be applied to develop DC vaccines for other diseases. PMID:25567537

  5. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing of Herpesviruses Limits Productive and Latent Infections

    PubMed Central

    van Diemen, Ferdy R.; Bruggeling, Carlijn E.; Schürch, Anita C.; van Ham, Petra M.; Imhof, Saskia M.; Nijhuis, Monique; Wiertz, Emmanuel J. H. J.; Lebbink, Robert Jan

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviruses infect the majority of the human population and can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 causes cold sores and herpes simplex keratitis, whereas HSV-2 is responsible for genital herpes. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most common viral cause of congenital defects and is responsible for serious disease in immuno-compromised individuals. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with infectious mononucleosis and a broad range of malignancies, including Burkitt’s lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, Hodgkin’s disease, and post-transplant lymphomas. Herpesviruses persist in their host for life by establishing a latent infection that is interrupted by periodic reactivation events during which replication occurs. Current antiviral drug treatments target the clinical manifestations of this productive stage, but they are ineffective at eliminating these viruses from the infected host. Here, we set out to combat both productive and latent herpesvirus infections by exploiting the CRISPR/Cas9 system to target viral genetic elements important for virus fitness. We show effective abrogation of HCMV and HSV-1 replication by targeting gRNAs to essential viral genes. Simultaneous targeting of HSV-1 with multiple gRNAs completely abolished the production of infectious particles from human cells. Using the same approach, EBV can be almost completely cleared from latently infected EBV-transformed human tumor cells. Our studies indicate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be effectively targeted to herpesvirus genomes as a potent prophylactic and therapeutic anti-viral strategy that may be used to impair viral replication and clear latent virus infection. PMID:27362483

  6. Mexican immigrants' explanatory model of latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Marylyn M

    2005-10-01

    This article reveals how the multiple and disparate explanations of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) from the U.S. and Mexico professional health sectors and the popular sector are used to inform the explanatory model (EM) of LTBI for Mexican immigrants residing in the U.S.-Mexico border region. Fourteen immigrants, nine diagnosed with LTBI (n = 9) and their spouses (n = 5) participated in this critical ethnographic study. Because care seeking and treatment decisions are influenced by EMs, the results indicate that it is imperative that interventions for Mexican immigrants with LTBI are built on an understanding of their illness experience and are contextually meaningful.

  7. CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Responses to Latent Antigen EBNA-1 and Lytic Antigen BZLF-1 during Persistent Lymphocryptovirus Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Leskowitz, R. M.; Zhou, X. Y.; Villinger, F.; Fogg, M. H.; Kaur, A.; Lieberman, P. M.; Wang, F.

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection leads to lifelong viral persistence through its latency in B cells. EBV-specific T cells control reactivations and prevent the development of EBV-associated malignancies in most healthy carriers, but infection can sometimes cause chronic disease and malignant transformation. Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) is the only viral protein consistently expressed during all forms of latency and in all EBV-associated malignancies and is a promising target for a therapeutic vaccine. Here, we studied the EBNA-1-specific immune response using the EBV-homologous rhesus lymphocryptovirus (rhLCV) infection in rhesus macaques. We assessed the frequency, phenotype, and cytokine production profiles of rhLCV EBNA-1 (rhEBNA-1)-specific T cells in 15 rhesus macaques and compared them to the lytic antigen of rhLCV BZLF-1 (rhBZLF-1). We were able to detect rhEBNA-1-specific CD4+ and/or CD8+ T cells in 14 of the 15 animals screened. In comparison, all 15 animals had detectable rhBZLF-1 responses. Most peptide-specific CD4+ T cells exhibited a resting phenotype of central memory (TCM), while peptide-specific CD8+ T cells showed a more activated phenotype, belonging mainly to the effector cell subset. By comparing our results to the human EBV immune response, we demonstrate that the rhLCV model is a valid system for studying chronic EBV infection and for the preclinical development of therapeutic vaccines. PMID:23698300

  8. Ocular and neural distribution of feline herpesvirus-1 during active and latent experimental infection in cats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) cause extensive intra-ocular and neural infections in humans and are closely related to Felid herpes virus 1 (FeHV-1). We report the extent of intra-ocular replication and the extent and morphological aspects of neural replication during the acute and latent phases of FeHV-1 infection. Juvenile, SPF cats were inoculated with FeHV-1. Additional cats were used as negative controls. Cats were euthanized on days 6, 10, and 30 post-inoculation. Results FeHV-1 was isolated from the conjunctiva, cornea, uveal tract, retina, optic nerve, ciliary ganglion (CG), pterygopalatine ganglion (PTPG), trigeminal ganglion (TG), brainstem, visual cortex, cerebellum, and olfactory bulb of infected cats during the acute phase, but not the cranial cervical ganglion (CCG) and optic chiasm. Viral DNA was detected in all tissues during acute infection by a real-time quantitative PCR assay. On day 30, viral DNA was detected in all TG, all CCG, and 2 PTPG. Histologically mild inflammation and ganglion cell loss were noted within the TG during acute, but not latent infection. Using linear regression, a strong correlation existed between clinical score and day 30 viral DNA copy number within the TG. Conclusions The correlation between clinical score and day 30 viral DNA copy number suggests the severity of the acute clinical infection is related to the quantity of latent viral DNA. The histologic response was similar to that seen during HSV-1 or VZV infection. To the author’s knowledge this is the first report of FeHV-1 infection involving intraocular structures and autonomic ganglia. PMID:24053192

  9. Epidemiology of cyprinid herpesvirus-3 infection in latently infected carp from aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Baumer, A; Fabian, M; Wilkens, M R; Steinhagen, D; Runge, M

    2013-07-22

    Cyprinid herpesvirus-3 (CyHV-3, koi herpesvirus, KHV) is the causative agent of an economically important disease in carp. The mode of transmission of this virus, especially how the infectious agent is introduced into ponds de novo, is not known in detail. The aim of this study was to investigate the shedding of CyHV-3 from fish with latent infections, under aquaculture conditions. Ponds in Saxony, Germany, with latently infected carp were examined at different times during the production cycle to investigate the influence of fish farming procedures on virus activation and shedding. Carp and water samples were investigated by quantitative real-time PCR. Some of the latently infected carp shed CyHV-3. Virus shedding was induced mainly when the ponds were drained and the carp either harvested or moved to different ponds, and was independent of the water temperature. This indicated that during these times there was a risk that effluent water from the ponds could disseminate the infectious agent. During summer, on-growing carp are infected with low numbers of CyHV-3. These findings are important for disease management strategies in carp aquaculture and for the design of testing protocols for the detection of latent infection in carp populations.

  10. Protection from genital herpes disease, seroconversion and latent infection in a non-lethal murine genital infection model by immunization with an HSV-2 replication-defective mutant virus.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Fernando M; Knipe, David M

    2016-01-15

    Viral vaccines have traditionally protected against disease, but for viruses that establish latent infection, it is desirable for the vaccine to reduce infection to reduce latent infection and reactivation. While seroconversion has been used in clinical trials of herpes simplex virus (HSV) vaccines to measure protection from infection, this has not been modeled in animal infection systems. To measure the ability of a genital herpes vaccine candidate to protect against various aspects of infection, we established a non-lethal murine model of genital HSV-2 infection, an ELISA assay to measure antibodies specific for infected cell protein 8 (ICP8), and a very sensitive qPCR assay. Using these assays, we observed that immunization with HSV-2 dl5-29 virus reduced disease, viral shedding, seroconversion, and latent infection by the HSV-2 challenge virus. Therefore, it may be feasible to obtain protection against genital disease, seroconversion and latent infection by immunization, even if sterilizing immunity is not achieved.

  11. Pulmonary responses to pathogen-specific antigens in latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Jarvela, Jessica R; Tuscano, Lori; Lee, Hung; Silver, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used ELISPOT to quantify frequencies of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and peripheral blood T cells capable of producing IFNγ in response to PPD, antigen 85B, and Mtb-specific antigens CFP-10 and ESAT-6 in individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and Mtb-naïve controls. Compared to peripheral blood, BAL cells of LTBI subjects displayed significant enrichment for T cells responding to PPD, antigen 85B, and CFP-10, but not to ESAT-6. Baseline BAL cells of LTBI subjects displayed significant production of Mig (CXCL9) in response to PPD, antigen 85B, and CFP-10 as well. These findings suggest that enrichment for Mtb-specific T cells within BAL is not unique to active pulmonary tuberculosis and may, to the contrary, contribute to protection from re-infection in Mtb immune individuals.

  12. Are Viral-Encoded MicroRNAs Mediating Latent HIV-1 Infection?

    PubMed Central

    WEINBERG, MARC S.; MORRIS, KEVIN V.

    2010-01-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1), a member of the lentivirus subfamily, infects both dividing and nondividing cells and, following reverse transcription of the viral RNA genome, integrates into the host chromatin where it enters into a latent state. Many of the factors governing viral latency remain unresolved and current antiviral treatment regimens are largely ineffective at eliminating cellular reservoirs of latent virus. The recent identification of microRNA (miRNA) encoding sequences embedded in the HIV-1 genome, and the discovery of functional virus-derived miRNAs, suggests a role for RNA Interference (RNAi) in the regulation of HIV-1 gene expression. Recently, the mammalian RNAi machinery was shown to regulate gene expression epigenetically by transcriptional modulation, providing a direct link between RNAi and a mechanism for inducing latency. Interestingly, both HIV-1 Tat, and the host TAR RNA-binding protein (TRBP), bind to the transactivating response (TAR) RNA of HIV-1 and affect the function of RNAi in human cells. Specifically, TRBP, a cofactor in Tat-TAR interactions, is a vital component of Dicer-mediated dsRNA processing. These novel observations support a central role for HIV-1 and associated host factors in regulating cellular RNAi and viral gene expression through RNA directed processes. Thus, HIV-1 may have evolved mechanisms to exploit the RNAi pathway at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional level to affect and/or maintain a latent infection. PMID:16629595

  13. RNA-directed gene editing specifically eradicates latent and prevents new HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenhui; Kaminski, Rafal; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yonggang; Cosentino, Laura; Li, Fang; Luo, Biao; Alvarez-Carbonell, David; Garcia-Mesa, Yoelvis; Karn, Jonathan; Mo, Xianming; Khalili, Kamel

    2014-08-05

    AIDS remains incurable due to the permanent integration of HIV-1 into the host genome, imparting risk of viral reactivation even after antiretroviral therapy. New strategies are needed to ablate the viral genome from latently infected cells, because current methods are too inefficient and prone to adverse off-target effects. To eliminate the integrated HIV-1 genome, we used the Cas9/guide RNA (gRNA) system, in single and multiplex configurations. We identified highly specific targets within the HIV-1 LTR U3 region that were efficiently edited by Cas9/gRNA, inactivating viral gene expression and replication in latently infected microglial, promonocytic, and T cells. Cas9/gRNAs caused neither genotoxicity nor off-target editing to the host cells, and completely excised a 9,709-bp fragment of integrated proviral DNA that spanned from its 5' to 3' LTRs. Furthermore, the presence of multiplex gRNAs within Cas9-expressing cells prevented HIV-1 infection. Our results suggest that Cas9/gRNA can be engineered to provide a specific, efficacious prophylactic and therapeutic approach against AIDS.

  14. Management of tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection in human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shui Shan; Meintjes, Graeme; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Leung, Chi Chiu

    2013-08-01

    The syndemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/tuberculosis (TB) co-infection has grown as a result of the considerable sociogeographic overlaps between the two epidemics. The situation is particularly worrisome in countries with high or intermediate TB burden against the background of a variable HIV epidemic state. Early diagnosis of TB disease in an HIV-infected person is paramount but suffers from lack of sensitive and specific diagnostic tools. Enhanced symptom screening is currently advocated, and the wide application of affordable molecular diagnostics is urgently needed. Treatment of TB/HIV co-infection involves the concurrent use of standard antiretrovirals and antimycobacterials during which harmful drug interaction may occur. The pharmacokinetic interaction between rifamycin and antiretrovirals is a case in point, requiring dosage adjustment and preferential use of rifabutin, if available. Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy is indicated, preferably at 2 weeks after starting TB treatment for patients with a CD4 of <50 cells/μL. Development of TB-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) is however more frequent with early antiretroviral therapy. The diagnosis of TB-IRIS is another clinical challenge, and cautious use of corticosteroids is suggested to improve clinical outcome. As a preventive measure against active TB disease, the screening for latent TB infection should be widely practiced, followed by at least 6-9 months of isoniazid treatment. To date tuberculin skin test remains the only diagnostic tool in high TB burden countries. The role of alternative tests, for example, interferon-γ release assay, would need to be better defined for clinical application.

  15. Prevalence of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in prisoners

    PubMed Central

    de Navarro, Pedro Daibert; de Almeida, Isabela Neves; Kritski, Afrânio Lineu; Ceccato, Maria das Graças; Maciel, Mônica Maria Delgado; Carvalho, Wânia da Silva; de Miranda, Silvana Spindola

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the prevalence of and the factors associated with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in prisoners in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Methods: This was a cross-sectional cohort study conducted in two prisons in Minas Gerais. Tuberculin skin tests were performed in the individuals who agreed to participate in the study. Results: A total of 1,120 individuals were selected for inclusion in this study. The prevalence of LTBI was 25.2%. In the multivariate analysis, LTBI was associated with self-reported contact with active tuberculosis patients within prisons (adjusted OR = 1.51; 95% CI: 1.05-2.18) and use of inhaled drugs (adjusted OR = 1.48; 95% CI: 1.03-2.13). Respiratory symptoms were identified in 131 (11.7%) of the participants. Serological testing for HIV was performed in 940 (83.9%) of the participants, and the result was positive in 5 (0.5%). Two cases of active tuberculosis were identified during the study period. Conclusions: Within the prisons under study, the prevalence of LTBI was high. In addition, LTBI was associated with self-reported contact with active tuberculosis patients and with the use of inhaled drugs. Our findings demonstrate that it is necessary to improve the conditions in prisons, as well as to introduce strategies, such as chest X-ray screening, in order to detect tuberculosis cases and, consequently, reduce M. tuberculosis infection within the prison system. PMID:27812634

  16. A Mycobacterium tuberculosis Dormancy Antigen Differentiates Latently Infected Bacillus Calmette–Guérin-vaccinated Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Delfina; Rovetta, Ana I.; Hernández Del Pino, Rodrigo E.; Amiano, Nicolás O.; Pasquinelli, Virginia; Pellegrini, Joaquín M.; Tateosian, Nancy L.; Rolandelli, Agustín; Gutierrez, Marisa; Musella, Rosa M.; Palmero, Domingo J.; Gherardi, María M.; Iovanna, Juan; Chuluyan, H. Eduardo; García, Verónica E.

    2015-01-01

    IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs) are better indicators of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection than the tuberculin skin test (TST) in Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG)-vaccinated populations. However, IGRAs do not discriminate active and latent infections (LTBI) and no gold standard for LTBI diagnosis is available. Thus, since improved tests to diagnose M. tuberculosis infection are required, we assessed the efficacy of several M. tuberculosis latency antigens. BCG-vaccinated healthy donors (HD) and tuberculosis (TB) patients were recruited. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube, TST and clinical data were used to differentiate LTBI. IFN-γ production against CFP-10, ESAT-6, Rv2624c, Rv2626c and Rv2628 antigens was tested in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. LTBI subjects secreted significantly higher IFN-γ levels against Rv2626c than HD. Additionally, Rv2626c peptide pools to which only LTBI responded were identified, and their cumulative IFN-γ response improved LTBI discrimination. Interestingly, whole blood stimulation with Rv2626c allowed the discrimination between active and latent infections, since TB patients did not secrete IFN-γ against Rv2626c, in contrast to CFP-10 + ESAT-6 stimulation that induced IFN-γ response from both LTBI and TB patients. ROC analysis confirmed that Rv2626c discriminated LTBI from HD and TB patients. Therefore, since only LTBI recognizes specific epitopes from Rv2626c, this antigen could improve LTBI diagnosis, even in BCG-vaccinated people. PMID:26425695

  17. Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Infections in Sensory Ganglia of Hairless Mice Prevented by Acycloguanosine†

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Richard J.; Friedman-Kien, Alvin E.; DeStefano, Eugene

    1979-01-01

    Acycloguanosine (ACG) was able to prevent the fatal outcome of herpes simplex virus-induced skin infections of the lumbosacral or orofacila area in hairless mice. Topical ACG treatment was more effective than systemic treatment in preventing the evolution of skin lesions. Acute ganglionic infections in the trigeminal ganglia were prevented by ACG, and latent ganglionic infections did not become established when the ACG treatment was initiated 3 h after infection. Serum antibody titers were, on the average, eight times higher in mice which developed latent ganglionic infections after ACG treatment than in mice without evidence of herpes simplex virus latency in ganglia. Reinoculation of ACG-treated mice at a site different from that of the primary inoculation did not lead to the establishment of a second latent infection with the homologous virus type when a latent infection was already present. In mice without evidence of latent infection after the primary inoculation, a latent infection at the site of reinoculation became established in 25% of the animals. PMID:230784

  18. A Mouse Model of Latent Tuberculosis Infection to Study Intervention Strategies to Prevent Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Kupz, Andreas; Zedler, Ulrike; Stäber, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the leading cause of death in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)+ individuals, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Management of this deadly co-infection is a significant global health challenge that is exacerbated by the lack of efficient vaccines against both Mtb and HIV, as well as the lack of reliable and robust animal models for Mtb/HIV co-infection. Here we describe a tractable and reproducible mouse model to study the reactivation dynamics of latent Mtb infection following the loss of CD4+ T cells as it occurs in HIV-co-infected individuals. Whereas intradermally (i.d.) infected C57BL/6 mice contained Mtb within the local draining lymph nodes, depletion of CD4+ cells led to progressive systemic spread of the bacteria and induction of lung pathology. To interrogate whether reactivation of Mtb after CD4+ T cell depletion can be reversed, we employed interleukin (IL)-2/anti-IL-2 complex-mediated cell boost approaches. Although populations of non-CD4 lymphocytes, such as CD8+ memory T cells, natural killer (NK) cells and double-negative (DN) T cells significantly expanded after IL-2/anti-IL-2 complex treatment, progressive development of bacteremia and pathologic lung alterations could not be prevented. These data suggest that the failure to reverse Mtb reactivation is likely not due to anergy of the expanded cell subsets and rather indicates a limited potential for IL-2-complex-based therapies in the management of Mtb/HIV co-infection. PMID:27391012

  19. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in latently infected lungs by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Eugenin, Eliseo; Kaplan, Gilla

    2014-01-01

    Detection of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a challenge in the diagnosis of asymptomatic, subclinical tuberculosis. We report the development of an immunofluorescence technique to visualize and enumerate M. tuberculosis in latently infected rabbit lungs where no acid-fast–stained organisms were seen and no cultivable bacilli were obtained by the agar-plating method. PMID:25161200

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of a Hop Latent Virus Infecting Hop Plants

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Choi, Hoseong

    2015-01-01

    The hop latent virus is a single-stranded RNA virus that mainly infects hop plants. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a hop latent virus, which was de novo assembled by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). Our study indicates that transcriptome data are useful for identifying a complete viral genome. PMID:25908127

  1. Completion of screening for latent tuberculosis infection among immigrants.

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, A. C. C.; Saleri, N.; El-Hamad, I.; Tedoldi, S.; Capone, S.; Pezzoli, M. C.; Zaccaria, M.; Pizzocolo, A.; Scarcella, C.; Matteelli, A.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the sociodemographic factors associated with completion of screening for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) among undocumented immigrants in Brescia, Italy. Screening for LTBI was offered to 649 immigrants; 213 (33%) immigrants completed the first step of screening; only 44% (55/124) of individuals with a positive tuberculin skin test result started treatment for LTBI. The univariate analysis showed that being unmarried, of Senegalese nationality and being interviewed by a health-care worker with the same native language as the immigrant were significantly associated with completion of screening for LTBI. In the multiple logistic regression, being interviewed in the native language of the health-care worker (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.3-4.8, P = 0.004) and being of Senegalese origin (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4-3.6, P = 0.0005) were independently associated with adherence to LTBI screening. Our results suggest that knowledge of the sociodemographic characteristics of immigrants, and the participation of health-care workers of the same cultural origin as the immigrant during the visits, can be an important tool to improve completion of screening for LTBI. PMID:15724725

  2. Substantial molecular evolution and mutation rates in prolonged latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Lillebaek, Troels; Norman, Anders; Rasmussen, Erik Michael; Marvig, Rasmus L; Folkvardsen, Dorte Bek; Andersen, Åse Bengård; Jelsbak, Lars

    2016-11-01

    The genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) of latently infected individuals may hold the key to understanding the processes that lead to reactivation and progression to clinical disease. We report here analysis of pairs of Mtb isolates from putative prolonged latent TB cases. We identified two confirmed cases, and used whole genome sequencing to investigate the mutational processes that occur over decades in latent Mtb. We found an estimated mutation rate between 0.2 and 0.3 over 33 years, suggesting that latent Mtb accumulates mutations at rates similar to observations from cases of active disease.

  3. Gamma interferon expression during acute and latent nervous system infection by herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, E M; Hinton, D R; Chen, J; Openshaw, H

    1995-01-01

    This study was initiated to evaluate a role for gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. At the acute stage of infection in mice, HSV-1 replication in trigeminal ganglia and brain stem tissue was modestly but consistently enhanced in mice from which IFN-gamma was by ablated monoclonal antibody treatment and in mice genetically lacking the IFN-gamma receptor (Rgko mice). As determined by reverse transcriptase PCR, IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor alpha transcripts were present in trigeminal ganglia during both acute and latent HSV-1 infection. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected initially in trigeminal ganglia at day 5 after HSV-1 inoculation, and these cells persisted for 6 months into latency. The T cells were focused around morphologically normal neurons that showed no signs of active infection, but many of which expressed HSV-1 latency-associated transcripts. Secreted IFN-gamma was present up to 6 months into latency in areas of the T-cell infiltration. By 9 months into latency, both the T-cell infiltrate and IFN-gamma expression had cleared, although there remained a slight increase in macrophage levels in trigeminal ganglia. In HSV-1-infected brain stem tissue, T cells and IFN-gamma expression were present at 1 month but were gone by 6 months after infection. Our hypothesis is that the persistence of T cells and the sustained IFN-gamma expression occur in response to an HSV-1 antigen(s) in the nervous system. This hypothesis is consistent with a new model of HSV-1 latency which suggests that limited HSV-1 antigen expression occurs during latency (M. Kosz-Vnenchak, J. Jacobson, D.M. Coen, and D.M. Knipe, J. Virol. 67:5383-5393, 1993). We speculate that prolonged secretion of IFN-gamma during latency may modulate a reactivated HSV-1 infection. PMID:7609058

  4. Genes Expressed in Grapevine Leaves Reveal Latent Wood Infection by the Fungal Pathogen Neofusicoccum parvum

    PubMed Central

    Czemmel, Stefan; Galarneau, Erin R.; Travadon, Renaud; McElrone, Andrew J.; Cramer, Grant R.; Baumgartner, Kendra

    2015-01-01

    Some pathogenic species of the Botryosphaeriaceae have a latent phase, colonizing woody tissues while perennial hosts show no apparent symptoms until conditions for disease development become favorable. Detection of these pathogens is often limited to the later pathogenic phase. The latent phase is poorly characterized, despite the need for non-destructive detection tools and effective quarantine strategies, which would benefit from identification of host-based markers in leaves. Neofusicoccum parvum infects the wood of grapevines and other horticultural crops, killing the fruit-bearing shoots. We used light microscopy and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) to examine the spatio-temporal relationship between pathogen colonization and anatomical changes in stem sections. To identify differentially-expressed grape genes, leaves from inoculated and non-inoculated plants were examined using RNA-Seq. The latent phase occurred between 0 and 1.5 months post-inoculation (MPI), during which time the pathogen did not spread significantly beyond the inoculation site nor were there differences in lesion lengths between inoculated and non-inoculated plants. The pathogenic phase occurred between 1.5 and 2 MPI, when recovery beyond the inoculation site increased and lesion lengths of inoculated plants tripled. By 2 MPI, inoculated plants also had decreased starch content in xylem fibers and rays, and increased levels of gel-occluded xylem vessels, the latter of which HRCT revealed at a higher frequency than microscopy. RNA-Seq and screening of 21 grape expression datasets identified 20 candidate genes that were transcriptionally-activated by infection during the latent phase, and confirmed that the four best candidates (galactinol synthase, abscisic acid-induced wheat plasma membrane polypeptide-19 ortholog, embryonic cell protein 63, BURP domain-containing protein) were not affected by a range of common foliar and wood pathogens or abiotic stresses. Assuming such host

  5. Genes expressed in grapevine leaves reveal latent wood infection by the fungal pathogen Neofusicoccum parvum.

    PubMed

    Czemmel, Stefan; Galarneau, Erin R; Travadon, Renaud; McElrone, Andrew J; Cramer, Grant R; Baumgartner, Kendra

    2015-01-01

    Some pathogenic species of the Botryosphaeriaceae have a latent phase, colonizing woody tissues while perennial hosts show no apparent symptoms until conditions for disease development become favorable. Detection of these pathogens is often limited to the later pathogenic phase. The latent phase is poorly characterized, despite the need for non-destructive detection tools and effective quarantine strategies, which would benefit from identification of host-based markers in leaves. Neofusicoccum parvum infects the wood of grapevines and other horticultural crops, killing the fruit-bearing shoots. We used light microscopy and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) to examine the spatio-temporal relationship between pathogen colonization and anatomical changes in stem sections. To identify differentially-expressed grape genes, leaves from inoculated and non-inoculated plants were examined using RNA-Seq. The latent phase occurred between 0 and 1.5 months post-inoculation (MPI), during which time the pathogen did not spread significantly beyond the inoculation site nor were there differences in lesion lengths between inoculated and non-inoculated plants. The pathogenic phase occurred between 1.5 and 2 MPI, when recovery beyond the inoculation site increased and lesion lengths of inoculated plants tripled. By 2 MPI, inoculated plants also had decreased starch content in xylem fibers and rays, and increased levels of gel-occluded xylem vessels, the latter of which HRCT revealed at a higher frequency than microscopy. RNA-Seq and screening of 21 grape expression datasets identified 20 candidate genes that were transcriptionally-activated by infection during the latent phase, and confirmed that the four best candidates (galactinol synthase, abscisic acid-induced wheat plasma membrane polypeptide-19 ortholog, embryonic cell protein 63, BURP domain-containing protein) were not affected by a range of common foliar and wood pathogens or abiotic stresses. Assuming such host

  6. Ranunculus latent virus: a strain of artichoke latent virus or a new macluravirus infecting artichoke?

    PubMed

    Ciuffo, M; Testa, M; Lenzi, R; Turina, M

    2011-06-01

    An elongated virus was isolated from artichoke crops in Liguria, and a 700-bp fragment was amplified by RT-PCR using oligonucleotides to detect members of the family Potyviridae. Comparison of fragment sequences showed 98% identity at the nucleotide level with the ranunculus isolate of the macluravirus Ranunculus latent virus (RaLV). RaLV was then detected by DAS-ELISA in symptomatic and asymptomatic artichoke plants from Liguria, Sardinia and Latium. The sequence of a 5.5-kb region was assembled from a cDNA library, and a 500-bp NIa fragment showed 80% identity to Artichoke latent virus.

  7. Gene-expression reversal of lncRNAs and associated mRNAs expression in active vs latent HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Madhavan; Sagar, Vidya; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh

    2016-01-01

    Interplay between lncRNAs and mRNAs is rapidly emerging as a key epigenetic mechanism in controlling various cell functions. HIV can actively infect and/or can persist latently for years by manipulating host epigenetics; however, its molecular essence remains undiscovered in entirety. Here for the first time, we delineate the influence of HIV on global lncRNAs expression in monocytic cells lines. Our analysis revealed the expression modulation of nearly 1060 such lncRNAs which are associated with differentially expressed mRNAs in active and latent infection. This suggests a greater role of lncRNAs in regulating transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene expression during HIV infection. The differentially expressed mRNAs were involved in several different biological pathways where immunological networks were most enriched. Importantly, we discovered that HIV induces expression reversal of more than 150 lncRNAs between its active and latent infection. Also, hundreds of unique lncRNAs were identified in both infection conditions. The pathology specific “gene-expression reversal” and “on-and-off” switching of lncRNAs and associated mRNAs may lead to establish the relationship between active and HIV infection. PMID:27756902

  8. The HSV-1 Latency-Associated Transcript Functions to Repress Latent Phase Lytic Gene Expression and Suppress Virus Reactivation from Latently Infected Neurons.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, Michael P; Hann, William; Shivkumar, Maitreyi; Harman, Laura E R; Connor, Viv; Coleman, Heather M; Proença, João T; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2016-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes life-long latent infection within sensory neurons, during which viral lytic gene expression is silenced. The only highly expressed viral gene product during latent infection is the latency-associated transcript (LAT), a non-protein coding RNA that has been strongly implicated in the epigenetic regulation of HSV-1 gene expression. We have investigated LAT-mediated control of latent gene expression using chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses and LAT-negative viruses engineered to express firefly luciferase or β-galactosidase from a heterologous lytic promoter. Whilst we were unable to determine a significant effect of LAT expression upon heterochromatin enrichment on latent HSV-1 genomes, we show that reporter gene expression from latent HSV-1 genomes occurs at a greater frequency in the absence of LAT. Furthermore, using luciferase reporter viruses we have observed that HSV-1 gene expression decreases during long-term latent infection, with a most marked effect during LAT-negative virus infection. Finally, using a fluorescent mouse model of infection to isolate and culture single latently infected neurons, we also show that reactivation occurs at a greater frequency from cultures harbouring LAT-negative HSV-1. Together, our data suggest that the HSV-1 LAT RNA represses HSV-1 gene expression in small populations of neurons within the mouse TG, a phenomenon that directly impacts upon the frequency of reactivation and the maintenance of the transcriptionally active latent reservoir.

  9. The HSV-1 Latency-Associated Transcript Functions to Repress Latent Phase Lytic Gene Expression and Suppress Virus Reactivation from Latently Infected Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Nicoll, Michael P.; Hann, William; Shivkumar, Maitreyi; Harman, Laura E. R.; Connor, Viv; Coleman, Heather M.; Proença, João T.; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes life-long latent infection within sensory neurons, during which viral lytic gene expression is silenced. The only highly expressed viral gene product during latent infection is the latency-associated transcript (LAT), a non-protein coding RNA that has been strongly implicated in the epigenetic regulation of HSV-1 gene expression. We have investigated LAT-mediated control of latent gene expression using chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses and LAT-negative viruses engineered to express firefly luciferase or β-galactosidase from a heterologous lytic promoter. Whilst we were unable to determine a significant effect of LAT expression upon heterochromatin enrichment on latent HSV-1 genomes, we show that reporter gene expression from latent HSV-1 genomes occurs at a greater frequency in the absence of LAT. Furthermore, using luciferase reporter viruses we have observed that HSV-1 gene expression decreases during long-term latent infection, with a most marked effect during LAT-negative virus infection. Finally, using a fluorescent mouse model of infection to isolate and culture single latently infected neurons, we also show that reactivation occurs at a greater frequency from cultures harbouring LAT-negative HSV-1. Together, our data suggest that the HSV-1 LAT RNA represses HSV-1 gene expression in small populations of neurons within the mouse TG, a phenomenon that directly impacts upon the frequency of reactivation and the maintenance of the transcriptionally active latent reservoir. PMID:27055281

  10. Rapid Detection of Cyprinid Herpesvirus 3 in Latently Infected Koi by Recombinase Polymerase Amplification.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Meagan A; Reed, Aimee N; Jin, Ling; Pastey, Manoj K

    2016-09-01

    Since the emergence of cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3), outbreaks have been devastating to Common Carp Cyprinus carpio and koi (a variant of Common Carp), leading to high economic losses. Current diagnostics for detecting CyHV-3 are limited in sensitivity and are further complicated by latency. Here we describe the detection of CyHV-3 by recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). The RPA assay can detect as low as 10 copies of the CyHV-3 genome by an isothermal reaction and yields results in approximately 20 min. Using the RPA assay, the CyHV-3 genome can be detected in the total DNA of white blood cells isolated from koi latently infected with CyHV-3, while less than 10% of the latently infected koi can be detected by a real-time PCR assay in the total DNA of white blood cells. In addition, RPA products can be detected in a lateral flow device that is cheap and fast and can be used outside of the diagnostic lab. The RPA assay and lateral flow device provide for the rapid, sensitive, and specific amplification of CyHV-3 that with future modifications for field use and validation could lead to enhanced surveillance and early diagnosis of CyHV-3 in the laboratory and field. Received September 14, 2015; accepted April 9, 2016.

  11. Treatment: Latent TB Infection (LTBI) and TB Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  12. Two epithelial tumor cell lines (HNE-1 and HONE-1) latently infected with Epstein-Barr virus that were derived from nasopharyngeal carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, R.; Zhang, Haizhang ); Yao, Kaitai; Zhu, Hecheng; Wang, Fuxi; Li, Guiyuan; Wen, Dongseng; Li, Yingping )

    1989-12-01

    Two epithelia tumor cell lines were established from biopsy specimens of nasopharyngeal carcinomas (NPC). The specimens were taken from poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinomas of the nasopharynx. The tissues were prepared for cell culture and eventually two continuous epithelia cell lines were obtained and designated HONE-1 and HNE-1. Light and electron microscopic examination of these two cell lines demonstrated cells with an epithelial morphology including the presence of desmosomes. It was found that early-passage uncloned HNE-1 cells (passage 23) could be superinfected with B95-8 and NPC-EBV isolates as demonstrated by the induction of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific early antigen(s) in a small percentage of the cells; HONE-1 cells could also be superinfected with EBV. Southern blot analysis detected EBV DNA in samples from uncloned HNE-1 cells at passages 12, 17, 21, 27, and 35. However, by passage 45, EBV DNA could no longer be detected in HNE-1 cells by Southern blot analysis. The EBV genome was detected in parental HONE-1 cells at subculture 9 and in clone 40 cells up to passage 40 thus far. The data suggest that EBV genome-positive HNE-1 and HONE-1 cells were lost as the cells were cultivated in vitro and that cloning the cells at an early passage level may be critical in maintaining EBV genome-positive epithelial NPC cells. These EBV genome-positive epithelia NPC cell lines will be useful for studying the association of EBV and NPC.

  13. Homeostatically Maintained Resting Naive CD4+ T Cells Resist Latent HIV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko; Kobayahi-Ishihara, Mie; Wada, Yamato; Terahara, Kazutaka; Takeyama, Haruko; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Tokunaga, Kenzo; Yamagishi, Makoto; Martinez, Javier P.; Meyerhans, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Homeostatic proliferation (HSP) is a major mechanism by which long-lived naïve and memory CD4+ T cells are maintained in vivo and suggested to contribute to the persistence of the latent HIV-1 reservoir. However, while many in vitro latency models rely on CD4+ T cells that were initially differentiated via T-cell receptor (TCR) stimulation into memory/effector cells, latent infection of naïve resting CD4+ T cells maintained under HSP conditions has not been fully addressed. Here, we describe an in vitro HSP culture system utilizing the cytokines IL-7 and IL-15 that allows studying latency in naïve resting CD4+ T cells. CD4+ T cells isolated from several healthy donors were infected with HIV pseudotypes expressing GFP and cultured under HSP conditions or TCR conditions as control. Cell proliferation, phenotype, and GFP expression were analyzed by flow cytometry. RNA expression was quantified by qRT-PCR. Under HSP culture conditions, latently HIV-1 infected naïve cells are in part maintained in the non-dividing (= resting) state. Although a few HIV-1 provirus+ cells were present in these resting GFP negative cells, the estimated level of GFP transcripts per infected cell seems to indicate a block at the post-transcriptional level. Interestingly, neither TCR nor the prototypic HDAC inhibitor SAHA were able to reactivate HIV-1 provirus from these cells. This lack of reactivation was not due to methylation of the HIV LTR. These results point to a mechanism of HIV control in HSP-cultured resting naïve CD4+ T cells that may be distinct from that in TCR-stimulated memory/effector T cells. PMID:27990142

  14. Upregulation of class I major histocompatibility complex gene expression in primary sensory neurons, satellite cells, and Schwann cells of mice in response to acute but not latent herpes simplex virus infection in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) deficiency is typical of almost all resident cells in normal neural tissue. However, CD8+ T cells, which recognize antigenic peptides in the context of class I MHC molecules, are known to mediate clearance of herpes simplex virus (HSV) from spinal ganglia of experimentally infected mice, leading to the hypothesis that class I expression in the peripheral nervous system must be upregulated in response to HSV infection. In addressing this hypothesis it is shown, in BALB/c (H-2d) mice, that normally deficient class I transcripts transiently accumulate in peripheral nerve Schwann cells, ganglionic satellite cells, and primary sensory neurons, indicating that in each of these cell types class I expression is regulated at the transcriptional level in vivo. Furthermore, for 3-4 wk after infection, H-2Kd/Dd antigens are expressed by satellite and Schwann cells but not neurons, suggesting additional posttranscriptional regulation of class I synthesis in neurons. Alternatively, the class I RNAs induced in neurons may not be derived from classical class I genes. Factors regulating H-2 class I expression emanate from within infected ganglia, probably from infected neurons themselves. However, induction of class I molecules was not maintained during latency, when viral gene expression in neurons is restricted to a single region within the virus repeats. These data have implications for the long-term survival of cells in HSV-infected neural tissue. PMID:8064236

  15. The AT-hook DNA binding ability of the Epstein Barr virus EBNA1 protein is necessary for the maintenance of viral genomes in latently infected cells.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Adityarup; Sugden, Bill

    2015-10-01

    Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) is a human tumor virus that is causally linked to malignancies such as Burkitt׳s lymphoma, and gastric and nasopharyngeal carcinomas. Tethering of EBV genomes to cellular chromosomes is required for the synthesis and persistence of viral plasmids in tumor cells. However, it is not established how EBV genomes are tethered to cellular chromosomes. We test the hypothesis that the viral protein EBNA1 tethers EBV genomes to chromosomes specifically through its N-terminal AT-hook DNA-binding domains by using a small molecule, netropsin, that has been shown to inhibit the AT-hook DNA-binding of EBNA1 in vitro. We show that netropsin forces the loss of EBV genomes from epithelial and lymphoid cells in an AT-hook dependent manner and that EBV-positive lymphoma cells are significantly more inhibited in their growth by netropsin than are corresponding EBV-negative cells.

  16. The latent cytomegalovirus decreases telomere length by microcompetition

    PubMed Central

    Javaherian, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Reduced telomere length has been associated with aging and age-related diseases. Latent infection with the Cytomegalovirus (CMV) induces telomere shortening in the infected cells. Latent CMV infection may cause reduced telomere length via GABP transcription factor deficiency, according to the Microcompetition Theory. Microcompetition and viral-induced transcription factor deficiency is important since most people harbor a latent viral infection.

  17. Latent toxoplasmosis is associated with neurocognitive impairment in young adults with and without chronic HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Ene, L; Marcotte, T D; Umlauf, A; Grancea, C; Temereanca, A; Bharti, A; Achim, C L; Letendre, S; Ruta, S M

    2016-10-15

    We evaluated the impact of latent toxoplasmosis (LT) on neurocognitive (NC) and neurobehavioural functioning in young adults with and without chronic HIV infection, using a standardised NC test battery, self-reported Beck Depression Inventory, Frontal System Behavior Scale, MINI-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and risk-assessment battery. 194 young adults (median age 24years, 48.2% males) with chronic HIV infection (HIV+) since childhood and 51 HIV seronegative (HIV-) participants were included. HIV+ individuals had good current immunological status (median CD4: 479 cells/μl) despite a low CD4 nadir (median: 93 cells/μl). LT (positive anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies) was present in one third of participants. The impairment rates in the HIV- with and without Toxo were not significantly different (p=0.17). However, we observed an increasing trend (p<0.001) in impairment rates with HIV and LT status: HIV-/LT- (6.1%); HIV-/LT+ (22%), HIV+/LT- (31%), HIV+/LT+ (49%). In a multivariable analysis using the entire study group there were main effects on cognition for HIV and also for LT. Within the HIV+ group LT was associated with worse performance globally (p=0.006), in memory (p=0.009), speed of information processing (p=0.01), verbal (p=0.02) and learning (p=0.02) domains. LT was not associated with depressive symptoms, frontal systems dysfunction or risk behaviors in any of the groups. HIV participants with lower Toxoplasma antibody concentration had worse NC performance, with higher GDS values (p=0.03) and worse learning (p=0.002), memory (p=0.006), speed of information processing (p=0.01) T scores. Latent Toxoplasmosis may contribute to NC impairment in young adults, including those with and without chronic HIV infection.

  18. Activation of HIV-1 from latent infection via synergy of RUNX1 inhibitor Ro5-3335 and SAHA.

    PubMed

    Klase, Zachary; Yedavalli, Venkat S R K; Houzet, Laurent; Perkins, Molly; Maldarelli, Frank; Brenchley, Jason; Strebel, Klaus; Liu, Paul; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2014-03-01

    A major barrier to the elimination of HIV-1 infection is the presence of a pool of long-lived, latently infected CD4+ memory T-cells. The search for treatments to re-activate latent HIV to aid in clearance is hindered by the incomplete understanding of the mechanisms that lead to transcriptional silencing of viral gene expression in host cells. Here we identify a previously unknown role for RUNX1 in HIV-1 transcriptional latency. The RUNX proteins, in combination with the co-factor CBF-β, are critical transcriptional regulators in T-cells. RUNX1 strongly modulates CD4 expression and contributes to CD4+ T-cell function. We show that RUNX1 can bind DNA sequences within the HIV-1 LTR and that this binding represses transcription. Using patient samples we show a negative correlation between RUNX1 expression and viral load. Furthermore, we find that pharmacologic inhibition of RUNX1 by a small molecule inhibitor, Ro5-3335, synergizes with the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor SAHA (Vorinostat) to enhance the activation of latent HIV-1 in both cell lines and PBMCs from patients. Our findings indicate that RUNX1 and CBF-β cooperate in cells to modulate HIV-1 replication, identifying for the first time RUNX1 as a cellular factor involved in HIV-1 latency. This work highlights the therapeutic potential of inhibitors of RUNX1 to re-activate virus and aid in clearance of HIV-1.

  19. Latent progenitor cells as potential regulators for tympanic membrane regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung Won; Kim, Jangho; Seonwoo, Hoon; Jang, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Yeon Ju; Lim, Hye Jin; Lim, Ki-Taek; Tian, Chunjie; Chung, Jong Hoon; Choung, Yun-Hoon

    2015-06-01

    Tympanic membrane (TM) perforation, in particular chronic otitis media, is one of the most common clinical problems in the world and can present with sensorineural healing loss. Here, we explored an approach for TM regeneration where the latent progenitor or stem cells within TM epithelial layers may play an important regulatory role. We showed that potential TM stem cells present highly positive staining for epithelial stem cell markers in all areas of normal TM tissue. Additionally, they are present at high levels in perforated TMs, especially in proximity to the holes, regardless of acute or chronic status, suggesting that TM stem cells may be a potential factor for TM regeneration. Our study suggests that latent TM stem cells could be potential regulators of regeneration, which provides a new insight into this clinically important process and a potential target for new therapies for chronic otitis media and other eardrum injuries.

  20. New approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    With nearly 9 million new active disease cases and 2 million deaths occurring worldwide every year, tuberculosis continues to remain a major public health problem. Exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis leads to active disease in only ~10% people. An effective immune response in remaining individuals stops M. tuberculosis multiplication. However, the pathogen is completely eradicated in ~10% people while others only succeed in containment of infection as some bacilli escape killing and remain in non-replicating (dormant) state (latent tuberculosis infection) in old lesions. The dormant bacilli can resuscitate and cause active disease if a disruption of immune response occurs. Nearly one-third of world population is latently infected with M. tuberculosis and 5%-10% of infected individuals will develop active disease during their life time. However, the risk of developing active disease is greatly increased (5%-15% every year and ~50% over lifetime) by human immunodeficiency virus-coinfection. While active transmission is a significant contributor of active disease cases in high tuberculosis burden countries, most active disease cases in low tuberculosis incidence countries arise from this pool of latently infected individuals. A positive tuberculin skin test or a more recent and specific interferon-gamma release assay in a person without overt signs of active disease indicates latent tuberculosis infection. Two commercial interferon-gamma release assays, QFT-G-IT and T-SPOT.TB have been developed. The standard treatment for latent tuberculosis infection is daily therapy with isoniazid for nine months. Other options include therapy with rifampicin for 4 months or isoniazid + rifampicin for 3 months or rifampicin + pyrazinamide for 2 months or isoniazid + rifapentine for 3 months. Identification of latently infected individuals and their treatment has lowered tuberculosis incidence in rich, advanced countries. Similar approaches also hold great promise for other

  1. RNA from an immediate early region of the type 1 herpes simplex virus genome is present in the trigeminal ganglia of latently infected mice

    SciTech Connect

    Deatly, A.M.; Spivack, J.G.; Lavi, E.; Fraser, N.W.

    1987-05-01

    Transcription of the type 1 herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) genome in trigeminal ganglia of latently infected mice was studied using in situ hybridization. Probes representative of each temporal gene class were used to determine the regions of the genome that encode the transcripts present in latently infected cells. Probes encoding HSV-1 sequences of the five immediate early genes and representative early (thymidine kinase), early-late (major capsid protein), and late (glycoprotein C) genes were used in these experiments. Of the probes tested, only those encoding the immediate early gene product infected-cell polypeptide (ICP) 0 hybridized to RNA in latently infected tissues. Probes containing the other immediate early genes (ICP4, ICP22, ICP27, and ICP47) and the representative early, early-late, and late genes did not hybridize. Two probes covering approx. = 30% of the HSV-1 genome and encoding over 20 early and late transcripts also did not hybridize to RNA in latently infected tissues. These results, with probes spanning > 60% of the HSV-1 genome, suggest that transcription of the HSV-1 genome is restricted to one region in latently infected mouse trigeminal ganglia.

  2. Latent tuberculosis infection: screening and treatment in an urban setting.

    PubMed

    Morano, Jamie P; Walton, Mary R; Zelenev, Alexei; Bruce, R Douglas; Altice, Frederick L

    2013-10-01

    Despite its benefit for treating active tuberculosis, directly observed therapy (DOT) for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) has been largely understudied among challenging inner city populations. Utilizing questionnaire data from a comprehensive mobile healthcare clinic in New Haven, CT from 2003 to July 2011, a total of 2,523 completed tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) resulted in 356 new LTBIs. Multivariate logistic regression correlated covariates of the two outcomes (a) initiation of isoniazid preventative therapy (IPT) and (b) completion of 9 months of IPT. Of the 357 newly positive TSTs, 86.3 % (n = 308) completed screening chest radiographs (CXRs): 90.3 % (n = 278) were normal, and 0.3 % (n = 1) had active tuberculosis. Of those completing CXR screening, 44.0 % (n = 135) agreed to IPT: 69.6 % (n = 94) selected DOT, and 30.4 % (n = 41) selected self-administered therapy (SAT). Initiating IPT was correlated with undocumented status (AOR = 3.43; p < 0.001) and being born in a country of highest and third highest tuberculosis prevalence (AOR = 14.09; p = 0.017 and AOR = 2.25; p = 0.005, respectively). Those selecting DOT were more likely to be Hispanic (83.0 vs 53.7 %; p < 0.0001), undocumented (57.4 vs 41.5 %; p = 0.012), employed (p < 0.0001), uninsured (p = 0.014), and have stable housing (p = 0.002), no prior cocaine or crack use (p = 0.013) and no recent incarceration (p = 0.001). Completing 9 months of IPT was correlated with no recent incarceration (AOR 5.95; p = 0.036) and younger age (AOR 1.03; p = 0.031). SAT and DOT participants did not significantly differ for IPT duration (6.54 vs 5.68 months; p = 0.216) nor 9-month completion (59.8 vs 46.3 %; p = 0.155). In an urban mobile healthcare sample, screening completion for LTBI was high with nearly half initiating IPT. Undocumented, Hispanic immigrants from high prevalence tuberculosis countries were more likely to self-select DOT at the mobile

  3. Immunization against Genital Herpes with a Vaccine Virus That has Defects in Productive and Latent Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, Xavier J.; Jones, Cheryl A.; Knipe, David M.

    1999-06-01

    An effective vaccine for genital herpes has been difficult to achieve because of the limited efficacy of subunit vaccines and the safety concerns about live viruses. As an alternative approach, mutant herpes simplex virus strains that are replication-defective can induce protective immunity. To increase the level of safety and to prove that replication was not needed for immunization, we constructed a mutant herpes simplex virus 2 strain containing two deletion mutations, each of which eliminated viral replication. The double-mutant virus induces protective immunity that can reduce acute viral shedding and latent infection in a mouse genital model, but importantly, the double-mutant virus shows a phenotypic defect in latent infection. This herpes vaccine strain, which is immunogenic but has defects in both productive and latent infection, provides a paradigm for the design of vaccines and vaccine vectors for other sexually transmitted diseases, such as AIDS.

  4. Can Taenia solium latent post-oncospheral stages be found in muscle tissue of cysticercosis-infected pigs (Sus scrofa)?

    PubMed

    Rodrìguez, Mary L; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gonzalez, Armando E; Verastegui, Manuela; Bernal, Teresa; Jimenez, Juan A; Garcia, Hector H

    2006-02-01

    The existence of latent Taenia solium post-oncospheral stages in the tissues of infected pigs has been postulated. To assess whether such structures exist and can be detected, we examined muscle samples from cysticercosis-infected and uninfected pigs. Pork samples were homogenized, centrifuged, and resuspended in saline solution. Round microscopic structures of approximately 10 microm with variable refringence were found in the pellets of all samples from both infected and uninfected pigs. These became homogeneously red after staining with Sudan IV and disappeared after ether extraction. The only difference between samples from infected and uninfected pigs was the presence of inflammatory cells and tissue necrosis debris in the former group. Taenia solium oncospheres were stained and observed for comparative purposes, before and after inoculation into pork. Control oncospheres were ellipsoidal, had nucleated basophile cells in their interior, and showed red aggregates on their surfaces when stained with 3% Sudan IV. While rounded microscopical structures similar to those previously reported were found, these differed morphologically from oncospheres, were of a lipid nature, and occurred in both infected and uninfected animals. No evidence supporting the presence of latent post-oncospheral stages of Taenia solium was generated in this series of experiments.

  5. Sequence Analysis of Raspberry latent virus Suggests a New Genus of Dicot Infecting Reoviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently, there are three assigned genera of plant reoviruses: Phytoreovirus, Fijivirus and Oryzavirus. With only two exceptions, all plant reoviruses infect monocotyledonous plants. The recent characterization of Raspberry latent virus (RpLV) isolated from red raspberry plants in northern Washingt...

  6. Isoniazid Completion Rates for Latent Tuberculosis Infection among College Students Managed by a Community Pharmacist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Karl; Goad, Jeffery; Wu, Joanne; Johnson, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors' objective was to document 9-month and previously recommended 6-month treatment completion rates for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in a pharmacist-managed LTBI clinic in a community pharmacy on a college campus, and to describe patient characteristics. Participants: Participants were university students diagnosed with…

  7. Screening and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection among HIV-infected patients in resource-rich settings.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ada W C; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2016-01-01

    Current international guidelines recommend screening and treatment of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection in HIV-infected patients in all settings. The main factors affecting the risk of TB in HIV-infected patients include the level of immunosuppression, coverage of antiretroviral therapy and local TB burden. In resource-rich settings where antiretroviral therapy is more accessible and HIV-infected patients are expected to be diagnosed at an earlier stage, local TB burden remains a key factor on their risk of TB. This article reviewed the epidemiology of latent TB infection among the adult HIV-infected patients, and the use and benefit of screening and treatment of latent TB infection in resource-rich settings in the past decade. While such practice should be continued in countries with medium or high TB burden, targeted screening and treatment only for HIV-infected patients with additional risk factors for TB might be a more practical option in resource-rich countries with low TB burden.

  8. Difference Between Latent TB Infection and Active TB Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... person with infectious TB coughs or sneezes, droplet nuclei containing M. tuberculosis are expelled into the air. If another person inhales air containing these droplet nuclei, he or she may become infected. However, not ...

  9. Anatomical Response and Infection of Soybean during Latent and Pathogenic Infection by Type A and B of Phialophora gregata

    PubMed Central

    Impullitti, Ann E.; Malvick, Dean K.

    2014-01-01

    Growth and anatomical responses of plants during latent and pathogenic infection by fungal pathogens are not well understood. The interactions between soybean (Glycine max) and two types of the pathogen Phialophora gregata were investigated to determine how plants respond during latent and pathogenic infection. Stems of soybean cultivars with different or no genes for resistance to infection by P. gregata were inoculated with wildtype or GFP and RFP-labeled strains of types A or B of P. gregata. Plants were sectioned during latent and pathogenic infection, examined with transmitted light or fluorescent microscopy, and quantitative differences in vessels and qualitative differences in infection were assessed using captured images. During latent infection, the number of vessels was similar in resistant and susceptible plants infected with type A or B compared to the control, and fungal infection was rarely observed in vessels. During pathogenic infection, the resistant cultivars had 20 to 25% more vessels than the uninfected plants, and fungal hyphae were readily observed in the vessels. Furthermore, during the pathogenic phase in a resistant cultivar, P.gregata type A-GFP was limited to outside of the primary xylem, while P.gregata type B-RFP was observed in the primary xylem. The opposite occurred with the susceptible cultivar, where PgA-GFP was observed in the primary xylem and PgB-RFP was limited to the interfascicular region. In summary, soybean cultivars with resistance to BSR produced more vessels and can restrict or exclude P. gregata from the vascular system compared to susceptible cultivars. Structural resistance mechanisms potentially compensate for loss of vessel function and disrupted water movement. PMID:24879418

  10. Defining nervous system susceptibility during acute and latent herpes simplex virus-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Chandra M; Carr, Daniel J J

    2017-03-08

    Herpes simplex viruses are neurotropic human pathogens that infect and establish latency in peripheral sensory neurons of the host. Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1) readily infects the facial mucosa that can result in the establishment of a latent infection in the sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglia (TG). From latency, HSV-1 can reactivate and cause peripheral pathology following anterograde trafficking from sensory neurons. Under rare circumstances, HSV-1 can migrate into the central nervous system (CNS) and cause Herpes Simplex Encephalitis (HSE), a devastating disease of the CNS. It is unclear whether HSE is the result of viral reactivation within the TG, from direct primary infection of the olfactory mucosa, or from other infected CNS neurons. Areas of the brain that are susceptible to HSV-1 during acute infection are ill-defined. Furthermore, whether the CNS is a true reservoir of viral latency following clearance of virus during acute infection is unknown. In this context, this review will identify sites within the brain that are susceptible to acute infection and harbor latent virus. In addition, we will also address findings of HSV-1 lytic gene expression during latency and comment on the pathophysiological consequences HSV-1 infection may have on long-term neurologic performance in animal models and humans.

  11. Seroprevalence of latent Toxoplasma gondii infection among HIV-infected pregnant women in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Bamba, S; Sourabié, Y; Guiguemdé, T R; Karou, D S; Simporé, J; Bambara, M; Villena, I

    2014-09-01

    The deficit of cellular immunity, as found in HIV infected individuals, may lead to the reactivation of latent Toxoplasma gondii cysts, with as consequence, the occurrence of toxoplasmosis and an eventual vertical transmission of the disease during pregnancy. The present study was designed for determining the occurrence of latent Toxoplasma gondii among HIV-infected pregnant women during the first trimester in Bobo-Dioulasso. Thus, 348 pregnant women aged from 17 to 47 years (average age of 6.64 ± 4.75 yaers) were enrolled. The specific anti-Toxoplasma gondii IgG and IgM antibodies were quantified from whole blood specimens using the high-sensitivity direct agglutination and the enzyme linked fluorescent assays, respectively, the IgG avidity test being used for the dating of the primary infection. The results revealed that the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii latent infection was 34.7%. It was significantly higher in HIV-infected women compared with uninfected ones (68,7%; CI 95%: 43,6%-88,9%) versus (33,1%; CI 95%: 28, 2%-38,3%). In addition, all the occurrences of the high IgG avidity were closely linked with the presence of IgM. These results underlined the need for the clinical follow-up of the maternal HIV diseases including the toxoplasmosis during the pregnancy since; the newborns are still exposed to vertical transmission of Toxoplasma infection in endemic areas like Burkina Faso.

  12. Incidence of persistent viraemia and latent feline leukaemia virus infection in cats with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Stützer, Bianca; Simon, Karin; Lutz, Hans; Majzoub, Monir; Hermanns, Walter; Hirschberger, Johannes; Sauter-Louis, Carola; Hartmann, Katrin

    2011-02-01

    In the past, feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) infection, and also latent FeLV infection, were commonly associated with lymphoma and leukaemia. In this study, the prevalence of FeLV provirus in tumour tissue and bone marrow in FeLV antigen-negative cats with these tumours was assessed. Seventy-seven diseased cats were surveyed (61 antigen-negative, 16 antigen-positive). Blood, bone marrow, and tumour samples were investigated by two polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays detecting deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences of the long terminal repeats (LTR) and the envelope (env) region of the FeLV genome. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed in bone marrow and tumour tissue. None of the antigen-negative cats with lymphoma was detectably infected with latent FeLV. The prevalence of FeLV viraemia in cats with lymphoma was 20.8%. This suggests that causes other than FeLV play a role in tumorigenesis, and that latent FeLV infection is unlikely to be responsible for most feline lymphomas and leukaemias.

  13. De Novo Herpes Simplex Virus VP16 Expression Gates a Dynamic Programmatic Transition and Sets the Latent/Lytic Balance during Acute Infection in Trigeminal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Sawtell, Nancy M.; Thompson, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    The life long relationship between herpes simplex virus and its host hinges on the ability of the virus to aggressively replicate in epithelial cells at the site of infection and transport into the nervous system through axons innervating the infection site. Interaction between the virus and the sensory neuron represents a pivot point where largely unknown mechanisms lead to a latent or a lytic infection in the neuron. Regulation at this pivot point is critical for balancing two objectives, efficient widespread seeding of the nervous system and host survival. By combining genetic and in vivo in approaches, our studies reveal that the balance between latent and lytic programs is a process occurring early in the trigeminal ganglion. Unexpectedly, activation of the latent program precedes entry into the lytic program by 12 -14hrs. Importantly, at the individual neuronal level, the lytic program begins as a transition out of this acute stage latent program and this escape from the default latent program is regulated by de novo VP16 expression. Our findings support a model in which regulated de novo VP16 expression in the neuron mediates entry into the lytic cycle during the earliest stages of virus infection in vivo. These findings support the hypothesis that the loose association of VP16 with the viral tegument combined with sensory axon length and transport mechanisms serve to limit arrival of virion associated VP16 into neuronal nuclei favoring latency. Further, our findings point to specialized features of the VP16 promoter that control the de novo expression of VP16 in neurons and this regulation is a key component in setting the balance between lytic and latent infections in the nervous system. PMID:27607440

  14. [Latent tuberculosis infection in healthcare personnel at a primary level general hospital in Catalonia, Spain].

    PubMed

    Sol Vidiella, Josep; Catalán Gómez, Teresa; Callau Casanova, Cristina; Lejeune, Marylène

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to analyze the prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection and associated risk factors in healthcare personnel at the Hospital de Tortosa Verge de la Cinta (Tarragona, Spain). This was a cross-sectional study of 398 workers at this hospital who underwent tuberculin skin testing for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) between 2001 and 2012.We also analyzed the relationship between LTBI and age, sex, job and work area according to their risk of exposure to tuberculosis(high, low, uncertain). The total prevalence of LTBI in our sample was 11.1% (95%CI 8.3%-14.5%). LBTI was associated with age and work area. Multivariate analysis showed that the risk of LTBI increased by 6.4% per 1 year increase in age. The prevalence of LTBI in this population approximates that of the general population in Spain.

  15. Potential novel markers to discriminate between active and latent tuberculosis infection in Chinese individuals.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue-juan; Liang, Yan; Yang, You-rong; Feng, Jin-dong; Luo, Zhan-peng; Zhang, Jun-Xian; Wu, Xue-qiong

    2016-02-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) constitutes the main reservoir for reactivation tuberculosis. The finding of potential biomarkers for differentiating between TB and LTBI is very necessary. In this study, the immunological characteristics and potential diagnostic utility of Rv2029c, Rv2628 and Rv1813c proteins were assessed. These three proteins stimulated PBMCs from ELISPOT-positive LTBI subjects produced higher levels of IFN-γ in comparison with TB patients and ELISPOT-negative healthy subjects (p<0.05). BCG vaccination and non-TB respiratory disease had little influence on the immunological responses of Rv2029c and Rv2628 proteins (p>0.05). The LTBI diagnostic performance of Rv2029c was higher than Rv2628 and Rv1813c by ROC evaluation. But Rv2628 had much higher specificity than Rv2029c in active TB patients and uninfected healthy subjects. The IgG level against Rv1813c was higher in the TB group than in LTBI and uninfected healthy subjects (p<0.05). These results suggest that T cell response to Rv2628 and antibody against Rv1813c might be applicable as biomarkers to distinguish TB from LTBI and uninfected individuals.

  16. Molecular and pathologic insights from latent HIV-1 infection in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Desplats, Paula; Dumaop, Wilmar; Smith, David; Adame, Anthony; Everall, Ian; Letendre, Scott; Ellis, Ronald; Cherner, Mariana; Grant, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate whether HIV latency in the CNS might have adverse molecular, pathologic, and clinical consequences. Methods: This was a case-control comparison of HIV-1 seropositive (HIV+) patients with clinical and neuropathologic examination. Based on the levels of HIV-1 DNA, RNA, and p24 in the brain, cases were classified as controls, latent HIV CNS infection, and HIV encephalitis (HIVE). Analysis of epigenetic markers including BCL11B, neurodegeneration, and neuroinflammation was performed utilizing immunoblot, confocal microscopy, immunochemistry/image analysis, and qPCR. Detailed antemortem neurocognitive data were available for 23 out of the 32 cases. Results: HIV+ controls (n = 12) had no detectable HIV-1 DNA, RNA, or p24 in the CNS; latent HIV+ cases (n = 10) showed high levels of HIV-1 DNA but no HIV RNA or p24; and HIVE cases (n = 10) had high levels of HIV-1 DNA, RNA, and p24. Compared to HIV+ controls, the HIV+ latent cases displayed moderate cognitive impairment with neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory alterations, although to a lesser extent than HIVE cases. Remarkably, HIV+ latent cases showed higher levels of BCL11B and other chromatin modifiers involved in silencing. Increased BCL11B was associated with deregulation of proinflammatory genes like interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor–α, and CD74. Conclusion: Persistence of latent HIV-1 infection in the CNS was associated with increased levels of chromatin modifiers, including BCL11B. Alteration of these epigenetic factors might result in abnormal transcriptomes, leading to inflammation, neurodegeneration, and neurocognitive impairment. BCL11B and other epigenetic factors involved in silencing might represent potential targets for HIV-1 involvement of the CNS. PMID:23486877

  17. Selective peptide inhibitors of antiapoptotic cellular and viral Bcl-2 proteins lead to cytochrome c release during latent Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection.

    PubMed

    Burrer, Christine M; Foight, Glenna W; Keating, Amy E; Chan, Gary C

    2016-01-04

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is associated with B-cell lymphomas including primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease. KSHV establishes latency within B cells by modulating or mimicking the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family of proteins to promote cell survival. Our previous BH3 profiling analysis, a functional assay that assesses the contribution of Bcl-2 proteins towards cellular survival, identified two Bcl-2 proteins, cellular Mcl-1 and viral KsBcl-2, as potential regulators of mitochondria polarization within a latently infected B-cell line, Bcbl-1. In this study, we used two novel peptide inhibitors identified in a peptide library screen that selectively bind KsBcl-2 (KL6-7_Y4eK) or KsBcl-2 and Mcl-1 (MS1) in order to decipher the relative contribution of Mcl-1 and KsBcl-2 in maintaining mitochondrial membrane potential. We found treatment with KL6-7_Y4eK and MS1 stimulated a similar amount of cytochrome c release from mitochondria isolated from Bcbl-1 cells, indicating that inhibition of KsBcl-2 alone is sufficient for mitochondrial outer membrane permiabilzation (MOMP) and thus apoptosis during a latent B cell infection. In turn, this study also identified and provides a proof-of-concept for the further development of novel KsBcl-2 inhibitors for the treatment of KSHV-associated B-cell lymphomas via the targeting of latently infected B cells.

  18. Sexual Behavior Latent Classes Among Men Who Have Sex With Men: Associations With Sexually Transmitted Infections.

    PubMed

    Rice, Cara E; Turner, Abigail Norris; Lanza, Stephanie T

    2016-08-12

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at disproportionate risk of acquisition of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We used latent class analysis (LCA) to examine patterns of sexual behavior among MSM and how those patterns are related to STIs. We examined patterns of sexual behavior using behavioral and clinical data from a cross-sectional study of 235 MSM who presented to an urban sexual health clinic for STI testing. Analyzed data were collected using a combination of interviewer- and self-administered surveys and electronic health records. We used LCA to identify underlying subgroups of men based on their sexual behavior, described the demographics of the latent classes, and examined the association between the latent classes and STI status. We identified three latent classes of sexual behavior: Unprotected Anal Intercourse (UAI) Only (67%), Partner Seekers (14%), and Multiple Behaviors (19%). Men in the Multiple Behaviors class had a 67% probability of being STI positive, followed by men in the UAI Only class (27%) and men in the Partner Seekers class (22%). Examining the intersection of a variety of sexual practices indicates particular subgroups of MSM have the highest probability of being STI positive.

  19. Reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus infection by ultraviolet light: a human model

    SciTech Connect

    Perna, J.J.; Mannix, M.L.; Rooney, J.F.; Notkins, A.L.; Straus, S.E.

    1987-09-01

    Infection with herpes simplex virus often results in a latent infection of local sensory ganglia and a disease characterized by periodic viral reactivation and mucocutaneous lesions. The factors that trigger reactivation in humans are still poorly defined. In our study, five patients with documented histories of recurrent herpes simplex virus infection on the buttocks or sacrum were exposed to three times their minimal erythema dose of ultraviolet light. Site-specific cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection occurred at 4.4 +/- 0.4 days after exposure to ultraviolet light in 8 of 13 attempts at reactivation. We conclude that ultraviolet light can reactivate herpes simplex virus under experimentally defined conditions. This model in humans should prove useful in evaluating the pathophysiology and prevention of viral reactivation.

  20. The Global Burden of Latent Tuberculosis Infection: A Re-estimation Using Mathematical Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Houben, Rein M. G. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The existing estimate of the global burden of latent TB infection (LTBI) as “one-third” of the world population is nearly 20 y old. Given the importance of controlling LTBI as part of the End TB Strategy for eliminating TB by 2050, changes in demography and scientific understanding, and progress in TB control, it is important to re-assess the global burden of LTBI. Methods and Findings We constructed trends in annual risk in infection (ARI) for countries between 1934 and 2014 using a combination of direct estimates of ARI from LTBI surveys (131 surveys from 1950 to 2011) and indirect estimates of ARI calculated from World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates of smear positive TB prevalence from 1990 to 2014. Gaussian process regression was used to generate ARIs for country-years without data and to represent uncertainty. Estimated ARI time-series were applied to the demography in each country to calculate the number and proportions of individuals infected, recently infected (infected within 2 y), and recently infected with isoniazid (INH)-resistant strains. Resulting estimates were aggregated by WHO region. We estimated the contribution of existing infections to TB incidence in 2035 and 2050. In 2014, the global burden of LTBI was 23.0% (95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 20.4%–26.4%), amounting to approximately 1.7 billion people. WHO South-East Asia, Western-Pacific, and Africa regions had the highest prevalence and accounted for around 80% of those with LTBI. Prevalence of recent infection was 0.8% (95% UI: 0.7%–0.9%) of the global population, amounting to 55.5 (95% UI: 48.2–63.8) million individuals currently at high risk of TB disease, of which 10.9% (95% UI:10.2%–11.8%) was isoniazid-resistant. Current LTBI alone, assuming no additional infections from 2015 onwards, would be expected to generate TB incidences in the region of 16.5 per 100,000 per year in 2035 and 8.3 per 100,000 per year in 2050. Limitations included the quantity and

  1. IFN-γ/TNF-α ratio in response to immuno proteomically identified human T-cell antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis - The most suitable surrogate biomarker for latent TB infection.

    PubMed

    Prabhavathi, Maddineni; Pathakumari, Balaji; Raja, Alamelu

    2015-08-01

    The enormous reservoir of latent TB infection (LTBI) poses a major hurdle for global TB control. The existing Tuberculin skin test (TST) and IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs) are found to be suboptimal for LTBI diagnosis. Previously we had taken an immunoproteomic approach and identified 10 protein fractions (contains 16 proteins), which are solely recognized by LTBI. In a cohort of 40 pulmonary TB patients (PTB) and 35 healthy household contacts (HHC), IFN-γ and TNF-α response were measured against 16 antigens by using 1:10 diluted whole blood assay. Among all the antigens, IFN-γ response to Rv2626c has shown positivity of 88.57% in HHC and 7.5% in PTB group. IFN-γ response to combination of Rv2626c + Rv3716c has demonstrated 100% positivity in HHC and 17.5% positivity in PTB respectively. Compared to individual cytokines (i.e. IFN-γ and TNF-α), ratio of IFN-γ/TNF-α has shown promising results for diagnosis of LTBI. IFN-γ/TNF-α ratio against Rv3716c and TrxC has exhibited a positivity of 94.29% in HHC and 5% in PTB group. Accession of Rv2626c and Rv3716c may improve the diagnostic performance of existing QFT-GIT. Independent of QFT-GIT assay, ratio of IFN-γ/TNF-α in response to either Rv3716c or TrxC may acts as suitable surrogate biomarker for LTBI.

  2. Deregulated microRNAs in CD4+ T cells from individuals with latent tuberculosis versus active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yurong; Yi, Zhengjun; Li, Jianhua; Li, Ruifang

    2014-03-01

    The mechanisms of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection remain elusive. Roles of microRNA (miRNA) have been highlighted in pathogen-host interactions recently. To identify miRNAs involved in the immune response to TB, expression profiles of miRNAs in CD4(+) T cells from patients with latent TB, active TB and healthy controls were investigated by microarray assay and validated by RT-qPCR. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis were used to analyse the significant functions and involvement in signalling pathways of the differentially expressed miRNAs. To identify potential target genes for miR-29, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) mRNA expression was measured by RT-qPCR. Our results showed that 27 miRNAs were deregulated among the three groups. RT-qPCR results were generally consistent with the microarray data. We observed an inverse correlation between miR-29 level and IFN-γ mRNA expression in CD4(+) T cells. GO and KEGG pathway analysis showed that the possible target genes of deregulated miRNAs were significantly enriched in mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathway, focal adhesion and extracellular matrix receptor interaction, which might be involved in the transition from latent to active TB. In all, for the first time, our study revealed that some miRNAs in CD4(+) T cells were altered in latent and active TB. Function and pathway analysis highlighted the possible involvement of miRNA-deregulated mRNAs in TB. The study might help to improve understanding of the relationship between miRNAs in CD4(+) T cells and TB, and laid an important foundation for further identification of the underlying mechanisms of latent TB infection and its reactivation.

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific CD4+ T-cell response is increased, and Treg cells decreased, in anthelmintic-treated patients with latent TB.

    PubMed

    Toulza, Frederic; Tsang, Lillian; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Brown, Michael; Dockrell, Hazel M

    2016-03-01

    In many settings, adults with active or latent tuberculosis will also be coinfected with helminths. Our study aimed to investigate how anthelmintic treatment modulates antimycobacterial immunity, in a setting where helminth reinfection should not occur. We investigated the potential impact of helminth infection on immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in patients with latent Mtb infection with or without helminth infection (Strongyloides or Schistosoma), and tested T-cell responses before and after anthelmintic treatment. The study was performed in migrants resident in the United Kingdom, where reexposure and reinfection following anthelmintic treatment would not occur. The frequency of CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells was measured following stimulation with Mtb Purified Protein Derivative or ESAT-6/CFP-10 antigen, and concentrations of IFN-γ in culture supernatants measured by ELISA and multiplex bead array. Helminth infection was associated with a lower frequency of CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells, which increased following treatment. Patients with helminth infection showed a significant increase in CD4(+) FoxP3(+) T cells (Treg) compared to those without helminth infection. There was a decrease in the frequency of Treg cells, and an associated increase in CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells after the anthelmintic treatment. Here, we show a potential role of Treg cells in reducing the frequency and function of antimycobacterial CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells, and that these effects are reversed after anthelmintic treatment.

  4. Donor-derived tuberculosis (TB): isoniazid-resistant TB transmitted from a lung transplant donor with inadequately treated latent infection.

    PubMed

    Jensen, T O; Darley, D R; Goeman, E E; Shaw, K; Marriott, D J; Glanville, A R

    2016-10-01

    Donor-derived tuberculosis (TB) is an increasingly recognized complication of solid organ transplantation. We report a case of isoniazid-resistant pulmonary TB in a lung transplant recipient. The patient acquired the infection from the lung donor who was previously empirically treated with isoniazid for latent TB. The case highlights the caveat that, while adequate treatment of latent TB with isoniazid is presumed, meticulous screening of donors is required.

  5. Antibody response of HIV-infected patients to latent, cerebral and recently acquired toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Machala, L; Malý, M; Hrdá, S; Rozsypal, H; Stanková, M; Kodym, P

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study with 626 HIV-infected patients was to evaluate the capability of serological tests in diagnosing the presence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in HIV-infected patients, as well as the potential impact of various treatment regimes on serological results. Low IgG antibody levels and stable or declining titres predominated. IgM positivity occurred in ten patients (one seroconversion, seven latent, two cerebral toxoplasmosis). Complement fixation test (CFT) titres >or=1:32 imply that the relative risk of cerebral toxoplasmosis is 6.84 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-32.5) but with a predictive value of only 14.0% (95% CI 5.3-27.9). Values of specific antibodies are not biassed by antiretroviral treatment and/or prophylaxis for toxoplasmosis, and the detection of specific antibodies is very useful in the identification of T. gondii infection in the HIV-infected population, but the role of serology in predicting the clinical manifestation of T. gondii infection is limited.

  6. Infection of brain-derived cells with the human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Chiodi, F; Fuerstenberg, S; Gidlund, M; Asjö, B; Fenyö, E M

    1987-01-01

    A malignant glioma cell line was infected with the human T-lymphotropic virus type IIIB isolate of the human immunodeficiency virus. Infection appeared to be latent rather than productive. Through contact with monocytic or lymphoid cells, the virus present in the glioma cells could be transmitted and gave rise to a fully productive infection. Images PMID:3644020

  7. Potential Economic Viability of Two Proposed Rifapentine-Based Regimens for Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Holland, David P.; Sanders, Gillian D.; Hamilton, Carol D.; Stout, Jason E.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Rifapentine-based regimens for treating latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are being considered for future clinical trials, but even if they prove effective, high drug costs may limit their economic viability. Objectives To inform clinical trial design by estimating the potential costs and effectiveness of rifapentine-based regimens for treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Methods We used a Markov model to estimate cost and societal benefits for three regimens for treating LTBI: Isoniazid/rifapentine daily for one month, isoniazid/rifapentine weekly for three months (self-administered and directly-observed), and isoniazid daily for nine months; a strategy of “no treatment” used for comparison. Costs, quality-adjusted life-years gained, and instances of active tuberculosis averted were calculated for all arms. Results Both daily isoniazid/rifapentine for one month and weekly isoniazid/rifapentine for three months were less expensive and more effective than other strategies under a wide variety of clinically plausibly parameter estimates. Daily isoniazid/rifapentine for one month was the least expensive and most effective regimen. Conclusions Daily isoniazid/rifapentine for one month and weekly isoniazid/rifapentine for three months should be studied in a large-scale clinical trial for efficacy. Because both regimens performed well even if their efficacy is somewhat reduced, study designers should consider relaxing non-inferiority boundaries. PMID:21789248

  8. Supervised preventive therapy for latent tuberculosis infection in illegal immigrants in Italy.

    PubMed

    Matteelli, A; Casalini, C; Raviglione, M C; El-Hamad, I; Scolari, C; Bombana, E; Bugiani, M; Caputo, M; Scarcella, C; Carosi, G

    2000-11-01

    In a multicenter, prospective, randomized, open-label study of isoniazid-preventive therapy (IPT) for latent tuberculosis infection, illegal immigrants from countries where tuberculosis is highly endemic were enrolled at two clinical sites in Northern Italy. Of 208 eligible subjects, 82 received supervised IPT at a dose of 900 mg twice weekly for 6 mo (Regimen A), 73 received unsupervised IPT 900 mg twice weekly for 6 mo (Regimen B), and 53 received unsupervised IPT 300 mg daily for 6 mo (Regimen C). Supervised IPT was delivered at either one tuberculosis clinic or one migrant clinic. The probability of completing a 26-wk regimen was 7, 26, and 41% in Regimens A, B, and C, respectively (p < 0.005, Log- rank test calculated using Kaplan-Meier plots). The mean time to dropout was 3. 8, 6, and 6.2 wk in Regimens A, B, and C, respectively (p = 0.003 for regimen A versus either Regimens B or C). Treatment was stopped in five subjects (2.4%) because of adverse events. The rate of completion of preventive therapy for latent tuberculosis infection among illegal immigrants was low. Supervised, clinic-based administration of IPT significantly reduced adherence. Alternative strategies to implement preventive therapy in illegal immigrants are clearly required.

  9. Language discordance and testing for latent tuberculosis infection among recent Asian and Latino immigrants.

    PubMed

    Leng, Jennifer C F; Changrani, Jyotsna; Gany, Francesca M

    2011-04-01

    The foreign-born population is disproportionately affected by tuberculosis (TB). Testing to identify persons with latent TB infection is critical. The aim of this study was to assess clinic-based testing for latent tuberculosis infection among recent Asian and Latino immigrants. A randomized controlled trial of interpreting methods and their impact on medical outcomes was conducted at the primary care clinic of a New York City municipal hospital. This study is a nested cohort of recruited patients with an indication to receive tuberculin testing, based on recent migration to the US from endemic areas. Medical record data were abstracted to determine referral for, and completion of, tuberculin testing. Bivariate analyses were used to test for differences in tuberculin testing between language concordant and discordant groups. Seven hundred and eighty-two patients were enrolled. One hundred and ninety-one had migrated within 5 years of enrollment from endemic areas. None spoke English as a primary language. Seventy percentage of patient-provider encounters were language discordant. Seventeen of 191 were referred for testing. Fifteen (88%) completed testing. Six (40%) had positive results. There were no significant differences between language concordant and discordant patients. In this at-risk population, every patient in clinical care should be considered for testing if indicated by country of origin.

  10. Association of autophagy-related IRGM polymorphisms with latent versus active tuberculosis infection in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanjun; Li, Qian; Peng, Jing; Zhu, Yaowu; Wang, Feng; Wang, Chunyu; Wang, Xiong

    2016-03-01

    The autophagy-related immunity-related GTPase family M protein, IRGM, plays an important role in the defense against tuberculosis (TB) infection. IRGM polymorphisms are associated with TB infection susceptibility, and recent studies demonstrate host genetic differences between active and latent TB. Here, we investigated the association between IRGM polymorphisms and TB infection type in a Chinese population. We recruited 268 and 321 patients with confirmed or latent TB, respectively, and 475 TB-free healthy controls. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs10065172, rs10051924, and rs13361189 within IRGM were genotyped using TaqMan-based assays. Interferon-gamma release levels were tested by T-SPOT. rs10065172 (P = 0.024, OR 0.67 (95% CI 0.48-0.95)), rs10051924 (P = 0.01, OR 0.64 (95% CI 0.46-0.90)), and rs13361189 (P = 0.055, OR 0.72 (95% CI 0.51-1.01)) were associated with a protective role against latent TB progression. Haplotype analysis showed that TCC was protective for latent TB (P = 0.022, OR 0.74 (95% CI 0.57-0.96)) whereas TTC conferred a higher risk of active TB. Additionally, patients with the rs10065172 TT genotype had a higher response to TB specific antigens. Thus, IRGM polymorphism differences between latent and active TB suggests that genetic differences in autophagy might partly affect host TB infection status.

  11. Latent tuberculosis among persons at risk for infection with HIV, Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Garfein, Richard S; Laniado-Laborin, Rafael; Rodwell, Timothy C; Lozada, Remedios; Deiss, Robert; Burgos, Jose Luis; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Cerecer, Paris; Moser, Kathleen; Volker, Maria Luisa; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2010-05-01

    Because there is little routine tuberculosis (TB) screening in Mexico, the prevalence of latent TB infection (LTBI) is unknown. In the context of an increasing HIV epidemic in Tijuana, Mexico, understanding prevalence of LTBI to anticipate emergence of increased LTBI reactivation is critical. Therefore, we recruited injection drug users, noninjection drug users, female sex workers, and homeless persons for a study involving risk assessment, rapid HIV testing, and TB screening. Of 503 participants, the overall prevalences of TB infection, HIV infection, and TB/HIV co-infection were 57%, 4.2%, and 2.2%, respectively; no significant differences by risk group (p>0.05) were observed. Two participants had TB (prevalence 398/100,000). Incarceration in Mexico (odds ratio [OR] 2.28), age (OR 1.03 per year), and years lived in Tijuana (OR 1.02 per year) were independently associated with TB infection (p<0.05). Frequent LTBI in marginalized persons may lead to increases in TB as HIV spreads.

  12. Nicotine applied by transdermal patch induced HSV-1 reactivation and ocular shedding in latently infected rabbits.

    PubMed

    Myles, M E; Alack, C; Manino, P M; Reish, E R; Higaki, S; Maruyama, K; Mallakin, A; Azcuy, A; Barker, S; Ragan, F A; Thompson, H; Hill, James M

    2003-04-01

    The identification of factors involved in herpes virus latency and reactivation is critical to a better understanding of the mechanisms essential to viral neuroinvasiveness and neurovirulence. Recurrent episodes of ocular herpes infections cause irreversible corneal scarring and are the primary cause of loss of vision due to an infectious agent in industrialized countries. In this study, we examined the ability of nicotine, a compound known to be involved in stress-associated immunomodulation and recognized as one of the most frequently used addictive agents, to induce ocular shedding in rabbits latently infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) strain McKrae. New Zealand white rabbits latently infected with HSV-1 at 3-4 weeks post-inoculation were randomly divided into two groups. The corneas of all rabbits were free of lesions as verified by slit lamp biomicroscopy. One group received nicotine by transdermal patch (21 mg/day) for 20 days and the other group served as the control. Reactivation data were obtained by detection of virus in tear film collected by ocular swabbing performed concurrently with the administration of nicotine. Compilation of data from three separate experiments demonstrated that 16.5% (258/1560) of the swabs taken from rabbits treated with nicotine were positive for virus, compared with 8.3% (53/639) of swabs taken from controls. Rabbits receiving nicotine exhibited a significantly (P < 0.0001) higher rate of ocular shedding than controls. The concentration of nicotine in the serum was determined at various times (0-24 hrs) after new patch replacement. Peak (average) serum level of nicotine was obtained 8 hours after patch replacement and exhibited a broad range of values (0.233 microg/mL-6.21 microg/mL). These results suggest that an initial systemic exposure to nicotine significantly increases HSV-1 reactivation. Further studies are needed to reveal any effects of nicotine dependency and nicotine withdrawal on herpesvirus

  13. Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1) and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Promote Survival of Latently Infected Sensory Neurons, in Part by Inhibiting Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Clinton

    2013-01-01

    α-Herpesvirinae subfamily members, including herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1), initiate infection in mucosal surfaces. BHV-1 and HSV-1 enter sensory neurons by cell-cell spread where a burst of viral gene expression occurs. When compared to non-neuronal cells, viral gene expression is quickly extinguished in sensory neurons resulting in neuronal survival and latency. The HSV-1 latency associated transcript (LAT), which is abundantly expressed in latently infected neurons, inhibits apoptosis, viral transcription, and productive infection, and directly or indirectly enhances reactivation from latency in small animal models. Three anti-apoptosis genes can be substituted for LAT, which will restore wild type levels of reactivation from latency to a LAT null mutant virus. Two small non-coding RNAs encoded by LAT possess anti-apoptosis functions in transfected cells. The BHV-1 latency related RNA (LR-RNA), like LAT, is abundantly expressed during latency. The LR-RNA encodes a protein (ORF2) and two microRNAs that are expressed in certain latently infected neurons. Wild-type expression of LR gene products is required for stress-induced reactivation from latency in cattle. ORF2 has anti-apoptosis functions and interacts with certain cellular transcription factors that stimulate viral transcription and productive infection. ORF2 is predicted to promote survival of infected neurons by inhibiting apoptosis and sequestering cellular transcription factors which stimulate productive infection. In addition, the LR encoded microRNAs inhibit viral transcription and apoptosis. In summary, the ability of BHV-1 and HSV-1 to interfere with apoptosis and productive infection in sensory neurons is crucial for the life-long latency-reactivation cycle in their respective hosts. PMID:25278776

  14. Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1) and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Promote Survival of Latently Infected Sensory Neurons, in Part by Inhibiting Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Clinton

    2013-01-01

    α-Herpesvirinae subfamily members, including herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1), initiate infection in mucosal surfaces. BHV-1 and HSV-1 enter sensory neurons by cell-cell spread where a burst of viral gene expression occurs. When compared to non-neuronal cells, viral gene expression is quickly extinguished in sensory neurons resulting in neuronal survival and latency. The HSV-1 latency associated transcript (LAT), which is abundantly expressed in latently infected neurons, inhibits apoptosis, viral transcription, and productive infection, and directly or indirectly enhances reactivation from latency in small animal models. Three anti-apoptosis genes can be substituted for LAT, which will restore wild type levels of reactivation from latency to a LAT null mutant virus. Two small non-coding RNAs encoded by LAT possess anti-apoptosis functions in transfected cells. The BHV-1 latency related RNA (LR-RNA), like LAT, is abundantly expressed during latency. The LR-RNA encodes a protein (ORF2) and two microRNAs that are expressed in certain latently infected neurons. Wild-type expression of LR gene products is required for stress-induced reactivation from latency in cattle. ORF2 has anti-apoptosis functions and interacts with certain cellular transcription factors that stimulate viral transcription and productive infection. ORF2 is predicted to promote survival of infected neurons by inhibiting apoptosis and sequestering cellular transcription factors which stimulate productive infection. In addition, the LR encoded microRNAs inhibit viral transcription and apoptosis. In summary, the ability of BHV-1 and HSV-1 to interfere with apoptosis and productive infection in sensory neurons is crucial for the life-long latency-reactivation cycle in their respective hosts.

  15. β-Catenin, a Transcription Factor Activated by Canonical Wnt Signaling, Is Expressed in Sensory Neurons of Calves Latently Infected with Bovine Herpesvirus 1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yilin; Hancock, Morgan; Workman, Aspen; Doster, Alan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Like many Alphaherpesvirinae subfamily members, bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) expresses an abundant transcript in latently infected sensory neurons, the latency-related (LR)-RNA. LR-RNA encodes a protein (ORF2) that inhibits apoptosis, interacts with Notch family members, interferes with Notch-mediated transcription, and stimulates neurite formation in cells expressing Notch. An LR mutant virus containing stop codons at the amino terminus of ORF2 does not reactivate from latency or replicate efficiently in certain tissues, indicating that LR gene products are important. In this study, β-catenin, a transcription factor activated by the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, was frequently detected in ORF2-positive trigeminal ganglionic neurons of latently infected, but not mock-infected, calves. Conversely, the lytic cycle regulatory protein (BoHV-1 infected cell protein 0, or bICP0) was not frequently detected in β-catenin-positive neurons in latently infected calves. During dexamethasone-induced reactivation from latency, mRNA expression levels of two Wnt antagonists, Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) and secreted Frizzled-related protein 2 (SFRP2), were induced in bovine trigeminal ganglia (TG), which correlated with reduced β-catenin protein expression in TG neurons 6 h after dexamethasone treatment. ORF2 and a coactivator of β-catenin, mastermind-like protein 1 (MAML1), stabilized β-catenin protein levels and stimulated β-catenin-dependent transcription in mouse neuroblastoma cells more effectively than MAML1 or ORF2 alone. Neuroblastoma cells expressing ORF2, MAML1, and β-catenin were highly resistant to cell death following serum withdrawal, whereas most cells transfected with only one of these genes died. The Wnt signaling pathway interferes with neurodegeneration but promotes neuronal differentiation, suggesting that stabilization of β-catenin expression by ORF2 promotes neuronal survival and differentiation. IMPORTANCE Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) is an

  16. [Screening contacts for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) using an interferon test in Paris in 2009].

    PubMed

    Fournier, A; Antoun, F; Collignon, A; Muller, G; Rouvier, J; Ayache, B; Guesnon, M-S; Larnaudie, S

    2012-01-01

    There are two reasons for screening contacts: one is to identify cases of secondary tuberculosis disease (TB) and the other is to identify new cases of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). The tuberculin skin test (TST) and the interferon-gamma-release assay (IGRA) have their limitations when used for the detection of LTBI. They neither allow a definite diagnosis of LTBI nor provide information as to the date of onset. The present study was observational, multi-centre (four centers) and retrospective. Six hundred and one contacts were included. The results of the QFT test showed 88 positive (15 %). Among the 144 index cases, all presented with pulmonary disease and 89 cases were sputum positive. In our series, 101 contacts belonged to the family circle. The four factors that had a significant positive impact on the result of the QFT test were: increasing age, the region of birth of the contact (high incidence areas), both of which may indicate old infection, while contact within the family and sputum positivity of the index case probably indicate recent infection. Only sputum positivity influenced the decision to treat the LTBI. We propose a tool aimed at facilitating the decision making process in QFT positive cases. Estimation of the duration of LTBI should help the physician to decide on the need for preventative treatment as well as a search for factors that increase the risk of progression to TB disease.

  17. Influence of Herpes Simplex Virus Latency-Associated Transcript (LAT) on the Distribution of Latently Infected Neurons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-20

    Establishment of Latency Because HSV-2 is uniformly lethal in the mouse ocular model, mice are typically treated with acyclovir or !-globulin when...comparing HSV-2 to HSV-1 in this model. Treatment with acyclovir during acute infection shifts the distribution of HSV-1 latently infected neurons from...68% A5+/2% KH10+ to 25% A5+/12% KH10+ (112). Acyclovir is a guanosine derivative that terminates replication of the virus by incorporation of its

  18. The multifactorial aetiology of fracture nonunion and the importance of searching for latent infection

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, J.; Hopper, G.; Keenan, G.; Simpson, A. H. R. W.

    2016-01-01

    and the importance of searching for latent infection. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:512–519. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.510.BJR-2016-0138. PMID:27784669

  19. Infection Cycle of Artichoke Italian Latent Virus in Tobacco Plants: Meristem Invasion and Recovery from Disease Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Santovito, Elisa; Mascia, Tiziana; Siddiqui, Shahid A.; Minutillo, Serena Anna; Valkonen, Jari P. T.; Gallitelli, Donato

    2014-01-01

    Nepoviral infections induce recovery in fully expanded leaves but persist in shoot apical meristem (SAM) by a largely unknown mechanism. The dynamics of infection of a grapevine isolate of Artichoke Italian latent virus (AILV-V, genus Nepovirus) in tobacco plants, including colonization of SAM, symptom induction and subsequent recovery of mature leaves from symptoms, were characterized. AILV-V moved from the inoculated leaves systemically and invaded SAM in 7 days post-inoculation (dpi), remaining detectable in SAM at least up to 40 dpi. The new top leaves recovered from viral symptoms earliest at 21 dpi. Accumulation of viral RNA to a threshold level was required to trigger the overexpression of RDR6 and DCL4. Consequently, accumulation of viral RNA decreased in the systemically infected leaves, reaching the lowest concentration in the 3rd and 4th leaves at 23 dpi, which was concomitant with recovery of the younger, upper leaves from disease symptoms. No evidence of virus replication was found in the recovered leaves, but they contained infectious virus particles and were protected against re-inoculation with AILV-V. In this study we also showed that AILV-V did not suppress initiation or maintenance of RNA silencing in transgenic plants, but was able to interfere with the cell-to-cell movement of the RNA silencing signal. Our results suggest that AILV-V entrance in SAM and activation of RNA silencing may be distinct processes since the latter is triggered in fully expanded leaves by the accumulation of viral RNA above a threshold level rather than by virus entrance in SAM. PMID:24911029

  20. Characterization of Prunus-infecting apricot latent virus-like Foveaviruses: evolutionary and taxonomic implications.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Fater; Marais, Armelle; Faure, Chantal; Barone, Maria; Gentit, Pascal; Candresse, Thierry

    2011-02-01

    The complete genomic sequences of four Prunus-infecting Apricot latent virus (ApLV) like isolates were determined and used to analyze the taxonomic position and variability of these viruses. The results indicate that all isolates show a typical Foveavirus genetic organization. Despite an average 23% nucleotide divergence, they show strong colinearity with only three regions of significant indel variability, in the internal and 3' non-coding regions and variable N-terminal half of the coat protein (CP). Sequence comparisons using the polymerase (Pol) and CP genes provide a conflicting taxonomic picture, with divergence level in the Pol and CP genes suggesting the existence of a single or of two species, respectively. However, a range of considerations argue that all four isolates should likely be considered as belonging to the ApLV species. ApLV is closely related to Apple stem pitting virus and could be considered a sister species to it, with ASPV being specialized to infect members of the Maloideae family and ApLV members of the Prunoideae. Analysis of selection pressures affecting the five open reading frames of ApLV and ASPV identified two regions under strong purifying selection, that coding for the conserved C-terminal half of the CP and the gene coding for the first protein of the triple gene block (TGBp1).

  1. Prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection among tuberculosis laboratory workers in Iran

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The risk of transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from patients to health care workers (HCWs) is a neglected problem in many countries, including Iran. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI) among TB laboratory staff in Iran, and to elucidate the risk factors associated with LTBI. METHODS All TB laboratory staff (689 individuals) employed in the TB laboratories of 50 Iranian universities of medical sciences and a random sample consisting of 317 low-risk HCWs were included in this cross-sectional study. Participants with tuberculin skin test indurations of 10 mm or more were considered to have an LTBI. RESULTS The prevalence of LTBI among TB laboratory staff and low-risk HCWs was 24.83% (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.31 to 27.74%) and 14.82% (95% CI, 11.31 to 19.20%), respectively. No active TB cases were found in either group. After adjusting for potential confounders, TB laboratory staff were more likely to have an LTBI than low-risk HCWs (prevalence odds ratio, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.35 to 3.17). CONCLUSIONS This study showed that LTBI are an occupational health problem among TB laboratory staff in Iran. This study reinforces the need to design and implement simple, effective, and affordable TB infection control programs in TB laboratories in Iran. PMID:28092930

  2. Management of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: WHO guidelines for low tuberculosis burden countries.

    PubMed

    Getahun, Haileyesus; Matteelli, Alberto; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Aziz, Mohamed Abdel; Baddeley, Annabel; Barreira, Draurio; Den Boon, Saskia; Borroto Gutierrez, Susana Marta; Bruchfeld, Judith; Burhan, Erlina; Cavalcante, Solange; Cedillos, Rolando; Chaisson, Richard; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Chesire, Lucy; Corbett, Elizabeth; Dara, Masoud; Denholm, Justin; de Vries, Gerard; Falzon, Dennis; Ford, Nathan; Gale-Rowe, Margaret; Gilpin, Chris; Girardi, Enrico; Go, Un-Yeong; Govindasamy, Darshini; D Grant, Alison; Grzemska, Malgorzata; Harris, Ross; Horsburgh, C Robert; Ismayilov, Asker; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Kik, Sandra; Kranzer, Katharina; Lienhardt, Christian; LoBue, Philip; Lönnroth, Knut; Marks, Guy; Menzies, Dick; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Mosca, Davide; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Mwinga, Alwyn; Nelson, Lisa; Nishikiori, Nobuyuki; Oordt-Speets, Anouk; Rangaka, Molebogeng Xheedha; Reis, Andreas; Rotz, Lisa; Sandgren, Andreas; Sañé Schepisi, Monica; Schünemann, Holger J; Sharma, Surender Kumar; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Stagg, Helen R; Sterling, Timothy R; Tayeb, Tamara; Uplekar, Mukund; van der Werf, Marieke J; Vandevelde, Wim; van Kessel, Femke; van't Hoog, Anna; Varma, Jay K; Vezhnina, Natalia; Voniatis, Constantia; Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten, Marije; Weil, Diana; Weyer, Karin; Wilkinson, Robert John; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Zellweger, Jean Pierre; Raviglione, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is characterised by the presence of immune responses to previously acquired Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection without clinical evidence of active tuberculosis (TB). Here we report evidence-based guidelines from the World Health Organization for a public health approach to the management of LTBI in high risk individuals in countries with high or middle upper income and TB incidence of <100 per 100 000 per year. The guidelines strongly recommend systematic testing and treatment of LTBI in people living with HIV, adult and child contacts of pulmonary TB cases, patients initiating anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment, patients receiving dialysis, patients preparing for organ or haematological transplantation, and patients with silicosis. In prisoners, healthcare workers, immigrants from high TB burden countries, homeless persons and illicit drug users, systematic testing and treatment of LTBI is conditionally recommended, according to TB epidemiology and resource availability. Either commercial interferon-gamma release assays or Mantoux tuberculin skin testing could be used to test for LTBI. Chest radiography should be performed before LTBI treatment to rule out active TB disease. Recommended treatment regimens for LTBI include: 6 or 9 month isoniazid; 12 week rifapentine plus isoniazid; 3-4 month isoniazid plus rifampicin; or 3-4 month rifampicin alone.

  3. Management of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: WHO guidelines for low tuberculosis burden countries

    PubMed Central

    Matteelli, Alberto; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Aziz, Mohamed Abdel; Baddeley, Annabel; Barreira, Draurio; Den Boon, Saskia; Borroto Gutierrez, Susana Marta; Bruchfeld, Judith; Burhan, Erlina; Cavalcante, Solange; Cedillos, Rolando; Chaisson, Richard; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Chesire, Lucy; Corbett, Elizabeth; Dara, Masoud; Denholm, Justin; de Vries, Gerard; Falzon, Dennis; Ford, Nathan; Gale-Rowe, Margaret; Gilpin, Chris; Girardi, Enrico; Go, Un-Yeong; Govindasamy, Darshini; D. Grant, Alison; Grzemska, Malgorzata; Harris, Ross; Horsburgh Jr, C. Robert; Ismayilov, Asker; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Kik, Sandra; Kranzer, Katharina; Lienhardt, Christian; LoBue, Philip; Lönnroth, Knut; Marks, Guy; Menzies, Dick; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Mosca, Davide; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Mwinga, Alwyn; Nelson, Lisa; Nishikiori, Nobuyuki; Oordt-Speets, Anouk; Rangaka, Molebogeng Xheedha; Reis, Andreas; Rotz, Lisa; Sandgren, Andreas; Sañé Schepisi, Monica; Schünemann, Holger J.; Sharma, Surender Kumar; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Stagg, Helen R.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Tayeb, Tamara; Uplekar, Mukund; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Vandevelde, Wim; van Kessel, Femke; van't Hoog, Anna; Varma, Jay K.; Vezhnina, Natalia; Voniatis, Constantia; Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten, Marije; Weil, Diana; Weyer, Karin; Wilkinson, Robert John; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Zellweger, Jean Pierre; Raviglione, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is characterised by the presence of immune responses to previously acquired Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection without clinical evidence of active tuberculosis (TB). Here we report evidence-based guidelines from the World Health Organization for a public health approach to the management of LTBI in high risk individuals in countries with high or middle upper income and TB incidence of <100 per 100 000 per year. The guidelines strongly recommend systematic testing and treatment of LTBI in people living with HIV, adult and child contacts of pulmonary TB cases, patients initiating anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment, patients receiving dialysis, patients preparing for organ or haematological transplantation, and patients with silicosis. In prisoners, healthcare workers, immigrants from high TB burden countries, homeless persons and illicit drug users, systematic testing and treatment of LTBI is conditionally recommended, according to TB epidemiology and resource availability. Either commercial interferon-gamma release assays or Mantoux tuberculin skin testing could be used to test for LTBI. Chest radiography should be performed before LTBI treatment to rule out active TB disease. Recommended treatment regimens for LTBI include: 6 or 9 month isoniazid; 12 week rifapentine plus isoniazid; 3–4 month isoniazid plus rifampicin; or 3–4 month rifampicin alone. PMID:26405286

  4. A model of latent adenovirus 5 infection in the guinea pig (Cavia porcellus).

    PubMed

    Vitalis, T Z; Keicho, N; Itabashi, S; Hayashi, S; Hogg, J C

    1996-03-01

    A model of adenovirus 5 (Ad5) infection was developed in guinea pigs to begin to study its role in the pathogenesis of peripheral lung inflammation. Forty animals were inoculated intranasally with 10(7.0) pfu of Ad5/animal, and 15 animals inoculated with sterile culture media served as controls. Viral titres were 10(4.4), 10(6.1), 10(5.2), and 10(2.9) pfu/animal, on days 1, 3, 4, and 7 after infection, respectively. In situ hybridization to viral DNA and immunocytochemistry for Ad5 E1A protein localized the virus to airway and alveolar epithelial cells. Histologic examination showed an extensive inflammatory cell infiltration around the airways, with epithelial necrosis and an alveolar exudate that caused localized alveolar collapse in the infected areas. Immunocytochemistry identified the cells in the infiltrate as cytotoxic T cells. Although all animals 20 and 47 days after infection had seroconverted to Ad5, virus was not detected in these groups either by viral plaque assay or in situ hybridization. Ad5 E1A DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in five of six animals 20 days after infection and in five of five animals 47 days after infection. In these same animals, E1A protein was detected 20 days after infection in two and 47 days after infection in one while persistent bronchiolitis was observed in four and three animals 20 and 47 days after infection, respectively. These results demonstrate that the guinea pig provides a useful model to study the role of Ad5 infection in chronic airway inflammation.

  5. HIV-1 Vpr Protein Induces Proteasomal Degradation of Chromatin-associated Class I HDACs to Overcome Latent Infection of Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Romani, Bizhan; Baygloo, Nima Shaykh; Hamidi-Fard, Mojtaba; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Allahbakhshi, Elham

    2016-02-05

    Mechanisms underlying HIV-1 latency remain among the most crucial questions that need to be answered to adopt strategies for purging the latent viral reservoirs. Here we show that HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr induces depletion of class I HDACs, including HDAC1, 2, 3, and 8, to overcome latency in macrophages. We found that Vpr binds and depletes chromatin-associated class I HDACs through a VprBP-dependent mechanism, with HDAC3 as the most affected class I HDAC. De novo expression of Vpr in infected macrophages induced depletion of HDAC1 and 3 on the HIV-1 LTR that was associated with hyperacetylation of histones on the HIV-1 LTR. As a result of hyperacetylation of histones on HIV-1 promotor, the virus established an active promotor and this contributed to the acute infection of macrophages. Collectively, HIV-1 Vpr down-regulates class I HDACs on chromatin to counteract latent infections of macrophages.

  6. Latent tuberculosis infection in a Malaysian prison: implications for a comprehensive integrated control program in prisons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prisons continue to fuel tuberculosis (TB) epidemics particularly in settings where access to TB screening and prevention services is limited. Malaysia is a middle-income country with a relatively high incarceration rate of 138 per 100,000 population. Despite national TB incidence rate remaining unchanged over the past ten years, data about TB in prisons and its contribution to the overall national rates does not exist. This survey was conducted to address the prevalence of latent TB infection (LTBI) in Malaysia’s largest prison. Methods From July to December 2010, all HIV-infected and a comparative group of HIV-uninfected prisoners housed separately in Kajang prison were asked to participate in the survey after explaining the study protocol. Subjects providing informed consent were interviewed using a structured questionnaire followed by the placement of tuberculin skin test (TST) with 2 TU of PPD RT-23 to subjects not being treated for active TB. TST was read after 48-72 hours and indurations of ≥ 5 mm and ≥ 10 mm were considered positive among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected subjects, respectively. Additionally, HIV-infected inmates underwent phlebotomy for CD4 lymphocyte count assessment. A logistic regression model was explored to determine factors associated with TST positivity. Results Overall, 286 subjects (138 HIV-infected and 148 HIV-uninfected) had complete data and TST results. The majority were men (95.1%), less than 40 years old (median age 36.0, SD 7.87), and Malaysians (93.3%). Most (82.5%) had been previously incarcerated and more than half (53.1%) reported sharing needles just prior to their incarceration. TST was positive in 88.8% (84.7% among HIV-infected and 92.5% among HIV-uninfected subjects) and was independently associated with being HIV-uninfected (AOR = 2.97, p = 0.01) and with frequent previous incarcerations (AOR = 1.22 for every one previous incarceration, p = 0.01) after adjusting for other

  7. In-depth sequencing of the siRNAs associated with peach latent mosaic viroid infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It has been observed that following viroid infection, there is an accumulation of viroid-derived siRNAs in infected plants. Some experimental results suggest that these small RNAs may be produced by the plant defense system to protect it from infection, indicating that viroids can elicit the RNA-silencing pathways. The objective of this study is to identify in the peach latent mosaic viroid (PLMVd), a model RNA genome, the regions that are most susceptible to RNA interference machinery. Results The RNA isolated from an infected tree have been used to sequence in parallel viroid species and small non-coding RNA species. Specifically, PLMVd RNAs were amplified, cloned and sequenced according to a conventional approach, while small non-coding RNAs were determined by high-throughput sequencing. The first led to the typing of 18 novel PLMVd variants. The second provided a library of small RNAs including 880 000 sequences corresponding to PLMVd-derived siRNAs, which makes up 11.2% of the sequences of the infected library. These siRNAs contain mainly 21-22 nucleotide RNAs and are equivalently distributed between the plus and the minus polarities of the viroid. They cover the complete viroid genome, although the amount varies depending on the regions. These regions do not necessarily correlate with the double-stranded requirement to be a substrate for Dicer-like enzymes. We noted that some sequences encompass the hammerhead self-cleavage site, indicating that the circular conformers could be processed by the RNA-silencing machinery. Finally, a bias in the relative abundance of the nature of the 5' nucleotides was observed (A, U >> G, C). Conclusions The approach used provided us a quantitative representation of the PLMVd-derived siRNAs retrieved from infected peach trees. These siRNAs account for a relatively large proportion of the small non-coding RNAs. Surprisingly, the siRNAs from some regions of the PLMVd genome appear over-represented, although these

  8. High prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection among injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Garfein, R. S.; Lozada, R.; Liu, L.; Laniado-Laborin, R.; Rodwell, T. C.; Deiss, R.; Alvelais, J.; Catanzaro, A.; Chiles, P. G.; Strathdee, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary BACKGROUND We studied prevalence and correlates of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) among injection drug users (IDUs) in Tijuana, Mexico, where tuberculosis (TB) is endemic. METHODS IDUs aged ⩾18 years were recruited via respondent-driven sampling (RDS) and underwent standardized interviews, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody testing and LTBI screening using QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube, a whole-blood interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA). LTBI prevalence was estimated and correlates were identified using RDS-weighted logistic regression. RESULTS Of 1020 IDUs, 681 (67%) tested IGRA-positive and 44 (4%) tested HIV-positive. Mean age was 37 years, 88% were male and 98% were Mexican-born. IGRA positivity was associated with recruitment nearest the US border (aOR 1.64, 95%CI 1.09–2.48), increasing years of injection (aOR 1.20/5 years, 95%CI 1.07–1.34), and years lived in Tijuana (aOR 1.10/5 years, 95%CI 1.03–1.18). Speaking some English (aOR 0.38, 95%CI 0.25–0.57) and injecting most often at home in the past 6 months (aOR 0.68, 95%CI 0.45–0.99) were inversely associated with IGRA positivity. DISCUSSION Increased LTBI prevalence among IDUs in Tijuana appears to be associated with greater drug involvement. Given the high risk for HIV infection among Tijuana’s IDUs, interventions are urgently needed to prevent HIV infection and treat LTBI among IDUs before these epidemics collide. PMID:19383197

  9. Epstein-Barr virus latent genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Myung-Soo; Kieff, Elliott

    2015-01-23

    Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection has a substantial role in causing many human disorders. The persistence of these viral genomes in all malignant cells, yet with the expression of limited latent genes, is consistent with the notion that EBV latent genes are important for malignant cell growth. While the EBV-encoded nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and latent membrane protein-2A (LMP-2A) are critical, the EBNA-leader proteins, EBNA-2, EBNA-3A, EBNA-3C and LMP-1, are individually essential for in vitro transformation of primary B cells to lymphoblastoid cell lines. EBV-encoded RNAs and EBNA-3Bs are dispensable. In this review, the roles of EBV latent genes are summarized.

  10. Nerve growth factor antibody stimulates reactivation of ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 in latently infected rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hill, J M; Garza, H H; Helmy, M F; Cook, S D; Osborne, P A; Johnson, E M; Thompson, H W; Green, L C; O'Callaghan, R J; Gebhardt, B M

    1997-06-01

    Anti-nerve growth factor (anti-NGF) antibody has been shown to induce reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. We found that systemically administered anti-NGF induces ocular shedding of HSV-1 in vivo in rabbits harboring latent virus. Rabbits in which HSV-1 latency had been established were given intravenous injections of goat anti-NGF serum daily for 10 days beginning 42 days after primary viral infection. Tears were assayed for virus for 12 days beginning on the day of the first injection. All eight rabbits given high titer anti-NGF had infectious virus in their tears at least once during the 12-day period. Fifteen of 16 eyes were positive and the average duration of viral shedding for these eyes was 4.0 days. Latently infected rabbits receiving daily injections of nonimmune goat serum or saline for 10 consecutive days were controls. Only six of the 16 (38%) eyes from rabbits receiving nonimmune goat serum shed virus. Only one of 12 eyes from untreated rabbits shed virus. Sera from control rabbits had no detectable anti-NGF activity; titers in anti-NGF-treated rabbits ranged between 1:1000 and 1:10,000. NGF deprivation may act as a neuronal stressor and may share a common second messenger pathway with heat- or cold-stress induced reactivation of latent HSV-1.

  11. Eligibility for and outcome of treatment of latent tuberculosis infection in a cohort of HIV-infected people in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of treatment for latent tuberculosis infection (TLTBI) in persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, but few studies have investigated the operational aspects of implementing TLTBI in the co-infected population.The study objectives were to describe eligibility for TLTBI as well as treatment prescription, initiation and completion in an HIV-infected Spanish cohort and to investigate factors associated with treatment completion. Methods Subjects were prospectively identified between 2000 and 2003 at ten HIV hospital-based clinics in Spain. Data were obtained from clinical records. Associations were measured using the odds ratio (OR) and its 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Results A total of 1242 subjects were recruited and 846 (68.1%) were evaluated for TLTBI. Of these, 181 (21.4%) were eligible for TLTBI either because they were tuberculin skin test (TST) positive (121) or because their TST was negative/unknown but they were known contacts of a TB case or had impaired immunity (60). Of the patients eligible for TLTBI, 122 (67.4%) initiated TLTBI: 99 (81.1%) were treated with isoniazid for 6, 9 or 12 months; and 23 (18.9%) with short-course regimens including rifampin plus isoniazid and/or pyrazinamide. In total, 70 patients (57.4%) completed treatment, 39 (32.0%) defaulted, 7 (5.7%) interrupted treatment due to adverse effects, 2 developed TB, 2 died, and 2 moved away. Treatment completion was associated with having acquired HIV infection through heterosexual sex as compared to intravenous drug use (OR:4.6; 95% CI:1.4-14.7) and with having taken rifampin and pyrazinamide for 2 months as compared to isoniazid for 9 months (OR:8.3; 95% CI:2.7-24.9). Conclusions A minority of HIV-infected patients eligible for TLTBI actually starts and completes a course of treatment. Obstacles to successful implementation of this intervention need to be addressed. PMID:20840743

  12. Knowledge and Perceptions of Latent Tuberculosis Infection among Chinese Immigrants in a Canadian Urban Centre

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Berry, Nicole S.; Taylor, Darlene; Venners, Scott A.; Cook, Victoria J.; Mayhew, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Background. Since most tuberculosis (TB) cases in immigrants to British Columbia (BC), Canada, develop from latent TB infection (LTBI), treating immigrants for LTBI can contribute to the eradication of TB. However, adherence to LTBI treatment is a challenge that is influenced by knowledge and perceptions. This research explores Chinese immigrants' knowledge and perceptions towards LTBI in Greater Vancouver. Methods. This mixed methods study included a cross-sectional patient survey at BC's Provincial TB clinics and two focus group discussions (FGDs) with Chinese immigrants. Data from FGDs were coded and analyzed in Simplified Chinese. Codes, themes, and selected quotes were then translated into English. Results. The survey identified a mean basic knowledge score: 40.0% (95% CI: 38.3%, 41.7%). FGDs confirmed that Chinese immigrants' knowledge of LTBI was low, and they confused it with TB disease to the extent of experiencing LTBI associated stigma. Participants also expressed difficulties navigating the health system which impeded testing and treatment of LTBI. Online videos were the preferred format for receiving health information. Conclusion. We identified striking gaps in knowledge surrounding an LTBI diagnosis. Concerns of stigma may influence acceptance and adherence of LTBI treatment in Chinese immigrants. Integrating these findings into routine health care is recommended. PMID:26690263

  13. Resistance, health, and latent tuberculosis infection: Mexican immigrants at the U.S.-Mexico border.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Marylyn Morris; Boyle, Joyceen

    2007-01-01

    Mexican immigrants living in the U.S.-Mexico border region are confronted with different national explanations about latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and preventive treatment. The purpose of this study was to explore how a group of Mexican immigrant women (N = 8) at risk of LTBI treatment failure interpreted and ultimately resisted LTBI preventive treatment. A critical ethnographic methodology, grounded in asymmetrical power relations that are historically embedded within the U.S.-Mexico border culture, was used to examine the encounters between the participants and the health care provider. The study findings are discussed from the perspective of women who experienced oppression and resistance in the U.S.-Mexico border region, providing an account of how Mexican immigrant women become entangled in U.S.-Mexico TB health policies and through resistance manage to assert control over health care choices. In the context of the U.S.-Mexico border region, health care professionals must be skilled at minimizing asymmetrical power relations and use methods that elicit immigrant voices in reconciling differences in health beliefs and practices.

  14. Elevated Circulating Concentrations of Interferon-Gamma in Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Huaman, Moises A.; Deepe, George S.; Fichtenbaum, Carl J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) has been associated with increased immune activation. We assessed circulating concentrations of interferon-gamma in persons with LTBI. Methods We used the 2011–2012 National Health Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) to identify adults with and without LTBI by QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT) results. Non-LTBI persons were 1:1 age-, gender-, and race-matched to LTBI persons using propensity scores. We compared the plasma concentrations of interferon-gamma measured from the unstimulated, negative control QFT tube between LTBI and non-LTBI persons. We used Mann-Whitney tests and ordered logistic regressions for comparisons. Results There were 430 LTBI and 430 non-LTBI matched persons included in the analysis. LTBI was associated with higher circulating concentrations of interferon-gamma (median, 3 pg/mL; IQR, 2 – 5) compared to non-LTBI (median, 2.5 pg/mL; IQR, 1.5 – 3.5); P < 0.001. LTBI remained associated with higher interferon-gamma concentrations after adjusting for age, gender, race, diabetes, hypertension, tobacco use, HIV status, body mass index, lipid profile, and lymphocyte count (odds ratio, 1.79, 95% CI, 1.26 – 2.53). Results remained similar when tuberculin skin testing defined LTBI. Conclusions LTBI was associated with increased circulating interferon-gamma concentrations. Future studies are needed to further characterize immune activation in LTBI and its potential long-term consequences. PMID:27853753

  15. Preventive therapy for latent tuberculosis infection-the promise and the challenges.

    PubMed

    Fox, G J; Dobler, C C; Marais, B J; Denholm, J T

    2017-03-01

    Around one third of the world's population may harbour latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), an asymptomatic immunological state that confers a heightened risk of subsequently developing tuberculosis (TB). Effectively treating LTBI will be essential if the End TB Strategy is to be realized. This review evaluates the evidence in relation to the effectiveness of preventive antibiotic therapy to treat LTBI due to both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant bacteria. Current national and international preventive therapy guidelines are summarized, as well as ongoing randomized trials evaluating regimens to prevent drug-resistant TB. Populations that may benefit most from screening and treatment for LTBI include close contacts of patients with TB (particularly children under 5 years of age) and individuals with substantial immunological impairment. The risks and benefits of treatment must be carefully balanced for each individual. Electronic decision support tools offer one way in which clinicians can help patients to make informed decisions. Modelling studies indicate that the expanded use of preventive therapy will be essential to achieving substantial reductions in the global TB burden. However, the widespread scale-up of screening and treatment will require careful consideration of cost-effectiveness, while ensuring the drivers of ongoing disease transmission are also addressed.

  16. Identifying components for programmatic latent tuberculosis infection control in the European Union

    PubMed Central

    Sandgren, Andreas; Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten, Jannigje M; Oordt-Speets, Anouk M; van Kessel, Gerarda B; de Vlas, Sake J; van der Werf, Marieke J

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are the reservoir of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a population and as long as this reservoir exists, elimination of tuberculosis (TB) will not be feasible. In 2013, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) started an assessment of benefits and risks of introducing programmatic LTBI control, with the aim of providing guidance on how to incorporate LTBI control into national TB strategies in European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA) Member States and candidate countries. In a first step, experts from the Member States, candidate countries, and international and national organisations were consulted on the components of programmatic LTBI control that should be considered and evaluated in literature reviews, mathematical models and cost-effectiveness studies. This was done through a questionnaire and two interactive discussion rounds. The main components identified were identification and targeting of risk groups, determinants of LTBI and progression to active TB, optimal diagnostic tests for LTBI, effective preventive treatment regimens, and to explore the potential for combining LTBI control with other health programmes. Political commitment, a solid healthcare infrastructure, and favourable economic situation in specific countries were identified as essential to facilitate the implementation of programmatic LTBI control. PMID:27589214

  17. Identifying components for programmatic latent tuberculosis infection control in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Sandgren, Andreas; Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten, Jannigje M; Oordt-Speets, Anouk M; van Kessel, Gerarda B; de Vlas, Sake J; van der Werf, Marieke J

    2016-08-25

    Individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are the reservoir of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a population and as long as this reservoir exists, elimination of tuberculosis (TB) will not be feasible. In 2013, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) started an assessment of benefits and risks of introducing programmatic LTBI control, with the aim of providing guidance on how to incorporate LTBI control into national TB strategies in European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA) Member States and candidate countries. In a first step, experts from the Member States, candidate countries, and international and national organisations were consulted on the components of programmatic LTBI control that should be considered and evaluated in literature reviews, mathematical models and cost-effectiveness studies. This was done through a questionnaire and two interactive discussion rounds. The main components identified were identification and targeting of risk groups, determinants of LTBI and progression to active TB, optimal diagnostic tests for LTBI, effective preventive treatment regimens, and to explore the potential for combining LTBI control with other health programmes. Political commitment, a solid healthcare infrastructure, and favourable economic situation in specific countries were identified as essential to facilitate the implementation of programmatic LTBI control.

  18. Short-Course Therapy with Daily Rifapentine in a Murine Model of Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianyu; Zhang, Ming; Rosenthal, Ian M.; Grosset, Jacques H.; Nuermberger, Eric L.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Regimens recommended to treat latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are 3 to 9 months long. A 2-month rifampin+pyrazinamide regimen is no longer recommended. Shorter regimens are highly desirable. Because substituting rifapentine for rifampin in the standard regimen for active tuberculosis halves the treatment duration needed to prevent relapse in mice, we hypothesized daily rifapentine-based regimens could shorten LTBI treatment to 2 months or less. Objectives: To improve an existing model of LTBI chemotherapy and evaluate the efficacy of daily rifapentine-based regimens. Methods: Mice were immunized with a more immunogenic recombinant Bacille Calmette-Guérin strain (rBCG30) and received very low-dose aerosol infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis to establish a stable lung bacterial burden below 104 CFU without drug treatment. Mice received a control (isoniazid alone, rifampin alone, rifampin+isoniazid, rifampin+pyrazinamide) or test (rifapentine alone, rifapentine+isoniazid, rifapentine+pyrazinamide, rifapentine+isoniazid+pyrazinamide) regimen for 8 weeks. Rifamycin doses were 10 mg/kg/d, analogous to the same human doses. Outcomes were biweekly lung CFU counts and relapse after 4 to 8 weeks of treatment. Measurements and Main Results: M. tuberculosis CFU counts remained stable around 3.65 log10 in immunized, untreated mice. Isoniazid or rifampin left all or most mice culture-positive at week 8. Rifampin+isoniazid cured 0 and 53% of mice and rifampin+pyrazinamide cured 47 and 100% of mice in 4 and 8 weeks, respectively. Rifapentine-based regimens were more active than rifampin+isoniazid and indistinguishable from rifampin+pyrazinamide. Conclusions: In this improved murine model of LTBI chemotherapy with very low lung burden, existing regimens were well represented. Daily rifapentine-based regimens were at least as active as rifampin+pyrazinamide, suggesting they could effectively treat LTBI in 6 to 8 weeks. PMID:19729664

  19. Relevance of latent TB infection in areas of high TB prevalence.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Surendra K; Mohanan, Sandeep; Sharma, Abhishek

    2012-09-01

    About one-third of the world population has latent TB infection (LTBI), the majority of which is distributed in 22 high-burden countries. Early diagnosis and treatment of active TB remains the top priority in resource-poor countries with high TB prevalence. Notwithstanding, because LTBI contributes significantly to the pool of active TB cases later on, its diagnosis and treatment is essential, especially in high-risk groups. The lack of a gold standard and several limitations of currently available tools, namely the tuberculin skin test and interferon-γ release assays, are major constraints for LTBI diagnosis. In areas with high TB prevalence, interferon-γ release assays have not shown superiority over the conventional tuberculin skin test and are yet to be systematically studied. Decisions regarding LTBI treatment with isoniazid preventive therapy should be made, keeping in mind the high prevalence of isoniazid resistance in these settings. Although efforts to shorten the LTBI treatment duration are encouraging, most trials have focused on adherence and toxicity. Future trials on short-duration regimens in high-burden settings should address drug efficacy issues as well. LTBI management, therefore, should comprise a targeted screening approach and individualization of LTBI treatment protocols. In addition, efforts should focus on airborne infection control measures in high-burden countries. A high prevalence of drug-resistant TB, the HIV epidemic, and delays in the diagnosis of active TB cases are other major concerns in areas of high TB prevalence. There is ample space for further research in these countries, whose outcomes may strengthen future national guidelines.

  20. Role for Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha in Murine Cytomegalovirus Transcriptional Reactivation in Latently Infected Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Christian O.; Seckert, Christof K.; Dreis, Doris; Reddehase, Matthias J.; Grzimek, Natascha K. A.

    2005-01-01

    Interstitial pneumonia is a major clinical manifestation of primary or recurrent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in immunocompromised recipients of a bone marrow transplant. In a murine model, lungs were identified as a prominent site of CMV latency and recurrence. Pulmonary latency of murine CMV is characterized by high viral genome burden and a low incidence of variegated immediate-early (IE) gene expression, reflecting a sporadic activity of the major IE promoters (MIEPs) and enhancer. The enhancer-flanking promoters MIEP1/3 and MIEP2 are switched on and off during latency in a ratio of ∼2:1. MIEP1/3 latency-associated activity generates the IE1 transcript of the ie1/3 transcription unit but not the alternative splicing product IE3 that encodes the essential transactivator of early gene expression. Splicing thus appeared to be an important checkpoint for maintenance of latency. In accordance with previous work of others, we show here that signaling by the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) activates IE1/3 transcription in vivo. As an addition to current knowledge, Poisson distribution analysis revealed an increased incidence of IE1/3 transcriptional events as well as a higher amount of transcripts per event. Notably, TNF-α promoted the splicing to IE3 transcripts, but transcription did not proceed to the M55/gB early gene. Moreover, the activated transcriptional state induced by TNF-α did not predispose latently infected mice to a higher incidence of virus recurrence after hematoablative treatment. In conclusion, TNF-α is an important inductor of IE gene transcriptional reactivation, whereas early genes downstream in the viral replicative cycle appear to be the rate-limiting checkpoint(s) for virus recurrence. PMID:15596827

  1. Interferon Gamma Release Assays for the Diagnosis of Latent TB Infection in HIV-Infected Individuals in a Low TB Burden Country

    PubMed Central

    Ní Cheallaigh, Clíona; Fitzgerald, Ian; Grace, Jacinta; Jagjit Singh, Gurmit; El-Eraki, Nahla; Gibbons, Noel; Keane, Joseph; Rogers, Thomas R.; Clarke, Susan; Bergin, Colm

    2013-01-01

    Background Interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) are used to diagnose latent tuberculosis infection. Two IGRAs are commercially available: the Quantiferon TB Gold In Tube (QFT-IT) and the T-SPOT.TB. There is debate as to which test to use in HIV+ individuals. Previous publications from high TB burden countries have raised concerns that the sensitivity of the QFT-IT assay, but not the T-SPOT.TB, may be impaired in HIV+ individuals with low CD4+ T-cell counts. We sought to compare the tests in a low TB burden setting. Methodology/Principal Findings T-SPOT.TB, QFT-IT, and tuberculin skin tests (TST) were performed in HIV infected individuals. Results were related to patient characteristics. McNemar’s test, multivariate regression and correlation analysis were carried out using SPSS (SPSS Inc). 256 HIV infected patients were enrolled in the study. The median CD4+ T-cell count was 338 cells/µL (range 1–1328). 37 (14%) patients had a CD4+ T-cell count of <100 cells/µL. 46/256 (18% ) of QFT-IT results and 28/256 (11%) of T-SPOT.TB results were positive. 6 (2%) of QFT-IT and 18 (7%) of T-SPOT.TB results were indeterminate. An additional 9 (4%) of T-SPOT.TB results were unavailable as tests were not performed due to insufficient cells or clotting of the sample. We found a statistically significant association between lower CD4+ T-cell count and negative QFT-IT results (OR 1.055, p = 0.03), and indeterminate/unavailable T-SPOT.TB results (OR 1.079, p = 0.02). Conclusions/Significance In low TB prevalence settings, the QFT-IT yields more positive and fewer indeterminate results than T-SPOT.TB. Negative results on the QFT-IT and indeterminate/unavailable results on the T-SPOT.TB were more common in individuals with low CD4+ T-cell counts. PMID:23382842

  2. Modulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in active and latent tuberculosis by coexistent Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    PubMed

    George, Parakkal Jovvian; Pavan Kumar, Nathella; Jaganathan, Jeeva; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Shen, Kui; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2015-12-01

    Helminth infections are known to induce modulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses in active and latent tuberculosis (TB). However, the role of helminth infections in modulating systemic cytokine responses in active and latent tuberculosis (LTB) is not known. To define the systemic cytokine levels in helminth-TB coinfection, we measured the circulating plasma levels of Type 1, Type 2, Type 17, other pro-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines in individuals with active TB (ATB) with or without coexistent Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss) infection by multiplex ELISA. Similarly, we also measured the same cytokine levels in individuals with LTB with or without concomitant Ss infection in a cross-sectional study. Our data reveal that individuals with ATB or LTB and coexistent Ss infection have significantly lower levels of Type 1 (IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2) and Type 17 (IL-17A and IL-17F) cytokines compared to those without Ss infection. In contrast, those with ATB and LTB with Ss infection have significantly higher levels of the regulatory cytokines (IL-10 and TGFβ), and those with LTB and Ss infection also have significantly higher levels of Type 2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13) as well. Finally, those with LTB (but not ATB) exhibit significantly lower levels of other pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFNα, IFNβ, IL-6, IL-12 and GM-CSF). Our data therefore reveal a profound effect of Ss infection on the systemic cytokine responses in ATB and LTB and indicate that coincident helminth infections might influence pathogenesis of TB infection and disease.

  3. New tools for detecting latent tuberculosis infection: evaluation of RD1-specific long-term response

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) were designed to detect latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). However, discrepancies were found between the tuberculin skin test (TST) and IGRAs results that cannot be attributed to prior Bacille Calmètte Guerin vaccinations. The aim of this study was to evaluate tools for improving LTBI diagnosis by analyzing the IFN-γ response to RD1 proteins in prolonged (long-term response) whole blood tests in those subjects resulting negative to assays such as QuantiFERON-TB Gold In tube (QFT-IT). Methods The study population included 106 healthy TST+ individuals with suspected LTBI (recent contact of smear-positive TB and homeless) consecutively enrolled. As controls, 13 healthy subjects unexposed to M. tuberculosis (TST-, QFT-IT-) and 29 subjects with cured pulmonary TB were enrolled. IFN-γ whole blood response to RD1 proteins and QFT-IT were evaluated at day 1 post-culture. A prolonged test evaluating long-term IFN-γ response (7-day) to RD1 proteins in diluted whole blood was performed. Results Among the enrolled TST+ subjects with suspected LTBI, 70/106 (66.0%) responded to QFT-IT and 64/106 (60.3%) to RD1 proteins at day 1. To evaluate whether a prolonged test could improve the detection of LTBI, we set up the test using cured TB patients (with a microbiologically diagnosed past pulmonary disease) who resulted QFT-IT-negative and healthy controls as comparator groups. Using this assay, a statistically significant difference was found between IFN-γ levels in cured TB patients compared to healthy controls (p < 0.006). Based on these data, we constructed a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and we calculated a cut-off. Based on the cut-off value, we found that among the 36 enrolled TST+ subjects with suspected LTBI not responding to QFT-IT, a long term response to RD1 proteins was detected in 11 subjects (30.6%). Conclusion These results indicate that IFN-γ long-term response to M. tuberculosis RD1

  4. EBV infection is common in gingival epithelial cells of the periodontium and worsens during chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Bugnas, Séverine; Vitale, Sébastien; Mouline, Caroline C; Khaali, Wafa; Charbit, Yves; Mahler, Patrick; Prêcheur, Isabelle; Hofman, Paul; Maryanski, Janet L; Doglio, Alain

    2013-01-01

    An amplifying role for oral epithelial cells (ECs) in Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infection has been postulated to explain oral viral shedding. However, while lytic or latent EBV infections of oro/nasopharyngeal ECs are commonly detected under pathological conditions, detection of EBV-infected ECs in healthy conditions is very rare. In this study, a simple non-surgical tissue sampling procedure was used to investigate EBV infection in the periodontal epithelium that surrounds and attaches teeth to the gingiva. Surprisingly, we observed that the gingival ECs of the periodontium (pECs) are commonly infected with EBV and may serve as an important oral reservoir of latently EBV-infected cells. We also found that the basal level of epithelial EBV-infection is significantly increased in chronic periodontitis, a common inflammatory disease that undermines the integrity of tooth-supporting tissues. Moreover, the level of EBV infection was found to correlate with disease severity. In inflamed tissues, EBV-infected pECs appear to be prone to apoptosis and to produce larger amounts of CCL20, a pivotal inflammatory chemokine that controls tissue infiltration by immune cells. Our discovery that the periodontal epithelium is a major site of latent EBV infection sheds a new light on EBV persistence in healthy carriers and on the role of this ubiquitous virus in periodontitis. Moreover, the identification of this easily accessible site of latent infection may encourage new approaches to investigate and monitor other EBV-associated disorders.

  5. Highly Multiplexed Proteomic Analysis of Quantiferon Supernatants To Identify Biomarkers of Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    De Groote, Mary Ann; Higgins, Michael; Hraha, Thomas; Wall, Kirsten; Wilson, Michael L.; Sterling, David G.; Janjic, Nebojsa; Reves, Randall

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The tests for diagnosing latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are limited by a poor predictive value for identifying people at the highest risk for progressing to active tuberculosis (TB) and have various sensitivities and specificities in different populations. Identifying a more robust signature for LTBI is important for TB prevention and elimination. A pilot study was conducted with samples from immigrants to the United States that were screened for LTBI by the three commercially approved tests, namely, the tuberculin skin test (TST), the Quantiferon-TB Gold in-tube (QFT-GIT), and the T-SPOT.TB (T-SPOT). QFT-GIT supernatants from 13 people with concordant positive results and 26 people with concordant negative results were analyzed via the highly multiplexed SOMAscan proteomic assay. The proteins in the stimulated supernatants that distinguished LTBI from controls included interleukin-2 (IL-2), monocyte chemotactic protein 2 (MCP-2), interferon gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 14 (TNFSF14, also known as LIGHT), monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG), and granzyme B (P <0.00001). In addition, antigen stimulation increased the expression of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) and activin AB in LTBI samples. In nil tubes, LIGHT was the most significant marker (P <0.0001) and was elevated in LTBI subjects. Other prominent markers in nonstimulated QFT-GIT supernatants were the complement-3 components C3b, iC3b, and C3d, which were upregulated in LTBI and markedly decreased upon stimulation. We found known and novel proteins that warrant further studies for developing improved tests for LTBI, for predicting progression to active disease, and for discriminating LTBI from active TB. PMID:27852671

  6. Latent Tuberculosis Infection Screening in Foreign-Born Populations: A Successful Mobile Clinic Outreach Model

    PubMed Central

    Zelenev, Alexei; Walton, Mary R.; Bruce, R. Douglas; Altice, Frederick L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the efficacy of a mobile medical clinic (MMC) screening program for detecting latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis. Methods. A LTBI screening program in a MMC in New Haven, Connecticut, used medical surveys to examine risk factors and tuberculin skin test (TST) screening eligibility. We assessed clinically relevant correlates of total (prevalent; n = 4650) and newly diagnosed (incident; n = 4159) LTBI from 2003 to 2011. Results. Among 8322 individuals, 4159 (55.6%) met TST screening eligibility criteria, of which 1325 (31.9%) had TST assessed. Similar to LTBI prevalence (16.8%; 779 of 4650), newly diagnosed LTBI (25.6%; 339 of 1325) was independently correlated with being foreign-born (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 8.49; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 5.54, 13.02), Hispanic (AOR = 3.12; 95% CI = 1.88, 5.20), Black (AOR = 2.16; 95% CI = 1.31, 3.55), employed (AOR = 1.61; 95% CI = 1.14, 2.28), and of increased age (AOR = 1.04; 95% CI = 1.02, 1.05). Unstable housing (AOR = 4.95; 95% CI = 3.43, 7.14) and marijuana use (AOR = 1.57; 95% CI = 1.05, 2.37) were significantly correlated with incident LTBI, and being male, heroin use, interpersonal violence, employment, not having health insurance, and not completing high school were significantly correlated with prevalent LTBI. Conclusions. Screening for TST in MMCs successfully identifies high-risk foreign-born, Hispanic, working, and uninsured populations and innovatively identifies LTBI in urban settings. PMID:24922157

  7. Cultured Vestibular Ganglion Neurons Demonstrate Latent HSV1 Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Roehm, Pamela C.; Camarena, Vladimir; Nayak, Shruti; Gardner, James B.; Wilson, Angus; Mohr, Ian; Chao, Moses V.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Vestibular neuritis is a common cause of both acute and chronic vestibular dysfunction. Multiple pathologies have been hypothesized to be the causative agent of vestibular neuritis; however, whether herpes simplex type I (HSV1) reactivation occurs within the vestibular ganglion has not been demonstrated previously by experimental evidence. We developed an in vitro system to study HSV1 infection of vestibular ganglion neurons (VGNs) using a cell culture model system. Study design basic science study. Results Lytic infection of cultured rat VGNs was observed following low viral multiplicity of infection (MOI). Inclusion of acyclovir suppressed lytic replication and allowed latency to be established. Upon removal of acyclovir, latent infection was confirmed with reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and by RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization for the latency-associated transcript (LAT). 29% cells in latently infected cultures were LAT positive. The lytic IPC27 transcript was not detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Reactivation of HSV1 occurred at a high frequency in latently infected cultures following treatment with trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deactylase inhibitor. Conclusions VGNs can be both lytically and latently infected with HSV1. Furthermore, latently infected VGNs can be induced to reactivate using TSA. This demonstrates that reactivation of latent HSV1 infection in the vestibular ganglion can occur in a cell culture model, and suggests that reactivation of HSV1 infection a plausible etiologic mechanism of vestibular neuritis. PMID:21898423

  8. A promoter of Epstein-Barr virus that can function during latent infection can be transactivated by EBNA-1, a viral protein required for viral DNA replication during latent infection.

    PubMed Central

    Sugden, B; Warren, N

    1989-01-01

    A viral promoter that functions on recombinant plasmids in cells immortalized by Epstein-Barr virus was identified and characterized. It is identical to that mapped on the viral genome by Bodescot et al. (M. Bodescot, M. Perricaudet, and P.J. Farrell, J. Virol. 61:3424-3430, 1987) which functions during the latent phase of the viral life cycle in some but not all cells to encode several latent viral gene products. Experiments with these plasmids indicated that this promoter requires the enhancer within oriP of Epstein-Barr virus in cis to function efficiently. They also indicated that it requires the EBNA-1 gene in trans to function efficiently. The EBNA-1 gene therefore positively affects both viral DNA replication (J.L. Yates, N. Warren, and B. Sugden, Nature [London] 313:812-815, 1985) and viral transcription. Images PMID:2542577

  9. Assessment of latent tuberculosis infection in Takayasu arteritis with tuberculin skin test and Quantiferon-TB Gold test.

    PubMed

    Karadag, Omer; Aksu, Kenan; Sahin, Abdurrahman; Zihni, Figen Yargucu; Sener, Burcin; Inanc, Nevsun; Kalyoncu, Umut; Aydin, Sibel Zehra; Ascioglu, Sibel; Ocakci, Pinar Talu; Bilgen, Sule Apras; Keser, Gokhan; Inal, Vedat; Direskeneli, Haner; Calguneri, Meral; Ertenli, Ihsan; Kiraz, Sedat

    2010-09-01

    A possible relationship between Takayasu arteritis (TA) and tuberculosis (TB) has been suggested. An increased frequency of tuberculin skin test (TST) was observed in TA patients. Quantiferon-TB Gold test (QFT) is a new in vitro assay measuring interferon-gamma response to M. tuberculosis antigens and helpful in diagnosing latent TB infection. The aim of this study was to investigate latent TB infection among TA patients by the use of both TST and QFT Gold test. Ninety-four (male/female: 7/87) TA patients fulfilling ACR 1990 TA criteria from three different university hospitals in Turkey and 107 control subjects without inflammatory diseases were included in the study. Data about medical history (TA and TB) were collected for both groups. TST and QFT were performed. TST values > or =5 mm for TA patients and > or =15 mm for controls was accepted as TST positivity. Even though TA group was older (40 +/- 12 vs. 32 +/- 8, P < 0.001), there was no significant difference between TA patients and controls regarding demographic characteristics. Six TA patients and one control had a history of previous TB infection (P = 0.054). Although TST positivity was higher in TA group [55 patients (62.5%) vs. 24 controls (41.4%), P = 0.008], QFT positivity was similar between two groups [21 patients (22.3%) vs. 24 controls (22.4%), P > 0.05]. QFT was negative in two of six TA patients with previous TB history. Rate of latent TB infection in TA patients measured with QFT is no more than controls. QFT seems to be a good and favorable test compared with TST in detecting LTBI in TA.

  10. Short Communication: The Broad-Spectrum Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Vorinostat and Panobinostat Activate Latent HIV in CD4+ T Cells In Part Through Phosphorylation of the T-Loop of the CDK9 Subunit of P-TEFb

    PubMed Central

    Jamaluddin, Md Saha; Hu, Pei-Wen; Jan, Yih; Siwak, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cessation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV-infected individual leads to a rebound of viral replication due to reactivation of a viral reservoir composed largely of latently infected memory CD4+ T cells. Efforts to deplete this reservoir have focused on reactivation of transcriptionally silent latent proviruses. HIV provirus transcription depends critically on the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), whose core components are cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) and cyclin T1. In resting CD4+ cells, the functional levels of P-TEFb are extremely low. Cellular activation upregulates cyclin T1 protein levels and CDK9 T-loop (T186) phosphorylation. The broad-spectrum histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) vorinostat and panobinostat have been shown to reactivate latent virus in vivo in HAART-treated individuals. In this study, we have found that vorinostat and panobinostat activate P-TEFb in resting primary CD4+ T cells through induction of CDK9 T-loop phosphorylation. In contrast, tacedinaline and romidepsin, HDAC 1 and 2 inhibitors, were unable to activate CDK9 T-loop phosphorylation. We used a CCL19 primary CD4+ T-cell model HIV latency to assess the correlation between induction of CDK9 T-loop phosphorylation and reactivation of latent HIV virus by HDACis. Vorinostat and panobinostat treatment of cells harboring latent HIV increased CDK9 T-loop phosphorylation and reactivation of latent virus, whereas tacedinaline and romidepsin failed to induce T-loop phosphorylation or reactivate latent virus. We conclude that the ability of vorinostat and panobinostat to induce latent HIV is, in part, likely due to the ability of the broad-spectrum HDACis to upregulate P-TEFb through increased CDK9 T-loop phosphorylation. PMID:26727990

  11. A viral function represses accumulation of transcripts from productive-cycle genes in mouse ganglia latently infected with herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, S H; Kramer, M F; Schaffer, P A; Coen, D M

    1997-08-01

    Latent infections of neurons by herpes simplex virus form reservoirs of recurrent viral infections that resist cure. In latently infected neurons, viral gene expression is severely repressed; only the latency-associated transcripts (LATs) are expressed abundantly. Using sensitive reverse transcriptase PCR assays, we analyzed the effects of a deletion mutation in the LAT locus on viral gene expression in latently infected mouse trigeminal ganglia. The deletion mutation, which reduced expression of the major LATs 10(5)-fold, resulted in a approximately 5-fold increase in accumulation of transcripts from the immediate-early gene encoding ICP4, an essential transactivator of viral gene expression. The LAT deletion also resulted in a >10-fold increase in the accumulation of transcripts from the early gene encoding thymidine kinase, whose expression during productive infection stringently depends on ICP4, and positively affected the correlation of the levels of these transcripts with the levels of ICP4 transcripts. We also detected transcripts antisense to ICP4 RNA, which were in substantial excess to ICP4 transcripts in ganglia latently infected with wild-type virus. In contrast to its effects on productive-cycle transcripts, the LAT deletion reduced the accumulation of these antisense transcripts approximately 15-fold. Thus, a viral function associated with the LAT locus represses the accumulation of transcripts from at least two productive-cycle genes in latently infected mouse ganglia. We discuss possible mechanisms and consequences of this repression.

  12. Epigenotypes of latent herpesvirus genomes.

    PubMed

    Minarovits, J

    2006-01-01

    Epigenotypes are modified cellular or viral genotypes which differ in transcriptional activity in spite of having an identical (or nearly identical) DNA sequence. Restricted expression of latent, episomal herpesvirus genomes is also due to epigenetic modifications. There is no virus production (lytic viral replication, associated with the expression of all viral genes) in tight latency. In vitro experiments demonstrated that DNA methylation could influence the activity of latent (and/or crucial lytic) promoters of prototype strains belonging to the three herpesvirus subfamilies (alpha-, beta-, and gamma-herpesviruses). In vivo, however, DNA methylation is not a major regulator of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1, a human alpha-herpesvirus) latent gene expression in neurons of infected mice. In these cells, the promoter/enhancer region of latency-associated transcripts (LATs) is enriched with acetyl histone H3, suggesting that histone modifications may control HSV-1 latency in terminally differentiated, quiescent neurons. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, a human gamma-herpesvirus) is associated with a series of neoplasms. Latent, episomal EBV genomes are subject to host cell-dependent epigenetic modifications (DNA methylation, binding of proteins and protein complexes, histone modifications). The distinct viral epigenotypes are associated with distinct EBV latency types, i.e., cell type-specific usage of latent EBV promoters controlling the expression of latent, growth transformation-associated EBV genes. The contribution of major epigenetic mechanisms to the regulation of latent EBV promoters is variable. DNA methylation contributes to silencing of Wp and Cp (alternative promoters for transcripts coding for the nuclear antigens EBNA 1-6) and LMP1p, LMP2Ap, and LMP2Bp (promoters for transcripts encoding transmembrane proteins). DNA methylation does not control, however, Qp (a promoter for EBNA1 transcripts only) in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), although in vitro

  13. Potential Role for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Specific IL-2 and IFN-γ Responses in Discriminating between Latent Infection and Active Disease after Long-Term Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qin; Wei, Wei; Sha, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) could accurately diagnose Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tuberculosis) infection. However, these assays do not discriminate between latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis disease (ATB). Here, a total of 177 subjects, including 65 patients with ATB, 43 subjects with LTBI, and 69 TB-uninfected controls (CON group) were enrolled. The concentration of IFN-γ, IP-10, and IL-2 was determined in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) after short-term (24h) or long-term (72h) stimulation with TB antigens including ESAT-6/CFP-10 (EC) and purified protein derivative (PPD).EC-stimulated IL-2 and gamma interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) release (24h and 72h) showed a good diagnostic performance in distinguishing between TB-infected and TB-uninfected individuals, but failed to discriminate between ATB and LTBI. After 72h of incubation, the release of IL-2 was higher in LTBI patients after stimulation with EC and PPD. The PPD-stimulated IL-2/IFN-γ ratio after 72h incubation had the diagnostic potential to discriminate between ATB and LTBI, with a sensitivity of 90.8% and a specificity of 97.7%. In addition, these new biomarkers, combined with T-SPOT test in a two-step strategy, were validated with high levels of accuracy in a prospective clinical-based cohort. Collectively, the PPD-stimulated IL-2/IFN-γ ratio after long-term incubation may be an alternative diagnostic biomarker in distinguishing between active TB patients and subjects with latent infection. PMID:28033330

  14. Bioactive Molecules Released From Cells Infected with the Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Luganini, Anna; Terlizzi, Maria E.; Gribaudo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Following primary infection in humans, the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) persists in a latent state throughout the host’s lifetime despite a strong and efficient immune response. If the host experiences some form of immune dysregulation, such as immunosuppression or immunodeficiency, HCMV reactivates, thereby emerging from latency. Thus, in the absence of effective functional immune responses, as occurs in immunocompromised or immunoimmature individuals, both HCMV primary infections and reactivations from latency can cause significant morbidity and mortality. However, even in immunocompetent hosts, HCMV represents a relevant risk factor for the development of several chronic inflammatory diseases and certain forms of neoplasia. HCMV infection may shift between the lytic and latent state, regulated by a delicate and intricate balance between virus-mediated immunomodulation and host immune defenses. Indeed, HCMV is a master in manipulating innate and adaptive host defense pathways, and a large portion of its genome is devoted to encoding immunomodulatory proteins; such proteins may thus represent important virulence determinants. However, the pathogenesis of HCMV-related diseases is strengthened by the activities of bioactive molecules, of both viral and cellular origin, that are secreted from infected cells and collectively named as the secretome. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the composition and functions of HCMV-derived secretomes. In lytic infections of fibroblasts and different types of endothelial cells, the majority of HCMV-induced secreted proteins act in a paracrine fashion to stimulate the generation of an inflammatory microenvironment around infected cells; this may lead to vascular inflammation and angiogenesis that, in turn, foster HCMV replication and its dissemination through host tissues. Conversely, the HCMV secretome derived from latently infected hematopoietic progenitor cells induces an immunosuppressive extracellular environment that

  15. A passive-flow microfluidic device for imaging latent HIV activation dynamics in single T cells

    PubMed Central

    Gearhart, Larisa M.; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying cell-to-cell variability in drug response dynamics is important when evaluating therapeutic efficacy. For example, optimizing latency reversing agents (LRAs) for use in a clinical “activate-and-kill” strategy to purge the latent HIV reservoir in patients requires minimizing heterogeneous viral activation dynamics. To evaluate how heterogeneity in latent HIV activation varies across a range of LRAs, we tracked drug-induced response dynamics in single cells via live-cell imaging using a latent HIV–GFP reporter virus in a clonal Jurkat T cell line. To enable these studies in suspension cells, we designed a simple method to capture an array of single Jurkat T cells using a passive-flow microfluidic device. Our device, which does not require external pumps or tubing, can trap hundreds of cells within minutes with a high retention rate over 12 hours of imaging. Using this device, we quantified heterogeneity in viral activation stimulated by transcription factor (TF) activators and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Generally, TF activators resulted in both faster onset of viral activation and faster rates of production, while HDAC inhibitors resulted in more uniform onset times, but more heterogeneous rates of production. Finally, we demonstrated that while onset time of viral gene expression and rate of viral production together predict total HIV activation, rate and onset time were not correlated within the same individual cell, suggesting that these features are regulated independently. Overall, our results reveal drug-specific patterns of noisy HIV activation dynamics not previously identified in static single-cell assays, which may require consideration for the most effective activate-and-kill regime. PMID:26138068

  16. A passive-flow microfluidic device for imaging latent HIV activation dynamics in single T cells.

    PubMed

    Ramji, Ramesh; Wong, Victor C; Chavali, Arvind K; Gearhart, Larisa M; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-09-01

    Quantifying cell-to-cell variability in drug response dynamics is important when evaluating therapeutic efficacy. For example, optimizing latency reversing agents (LRAs) for use in a clinical "activate-and-kill" strategy to purge the latent HIV reservoir in patients requires minimizing heterogeneous viral activation dynamics. To evaluate how heterogeneity in latent HIV activation varies across a range of LRAs, we tracked drug-induced response dynamics in single cells via live-cell imaging using a latent HIV-GFP reporter virus in a clonal Jurkat T cell line. To enable these studies in suspension cells, we designed a simple method to capture an array of single Jurkat T cells using a passive-flow microfluidic device. Our device, which does not require external pumps or tubing, can trap hundreds of cells within minutes with a high retention rate over 12 hours of imaging. Using this device, we quantified heterogeneity in viral activation stimulated by transcription factor (TF) activators and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Generally, TF activators resulted in both faster onset of viral activation and faster rates of production, while HDAC inhibitors resulted in more uniform onset times, but more heterogeneous rates of production. Finally, we demonstrated that while onset time of viral gene expression and rate of viral production together predict total HIV activation, rate and onset time were not correlated within the same individual cell, suggesting that these features are regulated independently. Overall, our results reveal drug-specific patterns of noisy HIV activation dynamics not previously identified in static single-cell assays, which may require consideration for the most effective activate-and-kill regime.

  17. Expression of B7 (CD80) and CD40 antigens and the CD40 ligand in Hodgkin's disease is independent of latent Epstein—Barr virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Murray, P G; Oates, J; Reynolds, G M; Crocker, J; Young, L S

    1995-01-01

    Aim—To examine the expression of CD40 and B7 (CD80) antigens and the CD40 ligand in Hodgkin's disease. Methods—Antigen and ligand expression was studied in 17 cases of Hodgkin's disease using immunohistochemistry. The study included 11 cases of Hodgkin's disease in which latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection could be demonstrated within tumour cells by in situ hybridisation for the EBV encoded early RNAs (EBERs). Results—In all cases, irrespective of EBV status, Reed-Sternberg cells and their variants (HRS cells) showed strong expression of both B7 and CD40 antigens. CD40 ligand expression was not shown in HRS cells but was confined to a subset of small lymphocytes some of which were seen to be in intimate contact with HRS cells. Paraffin wax sections from a further 60 cases of Hodgkin's disease were examined for CD40 and EBER expression alone. The CD40 antigen was identified in HRS cells in all of these cases irrespective of EBER expression. Conclusions—As CD40 and B7 expression are features of professional antigen presenting cells, these results provide further evidence that HRS cells may have antigen presenting properties and that this may contribute to the characteristic recruitment and activation of non-malignant lymphocytes which is a feature of Hodgkin's disease. The ability of HRS cells to activate Th cells may in turn contribute to their own survival through the induction of the gp39/CD40 pathway. Images PMID:16695980

  18. Targeting the latent reservoir to achieve functional HIV cure

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Daniele C.; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2016-01-01

    While highly active anti-retroviral therapy has greatly improved the lives of HIV-infected individuals, current treatments are unable to completely eradicate the virus. This is due to the presence of HIV latently infected cells which harbor transcriptionally silent HIV. Latent HIV does not replicate or produce viral proteins, thereby preventing efficient targeting by anti-retroviral drugs. Strategies to target the HIV latent reservoir include viral reactivation, enhancing host defense mechanisms, keeping latent HIV silent, and using gene therapy techniques to knock out or reactivate latent HIV. While research into each of these areas has yielded promising results, currently no one mechanism eradicates latent HIV. Instead, combinations of these approaches should be considered for a potential HIV functional cure. PMID:27303638

  19. The p19 protein of Grapevine Algerian latent virus is a determinant of systemic infection of Chenopodium quinoa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Semin; Cho, Won Kyong; Lee, Hyeok-Geun; Park, Sang-Ho; Sohn, Seong-Han; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2012-04-01

    A previous study showed that both Grapevine Algerian latent virus (GALV) and Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) systemically infect Nicotiana benthamiana, but GALV causes systemic infection whereas TBSV causes only local lesions in Chenopodium quinoa (C. quinoa). We recently isolated GALV strain Naju (GALV-N) from Limonium sinense and TBSV strain Sacheon (TBSV-S) from tomato. Both viruses belong to the genus Tombusvirus and have a similar genome organization. To identify determinants of systemic infection of GALV-N in C. quinoa in the current study, we generated infectious clones and capsid protein (CP)-deletion clones for the two viruses and confirmed that CP of GALV-N is required for systemic infection of C. quinoa due to its primary structural role in virus assembly. Through the use of chimeras, we identified a viral factor in addition to CP that contributes to systemic infection by GALV-N. Inactivation of the p19 demonstrated that host-specific activities of p19 are necessary for efficient systemic infection of C. quinoa by GALV-N. Our study is the first report to determine the viral factors required for systemic infection of GALV in C. quinoa.

  20. CD4+ T-cell-independent mechanisms suppress reactivation of latent tuberculosis in a macaque model of HIV coinfection.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Taylor W; Mehra, Smriti; LoBato, Denae N; Malek, Adel; Alvarez, Xavier; Golden, Nadia A; Bucşan, Allison N; Didier, Peter J; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E; Roy, Chad J; Blanchard, James; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Lackner, Andrew A; Chan, John; Khader, Shabaana A; Jacobs, William R; Kaushal, Deepak

    2016-09-20

    The synergy between Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and HIV in coinfected patients has profoundly impacted global mortality because of tuberculosis (TB) and AIDS. HIV significantly increases rates of reactivation of latent TB infection (LTBI) to active disease, with the decline in CD4(+) T cells believed to be the major causality. In this study, nonhuman primates were coinfected with Mtb and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), recapitulating human coinfection. A majority of animals exhibited rapid reactivation of Mtb replication, progressing to disseminated TB and increased SIV-associated pathology. Although a severe loss of pulmonary CD4(+) T cells was observed in all coinfected macaques, a subpopulation of the animals was still able to prevent reactivation and maintain LTBI. Investigation of pulmonary immune responses and pathology in this cohort demonstrated that increased CD8(+) memory T-cell proliferation, higher granzyme B production, and expanded B-cell follicles correlated with protection from reactivation. Our findings reveal mechanisms that control SIV- and TB-associated pathology. These CD4-independent protective immune responses warrant further studies in HIV coinfected humans able to control their TB infection. Moreover, these findings will provide insight into natural immunity to Mtb and will guide development of novel vaccine strategies and immunotherapies.

  1. Lolium latent virus (Alphaflexiviridae) coat proteins: expression and functions in infected plant tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lolium latent virus (LoLV, Lolavirus, Alphaflexiviridae) viral genome is encapsidated by two carboxy-coterminal coat protein (CP) variants (about 28 and 33 kDa), in equimolar proportion. The CP ORF contains two 5'-proximal AUGs, encoding Met 1 and Met 49, respectively promoting translation of th...

  2. Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults: definition, prevalence, beta-cell function, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Stenström, Gunnar; Gottsäter, Anders; Bakhtadze, Ekaterine; Berger, Bo; Sundkvist, Göran

    2005-12-01

    Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a disorder in which, despite the presence of islet antibodies at diagnosis of diabetes, the progression of autoimmune beta-cell failure is slow. LADA patients are therefore not insulin requiring, at least during the first 6 months after diagnosis of diabetes. Among patients with phenotypic type 2 diabetes, LADA occurs in 10% of individuals older than 35 years and in 25% below that age. Prospective studies of beta-cell function show that LADA patients with multiple islet antibodies develop beta-cell failure within 5 years, whereas those with only GAD antibodies (GADAs) or only islet cell antibodies (ICAs) mostly develop beta-cell failure after 5 years. Even though it may take up to 12 years until beta-cell failure occurs in some patients, impairments in the beta-cell response to intravenous glucose and glucagon can be detected at diagnosis of diabetes. Consequently, LADA is not a latent disease; therefore, autoimmune diabetes in adults with slowly progressive beta-cell failure might be a more adequate concept. In agreement with proved impaired beta-cell function at diagnosis of diabetes, insulin is the treatment of choice.

  3. A Herpesviral Lytic Protein Regulates the Structure of Latent Viral Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Priya; Lee, Jennifer S.; Pan, Dongli; Pesola, Jean M.; Coen, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Latent infections by viruses usually involve minimizing viral protein expression so that the host immune system cannot recognize the infected cell through the viral peptides presented on its cell surface. Herpes simplex virus (HSV), for example, is thought to express noncoding RNAs such as latency-associated transcripts (LATs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) as the only abundant viral gene products during latent infection. Here we describe analysis of HSV-1 mutant viruses, providing strong genetic evidence that HSV-infected cell protein 0 (ICP0) is expressed during establishment and/or maintenance of latent infection in murine sensory neurons in vivo. Studies of an ICP0 nonsense mutant virus showed that ICP0 promotes heterochromatin and latent and lytic transcription, arguing that ICP0 is expressed and functional. We propose that ICP0 promotes transcription of LATs during establishment or maintenance of HSV latent infection, much as it promotes lytic gene transcription. This report introduces the new concept that a lytic viral protein can be expressed during latent infection and can serve dual roles to regulate viral chromatin to optimize latent infection in addition to its role in epigenetic regulation during lytic infection. An additional implication of the results is that ICP0 might serve as a target for an antiviral therapeutic acting on lytic and latent infections. PMID:27190217

  4. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection of blood endothelial cells induces lymphatic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Patrick A; Brazeau, Elizabeth; Lagunoff, Michael

    2004-10-10

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is necessary for KS, a highly vascularized tumor predominated by endothelial-derived spindle cells that express markers of lymphatic endothelium. Following KSHV infection of TIME cells, an immortalized human dermal microvascular endothelial cell (DMVEC) line, expression of many genes specific to lymphatic endothelium, including VEGFR3, podoplanin, LYVE-1, and Prox-1, is significantly increased. Increases in VEGFR3 and podoplanin protein are also demonstrated following latent infection. Examination of cytokine secretion showed that KSHV infection significantly induces hIL-6 while strongly inhibiting secretion of IL-8, a gene product that is decreased by differentiation of blood to lymphatic endothelial cells. These studies support the hypotheses that latent KSHV infection of blood endothelial cells drives their differentiation to lymphatic endothelial cells.

  5. Influence of diabetes mellitus and risk factors in activating latent tuberculosis infection: a case for targeted screening in malaysia.

    PubMed

    Swarna Nantha, Y

    2012-10-01

    A review of the epidemiology of tuberculosis, its contributing risk factors (excluding HIV) and the role of screening latent tuberculosis infection in Malaysia was done. Despite the global and domestic decrease in prevalence rates of tuberculosis in the past decade, there is an alarming increase in the trend of non communicable diseases in the country. High prevalence rates of major risk factors leading to reactivation of tuberculosis were seen within the population, with diabetes mellitus being in the forefront. The rising numbers in the ageing population of Malaysia poses a further threat of re-emergence of tuberculosis in the years to come. Economically, screening of diabetic patients with comorbidities for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) using two major techniques, namely tuberculin sensitivity (TST) and Interferon gamma release assay tests (IGRA) could be a viable option. The role of future research in the detection of LTBI in the Malaysian setting might be necessary to gauge the disease reservoir before implementing prophylactic measures for high risk groups involved.

  6. Prevalence and associated risk factors of latent tuberculosis infection among undergraduate and postgraduate dental students: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Lamberti, Monica; Muoio, Maria Rosaria; Westermann, Claudia; Nienhaus, Albert; Arnese, Antonio; Ribeiro Sobrinho, Antônio Paulino; Di Giuseppe, Gabriella; Garzillo, Elpidio Maria; Crispino, Vincenzo; Coppola, Nicola; De Rosa, Alfredo

    2017-03-04

    To estimate the prevalence of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI) in Italian dental students exposed to the same occupational risks as dental health care personnel and to evaluate potential risk factors, a cross-sectional study was conducted on undergraduate and postgraduate students. After clinical evaluation, students were given a tuberculin skin test; in those found positive, an interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) was conducted. Of the 281 students enrolled, 10 were only TST positive; 8 were TST or/and IGRA positive. We found that participants testing positive at TST and/or IGRA, a group in which the risk of false LTBI positives is minimal, were older and had been studying longer. Although the prevalence of LTBI among dental students in our study was low, a risk of acquiring a work-related infection exists even in a country with a low incidence of TB. Thus, dental students should be screened to catch LTBI early on.

  7. The Ozobranchus leech as a mechanical vector for the fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpes virus found latently infecting skin tumors on Hawaiian green turtles (Chelonia mydas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenblatt, R.J.; Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.; Sutton, C.A.; Casey, R.N.; Casey, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Fibropapillomatosis (FP) of marine turtles is a neoplastic disease of ecological concern. A fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpesvirus (FPTHV) is consistently present, usually at loads exceeding one virus copy per tumor cell. DNA from an array of parasites of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) was examined with quantitative PCR (qPCR) to determine whether any carried viral loads are sufficient to implicate them as vectors for FPTHV. Marine leeches (Ozobranchus spp.) were found to carry high viral DNA loads; some samples approached 10 million copies per leech. Isopycnic sucrose density gradient/qPCR analysis confirmed that some of these copies were associated with particles of the density of enveloped viruses. The data implicate the marine leech Ozobranchus as a mechanical vector for FPTHV. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of FPTHV gene expression indicated that most of the FPTHV copies in a fibropapilloma have restricted DNA polymerase expression, suggestive of latent infection.

  8. [Neonatal screening for congenital Chagas infection: application of latent class analysis for diagnostic test evaluation].

    PubMed

    Andrade, André Queiroz de; Gontijo, Eliane Dias

    2008-01-01

    The present study had the aim of evaluating conventional serum tests that are used in neonatal screening for Chagas disease, with a discussion on the statistical methods available. A random sample among 23,308 newborns who were screened for congenital Chagas disease was studied using the following three tests: enzyme immunoassay, indirect immunofluorescence and indirect hemagglutination. The data were analyzed by different statistical methodologies: latent class analysis, Kappa test and relative sensitivity analysis. Using latent class analysis, enzyme immunoassay had the highest sensitivity (48.6%), followed by indirect immunofluorescence (39.8%) and indirect hemagglutination (23.2%). The kappa value was 0.496. The ratio between the sensitivities of enzyme immunoassays and indirect immunofluorescence tests was 92% [0.74;1.13]. Latent class analysis was not found to be adequate for sensitivity and specificity determination, but it provided important data about the equivalence of the tests, corroborated by relative sensitivity analysis. The results showed that enzyme immunoassaying of dry blood samples can be used as safely as the indirect immunofluorescence test.

  9. Prevalence of Latent and Active Tuberculosis among Dairy Farm Workers Exposed to Cattle Infected by Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Gonzalez, Pedro; Soberanis-Ramos, Orbelin; Martinez-Gamboa, Areli; Chavez-Mazari, Barbara; Barrios-Herrera, Ma Teresa; Torres-Rojas, Martha; Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo; Garcia-Garcia, Lourdes; Singh, Mahavir; Gonzalez-Aguirre, Adrian; Ponce de Leon-Garduño, Alfredo; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Bobadilla-del-Valle, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Background Human tuberculosis caused by M. bovis is a zoonosis presently considered sporadic in developed countries, but remains a poorly studied problem in low and middle resource countries. The disease in humans is mainly attributed to unpasteurized dairy products consumption. However, transmission due to exposure of humans to infected animals has been also recognized. The prevalence of tuberculosis infection and associated risk factors have been insufficiently characterized among dairy farm workers (DFW) exposed in settings with poor control of bovine tuberculosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Tuberculin skin test (TST) and Interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) were administered to 311 dairy farm and abattoir workers and their household contacts linked to a dairy production and livestock facility in Mexico. Sputa of individuals with respiratory symptoms and samples from routine cattle necropsies were cultured for M. bovis and resulting spoligotypes were compared. The overall prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) was 76.2% (95% CI, 71.4–80.9%) by TST and 58.5% (95% CI, 53.0–64.0%) by IGRA. Occupational exposure was associated to TST (OR 2.72; 95% CI, 1.31–5.64) and IGRA (OR 2.38; 95% CI, 1.31–4.30) adjusting for relevant variables. Two subjects were diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis, both caused by M. bovis. In one case, the spoligotype was identical to a strain isolated from bovines. Conclusions We documented a high prevalence of latent and pulmonary TB among workers exposed to cattle infected with M. bovis, and increased risk among those occupationally exposed in non-ventilated spaces. Interspecies transmission is frequent and represents an occupational hazard in this setting. PMID:23638198

  10. Construction of a System for the Strawberry Nursery Production towards Elimination of Latent Infection of Anthracnose Fungi by a Combination of PCR and Microtube Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Kazuyoshi; Nagashima, Saki; Inukai, Tsuyoshi; Masuta, Chikara

    2017-01-01

    One of the major problems in strawberry production is difficulty in diagnosis of anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum acutatum or Glomerella cingulata in latent infection stage. We here developed a diagnostic tool for the latent infection consisting of initial culturing of fungi, DNA extraction, synthesis of PCR-amplified probes and microtube hybridization (MTH) using a macroarray. The initial culturing step is convenient to lure the fungi out of the plant tissues, and to extract PCR-inhibitor-free DNA directly from fungal hyphae. For specific detection of the fungi, PCR primers were designed to amplify the fungal MAT1-2 gene. The subsequent MTH step using the PCR products as probes can replace the laborious electrophoresis step providing us sequence information and high-throughput screening. Using this method, we have conducted a survey for a few thousands nursery plants every year for three consecutive years, and finally succeeded in eliminating latent infection in the third year of challenge. PMID:28167891

  11. Identification and sequencing of a novel rodent gammaherpesvirus that establishes acute and latent infection in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Loh, Joy; Zhao, Guoyan; Nelson, Christopher A; Coder, Penny; Droit, Lindsay; Handley, Scott A; Johnson, L Steven; Vachharajani, Punit; Guzman, Hilda; Tesh, Robert B; Wang, David; Fremont, Daved H; Virgin, Herbert W

    2011-03-01

    Gammaherpesviruses encode numerous immunomodulatory molecules that contribute to their ability to evade the host immune response and establish persistent, lifelong infections. As the human gammaherpesviruses are strictly species specific, small animal models of gammaherpesvirus infection, such as murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (γHV68) infection, are important for studying the roles of gammaherpesvirus immune evasion genes in in vivo infection and pathogenesis. We report here the genome sequence and characterization of a novel rodent gammaherpesvirus, designated rodent herpesvirus Peru (RHVP), that shares conserved genes and genome organization with γHV68 and the primate gammaherpesviruses but is phylogenetically distinct from γHV68. RHVP establishes acute and latent infection in laboratory mice. Additionally, RHVP contains multiple open reading frames (ORFs) not present in γHV68 that have sequence similarity to primate gammaherpesvirus immunomodulatory genes or cellular genes. These include ORFs with similarity to major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I), C-type lectins, and the mouse mammary tumor virus and herpesvirus saimiri superantigens. As these ORFs may function as immunomodulatory or virulence factors, RHVP presents new opportunities for the study of mechanisms of immune evasion by gammaherpesviruses.

  12. Experimental infections of rabbits with proliferative and latent stages of Besnoitia besnoiti.

    PubMed

    Liénard, Emmanuel; Pop, Loredana; Prevot, Françoise; Grisez, Christelle; Mallet, Virginie; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Bouhsira, Émilie; Franc, Michel; Jacquiet, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    Cattle besnoitiosis due to Besnoitia besnoiti is spreading across Europe and is responsible for severe economic losses in newly infected herds. Experimentally speaking, rabbits have been found to be susceptible to this parasite. The adaptation of B. besnoiti to rabbits may offer a new, easier and cheaper model of investigation for this disease. This study compared the virulence between tachyzoites and bradyzoites of B. besnoiti in rabbits. Eighteen New Zealand rabbits were allocated into three groups of six animals each. The rabbits from the control (group C), "tachyzoite" (group T) and "bradyzoite" (group B) groups were subcutaneously injected in the right flank with 66 μg of ovalbumin, 6.10(6) tachyzoites (125th passage on Vero cells) and 6.10(6) bradyzoites (collected from a natural infected cow) of B. besnoiti, respectively. Clinical follow-up and blood sampling for serological survey and qPCR were performed during 10 weeks until euthanasia. Molecular and immunohistochemistry examination was achieved on 25 samples of tissue per rabbit. Seroconversion occurred in group T without any clinical signs. Rabbits of group B exhibited a febrile condition (temperature above 40 °C from day 8 to day 11 following injection) with positive qPCR in blood. Cysts of B. besnoiti were found on skin samples and organs of rabbits from group B in tissue explored with threshold cycle (Ct) values below 30. These results suggest a higher virulence of bradyzoites in rabbits than Vero cell-cultivated tachyzoites. The proposed model could be used to assess the in vivo effectiveness of vaccine or drugs against cattle besnoitiosis.

  13. Extracellular vesicles from infected cells: potential for direct pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Angela; Meyering, Shabana S.; Lepene, Ben; Iordanskiy, Sergey; van Hoek, Monique L.; Hakami, Ramin M.; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-01-01

    Infections that result in natural or manmade spread of lethal biological agents are a concern and require national and focused preparedness. In this manuscript, as part of an early diagnostics and pathogen treatment strategy, we have focused on extracellular vesicles (EVs) that arise following infections. Although the field of biodefense does not currently have a rich resource in EVs literature, none the less, similar pathogens belonging to the more classical emerging and non-emerging diseases have been studied in their EV/exosomal contents and function. These exosomes are formed in late endosomes and released from the cell membrane in almost every cell type in vivo. These vesicles contain proteins, RNA, and lipids from the cells they originate from and function in development, signal transduction, cell survival, and transfer of infectious material. The current review focuses on how different forms of infection exploit the exosomal pathway and how exosomes can be exploited artificially to treat infection and disease and potentially also be used as a source of vaccine. Virally-infected cells can secrete viral as well as cellular proteins and RNA in exosomes, allowing viruses to cause latent infection and spread of miRNA to nearby cells prior to a subsequent infection. In addition to virally-infected host cells, bacteria, protozoa, and fungi can all release small vesicles that contain pathogen-associated molecular patterns, regulating the neighboring uninfected cells. Examples of exosomes from both virally and bacterially infected cells point toward a re-programming network of pathways in the recipient cells. Finally, many of these exosomes contain cytokines and miRNAs that in turn can effect gene expression in the recipient cells through the classical toll-like receptor and NFκB pathway. Therefore, although exosomes do not replicate as an independent entity, they however facilitate movement of infectious material through tissues and may be the cause of many

  14. Predictors of low prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection among Egyptian health care workers at intensive care and bronchoscopy units

    PubMed Central

    Hefzy, Enas Mamdouh; Wegdan, Ahmed Ashraf; Elhefny, Radwa Ahmed; Nasser, Samar Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Latent tuberculosis infections (LTBI) contain a significant reservoir for future epidemics. Screening of health care workers (HCWs) in a high-risk tuberculosis (TB) environment is an important strategy in TB control. The study aimed to assess the prevalence of LTBI among high risk Egyptian HCWs and to assess infection associated risk factors. Methods: Fifty-two HCWs who work at intensive care unit (ICU), bronchoscopy unit, and chest diseases department were tested for LTBI using both tuberculin skin test (TST) and Quantiferon TB Gold in-tube test (QFT). Risk factors for infection, knowledge of HCWs towards different aspects of TB infection and agreement between TST and QFT were also evaluated. Results: Prevalence of LTBI in this study was 13.5% by QFT and TST. It was 13.6% by TST alone and 10.3% by QFT alone. There was good concordance between both tests (Kappa=0.713). There was a statistically significant association between prevalence of LTBI and age of staff ≥30 yr (p=0.002), period of working experience (p=0.006) and working at the Bronchoscopy Unit (p=0.001). The total knowledge of HCWs towards different aspects of TB infection was generally good. Conclusion: Although the participants in the current study were among high risk HCWs, the prevalence of LTBI was low. Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination, young age, short employment duration, good knowledge and a good infection control were the predictors of low risk of contracting TB at our hospitals. The risk of TB infection in resource-limited countries can be reduced with simple continuous educational and administrative infection control programmes. PMID:27777875

  15. Mechanisms Underlying T Cell Immunosenescence: Aging and Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Wenjuan; Rao, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the human immune system to protect against infectious disease declines with age and efficacy of vaccination reduces significantly in the elderly. Aging of the immune system, also termed as immunosenescence, involves many changes in human T cell immunity that is characterized by a loss in naïve T cell population and an increase in highly differentiated CD28- memory T cell subset. There is extensive data showing that latent persistent human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is also associated with age-related immune dysfunction in the T cells, which might enhance immunosenescence. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying age-related and HCMV-related immunosenescence is critical for the development of effective age-targeted vaccines and immunotherapies. In this review, we will address the role of both aging and HCMV infection that contribute to the T cell senescence and discuss the potential molecular mechanisms in aged T cells. PMID:28082969

  16. Epstein-Barr Virus Downregulates MicroRNA 203 through the Oncoprotein Latent Membrane Protein 1: a Contribution to Increased Tumor Incidence in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haibo; Zuo, Lielian; Yan, Qijia; Yu, Zhengyuan; Li, Xiayu; Huang, Jin; Zhao, Lian; Tang, Hailin; Luo, Zhaohui; Liao, Qianjin; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Zhang, Junyi

    2012-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is highly associated with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), and it regulates some microRNAs (miRNAs) that are involved in the development of cancer. The role of EBV in the deregulation of cellular miRNAs and how this affects the progression of NPC remain to be investigated. An analysis of the miRNA profile in an EBV-infected cell line revealed that miRNA 203 (miR-203) was downregulated. miR-203 is expressed specifically in epithelial cells. This downregulation of miR-203 was further verified and functionally analyzed. miR-203 was downregulated substantially in epithelial cells and NPC tissues that were latently infected with EBV. Downregulation of miR-203 also occurred during the early stage of EBV infection. Furthermore, the viral oncoprotein, latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), was responsible for downregulation of miR-203. Removal of the latent EBV genome or suppression of LMP1 resulted in restoration of miR-203 expression. EBV-LMP1 mediated the downregulation of miR-203 at the primary transcript level. E2F3 and CCNG1 were identified as target genes of miR-203. Ectopic expression of miR-203 inhibited EBV-induced S-phase entry and transformation in vivo. Overexpression of the targets overcame the effects of miR-203 mimics on the cell cycle, and the expression of target genes in tumor models was inhibited by miR-203. Inhibitors of Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and NF-κB blocked miR-203 downregulation. These results imply that EBV promotes malignancy by downregulating cellular miR-203, which contributes to the etiology of NPC. PMID:22205737

  17. Defective T-cell control of Epstein–Barr virus infection in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pender, Michael P; Csurhes, Peter A; Burrows, Jacqueline M; Burrows, Scott R

    2017-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that infection with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has a major role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Defective elimination of EBV-infected B cells by CD8+ T cells might cause MS by allowing EBV-infected autoreactive B cells to accumulate in the brain. Here we undertake a comprehensive analysis of the T-cell response to EBV in MS, using flow cytometry and intracellular IFN-γ staining to measure T-cell responses to EBV-infected autologous lymphoblastoid cell lines and pools of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-class-I-restricted peptides from EBV lytic or latent proteins and cytomegalovirus (CMV), in 95 patients and 56 EBV-seropositive healthy subjects. In 20 HLA-A2+ healthy subjects and 20 HLA-A2+ patients we also analysed CD8+ T cells specific for individual peptides, measured by binding to HLA-peptide complexes and production of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2. We found a decreased CD8+ T-cell response to EBV lytic, but not CMV lytic, antigens at the onset of MS and at all subsequent disease stages. CD8+ T cells directed against EBV latent antigens were increased but had reduced cytokine polyfunctionality indicating T-cell exhaustion. During attacks the EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell populations expanded, with increased functionality of latent-specific CD8+ T cells. With increasing disease duration, EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells progressively declined, consistent with T-cell exhaustion. The anti-EBNA1 IgG titre correlated inversely with the EBV-specific CD8+ T-cell frequency. We postulate that defective CD8+ T-cell control of EBV reactivation leads to an expanded population of latently infected cells, including autoreactive B cells. PMID:28197337

  18. The multistage vaccine H56 boosts the effects of BCG to protect cynomolgus macaques against active tuberculosis and reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Philana Ling; Dietrich, Jes; Tan, Esterlina; Abalos, Rodolfo M; Burgos, Jasmin; Bigbee, Carolyn; Bigbee, Matthew; Milk, Leslie; Gideon, Hannah P; Rodgers, Mark; Cochran, Catherine; Guinn, Kristi M; Sherman, David R; Klein, Edwin; Janssen, Christopher; Flynn, JoAnne L; Andersen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    It is estimated that one-third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Infection typically remains latent, but it can reactivate to cause clinical disease. The only vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), is largely ineffective, and ways to enhance its efficacy are being developed. Of note, the candidate booster vaccines currently under clinical development have been designed to improve BCG efficacy but not prevent reactivation of latent infection. Here, we demonstrate that administering a multistage vaccine that we term H56 in the adjuvant IC31 as a boost to vaccination with BCG delays and reduces clinical disease in cynomolgus macaques challenged with M. tuberculosis and prevents reactivation of latent infection. H56 contains Ag85B and ESAT-6, which are two of the M. tuberculosis antigens secreted in the acute phase of infection, and the nutrient stress-induced antigen Rv2660c. Boosting with H56/IC31 resulted in efficient containment of M. tuberculosis infection and reduced rates of clinical disease, as measured by clinical parameters, inflammatory markers, and improved survival of the animals compared with BCG alone. Boosted animals showed reduced pulmonary pathology and extrapulmonary dissemination, and protection correlated with a strong recall response against ESAT-6 and Rv2660c. Importantly, BCG/H56-vaccinated monkeys did not reactivate latent infection after treatment with anti-TNF antibody. Our results indicate that H56/IC31 boosting is able to control late-stage infection with M. tuberculosis and contain latent tuberculosis, providing a rationale for the clinical development of H56.

  19. Euphorbia Kansui Reactivates Latent HIV

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Daniele C.; Fujinaga, Koh; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2016-01-01

    While highly active anti-retroviral therapy has greatly improved the lives of HIV infected individuals, these treatments are unable to eradicate the virus. Current approaches to reactivate the virus have been limited by toxicity, lack of an orally available therapy, and limited responses in primary CD4+ T cells and in clinical trials. The PKC agonist ingenol, purified from Euphorbia plants, is a potent T cell activator and reactivates latent HIV. Euphorbia kansui itself has been used for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine to treat ascites, fluid retention, and cancer. We demonstrate that an extract of this plant, Euphorbia kansui, is capable of recapitulating T cell activation induced by the purified ingenol. Indeed, Euphorbia kansui induced expression of the early T cell activation marker CD69 and P-TEFb in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, Euphorbia kansui reactivated latent HIV in a CD4+ T cell model of latency and in HIV+ HAART suppressed PBMC. When combined with the other latency reversing agents, the effective dose of Euphorbia kansui required to reactive HIV was reduced 10-fold and resulted in synergistic reactivation of latent HIV. We conclude that Euphorbia Euphorbia kansui reactivates latent HIV and activates CD4+ T cells. When used in combination with a latency reversing agent, the effective dose of Euphorbia kansui is reduced; which suggests its application as a combination strategy to reactivate latent HIV while limiting the toxicity due to global T cell activation. As a natural product, which has been used in traditional medicine for thousands of years, Euphorbia kansui is attractive as a potential treatment strategy, particularly in resource poor countries with limited treatment options. Further clinical testing will be required to determine its safety with current anti-retroviral therapies. PMID:27977742

  20. NKG2A-Expressing Natural Killer Cells Dominate the Response to Autologous Lymphoblastoid Cells Infected with Epstein–Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hatton, Olivia; Strauss-Albee, Dara Marie; Zhao, Nancy Q.; Haggadone, Mikel D.; Pelpola, Judith Shanika; Krams, Sheri M.; Martinez, Olivia M.; Blish, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a human γ-herpesvirus that establishes latency and lifelong infection in host B cells while achieving a balance with the host immune response. When the immune system is perturbed through immunosuppression or immunodeficiency, however, these latently infected B cells can give rise to aggressive B cell lymphomas. Natural killer (NK) cells are regarded as critical in the early immune response to viral infection, but their role in controlling expansion of infected B cells is not understood. Here, we report that NK cells from healthy human donors display increased killing of autologous B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) harboring latent EBV compared to primary B cells. Coculture of NK cells with autologous EBV+ LCL identifies an NK cell population that produces IFNγ and mobilizes the cytotoxic granule protein CD107a. Multi-parameter flow cytometry and Boolean analysis reveal that these functional cells are enriched for expression of the NK cell receptor NKG2A. Further, NKG2A+ NK cells more efficiently lyse autologous LCL than do NKG2A− NK cells. More specifically, NKG2A+2B4+CD16−CD57−NKG2C−NKG2D+ cells constitute the predominant NK cell population that responds to latently infected autologous EBV+ B cells. Thus, a subset of NK cells is enhanced for the ability to recognize and eliminate autologous, EBV-infected transformed cells, laying the groundwork for harnessing this subset for therapeutic use in EBV+ malignancies. PMID:28018364

  1. Early events associated with infection of Epstein-Barr virus infection of primary B-cells.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sabyasachi; Murakami, Masanao; Verma, Subhash C; Kumar, Pankaj; Yi, Fuming; Robertson, Erle S

    2009-09-28

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is closely associated with the development of a vast number of human cancers. To develop a system for monitoring early cellular and viral events associated with EBV infection a self-recombining BAC containing 172-kb of the Epstein Barr virus genome BAC-EBV designated as MD1 BAC (Chen et al., 2005, J.Virology) was used to introduce an expression cassette of green fluorescent protein (GFP) by homologous recombination, and the resultant BAC clone, BAC-GFP-EBV was transfected into the HEK 293T epithelial cell line. The resulting recombinant GFP EBV was induced to produce progeny virus by chemical inducer from the stable HEK 293T BAC GFP EBV cell line and the virus was used to immortalize human primary B-cell as monitored by green fluorescence and outgrowth of the primary B cells. The infection, B-cell activation and cell proliferation due to GFP EBV was monitored by the expression of the B-cell surface antigens CD5, CD10, CD19, CD23, CD39, CD40 , CD44 and the intercellular proliferation marker Ki-67 using Flow cytometry. The results show a dramatic increase in Ki-67 which continues to increase by 6-7 days post-infection. Likewise, CD40 signals showed a gradual increase, whereas CD23 signals were increased by 6-12 hours, maximally by 3 days and then decreased. Monitoring the viral gene expression pattern showed an early burst of lytic gene expression. This up-regulation of lytic gene expression prior to latent genes during early infection strongly suggests that EBV infects primary B-cell with an initial burst of lytic gene expression and the resulting progeny virus is competent for infecting new primary B-cells. This process may be critical for establishment of latency prior to cellular transformation. The newly infected primary B-cells can be further analyzed for investigating B cell activation due to EBV infection.

  2. Sustained CD8+ T cell memory inflation after infection with a single-cycle cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Christopher M; Cho, Kathy S; Bonnett, Elizabeth L; Allan, Jane E; Hill, Ann B

    2011-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a β-herpesvirus that establishes a lifelong latent or persistent infection. A hallmark of chronic CMV infection is the lifelong persistence of large numbers of virus-specific CD8+ effector/effector memory T cells, a phenomenon called "memory inflation". How the virus continuously stimulates these T cells without being eradicated remains an enigma. The prevailing view is that CMV establishes a low grade "smoldering" infection characterized by tiny bursts of productive infection which are rapidly extinguished, leaving no detectable virus but replenishing the latent pool and leaving the immune system in a highly charged state. However, since abortive reactivation with limited viral gene expression is known to occur commonly, we investigated the necessity for virus reproduction in maintaining the inflationary T cell pool. We inhibited viral replication or spread in vivo using two different mutants of murine CMV (MCMV). First, famcyclovir blocked the replication of MCMV encoding the HSV Thymidine Kinase gene, but had no impact on the CD8+ T cell memory inflation once the infection was established. Second, MCMV that lacks the essential glycoprotein L, and thus is completely unable to spread from cell to cell, also drove memory inflation if the virus was administered systemically. Our data suggest that CMV which cannot spread from the cells it initially infects can repeatedly generate viral antigens to drive memory inflation without suffering eradication of the latent genome pool.

  3. Comparison of two interferon-gamma release assays (QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube and T-SPOT.TB) in testing for latent tuberculosis infection among HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Sultan, B; Benn, P; Mahungu, T; Young, M; Mercey, D; Morris-Jones, S; Miller, R F

    2013-10-01

    There is currently no 'gold standard' for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), and both the tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) are used for diagnosis; the latter have a higher sensitivity than tuberculin skin tests for diagnosis of LTBI in HIV-infected individuals with lower CD4 counts. No evidence base exists for selection of IGRA methodology to identify LTBI among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in the UK. We prospectively evaluated two commercially available IGRA methods (QuantiFERON-TB Gold In Tube [QFG] and T-SPOT.TB) for testing LTBI among HIV-infected patients potentially nosocomially exposed to an HIV-infected patient with 'smear-positive' pulmonary tuberculosis. Among the exposed patients median CD4 count was 550 cells/µL; 105 (90%) of 117 were receiving antiretroviral therapy, of who 104 (99%) had an undetectable plasma HIV load. IGRAs were positive in 12 patients (10.3%); QFG positive in 11 (9.4%) and T-SPOT.TB positive in six (5.1%); both IGRAs were positive in five patients (4.3%). There was one indeterminate QFG and one borderline T-SPOT.TB result. Concordance between the two IGRAs was moderate (κ = 0.56, 95% confidence interval = 0.27-0.85). IGRAs were positive in only 4 (29%) of 14 patients with previous culture-proven tuberculosis. No patient developed tuberculosis during 20 months of follow-up.

  4. Alteration of CD44 expression in HIV type 1-infected T cell lines.

    PubMed

    Giordanengo, V; Limouse, M; Doglio, A; Lesimple, J; Lefebvre, J C

    1996-11-20

    CD44 is known to interfere in HIV replication and to participate in many physiological processes such as lymphocyte binding to high endothelial venules of lymphoid tissue, lymph nodes, and mucosal endothelium. The T cell lines MOLT-4 and CEM, and CEM subclones were infected with the HIV-1 LAI strain and monitored for the expression of CD44 during the course of chronic virus production until the infected cells were at the stage of latent infection. The levels of CD44 protein expression were quantified using cell surface immunostaining and biotinylation. The maturation of CD44 molecules was evaluated by metabolic sulforadiolabeling and CD44 mRNA was visualized by Northern blot analysis. We show a downmodulation of CD44 expression in infected T cell lines and subclones. This phenomenon was most evident at the stage of latent infection. Then, CD44 molecules were undetectable at both the protein and mRNA levels in latently infected CEM cells and CEM subclones. In addition, the 97-kDa standard CD44 isoform showed a shift upward, while detectable during the stage of chronic virus production. In latently infected MOLT-4 cells, the CD44 protein levels were dramatically decreased; CD44 mRNA was detected, but the sizes differed from the mRNA in uninfected cells. Since CD44 is known to regulate in part lymphocyte homing and HIV replication, the alterations that were observed in the expression of this molecule could interfere with the particular homing of HIV-infected cells and/or viral latency.

  5. Prevalence and Diagnosis of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in Young Children in the Absence of a Gold Standard

    PubMed Central

    Ascaso, Carlos; Malheiro, Adriana; Bührer, Samira; Martinez-Espinosa, Flor; Abellana, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction For adequate disease control the World Health Organization has proposed the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculous infection (LTBI) in groups of risk of developing the disease such as children. There is no gold standard (GS) test for the diagnosis of LTBI. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of LTBI in young children in contact with a household case of tuberculosis (TB-HCC) and determine the accuracy and precision of the Tuberculin Skin Test (TST) and QuantiFERON-TB Gold in-tube (QFT) used in the absence of a GS. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in children up to 6 years of age in Manaus/Brazil during the years 2009–2010. All the children had been vaccinated with the BCG and were classified into two groups according to the presence of a TB-HCC or no known contact with tuberculosis (TB). The variables studied were: the TST and QFT results and the intensity and length of exposure to the index tuberculosis case. We used the latent class model to determine the prevalence of LTBI and the accuracy of the tests. Results Fifty percent of the children with TB-HCC had LTBI, with the prevalence depending on the intensity and length of exposure to the index case. The sensitivity and specificity of TST were 73% [95% confidence interval (CI): 53–91] and 97% (95%CI: 89–100), respectively, versus 53% (95%CI: 41–66) and 81% (95%CI:71–90) for QFT. The positive predictive value of TST in children with TB-HCC was 91% (95%CI: 61–99), being 74% for QFT (95%CI: 47–95). Conclusions This is one of the first studies to estimate the prevalence of LTBI in children and the parameters of the main diagnostic tests using a latent class model. Our results suggest that children in contact with an index case have a high risk of infection. The accuracy and the predictive value of the two tests did not significantly differ. Combined use of the two tests showed scarce improvement in the diagnosis of LTBI. PMID:27783642

  6. Patterns of adolescent sexual behavior predicting young adult sexually transmitted infections: a latent class analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Vasilenko, Sara A; Kugler, Kari C; Butera, Nicole M; Lanza, Stephanie T

    2015-04-01

    Adolescent sexual behavior is multidimensional, yet most studies of the topic use variable-oriented methods that reduce behaviors to a single dimension. In this study, we used a person-oriented approach to model adolescent sexual behavior comprehensively, using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. We identified five latent classes of adolescent sexual behavior: Abstinent (39%), Oral Sex (10%), Low-Risk (25%), Multi-Partner Normative (12%), and Multi-Partner Early (13%). Membership in riskier classes of sexual behavior was predicted by substance use and depressive symptoms. Class membership was also associated with young adult STI outcomes although these associations differed by gender. Male adolescents' STI rates increased with membership in classes with more risky behaviors whereas females' rates were consistent among all sexually active classes. These findings demonstrate the advantages of examining adolescent sexuality in a way that emphasizes its complexity.

  7. Subcellular localization of (latent) transforming growth factor beta and the latent TGF-beta binding protein in rat hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Roth-Eichhorn, S; Kühl, K; Gressner, A M

    1998-12-01

    Recently, the existence of the large latent transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) complex, consisting of TGF-beta, the N-terminal part of its precursor (latency-associated peptide [LAP]), and the latent TGF-beta binding protein (LTBP), was demonstrated in rat liver parenchymal cells (PC) and stellate cells (HSC). However, in contrast to HSC, in freshly isolated PC, no message of these proteins is detectable. This study was performed to investigate the subcellular distribution of the proteins forming the latent TGF-beta complex in PC and HSC from rat liver to obtain more information about their origin and potential intracellular functions. PC and HSC were isolated from rat liver by protease reperfusion and investigated for TGF-beta1,-2,-3, beta1-LAP, and LTBP-1 after cultivation using double-immunofluorescent staining, followed by high-resolution confocal microscopic analysis. Subcellular fractions obtained by standard differential centrifugation of rat liver homogenate were analyzed using a TGF-beta1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting for beta1-LAP and LTBP-1. By confocal microscopy, a diffuse distribution of TGF-beta and LAP in the cytoplasm of PC is noticed, whereas the LTBP immunostaining predominates at plasma membranes. In PC, distinct intracellular granules were superimposed with TGF-beta, LAP, and LTBP stainings identified as lysosomal compartments and mitochondria by ELISA and immunoblotting of subcellular fractions. In HSC, stainings of colocalized TGF-beta, LAP, and LTBP are strongest in the perinuclear area, indicating synthesis and secretion via endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi, respectively. Partially, the proteins were also found in HSC nuclei. During the transformation of HSC to myofibroblasts, LAP and LTBP become strongly colocalized with other components of the cytoskeletal network like smooth muscle--actin, desmin, and talin. The results confirm biochemical data about the existence and expression of the large latent

  8. Targeted screening and treatment for latent tuberculosis infection using QuantiFERON®-TB Gold is cost-effective in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, J. L.; Kahn, J. G.; Strathdee, S. A.; Valencia-Mendoza, A.; Bautista-Arredondo, S.; Laniado-Laborin, R.; Castañeda, R.; Deiss, R.; Garfein, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY OBJECTIVE To assess the cost-effectiveness of screening for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) using a commercially available detection test and treating individuals at high risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in a middle-income country. DESIGN We developed a Markov model to evaluate the cost per LTBI case detected, TB case averted and quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained for a cohort of 1000 individuals at high risk for HIV infection over 20 years. Baseline model inputs for LTBI prevalence were obtained from published literature and cross-sectional data from tuberculosis (TB) screening using QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) testing among sex workers and illicit drug users at high risk for HIV recruited through street outreach in Tijuana, Mexico. Costs are reported in 2007 US dollars. Future costs and QALYs were discounted at 3% per year. Sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate model robustness. RESULTS Over 20 years, we estimate the program would prevent 78 cases of active TB and 55 TB-related deaths. The incremental cost per case of LTBI detected was US$730, cost per active TB averted was US$529 and cost per QALY gained was US$108. CONCLUSIONS In settings of endemic TB and escalating HIV incidence, targeting LTBI screening and treatment among high-risk groups may be highly cost-effective. PMID:19723375

  9. Completion Rate and Side-Effect Profile of Three-Month Isoniazid and Rifapentine Treatment for Latent Tuberculosis Infection in an Urban County Jail.

    PubMed

    Juarez-Reyes, Maria; Gallivan, Mark; Chyorny, Alexander; O'Keeffe, Linda; Shah, Neha S

    2016-01-01

    In an urban jail population, 3 months of isoniazid and rifapentine (3HP) was associated with an 85% latent tuberculosis infection treatment completion rate compared with 18% in a standard 9-month isoniazid treatment group. Among the 91 patients who started 3HP therapy, there were 2 treatment discontinuations from adverse drug reactions.

  10. Completion Rate and Side-Effect Profile of Three-Month Isoniazid and Rifapentine Treatment for Latent Tuberculosis Infection in an Urban County Jail

    PubMed Central

    Juarez-Reyes, Maria; Gallivan, Mark; Chyorny, Alexander; O'Keeffe, Linda; Shah, Neha S.

    2016-01-01

    In an urban jail population, 3 months of isoniazid and rifapentine (3HP) was associated with an 85% latent tuberculosis infection treatment completion rate compared with 18% in a standard 9-month isoniazid treatment group. Among the 91 patients who started 3HP therapy, there were 2 treatment discontinuations from adverse drug reactions. PMID:26885547

  11. ß-catenin, a transcription factor activated by canonical Wnt signaling, is expressed in sensory neurons of calves latently infected with bovine herpesvirus 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Like many a-herpesvirinae subfamily members, bovine herpes virus 1 (BoHV-1) expresses an abundant transcript in latently infected sensory neurons: the latency-related (LR) RNA. LR-RNA encodes a protein (ORF2) that inhibits apoptosis, interacts with Notch family members, interferes with Notch mediate...

  12. Senescence as a Factor in Latent Pathogen Infection in Eurasian Watermilfoil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    safe bioherbicides (Sridhar and Raviraja 1995; Schulz et al. 2002). Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden...aboveground shoot biomass was harvested to detect biomass differences between endophyte-infected and endophyte-free milfoil plants. MATERIALS AND METHODS...from either endophyte-infected or endophyte-free milfoil were overlaid with silica-sand, and were placed in each aquarium . Each treatment was

  13. Altered T cell surface glycosylation in HIV-1 infection results in increased susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Lantéri, Marion; Giordanengo, Valérie; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Fuzibet, Jean-Gabriel; Auberger, Patrick; Fukuda, Minoru; Baum, Linda G; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude

    2003-12-01

    The massive T cell death that occurs in HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infection contributes profoundly to the pathophysiology associated with AIDS. The mechanisms controlling cell death of both infected and uninfected T cells ("bystander" death) are not completely understood. We have shown that HIV-1 infection of T cells results in altered glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins; specifically, it decreased sialylation and increased expression of core 2 O-glycans. Galectin-1 is an endogenous human lectin that recognizes these types of glycosylation changes and induces cell death of activated lymphocytes. Therefore we studied the possible contribution of galectin-1 in the pathophysiology of AIDS. O-glycan modifications were investigated on peripheral lymphocytes from AIDS patients. Oligosaccharides from CD43 and CD45 of CEM cells latently infected with HIV-1 were chemically analyzed. Consistent with our previous results, we show that HIV-1 infection results in accumulation of exposed lactosamine residues, oligosaccharides recognized by galectin-1 on cell surface glycoproteins. Both latently HIV-1-infected T cell lines and peripheral CD4 and CD8 T cells from AIDS patients exhibited exposed lactosamine residues and demonstrated marked susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death, in contrast to control cultures or cells from uninfected donors. The fraction of cells that died in response to galectin-1 exceeded the fraction of infected cells, indicating that death of uninfected cells occurred. Altered cell surface glycosylation of T cells during HIV-1 infection increases the susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death, and this death pathway can contribute to loss of both infected and uninfected T cells in AIDS.

  14. Acquired latent tuberculosis infection in psoriasis patients treated with etanercept in the People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Rang; Mao, Qiu-Xia; Chen, Min; Jia, Wei-Xue; Yao, Xu; Feng, Su-Ying; Jia, Hong; Gong, Juan-Qin; Yang, Xue-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background TNF-α plays a key role in host defense against mycobacterial infection, and patients receiving TNF-α blocker treatment have increased susceptibility to tuberculosis disease. In the People’s Republic of China, an intermediate tuberculosis-burden country, the latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) risk in patients with psoriasis who are treated with etanercept, the safest kind of TNF-α blocker, is unknown. Objectives This study reports the LTBI risk in patients with psoriasis after etanercept treatment and aims to answer the question of how often rescreening for LTBI should be done in order to reduce active tuberculosis infection of patients and further reduce the incidence of active tuberculosis disease. Patients and methods: This retrospective review evaluated patients with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis between 2009 and 2013. All patients were excluded tuberculosis infection and received etanercept 25 mg twice weekly, then the patients were checked for LTBI 3 months after etanercept treatment to observe the incidence of LTBI and assess the need for rescreening for LTBI every 3 months. Results We retrospectively analyzed 192 patients with psoriasis with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque whose tuberculin skin test and chest X-rays were negative and who received etanercept 25 mg twice weekly. Eighteen of them were excluded because they received less than 3 months of etanercept therapy. After treatment with etanercept, four patients were found to have LTBI. Conclusion In this study, the incidence of LTBI after 3 months was four in 192 (2.1%), which is higher than the annual incidence of LTBI in the People’s Republic of China (0.72%), so LTBI could be expected to occur within 3 months in psoriasis patients on etanercept. Periodic screening for LTBI in the therapy course, as well as before initiating treatment, is necessary in those patients who use a TNF-α blocker. We recommend rescreening for LTBI every 3 months. PMID:26508833

  15. Dynamics of an HBV/HCV infection model with intracellular delay and cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fengqin; Li, Jianquan; Zheng, Chongwu; Wang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    A new mathematical model of hepatitis B/C virus (HBV/HCV) infection which incorporates the proliferation of healthy hepatocyte cells and the latent period of infected hepatocyte cells is proposed and studied. The dynamics is analyzed via Pontryagin's method and a newly proposed alternative geometric stability switch criterion. Sharp conditions ensuring stability of the infection persistent equilibrium are derived by applying Pontryagin's method. Using the intracellular delay as the bifurcation parameter and applying an alternative geometric stability switch criterion, we show that the HBV/HCV infection model undergoes stability switches. Furthermore, numerical simulations illustrate that the intracellular delay can induce complex dynamics such as persistence bubbles and chaos.

  16. Levels of Epstein-Barr virus DNA in lymphoblastoid cell lines are correlated with frequencies of spontaneous lytic growth but not with levels of expression of EBNA-1, EBNA-2, or latent membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Metzenberg, S

    1990-01-01

    The process of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced transformation of human B lymphocytes results in a cell line that is a mixture of latently and lytically infected cells, with the lytic cells composing roughly 5% to less than 0.0001% of the overall population. A set of nine normal lymphoblastoid cell lines that span a 100- to 200-fold range in average EBV DNA content were studied, and the frequency with which these cells entered a lytic phase of viral growth correlated with their EBV DNA copy number (as a population average). However, neither factor correlated with the levels of expression of transcript for the viral genes EBNA-1, EBNA-2, and latent membrane protein, nor did they correlate with the levels of EBNA-2 protein and latent membrane protein. The rate at which a cell line enters into lytic growth spontaneously is therefore not dependent on the overall steady-state levels of expression of these latent-phase genes. Images PMID:2152830

  17. Inhibition of latent membrane protein 1 impairs the growth and tumorigenesis of latency II Epstein-Barr virus-transformed T cells.

    PubMed

    Ndour, Papa Alioune; Brocqueville, Guillaume; Ouk, Tan-Sothéa; Goormachtigh, Gautier; Morales, Olivier; Mougel, Alexandra; Bertout, Julie; Melnyk, Oleg; Fafeur, Véronique; Feuillard, Jean; Coll, Jean; Adriaenssens, Eric

    2012-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a common human herpesvirus. Infection with EBV is associated with several human malignancies in which the virus expresses a set of latent proteins, among which is latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1). LMP1 is able to transform numerous cell types and is considered the main oncogenic protein of EBV. The mechanism of action is based on mimicry of activated members of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily, through the ability of LMP1 to bind similar adapters and to activate signaling pathways. We previously generated two unique models: a monocytic cell line and a lymphocytic (NC5) cell line immortalized by EBV that expresses the type II latency program. Here we generated LMP1 dominant negative forms (DNs), based on fusion between green fluorescent protein (GFP) and transformation effector site 1 (TES1) or TES2 of LMP1. Then we generated cell lines conditionally expressing these DNs. These DNs inhibit NF-κB and Akt pathways, resulting in the impairment of survival processes and increased apoptosis in these cell lines. This proapoptotic effect is due to reduced interaction of LMP1 with specific adapters and the recruitment of these adapters to DNs, which enable the generation of an apoptotic complex involving TRADD, FADD, and caspase 8. Similar results were obtained with cell lines displaying a latency III program in which LMP1-DNs decrease cell viability. Finally, we prove that synthetic peptides display similar inhibitory effects in EBV-infected cells. DNs derived from LMP1 could be used to develop therapeutic approaches for malignant diseases associated with EBV.

  18. Prevalence and correlates of latent tuberculosis infection among employees of a high security prison in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Darraji, Haider Abdulrazzaq Abed; Tan, Cynthia; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although prison employees share the same tuberculosis (TB) risk environment with prisoners, the magnitude of TB problems among prison employees is unknown in most resource-limited prisons. This survey was conducted to investigate the prevalence and correlates of tuberculin skin test (TST) positivity among employees in Malaysia’s largest prison. Methods Consented, full-time prison employees were interviewed using a structured questionnaire that included sociodemographic data, history of working in the correctional system and TB-related risk. TST was placed intradermally and read after 48–72 h. Induration size of ≥10 mm was considered positive. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to explore associations with TST positivity. Results Of the 445 recruited prison employees, 420 (94.4%) had complete data. Most were young (median=30.0 years) men (88.8%) who had only worked at this prison (76.4%) for a median total employment period of 60 months (IQR 34.5–132.0). The majority were correctional officers, while civilian employees represented only 7.6% of the sample. Only 26 (6.2%) reported having ever been screened for TB since employment. Prevalence of TST positivity was 81% and was independently associated with longer (≥12 months) prison employment (AOR 4.9; 95% CI 1.5 to 15.9) and current tobacco smoking (AOR=1.9, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.2). Conclusions Latent TB prevalence was high in this sample, approximating that of prisoners in this setting, perhaps suggesting within prison TB transmission in this facility. Formal TB control programmes for personnel and prisoners alike are urgently needed within the Malaysian correctional system. PMID:25794506

  19. The Latent Reservoir for HIV-1: How Immunologic Memory and Clonal Expansion Contribute to HIV-1 Persistence.

    PubMed

    Murray, Alexandra J; Kwon, Kyungyoon J; Farber, Donna L; Siliciano, Robert F

    2016-07-15

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-1 infection reduces plasma virus levels to below the limit of detection of clinical assays. However, even with prolonged suppression of viral replication with ART, viremia rebounds rapidly after treatment interruption. Thus, ART is not curative. The principal barrier to cure is a remarkably stable reservoir of latent HIV-1 in resting memory CD4(+) T cells. In this review, we consider explanations for the remarkable stability of the latent reservoir. Stability does not appear to reflect replenishment from new infection events but rather normal physiologic processes that provide for immunologic memory. Of particular importance are proliferative processes that drive clonal expansion of infected cells. Recent evidence suggests that in some infected cells, proliferation is a consequence of proviral integration into host genes associated with cell growth. Efforts to cure HIV-1 infection by targeting the latent reservoir may need to consider the potential of latently infected cells to proliferate.

  20. Insights from the computational analysis of CD271 glycation in mescenchymal stem cells in diabetes mellitus as a predisposition to latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Rajasri; Shukla, Misha; Nagra, Sachin; Banerjee, Dibyajyoti

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered as a predisposition factor for active tuberculosis and is known to activate the latent form of tuberculosis. However, the causative association of latent tuberculosis with diabetes is not conclusively established. Therefore, it is of interest to relate their predisposition. We describe the glycation pattern of mescenchymal stem cell surface markers as CD271+/CD45-mescenchymal stem cell is known to be associated with latent tuberculosis. We show that the lysine residues important for function of CD271 death domain are predicted to be and glycated. These observations help to discuss the role of CD271 and glycation to modulate the genesis of latent tuberculosis in chronic diabetic mellitus.

  1. Interrelationship of Primary Virus Replication, Level of Latency, and Time to Reactivation in the Trigeminal Ganglia of Latently Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Matundan, Harry H.; Mott, Kevin R.; Allen, Sariah J.; Wang, Shaohui; Bresee, Catherine J.; Ghiasi, Yasamin N.; Town, Terrence

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We sought to determine the possibility of an interrelationship between primary virus replication in the eye, the level of viral DNA in the trigeminal ganglia (TG) during latency, and the amount of virus reactivation following ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. Mice were infected with virulent (McKrae) or avirulent (KOS and RE) strains of HSV-1, and virus titers in the eyes and TG during primary infection, level of viral gB DNA in TG on day 28 postinfection (p.i.), and virus reactivation on day 28 p.i. as measured by explant reactivation were calculated. Our results suggest that the avirulent strains of HSV-1, even after corneal scarification, had lower virus titers in the eye, had less latency in the TG, and took a longer time to reactivate than virulent strains of HSV-1. The time to explant reactivation of avirulent strains of HSV-1 was similar to that of the virulent LAT(−) McKrae-derived mutant. The viral dose with the McKrae strain of HSV-1 affected the level of viral DNA and time to explant reactivation. Overall, our results suggest that there is no absolute correlation between primary virus titer in the eye and TG and the level of viral DNA in latent TG and time to reactivation. IMPORTANCE Very little is known regarding the interrelationship between primary virus replication in the eye, the level of latency in TG, and the time to reactivate in the mouse model. This study was designed to answer these questions. Our results point to the absence of any correlation between the level of primary virus replication and the level of viral DNA during latency, and neither was an indicator of how rapidly the virus reactivated following explant TG-induced reactivation. PMID:27512072

  2. Upregulation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by CD4 cross-linking in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed Central

    Than, S; Oyaizu, N; Tetali, S; Romano, J; Kaplan, M; Pahwa, S

    1997-01-01

    This study was conducted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 67 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults. It supports the hypothesis that cross-linking of CD4 molecules by HIV gp120 can result in HIV upregulation and spread of infection. Underlying mechanisms include activation of latent infection by factors in addition to, or other than, tumor necrosis factor alpha. PMID:9223523

  3. Upregulation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by CD4 cross-linking in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Than, S; Oyaizu, N; Tetali, S; Romano, J; Kaplan, M; Pahwa, S

    1997-08-01

    This study was conducted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 67 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults. It supports the hypothesis that cross-linking of CD4 molecules by HIV gp120 can result in HIV upregulation and spread of infection. Underlying mechanisms include activation of latent infection by factors in addition to, or other than, tumor necrosis factor alpha.

  4. Persistence of low levels of plasma viremia and of the latent reservoir in patients under ART: A fractional-order approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Carla M. A.

    2017-02-01

    Low levels of viral load are found in HIV-infected patients, after many years under successful suppressive anti-retroviral therapy (ART). The factors leading to this persistence are still under debate, but it is now more or less accepted that the latent reservoir may be crucial to the maintenance of this residual viremia. In this paper, we study the role of the latent reservoir in the persistence of the latent reservoir and of the plasma viremia in a fractional-order (FO) model for HIV infection. Our model assumes that (i) the latently infected cells may undergo bystander proliferation, without active viral production, (ii) the latent cell activation rate decreases with time on ART, (iii) the productively infected cells' death rate is a function of the infected cell density. The proposed model provides new insights on the role of the latent reservoir in the persistence of the latent reservoir and of the plasma virus. Moreover, the fractional-order derivative distinguishes distinct velocities in the dynamics of the latent reservoir and of plasma virus. The later may be used to better approximations of HIV-infected patients data. To our best knowledge, this is the first FO model that deals with the role of the latent reservoir in the persistence of low levels of viremia and of the latent reservoir.

  5. Broad CTL response is required to clear latent HIV-1 due to dominance of escape mutations

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Kai; Pertea, Mihaela; Rongvaux, Anthony; Wang, Leyao; Durand, Christine M.; Ghiaur, Gabriel; Lai, Jun; McHugh, Holly L.; Hao, Haiping; Zhang, Hao; Margolick, Joseph B.; Gurer, Cagan; Murphy, Andrew J.; Valenzuela, David M.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Deeks, Steven G.; Strowig, Till; Kumar, Priti; Siliciano, Janet D.; Salzberg, Steven L.; Flavell, Richard A.; Shan, Liang; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV-1 persists in a stable latent reservoir1, 2, primarily in resting memory CD4+ T cells3, 4. This reservoir presents a major barrier to the cure of HIV-1 infection. To purge the reservoir, pharmacological reactivation of latent HIV-1 has been proposed5 and tested both in vitro and in vivo6–8. A key remaining question is whether virus-specific immune mechanisms including cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) can clear infected cells in ART-treated patients after latency is reversed. Here we show that there is a striking all or none pattern for CTL escape mutations in HIV-1 Gag epitopes. Unless ART is started early, the vast majority (>98%) of latent viruses carry CTL escape mutations that render infected cells insensitive to CTLs directed at common epitopes. To solve this problem, we identified CTLs that could recognize epitopes from latent HIV-1 that were unmutated in every chronically infected patient tested. Upon stimulation, these CTLs eliminated target cells infected with autologous virus derived from the latent reservoir, both in vitro and in patient-derived humanized mice. The predominance of CTL-resistant viruses in the latent reservoir poses a major challenge to viral eradication. Our results demonstrate that chronically infected patients retain a broad spectrum viral-specific CTL response and that appropriate boosting of this response may be required for the elimination of the latent reservoir. PMID:25561180

  6. Characterization of CD4 and CD8 T cells producing IFN-γ in human latent and active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Cesar M; Marín, Nancy D; García, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2010-11-01

    Patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) frequently have reduced IFN-γ production in response to mycobacterial antigens, compared to individuals with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBi). However, it is not clear whether this reduced responsiveness is restricted to a particular T cell subset. Herein, PBMCs from 26 PTB patients, 30 household contacts (HHCs) of PTB, and 30 tuberculin positive (TST+) healthy subjects not recently exposed to PTB, were stained with CFSE and stimulated non-specific (PPD) for 120 h, and specific (CFP-10/ESAT-6) and latency (HSpX) mycobacterial antigens for 144 h and the percentage of CD4(+) and CD8(+)IFN-γ(+) T cells responding determined by flow cytometry, in addition to their memory phenotype by the CD45RO and CD27 expression. PTB had decreased frequency of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) precursor cells, as well as decreased number of CD4(+)IFN-γ(+) cells in response to all antigens, whereas CD8(+)IFN-γ(+) cells were decreased in response to PPD and ESAT-6, but not to CFP-10 and HSpX. HHCs exhibited the highest precursor frequencies and IFN-γ responses, irrespective of the antigen employed. The CD4(+)/CD8(+) cell ratios showed that in response to PPD CD4(+) precursor and IFN-γ-producer cells are more frequent than their CD8(+) counterparts, and that PTB have a decreased CD4(+)IFN-γ(+)/CD8(+)IFN-γ(+) ratio in response to PPD, CFP-10, and ESAT-6. CD4(+)IFN-γ(+) and CD8(+)IFN-γ(+) cells exhibited a central memory phenotype (CD45RO(+)CD27(+)), irrespective of the group of subjects and the antigen used for stimulation. In conclusion, PTB patients had a decreased percentage of CD4(+) and CD8(+) precursor cells and CD4(+)IFN-γ(+). HHCs exhibited the highest frequency of CD4(+) and CD8(+) precursors and CD4(+)IFN-γ(+)-producing cells.

  7. Abandonment of Treatment for Latent Tuberculosis Infection and Socioeconomic Factors in Children and Adolescents: Rio De Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, Angela Marcia Cabral; Kritski, Afrânio Lineu; Land, Marcelo Gerardin Poirot; Sant’Anna, Clemax Couto

    2016-01-01

    Background Routine data on the use of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) in children and adolescents are scarce in high tuberculosis (TB) burden countries. Objective To describe the factors related to abandonment of IPT in children and adolescents with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) receiving routine care. Methods Retrospective (2005–2009) descriptive study of 286 LTBI cases with indication of IPT and serviced at a pediatric hospital in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Survival analysis of the risk of abandonment of IPT over six months was performed, including multivariate analysis using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results Out of the 245 cases of LTBI included, 62 abandoned IPT (25.3%; 95% CI: 20%-31%). On multivariate analysis, the variables related to the IPT abandonment hazard ratio were the Human Development Index (HDI) (hazard ratio—HR: 0.004; 0.000–0.569) of the place of residence and the contact with adults that were not undergoing anti-TB treatment (HR: 7.30; 1.00–53.3). Conclusion This study reveals the relevance of the relation of abandonment of IPT to the socioeconomic conditions at the place of residence and poor adherence to the active TB treatment. Educational measures to stimulate preventive treatment of child contacts and curative treatment of index cases should target the full familial setting. PMID:27149514

  8. Recommendations for use of an isoniazid-rifapentine regimen with direct observation to treat latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    2011-12-09

    Preventing tuberculosis (TB) by treating latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is a cornerstone of the U.S. strategy for TB elimination. Three randomized controlled trials have shown that a new combination regimen of isoniazid (INH) and rifapentine (RPT) administered weekly for 12 weeks as directly observed therapy (DOT) is as effective for preventing TB as other regimens and is more likely to be completed than the U.S. standard regimen of 9 months of INH daily without DOT. This report provides CDC recommendations for using the INH-RPT regimen. The new regimen is recommended as an equal alternative to the 9-month INH regimen for otherwise healthy patients aged≥12 years who have LTBI and factors that are predictive of TB developing (e.g., recent exposure to contagious TB). The new regimen also can be considered for other categories of patients when it offers practical advantages. Although the INH-RPT regimen was well tolerated in treatment trials, monitoring for adverse effects is recommended. Severe adverse effects should be reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and CDC.

  9. Rifapentine for latent tuberculosis infection treatment in the general population and human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients: summary of evidence.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Júlia Souza; Silva, Marcus Tolentino; Sanchez, Mauro Niskier

    2015-01-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-coinfection are challenges in the control of tuberculosis transmission. We aimed to assess and summarize evidence available in the literature regarding the treatment of LTBI in both the general and HIV-positive population, in order to support decision making by the Brazilian Tuberculosis Control Program for LTBI chemoprophylaxis. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, Embase, LILACS, SciELO, Trip database, National Guideline Clearinghouse, and the Brazilian Theses Repository to identify systematic reviews, randomized clinical trials, clinical guidelines, evidence-based synopses, reports of health technology assessment agencies, and theses that investigated rifapentine and isoniazid combination compared to isoniazid monotherapy. We assessed the quality of evidence from randomized clinical trials using the Jadad Scale and recommendations from other evidence sources using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluations approach. The available evidence suggests that there are no differences between rifapentine + isoniazid short-course treatment and the standard 6-month isoniazid therapy in reducing active tuberculosis incidence or death. Adherence was better with directly observed rifapentine therapy compared to self-administered isoniazid. The quality of evidence obtained was moderate, and on the basis of this evidence, rifapentine is recommended by one guideline. Available evidence assessment considering the perspective of higher adherence rates, lower costs, and local peculiarity context might support rifapentine use for LTBI in the general or HIV-positive populations. Since novel trials are ongoing, further studies should include patients on antiretroviral therapy.

  10. [Latent tuberculosis infection and associated risk factors among the tuberculosis contacts in one of district in Shanghai].

    PubMed

    Xie, X; Tang, L H; Huang, X X; Wu, Y; Su, H L

    2016-12-12

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection(LTBI) and associated risk factors among the tuberculosis(TB) contacts in Minhang District of Shanghai. Methods: A self-designed questionnaire was used to acquire socio-demographic information and to assess the degree of exposure to index cases. LTBI screening was performed by T-SPOT.TB assay. Pearson chi-square test and Logistic regression analyses were used to identify the risk factors associated with LTBI among the TB contacts. Results: A total of 137 contacts from 59 mycobacterial (culture) positive pulmonary TB patients were enrolled in this study. In these contacts, there were 54 men and 83 women, with the average age of 42. LTBI was identified in 20% (27/137) of these contacts. Several risk factors were found by logistic analyses in this study. The worse the ventilation in the exposure location was, the more likely to develop LTBI. Contacts aged more than 60 (42.1%) were 3.9 times more likely to develop LTBI than those aged less than 60 (16.1%). Individuals in contact with TB patients for more than 40 h/week(25.8%) had a 4.2 times risk of LTBI as compared to those for less than 40 h/week(6.8%). Conclusion: The prevalence of LTBI was 20% among the TB contacts in this study, highlighting the need of TB screening and intervention among TB contacts.

  11. Interferon Gamma-Based Detection of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in the Border States of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Eyal; Alatorre-Izaguirre, Gabriela; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Moreno-Treviño, Maria Guadalupe; Garcialuna-Martinez, Javier; Gonzalez-Salazar, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nearly one-third of the world’s population is infected with latent tuberculosis (LTBI). Tuberculosis (TB) rates in the border states are higher than national rates in both the US and Mexico, with the border accounting for 30% of total registered TB cases in both countries. However, LTBI rates in the general population in Mexican border states are unknown. In this region, LTBI is diagnosed using the tuberculin skin test (TST). New methods of detection more specific than TST have been developed, although there is currently no gold standard for LTBI detection. Our objective is to demonstrate utility of the Quantiferon TB gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) test compared with the TST to detect LTBI among border populations. This is an observational, cross-sectional study carried out in border areas of the states of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico. Participants (n = 210) provided a TST and blood sample for the QFT-GIT. Kappa coefficients assessed the agreement between TST and QFT-GIT. Participant characteristics were compared using Fisher exact tests. Thirty-eight percent of participants were diagnosed with LTBI by QFT-GIT. The proportion of LTBI detected using QFT-GIT was almost double [38% (79/210)] that found by TST [19% (39/210)] (P < 0.001). Concordance between TST and QFT-GIT was low (kappa = 0.37). We recommend further studies utilizing the QFT-GIT test to detect LTBI among border populations. PMID:26484340

  12. Interferon Gamma-Based Detection of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in the Border States of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Oren, Eyal; Alatorre-Izaguirre, Gabriela; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Moreno-Treviño, Maria Guadalupe; Garcialuna-Martinez, Javier; Gonzalez-Salazar, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nearly one-third of the world's population is infected with latent tuberculosis (LTBI). Tuberculosis (TB) rates in the border states are higher than national rates in both the US and Mexico, with the border accounting for 30% of total registered TB cases in both countries. However, LTBI rates in the general population in Mexican border states are unknown. In this region, LTBI is diagnosed using the tuberculin skin test (TST). New methods of detection more specific than TST have been developed, although there is currently no gold standard for LTBI detection. Our objective is to demonstrate utility of the Quantiferon TB gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) test compared with the TST to detect LTBI among border populations. This is an observational, cross-sectional study carried out in border areas of the states of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico. Participants (n = 210) provided a TST and blood sample for the QFT-GIT. Kappa coefficients assessed the agreement between TST and QFT-GIT. Participant characteristics were compared using Fisher exact tests. Thirty-eight percent of participants were diagnosed with LTBI by QFT-GIT. The proportion of LTBI detected using QFT-GIT was almost double [38% (79/210)] that found by TST [19% (39/210)] (P < 0.001). Concordance between TST and QFT-GIT was low (kappa = 0.37). We recommend further studies utilizing the QFT-GIT test to detect LTBI among border populations.

  13. Comparison of TST and IGRA in Diagnosis of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in a High TB-Burden Setting

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Surendra K.; Vashishtha, Richa; Chauhan, L. S.; Sreenivas, V.; Seth, Divya

    2017-01-01

    Background There are currently two tests for diagnosing latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI); TST and IGRA. However, it is still unclear that which one of these tests performs better in high TB-burden settings. Methods 1511 household contacts of pulmonary TB patients were enrolled to compare the performance of TST and IGRA for LTBI. At baseline all participant underwent testing for IGRA [QuantiFERON-TB® Gold In-tube (QFT-GIT) assay] and TST [2 tuberculin unit (TU), purified protein derivative (PPD), RT23, Staten Serum Institute (SSI), Copenhagen, Denmark]. All the household contacts were followed-up for two years for incident TB cases. Results Active TB was diagnosed in 76 household contacts at an incidence rate of 2.14 per 1000 person-years. Both, TST [Hazard Ratio (HR): 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.72–1.79, p = 0.57], as well as QFT-GIT assay (HR: 1.66, 95% CI: 0.97–2.84, p = 0.06) results at baseline were not significantly associated with subsequent development of active TB among household contacts of pulmonary TB patients. Conclusion Neither TST nor IGRA predicted subsequent development of active TB among household contacts of pulmonary TB patients during follow-up. However, keeping in view the cost, and other logistics, TST remains the most preferred method for LTBI diagnosis in resource-limited, high TB-burden settings. PMID:28060926

  14. Quality control in QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube for screening latent tuberculosis infection in health care workers.

    PubMed

    Igari, Hidetoshi; Watanabe, Akira; Ichimura, Yasunori; Sakurai, Takayuki; Taniguchi, Toshibumi; Ishiwada, Naruhiko

    2017-04-01

    QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube has been used for screening latent tuberculosis infection in newly employed health care workers in Japan. There have been a few studies concerning quality control. We retrospectively analysed QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube results in a hospital in Japan. Interferon-γ values in three blood collection tubes for QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube were analysed in association with the positivity rate. The data set consisted of health care workers aged 20-29 years during the 7 years between 2010 and 2016. The yearly QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube positivity rate was 0.9%, 16.4%, 3.0%, 39.3%, 2.8%, 0.9% and 1.5%, and was extremely high in 2011 and 2013. The interferon-γ values in the tuberculosis antigen tube were elevated in these two years, as indicated by higher median and wider interquartile range. The interferon-γ value in the negative control tube was also higher in 2011. The higher interferon-γ values in collection tubes (tuberculosis antigen tube and/or negative control tube) resulted in higher QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube positivity rate. The distribution of interferon-γ in tuberculosis antigen tube and negative control tube, as evaluated by median and interquartile range, proved to be an effective index for the quality control of QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube.

  15. Usefulness of interferon-γ release assay for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in young children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Kwang; Kim, Hae Ryun; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lim, In Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in young children may progress to severe active tuberculosis (TB) disease and serve as a reservoir for future transmission of TB disease. There are limited data on interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) performance in young children, which our research aims to address by investigating the usefulness of IGRA for the diagnosis of LTBI. Methods We performed a tuberculin skin test (TST) and IGRA on children who were younger than 18 years and were admitted to Chung-Ang University Hospital during May 2011–June 2015. Blood samples for IGRA were collected, processed, and interpreted according to manufacturer protocol. Results Among 149 children, 31 (20.8%) and 10 (6.7%) were diagnosed with LTBI and active pulmonary TB, respectively. In subjects lacking contact history with active TB patients, TST and IGRA results were positive in 41.4% (29 of 70) and 12.9% (9 of 70) subjects, respectively. The agreement (kappa) of TST and IGRA was 0.123. The control group, consisting of non-TB-infected subjects, showed no correlation between age and changes in interferon-γ concentration after nil antigen, TB-specific antigen, or mitogen stimulation in IGRAs (P=0.384, P=0.176, and P=0.077, respectively). In serial IGRAs, interferon-γ response to TB antigen increased in IGRA-positive LTBI subjects, but did not change considerably in initially IGRA-negative LTBI or control subjects. Conclusion The lack of decrease in interferon-γ response in young children indicates that IGRA could be considered for this age group. Serial IGRA tests might accurately diagnose LTBI in children lacking contact history with active TB patients. PMID:27462354

  16. Short-Course Chemotherapy with TMC207 and Rifapentine in a Murine Model of Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianyu; Li, Si-Yang; Williams, Kathy N.; Andries, Koen

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/XDR-TB) is an emerging global health threat. Proper management of close contacts of infectious patients is increasingly important. However, no evidence-based recommendations for treating latent TB infection (LTBI) after MDR/XDR-TB exposure (DR-LTBI) exist. An ultrashort regimen for LTBI caused by drug-susceptible strains (DS-LTBI) is also desirable. TMC207 has bactericidal and sterilizing activity in animal models of TB and improves the activity of current MDR-TB therapy in patients. Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine whether TMC207 might enable short-course treatment of DR-LTBI and ultrashort treatment of DS-LTBI. Methods: Using an established experimental model of LTBI chemotherapy in which mice are aerosol-immunized with a recombinant bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine before low-dose aerosol infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the efficacy of TMC207 alone and in combination with rifapentine was compared with currently recommended control regimens as well as once-weekly rifapentine + isoniazid and daily rifapentine ± isoniazid. Measurements: Outcomes included monthly lung colony-forming unit counts and relapse rates. Main Results: Lung colony-forming unit counts were stable at about 3.75 log10 for up to 7.5 months postinfection in untreated mice. Rifamycin-containing regimens were superior to isoniazid monotherapy. TMC207 exhibited sterilizing activity at least as strong as that of rifampin alone and similar to that of rifampin + isoniazid, but daily rifapentine +/− isoniazid was superior to TMC207. Addition of TMC207 to rifapentine did not improve the sterilizing activity of rifapentine in this model. Conclusions: TMC207 has substantial sterilizing activity and may enable treatment of DR-LTBI in 3–4 months. PMID:21659613

  17. Evaluation of heat shock proteins for discriminating between latent tuberculosis infection and active tuberculosis: A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Seema D; Purohit, Hemant J; Taori, Girdhar M; Daginawala, Hatim F; Kashyap, Rajpal S

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of a latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is of the utmost concern. The available tests, the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the Quantiferon-TB Gold test (QFT-G) cannot discriminate between active TB and LTBI. Therefore, the aim of the study is to identify new biomarkers that can discriminate between active TB and LTBI and can also assess the risk of the individual developing active TB. In total, 55 blood samples were collected, of which 10 samples were from the active TB infection group, 10 were from the high-risk exposure group, 23 were from the low-risk exposure group, and 12 were from healthy controls living in a non-TB endemic area. A panel of heat shock proteins (Hsps), including host Hsp25, Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) Hsp16, were evaluated in all of the collected samples using ELISA. The levels of the host Hsp(s) (Hsp25, Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90) and MTB Hsp16 were significantly (p<0.05) elevated in the active TB group compared to the high-risk exposure group, the low-risk exposure group and the control group. Notably, the levels of the same panel of Hsp(s) were elevated in the high-risk exposure group compared to the low-risk exposure group. On follow-up, out of the 10 high-risk exposure participants, 3 converted into active TB, indicating that this group has the highest risk of developing TB. Thus, the evaluated panel of Hsp(s) can discriminate between LTBI and active TB. They can also identify individuals who are at the highest risk of developing active TB. Because they can be rapidly detected, Hsp(s) have an edge over the existing diagnostic tools for LTBI. The evaluation of these proteins will be useful in designing better diagnostic methods for LTBI.

  18. Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections Recommend on Facebook ... Mold . Top of Page Preventing fungal infections in stem cell transplant patients Fungi are difficult to avoid because ...

  19. The Prevalence and Incidence of Latent Tuberculosis Infection and Its Associated Factors among Village Doctors in China

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Haiying; Gao, Fangfang; Gao, Fei; Han, Guoxin; Ren, Liping; Song, Yudan; Xiong, Yongchao; Geng, Mengjie; Hou, Yueyun; He, Guoming; Li, Jianbo; Guo, Shufang; Yang, Jun; Yan, Daiqin; Wang, Yali; Gao, Haiyan; An, Jing; Duan, Xiaoyan; Wu, Chunru; Duan, Fengming; Hu, Dongmei; Lu, Kai; Zhao, Yanlin; Rao, Carol Y.; Wang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background China is a high tuberculosis (TB) burden country. More than half of acute TB cases first seek medical care in village doctors’ clinics or community health centers. Despite being responsible for patient referral and management, village doctors are not systematically evaluated for TB infection or disease. We assessed prevalence and incidence of latent TB infection (LTBI) among village doctors in China. Methods and Findings A longitudinal study was conducted in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. We administered a questionnaire on demographics and risk factors for TB exposure and disease; Tuberculin skin testing (TST) and QuantiFERON-TB Gold in-tube assay (QFT-GIT) was conducted at baseline and repeated 12 months later. We used a logistic regression model to calculate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for risk factors for TST and QFT-GIT prevalence and incidence. At the time of follow up, 19.5% of the 880 participating village doctors had a positive TST and 46.0% had a positive QFT-GIT result. Factors associated with TST prevalence included having a BCG scar (OR = 1.45, 95%CI 1.03–2.04) and smoking (OR = 1.69, 95%CI 1.17–2.44). Risk factors associated with QFT-GIT prevalence included being male (OR = 2.17, 95%CI 1.63–2.89), below college education (OR=1.42, 95%CI 1.01–1.97), and working for ≥25 years as a village doctor (OR = 1.64, 95%CI 1.12–2.39). The annual incidence of LTBI was 11.4% by TST and 19.1% by QFT-GIT. QFT-GIT conversion was associated with spending 15 minutes or more per patient on average (OR = 2.62, 95%CI 1.39–4.97) and having BCG scar (OR = 0.53, 95%CI 0.28–1.00). Conclusions Prevalence and incidence of LTBI among Chinese village doctors is high. TB infection control measures should be strengthened among village doctors and at village healthcare settings. PMID:25996960

  20. GARP (LRRC32) is essential for the surface expression of latent TGF-β on platelets and activated FOXP3+ regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Dat Q.; Andersson, John; Wang, Rui; Ramsey, Heather; Unutmaz, Derya; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2009-01-01

    TGF-β family members are highly pleiotropic cytokines with diverse regulatory functions. TGF-β is normally found in the latent form associated with latency-associated peptide (LAP). This latent complex can associate with latent TGFβ-binding protein (LTBP) to produce a large latent form. Latent TGF-β is also found on the surface of activated FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), but it is unclear how it is anchored to the cell membrane. We show that GARP or LRRC32, a leucine-rich repeat molecule of unknown function, is critical for tethering TGF-β to the cell surface. We demonstrate that platelets and activated Tregs co-express latent TGF-β and GARP on their membranes. The knockdown of GARP mRNA with siRNA prevented surface latent TGF-β expression on activated Tregs and recombinant latent TGF-β1 is able to bind directly with GARP. Confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation strongly support their interactions. The role of TGF-β on Tregs appears to have dual functions, both for Treg-mediated suppression and infectious tolerance mechanism. PMID:19651619

  1. Evaluation of cytokine and chemokine response elicited by Rv2204c and Rv0753c to detect latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Pathakumari, Balaji; Prabhavathi, Maddineni; Raja, Alamelu

    2015-12-01

    Latent TB infection (LTBI) is one of the major contributing factors for the high incidence of TB in India that in turn significantly contributes to the pool of active TB. Hence, identification and treatment of LTBI is of utmost importance. Currently, no specific diagnostic test is available for LTBI. Earlier, in our immunoproteomic analysis, we identified Rv2204c and Rv0753c protein-containing fractions induced significantly higher interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) response in LTBI than in active TB. In this study, we evaluated cytokine and chemokine response against M. tuberculosis antigens for improving LTBI identification. Two M. tb proteins Rv2204c and Rv0753c were cloned, over expressed in E. coli and purified by affinity chromatography. Antigen-specific immune response was evaluated in 39 pulmonary TB patients (PTB) and 35 healthy house-hold contacts (HHC). After whole blood culture for 6 days, the secretion of cytokines and chemokines were quantified in culture supernatants using Enzyme Linked Immune Sorbent Assay (ELISA). Antigen specific cytokines such as interferon gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, IL-12p40 and chemokines like monocyte chemotactic proteins MCP-1, MCP-2 were significantly higher in HHC than PTB. In contrast to other cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF)-α response was significantly increased in PTB compared with HHC. Both Rv2204c and Rv0753c antigen specific IFN-γ response showed 86% positivity in HHC; whereas in PTB, these antigens showed 18% and 21% positivity respectively. Rv2204c antigen-specific IFN-γ/TNF-α response displayed maximum positivity of 91% in HHC and minimum positivity of 10% (4/39) in PTB. Rv2204c and Rv0753c specific IFN-γ and IFN-γ/TNF-α responses showed the most promising accuracy in identifying LTBI.

  2. Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection Increases Apoptosis and HIV-1 Replication in HIV-1 Infected Jurkat Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Tan, Jiying; Biswas, Santanu; Zhao, Jiangqin; Devadas, Krishnakumar; Ye, Zhiping; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-02-02

    Influenza virus infection has a significant impact on public health, since it is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. It is not well-known whether influenza virus infection affects cell death and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 replication in HIV-1-infected patients. Using a lymphoma cell line, Jurkat, we examined the in vitro effects of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus (pH1N1) infection on cell death and HIV-1 RNA production in infected cells. We found that pH1N1 infection increased apoptotic cell death through Fas and Bax-mediated pathways in HIV-1-infected Jurkat cells. Infection with pH1N1 virus could promote HIV-1 RNA production by activating host transcription factors including nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-ĸB), nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways and T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-related pathways. The replication of HIV-1 latent infection could be reactivated by pH1N1 infection through TCR and apoptotic pathways. These data indicate that HIV-1 replication can be activated by pH1N1 virus in HIV-1-infected cells resulting in induction of cell death through apoptotic pathways.

  3. Quantitative Analysis of the KSHV Transcriptome Following Primary Infection of Blood and Lymphatic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Bruce, A Gregory; Barcy, Serge; DiMaio, Terri; Gan, Emilia; Garrigues, H Jacques; Lagunoff, Michael; Rose, Timothy M

    2017-03-19

    The transcriptome of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV8) after primary latent infection of human blood (BEC), lymphatic (LEC) and immortalized (TIME) endothelial cells was analyzed using RNAseq, and compared to long-term latency in BCBL-1 lymphoma cells. Naturally expressed transcripts were obtained without artificial induction, and a comprehensive annotation of the KSHV genome was determined. A set of unique coding sequence (UCDS) features and a process to resolve overlapping transcripts were developed to accurately quantitate transcript levels from specific promoters. Similar patterns of KSHV expression were detected in BCBL-1 cells undergoing long-term latent infections and in primary latent infections of both BEC and LEC cultures. High expression levels of poly-adenylated nuclear (PAN) RNA and spliced and unspliced transcripts encoding the K12 Kaposin B/C complex and associated microRNA region were detected, with an elevated expression of a large set of lytic genes in all latently infected cultures. Quantitation of non-overlapping regions of transcripts across the complete KSHV genome enabled for the first time accurate evaluation of the KSHV transcriptome associated with viral latency in different cell types. Hierarchical clustering applied to a gene correlation matrix identified modules of co-regulated genes with similar correlation profiles, which corresponded with biological and functional similarities of the encoded gene products. Gene modules were differentially upregulated during latency in specific cell types indicating a role for cellular factors associated with differentiated and/or proliferative states of the host cell to influence viral gene expression.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of the KSHV Transcriptome Following Primary Infection of Blood and Lymphatic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, A. Gregory; Barcy, Serge; DiMaio, Terri; Gan, Emilia; Garrigues, H. Jacques; Lagunoff, Michael; Rose, Timothy M.

    2017-01-01

    The transcriptome of the Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV8) after primary latent infection of human blood (BEC), lymphatic (LEC) and immortalized (TIME) endothelial cells was analyzed using RNAseq, and compared to long-term latency in BCBL-1 lymphoma cells. Naturally expressed transcripts were obtained without artificial induction, and a comprehensive annotation of the KSHV genome was determined. A set of unique coding sequence (UCDS) features and a process to resolve overlapping transcripts were developed to accurately quantitate transcript levels from specific promoters. Similar patterns of KSHV expression were detected in BCBL-1 cells undergoing long-term latent infections and in primary latent infections of both BEC and LEC cultures. High expression levels of poly-adenylated nuclear (PAN) RNA and spliced and unspliced transcripts encoding the K12 Kaposin B/C complex and associated microRNA region were detected, with an elevated expression of a large set of lytic genes in all latently infected cultures. Quantitation of non-overlapping regions of transcripts across the complete KSHV genome enabled for the first time accurate evaluation of the KSHV transcriptome associated with viral latency in different cell types. Hierarchical clustering applied to a gene correlation matrix identified modules of co-regulated genes with similar correlation profiles, which corresponded with biological and functional similarities of the encoded gene products. Gene modules were differentially upregulated during latency in specific cell types indicating a role for cellular factors associated with differentiated and/or proliferative states of the host cell to influence viral gene expression. PMID:28335496

  5. Nucleotide sequence of an mRNA transcribed in latent growth-transforming virus infection indicates that it may encode a membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Fennewald, S; van Santen, V; Kieff, E

    1984-01-01

    The most abundant Epstein-Barr virus mRNA in a latently infected cell line, IB4, established by in vitro growth transformation with virus, was a 2,8-kilobase RNA encoded by largely unique DNA near the right end of the genome. The RNA was transcribed from right to left, and two introns were spliced out. This region of the genome was sequenced, and the exons of the RNA were identified by S1 analysis of DNA-RNA hybrids and primer extension. The first start codon in the RNA was 40 nucleotides from its 5' end. Beginning with the start codon, there was a 1,158-nucleotide open reading frame which crossed both introns. The important characteristics of the translated protein were as follows. (i) The amino terminus was highly charged and not suggestive of a leader sequence. (ii) There were six markedly hydrophobic alpha-helical domains, each having 21 amino acids and connected by 5 to 7 amino acid segments predicted to be reverse turns. (iii) The carboxy-terminal 200 amino acids were markedly acidic, containing 6 glutamic and 37 aspartic acids. The hydrophobic region is predicted to form six membrane-spanning regions, leaving the short charged amino terminus and long acidic carboxy terminus on the inside of the membrane. This protein could be responsible for the new antigen detected in the plasma membrane of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cells, lymphocyte-determined membrane antigen. There were two other open reading frames in the RNA. Images PMID:6086953

  6. Preventive and curative effects of Apple latent spherical virus vectors harboring part of the target virus genome against potyvirus and cucumovirus infections.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Akihiro; Kato, Takahiro; Taki, Ayano; Sone, Mikako; Satoh, Nozomi; Yamagishi, Noriko; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Ryo, Bo-Song; Natsuaki, Tomohide; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2013-11-01

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV)-based vectors experimentally infect a broad range of plant species without causing symptoms and can effectively induce stable virus-induced gene silencing in plants. Here, we show that pre-infection of ALSV vectors harboring part of a target viral genome (we called ALSV vector vaccines here) inhibits the multiplication and spread of the corresponding challenge viruses [Bean yellow mosaic virus, Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)] by a homology-dependent resistance. Further, the plants pre-infected with an ALSV vector having genome sequences of both ZYMV and CMV were protected against double inoculation of ZYMV and CMV. More interestingly, a curative effect of an ALSV vector vaccine could also be expected in ZYMV-infected cucumber plants, because the symptoms subsided on subsequent inoculation with an ALSV vector vaccine. This may be due to the invasion of ALSV, but not ZYMV, in the shoot apical meristem of cucumber.

  7. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-11-15

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4{sup +} T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. - Highlights: • X-ray irradiation

  8. Distribution and Phenotype of Epstein-Barr Virus-Infected Cells in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Spieker, Tilmann; Herbst, Hermann

    2000-01-01

    Little is known about Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of colon mucosa, particularly in inflammatory bowel diseases. Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are thought to differ in T-helper lymphocyte composition and cytokine secretion patterns. Some of the implicated cytokines are growth factors for EBV-infected cells. We examined colon mucosa for differences in the distribution and phenotype of EBV-infected cells. Colon tissues with Crohn’s disease (n = 31) or ulcerative colitis (n = 25) and controls (n = 60) were characterized by in situ hybridization and immunohistology for six EBV gene products as indicators of latent and replicative EBV infection. The cells were additionally phenotyped by combined detection of the EBV transcripts and B- or T-cell antigens. B lymphocytes predominated as the site of latent EBV infection in the colon and were most numerous in ulcerative colitis. In active ulcerative colitis, EBV-positive lymphocytes accumulated under and within the epithelium and displayed evidence for replicative infection. The patterns of mucosal EBV gene expression indicate local impairment of virus-specific T-cell responses in active ulcerative colitis. Detection of EBV may help to discriminate between active ulcerative colitis and other inflammatory bowel diseases. Colon mucosa is a potential site of EBV replication and may be relevant for EBV transmission. PMID:10880375

  9. Incidence of active mycobacterial infections in Brazilian patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis and negative evaluation for latent tuberculosis infection at baseline - A longitudinal analysis after using TNFα blockers

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Carina Mori Frade; Terreri, Maria Teresa; de Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel; Barbosa, Cássia; Machado, Natália Pereira; Melo, Maria Roberta; Pinheiro, Marcelo Medeiros

    2015-01-01

    Several studies point to the increased risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIAs) after using tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α blockers. To study the incidence of active mycobacterial infections (aMI) in patients starting TNF α blockers, 262 patients were included in this study: 109 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 93 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 44 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and 16 with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). All patients had indication for anti-TNF α therapy. Epidemiologic and clinical data were evaluated and a simple X-ray and tuberculin skin test (TST) were performed. The control group included 215 healthy individuals. The follow-up was 48 months to identify cases of aMI. TST positivity was higher in patients with AS (37.6%) than in RA (12.8%), PsA (18.8%) and JIA (6.8%) (p < 0.001). In the control group, TST positivity was 32.7%. Nine (3.43%) patients were diagnosed with aMI. The overall incidence rate of aMI was 86.93/100,000 person-years [95% confidence interval (CI) 23.6-217.9] for patients and 35.79/100,000 person-years (95% CI 12.4-69.6) for control group (p < 0.001). All patients who developed aMI had no evidence of LTBI at the baseline evaluation. Patients with CIA starting TNF α blockers and no evidence of LTBI at baseline, particularly with nonreactive TST, may have higher risk of aMI. PMID:26560983

  10. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells.

    PubMed

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-11-01

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4(+) T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4(+) T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4(+) T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the "Shock and Kill" strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells.

  11. Contribution of Interferon gamma release assays testing to the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in HIV-infected patients: A comparison of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In Tube, T-SPOT.TB and tuberculin skin test

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is the most effective strategy to control tuberculosis (TB) among patients with HIV infection. The tuberculin skin test (TST) was the only available method to identify LTBI. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the usefulness of the interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs): QuantiFERON-tuberculosis (TB) Gold-In-Tube test (QFG) and T-SPOT.TB for the diagnosis of LTBI in a diverse cohort of HIV-infected patients. Methods A prospective study was carried out in consecutive patients cared for in a single institution in Spain from January 2009 to October 2010. IGRAs and TST were performed simultaneously. TST induration ≥ 5 mm was considered positive. Results QFG, T-SPOT.TB and TST were performed in 373 subjects. Median CD4 cell count was 470/μl with a median nadir of 150/μl. TST, QFG and T-SPOT.TB were positive in 13.3%, 7.5% and 18.5% cases respectively. Among 277 patients with neither past or current TB nor previous treatment for LTBI and who had TST results, a positive TST result was obtained in 20 (7.2%) cases. When adding QFG results to TST, there were a total of 26 (8.6%) diagnoses of LTBI. When the results of both IGRAs were added, the number of diagnoses increased to 54 (17.9%) (incremental difference: 10.7% [95% confidence interval [CI]:5.3-16.2%] [p < 0.001]), and when both IGRAs were added, the number of diagnoses reached 56 (18.5%) (incremental difference: 11.3% [95% CI:5.7%–16.9%] [p < 0.001]). Patients with a CD4 cell count greater than 500 cells/μl and prior stay in prison were more likely to have a diagnosis of LTBI by TST and/or QFG and/or T-SPOT.TB (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 3.8; 95% CI, 1.4 – 9.9; and aOR: 3.3; 95% CI, 1.3 – 8.3, respectively). Conclusions IGRAs were more sensitive than TST for diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection in HIV-infected patients. Dual sequential testing with TST and IGRAs may be the optimal approach for LTBI screening in this

  12. Generation of specific cytotoxic T cells with a fragment of the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded p63/latent membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Thorley-Lawson, D A; Israelsohn, E S

    1987-01-01

    Human B lymphocytes, transformed by the herpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus, are known to express a characteristic antigen(s) recognized by the cellular immune response. This structure has been termed lymphocyte-determined membrane antigen. Because of the significance of this structure in controlling Epstein-Barr virus infection in vivo, the molecular nature of lymphocyte-determined membrane antigen has been long sought. In this paper, we show that a sequence of 10 amino acids (residues 43-53) from the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded membrane protein p63/latent membrane protein can induce Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T cells and, therefore, bears at least one of the lymphocyte-determined membrane antigenic determinants. PMID:3037547

  13. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  14. Targeting the latent cytomegalovirus reservoir with an antiviral fusion toxin protein

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, B. A.; Spiess, K.; Poole, E. L.; Lau, B.; Voigt, S.; Kledal, T. N.; Rosenkilde, M. M.; Sinclair, J. H.

    2017-01-01

    Reactivation of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in transplant recipients can cause life-threatening disease. Consequently, for transplant recipients, killing latently infected cells could have far-reaching clinical benefits. In vivo, myeloid cells and their progenitors are an important site of HCMV latency, and one viral gene expressed by latently infected myeloid cells is US28. This viral gene encodes a cell surface G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that binds chemokines, triggering its endocytosis. We show that the expression of US28 on the surface of latently infected cells allows monocytes and their progenitor CD34+ cells to be targeted and killed by F49A-FTP, a highly specific fusion toxin protein that binds this viral GPCR. As expected, this specific targeting of latently infected cells by F49A-FTP also robustly reduces virus reactivation in vitro. Consequently, such specific fusion toxin proteins could form the basis of a therapeutic strategy for eliminating latently infected cells before haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:28148951

  15. Impacts of 12-dose regimen for latent tuberculosis infection: Treatment completion rate and cost-effectiveness in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Wen; Yang, Shun-Fa; Yeh, Yen-Po; Tsao, Thomas Chang-Yao; Tsao, Shih-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is essential for eradicating tuberculosis (TB). Moreover, the patient adherence is crucial in determining the effectiveness of TB control. Isoniazid given by DOTS daily for 9 months (9H) is the standard treatment for LTBI in Taiwan. However, the completion rate is low due to the long treatment period and its side effects. The combined regimen using a high dose of rifapentine/isoniazid once weekly for 12 weeks (3HP) has been used as an alternative treatment option for LTBI in the United States. This may result in a higher completion rate. In this pilot study, patient adherence and cost of these 2 treatment regimens were investigated. Thus, we aimed to assess the treatment completion rate and costs of 3HP and compare to those with 9H.Data from 691 cases of LTBI treatments including 590 cases using the conventional regimen and 101 cases with rifapentine/Isoniazid were collected. The cost was the sum of the cost of treatment with Isoniazid for 9 months or with rifapentin/Isoniazid for 3 months of all contacts. The effectiveness was the cost of cases of tuberculosis avoided.In this study, the treatment completion rate for patients prescribed with the 3 months rifapentine/isoniazid regimen (97.03%) was higher than those given the conventional 9-month isoniazid regimen (87.29%) (P <0.001). The cost of 3HP and 9H was US$261.24 and US$717.3, respectively. The cost-effectiveness ratio with isoniazid for 9 months was US$ 15392/avoided 1 case of tuberculosis and US$ 5225/avoided 1 case of tuberculosis with 3HP. In addition, when compared with the conventional regimen, there were fewer patients discontinued with rifapentine/isoniazid regimen due to undesirable side effects.This was the first study to compare the 2 treatment regimens in Taiwan, and it showed that a short-term high-dosage rifapentine/isoniazid treatment regimen reduced costs and resulted in higher treatment completion than the standard LTBI isoniazid treatment.

  16. Toll-Like Receptor 7 Agonist GS-9620 Induces HIV Expression and HIV-Specific Immunity in Cells from HIV-Infected Individuals on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Angela; Irrinki, Alivelu; Kaur, Jasmine; Cihlar, Tomas; Kukolj, George; Sloan, Derek D; Murry, Jeffrey P

    2017-02-08

    Antiretroviral therapy can suppress HIV replication to undetectable levels but does not eliminate latent HIV, thus necessitating lifelong therapy. Recent efforts to target this persistent reservoir have focused on inducing the expression of latent HIV so that infected cells may be recognized and eliminated by the immune system. Toll like receptor (TLR) activation stimulates antiviral immunity and has been shown to induce HIV from latently infected cells. Activation of TLR7 leads to the production of several stimulatory cytokines, including type I interferons (IFNs). In this study, we show that the selective TLR7 agonist, GS-9620, induced HIV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HIV-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. GS-9620 increased extracellular HIV RNA 1.5-2-fold through a mechanism that required type I IFN signaling. GS-9620 also activated HIV-specific T cells and enhanced antibody-mediated clearance of HIV-infected cells. Activation by GS-9620 in combination with HIV peptide stimulation increased CD8 T cell degranulation, production of intracellular cytokines, and cytolytic activity. T cell activation was again dependent on type I IFNs produced by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. GS-9620 induced phagocytic cell maturation and improved effector-mediated killing of HIV-infected CD4 T cells by the HIV envelope-specific broadly neutralizing antibody PGT121. Collectively, these data show that GS-9620 can activate HIV production and improve the effector functions that target latently infected cells. GS-9620 may effectively complement orthogonal therapies designed to stimulate antiviral immunity, such as therapeutic vaccines or broadly neutralizing antibodies. Clinical studies are underway to determine if GS-9620 can target HIV reservoirs.IMPORTANCE Though antiretroviral therapies effectively suppress viral replication, they do not eliminate integrated proviral DNA. This stable intermediate of viral infection is persistently

  17. Toll-Like Receptor 7 Agonist GS-9620 Induces HIV Expression and HIV-Specific Immunity in Cells from HIV-Infected Individuals on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Angela; Irrinki, Alivelu; Kaur, Jasmine; Cihlar, Tomas; Kukolj, George

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antiretroviral therapy can suppress HIV replication to undetectable levels but does not eliminate latent HIV, thus necessitating lifelong therapy. Recent efforts to target this persistent reservoir have focused on inducing the expression of latent HIV so that infected cells may be recognized and eliminated by the immune system. Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation stimulates antiviral immunity and has been shown to induce HIV from latently infected cells. Activation of TLR7 leads to the production of several stimulatory cytokines, including type I interferons (IFNs). In this study, we show that the selective TLR7 agonist GS-9620 induced HIV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HIV-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. GS-9620 increased extracellular HIV RNA 1.5- to 2-fold through a mechanism that required type I IFN signaling. GS-9620 also activated HIV-specific T cells and enhanced antibody-mediated clearance of HIV-infected cells. Activation by GS-9620 in combination with HIV peptide stimulation increased CD8 T cell degranulation, production of intracellular cytokines, and cytolytic activity. T cell activation was again dependent on type I IFNs produced by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. GS-9620 induced phagocytic cell maturation and improved effector-mediated killing of HIV-infected CD4 T cells by the HIV envelope-specific broadly neutralizing antibody PGT121. Collectively, these data show that GS-9620 can activate HIV production and improve the effector functions that target latently infected cells. GS-9620 may effectively complement orthogonal therapies designed to stimulate antiviral immunity, such as therapeutic vaccines or broadly neutralizing antibodies. Clinical studies are under way to determine if GS-9620 can target HIV reservoirs. IMPORTANCE Though antiretroviral therapies effectively suppress viral replication, they do not eliminate integrated proviral DNA. This stable intermediate of viral infection is

  18. Properties of the pacemaker current (If) in latent pacemaker cells isolated from cat right atrium.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Z; Lipsius, S L

    1992-01-01

    1. Single latent pacemaker cells were isolated from the Eustachian ridge of cat right atrium using Langendorff perfusion and enzyme dispersion techniques. Whole-cell patch-clamp techniques were used to study the hyperpolarization-activated inward current (I(f)). 2. All cells studied beat rhythmically. Pacemaker activity was recorded in the voltage range -68 +/- 1 to -54 +/- 2 mV and its cycle length was 901 +/- 67 ms (72 +/- 5 beats min-1) at 34-36 degrees C. Cells were elongated with tapered ends, and appeared bent or crinkled without obvious striations. Mean cell diameter and length were 7.4 +/- 0.5 microns and 93.1 +/- 5.9 microns, respectively (n = 15). Input resistance and total membrane capacitance were 2.2 +/- 0.2 G omega and 27.8 +/- 3.1 pF, respectively. 3. Hyperpolarizing clamp steps more negative than -50 mV elicited a time-dependent increasing inward current that was maximally activated at -120 mV. Activation of I(f) was well within the pacemaker voltage range. Half-maximal activation voltage and slope factor were calculated, using a Boltzmann function, to be -80.5 mV and 8.4, respectively. 4. The fully activated current-voltage (I-V) relationship was approximately linear at voltages more negative than -30 mV and showed outward rectification at more positive voltages. The reversal potential of I(f) was -26 mV and the fully activated conductance was 1.75 +/- 0.14 nS (n = 21). Caesium (2 mM) blocked I(f) at voltages more negative than the reversal potential. Reducing extracellular Na+ or K+ shifted the reversal potential more negative, and increasing extracellular K+ exerted the opposite effect. Reducing extracellular Na+ decreased I(f) amplitude and the slope of the fully activated I-V relationship, and elevated extracellular K+ increased I(f) amplitude and the slope of the fully activated I-V relationship. 5. Some pacemaker cells exhibited a short delay in the onset of I(f) activation whereas other pacemaker cells exhibited little, if any, delay in

  19. Development of a Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction Detection Protocol for Cercospora kikuchii in Soybean Leaves and Its Use for Documenting Latent Infection as Affected by Fungicide Applications.

    PubMed

    Chanda, A K; Ward, N A; Robertson, C L; Chen, Z-Y; Schneider, R W

    2014-10-01

    Cercospora leaf blight (CLB) of soybean, caused by Cercospora kikuchii, is a serious disease in the southern United States. A sensitive TaqMan probe-based real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was developed to specifically detect and quantify C. kikuchii in naturally infected soybean plants. The sensitivity was 1 pg of genomic DNA, which was equivalent to about 34 copies of genome of C. kikuchii. Using this qPCR assay, we documented a very long latent infection period for C. kikuchii in soybean leaves beginning at the V3 growth stage (as early as 22 days after planting). The levels of biomass of C. kikuchii remained low until R1, and a rapid increase was detected from the R2/R3 to R4/R5 growth stages shortly before the appearance of symptoms at R6. The efficacy of various fungicide regimens under field conditions also was evaluated over a 3-year period using this qPCR method. Our results showed that multiple fungicide applications beginning at R1 until late reproductive stages suppressed the development of C. kikuchii in leaves and delayed symptom expression. Different fungicide chemistries also had differential effects on the amount of latent infection and symptom expression during late reproductive growth stages.

  20. Dengue Virus Infection Perturbs Lipid Homeostasis in Infected Mosquito Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Rushika M.; Riley, Catherine; Isaac, Georgis; Hopf- Jannasch, Amber; Moore, Ronald J.; Weitz, Karl K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Metz, Thomas O.; Adamec, Jiri; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2012-03-22

    Dengue virus causes {approx}50-100 million infections per year and thus is considered one of the most aggressive arthropod-borne human pathogen worldwide. During its replication, dengue virus induces dramatic alterations in the intracellular membranes of infected cells. This phenomenon is observed both in human and vector-derived cells. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry of mosquito cells, we show that this membrane remodeling is directly linked to a unique lipid repertoire induced by dengue virus infection. Specifically, 15% of the metabolites detected were significantly different between DENV infected and uninfected cells while 85% of the metabolites detected were significantly different in isolated replication complex membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that intracellular lipid redistribution induced by the inhibition of fatty acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in lipid biosynthesis, is sufficient for cell survival but is inhibitory to dengue virus replication. Lipids that have the capacity to destabilize and change the curvature of membranes as well as lipids that change the permeability of membranes are enriched in dengue virus infected cells. Several sphingolipids and other bioactive signaling molecules that are involved in controlling membrane fusion, fission, and trafficking as well as molecules that influence cytoskeletal reorganization are also up regulated during dengue infection. These observations shed light on the emerging role of lipids in shaping the membrane and protein environments during viral infections and suggest membrane-organizing principles that may influence virus-induced intracellular membrane architecture.

  1. Activation of latent HIV using drug-loaded nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kovochich, Michael; Marsden, Matthew D; Zack, Jerome A

    2011-04-05

    Antiretroviral therapy is currently only capable of controlling HIV replication rather than completely eradicating virus from patients. This is due in part to the establishment of a latent virus reservoir in resting CD4+ T cells, which persists even in the presence of HAART. It is thought that forced activation of latently infected cells could induce virus production, allowing targeting of the cell by the immune response. A variety of molecules are able to stimulate HIV from latency. However no tested purging strategy has proven capable of eliminating the infection completely or preventing viral rebound if therapy is stopped. Hence novel latency activation approaches are required. Nanoparticles can offer several advantages over more traditional drug delivery methods, including improved drug solubility, stability, and the ability to simultaneously target multiple different molecules to particular cell or tissue types. Here we describe the development of a novel lipid nanoparticle with the protein kinase C activator bryostatin-2 incorporated (LNP-Bry). These particles can target and activate primary human CD4+ T-cells and stimulate latent virus production from human T-cell lines in vitro and from latently infected cells in a humanized mouse model ex vivo. This activation was synergistically enhanced by the HDAC inhibitor sodium butyrate. Furthermore, LNP-Bry can also be loaded with the protease inhibitor nelfinavir (LNP-Bry-Nel), producing a particle capable of both activating latent virus and inhibiting viral spread. Taken together these data demonstrate the ability of nanotechnological approaches to provide improved methods for activating latent HIV and provide key proof-of-principle experiments showing how novel delivery systems may enhance future HIV therapy.

  2. A remarkable synergistic effect at the transcriptomic level in peach fruits doubly infected by prunus necrotic ringspot virus and peach latent mosaic viroid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Microarray profiling is a powerful technique to investigate expression changes of large amounts of genes in response to specific environmental conditions. The majority of the studies investigating gene expression changes in virus-infected plants are limited to interactions between a virus and a model host plant, which usually is Arabidopsis thaliana or Nicotiana benthamiana. In the present work, we performed microarray profiling to explore changes in the expression profile of field-grown Prunus persica (peach) originating from Chile upon single and double infection with Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) and Peach latent mosaic viroid (PLMVd), worldwide natural pathogens of peach trees. Results Upon single PLMVd or PNRSV infection, the number of statistically significant gene expression changes was relatively low. By contrast, doubly-infected fruits presented a high number of differentially regulated genes. Among these, down-regulated genes were prevalent. Functional categorization of the gene expression changes upon double PLMVd and PNRSV infection revealed protein modification and degradation as the functional category with the highest percentage of repressed genes whereas induced genes encoded mainly proteins related to phosphate, C-compound and carbohydrate metabolism and also protein modification. Overrepresentation analysis upon double infection with PLMVd and PNRSV revealed specific functional categories over- and underrepresented among the repressed genes indicating active counter-defense mechanisms of the pathogens during infection. Conclusions Our results identify a novel synergistic effect of PLMVd and PNRSV on the transcriptome of peach fruits. We demonstrate that mixed infections, which occur frequently in field conditions, result in a more complex transcriptional response than that observed in single infections. Thus, our data demonstrate for the first time that the simultaneous infection of a viroid and a plant virus synergistically

  3. Cell-to-cell infection by HIV contributes over half of virus infection.

    PubMed

    Iwami, Shingo; Takeuchi, Junko S; Nakaoka, Shinji; Mammano, Fabrizio; Clavel, François; Inaba, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Misawa, Naoko; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Sato, Kei

    2015-10-06

    Cell-to-cell viral infection, in which viruses spread through contact of infected cell with surrounding uninfected cells, has been considered as a critical mode of virus infection. However, since it is technically difficult to experimentally discriminate the two modes of viral infection, namely cell-free infection and cell-to-cell infection, the quantitative information that underlies cell-to-cell infection has yet to be elucidated, and its impact on virus spread remains unclear. To address this fundamental question in virology, we quantitatively analyzed the dynamics of cell-to-cell and cell-free human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections through experimental-mathematical investigation. Our analyses demonstrated that the cell-to-cell infection mode accounts for approximately 60% of viral infection, and this infection mode shortens the generation time of viruses by 0.9 times and increases the viral fitness by 3.9 times. Our results suggest that even a complete block of the cell-free infection would provide only a limited impact on HIV-1 spread.

  4. Kaposi's Sarcoma Herpesvirus MicroRNAs Induce Metabolic Transformation of Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yogev, Ohad; Lagos, Dimitris; Enver, Tariq; Boshoff, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Altered cell metabolism is inherently connected with pathological conditions including cancer and viral infections. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). KS tumour cells display features of lymphatic endothelial differentiation and in their vast majority are latently infected with KSHV, while a small number are lytically infected, producing virions. Latently infected cells express only a subset of viral genes, mainly located within the latency-associated region, among them 12 microRNAs. Notably, the metabolic properties of KSHV-infected cells closely resemble the metabolic hallmarks of cancer cells. However, how and why KSHV alters host cell metabolism remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the effect of KSHV infection on the metabolic profile of primary dermal microvascular lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) and the functional relevance of this effect. We found that the KSHV microRNAs within the oncogenic cluster collaborate to decrease mitochondria biogenesis and to induce aerobic glycolysis in infected cells. KSHV microRNAs expression decreases oxygen consumption, increase lactate secretion and glucose uptake, stabilize HIF1α and decreases mitochondria copy number. Importantly this metabolic shift is important for latency maintenance and provides a growth advantage. Mechanistically we show that KSHV alters host cell energy metabolism through microRNA-mediated down regulation of EGLN2 and HSPA9. Our data suggest that the KSHV microRNAs induce a metabolic transformation by concurrent regulation of two independent pathways; transcriptional reprograming via HIF1 activation and reduction of mitochondria biogenesis through down regulation of the mitochondrial import machinery. These findings implicate viral microRNAs in the regulation of the cellular metabolism and highlight new potential avenues to inhibit viral latency. PMID:25255370

  5. HCV Infection and B-Cell Lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Masahiko; Kusunoki, Hideki; Mochida, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Kazunari; Mizuochi, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been recognized as a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. It has been suggested that HCV infects not only hepatocytes but also mononuclear lymphocytes including B cells that express the CD81 molecule, a putative HCV receptor. HCV infection of B cells is the likely cause of B-cell dysregulation disorders such as mixed cryoglobulinemia, rheumatoid factor production, and B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders that may evolve into non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Epidemiological data indicate an association between HCV chronic infection and the occurrence of B-cell NHL, suggesting that chronic HCV infection is associated at least in part with B-cell lymphomagenesis. In this paper, we aim to provide an overview of recent literature, including our own, to elucidate a possible role of HCV chronic infection in B-cell lymphomagenesis. PMID:21789042

  6. EBV Latent Membrane Protein 1 Activates Akt, NFκB, and Stat3 in B Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Shair, Kathy H. Y; Bendt, Katherine M; Edwards, Rachel H; Bedford, Elisabeth C; Nielsen, Judith N; Raab-Traub, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is the major oncoprotein of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In transgenic mice, LMP1 promotes increased lymphoma development by 12 mo of age. This study reveals that lymphoma develops in B-1a lymphocytes, a population that is associated with transformation in older mice. The lymphoma cells have deregulated cell cycle markers, and inhibitors of Akt, NFκB, and Stat3 block the enhanced viability of LMP1 transgenic lymphocytes and lymphoma cells in vitro. Lymphoma cells are independent of IL4/Stat6 signaling for survival and proliferation, but have constitutively activated Stat3 signaling. These same targets are also deregulated in wild-type B-1a lymphomas that arise spontaneously through age predisposition. These results suggest that Akt, NFκB, and Stat3 pathways may serve as effective targets in the treatment of EBV-associated B cell lymphomas. PMID:17997602

  7. PET CT Identifies Reactivation Risk in Cynomolgus Macaques with Latent M. tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Philana Ling; Maiello, Pauline; Gideon, Hannah P.; Cadena, Anthony M.; Rodgers, Mark A.; Gregg, Robert; O’Malley, Melanie; Fillmore, Daniel; Frye, L. James; Rutledge, Tara; DiFazio, Robert M.; Janssen, Christopher; Klein, Edwin; Andersen, Peter L.; Fortune, Sarah M.; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection presents across a spectrum in humans, from latent infection to active tuberculosis. Among those with latent tuberculosis, it is now recognized that there is also a spectrum of infection and this likely contributes to the variable risk of reactivation tuberculosis. Here, functional imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxygluose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET CT) of cynomolgus macaques with latent M. tuberculosis infection was used to characterize the features of reactivation after tumor necrosis factor (TNF) neutralization and determine which imaging characteristics before TNF neutralization distinguish reactivation risk. PET CT was performed on latently infected macaques (n = 26) before and during the course of TNF neutralization and a separate set of latently infected controls (n = 25). Reactivation occurred in 50% of the latently infected animals receiving TNF neutralizing antibody defined as development of at least one new granuloma in adjacent or distant locations including extrapulmonary sites. Increased lung inflammation measured by PET and the presence of extrapulmonary involvement before TNF neutralization predicted reactivation with 92% sensitivity and specificity. To define the biologic features associated with risk of reactivation, we used these PET CT parameters to identify latently infected animals at high risk for reactivation. High risk animals had higher cumulative lung bacterial burden and higher maximum lesional bacterial burdens, and more T cells producing IL-2, IL-10 and IL-17 in lung granulomas as compared to low risk macaques. In total, these data support that risk of reactivation is associated with lung inflammation and higher bacterial burden in macaques with latent Mtb infection. PMID:27379816

  8. Extracellular heat shock protein HSP90beta secreted by MG63 osteosarcoma cells inhibits activation of latent TGF-beta1.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shigeki; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2010-07-30

    Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1) is secreted as a latent complex, which consists of latency-associated peptide (LAP) and the mature ligand. The release of the mature ligand from LAP usually occurs through conformational change of the latent complex and is therefore considered to be the first step in the activation of the TGF-beta signaling pathway. So far, factors such as heat, pH changes, and proteolytic cleavage are reportedly involved in this activation process, but the precise molecular mechanism is still far from clear. Identification and characterization of the cell surface proteins that bind to LAP are important to our understanding of the latent TGF-beta activation process. In this study, we have identified heat shock protein 90 beta (HSP90beta) from the cell surface of the MG63 osteosarcoma cell line as a LAP binding protein. We have also found that MG63 cells secrete HSP90beta into extracellular space which inhibits the activation of latent TGF-beta1, and that there is a subsequent decrease in cell proliferation. TGF-beta1-mediated stimulation of MG63 cells resulted in the increased cell surface expression of HSP90beta. Thus, extracellular HSP90beta is a negative regulator for the activation of latent TGF-beta1 modulating TGF-beta signaling in the extracellular domain.

  9. The assessment of cytokines in Quantiferon supernatants for the diagnosis of latent TB infection in a tribal population of Melghat, India.

    PubMed

    Bapat, Prachi R; Husain, Aliabbas A; Daginawala, Hatim F; Agrawal, Neha P; Panchbhai, Milind S; Satav, Ashish R; Taori, Girdhar M; Kashyap, Rajpal S

    2015-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma release assays (IGRA), namely, the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test (QFT), remain the standard immunological diagnostic tools for latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI). However, the sub-optimal detection rates of both of these tests are major impediments in recognizing the population at risk. This study was aimed at evaluating additional cytokines besides interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) as biomarkers for improving LTBI diagnosis in the tribal population of Melghat, India. Seventy-four close TB contacts were stratified by QFT and TST results into: (i) QFT+/TST+ (n = 26), (ii) QFT+/TST- (n = 12), (iii) QFT-/TST- (n = 35) and (iv) QFT-/TST+ (n = 1) groups. A panel of cytokines (IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and IL-2R) was then evaluated in antigen-stimulated QFT cell-free culture supernatants using IMMULITE-1000, an automated immunoassay analyzer. Cytokine estimation showed significantly higher levels of IL-6 in the QFT+/TST+ group, while significantly higher levels of IL-10 were found in the QFT-/TST- group. Correlation analysis identified a positive correlation between IL-6 and the QFT response (r = 0.6723, P < 0.0001), while a negative correlation was seen between QFT and IL-10 expression (r = -0.3271, P = 0.0044). Similarly, IL-6 was positively correlated with TST levels (r = 0.6631, P <0 .0001), and conversely, a negative correlation was found between TST and IL-10 expression (r = -0.5698, P < 0.0001). The positive and negative predictive values of IL-6 were found to be 92.59 and 93.33%, respectively, and the positive and negative predictive values of IL-10 were 96.55 and 91.18%, respectively. No significant impact of the demographic characteristics on cytokine positivity was observed. Our preliminary results suggest that the evaluation of additional cytokines in QFT cell-free culture supernatants may be valuable for the identification of LTBI. Combining IL-6 and IL-10 with QFT and/or TST could markedly improve the detection

  10. Epstein-Barr Virus Infection of Polarized Epithelial Cells via the Basolateral Surface by Memory B Cell-Mediated Transfer Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shannon-Lowe, Claire; Rowe, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV) exhibits a distinct tropism for both B cells and epithelial cells. The virus persists as a latent infection of memory B cells in healthy individuals, but a role for infection of normal epithelial is also likely. Infection of B cells is initiated by the interaction of the major EBV glycoprotein gp350 with CD21 on the B cell surface. Fusion is triggered by the interaction of the EBV glycoprotein, gp42 with HLA class II, and is thereafter mediated by the core fusion complex, gH/gL/gp42. In contrast, direct infection of CD21-negative epithelial cells is inefficient, but efficient infection can be achieved by a process called transfer infection. In this study, we characterise the molecular interactions involved in the three stages of transfer infection of epithelial cells: (i) CD21-mediated co-capping of EBV and integrins on B cells, and activation of the adhesion molecules, (ii) conjugate formation between EBV-loaded B cells and epithelial cells via the capped adhesion molecules, and (iii) interaction of EBV glycoproteins with epithelial cells, with subsequent fusion and uptake of virions. Infection of epithelial cells required the EBV gH and gL glycoproteins, but not gp42. Using an in vitro model of normal polarized epithelia, we demonstrated that polarization of the EBV receptor(s) and adhesion molecules restricted transfer infection to the basolateral surface. Furthermore, the adhesions between EBV-loaded B cells and the basolateral surface of epithelial cells included CD11b on the B cell interacting with heparan sulphate moieties of CD44v3 and LEEP-CAM on epithelial cells. Consequently, transfer infection was efficiently mediated via CD11b-positive memory B cells but not by CD11b–negative naïve B cells. Together, these findings have important implications for understanding the mechanisms of EBV infection of normal and pre-malignant epithelial cells in vivo. PMID:21573183

  11. A highly reproducible quantitative viral outgrowth assay for the measurement of the replication-competent latent HIV-1 reservoir.

    PubMed

    Fun, Axel; Mok, Hoi Ping; Wills, Mark R; Lever, Andrew M

    2017-02-24

    Cure of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection remains elusive due to the persistence of HIV in a latent reservoir. Strategies to eradicate latent infection can only be evaluated with robust, sensitive and specific assays to quantitate reactivatable latent virus. We have taken the standard peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) based viral outgrowth methodology and from it created a logistically simpler and more highly reproducible assay to quantify replication-competent latent HIV in resting CD4(+) T cells, both increasing accuracy and decreasing cost and labour. Purification of resting CD4(+) T cells from whole PBMC is expedited and achieved in 3 hours, less than half the time of conventional protocols. Our indicator cell line, SupT1-CCR5 cells (a clonal cell line expressing CD4, CXCR4 and CCR5) provides a readily available standardised readout. Reproducibility compares favourably to other published assays but with reduced cost, labour and assay heterogeneity without compromising sensitivity.

  12. A highly reproducible quantitative viral outgrowth assay for the measurement of the replication-competent latent HIV-1 reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Fun, Axel; Mok, Hoi Ping; Wills, Mark R.; Lever, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    Cure of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection remains elusive due to the persistence of HIV in a latent reservoir. Strategies to eradicate latent infection can only be evaluated with robust, sensitive and specific assays to quantitate reactivatable latent virus. We have taken the standard peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) based viral outgrowth methodology and from it created a logistically simpler and more highly reproducible assay to quantify replication-competent latent HIV in resting CD4+ T cells, both increasing accuracy and decreasing cost and labour. Purification of resting CD4+ T cells from whole PBMC is expedited and achieved in 3 hours, less than half the time of conventional protocols. Our indicator cell line, SupT1-CCR5 cells (a clonal cell line expressing CD4, CXCR4 and CCR5) provides a readily available standardised readout. Reproducibility compares favourably to other published assays but with reduced cost, labour and assay heterogeneity without compromising sensitivity. PMID:28233807

  13. Infection, stem cells and cancer signals.

    PubMed

    Sell, S

    2011-02-01

    The association of cancer with preceding parasitic infections has been observed for over 200 years. Some such cancers arise from infection of tissue stem cells by viruses with insertion of viral oncogenes into the host DNA (mouse polyoma virus, mouse mammary tumor virus). In other cases the virus does not insert its DNA into the host cells, but rather commandeers the metabolism of the infected cells, so that the cells continue to proliferate and do not differentiate (human papilloma virus and cervical cancer). Cytoplasmic Epstein Barr virus infection is associated with a specific gene translocation (Ig/c-myc) that activates proliferation of affected cells (Burkitt lymphoma). In chronic osteomyelitis an inflammatory reaction to the infection appears to act through production of inflammatory cytokines and oxygen radical formation to induce epithelial cancers. Infection with Helicobacter pylori leads to epigenetic changes in methylation and infection by a parasite. Clonorchis sinensis also acts as a promoter of cancer of the bile ducts of the liver (cholaniocarcinoma). The common thread among these diverse pathways is that the infections act to alter tissue stem cell signaling with continued proliferation of tumor transit amplifying cells.

  14. Infection, Stem Cells and Cancer Signals

    PubMed Central

    Sell, S.

    2013-01-01

    The association of cancer with preceding parasitic infections has been observed for over 200 years. Some such cancers arise from infection of tissue stem cells by viruses with insertion of viral oncogenes into the host DNA (mouse polyoma virus, mouse mammary tumor virus). In other cases the virus does not insert its DNA into the host cells, but rather commandeers the metabolism of the infected cells, so that the cells continue to proliferate and do not differentiate (human papilloma virus and cervical cancer). Cytoplasmic Epstein Barr virus infection is associated with a specific gene translocation (Ig/c-myc) that activates proliferation of affected cells (Burkitt lymphoma). In chronic osteomyelitis an inflammatory reaction to the infection appears to act through production of inflammatory cytokines and oxygen radical formation to induce epithelial cancers. Infection with Helicobacter pylori leads to epigenetic changes in methylation and infection by a parasite. Clonorchis sinensis also acts as a promoter of cancer of the bile ducts of the liver (cholaniocarcinoma). The common thread among these diverse pathways is that the infections act to alter tissue stem cell signaling with continued proliferation of tumor transit amplifying cells. PMID:21044009

  15. Plausibility of HIV-1 Infection of Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Herzberg, M.C.; Vacharaksa, A.; Gebhard, K.H.; Giacaman, R.A.; Ross, K.F.

    2011-01-01

    The AIDS pandemic continues. Little is understood about how HIV gains access to permissive cells across mucosal surfaces, yet such knowledge is crucial to the development of successful topical anti-HIV-1 agents and mucosal vaccines. HIV-1 rapidly internalizes and integrates into the mucosal keratinocyte genome, and integrated copies of HIV-1 persist upon cell passage. The virus does not appear to replicate, and the infection may become latent. Interactions between HIV-1 and oral keratinocytes have been modeled in the context of key environmental factors, including putative copathogens and saliva. In keratinocytes, HIV-1 internalizes within minutes; in saliva, an infectious fraction escapes inactivation and is harbored and transferable to permissive target cells for up to 48 hours. When incubated with the common oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, CCR5− oral keratinocytes signal through protease-activated receptors and Toll-like receptors to induce expression of CCR5, which increases selective uptake of infectious R5-tropic HIV-1 into oral keratinocytes and transfer to permissive cells. Hence, oral keratinocytes—like squamous keratinocytes of other tissues—may be targets for low-level HIV-1 internalization and subsequent dissemination by transfer to permissive cells. PMID:21441479

  16. Sensitivity and specificity of PCR analysis and bacteriological culture of milk samples for identification of intramammary infections in dairy cows using latent class analysis.

    PubMed

    Nyman, A-K; Persson Waller, K; Emanuelson, U; Frössling, J

    2016-12-01

    Real-time PCR analysis of milk samples is a fast method to identify intramammary infections (IMI) in dairy cows, and has the potential to be used for routine analysis of test milking composite milk samples. However, the results of the PCR analysis can be difficult to interpret. The objective of this study was to compare the sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of PCR analysis of composite milk samples, and conventional bacteriological culturing (BC) of quarter milk samples, when used to identify cows with IMI. The comparisons were performed for IMI with four common udder pathogens; Staphylococcus aureus (S aureus), Streptococcus dysgalactiae (Str dysgalactiae), Str uberis and coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS). The Se and Sp of real-time PCR (SePCR; SpPCR) and BC (SeBC; SpBC) was simultaneously estimated using latent class analysis (LCA), studying one pathogen at the time. Milk samples from 970 dairy cows from 25 herds were included. Aseptically collected quarter milk samples taken at the day before test milking (TM), at the day of TM, and at the day after TM, were analyzed using BC. Non-aseptically collected composite milk samples taken at the day of TM were analyzed using PCR. Moreover, the composite milk somatic cell count (SCC) was recorded and summarized by diagnostic test and bacterial finding. LCA was first performed using only test results from samples taken at the day of TM, but in a second analysis BC results from the three consecutive samplings, interpreted in parallel, were included. The SePCR was significantly higher than the SeBC for S aureus, Str dysgalactiae and CoNS in the first analysis, but only for CoNS in the second analysis. The SpPCR was significantly lower than the SpBC for Str dysgalactiae and CoNS. In conclusion, using PCR analysis of composite milk samples, as a diagnostic tool for identifying cows with IMI increased the Se for all the pathogens investigated (although not always significantly), while Sp in general remained on a

  17. Quantitative Comparison of Active and Latent Tuberculosis in the Cynomolgus Macaque Model▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Philana Ling; Rodgers, Mark; Smith, Le'kneitah; Bigbee, Matthew; Myers, Amy; Bigbee, Carolyn; Chiosea, Ion; Capuano, Saverio V.; Fuhrman, Carl; Klein, Edwin; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2009-01-01

    We previously described that low-dose Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in cynomolgus macaques results in a spectrum of disease similar to that of human infection: primary disease, latent infection, and reactivation tuberculosis (S. V. Capuano III, D. A. Croix, S. Pawar, A. Zinovik, A. Myers, P. L. Lin, S. Bissel, C. Fuhrman, E. Klein, and J. L. Flynn, Infect. Immun. 71:5831-5844, 2003). This is the only established model of latent infection, and it provides a unique opportunity to understand host and pathogen differences across of range of disease states. Here, we provide a more extensive and detailed characterization of the gross pathology, microscopic histopathology, and immunologic characteristics of monkeys in each clinical disease category. The data underscore the similarities between human and nonhuman primate M. tuberculosis infection. Furthermore, we describe novel methods of quantifying gross pathology and bacterial burden that distinguish between active disease and latent infection, and we extend the usefulness of this model for comparative studies. Early in infection, an abnormal chest X ray, M. tuberculosis growth by gastric aspirate, and increased mycobacterium-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells were associated with the development of active disease. At necropsy, disease was quantified with respect to pathology and bacterial numbers. Microscopically, a spectrum of granuloma types are seen and differ with disease type. At necropsy, monkeys with active disease had more lung T cells and more IFN-γ from PBMC, BAL, and mediastinal lymph nodes than monkeys with latent infection. Finally, we have observed a spectrum of disease not only in monkeys with active disease but also in those with latent infection that provides insight into human latent tuberculosis. PMID:19620341

  18. Extracellular heat shock protein HSP90{beta} secreted by MG63 osteosarcoma cells inhibits activation of latent TGF-{beta}1

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Shigeki; Kulkarni, Ashok B.

    2010-07-30

    Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) is secreted as a latent complex, which consists of latency-associated peptide (LAP) and the mature ligand. The release of the mature ligand from LAP usually occurs through conformational change of the latent complex and is therefore considered to be the first step in the activation of the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway. So far, factors such as heat, pH changes, and proteolytic cleavage are reportedly involved in this activation process, but the precise molecular mechanism is still far from clear. Identification and characterization of the cell surface proteins that bind to LAP are important to our understanding of the latent TGF-{beta} activation process. In this study, we have identified heat shock protein 90 {beta} (HSP90{beta}) from the cell surface of the MG63 osteosarcoma cell line as a LAP binding protein. We have also found that MG63 cells secrete HSP90{beta} into extracellular space which inhibits the activation of latent TGF-{beta}1, and that there is a subsequent decrease in cell proliferation. TGF-{beta}1-mediated stimulation of MG63 cells resulted in the increased cell surface expression of HSP90{beta}. Thus, extracellular HSP90{beta} is a negative regulator for the activation of latent TGF-{beta}1 modulating TGF-{beta} signaling in the extracellular domain. -- Research highlights: {yields} Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) is secreted as a latent complex. {yields} This complex consists of latency-associated peptide (LAP) and the mature ligand. {yields} The release of the mature ligand from LAP is the first step in TGF-{beta} activation. {yields} We identified for the first time a novel mechanism for this activation process. {yields} Heat shock protein 90 {beta} is discovered as a negative regulator for this process.

  19. Relationship between measures of HIV reactivation and the decline of latent reservoir under latency-reversing agents.

    PubMed

    Petravic, Janka; Rasmussen, Thomas A; Lewin, Sharon R; Kent, Stephen J; Davenport, Miles P

    2017-02-15

    Antiretroviral-free HIV remission requires substantial reduction of the number of latently infected cells and enhanced immune control of viremia. Latency-reversing agents (LRA) aim to eliminate latently infected cells by increasing the rate of reactivation of HIV transcription, which exposes these cells to killing by the immune system. As LRA are explored in clinical trials, it becomes increasingly important to assess the effect of increased HIV reactivation rate on the decline of latently infected cells, and estimate LRA efficacy in increasing virus reactivation. However, whether the extent of HIV reactivation is a good predictor of the rate of decline of the number of latently infected cells is dependent on a number of factors. Our modeling shows that mechanisms of maintenance and clearance of the reservoir, lifespan of cells with reactivated HIV and other factors may significantly impact the relationship between measures of HIV reactivation and the decline of the number of latently infected cells.The usual measures of HIV reactivation are the increase in cell-associated HIV RNA (CA RNA) and/or plasma HIV RNA soon after administration. We analyze two recent studies where CA RNA was used to estimate the impact of two novel LRAs, panobinostat and romidepsin. Both drugs increased the CA RNA level 3-4 fold in clinical trials. However, cells with panobinostat-reactivated HIV appeared long-lived (half-life > month), suggesting that HIV reactivation rate increased approximately by 8%. With romidepsin, the lifespan of cells that reactivated HIV was short (2 days), suggesting that HIV reactivation rate may have doubled under treatment.Importance Long-lived latently infected cells that persist on antiretroviral treatment (ART) are thought to be the source of viral rebound soon after ART interruption. The elimination of latently infected cells is an important step to achieving antiretroviral-free HIV remission. Latency-reversing agents (LRA) aim to activate HIV expression

  20. Performance of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test and Tuberculin Skin Test for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in BCG vaccinated health care workers

    PubMed Central

    Babayigit, Cenk; Ozer, Burcin; Inandi, Tacettin; Ozer, Cahit; Duran, Nizami; Gocmen, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculin skin test (TST) has been used for years as an aid in diagnosing latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) but it suffers from a number of well-documented performance and logistic problems. Quantiferon-TB Gold In Tube test (QFT-GIT) has been reported to have better sensitivity and specifity than TST. In this study, it was aimed to compare the performance of a commercial IFN-γ release assay (QFT-GIT) with TST in the diagnosis of HCWs at risk for latent TB infection in BCG vaccinated population. Material/Methods Hundred healthy volunteer health care workers were enrolled. All were subjected to TST and QFT-GIT. Results were compared among Health Care Workers (HCWs) groups in terms of profession, workplace, working duration. Results TST is affected by previous BCG vaccinations and number of cases with QFT-GIT positivity is increased in accordance with the TST induration diameter range. QFT-GIT result was negative in 17 of 32 TST positive (≥15 mm) cases and positive in 4 of 61 cases whose TST diameters are between 6–14 mm, that is attritutable to previous BCG vaccination(s). It was negative in all cases with TST diameters between 0–5 mm. HCWs with positive QFT-GIT results were significantly older than the ones with negative results. Furthermore duration of work was significantly longer in QFT-GIT positive than in negative HCWs. Conclusions There was a moderate concordance between QFT-GIT and TST, when TST result was defined as positive with a ≥15 mm diameter of induration. We suggest that QFT-GIT can be used as an alternative to TST for detection of LTBI, especially in groups with high risk of LTBI and in population with routine BCG vaccination program. PMID:24681806

  1. Large Amounts of Reactivated Virus in Tears Precedes Recurrent Herpes Stromal Keratitis in Stressed Rabbits Latently Infected with Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Perng, Guey-Chuen; Osorio, Nelson; Jiang, Xianzhi; Geertsema, Roger; Hsiang, Chinhui; Brown, Don; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Wechsler, Steven L.

    2017-01-01

    Aim Recurrent herpetic stromal keratitis (rHSK), due to an immune response to reactivation of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1), can cause corneal blindness. The development of therapeutic interventions such as drugs and vaccines to decrease rHSK have been hampered by the lack of a small and reliable animal model in which rHSK occurs at a high frequency during HSV-1 latency. The aim of this study is to develop a rabbit model of rHSK in which stress from elevated temperatures increases the frequency of HSV-1 reactivations and rHSK. Materials and methods Rabbits latently infected with HSV-1 were subjected to elevated temperatures and the frequency of viral reactivations and rHSK were determined. Results In an experiment in which rabbits latently infected with HSV-1 were subjected to ill-defined stress as a result of failure of the vivarium air conditioning system, reactivation of HSV-1 occurred at over twice the normal frequency. In addition, 60% of eyes developed severe rHSK compared to <1% of eyes normally. All episodes of rHSK were preceded four to five days prior by an unusually large amount of reactivated virus in the tears of that eye and whenever this unusually large amount of reactivated virus was detected in tears, rHSK always appeared 4–5 days later. In subsequent experiments using well defined heat stress the reactivation frequency was similarly increased, but no eyes developed rHSK. Conclusions The results reported here support the hypothesis that rHSK is associated not simply with elevated reactivation frequency, but rather with rare episodes of very high levels of reactivated virus in tears 4–5 days earlier. PMID:25859798

  2. Prior Corneal Scarification and Injection of Immune Serum are Not Required Before Ocular HSV-1 Infection for UV-B-Induced Virus Reactivation and Recurrent Herpetic Corneal Disease in Latently Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    BenMohamed, Lbachir; Osorio, Nelson; Khan, Arif A.; Srivastava, Ruchi; Huang, Lei; Krochmal, John J.; Garcia, Jairo M.; Simpson, Jennifer L.; Wechsler, Steven L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Blinding ocular herpetic disease in humans is due to spontaneous reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) from latency, rather than to primary acute infection. Mice latently infected with HSV-1 undergo little or no in vivo spontaneous reactivation with accompanying virus shedding in tears. HSV-1 reactivation can be induced in latently infected mice by several in vivo procedures, with UV-B-induced reactivation being one commonly used method. In the UV-B model, corneas are scarified (lightly scratched) just prior to ocular infection to increase efficiency of the primary infection and immune serum containing HSV-1 neutralizing antibodies is injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) to increase survival and decrease acute corneal damage. Since scarification can significantly alter host gene transcription in the cornea and in the trigeminal ganglia (TG; the site of HSV-1 latency) and since injection of immune serum likely modulates innate and adaptive herpes immunity, we investigated eliminating both treatments. Material and Methods Mice were infected with HSV-1 with or without corneal scarification and immune serum. HSV-1 reactivation and recurrent disease were induced by UV-B irradiation. Results When corneal scarification and immune serum were both eliminated, UV-B irradiation still induced both HSV-1 reactivation, as measured by shedding of reactivated virus in tears and herpetic eye disease, albeit at reduced levels compared to the original procedure. Conclusion Despite the reduced reactivation and disease, avoidance of both corneal scarification and immune serum should improve the clinical relevance of the UV-B mouse model. PMID:26398722

  3. Intestinal immune cells in Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Trajman, A; MacDonald, T T; Elia, C C

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strongyloides stercoralis can cause a wide spectrum of disease in man, ranging from a chronic asymptomatic infection to a hyperinfective, often fatal syndrome. In rodents, spontaneous expulsion of Strongyloides spp occurs after experimental infection. Mast cells, goblet cells, and eosinophils have been identified as possible effectors of this expulsion. AIMS: To investigate intestinal histopathology and mucosal immunity in immunocompetent patients with chronic S stercoralis infection. METHODS: Jejunal biopsies were performed in 19 immunocompetent patients with a positive stool examination for S stercoralis and few or no symptoms, and in seven healthy controls. Specimens were processed for histopathological analysis and stained by the immunoperoxidase technique, using the following monoclonal antibodies: CD2, CD3, CD4, CD8, anti-T cell receptor (TcR) gamma/delta, RFD1 and RFD7 (two different macrophage markers), Ki67+ (proliferating) cells, antihuman leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, and anticollagen IV. In addition, CD25+ cells, mast cells, IgE expressing cells, calprotectin containing cells, and neutrophil elastase positive cells were stained by the alkaline phosphatase method. RESULTS: Jejunal morphology and the numbers of different T cell subsets, mast cells, IgE expressing cells, eosinophils, and goblet cells were unaffected by S stercoralis infection. Conversely, the numbers of mature macrophages and dividing enterocytes in the crypts were reduced significantly. Crypt enterocytes did not express HLA-DR in both groups. The expression of HLA-DR by villus enterocytes was also comparable in patients and controls. There were no activated (CD25+) cells in the mucosa of either patients or controls. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with seven healthy uninfected volunteers, a group of 19 Brazilians with clinically mild strongyloides infection showed no abnormality of mucosal structure and no increase in non-specific inflammatory cells. Likewise, there was no increase in

  4. Reactivation of latently infected HIV-1 viral reservoirs and correction of aberrant alternative splicing in the LMNA gene via AMPK activation: Common mechanism of action linking HIV-1 latency and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Finley, Jahahreeh

    2015-09-01

    Although the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has proven highly effective in controlling and suppressing HIV-1 replication, the persistence of latent but replication-competent proviruses in a small subset of CD4(+) memory T cells presents significant challenges to viral eradication from infected individuals. Attempts to eliminate latent reservoirs are epitomized by the 'shock and kill' approach, a strategy involving the combinatorial usage of compounds that influence epigenetic modulation and initiation of proviral transcription. However, efficient regulation of viral pre-mRNA splicing through manipulation of host cell splicing machinery is also indispensible for HIV-1 replication. Interestingly, aberrant alternative splicing of the LMNA gene via the usage of a cryptic splice site has been shown to be the cause of most cases of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a rare genetic condition characterized by an accelerated aging phenotype due to the accumulation of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. Recent evidence has shown that inhibition of the splicing factors ASF/SF2 (or SRSF1) and SRp55 (or SRSF6) leads to a reduction or an increase in progerin at both the mRNA and protein levels, respectively, thus altering the LMNA pre-mRNA splicing ratio. It is also well-established that during the latter stages of HIV-1 infection, an increase in the production and nuclear export of unspliced viral mRNA is indispensible for efficient HIV-1 replication and that the presence of ASF/SF2 leads to excessive viral pre-mRNA splicing and a reduction of unspliced mRNA, while the presence of SRp55 inhibits viral pre-mRNA splicing and aids in the generation and translation of unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs. The splicing-factor associated protein and putative mitochondrial chaperone p32 has also been shown to inhibit ASF/SF2, increase unspliced HIV-1 viral mRNA, and enhance mitochondrial DNA replication and oxidative phosphorylation. It is our hypothesis that activation of

  5. Coexistent Malnutrition Is Associated with Perturbations in Systemic and Antigen-Specific Cytokine Responses in Latent Tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Munisankar, Saravanan; Bhootra, Yukthi; Kumar, Nathalla Pavan; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Babu, Subash

    2016-04-01

    Malnutrition, as defined by low body mass index (BMI), is a major risk factor for the development of active tuberculosis (TB), although the biological basis underlying this susceptibility remains poorly characterized. To verify whether malnutrition affects the systemic and antigen-specific cytokine levels in individuals with latent TB (LTB), we examined circulating and TB antigen-stimulated levels of cytokines in individuals with LTB and low BMI (LBMI) and compared them with those in individuals with LTB and normal BMI (NBMI). Coexistent LBMI with LTB was characterized by diminished circulating levels of type 1 (gamma interferon [IFN-γ] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]), type 2 (interleukin-4 [IL-4]), type 17 (IL-22), and other proinflammatory (IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-6) cytokines but elevated levels of other type 2 (IL-5 and IL-13) and regulatory (IL-10 and transforming growth factor beta [TGF-β]) cytokines. In addition, LBMI with LTB was associated with diminished TB antigen-induced IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1α, and IL-1β levels. Finally, there was a significant positive correlation between BMI values and TNF-α and IL-1β levels and a significant negative correlation between BMI values and IL-2, IL-10, and TGF-β levels in individuals with LTB. Therefore, our data reveal that latent TB with a coexistent low BMI is characterized by diminished protective cytokine responses and heightened regulatory cytokine responses, providing a potential biological mechanism for the increased risk of developing active TB.

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of chest radiography for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) and its role in the detection of latent TB infection: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Piccazzo, Riccardo; Paparo, Francesco; Garlaschi, Giacomo

    2014-05-01

    In this systematic review we evaluate the role of chest radiography (CXR) in the diagnostic flow chart for tuberculosis (TB) infection, focusing on latent TB infection (LTBI) in patients requiring medical treatment with biological drugs. In recent findings, patients scheduled for immunomodulatory therapy with biologic drugs are a group at risk of TB reactivation and, in such patients, detection of LTBI is of great importance. CXR for diagnosis of pulmonary TB has good sensitivity, but poor specificity. Radiographic diagnosis of active disease can only be reliably made on the basis of temporal evolution of pulmonary lesions. In vivo tuberculin skin test and ex vivo interferon-γ release assays are designed to identify development of an adaptive immune response, but not necessarily LTBI. Computed tomography (CT) is able to distinguish active from inactive disease. CT is considered a complementary imaging modality to CXR in the screening procedure to detect past and LTBI infection in specific subgroups of patients who have increased risk for TB reactivation, including those scheduled for medical treatment with biological drugs.

  7. Fungal Cell Gigantism during Mammalian Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Oscar; García-Rodas, Rocío; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between fungal pathogens with the host frequently results in morphological changes, such as hyphae formation. The encapsulated pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is not considered a dimorphic fungus, and is predominantly found in host tissues as round yeast cells. However, there is a specific morphological change associated with cryptococcal infection that involves an increase in capsule volume. We now report another morphological change whereby gigantic cells are formed in tissue. The paper reports the phenotypic characterization of giant cells isolated from infected mice and the cellular changes associated with giant cell formation. C. neoformans infection in mice resulted in the appearance of giant cells with cell bodies up to 30 µm in diameter and capsules resistant to stripping with γ-radiation and organic solvents. The proportion of giant cells ranged from 10 to 80% of the total lung fungal burden, depending on infection time, individual mice, and correlated with the type of immune response. When placed on agar, giant cells budded to produce small daughter cells that traversed the capsule of the mother cell at the speed of 20–50 m/h. Giant cells with dimensions that approximated those in vivo were observed in vitro after prolonged culture in minimal media, and were the oldest in the culture, suggesting that giant cell formation is an aging-dependent phenomenon. Giant cells recovered from mice displayed polyploidy, suggesting a mechanism by which gigantism results from cell cycle progression without cell fission. Giant cell formation was dependent on cAMP, but not on Ras1. Real-time imaging showed that giant cells were engaged, but not engulfed by phagocytic cells. We describe a remarkable new strategy for C. neoformans to evade the immune response by enlarging cell size, and suggest that gigantism results from replication without fission, a phenomenon that may also occur with other fungal pathogens. PMID:20585557

  8. Fungal cell gigantism during mammalian infection.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Oscar; García-Rodas, Rocío; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-06-17

    The interaction between fungal pathogens with the host frequently results in morphological changes, such as hyphae formation. The encapsulated pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is not considered a dimorphic fungus, and is predominantly found in host tissues as round yeast cells. However, there is a specific morphological change associated with cryptococcal infection that involves an increase in capsule volume. We now report another morphological change whereby gigantic cells are formed in tissue. The paper reports the phenotypic characterization of giant cells isolated from infected mice and the cellular changes associated with giant cell formation. C. neoformans infection in mice resulted in the appearance of giant cells with cell bodies up to 30 microm in diameter and capsules resistant to stripping with gamma-radiation and organic solvents. The proportion of giant cells ranged from 10 to 80% of the total lung fungal burden, depending on infection time, individual mice, and correlated with the type of immune response. When placed on agar, giant cells budded to produce small daughter cells that traversed the capsule of the mother cell at the speed of 20-50 m/h. Giant cells with dimensions that approximated those in vivo were observed in vitro after prolonged culture in minimal media, and were the oldest in the culture, suggesting that giant cell formation is an aging-dependent phenomenon. Giant cells recovered from mice displayed polyploidy, suggesting a mechanism by which gigantism results from cell cycle progression without cell fission. Giant cell formation was dependent on cAMP, but not on Ras1. Real-time imaging showed that giant cells were engaged, but not engulfed by phagocytic cells. We describe a remarkable new strategy for C. neoformans to evade the immune response by enlarging cell size, and suggest that gigantism results from replication without fission, a phenomenon that may also occur with other fungal pathogens.

  9. Experimental reactivation of latent canine herpesvirus-1 and induction of recurrent ocular disease in adult dogs.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter, Eric C; Kim, Sung G; Dubovi, Edward J; Bicalho, Rodrigo C

    2009-07-02

    Latent canine herpesvirus-1 (CHV-1) infection is common in domestic dogs, but recrudescent CHV-1 diseases are poorly characterized. To determine if administration of an immunosuppressive dosage of prednisolone to adult dogs latently infected with CHV-1 results in recurrent ocular disease, adult beagles with and without experimentally induced CHV-1 latent infection were divided into groups: group 1 latently infected and administered prednisolone, group 2 latently infected and administered placebo, and group 3 not latently infected and administered prednisolone. Prednisolone (3.0 mg/kg/day) was administered to dogs in groups 1 and 3 for seven consecutive days beginning on study day 1. Samples for CHV-1 polymerase chain reaction and serum neutralization (SN) assays were collected, and physical, ophthalmologic, and in vivo ocular confocal microscopic examinations were performed at intervals for 42 days. Bilateral ocular disease (i.e., conjunctivitis or keratitis) was detected in 83% of group 1 dogs between study days 3 and 18. In vivo confocal microscopic abnormalities included conjunctival leukocyte infiltration and corneal leukocyte infiltration, abnormal epithelial cell morphology, and Langerhans cell infiltration. Ocular viral shedding was detected in 50% of group 1 dogs on study days 10 and 13. Fourfold elevations in CHV-1 SN titers were detected in 100% of group 1 dogs by study day 14. Dogs in control groups did not develop clinical ocular disease (P<0.05), CHV-1 titer elevations (P<0.005), or viral shedding. Administration of an immunosuppressive dosage of systemic prednisolone to adult dogs latently infected with CHV-1 may result in viral reactivation and ocular disease recrudescence.

  10. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells sense hepatitis C virus-infected cells, produce interferon, and inhibit infection.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ken; Asabe, Shinichi; Wieland, Stefan; Garaigorta, Urtzi; Gastaminza, Pablo; Isogawa, Masanori; Chisari, Francis V

    2010-04-20

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a member of the Flaviviridae family, is a single-stranded positive-sense RNA virus that infects >170 million people worldwide and causes acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite its ability to block the innate host response in infected hepatocyte cell lines in vitro, HCV induces a strong type 1 interferon (IFN) response in the infected liver. The source of IFN in vivo and how it is induced are currently undefined. Here we report that HCV-infected cells trigger a robust IFN response in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) by a mechanism that requires active viral replication, direct cell-cell contact, and Toll-like receptor 7 signaling, and we show that the activated pDC supernatant inhibits HCV infection in an IFN receptor-dependent manner. Importantly, the same events are triggered by HCV subgenomic replicon cells but not by free virus particles, suggesting the existence of a novel cell-cell RNA transfer process whereby HCV-infected cells can activate pDCs to produce IFN without infecting them. These results may explain how HCV induces IFN production in the liver, and they reveal a heretofore unsuspected aspect of the innate host response to viruses that can subvert the classical sensing machinery in the cells they infect, and do not infect or directly activate pDCs.

  11. Differentiation of antigen-specific T cells with limited functional capacity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yun Hee; Jeon, Bo-Young; Gu, Sun-Hwa; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae; Chang, Jun; Ha, Sang-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Despite the generation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific T cell immune responses during the course of infection, only 5 to 10% of exposed individuals develop active disease, while others develop a latent infection. This phenomenon suggests defective M. tuberculosis-specific immunity, which necessitates more careful characterization of M. tuberculosis-specific T cell responses. Here, we longitudinally analyzed the phenotypes and functions of M. tuberculosis-specific T cells. In contrast to the functional exhaustion of T cells observed after chronic infection, M. tuberculosis-specific CD8(+) T cells differentiated into either effector (CD127(lo) CD62L(lo)) or effector memory (CD127(hi) CD62L(lo)) cells, but not central memory cells (CD127(hi) CD62L(hi)), with low programmed death 1 (PD-1) expression, even in the presence of high levels of bacteria. Additionally, M. tuberculosis-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells produced substantial levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ), but not interleukin 2 (IL-2), upon in vitro restimulation. Among M. tuberculosis-specific CD8(+) T cells, CD127(hi) effector memory cells displayed slower ongoing turnover but greater survival potential. In addition, these cells produced more IFN-γ and TNF-α and displayed lytic activity upon antigen stimulation. However, the effector function of M. tuberculosis-specific CD8(+) CD127(hi) effector memory T cells was inferior to that of canonical CD8(+) CD127(hi) memory T cells generated after acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. Collectively, our data demonstrate that M. tuberculosis-specific T cells can differentiate into memory T cells during the course of M. tuberculosis infection independent of the bacterial burden but with limited functionality. These results provide a framework for further understanding the mechanisms of M. tuberculosis infection that can be used to develop more effective vaccines.

  12. Rhesus lymphocryptovirus latent membrane protein 2A activates {beta}-catenin signaling and inhibits differentiation in epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, Catherine A.; Raab-Traub, Nancy

    2008-08-01

    Rhesus lymphocryptovirus (LCV) is a {gamma}-herpesvirus closely related to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The rhesus latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) is highly homologous to EBV LMP2A. EBV LMP2A activates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and {beta}-catenin signaling pathways in epithelial cells and affects differentiation. In the present study, the biochemical and biological properties of rhesus LMP2A in epithelial cells were investigated. The expression of rhesus LMP2A in epithelial cells induced Akt activation, GSK3{beta} inactivation and accumulation of {beta}-catenin in the cytoplasm and nucleus. The nuclear translocation, but not accumulation of {beta}-catenin was dependent on Akt activation. Rhesus LMP2A also impaired epithelial cell differentiation; however, this process was not dependent upon Akt activation. A mutant rhesus LMP2A lacking six transmembrane domains functioned similarly to wild-type rhesus LMP2A indicating that the full number of transmembrane domains is not required for effects on {beta}-catenin or cell differentiation. These results underscore the similarity of LCV to EBV and the suitability of the macaque as an animal model for studying EBV pathogenesis.

  13. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-01-01

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4+ T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4+ T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4+ T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. PMID:26184775

  14. Altered natural killer (NK) cell frequency and phenotype in latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) prior to insulin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Akesson, C; Uvebrant, K; Oderup, C; Lynch, K; Harris, R A; Lernmark, A; Agardh, C-D; Cilio, C M

    2010-07-01

    Approximately 10% of the patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D) have detectable serum levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 autoantibodies (GADA). These patients usually progress to insulin dependency within a few years, and are classified as being latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). A decrease in the frequency of peripheral blood natural killer (NK) cells has been reported recently in recent-onset T1D and in high-risk individuals prior to the clinical onset. As NK cells in LADA patients have been investigated scarcely, the aim of this study was to use multicolour flow cytometry to define possible deficiencies or abnormalities in the frequency or activation state of NK cells in LADA patients prior to insulin dependency. All patients were GADA-positive and metabolically compensated, but none were insulin-dependent at the time blood samples were taken. LADA patients exhibited a significant decrease in NK cell frequency in peripheral blood compared to healthy individuals (P=0.0018), as reported previously for recent-onset T1D patients. Interestingly, NKG2D expression was increased significantly (P<0.0001), whereas killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR)3DL1 expression was decreased (P<0.0001) within the NK cell population. These observations highlight a defect in both frequency and activation status of NK cells in LADA patients and suggest that this immunological alteration may contribute to the development of autoimmune diabetes by affecting peripheral tolerance. Indeed, recent evidence has demonstrated a regulatory function for NK cells in autoimmunity. Moreover, the decrease in NK cell number concords with observations obtained in recent-onset T1D, implying that similar immunological dysfunctions may contribute to the progression of both LADA and T1D.

  15. Xanthosine administration does not affect the proportion of epithelial stem cells in bovine mammary tissue, but has a latent negative effect on cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Rauner, Gat; Barash, Itamar

    2014-10-15

    The challenge in manipulating the proportion of somatic stem cells lies in having to override tissue homeostasis. Xanthosine infusion via the teat canal has been reported to augment the number of label-retaining cells in the mammary gland of 3-month-old bovine calves. To further delineate xanthosine's effect on defined stem cells in the mammary gland of heifers—which are candidates for increased prospective milk production following such manipulation—bovine mammary parenchymal tissue was transplanted and integrated into the cleared mammary fat pad of immunodeficient mice. Xanthosine administration for 14 days did not affect the number of label-retaining cells after 10- and 11-week chases. No change in stem cell proportion, analyzed according to CD49f and CD24 expression, was noted. Clone formation and propagation rate of cultured cells, as well as expression of stem cell markers, were also unaffected. In contrast, a latent 50% decrease in bovine mammary cell proliferation rate was observed 11 weeks after xanthosine administration. Tumor development in mice was also limited by xanthosine administration. These effects may have resulted from an initial decrease in expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in guanine synthesis, IMPDH. The data indicate that caution should be exerted when considering xanthosine for stem cell manipulation. - Highlights: • Novel “bovinized“ mouse model for exogenous effects on bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine did not affect stem cell number/function in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine caused an immediate decrease in IMPDH expression in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine had latent negative effect on cell proliferation in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine administration limited mammary tumor growth.

  16. The Role of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses against Alpha Herpes Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Philipp; Boscheinen, Jan Bernardin; Tennert, Karin; Schmidt, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    In 1999, two independent groups identified plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC) as major type I interferon- (IFN-) producing cells in the blood. Since then, evidence is accumulating that PDC are a multifunctional cell population effectively coordinating innate and adaptive immune responses. This paper focuses on the role of different immune cells and their interactions in the surveillance of alpha herpes virus infections, summarizes current knowledge on PDC surface receptors and their role in direct cell-cell contacts, and develops a risk factor model for the clinical implications of herpes simplex and varicella zoster virus reactivation. Data from studies involving knockout mice and cell-depletion experiments as well as human studies converge into a “spider web”, in which the direct and indirect crosstalk between many cell populations tightly controls acute, latent, and recurrent alpha herpes virus infections. Notably, cells involved in innate immune regulations appear to shape adaptive immune responses more extensively than previously thought. PMID:22312349

  17. Recent advances in testing for latent TB.

    PubMed

    Schluger, Neil W; Burzynski, Joseph

    2010-12-01

    After more than a century of relying on skin testing for the diagnosis of latent TB infection, clinicians now have access to blood-based diagnostics in the form of interferon γ release assays (IGRAs). These tests are generally associated with higher sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of latent TB infection. This article reviews the indications for testing and treatment of latent TB infection in the overall context of a TB control program and describes how IGRAs might be used in specific clinical settings and populations, including people having close contact with an active case of TB, the foreign born, and health-care workers.

  18. Acute retinal necrosis caused by herpes simplex virus type 2 in children: reactivation of an undiagnosed latent neonatal herpes infection.

    PubMed

    Grose, Charles

    2012-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is known to cause acute retinal necrosis (ARN). The availability of HSV-2-specific polymerase chain reaction tests for diagnostic analysis has greatly increased our ability to discriminate ARN caused by HSV-2 from ARN caused by either herpes simplex virus type 1 or varicella zoster virus (VZV). Of great interest, HSV-2 appears to be the most common cause of viral ARN in children and adolescents. Although a few children with ARN are known to have had neonatally acquired herpes infection, most children lack a history of known herpes disease. Thus, the origin of the HSV-2 infection is a mystery. The hypothesis of this review is that HSV-2 ARN in children and adolescents may be the first sign of a previously undiagnosed and asymptomatic neonatal HSV-2 infection, which has reactivated several years later from latency in a cranial nerve and entered the retina. The review brings together 7 previously published ARN cases, plus one new case is added. Thus, this review also expands the spectrum of complications from neonatal HSV-2 infection.

  19. Infected Cell Protein (ICP)47 Enhances Herpes Simplex Virus Neurovirulence by Blocking the CD8+ T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, Kim; Chen, Wei; Johnson, David C.; Hendricks, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) infected cell protein (ICP)47 blocks CD8+ T cell recognition of infected cells by inhibiting the transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP). In vivo, HSV-1 replicates in two distinct tissues: in epithelial mucosa or epidermis, where the virus enters sensory neurons; and in the peripheral and central nervous system, where acute and subsequently latent infections occur. Here, we show that an HSV-1 ICP47− mutant is less neurovirulent than wild-type HSV-1 in mice, but replicates normally in epithelial tissues. The reduced neurovirulence of the ICP47− mutant was due to a protective CD8+ T cell response. When compared with wild-type virus, the ICP47− mutant expressed reduced neurovirulence in immunologically normal mice, and T cell–deficient nude mice after reconstitution with CD8+ T cells. However, the ICP47− mutant exhibited normal neurovirulence in mice that were acutely depleted of CD8+ T cells, and in nude mice that were not reconstituted, or were reconstituted with CD4+ T cells. In contrast, CD8+ T cell depletion did not increase the neurovirulence of an unrelated, attenuated HSV-1 glycoprotein (g)E− mutant. ICP47 is the first viral protein shown to influence neurovirulence by inhibiting CD8+ T cell protection. PMID:9449714

  20. Prophylactic Use of Ganoderma lucidum Extract May Inhibit Mycobacterium tuberculosis Replication in a New Mouse Model of Spontaneous Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Lingjun; Tang, Jun; Lin, Shuzhu; Xu, Yanfeng; Xu, Yuhuan; Qin, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    A mouse model of spontaneous latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) that mimics LTBI in humans is valuable for drug/vaccine development and the study of tuberculosis. However, most LTBI mouse models require interventions, and a spontaneous LTBI mouse model with a low bacterial load is difficult to establish. In this study, mice were IV-inoculated with 100 CFU Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, and a persistent LTBI was established with low bacterial loads (0.5~1.5log10 CFU in the lung; < 4log10 CFU in the spleen). Histopathological changes in the lung and spleen were mild during the first 20 weeks post-inoculation. The model was used to demonstrate the comparative effects of prophylactic and therapeutic administration of Ganoderma lucidum extract (spores and spores lipid) in preventing H37Rv replication in both lung and spleen. H37Rv was inhibited with prophylactic use of G. lucidum extract relative to that of the untreated control and therapy groups, and observed in the spleen and lung as early as post-inoculation week 3 and week 5 respectively. H37Rv infection in the therapy group was comparable to that of the untreated control mice. No significant mitigation of pathological changes was observed in either the prophylactic or therapeutic group. Our results suggest that this new LTBI mouse model is an efficient tool of testing anti-tuberculosis drug, the use of G. lucidum extract prior to M. tuberculosis infection may protect the host against bacterial replication to some extent. PMID:26779146

  1. Prevalence of latent TB infection and TB disease among adolescents in high TB burden countries in Africa: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bunyasi, Erick Wekesa; Schmidt, Bey-Marrie; Abdullahi, Leila Hussein; Mulenga, Humphrey; Tameris, Michele; Luabeya, Angelique; Shenje, Justin; Scriba, Thomas; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Wood, Robin; Hatherill, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Almost a third of the world population has latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI), ∼10 million of whom develop TB disease annually, despite existence of effective, but lengthy, preventive and curative drug regimens. Although adolescents appear to have a very high force of LTBI, their reported incidence of TB disease is less than that of their corresponding general population. The few available studies on adolescent TB infection and disease prevalence are not sufficient to address the apparent discordance between rates of infection and disease in high TB burden countries in Africa. Therefore, we aim to perform a systematic review to examine the relationship between adolescent LTBI and TB disease, benchmarked against national TB disease burden data. Methods and analysis A comprehensive literature search will be performed for cross-sectional studies and screening data in cohort studies to determine the prevalence of LTBI and TB disease among adolescents in high TB burden countries in Africa in the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane library, Web of Science, Africa Wide, CINAHL and the Africa Index Medicus. This will be supplemented by a search of reference lists of selected articles for potentially relevant articles. We will restrict our search to articles published in the English language between 1990 and 2016 among adolescents in order to obtain estimates reflective of the mature HIV epidemic in most high TB burden countries in Africa that occurred over this critical period. Primary end points are: prevalence of LTBI and TB disease. We will use the random-effects or fixed-effects modelling for our meta-analysis based on heterogeneity estimates. Ethics and dissemination No ethics approval is required given that this is a systematic review. Findings will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal in line with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). Trial registration number CRD42015023495. PMID

  2. The Functional Response of B Cells to Antigenic Stimulation: A Preliminary Report of Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    du Plessis, Willem J.; Kleynhans, Léanie; du Plessis, Nelita; Stanley, Kim; Malherbe, Stephanus T.; Maasdorp, Elizna; Ronacher, Katharina; Chegou, Novel N.; Walzl, Gerhard; Loxton, Andre G.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) remains a successful pathogen, causing tuberculosis disease numbers to constantly increase. Although great progress has been made in delineating the disease, the host-pathogen interaction is incompletely described. B cells have shown to function as both effectors and regulators of immunity via non-humoral methods in both innate and adaptive immune settings. Here we assessed specific B cell functional interaction following stimulation with a broad range of antigens within the LTBI milieu. Our results indicate that B cells readily produce pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (including IL-1β, IL-10, IL-17, IL-21 and TNF-α) in response to stimulation. TLR4 and TLR9 based stimulations achieved the greatest secreted cytokine-production response and BCG stimulation displayed a clear preference for inducing IL-1β production. We also show that the cytokines produced by B cells are implicated strongly in cell-mediated communication and that plasma (memory) B cells (CD19+CD27+CD138+) is the subset with the greatest contribution to cytokine production. Collectively our data provides insight into B cell responses, where they are implicated in and quantifies responses from specific B cell phenotypes. These findings warrant further functional B cell research with a focus on specific B cell phenotypes under conditions of active TB disease to further our knowledge about the contribution of various cell subsets which could have implications for future vaccine development or refined B cell orientated treatment in the health setting. PMID:27050308

  3. Infective substructures of measles virus from acutely and persistently infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rozenblatt, S; Koch, T; Pinhasi, O; Bratosin, S

    1979-01-01

    Ribonucleoprotein from cells acutely or persistently infected with measles virus were shown to be infectious by the calcium phosphate technique. Very little or no infectivity was obtained when calcium phosphate precipitation was omitted. Electron microscopy showed that the majority of ribonucleoprotein structures isolated from acutely infected cells were folded, whereas those from persistently infected cells were linear in appearance. Images PMID:120450

  4. Silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 and red light causes apoptosis in HIV-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Ben-Hur, E; Oetjen, J; Horowitz, B

    1997-03-01

    The silicon phthalocyanine HOSiPcOSi(CH3)2(CH2)3 N(CH3)2 (Pc 4), is being studied as a photosensitizer for virus inactivation in red blood cell concentrates (RBCC). The RBCC spiked with cell-free human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or with HIV actively replicating in the T-lymphocytic cell line CEM can be successfully inactivated (> or = 6 log10) when exposed to 2 microM Pc 4 and 90 J/cm2 red light (600-800 nm). Inactivation of > or = 6 log10 inducible HIV in the latently infected promonocytic cell line U1 occurred at 22.5 J/cm2 (H. Margolis-Nunno et al., Transfusion 36, 743-750, 1996). In order to understand the reason for the increased susceptibility of U1 to photosensitized inactivation we looked for induction of apoptosis by photodynamic treatment (PDT). Agarose gel electrophoresis was used to observe the appearance of a characteristic 180-200 base pair DNA ladder, which can indicate apoptosis. Using this assay it is shown that Pc 4 treatment induced apoptosis in U1 cells in a light dose-dependent manner, starting 30 min after light exposure. Using the ApopTag Plus kit (which attaches a fluorescent label to the 3'-OH ends of the degraded DNA) and flow cytometry, the percentage of cells undergoing apoptosis was quantitated. At 10.5 J/cm2, 3 h after light exposure, about 92.5% of the cells were apoptotic. Under these conditions 99% of the cells eventually die. The CEM cells similarly treated underwent apoptosis at slower kinetics and required higher light doses. Other cell lines latently infected with HIV (ACH-2 and OM 10.1) were as sensitive as U1 to HIV inactivation by Pc 4-PDT (H. Margolis-Nunno et al., Transfusion 36, 743-750, 1996) and underwent apoptosis at a similar kinetic. These results suggest that the enhanced inactivation of HIV in latently infected cells compared to CEM cells by Pc 4-PDT may be due, at least in part, to apoptosis in the former.

  5. Prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection in Sudan: a case–control study comparing interferon-γ release assay and tuberculin skin test

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most people exposed to M. tuberculosis show no evidence of clinical disease. Five to 10% of individuals with latent infection progress to develop overt disease during their life time. Identification of people with latent TB infection will increase case detection rates and may dictate new treatment policies to control tuberculosis. This study aimed to determine LTBI point prevalence in a population from Sudan using two different diagnostic methods: the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the IFN-γ release assay (IGRA). Methods This was a prospective, community-based and case-controlled study. Following informed consent, household contacts (HHCs; n = 98) of smear-positive index cases and Community controls (CCs; 186), were enrolled. Tuberculin skin test (TST), whole blood stimulation with ESAT-6/CFP-10 ± TB7.7 antigens or purified protein derivative (PPD) and IFN-γ levels determination with ELISA were performed. The levels of IFN-γ and TST induration between the CCs and the HHCs were compared using student t-test, Chi-square and Kappa coefficient. Pearson correlation test was used to compare TST and IFN-γ. P levels of <0.05 were considered significant. Results TST induration of ≥ 10 mm gave an LTBI point prevalence of 327 cases/1000 individuals among HHCs compared to 126 cases/1000 individuals among CCs (p = 0.000). PPD-induced IFN-γ release assay gave an LTBI point prevalence of 418 cases/1000 individuals among HHCs compared to 301 cases/1000 individuals among CCs (p =0.06). On the other hand ESAT-6/CFP-10 ± TB7.7-induced IFN-γ gave an LTBI point prevalence of 429 cases/1000 individuals among HHCs compared to 268 cases/1000 individuals among CCs (p = 0.01). IFN-γ productions levels induced by ESAT-6/CPF-10 ± TB7.7 antigens in HHCS and CCs were not significantly different from those induced by PPD (p = 0.7). Conclusion IFN-γ release assay (IGRA) gave higher LTBI point prevalence compared to TST in HHCs and CCs. PPD

  6. Latent HIV-1 can be reactivated by cellular superinfection in a Tat-dependent manner, which can lead to the emergence of multidrug-resistant recombinant viruses.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Daniel A; Bastarache, Sophie M; Sloan, Richard D; Wainberg, Mark A

    2013-09-01

    The HIV-1 latent reservoir represents an important source of genetic diversity that could contribute to viral evolution and multidrug resistance following latent virus reactivation. This could occur by superinfection of a latently infected cell. We asked whether latent viruses might be reactivated when their host cells are superinfected, and if so, whether they could contribute to the generation of recombinant viruses. Using populations of latently infected Jurkat cells, we found that latent viruses were efficiently reactivated upon superinfection. Pathways leading to latent virus reactivation via superinfection might include gp120-CD4/CXCR4-induced signaling, modulation of the cellular environment by Nef, and/or the activity of Tat produced upon superinfection. Using a range of antiviral compounds and genetic approaches, we show that gp120 and Nef are not required for latent virus reactivation by superinfection, but this process depends on production of functional Tat by the superinfecting virus. In a primary cell model of latency in unstimulated CD4 T cells, superinfection also led to latent virus reactivation. Drug-resistant latent viruses were also reactivated following superinfection in Jurkat cells and were able to undergo recombination with the superinfecting virus. Under drug-selective pressure, this generated multidrug-resistant recombinants that were identified by unique restriction digestion band patterns and by population-level sequencing. During conditions of poor drug adherence, treatment interruption or treatment failure, or in drug-impermeable sanctuary sites, reactivation of latent viruses by superinfection or other means could provide for the emergence or spread of replicatively fit viruses in the face of strong selective pressures.

  7. The GARP/Latent TGF-β1 complex on Treg cells modulates the induction of peripherally derived Treg cells during oral tolerance.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Justin P; Hand, Timothy W; Morais da Fonseca, Denise; Glass, Deborah D; Belkaid, Yasmine; Shevach, Ethan M

    2016-06-01

    Treg cells can secrete latent TGF-β1 (LTGF-β1), but can also utilize an alternative pathway for transport and expression of LTGF-β1 on the cell surface in which LTGF-β1 is coupled to a distinct LTGF-β binding protein termed glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP)/LRRC32. The function of the GARP/LTGF-β1 complex has remained elusive. Here, we examine in vivo the roles of GARP and TGF-β1 in the induction of oral tolerance. When Foxp3(-) OT-II T cells were transferred to wild-type recipient mice followed by OVA feeding, the conversion of Foxp3(-) to Foxp3(+) OT-II cells was dependent on recipient Treg cells. Neutralization of IL-2 in the recipient mice also abrogated this conversion. The GARP/LTGF-β1 complex on recipient Treg cells, but not dendritic cell-derived TGF-β1, was required for efficient induction of Foxp3(+) T cells and for the suppression of delayed hypersensitivity. Expression of the integrin αvβ8 by Treg cells (or T cells) in the recipients was dispensable for induction of Foxp3 expression. Transient depletion of the bacterial flora enhanced the development of oral tolerance by expanding Treg cells with enhanced expression of the GARP/LTGF-β1 complex.

  8. Thrombospondins selectively activate one of the two latent forms of transforming growth factor-beta present in adrenocortical cell-conditioned medium.

    PubMed

    Souchelnitskiy, S; Chambaz, E M; Feige, J J

    1995-11-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) has been shown previously to be a potent inhibitor of bovine adrenocortical cell steroidogenic functions. However, it is present in the culture medium of these cells in a latent form. In this study, we analyzed in detail the biochemical composition of this latent TGF beta. Two distinct complexes could be separated chromatographically by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300, and their composition was studied using immunochemical methods. The results indicate that one form (peak I) is a complex between alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) and either the unprocessed TGF beta precursor or the mature form of TGF beta. In a major fraction of this complex, TGF beta is covalently linked to alpha 2 M, whereas in a minor fraction, it is noncovalently bound and, therefore, activatable. The second form of latent TGF beta (peak II) is a complex among latent TGF beta-binding protein (LTBP), latency-associated protein, and mature TGF beta and a complex between LTBP and unprocessed TGF beta. We investigated the ability of thrombospondins (TSP1 and TSP2) to activate these latent forms of TGF beta. TSP1 and TSP2 were equally potent at activating the LTBP-latency-associated protein-TGF beta complex in the absence of cell contact, but were ineffective on the alpha 2M-TGF beta complex. Therefore, TGF beta may act as an autocrine regulator of adrenocortical steroidogenic functions. Its activity appears to be controlled by TSPs, the local production of which is regulated by systemic ACTH.

  9. Alteration of cell cycle progression by Sindbis virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Ruirong; Saito, Kengo; Isegawa, Naohisa; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2015-07-10

    We examined the impact of Sindbis virus (SINV) infection on cell cycle progression in a cancer cell line, HeLa, and a non-cancerous cell line, Vero. Cell cycle analyses showed that SINV infection is able to alter the cell cycle progression in both HeLa and Vero cells, but differently, especially during the early stage of infection. SINV infection affected the expression of several cell cycle regulators (CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, p21, cyclin A and cyclin B) in HeLa cells and caused HeLa cells to accumulate in S phase during the early stage of infection. Monitoring SINV replication in HeLa and Vero cells expressing cell cycle indicators revealed that SINV which infected HeLa cells during G{sub 1} phase preferred to proliferate during S/G{sub 2} phase, and the average time interval for viral replication was significantly shorter in both HeLa and Vero cells infected during G{sub 1} phase than in cells infected during S/G{sub 2} phase. - Highlights: • SINV infection was able to alter the cell cycle progression of infected cancer cells. • SINV infection can affect the expression of cell cycle regulators. • SINV infection exhibited a preference for the timing of viral replication among the cell cycle phases.

  10. CRISPR-mediated Activation of Latent HIV-1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Limsirichai, Prajit; Gaj, Thomas; Schaffer, David V

    2016-03-01

    Complete eradication of HIV-1 infection is impeded by the existence of cells that harbor chromosomally integrated but transcriptionally inactive provirus. These cells can persist for years without producing viral progeny, rendering them refractory to immune surveillance and antiretroviral therapy and providing a permanent reservoir for the stochastic reactivation and reseeding of HIV-1. Strategies for purging this latent reservoir are thus needed to eradicate infection. Here, we show that engineered transcriptional activation systems based on CRISPR/Cas9 can be harnessed to activate viral gene expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further demonstrate that complementing Cas9 activators with latency-reversing compounds can enhance latent HIV-1 transcription and that epigenome modulation using CRISPR-based acetyltransferases can also promote viral gene activation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that CRISPR systems are potentially effective tools for inducing latent HIV-1 expression and that their use, in combination with antiretroviral therapy, could lead to improved therapies for HIV-1 infection.

  11. CRISPR-mediated Activation of Latent HIV-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Limsirichai, Prajit; Gaj, Thomas; Schaffer, David V

    2016-01-01

    Complete eradication of HIV-1 infection is impeded by the existence of cells that harbor chromosomally integrated but transcriptionally inactive provirus. These cells can persist for years without producing viral progeny, rendering them refractory to immune surveillance and antiretroviral therapy and providing a permanent reservoir for the stochastic reactivation and reseeding of HIV-1. Strategies for purging this latent reservoir are thus needed to eradicate infection. Here, we show that engineered transcriptional activation systems based on CRISPR/Cas9 can be harnessed to activate viral gene expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further demonstrate that complementing Cas9 activators with latency-reversing compounds can enhance latent HIV-1 transcription and that epigenome modulation using CRISPR-based acetyltransferases can also promote viral gene activation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that CRISPR systems are potentially effective tools for inducing latent HIV-1 expression and that their use, in combination with antiretroviral therapy, could lead to improved therapies for HIV-1 infection. PMID:26607397

  12. Analysis of latent tuberculosis infection treatment adherence among refugees and other patient groups referred to the Baltimore City Health Department TB clinic, February 2009-March 2011.

    PubMed

    Nuzzo, Jennifer B; Golub, Jonathan E; Chaulk, Patrick; Shah, Maunank

    2015-02-01

    We sought to determine the proportion of refugee patients at the Baltimore City Health Department Tuberculosis program (BCHD-TB) successfully completing latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) treatment, as compared to other referral groups, and to identify factors associated with treatment completion. We completed a retrospective cohort analysis of individuals referred to BCHD-TB program for LTBI care between February 1, 2009 and March 31, 2011. Among 841 patients evaluated by BCHD-TB and diagnosed with LTBI, 81% of refugees, 50% of non-refugee foreign-born, and 35% of US-born patients completed LTBI treatment. In multivariate analysis, refugees had greater odds of LTBI treatment completion (Adjusted Odds Ratio 7.2; 95% CI 4.2-12.4, p < 0.001) compared to US-born individuals adjusting for age, gender, and treatment regimen. Overall, LTBI treatment completion remains suboptimal. At BCHD-TB, LTBI treatment completion was significantly higher among refugees than other referral groups. Additional efforts are needed to optimize LTBI care, and future efforts may need to be tailored for different risk groups.

  13. Prevalence and predictors of latent tuberculosis infection among Italian State Policemen engaged in assistance to migrants: a national cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Durando, Paolo; Garbarino, Sergio; Dini, Guglielmo; Toletone, Alessandra; Ciprani, Fabrizio; Conte, Giuseppe; Santorsa, Roberto; Icardi, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Better knowledge about tuberculosis (TB) and latent TB infection (LTBI) epidemiology is a crucial step for the development of effective strategies towards the control and elimination of this deadliest and persistent health threat. No study has investigated LTBI epidemiology in policemen who act as an interface with cross-border migrants. Methods A survey to measure the LTBI prevalence and assess the demographic, professional and clinical features potentially associated with tuberculin skin test (TST) positivity was performed in Italian State Police (ISP) employees engaged, even occasionally, in relief activities, hospitality, photographical identification, escorting and accompanying of migrants, regardless of contact with active TB cases. Variables potentially associated with TST positivity were evaluated with univariate and multivariate analysis. Results From September to December 2014, 4225 ISP workers underwent TST screening and completed the questionnaire for data collection, according to study procedures. The TST was positive in 9.9% of individuals: no active TB cases were registered among the entire study population. Age, previous BCG vaccination and work category resulted independently associated with TST positivity. Conclusions This is the first study providing updated data about LTBI epidemiology among ISP employees engaged in assistance to migrants and furnish preliminary evidence of possible associations between TST positivity and different conditions that need to be deeply investigated with prospective studies. PMID:27697871

  14. Glycosaminoglycan receptors facilitate infection of mammalian cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A growing list of viruses has been reported to use more than one receptor for binding and internalization during infection of the host cell. Sialic acid residues or glycosaminoglycans, such as heparin sulfate, frequently function in this scenario, as a first contact, charge based, low affinity bindi...

  15. Activation of Latent HIV Using Drug-loaded Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovochich, Michael

    Antiretroviral therapy is currently only capable of controlling human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication, rather than completely eradicating virus from patients. This is due in part to the establishment of a latent virus reservoir in resting CD4+ T-cells, which persists even in the presence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). It is thought that forced activation of latently infected cells could induce virus production, allowing targeting of the cell by the immune response. A variety of molecules are able to stimulate HIV from latency. However, no tested purging strategy has proven capable of eliminating the infection completely or preventing viral rebound if therapy is stopped. Hence, novel latency activation approaches are required. Nanoparticles can offer several advantages over more traditional drug delivery methods, including improved drug solubility, stability, and the ability to simultaneously target multiple different molecules to particular cell or tissue types. Here we describe the development of a novel lipid nanoparticle with the protein kinase C activator bryostatin-2 incorporated (LNP-Bry). These particles can target, activate primary human CD4+ T-cells, and stimulate latent virus production from human T-cell lines in vitro and from latently infected cells in a humanized mouse model ex vivo. This activation was synergistically enhanced by the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) sodium butyrate. Furthermore, LNP-Bry can also be loaded with the protease inhibitor nelfinavir (LNP-Bry-Nel), producing a particle capable of both activating latent virus and inhibiting viral spread. LNP-Bry was further tested for its in vivo biodistribution in both wild type mice (C57 black 6), as well as humanized mice (SCID-hu Thy/Liv, and bone marrow-liver-thymus [BLT]). LNP-Bry accumulated in the spleen and induced the early activation marker CD69 in wild type mice. Taken together, these data demonstrate the ability of nanotechnological approaches to

  16. Recombination Enhances HIV-1 Envelope Diversity by Facilitating the Survival of Latent Genomic Fragments in the Plasma Virus Population.

    PubMed

    Immonen, Taina T; Conway, Jessica M; Romero-Severson, Ethan O; Perelson, Alan S; Leitner, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    HIV-1 is subject to immune pressure exerted by the host, giving variants that escape the immune response an advantage. Virus released from activated latent cells competes against variants that have continually evolved and adapted to host immune pressure. Nevertheless, there is increasing evidence that virus displaying a signal of latency survives in patient plasma despite having reduced fitness due to long-term immune memory. We investigated the survival of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments by simulating within-host HIV-1 sequence evolution and the cycling of viral lineages in and out of the latent reservoir. Our model incorporates a detailed mutation process including nucleotide substitution, recombination, latent reservoir dynamics, diversifying selection pressure driven by the immune response, and purifying selection pressure asserted by deleterious mutations. We evaluated the ability of our model to capture sequence evolution in vivo by comparing our simulated sequences to HIV-1 envelope sequence data from 16 HIV-infected untreated patients. Empirical sequence divergence and diversity measures were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those of our simulated HIV-1 populations, suggesting that our model invokes realistic trends of HIV-1 genetic evolution. Moreover, reconstructed phylogenies of simulated and patient HIV-1 populations showed similar topological structures. Our simulation results suggest that recombination is a key mechanism facilitating the persistence of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments in the productively infected cell population. Recombination increased the survival probability of latent virus forms approximately 13-fold. Prevalence of virus with latent fragments in productively infected cells was observed in only 2% of simulations when we ignored recombination, while the proportion increased to 27% of simulations when we allowed recombination. We also found that the selection pressures exerted by different fitness

  17. Recombination enhances HIV-1 envelope diversity by facilitating the survival of latent genomic fragments in the plasma virus population

    SciTech Connect

    Immonen, Taina T.; Conway, Jessica M.; Romero-Severson, Ethan O.; Perelson, Alan S.; Leitner, Thomas; Kouyos, Roger Dimitri

    2015-12-22

    HIV-1 is subject to immune pressure exerted by the host, giving variants that escape the immune response an advantage. Virus released from activated latent cells competes against variants that have continually evolved and adapted to host immune pressure. Nevertheless, there is increasing evidence that virus displaying a signal of latency survives in patient plasma despite having reduced fitness due to long-term immune memory. We investigated the survival of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments by simulating within-host HIV-1 sequence evolution and the cycling of viral lineages in and out of the latent reservoir. Our model incorporates a detailed mutation process including nucleotide substitution, recombination, latent reservoir dynamics, diversifying selection pressure driven by the immune response, and purifying selection pressure asserted by deleterious mutations. We evaluated the ability of our model to capture sequence evolution in vivo by comparing our simulated sequences to HIV-1 envelope sequence data from 16 HIV-infected untreated patients. Empirical sequence divergence and diversity measures were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those of our simulated HIV-1 populations, suggesting that our model invokes realistic trends of HIV-1 genetic evolution. Moreover, reconstructed phylogenies of simulated and patient HIV-1 populations showed similar topological structures. Our simulation results suggest that recombination is a key mechanism facilitating the persistence of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments in the productively infected cell population. Recombination increased the survival probability of latent virus forms approximately 13-fold. Prevalence of virus with latent fragments in productively infected cells was observed in only 2% of simulations when we ignored recombination, while the proportion increased to 27% of simulations when we allowed recombination. We also found that the selection pressures exerted by different fitness

  18. Recombination Enhances HIV-1 Envelope Diversity by Facilitating the Survival of Latent Genomic Fragments in the Plasma Virus Population

    PubMed Central

    Immonen, Taina T.; Conway, Jessica M.; Romero-Severson, Ethan O.; Perelson, Alan S.; Leitner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 is subject to immune pressure exerted by the host, giving variants that escape the immune response an advantage. Virus released from activated latent cells competes against variants that have continually evolved and adapted to host immune pressure. Nevertheless, there is increasing evidence that virus displaying a signal of latency survives in patient plasma despite having reduced fitness due to long-term immune memory. We investigated the survival of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments by simulating within-host HIV-1 sequence evolution and the cycling of viral lineages in and out of the latent reservoir. Our model incorporates a detailed mutation process including nucleotide substitution, recombination, latent reservoir dynamics, diversifying selection pressure driven by the immune response, and purifying selection pressure asserted by deleterious mutations. We evaluated the ability of our model to capture sequence evolution in vivo by comparing our simulated sequences to HIV-1 envelope sequence data from 16 HIV-infected untreated patients. Empirical sequence divergence and diversity measures were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those of our simulated HIV-1 populations, suggesting that our model invokes realistic trends of HIV-1 genetic evolution. Moreover, reconstructed phylogenies of simulated and patient HIV-1 populations showed similar topological structures. Our simulation results suggest that recombination is a key mechanism facilitating the persistence of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments in the productively infected cell population. Recombination increased the survival probability of latent virus forms approximately 13-fold. Prevalence of virus with latent fragments in productively infected cells was observed in only 2% of simulations when we ignored recombination, while the proportion increased to 27% of simulations when we allowed recombination. We also found that the selection pressures exerted by different fitness

  19. Co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis impairs HIV-Specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell functionality.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Shivan; Govender, Pamla; Zupkosky, Jennifer; Pillay, Mona; Ghebremichael, Musie; Moosa, Mahomed-Yunus S; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Porichis, Filippos; Kasprowicz, Victoria O

    2015-01-01

    The ability of antigen-specific T cells to simultaneously produce multiple cytokines is thought to correlate with the functional capacity and efficacy of T cells. These 'polyfunctional' T cells have been associated with control of HIV. We aimed to assess the impact of co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) on HIV-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell function. We assessed T cell functionality in 34 South African adults by investigating the IFN-y, IL-2, TNF-α, IL-21 and IL-17 cytokine secretion capacity, using polychromatic flow cytometry, following HIV Gag-specific stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We show that MTB is associated with lower HIV-specific T cell function in co-infected as compared to HIV mono-infected individuals. This decline in function was greatest in co-infection with active Tuberculosis (TB) compared to co-infection with latent MTB (LTBI), suggesting that mycobacterial load may contribute to this loss of function. The described impact of MTB on HIV-specific T cell function may be a mechanism for increased HIV disease progression in co-infected subjects as functionally impaired T cells may be less able to control HIV.

  20. Role of neutralizing antibodies and T-cells in pathogenesis of herpes simplex virus infection in congenitally athymic mice.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, A K; Buckmaster, A; Nash, A A; Field, H J; Wildy, P

    1982-11-01

    Congenitally athymic nude mice were infected with 10(4) p.f.u. herpes simplex type 1 (strain SC16). Following the passive transfer of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (AP7, AP8 and AP12) it was observed that AP7 alone reduced the virus infectivity in the nervous system; AP8 and AP12 failed to protect mice probably due to poor in vivo binding to the neutralization site on the virus. Latent ganglionic infection could be established in nude mice following adoptive transfer of optimum number (2 x 10(7) cells/mouse) of immune lymph node cells from day 7 herpes virus-infected hairy immunocompetent donor mice. Moreover, in some of the immune lymph node cell protected nudes, latency could be maintained even in complete absence of neutralizing antibodies. Results of ear-ablation experiments revealed that removal of primary source of infection after day 5 of infection reduced the amount of virus in the ganglia and spinal cord. Acute neurological infection was not detected following transfer of protective anti-gp-D neutralizing antibody (LP2) in combination with removal of infected pinna. These data suggest that continuous seeding of virus occurs in related ganglia via the axonal route from infected ear pinna. It appears that local T-cell-mediated immune mechanisms are involved in maintenance of latency.

  1. Zika virus infection of Hofbauer cells.

    PubMed

    Simoni, Michael K; Jurado, Kellie Ann; Abrahams, Vikki M; Fikrig, Erol; Guller, Seth

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies have linked antenatal infection with Zika virus (ZIKV) with major adverse fetal and neonatal outcomes, including microcephaly. There is a growing consensus for the existence of a congenital Zika syndrome (CZS). Previous studies have indicated that non-placental macrophages play a key role in the replication of dengue virus (DENV), a closely related flavivirus. As the placenta provides the conduit for vertical transmission of certain viruses, and placental Hofbauer cells (HBCs) are fetal-placental macrophages located adjacent to fetal capillaries, it is not surprising that several recent studies have examined infection of HBCs by ZIKV. In this review, we describe congenital abnormalities associated with ZIKV infection, the role of HBCs in the placental response to infection, and evidence for the susceptibility of HBCs to ZIKV infection. We conclude that HBCs may contribute to the spread of ZIKV in placenta and promote vertical transmission of ZIKV, ultimately compromising fetal and neonatal development and function. Current evidence strongly suggests that further studies are warranted to dissect the specific molecular mechanism through which ZIKV infects HBCs and its potential impact on the development of CZS.

  2. Rapamycin ameliorates the CTLA4-Ig-mediated defect in CD8+ T cell immunity during gammaherpesvirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Pinelli, DF; Wakeman, BS; Wagener, ME; Speck, SH; Ford, ML

    2017-01-01

    Latent viral infections are a major concern among immunosuppressed transplant patients. During clinical trials with belatacept, a CTLA4-Ig fusion protein, patients showed an increased risk of Epstein-Barr Virus-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder, thought to be due to a deficient primary CD8+ T cell response to the virus. Using a murine model of latent viral infection, we observed that rapamycin treatment alone led to a significant increase in virus-specific CD8+ T cells, as well as increased functionality of these cells, including the ability to make multiple cytokines, while CTLA4-Ig treatment alone significantly dampened the response and inhibited the generation of polyfunctional antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. However, the addition of rapamycin to the CTLA4-Ig regimen was able to quantitatively and qualitatively restore the antigen-specific CD8+ T cell response to the virus. This improvement was physiologically relevant, in that CTLA4-Ig treated animals exhibited a greater viral burden following infection that was reduced to levels observed in untreated immunocompetent animals by the addition of rapamycin. These results reveal that modulation of T cell differentiation though inhibition of mTOR signaling can restore virus-specific immune competence even in the absence of CD28 costimulation, and have implications for improving protective immunity in transplant recipients. PMID:25989700

  3. Origin of the transmitted virus in HIV infection: infected cells versus cell-free virus.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Manish

    2014-12-15

    All human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected inocula, such as genital secretions, breast milk, and blood, contain both cell-free virus and infected cells. The relative contributions of cell-free and/or cell-associated virus in establishing an infection in a naive host during the different modes of HIV-1 acquisition remains unclear. Studies aim to elucidate the source of the acquired virus because strategies to prevent acquisition may have differential efficacy against the different modes of transmission. In this review, I will detail some of the challenges in identifying the source of the transmitted virus, genotypic and phenotypic differences among cell-free compared with cell-associated HIV-1, and implications on the efficacy for prevention strategies.

  4. Analysis of the transfer RNA population of mouse mammary glands infected with a latent mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed

    Hentzen, D

    1976-09-01

    Mammary gland transfer RNA's (tRNA'S) of CEH mice infected with mammary tumor virus were analyzed in the preneoplastic state and compared to tRNAs of virus-free C3Hf mice and another uninfected strain, C57BL/6, which is completely resistant to cancer. This quantitative study was based on the ability of each tRNA to fix its corresponding amino acid. The amount of each of the 17 tRNA's tested was identical for the three mammary glands. In addition, tRNA populations during lactation correlated with the amino acids incorporated into the lactoproteins synthesized, which indicates adapation of the tRNA's to protein biosynthesis. Qualitative chromatographic studies on reverse phase capillary columns Type 5 of 10 aminoacyl-tRNA's did not reveal any difference in the isoacceptor elution profiles. This shows that no new isoaccepting tRNA is associated with the mammary tumor virus at that stage, and that no viral modification of a host tRNA has occurred.

  5. Fast Technology Analysis (FTA) Enables Identification of Species and Genotypes of Latent Microsporidia Infections in Healthy Native Cameroonians

    PubMed Central

    Ndzi, Edward S.; Asonganyi, Tazoacha; Nkinin, Mary Bello; Xiao, Lihua; Didier, Elizabeth S.; Bowers, Lisa C.; Nkinin, Stephenson W.; Kaneshiro, Edna S.

    2015-01-01

    Several enteric microsporidia species have been detected in humans and other vertebrates and their identifications at the genotype level are currently being elucidated. As advanced methods, reagents, and disposal kits for detecting and identifying pathogens become commercially available, it is important to test them in settings other than in laboratories with “state-of-the-art” equipment and well-trained staff members. In the present study, we sought to detect microsporidia DNA preserved and extracted from FTA (fast technology analysis) cards spotted with human fecal suspensions obtained from Cameroonian volunteers living in the capital city of Yaoundé to preclude the need for employing spore-concentrating protocols. Further, we tested whether amplicon nucleotide sequencing approaches could be used on small aliquots taken from the cards to elucidate the diversity of microsporidia species and strains infecting native residents. Of 196 samples analyzed, 12 (6.1%) were positive for microsporidia DNA; Enterocytozoon bieneusi (Type IV and KIN-1), Encephalitozoon cuniculi, and Encephalitozoon intestinalis were identified. These data demonstrate the utility of the FTA cards in identifying genotypes of microsporidia DNA in human fecal samples that may be applied to field testing for prevalence studies. PMID:26303263

  6. Eliminating the latent HIV reservoir by reactivation strategies

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Thomas A.; Tolstrup, Martin; Winckelmann, Anni; Østergaard, Lars; Søgaard, Ole S.

    2013-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has transformed HIV from a deadly to a chronic disease, but HIV patients are still burdened with excess morbidity and mortality, long-term toxicities from cART, stigmatization, and insufficient access to cART worldwide. Thus, a cure for HIV would have enormous impact on society as well as the individual. As the complexity and mechanisms of HIV persistence during therapy are being unraveled, new therapeutic targets for HIV eradication are discovered. Substances that activate HIV production in the latently infected cells have recently received much attention. By turning on expression of latent HIV proviruses, reactivation strategies could contribute to the eradication HIV infection. Compounds that are currently being or soon to be tested in clinical trials are emphasized. The results from these trials will provide important clues as to whether or not reactivating strategies could become significant components of a cure for HIV. PMID:23563519

  7. Primary B Lymphocytes Infected with Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Can Be Expanded In Vitro and Are Recognized by LANA-Specific CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nicol, Samantha M.; Sabbah, Shereen; Brulois, Kevin F.; Jung, Jae U.; Bell, Andrew I.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has tropism for B lymphocytes, in which it establishes latency, and can also cause lymphoproliferative disorders of these cells manifesting as primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman disease (MCD). T cell immunity is vital for the control of KSHV infection and disease; however, few models of B lymphocyte infection exist to study immune recognition of such cells. Here, we developed a model of B lymphocyte infection with KSHV in which infected tonsillar B lymphocytes were expanded by providing mitogenic stimuli and then challenged with KSHV-specific CD4+ T cells. The infected cells expressed viral proteins found in PELs, namely, LANA and viral IRF3 (vIRF3), albeit at lower levels, with similar patterns of gene expression for the major latency, viral interleukin 6 (vIL-6), and vIRF3 transcripts. Despite low-level expression of open reading frame 50 (ORF50), transcripts for the immune evasion genes K3 and K5 were detected, with some downregulation of cell surface-expressed CD86 and ICAM. The vast majority of infected lymphocytes expressed IgM heavy chains with Igλ light chains, recapitulating the features seen in infected cells in MCD. We assessed the ability of the infected lymphocytes to be targeted by a panel of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-matched CD4+ T cells and found that LANA-specific T cells restricted to different epitopes recognized these infected cells. Given that at least some KSHV latent antigens are thought to be poor targets for CD8+ T cells, we suggest that CD4+ T cells are potentially important effectors for the in vivo control of KSHV-infected B lymphocytes. IMPORTANCE KSHV establishes a latent reservoir within B lymphocytes, but few models exist to study KSHV-infected B cells other than the transformed PEL cell lines, which have likely accrued mutations during the transformation process. We developed a model of KSHV-infected primary B lymphocytes that

  8. HIV eradication: combinatorial approaches to activate latent viruses.

    PubMed

    De Crignis, Elisa; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2014-11-21

    The concept of eradication of the Human Immune Deficiency Virus (HIV) from infected patients has gained much attention in the last few years. While combination Anti-Retroviral Therapy (c-ART) has been extremely effective in suppressing viral replication, it is not curative. This is due to the presence of a reservoir of latent HIV infected cells, which persist in the presence of c-ART. Recently, pharmaceutical approaches have focused on the development of molecules able to induce HIV-1 replication from latently infected cells in order to render them susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and host immune responses. Alternative pathways and transcription complexes function to regulate the activity of the HIV promoter and might serve as molecular targets for compounds to activate latent HIV. A combined therapy coupling various depressors and activators will likely be the most effective in promoting HIV replication while avoiding pleiotropic effects at the cellular level. Moreover, in light of differences among HIV subtypes and variability in integration sites, the combination of multiple agents targeting multiple pathways will increase likelihood of therapeutic effectiveness and prevent mutational escape. This review provides an overview of the mechanisms that can be targeted to induce HIV activation focusing on potential combinatorial approaches.

  9. IGF-1 increases invasive potential of MCF 7 breast cancer cells and induces activation of latent TGF-β1 resulting in epithelial to mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction TGF-β signaling has been extensively studied in many developmental contexts, amongst which is its ability to induce epithelial to mesenchymal transitions (EMT). EMTs play crucial roles during embryonic development and have also come under intense scrutiny as a mechanism through which breast cancers progress to become metastatic. Interestingly, while the molecular hallmarks of EMT progression (loss of cell adhesion, nuclear localization of β-catenin) are straightforward, the cellular signaling cascades that result in an EMT are numerous and diverse. Furthermore, most studies describing the biological effects of TGF-β have been performed using high concentrations of active, soluble TGF-β, despite the fact that TGF-β is produced and secreted as a latent complex. Methods MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with recombinant IGF-1 were assayed for metalloproteinase activity and invasiveness through a matrigel coated transwell invasion chamber. IGF-1 treatments were then followed by the addition of latent-TGF-β1 to determine if elevated levels of IGF-1 together with latent-TGF-β1 could cause EMT. Results Results showed that IGF-1 - a molecule known to be elevated in breast cancer is a regulator of matrix metalloproteinase activity (MMP) and the invasive potential of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The effects of IGF-1 appear to be mediated through signals transduced via the PI3K and MAPK pathways. In addition, increased IGF-1, together with latent TGF-β1 and active MMPs result in EMT. Conclusions Taken together our data suggest a novel a link between IGF-1 levels, MMP activity, TGF-β signaling, and EMT in breast cancer cells. PMID:21535875

  10. Systemic Expression of Notch Ligand Delta-Like 4 during Mycobacterial Infection Alters the T Cell Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Matthew A.; Allen, Ronald M.; Kimura, Soichiro; Day, Cheryl L.; Kunkel, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    The Notch ligand delta-like 4 (DLL4) is known to fine-tune the CD4+ T cell cytokine response. DLL4 is expressed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in a MyD88-dependent manner. We found that DLL4 expression was upregulated on bone marrow progenitor cells and APCs in mice infected with BCG Mycobacterium. Transfer of DLL4+ progenitor cells from infected hosts resulted in an increase DLL4+ myeloid cells in the spleen, indicating that expression of the dll4 gene is propagated throughout hematopoiesis. We also found an increase in DLL4+ monocytes from individuals who were infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In latent individuals, DLL4 expression correlated with increased cytokine production from T cells in response to PPD stimulation. Finally, antibody blockade of DLL4 reduced T cell cytokine production from naïve T cells stimulated with antigen. These results demonstrate that the Notch ligand DLL4 can influence T cell cytokine production in both humans and mice, and further reveal that expression of DLL4 is upregulated on early hematopoietic progenitors in response to chronic mycobacterial infection. These data suggest that widespread DLL4 expression may occur as a result of mycobacterial infection, and that this expression may alter CD4+ T cell responses to both previously encountered and novel antigens. PMID:27933064

  11. Evaluating Clonal Expansion of HIV-Infected Cells: Optimization of PCR Strategies to Predict Clonality

    PubMed Central

    Laskey, Sarah B.; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W.; Bruner, Katherine M.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    In HIV-infected individuals receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy, the virus persists indefinitely in a reservoir of latently infected cells. The proliferation of these cells may contribute to the stability of the reservoir and thus to the lifelong persistence of HIV-1 in infected individuals. Because the HIV-1 replication process is highly error-prone, the detection of identical viral genomes in distinct host cells provides evidence for the clonal expansion of infected cells. We evaluated alignments of unique, near-full-length HIV-1 sequences to determine the relationship between clonality in a short region and clonality in the full genome. Although it is common to amplify and sequence short, subgenomic regions of the viral genome for phylogenetic analysis, we show that sequence identity of these amplicons does not guarantee clonality across the full viral genome. We show that although longer amplicons capture more diversity, no subgenomic region can recapitulate the diversity of full viral genomes. Consequently, some identical subgenomic amplicons should be expected even from the analysis of completely unique viral genomes, and the presence of identical amplicons alone is not proof of clonally expanded HIV-1. We present a method for evaluating evidence of clonal expansion in the context of these findings. PMID:27494508

  12. Characterization of a spliced exon product of herpes simplex type-1 latency-associated transcript in productively infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Wen; Mukerjee, Ruma; Gartner, Jared J.; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G.; Sandri-Goldin, Rozanne M.; Fraser, Nigel W. . E-mail: nfraser@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2006-12-20

    The latency-associated transcripts (LATs) of herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) are the only viral RNAs accumulating during latent infections in the sensory ganglia of the peripheral nervous system. The major form of LAT that accumulates in latently infected neurons is a 2 kb intron, spliced from a much less abundant 8.3 primary transcript. The spliced exon mRNA has been hard to detect. However, in this study, we have examined the spliced exon RNA in productively infected cells using ribonuclease protection (RPA), and quantitative RT-PCR (q-PCR) assays. We were able to detect the LAT exon RNA in productively infected SY5Y cells (a human neuronal cell line). The level of the LAT exon RNA was found to be approximately 5% that of the 2 kb intron RNA and thus is likely to be relatively unstable. Quantitative RT-PCR (q-PCR) assays were used to examine the LAT exon RNA and its properties. They confirmed that the LAT exon mRNA is present at a very low level in productively infected cells, compared to the levels of other viral transcripts. Furthermore, experiments showed that the LAT exon mRNA is expressed as a true late gene, and appears to be polyadenylated. In SY5Y cells, in contrast to most late viral transcripts, the LAT exon RNA was found to be mainly nuclear localized during the late stage of a productive infection. Interestingly, more LAT exon RNA was found in the cytoplasm in differentiated compared to undifferentiated SY5Y cells, suggesting the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of the LAT exon RNA and its related function may be influenced by the differentiation state of cells.

  13. Six-year follow-up of pancreatic β cell function in adults with latent autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Zhou, Zhi-Guang; Huang, Gan; Ouyang, Ling-Li; Li, Xia; Yan, Xiang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the characteristics of the progression of islet β cell function in Chinese latent autoimmune diabetes in adult (LADA) patients with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) positivity, and to explore the prognostic factors for β cell function. METHODS: Forty-five LADA patients with GAD-Ab positivity screened from phenotypic type 2 diabetic (T2DM) patients and 45 T2DM patients without GAD-Ab matched as controls were followed-up every 6 mo. Sixteen patients in LADA1 and T2DM1 groups respectively have been followed-up for 6 years, while 29 patients in LADA2 and T2DM2 groups respectively for only 1.5 years. GAD-Ab was determined by radioligand assay, and C-peptides (CP) by radioimmune assay. RESULTS: The percentage of patients whose fasting CP (FCP) decreased more than 50% compared with the baseline reached to 25.0% at 1.5th year in LADA1 group, and FCP level decreased (395.8±71.5 vs 572.8±72.3 pmol/L, P<0.05) at 2.5th year and continuously went down to the end of follow-up. No significant changes of the above parameters were found in T2DM1 group. The average decreased percentages of FCP per year in LADA and T2DM patients were 15.8% (4.0-91.0%) and 5.2% (-3.5 to 35.5%, P = 0.000) respectively. The index of GAD-Ab was negatively correlated with the FCP in LADA patients (rs = -0.483, P = 0.000). The decreased percentage of FCP per year in LADA patients were correlated with GAD-Ab index, body mass index (BMI) and age at onset (rs = 0.408, -0.301 and -0.523 respectively, P<0.05). Moreover, GAD-Ab was the only risk factor for predicting β cell failure in LADA patients (B = 1.455, EXP (B) = 4.283, P = 0.023). CONCLUSION: The decreasing rate of islet β cell function in LADA, being highly heterogeneous, is three times that of T2DM patients. The titer of GAD-Ab is an important predictor for the progression of islet β cell function, and age at onset and BMI could also act as the predictors. PMID:15902725

  14. Characterization of latent transforming growth factor-beta 2 from monkey kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Lioubin, M N; Madisen, L; Roth, R A; Purchio, A F

    1991-05-01

    Serum-free medium conditioned by BSC-40 cells was analyzed for the presence of transforming growth factor-beta 2 (TGF beta 2)-related proteins. Western blot analysis was performed using site-specific antipeptide antibodies directed against the pro- and mature regions of the TGF beta 2 precursor. When conditioned medium was analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions, proteins with mol wt of 53 kDa (containing both mature and proregion sequences), 34-38 kDa (containing proregion sequences only), and 12 kDa (containing mature sequences) were detected. Under nonreducing conditions, complexes of 60- to 80-kDa, 160- to 200-kDa, as well as 24-kDa mature dimers were seen. Cleavage of mature TGF beta 2 from its precursor was inhibited by monensin and chloroquin, but not by ammonium chloride or methylamine. Two peaks of bioactivity were detected after fractionation on a TSK column corresponding to mol wt of 130 and 400 kDa. These peaks contained TGF beta 2 and pro-TGF beta 2 proteins. Partial purification of the 130-kDa complex followed by N-glyconase digestion indicated that the pro-TGF beta 2 proteins were glycosylated. These data demonstrate that BSC-40 cells secrete mature TGF beta 2 complexed with proregion-containing proteins and suggest that this association may contribute to the latency phenomena observed with respect to this growth regulator.

  15. Bacterial foodborne infections after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Nicole M; Podczervinski, Sara; Jordan, Kim; Stednick, Zach; Butler-Wu, Susan; McMillen, Kerry; Pergam, Steven A

    2014-11-01

    Diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fever are common among patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but such symptoms are also typical with foodborne infections. The burden of disease caused by foodborne infections in patients undergoing HCT is unknown. We sought to describe bacterial foodborne infection incidence after transplantation within a single-center population of HCT recipients. All HCT recipients who underwent transplantation from 2001 through 2011 at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington were followed for 1 year after transplantation. Data were collected retrospectively using center databases, which include information from transplantation, on-site examinations, outside records, and collected laboratory data. Patients were considered to have a bacterial foodborne infection if Campylobacter jejuni/coli, Listeria monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella species, Shigella species, Vibrio species, or Yersinia species were isolated in culture within 1 year after transplantation. Nonfoodborne infections with these agents and patients with pre-existing bacterial foodborne infection (within 30 days of transplantation) were excluded from analyses. A total of 12 of 4069 (.3%) patients developed a bacterial foodborne infection within 1 year after transplantation. Patients with infections had a median age at transplantation of 50.5 years (interquartile range [IQR], 35 to 57), and the majority were adults ≥18 years of age (9 of 12 [75%]), male gender (8 of 12 [67%]) and had allogeneic transplantation (8 of 12 [67%]). Infectious episodes occurred at an incidence rate of 1.0 per 100,000 patient-days (95% confidence interval, .5 to 1.7) and at a median of 50.5 days after transplantation (IQR, 26 to 58.5). The most frequent pathogen detected was C. jejuni/coli (5 of 12 [42%]) followed by Yersinia (3 of 12 [25%]), although Salmonella (2 of 12 [17%]) and Listeria (2 of 12 [17%]) showed equal frequencies; no cases of Shigella

  16. Vaccinia Virus Recombinant Expressing Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Glycoprotein D Prevents Latent Herpes in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Kenneth J.; Mackett, Michael; Wohlenberg, Charles; Notkins, Abner Louis; Moss, Bernard

    1985-05-01

    In humans, herpes simplex virus causes a primary infection and then often a latent ganglionic infection that persists for life. Because these latent infections can recur periodically, vaccines are needed that can protect against both primary and latent herpes simplex infections. Infectious vaccinia virus recombinants that contain the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D gene under control of defined early or late vaccinia virus promoters were constructed. Tissue culture cells infected with these recombinant viruses synthesized a glycosylated protein that had the same mass (60,000 daltons) as the glycoprotein D produced by HSV-1. Immunization of mice with one of these recombinant viruses by intradermal, subcutaneous, or intraperitoneal routes resulted in the production of antibodies that neutralized HSV-1 and protected the mice against subsequent lethal challenge with HSV-1 or HSV-2. Immunization with the recombinant virus also protected the majority of the mice against the development of a latent HSV-1 infection of the trigeminal ganglia. This is the first demonstration that a genetically engineered vaccine can prevent the development of latency.

  17. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 enhances the expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 and its latent form binding protein in cultured breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Koli, K; Keski-Oja, J

    1995-04-01

    Transforming growth factor beta s (TGF-beta s) are a family of polypeptide growth factors that regulate cellular growth, phenotype, and differentiation. TGF-beta s are synthesized as latent high molecular weight complexes that include the NH2-terminal remnant of the TGF-beta precursor (latency-associated protein) and, frequently, latent TGF-beta binding protein. After activation, TGF-beta s act as local mediators of hormonal responses in target tissues. TGF-beta functions as a negative growth regulator for both breast cancer cells and normal mammary epithelial cells. Vitamin D3 is growth inhibitory for the estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cell line BT-20 and regulates TGF-beta expression in cultured keratinocytes. We studied here the effects of vitamin D3 and its analogues on TGF-beta expression and activity in BT-20 cells. It was found that vitamin D3 enhanced both TGF-beta 1 mRNA and secretion of the protein in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Analyses of the vitamin D3 responses in the presence of cycloheximide or actinomycin D indicated that the TGF-beta 1 mRNA induction was dependent on both protein and RNA synthesis. The amounts of latent TGF-beta binding protein were also increased in the conditioned medium but not in the pericellular matrix of vitamin D3-treated cultures. The amounts of active TGF-beta were enhanced in vitamin D3-treated cultures as well, suggesting autocrine or paracrine functions for the secreted growth factor. Some analogues of vitamin D3 (EB 1089, MC 903, and KH 1060) that are known to be potent inhibitors of breast cancer cell growth both in vitro and in vivo had similar or more pronounced inducing effects on TGF-beta 1 mRNA levels. The present results indicate that vitamin D3 and its analogues are potent inducers of both active and latent forms of TGF-beta 1 in BT-20 breast carcinoma cells and provide evidence for coordinated regulation of latent TGF-beta binding protein and TGF-beta 1.

  18. Virus-induced aggregates in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Moshe, Adi; Gorovits, Rena

    2012-10-17

    During infection, many viruses induce cellular remodeling, resulting in the formation of insoluble aggregates/inclusions, usually containing viral structural proteins. Identification of aggregates has become a useful diagnostic tool for certain viral infections. There is wide variety of viral aggregates, which differ by their location, size, content and putative function. The role of aggregation in the context of a specific virus is often poorly understood, especially in the case of plant viruses. The aggregates are utilized by viruses to house a large complex of proteins of both viral and host origin to promote virus replication, translation, intra- and intercellular transportation. Aggregated structures may protect viral functional complexes from the cellular degradation machinery. Alternatively, the activation of host defense mechanisms may involve sequestration of virus components in aggregates, followed by their neutralization as toxic for the host cell. The diversity of virus-induced aggregates in mammalian and plant cells is the subject of this review.

  19. Living donor and recipient screening for latent tuberculosis infection by tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma releasing assay in a country with an intermediate burden of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Song Mi; Park, In-Ah; Kim, Sun-Mi; Park, Su-Jin; Jung, Joo Hee; Kim, Young Hoon; Park, Jae Berm; Hong, Bumsik; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee; Park, Su-Kil; Lee, Sang Koo; Park, Jung Sik; Han, Duck Jong; Kim, Sung-Han

    2013-10-01

    There are few data on donor screening for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) using the tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma releasing assay (IGRA). In South Korea, most renal allografts involve living donors (average, 80%). Hence, we have an opportunity to evaluate donor and recipient screening for LTBI by TST and IGRA. All donors and recipients admitted for kidney transplantation during a 20-month period were evaluated prospectively by using TST and Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assay. The study population consisted of 205 living donor-recipient pairs (≥16 years) including 15 (7%) who yielded indeterminate donor or recipient ELISPOT results. Of the 205 donors, 63 (31%) gave a positive TST ≥5 mm, 33 (16%) a positive TST ≥10 mm, and 96 (47%) a positive ELISPOT. Of the 205 recipients, 9 (5%) gave a positive TST ≥5 mm, 3 (2%) a positive TST ≥10 mm, and 79 (39%) had a positive ELISPOT. Of the 205 donor-recipient pairs, only 59 (29%) gave negative donor and recipient ELISPOT results and 139 (68%) negative donor and recipient TSTs (<5 mm) (P < 0.001). One third of donor-recipient pairs tends to be positive in the TST, and two thirds of the donor-recipient pairs tends to be positive in the ELISPOT. Given the high positive rate of LTBI obtained by screening donors, further studies on the clinical value of solid organ transplant donors with positive TST or ELISPOT and health economics analysis in countries with intermediate burden of TB are needed for policy decisions on isoniazid (INH) prophylaxis.

  20. Predictors of Latent Tuberculosis Infection Treatment After Introduction of a New Regimen: A Retrospective Cohort Study at an Inner City Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Yamin, Aliya; Bornstein, Ethan; Hensel, Rachel; Mohamed, Omar; Kempker, Russell R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite the low and decreasing prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) in the United States, there remain certain high-risk groups with high incidence rates. The targeted screening and treatment of latent TB infection (LTBI) among these high-risk groups are needed to achieve TB elimination; however, by most accounts, LTBI treatment completion rates remain low. Methods. We retrospectively studied all patients accepting treatment for LTBI at the Fulton County Health Department TB clinic over 2 years. Medical chart abstraction was performed to collect information on sociodemographics, medical, and LTBI treatment history. Treatment completion was defined as finishing ≥88% of the prescribed regimen. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of treatment completion. Results. Among 547 adults offered LTBI treatment, 424 (78%) accepted treatment and 298 of 424 (70%) completed treatment. The median age was 42 years, most patients were black (77%), and close to one third did not have stable housing. No significant difference in completion rates was found between the 3 regimens of 9 months isoniazid (65%), 4 months rifampin (71%), and 3 months of weekly rifapentine and isoniazid (79%). In multivariate analysis, having stable housing increased the odds of finishing treatment, whereas tobacco use and an adverse event decreased the odds. Conclusion. Utilizing comprehensive case management, we demonstrated high rates of LTBI treatment completion, including among those receiving a 3-month regimen. Completion rates were higher among persons with stable housing, and this finding highlights the need to develop strategies that will improve adherence among homeless persons. PMID:27757409

  1. Performance of QuantiFERON TB Gold test in detecting latent tuberculosis infection in brain-dead organ donors in Iran: a brief report.

    PubMed

    Tabarsi, Payam; Yousefzadeh, Amir; Najafizadeh, Katayoun; Droudinia, Atousa; Bayati, Rouzbeh; Marjani, Majid; Shafaghi, Shadi; Farokhzad, Banafsheh; Javanmard, Pedram; Velayati, Ali Akbar

    2014-11-01

    With regard to the significant morbidity and mortality due to tuberculosis in lung transplant recipients, the identification of brain-dead organ donors with latent tuberculosis by use of the QuantiFERON TB Gold (QFT-G) test may be of help to reduce the risk of TB reactivation and mortality in lung recipients. This study was conducted in the National Research Institute of Tuber-culosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD) in Iran, from January to March 2013. A total of 38 conse-cutive brain-dead donors, not currently infected with active tuberculosis, were recruited. The medi-cal records of all the study enrollees were reviewed. A whole-blood IFN- release assay (IGRA) in reaction to early secreted antigenic target 6 (ESAT-6), culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10), and TB7.7 antigens, was performed and the released Interferon- was measured via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The data was analyzed with QFT-G software which was provided by the company. The demographic, characteristics and other variables were entered into SPSS version 11.5. The QFT-G test results of three donors (7.9%) turned out to be positive, negative for 24 donors (63.1%), and indeterminate for 11 cases (28.9%). Our study revealed the potential advantages of QFT-G in lowering the incidence of donor-derived post-transplant tuberculosis among lung recipients. However, a high rate of indeterminate results restricted the performance of QFT-G in this study.

  2. Diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in healthy young adults in a country with high tuberculosis burden and BCG vaccination at birth

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background One third of the world’s population is thought to have latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) with the potential for subsequent reactivation of disease. To better characterize this important population, studies comparing Tuberculin Skin Test (TST) and the new interferon-γ release assays including QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) have been conducted in different parts of the world, but most of these have been in countries with a low incidence of tuberculosis (TB). The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate the use of QFT-GIT assay as compared with TST in the diagnosis of LTBI in Ethiopia, a country with a high burden of TB and routine BCG vaccination at birth. Methods Healthy medical and paramedical male students at the Faculty of Medicine, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia were enrolled into the study from December 2008 to February 2009. The TST and QFTG-IT assay were performed using standard methods. Results The mean age of the study participants was 20.9 years. From a total of 107 study participants, 46.7% (95%CI: 37.0% to 56.6%) had a positive TST result (TST≥10 mm), 43.9% (95%CI: 34.3% to 53.9%) had a positive QFT-GIT assay result and 44.9% (95%CI: 35.2% to 54.8%) had BCG scar. There was strong agreement between TST (TST ≥10mm) and QFT-GIT assay (Kappa = 0.83, p value = 0.000). Conclusion The TST and QFT-GIT assay show similar efficacy for the diagnosis of LTBI in healthy young adults residing in Ethiopia, a country with high TB incidence. PMID:22870897

  3. Parasitic Infections in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jarque, Isidro; Salavert, Miguel; Pemán, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients. PMID:27413527

  4. Hospital infection control in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Dykewicz, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Guidelines for Preventing Opportunistic Infections Among Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients contains a section on hospital infection control including evidence-based recommendations regarding ventilation, construction, equipment, plants, play areas and toys, health-care workers, visitors, patient skin and oral care, catheter-related infections, drug-resistant organisms, and specific nosocomial infections. These guidelines are intended to reduce the number and severity of hospital infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. PMID:11294720

  5. Validation of real-time polymerase chain reaction tests for diagnosing feline immunodeficiency virus infection in domestic cats using Bayesian latent class models.

    PubMed

    Morton, John M; McCoy, Richard J; Kann, Rebecca K C; Gardner, Ian A; Meers, Joanne

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of the current study were to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of three real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for diagnosis of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in domestic cats, both individually and when interpreted in series with one of two serological tests, separately in populations of cats at low and high risk of being infected with FIV. One PCR test targeted the pol gene and two targeted the gag gene of FIV. For comparison, sensitivities and specificities of the individual serological tests (IDEXX SNAP(®) test and AGEN Simplify(®) test) were also estimated. The study populations consisted of domestic cats thought to be not vaccinated against FIV. Low-risk (males aged 4 years or less and females; n=128) and high-risk (males over 4 years; n=128) cats were selected from those where blood samples were submitted to a commercial clinical pathology service. Bayesian latent class models were used to obtain posterior probability distributions for sensitivity and specificity for each test, based on prior distributions obtained from three experts. Medians of the posterior sensitivity distributions for the PCR tests based on the pol gene and two regions of the gag gene tests ranged from 0.85 to 0.89, compared to 0.89-0.97 for the two serological tests. The medians of posterior specificity distributions for these PCR tests were 0.94-0.96, and 0.95-0.97 for the serological tests. In contrast, the PCR based on one region of the gag gene had lower median sensitivity. Sensitivities of combinations of these serological and PCR tests interpreted in series were low; medians of posterior sensitivity distributions ranged from 0.75 to 0.83. Relative to the low-risk population, median sensitivities in the high-risk population were lower for all tests other than the AGEN Simplify(®) test; specificities were similar in both populations. We conclude that the sensitivities of the two PCR tests based on the pol gene and two regions of the

  6. The Significance of Sensitive Interferon Gamma Release Assays for Diagnosis of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in Patients Receiving Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Antagonist Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yu Jung; Woo, Hye In; Jeon, Kyeongman; Koh, Won-Jung; Jang, Dong Kyoung; Cha, Hoon Suk; Koh, Eun Mi; Lee, Nam Yong; Kang, Eun-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Objective We compared two interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs), QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) and T-SPOT.TB, for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients before and while receiving tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antagonist therapy. This study evaluated the significance of sensitive IGRAs for LTBI screening and monitoring. Methods Before starting TNF-α antagonist therapy, 156 consecutive patients with rheumatic diseases were screened for LTBI using QFT-GIT and T-SPOT.TB tests. According to our study protocol, QFT-GIT-positive patients received LTBI treatment. Patients positive by any IGRAs were subjected to follow-up IGRA tests after completing LTBI-treatment and/or during TNF-α antagonist therapy. Results At the initial LTBI screening, 45 (28.9%) and 70 (44.9%) patients were positive by QFT-GIT and T-SPOT.TB, respectively. The agreement rate between IGRA results was 78.8% (k = 0.56; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 0.43 to 0.68). Of 29 patients who were positive only by T-SPOT.TB in the initial screening, 83% (19/23) were persistently positive by T-SPOT.TB, while QFT-GIT testing showed that 36% (9/25) had conversion during TNF-α antagonist therapy. By the end of the follow-up period (218 to 1,264 days), four patients (4/137, 2.9%) developed active tuberculosis (TB) diseases during receiving TNF-α antagonist therapy. Among them, one was Q-T+, one was Q+T-, and the remaining two were Q-T- at the initial screening (Q, QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube; T, T-SPOT.TB; +, positive; -, negative). Two (2/4, 50%) patients with TB reactivation had at least one prior risk factor consistent with previous TB infection. Conclusion This study demonstrated the need to capitalize on sensitive IGRAs to monitor for LTBI in at-risk patients for a more sensitive diagnosis in countries with an intermediate TB burden. PMID:26474294

  7. Pilot, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial of the supplement food Nyaditum resae® in adults with or without latent TB infection: Safety and immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Montané, Eva; Barriocanal, Ana Maria; Arellano, Ana Lucía; Valderrama, Angelica; Sanz, Yolanda; Perez-Alvarez, Nuria; Cardona, Paula; Vilaplana, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Background Nyaditum resae® (NR) is a galenic preparation of heat-killed Mycobacterium manresensis, a new species of the fortuitum complex, that is found in drinkable water, and that has demonstrated to protect against the development of active TB in a murine experimental model that develop human-like lesions. Methods Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled Clinical Trial (51 volunteers included). Two different doses of NR and a placebo were tested, the randomization was stratified by Latent Tuberculosis Infection (LTBI)-positive (n = 21) and LTBI-negative subjects (n = 30). Each subject received 14 drinkable daily doses for 2 weeks. Results All patients completed the study. The 46.3% of the overall reported adverse events (AE) were considered related to the investigational treatment. None of them were severe (94% were mild and 6% moderate). No statistical differences were found when comparing the median number of AE between the placebo group and both treatment groups. The most common AE reported were gastrointestinal events, most frequently mild abdominal pain and increase in stool frequency. Regarding the immunogenic response, both LTBI-negative and LTBI-positive volunteers treated with NR experienced a global increase on the Treg response, showed both in the population of CD25+CD39-, mainly effector Treg cells, or CD25+CD39+ memory PPD-specific Treg cells. Conclusion This clinical trial demonstrates an excellent tolerability profile of NR linked to a significant increase in the population of specific effector and memory Tregs in the groups treated with NR in both LTBI-positive and negative subjects. NR shows a promising profile to be used to reduce the risk of active TB. PMID:28182700

  8. Coincident diabetes mellitus modulates Th1-, Th2-, and Th17-cell responses in latent tuberculosis in an IL-10- and TGF-β-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Moideen, Kadar; George, Parakkal Jovvian; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Babu, Subash

    2016-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a risk factor for the development of active tuberculosis (TB), although its role in the TB-induced responses in latent TB (LTB) is not well understood. Since Th1, Th2, and Th17 responses are important in immunity to LTB, we postulated that coincident DM could alter the function of these CD4(+) T-cell subsets. To this end, we examined mycobacteria-induced immune responses in the whole blood of individuals with LTB-DM and compared them with responses of individuals without DM (LTB-NDM). T-cell responses from LTB-DM are characterized by diminished frequencies of mono- and dual-functional CD4(+) Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells at baseline and following stimulation with mycobacterial antigens-purified protein derivative, early secreted antigen-6, and culture filtrate protein-10. This modulation was at least partially dependent on IL-10 and TGF-β, since neutralization of either cytokine resulted in significantly increased frequencies of Th1 and Th2 cells but not Th17 cells in LTB-DM but not LTB individuals. LTB-DM is therefore characterized by diminished frequencies of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells, indicating that DM alters the immune response in latent TB leading to a suboptimal induction of protective CD4(+) T-cell responses, thereby providing a potential mechanism for increased susceptibility to active disease.

  9. TLR7 Agonist GS-9620 Is a Potent Inhibitor of Acute HIV-1 Infection in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bam, Rujuta A.; Hansen, Derek; Irrinki, Alivelu; Mulato, Andrew; Jones, Gregg S.; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Frey, Christian R.; Cihlar, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT GS-9620 is a potent and selective oral Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) agonist that directly activates plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). GS-9620 suppressed hepatitis B virus (HBV) in animal models of chronic infection and transiently activated HIV expression ex vivo in latently infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from virally suppressed patients. Currently, GS-9620 is under clinical evaluation for treating chronic HBV infection and for reducing latent reservoirs in virally suppressed HIV-infected patients. Here, we investigated the in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of GS-9620. GS-9620 potently inhibited viral replication in PBMCs, particularly when it was added 24 to 48 h prior to HIV infection (50% effective concentration = 27 nM). Depletion of pDCs but not other immune cell subsets from PBMC cultures suppressed GS-9620 antiviral activity. Although GS-9620 was inactive against HIV in purified CD4+ T cells and macrophages, HIV replication was potently inhibited by conditioned medium derived from GS-9620-treated pDC cultures when added to CD4+ T cells prior to infection. This suggests that GS-9620-mediated stimulation of PBMCs induced the production of a soluble factor(s) inhibiting HIV replication in trans. GS-9620-treated PBMCs primarily showed increased production of interferon alpha (IFN-α), and cotreatment with IFN-α-blocking antibodies reversed the HIV-1-inhibitory effect of GS-9620. Additional studies demonstrated that GS-9620 inhibited a postentry event in HIV replication at a step coincident with or prior to reverse transcription. The simultaneous activation of HIV-1 expression and inhibition of HIV-1 replication are important considerations for the clinical evaluation of GS-9620 since these antiviral effects may help restrict potential local HIV spread upon in vivo latency reversal. PMID:27799218

  10. BZLF1 Attenuates Transmission of Inflammatory Paracrine Senescence in Epstein-Barr Virus-Infected Cells by Downregulating Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xubing; Li, Yuqing; Yang, Mengtian; Huang, Lu; Gong, Weijie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent studies have shown that inflammatory responses trigger and transmit senescence to neighboring cells and activate the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection induces increased secretion of several inflammatory factors, whereas lytic infections evade the antiviral inflammatory response. However, the changes in and roles of the inflammatory microenvironment during the switch between EBV life cycles remain unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that latent EBV infection in EBV-positive cells triggers the SASP in neighboring epithelial cells. In contrast, lytic EBV infection abolishes this phenotype. BZLF1 attenuates the transmission of paracrine senescence during lytic EBV infection by downregulating tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) secretion. A mutant BZLF1 protein, BZLF1Δ207-210, that cannot inhibit TNF-α secretion while maintaining viral transcription, fails to block paracrine senescence, whereas a neutralizing antibody against TNF-α is sufficient to restore its inhibition. Furthermore, latent EBV infection induces oxidative stress in neighboring cells, while BZLF1-mediated downregulation of TNF-α reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in neighboring cells, and ROS scavengers alleviate paracrine senescence. These results suggest that lytic EBV infection attenuates the transmission of inflammatory paracrine senescence through BZLF1 downregulation of TNF-α secretion and alters the inflammatory microenvironment to allow virus propagation and persistence. IMPORTANCE The senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), an important tumorigenic process, is triggered and transmitted by inflammatory factors. The different life cycles of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in EBV-positive cells employ distinct strategies to modulate the inflammatory response and senescence. The elevation of inflammatory factors during latent EBV infection promotes the SASP in uninfected cells. In

  11. Generalized Latent Trait Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moustaki, Irini; Knott, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discusses a general model framework within which manifest variables with different distributions in the exponential family can be analyzed with a latent trait model. Presents a unified maximum likelihood method for estimating the parameters of the generalized latent trait model and discusses the scoring of individuals on the latent dimensions.…

  12. Visualization of DNA G-quadruplexes in herpes simplex virus 1-infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Artusi, Sara; Perrone, Rosalba; Lago, Sara; Raffa, Paolo; Di Iorio, Enzo; Palù, Giorgio; Richter, Sara N.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that clusters of guanine quadruplex (G4) structures can form in the human herpes simplex-1 (HSV-1) genome. Here we used immunofluorescence and immune-electron microscopy with a G4-specific monoclonal antibody to visualize G4 structures in HSV-1 infected cells. We found that G4 formation and localization within the cells was virus cycle dependent: viral G4s peaked at the time of viral DNA replication in the cell nucleus, moved to the nuclear membrane at the time of virus nuclear egress and were later found in HSV-1 immature virions released from the cell nucleus. Colocalization of G4s with ICP8, a viral DNA processing protein, was observed in viral replication compartments. G4s were lost upon treatment with DNAse and inhibitors of HSV-1 DNA replication. The notable increase in G4s upon HSV-1 infection suggests a key role of these structures in the HSV-1 biology and indicates new targets to control both the lytic and latent infection. PMID:27794039

  13. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in epithelial cells in vivo: rare detection of EBV replication in tongue mucosa but not in salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Frangou, Phroso; Buettner, Maike; Niedobitek, Gerald

    2005-01-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is transmitted through saliva, but the cellular source is controversial. Putative reservoirs include oral epithelium and salivary glands. Tongue mucosal samples, salivary glands, and tongue carcinomas were studied, by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, for evidence of EBV infection. EBV replication was seen in 1.3% of tongue mucosal samples. No latent infection was found at this site. EBV infection was detected neither in normal salivary glands nor in tongue carcinomas. Thus, EBV replication occurs infrequently in tongue epithelial cells, and salivary glands are unlikely to harbor EBV. EBV is unlikely to be involved in the pathogenesis of tongue cancer.

  14. Latent geometry of bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsak, Maksim; Papadopoulos, Fragkiskos; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2017-03-01

    Despite the abundance of bipartite networked systems, their organizing principles are less studied compared to unipartite networks. Bipartite networks are often analyzed after projecting them onto one of the two sets of nodes. As a result of the projection, nodes of the same set are linked together if they have at least one neighbor in common in the bipartite network. Even though these projections allow one to study bipartite networks using tools developed for unipartite networks, one-mode projections lead to significant loss of information and artificial inflation of the projected network with fully connected subgraphs. Here we pursue a different approach for analyzing bipartite systems that is based on the observation that such systems have a latent metric structure: network nodes are points in a latent metric space, while connections are more likely to form between nodes separated by shorter distances. This approach has been developed for unipartite networks, and relatively little is known about its applicability to bipartite systems. Here, we fully analyze a simple latent-geometric model of bipartite networks and show that this model explains the peculiar structural properties of many real bipartite systems, including the distributions of common neighbors and bipartite clustering. We also analyze the geometric information loss in one-mode projections in this model and propose an efficient method to infer the latent pairwise distances between nodes. Uncovering the latent geometry underlying real bipartite networks can find applications in diverse domains, ranging from constructing efficient recommender systems to understanding cell metabolism.

  15. Isolation of virus from brain after immunosuppression of mice with latent herpes simplex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastrukoff, Lorne; Long, Carol; Doherty, Peter C.; Wroblewska, Zofia; Koprowski, Hilary

    1981-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is usually present in a latent form in the trigeminal ganglion of man1-3. Various stress factors may induce virus reactivation, which is manifest by a lip lesion (innervated from the trigeminal ganglion) and the production of infectious virus. The considerable experimental efforts to define the conditions that lead to the reactivation of latent HSV have concentrated on isolating virus either from the original extraneural site of virus inoculation, or from cell-free homogenates of sensory ganglia from latently infected animals4-15. Recent DNA hybridization experiments resulted in the demonstration of the presence of HSV genomes in the brain tissue of both latently infected mice, and of humans who showed no clinical symptoms of HSV (ref. 16 and N. Fraser, personal communication). This led us to consider the possibility that HSV may be present in brain tissue as the result of either reactivation of the virus in brain cells or the passage of reactivated virus from trigeminal ganglia through the brain stem to the brain. The presence of infectious HSV in brain tissue has not previously been demonstrated; yet this could be a factor in chronic, relapsing neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis. We have now shown experimentally that mice carrying latent HSV in their trigeminal ganglia may, following massive immunosuppression, express infectious virus in the central nervous system (CNS).

  16. CD8+ T Cells in Leishmania Infections: Friends or Foes?

    PubMed Central

    Stäger, Simona; Rafati, Sima

    2012-01-01

    Host protection against several intracellular pathogens requires the induction of CD8+ T cell responses. CD8+ T cells are potent effector cells that can produce high amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines and kill infected target cells efficiently. However, a protective role for CD8+ T cells during Leishmania infections is still controversial and largely depends on the infection model. In this review, we discuss the role of CD8+ T cells during various types of Leishmania infections, following vaccination, and as potential immunotherapeutic targets. PMID:22566891

  17. Interferon Response in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection: Lessons from Cell Culture Systems of HCV Infection.

    PubMed

    Sung, Pil Soo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2015-10-07

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-stranded RNA virus that infects approximately 130-170 million people worldwide. In 2005, the first HCV infection system in cell culture was established using clone JFH-1, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with fulminant HCV infection. JFH-1 replicates efficiently in hepatoma cells and infectious virion particles are released into the culture supernatant. The development of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) systems has allowed us to understand how hosts respond to HCV infection and how HCV evades host responses. Although the mechanisms underlying the different outcomes of HCV infection are not fully understood, innate immune responses seem to have a critical impact on the outcome of HCV infection, as demonstrated by the prognostic value of IFN-λ gene polymorphisms among patients with chronic HCV infection. Herein, we review recent research on interferon response in HCV infection, particularly studies using HCVcc infection systems.

  18. The transforming domain alone of the latent membrane protein of Epstein-Barr virus is toxic to cells when expressed at high levels.

    PubMed Central

    Hammerschmidt, W; Sugden, B; Baichwal, V R

    1989-01-01

    A previously unrecognized activity has been associated with the product of the BNLF-1 gene of Epstein-Barr virus. This gene encodes the latent membrane protein of Epstein-Barr virus. When the gene was expressed at high levels, it was toxic to all cell lines tested, which included six human B-lymphoid lines as well as BALB/3T3, 143/EBNA-1, and HEp-2 cells. The BNLF-1 gene was previously shown to induce anchorage-independent and tumorigenic growth in Rat-1 and BALB/3T3 cells. We demonstrate here that only those mutations in the BNLF-1 gene that score positively in the anchorage-independent growth assay were cytotoxic when expressed at high levels. It is therefore possible that the same activities of the latent membrane protein that are necessary to induce anchorage-independent growth of some rodent cell lines also confer toxicity to many cell lines when expressed at high levels. Images PMID:2542565

  19. Dichotomy between T Cell and B Cell Tolerance to Neonatal Retroviral Infection Permits T Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mavrommatis, Bettina; Baudino, Lucie; Levy, Prisca; Merkenschlager, Julia; Eksmond, Urszula; Donnarumma, Tiziano; Young, George; Stoye, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Elucidation of the immune requirements for control or elimination of retroviral infection remains an important aim. We studied the induction of adaptive immunity to neonatal infection with a murine retrovirus, under conditions leading to immunological tolerance. We found that the absence of either maternal or offspring adaptive immunity permitted efficient vertical transmission of the retrovirus. Maternal immunodeficiency allowed the retrovirus to induce central Th cell tolerance in the infected offspring. In turn, this compromised the offspring’s ability to mount a protective Th cell–dependent B cell response. However, in contrast to T cells, offspring B cells were not centrally tolerized and retained their ability to respond to the infection when provided with T cell help. Thus, escape of retrovirus-specific B cells from deletional tolerance offers the opportunity to induce protective retroviral immunity by restoration of retrovirus-specific T cell help, suggesting similar T cell immunotherapies for persistent viral infections. PMID:27647833

  20. Comparison of Interferon-γ Release Assay to Two Cut-Off Points of Tuberculin Skin Test to Detect Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Primary Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Fernanda Mattos; do Prado, Thiago Nascimento; Pinheiro, Jair dos Santos; Peres, Renata Lyrio; Lacerda, Thamy Carvalho; Loureiro, Rafaela Borge; Carvalho, Jose Américo; Fregona, Geisa; Dias, Elias Santos; Cosme, Lorrayne Beliqui; Rodrigues, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Riley, Lee Wood; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia

    2014-01-01

    Background An interferon-γ release assay, QuantiFERON-TB (QFT) test, has been introduced an alternative test for the diagnosis of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Here, we compared the performance of QFT with tuberculin skin test (TST) measured at two different cut-off points among primary health care work (HCW) in Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among HCWs in four Brazilian cities with a known history of high incidence of TB. Results of the QFT were compared to TST results based on both ≥5 mm and ≥10 mm as cut-off points. Results We enrolled 632 HCWs. When the cut-off value of ≥10 mm was used, agreement between QFT and TST was 69% (k = 0.31), and when the cut-off of ≥5 mm was chosen, the agreement was 57% (k = 0.22). We investigated possible factors of discordance of TST vs QFT. Compared to the TST−/QFT− group, risk factors for discordance in the TST+/QFT− group with TST cut-off of ≥5 mm included age between 41–45 years [OR = 2.70; CI 95%: 1.32–5.51] and 46–64 years [OR = 2.04; CI 95%: 1.05–3.93], BCG scar [OR = 2.72; CI 95%: 1.40–5.25], and having worked only in primary health care [OR = 2.30; CI 95%: 1.09–4.86]. On the other hand, for the cut-off of ≥10 mm, BCG scar [OR = 2.26; CI 95%: 1.03–4.91], being a household contact of a TB patient [OR = 1.72; CI 95%: 1.01–2.92] and having had a previous TST [OR = 1.66; CI 95%: 1.05–2.62], were significantly associated with the TST+/QFT− group. No statistically significant associations were found among the TST−/QFT+ discordant group with either TST cut-off value. Conclusions Although we identified BCG vaccination to contribute to the discordance at both TST cut-off measures, the current Brazilian recommendation for the initiation of LTBI treatment, based on information gathered from medical history, TST, chest radiograph and physical examination, should not be changed. PMID:25137040

  1. Latent Tuberculosis Infection Diagnostic and Treatment Cascade among Contacts in Primary Health Care in a City of Sao Paulo State, Brazil: Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is a tool for global TB control, especially in close contacts. But data is scarce in high burden countries, under field conditions, including data on the benefits of LTBI management. Objective To analyze the LTBI diagnosis and treatment cascade among contacts in primary health care (PHC) services in São José do Rio Preto—SP, Brazil. Methods Cross-sectional design, conducted with contacts of pulmonary TB patients followed in all PHC services. Data was collected from May to September 2014 in the Reporting System for TB cases (TBWEB) and Reporting System for Chemoprophylaxis. Medical records and treatment follow-up forms were reviewed and all the nurses responsible for TB in PHC services were interviewed. Results Among 336 contacts included, 267 (79.4%) were screened for TB or LTBI, according to the presence or not of respiratory symptoms. Among those contacts screened, 140 (52.4%) were symptomatic, 9 (3.4%) had TB disease, 106/221 (48%) had positive TST result, meeting the criteria for LTBI treatment, and 64/106 (60.4%) actually started it. Overall, among 267 screened, only 64 (24%) started LTBI treatment. The completion rates of treatment among the contacts who started it, those with positive TST result and those screened were 56.3% (36/64), 16.3% (36/221) and 13.5% (36/267), respectively. Nurses claimed that asymptomatic TB contacts pay no attention to preventive health care and do not seek medical care as they do not have symptoms of the disease. In reviewing the medical records, high proportions of contacts without evaluation, incomplete assessment, incorrect records of contraindication for LTBI treatment, lack of notes regarding the identification and evaluation of contacts were identified. Conclusions There is a need for better organization of the surveillance and investigation routine for contacts in PHC, considering the reorganization of the work process and the features of the

  2. Latent tuberculosis infection, tuberculin skin test and vitamin D status in contacts of tuberculosis patients: a cross-sectional and case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Deficient serum vitamin D levels have been associated with incidence of tuberculosis (TB), and latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). However, to our knowledge, no studies on vitamin D status and tuberculin skin test (TST) conversion have been published to date. The aim of this study was to estimate the associations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25[OH]D) status with LTBI prevalence and TST conversion in contacts of active TB in Castellon (Spain). Methods The study was designed in two phases: cross-sectional and case-control. From November 2009 to October 2010, contacts of 42 TB patients (36 pulmonary, and 6 extra-pulmonary) were studied in order to screen for TB. LTBI and TST conversion cases were defined following TST, clinical, analytic and radiographic examinations. Serum 25(OH)D levels were measured by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA) on a COBAS® 410 ROCHE® analyzer. Logistic regression models were used in the statistical analysis. Results The study comprised 202 people with a participation rate of 60.1%. Only 20.3% of the participants had a sufficient serum 25(OH)D (≥ 30 ng/ml) level. In the cross-sectional phase, 50 participants had LTBI and no association between LTBI status and serum 25(OH)D was found. After 2 months, 11 out of 93 negative LTBI participants, without primary prophylaxis, presented TST conversion with initial serum 25(OH)D levels: a:19.4% (7/36): < 20 ng/ml, b:12.5% (4/32):20-29 ng/ml, and c:0%(0/25) ≥ 30 ng/ml. A sufficient serum 25(OH)D level was a protector against TST conversion a: Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.00; b: OR = 0.49 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07-2.66); and c: OR = 0.10 (95% CI 0.00-0.76), trends p = 0.019, adjusted for high exposure and sputum acid-fast bacilli positive index cases. The mean of serum level 25(OH)D in TST conversion cases was lower than controls,17.5 ± 5.6 ng/ml versus 25.9 ± 13.7 ng/ml (p = 0.041). Conclusions The results suggest that sufficient serum 25(OH)D levels protect against

  3. Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Genome Programming during the Early Stages of Primary Infection of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Hem C.; Lu, Jie; Verma, Subhash C.; Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Mehta, Devan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The early period of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection involves the dynamic expression of viral genes, which are temporally and epigenetically regulated. KSHV can effectively infect and persist in endothelial as well as human B cells with different gene expression patterns. To understand the temporal epigenetic changes which occur when KSHV infects the lymphocytic compartment, we infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and comprehensively analyzed the changes which occurred at the binding sites of virally encoded lytic as well as latent proteins along with epigenetic modifications across the KSHV genome during early primary infection. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, we showed that the KSHV genome acquires a uniquely distinct histone modification pattern of methylation (H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and H3K27me3) and acetylation (H3Ac) during de novo infection of human PBMCs. This pattern showed that the epigenetic changes were temporally controlled. The binding profiles of KSHV latent protein LANA and the immediate early proteins RTA and K8 showed specific patterns at different times postinfection, which reflects the gene expression program. Further analysis demonstrated that KSHV can concurrently express lytic and latent genes which were associated with histone modifications at these specific regions on the viral genome. We identified three KSHV genes, K3, ORF49, and ORF64, which exhibited different profiles of histone modifications during the early stages of PBMC infection. These studies established a distinct pattern of epigenetic modification which correlates with viral gene expression temporally regulated during the first 7 days of PBMC infection and provides clues to the regulatory program required for successful infection by KSHV of human PBMCs. PMID:25516617

  4. Humoral Responses to Rv1733c, Rv0081, Rv1735c, and Rv1737c DosR Regulon-Encoded Proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Individuals with Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nalwoga, Angela; Levin, Jonathan; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Elliott, Alison M.; Cose, Stephen; Andia-Biraro, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is evidence of immunological control of tuberculosis. Dormancy survival regulator (DosR) regulon-encoded proteins may have a role in the maintenance of LTBI. T cell responses to Rv1733c, Rv0081, Rv1735c, and Rv1737c DosR regulon-encoded proteins were found to be most frequent among household contacts of TB cases from Uganda compared to other DosR proteins, but antibody responses were not described. We characterized antibody responses to these proteins in individuals from Uganda. Antibodies to Rv1733c, Rv0081, Rv1735c, and Rv1737c DosR regulon-encoded proteins were measured in 68 uninfected individuals, 62 with LTBI, and 107 with active pulmonary tuberculosis (APTB) cases. There were no differences in the concentrations of antibodies to Rv0081, Rv1735c, and Rv1737c DosR regulon-encoded proteins between individuals with LTBI and APTB and those who were uninfected. LTBI was associated with higher concentrations of antibodies to Rv1733c in female participants [adjusted geometric mean ratio: 1.812, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.105 2.973, and p = 0.019] but not in males (p value for interaction = 0.060). Antibodies to the four DosR regulon-encoded proteins investigated may not serve as good biomarkers of LTBI in the general population. More of the M.tb proteome needs to be screened to identify proteins that induce strong antibody responses in LTBI. PMID:28255560

  5. Cells infected with herpes simplex virus 1 export to uninfected cells exosomes containing STING, viral mRNAs, and microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Kalamvoki, Maria; Du, Te; Roizman, Bernard

    2014-11-18

    STING (stimulator of IFN genes) activates the IFN-dependent innate immune response to infection on sensing the presence of DNA in cytosol. The quantity of STING accumulating in cultured cells varies; it is relatively high in some cell lines [e.g., HEp-2, human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HEL), and HeLa] and low in others (e.g., Vero cells). In a preceding publication we reported that STING was stable in four cell lines infected with herpes simplex virus 1 and that it was actively stabilized in at least two cell lines derived from human cancers. In this report we show that STING is exported from HEp-2 cells to Vero cells along with virions, viral mRNAs, microRNAs, and the exosome marker protein CD9. The virions and exosomes copurified. The quantity of STING and CD9 exported from one cell line to another was inoculum-size-dependent and reflected the levels of STING and CD9 accumulating in the cells in which the virus inoculum was made. The export of STING, an innate immune sensor, and of viral mRNAs whose major role may be in silencing viral genes in latently infected neurons, suggests that the virus has evolved mechanisms that curtail rather than foster the spread of infection under certain conditions.

  6. Mosquito salivary gland extracts induce EBV-infected NK cell oncogenesis via CD4 T cells in patients with hypersensitivity to mosquito bites.

    PubMed

    Asada, Hideo; Saito-Katsuragi, Mamiko; Niizeki, Hironori; Yoshioka, Akira; Suguri, Setsuo; Isonokami, Masaaki; Aoki, Toshiyuki; Ishihara, Shigehiko; Tokura, Yoshiki; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Miyagawa, Sachiko

    2005-11-01

    Severe hypersensitivity to mosquito bites (HMB) is characterized by intense local skin reactions and systemic symptoms such as high fever, lymphadenopathy, and hepatosplenomegaly. Patients with HMB often have natural killer (NK) cell lymphocytosis associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Here we investigated whether mosquito bites have any influence on the oncogenesis of EBV-infected NK cells. We examined six HMB patients with EBV-infected NK cell lymphocytosis. We first demonstrated that CD4+ T cells, but not NK cells, proliferated well in response to mosquito salivary gland extracts (SGE), especially to SGE of Aedes albopictus. When NK cells were cocultured with autologous CD4+ T cells stimulated by mosquito SGE, the expression of viral oncogene latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) was remarkably enhanced. Next, we stimulated mononuclear cells of the patients with mosquito SGE, and NK cell counts were monitored for 28 d. The counts changed little from initial levels in the culture with mosquito SGE, whereas they decreased steadily in the culture without the extracts. Furthermore, we detected LMP1 mRNA in the skin lesion induced by mosquito SGE. These results suggest that mosquito bites can induce expression of the viral oncogene LMP1 in NK cells via mosquito antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, which is involved in the oncogenesis of NK cells in vivo.

  7. Combined Analysis of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-5, IL-10, IL-1RA and MCP-1 in QFT Supernatant Is Useful for Distinguishing Active Tuberculosis from Latent Infection.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, Maho; Akashi, Shunsuke; Nagai, Hideaki; Nagase, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Hirotoshi; Hebisawa, Akira; Ohta, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT), an interferon-γ release assay, is used to diagnose Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but its inaccuracy in distinguishing active tuberculosis from latent infection is a major concern. There is thus a need for an easy and accurate tool for achieving that goal in daily clinical settings. This study aimed to identify candidate cytokines for specifically differentiating active tuberculosis from latent infection. Our study population consisted of 31 active TB (tuberculosis) patients, 29 LTBI (latent tuberculosis infection) patients and 10 healthy control subjects. We assayed for 27 cytokines in QFT supernatants of both specific antigen-stimulated blood samples (TBAg) and negative-control samples (Nil). We analyzed their specificities and sensitivities by creating receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and measuring the area under those curves (AUCs). In TBAg-Nil supernatants, IL-10, IFN-γ, MCP-1 and IL-1RA showed high AUCs of 0.8120, 0.7842, 0.7419 and 0.7375, respectively. Compared with each cytokine alone, combined assay for these top four cytokines showed positive rates in diagnosing active TB, and GDA analysis revealed that MCP-1 and IL-5 are potent in distinguishing active TB from LTBI, with Wilk's lambda = 0.718 (p < 0.001). Furthermore, utilizing the unique characteristic of IL-2 that its TBAg-Nil supernatant levels are higher in LTBI compared to active TB, the difference between IFN-γ and IL-2 showed a large AUC of 0.8910. In summary, besides IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-5, IL-10, IL-1RA and MCP-1 in QFT supernatants may be useful for distinguishing active TB from LTBI. Those cytokines may also help us understand the difference in pathogenesis between active TB and LTBI.

  8. Infected cell protein 0 functional domains and their coordination in herpes simplex virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Haidong

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous human pathogen that establishes latent infection in ganglia neurons. Its unique life cycle requires a balanced “conquer and compromise” strategy to deal with the host anti-viral defenses. One of HSV-1 α (immediate early) gene products, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), is a multifunctional protein that interacts with and modulates a wide range of cellular defensive pathways. These pathways may locate in different cell compartments, which then migrate or exchange factors upon stimulation, for the purpose of a concerted and effective defense. ICP0 is able to simultaneously attack multiple host pathways by either degrading key restrictive factors or modifying repressive complexes. This is a viral protein that contains an E3 ubiquitin ligase, translocates among different cell compartments and interacts with major defensive complexes. The multiple functional domains of ICP0 can work independently and at the same time coordinate with each other. Dissecting the functional domains of ICP0 and delineating the coordination of these domains will help us understand HSV-1 pathogenicity as well as host defense mechanisms. This article focuses on describing individual ICP0 domains, their biochemical properties and their implication in HSV-1 infection. By putting individual domain functions back into the picture of host anti-viral defense network, this review seeks to elaborate the complex interactions between HSV-1 and its host. PMID:26870669

  9. Infected cell protein 0 functional domains and their coordination in herpes simplex virus replication.

    PubMed

    Gu, Haidong

    2016-02-12

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous human pathogen that establishes latent infection in ganglia neurons. Its unique life cycle requires a balanced "conquer and compromise" strategy to deal with the host anti-viral defenses. One of HSV-1 α (immediate early) gene products, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), is a multifunctional protein that interacts with and modulates a wide range of cellular defensive pathways. These pathways may locate in different cell compartments, which then migrate or exchange factors upon stimulation, for the purpose of a concerted and effective defense. ICP0 is able to simultaneously attack multiple host pathways by either degrading key restrictive factors or modifying repressive complexes. This is a viral protein that contains an E3 ubiquitin ligase, translocates among different cell compartments and interacts with major defensive complexes. The multiple functional domains of ICP0 can work independently and at the same time coordinate with each other. Dissecting the functional domains of ICP0 and delineating the coordination of these domains will help us understand HSV-1 pathogenicity as well as host defense mechanisms. This article focuses on describing individual ICP0 domains, their biochemical properties and their implication in HSV-1 infection. By putting individual domain functions back into the picture of host anti-viral defense network, this review seeks to elaborate the complex interactions between HSV-1 and its host.

  10. Modeling malaria infected cells in microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffiee, Amir Hossein; Dabiri, Sadegh; Motavalizadeh Ardekani, Arezoo

    2016-11-01

    Plasmodim (P.) falciparum is one of the deadliest types of malaria species that invades healthy red blood cells (RBC) in human blood flow. This parasite develops through 48-hour intra-RBC process leading to significant morphological and mechanical (e.g., stiffening) changes in RBC membrane. These changes have remarkable effects on blood circulation such as increase in flow resistance and obstruction in microcirculation. In this work a computational framework is developed to model RBC suspension in blood flow using front-tracking technique. The present study focuses on blood flow behavior under normal and infected circumstances and predicts changes in blood rheology for different levels of parasitemia and hematocrit. This model allows better understanding of blood flow circulation up to a single cell level and provides us with realistic and deep insight into hematologic diseases such as malaria.

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus can productively infect cultured human glial cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng-Mayer, C; Rutka, J T; Rosenblum, M L; McHugh, T; Stites, D P; Levy, J A

    1987-05-01

    Six isolates of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) showed differences in their ability to productively infect glioma-derived cell lines and early-passage human brain cell cultures. Susceptibility to HIV infection correlated well with the expression of the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein. The CD4 molecule was expressed on some, but not all, of the brain-derived cells; however, no correlation was observed between CD4 protein expression and susceptibility to virus infection. The results show that HIV can productively infect human brain cells, particularly those of glial origin, and suggest that these cell types in the brain can harbor the virus.

  12. Activation of Langerhans-Type Dendritic Cells Alters Human Cytomegalovirus Infection and Reactivation in a Stimulus-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Coronel, Roxanne; Jesus, Desyree M.; Dalle Ore, Lucia; Mymryk, Joe S.; Hertel, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucosal Langerhans cells (LC) are likely to play important roles in host defense against infection by human cytomegalovirus (CMV). We previously showed that in vitro-differentiated immature LC (iLC) populations contain smaller amounts of infected cells but produce higher yields than mature LC (mLC) cultures, obtained by iLC stimulation with fetal bovine serum (FBS), CD40 ligand (CD40L) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here, we sought to determine if exposure to select stimuli can improve LC permissiveness to infection, if specific components of the mLC cocktail are responsible for lowering viral yields, if this is due to defects in progeny production or release, and if these restrictions are also effective against reactivated virus. None of the stimuli tested extended the proportion of infected cells to 100%, suggesting that the block to infection onset cannot be fully removed. While CD40L and FBS exerted positive effects on viral progeny production per cell, stimulation with LPS alone or in combination with CD40L was detrimental. Reductions in viral titers were not due to defects in progeny release, and the permissive or restrictive intracellular environment established upon exposure to each stimulus appeared to act in a somewhat similar way toward lytic and latent infections. PMID:27683575

  13. Hepatitis C Virus Infection of Cultured Human Hepatoma Cells Causes Apoptosis and Pyroptosis in Both Infected and Bystander Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kofahi, H. M.; Taylor, N. G. A.; Hirasawa, K.; Grant, M. D.; Russell, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) are at high risk of developing progressive liver disease, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). How HCV infection causes liver destruction has been of significant interest for many years, and apoptosis has been proposed as one operative mechanism. In this study, we employed a tissue culture-adapted strain of HCV (JFH1T) to test effects of HCV infection on induction of programmed cell death (PCD) in Huh-7.5 cells. We found that HCV infection reduced the proliferation rate and induced caspase-3-mediated apoptosis in the infected cell population. However, in addition to apoptosis, we also observed infected cells undergoing caspase-1-mediated pyroptosis, which was induced by NLRP3 inflammasome activation. By co-culturing HCV-infected Huh-7.5 cells with an HCV-non-permissive cell line, we also demonstrated induction of both apoptosis and pyroptosis in uninfected cells. Bystander apoptosis, but not bystander pyroptosis, required cell-cell contact between infected and bystander cells. In summary, these findings provide new information on mechanisms of cell death in response to HCV infection. The observation that both apoptosis and pyroptosis can be induced in bystander cells extends our understanding of HCV-induced pathogenesis in the liver. PMID:27974850

  14. Acute Morphine Administration Reduces Cell-Mediated Immunity and Induces Reactivation of Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mojadadi, Shafi; Jamali, Abbas; Khansarinejad, Behzad; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Bamdad, Taravat

    2009-01-01

    Acute morphine administration is known to alter the course of herpes simplex virus infection. In this study, the effect of acute morphine administration on the reactivation of latent herpes was investigated in a mouse model. Because of the important role of cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity in the inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) reactivation, the effect of acute morphine administration on CTL responses was also evaluated. Furthermore, lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ production were evaluated for their roles in the induction of the CTL response. The findings showed that acute morphine administration significantly reduced CTL responses, lymphocyte proliferation, and IFN-γ production. Furthermore, acute morphine administration has been shown to reactivate latent HSV-1. Previous studies have shown that cellular immune responses have important roles in the inhibition of HSV reactivation. These findings suggest that suppression of a portion of the cellular immune response after acute morphine administration may constitute one part of the mechanism that induces HSV reactivation. PMID:19403060

  15. Human Th17 Cells Lack HIV-Inhibitory RNases and Are Highly Permissive to Productive HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Christensen-Quick, Aaron; Lafferty, Mark; Sun, Lingling; Marchionni, Luigi; DeVico, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    cells that support high levels of viral replication (rather than becoming latently infected or undergoing cell death) informs the search for new therapeutics aimed at manipulating intracellular signaling pathways and/or transcriptional factors that affect HIV replication. PMID:27334595

  16. Combination of Antiretroviral Drugs and Radioimmunotherapy Specifically Kills Infected Cells from HIV-Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Tsukrov, Dina; McFarren, Alicia; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Dolce, Eugene; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Berman, Joan W; Schoenbaum, Ellie; Zingman, Barry S; Casadevall, Arturo; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Eliminating virally infected cells is an essential component of any HIV eradication strategy. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT), a clinically established method for killing cells using radiolabeled antibodies, was recently applied to target HIV-1 gp41 antigen expressed on the surface of infected cells. Since gp41 expression by infected cells is likely downregulated in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART), we evaluated the ability of RIT to kill ART-treated infected cells using both in vitro models and lymphocytes isolated from HIV-infected subjects. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were infected with HIV and cultured in the presence of two clinically relevant ART combinations. Scatchard analysis of the 2556 human monoclonal antibody to HIV gp41 binding to the infected and ART-treated cells demonstrated sufficient residual expression of gp41 on the cell surface to warrant subsequent RIT. This is the first time the quantification of gp41 post-ART is being reported. Cells were then treated with Bismuth-213-labeled 2556 antibody. Cell survival was quantified by Trypan blue and residual viremia by p24 ELISA. Cell surface gp41 expression was assessed by Scatchard analysis. The experiments were repeated using PBMCs isolated from blood specimens obtained from 15 HIV-infected individuals: 10 on ART and 5 ART-naïve. We found that (213)Bi-2556 killed ART-treated infected PBMCs and reduced viral production to undetectable levels. ART and RIT co-treatment was more effective at reducing viral load in vitro than either therapy alone, indicating that gp41 expression under ART was sufficient to allow (213)Bi-2556 to deliver cytocidal doses of radiation to infected cells. This study provides proof of concept that (213)Bi-2556 may represent an innovative and effective targeting method for killing HIV-infected cells treated with ART and supports continued development of (213)Bi-2556 for co-administration with ART toward an HIV eradication strategy.

  17. Combination of Antiretroviral Drugs and Radioimmunotherapy Specifically Kills Infected Cells from HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Tsukrov, Dina; McFarren, Alicia; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Dolce, Eugene; Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Berman, Joan W.; Schoenbaum, Ellie; Zingman, Barry S.; Casadevall, Arturo; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Eliminating virally infected cells is an essential component of any HIV eradication strategy. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT), a clinically established method for killing cells using radiolabeled antibodies, was recently applied to target HIV-1 gp41 antigen expressed on the surface of infected cells. Since gp41 expression by infected cells is likely downregulated in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART), we evaluated the ability of RIT to kill ART-treated infected cells using both in vitro models and lymphocytes isolated from HIV-infected subjects. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were infected with HIV and cultured in the presence of two clinically relevant ART combinations. Scatchard analysis of the 2556 human monoclonal antibody to HIV gp41 binding to the infected and ART-treated cells demonstrated sufficient residual expression of gp41 on the cell surface to warrant subsequent RIT. This is the first time the quantification of gp41 post-ART is being reported. Cells were then treated with Bismuth-213-labeled 2556 antibody. Cell survival was quantified by Trypan blue and residual viremia by p24 ELISA. Cell surface gp41 expression was assessed by Scatchard analysis. The experiments were repeated using PBMCs isolated from blood specimens obtained from 15 HIV-infected individuals: 10 on ART and 5 ART-naïve. We found that 213Bi-2556 killed ART-treated infected PBMCs and reduced viral production to undetectable levels. ART and RIT co-treatment was more effective at reducing viral load in vitro than either therapy alone, indicating that gp41 expression under ART was sufficient to allow 213Bi-2556 to deliver cytocidal doses of radiation to infected cells. This study provides proof of concept that 213Bi-2556 may represent an innovative and effective targeting method for killing HIV-infected cells treated with ART and supports continued development of 213Bi-2556 for co-administration with ART toward an HIV eradication strategy. PMID:27725930

  18. Prophylactic Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2) Vaccines Adjuvanted with Stable Emulsion and Toll-Like Receptor 9 Agonist Induce a Robust HSV-2-Specific Cell-Mediated Immune Response, Protect against Symptomatic Disease, and Reduce the Latent Viral Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Michael T; Marshall, Jason D; Dorwart, Michael R; Heeke, Darren S; Rao, Eileen; Tummala, Padmaja; Yu, Li; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Sloan, Derek D

    2017-02-22

    Several prophylactic vaccines targeting HSV-2 have failed in the clinic to demonstrate a sustained depression in viral shedding or protection from recurrences. Although these vaccines have generated high titers of neutralizing antibodies, their induction of robust CD8 T cells has largely been unreported, even though evidence for the importance of HSV-2 antigen-specific CD8 T cells is mounting in animal models and in translational studies involving subjects with active HSV-2-specific immune responses. We developed a subunit vaccine composed of the neutralizing antibody (nAb) targets gD and gB, the novel T cell antigen and tegument protein UL40, and we compared this to a whole-inactivated virus vaccine (FI-HSV-2). We evaluated different formulations in combination with several Th1-inducing TLR agonists in vivo. In mice, the TLR9 agonist cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotide formulated in a squalene-based oil-in-water emulsion promoted the most robust, functional HSV-2 antigen-specific CD8 T cell responses and high neutralizing antibodies, demonstrating superiority to vaccines adjuvanted by monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL)/alum. We further established that FI-HSV-2 alone or in combination with adjuvants as well as adjuvanted subunit vaccines were successful in the induction of nAbs and T cell responses in guinea pigs. These immunological responses were coincident with a suppression of vaginal HSV-2 shedding, low lesion scores, and a reduction in latent HSV-2 DNA in dorsal root ganglia to undetectable levels. These data support the further preclinical and clinical development of prophylactic HSV-2 vaccines that contain appropriate antigen and adjuvant components responsible for programming elevated CD8 T cell responses.IMPORTANCE Millions of people worldwide are infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), and to date, an efficacious prophylactic vaccine has not met the rigors of clinical trials. Attempts to develop a vaccine have focused primarily on

  19. Establishment of Human Papillomavirus Infection Requires Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Pyeon, Dohun; Pearce, Shane M.; Lank, Simon M.; Ahlquist, Paul; Lambert, Paul F.

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are DNA viruses associated with major human cancers. As such there is a strong interest in developing new means, such as vaccines and microbicides, to prevent HPV infections. Developing the latter requires a better understanding of the infectious life cycle of HPVs. The HPV infectious life cycle is closely linked to the differentiation state of the stratified epithelium it infects, with progeny virus only made in the terminally differentiating suprabasal compartment. It has long been recognized that HPV must first establish its infection within the basal layer of stratified epithelium, but why this is the case has not been understood. In part this restriction might reflect specificity of expression of entry receptors. However, this hypothesis could not fully explain the differentiation restriction of HPV infection, since many cell types can be infected with HPVs in monolayer cell culture. Here, we used chemical biology approaches to reveal that cell cycle progression through mitosis is critical for HPV infection. Using infectious HPV16 particles containing the intact viral genome, G1-synchronized human keratinocytes as hosts, and early viral gene expression as a readout for infection, we learned that the recipient cell must enter M phase (mitosis) for HPV infection to take place. Late M phase inhibitors had no effect on infection, whereas G1, S, G2, and early M phase cell cycle inhibitors efficiently prevented infection. We conclude that host cells need to pass through early prophase for successful onset of transcription of the HPV encapsidated genes. These findings provide one reason why HPVs initially establish infections in the basal compartment of stratified epithelia. Only this compartment of the epithelium contains cells progressing through the cell cycle, and therefore it is only in these cells that HPVs can establish their infection. By defining a major condition for cell susceptibility to HPV infection, these results also have

  20. Listeria monocytogenes infection differentially affects expression of ligands for NK cells and NK cell responses, depending on the cell type infected.

    PubMed

    Shegarfi, Hamid; Rolstad, Bent; Kane, Kevin P; Nestvold, Janne

    2016-04-22

    The pivotal role of NK cells in viral infection is extensively studied, whereas the role of NK cells in bacterial infection has been poorly investigated. Here, we have examined how Listeria monocytogenes (LM) affects expression of ligands for NK cell receptors and subsequent NK cell responses, depending on the type of cell infected. LM infected rat cell lines derived from different tissues were coincubated with splenic NK cells, and NK cell proliferation and IFN-γ production were measured. In addition, expression of ligands for the NK cell receptors Ly49 and NK cell receptor protein 1 (NKR-P1), MHC class I and C-type lectin-related molecules, respectively, was assessed. Infected pleural R2 cells, but not epithelium-derived colon carcinoma cell line CC531 cells, induced proliferation of NK cells. Reporter cells expressing the inhibitory NKR-P1G receptor or the activating NKR-P1F receptor were less stimulated under incubation with infected CC531 cells versus uninfected CC531 controls, suggesting that the ligand(s) in question were down-regulated by infection. Conversely, LM infection of R2 cells did not affect reporter cell stimulation compared with uninfected R2 controls. We characterized a rat monocyte cell line, termed RmW cells. In contrast to LM infected R2 cells that up-regulate MHC class I molecules, RmW cells displayed unchanged MHC class I expression following infection. In line with MHC class I expression, more NK cells produced a higher amount of IFN-γ against infected R2 cells compared with RmW cells. Together, L. monocytogenes infection may variously regulate cellular ligands for NK cells, depending on the cell type infected, affecting the outcome of NK cell responses.

  1. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus MicroRNAs Target GADD45B To Protect Infected Cells from Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Happel, Christine; Ziegelbauer, Joseph M

    2017-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is one of the most common malignancies in HIV-infected individuals. The responsible agent, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV; HHV8), expresses multiple microRNAs (miRNAs), but the targets and functions of these miRNAs are not completely understood. After infection in primary endothelial cells with KSHV, growth arrest DNA damage-inducible gene 45 beta (GADD45B) is one of the most repressed genes using genomic expression profiling. GADD45B was also repressed in mRNA expression profiling experiments when KSHV miRNAs were introduced to uninfected cells. We hypothesized that KSHV miRNAs target human GADD45B to protect cells from consequences of DNA damage, which can be triggered by viral infection. Expression of GADD45B protein is induced by the p53 activator, Nutlin-3, and KSHV miRNA-K9 inhibits this induction. In addition, Nutlin-3 increased apoptosis and cell cycle arrest based on flow cytometry assays. KSHV miR-K9 protected primary endothelial cells from apoptosis and cell cycle arrest following Nutlin-3 treatment. Similar protective phenotypes were seen for targeting GADD45B with short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), as with miR-K9. KSHV miR-K9 also decreased the protein levels of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-7, and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). In B lymphocytes latently infected with KSHV, specific inhibitors of KSHV miR-K9 led to increased GADD45B expression and apoptosis, indicating that miR-K9 is important for reducing apoptosis in infected cells. Furthermore, ectopic expression of GADD45B in KSHV-infected cells promoted apoptosis. Together, these results identify a new miRNA target and demonstrate that KSHV miRNAs are important for protecting infected cells from DNA damage responses.

  2. Interaction of Adenovirus E1A with the HHV8 Promoter of Latent Genes: E1A Proteins are Able to Activate the HHV-8 LANAp in MV3 Reporter Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koehler-Hansner, Karin; Flore, Ornella; Opalka, Bertram; Hengge, Ulrich R

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is associated with Kaposi’s sarcoma, body cavity-based lymphoma, and Castleman’s disease. Adenoviral (Ad) E1A proteins regulate the activity of cellular and viral promoters/enhancers and transcription factors and can suppress tumorigenicity of human cancers. As (i) HHV-8 and Ad may co-exist in immunocompromised patients and (ii) E1A might be considered as therapeutic transgene for HHV-8-associated neoplasms we investigated whether the promoter of the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANAp) controlling expression of vCyclin, vFLIP, and LANA proteins required for latent type infection is regulated by E1A. Transfection experiments in MV3 melanoma cells revealed activation of the LANAp by Ad5 E1A constructs containing an intact N terminus (aa 1-119). In particular, an Ad12 E1A mutant, Spm2, lacking six consecutive alanine residues in the “spacer” region activated the HHV-8 promoter about 15-fold compared to vector controls. In summary, we report the activation of the LANAp by E1A as a novel interaction of E1A with a viral promoter. These data may have relevance for the management of viral infections in immunocompromised patients. A role for E1A as a therapeutic in this context remains to be defined. PMID:19440465

  3. Interaction of Adenovirus E1A with the HHV8 Promoter of Latent Genes: E1A Proteins are Able to Activate the HHV-8 LANAp in MV3 Reporter Cells.

    PubMed

    Koehler-Hansner, Karin; Flore, Ornella; Opalka, Bertram; Hengge, Ulrich R

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, body cavity-based lymphoma, and Castleman's disease. Adenoviral (Ad) E1A proteins regulate the activity of cellular and viral promoters/enhancers and transcription factors and can suppress tumorigenicity of human cancers. As (i) HHV-8 and Ad may co-exist in immunocompromised patients and (ii) E1A might be considered as therapeutic transgene for HHV-8-associated neoplasms we investigated whether the promoter of the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANAp) controlling expression of vCyclin, vFLIP, and LANA proteins required for latent type infection is regulated by E1A. Transfection experiments in MV3 melanoma cells revealed activation of the LANAp by Ad5 E1A constructs containing an intact N terminus (aa 1-119). In particular, an Ad12 E1A mutant, Spm2, lacking six consecutive alanine residues in the "spacer" region activated the HHV-8 promoter about 15-fold compared to vector controls. In summary, we report the activation of the LANAp by E1A as a novel interaction of E1A with a viral promoter. These data may have relevance for the management of viral infections in immunocompromised patients. A role for E1A as a therapeutic in this context remains to be defined.

  4. Regulatory T Cells in Hepatitis B and C Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are hepatotropic viruses that establish chronic persistent infection by effectively escaping the host immune response and can cause immune-mediated liver injury. It has recently become apparent that regulatory T (Treg) cells, specifically CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells, modulate viral diseases by suppressing antiviral immune responses and regulating inflammatory host injury. The roles of Treg cells in HBV and HCV infections range from suppressing antiviral T cell responses to protecting the liver from immune-mediated damage. This review describes Treg cells and subpopulations and focuses on the roles of these cells in HBV and HCV infections. PMID:28035208

  5. Immune Function and Reactivation of Latent Viruses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butel, Janet S.

    1999-01-01

    A major concern associated with long-duration space flight is the possibility of infectious diseases posing an unacceptable medical risk to crew members. One major hypothesis addressed in this project is that space flight will cause alterations in the immune system that will allow latent viruses that are endogenous in the human population to reactivate and shed to higher levels than normal, which may affect the health of crew members. The second major hypothesis being examined is that the effects of space flight will alter the mucosal immune system, the first line of defense against many microbial infections, including herpesviruses, polyomaviruses, and gastroenteritis viruses, rendering crew members more susceptible to virus infections across the mucosa. We are focusing the virus studies on the human herpesviruses and polyomaviruses, important pathogens known to establish latent infections in most of the human population. Both primary infection and reactivation from latent infection with these groups of viruses (especially certain herpesviruses) can cause a variety of illnesses that result in morbidity and, occasionally, mortality. Both herpesviruses and polyomaviruses have been associated with human cancer, as well. Effective vaccines exist for only one of the eight known human herpesviruses and available antivirals are of limited use. Whereas normal individuals display minimal consequences from latent viral infections, events which alter immune function (such as immunosuppressive therapy following solid organ transplantation) are known to increase the risk of complications as a result of viral reactivations.

  6. Cellular organization of the central canal ependymal zone, a niche of latent neural stem cells in the adult mammalian spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, L K; Truong, M K V; Bednarczyk, M R; Aumont, A; Fernandes, K J L

    2009-12-15

    A stem cell's microenvironment, or "niche," is a critical regulator of its behaviour. In the adult mammalian spinal cord, central canal ependymal cells possess latent neural stem cell properties, but the ependymal cell niche has not yet been described. Here, we identify important similarities and differences between the central canal ependymal zone and the forebrain subventricular zone (SVZ), a well-characterized niche of neural stem cells. First, direct immunohistochemical comparison of the spinal cord ependymal zone and the forebrain SVZ revealed distinct patterns of neural precursor marker expression. In particular, ependymal cells in the spinal cord were found to be bordered by a previously uncharacterized sub-ependymal layer, which is relatively less elaborate than that of the SVZ and comprised of small numbers of astrocytes, oligodendrocyte progenitors and neurons. Cell proliferation surrounding the central canal occurs in close association with blood vessels, but unlike in the SVZ, involves mainly ependymal rather than sub-ependymal cells. These proliferating ependymal cells typically self-renew rather than produce transit-amplifying progenitors, as they generate doublets of progeny that remain within the ependymal layer and show no evidence of a lineage relationship to sub-ependymal cells. Interestingly, the dorsal pole of the central canal was found to possess a sub-population of tanycyte-like cells that express markers of both ependymal cells and neural precursors, and their presence correlates with higher numbers of dorsally proliferating ependymal cells. Together, these data identify key features of the spinal cord ependymal cell niche, and suggest that dorsal ependymal cells possess the potential for stem cell activity. This work provides a foundation for future studies aimed at understanding ependymal cell regulation under normal and pathological conditions.

  7. Are Basophils and Mast Cells Masters in HIV Infection?

    PubMed

    Marone, Gianni; Varricchi, Gilda; Loffredo, Stefania; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Rivellese, Felice; de Paulis, Amato

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization AIDS epidemic update estimates that more than 37 million people are living with HIV infection. Despite the unprecedented success of antiretroviral treatments, significant challenges remain in the fight against HIV. In particular, how uninfected cells capture HIV and transmit virions to target cells remains an unanswered question. Tissue mast cells and peripheral blood basophils can be exposed to virions or HIV products during infection. Several HIV proteins (i.e., envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41, Tat, and Nef) can interact with distinct surface receptors expressed by human basophils and mast cells and modulate their functional responses at different levels. Additionally, several groups have provided evidence that human mast cells can be infected in vitro, as well as in vivo, by certain strains of HIV. Recently, it has been demonstrated that basophils purified from healthy donors and intestinal mast cells can efficiently capture HIV on their cell surface and, cocultured with CD4+ T cells, they can transfer the virus to the cocultured cells leading to infection. Direct contact between human basophils or intestinal mast cells and CD4+ T cells can mediate viral trans-infection of T cells through the formation of viral synapses. Thus, basophils and mast cells can provide a cellular basis for capturing and then spreading viruses throughout the body. Collectively, these findings suggest that human basophils and mast cells play a complex and possibly distinct role in HIV infection, warranting further investigations.

  8. Highly potent, synthetically accessible prostratin analogs induce latent HIV expression in vitro and ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Beans, Elizabeth J; Fournogerakis, Dennis; Gauntlett, Carolyn; Heumann, Lars V; Kramer, Rainer; Marsden, Matthew D; Murray, Danielle; Chun, Tae-Wook; Zack, Jerome A; Wender, Paul A

    2013-07-16

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) decreases plasma viremia below the limits of detection in the majority of HIV-infected individuals, thus serving to slow disease progression. However, HAART targets only actively replicating virus and is unable to eliminate latently infected, resting CD4(+) T cells. Such infected cells are potentially capable of reinitiating virus replication upon cessation of HAART, thus leading to viral rebound. Agents that would eliminate these reservoirs, when used in combination with HAART, could thus provide a strategy for the eradication of HIV. Prostratin is a preclinical candidate that induces HIV expression from latently infected CD4(+) T cells, potentially leading to their elimination through a virus-induced cytopathic effect or host anti-HIV immunity. Here, we report the synthesis of a series of designed prostratin analogs and report in vitro and ex vivo studies of their activity relevant to induction of HIV expression. Members of this series are up to 100-fold more potent than the preclinical lead (prostratin) in binding to cell-free PKC, and in inducing HIV expression in a latently infected cell line and prostratin-like modulation of cell surface receptor expression in primary cells from HIV-negative donors. Significantly, selected members were also tested for HIV induction in resting CD4(+) T cells isolated from infected individuals receiving HAART and were found to exhibit potent induction activity. These more potent agents and by extension related tunable analogs now accessible through the studies described herein should facilitate research and preclinical advancement of this strategy for HIV/AIDS eradication.

  9. Natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shao-fei; Wang, Wen-jing; Gao, Yue-qiu

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells are a unique type of lymphocytes with cytotoxic capacity, and play important roles against tumors and infections. Recently, natural killer cells have been increasingly valued in their effects in hepatitis B virus infection. Since hepatitis B virus is not cytopathic, the subsequent antiviral immune responses of the host are responsible for sustaining the liver injury, which may result in cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Many studies have confirmed that natural killer cells participate in anti-hepatitis B virus responses both in the early phase after infection and in the chronic phase via cytolysis, degranulation, and cytokine secretion. However, natural killer cells play dichotomic roles: they exert antiviral and immunoregulatory functions whilst contribute to the pathogenesis of liver injury. Here, we review the roles of natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection, introducing novel therapeutic strategies for controlling hepatitis B virus infection via the modulation of natural killer cells.

  10. TIM3 Mediates T Cell Exhaustion during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Pushpa; Jacques, Miye K; Zhu, Chen; Steblenko, Katherine M; Stowell, Britni L; Madi, Asaf; Anderson, Ana C; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Behar, Samuel M

    2016-03-01

    While T cell immunity initially limits Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, why T cell immunity fails to sterilize the infection and allows recrudescence is not clear. One hypothesis is that T cell exhaustion impairs immunity and is detrimental to the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. Here we provide functional evidence for the development T cell exhaustion during chronic TB. Second, we evaluate the role of the inhibitory receptor T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing-3 (TIM3) during chronic M. tuberculosis infection. We find that TIM3 expressing T cells accumulate during chronic infection, co-express other inhibitory receptors including PD1, produce less IL-2 and TNF but more IL-10, and are functionally exhausted. Finally, we show that TIM3 blockade restores T cell function and improves bacterial control, particularly in chronically infected susceptible mice. These data show that T cell immunity is suboptimal during chronic M. tuberculosis infection due to T cell exhaustion. Moreover, in chronically infected mice, treatment with anti-TIM3 mAb is an effective therapeutic strategy against tuberculosis.

  11. Direct transfer of viral and cellular proteins from varicella-zoster virus-infected non-neuronal cells to human axons.

    PubMed

    Grigoryan, Sergei; Yee, Michael B; Glick, Yair; Gerber, Doron; Kepten, Eldad; Garini, Yuval; Yang, In Hong; Kinchington, Paul R; Goldstein, Ronald S

    2015-01-01

    Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV), the alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection and Herpes zoster (shingles) following reactivation in latently infected neurons, is known to be fusogenic. It forms polynuclear syncytia in culture, in varicella skin lesions and in infected fetal human ganglia xenografted to mice. After axonal infection using VZV expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in compartmentalized microfluidic cultures there is diffuse filling of axons with GFP as well as punctate fluorescence corresponding to capsids. Use of viruses with fluorescent fusions to VZV proteins reveals that both proteins encoded by VZV genes and those of the infecting cell are transferred in bulk from infecting non-neuronal cells to axons. Similar transfer of protein to axons was observed following cell associated HSV1 infection. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments provide evidence that this transfer is by diffusion of proteins from the infecting cells into axons. Time-lapse movies and immunocytochemical experiments in co-cultures demonstrate that non-neuronal cells fuse with neuronal somata and proteins from both cell types are present in the syncytia formed. The fusogenic nature of VZV therefore may enable not only conventional entry of virions and capsids into axonal endings in the skin by classical entry mechanisms, but also by cytoplasmic fusion that permits viral protein transfer to neurons in bulk.

  12. Towards an HIV-1 cure: measuring the latent reservoir.

    PubMed

    Bruner, Katherine M; Hosmane, Nina N; Siliciano, Robert F

    2015-04-01

    The latent reservoir (LR) of HIV-1 in resting memory CD4(+) T cells serves as a major barrier to curing HIV-1 infection. While many PCR- and culture-based assays have been used to measure the size of the LR, correlation between results of different assays is poor and recent studies indicate that no available assay provides an accurate measurement of reservoir size. The discrepancies between assays are a hurdle to clinical trials that aim to measure the efficacy of HIV-1 eradication strategies. Here we describe the advantages and disadvantages of various approaches to measuring the LR.

  13. Synergistic Activation of Latent HIV-1 Expression by Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors and Bryostatin-1

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Bonet, Marta; Isabel Clemente, Maria; Jesús Serramía, Maria; Muñoz, Eduardo; Moreno, Santiago; Ángeles Muñoz-Fernández, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Viral reactivation from latently infected cells has become a promising therapeutic approach to eradicate HIV. Due to the complexity of the viral latency, combinations of efficient and available drugs targeting different pathways of latency are needed. In this work, we evaluated the effect of various combinations of bryostatin-1 (BRY) and novel histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) on HIV-reactivation and on cellular phenotype. The lymphocyte (J89GFP) or monocyte/macrophage (THP89GFP) latently infected cell lines were treated with BRY, panobinostat (PNB) and romidepsin (RMD) either alone or in combination. Thus, the effect on the viral reactivation was evaluated. We calculated the combination index for each drug combination; the BRY/HDACIs showed a synergistic HIV-reactivation profile in the majority of the combinations tested, whereas non-synergistic effects were observed when PNB was mixed with RMD. Indeed, the 75% effective concentrations of BRY, PNB and RMD were reduced in these combinations. Moreover, primary CD4 T cells treated with such drug combinations presented similar activation and proliferation profiles in comparison with single drug treated cells. Summing up, combinations between BRY, PNB and/or RMD presented a synergistic profile by inducing virus expression in HIV-latently infected cells, rendering these combinations an attractive novel and safe option for future clinical trials. PMID:26563568

  14. Macrophage infection via selective capture of HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Amy E; Russell, Rebecca A; Duncan, Christopher J A; Moore, Michael D; Willberg, Christian B; Pablos, Jose L; Finzi, Andrés; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C; Groot, Fedde; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2014-12-10

    Macrophages contribute to HIV-1 pathogenesis by forming a viral reservoir and mediating neurological disorders. Cell-free HIV-1 infection of macrophages is inefficient, in part due to low plasma membrane expression of viral entry receptors. We find that macrophages selectively capture and engulf HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells leading to efficient macrophage infection. Infected T cells, both healthy and dead or dying, were taken up through viral envelope glycoprotein-receptor-independent interactions, implying a mechanism distinct from conventional virological synapse formation. Macrophages infected by this cell-to-cell route were highly permissive for both CCR5-using macrophage-tropic and otherwise weakly macrophage-tropic transmitted/founder viruses but restrictive for nonmacrophage-tropic CXCR4-using virus. These results have implications for establishment of the macrophage reservoir and HIV-1 dissemination in vivo.

  15. Stem-Cell-Based Gene Therapy for HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Anjie; Kitchen, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Despite the enormous success of combined anti-retroviral therapy, HIV infection is still a lifelong disease and continues to spread rapidly worldwide. There is a pressing need to develop a treatment that will cure HIV infection. Recent progress in stem cell manipulation and advancements in humanized mouse models have allowed rapid developments of gene therapy for HIV treatment. In this review, we will discuss two aspects of HIV gene therapy using human hematopoietic stem cells. The first is to generate immune systems resistant to HIV infection while the second strategy involves enhancing anti-HIV immunity to eliminate HIV infected cells. PMID:24368413

  16. Stem-cell-based gene therapy for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Anjie; Kitchen, Scott

    2013-12-24

    Despite the enormous success of combined anti-retroviral therapy, HIV infection is still a lifelong disease and continues to spread rapidly worldwide. There is a pressing need to develop a treatment that will cure HIV infection. Recent progress in stem cell manipulation and advancements in humanized mouse models have allowed rapid developments of gene therapy for HIV treatment. In this review, we will discuss two aspects of HIV gene therapy using human hematopoietic stem cells. The first is to generate immune systems resistant to HIV infection while the second strategy involves enhancing anti-HIV immunity to eliminate HIV infected cells.

  17. HIV Cell-to-Cell Spread Results in Earlier Onset of Viral Gene Expression by Multiple Infections per Cell

    PubMed Central

    Boullé, Mikaël; Müller, Thorsten G.; Dähling, Sabrina; Jackson, Laurelle; Mahamed, Deeqa; Oom, Lance; Lustig, Gila

    2016-01-01

    Cell-to-cell spread of HIV, a directed mode of viral transmission, has been observed to be more rapid than cell-free infection. However, a mechanism for earlier onset of viral gene expression in cell-to-cell spread was previously uncharacterized. Here we used time-lapse microscopy combined with automated image analysis to quantify the timing of the onset of HIV gene expression in a fluorescent reporter cell line, as well as single cell staining for infection over time in primary cells. We compared cell-to-cell spread of HIV to cell-free infection, and limited both types of transmission to a two-hour window to minimize differences due to virus transit time to the cell. The mean time to detectable onset of viral gene expression in cell-to-cell spread was accelerated by 19% in the reporter cell line and by 35% in peripheral blood mononuclear cells relative to cell-free HIV infection. Neither factors secreted by infected cells, nor contact with infected cells in the absence of transmission, detectably changed onset. We recapitulated the earlier onset by infecting with multiple cell-free viruses per cell. Surprisingly, the acceleration in onset of viral gene expression was not explained by cooperativity between infecting virions. Instead, more rapid onset was consistent with a model where the fastest expressing virus out of the infecting virus pool sets the time for infection independently of the other co-infecting viruses. PMID:27812216

  18. Cytotoxic cells induced after Chlamydia psittaci infection in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lammert, J.K.

    1982-03-01

    The ability of spleen cells from Chlamydia psittaci-infected mice to lyse C. psittaci-infected and uninfected target cell monolayers was studied. The cytotoxicity assay used was a terminal label method in which the number of adherent target cells surviving the interaction with effector cells was determined by measuring the uptake of (3H)uridine by such cells. It was observed that in the first few days postinfection (3 to 5), spleens contained cells that lysed infected and uninfected targets with equal efficiency. Subsequently, infected targets were killed primarily. The activity of effector spleen cells for infected targets continued, although at a reduced level, beyond 21 days postinfection. Intact effector cells were required since a disruption by sonication resulted in a loss of cytotoxicity. The enhanced killing observed with infected targets was also observed when target cells were sensitized with heat- or UV-inactivated C. psittaci. This study suggests that the induction of cytotoxic cells after C. psittaci infection may contribute to the ability of the host to control multiplication of the microorganism.

  19. Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein-1 activates CD25 expression in lymphoma cells involving the NFkappaB pathway.

    PubMed

    Vockerodt, M; Tesch, H; Kube, D

    2001-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with several human malignancies including Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), Hodgkin's disease (HD) and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. A variety of cytokines and receptors have been described to be activated by EBV. Here we show that the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) alpha-chain, which is weakly expressed on normal resting lymphoid cells, is activated by EBV. Comparison of EBV-negative BL cell lines and their EBV convertants showed an enhanced CD25 expression in EBV-positive BL cells. Transient expression of the oncogenic virus protein latent membrane protein-1 (LMP1) in L428 Hodgkin's lymphoma cells and in Burkitt's lymphoma cells (BL2, BL41, BL30) cells leads to enhanced CD25 expression. Both C-terminal activating regions (CTARs) of LMP1 are involved in CD25 activation. Inhibition of LMP1-mediated NFkappaB enhancement by a constitutive repressive form of IkappaB-alpha resulted in decreased CD25 surface expression, indicating that NFkappaB is involved in CD25 gene regulation. Furthermore, LMP1-mediated CD25 activation was associated with enhanced levels of the soluble form of CD25 (sCD25) in L428 Hodgkin's lymphoma cells but not in BL cells. LMP1 associated enhanced expression of membrane CD25 and soluble CD25 may have immunomodulatory functions and could be involved in biology of EBV-associated diseases.

  20. Latent Period of Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Irisawa, H

    1961-10-27

    The latent period of relaxation of molluscan myocardium due to anodal current is much longer than that of contraction. Although the rate and the grade of relaxation are intimately related to both the stimulus condition and the muscle tension, the latent period of relaxation remains constant, except when the temperature of the bathing fluid is changed.

  1. Predominant Infection of CD150+ Lymphocytes and Dendritic Cells during Measles Virus Infection of Macaques

    PubMed Central

    de Swart, Rik L; Yanagi, Yusuke; van Amerongen, Geert; McQuaid, Stephen; Yüksel, Selma; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H; Duprex, W. Paul; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E

    2007-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) is hypothesized to enter the host by infecting epithelial cells of the respiratory tract, followed by viremia mediated by infected monocytes. However, neither of these cell types express signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (CD150), which has been identified as the receptor for wild-type MV. We have infected rhesus and cynomolgus macaques with a recombinant MV strain expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP); thus bringing together the optimal animal model for measles and a virus that can be detected with unprecedented sensitivity. Blood samples and broncho-alveolar lavages were collected every 3 d, and necropsies were performed upon euthanasia 9 or 15 d after infection. EGFP production by MV-infected cells was visualized macroscopically, in both living and sacrificed animals, and microscopically by confocal microscopy and FACS analysis. At the peak of viremia, EGFP fluorescence was detected in skin, respiratory and digestive tract, but most intensely in all lymphoid tissues. B- and T-lymphocytes expressing CD150 were the major target cells for MV infection. Highest percentages (up to 30%) of infected lymphocytes were detected in lymphoid tissues, and the virus preferentially targeted cells with a memory phenotype. Unexpectedly, circulating monocytes did not sustain productive MV infection. In peripheral tissues, large numbers of MV-infected CD11c+ MHC class-II+ myeloid dendritic cells were detected in conjunction with infected T-lymphocytes, suggesting transmission of MV between these cell types. Fluorescent imaging of MV infection in non-human primates demonstrated a crucial role for lymphocytes and dendritic cells in the pathogenesis of measles and measles-associated immunosuppression. PMID:18020706

  2. The cell biology of Cryptosporidium infection

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Steven P.; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis remains a significant cause of enteric disease worldwide. Basic investigations of host: pathogen interactions have revealed the intricate processes mediating infection. The following summarizes the interactions that mediate infection and the host responses that both permit and ultimately clear the infection. PMID:21458585

  3. The cell biology of cryptosporidium infection.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Steven P; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2011-08-01

    Cryptosporidiosis remains a significant cause of enteric disease worldwide. Basic investigations of host: pathogen interactions have revealed the intricate processes mediating infection. The following summarizes the interactions that mediate infection and the host responses that both permit and ultimately clear the infection.

  4. Suppression of HIV-1 Infectivity by Human Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Tanaka, Atsushi; Islam, Salequl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infection to the central nervous system (CNS) is very common in AIDS patients. The predominant cell types infected in the brain are monocytes and macrophages, which are surrounded by several HIV-1-resistant cell types, such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and microvascular cells. The effect of these HIV-1-resistant cells on HIV-1 infection is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the stability of HIV-1 cultured with several human glioblastoma cell lines, for example, NP-2, U87MG, T98G, and A172, to determine whether these HIV-1-resistant brain cells could enhance or suppress HIV-1 infection and thus modulate HIV-1 infection in the CNS. The HIV-1 titer was determined using the MAGIC-5A indicator cell line as well as naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells. We found that the stability of HIV-1 incubated with NP-2 or U87MG cells at 37°C was significantly shorter (half-life, 2.5-4 h) compared to that of HIV-1 incubated with T98G or A172 cells or in culture medium without cells (half-life, 8-18 h). The spent culture media (SCM) of NP-2 and U87MG cells had the ability to suppress both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection by inhibiting HIV-1 attachment to target cells. This inhibitory effect was eliminated by the treatment of the SCM with chondroitinase ABC but not heparinase, suggesting that the inhibitory factor(s) secreted by NP-2 and U87MG cells was chiefly mediated by chondroitin sulfate (CS) or CS-like moiety. Thus, this study reveals that some but not all glioma cells secrete inhibitory molecules to HIV-1 infection that may contribute in lowering HIV-1 infection in the CNS in vivo.

  5. MAIT cells are activated during human viral infections.

    PubMed

    van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Scherwitzl, Iris; Hutchinson, Edward C; Leng, Tianqi; Kurioka, Ayako; Kulicke, Corinna; de Lara, Catherine; Cole, Suzanne; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Limpitikul, Wannee; Malasit, Prida; Young, Duncan; Denney, Laura; Moore, Michael D; Fabris, Paolo; Giordani, Maria Teresa; Oo, Ye Htun; Laidlaw, Stephen M; Dustin, Lynn B; Ho, Ling-Pei; Thompson, Fiona M; Ramamurthy, Narayan; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Willberg, Christian B; Screaton, Gavin R; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-06-23

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are abundant in humans and recognize bacterial ligands. Here, we demonstrate that MAIT cells are also activated during human viral infections in vivo. MAIT cells activation was observed during infection with dengue virus, hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This activation-driving cytokine release and Granzyme B upregulation-is TCR-independent but dependent on IL-18 in synergy with IL-12, IL-15 and/or interferon-α/β. IL-18 levels and MAIT cell activation correlate with disease severity in acute dengue infection. Furthermore, HCV treatment with interferon-α leads to specific MAIT cell activation in vivo in parallel with an enhanced therapeutic response. Moreover, TCR-independent activation of MAIT cells leads to a reduction of HCV replication in vitro mediated by IFN-γ. Together these data demonstrate MAIT cells are activated following viral infections, and suggest a potential role in both host defence and immunopathology.

  6. CD8 T cells and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Philana Ling; Flynn, JoAnne L

    2015-05-01

    Tuberculosis is primarily a respiratory disease that is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis can persist and replicate in macrophages in vivo, usually in organized cellular structures called granulomas. There is substantial evidence for the importance of CD4 T cells in control of tuberculosis, but the evidence for a requirement for CD8 T cells in this infection has not been proven in humans. However, animal model data support a non-redundant role for CD8 T cells in control of M. tuberculosis infection. In humans, infection with this pathogen leads to generation of specific CD8 T cell responses. These responses include classical (MHC Class I restricted) and non-classical CD8 T cells. Here, we discuss the potential roles of CD8 T cells in defense against tuberculosis, and our current understanding of the wide range of CD8 T cell types seen in M. tuberculosis infection.

  7. The Role of CD4+ T Follicular Helper Cells in HIV Infection: From the Germinal Center to the Periphery

    PubMed Central

    Thornhill, John Patrick; Fidler, Sarah; Klenerman, Paul; Frater, John; Phetsouphanh, Chansavath

    2017-01-01

    T follicular helper cells (TFh) are key components of the adaptive immune system; they are primarily found in germinal centers (GCs) where their interaction with B cells supports humoral immune responses and efficient antibody production. They are defined by the expression of CXC receptor 5, program death-1, ICOS, and secretion of IL-21. Their differentiation is regulated by B-cell lymphoma 6. The relationship and function of circulating TFh to bona fide TFh resident in the GC is much debated. HIV infection impacts the TFh response with evidence of aberrant TFh function observed in acute and chronic infection. Effective TFh responses are associated with the development of broadly neutralizing antibody responses to HIV and may be important for viral control. In addition, TFh are preferentially infected and act as a key reservoir for latent HIV infection. This review explores recent developments in our understanding of TFh differentiation, regulation, function, and the relationship between cTFh and those in GCs, and the complex interaction between TFh and HIV infection. PMID:28194154

  8. Bovine herpesvirus 1 can efficiently infect the human (SH-SY5Y) but not the mouse neuroblastoma cell line (Neuro-2A).

    PubMed

    Thunuguntla, Prasanth; El-Mayet, Fouad S; Jones, Clinton

    2017-03-15

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) is a significant bovine pathogen that establishes a life-long latent infection in sensory neurons. Previous attempts to develop immortalized bovine neuronal cells were unsuccessful. Consequently, our understanding of the BoHV-1 latency-reactivation cycle has relied on studying complex virus-host interactions in calves. In this study, we tested whether BoHV-1 can infect human (SH-SY5Y) or mouse (Neuro-2A) neuroblastoma cells. We provide new evidence that BoHV-1 efficiently infects SH-SY5Y cells and yields virus titers approximately 100 fold less than bovine kidney cells. Conversely, virus titers from productively infected Neuro-2A cells were approximately 10,000 fold less than bovine kidney cells. Using a β-Gal expressing virus (gC-Blue), we demonstrate that infection of Neuro-2A cells (actively dividing or differentiated) does not result in efficient virus spread, unlike bovine kidney or SH-SY5Y cells. Additional studies demonstrated that lytic cycle viral gene expression (bICP4 and gE) was readily detected in SH-SY5Y cells: conversely bICP4 was not readily detected in productively infected Neuro-2A cells. Finally, infection of SH-SY5Y and bovine kidney cells, but not Neuro-2A cells, led to rapid activation of the Akt protein kinase. These studies suggest that the Neuro-2A cell line may be a novel cell culture model to identify factors that regulate BoHV-1 productive infection in neuronal cells.

  9. A Dichotomy in Cortical Actin and Chemotactic Actin Activity between Human Memory and Naive T Cells Contributes to Their Differential Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weifeng; Guo, Jia; Yu, Dongyang; Vorster, Paul J.; Chen, WanJun; Wu, Yuntao

    2012-01-01

    Human memory and naive CD4 T cells can mainly be identified by the reciprocal expression of the CD45RO or CD45RA isoforms. In HIV-1 infection, blood CD45RO memory CD4 T cells are preferentially infected and serve as a major viral reservoir. The molecular mechani