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Sample records for lateral ankle sprain

  1. Conservative treatment of acute lateral ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jason M; Maleski, Richard M

    2002-04-01

    Lateral ankle sprains are among the most common sports injuries. Although ankle sprains are treated conservatively at the present time, for years the treatment was based on acute repair of the ruptured ligaments. Several differing opinions currently exist as to the treatment of lateral ankle sprains. A review of the literature and explanation of the benefits and risks of each treatment protocol is undertaken.

  2. Balance problems after unilateral lateral ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mohammad; Karimi, Hossein; Farahini, Hossein; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat

    2006-01-01

    Abstract-Ankle ligament injury is the most common injury in athletic activities. This study examined balance problems in athletes with acute lateral ankle sprains. Thirty male athletes aged 20 to 35 years with right dominant side and traumatic ankle sprain were recruited through simple nonprobability sampling. We measured the sway index and limits of stability with the Biodex Balance System under different conditions. Functional balance was evaluated with two clinical tests: the Functional Reach Test and the Star-Excursion Balance Test. The results showed that balance ability in patients with acute lateral ankle sprain was significantly weaker under closed- versus open-eye conditions. Symmetry of weight-bearing on involved and sound limb in bilateral standing was not significantly different, but weight-bearing on the nondominant limb was significantly higher than on the dominant limb. We can conclude that balance problems occur after acute ankle sprains because of proprioception deficits and that the unconscious (reflexive) aspect of proprioception is more severely affected than the conscious (voluntary) aspect.

  3. Syndesmosis and lateral ankle sprains in the National Football League.

    PubMed

    Osbahr, Daryl C; Drakos, Mark C; O'Loughlin, Padhraig F; Lyman, Stephen; Barnes, Ronnie P; Kennedy, John G; Warren, Russell F

    2013-11-01

    Syndesmosis sprains in the National Football League (NFL) can be a persistent source of disability, especially compared with lateral ankle injuries. This study evaluated syndesmosis and lateral ankle sprains in NFL players to allow for better identification and management of these injuries. Syndesmosis and lateral ankle sprains from a single NFL team database were reviewed over a 15-year period, and 32 NFL team physicians completed a questionnaire detailing their management approach. A comparative analysis was performed analyzing several variables, including diagnosis, treatment methods, and time lost from sports participation. Thirty-six syndesmosis and 53 lateral ankle sprains occurred in the cohort of NFL players. The injury mechanism typically resulted from direct impact in the syndesmosis and torsion in the lateral ankle sprain group (P=.034). All players were managed nonoperatively. The mean time lost from participation was 15.4 days in the syndesmosis and 6.5 days in the lateral ankle sprain groups (P⩽.001). National Football League team physicians varied treatment for syndesmosis sprains depending on the category of diastasis but recommended nonoperative management for lateral ankle sprains. Syndesmosis sprains in the NFL can be a source of significant disability compared with lateral ankle sprains. Successful return to play with nonoperative management is frequently achieved for syndesmosis and lateral ankle sprains depending on injury severity. With modern treatment algorithms for syndesmosis sprains, more aggressive nonoperative treatment is advocated. Although the current study shows that syndesmosis injuries require longer rehabilitation periods when compared with lateral ankle sprains, the time lost from participation may not be as prolonged as previously reported. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Can Chronic Ankle Instability be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J., III

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether chronic ankle instability can be prevented, discussing: the relationship between mechanical and functional instability; normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics; and tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and acute lateral ankle sprain management. The paper describes a treatment model…

  5. Can Chronic Ankle Instability be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J., III

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether chronic ankle instability can be prevented, discussing: the relationship between mechanical and functional instability; normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics; and tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and acute lateral ankle sprain management. The paper describes a treatment model…

  6. Lateral and syndesmotic ankle sprain injuries: a narrative literature review

    PubMed Central

    Dubin, Joshua C.; Comeau, Doug; McClelland, Rebecca I.; Dubin, Rachel A.; Ferrel, Ernest

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to review the literature that discusses normal anatomy and biomechanics of the foot and ankle, mechanisms that may result in a lateral ankle sprain or syndesmotic sprain, and assessment and diagnostic procedures, and to present a treatment algorithm based on normal ligament healing principles. Methods Literature was searched for years 2000 to 2010 in PubMed and CINAHL. Key search terms were ankle sprain$, ankle injury and ankle injuries, inversion injury, proprioception, rehabilitation, physical therapy, anterior talofibular ligament, syndesmosis, syndesmotic injury, and ligament healing. Discussion Most ankle sprains respond favorably to nonsurgical treatment, such as those offered by physical therapists, doctors of chiropractic, and rehabilitation specialists. A comprehensive history and examination aid in diagnosing the severity and type of ankle sprain. Based on the diagnosis and an understanding of ligament healing properties, a progressive treatment regimen can be developed. During the acute inflammatory phase, the goal of care is to reduce inflammation and pain and to protect the ligament from further injury. During the reparative and remodeling phase, the goal is to progress the rehabilitation appropriately to facilitate healing and restore the mechanical strength and proprioception. Radiographic imaging techniques may need to be used to rule out fractures, complete ligament tears, or instability of the ankle mortise. A period of immobilization and ambulating with crutches in a nonweightbearing gait may be necessary to allow for proper ligament healing before commencing a more active treatment approach. Surgery should be considered in the case of grade 3 syndesmotic sprain injuries or those ankle sprains that are recalcitrant to conservative care. Conclusion An accurate diagnosis and prompt treatment can minimize an athlete's time lost from sport and prevent future reinjury. Most ankle sprains can be successfully

  7. An alternative management protocol for lateral ankle sprains*.

    PubMed

    Quillen, W S

    1981-01-01

    Soft tissue ankle injuries, particularly lateral ligament sprains, cause considerable disability and loss of time from activities. These injuries are commonly and frequently treated by physical therapists. Controversy exists over the efficacy of various methods for the nonoperative management of these injuries. A comprehensive program for the management of the lateral ankle sprain, involving the fabrication of a thermoplastic ankle stirrup and the initiation of a selfdirected home program of ankle rehabilitation using surgical tubing, is detailed. Based upon the experimental work of Brostrom, Noyes, and others, the early application of stress with protective motion has been found to facilitate the strength and structural integrity of healing ligaments. The ankle stirrup regimen allows weight bearing and easy removal for treatment or exercise. Joint stiffness, muscular atrophy, and circulatory stasis are minimized. The ankle stirrup provides an aggressive yet therapeutically sound approach to the management of this injury. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1981;2(4):187-190.

  8. The relationship between lateral ankle sprain and ankle tendinitis in ballet dancers.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Stephanie; Moore, Marjorie

    2008-01-01

    The lateral ligament complex of the ankle is the most frequently injured structure in the body. Although most simple ankle sprains do not result in long-term disability, a significant number do not completely resolve, leading to residual symptoms that may persist for years. The most commonly reported symptoms, particularly among athletes, include instability, re-injury, and tendinitis. Ballet dancers are a combination of artist and high-performance athlete; consequently, they are subjected to the same types of injuries as other athletes, including lateral ankle sprains and their sequelae. Furthermore, ballet dancers perform in unusual positions such as en pointe, which places the ankle in extreme plantar flexion, requiring stabilization by surrounding muscles. Dancers' extraordinary performance demands place them at risk for other ankle injuries as well, including inflammation ofseveral tendons, especially the peroneals. This report reviews the relevant literature to characterize the scope of lateral ankle sprains and sequelae, discuss the importance of the peroneal muscles in ankle stability, and explore a relationship between lateral ankle sprain and ankle tendinitis in ballet dancers. Informal interviews were conducted with physical therapists who specialize in treating ballet dancers, providing a clinical context for this report. An extensive review of the literature was conducted, including electronic databases, reference lists from papers, and relevant reference texts. Numerous studies have investigated ankle sprains and residual complaints; nearly all report that lateral ankle sprains commonly lead to chronic ankle instability. Studies exploring ankle stability have demonstrated that the peroneal muscles play a crucial role in ankle stabilization; EMG studies confirm they are the first to contract during ankle inversion stress. The dancer's need for exceptional ankle stabilization may lead to peroneal overuse and tendinitis. Studies have linked peroneal

  9. Ankle Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... the sole of the foot is facing inwards, stretching and possibly damaging the ligaments on the outer ... sprains: Always warm up and use the recommended stretching techniques for your ankles before playing sports, exercising, ...

  10. Serial Testing of Postural Control After Acute Lateral Ankle Sprain

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, W. E.; Denegar, Craig R.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To identify subjects' changes in postural control during single-leg stance in the 4 weeks after acute lateral ankle sprain. Design and Setting: We used a 2 × 2 × 3 (side-by-plane-by-session) within-subjects design with repeated measures on all 3 factors. All tests were performed in a university laboratory. Subjects: Seventeen young adults (9 men, 8 women; age, 21.8 ± 5.9 years; mass, 74.9 ± 10.5 kg; height, 176.9 ± 7.1 cm) who had sustained unilateral acute mild or moderate lateral ankle sprains. Measurements: Measures of center-of-pressure excursion length, root mean square velocity of center-of-pressure excursions (VEL), and range of center-of-pressure excursions (RANGE) were calculated separately in the frontal and sagittal planes during 5-second trials of static single-leg stance. Results: We noted significant side-by-plane-by-session interactions for magnitude of center-of-pressure excursions in a given trial (PSL) (P = .004), VEL (P = .011), and RANGE (P = .009). Both PSL and VEL in the frontal plane were greater in the injured limbs compared with the uninjured limbs on day 1 and during week 2 but not during week 4, whereas sagittal-plane differences existed during all 3 testing sessions. Injured-limb, frontal-plane RANGE scores were greater than uninjured values at day 1 but not during weeks 2 or 4. No significant differences in sagittal-plane RANGE scores were seen. Conclusions: Postural control was significantly impaired in the injured limbs at day 1 and during week 2 after lateral ankle sprain but not during week 4. Consistent improvement in postural control measures on both injured and uninjured limbs was seen throughout the 4 weeks after ankle sprain. PMID:12937477

  11. Can Chronic Ankle Instability Be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains

    PubMed Central

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To pose the question, “Can chronic ankle instability be prevented?” The evaluation and treatment of chronic ankle instability is a significant challenge in athletic health care. The condition affects large numbers of athletes and is associated with reinjury and impaired performance. The management of acute injuries varies widely but in athletic training has traditionally focused on initial symptom management and rapid return to activity. A review of practice strategies and philosophies suggests that a more detailed evaluation of all joints affected by the injury, correction of hypomobility, and protection of healing structures may lead to a more optimal long-term outcome. Background: Sprains to the lateral ankle are common in athletes, and the reinjury rate is high. These injuries are often perceived as being isolated to the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments. It is, however, becoming apparent that a lateral ankle sprain can injure other tissues and result in joint dysfunction throughout the ankle complex. Description: We begin by addressing the relationship between mechanical and functional instability. We then discuss normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics. Finally, tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and the management of acute lateral ankle sprain are reviewed, with an emphasis on restoring normal mechanics of the ankle-joint complex. A treatment model based on assessment of joint function, treatment of hypomobile segments, and protection of healing tissues at hypermobile segments is described. PMID:12937564

  12. Sprained Ankles

    MedlinePlus

    ... 18-21yrs. Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & ... Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention ... Children > Health Issues > Conditions > Orthopedic > Sprained Ankles Health Issues ...

  13. Reinjury after acute lateral ankle sprains in elite track and field athletes.

    PubMed

    Malliaropoulos, Nikolaos; Ntessalen, Maria; Papacostas, Emmanuel; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Maffulli, Nicola

    2009-09-01

    Lateral ankle sprains can lead to persistent disability in athletes. The authors studied the effect of a lateral ankle sprain on reinjury occurrence in the same region. There will be no difference in reinjury rate between low-grade (grades I and II) and high-grade (IIIA and IIIB) acute lateral ankle sprains. Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 1. From 1996 to 2004, the authors managed 202 elite Greek track and field athletes for an acute lateral ankle sprain. Sprains were classified into 4 degrees (I, II, IIIA, and IIIB). The same rehabilitation protocol was prescribed for all the athletes. The rate of a lateral ankle reinjury was recorded in the 24 months following injury. At a follow-up of 24 months, 36 of 202 athletes (17.8%) experienced a second lateral ankle sprain. Of the 79 athletes with a grade I injury, 11 (14%) experienced a recurrence during the study period. Of the 81 athletes with a grade II injury, 23 (29%) experienced a recurrence during the study period. Of the 36 athletes with a grade IIIA injury, 2 (5.6%) experienced a recurrence during the study period. Of the 6 athletes with a grade IIIB injury, none experienced a recurrence during the study period. Athletes with a grade I or II lateral ankle sprain are at higher risk of experiencing a reinjury. Low-grade acute lateral ankle sprains result in a higher risk of reinjury than high-grade acute lateral ankle sprains.

  14. Dynamic balance deficits in individuals with chronic ankle instability compared to ankle sprain copers 1 year after a first-time lateral ankle sprain injury.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2016-04-01

    To quantify the dynamic balance deficits that characterise a group with chronic ankle instability compared to lateral ankle sprain copers and non-injured controls using kinematic and kinetic outcomes. Forty-two participants with chronic ankle instability and twenty-eight lateral ankle sprain copers were initially recruited within 2 weeks of sustaining a first-time, acute lateral ankle sprain and required to attend our laboratory 1 year later to complete the current study protocol. An additional group of non-injured individuals were also recruited to act as a control group. All participants completed the anterior, posterior-lateral and posterior-medial reach directions of the star excursion balance test. Sagittal plane kinematics of the lower extremity and associated fractal dimension of the centre of pressure path were also acquired. Participants with chronic ankle instability displayed poorer performance in the anterior, posterior-medial and posterior-lateral reach directions compared with controls bilaterally, and in the posterior-lateral direction compared with lateral ankle sprain copers on their 'involved' limb only. These performance deficits in the posterior-lateral and posterior-medial directions were associated with reduced flexion and dorsiflexion displacements at the hip, knee and ankle at the point of maximum reach, and coincided with reduced complexity of the centre of pressure path. In comparison with lateral ankle sprain copers and controls, participants with chronic ankle instability were characterised by dynamic balance deficits as measured using the SEBT. This was attested to reduced sagittal plane motions at the hip, knee and ankle joints, and reduced capacity of the stance limb to avail of its supporting base. III.

  15. Intrinsic predictors of lateral ankle sprain in adolescent dancers: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Claire E; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Herbert, Robert D; Kilbreath, Sharon L

    2008-01-01

    To identify intrinsic predictors of lateral ankle sprain. Prospective cohort study. A performing arts secondary school and a dance school. One hundred fifteen adolescent dancers (94 female and 21 male) entered the study. One ankle of each dancer was randomly assigned to a test group (n = 114), and the other was assigned to a validation group (n = 112). Eighteen measures, including age, dance history, previous ankle sprain, ankle and foot laxity and range of motion, and balance from test ankles were entered into a backwards stepwise Cox regression model. The model generated with the test group was used to predict ankle sprains in the validation group. Time to first lateral ankle sprain. An increased risk of sprain in the test group was predicted by younger age [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.65, 95% CI 0.45-0.94], previous sprain of the contralateral ankle (HR = 3.76, CI 1.24-11.40), increased passive inversion range (HR = 1.06, CI 1.00-1.12), and inability to balance on demipointe (HR = 3.75, CI 1.02-13.73). Of these predictors, only previous sprain of the contralateral ankle significantly predicted ankle sprain in the validation group (HR = 3.90, CI 1.49-10.22). The predictive accuracy of this variable was not strong (positive likelihood ratio of 2.01 and negative likelihood ratio of 0.45). A history of previous lateral ankle sprain is associated with an increase in the risk of future sprain of the contralateral ankle.

  16. Weight-bearing immobilization and early exercise treatment following a grade II lateral ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Glasoe, W M; Allen, M K; Awtry, B F; Yack, H J

    1999-07-01

    Case study. To describe a protocol used in the rehabilitation of a grade II lateral ankle sprain, emphasizing brief immobilization with a removable boot, weight bearing as tolerated, and progression of early exercise. The optimum conservative treatment of severe grade II ankle sprains remains undefined. Short-term benefits of early mobilization have won favor over immobilization by casting; however, pain and ankle joint instability often linger. The timing of weight bearing as a variable that influences recovery has largely been ignored when either treatment is considered. The patient was a 17-year-old girl who had sustained a left ankle inversion sprain while playing high school basketball. The sprained ankle was placed in an immobilizer boot for 1 week, and weight bearing was encouraged. She received instructions for active exercise and for resistive exercise with elastic tubing. Volumetric and active range of motion measurements and gait observation provided indicators of rehabilitation progress. A digital inclinometer was used to measure active range of motion in the sagittal plane. Vertical ground reaction forces recorded with an instrumented treadmill documented gait symmetry. The patient responded well to the course of treatment, returning to full participation in basketball 2 weeks after the injury. The injured ankle had 29% (19 degrees) less active range of motion than the nonimpaired ankle at the beginning of physical therapy. The injured ankle also displaced 50 mL more water compared with the nonimpaired ankle at the start of treatment. Four weeks after beginning treatment, the sprained ankle had 4 degrees less active range of motion and displaced 5 mL more water compared with the nonimpaired ankle. As a college athlete, the patient has remained free of subjective complaints of ankle pain, instability, and swelling. Weight-bearing immobilization combined with early exercise provided safe and effective treatment for this patient, who suffered a grade II

  17. Anatomical predisposition of the ankle joint for lateral sprain or lateral malleolar fracture evaluated by radiographic measurements.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Lee, SeungYeol; Kim, Tae Gyun; Choi, Young; Jung, Ki Jin; Kim, Yeon Ho; Koo, Seung Bum; Park, Moon Seok

    2015-01-01

    Injury mechanism and the amount of force are important factors determining whether a fracture or sprain occurs at the time of an ankle inversion injury. However, the anatomical differences between the ankle fracture and sprain have not been investigated sufficiently. This study was performed to investigate whether an anatomical predisposition of the ankle joint results in a lateral malleolar fracture or lateral ankle sprain. Two groups of consecutive patients, one with lateral malleolar fracture (274 patients, mean age 49.0 years) and the other with lateral ankle sprain (400 patients, mean age 38.4 years), were evaluated. Ankle radiographs were examined for 7 measures: distal tibial articular surface (DTAS) angle, bimalleolar tilt (BT), medial malleolar relative length (MMRL), lateral malleolar relative length (LMRL), medial malleolar slip angle (MMSA), anterior inclination of tibia (AI), and fibular position (FP). After an interobserver reliability test, the radiographic measurements were compared between the 2 groups. Linear regression analysis was performed to correct for age and sex effects between the groups. The fracture group and the sprain group showed significant differences in BT (P = .001), MMSA (P < .001), AI (P = .023), and FP (P < .001). In multiple regression analysis, after adjusting for age and sex effects, fracture and sprain groups showed a significant difference in BT (P = .001), MMRL (P < .001), MMSA (P < .001), and FP (P < .001). The lateral malleolar fracture group tended to show more bony constraint than that of the lateral ankle sprain group. Further 3-dimensional assessment of the bony structure and subsequent biomechanical studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism of injury according to the various types of ankle fractures and ankle sprain. Level III, retrospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Motor-Neuron Pool Excitability of the Lower Leg Muscles After Acute Lateral Ankle Sprain

    PubMed Central

    Klykken, Lindsey W.; Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Kim, Kyung-Min; Ingersoll, Christopher D.; Hertel, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Context: Neuromuscular deficits in leg muscles that are associated with arthrogenic muscle inhibition have been reported in people with chronic ankle instability, yet whether these neuromuscular alterations are present in individuals with acute sprains is unknown. Objective: To compare the effect of acute lateral ankle sprain on the motor-neuron pool excitability (MNPE) of injured leg muscles with that of uninjured contralateral leg muscles and the leg muscles of healthy controls. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten individuals with acute ankle sprains (6 females, 4 males; age = 19.2 ± 3.8 years, height = 169.4 ± 8.5 cm, mass = 66.3 ±11.6 kg) and 10 healthy individuals (6 females, 4 males; age = 20.6 ± 4.0 years, height = 169.9 ± 10.6 cm, mass = 66.3 ± 10.2 kg) participated. Intervention(s): The independent variables were group (acute ankle sprain, healthy) and limb (injured, uninjured). Separate dependent t tests were used to determine differences in MNPE between legs. Main Outcome Measure(s): The MNPE of the soleus, fibularis longus, and tibialis anterior was measured by the maximal Hoffmann reflex (Hmax) and maximal muscle response (Mmax) and was then normalized using the Hmax:Mmax ratio. Results: The soleus MNPE in the ankle-sprain group was higher in the injured limb (Hmax:Mmax = 0.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.46, 0.80) than in the uninjured limb (Hmax:Mmax = 0.47; 95% CI, 0.08, 0.93) (t6 = 3.62, P = .01). In the acute ankle-sprain group, tibialis anterior MNPE tended to be lower in the injured ankle (Hmax:Mmax = 0.06; 95% CI, 0.01, 0.10) than in the uninjured ankle (Hmax:Mmax = 0.22; 95% CI, 0.09, 0.35), but this finding was not different (t9 = −2.01, P = .07). No differences were detected between injured (0.22; 95% CI, 0.14, 0.29) and uninjured (0.25; 95% CI, 0.12, 0.38) ankles for the fibularis longus in the ankle-sprain group (t9 = −0.739, P = .48). We found no side-to-side differences in

  19. Management of ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, M W; Uhl, T L; Mattacola, C G; McCluskey, L C

    2001-01-01

    Without adequate care, acute ankle trauma can result in chronic joint instability. Use of a standardized protocol enhances the management of ankle sprains. In patients with grades I or II sprains, emphasis should be placed on accurate diagnosis, early use of RICE (rest, ice, compression and elevation), maintenance of range of motion and use of an ankle support. Sprains with complete ligament [corrected] tears (grade III) may require surgical intervention. Although early motion and mobility are recommended, ligamentous strength does not return until months after an ankle sprain.

  20. Joint Stability Characteristics of the Ankle Complex in Female Athletes With Histories of Lateral Ankle Sprain, Part II: Clinical Experience Using Arthrometric Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Kovaleski, John E.; Heitman, Robert J.; Gurchiek, Larry R.; Hollis, J. M.; Liu, Wei; IV, Albert W. Pearsall

    2014-01-01

    Context: This is part II of a 2-part series discussing stability characteristics of the ankle complex. In part I, we used a cadaver model to examine the effects of sectioning the lateral ankle ligaments on anterior and inversion motion and stiffness of the ankle complex. In part II, we wanted to build on and apply these findings to the clinical assessment of ankle-complex motion and stiffness in a group of athletes with a history of unilateral ankle sprain. Objective: To examine ankle-complex motion and stiffness in a group of athletes with reported history of lateral ankle sprain. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-five female college athletes (age = 19.4 ± 1.4 years, height = 170.2 ± 7.4 cm, mass = 67.3 ± 10.0 kg) with histories of unilateral ankle sprain. Intervention(s): All ankles underwent loading with an ankle arthrometer. Ankles were tested bilaterally. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent variables were anterior displacement, anterior end-range stiffness, inversion rotation, and inversion end-range stiffness. Results: Anterior displacement of the ankle complex did not differ between the uninjured and sprained ankles (P = .37), whereas ankle-complex rotation was greater for the sprained ankles (P = .03). The sprained ankles had less anterior and inversion end-range stiffness than the uninjured ankles (P < .01). Conclusions: Changes in ankle-complex laxity and end-range stiffness were detected in ankles with histories of sprain. These results indicate the presence of altered mechanical characteristics in the soft tissues of the sprained ankles. PMID:24568223

  1. Acute ankle sprain: an update.

    PubMed

    Ivins, Douglas

    2006-11-15

    Acute ankle injury, a common musculoskeletal injury, can cause ankle sprains. Some evidence suggests that previous injuries or limited joint flexibility may contribute to ankle sprains. The initial assessment of an acute ankle injury should include questions about the timing and mechanism of the injury. The Ottawa Ankle and Foot Rules provide clinical guidelines for excluding a fracture in adults and children and determining if radiography is indicated at the time of injury. Reexamination three to five days after injury, when pain and swelling have improved, may help with the diagnosis. Therapy for ankle sprains focuses on controlling pain and swelling. PRICE (Protection, Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation) is a well-established protocol for the treatment of ankle injury. There is some evidence that applying ice and using nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs improves healing and speeds recovery. Functional rehabilitation (e.g., motion restoration and strengthening exercises) is preferred over immobilization. Superiority of surgical repair versus functional rehabilitation for severe lateral ligament rupture is controversial. Treatment using semirigid supports is superior to using elastic bandages. Support devices provide some protection against future ankle sprains, particularly in persons with a history of recurrent sprains. Ankle disk or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercise regimens also may be helpful, although the literature supporting this is limited.

  2. Explanatory variables for adult patients' self-reported recovery after acute lateral ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, Rogier M; Willemsen, Sten P; Verhagen, Arianne P; Koes, Bart W; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A

    2011-01-01

    Longitudinal research on musculoskeletal disorders often makes use of a single measure of recovery, despite the large variation in reported recovery that exists. Patients with an acute ankle sprain often experience no pain or functional disability following treatment, yet report not being fully recovered, or vice versa. The purpose of this study was to find explanatory variables for reporting recovery by analyzing the extent to which different outcomes (eg, pain intensity) were associated with recovery and how baseline scores of different variables influence this association in adult patients after acute lateral ankle sprain. This was a cohort study based on data collected in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). This study was constructed within the framework of an RCT. One hundred two patients who incurred an acute ankle sprain were included. Recovery, pain intensity, giving way of the ankle, and Ankle Function Score (AFS) were assessed during the RCT at baseline and at 4 weeks, 8 weeks, 3 months, and 12 months postinjury. Mean differences were calculated between baseline and follow-up. Associations were calculated using linear mixed models, and the influence of baseline scores on these associations was determined using linear regression with interaction. Associations were found between recovery and the mean differences of pain during running on flat and rough surfaces (4 and 8 weeks, 3 months) and between recovery and the mean difference of giving way of the ankle during walking on a rough surface (8 weeks, 3 months). This study used data collected from an RCT. Therefore, the study was limited to the outcomes measured in that trial, and some explanatory factors easily could have been missed. This study is the first to identify explanatory variables for reporting recovery in adults after ankle sprain. Pain intensity and giving way of the ankle measured during high ankle load activities make it easier to measure and to generalize recovery in this population and

  3. Ankle Sprains. A Round Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Types of ankle sprains, surgical versus nonsurgical treatment, tape versus brace for support, rehabilitation, exercise, and prevention of ankle sprains are discussed by a panel of experts. An acute ankle taping technique is illustrated. (MT)

  4. Peroneal tendinosis as a predisposing factor for the acute lateral ankle sprain in runners.

    PubMed

    Ziai, Pejman; Benca, Emir; Wenzel, Florian; Schuh, Reinhard; Krall, Christoph; Auffahrt, Alexander; Hofstetter, Martin; Windhager, Reinhard; Buchhorn, Tomas

    2016-04-01

    A painful episode in the region of the peroneal tendons, within the retromalleolar groove, is a common precipitating event of an acute lateral ankle sprain. A forefoot striking pattern is suspected to cause peroneal tendinosis. The aim of this study is to analyse the role of peroneal tendinosis as a predisposing factor for ankle sprain trauma in runners. Fifty-eight runners who had experienced acute ankle sprain trauma, with pre-existing pain episodes for up to 4 weeks in the region of the peroneal tendons, were assessed clinically. Fractures were excluded by conventional radiography. An magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan had been performed within 14 days after the traumatic event and was subsequently evaluated by two experienced radiologists. MRI revealed peroneal tendinosis in 55 patients (95% of the total study population). Peroneus brevis (PB) tendinosis was found in 48 patients (87% of all patients with peroneal tendinosis), and peroneus longus (PL) tendinosis was observed in 42 cases (76%). Thirty-five patients (64%) had combined PB and PL tendinosis. A lesion of the anterior talofibular ligament was found to be the most common ligament injury associated with peroneal tendinosis (29 cases; 53%), followed by a lesion of the calcaneofibular ligament (16 cases; 29%) and a lesion of the posterior tibiofibular ligament (13 cases; 24%). The results of this study reflect the correlation between peroneal tendinosis and ankle sprain trauma. Injuries of one or more ligaments are associated with further complications. A period of rest or forbearance of sports as well as adequate treatment of the peroneal tendinosis is essential to prevent subsequent ankle injuries, especially in runners. Modification of the running technique would also be beneficial. IV.

  5. The effect of lateral ankle sprain on dorsiflexion range of motion, posterior talar glide, and joint laxity.

    PubMed

    Denegar, Craig R; Hertel, Jay; Fonseca, Jose

    2002-04-01

    Retrospective study. Assess range of motion, posterior talar glide, and residual joint laxity following ankle sprain in a population of athletes who have returned to unrestricted activity. Lateral ankle sprains occur frequently in athletic populations and the reinjury rate may be as high as 80%. In an effort to better understand risk factors for reinjury, the sequelae to injury in a sample of college athletes were assessed. Twelve athletes with a history of lateral ankle sprain within the last 6 months and who had returned to sport participation were tested. Only athletes who reported never injuring the contralateral ankle were included. The injured and uninjured ankles of subjects were compared for measures of joint laxity, ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, and posterior talar glide. Friedman's test of rank order was used to analyze the laxity measures and a MANOVA was used to assess the dorsiflexion and posterior talar glide measures. Laxity was significantly greater at the talocrural and subtalar joints of the injured ankles. There were no significant differences in any of the ankle dorsiflexion measurements between injured and uninjured ankles, but posterior talar glide was significantly reduced in injured ankles as compared to uninjured ankles. In our sample of subjects, residual ligamentous laxity was commonly found following lateral ankle sprain. Dorsiflexion range of motion was restored in the population studied despite evidence of restricted posterior glide of the talocrural joint. Although restoration of physiological range of motion was achieved, residual joint dysfunction persisted. Further research is warranted to elucidate the role of altered arthrokinematics after lateral ankle sprain.

  6. 2016 consensus statement of the International Ankle Consortium: prevalence, impact and long-term consequences of lateral ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Gribble, Phillip A; Bleakley, Chris M; Caulfield, Brian M; Docherty, Carrie L; Fourchet, François; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Hertel, Jay; Hiller, Claire E; Kaminski, Thomas W; McKeon, Patrick O; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Verhagen, Evert A; Vicenzino, Bill T; Wikstrom, Erik A; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2016-12-01

    The Executive Committee of the International Ankle Consortium presents this 2016 position paper with recommendations for information implementation and continued research based on the paradigm that lateral ankle sprain (LAS), and the development of chronic ankle instability (CAI), serve as a conduit to a significant global healthcare burden. We intend our recommendations to serve as a mechanism to promote efforts to improve prevention and early management of LAS. We believe this will reduce the prevalence of CAI and associated sequelae that have led to the broader public health burdens of decreased physical activity and early onset ankle joint post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Ultimately, this can contribute to healthier lifestyles and promotion of physical activity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. CLINICAL COMMENTARY ON MIDFOOT AND FOREFOOT INVOLVEMENT IN LATERAL ANKLE SPRAINS AND CHRONIC ANKLE INSTABILITY. PART 2: CLINICAL CONSIDERATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Mark A.; Hertel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Lateral ankle sprains (LAS) and chronic ankle instability (CAI) are common musculoskeletal injuries that are a result of inversion injury during sport. The midfoot and forefoot is frequently injured during a LAS, is often overlooked during clinical examination, and maybe contributory to the development of CAI. The purpose of part two of this clinical commentary and current concept review is to increase clinician's awareness of the contribution of midfoot and forefoot impairment to functional limitation and disability of individuals who experience LAS and CAI and to facilitate future research in this area. The importance of multisegmented foot and ankle assessment from a clinical and research perspective is stressed. Select physical assessment and manual therapeutic techniques are presented to assist the clinician in examination and treatment of the ankle-foot complex in patients with LAS and CAI. PMID:27999731

  8. Contrast Therapy and Heat Therapy in Subacute Stage of Grade I and II Lateral Ankle Sprains.

    PubMed

    Weerasekara, R M I M; Tennakoon, S U B; Suraweera, H J

    2016-08-01

    Objective This study was conducted to determine the most effective thermal modality; heat or contrast therapy-in reducing pain, reducing swelling, and increasing range of movement (ROM) of the grade I and II lateral ankle sprain in the prechronic stage of the subacute phase. Design Randomized control trail. Methods One hundred and fifteen participants of both genders who were diagnosed as having grade I or II lateral ankle sprain were randomly assigned to the study on the fifth day of injury. Pain, volume, and ROM were recorded before and after treatment continuously for 3 days. Results Effects were evaluated as "Immediately after application" and "3 days after continuous application." Immediately after application, there was no difference between the 2 modalities on ankle ROM; heat reduced pain over contrast therapy, and both modalities increased swelling. When considering the effects after continuous application for 3 days, no difference was found between the 2 modalities on ROM and the reduction of pain. Contrast therapy reduced swelling while heat caused increased swelling even after 3 days. Conclusion The use of different thermal modalities during the transition from the acute to chronic phase of injury can be suggested as effective treatment options according to the objectives of injury management: pain reduction, improve ROM, and swelling management. Therapeutic, Level II: Randomized clinical trial. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. Ankle sprain - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100209.htm Ankle sprain - Series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 4 Go to slide 2 ...

  10. Radiograph-Negative Lateral Ankle Injuries in Children: Occult Growth Plate Fracture or Sprain?

    PubMed

    Boutis, Kathy; Plint, Amy; Stimec, Jennifer; Miller, Elka; Babyn, Paul; Schuh, Suzanne; Brison, Robert; Lawton, Louis; Narayanan, Unni G

    2016-01-01

    Lateral ankle injuries without radiographic evidence of a fracture are a common pediatric injury. These children are often presumed to have a Salter-Harris type I fracture of the distal fibula (SH1DF) and managed with immobilization and orthopedic follow-up. However, previous small studies suggest that these injuries may represent ankle sprains rather than growth plate fractures. To determine the frequency of SH1DF using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and compare the functional recovery of children with fractures identified by MRI vs those with isolated ligament injuries. A prospective cohort study was conducted between September 2012 and August 2014 at 2 tertiary care pediatric emergency departments. We screened 271 skeletally immature children aged 5 to 12 years with a clinically suspected SH1DF; 170 were eligible and 140 consented to participate. Children underwent MRI of both ankles within 1 week of injury. Children were managed with a removable brace and allowed to return to activities as tolerated. The proportion with MRI-confirmed SH1DF. A secondary outcome included the Activity Scale for Kids score at 1 month. Of the 135 children who underwent ankle MRI, 4 (3.0%; 95% CI, 0.1%-5.9%) demonstrated MRI-confirmed SH1DF, and 2 of these were partial growth plate injuries. Also, 108 children (80.0%) had ligament injuries and 27 (22.0%) had isolated bone contusions. Of the 108 ligament injuries, 73 (67.6%) were intermediate to high-grade injuries, 38 of which were associated with radiographically occult fibular avulsion fractures. At 1 month, the mean (SD) Activity Scale for Kids score of children with MRI-detected fibular fractures (82.0% [17.2%]) was not significantly different from those without fractures (85.8% [12.5%]) (mean difference, -3.8%; 95% CI, -1.7% to 9.2%). Salter-Harris I fractures of the distal fibula are rare in children with radiograph fracture-negative lateral ankle injuries. These children most commonly have ligament injuries (sprains

  11. Muscle Reaction Time During a Simulated Lateral Ankle Sprain After Wet-Ice Application or Cold-Water Immersion

    PubMed Central

    Thain, Peter K.; Bleakley, Christopher M.; Mitchell, Andrew C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Context Cryotherapy is used widely in sport and exercise medicine to manage acute injuries and facilitate rehabilitation. The analgesic effects of cryotherapy are well established; however, a potential caveat is that cooling tissue negatively affects neuromuscular control through delayed muscle reaction time. This topic is important to investigate because athletes often return to exercise, rehabilitation, or competitive activity immediately or shortly after cryotherapy. Objective To compare the effects of wet-ice application, cold-water immersion, and an untreated control condition on peroneus longus and tibialis anterior muscle reaction time during a simulated lateral ankle sprain. Design Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting University of Hertfordshire human performance laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 54 physically active individuals (age = 20.1 ± 1.5 years, height = 1.7 ± 0.07 m, mass = 66.7 ± 5.4 kg) who had no injury or history of ankle sprain. Intervention(s) Wet-ice application, cold-water immersion, or an untreated control condition applied to the ankle for 10 minutes. Main Outcome Measure(s) Muscle reaction time and muscle amplitude of the peroneus longus and tibialis anterior in response to a simulated lateral ankle sprain were calculated. The ankle-sprain simulation incorporated a combined inversion and plantar-flexion movement. Results We observed no change in muscle reaction time or muscle amplitude after cryotherapy for either the peroneus longus or tibialis anterior (P > .05). Conclusions Ten minutes of joint cooling did not adversely affect muscle reaction time or muscle amplitude in response to a simulated lateral ankle sprain. These findings suggested that athletes can safely return to sporting activity immediately after icing. Further evidence showed that ice can be applied before ankle rehabilitation without adversely affecting dynamic neuromuscular control. Investigation in patients with acute ankle sprains is

  12. Muscle Reaction Time During a Simulated Lateral Ankle Sprain After Wet-Ice Application or Cold-Water Immersion.

    PubMed

    Thain, Peter K; Bleakley, Christopher M; Mitchell, Andrew C S

    2015-07-01

    Cryotherapy is used widely in sport and exercise medicine to manage acute injuries and facilitate rehabilitation. The analgesic effects of cryotherapy are well established; however, a potential caveat is that cooling tissue negatively affects neuromuscular control through delayed muscle reaction time. This topic is important to investigate because athletes often return to exercise, rehabilitation, or competitive activity immediately or shortly after cryotherapy. To compare the effects of wet-ice application, cold-water immersion, and an untreated control condition on peroneus longus and tibialis anterior muscle reaction time during a simulated lateral ankle sprain. Randomized controlled clinical trial. University of Hertfordshire human performance laboratory. A total of 54 physically active individuals (age = 20.1 ± 1.5 years, height = 1.7 ± 0.07 m, mass = 66.7 ± 5.4 kg) who had no injury or history of ankle sprain. Wet-ice application, cold-water immersion, or an untreated control condition applied to the ankle for 10 minutes. Muscle reaction time and muscle amplitude of the peroneus longus and tibialis anterior in response to a simulated lateral ankle sprain were calculated. The ankle-sprain simulation incorporated a combined inversion and plantar-flexion movement. We observed no change in muscle reaction time or muscle amplitude after cryotherapy for either the peroneus longus or tibialis anterior (P > .05). Ten minutes of joint cooling did not adversely affect muscle reaction time or muscle amplitude in response to a simulated lateral ankle sprain. These findings suggested that athletes can safely return to sporting activity immediately after icing. Further evidence showed that ice can be applied before ankle rehabilitation without adversely affecting dynamic neuromuscular control. Investigation in patients with acute ankle sprains is warranted to assess the clinical applicability of these interventions.

  13. Syndesmotic ankle sprains in athletes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Glenn N; Jones, Morgan H; Amendola, Annunziato

    2007-07-01

    Ankle sprains are among the most common athletic injuries and represent a significant source of persistent pain and disability. Despite the high incidence of ankle sprains in athletes, syndesmosis injuries have historically been underdiagnosed, and assessment in terms of severity and optimal treatment has not been determined. More recently, a heightened awareness in sports medicine has resulted in more frequent diagnoses of syndesmosis injuries. However, there is a low level of evidence and a paucity of literature on this topic compared with lateral ankle sprains. As a result, no clear guidelines are available to help the clinician assess the severity of injury, choose an imaging modality to visualize the injury, make a decision in terms of operative versus nonoperative treatment, or decide when the athlete may return to play. Increased knowledge and understanding of these injuries by clinicians and researchers are essential to improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of this significant condition. This review will discuss the anatomy, mechanism of injury, diagnosis, and treatment of syndesmosis sprains of the ankle while identifying controversies in management and topics for future research.

  14. A modified mobilization-with-movement to treat a lateral ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Mau, Heather; Baker, Russell T

    2014-08-01

    Lateral ankle sprains (LAS) are common in sports medicine and can result in a high rate of re-injury and chronic ankle instability (CAI). Recent evidence supports the use on mobilizations directed at the ankle in patients who have suffered a LAS. The Mulligan Concept of Mobilization-with-Movement (MWM) provides an intervention strategy for LASs, but requires pain-free mobilization application and little literature exists on modifications of these techniques. To present the use of a modified MWM to treat LASs when the traditional MWM technique could not be performed due to patient reported pain and to assess outcomes of the treatment. The subject of this case report is a 23 year-old female collegiate basketball player who had failed to respond to initial conservative treatments after being diagnosed with a lateral ankle sprain. The initial management and subsequent interventions are presented. After re-examination, the addition of a modification of a MWM technique produced immediate and clinically significant changes in patient symptoms. The use of the modified-MWM resulted in full resolution of symptoms and a rapid return to full athletic participation. After the initial application of the modified-MWM, the patient reported immediate pain-free ankle motion and ambulation. Following a total of 5 treatments, using only the modified MWM and taping technique, the patient was discharged with equal range of motion (ROM) bilaterally, a decreased Disablement in the Physically Active (DPA) Scale score, and an asymptomatic physical exam. Follow-up exam 6 weeks later indicated a full maintenance of these results. Recent evidence has been presented to support the use of mobilization techniques to treat patient limitations following ankle injury; however, the majority of evidence is associated with addressing the talar and dorsiflexion limitations. Currently, little evidence is available regarding the use of the MWM technique designed for LASs and the expected outcomes. This

  15. Electrical stimulation as a treatment intervention to improve function, edema or pain following acute lateral ankle sprains: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Feger, Mark A; Goetschius, John; Love, Hailey; Saliba, Sue A; Hertel, Jay

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to assess whether electrical stimulation (ES), when used in conjunction with a standard treatment, can reduce levels of functional impairment, edema, and pain compared to a standard treatment alone, in patients following a lateral ankle sprain. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, SportDiscus, and Medline (OVID) databases through June 2014 using the terms "ankle sprain or ankle sprains or ligament injury or ligamentous injury," and "electric stimulation or electric stimulation or electrotherapy." Our search identified four randomized control trials, of which, neuromuscular ES and high-voltage pulsed stimulation were the only two ES modalities utilized. Effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cohen's d for comparison between treatment groups. Three of four effect sizes for function had 95% CI that crossed zero. Twenty-four of the thirty-two effect sizes for edema had 95% CI that crossed zero. All effect sizes for pain had 95% CI that crossed zero. Therefore, the use of ES is not recommended as a means to improve function, reduce edema, or decrease pain in the treatment of acute lateral ankle sprains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute ankle sprain in dancers.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jeffrey A

    2010-01-01

    Ankle sprain is a common injury in dancers. Because of the relative frequency of this injury and its wide acceptance as a likely part of an active lifestyle, in many individuals it may not receive the careful attention it deserves. An extreme ankle range of motion and excellent ankle stability are fundamental to success in dance. Hence, following a proper treatment protocol is crucial for allowing a dancer who suffers an ankle sprain to return to dance as soon as possible without impaired function. This article reviews the basic principles of the etiology and management of ankle sprain in dancers. Key concepts are on-site examination and treatment, early restoration, dance-specific rehabilitation, and a carefully administered safe return to dance. Additionally, injuries that may occur in conjunction with ankle sprain are highlighted, and practical, clinically relevant summary concepts for dance healthcare professionals, dance scientists, dance teachers, and dancers are provided.

  17. An Acute Lateral Ankle Sprain Significantly Decreases Physical Activity across the Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Hubbard-Turner, Tricia; Wikstrom, Erik A; Guderian, Sophie; Turner, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    We do not know the impact an ankle sprain has on physical activity levels across the lifespan. With the negative consequences of physical inactivity well established, understanding the effect of an ankle sprain on this outcome is critical. The objective of this study was to measure physical activity across the lifespan after a single ankle sprain in an animal model. Thirty male mice (CBA/J) were randomly placed into one of three groups: the transected calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) group, the transected anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL)/CFL group, and a SHAM group. Three days after surgery, all of the mice were individually housed in a cage containing a solid surface running wheel. Physical activity levels were recorded and averaged every week across the mouse's lifespan. The SHAM mice ran significantly more distance each day compared to the remaining two running groups (post hoc p = 0.011). Daily duration was different between the three running groups (p = 0.048). The SHAM mice ran significantly more minutes each day compared to the remaining two running groups (post hoc p=0.046) while the ATFL/CFL mice ran significantly less minutes each day (post hoc p = 0.028) compared to both the SHAM and CFL only group. The SHAM mice ran at a faster daily speed versus the remaining two groups of mice (post hoc p = 0.019) and the ATFL/CFL mice ran significantly slower each day compared to the SHAM and CFL group (post hoc p = 0.005). The results of this study indicate that a single ankle sprain significantly decreases physical activity across the lifespan in mice. This decrease in physical activity can potentially lead to the development of numerous chronic diseases. An ankle sprain thus has the potential to lead to significant long term health risks if not treated appropriately. Key pointsA single ankle significantly decreased physical activity levels in mice across the lifespan.Decreased physical activity could significantly negatively impact overall health if not modified

  18. An Acute Lateral Ankle Sprain Significantly Decreases Physical Activity across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard-Turner, Tricia; Wikstrom, Erik A.; Guderian, Sophie; Turner, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We do not know the impact an ankle sprain has on physical activity levels across the lifespan. With the negative consequences of physical inactivity well established, understanding the effect of an ankle sprain on this outcome is critical. The objective of this study was to measure physical activity across the lifespan after a single ankle sprain in an animal model. Thirty male mice (CBA/J) were randomly placed into one of three groups: the transected calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) group, the transected anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL)/CFL group, and a SHAM group. Three days after surgery, all of the mice were individually housed in a cage containing a solid surface running wheel. Physical activity levels were recorded and averaged every week across the mouse’s lifespan. The SHAM mice ran significantly more distance each day compared to the remaining two running groups (post hoc p = 0.011). Daily duration was different between the three running groups (p = 0.048). The SHAM mice ran significantly more minutes each day compared to the remaining two running groups (post hoc p=0.046) while the ATFL/CFL mice ran significantly less minutes each day (post hoc p = 0.028) compared to both the SHAM and CFL only group. The SHAM mice ran at a faster daily speed versus the remaining two groups of mice (post hoc p = 0.019) and the ATFL/CFL mice ran significantly slower each day compared to the SHAM and CFL group (post hoc p = 0.005). The results of this study indicate that a single ankle sprain significantly decreases physical activity across the lifespan in mice. This decrease in physical activity can potentially lead to the development of numerous chronic diseases. An ankle sprain thus has the potential to lead to significant long term health risks if not treated appropriately. Key points A single ankle significantly decreased physical activity levels in mice across the lifespan. Decreased physical activity could significantly negatively impact overall health if not

  19. Syndesmotic ankle sprain in a recreational hockey player.

    PubMed

    Ward, D W

    1994-01-01

    To present a case of distal tibiofibular sprain, a rare injury among ubiquitous lateral ligament sprains of the ankle. A 45-yr-old recreational hockey player was treated for an ankle sprain demonstrating increased translation on the drawer test and pain with inversion stress, but also pain with external rotation and dorsiflexion. X-rays demonstrated no fractures. The conventional protocol of protect, rest, ice, compress and elevate (PRICE), employed for the more common lateral ankle sprains, was followed by early mobilization and proprioceptive training with a tilt board. Recovery was prolonged, and ossification of the ankle syndesmosis was seen in follow-up radiographs. Because management implications and outcome sequelae of the uncommon syndesmotic sprain are more severe than the commonly seen lateral ankle sprain, simple physical examination procedures useful in identifying syndesmotic sprains in the routine examination of the injured ankle are emphasized. These include dorsiflexion and external rotation stress and the "squeeze test."

  20. Prediction of Lateral Ankle Sprains in Football Players Based on Clinical Tests and Body Mass Index.

    PubMed

    Gribble, Phillip A; Terada, Masafumi; Beard, Megan Q; Kosik, Kyle B; Lepley, Adam S; McCann, Ryan S; Pietrosimone, Brian G; Thomas, Abbey C

    2016-02-01

    The lateral ankle sprain (LAS) is the most common injury suffered in sports, especially in football. While suggested in some studies, a predictive role of clinical tests for LAS has not been established. To determine which clinical tests, focused on potentially modifiable factors of movement patterns and body mass index (BMI), could best demonstrate risk of LAS among high school and collegiate football players. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 539 high school and collegiate football players were evaluated during the preseason with the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) and Functional Movement Screen as well as BMI. Results were compared between players who did and did not suffer an LAS during the season. Logistic regression analyses and calculated odds ratios were used to determine which measures predicted risk of LAS. The LAS group performed worse on the SEBT-anterior reaching direction (SEBT-ANT) and had higher BMI as compared with the noninjured group (P < .001). The strongest prediction models corresponded with the SEBT-ANT. Low performance on the SEBT-ANT predicted a risk of LAS in football players. BMI was also significantly higher in football players who sustained an LAS. Identifying clinical tools for successful LAS injury risk prediction will be a critical step toward the creation of effective prevention programs to reduce risk of sustaining an LAS during participation in football. © 2015 The Author(s).

  1. Coordination and Symmetry Patterns During the Drop Vertical Jump in People With Chronic Ankle Instability and Lateral Ankle Sprain Copers.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Sweeney, Kevin; Patterson, Matthew R; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2016-08-01

    The drop vertical jump (DVJ) task has previously been used to identify movement patterns associated with a number of injury types. However, no current research exists evaluating people with chronic ankle instability (CAI) compared with people coping with lateral ankle sprain (LAS) (referred to as "LAS copers") during this task. The aim of this study was to identify the coping movement and motor control patterns of LAS copers in comparison with individuals with CAI during the DVJ task. This was a case-control study. Seventy individuals were recruited at convenience within 2-weeks of sustaining a first-time acute LAS injury. One year following recruitment, these individuals were stratified into 2 groups: 28 with CAI and 42 LAS copers. They attended the testing laboratory to complete a DVJ task. Three-dimensional kinematic and sagittal-plane kinetic profiles were plotted for the lower extremity joints of both limbs for the drop jump phase (phase 1) and drop landing phase (phase 2) of the DVJ. The rate of impact modulation relative to body weight during both phases of the DVJ also was determined. Compared with LAS copers, participants with CAI displayed significant increases in hip flexion on their "involved" limb during phase 1 of the DVJ (23° vs 18°) and bilaterally during phase 2 (15° vs 10°). These movement patterns coincided with altered moment-of-force patterns at the hip on the "uninvolved" limb. It is unknown whether these movement and motor control patterns preceded or occurred as a result of the initial LAS injury. Participants with CAI displayed hip-centered changes in movement and motor control patterns during a DVJ task compared with LAS copers. The findings of this study may give an indication of the coping mechanism underlying outcome following initial LAS injury. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  2. The preventive effect of a soccer-specific ankle brace on acute lateral ankle sprains in girls amateur soccer players: study protocol of a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Thijs, Karin; Huisstede, Bionka; Goedhart, Edwin; Backx, Frank

    2017-07-27

    Acute lateral ankle sprains are the single most often diagnosed injury in female soccer players and often result in an inability to play. This highlights the need for effective prevention strategies. Proprioceptive training and/or the use of an external support to decrease inversion of the ankle joint can prevent or reduce the number of acute lateral ankle sprains. The effectiveness of a soccer-specific ankle brace in reducing first-time and recurrent acute lateral ankle sprains has never been investigated in girl soccer players. If effective, ankle braces could be introduced into soccer. Cluster-randomised controlled trial. Girl amateur soccer players (aged 14-18 years) will be allocated to an intervention or control group. The intervention group will be instructed to wear soccer-specific ankle braces on both ankles during soccer training and matches; the control group will continue playing soccer as usual. Primary outcomes are the incidence and severity of acute lateral ankle sprains. Secondary outcomes are the prognostic value of generalised joint hypermobility and functional stability on the risk of acute lateral ankle sprains and compliance with the intervention. The findings from this study may provide evidence to support the use of a soccer-specific ankle brace to prevent lateral ankle sprains during soccer. We hypothesise that this brace will reduce the incidence of ankle sprains among young amateur girl soccer players by 50%. The prevention of such injuries will be beneficial to players, clubs and society. The Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR6045; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. The Incidence of Ankle Sprains in Orienteering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekstrand, Jan; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigates relationship between ankle sprains and participation time in competitive orienteering. Examined 15,474 competitors in races in the Swedish O-ringen 5-day event in 1987. Injuries requiring medical attention were analyzed, showing 137 (23.9 percent) ankle sprains. Injury incidence was 8.4/10,000 hours. Incidence of ankle sprains was…

  4. Using Balance Tests to Discriminate Between Participants With a Recent Index Lateral Ankle Sprain and Healthy Control Participants: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Pourkazemi, Fereshteh; Hiller, Claire; Raymond, Jacqueline; Black, Deborah; Nightingale, Elizabeth; Refshauge, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Context:  The first step to identifying factors that increase the risk of recurrent ankle sprains is to identify impairments after a first sprain and compare performance with individuals who have never sustained a sprain. Few researchers have restricted recruitment to a homogeneous group of patients with first sprains, thereby introducing the potential for confounding. Objective:  To identify impairments that differ in participants with a recent index lateral ankle sprain versus participants with no history of ankle sprain. Design:  Cross-sectional study. Patients or Other Participants:  We recruited a sample of convenience from May 2010 to April 2013 that included 70 volunteers (age = 27.4 ± 8.3 years, height = 168.7 ± 9.5 cm, mass = 65.0 ± 12.5 kg) serving as controls and 30 volunteers (age = 31.1 ± 13.3 years, height = 168.3 ± 9.1 cm, mass = 67.3 ± 13.7 kg) with index ankle sprains. Main Outcome Measure(s):  We collected demographic and physical performance variables, including ankle-joint range of motion, balance (time to balance after perturbation, Star Excursion Balance Test, foot lifts during single-legged stance, demi-pointe balance test), proprioception, motor planning, inversion-eversion peak power, and timed stair tests. Discriminant analysis was conducted to determine the relationship between explanatory variables and sprain status. Sequential discriminant analysis was performed to identify the most relevant variables that explained the greatest variance. Results:  The average time since the sprain was 3.5 ± 1.5 months. The model, including all variables, correctly predicted a sprain status of 77% (n = 23) of the sprain group and 80% (n = 56) of the control group and explained 40% of the variance between groups ( = 42.16, P = .03). Backward stepwise discriminant analysis revealed associations between sprain status and only 2 tests: Star Excursion Balance Test in the anterior direction and foot lifts during single-legged stance ( = 15

  5. Effectiveness of additional supervised exercises compared with conventional treatment alone in patients with acute lateral ankle sprains: systematic review.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, Rogier M; van Ochten, John; Luijsterburg, Pim A J; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Koes, Bart W; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A

    2010-10-26

    To summarise the effectiveness of adding supervised exercises to conventional treatment compared with conventional treatment alone in patients with acute lateral ankle sprains. Systematic review. Data sources Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cinahl, and reference screening. Included studies were randomised controlled trials, quasi-randomised controlled trials, or clinical trials. Patients were adolescents or adults with an acute lateral ankle sprain. The treatment options were conventional treatment alone or conventional treatment combined with supervised exercises. Two reviewers independently assessed the risk of bias, and one reviewer extracted data. Because of clinical heterogeneity we analysed the data using a best evidence synthesis. Follow-up was classified as short term (up to two weeks), intermediate (two weeks to three months), and long term (more than three months). 11 studies were included. There was limited to moderate evidence to suggest that the addition of supervised exercises to conventional treatment leads to faster and better recovery and a faster return to sport at short term follow-up than conventional treatment alone. In specific populations (athletes, soldiers, and patients with severe injuries) this evidence was restricted to a faster return to work and sport only. There was no strong evidence of effectiveness for any of the outcome measures. Most of the included studies had a high risk of bias, with few having adequate statistical power to detect clinically relevant differences. Additional supervised exercises compared with conventional treatment alone have some benefit for recovery and return to sport in patients with ankle sprain, though the evidence is limited or moderate and many studies are subject to bias.

  6. Persistence of long term isokinetic strength deficits in subjects with lateral ankle sprain as measured with a protocol including maximal preloading.

    PubMed

    Perron, Marc; Moffet, Hélène; Nadeau, Sylvie; Hébert, Luc J; Belzile, Sylvain

    2014-12-01

    The assessment of muscle function is a cornerstone in the management of subjects who have sustained a lateral ankle sprain. The ankle range of motion being relatively small, the use of preloading allows to measure maximal strength throughout the whole amplitude and therefore to better characterize ankle muscles weaknesses. This study aimed to assess muscle strength of the injured and uninjured ankles in subjects with a lateral ankle sprain, to document the timeline of strength recovery, and to determine the influence of sprain grade on strength loss. Maximal torque of the periarticular muscles of the ankle in a concentric mode using a protocol with maximal preloading was tested in 32 male soldiers at 8 weeks and 6 months post-injury. The evertor muscles of the injured ankles were weaker than the uninjured ones at 8 weeks and 6 months post-injury (P<0.0001, effect size=0.31-0.42). Muscle weaknesses also persisted in the plantarflexors of the injured ankles at 8 weeks (P=0.0014, effect size=0.52-0.58) while at 6 months, only the subjects with a grade II sprain displayed such weaknesses (P<0.0001, effect size 0.27-0.31). The strength of the invertor and dorsiflexor muscles did not differ between sides. The use of an isokinetic protocol with preloading demonstrates significant but small strength deficits in the evertor and plantarflexor muscles. These impairments may contribute to the high incidence of recurrence of lateral ankle sprain in very active individuals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. How to Care for a Sprained Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... needed to repair the damage, especially in competitive athletes. For severe ankle sprains, your doctor may also ... includes resting, protecting and reducing swelling of your injured ankle. Phase II includes restoring your ankle's flexibility, ...

  8. Assessment of functional treatment versus plaster of Paris in the treatment of grade 1 and 2 lateral ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Muhammad; Rahimnajjad, Muhammad Kazim; Rahimnajjad, Nasir Ali; Idrees, Zaki; Shah, Ghazanfar Ali; Abbas, Ghulam

    2015-03-01

    Despite the common occurrence of ankle sprains, no treatment is considered to be the gold standard for the management of such sprains. We assessed functional treatment versus plaster of Paris (POP) for the treatment of lateral ankle sprains, with pain and function employed as the outcome measures. 126 Patients were eligible for inclusion. They were assigned to either the functional treatment Tubigrip (TG) group or the POP group after applying block randomization. Characteristics such as age, dominant ankle, and gender were assessed at baseline. Pain and functional assessments were done using the visual analog scale (VAS) and the Karlsson score (KS) at baseline (at the start of the study) and during the 2nd and 6th weeks, respectively. Data on other subjective parameters, such as the number of painkillers used, the number of days taken off work, and the number of sleepless nights, were requested from the patients at the end of the study. SPSS version 16 was used for analysis, and p < 0.05 was taken to indicate significance. 60 Patients completed the trial in each group. The mean ages were 28.77 ± 6.72 in the TG group and 29.83 ± 6.30 in the POP group (p = 0.034). There was a slight female predominance. Right and left ankles were equally involved in the TG group, while left ankles were mainly involved in the POP group. Mean differences in VAS and KS between the two groups were statistically significant at the end of the study. The mean number of painkillers used by the patients in the TG group was higher than the number used in the POP group (p < 0.001). The mean number of days taken off work was 4.18 ± 1.73 days in the TG group, and 6.25 ± 2.73 days in the POP group (p < 0.001). The mean number of sleepless nights was higher in the POP group. The results of our study indicate that functional treatment provides better functional support and pain reduction than a below-knee POP cast. Level I.

  9. MIDFOOT AND FOREFOOT INVOLVEMENT IN LATERAL ANKLE SPRAINS AND CHRONIC ANKLE INSTABILITY. PART 1: ANATOMY AND BIOMECHANICS.

    PubMed

    Fraser, John J; Feger, Mark A; Hertel, Jay

    2016-12-01

    The modern human foot is the culmination of more than five million years of evolution. The ankle-foot complex absorbs forces during loading, accommodates uneven surfaces, and acts as a lever for efficient propulsion. The ankle-foot complex has six independent functional segments that should be understood for proper assessment and treatment of foot and ankle injuries: the shank, rearfoot, midfoot, lateral forefoot, and the medial forefoot. The compliance of the individual segments of the foot is dependent on velocity, task, and active and passive coupling mechanisms within each of the foot segments. It is also important to understand the passive, active, and neural subsystems that are functionally intertwined to provide structure and control to the multisegmented foot. The purpose of the first part of this clinical commentary and current concepts review was to examine foot and ankle anatomy, detail the roles of the intrinsic and extrinsic foot and ankle musculature from a multisegmented foot perspective, and discuss the biomechanics of the ankle-foot complex during function. The interplay of segmental joint mobility, afferent and efferent sensorimotor function, and movement and stabilization provided by the extrinsic and intrinsic musculature is required to coordinate and execute the complex kinematic movements in the ankle-foot complex during propulsion.

  10. MIDFOOT AND FOREFOOT INVOLVEMENT IN LATERAL ANKLE SPRAINS AND CHRONIC ANKLE INSTABILITY. PART 1: ANATOMY AND BIOMECHANICS

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Mark A.; Hertel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The modern human foot is the culmination of more than five million years of evolution. The ankle-foot complex absorbs forces during loading, accommodates uneven surfaces, and acts as a lever for efficient propulsion. The ankle-foot complex has six independent functional segments that should be understood for proper assessment and treatment of foot and ankle injuries: the shank, rearfoot, midfoot, lateral forefoot, and the medial forefoot. The compliance of the individual segments of the foot is dependent on velocity, task, and active and passive coupling mechanisms within each of the foot segments. It is also important to understand the passive, active, and neural subsystems that are functionally intertwined to provide structure and control to the multisegmented foot. The purpose of the first part of this clinical commentary and current concepts review was to examine foot and ankle anatomy, detail the roles of the intrinsic and extrinsic foot and ankle musculature from a multisegmented foot perspective, and discuss the biomechanics of the ankle-foot complex during function. The interplay of segmental joint mobility, afferent and efferent sensorimotor function, and movement and stabilization provided by the extrinsic and intrinsic musculature is required to coordinate and execute the complex kinematic movements in the ankle-foot complex during propulsion. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:27904801

  11. Ankle sprain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... help to ease pain and swelling. You can buy these medicines without a prescription. DO NOT use ... easily. Your ankle is increasingly discolored (red or black and blue), or it becomes numb or tingly. ...

  12. The Effects of Kinesiotape Applied to the Lateral Aspect of the Ankle: Relevance to Ankle Sprains – A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brendan; Bialocerkowski, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify, evaluate and synthesise evidence on the effect of kinesiotape applied to the lateral aspect of the ankle, through a systematic review of quantitative studies. Data Sources A search for quantitative studies was undertaken using key terms of “kinesiotape” and “ankle” in seven electronic databases, using the maximum date ranges. Databases included: the Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Medline, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science. Study Selection Database hits were evaluated against explicit inclusion criteria. From 107 database hits, 8 quantitative studies were included. Data Extraction Two independent reviewers appraised the methodological rigour of the studies using the McMaster Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies. Data were extracted on participant characteristics, kinesiotape parameters, comparison interventions, outcome measures and findings. Data Syntheses Most studies (n=7) had good to very good methodological rigour. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity in participants, interventions and outcome measures. No adverse events were reported. Kinesiotape may produce different effects in healthy and injured ankles. In healthy ankles, kinesiotape may increase postural control, whereas in injured ankles it may improve proprioception, plantarflexor endurance and the performance of activities. These trends were identified from a small body of evidence including 276 participants. Conclusions It is recommended that kinesiotape may be used in clinical practice to prevent lateral ankle injuries (through its effects on postural control) and manage lateral ankle injuries due to its positive effects on proprioception, muscle endurance and activity performance. It appears that kinesiotape may not provide sufficient mechanical support to improve postural control in unstable ankles. Adverse events associated with kinseiotape are unlikely. PMID

  13. Incidence and Cost of Ankle Sprains in United States Emergency Departments.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shweta; Thomas, Abbey C; Noone, Joshua M; Blanchette, Christopher M; Wikstrom, Erik A

    Ankle sprains represent a common injury in emergency departments, but little is known about common complications, procedures, and charges associated with ankle sprains in emergency departments. There will be a higher incidence of ankle sprains among younger populations (≤25 years old) and in female patients. Complications and procedures will differ between ankle sprain types. Lateral ankle sprains will have lower health care charges relative to medial and high ankle sprains. Descriptive epidemiological study. Level 3. A cross-sectional study of the 2010 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample was conducted. Outcomes such as charges, complications, and procedures were compared using propensity score matching between lateral and medial as well as lateral and high ankle sprains. The sample contained 225,114 ankle sprains. Female patients sustained more lateral ankle sprains (57%). After propensity score adjustment, lateral sprains incurred greater charges than medial ankle sprains (median [interquartile range], $1008 [$702-$1408] vs $914 [$741-$1108]; P < 0.01). Among complications, pain in the limb (1.92% vs 0.52%, P = 0.03), sprain of the foot (2.96% vs 0.70%, P < 0.01), and abrasion of the hip/leg (1.57% vs 0.35%, P = 0.03) were more common in lateral than medial ankle sprain events. Among procedures, medial ankle sprains were more likely to include diagnostic radiology (97.91% vs 83.62%, P < 0.01) and less likely to include medications than lateral ankle sprains (0.87% vs 2.79%, P < 0.01). Hospitalizations were more common following high ankle sprains than lateral ankle sprains (24 [6.06%] vs 1 [0.25%], P < 0.01). Ankle sprain emergency department visits account for significant health care charges in the United States. Age- and sex-related differences persist among the types of ankle sprains. The health care charges associated with ankle sprains indicate the need for additional preventive measures. There are age- and sex-related differences in the prevalence of

  14. Study protocol: the effect of whole body vibration on acute unilateral unstable lateral ankle sprain- a biphasic randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Baumbach, Sebastian Felix; Fasser, Mariette; Polzer, Hans; Sieb, Michael; Regauer, Markus; Mutschler, Wolf; Schieker, Matthias; Blauth, Michael

    2013-01-14

    Ankle sprains often result in ankle instability, which is most likely caused by damage to passive structures and neuromuscular impairment. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a neuromuscular training method improving those impaired neurologic parameters. The aim of this study is to compare the current gold standard functional treatment to functional treatment plus WBV in patients with acute unilateral unstable inversion ankle sprains. 60 patients, aged 18-40 years, presenting with an isolated, unilateral, acute unstable inversion ankle sprain will be included in this bicentric, biphasic, randomized controlled trial. Samples will be randomized by envelope drawing. All patients will be allowed early mobilization and pain-dependent weight bearing, limited functional immobilization by orthosis, PRICE, NSARDs as well as home and supervised physiotherapy. Supervised physical therapy will take place twice a week, for 30 minutes for a period of 6 weeks, following a standardized intervention protocol. During supervised physical therapy, the intervention group will perform exercises similar to those of the control group, on a side-alternating sinusoidal vibration platform. Two time-dependent primary outcome parameters will be assessed: short-term outcome after six weeks will be postural control quantified by the sway index; mid-term outcome after one year will be assessed by subjective instability, defined by the presence of giving-way attacks. Secondary outcome parameters include: return to pre-injury level of activities, residual pain, recurrence, objective instability, energy/coordination, Foot and Ankle Disability Index and EQ 5D. This is the first trial investigating the effects of WBV in patients with acute soft tissue injury. Inversion ankle sprains often result in ankle instability, which is most likely due to damage of neurological structures. Due to its unique, frequency dependent, influence on various neuromuscular parameters, WBV is a promising treatment method for

  15. Study protocol: the effect of whole body vibration on acute unilateral unstable lateral ankle sprain- a biphasic randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankle sprains often result in ankle instability, which is most likely caused by damage to passive structures and neuromuscular impairment. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a neuromuscular training method improving those impaired neurologic parameters. The aim of this study is to compare the current gold standard functional treatment to functional treatment plus WBV in patients with acute unilateral unstable inversion ankle sprains. Methods/Design 60 patients, aged 18–40 years, presenting with an isolated, unilateral, acute unstable inversion ankle sprain will be included in this bicentric, biphasic, randomized controlled trial. Samples will be randomized by envelope drawing. All patients will be allowed early mobilization and pain-dependent weight bearing, limited functional immobilization by orthosis, PRICE, NSARDs as well as home and supervised physiotherapy. Supervised physical therapy will take place twice a week, for 30 minutes for a period of 6 weeks, following a standardized intervention protocol. During supervised physical therapy, the intervention group will perform exercises similar to those of the control group, on a side-alternating sinusoidal vibration platform. Two time-dependent primary outcome parameters will be assessed: short-term outcome after six weeks will be postural control quantified by the sway index; mid-term outcome after one year will be assessed by subjective instability, defined by the presence of giving-way attacks. Secondary outcome parameters include: return to pre-injury level of activities, residual pain, recurrence, objective instability, energy/coordination, Foot and Ankle Disability Index and EQ 5D. Discussion This is the first trial investigating the effects of WBV in patients with acute soft tissue injury. Inversion ankle sprains often result in ankle instability, which is most likely due to damage of neurological structures. Due to its unique, frequency dependent, influence on various neuromuscular parameters, WBV

  16. Managing ankle ligament sprains and tears: current opinion

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Ryan P; Martin, RobRoy L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a current review of pathoanatomical features, differential diagnosis, objective assessment, intervention, and clinical course associated with managing lateral ankle ligament sprains. Proper diagnosis and identification of affected structures should be obtained through history and objective assessment. From this information, an individualized evidence-based intervention plan can be developed to enable recovery while decreasing the risk of reinjury. An appropriate evaluation is needed not only to determine the correct diagnosis but also to allow for grading and determining the prognosis of the injury in those with an acute lateral ankle sprain. Examination should include an assessment of impairments as well as a measure of activity and participation. Evidence-based interventions for those with an acute lateral ankle sprain should include weight bearing with bracing, manual therapy, progressive therapeutic exercises, and cryotherapy. For those with chronic ankle instability (CAI), interventions should include manual therapy and a comprehensive rehabilitation program. It is essential to understand the normal clinical course for athletes who sustain a lateral ankle sprain as well as risk factors for an acute injury and CAI. Risk factors for both an acute lateral ankle sprain and CAI include not using an external support and not participating in an appropriate exercise program. Incorporating the latest evidence-based rehabilitation techniques provides the best course of treatment for athletes with an acute ankle sprain or CAI. PMID:27042147

  17. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tp; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick Sh; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-07-30

    This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing - a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms). Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60-90 ms). The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41-45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative. Immobilization should not be

  18. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Daniel TP; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick SH; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms). Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms). The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative. Immobilization should not

  19. Acute ankle sprain: conservative or surgical approach?

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohrej, Omar A.; Al-Kenani, Nader S.

    2016-01-01

    Ankle sprains fall into two main categories: acute ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability, which are among the most common recurrent injuries during occupational activities, athletic events, training and army service. Acute ankle sprain is usually managed conservatively and functional rehabilitation failure by conservative treatment leads to development of chronic ankle instability, which most often requires surgical intervention. Enhancing the in-depth knowledge of the ankle anatomy, biomechanics and pathology helps greatly in deciding the management options. Cite this article: Al-Mohrej OA, Al-Kenani NS. Acute ankle sprain: conservative or surgical approach? EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:34-44. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000010. PMID:28461926

  20. TEMPER: an acronym for ankle sprain rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Rzonca, E C; Lue, B Y

    1988-07-01

    As has been previously discussed, the incidence and resultant associated disabilities of ankle sprains have been well documented in the literature. The staggering statistics on long-term disability show that there is no such thing as a simple ankle sprain. The degree of disability is related to the extent of the initial injury as well as the follow-up medical care provided. It is this fact that requires a complete understanding of the injury as well as a proper treatment and rehabilitation program. One of the reasons cited for the long-term disability or lack of consistently good results in treating ankle sprains is the lack of uniformity in treatment. One possible reason is the lack of agreement in diagnostic techniques as well as the end diagnosis of a particular grade of ankle sprain. If a sprain is managed correctly, resultant disability will be kept to a minimum. A proper rehabilitation program may be the most important factor in preventing chronic instability. The acronym RICE falls short of complete ankle management. RICE primarily addresses the ankle edema. Thus, the patient's ankle is only partially rehabilitated. A rational approach to the management of ankle sprains is given. Upon reviewing a complete protocol for ankle sprain rehabilitation, the acronym TEMPER can be used judiciously to remember the key steps in the treatment plan. Through the use of this acronym, one can institute a complete rehabilitation program.

  1. Treatment options for ankle ligament sprain.

    PubMed

    Slade, Harmony

    2012-02-01

    There is a wealth of literature on the management of ankle sprains, but the quality of evidence is variable and conclusions diverge. Practice in emergency departments (EDs) also varies and in some cases does not reflect the evidence base. This article reviews some of the most recent research on the subject and suggests air-stirrup ankle braces can be used in EDs for management of moderate and severe ankle sprains.

  2. Is balance impaired by recurrent sprained ankle?

    PubMed Central

    Isakov, E; Mizrahi, J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate uninjured and recurrent sprained ankles during single leg standing, both with and without visual input, and the contribution of related proprioceptive feedback in this event. METHODS: A force measuring system was used for monitoring reaction forces in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions during single leg standing. Differences between selected variables obtained in the uninjured and sprained ankles were analysed using two way analysis of variance. RESULTS: Foot-ground reaction forces in both anteroposterior and mediolateral directions were the same in normal and sprained ankles of each subject while standing with either open or closed eyes. However, standing with closed eyes, irrespective of the ankle status, always produced significantly higher reaction forces than those obtained with open eyes (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The amount of postural sway during single leg standing is similar in the chronically sprained and the uninjured ankle joint. Images p66-a PMID:9132216

  3. The relationship between self-reported and clinical measures and the number of days to return to sport following acute lateral ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Cross, Kevin M; Worrell, Teddy W; Leslie, James E; Van Veld, K Renee

    2002-01-01

    This is a prospective observational study. To determine the relationship of self-reported and clinical measures to the number of days to return to sport following acute lateral ankle sprains. In order to direct rehabilitation, injury classification schemes should include self-reported and clinical measures that help prognosticate the number of days to return to sport (DAYS). Twenty Division II college athletes (7 men, 13 women; mean age = 19.2 +/- 1.1 years) were assessed following an acute lateral ankle sprain and upon return to sport. Athletes were assessed by three self-reported measures: global function question, Short Form-36 Physical Function scale (SF36PF), visual analog pain scale, and four clinical measures: ankle active range of motion (AROM), ankle dorsiflexion strength, ankle plantar flexion strength, ambulation status. Simple regression, multiple regression, and effect sizes (ES) were used to analyze these data. The simple regression revealed a statistically significant relationship between DAYS and the global function question (r2 = .22), the SF36PF (r2 = .28), and the patient's ambulation status (r2 = .27). A multiple regression using these three variables in combination was also statistically significant (P = .015) and explained approximately one-third of the variance in DAYS, (r2 = .37). All dependent variables revealed large or moderate ES. Self-reported functional measures in conjunction with the athlete's ambulation status are important factors in predicting the number of days to return to sport following acute lateral ankle sprains. Further research using large sample sizes and other clinical and functional measures is necessary.

  4. Functional Anatomy, Pathomechanics, and Pathophysiology of Lateral Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, Jay

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe the functional anatomy of the ankle complex as it relates to lateral ankle instability and to describe the pathomechanics and pathophysiology of acute lateral ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability. Data Sources: I searched MEDLINE (1985–2001) and CINAHL (1982–2001) using the key words ankle sprain and ankle instability. Data Synthesis: Lateral ankle sprains are among the most common injuries incurred during sports participation. The ankle functions as a complex with contributions from the talocrural, subtalar, and inferior tibiofibular joints. Each of these joints must be considered in the pathomechanics and pathophysiology of lateral ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability. Lateral ankle sprains typically occur when the rearfoot undergoes excessive supination on an externally rotated lower leg. Recurrent ankle sprain is extremely common; in fact, the most common predisposition to suffering a sprain is the history of having suffered a previous ankle sprain. Chronic ankle instability may be due to mechanical instability, functional instability, or most likely, a combination of these 2 phenomena. Mechanical instability may be due to specific insufficiencies such as pathologic laxity, arthrokinematic changes, synovial irritation, or degenerative changes. Functional instability is caused by insufficiencies in proprioception and neuromuscular control. Conclusions/Recommendations: Lateral ankle sprains are often inadequately treated, resulting in frequent recurrence of ankle sprains. Appreciation of the complex anatomy and mechanics of the ankle joint and the pathomechanics and pathophysiology related to acute and chronic ankle instability is integral to the process of effectively evaluating and treating ankle injuries. PMID:12937557

  5. Assessment of acute foot and ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Lynam, Louise

    2006-07-01

    Acute ankle and foot trauma is a regular emergency presentation and prompt strategic assessment skills are required to enable nurses to categorise and prioritise these injuries appropriately. This article provides background information on the anatomy and physiology of the lower limb to help nurses to identify various grades of ankle sprain as well as injuries that are limb threatening

  6. Rehabilitation of Syndesmotic (High) Ankle Sprains

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Glenn N.; Allen, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: High ankle sprains are common in athletes who play contact sports. Most high ankle sprains are treated nonsurgically with a rehabilitation program. Evidence Acquisition: All years of PUBMED, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL PLUS, SPORTDiscuss, Google Scholar, and Web of Science were searched to August 2010, cross-referencing existing publications. Keywords included syndesmosis ankle sprain or high ankle sprain and the following terms: rehabilitation, treatment, cryotherapy, braces, orthosis, therapeutic modalities, joint mobilization, massage, pain, pain medications, TENS (ie, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation), acupuncture, aquatic therapy, strength, neuromuscular training, perturbation training, and outcomes. Results: Level of evidence, 5. A 3-phase rehabilitation program is described. The acute phase is directed at protecting the joint while minimizing pain, inflammation, muscle weakness, and loss of motion. Most patients are treated with some form of immobilization and have weightbearing restrictions. A range of therapeutic modalities are used to minimize pain and inflammation. Gentle mobilization and resistance exercises are used to gain mobility and maintain muscle size and strength. The subacute phase is directed at normalizing range of motion, strength, and function in activities of daily living. Progressive mobilization and strengthening are hallmarks of this phase. Neuromuscular training is begun and becomes the central component of rehabilitation. The advanced training phase focuses on preparing the patient for return to sports participation. Perturbation of support surfaces, agility drills, plyometrics, and sport-specific training are central components of this phase. Conclusion: The rehabilitation guidelines discussed may assist clinicians in managing syndesmotic ankle sprains. PMID:23015976

  7. [Ankle sprain. Management of recent lesions and prevention of secondary instability].

    PubMed

    Popovic, N; Gillet, P

    2005-10-01

    Ankle sprains are among the most common musculoskeletal injuries. The vast majority of these injuries are lateral ligament sprains, resulting from inversion of the plantar-flexed foot. Initial management should include rest, ice, compression and elevation. Functional treatment proved to provide the quickest recovery and an earlier return to work without compromising the lateral mechanical stability. Surgical management of acute ankle sprains is rarely, if ever, indicated. Patients who continue to sustain multiple recurrent inversion sprains despite a supervised rehabilitation program aimed at improving proprioception and strengthening of the peroneal muscles are candidate for surgical reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments.

  8. Isolated posterior high ankle sprain: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Botchu, Rajesh; Allen, Patricia; Rennie, Winston J

    2013-12-01

    High ankle sprains are difficult to diagnose and account for 10% of all ankle sprains. A high index of suspicion is essential for diagnosis. High ankle sprains are managed symptomatically, with prolonged rehabilitation. The posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament is the strongest syndesmotic ligament; isolated injury of it is rare. We present 3 cases of isolated posterior high ankle sprain and discuss the relevant anatomy, mechanism of injury, and management.

  9. Laboratory Measures of Postural Control During the Star Excursion Balance Test After Acute First-Time Lateral Ankle Sprain

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris M.; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-01-01

    Context No researchers, to our knowledge, have investigated the immediate postinjury-movement strategies associated with acute first-time lateral ankle sprain (LAS) as quantified by center of pressure (COP) and kinematic analyses during performance of the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT). Objective To analyze the kinematic and COP patterns of a group with acute first-time LAS and a noninjured control group during performance of the SEBT. Design Case-control study. Setting University biomechanics laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 81 participants with acute first-time LAS (53 men, 28 women; age = 23.22 ± 4.93 years, height = 1.73 ± 0.09 m, mass = 75.72 ± 13.86 kg) and 19 noninjured controls (15 men, 4 women; age = 22.53 ± 1.68 years, height = 1.74 ± 0.08 m, mass = 71.55 ± 11.31 kg). Intervention Participants performed the anterior (ANT), posterolateral (PL), and posteromedial (PM) reach directions of the SEBT. Main Outcome Measure(s) We assessed 3-dimensional kinematics of the lower extremity joints and associated fractal dimension (FD) of the COP path during performance of the SEBT. Results The LAS group had decreased normalized reach distances in the ANT, PL, and PM directions when compared with the control group on their injured (ANT: 58.16% ± 6.86% versus 64.86% ± 5.99%; PL: 85.64% ± 10.62% versus 101.14% ± 8.39%; PM: 94.89% ± 9.26% versus 107.29 ± 6.02%) and noninjured (ANT: 60.98% ± 6.74% versus 64.76% ± 5.02%; PL: 88.95% ± 11.45% versus 102.36% ± 8.53%; PM: 97.13% ± 8.76% versus 106.62% ± 5.78%) limbs (P < .01). This observation was associated with altered temporal sagittal-plane kinematic profiles throughout each reach attempt and at the point of maximum reach (P < .05). This result was associated with a reduced FD of the COP path for each reach direction on the injured limb only (P < .05). Conclusions Acute first-time LAS was associated with bilateral deficits in postural control, as evidenced by the bilateral

  10. An epidemiological survey on ankle sprain.

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, M S; Chan, K M; So, C H; Yuan, W Y

    1994-01-01

    Ankle sprain is a common sports injury and is often regarded as trivial by athletes and coaches. This epidemiological study was conducted among three categories of Hong Kong Chinese athletes: national teams, competitive athletes and recreational athletes. This study shows that as much as 73% of all athletes had recurrent ankle sprain and 59% of these athletes had significant disability and residual symptoms which led to impairment of their athletic performance. This study indicates that a proper approach towards injury prevention and a comprehensive rehabilitation programme are required. PMID:7921910

  11. Acute ankle sprain: is there a best support?

    PubMed

    O'connor, Gabrielle; Martin, Anthony J

    2011-08-01

    Acute lateral ankle sprain accounts for 85% of all sprains, being generally accepted as the most common sports-related ligamentous injury. There is a lack of consensus about the optimal management of these injuries despite their frequency. The time-honoured mantra of rest, ice, elevation and compression is still commonly used, even though the current evidence for compression is conflicting. A prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was carried out in the emergency department of a regional hospital in Ireland to compare outcomes, in terms of ankle function, pain improvement and return-to-work times, in adults presenting within 24 h of first-time acute lateral ankle sprain, among three external supports. We found no statistically significant differences among all three treatments in terms of ankle joint function, using the Karlsson ankle function scale, at 10 or 30-days follow-up. There was a tendency for Elastoplast bandaging to provide better average ankle function at both time points, when compared with double tubigrip and no support. Participants returned to work an average 2 days earlier, if treated with Elastoplast. This study found no statistically significant difference in ankle function between double tubigrip bandage, Elastoplast bandage and no support at 10 or 30-days follow-up.

  12. Acute Tears of the Tibialis Posterior Tendon Following Ankle Sprain.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Lyle T; Dunaway, Linda J; Lundeen, Gregory A

    2017-07-01

    Traumatic tears of the tibialis posterior (TP) tendon following an ankle sprain are rare. The purpose of this study was to report our case series of TP tendon tears following an ankle sprain. Patients with persistent TP tendon pain after an ankle sprain were retrospectively identified over a 4-year period and reviewed. A comparison of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) interpretations by a radiologist and surgeon was made. Patients failing conservative management underwent operative repair of the TP tendon tear and concomitant pathology. Failure of the index surgery was defined as TP tendinosis, which was treated with excision and flexor digitorum longus tendon transfer. Outcomes were measured with the Foot Function Index (FFI) and American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot scores. Thirteen patients were found to have a TP tendon tear following an ankle sprain. The incidence for TP tears with sprains presented to our clinic was 1.04%. MRI identified TP tendon pathology in 4 patients by a radiologist review and in 11 patients by a surgeon review. The most common concomitant pathology was a talar osteochondral defect in 13 of 13 patients and ligament instability in 12 of 13 patients (5/13 lateral, 3/13 medial, 4/13 multidirectional instability). Four of 13 patients failed the index surgery. Of the 9 remaining patients, 4 had clinical follow-up at an average of 4.6 years postoperatively. The average FFI subscale scores were the following: pain, 40.4; disability, 28.9; and activity, 23.6. The average AOFAS hindfoot score was 68.8. Despite being rare, a TP tendon tear should be included in the differential diagnosis for persistent medial-sided pain following an ankle sprain. MRI findings can be subtle. Associated pathology was very common and likely confounded the diagnosis and outcomes. Patients should be counseled on the possibility of poor outcomes and long-term pain. Level IV, case series.

  13. An ankle protocol for second-degree ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, M L

    1993-12-01

    Returning to full activity is of primary concern for the injured patient with a second-degree ankle sprain. This is especially true of a member of the United States Marine Corps. Unfortunately, many patients are not referred to physical therapy for comprehensive management of acute ankle sprains. An ankle protocol based on previous clinical experience was developed which included an acute and rehabilitative phase. An air stirrup orthosis was used as an adjunct to therapy to resume activities safely. This combination allowed Marines to return to full duty in less than 2 weeks.

  14. Intrinsic predictive factors for ankle sprain in active university students: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    de Noronha, M; França, L C; Haupenthal, A; Nunes, G S

    2013-10-01

    The ankle is the joint most affected among the sports-related injuries. The current study investigated whether certain intrinsic factors could predict ankle sprains in active students. The 125 participants were submitted to a baseline assessment in a single session were then followed-up for 52 weeks regarding the occurrence of sprain. The baseline assessment were performed in both ankles and included the questionnaire Cumberland ankle instability tool - Portuguese, the foot lift test, dorsiflexion range of motion, Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT), the side recognition task, body mass index, and history of previous sprain. Two groups were used for analysis: one with those who suffered an ankle sprain and the other with those who did not suffer an ankle sprain. After Cox regression analysis, participants with history of previous sprain were twice as likely to suffer subsequent sprains [hazard ratio (HR) 2.21 and 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-4.57] and people with better performance on the SEBT in the postero-lateral (PL) direction were less likely to suffer a sprain (HR 0.96 and 95% CI 0.92-0.99). History of previous sprain was the strongest predictive factor and a weak performance on SEBT PL was also considered a predictive factor for ankle sprains. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Therapeutic ultrasound for acute ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    van den Bekerom, Michel Pj; van der Windt, Daniëlle Awm; Ter Riet, Gerben; van der Heijden, Geert J; Bouter, Lex M

    2011-06-15

    Ultrasound is used in the treatment of a wide variety of musculoskeletal disorders, which include acute ankle sprains. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 1999, and previously updated in 2004. To evaluate the effects of ultrasound therapy in the treatment of acute ankle sprains. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (September 2010), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 3), MEDLINE (1966 to September 2010), EMBASE (1983 to September 2010), CINAHL (1982 to 2004), and PEDro - the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (accessed 01/06/09). We also searched the Cochrane Rehabilitation and Related Therapies Field database, reference lists of articles, and contacted colleagues.The WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform was searched for ongoing trials. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials were included if the following conditions were met: at least one study group was treated with therapeutic ultrasound; participants had acute lateral ankle sprains; and outcome measures included general improvement, pain, swelling, functional disability, or range of motion. Two authors independently performed study selection, and assessed the risk of bias and extracted data. Risk ratios and risk differences together with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for dichotomous outcomes and mean differences together with 95% confidence intervals for continuous outcome measures. Limited pooling of data was undertaken where there was clinical homogeneity in terms of participants, treatments, outcomes, and follow-up time points. Six trials were included, involving 606 participants. Five trials included comparisons of ultrasound therapy with sham ultrasound; and three trials included single comparisons of ultrasound with three other treatments. The assessment of risk of bias was hampered by poor reporting of trial methods and results. None of the five placebo

  16. The Prevalence of Selected Intrinsic Risk Factors for Ankle Sprain Among Elite Football and Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Halabchi, Farzin; Angoorani, Hooman; Mirshahi, Maryam; Pourgharib Shahi, Mohammad Hosein; Mansournia, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Lateral ankle sprains (LAS) are among the most common sports- related injuries and the reinjury rate is very high. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of some intrinsic risk factors among professional football and basketball players with or without history of acute or recurrent ankle sprain. Patients and Methods One hundred and six professional football and basketball players who were referred for pre-participation examinations were recruited in this study. Prepared checklist was completed for each participant. Athletes were asked for any history of previous ankle sprain and the severity (based of self-description of signs and symptoms by the athlete), level and number of injuries in the last two years. All players were assessed for measures of foot posture index- 6, foot length and width, Beighton generalized joint laxity score, anterior drawer and talar tilt tests, star excursion and single leg balance tests and goniometric assessment of ankle plantarflexion, ankle dorsiflexion and first metatarsophalangeal dorsiflexion. Results Forty eight basketball players (45.3%) and 58 football players (54.7%) with mean (SD) age of 19.8 (4.5) years participated. About 58.5% and 14.2% of athletes had a history of ankle sprain and recurrent sprain in at least one extremity, respectively. Sprains were more prevalent in basketball players and in dominant leg. There was no significant difference in assessed risk factors between athletes with and without history of ankle sprain, except for positive single leg balance test which was more prevalent in athletes with history of ankle sprain and also for positive talar tilt test and decreased ankle plantarflexion range of motion in acute and recurrent injury of left ankle. Conclusions Some intrinsic risk factors including lateral ankle ligaments laxity, balance and ankle plantarflexion seem to be related to acute or recurrent LAS in athletes. Further research is needed to reveal the role of different

  17. Adherence and effectiveness of rehabilitation in acute ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Guillodo, Y; Le Goff, A; Saraux, A

    2011-06-01

    To estimate adherence to and effectiveness of rehabilitation after acute ankle sprain. Patients with acute ankle sprain attending four emergency departments were recruited between February and July 2009. After the initial examination (classification of the severity of the sprain), each patient received an Aircast(®) ankle brace and the same, standardized rehabilitation program. Between two and three months later; the patient was contacted by phone (always by the same investigator) in order to find out whether he/she had performed the prescribed rehabilitation, establish whether the physiotherapist had complied with the prescribed rehabilitation programme and assess subjective recovery. If a patient failed to respond to three phone calls, he/she was excluded from the study. Of the 245 patients initially included, 111 (67 men and 44 women; 17 mild sprains, 67 moderate sprains and 27 severe sprains) answered the "phone questionnaire". In terms of treatment adherence by the patient, 92 patients (82.9%) performed their rehabilitation (beginning an average of 13.8 days after the injury). In terms of prescription compliance by the physiotherapist, 88 patients (95.6%) received massage, 71 (77.2%) underwent physiotherapy, 83 (90.2%) performed weight training and 87 (94.5%) received proprioceptive training. Eighty-two patients said that they had received manipulative therapy that was not part of the prescribed programme. Impact on recovery: 61 patients (55%) considered that their injury had healed (10 mild, 42 medium and nine severe sprains), whereas 50 had not healed (seven mild, 25 medium and 18 severe sprains). There was no statistically significant association between recovery and compliance with rehabilitation. However, the application of massage (p=0.004) and proprioceptive training (p=0.017) were significantly associated with recovery, while physiotherapy, weight training and manipulative therapy were not. In acute ankle sprain, adherence with rehabilitation is good

  18. [Advances on biomechanics and kinematics of sprain of ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Ankle sprains are orthopedic clinical common disease, accounting for joint ligament sprain of the first place. If treatment is not timely or appropriate, the joint pain and instability maybe develop, and even bone arthritis maybe develop. The mechanism of injury of ankle joint, anatomical basis has been fully study at present, and the diagnostic problem is very clear. Along with the development of science and technology, biological modeling and three-dimensional finite element, three-dimensional motion capture system,digital technology study, electromyographic signal study were used for the basic research of sprain of ankle. Biomechanical and kinematic study of ankle sprain has received adequate attention, combined with the mechanism research of ankle sprain,and to explore the the biomechanics and kinematics research progress of the sprain of ankle joint.

  19. Epidemiology of ankle sprain at the United States Military Academy.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Brian R; Belmont, Philip J; Cameron, Kenneth L; Deberardino, Thomas M; Owens, Brett D

    2010-04-01

    Ankle sprain is a common injury in athletic populations that results in significant time lost to injury. The incidence rates (IRs) of ankle ligament sprains are influenced by gender, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), physical conditioning, level of competition, type of sport, and athlete exposure to sport. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. A longitudinal cohort study was performed to determine the effect of risk factors for ankle sprain at the United States Military Academy between 2005 and 2007. A total 614 cadets sustained new ankle sprains during 10 511 person-years at risk, resulting in an overall IR of 58.4 per 1000 person-years. Women (96.4), compared with men (52.7), had a significantly increased rate ratio (IRR) for ankle sprain of 1.83 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.52-2.20). Men with ankle sprains had higher mean height, weight, and BMI than uninjured men (P <.001). Men with ankle sprains had higher average scores in push-ups, sit-ups, and run time than uninjured men (P <.001). Ankle sprain occurred most commonly during athletics (64.1%). Ankle sprain IR did not significantly differ between intercollegiate and intramural athletic competition after controlling for athlete-exposure (IRR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.81-1.37). The ankle sprain IRR of female compared with male intercollegiate athletes was 0.93 (95% CI, 0.67-1.32) per 1000 person-years and 1.04 (95% CI, 0.74-1.47) per 1000 athlete-exposures. The intercollegiate sports of men's rugby, women's cheerleading, and men's/women's basketball, soccer, and lacrosse had the highest ankle sprain IR. Higher mean height and weight in men, increased BMI in men, greater physical conditioning in men, and athlete exposure to selected sports were all risk factors for ankle sprain.

  20. A double blind, randomised, parallel group study on the efficacy and safety of treating acute lateral ankle sprain with oral hydrolytic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhoffs, G; Struijs, P; de Wit, C; Rahlfs, V; Zwipp, H; van Dijk, C N

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness and safety of the triple combination Phlogenzym (rutoside, bromelain, and trypsin) with double combinations, the single substances, and placebo. Design: Multinational, multicentre, double blind, randomised, parallel group design with eight groups structured according to a factorial design. Setting: Orthopaedic surgery and emergency departments in 27 European hospitals. Participants: A total of 721 patients aged 16–53 years presenting with acute unilateral sprain of the lateral ankle joint. Primary efficacy criteria: (a) Pain on walking one or two steps, as defined by the patient on a visual analogue scale. (b) The range of motion, as measured by the investigator and expressed as a sum of flexion and extension. (c) The volume of the injured ankle measured with a volometer. Results: At the primary end point at seven days, the greatest reduction in pain was in the bromelain/trypsin group (73.7%). The Phlogenzym group showed a median reduction of 60.3%, and the placebo group showed a median reduction of 73.3%. The largest increase in range of motion (median) was in the placebo group (60% change from baseline). The Phlogenzym group showed a median increase of 42.9%. The biggest decrease in swelling was in the trypsin group (3.9% change from baseline). The Phlogenzym group showed a –2.30% change from baseline and the placebo group a –2.90% change. In the subgroup analysis of patients who did not use a Caligamed brace, Phlogenzym was superior to placebo for the summarising directional test of the primary efficacy criteria (MW = 0.621; LB-CI 0.496; p = 0.029; one sided Wei-Lachin procedure). The vast majority of doctors and patients rated the tolerability of all treatments tested as very good or at least good. Conclusions: Phlogenzym was not found to be superior to the three two-drug combinations, the three single substances, or placebo for treatment of patients with acute unilateral sprain of the lateral ankle joint. The small

  1. Ankle braces effectively reduce recurrence of ankle sprains in female soccer players.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, S R; Knapik, J; Jones, B

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of ankle bracing and taping in preventing recurrencess of ankle sprains, specifically in female athletes. Varsity soccer players' medical records over a five-year period were retrospectively reviewed at a Division III women's college. Data were extracted regarding any history of ankle sprain(s), type of intervention used as prophylaxis after the ankle sprain, number of exposures, and any incidence of recurrence. All collegiate varsity soccer players who had suffered a previous sprain to either one or both ankles (38 players) were identified as subjects. Each previously injured ankle (n = 56) was considered as a case for the analysis. Ankles that had a previous sprain received one of four interventions: 1) a canvas, laced ankle brace (n = 19), 2) taping (n = 12), 3) a combination of taping and ankle bracing (n = 8), or 4) no treatment (n = 17). The four intervention groups had a total of 1717 practice exposures and 650 competitive game exposures; exposures did not differ among the 4 groups. Ankle sprain recurrence frequency was 0%, 25%, 25%, and 35% for the braced, taped, combination, and untreated groups, respectively. The recurrence incidence for the braced group was significantly lower than that of the other three groups. The ankle sprain recurrence frequency did not differ among the taped, combination, and no treatment groups. We suggest that prophylactic ankle bracing is effective in reducing the incidence of ankle sprains in female soccer players with a previous history of ankle sprains.

  2. [Ankle sprains: from diagnosis to management. the physiatric view].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Vítor; Antunes, Filipe

    2008-01-01

    Ankle injuries are the most frequently encountered injuries in clinical practice. They are often managed by general practicians, and not only by orthopaedic or physiatric physicians. This injury is usually non-complicated, but some care should be taken to assure an adequate management and to exclude severe lesions. The stability of the ankle is necessary for functional activity of lower extremity, allowing walking and participation in other high demanding activities like running or jumping. There is a constant concern in adopting the best diagnostic and treatment procedures to enhance the recovery and to prevent the chronic joint instability. According to this, there should be proposed comprehensive strategies focusing the rehabilitation view. The ankle is a complex articular structure with contributions from the talocrural, subtalar, and inferior tibiofibular joints. The full understanding of the functional anatomy and biomechanics is the first step for the evaluation of the etiologic factors. The recognition of the mechanism of injury, and the risk factors, should be carefully addressed to make an accurate diagnosis, proper management and to implement prophylactic measures, knowing that the lateral ligamentous complex is the most commonly injured. As always, diagnosis can be made taking an adequate history, performing a thorough physical examination, and when necessary, requesting complementary studies. The priority in initial assessment it's to clear out some severe complications, like fractures, that can mimic or that can be associated with ankle sprains. Although the conventional radiology is suitable for most cases, that has been greatly improved through the institution of the Ottawa Rules, in selected patients the severity of the damage is best evaluated with other imaging resources. Treatment of acute ankle sprains depends on the severity of the injury. Most acute lateral ligament injuries are best treated nonsurgically and will regain satisfactory ankle

  3. A systematic review on the treatment of acute ankle sprain: brace versus other functional treatment types.

    PubMed

    Kemler, Ellen; van de Port, Ingrid; Backx, Frank; van Dijk, C Niek

    2011-03-01

    Ankle injuries, especially ankle sprains, are a common problem in sports and medical care. Ankle sprains result in pain and absenteeism from work and/or sports participation, and can lead to physical restrictions such as ankle instability. Nowadays, treatment of ankle injury basically consists of taping the ankle. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the effectiveness of ankle braces as a treatment for acute ankle sprains compared with other types of functional treatments such as ankle tape and elastic bandages. A computerized literature search was conducted using PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Clinical Trial Register. This review includes randomized controlled trials in English, German and Dutch, published between 1990 and April 2009 that compared ankle braces as a treatment for lateral ankle sprains with other functional treatments. The inclusion criteria for this systematic review were (i) individuals (sports participants as well as non-sports participants) with an acute injury of the ankle (acute ankle sprains); (ii) use of an ankle brace as primary treatment for acute ankle sprains; (iii) control interventions including any other type of functional treatment (e.g. Tubigrip™, elastic wrap or ankle tape); and (iv) one of the following reported outcome measures: re-injuries, symptoms (pain, swelling, instability), functional outcomes and/or time to resumption of sports, daily activities and/or work. Eight studies met all inclusion criteria. Differences in outcome measures, intervention types and patient characteristics precluded pooling of the results, so best evidence syntheses were conducted. A few individual studies reported positive outcomes after treatment with an ankle brace compared with other functional methods, but our best evidence syntheses only demonstrated a better treatment result in terms of functional outcome. Other studies have suggested that ankle brace treatment is a more cost-effective method, so the use of braces after acute

  4. Acute treatment of inversion ankle sprains: immobilization versus functional treatment.

    PubMed

    Jones, Morgan H; Amendola, Annunziato S

    2007-02-01

    Inversion ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries in sports. Although these injuries are often considered minor, they can lead to persistent disability in athletes. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the effect of immobilization versus early functional treatment on time to return to preinjury activity after inversion ankle sprain. Residual subjective instability, recurrent injury, and patient satisfaction were secondary outcomes. A systematic review identified 9 randomized controlled trials. Return to preinjury activity was less with early functional treatment in 4 of 5 studies that evaluated this outcome. Subjective instability was less in 3 of 5 studies. Similarly, reinjury rate was less in 5 of 6 studies. Patient satisfaction was not substantially different in the two studies that evaluated this outcome. Limitations of the identified trials included small sample size, heterogeneity of treatment methods, and lack of standardized outcome measures. However, based on our review the current best evidence suggests a trend favoring early functional treatment over immobilization for the treatment of acute lateral ankle sprains.

  5. The epidemiology of ankle sprains in the United States.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Brian R; Owens, Brett D; Davey, Shaunette; Zacchilli, Michael A; Belmont, Philip J

    2010-10-06

    Ankle sprain has been studied in athletic cohorts, but little is known of its epidemiology in the general population. A longitudinal, prospective epidemiological database was used to determine the incidence and demographic risk factors for ankle sprains presenting to emergency departments in the United States. It was our hypothesis that ankle sprain is influenced by sex, race, age, and involvement in athletics. The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) was queried for all ankle sprain injuries presenting to emergency departments between 2002 and 2006. Incidence rate ratios were then calculated with respect to age, sex, and race. During the study period, an estimated 3,140,132 ankle sprains occurred among an at-risk population of 1,461,379,599 person-years for an incidence rate of 2.15 per 1000 person-years in the United States. The peak incidence of ankle sprain occurred between fifteen and nineteen years of age (7.2 per 1000 person-years). Males, compared with females, did not demonstrate an overall increased incidence rate ratio for ankle sprain (incidence rate ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.00 to 1.09). However, males between fifteen and twenty-four years old had a substantially higher incidence of ankle sprain than their female counterparts (incidence rate ratio, 1.53; 95% confidence interval, 1.41 to 1.66), whereas females over thirty years old had a higher incidence compared with their male counterparts (incidence rate ratio, 2.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.65 to 2.65). Compared with the Hispanic race, the black and white races were associated with substantially higher rates of ankle sprain (incidence rate ratio, 3.55 [95% confidence interval, 1.01 to 6.09] and 2.49 [95% confidence interval, 1.01 to 3.97], respectively). Nearly half of all ankle sprains (49.3%) occurred during athletic activity, with basketball (41.1%), football (9.3%), and soccer (7.9%) being associated with the highest percentage of ankle sprains during athletics

  6. [Lateral instability of the upper ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Harrasser, N; Eichelberg, K; Pohlig, F; Waizy, H; Toepfer, A; von Eisenhart-Rothe, R

    2016-11-01

    Because of their frequency, ankle sprains are of major clinical and economic importance. The simple sprain with uneventful healing has to be distinguished from the potentially complicated sprain which is at risk of transition to chronic ankle instability. Conservative treatment is indicated for the acute, simple ankle sprain without accompanying injuries and also in cases of chronic instability. If conservative treatment fails, good results can be achieved by anatomic ligament reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments. Arthroscopic techniques offer the advantage of joint inspection and addressing intra-articular pathologies in combination with ligament repair. Accompanying pathologies must be adequately addressed during ligament repair to avoid persistent ankle discomfort. If syndesmotic insufficiency and tibiofibular instability are suspected, the objective should be early diagnosis with MRI and surgical repair.

  7. Analgesia for people with acute ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Carter, David; Amblum-Almer, Jeshni

    2015-04-01

    Around 302,000 people with soft-tissue ankle injuries present to UK emergency departments every year (Ferran and Maffulli 2006). These patients are generally treated conservatively with analgesia, ice, compression and elevation, and rest. There is some discussion in the literature about whether or not people with these injuries should be treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), with some authors claiming that the inflammatory response following injury is part of the healing process and should not be halted. This article examines the literature on the efficacy of administering NSAIDs as the first-line drug management for ankle sprain. It also considers cost of treatment, prescribing practice and contraindications of NSAIDs.

  8. The Role of Shoe Design in Ankle Sprain Rates Among Collegiate Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Claudia K; Laudner, Kevin G; McLoda, Todd A; McCaw, Steven T

    2008-01-01

    Context: Much of the recent focus in shoe design and engineering has been on improving athletic performance. Currently, this improvement has been in the form of “cushioned column systems,” which are spring-like in design and located under the heel of the shoe in place of a conventional heel counter. Concerns have been raised about whether this design alteration has increased the incidence of ankle sprains. Objective: To examine the incidence of lateral ankle sprains in collegiate basketball players with regard to shoe design. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Certified athletic trainers at 1014 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)-affiliated schools sponsoring basketball during the 2005–2006 regular season were notified of an online questionnaire. Athletic trainers at 22 of the 1014 schools participated. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 230 basketball players (141 males, 89 females; age  =  20.2 ± 1.5 years) from NCAA Division I–III basketball programs sustained lateral ankle sprains. Main Outcome Measure(s): Ankle sprain information and type of shoe worn (cushioned column or noncushioned column) were collected via online survey. The incidence of lateral ankle sprains and type of shoes worn were compared using a chi-square analysis. Results: No difference was noted in ankle sprain incidence between groups (χ2  =  2.44, P  =  .20, relative risk  =  1.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]  =  0.32, 6.86). The incidence of ankle sprains was 1.33 per 1000 exposures in the cushioned column group (95% CI  =  0.62, 3.51) and 1.96 per 1000 exposures in the noncushioned column group (95% CI  =  0.51, 4.22). Conclusions: No increased incidence of ankle sprains was associated with shoe design. PMID:18523571

  9. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15 h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and reach distances in the Y-Balance and lunge tests were increased. [Conclusion] Repeated ankle eversion taping may be an effective treatment intervention for ankle inversion sprain. PMID:27064668

  10. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15 h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and reach distances in the Y-Balance and lunge tests were increased. [Conclusion] Repeated ankle eversion taping may be an effective treatment intervention for ankle inversion sprain.

  11. Ankle sprain: pathophysiology, predisposing factors, and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Tricia J; Wikstrom, Erik A

    2010-07-16

    With the high percentage (up to 75%) of initial lateral ankle sprains (LAS) leading to repetitive sprains and chronic symptoms, it is imperative to better understand how best to treat and rehabilitate LAS events. The purpose of this paper is to review LAS pathophysiology, predisposing factors, and the current evidence regarding therapeutic modalities and exercises used in the treatment of LAS. Functional rehabilitation, early mobilization with support, is the current standard of care for LAS. However, the high percentage of reinjury occurrence and development of chronic symptoms (up to 75%) after a LAS, suggests the current standard of care may not be effective. Recent evidence has shown the need for more stringent immobilization to facilitate ligament healing and restoration of joint stability and function after a LAS. Additionally, the importance of adding adjunctive therapies, specifically joint mobilizations and balance training have been shown to improve function and decrease the incidence of reinjury after a LAS. Modifying current rehabilitation protocols to include protecting the ankle joint with stringent immobilization, and including joint mobilizations and balance training may be the first step to decreasing the incidence of short and long term ankle joint dysfunction.

  12. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain. PMID:26311991

  13. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain.

  14. Comparison of two main treatment modalities for acute ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Bilgic, Serkan; Durusu, Murat; Aliyev, Bahtiyar; Akpancar, Serkan; Ersen, Omer; Yasar, S Mehmet; Ardic, Sukru

    2015-01-01

    Acute ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries in emergency departments. Immobilization is widely accepted as the basic treatment modality for acute ankle sprains; however, immobilization method remains controversial. In this study, we aimed to compare two treatment modalities: splint and elastic bandage for the management of acute ankle sprains. This prospective study was conducted in the emergency department. Fifty-one consecutive patients who were admitted to the emergency department owing to the complaint of ankle sprain and who were treated with an elastic bandage or a splint were included in the study. After bone injury was ruled out, treatment choice was left to the on-shift physicians' discretion. The extent of edema was evaluated before and after the treatment by using a small, graduated container filled with warm water. Volume differences were calculated by immersing both lower extremities in a container filled to a constant level. Pain was evaluated using the visual analogue scale. There were 25 patients in the elastic bandage group and 26 patients in the splint group. VAS scores of these groups before and after the treatment were similar. Although edema size before and after the treatment were similar between the groups, edema size reduction was significantly more in the elastic bandage group [p=0,025]. This study showed that treatment of acute ankle sprains with an elastic bandage was more effective than splint in reducing edema. Therefore, an elastic bandage could be preferred over a splint for the treatment of acute ankle sprains.

  15. [Ankle sprain during a volleyball game].

    PubMed

    Boersma, Anton R; Munzebrock, Arvid V E

    2015-01-01

    A 27-year old woman was admitted to the emergency room after her left ankle rolled inward during a volleyball game. On physical examination a bony prominence on the lateral side of the left foot was noticeable, without neurovascular injury. An X-ray (anterior-posterior view) showed a subtalar dislocation without associated fractures.

  16. Ankle Ligament Healing After an Acute Ankle Sprain: An Evidence-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Tricia J; Hicks-Little, Charlie A

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To perform a systematic review to determine the healing time of the lateral ankle ligaments after an acute ankle sprain. Data Sources: We identified English-language research studies from 1964 to 2007 by searching MEDLINE, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), SportDiscus, and CINAHL using the terms ankle sprain, ankle rehabilitation, ankle injury, ligament healing, and immobilization. Study Selection: We selected studies that described randomized, controlled clinical trials measuring ligament laxity either objectively or subjectively immediately after injury and at least 1 more time after injury. Data Extraction: Two reviewers independently scored the 7 studies that met the inclusion criteria. Because of differences in study designs, a meta-analysis could not be performed. Effect sizes and confidence intervals could be calculated only for 1 study. The percentages of subjective and objective instability were calculated for the remaining studies. Data Synthesis: Ankle laxity improved over a period of 6 weeks to 1 year. One author showed stress talar tilt values of 16.10 ± 8.8° immediately after injury and 3.4 ± 3.6° at 3 months after injury. In 2 articles, the authors reported that positive anterior drawer tests were still present in 3% to 31% of participants at 6 months after injury. Additionally, feelings of instability affected 7% to 42% of participants up to 1 year after injury. Conclusions/Recommendations: In the studies that we examined, it took at least 6 weeks to 3 months before ligament healing occurred. However, at 6 weeks to 1 year after injury, a large percentage of participants still had objective mechanical laxity and subjective ankle instability. Direct comparison among articles is difficult because of differences in methods. More research focusing on more reliable methods of measuring ankle laxity is needed so that clinicians can know how long ligament healing takes after injury. This knowledge will help clinicians to make better

  17. Efficacy of paracetamol versus diclofenac for Grade II ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Lyrtzis, Christos; Natsis, Konstantinos; Papadopoulos, Christos; Noussios, Georgios; Papathanasiou, Efthymia

    2011-06-01

    Ankle sprains are usually treated with the RICE protocol often with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) for pain reduction. We evaluated the effect of diclofenac, an NSAID, versus paracematol in the reduction of pain and acute edema of severe ankle sprains. Ninety patients, 18 to 60 years old, with Grade II acute ankle sprains were randomized into two groups. Group A (45 patients) received for the first 10 days diclofenac 75 mg orally twice per day. Group B (45 patients) received paracetamol 500 mg orally three times per day for the same period. We evaluated ankle joint edema with the Figure-of-Eight method and with the volumetric method, as well as pain with the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) in both groups. The patients had no significant differences concerning their baseline values (p > 0.05). The ankle joint edema was decreased in both groups (p < 0.001) but there was more edema in group A than in group B at the third post-traumatic day with both measurement methods (p = 0.028/0.025). By the tenth post-traumatic day no difference was found. Pain decreased in both groups at the third day and at the tenth day (p < 0.001). According to these results, diclofenac and paracetamol had the same effect on pain reduction of ankle sprains but more acute ankle edema was present in patients who were treated with diclofenac than in patients who were treated with paracetamol.

  18. Managing ankle sprains in primary care: what is best practice? A systematic review of the last 10 years of evidence.

    PubMed

    Seah, Richard; Mani-Babu, Sivanadian

    2011-01-01

    To summarize the best available evidence in the last decade for managing ankle sprains in the community, data were collected using MEDLINE database from January 2000 to December 2009. Terms utilized: 'ankle injury primary care' (102 articles were found), 'ankle sprain primary care' (34 articles), 'ankle guidelines primary care' (25 articles), 'ankle pathways primary care' (2 articles), 'ankle sprain community' (18 articles), 'ankle sprain general practice' (22 articles), 'Cochrane review ankle' (58 articles). Of these, only 33 satisfied the inclusion criteria. The search terms identified many of the same studies. Two independent reviewers reviewed the articles. The study results and generated conclusions were extracted, discussed and finally agreed on. Ankle sprains occur commonly but their management is not always readily agreed. The Ottawa Ankle Rules are ubiquitous in the clinical pathway and can be reliably applied by emergency care physicians, primary care physicians and triage nurses. For mild-to-moderate ankle sprains, functional treatment options (which can consist of elastic bandaging, soft casting, taping or orthoses with associated coordination training) were found to be statistically better than immobilization for multiple outcome measures. For severe ankle sprains, a short period of immobilization in a below-knee cast or pneumatic brace results in a quicker recovery than tubular compression bandage alone. Lace-up supports are a more effective functional treatment than elastic bandaging and result in less persistent swelling in the short term when compared with semi-rigid ankle supports, elastic bandaging and tape. Semi-rigid orthoses and pneumatic braces provide beneficial ankle support and may prevent subsequent sprains during high-risk sporting activity. Supervised rehabilitation training in combination with conventional treatment for acute lateral ankle sprains can be beneficial, although some of the studies reviewed gave conflicting outcomes

  19. Valdecoxib provides effective pain relief following acute ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Diaz, J A; Cuervo, C; Valderrama, A M; Kohles, J

    2006-01-01

    We sought to determine whether valdecoxib is as effective as diclofenac in treating acute ankle sprain. Patients (n=202) with acute first- and second-degree ankle sprain were randomized to valdecoxib (40 mg twice daily on day 1 followed by 40 mg once daily on days 2-7) or diclofenac (75 mg twice daily). The primary efficacy end-point was the Patient's Assessment of Ankle Pain visual analogue scale (VAS, 0-100 mm) value on day 4. Valdecoxib was as efficacious as diclofenac in treating the signs and symptoms of acute ankle sprain. The mean VAS reduction in ankle pain on day 4 was not different between groups; the two-sided 95% confidence interval for the between-group difference was within the prespecified limit for non-inferiority (10 mm). There were no significant differences between groups for all secondary efficacy end-points. The two treatments were similarly effective and well tolerated for treatment of acute ankle sprain.

  20. A systematic review on ankle injury and ankle sprain in sports.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Hong, Youlian; Chan, Lap-Ki; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2007-01-01

    This article systematically reviews epidemiological studies on sports injury from 1977 to 2005 in which ankle injury was included. A total of 227 studies reporting injury pattern in 70 sports from 38 countries were included. A total of 201,600 patients were included, with 32,509 ankle injuries. Ankle injury information was available from 14,098 patients, with 11 847 ankle sprains. Results show that the ankle was the most common injured body site in 24 of 70 included sports, especially in aeroball, wall climbing, indoor volleyball, mountaineering, netball and field events in track and field. Ankle sprain was the major ankle injury in 33 of 43 sports, especially in Australian football, field hockey, handball, orienteering, scooter and squash. In sports injuries throughout the countries studied, the ankle was the second most common injured body site after the knee, and ankle sprain was the most common type of ankle injury. The incidence of ankle injury and ankle sprain was high in court games and team sports, such as rugby, soccer, volleyball, handball and basketball. This systematic review provides a summary of the epidemiology of ankle injury in sports.

  1. The initial effects of a Mulligan's mobilization with movement technique on dorsiflexion and pain in subacute ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Collins, Natalie; Teys, Pamela; Vicenzino, Bill

    2004-05-01

    Physiotherapists frequently use manipulative therapy techniques to treat dysfunction and pain resulting from ankle sprain. This study investigated whether a Mulligan's mobilization with movement (MWM) technique improves talocrural dorsiflexion, a major impairment following ankle sprain, and relieves pain in subacute populations. Fourteen subjects with subacute grade II lateral ankle sprains served as their own control in a repeated measures, double-blind randomized controlled trial that measured the initial effects of the MWM treatment on weight bearing dorsiflexion and pressure and thermal pain threshold. The subacute ankle sprain group studied displayed deficits in dorsiflexion and local pressure pain threshold in the symptomatic ankle. Significant improvements in dorsiflexion occurred initially post-MWM ( F(2,26) = 7.82, P = 0.002 ), but no significant changes in pressure or thermal pain threshold were observed after the treatment condition. Results indicate that the MWM treatment for ankle dorsiflexion has a mechanical rather than hypoalgesic effect in subacute ankle sprains. The mechanism by which this occurs requires investigation if we are to better understand the role of manipulative therapy in ankle sprain management.

  2. Evaluation and management of lateral ankle injuries.

    PubMed

    Lee, M S; Hofbauer, M H

    1999-10-01

    The diagnosis and management of lateral ankle injuries require the physician to obtain an accurate history, complete a thorough physical examination, and institute appropriate treatment protocol. Labeling all acute lateral ankle injuries as ankle sprains can lead to long-term mechanical and functional instability and chronic pain around the ankle. Appropriate and aggressive functional rehabilitation of the acute ankle limits the postinjury convalescence and need for surgical reconstruction. If surgical repair of the chronic or acute ankle is warranted, the Brostrom-Gould procedure serves as a highly successful anatomic repair. Lateral ankle tenodesing procedures also are effective; however, in most cases, the loss of rearfoot motion limits this procedure to a secondary reconstructive procedure.

  3. Isolated medial foot compartment syndrome after ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Cortina, Josep; Amat, Carles; Selga, Jordi; Corona, Pablo Salvador

    2014-03-01

    Foot compartment syndrome is a serious potential complication of foot crush injury, fractures, surgery, and vascular injury. An acute compartment syndrome isolated to the medial compartment of the foot after suffering an ankle sprain is a rare complication. We report the case of a 31-year-old man who developed a medial foot compartment syndrome after suffering a deltoid ligament rupture at ankle while playing football. The patient underwent a medial compartment fasciotomy with resolution of symptoms. Compartment syndromes of the foot are rare and have been reported to occur after severe trauma. But, there are some reports in the literature of acute exertional compartment syndrome. In our case, the compartment syndrome appeared after an ankle sprain without vascular injuries associated. Copyright © 2013 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Relationship between viscosity of the ankle joint complex and functional ankle instability for inversion ankle sprain patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Che-Yu; Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Wang, Chung-Li; Shau, Yio-Wha

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of viscosity of the ankle joint complex is a novel method to assess mechanical ankle instability. In order to further investigate the clinical significance of the method, this study intended to investigate the relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability. Cross-sectional study. 15 participants with unilateral inversion ankle sprain and 15 controls were recruited. Their ankles were further classified into stable and unstable ankles. Ankle viscosity was measured by an instrumental anterior drawer test. Severity of functional ankle instability was measured by the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. Unstable ankles were compared with stable ankles. Injured ankles were compared with uninjured ankles of both groups. The spearman's rank correlation coefficient was applied to determine the relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability in unstable ankles. There was a moderate relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability (r=-0.64, p<0.0001). Unstable ankles exhibited significantly lower viscosity (p<0.005) and more severe functional ankle instability (p<0.0001) than stable ankles. Injured ankles exhibited significantly lower viscosity and more severe functional ankle instability than uninjured ankles (p<0.0001). There was a moderate relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability. This finding suggested that, severity of functional ankle instability may be partially attributed to mechanical insufficiencies such as the degenerative changes in ankle viscosity following the inversion ankle sprain. In clinical application, measurement of ankle viscosity could be a useful tool to evaluate severity of chronic ankle instability. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The ankle meter: an instrument for evaluation of anterior talar drawer in ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Gunter

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to work out a clinical test which is possible to measure the anterior talar drawer (ATD) in patients after ankle sprain. The instrument for evaluation was called "ankle meter". The instrument consists of two plastic scales (heal scale and tibia scale). The instrument allows quantifying the results of the anterior drawing test. A total of 38 persons (16 men, 22 women) were available as control group. The persons were 28.8+/-10.1 years old. No proband had any ankle problems in his history. A total of 45 patients (25 males, 20 females) suffering from ankle sprain were included in the study. In these patients stress radiography (147.1 N) was performed to measure the ATD. In control group the clinical measured ATD was 1.7+/-1.3 mm. Measurement for detect the interobserver validity did not detect significant differences. The ATD of the joint after ankle sprain was significantly higher (8.9+/-4.3 mm). The difference between healthy and injured ankle in case of an ankle sprain was 7.4+/-4.2 mm. There was a significant correlation between clinical and radiological measured ATD (R=0.91). The results suggest that it is possible to measure the ATD exactly. The values of the clinical ATD measurement showed a good correlation with the results of stress radiography. Diligent clinical examination in combination with this special test are after this experiences sufficient to classify the severity of injury after ankle sprain.

  6. Analysis of the Effects of Normal Walking on Ankle Joint Contact Characteristics After Acute Inversion Ankle Sprain.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji Yong; Park, Kyung Soon; Seon, Jong Keun; Jeon, Insu

    2015-12-01

    To show the causal relationship between normal walking after various lateral ankle ligament (LAL) injuries caused by acute inversion ankle sprains and alterations in ankle joint contact characteristics, finite element simulations of normal walking were carried out using an intact ankle joint model and LAL injury models. A walking experiment using a volunteer with a normal ankle joint was performed to obtain the boundary conditions for the simulations and to support the appropriateness of the simulation results. Contact pressure and strain on the talus articular cartilage and anteroposterior and mediolateral translations of the talus were calculated. Ankles with ruptured anterior talofibular ligaments (ATFLs) had a higher likelihood of experiencing increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations than ATFL-deficient ankles. In particular, ankles with ruptured ATFL + calcaneofibular ligaments and all ruptured ankles had a similar likelihood as the ATFL-ruptured ankles. The push off stance phase was the most likely situation for increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations in LAL-injured ankles.

  7. Original research: long-term efficacy and safety of periarticular hyaluronic acid in acute ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Michael J; Cogliano, Anthony; Petrella, Robert J

    2009-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the long-term efficacy and safety of periarticular hyaluronic acid (HA) injections in acute lateral ankle sprain. A randomized, controlled, prospective trial in a primary sports medicine and emergency practice involved 158 competitive athletes who suffered an acute grade 1 or 2 lateral ankle sprain, and who were randomly assigned within 48 hours of injury. Patients were randomly assigned at baseline to periarticular injection with HA + standard of care (rest, ice, elevation, and compression [RICE]) or placebo injection (PL) + standard of care (RICE) treatment at baseline assessment and day 4 after injury. Follow-up was at 30, 90, and 712 days after treatment. Assessments at baseline and days 4, 8, 30, 90, and 712 included visual analogue scale (VAS) (0-10 cm) pain on weight bearing and walking 20 m, patient global assessment of ankle injury (5-point categorical scale), patient satisfaction with treatment (5-point categorical scale), time to return to pain-free and disability-free sport, recurrent ankle sprain, total number of days missing from primary sport activity, and adverse events (AEs). Time to intervention was 39 +/- 4 hours with no difference between groups. A significant reduction in VAS pain on both weight bearing and walking was observed at all follow-up assessments for HA compared with PL (P < 0.001). Time to pain-free and disability-free return to sport was 11 (+/- 8) versus 17 (+/- 8) days for HA and PL, respectively (P < 0.05). At 24 months, in the PL versus HA group, there were 2 versus 0 lower limb fractures, 16 versus 7 second ankle sprains (P < 0.05), 3 versus 1 third ankle sprains, and a significantly greater number of days missing primary sport activity (41 vs 21; P < 0.002). Significantly greater patient satisfaction was also observed for HA versus PL at all follow-up assessments. No serious AEs were recorded throughout follow-up. Periarticular HA treatment for acute ankle sprain was highly

  8. What is the clinical course of acute ankle sprains? A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, Rogier M; van Os, Anton G; Bernsen, Roos M D; Luijsterburg, Pim A; Koes, Bart W; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A

    2008-04-01

    Ankle sprains are one of the most common musculoskeletal injuries. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions and to guide management decisions, it is important to have clear insight of the course of recovery after an acute lateral ankle injury and to evaluate potential factors for nonrecovery and re-sprains. A database search was conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, PEDro, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Controlled trial register. Included were observational studies and controlled trials with adult subjects who suffered from an acute lateral ankle sprain that was conventionally treated. One of the following outcomes had to be described: pain, re-sprains, instability, or recovery. Two reviewers independently assessed the methodological quality of each included study. One reviewer extracted relevant data. In total, 31 studies were included, from which 24 studies were of high quality. There was a rapid decrease in pain reporting within the first 2 weeks. Five percent to 33% of patients still experienced pain after 1 year, while 36% to 85% reported full recovery within a period of 3 years. The risk of re-sprains ranged from 3% to 34% of the patients, and re-sprain was registered in periods ranging from 2 weeks to 96 months postinjury. There was a wide variation in subjective instability, ranging from 0% to 33% in the high-quality studies and from 7% to 53% in the low-quality studies. One study described prognostic factors and indicated that training more than 3 times a week is a prognostic factor for residual symptoms. After 1 year of follow-up, a high percentage of patients still experienced pain and subjective instability, while within a period of 3 years, as much as 34% of the patients reported at least 1 re-sprain. From 36% up to 85% of the patients reported full recovery within a period of 3 years.

  9. Responses of spinal dorsal horn neurons to foot movements in rats with a sprained ankle

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hyo; Kim, Hee Young; Chung, Kyungsoon

    2011-01-01

    Acute ankle injuries are common problems and often lead to persistent pain. To investigate the underlying mechanism of ankle sprain pain, the response properties of spinal dorsal horn neurons were examined after ankle sprain. Acute ankle sprain was induced manually by overextending the ankle of a rat hindlimb in a direction of plantarflexion and inversion. The weight-bearing ratio (WBR) of the affected foot was used as an indicator of pain. Single unit activities of dorsal horn neurons in response to plantarflexion and inversion of the foot or ankle compression were recorded from the medial part of the deep dorsal horn, laminae IV-VI, in normal and ankle-sprained rats. One day after ankle sprain, rats showed significantly reduced WBRs on the affected foot, and this reduction was partially restored by systemic morphine. The majority of deep dorsal horn neurons responded to a single ankle stimulus modality. After ankle sprain, the mean evoked response rates were significantly increased, and afterdischarges were developed in recorded dorsal horn neurons. The ankle sprain-induced enhanced evoked responses were significantly reduced by morphine, which was reversed by naltrexone. The data indicate that movement-specific dorsal horn neuron responses were enhanced after ankle sprain in a morphine-dependent manner, thus suggesting that hyperactivity of dorsal horn neurons is an underlying mechanism of pain after ankle sprain. PMID:21389306

  10. Perineural fibrosis of superficial peroneal nerve complicating ankle sprain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Acus, R W; Flanagan, J P

    1991-02-01

    The peroneal nerve is susceptible to traction injury during inversion ankle sprains. Previously, these traction lesions have been identified only at the fibular neck and popliteal fossa level. This report illustrates a previously unreported condition of perineural fibrosis of the superficial peroneal nerve at the level of the ankle following an inversion ankle sprain. Perineural fibrosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with persistent pain after ankle sprain.

  11. Tibiofemoral angle and its relation to ankle sprain occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pefanis, Nikolaos; Karagounis, Panagiotis; Tsiganos, Georgios; Armenis, Elias; Baltopoulos, Panagiotis

    2009-12-01

    The lack of a normal joint orientation generates translational or shear forces across the joint. These forces can put abnormally high strain on the cartilage and the surrounding capsuloligamentous tissues. Ankle joint structure can affect or be affected by bony malformations of the surrounding areas, including the knee and hip. The aim of the current study is to examine the possible relationship between the tibiofemoral (TFA) angle and other factors (anthropometric characteristics, medical history, and age) on the occurrence of ankle sprains because its value provides useful information for the anatomical alignment of the lower extremity. The study sample consisted of 45 high-level athletes, evenly distributed among 3 sports (basketball, soccer, and volleyball). TFA measurements were made on radiographs. The study lasted 2 years. A logistic regression was used to determine the importance of each factor on the probability in question. A significance level of P = .1 was used. The factors contributing more to an ankle sprain were a previous injury of the same type followed by body mass index (BMI) and age. On the contrary, TFA was proven to be statistically nonsignificant. When the BMI variable was substituted with body inertia propensity, a derived variable, the TFA remained statistically nonsignificant. TFA magnitude does not seem to be a determinant factor that could increase the probability of spraining an ankle.

  12. The effect of Q angle on ankle sprain occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pefanis, Nikolaos; Papaharalampous, Xenofon; Tsiganos, Georgios; Papadakou, Eugenia; Baltopoulos, Panagiotis

    2009-02-01

    The intersegmental joint forces and the structures that must resist them (articular surfaces, ligaments, and musculature) are related through anatomical alignment of the joints and skeletal system. Ankle joint structure can affect or be affected by bony malformations of the surrounding areas, including the knee and hip. The aim of the current study is to examine the possible relationship between the quadriceps (Q) angle and other factors (anthropometric characteristics, medical history, and age) on the occurrence of ankle sprains, because its value, when assessed correctly, provides useful information for the anatomical alignment of the lower extremity. The study sample consisted of 45 high-level athletes, evenly distributed among 3 sports (basketball, soccer, and volleyball). Q angle measurements were made on radiographs. The study lasted for 2 years. A logistic regression was used to determine the importance of each factor on the probability in question. A significance level of P = .1 was used. The factors contributing more to an ankle sprain were a previous injury of the same type ( P < .01) followed by body mass index (BMI; P < .10) and age (P < .10). On the contrary, Q angle was proven to be statistically nonsignificant (P > .10). The results were valid even when the BMI variable was substituted by body inertia propensity, a derived variable. The Q angle remained statistically nonsignificant ( P > .10). The Q angle magnitude does not seem to be a decisive factor that could increase the probability of spraining an ankle. The most important factors that could affect the probability of sustaining an ankle sprain are the athlete's age, anthropometric characteristics, and prior injuries.

  13. Acupressure Therapy for Acute Ankle Sprains: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingxing; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Long; Huang, Wei; Zheng, Sihua; Wang, Guanliang; Hong, Brian Y; Tang, Baoyong

    2017-06-19

    Ankle sprains occur frequently among young and active people, accounting for almost 2 million injuries per year. Previous reports suggest that acupressure therapy for acute ankle sprains may shorten the recovery time. To evaluate whether acupressure therapy can improve ankle sprain recovery compared with standard RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation) treatment. A randomized controlled trial was conducted. The study protocol was registered in the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry with the study registration number: ChiCTR-TRC-14004794. Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine Orthopedics, PLA No.60 Center Hospital, Dali, China, and Department of Orthopedics, Xixi Hospital of Hangzhou, Hangzhou China, between June 2014 and January 2016. A total of 68 patients with acute ankle sprains were assessed for study eligibility, and a total of 62 patients were included in the present study. All patients with ankle sprains seen by the Orthopedics Department within 48 hours since the time of injury were identified. Consenting patients were randomized to either (1) standard treatment (ST group), (2) standard treatment + acupressure (AP group), or (3) standard treatment + mock acupressure (mock AP group). Outcomes of interest included a volumetric measurement of the foot, ankle, and lower leg), range of ankle movement, and visual analog pain scores. The American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Score) and SF12v2 scores were used to assess quality of life. Among the 62 randomized patients, the mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) volumetric measurement of the foot, ankle, and lower leg in the AP group decreased from 185.24 (95% CI 142.80-227.67) to 62.14 (95% CI 44.03-80.25) after 3 sessions of acupressure treatment. This was a statistically significant difference (P < .01) compared with the means of ST group (119.00; 95% CI 89.14-148.86) and mock AP group (118.18; 95% CI 83.99-152.37). After the first treatment, the mean range of ankle movement, visual analog pain scores, and

  14. The Effects of Ankle Sprain on Balance Tests in Adolescent Volleyball Players with Previous History of Ankle Sprain

    PubMed Central

    Sarıal, Ceyda; Tayfur, Abdulhamıt; Kap, Beyza; Donder, Dılara; Ertuzun, Ozum Melıs; Tunay, Volga Bayrakcı

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the impact of having previous history of inversion ankle sprain on balance tests in adolescent volleyball players. Methods: Fourty-five adolescent volleyball players with mean age of 15.26±1.03 participated in our study. Twenty-nine were uninjured (control group) and sixteen had previously experienced inversion injuries on right ankle. 9 players had the injury more than than one year ago and 7 players had it before six to twelf months. Balancing abilities were evaluated by Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) and Single Limb Hurdle Test (SLHT). The fact that players with history of injury had the ankle sprain at right foot led us to perform the measurements in the control group also for the right foot. We compared the results of injured and uninjured players on both tests. Results: Uninjured players' reaching distance on right foot was found out to be significantly more than in players with ankle sprain at medial and posteromedial directions of SEBT(p<.05), whereas there were no differences detected for the other directions (p>.05). For comparing athletes' performances with SLHT, finishing time was found significantly better in uninjured players (p<.05). Conclusion: Adolescent volleyball players with history of injury show lower performance on balance tests compared to uninjured players. This demonstrates that they should be given a training including balance and stabilization programs.

  15. Population based epidemiology of ankle sprains attending accident and emergency units in the West Midlands of England, and a survey of UK practice for severe ankle sprains

    PubMed Central

    Bridgman, S; Clement, D; Downing, A; Walley, G; Phair, I; Maffulli, N

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the incidence of ankle sprains and severe ankle sprains attending accident and emergency (A&E) units; to describe current practice for severe ankle sprains in A&E units in the United Kingdom. Methods: Crude age and sex specific incidence rates were calculated for four health districts from cases ascertained from data on seven A&E clinical information systems. Case records of patients with ankle sprains at an A&E unit in another health district were audited and the proportion of severe ankle sprains calculated. UK A&E units were surveyed about their usual treatment of patients with severe ankle sprains. Results: The estimate of the crude incidence rate of ankle sprains was a minimum of 52.7 per 10 000, rising to 60.9 (95% CI 59.4 to 62.4) when figures were adjusted for the proportion of patients without a diagnostic code (13.7%). There were important age-sex differences with unadjusted rates observed from 127.8 per 10 000 (CI 115.5 to 140.0) in girls aged 10–14 years to 8.2 (CI 4.2 to 12.3) in men aged 70–74 years. As 14% of ankle sprains attending A&E were classed as severe, this would equate to 42 000 severe ankle sprains per year in the UK. In the UK wide survey, there was a response rate of 79% (211 of 266). Among the responders, Tubigrip was used routinely in 55%, below knee casts in 3%, and braces in 2%. Boots were not used routinely in any unit. Conclusion: While there is considerable variation in severe ankle sprain management in UK A&E units, most are treated with the minimal mechanical support of Tubigrip. PMID:14623833

  16. Electroacupuncture reduces the evoked responses of the spinal dorsal horn neurons in ankle-sprained rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hyo; Kim, Hee Young; Chung, Kyungsoon; Chung, Jin Mo

    2011-05-01

    Acupuncture is shown to be effective in producing analgesia in ankle sprain pain in humans and animals. To examine the underlying mechanisms of the acupuncture-induced analgesia, the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on weight-bearing forces (WBR) of the affected foot and dorsal horn neuron activities were examined in a rat model of ankle sprain. Ankle sprain was induced manually by overextending ligaments of the left ankle in the rat. Dorsal horn neuron responses to ankle movements or compression were recorded from the lumbar spinal cord using an in vivo extracellular single unit recording setup 1 day after ankle sprain. EA was applied to the SI-6 acupoint on the right forelimb (contralateral to the sprained ankle) by trains of electrical pulses (10 Hz, 1-ms pulse width, 2-mA intensity) for 30 min. After EA, WBR of the sprained foot significantly recovered and dorsal horn neuron activities were significantly suppressed in ankle-sprained rats. However, EA produced no effect in normal rats. The inhibitory effect of EA on hyperactivities of dorsal horn neurons of ankle-sprained rats was blocked by the α-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine (5 mg/kg ip) but not by the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (10 mg/kg ip). These data suggest that EA-induced analgesia in ankle sprain pain is mediated mainly by suppressing dorsal horn neuron activities through α-adrenergic descending inhibitory systems at the spinal level.

  17. Electroacupuncture reduces the evoked responses of the spinal dorsal horn neurons in ankle-sprained rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hyo; Kim, Hee Young; Chung, Kyungsoon

    2011-01-01

    Acupuncture is shown to be effective in producing analgesia in ankle sprain pain in humans and animals. To examine the underlying mechanisms of the acupuncture-induced analgesia, the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on weight-bearing forces (WBR) of the affected foot and dorsal horn neuron activities were examined in a rat model of ankle sprain. Ankle sprain was induced manually by overextending ligaments of the left ankle in the rat. Dorsal horn neuron responses to ankle movements or compression were recorded from the lumbar spinal cord using an in vivo extracellular single unit recording setup 1 day after ankle sprain. EA was applied to the SI-6 acupoint on the right forelimb (contralateral to the sprained ankle) by trains of electrical pulses (10 Hz, 1-ms pulse width, 2-mA intensity) for 30 min. After EA, WBR of the sprained foot significantly recovered and dorsal horn neuron activities were significantly suppressed in ankle-sprained rats. However, EA produced no effect in normal rats. The inhibitory effect of EA on hyperactivities of dorsal horn neurons of ankle-sprained rats was blocked by the α-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine (5 mg/kg ip) but not by the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (10 mg/kg ip). These data suggest that EA-induced analgesia in ankle sprain pain is mediated mainly by suppressing dorsal horn neuron activities through α-adrenergic descending inhibitory systems at the spinal level. PMID:21389301

  18. Closed total talar extrusion after ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Yalcin; Cift, Hakan; Ozkan, Korhan; Ozkut, Afsar; Eren, Abdullah

    2012-02-01

    Closed total talus dislocation from tibiotalar, subtalar, and talonavicular joints is a very rare injury. A 25-year-old young man, who had severe ankle distortion while walking down a flight of stairs, was brought to the emergency room complaining of a deformity and pain in his ankle joint. Roentgenographies revealed total talar body extrusion. The patient was treated urgently with open reduction in the authors' clinic. Tibialis posterior tendon might prevent closed reduction so open reduction with retraction of the tendon may be necessary.

  19. Risk of knee and ankle sprains under various weather conditions in American football.

    PubMed

    Orchard, John W; Powell, John W

    2003-07-01

    Previous studies have found conflicting relationships between type of playing surface and injury in American football but have not taken into account possible variations in the surface conditions of outdoor stadiums due to changing weather. A total of 5910 National Football League team games between 1989 and 1998 inclusive were studied to determine associations between knee and ankle sprains, playing surface, and the weather conditions on the day of the game. There was reduced risk of significant ankle sprains (at least 7-d time loss) for games in natural grass stadiums compared with domes (indoor stadiums using AstroTurf) (RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.58-0.83). There was also reduced risk of significant knee sprains on grass compared with domes (RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.66-0.91), although most of this reduction was related to cold and wet weather on grass (RR 0.66, 95% CI 0.47-0.93 compared with hot and dry weather on grass). In open (outdoor) AstroTurf stadiums, cold weather was associated with a lower risk of significant ankle sprains (RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.51-0.91), significant knee sprains (RR 0.60, 95% CI 0.47-0.77) and ACL injuries (RR 0.50, 95% CI 0.31-0.81) compared with hot weather in the same stadiums. Weather did not have any significant effects on the injury risk in domes. The ACL incidence rate was lower during the later (cooler) months of the season in open stadiums (both AstroTurf and natural grass) but not in domes. Cold weather is associated with lower knee and ankle injury risk in outdoor stadiums (both natural grass and AstroTurf), probably because of reduced shoe-surface traction.

  20. Autologous split peroneus longus lateral ankle stabilization.

    PubMed

    Budny, Adam M; Schuberth, John M

    2012-01-01

    Lateral ankle instability is a common clinical entity, and a variety of surgical procedures are available for stabilization after conservative management fails. Herein the authors reviewed outcomes after performing autologous split peroneus longus lateral ankle stabilization, using a previously described surgical technique to anatomically recreate the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments. Twenty-five consecutive patients from 2 surgeons' practices underwent reconstruction between March 2007 and January 2011 with a minimum follow-up of 12 (range 12 to 51) months (mean 29.5 months). Follow-up interviews demonstrated 92.0% good or excellent outcomes with only 8.0% rating the outcome as fair and none as poor; 92.0% had no recurrent sprains or difficulty going up or down hills; 88.0% related no difficulty with uneven ground. The authors conclude that the autologous split peroneus longus lateral ankle stabilization results in a stable ankle with a low rate of complications and high patient satisfaction.

  1. Bracing superior to neuromuscular training for the prevention of self-reported recurrent ankle sprains: a three-arm randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Kasper W; van Mechelen, Willem; Verhagen, Evert A L M

    2014-08-01

    Ankle sprain is the most common sports-related injury with a high rate of recurrence and associated costs. Recent studies have emphasised the effectiveness of both neuromuscular training and bracing for the secondary prevention of ankle sprains. To evaluate the effectiveness of combined bracing and neuromuscular training, or bracing alone, against the use of neuromuscular training on recurrences of ankle sprain after usual care. 384 athletes, aged 18-70, who had sustained a lateral ankle sprain, were included (training group n=120; brace group n=126; combi group n=138). The training group received an 8-week home-based neuromuscular training programme, the brace group received a semirigid ankle brace to be worn during all sports activities for 12 months, and the combi group received both the training programme, as well as the ankle brace, to be worn during all sports activities for 8 weeks. The main outcome measure was self-reported recurrence of the ankle sprain. During the 1-year follow-up, 69 participants (20%) reported a recurrent ankle sprain: 29 (27%) in the training group, 17 (15%) in the brace group and 23 (19%) in the combi group. The relative risk for a recurrent ankle sprain in the brace group versus the training group was 0.53 (95% CI 0.29 to 0.97). No significant differences were found for time losses or costs due to ankle sprains between the intervention groups. Bracing was superior to neuromuscular training in reducing the incidence but not the severity of self-reported recurrent ankle sprains after usual care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Prospective evaluation of syndesmotic ankle sprains without diastasis.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum, E D; Hosea, T M; Sieler, S D; Incremona, B R; Kessler, D E

    2001-01-01

    Sixty consecutive collegiate athletes with "high" ankle symptoms were prospectively evaluated over a 3-year period in an effort to better define this debilitating ankle injury. All athletes included in this study had tenderness over the distal anterior tibiofibular ligament, tenderness proximally along the interosseous membrane, and functional disability. No study subject had a fracture or frank tibia-fibula diastasis. The severity of the sprain was quantified using the interosseous "tenderness length." A standard rehabilitation protocol was followed by all patients. Athletes returned to competition when they could perform all functional testing without difficulty. Time to return to full competitive activity averaged 13.4 days. The number of days missed from competition was statistically related to the interosseous tenderness length (P = 0.0001) and to positive results on the squeeze test (P = 0.03). Fifty-three of the 60 injured athletes were evaluated at least 6 months after injury. Patients rated their outcomes as good or excellent. Six of the patients experienced occasional ankle pain and stiffness, four patients reported recurrent ankle sprains, and one patient had heterotopic ossification formation.

  3. Therapeutic Interventions for Increasing Ankle Dorsiflexion After Ankle Sprain: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Masafumi; Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Gribble, Phillip A.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Clinicians perform therapeutic interventions, such as stretching, manual therapy, electrotherapy, ultrasound, and exercises, to increase ankle dorsiflexion. However, authors of previous studies have not determined which intervention or combination of interventions is most effective. Objective: To determine the magnitude of therapeutic intervention effects on and the most effective therapeutic interventions for restoring normal ankle dorsiflexion after ankle sprain. Data Sources: We performed a comprehensive literature search in Web of Science and EBSCO HOST from 1965 to May 29, 2011, with 19 search terms related to ankle sprain, dorsiflexion, and intervention and by cross-referencing pertinent articles. Study Selection: Eligible studies had to be written in English and include the means and standard deviations of both pretreatment and posttreatment in patients with acute, subacute, or chronic ankle sprains. Outcomes of interest included various joint mobilizations, stretching, local vibration, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, electrical stimulation, and mental-relaxation interventions. Data Extraction: We extracted data on dorsiflexion improvements among various therapeutic applications by calculating Cohen d effect sizes with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and evaluated the methodologic quality using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. Data Synthesis: In total, 9 studies (PEDro score = 5.22 ± 1.92) met the inclusion criteria. Static-stretching interventions with a home exercise program had the strongest effects on increasing dorsiflexion in patients 2 weeks after acute ankle sprains (Cohen d = 1.06; 95% CI = 0.12, 2.42). The range of effect sizes for movement with mobilization on ankle dorsiflexion among individuals with recurrent ankle sprains was small (Cohen d range = 0.14 to 0.39). Conclusions: Static-stretching intervention as a part of standardized care yielded the strongest effects on dorsiflexion after acute ankle sprains. The

  4. Acupuncture for ankle sprain: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankle sprain is one of the most frequently encountered musculoskeletal injuries; however, the efficacy of acupuncture in treating ankle sprains remains uncertain. We therefore performed a systematic review to evaluate the evidence regarding acupuncture for ankle sprains. Methods We searched 15 data sources and two trial registries up to February 2012. Randomized controlled trials of acupuncture were included if they involved patients with ankle sprains and reported outcomes of symptom improvement, including pain. A Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool was used. Risk ratio (RR) or mean difference (MD) was calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in a random effects model. Subgroup analyses were performed based on acupuncture type, grade of sprain, and control type. Sensitivity analyses were also performed with respect to risk of bias, sample size, and outcomes reported. Results Seventeen trials involving 1820 participants were included. Trial quality was generally poor, with just three reporting adequate methods of randomization and only one a method of allocation concealment. Significantly more participants in acupuncture groups reported global symptom improvement compared with no acupuncture groups (RR of symptoms persisting with acupuncture = 0.56, 95% CI 0.42–0.77). However, this is probably an overestimate due to the heterogeneity (I2 = 51%) and high risk of bias of the included studies. Acupuncture as an add-on treatment also improved global symptoms compared with other treatments only, without significant variability (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.51–0.73, I2 = 1%). The benefit of acupuncture remained significant when the analysis was limited to two studies with a low risk of bias. Acupuncture was more effective than various controls in relieving pain, facilitating return to normal activity, and promoting quality of life, but these analyses were based on only a small number of studies. Acupuncture did not appear to be associated with

  5. Electroacupuncture analgesia in rat ankle sprain pain model: neural mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Young; Koo, Sung Tae; Kim, Jae Hyo; An, Kyungeh; Chung, Kyungsoon; Chung, Jin Mo

    2010-02-01

    Acupuncture, an alternative medical therapy with a long history, is appealing because it can activate endogenous analgesic mechanisms by minimally invasive means. The mechanisms of acupuncture, however, are not well understood yet. The following sentence was removed from our original manuscript. One of the major problems impeding understanding of the acupuncture mechanism is lack of experimental models that mimic various forms of persistent pain that respond to acupuncture in humans. In this review, we summarize and discuss previous and recent findings regarding electroacupuncture-induced analgesia in an ankle sprain pain model and the potential underlying mechanisms of acupuncture. A novel model of ankle sprain pain is introduced recently and the mechanism of electroacupuncture-induced analgesia in this model has been explored. The following sentence was removed from our original manuscript. This model provides a reproducible and quantifiable index of persistent pain at the ankle joint in rats. Acupuncture at a remote site produces long-lasting and powerful analgesia. The consistent analgesic effect of acupuncture in this model has allowed us to pursue the underlying neural mechanisms. These studies provide insight into the mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia in one particular form of persistent pain, and hopefully will allow us to expand our knowledge to other painful conditions.

  6. Ankle sprains: patient perceptions of function and performance of physical tasks. A mixed methods approach.

    PubMed

    Larmer, Peter J; McNair, Peter J; Smythe, Liz; Williams, Maynard

    2011-01-01

    To investigate patient's perceptions of function and performance of physical tasks after discharge from treatment for an ankle sprain. Using a mixed methods approach, 40 participants who presented with an acute sprained ankle and their treating clinicians completed two questionnaires related to function at the start and end of a rehabilitation programme. Additionally, participants completed the questionnaires at 6 weeks following discharge at which time they also performed physical tasks that were still perceived as difficult. Ten participants also completed a semi-structured interview. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in the participant's and clinician's initial assessment of function. However, at discharge participants scored their function significantly (p < 0.05) lower than clinicians. This difference was not apparent 6 weeks later (p > 0.05). However, there was a significant difference (p  < 0.05) following actual performance of tasks with an effect size of 1.58. Participant interviews confirmed that patients had a fear of re-injury until they actually performed tasks that were perceived as difficult. Clinicians and participants do not have a similar perception of the recovery of an ankle sprain at discharge. Performing tasks which were perceived as difficult were valuable in assisting participants gain an improved appreciation of their function.

  7. Foot Structure and Muscle Reaction Time to a Simulated Ankle Sprain

    PubMed Central

    Denyer, Joanna R.; Hewitt, Naomi L. A.; Mitchell, Andrew C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Foot structure has been shown to affect aspects of neuromuscular control, including postural stability and proprioception. However, despite an association between pronated and supinated foot structures and the incidence of lateral ankle sprains, no one to our knowledge has measured muscle reaction time to a simulated ankle-sprain mechanism in participants with different foot structures. Objective: To determine whether pronated or supinated foot structures contribute to neuromuscular deficits as measured by muscle reaction time to a simulated ankle-sprain mechanism. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University biomechanics laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty volunteers were categorized into 3 groups according to navicular-drop–height measures. Ten participants (4 men, 6 women) had neutral feet (navicular-drop height = 5–9 mm), 10 participants (4 men, 6 women) had pronated feet (navicular-drop height ≥ 10 mm), and 10 participants (4 men, 6 women) had supinated feet (navicular-drop height ≤ 4 mm). Intervention(s): Three perturbations on a standing tilt platform simulating the mechanics of an inversion and plantar-flexion ankle sprain. Main Outcome Measure(s): Muscle reaction time in milliseconds of the peroneus longus, tibialis anterior, and gluteus medius to the tilt-platform perturbation. Results: Participants with pronated or supinated foot structures had slower peroneus longus reaction times than participants with neutral feet (P = .01 and P = .04, respectively). We found no differences for the tibialis anterior or gluteus medius. Conclusions: Foot structure influenced peroneus longus reaction time. Further research is required to establish the consequences of slower peroneal reaction times in pronated and supinated foot structures. Researchers investigating lower limb muscle reaction time should control for foot structure because it may influence results. PMID:23675791

  8. Foot structure and muscle reaction time to a simulated ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Denyer, Joanna R; Hewitt, Naomi L A; Mitchell, Andrew C S

    2013-01-01

    Foot structure has been shown to affect aspects of neuromuscular control, including postural stability and proprioception. However, despite an association between pronated and supinated foot structures and the incidence of lateral ankle sprains, no one to our knowledge has measured muscle reaction time to a simulated ankle-sprain mechanism in participants with different foot structures. To determine whether pronated or supinated foot structures contribute to neuromuscular deficits as measured by muscle reaction time to a simulated ankle-sprain mechanism. Cross-sectional study. University biomechanics laboratory. Thirty volunteers were categorized into 3 groups according to navicular-drop-height measures. Ten participants (4 men, 6 women) had neutral feet (navicular-drop height = 5-9 mm), 10 participants (4 men, 6 women) had pronated feet (navicular-drop height ≥ 10 mm), and 10 participants (4 men, 6 women) had supinated feet (navicular-drop height ≤ 4 mm). Three perturbations on a standing tilt platform simulating the mechanics of an inversion and plantar-flexion ankle sprain. Muscle reaction time in milliseconds of the peroneus longus, tibialis anterior, and gluteus medius to the tilt-platform perturbation. Participants with pronated or supinated foot structures had slower peroneus longus reaction times than participants with neutral feet (P = .01 and P = .04, respectively). We found no differences for the tibialis anterior or gluteus medius. Foot structure influenced peroneus longus reaction time. Further research is required to establish the consequences of slower peroneal reaction times in pronated and supinated foot structures. Researchers investigating lower limb muscle reaction time should control for foot structure because it may influence results.

  9. Misdiagnosis of Talar Body or Neck Fractures as Ankle Sprains in Low Energy Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki-Won; Kim, Jin-Su; Cho, Hun-Ki; Choo, Ho-Sik; Park, Jang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background The talus has a very complex anatomical morphology and is mainly fractured by a major force caused by a fall or a traffic accident. Therefore, a talus fracture is not common. However, many recent reports have shown that minor injuries, such as sprains and slips during sports activities, can induce a talar fracture especially in the lateral or posterior process. Still, fractures to the main parts of the talus (neck and body) after ankle sprains have not been reported as occult fractures. Methods Of the total 102 cases from January 2005 to December 2012, 7 patients had confirmed cases of missed/delayed diagnosis of a talus body or neck fracture and were included in the study population. If available, medical records, X-rays, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging of the confirmed cases were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Results In the 7-patient population, there were 3 talar neck fractures and 4 talar body fractures (coronal shearing type). The mechanisms of injuries were all low energy trauma episodes. The causes of the injuries included twisting of the ankle during climbing (n = 2), jumping to the ground from a 1-m high wall (n = 2), and twisting of the ankle during daily activities (n = 3). Conclusions A talar body fracture and a talar neck fracture should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute and chronic ankle pain after a minor ankle injury. PMID:27583114

  10. Ankle sprains in players of the field-games Gaelic football and hurling.

    PubMed

    Watson, A W

    1999-03-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine the most common injuries in Gaelic football and hurling and to quantify contributory factors. The hypothesis tested was "Ankle sprains are a common injury in Gaelic football and hurling and their incidence can be linked to physical characteristics of the players". prospective study over four years. eighty male players of Gaelic football, and hurling, aged 18-27 years. the injuries sustained over a four-year period. Physical fitness tests and examination at the start of the study which included assessment of: anthropometric variables, lower-limb proprioception, lung function, six aspects of flexibility, 15 aspects of posture and body mechanics. 962 significant sports injuries which included: 218 strains and 184 sprains. 122 were ankle sprains; 79 to the left ankle and 43 to the right. 104 ankle sprains represented a recurrence of this injury in a particular individual. In 26 out of 34 of these subjects both ankles were involved. This suggests that recurrence is not primarily due to previous injury but to intrinsic factors in the subjects that predispose them to ankle sprain. The subjects who sustained ankle sprains had (1) greater height, (2) lower body mass index (3) a higher incidence of posture defects of the ankle and knee, (4) more clinical defects (5) a higher incidence of defective lower-limb proprioception. Ankle sprains are a common injury. Their incidence is linked to the five intrinsic factors listed above.

  11. The improvement of postural control in patients with mechanical ankle instability after lateral ankle ligaments reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Yun; Zheng, Jie-Jiao; Zhang, Jian; Cai, Ye-Hua; Hua, Ying-Hui; Chen, Shi-Yi

    2016-04-01

    Lateral ankle sprain is the most common injury. A previous study demonstrated that patients with mechanical ankle instability suffered deficits in postural control, indicating that structural damage of the lateral ankle ligaments may produce a balance deficit. The purpose of this study was to confirm that lateral ligaments reconstruction could improve postural control in patients with mechanical ankle instability. A total of 15 patients were included in the study. Each patient had a history of an ankle sprain with persistent symptoms of ankle instability and a positive anterior drawer test and had been treated nonoperatively for at least 3 months. All patients were diagnosed with lateral ankle ligaments tear by ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. They underwent arthroscopic debridement and open lateral ankle ligaments reconstruction with a modified Broström procedure. One day before and 6 months after the operation, all of the participants underwent single-limb postural sway tests. The anterior drawer test and the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society scale score were used to evaluate the clinical results in these patients. At 6 months after the operation, with the patients' eyes closed, there was significantly decreased postural sway in the anteroposterior direction, the circumferential area, and the total path length on the operated ankles compared with those measurements before the operation. With eyes open, however, no difference was found in postural sway before and after the operation. Postural control was improved by reconstructing the lateral ligaments. IV.

  12. Ankles back in randomized controlled trial (ABrCt): braces versus neuromuscular exercises for the secondary prevention of ankle sprains. Design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ankle sprains are the most common sports and physical activity related injury. There is extensive evidence that there is a twofold increased risk for injury recurrence for at least one year post injury. In up to 50% of all cases recurrences result in disability and lead to chronic pain or instability, requiring prolonged medical care. Therefore ankle sprain recurrence prevention in athletes is essential. This RCT evaluates the effect of the combined use of braces and neuromuscular training (e.g. proprioceptive training/sensorimotor training/balance training) against the individual use of either braces or neuromuscular training alone on ankle sprain recurrences, when applied to individual athletes after usual care. Methods/Design This study was designed as three way randomized controlled trial with one year follow-up. Healthy individuals between 12 and 70 years of age, who were actively participating in sports and who had sustained a lateral ankle sprain in the two months prior to inclusion, were eligible for inclusion. After subjects had finished ankle sprain treatment by means of usual care, they were randomised to any of the three study groups. Subjects in group 1 received an eight week neuromuscular training program, subjects in group 2 received a sports brace to be worn during all sports activities for the duration of one year, and group 3 received a combination of the neuromuscular training program and a sports brace to be worn during all sports activities for the duration of eight weeks. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and every month for 12 months therafter. The primary outcome measure was incidence of ankle sprain recurrences. Secondary outcome measures included the direct and indirect costs of recurrent injury, the severity of recurrent injury, and the residual complaints during and after the intervention. Discussion The ABrCt is the first randomized controlled trial to directly compare the secondary preventive effect of the combined use of

  13. Ankle Sprain Injuries: A 2-Year Prospective Cohort Study in Female Greek Professional Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Kofotolis, Nikolaos; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2007-01-01

    Context: Ankle sprains are a common basketball injury. Therefore, examination of risk factors for injury in female professional basketball players is worthwhile. Objective: To examine rates of ankle sprains, associated time missed from participation, and risk factors for injury during 2 consecutive seasons. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Eighteen professional basketball facilities. Patients or Other Participants: We observed 204 players from 18 female professional basketball teams for 2 consecutive seasons during a 2-year period. Main Outcome Measure(s): Using questionnaires, we recorded the incidence of ankle sprains, participation time missed, and mechanisms of injury in games and practice sessions. Potential risk factors, such as age, body mass, height, training experience, and history of ankle sprain, were examined using multivariate logistic regression. Results: Fifty of the 204 participants sustained ankle injuries; injuries included 32 ankle sprains, which translated to an ankle sprain rate of 1.12 per 1000 hours of exposure to injury. The 32 players missed 224.4 training and game sessions and an average of 7.01 sessions per injury. Most injuries occurred in the key area of the basketball court and were the result of contact. Injury rates during games were higher than injury rates during practice sessions. Centers, followed by guards and forwards, had the highest rate of injury. Players who did not wear an external ankle support had an odds ratio of 2.481 for sustaining an ankle sprain. Conclusions: Female professional basketball athletes who did not wear an external ankle support, who played in the key area, or who functioned as centers had a higher risk for ankle sprain than did other players. PMID:18059995

  14. Potential savings of a program to prevent ankle sprain recurrence: economic evaluation of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hupperets, Maarten D W; Verhagen, Evert A L M; Heymans, Martijn W; Bosmans, Judith E; van Tulder, Maurits W; van Mechelen, Willem

    2010-11-01

    The most common ankle injury is the lateral ankle sprain. Dutch annual sports-related ankle sprain costs can roughly be estimated at €187,200,000. Research has shown that proprioceptive training accounts for an approximated overall 50% reduction in ankle sprain recurrence rate. An unsupervised proprioceptive training program to reduce the recurrence of lateral ankle sprains will reduce overall health care costs. Cohort study (economic analysis); Level of evidence, 2. The study included 522 male and female athletes: 256 athletes (120 female and 136 male) in the intervention group, and 266 athletes (128 female and 138 male) in the control group. Both groups received treatment according to usual care. Athletes allocated to the intervention group received an 8-week proprioceptive training program in addition to usual care. Costs per athlete and costs per injured athlete were calculated. Costs related to ankle sprain recurrences were measured from a societal perspective using cost diaries. Bootstrapping was used to analyze the cost-effectiveness data. Follow-up was 1 year. Mean total costs in the intervention group were €81 (standard deviation, €134) per athlete and €114 (€325) per injured athlete. Mean overall costs in the control group were €149 (€836) per athlete and €447 (€1403) per injured athlete. Statistically significant differences in total costs were found per athlete (mean difference, -€69; 95% confidence interval, -€200 to -€2) and per injured athlete (-€332; -€741 to -€62) in favor of the intervention group. A cost-effectiveness plane showed the effect of the intervention was larger and the costs were lower in the intervention group than the control group. The use of a proprioceptive training program after usual care of an ankle sprain is cost-effective for the prevention of ankle sprain recurrences in comparison with usual care alone. In the Netherlands, an estimated annual €35.9 million in medical and lost productivity

  15. The Relation of Q Angle and Anthropometric Measures with Ankle Sprain; a Case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Zamani Moghadam, Hamid; Hoseini, Seyed Taha; Hashemian, Amir Masoud; Sharifi, Mohammad Davood

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Since most studies on ankle sprain are medical and sports-related and not much epidemiologic and etiologic data from the general population exist in this field, the present study evaluates the relationship between Q angle and anthropometric measures with ankle sprain in the general population. Methods: In the present case-control study, all of the patients over 18 years age presenting to emergency departments (ED) of two educational Hospitals, complaining from ankle sprain, were evaluated during more than 1 year. A checklist consisting of demographic data, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and history of ankle sprain, as well as degree of Q angle was filled for all participants. The correlation of mentioned variables with incidence of ankle sprain was calculated using SPSS 22. Results: 300 patients with ankle sprain were evaluated (53.5% male). Mean age of the patients was 37.03 ± 14.20 years. Mean weight, height, and BMI were 71.71 ± 11.26 (43 – 114), 168.74 ± 8.63 (143 – 190) and 25.14 ± 3.19 (18.41 – 38.95), respectively. Mean Q angle of the patients was 12.78 ± 3.19 degrees (5 – 23). There was a significant correlation between weight (p < 0.001), BMI (p = 0.001), history of sprain (r: 0.26, p < 0.001) and Q angle (p = 0.002) with incidence of ankle sprain. In addition, there was a significant statistical correlation between weight (p = 0.031), BMI (p = 0.020) and Q angle (p = 0.004) with history of ankle sprain. In patients with a history of ankle sprain, Q angle was wider by about 2 degrees. Conclusion: It seems that the prevalence of ankle sprain directly correlates with high weight, BMI, and Q angle and is more prevalent in those with a history of sprain. Although the findings of the present study show a statistically significant correlation between these factors and ankle sprain, the correlation is not clinically significant. PMID:28286816

  16. Effects of balance training on post-sprained ankle joint instability.

    PubMed

    Faizullin, I; Faizullina, E

    2015-01-01

    excluded at the stage of reading abstracts. The third MeSH term was "Balance exercises for instable ankle". One additional article was found by initial search and was excluded after reading the abstract.Scopus search.The same MeSH terms were used as in PubMed search. With the first MeSH term one article was found and filtered by the title. With the second MeSH term no results were found in the initial search and with the third term 2 articles were picked up by the initial search. One of these articles was filtered by the title. The other one was filtered after reading the abstract. Overall 8 articles were taken into consideration for conducting a systematic review. Nevertheless, three of them could not be downloaded for free even using UB FAU up to the 28th of December, 2014. Thus, five articles were taken for the systematic review. After reading all 5 articles, one article by Maraike Alice Wortmann and Carrie L. Docherty was excluded from the study because it was a systematic review per se and at the same time it was not mentioned neither in the article title, nor in the abstract that the current study was a systematic review [3]. Also the article by Borreani et al. 2014 [4] was excluded after reading the paragraph "Methods" as this was not an RCT but a descriptive study. Therefore, 3 articles were taken for conducting a systematic review. The first article by Janssen et al. 2011 [5] was a 3-way randomised controlled trial with 1 year follow-up. Participants aged from 12 to 70 years used this intervention. People with active participation in sports with a lateral ankle sprain during the last 2 months were eligible for inclusion in the study. Participants were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 undertook an 8 week neuromuscular training programme. Group 2 wore sports brace during their sport activities for the duration of 1 year, and group 3 was a control group and used the combination of neuromuscular training program and wore sports brace for 8 weeks. There were 122

  17. Immediate effect of ankle balance taping on dynamic and static balance of soccer players with acute ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young-Jun; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to evaluate the immediate effect of ankle balance taping on balance ability of soccer players with acute ankle sprain. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted with 16 subjects who were diagnosed with ankle sprain. A cross-over randomized design was used. Each subject performed three interventions in a random order. Subjects were randomly assigned to an ankle balance taping, placebo taping, and no taping. For dynamic and static balance, ability was measured using BIORescue (RM Ingenierie, Rodes, France). Limit of stability, sway length and sway speed for one minute were measured. [Results] The Limit of Stability, Sway length and Sway speed differed significantly among the three different taping methods. [Conclusion] In this study, we found that ankle balance taping was effective in terms of improving balance ability of soccer players with an ankle sprain.

  18. Treatment algorithm for chronic lateral ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, Sandro; Ruffilli, Alberto; Pagliazzi, Gherardo; Mazzotti, Antonio; Evangelisti, Giulia; Buda, Roberto; Faldini, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction: ankle sprains are a common sports-related injury. A 20% of acute ankle sprains results in chronic ankle instability, requiring surgery. Aim of this paper is to report the results of a series of 38 patients treated for chronic lateral ankle instability with anatomic reconstruction. Materials and methods: thirty-eight patients were enrolled in the study. Seventeen patients underwent a surgical repair using the Brostrom-modified technique, while the remaining underwent anatomic reconstruction with autologous or allogenic graft. Results: at a mean follow-up of 5 years the AOFAS score improved from 66.1 ± 5.3 to 92.2 ± 5.6. Discussion: the findings of this study confirm that anatomic reconstruction is an effective procedure with satisfactory subjective and objective results which persist at long-term follow-up along with a low complication rate. No differences, in term of clinical and functional outcomes, were observed between the Brostrom-modified repair and the anatomic reconstruction technique. Level of evidence: level IV. PMID:25767783

  19. Wii Fit™ exercise therapy for the rehabilitation of ankle sprains: Its effect compared with physical therapy or no functional exercises at all.

    PubMed

    Punt, I M; Ziltener, J-L; Monnin, D; Allet, L

    2016-07-01

    Lateral ankle sprains represent the most common sports-related injuries. The Nintendo Wii Fit™ could be useful in the treatment of ankle sprains. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of exercise training using the Wii Fit™ in ankle sprain patients: (a) with physical therapy; and (b) a control group not receiving any treatment. Ninety lateral ankle sprain patients were randomized to a Wii Fit™, physical therapy, or control group. We assessed the following outcome measures before, and 6 weeks after starting the allocated treatment: Foot and Ankle Ability Measure, pain during rest and walking, delay before return to sport, patient satisfaction, and effectiveness of the allocated treatment. Six weeks after the baseline measures, foot and ankle ability scores had improved in all groups, and pain had decreased during walking (P < 0.050). No between-group differences were detected between Wii Fit™ treatment, and both other groups (P > 0.050). In conclusion, the Wii Fit™ could be used as an exercise therapy to treat ankle sprain patients. However, Wii Fit™ was not more effective than only physical therapy, or no exercise therapy at all. Patients who did not receive treatment showed similar results as people who got any kind of exercise therapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Lateral ankle instability: MR imaging of associated injuries and surgical treatment procedures.

    PubMed

    Alparslan, Leyla; Chiodo, Christopher P

    2008-12-01

    Chronic ankle instability has been defined as the development of recurrent ankle sprains and persistent symptoms after initial lateral ankle sprain. The diagnosis of ankle instability is usually established on the patient's history, physical examination, and radiographic assessment. Patients have signs of both functional and mechanical instability, and the repetitive, chronic nature of the injury may lead to intra-articular and periarticular pathologies. This article discusses the incidence, etiology, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of these pathologies, reviews the surgical treatment procedures for lateral ankle instability, and presents the postoperative MR imaging findings.

  1. Epidemiological Patterns of Ankle Sprains in Youth, High School, and College Football.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Daniel R; Koldenhoven, Rachel M; Hertel, Jay; Onate, James A; Dompier, Thomas P; Kerr, Zachary Y

    2017-02-01

    Variations in ankle injury rates and distributions among competition levels are unclear, but such data may help inform strategies to prevent ankle sprains during American football. To describe the epidemiological patterns of ankle sprains in youth, high school (HS), and collegiate American football. Descriptive epidemiological study. Data regarding youth, HS, and college football athletes were collected from 3 injury surveillance programs: (1) the Youth Football Safety Study (YFSS), (2) the National Athletic Treatment, Injury and Outcomes Network (NATION), and (3) the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance Program (ISP). During the 2012-2014 seasons, the YFSS, NATION, and NCAA ISP included 310, 184, and 71 football team-seasons, respectively. Athletic trainers (ATs) attended each practice and game and reported injuries and athlete-exposures (AEs) via their preferred injury documentation application. Ankle sprain rates for each type of ankle sprain were calculated overall, by event type (ie, practices and games), and specifically for severe injuries (ie, participation restriction time >21 days) and recurrent injuries (as defined by ATs). Rate ratios (RRs) were used to compare ankle sprain rates by competition level and event type. Injury proportion ratios (IPRs) were used to compare differences in severity, surgical needs, recurrence, injury mechanism, and injury activity by competition level. RRs and IPRs with 95% confidence intervals excluding 1.00 were considered statistically significant. A total of 124, 897, and 643 ankle sprains were reported in youth, HS, and college football, respectively. This led to respective rates of 0.59, 0.73, and 1.19 sprains per 1000 AEs. The ankle sprain rate in college football was higher than the rates in HS (RR = 1.64; 95% CI, 1.48-1.82) and youth (RR = 2.01; 95% CI, 1.65-2.43) football. The proportion of ankle sprains that were recurrent in youth football was higher than the proportions in HS (IPR

  2. Clinical benefits of joint mobilisation on ankle sprains: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Weerasekara, Ishanka; Osmotherly, Peter; Snodgrass, Suzanne; Marquez, Jodie; de Zoete, Rutger; Rivett, Darren A

    2017-09-04

    To assess the clinical benefits of joint mobilisation on ankle sprains. MEDLINE, MEDLINE In Process, Embase, AMED, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane library, PEDro, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and Dissertations and Thesis were searched from inception to June, 2017. Studies investigating humans with a grade I or II lateral or medial sprains of the ankle in any pathological state from acute to chronic, who had been treated with joint mobilisation were considered for inclusion. Any conservative intervention was considered as a comparator. Commonly reported clinical outcomes were considered such as ankle range of movement, pain, and function. After screening of 1530 abstracts, 56 studies were selected for full text screening, and 23 were eligible for inclusion. Eleven studies on chronic sprains reported sufficient data for meta-analysis. Data were extracted using the participants, interventions, comparison, outcomes and study design approach. Clinically relevant outcomes (dorsiflexion range, proprioception, balance, function, pain threshold, pain intensity) were assessed at immediate, short term and long term follow-up points. Methodological quality was assessed independently by two reviewers and most studies were found to be of moderate quality, with no studies rated as poor. Meta-analysis revealed significant immediate benefits of joint mobilisation compared to comparators on improving postero-medial dynamic balance (p=0.0004), but not for improving dorsiflexion range (p= 0.16), static balance (p = 0.96) or pain intensity (p= 0.45). Joint mobilisation was beneficial in the short term for improving weight-bearing dorsiflexion range (p= 0.003) compared to a control. Joint mobilisation appears to be beneficial for improving dynamic balance immediately after application and dorsiflexion range in the short term. Long term benefits have not been adequately investigated. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging and incidental findings of lateral ankle pathologic features with asymptomatic ankles.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Amol; Luhadiya, Amit; Ewen, Brynn; Goumas, Chris

    2011-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated 102 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations in 100 patients with asymptomatic lateral ankles. The patients were undergoing MRI for other ankle pathologic features, including medial ankle, posterior ankle, soft tissue masses, or Achilles tendon pain. No patient had had a recent lateral ankle injury or any surgery. Whether the anterior talofibular ligament, calcaneofibular ligament, and peroneal tendons were intact, torn, or absent was recorded. The average patient age was 46.4 years. Of the 100 patients, 67 (66%) had no history of a lateral ankle sprain, and 35 (34%) had sustained 1 or more sprains in the remote past. Also, 72 had an intact anterior talofibular ligament (71%), 90 had an intact calcaneofibular ligament (89%), 67 had intact peroneus brevis tendons (66%), and 68 (67%) had intact peroneus longus tendons. One accessory peroneal tendon was noted. Approximately 30% of asymptomatic patients undergoing MRI had abnormal anterior talofibular ligaments and peronei. Because the published data show that functional rehabilitation is successful for 90% of symptomatic lateral ankle patients, caution is warranted if choosing surgical treatment on the basis of the MRI findings alone. Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The ANKLE TRIAL (ANKLE treatment after injuries of the ankle ligaments): what is the benefit of external support devices in the functional treatment of acute ankle sprain? : a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute lateral ankle ligament injuries are very common problems in present health care. Still there is no hard evidence about which treatment strategy is superior. Current evidence supports the view that a functional treatment strategy is preferable, but insufficient data are present to prove the benefit of external support devices in these types of treatment. The hypothesis of our study is that external ankle support devices will not result in better outcome in the treatment of acute ankle sprains, compared to a purely functional treatment strategy. Overall objective is to compare the results of three different strategies of functional treatment for acute ankle sprain, especially to determine the advantages of external support devices in addition to functional treatment strategy, based on balance and coordination exercises. Methods/design This study is designed as a randomised controlled multi-centre trial with one-year follow-up. Adult and healthy patients (N = 180) with acute, single sided and first inversion trauma of the lateral ankle ligaments will be included. They will all follow the same schedule of balancing exercises and will be divided into 3 treatment groups, 1. pressure bandage and tape, 2. pressure bandage and brace and 3. no external support. Primary outcome measure is the Karlsson scoring scale; secondary outcomes are FAOS (subscales), number of recurrent ankle injuries, Visual Analogue Scales of pain and satisfaction and adverse events. They will be measured after one week, 6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year. Discussion The ANKLE TRIAL is a randomized controlled trial in which a purely functional treated control group, without any external support is investigated. Results of this study could lead to other opinions about usefulness of external support devices in the treatment of acute ankle sprain. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR2151 PMID:22340371

  5. What Is the Evidence for Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation Therapy in the Treatment of Ankle Sprains in Adults?

    PubMed Central

    van den Bekerom, Michel P.J; Struijs, Peter A.A; Blankevoort, Leendert; Welling, Lieke; van Dijk, C. Niek; Kerkhoffs, Gino M.M.J

    2012-01-01

    Context: Ankle sprains are common problems in acute medical care. The variation in treatment observed for the acutely injured lateral ankle ligament complex in the first week after the injury suggests a lack of evidence-based management strategies for this problem. Objective: To analyze the effectiveness of applying rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE) therapy begun within 72 hours after trauma for patients in the initial period after ankle sprain. Study Selection: Eligible studies were published original randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials concerning at least 1 of the 4 subtreatments of RICE therapy in the treatment of acute ankle sprains in adults. Data Sources: MEDLINE, Cochrane Clinical Trial Register, CINAHL, and EMBASE. The lists of references of retrieved publications also were checked manually. Data Extraction: We extracted relevant data on treatment outcome (pain, swelling, ankle mobility or range of motion, return to sports, return to work, complications, and patient satisfaction) and assessed the quality of included studies. If feasible, the results of comparable studies were pooled using fixed- or random-effects models. Data Synthesis: After deduction of the overlaps among the different databases, evaluation of the abstracts, and contact with some authors, 24 potentially eligible trials remained. The full texts of these articles were retrieved and thoroughly assessed as described. This resulted in the inclusion of 11 trials involving 868 patients. The main reason for exclusion was that the authors did not describe a well-defined control group without the intervention of interest. Conclusions: Insufficient evidence is available from randomized controlled trials to determine the relative effectiveness of RICE therapy for acute ankle sprains in adults. Treatment decisions must be made on an individual basis, carefully weighing the relative benefits and risks of each option, and must be based on expert opinions and national guidelines

  6. What is the evidence for rest, ice, compression, and elevation therapy in the treatment of ankle sprains in adults?

    PubMed

    van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Struijs, Peter A A; Blankevoort, Leendert; Welling, Lieke; van Dijk, C Niek; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J

    2012-01-01

    Ankle sprains are common problems in acute medical care. The variation in treatment observed for the acutely injured lateral ankle ligament complex in the first week after the injury suggests a lack of evidence-based management strategies for this problem. To analyze the effectiveness of applying rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE) therapy begun within 72 hours after trauma for patients in the initial period after ankle sprain. Eligible studies were published original randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials concerning at least 1 of the 4 subtreatments of RICE therapy in the treatment of acute ankle sprains in adults. MEDLINE, Cochrane Clinical Trial Register, CINAHL, and EMBASE. The lists of references of retrieved publications also were checked manually. We extracted relevant data on treatment outcome (pain, swelling, ankle mobility or range of motion, return to sports, return to work, complications, and patient satisfaction) and assessed the quality of included studies. If feasible, the results of comparable studies were pooled using fixed- or random-effects models. After deduction of the overlaps among the different databases, evaluation of the abstracts, and contact with some authors, 24 potentially eligible trials remained. The full texts of these articles were retrieved and thoroughly assessed as described. This resulted in the inclusion of 11 trials involving 868 patients. The main reason for exclusion was that the authors did not describe a well-defined control group without the intervention of interest. Insufficient evidence is available from randomized controlled trials to determine the relative effectiveness of RICE therapy for acute ankle sprains in adults. Treatment decisions must be made on an individual basis, carefully weighing the relative benefits and risks of each option, and must be based on expert opinions and national guidelines.

  7. The prevention of ankle sprains in sports. A systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Thacker, S B; Stroup, D F; Branche, C M; Gilchrist, J; Goodman, R A; Weitman, E A

    1999-01-01

    To assess the published evidence on the effectiveness of various approaches to the prevention of ankle sprains in athletes, we used textbooks, journals, and experts in the field of sports medicine to identify citations. We identified 113 studies reporting the risk of ankle sprains in sports, methods to provide support, the effect of these interventions on performance, and comparison of prevention efforts. The most common risk factor for ankle sprain in sports is history of a previous sprain. Ten citations of studies involving athletes in basketball, football, soccer, or volleyball compared alternative methods of prevention. Methods tested included wrapping the ankle with tape or cloth, orthoses, high-top shoes, or some combination of these methods. Most studies indicate that appropriately applied braces, tape, or orthoses do not adversely affect performance. Based on our review, we recommend that athletes with a sprained ankle complete supervised rehabilitation before returning to practice or competition, and those athletes suffering a moderate or severe sprain should wear an appropriate orthosis for at least 6 months. Both coaches and players must assume responsibility for prevention of injuries in sports. Methodologic limitations of published studies suggested several areas for future research.

  8. Ankle manual therapy for individuals with post-acute ankle sprains: description of a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ankle sprains are common within the general population and can result in prolonged disablement. Limited talocrural dorsiflexion range of motion (DF ROM) is a common consequence of ankle sprain. Limited talocrural DF ROM may contribute to persistent symptoms, disability, and an elevated risk for re-injury. As a result, many health care practitioners use hands-on passive procedures with the intention of improving talocrural joint DF ROM in individuals following ankle sprains. Dosage of passive hands-on procedures involves a continuum of treatment speeds. Recent evidence suggests both slow- and fast-speed treatments may be effective to address disablement following ankle sprains. However, these interventions have yet to be longitudinally compared against a placebo study condition. Methods/Design We developed a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial designed to test the hypotheses that hands-on treatment procedures administered to individuals following ankle sprains during the post-acute injury period can improve short-, intermediate-, and long-term disablement, as well as reduce the risk for re-injury. Discussion This study is designed to measure the clinical effects of hands-on passive stretching treatment procedures directed to the talocrural joint that vary in treatment speed during the post-acute injury period, compared to hands-on placebo control intervention. Trial Registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00888498. PMID:20958995

  9. Return to play after an ankle sprain: guidelines for the podiatric physician.

    PubMed

    Richie, Douglas H; Izadi, Faye E

    2015-04-01

    The ankle sprain is the most common injury in sport and has a high incidence of long-term disability. This disability may be partly due to early return to sport before ligament healing has been completed. The podiatric physician can follow sound guidelines for making a return-to-play decision for athletes suffering from an ankle sprain. The decision-making process requires the podiatric physician to monitor the rehabilitation process and then administer patient self-reported questionnaires as well as functional performance tests to assess the status of ankle function after injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Consequence of a Medial Ankle Sprain on Physical and Self-reported Functional Limitations: A Case Study Over a 5-Month Period.

    PubMed

    Terada, Masafumi; Thomas, Abbey C; Pietrosimone, Brian; Hiller, Claire E; Bowker, Samantha; Gribble, Phillip A

    2015-10-01

    Case report. Little evidence exists about impairments and perceived disability following eversion injury to the deltoid ligament. This case study prospectively examined the neuromuscular, biomechanical, and psychological consequences of a case of a medial ankle sprain. A recreationally active man with a history of a lateral ankle sprain (grade I) was participating in a university Institutional Review Board-approved research study examining the neuromuscular and mechanical characteristics associated with chronic ankle instability. Twenty-two days after the testing session, the participant sustained an eversion injury to his left ankle while playing basketball. Outcomes The outcomes of this case are presented using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health model. Outcome variables were assessed at preinjury (medial ankle sprain), 3 months postinjury, and 5 months postinjury. Measurements included neural excitability of the soleus, balance assessment, joint stability, and psychological assessments. Data from this case study revealed that a medial ankle sprain reduces joint mobility and alters neural excitability of the soleus, with concurrent deficits in balance and self-reported function. These impairments forced the participant to downgrade his physical activity lifestyle up to 5 months postinjury. These data suggest the need for the development of intervention strategies to address impairments in neural excitability and joint mobility at the ankle to help patients meet the goal of maintaining long-term joint health. Prognosis, level 4.

  11. National Athletic Trainers' Association position statement: conservative management and prevention of ankle sprains in athletes.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Thomas W; Hertel, Jay; Amendola, Ned; Docherty, Carrie L; Dolan, Michael G; Hopkins, J Ty; Nussbaum, Eric; Poppy, Wendy; Richie, Doug

    2013-01-01

    To present recommendations for athletic trainers and other allied health care professionals in the conservative management and prevention of ankle sprains in athletes. Because ankle sprains are a common and often disabling injury in athletes, athletic trainers and other sports health care professionals must be able to implement the most current and evidence-supported treatment strategies to ensure safe and rapid return to play. Equally important is initiating preventive measures to mitigate both first-time sprains and the chance of reinjury. Therefore, considerations for appropriate preventive measures (including taping and bracing), initial assessment, both short- and long-term management strategies, return-to-play guidelines, and recommendations for syndesmotic ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability are presented. The recommendations included in this position statement are intended to provide athletic trainers and other sports health care professionals with guidelines and criteria to deliver the best health care possible for the prevention and management of ankle sprains. An endorsement as to best practice is made whenever evidence supporting the recommendation is available.

  12. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Conservative Management and Prevention of Ankle Sprains in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Thomas W.; Hertel, Jay; Amendola, Ned; Docherty, Carrie L.; Dolan, Michael G.; Hopkins, J. Ty; Nussbaum, Eric; Poppy, Wendy; Richie, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To present recommendations for athletic trainers and other allied health care professionals in the conservative management and prevention of ankle sprains in athletes. Background: Because ankle sprains are a common and often disabling injury in athletes, athletic trainers and other sports health care professionals must be able to implement the most current and evidence-supported treatment strategies to ensure safe and rapid return to play. Equally important is initiating preventive measures to mitigate both first-time sprains and the chance of reinjury. Therefore, considerations for appropriate preventive measures (including taping and bracing), initial assessment, both short- and long-term management strategies, return-to-play guidelines, and recommendations for syndesmotic ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability are presented. Recommendations: The recommendations included in this position statement are intended to provide athletic trainers and other sports health care professionals with guidelines and criteria to deliver the best health care possible for the prevention and management of ankle sprains. An endorsement as to best practice is made whenever evidence supporting the recommendation is available. PMID:23855363

  13. Effects of the application of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on the ankle joint functional movement screen and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on ankle joint functional movement screen results and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain patients. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 16 patients with chronic ankle sprain were randomized to an ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group (n=8) and a control group (n=8). The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise centered on a proprioceptive sense exercise program, which was applied 12 times for 2 weeks. To verify changes after the application, ankle joint functional movement screen scores and isokinetic muscular function were measured and analyzed. [Results] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group showed significant improvements in all items of the ankle joint functional movement screen and in isokinetic muscular function after the exercise, whereas the control group showed no difference after the application. [Conclusion] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise program can be effectively applied in patients with chronic ankle sprain for the improvement of ankle joint functional movement screen score and isokinetic muscular function. PMID:28265157

  14. Effects of the application of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on the ankle joint functional movement screen and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on ankle joint functional movement screen results and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain patients. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 16 patients with chronic ankle sprain were randomized to an ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group (n=8) and a control group (n=8). The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise centered on a proprioceptive sense exercise program, which was applied 12 times for 2 weeks. To verify changes after the application, ankle joint functional movement screen scores and isokinetic muscular function were measured and analyzed. [Results] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group showed significant improvements in all items of the ankle joint functional movement screen and in isokinetic muscular function after the exercise, whereas the control group showed no difference after the application. [Conclusion] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise program can be effectively applied in patients with chronic ankle sprain for the improvement of ankle joint functional movement screen score and isokinetic muscular function.

  15. Management of ankle sprains: a randomised controlled trial of the treatment of inversion injuries using an elastic support bandage or an Aircast ankle brace.

    PubMed

    Boyce, S H; Quigley, M A; Campbell, S

    2005-02-01

    Lateral ligament ankle sprains are the single most common sports injury. To determine the functional outcome of the ankle joint after a moderate or severe inversion injury, comparing standard treatment with an elastic support bandage against an Aircast ankle brace. Prospective, randomised controlled trial. Two accident and emergency departments. Fifty patients presenting consecutively were randomised into two equal groups: one group was treated with an elastic support bandage and the other with an Aircast ankle brace. All patients were given a standardised advice sheet referring to rest, ice, compression, and elevation. Patients were reviewed after 48-72 hours, 10 days, and one month. Ankle joint function assessed at 10 days and one month using the modified Karlsson scoring method (maximum score 90). The difference in ankle girth (swelling) and pain score at 10 days. Seventeen patients in the elastic support bandage group (six defaulted, two excluded) and 18 patients in the Aircast ankle brace group (six defaulted, one excluded) completed the study. There were no significant differences between the two groups at presentation in terms of age (mean 35.3 and 32.6 years respectively), sex, dominant leg, left or right ankle injured, previous injury, time to presentation (median three and four hours respectively), difference in ankle girth (mean 14.5 and 14.3 mm respectively), and pain scores (mean 6.2 and 5.8 respectively). The Karlsson score was significantly higher in the Aircast ankle cast group than in the elastic bandage group at 10 days (mean 50 v 35, p = 0.028, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7 to 27.7) and one month (mean 68 v 55, p = 0.029, 95% CI 1.4 to 24.8) (Student's t test). There was no difference between the groups in the secondary outcome measures (swelling, p = 0.09; pain, p = 0.07). When hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to correct for possible baseline confounding factors, the Aircast ankle brace group was significantly associated

  16. The 2BFit study: is an unsupervised proprioceptive balance board training programme, given in addition to usual care, effective in preventing ankle sprain recurrences? Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hupperets, Maarten DW; Verhagen, Evert ALM; van Mechelen, Willem

    2008-01-01

    Background There is strong evidence that athletes have a twofold risk for re-injury after a previous ankle sprain, especially during the first year post-injury. These ankle sprain recurrences could result in disability and lead to chronic pain or instability in 20 to 50% of these cases. When looking at the high rate of ankle sprain recurrences and the associated chronic results, ankle sprain recurrence prevention is important. Objective To evaluate the effect of a proprioceptive balance board training programme on ankle sprain recurrences, that was applied to individual athletes after rehabilitation and treatment by usual care. Methods/Design This study was designed as a randomized controlled trial with a follow-up of one year. Healthy individuals between 12 and 70 years of age, who were actively participating in sports and who had sustained a lateral ankle sprain up to two months prior to inclusion, were eligible for inclusion in the study. The intervention programme was compared to usual care. The intervention programme consisted of an eight-week proprioceptive training, which started after finishing usual care and from the moment that sports participation was again possible. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and every month for 12 months. The primary outcome of this study was the incidence of recurrent ankle injuries in both groups within one year after the initial sprain. Secondary outcomes were severity and etiology of re-injury and medical care. Cost-effectiveness was evaluated from a societal perspective. A process evaluation was conducted for the intervention programme. Discussion The 2BFit trial is the first randomized controlled trial to study the effect of a non-supervised home-based proprioceptive balance board training programme in addition to usual care, on the recurrence of ankle sprains in sports. Results of this study could possibly lead to changes in practical guidelines on the treatment of ankle sprains. Results will become available in 2009

  17. Soccer-specific fatigue decreases reactive postural control with implications for ankle sprain injury.

    PubMed

    Greig, Matt; McNaughton, Lars

    2014-01-01

    To quantify the influence of soccer-specific fatigue on reactive dynamic balance, ten male professional soccer players (age 24.7 ± 4.4 yr, body mass 77.1 ± 8.3 kg, VO2max 63.0 ± 4.8 ml·kg·min(-1)) completed an exercise protocol replicating the activity profile of match-play. Pre-exercise, and at 15 min intervals, players completed three balance tasks requiring response to a system perturbed to induce either plantar flexion of the ankle or inversion of the ankle (by rotation or translation). ANOVA revealed a significant main effect for exercise duration in each task, with both reaction time and total centre of gravity displacement tending to increase during each half. In all three trials there was a significant increase in medio-lateral and anterior-posterior displacement, the planar perturbation of the platform evoking a multi-angular response. Dynamic balance performance decreased as a function of time during each half, suggesting a greater risk of injuries at these specific times, in accord with epidemiological observations of ankle sprain injury.

  18. The use of Bioptron light (polarized, polychromatic, non-coherent) therapy for the treatment of acute ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Stasinopoulos, Dimitrios; Papadopoulos, Costas; Lamnisos, Dimitrios; Stasinopoulos, Ioannis

    2017-03-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of Bioptron light therapy for the treatment of acute ankle sprains. Method A parallel group, single-blind, controlled study was carried out in patients with grade II acute ankle sprains. Patients were randomly allocated into two treatment groups (n = 25 for each). Both groups received cryotherapy, and the test group also received Bioptron light therapy. All treatments were performed daily for 5 d. Evaluations included self-reported pain via a visual analogue scale, degree of ankle edema, and ankle range of motion via goniometry carried out before the treatment and at the end of the treatment. Results The test group showed the largest magnitude of improvement for all evaluations at treatment five, and the between-group differences observed were statistically significant (p < 0.0005 for each). Conclusions These data provide preliminary evidence of the efficacy of Bioptron light therapy supplemented with cryotherapy for the treatment of acute ankle sprains; however, larger studies are required to confirm these results. Implications for Rehabilitation Ankle sprains are common acute injuries among professional and recreational sports players but also among people in general. Cryotherapy is the first-standard treatment of acute ankle sprains. Phototherapy such as Bioptron light has been recommended supplement to cryotherapy to reduce the symptoms of ankle sprains. The results of the present trial showed that using BIOPTRON LIGHT and cryotherapy the rehabilitation period of acute ankle sprains can be reduced.

  19. A randomized controlled trial of piroxicam in the management of acute ankle sprain in Australian Regular Army recruits. The Kapooka Ankle Sprain Study.

    PubMed

    Slatyer, M A; Hensley, M J; Lopert, R

    1997-01-01

    Three hundred sixty-four Australian Regular Army recruits with acute ankle sprains sustained during training were randomized to treatment with either piroxicam or placebo. Compared with the placebo group, subjects treated with piroxicam had less pain, were able to resume training more rapidly, were treated at lower cost, and were found to have increased exercise endurance on resumption of activity. Nausea was the only side effect reported significantly more often in the treatment group than in the placebo group (6.8% versus 0.3%). Interestingly, subjects treated with piroxicam showed some evidence of local abnormalities such as instability and reduced range of movement. We conclude that nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents should form an integral part of the treatment of acute ankle sprains.

  20. Use of infrared thermography for the diagnosis and grading of sprained ankle injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, João; Vardasca, Ricardo; Pimenta, Madalena; Gabriel, Joaquim; Torres, João

    2016-05-01

    Ankle joint sprains are a common medical condition estimated to be responsible for 15-25% of all musculoskeletal injuries worldwide. The pathophysiology of the lesion can represent considerable time lost to injury, as well as long-term disability in up to 60% of patients. A percentage between 10% and 20% may complicate with chronic instability of the ankle joint and disability in walking, contributing to morbidity and poor life quality. Ankle sprains can be classified as grade I, II, or III, based on the extent of damage and number of ligaments affected. The diagnostic grading is important for setting further treatment and rehabilitation, since more severe injuries carries risk of recurrence, added morbidity and decrease in life quality. The aim of this work was to evaluate the adequacy of infrared thermography as a potential complimentary diagnostic tool of the distinct lesions grades. Evaluation of different thermographic values of the ankle region (in both affected and non-affected foot) was conducted for this purpose. The principal results to be highlighted are that some of the regions, namely anterior view for non defined time after injury analysis, and anterior, frontal, posterior and anterior talofibular ligament regions and proximal calcaneofibular ligament regions in acute lesions (herein defined as less than 6 h post-traumatic event) presented consistent profiles of variation. The analyses were performed considering affected and non-affected ankles results on plotted graphics representing termographic evaluation and grading of these lesions performed using ultrasound by experimented medical radiologists. An increase in temperature values was observed when progressing from mild to severe ankle sprain injuries, with these regions presenting lower values for the affected ankle when compared to the non-affected ankle in all the analysis performed. The remaining analysed regions did not present the same variations. Statistical analysis using Kruskal

  1. Management of acute lateral ankle ligament injury in the athlete.

    PubMed

    van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J; McCollum, Graham A; Calder, James D F; van Dijk, C Niek

    2013-06-01

    Inversion injuries involve about 25 % of all injuries of the musculoskeletal system and about 50 % of these injuries are sport-related. This article reviews the acute lateral ankle injuries with special emphasis on a rationale for treatment of these injuries in athletes. A narrative review was performed using Pubmed/Medline, Ovid and Embase using key words: ankle ligaments, injury, lateral ligament, ankle sprain and athlete. Articles related to the topic were included and reviewed. It is estimated that one inversion injury of the ankle occurs for every 10,000 people each day. Ankle sprains constitute 7-10 % of all admissions to hospital emergency departments. Inversion injuries involve about 25 % of all injuries of the musculoskeletal system, and about 50 % of these injuries are sport-related. The lateral ankle ligament complex consists of three ligaments: the anterior talofibular ligament, the calcaneofibular ligament and the posterior talofibular ligament. The most common trauma mechanism is supination and adduction (inversion) of the plantar-flexed foot. Delayed physical examination provides a more accurate diagnosis. Ultrasound and MRI can be useful in diagnosing associated injury and are routine investigations in professional athletes. Successful treatment of grade II and III acute lateral ankle ligament injuries can be achieved with individualized aggressive, non-operative measures. RICE therapy is the treatment of choice for the first 4-5 days to reduce pain and swelling. Initially, 10-14 days of immobilization in a below the knee cast/brace is beneficial followed by a period in a lace-up brace or functional taping reduces the risk of recurrent injury. Acute repair of the lateral ankle ligaments in grade III injuries in professional athletes may give better results.

  2. Randomized controlled noninferiority trial to compare extended release acetaminophen and ibuprofen for the treatment of ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Dalton, James D; Schweinle, Jo Ellen

    2006-11-01

    To compare acetaminophen extended release 1,300 mg 3 times daily and ibuprofen 400 mg 3 times daily for treatment of signs and symptoms of grade I or II lateral ankle sprains. Patients (N=260) 18 years or older and with grade I or II lateral ankle sprains were randomized to receive acetaminophen extended release 1,300 mg 3 times daily or ibuprofen 400 mg 3 times daily for 9 days. Primary endpoint was change from baseline at day 4 in pain on walking. Other endpoints included change from baseline at day 9 in pain on walking; change from baseline at days 4 and 9 in ability to walk and ankle swelling, bruising, and range of motion; satisfaction with treatment on days 4 and 9; percentage of patients with positive anterior drawer test on day 4; and time to resume normal activity. Safety assessments consisted of reported adverse events. This study had a noninferiority design in which the hypothesis was that acetaminophen extended release was not inferior to ibuprofen for treatment of signs and symptoms of grade I or II lateral ankle sprains. The difference in least squares means (acetaminophen extended release, ibuprofen) with respect to the primary endpoint within the per-protocol population was -0.88; acetaminophen extended release was comparable to ibuprofen for the primary endpoint because the upper limit (3.26) of the 1-sided 95% confidence interval (CI) for the difference in least squares means did not exceed the noninferiority limit of 6.90. The intention-to-treat population was used to test the second step of the 2-step testing process because the null hypothesis was rejected in the noninferiority test. For this analysis, the difference between acetaminophen extended release and ibuprofen in the least squares mean change from baseline for the primary endpoint was -1.63 (not significant). Results showed that acetaminophen extended release was noninferior to ibuprofen with respect to the secondary endpoints. No serious drug-related adverse events were reported. The

  3. How to Stretch Your Ankle After a Sprain

    MedlinePlus

    ... to seven days. First is restoration of ankle range of motion, which should begin when you can tolerate weight bearing. Once ankle range of motion has been almost or completely restored, you must ...

  4. Interest of rehabilitation in healing and preventing recurrence of ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Guillodo, Y; Simon, T; Le Goff, A; Saraux, A

    2013-10-01

    To assess the impact of rehabilitation on healing and recurrence rate of ankle sprain, 1year apart, 111 patients, who suffered an ankle sprain (67 men and 44 women; 17 mild sprains, 67 medium and 27 severe), were included by emergency physicians of four emergency rooms (ER) of Finistère. The physician was free to prescribe, or not, further investigations. He prescribed systematically to patients RICE (rest, ice, compression, elevation) protocol, put an ankle brace, and gave a prescription of standardized rehabilitation. The prescription was the same for the four ER. All patients were recalled to 1year. Of the 111 patients initially included, 21 patients were excluded for lack of response after three phone calls. In the end, 90 patients were assessable (56 men and 34 women), mean age 31.4±12.6years (range 15-55) at the time of initial trauma. Emergency physicians had diagnosed, initially, 16 mild sprains (17.8%), 56 medium sprains (62.2%) and 18 severe sprains (20%). Of the 90 patients, 73 patients have been rehabilitated (81.1%). Of the 44 accidents of everyday life, 31 were rehabilitated (70.5%). Of the 27 sports accidents, 25 were rehabilitated (92.6%). Of the 19 work-related injuries, 17 were rehabilitated (89.5%). There is no significant relationship between rehabilitation and no recurrence (P=0.45) nor between rehabilitation and full recovery of the ankle (P=0.59). We find no association between rehabilitation and prevention of recurrence, nor between rehabilitation and healing of patients. However, our study is limited by the small size of the non-rehabilitated group. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. Severe open ankle sprain (SOAS): a lesion presenting as a penetrating soft tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Soubeyrand, Marc; Vincent-Mansour, César; Guidon, Julie; Asselineau, Alain; Ducharnes, Gildas; Molina, Véronique

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective case study was to describe the incidence and clinical features of severe open ankle sprain (SOAS), defined as a tear of the lateral or medial collateral ligaments with an associated transverse tear of the skin over the corresponding malleolus. To this end, we reviewed the medical records of patients with SOAS managed between January 2005 and January 2009, using the databases of 3 different orthopedic trauma centers. Our review revealed 9 patients with SOAS, 7 (77.77%) of which involved the lateral ligaments and 2 (22.22%) of which involved the medial ligaments. The median age was 32 (range 21 to 45) years, and the injury occurred as a result of a motor vehicle accident in 6 (66.67%) patients, and as a result of a fall from a height in 3 (33.33%) patients. Two tendons were damaged in 2 (22.22%) patients, the deep fibular nerve (deep peroneal nerve) in 2 (22.22%) patients, and the anterior tibial artery in 1 (11.11%) patient. The only abnormality on plain radiographs was pneumarthrosis, which was present in 5 (55.56%) patients. The incidence of SOAS is rare, accounting for 0.002% (9/438,000) of all trauma cases and 0.22% (9/4142) of all cases of ankle trauma. The diagnosis was confirmed by intraoperative stress-maneuvers in all 9 patients. In conclusion, SOAS should be suspected in patients who present with a traumatic skin wound over the malleolus. Copyright 2010 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Lateral ankle triad: the triple injury of ankle synovitis, lateral ankle instability, and peroneal tendon tear.

    PubMed

    Franson, Justin; Baravarian, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Many articles have been published that discuss various lateral ankle injuries and specific lateral ankle pathology. The purpose of this article is to explore and present a specific combination of findings that the author's multiphysician practice has noticed on a frequently recurring basis. The triple injury of ankle synovitis, ankle instability, and peroneal tendon tear can be termed the Lateral Ankle Triad. While it is common to find each of these specific injuries individually, they are often found in combination. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The effect of 2 Hz and 100 Hz electrical stimulation of acupoint on ankle sprain in rats.

    PubMed

    Hahm, Tae Soo

    2007-04-01

    The electrical stimulation of acupoint (ESA) releases several endogenous neuropeptides, which play important roles in management of pain and inflammation. ESA with low and high frequencies has been shown to release different neuropepides, suggesting its various therapeutic effects. Pain and edema are major problems for ankle sprain. However, there have been few reports on the effects of ESA for ankle sprain. We aimed to investigate that ESA can reduce pain and edema resulting from ankle sprain, and whether there is a difference in therapeutic effects between low and high frequency ESA. To induce ankle sprain in Sprague-Dawley rats, the ankle of right hindpaw was overextended in direction of simultaneous inversion and plantar flexion. Stepping force and edema in the paw of the sprained ankle were measured by electronic balance and plethysmometer, respectively. In both 2 and 100 Hz ESA groups, stepping force was increased significantly in similar degrees (p<0.05). Only 2 Hz ESA produced the significant rapid decrease in ankle edema. This study demonstrates that ESA of 2 Hz and 100 Hz shows comparable analgesic effects, but only 2 Hz ESA can facilitate the reduction of edema caused by ankle sprain.

  8. Gait and physical impairments in patients with acute ankle sprains who did not receive physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Punt, Ilona M; Ziltener, Jean-Luc; Laidet, Magali; Armand, Stéphane; Allet, Lara

    2015-01-01

    To assess ankle function 4 weeks after conservative management and to examine the correlation of function with gait. A prospective comparison study. Thirty patients with grade I or II acute ankle sprains were followed up after 4 weeks of conservative management not involving physical therapy. Participants underwent a clinical assessment and had to walk at a normal self-selected walking speed. Their results were compared with the data of 15 healthy subjects. Participants' joint swelling, muscle strength, passive mobility, and pain were assessed. In addition, patients' temporal-spatial, kinematic, and kinetic gait data were measured while walking. Muscle strength and passive mobility were significantly reduced on the injured side compared with the noninjured side (P < .001). During gait analysis, patients with ankle sprains showed slower walking speed, shorter step length, shorter single support time, reduced and delayed maximum plantar flexion, decreased maximum power, and decreased maximum moment (P < .050) compared with healthy persons. Decreased walking speed was mainly correlated with pain (R = -0.566, P = .001) and deficits in muscle strength of dorsiflexors (R = 0.506, P = .004). Four weeks after an ankle sprain, patients who did not receive physical therapy showed physical impairments of the ankle that were correlated with gait parameters. These findings might help fine-tune rehabilitation protocols. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Treatment and prevention of acute and recurrent ankle sprain: an overview of systematic reviews with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Delahunt, Eamonn; Holden, Sinead

    2017-01-01

    Ankle sprains are highly prevalent with high risk of recurrence. Consequently, there are a significant number of research reports examining strategies for treating and preventing acute and recurrent sprains (otherwise known as chronic ankle instability (CAI)), with a coinciding proliferation of review articles summarising these reports. To provide a systematic overview of the systematic reviews evaluating treatment strategies for acute ankle sprain and CAI. Overview of intervention systematic reviews. Individuals with acute ankle sprain/CAI. The primary outcomes were injury/reinjury incidence and function. 46 papers were included in this systematic review. The reviews had a mean score of 6.5/11 on the AMSTAR quality assessment tool. There was strong evidence for bracing and moderate evidence for neuromuscular training in preventing recurrence of an ankle sprain. For the combined outcomes of pain, swelling and function after an acute sprain, there was strong evidence for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and early mobilisation, with moderate evidence supporting exercise and manual therapy techniques. There was conflicting evidence regarding the efficacy of surgery and acupuncture for the treatment of acute ankle sprains. There was insufficient evidence to support the use of ultrasound in the treatment of acute ankle sprains. For the treatment of acute ankle sprain, there is strong evidence for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and early mobilisation, with moderate evidence supporting exercise and manual therapy techniques, for pain, swelling and function. Exercise therapy and bracing are supported in the prevention of CAI. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. [Therapy of acute ankle sprain: one-year results of primary conservative treatment].

    PubMed

    Suhr, A; Mückley, T; Hofmann, G O; Spahn, G

    2012-03-01

    Ankle sprains (supination-eversion injury) have a high incidence. Conservative treatment is generally the method of choice. This study is intended to evaluate the 1-year results of a standardised treatment protocol. A total of 416 patients who had suffered an ankle sprain were included into this study. All of them had undergone primary conservative treatment. A total of 66 of them (15.9 %) had undergone operative treatment within one year after injury. The indications for operation were persistent pain, swelling or persistent instability. In 33 patients an arthroscopy for evaluation of the joint and debridement was used. In the case of a persistent instability 22 ligament augmentations (Kuner periostal flap) and 11 peroneus tenodesis (Watson-Jones) were performed. The evaluation was done by using the AOFAS score ("Ankle Hindfoot Scale" of the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society). A 1-year follow-up was possible in 96.4 % of the patients. The mean AOFAS score was 77.1 ± 10.5 points after conservative treatment. Those patients who needed an arthroscopic debridement had a slightly better outcome (AOFAS score 79.5 ± 10.2 points). Patients who had undergone stabilisation operations tended to have the best outcome (p = 0.093). The AOFAS score was 79.6 ± 15.4 points in patients after periostal flap augmentation, respectively, 83.0 ± 7.4 points after peroneus tenodesis. The results confirm the benefit of conservative treatment in acute ankle sprain. Even so about 15 - 20 % of the patients still suffer from persistent pain, swelling or instability. The indication for operative intervention should be made relatively broadly. Most of these patients profit from the operation. Above all, after ankle sprain patients need a continuous re-evaluation by a specialised centre during the first post-injury year. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Rehabilitation of the Ankle after Acute Sprain or Chronic Instability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattacola, Carl G.; Dwyer, Maureen K.

    2002-01-01

    Outlines rehabilitation concepts applicable to acute and chronic ankle injury, providing evidence for current techniques used in ankle rehabilitation and describing a functional rehabilitation program that progresses from basic to advanced, while taking into account empirical data from the literature and clinical practice. The article notes that…

  12. Prospective Epidemiological Study of Basketball Injuries During One Competitive Season: Ankle Sprains and Overuse Knee Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Cumps, Elke; Verhagen, Evert; Meeusen, Romain

    2007-01-01

    This prospective cohort study aims to assess the overall incidence of acute and overuse basketball injuries and identifies risk factors associated with ankle sprains and knee overuse injuries. In total, 164 senior players (23.7 years ± 7.0) of all levels of play, and including both men and women, participated voluntarily during one season. A total of 139 acute and 87 overuse injuries were reported, resulting in an overall injury incidence of 9.8 (8.5 to 11.1) per 1,000 hours. The incidence of acute injuries was 6.0/1,000 hours. Ankle sprains (n = 34) accounted for most acute injuries, and 52.9% of all players with ankle sprains reported a previous ankle sprain. Relative Risks (RR) and Odds Ratio (OR) with their 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) were calculated to determine significant differences. Landing on an opponent’s foot was the major inciting event, significantly more so than non contact mechanisms (RR=2.1 [95% CI: 1.0-4.2]). Acute knee injuries resulted in the highest playing absence (7 weeks 2 days ± 9 weeks 1 day). Overuse injury incidence was 3.8/1,000 hours. The knee (1.5/1,000 hours) was the most common site. Forward players sustained less knee overuse injuries than players of all other playing positions, and significantly less than center players (OR=0.5 [95% CI: 0.2-0.9]). This study showed that ankle sprains and overuse knee injuries are the most common injuries in basketball, both accounting for 14.8%. Injury prevention programmes however should not concentrate on those injuries only, but might one to consider that acute knee injuries, in spite of the fact that they occur less frequently, also merit further research. Key pointsAnkle sprains are the most common acute injuries in basketball with the inciting event being landing on an opponent’s foot or changing direction.Anterior knee pain is the most common overuse injury. Etiologic factors are well described in literature, but prevention strategies are lacking.Acute knee injuries account for the

  13. Effectiveness of exercise therapy and manual mobilisation in ankle sprain and functional instability: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    van der Wees, Philip J; Lenssen, Anton F; Hendriks, Erik J M; Stomp, Derrick J; Dekker, Joost; de Bie, Rob A

    2006-01-01

    This study critically reviews the effectiveness of exercise therapy and manual mobilisation in acute ankle sprains and functional instability by conducting a systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Trials were searched electronically and manually from 1966 to March 2005. Randomised controlled trials that evaluated exercise therapy or manual mobilisation of the ankle joint with at least one clinically relevant outcome measure were included. Internal validity of the studies was independently assessed by two reviewers. When applicable, relative risk (RR) or standardised mean differences (SMD) were calculated for individual and pooled data. In total 17 studies were included. In thirteen studies the intervention included exercise therapy and in four studies the effects of manual mobilisation of the ankle joint was evaluated. Average internal validity score of the studies was 3.1 (range 1 to 7) on a 10-point scale. Exercise therapy was effective in reducing the risk of recurrent sprains after acute ankle sprain: RR 0.37 (95% CI 0.18 to 0.74), and with functional instability: RR 0.38 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.62). No effects of exercise therapy were found on postural sway in patients with functional instability: SMD: 0.38 (95% CI -0.15 to 0.91). Four studies demonstrated an initial positive effect of different modes of manual mobilisation on dorsiflexion range of motion. It is likely that exercise therapy, including the use of a wobble board, is effective in the prevention of recurrent ankle sprains. Manual mobilisation has an (initial) effect on dorsiflexion range of motion, but the clinical relevance of these findings for physiotherapy practice may be limited.

  14. The acute effects of local vibration therapy on ankle sprain and hamstring strain injuries.

    PubMed

    Peer, Kimberly S; Barkley, Jacob E; Knapp, Danielle M

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if biomechanical muscle stimulation (BMS) applied directly to different segments of the body using the Swisswing device results in acute improvements in range of motion and perceived stiffness in physically active adults with acute or subacute ankle sprain and hamstring strain injuries. Two separate groups of individuals with grade I or II ankle sprain (n = 5; 21.2 +/- 1.9 years) or hamstring strain (Nn= 5; 20.6 +/- 1.8 year) underwent 20 minutes of a controlled therapy consisting of ice, compression, and elevation, and 10 minutes of segmental BMS using the Swisswing at 20 Hz. Ankle (dorsiflexion, plantar flexion, inversion, eversion), hamstring flexibility, and subjective ratings of stiffness were assessed prior to control treatment (baseline), post-control treatment, and post-Swisswing treatment. Relative to the post-control condition, Swisswing treatment significantly (P < 0.03 for all) increased ankle dorsiflexion and eversion and hamstring flexibility, and significantly (P ankle and hamstring stiffness. Segmental BMS therapy using the Swisswing device appears to have significant acute benefits for improving flexibility and reducing perceived stiffness in healthy adults with ankle or hamstring injury. Future research is needed to determine the duration of these effects and if repeated periods of segmental BMS therapy aid in long-term injury recovery.

  15. How to Strengthen Your Ankle After a Sprain

    MedlinePlus

    ... once you can bear weight comfortably and your range of motion is near full. There are several types of ... to isotonic exercises, which involve using your ankle's range of motion against some form of resistance. The photos below ...

  16. Biomechanical analysis of ankle ligamentous sprain injury cases from televised basketball games: Understanding when, how and why ligament failure occurs.

    PubMed

    Panagiotakis, Emmanouil; Mok, Kam-Ming; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Bull, Anthony M J

    2017-05-25

    Ankle sprains due to landing on an opponent's foot are common in basketball. There is no analysis to date that provides a quantification of this injury mechanism. The aim of this study was to quantify the kinematics of this specific injury mechanism and relate this to lateral ankle ligament biomechanics. Case series. The model-based image-matching technique was used to quantify calcaneo-fibular-talar kinematics during four ankle inversion sprain injury incidents in televised NBA basketball games. The four incidents follow the same injury pattern in which the players of interest step onto an opponent's foot with significant inversion and a diagnosed ankle injury. A geometric analysis was performed to calculate the in vivo ligament strains and strain rates for the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) and the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL). Despite the controlled selection of cases, the results show that there are two distinct injury mechanisms: sudden inversion and internal rotation with low levels of plantarflexion; and a similar mechanism without internal rotation. The first of these mechanisms results in high ATFL and CFL strains, whereas the second of these strains the CFL in isolation. The injury mechanism combined with measures of the ligament injury in terms of percentage of strain to failure correlate directly with the severity of the injury quantified by return-to-sport. The opportunity to control excessive internal rotation through proprioceptive training and/or prophylactic footwear or bracing could be utilised to reduce the severity of common ankle injuries in basketball. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of a proprioceptive balance board training program for the prevention of ankle sprains: a prospective controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Evert; van der Beek, Allard; Twisk, Jos; Bouter, Lex; Bahr, Roald; van Mechelen, Willem

    2004-09-01

    Ankle sprains are the most common injuries in a variety of sports. A proprioceptive balance board program is effective for prevention of ankle sprains in volleyball players. Prospective controlled study. There were 116 male and female volleyball teams followed prospectively during the 2001-2002 season. Teams were randomized by 4 geographical regions to an intervention group (66 teams, 641 players) and control group (50 teams, 486 players). Intervention teams followed a prescribed balance board training program; control teams followed their normal training routine. The coaches recorded exposure on a weekly basis for each player. Injuries were registered by the players within 1 week after onset. Significantly fewer ankle sprains in the intervention group were found compared to the control group (risk difference = 0.4/1000 playing hours; 95% confidence interval, 0.1-0.7). A significant reduction in ankle sprain risk was found only for players with a history of ankle sprains. The incidence of overuse knee injuries for players with history of knee injury was increased in the intervention group. History of knee injury may be a contraindication for proprioceptive balance board training. Use of proprioceptive balance board program is effective for prevention of ankle sprain recurrences.

  18. Effect of accelerated rehabilitation on function after ankle sprain: randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bleakley, Chris M; O'Connor, Seán R; Tully, Mark A; Rocke, Laurence G; Macauley, Domhnall C; Bradbury, Ian; Keegan, Stephen; McDonough, Suzanne M

    2010-05-10

    To compare an accelerated intervention incorporating early therapeutic exercise after acute ankle sprains with a standard protection, rest, ice, compression, and elevation intervention. Randomised controlled trial with blinded outcome assessor. Accident and emergency department and university based sports injury clinic. 101 patients with an acute grade 1 or 2 ankle sprain. Participants were randomised to an accelerated intervention with early therapeutic exercise (exercise group) or a standard protection, rest, ice, compression, and elevation intervention (standard group). The primary outcome was subjective ankle function (lower extremity functional scale). Secondary outcomes were pain at rest and on activity, swelling, and physical activity at baseline and at one, two, three, and four weeks after injury. Ankle function and rate of reinjury were assessed at 16 weeks. An overall treatment effect was in favour of the exercise group (P=0.0077); this was significant at both week 1 (baseline adjusted difference in treatment 5.28, 98.75% confidence interval 0.31 to 10.26; P=0.008) and week 2 (4.92, 0.27 to 9.57; P=0.0083). Activity level was significantly higher in the exercise group as measured by time spent walking (1.2 hours, 95% confidence interval 0.9 to 1.4 v 1.6, 1.3 to 1.9), step count (5621 steps, 95% confidence interval 4399 to 6843 v 7886, 6357 to 9416), and time spent in light intensity activity (53 minutes, 95% confidence interval 44 to 60 v 76, 58 to 95). The groups did not differ at any other time point for pain at rest, pain on activity, or swelling. The reinjury rate was 4% (two in each group). An accelerated exercise protocol during the first week after ankle sprain improved ankle function; the group receiving this intervention was more active during that week than the group receiving standard care. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN13903946.

  19. Early functional outcome of two different orthotic concepts in ankle sprains: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Best, Raymond; Böhle, Caroline; Schiffer, Thorsten; Petersen, Wolf; Ellermann, Andree; Brueggemann, Gert Peter; Liebau, Christian

    2015-07-01

    Purpose of the study was the evaluation of the early functional outcome of patients with an acute ankle sprain treated either with a semirigid, variable, phase-adapted modular ankle orthosis or an invariable orthotic reference device. Forty-seven patients with acute ankle sprain grade II or more were included. In addition, 77 healthy controls as a reference were investigated. The injured subjects were treated with one of the two devices by random for 6 weeks. Ankle scores (FAOS, AOFAS) were taken at baseline after injury, 1 and 3 months after injury. Functional performance tests (balance platform, zig zag run, shuttle run, vertical drop jump) were performed at 1 and 3 months after injury. No significant score differences could be found between the two intervention groups except for achieving a preinjury activity level after 3 months only in the modular orthosis group. Postural functional performances (balance test) also showed no significant differences whereas the results of the agility tests revealed small but significant better results in the modular orthosis group in comparison to the invariable orthosis group. Cohen's effect sizes were high. Differences between the two intervention groups were marginal and very small but significant and--regarding Cohen's effect sizes--effective. Especially relating to functional performance, this might be a careful indication that a more effective strategy for promoting a protected, rapid recovery to physical activity after ankle sprains might be achieved by applying a phase-adapted ankle orthosis. Especially in athletic patients, phase-adapted orthosis should be further investigated and considered to ensure fully protected ligament healing as well as to regain early functional recovery.

  20. IINCIDENCE OF ANKLE SPRAINS IN SOCCER PLAYERS WITH JOINT HYPERMOBILITY SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Rodrigo Barreiros; Bertolini, Fabricio Melo; Vieira, Tallys Campos; Aguiar, Rodrigo Manso; Pinheiro, Guilherme Baldez; Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos Pace

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Eighty-three soccer players aged between 14 and 19 years, in the basic category of a professional soccer club in the city of Belo Horizonte, were followed up during the 2009 season. Methods: A prospective observational cohort study was conducted, in which these soccer players were divided randomly into two groups. The first consisted of individuals with joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), totaling 22 players, and the second was a control group with 61 players without this syndrome, determined through a physical examinati. Results: Both groups were studied with regard to incidence of ankle sprains. At the end of this period, the data were compiled and statistical analysis was performed. A total of 43 cases of ankle injury due to sprains were recorded, of which nine episodes were in players with JHS, thus making p = 0.106. The significance level was 5%. Conclusion: We were able to conclude that in our study there was insufficient evidence to assert that there is an association with increased incidence of ankle sprains among patients with JHS. PMID:27047888

  1. Single-leg drop landing motor control strategies following acute ankle sprain injury.

    PubMed

    Doherty, C; Bleakley, C; Hertel, J; Caulfield, B; Ryan, J; Delahunt, E

    2015-08-01

    No research currently exists investigating the effect of acute injury on single-limb landing strategies. The aim of the current study was to analyze the coordination strategies of participants in the acute phase of lateral ankle sprain (LAS) injury. Thirty-seven participants with acute, first-time LAS and 19 uninjured participants completed a single-leg drop landing task on both limbs. Three-dimensional kinematic (angular displacement) and sagittal plane kinetic (moment-of-force) data were acquired for the joints of the lower extremity from 200 ms pre-initial contact (IC) to 200 ms post-IC. The peak magnitude of the vertical component of the ground reaction force (GRF) was also computed. Injured participants displayed a bilateral increase in hip flexion, with altered transverse plane kinematic profiles at the knee and ankle for both limbs (P < 0.05). This coincided with a reduction in the net-supporting flexor moment of the lower extremity (P < 0.05) and magnitude of the peak vertical GRF for the injured limb (21.82 ± 2.44 N/kg vs 24.09 ± 2.77 N/kg; P = 0.013) in injured participants compared to control participants. These results demonstrate that compensatory movement strategies are utilized by participants with acute LAS to successfully reduce the impact forces of landing. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Incidence of Ankle Sprains Among Active-Duty Members of the United States Armed Services From 1998 Through 2006

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Kenneth L.; Owens, Brett D.; DeBerardino, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Ankle sprains have been reported as one of the most common injuries sustained by members of the US Armed Services. However, little is known about the incidence rate and injury patterns associated with ankle sprains in this population. Objective: To examine the incidence of ankle sprains among active-duty members of the US Armed Services from 1998 through 2006. A secondary objective was to describe the sex, age, and service-specific injury patterns in this young, physically active population. Design: Cohort study. Patients or Other Participants: All active-duty service members from the day they enter military service until the day they leave military service and US Army Reserve and National Guard service members during periods of active duty and mobilization. Main Outcome Measure(s): Injury data were extracted from the Defense Medical Epidemiological Database from 1998 through 2006. All data for ankle sprains, coded according to the International Classification of Diseases (9th revision), were included. Cases were limited to those injuries reported as first occurrences. Incidence rates (IRs) were calculated per 1000 person-years by sex, age, and service. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used to assess the strength of association between the incidence of ankle sprain and the independent variables of sex, age, and service. Results: From 1998 through 2006, 423 581 service members sustained ankle sprains and 12 118 863 person-years at risk to injury were documented in this population. The incidence rate was 34.95 (95% CI  =  34.85, 35.06) per 1000 person-years at risk. Females were 21% more likely (IRR  =  1.21, 95% CI  =  1.21, 1.23) to sustain an ankle sprain than males. Sex-specific IR varied by age and service. Differences in the rate of ankle sprains were also noted by age and service. Conclusions: The incidence of ankle sprains among US service members was 5 times greater than that

  3. [Reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments with hamstring tendon autograft in patients with chronic ankle instability].

    PubMed

    Richter, J; Volz, R; Immendörfer, M; Schulz, M

    2012-02-01

    Reconstruction of the anterior talofibular (ATFL) and calcaneofibular (CFL) ligament in patients with chronic lateral ankle instability. Symptomatic chronic lateral ankle instability. Bony malalignment, advanced arthritic changes of the ankle joint, diabetic foot syndrome. Reconstruction of the ATFL and CFL with a free gracilisor or semitendinosus tendon graft through a V-shaped tunnel at the insertion site of the ATFL on the talar neck as well as a transfibular tunnel directed anterior to posterior through the fibula tip to a blind ending tunnel in the calcaneus at the insertion site of the CFL. Insertion of the graft through the talar tunnel, passing both graft ends through the fibular tunnel to the calcaneus. Fixation with a bioabsorbable screw. Short leg cast for 10-14 days and partial weight-bearing. Afterwards ankle brace for 6 weeks and functional physical therapy. From December 2003 to August 2005, reconstruction of the ATFL and CFL with a hamstring tendon autograft was performed in 20 patients with chronic lateral instability of the ankle joint. All patients were evaluated after a mean follow-up time of 1.8 years (15-36 months). Clinical evaluation referred to the AOFAS score. Stress radiography was performed for objective assessment of lateral ankle stability. Postoperatively 19 of 20 patients reported good subjective stability with no further ankle sprains. The mean postoperative AOFAS score was 92 of 100 points (72-100). Stress radiography showed a significant reduction of both lateral ankle instability and talar tilt.

  4. Manual therapy in joint and nerve structures combined with exercises in the treatment of recurrent ankle sprains: A randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo; Vergara-Vila, Marta; Val-Otero, Sandra; Rivera-Prieto, Cristina; Pecos-Martin, Daniel; Gallego-Izquierdo, Tomás; Ferragut-Garcías, Alejandro; Romero-Franco, Natalia

    2016-12-01

    Recurrent ankle sprains often involve residual symptoms for which subjects often perform proprioceptive or/and strengthening exercises. However, the effectiveness of mobilization to influence important nerve structures due to its anatomical distribution like tibial and peroneal nerves is unclear. To analyze the effects of proprioceptive/strengthening exercises versus the same exercises and manual therapy including mobilizations to influence joint and nerve structures in the management of recurrent ankle sprains. A randomized single-blind controlled clinical trial. Fifty-six patients with recurrent ankle sprains and regular sports practice were randomly assigned to experimental or control group. The control group performed 4 weeks of proprioceptive/strengthening exercises; the experimental group performed 4 weeks of the same exercises combined with manual therapy (mobilizations to influence joint and nerve structures). Pain, self-reported functional ankle instability, pressure pain threshold (PPT), ankle muscle strength, and active range of motion (ROM) were evaluated in the ankle joint before, just after and one month after the interventions. The within-group differences revealed improvements in all of the variables in both groups throughout the time. Between-group differences revealed that the experimental group exhibited lower pain levels and self-reported functional ankle instability and higher PPT, ankle muscle strength and ROM values compared to the control group immediately after the interventions and one month later. A protocol involving proprioceptive and strengthening exercises and manual therapy (mobilizations to influence joint and nerve structures) resulted in greater improvements in pain, self-reported functional joint stability, strength and ROM compared to exercises alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The ability of the Biodex Stability System to distinguish level of function in subjects with a second-degree ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Perron, Marc; Hébert, Luc J; McFadyen, Bradford J; Belzile, Sylvain; Regniére, Mario

    2007-01-01

    To assess the capacity of the Biodex Stability System using a one-leg stance protocol to differentiate between injured and non-injured limbs and between level of disabilities. Cross-sectional study. Military and civilian clinic. Thirty-four individuals with a second-degree lateral ankle sprain and 36 healthy subjects. Subjects were tested on the Stability System 30 days after injury using a one-leg stance protocol in the dynamic limit-of-stability mode. All subjects also filled out a disability questionnaire (Lower Extremity Functional Scale). The groups were compared based on the overall dynamic limit-of-stability score and its relationship with the score on the disability questionnaire was also examined. The overall dynamic limit-of-stability scores (subjects with a lateral ankle sprain: 13.0% (5.5)-26.0% (9.2); healthy subjects: 16.9% (7.9)-27.9% (9.6)) clustered in the lower end of the theoretical range of 0-100%. Statistically significant differences in the overall dynamic limit-of-stability scores were found between the injured and non-injured limbs but group differences were small and clinically not relevant. No significant relationships were found between the overall dynamic limit-of-stability scores and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale scores (58.2 (11.8)) of the subjects with a lateral ankle sprain. The one-leg stance protocol carried out in the dynamic limit-of-stability mode is very challenging and offers a very limited capacity to differentiate between injured and non-injured limbs. The main outcome of the Stability System does not appear to be a good indicator of the functional capacity of people with a lateral ankle sprain.

  6. The cost-effectiveness of semi-rigid ankle brace to facilitate return to work following first-time acute ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Fatoye, Francis; Haigh, Carol

    2016-05-01

    To examine the cost-effectiveness of semi-rigid ankle brace to facilitate return to work following first-time acute ankle sprains. Economic evaluation based on cost-utility analysis. Ankle sprains are a source of morbidity and absenteeism from work, accounting for 15-20% of all sports injuries. Semi-rigid ankle brace and taping are functional treatment interventions used by Musculoskeletal Physiotherapists and Nurses to facilitate return to work following acute ankle sprains. A decision model analysis, based on cost-utility analysis from the perspective of National Health Service was used. The primary outcomes measure was incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, based on quality-adjusted life years. Costs and quality of life data were derived from published literature, while model clinical probabilities were sourced from Musculoskeletal Physiotherapists. The cost and quality adjusted life years gained using semi-rigid ankle brace was £184 and 0.72 respectively. However, the cost and quality adjusted life years gained following taping was £155 and 0.61 respectively. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for the semi-rigid brace was £263 per quality adjusted life year. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that ankle brace provided the highest net-benefit, hence the preferred option. Taping is a cheaper intervention compared with ankle brace to facilitate return to work following first-time ankle sprains. However, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio observed for ankle brace was less than the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence threshold and the intervention had a higher net-benefit, suggesting that it is a cost-effective intervention. Decision-makers may be willing to pay £263 for an additional gain in quality adjusted life year. The findings of this economic evaluation provide justification for the use of semi-rigid ankle brace by Musculoskeletal Physiotherapists and Nurses to facilitate return to work in individuals with first-time ankle

  7. Prophylactic bracing versus taping for the prevention of ankle sprains in high school athletes: a prospective, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Mickel, Timothy J; Bottoni, Craig R; Tsuji, Garvin; Chang, Kevin; Baum, Lenny; Tokushige, Kristie Ann S

    2006-01-01

    Prophylactic ankle taping has been considered the mainstay of ankle injury prevention and has been used at all levels of competitive football. An alternative to taping is a semirigid ankle orthosis. This study prospectively compared the incidence of ankle sprains in high school football players during a single season, after randomization to either prophylactic bracing or taping of both ankles. Of 83 athletes followed up for an entire season, 6 ankle sprains occurred, 3 in each treatment group; and there was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of ankle sprains between the 2 groups. The time required to tape an athlete averaged 67 seconds per ankle, resulting in a total of 97 minutes per ankle during an entire season, and the average cost to tape each ankle during an entire season was greater than the cost of the commercially available brace. The projected cost savings for an athletic program using prophylactic bracing could be substantial when compared with the use of prophylactic taping of the ankle.

  8. Sonographic Findings of Chondral Avulsion Fractures of the Lateral Ankle Ligaments in Children.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Manabu; Maeda, Nana; Takaoka, Takanori; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2017-02-01

    In this series, we aimed to describe the sonographic findings of chondral avulsion fractures that develop concomitant with lateral ankle ligament injury in children. We performed stress sonography during a manual anterior drawer stress procedure of the ankle in 9 skeletally immature patients who had recently had a lateral ankle sprain. Echo videos were obtained through the course of treatment, and all videos were reviewed. We elucidated the common features of chondral avulsion fractures of the lateral ankle ligaments in the children. The features of avulsion fractures on conventional sonography included absence of a fracture with hyperechoic spots (sonographic occult fracture type), cortical discontinuity with hyperechoic spots (cortical disruption fracture type), fracture line in the cortical bone (double-line fracture type), and a step-off deformity of the cortical bone with cartilage (displaced fracture type). In contrast, the features of chondral fractures on stress sonography included abnormal motion of the chondral lesions and mobility/fluidity of hyperechoic spots along the chondral fracture site. The presence of hyperechoic spots around the chondral lesion is an important sonographic sign for diagnosing chondral fractures concomitant with ankle lateral ligament injury. Hence, we believe that stress sonography should be considered for the detection of chondral fractures concomitant with radiographically negative ankle lateral ligament injuries in skeletally immature patients with lateral ankle pain and ankle sprains, if hyperechoic spots are present in the cartilage of the distal fibula. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  9. Long-term impact of ankle sprains on postural control and fascial densification.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Leonid; Lachman, Hila; Freilich, Naama

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of a past ankle sprain (AS) on postural control and fascial changes in the adjacent body segment. 20 young, healthy subjects with a history (≥6 months) of significant (Grades 2, 3) lateral ASs and 20 controls with no history of AS were recruited to cross-sectional case-control study. All subjects performed the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT). The Stecco method was used to evaluate fascial densification in the calf and upper foot areas. The leg with the AS in the study group vs. the right leg in the control group exhibited significant differences (lower scores of SEBT test in the AS group) for the following directions: anterior (p < 0.001), antero-lateral (p < 0.001), posterior (P = 0.028), postero-medial (P = 0.001), medial (P = 0.001), antero-medial (p < 0.001). A comparison between the leg with an AS in the study group and the right leg in the control group showed a significantly high prevalence of fascial densification for the talus internal rotation (p = 0.014), talus retromotion (p = 0.001), talus lateral (p = 0.040) and pes external rotation (p = 0.060) points. There are long term effects of an AS on postural control and on the sensitivity and movability of the fascia in the calf and foot. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cryotherapy for acute ankle sprains: a randomised controlled study of two different icing protocols.

    PubMed

    Bleakley, C M; McDonough, S M; MacAuley, D C; Bjordal, J

    2006-08-01

    The use of cryotherapy in the management of acute soft tissue injury is largely based on anecdotal evidence. Preliminary evidence suggests that intermittent cryotherapy applications are most effective at reducing tissue temperature to optimal therapeutic levels. However, its efficacy in treating injured human subjects is not yet known. To compare the efficacy of an intermittent cryotherapy treatment protocol with a standard cryotherapy treatment protocol in the management of acute ankle sprains. Sportsmen (n = 44) and members of the general public (n = 45) with mild/moderate acute ankle sprains. Subjects were randomly allocated, under strictly controlled double blind conditions, to one of two treatment groups: standard ice application (n = 46) or intermittent ice application (n = 43). The mode of cryotherapy was standardised across groups and consisted of melting iced water (0 degrees C) in a standardised pack. Function, pain, and swelling were recorded at baseline and one, two, three, four, and six weeks after injury. Subjects treated with the intermittent protocol had significantly (p<0.05) less ankle pain on activity than those using a standard 20 minute protocol; however, one week after ankle injury, there were no significant differences between groups in terms of function, swelling, or pain at rest. Intermittent applications may enhance the therapeutic effect of ice in pain relief after acute soft tissue injury.

  11. Modified Evans peroneus brevis lateral ankle stabilization for balancing varus ankle contracture during total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    Lateral ankle instability is frequently encountered when performing total ankle replacement and remains a challenge. In the present techniques report, I have described a modification of the Evans peroneus brevis tendon lateral ankle stabilization harvested through limited incisions using simple topographic anatomic landmarks. The harvested peroneus brevis is then transferred either to the anterior distal tibia concomitantly with total ankle replacement or through the tibia when performed after total ankle replacement and secured with plate and screw fixation. This modified Evans peroneus brevis tendon is useful in providing lateral ankle stability during or after primary and revision total ankle replacement.

  12. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL)

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all–inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive. PMID:26900560

  13. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL).

    PubMed

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-10-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all-inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive.

  14. Topical Ketoprofen Versus Placebo in Treatment of Acute Ankle Sprain in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Serinken, Mustafa; Eken, Cenker; Elicabuk, Hayri

    2016-09-01

    Topical agents have been shown to be effective in soft tissue injuries and commonly used in outpatient clinics. However, the data regarding topical agents in the emergency department is insufficient, and they are not used often in the emergency department setting. The present study aimed to compare the effect of 2.5% topical ketoprofen (gel form) to placebo in patients presenting with ankle sprain to the emergency department. Patients presenting with ankle sprain composed the study population. Study patients were randomized into 2 study arms: 2.5% ketoprofen gel and placebo administered over a 5-cm area locally. Pain alleviation was measured by visual analog scale at 15 and 30 minutes. A total of 100 patients were included in the final analysis. The median pain reduction in ketoprofen and placebo groups at 15 minutes was 27 (19.8-33.4) and 9 (7.6-17), respectively. The median pain reduction at 30 minutes for both groups was 42 (36-50.8) and 20 (17.6-24.4), respectively. Pain improvement either at 15 minutes (median difference: 16 [9-22]) or 30 minutes (median difference: 21 [15-27]) was better in the ketoprofen group than placebo. There were no adverse effects in either group. Ketoprofen gel was superior to placebo at 30 minutes in alleviating pain secondary to ankle sprain in the ED with a high safety profile. Further studies are needed concerning the effect of ketoprofen gel for long-term effects. Level I, high quality prospective randomized study. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Effect of early supervised physiotherapy on recovery from acute ankle sprain: randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Brison, Robert J; Day, Andrew G; Pelland, Lucie; Pickett, William; Johnson, Ana P; Aiken, Alice; Pichora, David R; Brouwer, Brenda

    2016-11-16

     To assess the efficacy of a programme of supervised physiotherapy on the recovery of simple grade 1 and 2 ankle sprains.  A randomised controlled trial of 503 participants followed for six months.  Participants were recruited from two tertiary acute care settings in Kingston, ON, Canada.  The broad inclusion criteria were patients aged ≥16 presenting for acute medical assessment and treatment of a simple grade 1 or 2 ankle sprain. Exclusions were patients with multiple injuries, other conditions limiting mobility, and ankle injuries that required immobilisation and those unable to accommodate the time intensive study protocol.  Participants received either usual care, consisting of written instructions regarding protection, rest, cryotherapy, compression, elevation, and graduated weight bearing activities, or usual care enhanced with a supervised programme of physiotherapy.  The primary outcome of efficacy was the proportion of participants reporting excellent recovery assessed with the foot and ankle outcome score (FAOS). Excellent recovery was defined as a score ≥450/500 at three months. A difference of at least 15% increase in the absolute proportion of participants with excellent recovery was deemed clinically important. Secondary analyses included the assessment of excellent recovery at one and six months; change from baseline using continuous scores at one, three, and six months; and clinical and biomechanical measures of ankle function, assessed at one, three, and six months.  The absolute proportion of patients achieving excellent recovery at three months was not significantly different between the physiotherapy (98/229, 43%) and usual care (79/214, 37%) arms (absolute difference 6%, 95% confidence interval -3% to 15%). The observed trend towards benefit with physiotherapy did not increase in the per protocol analysis and was in the opposite direction by six months. These trends remained similar and were never statistically or clinically

  16. Effect of early supervised physiotherapy on recovery from acute ankle sprain: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Day, Andrew G; Pelland, Lucie; Pickett, William; Johnson, Ana P; Aiken, Alice; Pichora, David R; Brouwer, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of a programme of supervised physiotherapy on the recovery of simple grade 1 and 2 ankle sprains. Design A randomised controlled trial of 503 participants followed for six months. Setting Participants were recruited from two tertiary acute care settings in Kingston, ON, Canada. Participants The broad inclusion criteria were patients aged ≥16 presenting for acute medical assessment and treatment of a simple grade 1 or 2 ankle sprain. Exclusions were patients with multiple injuries, other conditions limiting mobility, and ankle injuries that required immobilisation and those unable to accommodate the time intensive study protocol. Intervention Participants received either usual care, consisting of written instructions regarding protection, rest, cryotherapy, compression, elevation, and graduated weight bearing activities, or usual care enhanced with a supervised programme of physiotherapy. Main outcome measures The primary outcome of efficacy was the proportion of participants reporting excellent recovery assessed with the foot and ankle outcome score (FAOS). Excellent recovery was defined as a score ≥450/500 at three months. A difference of at least 15% increase in the absolute proportion of participants with excellent recovery was deemed clinically important. Secondary analyses included the assessment of excellent recovery at one and six months; change from baseline using continuous scores at one, three, and six months; and clinical and biomechanical measures of ankle function, assessed at one, three, and six months. Results The absolute proportion of patients achieving excellent recovery at three months was not significantly different between the physiotherapy (98/229, 43%) and usual care (79/214, 37%) arms (absolute difference 6%, 95% confidence interval −3% to 15%). The observed trend towards benefit with physiotherapy did not increase in the per protocol analysis and was in the opposite direction by six months

  17. Neuromuscular Control Mechanisms During Single-Leg Jump Landing in Subacute Ankle Sprain Patients: A Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Allet, Lara; Zumstein, Franziska; Eichelberger, Patric; Armand, Stéphane; Punt, Ilona M

    2017-03-01

    Optimal neuromuscular control mechanisms are essential for preparing, maintaining, and restoring functional joint stability during jump landing and to prevent ankle injuries. In subacute ankle sprain patients, neither muscle activity nor kinematics during jump landing has previously been assessed. To compare neuromuscular control mechanisms and kinematics between subacute ankle sprain patients and healthy persons before and during the initial contact phase of a 25-cm single-leg jump. Case-control study. University hospital. Fifteen patients with grade I or II acute ankle sprains were followed up after 4 weeks of conservative management not involving physical therapy. Subjects performed alternately 3 single-leg forward jumps of 25 cm (toe-to-heel distance) barefoot. Their results were compared with the data of 15 healthy subjects. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of the musculus (m.) gastrocnemius lateralis, m. tibialis anterior, and m. peroneus longus as well as kinematics for ankle, knee, and hip joint were recorded for pre-initial contact (IC) phase, post-initial contact phase, and reflex-induced phase. The results showed that EMG activity of the 3 muscles did not differ between ankle sprain patients (n = 15) and healthy persons (n = 15) for any of the analyzed time intervals (all P > .05). However, during the pre-IC phase, ankle sprain patients presented less plantar flexion, as well as during the post-IC phase after jump landing, compared to healthy persons (P < .05). Taken together, these kinematic alterations of the ankle joint can lead to neuromuscular control mechanism disturbances through which functional instability might arise. III. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Management and prevention of acute and chronic lateral ankle instability in athletic patient populations

    PubMed Central

    McCriskin, Brendan J; Cameron, Kenneth L; Orr, Justin D; Waterman, Brian R

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic lateral ankle instability are common in high-demand patient populations. If not managed appropriately, patients may experience recurrent instability, chronic pain, osteochondral lesions of the talus, premature osteoarthritis, and other significant long-term disability. Certain populations, including young athletes, military personnel and those involved in frequent running, jumping, and cutting motions, are at increased risk. Proposed risk factors include prior ankle sprain, elevated body weight or body mass index, female gender, neuromuscular deficits, postural imbalance, foot/ankle malalignment, and exposure to at-risk athletic activity. Prompt, accurate diagnosis is crucial, and evidence-based, functional rehabilitation regimens have a proven track record in returning active patients to work and sport. When patients fail to improve with physical therapy and external bracing, multiple surgical techniques have been described with reliable results, including both anatomic and non-anatomic reconstructive methods. Anatomic repair of the lateral ligamentous complex remains the gold standard for recurrent ankle instability, and it effectively restores native ankle anatomy and joint kinematics while preserving physiologic ankle and subtalar motion. Further preventative measures may minimize the risk of ankle instability in athletic cohorts, including prophylactic bracing and combined neuromuscular and proprioceptive training programs. These interventions have demonstrated benefit in patients at heightened risk for lateral ankle sprain and allow active cohorts to return to full activity without adversely affecting athletic performance. PMID:25793157

  19. Management and prevention of acute and chronic lateral ankle instability in athletic patient populations.

    PubMed

    McCriskin, Brendan J; Cameron, Kenneth L; Orr, Justin D; Waterman, Brian R

    2015-03-18

    Acute and chronic lateral ankle instability are common in high-demand patient populations. If not managed appropriately, patients may experience recurrent instability, chronic pain, osteochondral lesions of the talus, premature osteoarthritis, and other significant long-term disability. Certain populations, including young athletes, military personnel and those involved in frequent running, jumping, and cutting motions, are at increased risk. Proposed risk factors include prior ankle sprain, elevated body weight or body mass index, female gender, neuromuscular deficits, postural imbalance, foot/ankle malalignment, and exposure to at-risk athletic activity. Prompt, accurate diagnosis is crucial, and evidence-based, functional rehabilitation regimens have a proven track record in returning active patients to work and sport. When patients fail to improve with physical therapy and external bracing, multiple surgical techniques have been described with reliable results, including both anatomic and non-anatomic reconstructive methods. Anatomic repair of the lateral ligamentous complex remains the gold standard for recurrent ankle instability, and it effectively restores native ankle anatomy and joint kinematics while preserving physiologic ankle and subtalar motion. Further preventative measures may minimize the risk of ankle instability in athletic cohorts, including prophylactic bracing and combined neuromuscular and proprioceptive training programs. These interventions have demonstrated benefit in patients at heightened risk for lateral ankle sprain and allow active cohorts to return to full activity without adversely affecting athletic performance.

  20. Ankle instability and arthroscopic lateral ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Jorge I; Mangone, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, the surgical management of chronic lateral ankle ligament insufficiency has focused on 2 main categories: local soft-tissue reconstruction and tendon grafts/transfer procedures. There is an increasing interest in the arthroscopic solutions for chronic instability of the ankle. Recent biomechanical studies suggest the at least one of the arthroscopic techniques can provide equivalent results to current open local soft-tissue reconstruction (such as the modified Brostrom technique). Arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament reconstruction is becoming an increasingly acceptable method for the surgical management of chronic lateral ankle instability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fatigue-induced alterations of static and dynamic postural control in athletes with a history of ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Steib, Simon; Zech, Astrid; Hentschke, Christian; Pfeifer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Sensorimotor control is impaired after ankle injury and in fatigued conditions. However, little is known about fatigue-induced alterations of postural control in athletes who have experienced an ankle sprain in the past. To investigate the effect of fatiguing exercise on static and dynamic balance abilities in athletes who have successfully returned to preinjury levels of sport activity after an ankle sprain. Cohort study. University sport science research laboratory. 30 active athletes, 14 with a previous severe ankle sprain (return to sport activity 6-36 months before study entry; no residual symptoms or subjective instability) and 16 uninjured controls. Fatiguing treadmill running in 2 experimental sessions to assess dependent measures. Center-of-pressure sway velocity in single-legged stance and time to stabilization (TTS) after a unilateral jump-landing task (session 1) and maximum reach distance in the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) (session 2) were assessed before and immediately after a fatiguing treadmill exercise. A 2-factorial linear mixed model was specified for each of the main outcomes, and effect sizes (ESs) were calculated as Cohen d. In the unfatigued condition, between-groups differences existed only for the anterior-posterior TTS (P = .05, ES = 0.39). Group-by-fatigue interactions were found for mean SEBT (P = .03, ES = 0.43) and anterior-posterior TTS (P = .02, ES = 0.48). Prefatigue versus postfatigue SEBT and TTS differences were greater in previously injured athletes, whereas static sway velocity increased similarly in both groups. Fatiguing running significantly affected static and dynamic postural control in participants with a history of ankle sprain. Fatigue-induced alterations of dynamic postural control were greater in athletes with a previous ankle sprain. Thus, even after successful return to competition, ongoing deficits in sensorimotor control may contribute to the enhanced ankle reinjury risk.

  2. Short-term natural recovery of ankle sprains following discharge from emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Alice B; Pelland, Lucie; Brison, Robert; Pickett, William; Brouwer, Brenda

    2008-09-01

    Prospective cohort study. To examine the natural recovery from grade I and II ankle injuries over a 1-month period. There is a high rate of injury recurrence and persistence of symptoms following ankle sprains, suggesting that these injuries may not be adequately managed. However, little is known about the recovery process after discharge from emergency departments. Clinical assessment of ankle swelling, strength, and joint mobility and laboratory assessment of peak torque and joint range of motion (ROM) were performed 4 and 30 days following initial clinical assessment in the emergency department. Analyses for repeated measures determined change over time and differences between injured and noninjured ankles. Self-assessed ankle function was evaluated on day 4 and day 30, and its relationship to clinical and laboratory assessments determined. Forty-six subjects entered the study and complete datasets were obtained from 28. Significant swelling, weakness, and mobility restrictions were evident on initial assessment. Symptoms improved over time and, while clinical variables were normal by day 30, laboratory assessment indicated weakness of plantar flexors and limited active and passive ROM at 1 month. Swelling and reduced passive ROM were associated with overall function and limitations in sports and recreation activities, as well as quality of life 1 month postinjury. Clinically assessed strength and ankle dorsiflexion mobility suggested full recovery at 1 month post injury, yet more sensitive measures of ankle impairment and performance detected residual deficits. Persistent impairment and incomplete recovery of self-assessed function suggest the need for management beyond standard emergency department care. Associations between impairment measures and function may provide guidance for treatment intervention.

  3. Association between Patient History and Physical Examination and Osteoarthritis after Ankle Sprain.

    PubMed

    van Ochten, John M; de Vries, Anja D; van Putte, Nienke; Oei, Edwin H G; Bindels, Patrick J E; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; van Middelkoop, Marienke

    2017-09-01

    Structural abnormalities on MRI are frequent after an ankle sprain. To determine the association between patient history, physical examination and early osteoarthritis (OA) in patients after a previous ankle sprain, 98 patients with persistent complaints were selected from a cross-sectional study. Patient history taking and physical examination were applied and MRI was taken. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to test possible associations. Signs of OA (cartilage loss, osteophytes and bone marrow edema) were seen in the talocrural joint (TCJ) in 40% and the talonavicular joint (TNJ) in 49%. Multivariable analysis showed a significant positive association between swelling (OR 3.58, 95%CI 1.13;11.4), a difference in ROM of passive plantar flexion (OR 1.09, 95%CI 1.01;1.18) and bone edema in the TCJ. A difference in ROM of passive plantar flexion (OR 1.07, 95%CI 1.00;1.15) and pain at the end range of dorsiflexion/plantar flexion (OR 5.23, 95%CI 1.88;14.58) were associated with osteophytes in the TNJ. Pain at the end of dorsiflexion/plantar flexion, a difference in ROM of passive plantar flexion and swelling seem to be associated with features of OA (bone marrow edema, osteophytes) in the TCJ and TNJ. Our findings may guide physicians to predict structural joint abnormalities as signs of osteoarthritis. 1b. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. A randomized controlled trial of a passive accessory joint mobilization on acute ankle inversion sprains.

    PubMed

    Green, T; Refshauge, K; Crosbie, J; Adams, R

    2001-04-01

    Passive joint mobilization is commonly used by physical therapists as an intervention for acute ankle inversion sprains. A randomized controlled trial with blinded assessors was conducted to investigate the effect of a specific joint mobilization, the anteroposterior glide on the talus, on increasing pain-free dorsiflexion and 3 gait variables: stride speed (gait speed), step length, and single support time. Forty-one subjects with acute ankle inversion sprains (<72 hours) and no other injury to the lower limb entered the trial. Subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups. The control group received a protocol of rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE). The experimental group received the anteroposterior mobilization, using a force that avoided incurring any increase in pain, in addition to the RICE protocol. Subjects in both groups were treated every second day for a maximum of 2 weeks or until the discharge criteria were met, and all subjects were given a home program of continued RICE application. Outcomes were measured before and after each treatment. The results showed that the experimental group required fewer treatment sessions than the control group to achieve full pain-free dorsiflexion. The experimental group had greater improvement in range of movement before and after each of the first 3 treatment sessions. The experimental group also had greater increases in stride speed during the first and third treatment sessions. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION Addition of a talocrural mobilization to the RICE protocol in the management of ankle inversion injuries necessitated fewer treatments to achieve pain-free dorsiflexion and to improve stride speed more than RICE alone. Improvement in step length symmetry and single support time was similar in both groups.

  5. The Role of the Accessory Malleolar Ossicles and Malleolar Avulsion Fractures in Lateral Ankle Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Matthew M; Sharpe, Jonathan J

    2017-09-01

    While it is well known that ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries in the United States, predictive factors regarding failure of conservative treatment are not well known. There are many biomechanical and epidemiological factors that play a role in recurrence and failure of conservative treatment, but most cases are able to be treated with immobilization and/or rest, ice, elevation, physical therapy, and bracing. We propose that one important risk factor is often overlooked simply due to the fact that a vast majority of these cases resolve without the need for surgery. Accessory ossicles and avulsion fractures of the malleoli or talus may represent a predisposition or marker for ligamentous damage that may lead to the need for lateral ankle ligament repair or reconstruction in the future. We have identified 61 consecutive patients who underwent lateral ankle ligament repair or reconstruction by the primary surgeon from the years 2007 to 2017. Out of those patients who met our inclusion and exclusion criteria, 66% had the presence of osseous pathology consisting of accessory ossicles or avulsion fractures of the medial or lateral malleolus or talus. The proportion of osseous pathology seen with lateral ankle ligament repair or reconstruction was higher than what has been previously reported in both operative and nonoperative settings. This may help identify a risk factor for failure of conservative treatment in patients presenting with acute ankle sprains or ankle instability especially in the active cohort. Level IV: Case series.

  6. Ankle Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... that involve rolling or twisting the feet, like running, dancing, or playing sports. previous continue Can I ... Watch your step when you're walking or running on uneven or cracked surfaces . Don't overdo ...

  7. Functional management of ankle sprains: what volume and intensity of walking is undertaken in the first week postinjury.

    PubMed

    Tully, Mark A; Bleakley, Chris M; O'Connor, Sean R; McDonough, Suzanne M

    2012-09-01

    Acute ankle sprains are usually managed functionally, with advice to undertake progressive weight-bearing and walking. Mechanical loading is an important modular of tissue repair; therefore, the clinical effectiveness of walking after ankle sprain may be dose dependent. The intensity, magnitude and duration of load associated with current functional treatments for ankle sprain are unclear. To describe physical activity (PA) in the first week after ankle sprain and to compare results with a healthy control group. Participants (16-65 years) with an acute ankle sprain were randomised into two groups (standard or exercise). Both groups were advised to apply ice and compression, and walk within the limits of pain. The exercise group undertook additional therapeutic exercises. PA was measured using an activPAL accelerometer, worn for 7 days after injury. Comparisons were made with a non-injured control group. The standard group were significantly less active (1.2 ± 0.4 h activity/day; 5621 ± 2294 steps/day) than the exercise (1.7 ± 0 .7 h/day, p=0.04; 7886 ± 3075 steps/day, p=0.03) and non-injured control groups (1.7 ± 0.4 h/day, p=0.02; 8844 ± 2185 steps/day, p=0.002). Also, compared with the non-injured control group, the standard and exercise groups spent less time in moderate (38.3 ± 12.7 min/day vs 14.5 ± 11.4 min/day, p=0.001 and 22.5 ± 15.9 min/day, p=0.003) and high-intensity activity (4.1 ± 6.9 min/day vs 0.1 ± 0.1 min/day, p=0.001 and 0.62 ± 1.0 min/day p=0.005). PA patterns are reduced in the first week after ankle sprain, which is partly ameliorated with addition of therapeutic exercises. This study represents the first step towards developing evidence-based walking prescription after acute ankle sprain.

  8. Effects of two proprioceptive training programs on ankle range of motion, pain, functional and balance performance in individuals with ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Lazarou, Lazaros; Kofotolis, Nikolaos; Pafis, Georgios; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2017-09-08

    Following ankle sprain, residual symptoms are often apparent, and proprioceptive training is a treatment approach. Evidence, however, is limited and the optimal program has to be identified. To investigate the effects of two post-acute supervised proprioceptive training programs in individuals with ankle sprain. Participants were recruited from a physiotherapy center for ankle sprain rehabilitation. In a pre-post treatment, blinded-assessor design, 22 individuals were randomly allocated to a balance or a proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) group. Both groups received 10 rehabilitation sessions, within a six-week period. Dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM), pain, functional and balance performance were assessed at baseline, at the end of training and eight weeks after training. Follow-up data were provided for 20 individuals. Eight weeks after training, statistically significant (p< 0.017) improvements were found in dorsiflexion ROM and most functional performance measures for both balance and PNF groups. Eight weeks after training, significant (p< 0.017) improvements in the frontal plane balance test and pain were observed for the balance group. Balance and PNF programs are recommended in clinical practice for improving ankle ROM and functional performance in individuals with sprain. Balance programs are also recommended for pain relief.

  9. The implementation effectiveness of the 'Strengthen your ankle' smartphone application for the prevention of ankle sprains: design of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Van Reijen, Miriam; Vriend, Ingrid I; Zuidema, Victor; van Mechelen, Willem; Verhagen, Evert A

    2014-01-07

    Ankle sprains continue to pose a significant burden to the individual athlete, as well as to society as a whole. However, despite ankle sprains being the single most common sports injury and despite an active approach by various Dutch organisations in implementing preventive measures, large-scale community uptake of these preventive measures, and thus actual prevention of ankle sprains, is lagging well behind. In an attempt to bridge this implementation gap, the Dutch Consumer Safety Institute VeiligheidNL developed a freely available interactive App ('Strenghten your ankle' translated in Dutch as: 'Versterk je enkel; available for iOS and Android) that contains - next to general advice on bracing and taping - a proven cost-effective neuromuscular program. The 'Strengthen your ankle' App has not been evaluated against the 'regular' prevention approach in which the neuromuscular program is advocated through written material. The aim of the current project is to evaluate the implementation value of the 'Strengthen your ankle' App as compared to the usual practice of providing injured athletes with written materials. In addition, as a secondary outcome measure, the cost-effectiveness will be assessed against usual practice. The proposed study will be a randomised controlled trial. After stratification for medical caregiver, athletes will be randomised to two study groups. One group will receive a standardized eight-week proprioceptive training program that has proven to be cost-effective to prevent recurrent ankle injuries, consisting of a balance board (machU/ MSG Europe BVBA), and a traditional instructional booklet. The other group will receive the same exercise program and balance board. However, for this group the instructional booklet is exchanged by the interactive 'Strengthen your ankle' App. This trial is the first randomized controlled trial to study the implementation effectiveness of an App for proprioceptive balance board training program in comparison to

  10. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of ankle sprains: an evidence-based clinical guideline.

    PubMed

    Kerkhoffs, Gino M; van den Bekerom, Michel; Elders, Leon A M; van Beek, Peter A; Hullegie, Wim A M; Bloemers, Guus M F M; de Heus, Elly M; Loogman, Masja C M; Rosenbrand, Kitty C J G M; Kuipers, Ton; Hoogstraten, J W A P; Dekker, Rienk; Ten Duis, Henk-Jan; van Dijk, C Niek; van Tulder, Maurits W; van der Wees, Philip J; de Bie, Rob A

    2012-09-01

    Ankle injuries are a huge medical and socioeconomic problem. Many people have a traumatic injury of the ankle, most of which are a result of sports. Total costs of treatment and work absenteeism due to ankle injuries are high. The prevention of recurrences can result in large savings on medical costs. A multidisciplinary clinical practice guideline was developed with the aim to prevent further health impairment of patients with acute lateral ankle ligament injuries by giving recommendations with respect to improved diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities. The recommendations are based on evidence from published scientific research, which was extensively discussed by the guideline committee. This clinical guideline is helpful for healthcare providers who are involved in the management of patients with ankle injuries.

  11. Evaluation of topical ibuprofen cream in the treatment of acute ankle sprains.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, J; Dunn, T

    1994-01-01

    One hundred patients who presented to the accident and emergency (A&E) department with an acute ankle sprain were entered into a study to determine the efficacy of topical ibuprofen cream by using a double-blind placebo controlled design in a single type of soft-tissue injury. The subjects were given either topical ibuprofen cream or a placebo cream in addition to the standard management of the department. Patients kept diaries recording walking ability and pain visual analogue scales for resting, standing and walking. A total of 51 patients returned diaries that were suitable for analysis. Patients using the topical ibuprofen cream had significant reduction in pain scores over the first 48 h of treatment. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7804585

  12. Traumeel vs. diclofenac for reducing pain and improving ankle mobility after acute ankle sprain: a multicentre, randomised, blinded, controlled and non-inferiority trial.

    PubMed

    González de Vega, C; Speed, C; Wolfarth, B; González, J

    2013-10-01

    Acute ankle sprains are common and activity limiting injuries, and topical diclofenac gel has proven efficacy in alleviating pain and restoring function. This trial aimed to compare a topical natural agent, Traumeel with topical diclofenac gel (1%) in the management of acute ankle sprain. This prospective, multicentre, randomised, blinded, active-control and non-inferiority study involved 449 physically active adults sustaining unilateral grade 1 or 2 ankle sprain within the past 24 h. Participants were randomised to receive 2 g of Traumeel ointment (T-O) (n = 152) or Traumeel gel (T-G) (n = 150) or diclofenac gel (D-G) (n = 147), administered topically to the ankle three times a day for 14 days, with 6-weeks follow up. Day 7 median percentage reductions in Visual Analogue Scale pain score were 60.6%, 71.1% and 68.9% for the T-O, T-G and D-G groups, respectively. Total pain relief was reported by 12 (8.5%), 7 (5.0%) and 8 (5.9%) participants in each group, respectively. Median improvements in Foot and Ankle Ability Measure Activities of Daily Living subscale score were 26.2, 26.2 and 25.0 points for T-O, T-G and D-G groups, respectively. Mann-Whitney effect sizes and lower bound confidence intervals demonstrated non-inferiority of Traumeel vs. diclofenac for reducing pain and functional improvement. At 6 weeks, participants reported total pain relief and normal functioning. Adverse events (n = 43) were reported by 31/447 participants (6.9%). Treatments were equally well tolerated. T-O and T-G decreased pain and improved joint function to the same extent as D-G in acute ankle sprain, and were well tolerated. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Clinical Practice published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Traumeel vs. diclofenac for reducing pain and improving ankle mobility after acute ankle sprain: A multicentre, randomised, blinded, controlled and non-inferiority trial

    PubMed Central

    González de Vega, C; Speed, C; Wolfarth, B; González, J

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute ankle sprains are common and activity limiting injuries, and topical diclofenac gel has proven efficacy in alleviating pain and restoring function. This trial aimed to compare a topical natural agent, Traumeel with topical diclofenac gel (1%) in the management of acute ankle sprain. Methods This prospective, multicentre, randomised, blinded, active-control and non-inferiority study involved 449 physically active adults sustaining unilateral grade 1 or 2 ankle sprain within the past 24 h. Participants were randomised to receive 2 g of Traumeel ointment (T-O) (n = 152) or Traumeel gel (T-G) (n = 150) or diclofenac gel (D-G) (n = 147), administered topically to the ankle three times a day for 14 days, with 6-weeks follow up. Results Day 7 median percentage reductions in Visual Analogue Scale pain score were 60.6%, 71.1% and 68.9% for the T-O, T-G and D-G groups, respectively. Total pain relief was reported by 12 (8.5%), 7 (5.0%) and 8 (5.9%) participants in each group, respectively. Median improvements in Foot and Ankle Ability Measure Activities of Daily Living subscale score were 26.2, 26.2 and 25.0 points for T-O, T-G and D-G groups, respectively. Mann–Whitney effect sizes and lower bound confidence intervals demonstrated non-inferiority of Traumeel vs. diclofenac for reducing pain and functional improvement. At 6 weeks, participants reported total pain relief and normal functioning. Adverse events (n = 43) were reported by 31/447 participants (6.9%). Treatments were equally well tolerated. Conclusions T-O and T-G decreased pain and improved joint function to the same extent as D-G in acute ankle sprain, and were well tolerated. PMID:23889885

  14. Electroacupuncture-induced analgesia in a rat model of ankle sprain pain is mediated by spinal alpha-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Koo, Sung Tae; Lim, Kyu Sang; Chung, Kyungsoon; Ju, Hyunsu; Chung, Jin Mo

    2008-03-01

    In a previous study, we showed that electroacupuncture (EA) applied to the SI-6 point on the contralateral forelimb produces long-lasting and powerful analgesia in pain caused by ankle sprain in a rat model. To investigate the underlying mechanism of EA analgesia, the present study tested the effects of various antagonists on known endogenous analgesic systems in this model. Ankle sprain was induced in anesthetized rats by overextending their right ankle with repeated forceful plantar flexion and inversion of the foot. When rats developed pain behaviors (a reduction in weight-bearing of the affected hind limb), EA was applied to the SI-6 point on the contralateral forelimb for 30 min under halothane anesthesia. EA significantly improved the weight-bearing capacity of the affected hind limb for 2h, suggesting an analgesic effect. The alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine (2mg/kg, i.p. or 30 microg, i.t.) completely blocked the EA-induced analgesia, whereas naloxone (1mg/kg, i.p.) failed to block the effect. These results suggest that EA-induced analgesia is mediated by alpha-adrenoceptor mechanisms. Further experiments showed that intrathecal administration of yohimbine, an alpha(2)-adrenergic antagonist, reduced the EA-induced analgesia in a dose-dependent manner, whereas terazosin, an alpha(1)-adrenergic antagonist, did not produce any effect. These data suggest that the analgesic effect of EA in ankle sprain pain is, at least in part, mediated by spinal alpha(2)-adrenoceptor mechanisms.

  15. Avulsion of the perforating branch of the peroneal artery secondary to an ankle sprain: a cause of acute compartment syndrome in the leg.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Mark A; Barnes, James R; Thorpe, Paul L; Williams, James L

    2011-01-01

    In this report, we describe the case of an adult male who developed an acute compartment syndrome localized to the anterior compartment of the leg following an ankle sprain. Compartment syndrome in association with ankle sprain is unusual, and has been previously described in association with avulsion of the perforating peroneal artery. Because of the potential for severe morbidity, we feel that it is important to make foot and ankle surgeons aware of this unusual injury. Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Reliability and Validity Study of the Chamorro Assisted Gait Scale for People with Sprained Ankles, Walking with Forearm Crutches.

    PubMed

    Chamorro-Moriana, Gema; Ridao-Fernández, Carmen; Ojeda, Joaquín; Benítez-Lugo, Marisa; Sevillano, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design and validate a functional assessment scale for assisted gait with forearm crutches (Chamorro Assisted Gait Scale-CHAGS) and to assess its reliability in people with sprained ankles. Thirty subjects who suffered from sprained ankle (anterior talofibular ligament first and second degree) were included in the study. A modified Delphi technique was used to obtain the content validity. The selected items were: pelvic and scapular girdle dissociation(1), deviation of Center of Gravity(2), crutch inclination(3), steps rhythm(4), symmetry of step length(5), cross support(6), simultaneous support of foot and crutch(7), forearm off(8), facing forward(9) and fluency(10). Two raters twice visualized the gait of the sample subjects which were recorded. The criterion-related validity was determined by correlation between CHAGS and Coding of eight criteria of qualitative gait analysis (Viel Coding). Internal consistency and inter and intra-rater reliability were also tested. CHAGS obtained a high and negative correlation with Viel Coding. We obtained a good internal consistency and the intra-class correlation coefficients oscillated between 0.97 and 0.99, while the minimal detectable changes were acceptable. CHAGS scale is a valid and reliable tool for assessing assisted gait with crutches in people with sprained ankles to perform partial relief of lower limbs.

  17. Reliability and Validity Study of the Chamorro Assisted Gait Scale for People with Sprained Ankles, Walking with Forearm Crutches

    PubMed Central

    Ridao-Fernández, Carmen; Ojeda, Joaquín; Benítez-Lugo, Marisa; Sevillano, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to design and validate a functional assessment scale for assisted gait with forearm crutches (Chamorro Assisted Gait Scale—CHAGS) and to assess its reliability in people with sprained ankles. Design Thirty subjects who suffered from sprained ankle (anterior talofibular ligament first and second degree) were included in the study. A modified Delphi technique was used to obtain the content validity. The selected items were: pelvic and scapular girdle dissociation(1), deviation of Center of Gravity(2), crutch inclination(3), steps rhythm(4), symmetry of step length(5), cross support(6), simultaneous support of foot and crutch(7), forearm off(8), facing forward(9) and fluency(10). Two raters twice visualized the gait of the sample subjects which were recorded. The criterion-related validity was determined by correlation between CHAGS and Coding of eight criteria of qualitative gait analysis (Viel Coding). Internal consistency and inter and intra-rater reliability were also tested. Results CHAGS obtained a high and negative correlation with Viel Coding. We obtained a good internal consistency and the intra-class correlation coefficients oscillated between 0.97 and 0.99, while the minimal detectable changes were acceptable. Conclusion CHAGS scale is a valid and reliable tool for assessing assisted gait with crutches in people with sprained ankles to perform partial relief of lower limbs. PMID:27168236

  18. All-inside, anatomical lateral ankle stabilization for revision and complex primary lateral ankle stabilization: a technique guide.

    PubMed

    Prissel, Mark A; Roukis, Thomas S

    2014-12-01

    Lateral ankle instability is a common mechanical problem that often requires surgical management when conservative efforts fail. Historically, myriad open surgical approaches have been proposed. Recently, consideration for arthroscopic management of lateral ankle instability has become popular, with promising results. Unfortunately, recurrent inversion ankle injury following lateral ankle stabilization can occur and require revision surgery. To date, arthroscopic management for revision lateral ankle stabilization has not been described. We present a novel arthroscopic technique combining an arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization kit with a suture anchor ligament augmentation system for revision as well as complex primary lateral ankle stabilization. © 2014 The Author(s).

  19. Lateral ligament reconstruction procedures for the ankle.

    PubMed

    Tourné, Y; Mabit, C

    2017-02-01

    Capsule/ligament lesions of the lateral compartment of the ankle lead to lateral laxity, which is a prime contributor to chronic ankle instability. Lateral ligament reconstruction stabilizes the joint. Exhaustive preoperative clinical and paraclinical work-up is essential. The present article classifies, presents and criticizes the main techniques in terms of long-term stabilization and reduction of osteoarthritis risk. Anatomic ligament repair with reinforcement (mainly extensor retinaculum) or anatomic ligament reconstruction are the two recommended options. Non-anatomic reconstructions using the peroneus brevis should be abandoned. Arthroscopy is increasingly being developed, but results need assessment on longer follow-up than presently available. Postoperative neuromuscular reprogramming is fundamental to optimal recovery. Finally, the concept of complex ankle instability is discussed from the diagnostic and therapeutic points of view. The various forms of ligament reconstruction failure and corresponding treatments are reported.

  20. The effect of 8-weeks proprioceptive exercise program in postural sway and isokinetic strength of ankle sprains of Tunisian athletes.

    PubMed

    Ben Moussa Zouita, A; Majdoub, O; Ferchichi, H; Grandy, K; Dziri, C; Ben Salah, F Z

    2013-12-01

    Our objective is to investigate the effects of proprioceptive exercises rehabilitation on isokinetic strength and postural balance in athletes with sprain ankle. The ankles of 16 subjects were tested: eight in the functional instability (FI) group and eight non-injured (NI) subjects in the control group. Subjects were asked to take part in a testing session. The test order for the postural stability and isokinetic strength tests was randomized to avoid learning or fatigue effects. The testing session started with a 5-minute warm-up. Subjects were then instructed to perform several lower body flexibility exercises. The test procedure consisted in static assessments, where single-limb (right and left) stance postural stability was assessed. Three practice trials were allowed for each subject. The assessment quantifies postural sway velocity while the athlete stands calmly on one foot on the force plate, for each leg. They were asked to stand as still as possible for 30s, upper limbs along the body. The subjects were requested to maintain balance with eyes open and then with the eyes closed on the firm surface. The sway velocity (in degrees per second) is given for all trials. Subjects were allowed a 1-minute rest between tests. The regime of isokinetic evaluation of dorsi-plantar flexions is concentric, with three successive speeds: slow (30°/s, reps 5), average (60°/s, reps 10), and fast (120°/s, reps 15), according to the protocol established by European Group for the development and the isokinetic research and the procedural guidelines. Relative moment of strength and times of acceleration and deceleration were calculated for each set of isokinetic testing repetitions per body side, muscle group and testing speed. The results of tests-retest and between both groups (injured vs. healthy) show that after eight weeks of proprioceptive work, significant increase of maximal strength, decrease in times of acceleration and deceleration at the level of plantar flexors

  1. Value of ultrasonography for detecting chronic injury of the lateral ligaments of the ankle joint compared with ultrasonography findings

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Y; Cai, Y

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of chronic lateral ankle ligament injury. Methods: A total of 120 ankles in 120 patients with a clinical suspicion of chronic ankle ligament injury were examined by ultrasonography by using a 5- to 17-MHz linear array transducer before surgery. The results of ultrasonography were compared with the operative findings. Results: There were 18 sprains and 24 partial and 52 complete tears of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL); 26 sprains, 27 partial and 12 complete tears of the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL); and 1 complete tear of the posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) at arthroscopy and operation. Compared with operative findings, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ultrasonography were 98.9%, 96.2% and 84.2%, respectively, for injury of the ATFL and 93.8%, 90.9% and 83.3%, respectively, for injury of the CFL. The PTFL tear was identified by ultrasonography. The accuracy of identification between acute-on-chronic and subacute–chronic patients did not differ. The accuracies of diagnosing three grades of ATFL injuries were almost the same as those of diagnosing CFL injuries. Conclusion: Ultrasonography provides useful information for the evaluation of patients presenting with chronic pain after ankle sprain. Advances in knowledge: Intraoperative findings are the reference standard. We demonstrated that ultrasonography was highly sensitive and specific in detecting chronic lateral ligments injury of the ankle joint. PMID:24352708

  2. Musculoskeletal Management of a Patient With a History of Chronic Ankle Sprains: Identifying Rupture of Peroneal Brevis and Peroneal Longus With Diagnostic Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Bruin, Dick B.; von Piekartz, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the use of mobilization and eccentric exercise training for a patient with ankle pain and a history of chronic ankle sprains and discuss the course of diagnostic decision making when the patient did not respond to care. Clinical Features A 48-year-old police officer who had sustained multiple ankle sprains throughout his life presented with pain and restriction in his ability to walk, run, and work. The Global Rating of Change Scale score was − 6, the Numeric Pain Rating Scale score was 7/10, and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale score was − 33. Palpation of the peroneus longus and brevis muscles and inversion with overpressure reproduced the chief concern (Numeric Pain Rating Scale 7/10). The patient was initially diagnosed with chronic peroneal tendinopathy. Intervention and Outcome Treatment included lateral translation mobilization of the talocrural joint combined with eccentric exercise using an elastic band for the peroneal muscles. The patient reported improvement in pain and function during the course of intervention but not as rapidly as expected. Therefore, follow-up ultrasonographic imaging and radiography were performed. These studies revealed partial rupture of the peroneal brevis muscle and total rupture of the peroneal longus muscle. Conclusion A patient with long-term concerns of the foot complex with a diagnosis of peroneal tendinopathy showed slight improvement with eccentric exercises combined with manual therapy of the talocrural joint. After a course of treatment but minimal response, a diagnosis of tendon rupture was confirmed with diagnostic ultrasonography. Clinicians should be aware that when injuries do not improve with care, tendon rupture should be considered. PMID:25225470

  3. The effect of taping versus semi-rigid bracing on patient outcome and satisfaction in ankle sprains: a prospective, randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lardenoye, Sacha; Theunissen, Ed; Cleffken, Berry; Brink, Peter Rg; de Bie, Rob A; Poeze, Martijn

    2012-05-28

    Functional treatment is a widely used and generally accepted treatment for ankle sprain. A meta-analysis comparing the different functional treatment options could not make definitive conclusions regarding the effectiveness, and until now, little was known about patient satisfaction in relation to the outcome. Patients with acute ankle sprain received rest, ice, compression and elevation with an compressive bandage at the emergency department. After 5-7 days, 100 patients with grade II and III sprains were randomized into two groups: one group was treated with tape and the other with a semi-rigid ankle brace, both for 4 weeks. Post-injury physical and proprioceptive training was standardized. As primary outcome parameter patient satisfaction and skin complications were evaluated using a predefined questionnaire and numeric rating scale. As secondary outcome parameter the ankle joint function was assessed using the Karlsson scoring scale and range of motion. Patient-reported comfort and satisfaction during treatment with a semi-rigid brace was significantly increased. The rate of skin complication in this group was significantly lower compared to the tape group (14.6% versus 59.1%, P < 0.0001). Functional outcome of the ankle joint was similar between the two treatment groups, as well as reported pain. Treatment of acute ankle sprain with semi-rigid brace leads to significantly higher patient comfort and satisfaction, both with similar good outcome.

  4. The effect of taping versus semi-rigid bracing on patient outcome and satisfaction in ankle sprains: a prospective, randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Functional treatment is a widely used and generally accepted treatment for ankle sprain. A meta-analysis comparing the different functional treatment options could not make definitive conclusions regarding the effectiveness, and until now, little was known about patient satisfaction in relation to the outcome. Methods Patients with acute ankle sprain received rest, ice, compression and elevation with an compressive bandage at the emergency department. After 5-7 days, 100 patients with grade II and III sprains were randomized into two groups: one group was treated with tape and the other with a semi-rigid ankle brace, both for 4 weeks. Post-injury physical and proprioceptive training was standardized. As primary outcome parameter patient satisfaction and skin complications were evaluated using a predefined questionnaire and numeric rating scale. As secondary outcome parameter the ankle joint function was assessed using the Karlsson scoring scale and range of motion. Results Patient-reported comfort and satisfaction during treatment with a semi-rigid brace was significantly increased. The rate of skin complication in this group was significantly lower compared to the tape group (14.6% versus 59.1%, P < 0.0001). Functional outcome of the ankle joint was similar between the two treatment groups, as well as reported pain. Conclusion Treatment of acute ankle sprain with semi-rigid brace leads to significantly higher patient comfort and satisfaction, both with similar good outcome. PMID:22639864

  5. [Lateral ligament injuries of the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Walther, M; Kriegelstein, S; Altenberger, S; Volkering, C; Röser, A; Wölfel, R

    2013-09-01

    Lateral ligament injuries are the most common sports injury and have a high incidence even in non-sportive activities. Although lateral ligament injuries are very common there is still a controversial debate on the best management. The diagnosis is based on clinical examination and X-ray images help to rule out fractures. Further imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to diagnose associated injuries. According to the recommendations of the various scientific societies the primary therapy of lateral ligament injuries is conservative. Chronic ankle instability develops in 10-20 % of patients and the instability can be a result of sensomotoric deficits or insufficient healing of the lateral ligament complex. If the patient does not respond to an intensive rehabilitation program an operative reconstruction of the lateral ligaments has to be considered. Most of the procedures currently performed are anatomical reconstructions due to better long-term results compared to tenodesis procedures.

  6. Lateral ankle instability in high-demand athletes: reconstruction with fibular periosteal flap.

    PubMed

    Benazzo, Francesco; Zanon, Giacomo; Marullo, Matteo; Rossi, Stefano Marco Paolo

    2013-09-01

    Fibular periosteal flaps have been used to address chronic lateral ankle instability, but there are no studies in the literature reporting functional outcomes after this particular procedure in high-demand athletes. We postulated that for chronic instability, nonanatomical reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligament with a fibular periosteal flap will return high-demand athletes to their previous levels of activity. Forty patients who had grade III ankle sprain and experienced no success after a course of supervised conservative management lasting at least six months and who had a preinjury Tegner score of ≥ 6 underwent a lateral compartment reconstruction with a fibular periosteal flap. Each patient was given the Tegner and Karlsson questionnaire and was evaluated by the Zwipp method, Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score at the six-month, one, two and three-year time points. Range of motion (ROM) of the affected ankle was assessed, and stress X-rays were performed. Mean patient age was 24.5 (range17-30) years, and no patient was lost to follow-up. Mean follow-up was 36 (minimum 18) months, mean Tegner scores at the one, two and three-year time points were 8.8, 8.9 and 8.9, respectively, and mean Karlsson scores were 93 ± 5.2, 95 ± 3.1 and 94.9, respectively. AOFAS and FAOS scores improved from a mean of 69.4 and 71.4, respectively, in the preoperative group to a mean of 97.2 and 94.4, respectively, at the last follow-up. The ROM was equal to the contralateral ankle in all but two patients at the two-year follow-up. No major complications were found. Nonanatomical ligament reconstruction with a fibular periosteal flap for chronic lateral ankle instability was effective in returning high-demand athletes to their preinjury functional levels.

  7. Diclofenac epolamine plus heparin plaster versus diclofenac epolamine plaster in mild to moderate ankle sprain: a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, multicentre, phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Cosimo; Kwarecki, Jacek; Samokhin, Anatoly V; Mautone, Giuseppe; Rovati, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    In general sports, ankle sprain is the most frequently reported ankle injury and can cause chronic lateral ankle pain and tenderness. Treatment with NSAIDs is preferred, and several topical NSAID formulations are now available, helping to avoid the systemic adverse events typically associated with oral preparations. To compare the efficacy and tolerability of a newly developed fixed-dose diclofenac epolamine (diclofenac hydroxyethylpyrrolidine, DHEP)/heparin plaster (Flectoparin® Tissugel) with that of a DHEP (Flector EP Tissugel®) or placebo plaster in the treatment of mild to moderate ankle sprain in adults. This was a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, multicentre, phase III study conducted in the emergency medical centres of hospitals or private clinics in Europe. Outpatients aged 18-65 years who had suffered an acute ankle sprain (O'Donoghue grade I or II in severity, with external lateral ligament involvement) within the previous 48 hours and had peri-malleolar oedema were eligible for inclusion. A total of 430 patients were randomized to receive a DHEP/heparin 1.3%/5600 IU (n = 142), DHEP 1.3% (n = 146) or placebo (n = 142) plaster, applied once daily to the injured ankle for a total of 7 days. The primary endpoint was the mean change from baseline in pain on movement on day 3, as measured by a visual analogue scale (VAS). The DHEP/heparin plaster was associated with a significantly (p = 0.002) greater mean reduction from baseline in pain on movement after 3 days of treatment than the DHEP plaster (-24.2 vs -18.8 mm VAS), with each active treatment providing significantly (p ≤ 0.005) greater pain relief than placebo (-13.7 mm VAS). Both DHEP/heparin and DHEP were also effective in relieving other measures of pain, with DHEP/heparin recipients experiencing significantly less daily pain while leaning on the injured limb than DHEP recipients (p < 0.001). In addition, oedema was reduced to a

  8. Imaging appearances of lateral ankle ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chien, Alexander J; Jacobson, Jon A; Jamadar, David A; Brigido, Monica Kalume; Femino, John E; Hayes, Curtis W

    2004-01-01

    Six patients were retrospectively identified as having undergone lateral ligament reconstruction surgery. The surgical procedures were categorized into four groups: direct lateral ligament repair, peroneus brevis tendon rerouting, peroneus brevis tendon loop, and peroneus brevis tendon split and rerouting. At radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, the presence of one or more suture anchors in the region of the anterior talofibular ligament indicates direct ligament repair, whereas a fibular tunnel indicates peroneus brevis tendon rerouting or loop. Both ultrasonography (US) and MR imaging demonstrate rerouted tendons as part of lateral ankle reconstruction; however, MR imaging can also depict the rerouted tendon within an osseous tunnel if present, especially if T1-weighted sequences are used. Artifact from suture material may obscure the tendon at MR imaging but not at US. With both modalities, the integrity of the rerouted peroneus brevis tendon is best evaluated by following the tendon proximally from its distal attachment site, which typically remains unchanged. The rerouted tendon or portion of the tendon can then be traced proximally to its reattachment site. Familiarity with the surgical procedures most commonly used for lateral ankle ligament reconstruction, and with the imaging features of these procedures, is essential for avoiding diagnostic pitfalls and ensuring accurate assessment of the ligament reconstruction.

  9. Postural Control Characteristics during Single Leg Standing of Individuals with a History of Ankle Sprain: Measurements Obtained Using a Gravicorder and Head and Foot Accelerometry.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yota; Sugaya, Tomoaki; Sakamoto, Masaaki

    2014-03-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to validate the postural control characteristics of individuals with a history of ankle sprain during single leg standing by using a gravicorder and head and foot accelerometry. [Subjects] Twenty subjects with and 23 subjects without a history of ankle sprain (sprain and control groups, respectively) participated. [Methods] The anteroposterior, mediolateral, and total path lengths, as well as root mean square (RMS) of each length, were calculated using the gravicorder. The anteroposterior, mediolateral, and resultant acceleration of the head and foot were measured using accelerometers and were evaluated as the ratio of the acceleration of the head to the foot. [Results] There was no significant difference between the two groups in path length or RMS acceleration of the head and foot. However, the ratios of the mediolateral and resultant components were significantly higher in the sprain group than in the control group. [Conclusion] Our findings suggest that individuals with a history of ankle sprain have a higher head-to-foot acceleration ratio and different postural control characteristics than those of control subjects.

  10. Time-trends and circumstances surrounding ankle injuries in men's professional football: an 11-year follow-up of the UEFA Champions League injury study.

    PubMed

    Waldén, Markus; Hägglund, Martin; Ekstrand, Jan

    2013-08-01

    Ankle injury is common in football, but the circumstances surrounding them are not well characterised. To investigate the rates, especially time-trends, and circumstances of ankle injuries in male professional football. 27 European clubs with 1743 players were followed prospectively between 2001/2002 and 2011/2012. Time loss injuries and individual-player exposure during training sessions and matches were recorded. Injury rate was defined as the number of injuries/1000 h. A total of 1080 ankle injuries were recorded (13% of all injuries) with lateral ligament ankle sprain being the most common injury subtype (51% of all ankle injuries). The rates of ankle injury and ankle sprain were 1/1000 h and 0.7/1000 h, respectively. The ankle sprain rate declined slightly over time during the 11-year study period (on average 3.1%/season) with a statistically significant seasonal trend (p=0.041). Foul play according to the referee was involved in 40% of the match-related ankle sprains. Syndesmotic sprains and ankle impingement were uncommon causes of time loss (3% each of all ankle injuries). Lateral ligament ankle sprain constituted half of all ankle injuries in male professional football, whereas ankle impingement syndromes were uncommon. The ankle sprain rate decreased slightly over time, but many ankle sprains were associated with foul play. Our data extend the body of literature that provides football policy makers with a foundation to review existing rules and their enforcement.

  11. The Effect of Velocity of Joint Mobilization on Corticospinal Excitability in Individuals With a History of Ankle Sprain.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Beth E; Piraino, Andrew; Lee, Ya-Yun; Smith, Jo Armour; Johnson, Sean; Davenport, Todd E; Kulig, Kornelia

    2016-07-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Joint mobilization and manipulation decrease pain and improve patient function. Yet, the processes underlying these changes are not well understood. Measures of corticospinal excitability provide insight into potential mechanisms mediated by the central nervous system. Objectives To investigate the differential effects of joint mobilization and manipulation at the talocrural joint on corticospinal excitability in individuals with resolved symptoms following ankle sprain. Methods Twenty-seven participants with a history of ankle sprain were randomly assigned to the control, joint mobilization, or thrust manipulation group. The motor-evoked potential (MEP) and cortical silent period (CSP) of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius were obtained with transcranial magnetic stimulation at rest and during active contraction of the tibialis anterior. The slopes of MEP/CSP input/output curves and the maximal MEP/CSP values were calculated to indicate corticospinal excitability. Behavioral measures, including ankle dorsiflexion and dynamic balance, were evaluated. Results A repeated-measures analysis of variance of the MEP slope showed a significant group-by-time interaction for the tibialis anterior at rest (P = .002) and during active contraction (P = .042). After intervention, the thrust manipulation group had an increase in corticospinal excitability, while the corticospinal excitability decreased in the mobilization group. The thrust manipulation group, but not other groups, also demonstrated a significant increase in the maximal MEP amplitude of the tibialis anterior after intervention. Conclusion The findings suggest that joint manipulation and mobilization have different effects on corticospinal excitability. The increased corticospinal excitability following thrust manipulation may provide a window for physical therapists to optimize muscle recruitment and subsequently movement. The trial was registered at

  12. Examining the relation of osteochondral lesions of the talus to ligamentous and lateral ankle tendinous pathologic features: a comprehensive MRI review in an asymptomatic lateral ankle population.

    PubMed

    Galli, Melissa M; Protzman, Nicole M; Mandelker, Eiran M; Malhotra, Amit D; Schwartz, Edward; Brigido, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Given the frequency and burden of ankle sprains, the pathologic features identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are widely known in the symptomatic population. Ankle MRI pathologic features in the asymptomatic population, however, are poorly understood. Such examinations are rarely undertaken unless an ankle has been injured or is painful. We report the systematic MRI findings from the reports of 108 consecutive asymptomatic lateral ankles (104 patients). Our purpose was to (1) report the prevalence of osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLTs) and pathologic features of the medial and lateral ligaments, peroneal tendons, and superior peroneal retinaculum (SPR); (2) correlate the presence of OLTs with the pathologic features of the medial and lateral ligaments, peroneal tendons, and SPR; and (3) correlate ligamentous discontinuity with the peroneal pathologic features, OLTs, and SPR pathologic features. A total of 16 OLTs (14.81%) were present (13 medial and 3 lateral). Of the 16 patients with OLTs, 8 (50.00%) had concomitant peroneal pathologic findings. Healthy medial and lateral ligaments were noted in 41 patients (37.96%), and ligamentous discontinuity was grade I in 25 (23.15%), II in 32 (29.63%), III in 5 (4.63%), and grade IV in 5 patients (4.63%). A weak positive correlation was found between attenuation or tears of the superficial deltoid and medial OLTs (phi coefficient = 0.23, p = .0191) and a moderate positive correlation between tears of the posterior talofibular ligament and lateral OLTs (phi coefficient = 0.30, p = .0017). Additionally, a moderate positive correlation between ligamentous discontinuity and tendinopathy of the peroneus brevis was noted [Spearman's coefficient(106) = 0.29, p = .0024]. These findings add to the evidence of concomitant pathologic features in the asymptomatic population. To definitively assess causation and evaluate the clinical evolution of radiologic findings, future, prospective, longitudinal

  13. [Impacts on analgesia and detumescence in ankle sprain treated with acupuncture at Xiaojie point combined with tendon-regulation manipulation].

    PubMed

    Du, Wei-Bin; Bao, Guan-Ai; Quan, Ren-Fu

    2014-07-01

    To compare the efficacy difference of analgesia and detumescence on ankle sprain among acupuncture at Xiaojie point combined with tendon regulation manipulation, acupuncture at Xiaojie point and tendon regulation manipulation. Sixty cases of ankle sprain were randomized into a combined therapy group, a Xiaojie point group and a tendon-regulation manipulation group, 20 cases in each one. The combined therapy of acupuncture at Xiaojie point and tendon regulation manipulation, the acupuncture at Xiaojie point and the simple application of tendon-regulation manipulation were applied respectively in the three groups, once a day, 3 treatments were required. The symptom score such as pain, ecchymosis, swelling and motor dysfunction and the total score were observed before and after treatment in the three groups. The different values of pain and swelling scores were compared before and after treatment in the three groups. The efficacy was compared among the groups. The total effective rate was 100.0% (20/20) in each group. But the curative rate was 85.0% (17/20) in the combined group, 65.0% (13/20) in the Xiaojie point tion manipulation group. After treatment, the symptom scores of pain, ecchymosis, swelling and motor dysfunction and the total score were all improved as compared with those before treatment in the three groups (P < 0.01, P < 0.05). The pain score in either the combined therapy group or Xiaojie point group was lower than that in the tendon-regulation manipulation group after treatment (0.20 -/+ 0.41, 0.15 +/- 0.37 vs 0.60 +/- 0.50, both P < 0.05). Swelling score in the Xiaojie point group was different significantly from that in the tendon-regulation manipulation 0.49 vs 06.4 vs. 20+0.41, P < 0.05). The different value of pain score in either the combined therapy group or Xiaojie point group was higher than that in the tendon-regulation manipulation group before group after treatment (0.65 bined therapy group or Xiaojie point group was higher than that in

  14. [Back to the emergency department with a painful ankle].

    PubMed

    van Egmond, Pim W; van de Rest, Hendrik J M; Nolte, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    A 31-year-old woman came to the Emergency Department with a painful ankle 2 days after a fall off a horse. On the day of the accident, she was misdiagnosed with a lateral ankle sprain. A lateral X-ray of the ankle showed a positive 'V-sign', which is pathognomonic for a fracture of the lateral process of the talus.

  15. Ankle "sprains" during sport activities with normal radiographs: Incidence of associated bone and tendon injuries on MRI findings and its clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Yammine, Kaissar; Fathi, Yahia

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the occurrence of bone and tendon injuries and their impact on clinical management in athletes with ankle trauma during sports activities having normal radiographs and referred to the orthopedic department as "ankle sprains". This was a prospective study of 54 patients. Clinical examination and MR imaging were done in order to have an accurate diagnosis and the incidence of those injuries. Nearly half of the patients were found to have no ligament injury on MRI. Isolated bone bruises and isolated tendon injuries may share the same clinical signs with ankle sprains. MRI-based clinical management has been adjusted for each case; beside the Grade 3 ligament injuries and the rare, but difficult to diagnose osteochondral lesions of the talus, partial weight bearing or short-immobilization were offered as treatment modalities for the rest of the patients avoiding unnecessary long-term treatments and rehabilitation exercises. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Immediate effects of manipulation of the talocrural joint on stabilometry and baropodometry in patients with ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    López-Rodríguez, Sandra; Fernández de-Las-Peñas, César; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; Rodríguez-Blanco, Cleofás; Palomeque-del-Cerro, Luis

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed the immediate effects of talocrural joint manipulation on stabilometric and baropodometric outcomes in patients with grade II ankle sprain. Fifty-two field hockey players (35 men and 17 women) between 18 and 40 years old (mean = 22.5 years, SD = 3.6 years) were included in this study. A simple blind, intrapatient, placebo-controlled, and repeated-measures study was carried out. All the patients underwent a baropodometric study performed with a Foot Work force platform (4 times; pre-post placebo group and pre-post intervention group). The sample was subjected to two techniques of manipulative treatment: (a) talocrural joint manipulation and (b) posterior gliding manipulation over the talus. In a second instance, placebo manipulation was applied. Unilateral analysis of variance and multivariate analysis of variance were used for statistical analysis. The results in the intervention group revealed significant differences in the percentage of posterior load on the foot (P = .015) and the percentage of bilateral anterior load (P = .02) before and after the manipulation. The placebo group did not show any change in any of the variables except for area (P = .045). Intergroup comparison revealed statistically significant differences in the increase in percentage of posterior load on the manipulated foot, percentage of bilateral posterior load, percentage of anterior load on the manipulated foot, and percentage of bilateral anterior load (with the exception of the total load on the foot). The application of caudal talocrural joint manipulation, as compared with placebo manipulation, in athletic patients with grade II ankle sprain redistributed the load supports at the level of the foot.

  17. Efficacy of thrust and nonthrust manipulation and exercise with or without the addition of myofascial therapy for the management of acute inversion ankle sprain: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Truyols-Domí Nguez, Sebastián; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Abian-Vicen, Javier; Cleland, Joshua A; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2013-05-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To compare the effects of thrust and nonthrust manipulation and exercises with and without the addition of myofascial therapy for the treatment of acute inversion ankle sprain. Studies have reported that thrust and nonthrust manipulations of the ankle joint are effective for the management of patients post-ankle sprain. However, it is not known whether the inclusion of soft tissue myofascial therapy could further improve clinical and functional outcomes. Fifty patients (37 men and 13 women; mean ± SD age, 33 ± 10 years) post-acute inversion ankle sprain were randomly assigned to 2 groups: a comparison group that received a thrust and nonthrust manipulation and exercise intervention, and an experimental group that received the same protocol and myofascial therapy. The primary outcomes were ankle pain at rest and functional ability. Additionally, ankle mobility and pressure pain threshold over the ankle were assessed by a clinician who was blinded to the treatment allocation. Outcomes of interest were captured at baseline, immediately after the treatment period, and at a 1-month follow-up. The primary analysis was the group-by-time interaction. The 2-by-3 mixed-model analyses of variance revealed a significant group-by-time interaction for ankle pain (P<.001) and functional score (P = .002), with the patients who received the combination of nonthrust and thrust manipulation and myofascial intervention experiencing a greater improvement in pain and function than those who received the nonthrust and thrust manipulation intervention alone. Significant group-by-time interactions were also observed for ankle mobility (P<.001) and pressure pain thresholds (all, P<.01), with those in the experimental group experiencing greater increases in ankle mobility and pressure pain thresholds. Between-group effect sizes were large (d>0.85) for all outcomes. This study provides evidence that, in the treatment of individuals post-inversion ankle sprain, the

  18. Efficacy and safety of topical diclofenac/menthol gel for ankle sprain: A randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lai, Pamela M; Collaku, Agron; Reed, Kenneth

    2017-04-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate topical 1% diclofenac/3% menthol gel in treating ankle sprain. Design In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, adolescents and adults with acute ankle sprain (N = 385) applied 4 g of gel containing 1% diclofenac/3% menthol (n = 117), 1% diclofenac (n = 112), 3% menthol (n = 77), or placebo (n = 75) four times daily. The primary outcome was the area under the curve of pain intensity (PI) on movement [0 (no pain) to 10 (extreme pain)] from 24 to 72 hours post-application (AUC1-3 days). Secondary outcomes included pain relief (PR); PI; time to onset of PR, meaningful PR, cooling, and complete recovery; PI difference; sum of PI difference; total PR; reduction in ankle swelling; and the patient's global assessment of response to treatment. Results There were no statistically significant differences in AUC1-3 between 1% diclofenac/3% menthol and placebo, diclofenac, or menthol gels and no meaningful advantages of 1% diclofenac/3% menthol for any secondary outcome. There was a higher incidence of skin and application-site events with 1% diclofenac/3% menthol than with placebo or 1% diclofenac. Conclusion No significant improvement was observed with topical 1% diclofenac/3% menthol gel compared with placebo, 1% diclofenac, or 3% menthol gel in treating pain from ankle sprain. ClinicalTrials.Gov Identifier: NCT02100670.

  19. In vivo cartilage contact strains in patients with lateral ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Bischof, Johanna E.; Spritzer, Charles E.; Caputo, Adam M.; Easley, Mark E.; DeOrio, James K.; Nunley, James A.; DeFrate, Louis E.

    2010-01-01

    Damage to the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) and cacaneofibular ligament (CFL) during ankle sprain may be linked to the development of osteoarthritis. Altered tibiotalar kinematics have been demonstrated in these patients, but the effects of lateral ankle instability (LAI) on in vivo cartilage strains have not been described. We hypothesized that peak cartilage strains increase, and the location is shifted in patients with ATFL injuries. We used 3-D MRI models and biplanar fluoroscopy to evaluate in vivo cartilage contact strains in seven patients with unilateral LAI. Subjects had chronic unilateral ATFL injury or combined ATFL and CFL injury, and were evaluated with increasing load while stepping onto a force plate. Peak cartilage strain and the location of the peak strain were measured using the contralateral normal ankle as a control. Ankles with LAI demonstrated significantly increased peak strain when compared with ATFL-intact controls. For example, at 100% body weight, peak strain was 29±8% on the injured side compared to 21±5% on the intact side. The position of peak strain on the injured ankle also showed significant anterior translation and medial translation. At 100% body weight, the location of peak strain in the injured ankle translated anteriorly by 15.5±7.1mm and medially by 12.9±4.3mm relative to the intact ankle. These changes correspond to the region of clinically-observed osteoarthritis. Chronic LAI, therefore, may contribute to the development of tibiotalar cartilage degeneration due to altered cartilage strains. PMID:20605154

  20. The effect of treadmill-based and track-based walking training on physical fitness in ankle-sprain experienced young people

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Eunsook

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 12-week treadmill-based (MT) and track-based (TT) walking program on maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), muscular endurance, muscle strength, and ankle range of motion (ROM) in ankle sprain experienced young people. Twenty subjects (12 males, 8 females) volunteered to participate in this study and divided into two groups (MT and TT). All subjects completed MT and TT 4 times per week with each session of 60 min with 65% from maximum heart rate. Incremental test on treadmill and 20-m shuttle run test for endurance capacity (VO2max), 2-km walking test for muscular endurance, vertical jump for strength, and ankle ROM for flexibility were analyzed before and after the training intervention. We found significant increase in incremental, 2-km walking and 20-m shuttle run after both MT and TT. Just after TT were significant increased vertical jump and ankle ROM. In conclusion, TT seems to induce a more positive effect on muscle strength in lower extremity and ankle ROM than treadmill-based walking training in ankle sprain experienced young people. PMID:28349038

  1. Comparison of dynamic postural stability scores between athletes with and without chronic ankle instability during lateral jump landing.

    PubMed

    Shiravi, Zeinab; Shadmehr, Azadeh; Moghadam, Saeed Talebian; Moghadam, Behrouz Attarbashi

    2017-01-01

    Many ankle injuries occur while participating in sports that require jumping and landing such as basketball, volleyball and soccer. Most recent studies have investigated dynamic postural stability of patients with chronic ankle instability after landing from a forward jump. The present study aimed to investigate the dynamic postural stability of the athletes who suffer from chronic ankle sprain while landing from a lateral jump. Twelve athletes with self-reported unilateral chronic ankle instability (4 females and 8 males) and 12 matched controls (3 females and 9 males) voluntarily participated in the study. Dynamic postural stability index and its directional indices were measured while performing lateral jump landing test. No differences were found between athletes with and without chronic ankle instability during our landing protocol by means of the dynamic postural stability index and its directional indices. Findings showed that in each group, medial/lateral stability index is significantly higher than anterior/posterior and vertical stability indexes. Findings showed that dynamic postural stability was not significantly different between the two groups. Future studies should examine chronic ankle instability patients with more severe disabilities and expose them to more challenging dynamic balance conditions to further explore postural stability. IIIa.

  2. Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) as a treatment for high ankle sprain in elite athletes: a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Laver, Lior; Carmont, Michael R; McConkey, Mark O; Palmanovich, Ezequiel; Yaacobi, Eyal; Mann, Gideon; Nyska, Meir; Kots, Eugene; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2015-11-01

    Syndesmotic sprains are uncommon injuries that require prolonged recovery. The influence of ultrasound-guided injections of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) into the injured antero-inferior tibio-fibular ligaments (AITFL) in athletes on return to play (RTP) and dynamic stability was studied. Sixteen elite athletes with AITFL tears were randomized to a treatment group receiving injections of PRP or to a control group. All patients followed an identical rehabilitation protocol and RTP criteria. Patients were prospectively evaluated for clinical ability to return to full activity and residual pain. Dynamic ultrasound examinations were performed at initial examination and at 6 weeks post-injury to demonstrate re-stabilization of the syndesmosis joint and correlation with subjective outcome. All patients presented with a tear to the AITFL with dynamic syndesmosis instability in dorsiflexion-external rotation, and larger neutral tibia-fibula distance on ultrasound. Early diagnosis and treatment lead to shorter RTP, with 40.8 (±8.9) and 59.6 (±12.0) days for the PRP and control groups, respectively (p = 0.006). Significantly less residual pain upon return to activity was found in the PRP group; five patients (62.5 %) in the control group returned to play with minor discomfort versus one patient in the treatment group (12.5 %). One patient in the control group had continuous pain and disability and subsequently underwent syndesmosis reconstruction. Athletes suffering from high ankle sprains benefit from ultrasound-guided PRP injections with a shorter RTP, re-stabilization of the syndesmosis joint and less long-term residual pain. II.

  3. Naproxen Twice Daily Versus as Needed (PRN) Dosing: Efficacy and Tolerability for Treatment of Acute Ankle Sprain, a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hajimaghsoudi, Majid; Jalili, Mohammad; Mokhtari, Mehdi; Nejati, Amir; Mesbahi, Javad; Paydary, Koosha

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of naproxen 500 mg twice daily (BID) versus naproxen 500 mg as needed (PRN) for treatment of ankle sprain. Methods In this seven-day, randomized, parallel group trial, 135 patients with ankle sprain occurring less than 48 hours prior to the first dose of study medication were randomized to receive naproxen 500 mg BID (67 patients) and naproxen 500 mg as needed (PRN) (68 patients). The ankle pain was assessed at rest and on full weight bearing using Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) from 0 (no pain) to 10 (the worst imaginable pain). Ankle swelling was assessed as a 4-point scale ranging from 0 (no swelling) to 3 (severe swelling) rated by the investigator. The primary efficacy end point was the patient's assessment of ankle pain via NRS and the degree of swelling on day seven. Results Results showed a significant decrease in pain on weight bearing, pain at rest and the extent of swelling (P<0.001) in both groups, but there was no substantial difference between the two groups (P>0.05) after seven days. Assessing the safety profile of the two different dosing, 13.3% of the naproxen BID group and 6.7% of the as needed group had adverse events, showing that the as needed regimen was safer (P<0.001). Conclusion Results showed that naproxen as needed may reduce the pain and edema of the sprained ankle with no significant difference compared to the BID regimen, while it possesses better safety profile and lower total drug use. PMID:24799999

  4. The implementation effectiveness of the ‘Strengthen your ankle’ smartphone application for the prevention of ankle sprains: design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ankle sprains continue to pose a significant burden to the individual athlete, as well as to society as a whole. However, despite ankle sprains being the single most common sports injury and despite an active approach by various Dutch organisations in implementing preventive measures, large-scale community uptake of these preventive measures, and thus actual prevention of ankle sprains, is lagging well behind. In an attempt to bridge this implementation gap, the Dutch Consumer Safety Institute VeiligheidNL developed a freely available interactive App (‘Strenghten your ankle’ translated in Dutch as: ‘Versterk je enkel; available for iOS and Android) that contains - next to general advice on bracing and taping - a proven cost-effective neuromuscular program. The ‘Strengthen your ankle’ App has not been evaluated against the ‘regular’ prevention approach in which the neuromuscular program is advocated through written material. The aim of the current project is to evaluate the implementation value of the ‘Strengthen your ankle’ App as compared to the usual practice of providing injured athletes with written materials. In addition, as a secondary outcome measure, the cost-effectiveness will be assessed against usual practice. Methods/Design The proposed study will be a randomised controlled trial. After stratification for medical caregiver, athletes will be randomised to two study groups. One group will receive a standardized eight-week proprioceptive training program that has proven to be cost-effective to prevent recurrent ankle injuries, consisting of a balance board (machU/ MSG Europe BVBA), and a traditional instructional booklet. The other group will receive the same exercise program and balance board. However, for this group the instructional booklet is exchanged by the interactive ‘Strengthen your ankle’ App. Discussion This trial is the first randomized controlled trial to study the implementation effectiveness of an App for

  5. Differences in Lateral Drop Jumps From an Unknown Height Among Individuals With Functional Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Adam; Swanik, Charles; Thomas, Stephen; Glutting, Joseph; Knight, Christopher; Kaminski, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Functional ankle instability (FAI) is a debilitating condition that has been reported to occur after 20% to 50% of all ankle sprains. Landing from a jump is one common mechanism of ankle injury, yet few researchers have explored the role of visual cues and anticipatory muscle contractions, which may influence ankle stability, in lateral jumping maneuvers. Objective: To examine muscle-activation strategies between FAI and stable ankles under a lateral load and to evaluate the differences in muscle activation in participants with FAI and participants with stable ankles when they were unable to anticipate the onset of lateral loads during eyes-open versus eyes-closed conditions. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Controlled laboratory setting. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 40 people participated: 20 with FAI and 20 healthy, uninjured, sex- and age-matched persons (control group). Intervention(s): Participants performed a 2-legged lateral jump off a platform onto a force plate set to heights of 35 cm or 50 cm and then immediately jumped for maximal height. They performed jumps in 2 conditions (eyes open, eyes closed) and were unaware of the jump height when their eyes were closed. Main Outcome Measure(s): Amplitude normalized electromyographic (EMG) area (%), peak (%), and time to peak in the tibialis anterior (TA), peroneus longus (PL), and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscles were measured. Results: Regardless of the eyes-open or eyes-closed condition, participants with FAI had less preparatory TA (t158 = 2.22, P = .03) and PL (t158 = 2.09, P = .04) EMG area and TA (t158 = 2.45, P = .02) and PL (t158 = 2.17, P = .03) peak EMG than control-group participants. Conclusions: By removing visual cues, unanticipated lateral joint loads occurred simultaneously with decreased muscle activity, which may reduce dynamic restraint capabilities in persons with FAI. Regardless of visual impairment and jump height, participants with FAI exhibited PL and TA

  6. Efficacy and Safety of Split Peroneal Tendon Lateral Ankle Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Naohiro; Bazán, D Issac; Evans, Andrew M; Agarwal, Monica R; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lateral ankle instability is a common condition. Split peroneal tendon lateral ankle stabilization, a modification of the Chrisman-Snook procedure, is biomechanically stable and often used for severe and/or recurrent chronic lateral ankle instability. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this technique. Specifically, the midterm recurrence of instability and postoperative complications, such as stiffness, neurologic pain, and wound healing complications, were evaluated. We evaluated 30 consecutive procedures with a minimal follow-up period of 1 year. The mean follow-up period was 25 ± 13 (median 19, range 13 to 62) months. Five patients (17%) developed recurrent ankle instability, of whom 4 underwent revision surgery. One superficial infection and two wound disruptions developed. Two patients experienced stiffness and eight (27%) surgically induced neurologic complaints, such as sural neuritis. Finally, 2 patients developed complex regional pain syndrome.

  7. Effects of Achilles tendon vibration, surface and visual conditions on lower leg electromyography in young adults with and without recurrent ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Lubetzky, Anat V; Price, Robert; McCoy, Sarah W

    2016-07-01

    Functional ankle instability is associated with decreased ankle muscle function. Compliant surfaces and eyes-closed training are commonly used for rehabilitation and prevention of ankle sprains. Brief Achilles tendon vibration is commonly used in the study of postural control. To test the level of activation of tibialis anterior (TIB) and fibularis longus (FIB), bilateral Achilles tendon vibration was applied for the middle 20 s in a series of 60-s trials, when 10 healthy young adults and 10 adults with history of repeated ankle sprains were standing bipedal: on floor, on memory foam, or on a Both Sides Up (BOSU) ball, with eyes open, and on floor and foam with eyes closed. Differences in Integrated surface electromyography (IEMG) of TIB and FIB were significant for both groups pre, during, and post vibration (Friedman Tests, p < 0.001 for all). In both groups, the highest IEMG for TIB was obtained during vibration when standing on foam with eyes closed, whereas the highest IEMG for FIB was obtained during vibration when standing on the BOSU. Bipedal stance on BOSU and brief Achilles tendon vibration may be a useful intervention when a session's goal is to facilitate lower leg muscles activation. Future research should explore training effects as well as the effect of FIB tendon vibration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Acupuncture as analgesia for low back pain, ankle sprain and migraine in emergency departments: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Marc; Parker, Shefton; Taylor, David; Smit, De Villiers; Ben-Meir, Michael; Cameron, Peter; Xue, Charlie

    2011-11-15

    Pain is the most common reason that patients present to an emergency department (ED) and is often inadequately managed. Evidence suggests that acupuncture is effective for pain relief, yet it is rarely practiced in the ED. The current study aims to assess the efficacy of acupuncture for providing effective analgesia to patients presenting with acute low back pain, migraine and ankle sprain at the EDs of four hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. The study is a multi-site, randomized, assessor-blinded, controlled trial of acupuncture analgesia in patients who present to an ED with low back pain, migraine or ankle sprain. Patients will be block randomized to receive either acupuncture alone, acupuncture as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy or pharmacotherapy alone. Acupuncture will be applied according to Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA). Pain after one hour, measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), is the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes measures include the following instruments; the Oswestry low back pain disability questionnaire, 24-hour Migraine Quality of Life questionnaire and Patient's Global Assessment of Ankle Injury Scale. These measures will be recorded at baseline, 1 hour after intervention, each hour until discharge and 48±12 hours of ED discharge. Data will also be collected on the safety and acceptability of acupuncture and health resource utilization. The results of this study will determine if acupuncture, alone or as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy provides effective, safe and acceptable pain relief for patients presenting to EDs with acute back pain, migraine or ankle sprain. The results will also identify the impact that acupuncture treatment may have upon health resource utilisation in the ED setting. Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12609000989246.

  9. More than meets the eye: clinical reflection and evidence-based practice in an unusual case of adolescent chronic ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mohamed; Wong, Christopher Kevin

    2011-09-01

    Adolescents who have chronic pain after common orthopedic injuries such as ankle sprains may present a multidimensional clinical problem stemming from both physical and psychological issues. A traumatic incident such as a motor vehicle accident can produce clinical issues ranging from a specific tissue injury to multisystem complications such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The purpose of this retrospective case report on an adolescent with chronic ankle pain stemming from a motor vehicle accident is to demonstrate how reflection and the evidence base influenced the modification of the plan of care. Description of the screening methods, clinical findings, interventions, and outcomes of the case may help physical therapists identify and improve the quality of care in cases of suspected CRPS and PTSD. The patient was a 12-year-old girl with a medical diagnosis of recurrent right ankle sprain and with signs of potential CRPS and PTSD. Poor initial response to ankle sprain management led to reflective reconsideration of the diagnosis and plan of care. The revised plan of care supported by the evidence base emphasized empathetic consideration of the traumatic motor vehicle accident and focused on CRPS prevention and management of potential non-physical pain via mirror therapy and motor imagery therapy. Pain was relieved, behavior improved, and functional movement began to normalize after 3 sessions of mirror therapy and motor imagery therapy. Patient symptoms were inconsistent with the medical diagnosis, and the clinical outcome of the original plan of care was unsuccessful. Reflection inspired a more-detailed history and systems review, which led to greater understanding and more-effective care.

  10. A comparative, prospective, and randomized study of two conservative treatment protocols for first-episode lateral ankle ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Prado, Marcelo Pires; Mendes, Alberto Abussamra Moreira; Amodio, Daniel Tasseto; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Smyth, Niall A; Fernandes, Tulio Diniz

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate functional results, the amount of time that patients missed from regular working activities, and the incidence of residual mechanical ankle instability following conservative treatment of a first episode of severe lateral ankle ligament sprain (with articular instability). This prospective and randomized study included 186 patients with severe lateral ankle ligament injuries, who were randomly assigned into 2 conservative treatment groups. In group A, participants were treated with a walking boot with weight-bearing allowed, pain management, ice, and elevation with restricted joint mobilization for 3 weeks. In group B, patients were treated with a functional brace for 3 weeks. After this period, patients from both groups were placed in a short, functional brace for an additional 3 weeks, during which they also started a rehabilitation program. No statistically significant difference was found in pain intensity score between the 2 groups; however, functional evaluations based on the AOFAS ankle and hindfoot score system showed a statistically significant improvement in the group treated with the functional brace. In addition, the average recovery period necessary for patients of group B to resume their duties was shorter than that for patients in group A. No significant difference was detected in residual mechanical ankle instability between the 2 groups. Patients with severe lateral ankle ligament lesions treated with a functional brace were shown to exhibit somewhat better results than those treated with a walking boot, and both methods presented a very low incidence of residual chronic instability. We found adequate conservative treatment was sufficient to reestablish ankle stability and that functional treatment had a marginally better clinical short-term outcome with a shorter average recovery period. Level I, prospective randomized study.

  11. Isolated anterior talofibular ligament Broström repair for chronic lateral ankle instability: 9-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Del Buono, Angelo; Maffulli, Gayle D; Oliva, Francesco; Testa, Vittorino; Capasso, Giovanni; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2013-04-01

    Lateral ankle sprains may result in pain and disability in the short term, decreased sport activity and early retirement from sports in the mid term, and secondary injuries and development of early osteoarthritis to the ankle in the long term. This combined approach to chronic lateral instability and intra-articular lesions of the ankle is safe and in the long term maintains mechanical stability, functional ability, and a good level of sport activity. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. We present the long-term outcomes of 42 athletes who underwent ankle arthroscopy and anterior talofibular Broström repair for management of chronic lateral ankle instability. We assessed in all patients preoperative and postoperative anterior drawer test and side-to-side differences, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score, and Kaikkonen grading scales. Patients were asked about return to sport and level of activity. Patients were also assessed for development of degenerative changes to the ankle, and preoperative versus postoperative findings were compared. Thirty-eight patients were reviewed at an average of 8.7 years (range, 5-13 years) after surgery; 4 patients were lost to follow-up. At the last follow-up, patients were significantly improved for ankle laxity, AOFAS scores, and Kaikkonen scales. The mean AOFAS score improved from 51 (range, 32-71) to 90 (range, 67-100), and the mean Kaikkonen score improved from 45 (range, 30-70) to 90 (range, 65-100). According to outcome criteria set preoperatively, there were 8 failures by the AOFAS score and 9 by the Kaikkonen score. Twenty-two (58%) patients practiced sport at the preinjury level, 6 (16%) had changed to lower levels but were still active in less demanding sports (cycling and tennis), and 10 (26%) had abandoned active sport participation although they still were physically active. Six of these patients did not feel safe with their ankle because of the occurrence of new episodes of ankle instability. Of the

  12. Management of chronic lateral ankle instability in military service members.

    PubMed

    Orr, Justin D; Robbins, Justin; Waterman, Brian R

    2014-10-01

    Chronic lateral ankle instability is a condition frequently encountered by orthopedic surgeons treating highly active patient populations, particularly military service members. Providers treating military service members must have a high index of suspicion for this condition when signs and symptoms of functional or mechanical instability exist. Stress testing and ankle MRI, although not definitive in sensitivity for detecting instability or other concomitant injuries, should be considered during the treatment decision-making process. Appropriate nonoperative treatment should be attempted initially; however, when nonoperative treatment fails, surgical management is warranted to prevent untoward long-term sequelae. Proper surgical treatment and subsequent postoperative management are at the discretion of the individual surgeon but must account for the concomitant diseases frequently associated with chronic lateral ankle instability. Low recurrence of lateral instability can be achieved even in high-demand military patient populations with a focused treatment plan. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. WITHDRAWN: Immobilisation and functional treatment for acute lateral ankle ligament injuries in adults.

    PubMed

    Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J; Rowe, Brian H; Assendelft, Willem J J; Kelly, Karen D; Struijs, Peter A A; van Dijk, C N

    2013-03-28

    Acute lateral ankle ligament injuries (ankle sprains) are common problems in acute medical care. The treatment variation observed for the acutely injured lateral ankle ligament complex suggests a lack of evidence-based management strategies for this problem. The objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness of methods of immobilisation for acute lateral ankle ligament injuries and to compare immobilisation with functional treatment methods. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group specialised register (December 2001); the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2001), MEDLINE (1966-May 2000), EMBASE (1988-May 2000), reference lists of articles, and contacted organisations and researchers in the field. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing either different types of immobilisation or immobilisation versus functional treatments for injuries to the lateral ligament complex of the ankle in adults were included. Trials which investigated the treatment of chronic instability or post-surgical treatment were excluded. Data were independently extracted by two authors. Where appropriate, results of comparable studies were pooled using fixed effects models. Individual and pooled statistics were reported as relative risks with 95% confidence intervals for dichotomous outcomes and weighted (WMD) or standardised (SMD) mean differences and 95% confidence intervals for continuous outcome measures. Heterogeneity between trials was tested using a standard chi-squared test. Twenty-one trials involving 2184 participants were included. The mean validity score of the included trials increased from 9.1 (SD 3.0) to 10 (SD 2.9) after retrieving further information (maximum 18 points). Statistically significant differences in favour of functional treatment when compared with immobilisation were found for seven outcome measures: more patients returned to sport in the long term (relative risk (RR) 1.86, 95

  14. Long-term follow-up of lateral reconstruction with extensor retinaculum flap for chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Tourné, Yves; Mabit, Christian; Moroney, Paul J; Chaussard, Christophe; Saragaglia, Dominique

    2012-12-01

    Chronic instability is a common complication of lateral ankle sprains. Furthermore, patients often have unrecognized associated lesions affecting the ankle and subtalar joints. Many stabilizing surgical techniques have been described, each with variable results. This article reports the long-term results of ligamentous retensioning combined with reinforcement using an extensor retinaculum flap. This is a retrospective, multicenter study. One hundred fifty cases were reviewed at a mean follow-up of 11 years. Functional results were assessed using the Karlsson score. Pre- and postoperative radiological assessment employed stress x-rays to measure varus tilt and anterior drawer and the Van Dijk classification to grade osteoarthrosis. The Stata 10 program was used for statistical analysis. A thorough preoperative workup identified ligamentous lesions of the subtalar joint in 30% of cases. At review, 93% of patients were satisfied. Residual instability was present in only 4.8%. Radiographic analysis of both ankles revealed a differential in varus tilt of only 0.12° and in anterior drawer of 0.17~mm. There was no deterioration of the articular surfaces after 11 years of follow-up. To the authors' knowledge, this is the largest series reported with such a follow-up. This technique addressed both lateral ankle and subtalar instability without sacrificing the peroneal tendons. It protected against progression of posttraumatic arthrosis and provided superior results to other reported techniques in terms of patient satisfaction and residual instability.

  15. Lateral Ankle Stabilization Using Acellular Human Dermal Allograft Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Parks, Robert M; Parks, Stephanie M

    2015-05-01

    We describe a retrospective study that uses the Broström-type surgical procedure with modifications that augment deficient and torn ligaments with acellular human dermal grafts. At the onset of this study, the most prevalent dermal graft available to us was GraftJacket (Wright Medical Technology, Arlington, Tennessee). Greater than 50% of the study participants were grafted with this product, but more recently other equally effective human dermal grafts have been used with no apparent difference. Thirty-five lateral ankle stabilization procedures were performed in the past 6 years on 33 patients. Eight patients were considered athletes (mean age, 23 years). The balance of the study group consisted of sedentary patients (mean age, 41 years). The mean patient body mass index (calculated as the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) was 31. All of the patients were satisfied with their results, with no recurrent instability. Two patients in this group went on to have contralateral ankle stabilization in a similar manner owing to their satisfaction. Complications included two soft-tissue infections. Lateral ankle stabilization using acellular human dermal graft augmentation is a useful tool in the surgical treatment of ankle instability. This procedure offers distinct advantages over traditional methods of ankle repair and can be performed with relatively limited surgical exposure. Ease of operation, consistent results, and limited patient morbidity should allow surgeons to use this procedure independently or adjunctively to improve surgical outcomes.

  16. Neuromuscular control and rehabilitation of the unstable ankle.

    PubMed

    Hung, You-Jou

    2015-06-18

    Lateral ankle sprain is a common orthopedic injury with a very high recurrence rate in athletes. After decades of research, it is still unclear what contributes to the high recurrence rate of ankle sprain, and what is the most effective intervention to reduce the incident of initial and recurrent injuries. In addition, clinicians often implement balance training as part of the rehabilitation protocol in hopes of enhancing the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint. However, there is no consensus on whether the neuromuscular control and proprioception are compromised in unstable ankles. To reduce the prevalence of ankle sprains, the effectiveness of engaging balance training to enhance the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint is also questionable.

  17. Neuromuscular control and rehabilitation of the unstable ankle

    PubMed Central

    Hung, You-jou

    2015-01-01

    Lateral ankle sprain is a common orthopedic injury with a very high recurrence rate in athletes. After decades of research, it is still unclear what contributes to the high recurrence rate of ankle sprain, and what is the most effective intervention to reduce the incident of initial and recurrent injuries. In addition, clinicians often implement balance training as part of the rehabilitation protocol in hopes of enhancing the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint. However, there is no consensus on whether the neuromuscular control and proprioception are compromised in unstable ankles. To reduce the prevalence of ankle sprains, the effectiveness of engaging balance training to enhance the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint is also questionable. PMID:26085985

  18. Ankle Sprain Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & Prevention Safety & ... Preventable Diseases Healthy Children > Health Issues > Injuries & Emergencies > Sports ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share ...

  19. Reconstruction of compound loss of lateral malleolus and lateral ankle ligaments with double-bundle Achilles tendon-bone allograft.

    PubMed

    Ko, Dukhwan; Jung, Hong-Geun; Kim, Hyeung-June; Cha, Seung-Han; Nam, Kyoung-Mo

    2014-01-01

    Open ankle fracture, including compound loss of the lateral malleolus, lateral ankle ligaments, and overlying skin, is a severe injury and can result in ankle instability and permanent disability. Treatment of this injury is challenging and requires bone grafting and soft tissue reconstruction. In the present report, we describe a unique reconstruction technique for compound loss of the lateral malleolus, lateral ankle ligaments, and the overlying skin using a double-bundle Achilles tendon-bone allograft combined with a reverse sural fasciocutaneous flap. The patient obtained a stable ankle with nearly full range of motion and displayed satisfactory function during the follow-up period.

  20. Ankle Cheilectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... your primary doctor. Treatments of the Ankle Achilles Tendinosis Surgery Achilles Tendon Rupture Surgery Ankle Arthrodesis Ankle ... for Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus Insertional Achilles Tendinosis Surgery Lateral Ankle Ligament Reconstruction Lateral Ankle Stabilization ...

  1. Comparing the Effects of Peroneal Muscle Fatigue and Cyclic Loading on Ankle Neuromuscular Control During Lateral-Hop Landing.

    PubMed

    Malmir, Kazem; Olyaei, Gholam Reza; Talebian, Saeed; Jamshidi, Ali Ashraf

    2015-08-01

    Cyclic movements and muscle fatigue may result in musculoskeletal injuries by inducing changes in neuromuscular control. Ankle frontal-plane neuromuscular control has rarely been studied in spite of its importance. To compare the effects of peroneal muscle fatigue and a cyclic passive-inversion (CPI) protocol on ankle neuromuscular control during a lateral hop. Quasi-experimental, repeated measures. University laboratory. 22 recreationally active, healthy men with no history of ankle sprain or giving way. Participants performed a lateral hop before and after 2 interventions on a Biodex dynamometer. They were randomly assigned to intervention order and interventions were 1 wk apart. A passive intervention included 40 CPIs at 5°/s through 80% of maximum range of motion, and a fatigue intervention involved an isometric eversion at 40% of the maximal voluntary isometric contraction until the torque decreased to 50% of its initial value. Median frequency of the peroneus longus during the fatigue protocol, energy absorption by the viscoelastic tissues during the CPI protocol, and feedforward onset and reaction time of the peroneus longus during landing. A significant fall in median frequency (P < .05) and a significant decrease in energy absorption (P < .05) confirmed fatigue and a change in viscoelastic behavior, respectively. There was a significant main effect of condition on feedforward onset and reaction time (P < .05). No significant main effect of intervention or intervention × condition interaction was noted (P > .05). There was a significant difference between pre- and postintervention measures (P < .0125), but no significant difference was found between postintervention measures (P > .0125). Both fatigue and the CPI may similarly impair ankle neuromuscular control. Thus, in prolonged sports competitions and exercises, the ankle may be injured due to either fatigue or changes in the biomechanical properties of the viscoelastic tissues.

  2. A new paradigm for rehabilitation of patients with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Luke; Hertel, Jay

    2012-11-01

    Lateral ankle sprains have been shown to be one of the most common musculoskeletal injuries in both athletes and the recreationally active population. Moreover, it is estimated that approximately 30% of people who incur a lateral ankle sprain will sustain recurrent ankle sprains and experience symptoms of pain and instability that last > 1 year. Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is the term used to describe cases involving repetitive ankle sprains, multiple episodes of the ankle "giving way," persistent symptoms, and diminished self-reported function for > 1 year after the initial ankle sprain. The optimal conservative treatment for CAI is yet to be determined; however, comparison between patients with CAI and individuals showing no history of ankle sprain has revealed several characteristic features of CAI. These include diminished range of motion, decreased strength, impaired neuromuscular control, and altered functional movement patterns. We propose a new treatment paradigm for conservative management of CAI with the aim of assessing and treating specific deficits exhibited by individual patients with CAI.

  3. Validity of an ankle joint motion and position sense measurement system and its application in healthy subjects and patients with ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chueh-Ho; Chiang, Shang-Lin; Lu, Liang-Hsuan; Wei, Shun-Hwa; Sung, Wen-Hsu

    2016-07-01

    Ankle motion and proprioception in multiple axis movements are crucial for daily activities. However, few studies have developed and used a multiple axis system for measuring ankle motion and proprioception. This study was designed to validate a novel ankle haptic interface system that measures the ankle range of motion (ROM) and joint position sense in multiple plane movements, investigating the proprioception deficits during joint position sense tasks for patients with ankle instability. Eleven healthy adults (mean ± standard deviation; age, 24.7 ± 1.9 years) and thirteen patients with ankle instability were recruited in this study. All subjects were asked to perform tests to evaluate the validity of the ankle ROM measurements and underwent tests for validating the joint position sense measurements conducted during multiple axis movements of the ankle joint. Pearson correlation was used for validating the angular position measurements obtained using the developed system; the independent t test was used to investigate the differences in joint position sense task performance for people with or without ankle instability. The ROM measurements of the device were linearly correlated with the criterion standards (r = 0.99). The ankle instability and healthy groups were significantly different in direction, absolute, and variable errors of plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion (p < 0.05). The results demonstrate that the novel ankle joint motion and position sense measurement system is valid and can be used for measuring the ankle ROM and joint position sense in multiple planes and indicate proprioception deficits for people with ankle instability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Balance failure in single limb stance due to ankle sprain injury: an analysis of center of pressure using the fractal dimension method.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2014-01-01

    Instrumented postural control analysis plays an important role in evaluating the effects of injury on dynamic stability during balance tasks, and is often conveyed with measures based on the displacement of the center-of-pressure (COP) assessed with a force platform. However, the desired outcome of the task is frequently characterized by a loss of dynamic stability, secondary to injury. Typically, these failed trials are discarded during research investigations, with the potential loss of informative data pertaining to task success. The novelty of the present study is that COP characteristics of failed trials in injured participants are compared to successful trial data in another injured group, and a control group of participants, using the fractal dimension (FD) method. Three groups of participants attempted a task of eyes closed single limb stance (SLS): twenty-nine participants with acute ankle sprain successfully completed the task on their non-injured limb (successful injury group); twenty eight participants with acute ankle sprain failed their attempt on their injured limb (failed injury group); sixteen participants with no current injury successfully completed the task on their non-dominant limb (successful non-injured group). Between trial analyses of these groups revealed significant differences in COP trajectory FD (successful injury group: 1.58±0.06; failed injury group: 1.54±0.07; successful non-injured group: 1.64±0.06) with a large effect size (0.27). These findings demonstrate that successful eyes-closed SLS is characterized by a larger FD of the COP path when compared to failed trials, and that injury causes a decrease in COP path FD.

  5. Endoscopic Resection of the Lateral Ankle Bursa With Synovial Chondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-06-01

    Bursal chondromatosis is synovial chondromatosis of the bursae. It is a rare disease entity that can involve the adventitial bursa of the lateral ankle. Complete synovectomy, removal of loose bodies, and bursectomy comprise the treatment of choice. Detailed preoperative radiologic assessment and surgical planning are the keys to success. Any accompanying synovial chondromatosis of the ankle or subtalar joint or tenosynovial chondromatosis of the peroneal tendon sheath should be treated together with the bursectomy. Endoscopic bursectomy can be performed through the bursal portal. The proximal and distal peroneal tendoscopy portals serve as viewing portals. The resection of the diseased tissues should be performed in a step-by-step zonal manner. Complete synovectomy and removal of loose bodies should be performed before bursectomy. Internal drainage of the bursal sac into the peroneal tendon sheath may be indicated if the sac is adherent to the skin. It should only be performed after complete synovectomy and removal of loose bodies.

  6. Tibial slope in total ankle arthroplasty: Anterior or lateral approach.

    PubMed

    Usuelli, Federico Giuseppe; Maccario, Camilla; Indino, Cristian; Manzi, Luigi; Gross, Christopher Edward

    2017-06-01

    A new total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) system performed through a lateral approach provides direct visualization of the centre of rotation, allowing for accurate reconstruction of the joint alignment and less bone resection. Radiographic references are needed to describe deformities and plan the surgical procedures. The tibial slope is an important factor when treating malalignment. The aim of this study is to show if there is any difference regarding the post-operative tibial slope (β angle) measurement comparing a fixed-bearing TAA through a lateral approach and a mobile-bearing TAA through an anterior approach. The study included 217 ankles. Between May 2011 and April 2015, 77 patients underwent a TAA with a mobile-bearing implant through an anterior approach and 45 with a fixed-bearing implant through a lateral approach: in these patients the β angle was measured 2 and 12 months postoperatively. 95 subjects with unilateral post-traumatic ankle arthritis composed the control group: in these patients we measured the anterior distal tibial angle (ADTA) of the controlateral, non arthritic tibiotalar joint. In the mobile-bearing group, the mean β angle at 2 and 12 months postoperatively was 86.4±3.1 and 86.8±3.1 (p-value=0.12). In the fixed-bearing group, the mean β angle at 2 and 12 months postoperatively was 83.1±5.4 and 83.9±6.5 (p-value=0.26). A statistically significant difference was found between the β angle of the two groups. In the control group the mean ADTA was 84.9±2.5. A non-statistically significant difference was observed only between β angle of the fixed-bearing group and the ADTA of the control group. Regarding the tibial slope, fixed-bearing TAA through a lateral approach showed a more anatomic placement. In contrast, β angle in mobile-bearing group appeared more reproducible than fixed-bearing group. Copyright © 2016 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Utilization of mobilization with movement for an apparent sprain of the posterior talofibular ligament: a case report.

    PubMed

    Woodman, Russell; Berghorn, Kevin; Underhill, Traci; Wolanin, Meredith

    2013-02-01

    Ankle sprains are a common injury. According to the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS), an estimated 630,891 ankle sprains occurred in 2009 (CPSC, 2011). The anterior talofibular ligament (AFTL) is frequently sprained as a result of a plantarflexion-inversion injury. Sometimes the calcaneofibular ligament or posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) is also sprained (Komenda and Ferkel, 1999). The patient in this study presented with lateral ankle pain reproducible by passive plantarflexion and eversion, complaining of pain during exercise and playing sports. These findings are consistent with a sprain of the PTFL. Positional faults have also been shown to occur at tibiofibular joint, mimicking the symptoms of an ankle sprain. Brian Mulligan first hypothesized the occurrence of positional faults at the ankle. He developed a Mobilization with Movement (MWM) technique to treat these positional faults. Mulligan also hypothesized that a similar positional fault could occur in a posterior direction mimicking a sprain of the PTFL (Mulligan, 2010, p. 71, 96-97). The purpose of this case study is to present a patient with an apparent posterior talofibular ligament sprain who responded to an anterior glide MWM of the fibula. The two measurements used to assess function and pain were the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) and a 10-point numeric pain scale. Each measure was conducted prior to treatment, after treatment was discontinued, 6 months post treatment and 12 months post treatment. A positive response was achieved, as her symptoms were reduced and she was able return to her prior level of function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Gain modulation of the middle latency cutaneous reflex in patients with chronic joint instability after ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Futatsubashi, Genki; Sasada, Shusaku; Tazoe, Toshiki; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the neural alteration of reflex pathways arising from cutaneous afferents in patients with chronic ankle instability. Cutaneous reflexes were elicited by applying non-noxious electrical stimulation to the sural nerve of subjects with chronic ankle instability (n=17) and control subjects (n=17) while sitting. Electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from each ankle and thigh muscle. The middle latency response (MLR; latency: 70-120 ms) component was analyzed. In the peroneus longus (PL) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles, linear regression analyses between the magnitude of the inhibitory MLR and background EMG activity showed that, compared to the uninjured side and the control subjects, the gain of the suppressive MLR was increased in the injured side. This was also confirmed by the pooled data for both groups. The degree of MLR alteration was significantly correlated to that of chronic ankle instability in the PL. The excitability of middle latency cutaneous reflexes in the PL and VL is modulated in subjects with chronic ankle instability. Cutaneous reflexes may be potential tools to investigate the pathological state of the neural system that controls the lower limbs in subjects with chronic ankle instability. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Total ankle replacement through a lateral approach: surgical tips

    PubMed Central

    Usuelli, Federico Giuseppe; Indino, Cristian; Maccario, Camilla; Manzi, Luigi; Salini, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, the Zimmer Trabecular Metal Total Ankle Replacement (Zimmer TM TAR) was developed to be used through a lateral transfibular approach. The purpose of this paper is to describe the surgical technique and early outcomes of the TAR via the lateral approach using the Zimmer TM TARs. Methods: Sixty-seven patients underwent primary TAR using the Zimmer TM TAR between May 2013 and May 2015. Patients were clinically evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively at six and twelve months and annually using the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle and hindfoot scores, visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score, and the Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) questionnaire. The minimum follow-up was 12 months. Results: The mean AOFAS hindfoot score increased from 32.8 preoperatively to 85.0 at the latest follow-up (p-value < 0.001). The mean VAS pain score decreased from 8.0 to 2.0 at the latest follow-up (p-value < 0.001). The Physical and Mental Health Composite Scale scores (PCS and MCS) of the SF-12 passed from a mean value of 30.2 preoperatively to 43.1 (p-value < 0.001) and from a mean value of 44.6 to 53.5 at the latest follow-up (p-value < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: We present our surgical tips and the early results of this prosthetic design which are encouraging. They could be useful as an adjunct to the manufacturer’s surgical technique guidance for surgeons who utilize these implants. PMID:27855774

  10. Optimal suture anchor direction in arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ichiro; Hagio, Tomonobu; Noda, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Kazuki; Minokawa, So; Yamamoto, Takuaki

    2017-05-26

    In this study, the distance between the insertion point of the suture anchors and posterior surface of the fibula during arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament repair was investigated on computed tomography (CT) images. The hypothesis of this study was that there is an optimal insertional direction of the suture anchor to avoid anchor-related complications. One hundred eleven ankles of 98 patients who had undergone three-dimensional CT scans for foot or ankle disorders without deformity of the fibula were assessed (59 males, 52 females; median age 25.5 years; age range 12-78 years). The shortest distance from the insertion point of the suture anchor to the deepest point of the fossa/top of the convex aspect of the fibula was measured on the axial plane, tilting from the longitudinal axis of the fibula at 90°, 75°, 60°, and 45°. The distance from the insertion point of the suture anchor to the posterior surface of the fibula was also measured in a direction parallel to the sagittal plane of the lateral surface of the talus on the axial plane, tilting from the longitudinal axis of the fibula at 90°, 75°, 60°, and 45°. The posterior fossa was observed in all cases on the 90° and 75° images. The distance from the insertion point to the posterior surface of the fibula in the parallel direction was 15.0 ± 3.4 mm at 90°, 17.5 ± 3.2 mm at 75°, 21.7 ± 3.3 mm at 60°, and 25.7 ± 3.6 mm at 45°. The posterior points in the parallel direction were located on the posterior fossa in 36.0% of cases at 90°, in 12.6% at 75°, and in 0.0% at 60° and 45°. The suture anchor should be directed from anterior to posterior at an angle of <45° to the longitudinal axis of the fibula, parallel to the lateral surface of the talus, to avoid passing through the fibula. Cohort study, Level III.

  11. The Effect of Lateral Ankle Ligament Repair in Muscle Reaction Time in Patients with Mechanical Ankle Instability.

    PubMed

    Li, H-Y; Zheng, J-J; Zhang, J; Hua, Y-H; Chen, S-Y

    2015-11-01

    Studies have shown that functional ankle instability can result in prolonged muscle reaction time. However, the deficit in muscle reaction time in patients with mechanical ankle instability (MAI) and the effect of lateral ankle ligament repair on muscle reaction time are unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify the deficit in muscle reaction time, and to evaluate the role of lateral ligament repair in improving muscle reaction time in MAI patients. Sixteen MAI patients diagnosed with lateral ankle ligament tears by ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging underwent arthroscopic debridement and open lateral ankle ligament repair with a modified Broström procedure. One day before the operation, reaction times of the tibialis anterior and peroneus longus muscles were recorded following sudden inversion perturbation while walking on a custom walkway, and anterior drawer test (ADT) and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scale score were evaluated. Six months postoperatively, muscle reaction time, ADT and AOFAS scale score were reevaluated, and muscle reaction times in 15 healthy controls were also recorded. Preoperatively, the affected ankles in the MAI group had significantly delayed tibialis anterior and peroneus longus muscles reaction times compared with controls. Six months after the operation, median AOFAS scale scores were significantly greater than preoperatively, and ADT was negative in the MAI group. However, the affected ankles in the MAI group showed no difference in muscle reaction time compared with preoperative values. MAI patients had prolonged muscle reaction time. The modified Broström procedure produced satisfactory clinical outcomes in MAI patients, but did not shorten reaction times of the tibialis anterior and peroneus longus muscles. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Foot characteristics in association with inversion ankle injury.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Katherine E; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2007-01-01

    To review the literature that provides information to assist in analyzing the role of the foot in acute and chronic lateral ankle injury. We searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, Institute for Scientific Information's Web of Science, and SPORT Discus from 1965-2005 using the terms lateral, ankle, ligament, injury, risk factors, foot, subtalar joint, talocrural joint, gait analysis, and foot biomechanics. We found substantial information on the incidence and treatment of lateral ankle sprains in sport but very few articles that focused on risk factors associated with these injuries and even less information on the foot as it relates to this condition. Moreover, little information was available regarding the risk factors associated with the development of chronic instability after a lateral ankle sprain. We critically analyzed the foot articulations and the foot's role in the mechanism of injury to assist our clinical synopsis. An in-depth review of the foot complex in relation to lateral ankle sprains strongly suggested its importance when treating and preventing inversion ankle trauma. Throughout the literature, the only static foot measurements that show a significant correlation to this condition are an identified cavovarus deformity, increased foot width, and increased calcaneal eversion range of motion. Authors also provided dynamic measurements of the foot, which produced several significant findings that we discuss. Although our findings offer some insight into the relationship between foot characteristics and lateral ankle injuries, future research is needed to confirm the results of this review and expand this area of investigation.

  13. Chronic ankle instability: Current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohrej, Omar A.; Al-Kenani, Nader S.

    2016-01-01

    Ankle sprain is reported to be among the most common recurrent injuries. About 20% of acute ankle sprain patients develop chronic ankle instability. The failure of functional rehabilitation after acute ankle sprain leads to the development of chronic ankle instability. Differentiation between functional and anatomical ankle instability is very essential to guide the proper treatment. Stability testing by varus stress test and anterior drawer test should be carried out. Subtalar instability is an important pathology that is commonly by passed during the assessment of chronic ankle instability. Unlike acute ankle sprain, chronic ankle instability might require surgical intervention. The surgical and conservative management options can be very much developed by in-depth knowledge of the ankle anatomy, biomechanics, and pathology. Anatomical repair, augmentation by tendon, or both are the basic methods of surgical intervention. Arthroscopy is becoming more popular in the management of chronic ankle instability. PMID:27843798

  14. Strains and Sprains Are a Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... strain at some point. Strains and sprains are common injuries, especially for kids who are very active or ... such as twisting your ankle. This kind of injury is common in sports, but also can happen any time ...

  15. Implementation of an app-based neuromuscular training programme to prevent ankle sprains: a process evaluation using the RE-AIM Framework.

    PubMed

    Vriend, Ingrid; Coehoorn, Iris; Verhagen, Evert

    2015-04-01

    The contemporary electronic media is regarded as a practical tool in the dissemination of preventive measures and interventions. For this purpose an App (free of charge) was developed including an efficacious programme for the prevention of ankle sprain recurrences. This study evaluated the implementation effectiveness of this 'Versterk je Enkel' App. The App was evaluated within its practical context using the Reach Effectiveness Adoption Implementation Maintenance (RE-AIM) Framework. The launch of the App was accompanied by a press release, website banners, as well as online and offline advertisements. Data for the evaluation of the App were objectively registered through Google analytics. Data were obtained in February 2013 based on 25,781 users resulting in follow-ups of 18 months (iOS version) and 15 months (Android version), respectively. Users questionnaires provided a qualitative view of the objectively assessed measures (n=82) to gain insight into the demographics of users, reasons to download, user experience and how the information was used. The App reached only 2.6% of the projected target population. User ratings for the App's relevancy, clarity, usefulness, appeal, information and reliability were high. App usage indicates that compliance with the embedded programme was low. Although the App was well received by the users, targeted efforts are required to ensure proper uptake and usage of the App by the target population. This also holds true for eHealth and mHealth efforts aimed at athlete care and injury prevention in general. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. The PRICE study (Protection Rest Ice Compression Elevation): design of a randomised controlled trial comparing standard versus cryokinetic ice applications in the management of acute ankle sprain [ISRCTN13903946].

    PubMed

    Bleakley, Chris M; O'Connor, Seán; Tully, Mark A; Rocke, Laurence G; Macauley, Domnhall C; McDonough, Suzanne M

    2007-12-19

    Cryotherapy (the application of ice for therapeutic purposes) is one of the most common treatment modalities employed in the immediate management of acute soft tissue injury. Despite its widespread clinical use, the precise physiological responses to therapeutic cooling have not been fully elucidated, and effective evidence-based treatment protocols are yet to be established. Intermittent ice applications are thought to exert a significant analgesic effect. This could facilitate earlier therapeutic exercise after injury, potentially allowing for a quicker return to activity. The primary aim of the forthcoming study is therefore to examine the safety and effectiveness of combining intermittent ice applications with periods of therapeutic exercise in the first week after an acute ankle sprain. The study is a randomised controlled trial. 120 subjects with an acute grade I or grade II ankle sprain will be recruited from Accident & Emergency and a University based Sports Injury Clinic. Subjects will be randomised under strict double-blind conditions to either a standard cryotherapy (intermittent ice applications with compression) or cryokinetic treatment group (intermittent ice applications with compression and therapeutic exercise). After the first week, treatment will be standardised across groups. Assessor blinding will be maintained throughout the trial. Primary outcome will be function, assessed using the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS). Additional outcomes will include pain (10 cm Visual Analogue Scale), swelling (modified figure-of-eight method) and activity levels (activPALtrade mark physical activity monitor, PAL Technologies, Glasgow, UK). Diagnostic Ultrasound (Episcan-1-200 high frequency ultrasound scanning system, Longport International Ltd, PA) will also be used to assess the degree of soft tissue injury. After baseline assessment subjects will be followed up at 1, 2, 3 & 4 weeks post injury. All data will be analysed using repeated measures

  17. Incidence and variance of foot and ankle injuries in elite college football players.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Lee D; Jost, Patrick W; Honkamp, Nicholas; Norwig, John; West, Robin; Bradley, James P

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a study on the risk for foot and ankle injuries in college football players on the basis of injury type and player position. In February 2006, we evaluated 320 intercollegiate football players at the National Football League Combine. All pathologic conditions and surgical procedures of the foot and ankle were recorded, and data were analyzed by player position to detect any trends. Seventy-two percent (n = 231) of the players had a history of foot and ankle injuries, with a total of 287 foot and ankle injuries (1.24 injuries/player injured). The most common injuries were lateral ankle sprain (n = 115), syndesmotic sprain (50), metatarsophalangeal dislocation/turf toe (36), and fibular fracture (25). Foot and ankle injuries were most common in kickers/punters (100% incidence), special teams (100%), running backs (83%), wide receivers (83%), and offensive linemen (80%). Lateral ankle sprains, the most common injuries, were treated surgically only 2.6% of the time. Offensive linemen were most likely to have had syndesmotic sprains (32%), and quarterbacks had the highest incidence of fibular fractures (16%). Foot and ankle injuries are common in collegiate football players, affecting 72% of players. Thirteen percent underwent surgical treatment. Trends are seen in the types of injuries for the different player positions.

  18. Partial transmalleolar approach for lateral impingement after total ankle arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takumi; Nakamura, Ichiro; Miura, Ayumi; Momoyama, Gen; Ito, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Advances in implant technology have made total ankle arthroplasty an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of ankle arthritis. However, a frequent complication of the procedure is nerve impingement related to either to heterotrophic bone growth or the prosthesis itself. Successful resolution of this complication presents a challenge to clinicians. We present a case of lateral impingement following total ankle arthroplasty that was successfully treated using a partial transmalleolar approach to effect a partial osteotomy of the lateral malleolus and create a fragment attached to the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments. This approach provides a good operative field in the lateral gutter with minimal soft tissue impairment. It also facilitates curettage, and resolution of tissue impingement. The osteotomy site healed fully by 3 months postoperative, and the pain around the lateral malleolus resolved. Furthermore, the patient's score on the Japanese Society for Surgery of the Foot Ankle/Hindfoot Scale improved from 33 preoperatively to 82 at 6 months postoperative.

  19. An unusual case of chronic lateral foot pain following ankle inversion injury: osteoid osteoma of the tarsal cuboid bone.

    PubMed

    Aydogan, Umur; Dellenbaugh, Samuel G

    2014-04-01

    Osteoid osteomas are common benign tumors normally seen in the femur, tibia, and spine. They rarely are seen in the foot. We present an unusual case of osteoid osteoma of the cuboid in a 26-year-old man. This was initially thought to be an ankle sprain, as its first presentation was after a sporting injury. It was then treated as an infection before the true diagnosis--that of osteoid osteoma--was obtained.

  20. [Chronic ankle instability in sports -- a review for sports physicians].

    PubMed

    Valderrabano, V; Leumann, A; Pagenstert, G; Frigg, A; Ebneter, L; Hintermann, B

    2006-12-01

    Chronic ankle instability represents a typical sports injury which can mostly be seen in basketball, soccer, orienteering and other high risk sports. 20 to 40 % of the acute ankle sprains develop into chronic ankle instability. From a sports orthopaedic point of view, chronic ankle instability can be subdivided into a lateral, medial or a combination of both so called rotational ankle instability. From a pathophysiological point of view, chronic ankle instability can be either mechanical with a structural ligament lesion or functional with loss of the neuromuscular control. For the sports physician, the chronic ankle instability is a difficult entity as the diagnosis is usually complex and the therapy usually surgical. This review on chronic ankle instability addresses pathomechanism, diagnostics, indications for conservative and surgical treatments, and possible long-term sequelae, as ligamentous osteoarthritis.

  1. Ankle taping can improve proprioception in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Miralles, Iris; Monterde, Sónia; Montull, Salvador; Salvat, Isabel; Fernández-Ballart, J; Beceiro, Judith

    2010-12-01

    Taping is a common technique to treat inversion ankle sprains, but the effects of tape on proprioception are still not clear. The purpose of this study was to establish whether proprioception would be modified by the use of ankle tape. To do so we studied joint position sense (JPS) in healthy volunteers using three-dimensional (3D) movement analysis systems. Forty healthy volunteers (mean age and SD = 23.2 ± 4.2) were asked to actively reproduce four different ankle positions: 10 degrees of dorsiflexion, neutral, 10 degrees and 20 degrees of plantarflexion. The absolute difference between the estimated angle and the target angle was used to assess JPS. This difference was named Error. Subjects were randomly assigned to the control (n = 21) or the intervention (n = 19) groups. Members of the intervention group received ankle tape for a lateral ligament sprain in the non-dominant leg. A t-test was used to evaluate the results. Tape significantly improved JPS for the dorsiflexion position (p = 0.038). Neutral was the most accurately reproduced position, and the remaining positions were overestimated for both groups. Taping improved proprioception in healthy volunteers, and 3D movement analysis was a useful method to accurately quantify joint position sense. Because ankle proprioception is critical to the functional success of surgical and rehabilitation treatments, these results regarding proprioception are of particular importance because ankle taping is often used in preventing ankle sprains and it is a common treatment after ankle injuries.

  2. Stable Versus Unstable Grade II High Ankle Sprains: A Prospective Study Predicting the Need for Surgical Stabilization and Time to Return to Sports.

    PubMed

    Calder, James D; Bamford, Richard; Petrie, Aviva; McCollum, Graham A

    2016-04-01

    To investigate grade II syndesmosis injuries in athletes and identify factors important in differentiating stable from dynamically unstable ankle sprains and those associated with a longer time to return to sports. Sixty-four athletes with an isolated syndesmosis injury (without fracture) were prospectively assessed, with a mean follow-up period of 37 months (range, 24 to 66 months). Those with an associated deltoid ligament injury or osteochondral lesion were included. Those whose injuries were considered stable (grade IIa) were treated conservatively with a boot and rehabilitation. Those whose injuries were clinically unstable underwent arthroscopy, and if instability was confirmed (grade IIb), the syndesmosis was stabilized. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging assessments of injury to individual ligaments were recorded, along with time to return to play. A power analysis estimated that each group would need 28 patients. All athletes returned to the same level of professional sport. The 28 patients with grade IIa injuries returned at a mean of 45 days (range, 23 to 63 days) compared with 64 days (range, 27 to 104 days) for those with grade IIb injuries (P < .0001). There was a highly significant relationship between clinical and magnetic resonance imaging assessments of ligament injury (anterior tibiofibular ligament [ATFL], anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament [AITFL], and deltoid ligament, P < .0001). Instability was 9.5 times as likely with a positive squeeze test and 11 times as likely with a deltoid injury. Combined injury to the anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament and deltoid ligament was associated with a delay in return to sports. Concomitant injury to the ATFL indicated a different mechanism of injury-the syndesmosis is less likely to be unstable and is associated with an earlier return to sports. A positive squeeze test and injury to the ATFL and deltoid ligament are important factors in differentiating stable from dynamically unstable grade

  3. [Treatment of lateral ankle joint instability. Open or arthroscopic?].

    PubMed

    Galla, M

    2016-02-01

    Chronic ankle joint instability often necessitates operative treatment. Operative treatment methods are classified into non-anatomical tenodesis, anatomical reconstruction and direct repair. In addition to open approaches, arthroscopic techniques are increasingly becoming established. This article describes the various operative treatment procedures, their advantages and disadvantages and in particular the arthroscopic feasibility.

  4. Prevalence of chronic ankle instability and associated symptoms in university dance majors: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Simon, Janet; Hall, Emily; Docherty, Carrie

    2014-01-01

    Previous investigations have established that dancers suffer a large number of injuries to the lower leg, foot, and ankle, with a portion of these being significant time loss injuries or in some cases career ending. Lateral ankle sprain is a common injury in dancers and can often lead to recurrent instability and repetitive injuries. Research in other active populations has linked ankle sprains to the development of chronic ankle instability (CAI). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of CAI and related symptoms of ankle sprain in a student dance population. Individuals were included if they were currently a modern or ballet dance major at the investigators' university (exclusion criterion: a history of fracture or surgery in the lower extremities). A self-reported demographic questionnaire and the Identification of Functional Ankle Instability survey were used to identify the presence and characteristics of CAI. A total of 83 questionnaires were collected, and after exclusions, 77 participants remained: 43 modern dancers and 34 ballet dancers (10 males and 67 females, mean age 19.61 ± 2.53 years, mean dance experience 13.61 ± 3.16 years). Of all dancers surveyed, 41 (53.2%) had CAI, and of those 24 (58.5%) were modern dancers, and 17 (41.5%) were ballet dancers. When looking only at those dancers who had a previous lateral ankle sprain, 75.9% were identified as having CAI. Chronic Ankle Instability can create long-term problems for anyone but especially female dancers, who place extreme stress on their feet and ankles from being en pointe or demi-pointe. It is important to educate dancers, instructors, and medical staff of the importance of recognizing CAI and seeking medical care for ankle sprains and their residual symptoms.

  5. Effects of Kinesio taping on joint position sense of the ankle

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyun-Do; Kim, Min-Young; Choi, Jung-Eun; Lim, Ga-Hee; Jung, Seong-In; Park, So-Hyun; Cheon, Song-Hee; Lee, Hae-Yong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Kinesio taping on the joint position sense of the ankle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 26 nomal adults who had experienced ankle sprain. Kinesio taping was applied over the ankle medial ligament and ankle lateral ligament with eight pattern reinforcement taping. Joint position sense was measured using isokinetic equipment (Biodex System 4 pro dynamometer, Biodex Medical systems Inc., USA) during dorsiflexion/plantarflexion and inversion/eversion, before and after taping. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 21.0 for Windows. [Results] Joint position sense after Kinesio taping was improved in the dorsiflexion and inversion positions. [Conclusion] According to the results of this study, Kinesio taping of the ankle is effective for the prevention of ankle sprain. PMID:27190446

  6. A biomechanical study of human lateral ankle ligaments and autogenous reconstructive grafts.

    PubMed

    Attarian, D E; McCrackin, H J; Devito, D P; McElhaney, J H; Garrett, W E

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanical behavior of human anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments, as well as peroneus brevis, split peroneus brevis, and toe extensor tendon grafts. This article represents the first published data comparing the most frequently injured ankle ligaments to the most commonly used autogenous reconstructive grafts. Twenty fresh human ankles provided the bone-ligament-bone and tendon graft specimens for biomechanical testing on a Minneapolis Testing System. Protocol consisted of cyclic loading at physiologic deflections, followed by several load-deflection tests at varying velocities, followed by a final extremely rapid load to failure test. The load-deflection data for all ligaments and tendons demonstrated nonlinearity and strain rate dependence. The maximum load to failure for the anterior talofibular ligament was the lowest of all specimens tested, while its strain to failure was the highest. The loads to failure of the peroneus brevis and split peroneus tendons were significantly greater than the anterior talofibular ligament and approximately equal to the calcaneofibular ligament. Strains to failure for all tendons were significantly less than ligament strains. The high strain to failure of the anterior talofibular ligament demonstrates its physiologic function of allowing increased ankle plantar flexion-internal rotation, while its low load to failure shows its propensity for injury. The greater strength of the tendon grafts explains the success of most reconstructive procedures in reestablishing stability in chronic ankle sprains; at the same time, the data presented suggest that those surgical procedures sacrificing the entire peroneus brevis tendon are unnecessary.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. The Effect of Modified Brostrom-Gould Repair for Lateral Ankle Instability on In Vivo Tibiotalar Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Wainright, William B; Spritzer, Charles E.; Lee, Jun Young; Easley, Mark E.; DeOrio, James K.; Nunley, James A.; DeFrate, Louis E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lateral ankle instability leads to an increased risk of tibiotalar joint osteoarthritis. Previous studies have found abnormal tibiotalar joint motions with lateral ankle instability that may contribute to this increased incidence of osteoarthritis, including increased anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus under weight-bearing loading. Surgical repairs for lateral ankle instability have shown good clinical results, but the effects of repair on in vivo ankle motion are not well understood. Hypothesis The modified Broström-Gould lateral ligament reconstruction decreases anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus under in vivo weight-bearing loading conditions. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Seven patients underwent modified Brostöm-Gould repair for unilateral lateral ankle instability. Ankle joint kinematics as a function of increasing body weight were studied with magnetic resonance imaging and biplanar fluoroscopy. Tibiotalar kinematics were measured in unstable ankles preoperatively and postoperatively at a mean follow-up of 12 months, as well as in the uninjured contralateral ankles of the same individuals. Results Surgical repair resulted in statistically significant decreases in anterior translation of the talus (0.9±0.3mm, p=0.018) at 100% bodyweight and internal rotation of the talus at 75% (2.6±0.8°, p=0.019) and 100% (2.7±0.8°, p=0.013) bodyweight compared to ankle kinematics measured before repair. No statistically significant differences were detected between repaired ankles and contralateral normal ankles. Conclusion The modified Broström-Gould repair improved the abnormal joint motion observed in patients with lateral ankle instability, decreasing anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus. Clinical Relevance Altered kinematics may contribute to the tibiotalar joint degeneration that occurs with chronic lateral ankle instability. The findings of the current study support

  8. Effect of peripheral afferent alteration of the lateral ankle ligaments on dynamic stability.

    PubMed

    Myers, Joseph B; Riemann, Bryan L; Hwang, Ji-Hye; Fu, Freddie H; Lephart, Scott M

    2003-01-01

    The sensorimotor influence of the lateral ankle ligaments in muscle activation is unclear. The lateral ankle ligaments have significant sensorimotor influence on muscle activation. Controlled laboratory study. Muscle-firing characteristics in response to a high-speed inversion perturbation and during gait were assessed in 13 normal subjects. Solutions (1.5% lidocaine or a placebo of saline) were injected bilaterally into the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments (1.5 ml per ligament) to alter peripheral afferent influence. Subjects were again tested with the same protocol. The protective response of the anterior tibialis and peroneal muscles during inversion perturbation and mean muscle activation amplitude decreased during running after both injections. After injection, no significant differences were seen for muscle reflex latencies, maximum amplitude, time to maximum amplitude during inversion perturbation, or mean amplitude during walking. The lateral ankle ligaments have a sensorimotor influence on muscle activation. Induced edema from the injected solutions may have altered the sensorimotor influence of the lateral ankle ligaments, thereby inhibiting the dynamic ankle stabilizers. This finding suggests that dynamic stability may be compromised because of swelling after joint injury.

  9. Reliability of MRI Findings of Peroneal Tendinopathy in Patients with Lateral Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Jin; Kim, Hyung Soo; Chung, Soo Tae; Park, Noh Hyuck; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Park, Jai Hyung; Kim, Joo Hak; Lee, Tae Woo; Lee, Chang Hyun; Oh, Se Man

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic lateral ankle instability also have peroneal tendinopathy often. However, preoperative MRIs of these patients are vague in many cases. Our study was performed to see the reliability of MRI findings of peroneal tendinopathy in patients with chronic lateral ankle instability. Methods MRI images for 82 patients who had chronic lateral ankle instability, and had received surgical treatment between March 2006 and November 2009 were compared with impressions from operating rooms. The mean age of patients was 36.4 years (range, 15 to 64 years), 82 ankles were studied, and patients with rheumatoid diseases were excluded from the study. Results Of the 82 cases, 26 were true positives, 38 true negatives, 13 false positives and 5 false negatives. Of 39 cases of peroneal tendinopathy diagnosed from MRI, 14 had peroneal tendon partial tears, 15 tenosynovitis, 3 dislocations, 17 low-lying muscle bellies, and 6 peroneus quartus muscles. Of 31 cases of peroneal tendinopathy observed in surgery 11 had peroneal tendon partial tears, 4 tenosynovitis, 5 dislocations, 12 low-lying muscle belliess, and 1 peroneus quartus muscle. Sensitivity and specificity of peroneal tendinopathy were 83.9% and 74.5%, respectively. Positive predictive value was 66.7%. Negative predictive value was 88.4%. Accuracy rate was 78.0%. Conclusions MRI is a useful diagnostic tool for detecting peroneal tendinopathy in patients with chronic lateral ankle instability. However, MRI is vague in many cases. Therefore, a thorough delicate physical examination and careful observation is needed. PMID:21119941

  10. The PRICE study (Protection Rest Ice Compression Elevation): design of a randomised controlled trial comparing standard versus cryokinetic ice applications in the management of acute ankle sprain [ISRCTN13903946

    PubMed Central

    Bleakley, Chris M; O'Connor, Seán; Tully, Mark A; Rocke, Laurence G; MacAuley, Domnhall C; McDonough, Suzanne M

    2007-01-01

    Background Cryotherapy (the application of ice for therapeutic purposes) is one of the most common treatment modalities employed in the immediate management of acute soft tissue injury. Despite its widespread clinical use, the precise physiological responses to therapeutic cooling have not been fully elucidated, and effective evidence-based treatment protocols are yet to be established. Intermittent ice applications are thought to exert a significant analgesic effect. This could facilitate earlier therapeutic exercise after injury, potentially allowing for a quicker return to activity. The primary aim of the forthcoming study is therefore to examine the safety and effectiveness of combining intermittent ice applications with periods of therapeutic exercise in the first week after an acute ankle sprain. Methods/Design The study is a randomised controlled trial. 120 subjects with an acute grade I or grade II ankle sprain will be recruited from Accident & Emergency and a University based Sports Injury Clinic. Subjects will be randomised under strict double-blind conditions to either a standard cryotherapy (intermittent ice applications with compression) or cryokinetic treatment group (intermittent ice applications with compression and therapeutic exercise). After the first week, treatment will be standardised across groups. Assessor blinding will be maintained throughout the trial. Primary outcome will be function, assessed using the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS). Additional outcomes will include pain (10 cm Visual Analogue Scale), swelling (modified figure-of-eight method) and activity levels (activPAL™ physical activity monitor, PAL Technologies, Glasgow, UK). Diagnostic Ultrasound (Episcan-1-200 high frequency ultrasound scanning system, Longport International Ltd, PA) will also be used to assess the degree of soft tissue injury. After baseline assessment subjects will be followed up at 1, 2, 3 & 4 weeks post injury. All data will be analysed using

  11. Foot Characteristics in Association With Inversion Ankle Injury

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Katherine E; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review the literature that provides information to assist in analyzing the role of the foot in acute and chronic lateral ankle injury. Data Sources: We searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, Institute for Scientific Information's Web of Science, and SPORT Discus from 1965–2005 using the terms lateral, ankle, ligament, injury, risk factors, foot, subtalar joint, talocrural joint, gait analysis, and foot biomechanics. Data Synthesis: We found substantial information on the incidence and treatment of lateral ankle sprains in sport but very few articles that focused on risk factors associated with these injuries and even less information on the foot as it relates to this condition. Moreover, little information was available regarding the risk factors associated with the development of chronic instability after a lateral ankle sprain. We critically analyzed the foot articulations and the foot's role in the mechanism of injury to assist our clinical synopsis. Conclusions/Recommendations: An in-depth review of the foot complex in relation to lateral ankle sprains strongly suggested its importance when treating and preventing inversion ankle trauma. Throughout the literature, the only static foot measurements that show a significant correlation to this condition are an identified cavovarus deformity, increased foot width, and increased calcaneal eversion range of motion. Authors also provided dynamic measurements of the foot, which produced several significant findings that we discuss. Although our findings offer some insight into the relationship between foot characteristics and lateral ankle injuries, future research is needed to confirm the results of this review and expand this area of investigation. PMID:17597955

  12. The Effects of a Lateral Wedge Insole on Knee and Ankle Joints During Slope Walking.

    PubMed

    Uto, Yuki; Maeda, Tetsuo; Kiyama, Ryoji; Kawada, Masayuki; Tokunaga, Ken; Ohwatashi, Akihiko; Fukudome, Kiyohiro; Ohshige, Tadasu; Yoshimoto, Yoichi; Yone, Kazunori

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a lateral wedge insole reduces the external knee adduction moment during slope walking. Twenty young, healthy subjects participated in this study. Subjects walked up and down a slope using 2 different insoles: a control flat insole and a 7° lateral wedge insole. A three-dimensional motion analysis system and force plate were used to examine the knee adduction moment, the ankle valgus moment, and the moment arm of the ground reaction force to the knee joint center in the frontal plane. The lateral wedge insole significantly decreased the moment arm of the ground reaction force, resulting in a reduction of the knee adduction moment during slope walking, similar to level walking. The reduction ratio of knee adduction moment by the lateral wedge insole during the early stance of up-slope walking was larger than that of level walking. Conversely, the lateral wedge insole increased the ankle valgus moment during slope walking, especially during the early stance phase of up-slope walking. Clinicians should examine the utilization of a lateral wedge insole for knee osteoarthritis patients who perform inclined walking during daily activity, in consideration of the load on the ankle joint.

  13. Preventive lateral ligament tester (PLLT): a novel method to evaluate mechanical properties of lateral ankle joint ligaments in the intact ankle.

    PubMed

    Best, Raymond; Böhle, Caroline; Mauch, Frieder; Brüggemann, Peter G

    2016-04-01

    To construct and evaluate an ankle arthrometer that registers inversion joint deflection at standardized inversion loads and that, moreover, allows conclusions about the mechanical strain of intact ankle joint ligaments at these loads. Twelve healthy ankles and 12 lower limb cadaver specimens were tested in a self-developed measuring device monitoring passive ankle inversion movement (Inv-ROM) at standardized application of inversion loads of 5, 10 and 15 N. To adjust in vivo and in vitro conditions, the muscular inactivity of the evertor muscles was assured by EMG in vivo. Preliminary, test-retest and trial-to-trial reliabilities were tested in vivo. To detect lateral ligament strain, the cadaveric calcaneofibular ligament was instrumented with a buckle transducer. After post-test harvesting of the ligament with its bony attachments, previously obtained resistance strain gauge results were then transferred to tensile loads, mounting the specimens with their buckle transducers into a hydraulic material testing machine. ICC reliability considering the Inv-ROM and torsional stiffness varied between 0.80 and 0.90. Inv-ROM ranged from 15.3° (±7.3°) at 5 N to 28.3° (±7.6) at 15 N. The different tests revealed a CFL tensile load of 31.9 (±14.0) N at 5 N, 51.0 (±15.8) at 10 N and 75.4 (±21.3) N at 15 N inversion load. A highly reliable arthrometer was constructed allowing not only the accurate detection of passive joint deflections at standardized inversion loads but also reveals some objective conclusions of the intact CFL properties in correlation with the individual inversion deflections. The detection of individual joint deflections at predefined loads in correlation with the knowledge of tensile ligament loads in the future could enable more individual preventive measures, e.g., in high-level athletes.

  14. Changes in joint position sense after surgically treated chronic lateral ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Halasi, T; Kynsburg, A; Tallay, A; Berkes, I

    2005-01-01

    Background: A search of the literature shows that the effect of surgery on ankle proprioception has been hardly investigated. Objective: To examine the effect of anatomical reconstruction of the anterolateral capsuloligamentous complex on ankle joint position sense. Methods: A prospective study using the "slope box" test. Ten consecutive patients were included in the study, and 10 healthy athletes represented the control group. Results: Similar test-retest reliability rates (overall reliability 0.92; p = 0.0013) were obtained to those of the original designers of the method. There were no significant differences with respect to side dominance (p = 0.9216). Investigation of the characteristics of mean absolute estimate errors showed that the controls tested became error prone in the range of slope altitudes 7.5–25° in every direction, compared with the range 0–5° (range of p values 0.00003–0.00072). The results of the intervention group showed that, for the two main directions of interest (anterior and lateral), preoperative differences in mean absolute estimate errors between injured (anterior 3.91 (2.81)°; lateral 4.06 (2.85)°) and healthy (anterior 2.94 (2.21)°, lateral 3.19 (2.64)°) sides (anterior, p = 0.0124; lateral, p = 0.0250) had disappeared (postoperative differences: anterior, p = 0.6906; lateral, p = 0.4491). The afflicted ankle had improved significantly after surgery in both important directions (anterior, p<0.0001; lateral, p = 0.0023). Conclusions: The study shows that differences in joint position sense between healthy and injured ankles disappeared as the result of surgery. Preoperative data show that proprioceptive malfunction is a cause of functional instability. If treatment is by means of surgery, the retensioning of the original anterolateral structures is inevitable, even if other grafting or surgical techniques are used. PMID:16244190

  15. Reconstruction of the form and function of lateral malleolus and ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Kensuke; Tanaka, Shinsuke; Kiduka, Yuichiro; Inoue, Yojiro; Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Tai, Yoshiaki

    2005-08-01

    Soft-tissue reconstruction alone cannot obtain normal ankle function in patients with large defects in the area of the lateral malleolus. The authors report a functional reconstructive method for the lateral malleolus, utilized in a male patient whose osteosarcoma in the fibula was resected with surrounding soft tissue. In order to reconstruct the lateral malleolus, the remaining half of the fibula at the knee was removed, and the fibular head was fixed with the tibia at the ankle joint. Ligaments were reconstructed with tendon grafts. Skin and soft-tissue defects were reconstructed with a combined composite flap comprised of a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap and a serratus anterior muscle flap. Dead space around the bone graft was filled with the serratus anterior muscle flap that was divided into two portions. The surface was covered with the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap. The patient regained almost normal function of the ankle joint. This technique would be a useful functional reconstructive method for patients with large defects in the area of the lateral malleolus.

  16. The effect of repetitive ankle perturbations on muscle reaction time and muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Thain, Peter Kevin; Hughes, Gerwyn Trefor Gareth; Mitchell, Andrew Charles Stephen

    2016-10-01

    The use of a tilt platform to simulate a lateral ankle sprain and record muscle reaction time is a well-established procedure. However, a potential caveat is that repetitive ankle perturbation may cause a natural attenuation of the reflex latency and amplitude. This is an important area to investigate as many researchers examine the effect of an intervention on muscle reaction time. Muscle reaction time, peak and average amplitude of the peroneus longus and tibialis anterior in response to a simulated lateral ankle sprain (combined inversion and plantar flexion movement) were calculated in twenty-two physically active participants. The 40 perturbations were divided into 4 even groups of 10 dominant limb perturbations. Within-participants repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests were conducted to assess the effect of habituation over time for each variable. There was a significant reduction in the peroneus longus average amplitude between the aggregated first and last 10 consecutive ankle perturbations (F2.15,45.09=3.90, P=0.03, ɳp(2)=0.16). Authors should implement no more than a maximum of 30 consecutive ankle perturbations (inclusive of practice perturbations) in future protocols simulating a lateral ankle sprain in an effort to avoid significant attenuation of muscle activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Arthroscopic anatomical reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments: A technical simplification.

    PubMed

    Lopes, R; Decante, C; Geffroy, L; Brulefert, K; Noailles, T

    2016-12-01

    Anatomical reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments has become a pivotal component of the treatment strategy for chronic ankle instability. The recently described arthroscopic version of this procedure is indispensable to ensure that concomitant lesions are appropriately managed, yet remains technically demanding. Here, we describe a simplified variant involving percutaneous creation of the calcaneal tunnel for the distal attachment of the calcaneo-fibular ligament. The rationale for this technical stratagem was provided by a preliminary cadaver study that demonstrated a correlation between the lateral malleolus and the distal footprint of the calcaneo-fibular ligament. The main objectives are simplification of the operative technique and decreased injury to tissues whose function is crucial to the recovery of proprioception. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Is deltoid and lateral ligament reconstruction necessary in varus and valgus ankle osteoarthritis, and how should these procedures be performed?

    PubMed

    Hogan, Macalus V; Dare, David M; Deland, Jonathan T

    2013-09-01

    Varus and valgus ankle deformities represent a challenge to the foot and ankle surgeons. The presence of degenerative changes of the tibiotalar joint articular surfaces introduces an additional layer of complexity. Reconstruction of such deformities requires a customized approach to each patient. Surgical intervention often requires joint-sparing realignment, arthroplasty, and/or arthrodesis, depending on the severity of deformity and the joint surface integrity. The ligamentous stability of the ankle plays an essential role in the preservation and optimization of function. This article reviews the role of deltoid and lateral ligament reconstruction in the treatment of varus and valgus ankle osteoarthritis.

  19. Measurement of plantar pressure distribution during gait for diagnosis of functional lateral ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Becker, HP; Rosenbaum, D; Claes, L; Gerngro, H

    1997-04-01

    INTRODUCTION:: Chronic functional instability of the lateral ankle may be difficult to distinguish from mechanical instability when radiological stress tests reveal only small ligamentous defects. For decision making whether to surgically reconstruct the ligaments or not, it can be helpful to use additional information on joint and foot function. Therefore, the aim of a prospective study of patients with longstanding chronic ankle instability was to demonstrate that the dynamic measurement of plantar pressure distribution can identify patients with functional ankle instability. [Table: see text] MATERIALS AND METHODS:: Sixty five patients (mean age 24 (4.6 years)) were included. After clinical examination and radiological stress views, plantar pressure patterns were measured during gait using a capacitive platform, the EMED-SF 2-system. Five trials of each foot were documented and the maximum impulses in eight points of the foot (central heel, lateral and medial heel, midfoot, 1st, 2nd, 5th metatarsal head and hallux) were calculated intraindividually and compared with a group of 100 healthy subjects. The medio-lateral loading factor (MLF) as the quotient of the medial and lateral relative impulses indicated the tendency to walk on the lateral edge of the foot. RESULTS:: Based on clinical criteria alone, two comparable groups of patients were separated, 35 with functional instability and 30 with mechanical instability. After collective analyses of the results, the patients with functional instability showed a significantly increased lateral loading of the unstable foot (p=0 0 1), whereas the mechanically unstable group tended to walk more on the medial side of the unstable foot (Table 1). DISCUSSION:: Dynamic measurement of plantar pressure can identify a group of patients walking on the lateral side of the unstable foot when compared with the stable foot. This finding is explained by a deficit of peroneal strength during stance phase based on a proprioceptive

  20. All Arthroscopic Remnant-Preserving Technique to Reconstruct the Lateral Ankle Ligament Complex.

    PubMed

    Gui, Jianchao; Jiang, Yiqiu; Li, Yang; Tao, Tianqi; Li, Wang; Zhang, Kaibing; Yao, Wangxiang; Dong, Peilong

    2017-06-01

    Arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament reconstruction has been recently advocated. But this technique has not been popularized because of the technical complexity and potential iatrogenic injury. Because the talocalcaneal and calcaneofibular ligaments are extra-articular structures, how to efficiently view and address them is a difficult task. Limited dissection outside the capsule to form a working space is required, but aggressive dissection is harmful for tissue healing although it is helpful for visualization and instrumentation. Because almost the entire talar body is covered by articular cartilage, it is very difficult to safely make a bone tunnel without damaging the cartilage. The remnants of the lateral ankle ligament have proprioceptive sensors that are important for functional stability, but it is difficult to perform anatomical reconstruction arthroscopically while preserving them because of the narrow working space. Furthermore, how to properly tension the reconstructed ligaments in such a narrow working space is also a very difficult task. We have designed a technique that preserves the remnants of lateral ankle ligaments, and all of the above-mentioned problems have been successfully addressed. We have used this technique clinically, and only minor complications occurred.

  1. Changes in joint position sense after conservatively treated chronic lateral ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kynsburg, A; Halasi, T; Tállay, A; Berkes, I

    2006-12-01

    Improvement of ankle proprioception through physiotherapy (a.k.a. proprioceptive training) is a widely accepted conservative treatment modality of chronic functional lateral ankle instability. Clinical studies provided controversial data on its proprioceptive effect. Aim of this study was to gain evidence on the efficacy of proprioceptive training on ankle joint position sense. Ten patients (five males and five females, aged 23.3+/-5.4 years) were treated conservatively for chronic lateral ankle instability with a special training programme over 6 weeks. For the assessment of joint position sense we used the slope-box test, first applied and described by Robbins et al. (Br J Sports Med 29:242-247, 1995). The test was performed before the start and after the end of the training programme, measuring joint position sense on 11 different slope amplitudes in four directions (anterior, posterior, lateral and medial) in random order each on both ankles. Comparisons were made between pre- and post-training results as well as versus a control-group of ten healthy athletes. Overall the proprioceptive sensory function of the studied group has improved, but this improvement was not significant in all directions. Only two patients have shown significant improvement of joint position sense in all directions (mean estimate error improvement: 2.47 degrees ), while conservative treatment was partially successful in five others (mean estimate error improvement: 0.73 degrees ). The follow-up results of these seven patients were comparable with the values measured in the control-group. Three patients did not show any improvements (mean estimate error improvement: -0.55 degrees ) (overall difference between improving and non-improving patients: P<0.0001). Mean absolute estimate error profiles of the seven improving patients became similar to the profiles of healthy athletes, while these changes could not be observed in the case of the three non-improving participants. Proprioceptive

  2. The anterior talo-fibular ligament reconstruction in surgical treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Trc, Tomás; Handl, Milan; Havlas, Vojtech

    2010-10-01

    Chronic lateral ankle instability causes significant problems in physical activity and accelerates development of osteoarthritic changes. The results of treatment for chronic ankle instability are often meets controversial. A surgical reconstruction of ATFL as described in this paper was performed during the period 1997-2005 on 47 patients (26 male, 21 female), with a mean age of 29.3 years. The average follow-up period was 46.2 months. All patients had clinical examination, X-ray and MRI. The mean values of the Good score improved from an average 3.32 prior to surgery to 1.19 one year after the operation. Paired t-tests showed improvements of great significance (p < 10(-28)). The Good score prior to surgery ranged from 2-4, whereas the scores one year after surgery were either 1 or 2, with a score of 1 being recorded in 38 cases (81%). In the postoperative follow-up, MRI showed a newly-formed ligament structure in all cases. The authors describe their own technique for a reconstruction of lateral ankle instability using remnants of the former ATFL. The scar tissue seems to be sufficient to form a new duplicated structure providing good stability. MRI proved to be a sensitive and specific method for identifying the extent of talo-fibular ligament injury.

  3. Effect of lace-up ankle braces on electromyography measures during walking in adults with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Greg; Donovan, Luke; Hart, Joseph M; Hertel, Jay

    2015-02-01

    Lace-up ankle braces reduce the incidence of ankle sprains and have been hypothesized to do so through both mechanical and neuromuscular mechanisms. To determine the effect of lace-up ankle braces on surface electromyography (sEMG) measures during walking in adults with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Randomized crossover. Laboratory. Fifteen adults with CAI. Surface EMG activity was recorded from the anterior tibialis, peroneus longus, lateral gastrocnemius, rectus femoris, biceps femoris and gluteus medius during treadmill walking with and without lace-up ankle braces. The dependent variables were sEMG amplitude 100 ms pre- and 200 ms post-initial contact, time of activation relative to initial contact, and percent of activation across the stride cycle. When compared to no brace, ankle bracing resulted in lower pre-contact amplitude of the peroneus longus (p = 0.02). The anterior tibialis, peroneus longus, rectus femoris, and gluteus medius were activated later relative to initial contact (p < 0.03). The peroneus longus and rectus femoris were activated for a shorter percentage of the stride cycle (p < 0.05). Braces cause a change in neuromuscular activity during walking. Clinicians should be aware of these changes when prescribing braces, as it may relate to the mechanism in which braces decrease sprains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Arthroscopy for anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Koczy, Bogdan; Pyda, Michał; Stołtny, Tomasz; Mielnik, Michał; Pajak, Jan; Hermanson, Jacek; Pasek, Jarosław; Widuchowski, Jerzy

    2009-01-01

    Anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle joint is a common consequence of ankle sprain due to excessive supination and adduction of the foot, injuries to the tibiofibular syndesmosis and lateral malleolus fractures. Twenty-two arthroscopic procedures to treat anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle joint were performed at the Independent Public Regional Hospital of Trauma Surgery in Piekary Slaskie between 2006 and 2007. The study group included male patients at the mean age of 34 (17 to 55) years. Medical histories revealed ankle sprain in 13 patients, lateral malleolus fracture in 7, and isolated tibiofibular syndesmotic disruption in 2. The mean time from the injury to the arthroscopic treatment was 5 years (range 2 to 8 years). All patients that underwent arthroscopy were evaluated according to the AOFAS score at baseline (before surgery), and at 3 and 12 months after the treatment. The procedure consisted in the removal of hypertrophic, inflamed and scarred soft tissue from the lateral recess. The mean preoperative AOFAS score was 75.4 points. Post-operatively, the AOFAS functional scores increased to 90.6 and 92 points in the third and twelfth month after the procedure respectively. One patient showed temporary neurapraxia of the dorsal intermediate nerve and the ramus cutaneus branch of the superficial peroneal nerve. These results show that arthroscopic treatment of anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle joint produces satisfactory early outcomes.

  5. The Parachute Ankle Brace: Entanglements and Injuries After Controlling for Extrinsic Risk Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-10

    as well as incidence of ankle sprains, ankle fractures, overall ankle injuries and concussions . Because of concern that the PAB may be...ankle) 6.27 6.20 0.99 (0.59-1.67) 0.97 Lower Body Strains/Sprains (exclusive of ankle) 3.29 4.76 1.45 (0.73-2.87) 0.29 Concussions 10.46 8.80 0.84...time of day, jump type) and all injuries, ankle sprains, ankle fractures, ankle injuries, and concussions . All injuries were associated with each

  6. Treatment of common deficits associated with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Alison; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2009-01-01

    Lateral ankle sprains are amongst the most common injuries incurred by athletes, with the high rate of reoccurrence after initial injury becoming of great concern. Chronic ankle instability (CAI) refers to the development of repetitive ankle sprains and persistent residual symptoms post-injury. Some of the initial symptoms that occur in acute sprains may persist for at least 6 months post-injury in the absence of recurrent sprains, despite the athlete having returned to full functional activity. CAI is generally thought to be caused by mechanical instability (MI) or functional instability (FI), or both. Although previously discussed as separate entities, recent research has demonstrated that deficits associated with both MI and FI may co-exist to result in CAI. For clinicians, the main deficits associated with CAI include deficits in proprioception, neuromuscular control, strength and postural control. Based on the literature reviewed, it does seem that subjects with CAI have a deficit in frontal plane ankle joint positional sense. Subjects with CAI do not appear to exhibit any increased latency in the peroneal muscles in response to an external perturbation. Preliminary data suggest that feed-forward neuromuscular control may be more important than feed-back neuromuscular control and interventions are now required to address deficits in feed-forward neuromuscular control. Balance training protocols have consistently been shown to improve postural stability in subjects with CAI. Subjects with CAI do not experience decreased peroneus longus strength, but instead may experience strength deficits in the ankle joint invertor muscles. These findings are of great clinical significance in terms of understanding the mechanisms and deficits associated with CAI. An appreciation of these is vital to allow clinicians to develop effective prevention and treatment programmes in relation to CAI.

  7. Conservative management of posterior ankle impingement: a case report.

    PubMed

    Senécal, Isabelle; Richer, Nadia

    2016-06-01

    To describe the pain and functional improvements of a patient with posterior ankle impingement following a treatment plan incorporating soft tissue therapy, chiropractic adjustment and a progressive rehabilitation program. A 37-year- old male presented with posterolateral ankle pain exacerbated by plantar flexion two weeks after sustaining an inversion ankle sprain. Oedema was present and the patient was describing a sensation of instability while walking. The initial diagnosis of lateral ankle sprain was found to be complicated by a posterior ankle impingement caused by a tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus sheath suspected during the physical examination and confirmed by MRI. The patient was treated over a 14-week period. Soft tissue therapy, a rehabilitation program and cortisone injection were used to treat this condition. A precise description of the rehabilitation program that contains open kinetic chain, closed kinetic chain, proprioception, and conditioning exercises prescribed to the patient is given. After the treatment plan, the patient returned to play pain free and had no daily living restrictions. A protocol including rest, soft tissue therapy, open and closed kinetic chain exercises, sport-specific exercises and cortisone injection appeared to facilitate complete recovery of this patient's posterior ankle impingement.

  8. Conservative management of posterior ankle impingement: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Senécal, Isabelle; Richer, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the pain and functional improvements of a patient with posterior ankle impingement following a treatment plan incorporating soft tissue therapy, chiropractic adjustment and a progressive rehabilitation program. Clinical Features: A 37-year- old male presented with posterolateral ankle pain exacerbated by plantar flexion two weeks after sustaining an inversion ankle sprain. Oedema was present and the patient was describing a sensation of instability while walking. The initial diagnosis of lateral ankle sprain was found to be complicated by a posterior ankle impingement caused by a tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus sheath suspected during the physical examination and confirmed by MRI. Intervention and Outcome: The patient was treated over a 14-week period. Soft tissue therapy, a rehabilitation program and cortisone injection were used to treat this condition. A precise description of the rehabilitation program that contains open kinetic chain, closed kinetic chain, proprioception, and conditioning exercises prescribed to the patient is given. After the treatment plan, the patient returned to play pain free and had no daily living restrictions. Summary: A protocol including rest, soft tissue therapy, open and closed kinetic chain exercises, sport-specific exercises and cortisone injection appeared to facilitate complete recovery of this patient’s posterior ankle impingement. PMID:27385836

  9. Shoes influence lower limb muscle activity and may predispose the wearer to lateral ankle ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Robin; Arnold, Graham P; Drew, Tim S; Cochrane, Lynda A; Abboud, Rami J

    2009-03-01

    Lateral ankle ligaments are injured by hyperinversion of the foot. Foot position is controlled by the lower limb muscles. Awareness of foot position is impaired by wearing shoes. We aimed to determine the influence of wearing shoes upon muscle activity. Sixty-two healthy subjects underwent the same measurements, barefoot and with standardized shoes in a random order. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded from the peroneus longus muscle in response to sudden and unanticipated inversion of the ipsilateral foot. Following foot inversion, the EMG signal showed an initial peak muscle contraction followed by a sustained smaller contraction. Both changes were significantly greater in shoes compared to the barefoot condition for all tested degrees of inversion. Muscle contraction following sudden inversion of the foot was significantly greater when wearing shoes. This greater muscular contraction may be an intrinsic mechanism to oppose the increased moment created by the inverted foot/shoe condition, and hence, may counter balance the increased tendency to injure the lateral ankle ligaments created by wearing shoes.

  10. Acupuncture as analgesia for non-emergent acute non-specific neck pain, ankle sprain and primary headache in an emergency department setting: a protocol for a parallel group, randomised, controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kun Hyung; Ryu, Ji Ho; Park, Maeng Real; Kim, Yong In; Min, Mun Ki; Park, Yong Myeon; Kim, Yu Ri; Noh, Seung Hee; Kang, Min Joo; Kim, Young Jun; Kim, Jae Kyu; Lee, Byung Ryul; Choi, Jun Yong; Yang, Gi Young

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to assess the feasibility of acupuncture as an add-on intervention for patients with non-emergent acute musculoskeletal pain and primary headache in an emergency department (ED) setting. Methods and analysis A total of 40 patients who present to the ED and are diagnosed to have acute non-specific neck pain, ankle sprain or primary headache will be recruited by ED physicians. An intravenous or intramuscular injection of analgesics will be provided as the initial standard pain control intervention for all patients. Patients who still have moderate to severe pain after the 30 min of initial standard ED management will be considered eligible. These patients will be allocated in equal proportions to acupuncture plus standard ED management or to standard ED management alone based on computer-generated random numbers concealed in opaque, sealed, sequentially numbered envelopes. A 30 min session of acupuncture treatment with manual and/or electrical stimulation will be provided by qualified Korean medicine doctors. All patients will receive additional ED management at the ED physician's discretion and based on each patient's response to the allocated intervention. The primary outcome will be pain reduction measured at discharge from the ED by an unblinded assessor. Adverse events in both groups will be documented. Other outcomes will include the patient-reported overall improvement, disability due to neck pain (only for neck-pain patients), the treatment response rate, the use of other healthcare resources and the patients’ perceived effectiveness of the acupuncture treatment. A follow-up telephone interview will be conducted by a blinded assessor 72±12 h after ED discharge. Ethics and dissemination Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. The study has been approved by the Institutional Review Boards (IRBs). The results of this study will guide a full-scale randomised trial of acupuncture in an ED context

  11. Anatomy of the inferior extensor retinaculum and its role in lateral ankle ligament reconstruction: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Dalmau-Pastor, M; Yasui, Y; Calder, J D; Karlsson, J; Kerkhoffs, G M M J; Kennedy, J G

    2016-04-01

    The inferior extensor retinaculum (IER) is an aponeurotic structure, which is in continuation with the anterior part of the sural fascia. The IER has often been used to augment the reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments, for instance in the Broström-Gould procedure, with good outcomes reported. However, its anatomy has not been described in detail and only a few studies are available on this structure. The presence of a non-constant oblique supero-lateral band appears to be important. This structure defines whether the augmentation of the lateral ankle ligaments reconstruction is performed using true IER or only the anterior part of the sural fascia. It is concluded that the use of this structure will have an impact on the resulting ankle stability.

  12. Incidence and Severity of Foot and Ankle Injuries in Men’s Collegiate American Football

    PubMed Central

    Lievers, W. Brent; Adamic, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: American football is an extremely physical game with a much higher risk of injury than other sports. While many studies have reported the rate of injury for particular body regions or for individual injuries, very little information exists that compares the incidence or severity of particular injuries within a body region. Such information is critical for prioritizing preventative interventions. Purpose: To retrospectively analyze epidemiological data to identify the most common and most severe foot and ankle injuries in collegiate men’s football. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Injury data were obtained from the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance System (ISS) for all foot and ankle injuries during the 2004-2005 to 2008-2009 seasons. Injuries were analyzed in terms of incidence and using multiple measures of severity (time loss, surgeries, medical disqualifications). This frequency and severity information is summarized in tabular form as well as in a 4 × 4 quantitative injury risk assessment matrix (QIRAM). Results: The rate of foot and ankle injuries was 15 per 10,000 athletic exposures (AEs). Five injuries were found to be responsible for more than 80% of all foot and ankle injuries: lateral ankle ligament sprains, syndesmotic (high ankle) sprains, medial ankle ligament sprains, midfoot injuries, and first metatarsophalangeal joint injuries. Ankle dislocations were found to be the most severe in terms of median time loss (100 days), percentage of surgeries (83%), and percentage of medical disqualifications (94%), followed by metatarsal fractures (38 days, 36%, and 49%, respectively) and malleolus fractures (33 days, 41%, and 59%, respectively). Statistical analysis suggests that the 3 measures of severity are highly correlated (r > 0.94), thereby justifying the use of time loss as a suitable proxy for injury severity in the construction of the QIRAM. Conclusion: Based on the QIRAM analysis

  13. [Effects of acupuncture-moxibustion intervention on proprioception in athletes with lateral collateral ligament injury of ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Tang, Wen-Jiang; Jiang, Chui-Gang; Chen, Li-Rong; Pang, Yong; Li, Jie; Huang, Yun

    2013-08-01

    To compare the efficacy differences between acupuncture-moxibustion and physiotherapy interventions in improving proprioception of athletes with lateral collateral ligament injury of the ankle joint. Thirty patients with injured lateral collateral ligament of ankle joint were randomly divided into acupuncture group (n = 15) and physiotherapy group (n = 15). Patients of the acupuncture group were treated by acupuncture and moxibustion stimulation of Qiuxu (GB40), Kunlun (BL 60), Shenmai (BL 62), Jiexi (ST 41), and Ashi-points, etc., and those of the physiotherapy group treated with TDP irradiation of the regional lateral malleolus. The treatment of the two groups was conducted once the other day, 3 times each week, continuously for 8 weeks. Before and after the treatment, the ankle-joint's active and passive repositioning error angles were measured by using a joint angle ruler. The average error angle values of active and passive reposition tests of the injured ankle-joint were 4.98 +/- 1.11 and 4.78 +/- 1.3 before the treatment, and 3.67 +/- 0.58 and 3.51 +/- 0.64 after the treatment, respectively in the acupuncture group, being reduced significantly after the treatment (both P < 0.01). No significant changes of the average error angle values of both active and passive reposition tests of the ankle-joint were found after the treatment in the physiotherapy group (P > 0.05). Comparison between two groups showed that the average error angle, average active and passive reposition angles of the injured ankle in the acupuncture group were evidently lower than those in the physiotherapy group (P < 0.01). Acupuncture and moxibustion can effectively improve the proprioception of the injured lateral collateral ligament of the ankle joint in athletes, which is superior to conventional physiotherapy in the therapeutic effect.

  14. Minimum reporting standards for copers in chronic ankle instability research.

    PubMed

    Wikstrom, Erik A; Brown, Cathleen N

    2014-02-01

    Lateral ankle sprains (LASs) are among the most common sports-related injuries and a high percentage of individuals who sprain their ankle go on to develop chronic ankle instability (CAI). The condition of CAI is often classified as having pain, loss of function, and a restriction of, or failure to, return to levels of previous activity. Historically, uninjured healthy controls are used as a comparison group to study the biomechanical and neuromuscular consequences of CAI. However, this model is not ideal to determine why a portion of the population experiencing an ankle sprain does not recover. A more appropriate comparison may be individuals who had an ankle sprain, and thus the exposure, but did not go on to develop CAI (i.e., copers). Thus, the purpose of this review was to determine the existing discrepancies and common standards in definitions of, terminology used for, and the inclusionary/exclusionary criteria used to describe copers within the CAI literature. Multiple databases were searched by keywords and specific authors. Potential studies were screened independently by both authors. Inclusion criteria consisted of an explicit definition of copers and explicit inclusionary/exclusionary criteria. A total of 21 studies were included in the current study and had four outcomes extracted: (1) the definition of copers; (2) the terminology used; (3) specific inclusionary/exclusionary criteria; and (4) injury characteristics of the copers. Based on the included operational definitions, it is recommend that future operational definitions of copers include three key components: (1) an initial LAS; (2) subsequent lack of CAI symptoms (i.e., no complaints of disability or giving way); and (3) a time since injury component. The term coper was overwhelming used within the existing literature (n = 15) and is thus recommended to be used in future studies when describing individuals who have suffered an LAS but failed to develop CAI. Minimal inclusionary criteria should

  15. Seven years follow-up after ankle inversion trauma.

    PubMed

    Konradsen, L; Bech, L; Ehrenbjerg, M; Nickelsen, T

    2002-06-01

    During one year all ankle inversion injuries seen at the acute ward of our institution were divided into grades of severity and classified according to the maximal area of tenderness at the time of clinical examination. Seven years later 648 of the subjects (91%) evaluated their ankle with the help of a questionnaire. Location of maximal tenderness at the time of injury was: lateral fibular ligaments 61%, lateral midfoot ligaments 24%, base of the fifth metatarsal/peroneal tendons 5% and combined lesions 8%. 39% were considered minor, 46% were moderate, and 15% severe. All cases followed a functional treatment protocol. Seven years post- injury 32% reported chronic complaints of pain, swelling or recurrent sprains. 72% of the subjects with residual disability reported that they were functionally impaired by their ankle - in most cases a question of not performing sports at a desired level. 4% experienced pain at rest and were severely disabled. 19% were bothered by repeated inversion injuries - 43% of these subjects felt that they could compensate by using an external ankle support. There was no correlation between the severity of the sprain as judged at the time of injury and the frequency of residual disability or between the area of maximal tenderness at the time of injury and the area of maximal pain at the time of follow-up.

  16. Diminished Foot and Ankle Muscle Volumes in Young Adults With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Mark A.; Snell, Shannon; Handsfield, Geoffrey G.; Blemker, Silvia S.; Wombacher, Emily; Fry, Rachel; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan A.; Park, Joseph S.; Hertel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    % CIs that did not overlap. No other significant differences were identified. Conclusion: Patients with CAI demonstrate atrophy of intrinsic and extrinsic foot and ankle musculature accompanied by lower ankle strength. Clinical Relevance: Clinicians should be aware of the muscle atrophy and strength deficits when prescribing rehabilitation for patients with lateral ankle sprain or CAI. PMID:27570782

  17. Functional ankle instability as a risk factor for osteoarthritis: using T2-mapping to analyze early cartilage degeneration in the ankle joint of young athletes.

    PubMed

    Golditz, T; Steib, S; Pfeifer, K; Uder, M; Gelse, K; Janka, R; Hennig, F F; Welsch, G H

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate, using T2-mapping, the impact of functional instability in the ankle joint on the development of early cartilage damage. Ethical approval for this study was provided. Thirty-six volunteers from the university sports program were divided into three groups according to their ankle status: functional ankle instability (FAI, initial ankle sprain with residual instability); ankle sprain Copers (initial sprain, without residual instability); and controls (without a history of ankle injuries). Quantitative T2-mapping magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at the beginning ('early-unloading') and at the end ('late-unloading') of the MR-examination, with a mean time span of 27 min. Zonal region-of-interest T2-mapping was performed on the talar and tibial cartilage in the deep and superficial layers. The inter-group comparisons of T2-values were analyzed using paired and unpaired t-tests. Statistical analysis of variance was performed. T2-values showed significant to highly significant differences in 11 of 12 regions throughout the groups. In early-unloading, the FAI-group showed a significant increase in quantitative T2-values in the medial, talar regions (P = 0.008, P = 0.027), whereas the Coper-group showed this enhancement in the central-lateral regions (P = 0.05). Especially the comparison of early-loading to late-unloading values revealed significantly decreasing T2-values over time laterally and significantly increasing T2-values medially in the FAI-group, which were not present in the Coper- or control-group. Functional instability causes unbalanced loading in the ankle joint, resulting in cartilage alterations as assessed by quantitative T2-mapping. This approach can visualize and localize early cartilage abnormalities, possibly enabling specific treatment options to prevent osteoarthritis in young athletes. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prophylactic ankle brace use in high school volleyball players: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Frey, Carol; Feder, Keith S; Sleight, Jill

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of prophylactic ankle bracing on the incidence of ankle injuries in a high school population of interscholastic volleyball players followed prospectively for one season. The study was designed to evaluate the effect of different types of ankle braces on the incidence of ankle sprains in high school volleyball players. There were 957 players in the group that wore braces and 42 in the control group who did not wear a brace. Information was collected on age, sex, previous injury, incidence of injury, and time off from play. Only the dominant ankle was studied. Overall, the use of a prophylactic ankle brace did not significantly alter the incidence of ankle sprains in high school volleyball players. However, in players without a previous ankle sprain, the use of an ankle brace did make a significant difference in two of the braced groups. The Active Ankle Trainer II and the Aircast Sports Stirrup protected volleyball players from a sprain only if they had not had a previous sprain. If the player had a history of a previous ankle sprain, these two brace groups did not protect the ankle from another ankle sprain (p < 0.05). In addition, there were significantly more injuries in the female group of players who wore a non-rigid brace versus those who wore a more rigid brace. This information may be helpful in deciding whether to recommend prophylactic ankle braces in volleyball players.

  19. Effects of fatigue due to contraction of evertor muscles on the ankle joint position sense in male soccer players.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Farshid; Roozdar, Arash

    2010-04-01

    The high incidence of ankle sprains that occur later in matches suggests that fatigue may contribute to altered neuromuscular control of the ankle. Moreover, deficits in ankle joint position sense (JPS) were seen in patients with a history of recurrent ankle sprains. It has been hypothesized that ankle sprains may be related to altered ankle JPS as a consequence of fatigue. To evaluate if fatiguing contractions of evertor muscles alter the ankle JPS. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty-six soccer players (age, 24.7 +/- 1.3 years; height, 183.7 +/- 8.2 cm; weight, 78.9 +/- 7.9 kg) were recruited. Subjects were asked to recognize 2 positions (15 degrees of inversion and maximal active inversion minus 5 degrees ) for 2 conditions: normal and fatigue. Muscular fatigue was induced in evertor muscles of the dominant leg by using isometric contractions. The average of the absolute and variable errors of 3 trials were recorded for both fatigue and nonfatigue conditions. A matched control group of 36 soccer players (age, 23.9 +/- 0.9 years; height, 181.2 +/- 6.9 cm; weight, 77.8 +/- 6.5 kg) was asked to recognize the same positions, before a soccer match and after 45 minutes of playing, and their same scores were recorded. Finally, results of the 2 groups were compared. There was significant decrease in subjects' ability to recognize passive and active repositioning of their ankle after a fatigue protocol (P <.001). Passive and active JPS were reduced after playing (P <.001). There was no significant difference between 2 groups in the results of JPS before and after the intervention (P > .1). The acuity of the ankle JPS is reduced subsequent to a fatigue protocol and after a soccer match. Evaluation of athletes' ankle JPS before returning to physical activity may prevent further injuries.

  20. Prevalence of chronic ankle instability in high school and division I athletes.

    PubMed

    Tanen, Leah; Docherty, Carrie L; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Simon, Janet; Schrader, John

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of chronic ankle instability among high school and collegiate athletes. Descriptive epidemiological survey. Athletes from four high schools and a division I university were contacted to participate. For collegiate athletes, a questionnaire packet was distributed during preparticipation physicals. For high school athletes, parental consent was obtained and then questionnaires were distributed during preparticipation physicals, parent meetings, or individual team meetings. All athletes completed the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool for both their left and right ankles. Subjects also provided general demographic data and completed the Ankle Instability Instrument regarding history of lateral ankle sprains and giving way. Athletes were identified as having chronic ankle instability if they scored less than 24 on the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. Of the 512 athletes who completed and returned surveys, 23.4% were identified as having chronic ankle instability. High school athletes were more likely to have chronic ankle instability than their collegiate counterparts (P < .001). Chronic ankle instability was more prevalent among women than among men in both high school (P = .01) and collegiate settings (P = .01). Findings of this study revealed differences in the distribution of chronic ankle instability that warrant further study.

  1. Clinical outcome after anatomical reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments using the Duquennoy technique in chronic lateral instability of the ankle: a long-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Muijs, S P J; Dijkstra, P D S; Bos, C F A

    2008-01-01

    We performed a retrospective study to assess the long-term outcome of non-augmented anatomical direct repair of the lateral ankle ligaments, as originally described by Duquennoy et al, for the treatment of chronic lateral instability of the ankle. This procedure aims to restore stability by the re-insertion and tightening of the original talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments without division of the ligament. We examined the outcome in terms of the post-operative quality of life, the function of the joint and the development of osteoarthritis. Between 1985 and 2002, 23 patients (11 males, 12 females) with a mean age of 32 years (15 to 58) who had undergone this procedure completed the Short-Form 36 assessment of quality of life and the Olerud and Molander Ankle score for the subjective evaluation of symptoms. Clinical re-evaluation, including examination of the ankle and the completion of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society questionnaire was performed on 21 patients after a mean follow-up of 13 years (3 to 22.2). At the final follow-up radiographs of both ankles were taken to assess the development of osteoarthritis. The mean total Short-Form 36 and Olerud and Molander Ankle scores in 23 patients at final follow-up were 79.6 points (37 to 100) and 81.6 points (40 to 100), respectively. The mean total post-operative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score in 21 patients was 89.7 points (72 to 100). We found a significant post-operative reduction in talar tilt and anterior drawer sign (chi-squared test, p <0.001). The functional outcome of the procedure was excellent in ten patients (48%), good in seven (33%) and fair in four (19%). The results in terms of ankle function and stability did not deteriorate with time and there was little restriction in movement. This procedure is simple and effective with a very low rate of complications.

  2. Enhanced balance associated with coordination training with stochastic resonance stimulation in subjects with functional ankle instability: an experimental trial

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Scott E; Arnold, Brent L; Blackburn, J Troy; Brown, Cathleen N; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2007-01-01

    Background Ankle sprains are common injuries that often lead to functional ankle instability (FAI), which is a pathology defined by sensations of instability at the ankle and recurrent ankle sprain injury. Poor postural stability has been associated with FAI, and sports medicine clinicians rehabilitate balance deficits to prevent ankle sprains. Subsensory electrical noise known as stochastic resonance (SR) stimulation has been used in conjunction with coordination training to improve dynamic postural instabilities associated with FAI. However, unlike static postural deficits, dynamic impairments have not been indicative of ankle sprain injury. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of coordination training with or without SR stimulation on static postural stability. Improving postural instabilities associated with FAI has implications for increasing ankle joint stability and decreasing recurrent ankle sprains. Methods This study was conducted in a research laboratory. Thirty subjects with FAI were randomly assigned to either a: 1) conventional coordination training group (CCT); 2) SR stimulation coordination training group (SCT); or 3) control group. Training groups performed coordination exercises for six weeks. The SCT group received SR stimulation during training, while the CCT group only performed coordination training. Single leg postural stability was measured after the completion of balance training. Static postural stability was quantified on a force plate using anterior/posterior (A/P) and medial/lateral (M/L) center-of-pressure velocity (COPvel), M/L COP standard deviation (COPsd), M/L COP maximum excursion (COPmax), and COP area (COParea). Results Treatment effects comparing posttest to pretest COP measures were highest for the SCT group. At posttest, the SCT group had reduced A/P COPvel (2.3 ± 0.4 cm/s vs. 2.7 ± 0.6 cm/s), M/L COPvel (2.6 ± 0.5 cm/s vs. 2.9 ± 0.5 cm/s), M/L COPsd (0.63 ± 0.12 cm vs. 0.73 ± 0.11 cm), M

  3. Enhanced balance associated with coordination training with stochastic resonance stimulation in subjects with functional ankle instability: an experimental trial.

    PubMed

    Ross, Scott E; Arnold, Brent L; Blackburn, J Troy; Brown, Cathleen N; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2007-12-17

    Ankle sprains are common injuries that often lead to functional ankle instability (FAI), which is a pathology defined by sensations of instability at the ankle and recurrent ankle sprain injury. Poor postural stability has been associated with FAI, and sports medicine clinicians rehabilitate balance deficits to prevent ankle sprains. Subsensory electrical noise known as stochastic resonance (SR) stimulation has been used in conjunction with coordination training to improve dynamic postural instabilities associated with FAI. However, unlike static postural deficits, dynamic impairments have not been indicative of ankle sprain injury. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of coordination training with or without SR stimulation on static postural stability. Improving postural instabilities associated with FAI has implications for increasing ankle joint stability and decreasing recurrent ankle sprains. This study was conducted in a research laboratory. Thirty subjects with FAI were randomly assigned to either a: 1) conventional coordination training group (CCT); 2) SR stimulation coordination training group (SCT); or 3) control group. Training groups performed coordination exercises for six weeks. The SCT group received SR stimulation during training, while the CCT group only performed coordination training. Single leg postural stability was measured after the completion of balance training. Static postural stability was quantified on a force plate using anterior/posterior (A/P) and medial/lateral (M/L) center-of-pressure velocity (COPvel), M/L COP standard deviation (COPsd), M/L COP maximum excursion (COPmax), and COP area (COParea). Treatment effects comparing posttest to pretest COP measures were highest for the SCT group. At posttest, the SCT group had reduced A/P COPvel (2.3 +/- 0.4 cm/s vs. 2.7 +/- 0.6 cm/s), M/L COPvel (2.6 +/- 0.5 cm/s vs. 2.9 +/- 0.5 cm/s), M/L COPsd (0.63 +/- 0.12 cm vs. 0.73 +/- 0.11 cm), M/L COPmax (1.76 +/- 0

  4. Acupuncture as analgesia for non-emergent acute non-specific neck pain, ankle sprain and primary headache in an emergency department setting: a protocol for a parallel group, randomised, controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun Hyung; Ryu, Ji Ho; Park, Maeng Real; Kim, Yong In; Min, Mun Ki; Park, Yong Myeon; Kim, Yu Ri; Noh, Seung Hee; Kang, Min Joo; Kim, Young Jun; Kim, Jae Kyu; Lee, Byung Ryul; Choi, Jun Yong; Yang, Gi Young

    2014-06-12

    This study aims to assess the feasibility of acupuncture as an add-on intervention for patients with non-emergent acute musculoskeletal pain and primary headache in an emergency department (ED) setting. A total of 40 patients who present to the ED and are diagnosed to have acute non-specific neck pain, ankle sprain or primary headache will be recruited by ED physicians. An intravenous or intramuscular injection of analgesics will be provided as the initial standard pain control intervention for all patients. Patients who still have moderate to severe pain after the 30 min of initial standard ED management will be considered eligible. These patients will be allocated in equal proportions to acupuncture plus standard ED management or to standard ED management alone based on computer-generated random numbers concealed in opaque, sealed, sequentially numbered envelopes. A 30 min session of acupuncture treatment with manual and/or electrical stimulation will be provided by qualified Korean medicine doctors. All patients will receive additional ED management at the ED physician's discretion and based on each patient's response to the allocated intervention. The primary outcome will be pain reduction measured at discharge from the ED by an unblinded assessor. Adverse events in both groups will be documented. Other outcomes will include the patient-reported overall improvement, disability due to neck pain (only for neck-pain patients), the treatment response rate, the use of other healthcare resources and the patients' perceived effectiveness of the acupuncture treatment. A follow-up telephone interview will be conducted by a blinded assessor 72±12 h after ED discharge. Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. The study has been approved by the Institutional Review Boards (IRBs). The results of this study will guide a full-scale randomised trial of acupuncture in an ED context. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02013908. Published by the BMJ Publishing

  5. Treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability using the Broström-Gould procedure in athletes: long-term results

    PubMed Central

    RUSSO, ADRIANO; GIACCHÈ, PAOLO; MARCANTONI, ENRICO; ARRIGHI, ANNALISA; MOLFETTA, LUIGI

    2016-01-01

    Purpose this study was conducted to evaluate long-term results following treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability using the Broström-Gould technique in athletes. Methods eighteen athletes involved in competitive sports at different levels, who suffered from chronic lateral ankle instability, underwent Broström-Gould ligamentoplasty between 2000 and 2005. The results of the surgery were evaluated using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scale. Results the results at 10–15 years of follow-up were excellent in 94.5% of these cases and good in the remaining 5.5%. An increase of 31.2 points in the AOFAS scale score was recorded at follow-up (with the score rising to 98.8, from 67.6 preoperatively). All the athletes returned to their respective sports at the same level as prior to the surgery. Imaging at long-term follow-up showed no signs of arthritic degeneration. Conclusions the results of this study show that the Broström-Gould technique is an effective procedure for the treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability in the athlete, giving excellent long-term results. Level of evidence therapeutic case series, level IV. PMID:27602349

  6. Clinical results and functional evaluation of the Chrisman-Snook procedure for lateral ankle instability in athletes.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Dennis; Solomon, Ruth; Curtis, Christine; Zurakowski, David; Micheli, Lyle J

    2011-02-01

    There is no consensus regarding optimum surgical treatment for chronic ankle instability. The purpose of this study is to describe a variation of the Chrisman-Snook lateral ligament reconstruction that the senior author uses in patients with chronic ankle instability recalcitrant to conservative management. All patients who underwent reconstruction from 1997 to 2006 were identified, and those with a minimum 2-year follow-up were included, representing a total of 44 ankles in 43 patients. All underwent clinical evaluation and completion of the Foot and Ankle Outcome Survey and the Kaikkonen Scale. At mean follow-up of 4.4 years, mean dorsiflexion loss was 2° compared with the nonoperative side. The postoperative mean Foot and Ankle Outcome Survey score was 74 ± 16 (range, 36-98), while the mean Kaikkonen total score was 77 ± 14 (range, 40-95). Thirty-eight patients (84.6%) were satisfied with their result. Six patients (13.6%) underwent reoperation, including 4 with peroneal tendon scarring requiring tenolysis. Return to sport was achieved in 28 of 35 patients (80%) at a median of 6 months postoperatively. It is concluded that dorsiflexion loss can be minimized and return to sport expected in most patients following this variation of the Chrisman-Snook reconstruction.

  7. Developing a Framework for Ankle Function: A Delphi Study

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Kelli R.; Evans, Todd A.; Neibert, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Addressing clinical outcomes is paramount to providing effective health care, yet there is no consensus regarding the appropriate outcomes to address after ankle injuries. Compounding the problem is the repetitive nature of lateral ankle sprains, referred to as functional (FAI) or chronic (CAI) ankle instability. Although they are commonly used terms in practice and research, FAI and CAI are inconsistently defined and assessed. Objective: To establish definitions of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, FAI, and CAI, as well as their characteristics and assessment techniques. Design: Delphi study. Setting: Telephone interviews and electronic surveys. Patients or Other Participants: Sixteen experts representing the fields of ankle function and treatment, ankle research, and outcomes assessment and research were selected as panelists. Data Collection and Analysis: A telephone interview produced feedback regarding the definition of, functional characteristics of, and assessment techniques for a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, an unhealthy/acutely injured ankle, and FAI/CAI. Those data were compiled, reduced, and returned through electronic surveys and were either included by reaching consensus (80% agreement) or excluded. Results: The definitions of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle and FAI reached consensus. Experts did not agree on a definition of CAI. Eleven functional characteristics of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, 32 functional characteristics of an unhealthy/acutely injured ankle, and 13 characteristics of FAI were agreed upon. Conclusions: Although a consensus was reached regarding the definitions and functional characteristics of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle and FAI, the experts could only agree on 1 characteristic to include in the FAI definition. Several experts did, however, provide additional comments that reinforced the differences in the interpretation of those concepts. Although the experts could not agree on the definition of CAI, its

  8. Ankle motion influences the external knee adduction moment and may predict who will respond to lateral wedge insoles?: an ancillary analysis from the SILK trial

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, G.J.; Parkes, M.J.; Forsythe, L.; Felson, D.T.; Jones, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective Lateral wedge insoles are a potential simple treatment for medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients by reducing the external knee adduction moment (EKAM). However in some patients, an increase in their EKAM is seen. Understanding the role of the ankle joint complex in the response to lateral wedge insoles is critical in understanding and potentially identifying why some patients respond differently to lateral wedge insoles. Method Participants with medial tibiofemoral OA underwent gait analysis whilst walking in a control shoe and a lateral wedge insole. We evaluated if dynamic ankle joint complex coronal plane biomechanical measures could explain and identify those participants that increased (biomechanical non-responder) or decreased (biomechanical responder) EKAM under lateral wedge conditions compared to the control shoe. Results Of the 70 participants studied (43 male), 33% increased their EKAM and 67% decreased their EKAM. Overall, lateral wedge insoles shifted the centre of foot pressure laterally, increased eversion of the ankle/subtalar joint complex (STJ) and the eversion moment compared to the control condition. Ankle angle at peak EKAM and peak eversion ankle/STJ complex angle in the control condition predicted if individuals were likely to decrease EKAM under lateral wedge conditions. Conclusions Coronal plane ankle/STJ complex biomechanical measures play a key role in reducing EKAM when wearing lateral wedge insoles. These findings may assist in the identification of those individuals that could benefit more from wearing lateral wedge insoles. PMID:25749010

  9. Talocalcaneal coalition. Diagnosis with the C-sign on lateral radiographs of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Sakellariou, A; Sallomi, D; Janzen, D L; Munk, P L; Claridge, R J; Kiri, V A

    2000-05-01

    We analysed 42 weight-bearing lateral radiographs of the ankle, 20 of which were from patients with a clinical and plain radiological diagnosis of talocalcaneal coalition (TCC) who subsequently had CT. The remainder were from 22 healthy volunteers with no clinical findings suggestive of hindfoot pathology. Four observers, blinded to the CT findings, independently evaluated the radiographs on two separate occasions. With the 95% confidence interval and using the CT findings as the comparison we calculated the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values for the C-sign, and for other signs known to be associated with TCC. Similarly, we also calculated the interobserver and intraobserver reliability for these signs using the kappa statistic. Our results suggest that the C-sign is highly sensitive and specific for TCC. It is an accurate indicator and significantly more reliable than other previously recognised radiological signs of TCC. Features of the C-sign, however, cannot be relied upon to indicate whether the TCC is fibrous or bony.

  10. Sprains, Strains and Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Young Physicians Annual Scientific Meeting Webinars Careers in Podiatry APMA 2040 Student Profiles CPME REdRC Manage Your ... and fractures. Many fractures and sprains occur during sports. Football players are particularly vulnerable to foot and ...

  11. Wrist sprain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... begins to heal. This can improve with light stretching. Severe (grade 3) wrist sprains may need to ... times. Bend your wrist in the opposite direction, stretching downward and holding for 30 seconds. Relax your ...

  12. A minimally invasive surgical technique for augmented reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments with woven polyester tape.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alex P; Sidhom, Sameh; Sefton, Graham

    2007-01-01

    Although stabilization of the lateral ankle ligament complex (LALC) with augmented techniques is known to be successful, it is associated with a number of complications. We hypothesize that successful stabilization of LALC can be achieved with a woven polyester tape implant via a minimally invasive procedure, as an alternative to tenodesis. Four men with chronic instability of the ankle underwent a minimally invasive surgical stabilization of LALC with a woven polyester tape. This tape was passed through the distal fibula to the base of the fifth metatarsal and then back to the fibula once more before being tied. The foot was immobilized in a neutral position for 2 weeks. Partial weightbearing with a walking stick began on the same day, and physiotherapy began for 10 weeks. Evaluation was performed at a mean follow-up of 24.5 months postoperatively. Preoperatively, all patients had a chronically unstable index ankle both functionally and clinically. At a mean of 24.5 months postoperatively, functional stability for all patients was normal (Sefton grade 1). Subjective ankle performance grades were normal in all cases, and all patients felt the outcome was excellent. Objective measurement with clinical stress testing showed anterior drawer and inversion tests to be the same as the contralateral ankle in all patients. However, each displayed limited inversion of the ankle. No complications such as wound dehiscence, infection, pain, or nerve injury were observed after the procedure. All were able to return to their preinjury activity level within 3 months. Stabilization of LALC may be simply and successfully achieved with a woven polyester graft as an alternative to tenodesis.

  13. The Association of Ankle Dorsiflexion Range of Motion With Hip and Knee Kinematics During the Lateral Step-down Test.

    PubMed

    Rabin, Alon; Portnoy, Sigal; Kozol, Zvi

    2016-11-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Altered hip and knee kinematics have been associated with several knee disorders, including anterior cruciate ligament tear, patellofemoral pain, and iliotibial band syndrome. Limited ankle dorsiflexion (DF) range of motion (ROM), which has been linked with some of these disorders, has also been associated with altered knee kinematics. Objective To explore the association of ankle DF ROM with hip and knee kinematics during a step-down task. Methods Thirty healthy participants underwent a 3-D analysis of hip and knee kinematics during a lateral step-down test, followed by measurement of ankle DF ROM in weight bearing (WB) and non-weight bearing (NWB). Participants were dichotomized using the median values into low- and high-DF subgroups within both WB and NWB. Hip and knee kinematics were compared between the low- and high-DF subgroups. Results Participants in the low-DF subgroups exhibited greater peak hip adduction (WB, P = .02; NWB, P<.01) and greater peak knee external rotation (WB, P = .02; NWB, P<.01) compared with participants in the high-DF subgroups. In addition, participants in the low-DF WB subgroup exhibited decreased peak knee flexion compared with participants in the high-DF WB subgroup (P<.01). Conclusion Individuals with lower ankle DF ROM exhibited hip and knee kinematics previously associated with several knee disorders, suggesting that this impairment may be involved in the pathogenesis of the same disorders. Assessment of ankle DF ROM may be useful as part of a preparticipation screening. Furthermore, deficits in ankle DF ROM may need to be addressed in individuals with altered movement patterns. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(11):-1. Epub 29 Sep 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6621.

  14. [Surgery of ipsilateral Hawkins Ⅲ talus neck and ankle joint fractures via internal and lateral approaches with Herbert screws].

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Dong, Q R; Wang, Z Y; Chen, B; Wan, J H; Wang, L

    2016-11-08

    Objective: To explore the manual operation skills of operative treatment of ipsilateral Hawkins Ⅲ talus neck and ankle joint fractures via internal and lateral approaches with Herbert screws, and to study the clinical results. Method: From Jan 2009 to Dec 2014, the clinical data of 13 patients with ipsilateral Hawkins Ⅲ talus neck and ankle joint fractres via internal and lateral approaches with Herbert screws were retrospectively analyzed in our department.There were 10 males and 3 female, ranging in age from 20 to 60 years with an average age of 31.5 years.The fractures occurred on the right side in 9 patients and on the left side in 4 patients.Three cases had the complication of medial malleolar fracture.Ten cases had the complication of medial and lateral malleolar fracture. Totally 11 cases were made calcaneal skeletal traction, and all the were made CT with three-dimensional image reconstruction.Two cases were treated with emergency operation.Eleven cases were treated with selective operation.The operation time was 5 hours-10 days after injury. The functional results were evaluated by American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS). Result: The average duration of follow-up was 22.6 months (range, 14-65 months). There was skin necrosis in one cases, no incision infection, malunion and nonunion of the fractures and loss of reduction. At final follow-up, AOFAS ankle score was 75.2 (range, 42 to 93), higher than preoperative 39.2 (range, 23 to 60), the difference was statistically significant (P=0.023). The result was excellent in 4 cases, good in 5 cases, fair in 3 cases and 1 cases in poor, and the overall excellent or good rate was 69.2%. Avascular necrosis occurred in 3 cases (23.1%, 3/13). Traumatic arthritis was found in 5 cases (38.5%, 5/13), involved tibial astragaloid joint in 2 cases, involved subtalar joint in 1 case, involved tibial astragaloid joint and subtalar joint in 2 cases. Conclusion: The effect of surgical treatment for ipsilateral

  15. Randomized comparison of tape versus semi-rigid and versus lace-up ankle support in the treatment of acute lateral ankle ligament injury.

    PubMed

    van den Bekerom, M P J; van Kimmenade, Robert; Sierevelt, I N; Eggink, Karin; Kerkhoffs, G M M J; van Dijk, C N; Raven, E E J

    2016-04-01

    Functional treatment is the optimal non-surgical treatment for acute lateral ankle ligament injury (ALALI) in favour of immobilization treatment. There is no single most effective functional treatment (tape, semi-rigid brace or lace-up brace) based on currently available randomized trials. This study is designed as a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the difference in functional outcome after treatment with tape versus semi-rigid versus lace-up ankle support (brace) for grades II and III ALALIs. The Karlsson score and the FAOS were evaluated at 6-month follow-up. One hundred and ninety-three patients (52% males) were randomized, 66 patients were treated with tape, 58 patients with a semi-rigid brace and 62 patients with a lace-up brace. There were no significant differences in any baseline characteristics between the three groups. Mean age of the patients was 37.3 years (35.1-39.5; SD 15.3). Ninety-five males (49%) were included. One hundred and sixty-one (59 + 50 + 52) patients completed the study through final follow-up; 32% lost at follow-up. In two patients treated with tape support, the treatment was changed to a semi-rigid brace because of dermatomal blisters. Except for the difference in Foot and Ankle Outcome Score sport between the lace-up and the semi-rigid brace, there are no differences in any of the outcomes after 6-month follow-up. The most important finding of current study was that there is no difference in outcome 6 months after treatment with tape, semi-rigid brace and a lace-up brace. I.

  16. Dynamic Stress Testing Is Unnecessary for Unimalleolar Supination-External Rotation Ankle Fractures with Minimal Fracture Displacement on Lateral Radiographs.

    PubMed

    Nortunen, Simo; Leskelä, Hannu-Ville; Haapasalo, Heidi; Flinkkilä, Tapio; Ohtonen, Pasi; Pakarinen, Harri

    2017-03-15

    This study aimed to identify factors from standard radiographs that contributed to the stability of the ankle mortise in patients with isolated supination-external rotation fractures of the lateral malleolus (OTA/AO 44-B). Non-stress radiographs of the mortise and lateral views, without medial clear space widening or incongruity, were prospectively collected for 286 consecutive patients (mean age, 45 years [range, 16 to 85 years]), including 144 female patients (mean age, 50 years [range, 17 to 85 years]) and 142 male patients (mean age, 40 years [range, 16 to 84 years]) from 2 trauma centers. The radiographs were analyzed for fracture morphology by 2 orthopaedic surgeons, who were blinded to each other's measurements and to the results of external rotation stress radiographs (the reference for stability). Factors significantly associated with ankle mortise stability were tested in multiple logistic regression. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed for continuous variables to determine optimal thresholds. A sensitivity of >90% was used as the criterion for an optimal threshold. According to external rotation stress radiographs, 217 patients (75.9%) had a stable injury, defined as that with a medial clear space of <5 mm. Independent factors that predicted stable ankle mortise were female sex (odds ratio [OR], 2.5 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.4 to 4.6]), a posterior diastasis of <2 mm (corresponding with a sensitivity of 0.94 and specificity of 0.39) on lateral radiographs (OR, 10.8 [95% CI, 3.7 to 31.5]), and only 2 fracture fragments (OR, 7.3 [95% CI, 2.1 to 26.3]). When the posterior diastasis was <2 mm and only 2 fracture fragments were present, the probability of a stable ankle mortise was 0.98 for 48 female patients (16.8%) and 0.94 for 37 male patients (12.9%). Patients with noncomminuted lateral malleolar fractures (85 patients [29.7%]) could be diagnosed with a stable ankle mortise without further stress testing, when the fracture

  17. [Chronic instability in the ankle area].

    PubMed

    Dubrana, F; Poichotte, A; Toullec, E; Colin, D; Guillodo, Y; Moati, J-C; Brilhauht, J; Musset, T; Feron, F; Richou, J; Henri, M; Guillemot, E

    2006-06-01

    For ankle sprains, the initial radiological work-up must include weight-bearing AP and lateral stress views of the sprained and healthy ankle. Films are taken in auto-varus. Other explorations included arthroMRI, arthroscanner or MRI which can be indicated preoperatively to confirm suspected cartilage injury or an associated ligament tear. These techniques should be employed when pertinent information can be expected according to the clinical situation and the operator's experience. In the emergency setting, ultrasonography can provide a simple low-cost confirmation of joint hematoma which is more precise than x-rays with a positive predictive value of nearly 100%. The objective and subjective clinical outcome after surgical anatomic repair or ligamentoplasty are quite similar. The two principal differences relate to persistent subjective instability and post-operative surgical complications. Thus there are advantages and disadvantages for each option advantage for anatomical repair because of the low rate of surgical complications and advantage for ligament repairs which stabilize the subtalar joint with a low rate of residual instability.

  18. US in ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pesquer, Lionel; Guillo, Stephane; Meyer, Philippe; Hauger, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Ankle impingement is a common condition occurring secondary to sprain or repeated microtrauma. Clinical symptoms are chronic pain located in the affected region and limited range of ankle motion. There are three types of ankle impingement syndrome: anterior impingement, which can be subdivided into anterolateral, anteromedial and purely anterior impingement; posterior impingement, which can be subdivided into posterior and posteromedial impingement; and calcaneal peroneal impingement which is secondary to planovalgus foot deformity. This paper evaluates physiological and clinical elements of these three types of ankle impingement syndrome as well as the role of ultrasound (US) imaging and US-guided treatment.

  19. [EFFECTIVENESS OF ARTHROSCOPY FOR ANKLE IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Han, Guansheng; Xu, Bin; Geng, Chunhui; Cheng, Xinde

    2014-06-01

    To explore the effectiveness of arthroscopy for ankle impingement syndrome. Between March 2009 and April 2013, 30 patients with ankle impingement syndrome were treated. Among them, there were 22 males and 8 females with an average age of 28.6 years (range, 16-55 years). Twenty-six patients had a history of obvious ankle sprains. The disease duration was 6-62 months (mean, 21.5 months). All cases had ankle pain, limitation of activity, and positive results of ankle impact test. According to Meislin scoring criteria, 5 cases were rated as good, 8 cases as medium, and 17 cases as poor; the excellent and good rate was 16.7%. American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score was 43.3 ± 5.1. Visual analogue scale (VAS) score was 6.7 ± 2.3. Preoperative X-ray film showed ankle loose bodies and hyperplasia osteophyte in 6 cases, and lateral malleolus old avulsion fracture in 4 cases. MRI showed soft tissue in the ankle joint in the 17 cases, and articular cartilage injury of tibiotalar joint and bone marrow edema in 7 cases. The location, degree, and organization of the impact were observed under arthroscopy. The joint debridement, removal of loose body and osteophyte, plasty of articular cartilage, and plasma radiofrequency ablation of lateral and medial ligaments were performed. All incisions healed primarily. No infection of skin and joint, or neurological and vascular injury was found. All patients were followed up 6-32 months (mean, 19.5 months). According to Meislin scoring criteria at last follow-up, 16 cases were rated as excellent, 11 cases as good, and 3 cases as medium; the excellent and good rate was 90.0%, showing significant difference when compared with preoperative value (Z = 6.045, P = 0.000). AOFAS score was 89.8 ± 4.3, showing significant difference when compared with preoperative score (t = 38.180, P = 0.000). VAS score was 2.8 ± 1.6, showing significant difference when compared with preoperative score (t = 7.624, P = 0.000). A clear

  20. The V sign in lateral talar process fractures: an experimental study using a foot and ankle model.

    PubMed

    Jentzsch, Thorsten; Hasler, Anita; Renner, Niklas; Peterhans, Manuel; Sutter, Reto; Espinosa, Norman; Wirth, Stephan H

    2017-07-03

    Lateral talar process fractures (LTPF) are often missed on conventional radiographs. A positive V sign is an interruption of the contour of the LTP. It has been suggested, but not proven to be pathognomonic for LTPF. The objective was to study whether the V sign is pathognomonic for LTPF and if it can be properly assessed in different ankle positions and varying fracture types. An experimental study was conducted. Two investigators assessed lateral radiographs (n = 108) of a foot and ankle model. The exposure variables were different ankle positions and fracture types. The primary outcome was the correct detection of a V sign. The secondary outcomes were the detection of the V sign depending on ankle position and fracture type as well as the uncertainty. The interobserver agreement on the V sign and type of fracture were fair (κ = 0.35, 95% CI 0.18-0.53, p < 0.001 and κ = 0.37, 95% CI 0.26-0.48, p < 0.001). The mean sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and likelihood ratio for the detection of the V sign were 77% (95% CI 67-86%), 59% (95% CI 39-78%), 85% (95% CI 75-92%), 46% (95% CI 29-63%), and 2. The mean uncertainty in the V sign detection was 38%. The V sign identification stratified by ankle position and fracture type showed significant better results with increasing inversion (p = 0.035 and p = 0.011) and type B fractures (p = 0.001 and p = 0.013). The V sign may not be pathognomonic and is not recommended as the only modality for the detection of LTPF. It is better visualized with inversion, but does not depend on plantar flexion or internal rotation. It is also better seen in type B fractures. It is difficult to detect and investigator-dependent. It may be helpful in a clinical setting to point into a direction, but a CT scan may be used if in doubt about a LTPF.

  1. Effect of a 4-week balance exercise with medio-lateral unstable sole on ankle joint functional ability.

    PubMed

    Nam, Su-Bin; Choi, Bo-Ram

    2017-07-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of 4-week of balance exercise with medio-lateral unstable sole on ankle muscle activation and functional ability. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty university students without current or past ankle injuries were assigned to either an experimental group or control group. The experimental group participated in a balance exercise program 3 times a week over 4 weeks, which consisted of one-leg stands and semi-squat exercises with medio-lateral unstable sole. The control group continued with their regular life activities without participation in the program. Electromyographic activities of peroneus longus and brevis muscles were recorded during stair descending immediately before and after the exercise program. Functional balance was tested with the Star Excursion Balance test immediately before and after the exercise program. Paired t-tests were used to assess statistical significance. [Results] Activation of peroneus longus and brevis and Star Excursion Balance Test scores in both groups did not show a significant difference between pre- and post-exercise. [Conclusion] A future study is suggested with increased level of medio-lateral perturbation during outcome measurements and exercises with addition of supervision in the exercise training and home program.

  2. Reverse lateral supramalleolar adipofascial flap and skin grafting for one-stage soft tissue reconstruction of foot and ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Duke-Whan

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this report is to present the clinical result and efficacy of reverse lateral supramalleolar adipofascial flap and skin grafting for one stage soft tissue reconstruction of the foot and ankle joints. Reconstruction using a reverse lateral supramalleolar adipofascial flap and skin grafting was performed in eight cases between January 2005 and March 2009. All the subjects were male with a mean age of 53 years. The mean follow-up period was 20 months. The reasons for soft tissue defects were diabetic foot, infected bursitis, open injuries of the foot, and chronic osteomyelitis. The mean size of the flaps was 3.5 (3-4) × 4.5 (4-6) cm. The flaps were elevated in the form of an adipofascial flap and split-thickness skin grafting was performed over the flaps and adjoining raw areas. Flaps survived in all cases. The implantation of the split-thickness skin graft over the flap was also successful in all cases. Neither partial necrosis in the adipofascial flap nor venous congestion was observed. At the last follow-up, there were no limited motions in the ankle and the toe. No cases complained of inconveniences in ambulation or had difficulties in selecting footwear. In cases that require a flap for the exposed bone or tendon of the foot with a small-sized defect, reverse lateral supramalleolar adipofascial flap and skin grafting is considered a useful method as it lowers the morbidity rate of the donor site and reconstructs soft tissues.

  3. Posterior tibial tendon displacement behind the tibia and its interposition in an irreducible isolated ankle dislocation: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    ORTOLANI, ALESSANDRO; BEVONI, ROBERTO; RUSSO, ALESSANDRO; MARCACCI, MAURILIO; GIROLAMI, MAURO

    2016-01-01

    Isolated posteromedial ankle dislocation is a rare condition thanks to the highly congruent anatomical configuration of the ankle mortise, in which the medial and lateral malleoli greatly reduce the rotational movement of the talus, and the strength of the ligaments higher than the malleoli affords protection against fractures. However, other factors, like medial malleolus hypoplasia, laxity of the ligaments, peroneal muscle weakness and previous ankle sprains, could predispose to pure dislocation. In the absence of such factors, only a complex high-energy trauma, with a rotational component, can lead to this event. Irreducibility of an ankle dislocation, which is rarely encountered, can be due to soft tissue interposition. Dislocation of the posterior tibial tendon can be the cause of an irreducible talar dislocation; interposition of this tendon, found to have slid posteriorly to the distal tibia and then passed through the tibioperoneal syndesmosis, is reported in just a few cases of ankle fracture-dislocation. PMID:27900312

  4. Posterior tibial tendon displacement behind the tibia and its interposition in an irreducible isolated ankle dislocation: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ortolani, Alessandro; Bevoni, Roberto; Russo, Alessandro; Marcacci, Maurilio; Girolami, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Isolated posteromedial ankle dislocation is a rare condition thanks to the highly congruent anatomical configuration of the ankle mortise, in which the medial and lateral malleoli greatly reduce the rotational movement of the talus, and the strength of the ligaments higher than the malleoli affords protection against fractures. However, other factors, like medial malleolus hypoplasia, laxity of the ligaments, peroneal muscle weakness and previous ankle sprains, could predispose to pure dislocation. In the absence of such factors, only a complex high-energy trauma, with a rotational component, can lead to this event. Irreducibility of an ankle dislocation, which is rarely encountered, can be due to soft tissue interposition. Dislocation of the posterior tibial tendon can be the cause of an irreducible talar dislocation; interposition of this tendon, found to have slid posteriorly to the distal tibia and then passed through the tibioperoneal syndesmosis, is reported in just a few cases of ankle fracture-dislocation.

  5. Consensus in chronic ankle instability: aetiology, assessment, surgical indications and place for arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Guillo, S; Bauer, T; Lee, J W; Takao, M; Kong, S W; Stone, J W; Mangone, P G; Molloy, A; Perera, A; Pearce, C J; Michels, F; Tourné, Y; Ghorbani, A; Calder, J

    2013-12-01

    Ankle sprains are the most common injuries sustained during sports activities. Most ankle sprains recover fully with non-operative treatment but 20-30% develop chronic ankle instability. Predicting which patients who sustain an ankle sprain will develop instability is difficult. This paper summarises a consensus on identifying which patients may require surgery, the optimal surgical intervention along with treatment of concomitant pathology given the evidence available today. It also discusses the role of arthroscopic treatment and the anatomical basis for individual procedures.

  6. Sprains and Strains - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... العربية) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) French (français) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) ... 足首のねんざ - 日本語 (Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Korean (한국어) Ankle Sprain 발목 염좌 - 한국어 (Korean) Bilingual ...

  7. Foot and ankle problems in dancers.

    PubMed

    Kadel, Nancy

    2014-11-01

    The dancer's foot and ankle are subjected to high forces and unusual stresses in training and performance. Injuries are common in dancers, and the foot and ankle are particularly vulnerable. Ankle sprains, ankle impingement syndromes, flexor hallucis longus tendonitis, cuboid subluxation, stress fractures, midfoot injuries, heel pain, and first metatarsophalangeal joint problems including hallux valgus, hallux rigidus, and sesamoid injuries will be reviewed. This article will discuss these common foot and ankle problems in dancers and give typical clinical presentation and diagnostic and treatment recommendations.

  8. Intraarticular Entrapment of Os Subfibulare Following a Severe Inversion Injury of the Ankle: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kose, Ozkan; Kilicaslan, Omer Faruk; Guler, Ferhat; Aktan, Cemil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Anterior Talofibular Ligament (ATFL) rupture is the most commonly injured anatomic structure in lateral ankle sprain. In some cases, ATFL avulsion fracture from the lateral malleolus may occur instead of purely ligamentous injuries. The ATFL avulsion fracture is detected as a small ossicle at the tip of lateral malleolus on direct radiographs, which is called os subfibulare in chronic cases. Case Presentation: Severe displacement of this ossicle to the tibiotalar joint space is an extremely rare injury. Herein, a case of intra-articular entrapment of os subfibulare following a severe inversion injury of the ankle, which caused a diagnostic challenge was presented. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of entrapment of os subfibulare in the talotibial joint space. Fixation of the os subfibulare to lateral malleolus resulted in union and excellent functional results. PMID:26101763

  9. Ankle arthrodesis from lateral transfibular approach: analysis of treatment results of 23 feet treated by the modified Mann's technique.

    PubMed

    Napiontek, Marek; Jaszczak, Tomasz

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the results of treatment by ankle arthrodesis by modified Mann's technique. The study included 23 patients, and a total of 23 feet were treated. Stabilization of arthrodesis was performed by two screws going from the sinus tarsi to the talus and tibia. Lateral part of the fibula was fixed with one or two screws to the talus and tibia. No additional medial approach to the ankle was performed. In 16 feet, arthrodesis was done due to secondary posttraumatic osteoarthritis, in five due to paralytic drop foot and in two due to osteoarthritis of unknown etiology. In 18 patients, the purpose of arthrodesis was also to correct the malalignment. The average age at operation was 46 (range 19-74) years. The average follow-up was 32 (range 12-69) months. At follow-up, the average AOFAS score was 76 points and subjective scale result 7.9 points. The correct alignment was not achieved in three feet. In one foot, fusion was not achieved and the patient needed repeated operation. The study has confirmed the effectiveness of the technique.

  10. Assessment of ankle and hindfoot stability and joint pressures using a human cadaveric model of a large lateral talar process excision: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Sands, Andrew; White, Charles; Blankstein, Michael; Zderic, Ivan; Wahl, Dieter; Ernst, Manuela; Windolf, Markus; Hagen, Jennifer E; Richards, R Geoff; Stoffel, Karl; Gueorguiev, Boyko

    2015-03-01

    Lateral talar process fragment excision may be followed by hindfoot instability and altered biomechanics. There is controversy regarding the ideal fragment size for internal fixation versus excision and a concern that excision of a large fragment may lead to significant instability. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a simulated large lateral talar process excision on ankle and subtalar joint stability.A custom-made seesaw rig was designed to apply inversion/eversion stress loading on 7 fresh-frozen human cadaveric lower legs and investigate them in pre-excision, 5 cm and 10 cm lateral talar process fragment excision states. Anteroposterior radiographs were taken to assess ankle and subtalar joint tilt and calculate angular change from neutral hindfoot alignment to 10-kg forced inversion/eversion. Ankle joint pressures and contact areas were measured under 30-kg axial load in neutral hindfoot alignment.In comparison to the pre-excision state, no significantly different mediolateral angular change was observed in the subtalar joint after 5 and 10 cm lateral talar process fragment excision in inversion and eversion. With respect to the ankle joint, 10-cm fragment excision produced significantly bigger inversion tibiotalar tilt compared with the pre-excision state, P = .04. No significant change of the ankle joint pressure and contact area was detected after 5 and 10-cm excision in comparison with the pre-excison state.An excision of up to 10 cm of the lateral talar process does not cause a significant instability at the level of the subtalar joint but might be a destabilizing factor at the ankle joint under inversion stress. The latter could be related to extensive soft tissue dissection required for resection.

  11. Chronic ankle instability alters eccentric eversion/inversion and dorsiflexion/plantarflexion ratio.

    PubMed

    Abdel-aziem, Amr Almaz; Draz, Amira Hussin

    2014-01-01

    To determine if the eccentric evertor/invertor and dorsiflexor/plantar-flexor ratio are altered in subjects with chronic ankle instability. Twenty chronic ankle instability (CAI) subjects as an experimental group, and twenty healthy subjects as a control group, were matched in age, gender, and activity level. CAI subjects have a history of at least one ankle sprain and repeated episodes of giving way were included in CAI group. Subjects with no prior history of ankle injury were included in the control group. Ankle evertor/invertor and dorsiflexor/plantar-flexor muscles eccentric torque ratios were measured using the eccentric muscle contraction at angular velocities 60 and 120°/s. Analysis of variance revealed that the eccentric contraction eversion/inversion ratio of CAI group was significantly lower than normal group ratio at angular velocities 60 and 120°/s (p=0.041 and 0.012) respectively. The eccentric contraction dorsiflexion/plantarflexion ratio of CAI group was significantly higher than normal group ratio at both angular velocities (p=0.036 and 0.013) respectively. Moreover, at angular velocities of 60°/s and 120°/s a deficit in inversion and eversion eccentric torques were identified in CAI group (p=0.000), plantarflexion torque deficit of CAI group (p=0.034 and 0.028), respectively, and no deficit was identified for dorsiflexion torque of CAI group (p=0.595 and 0.696) respectively. Chronic ankle instability increases the dorsiflexion/plantarflexion muscles torque ratio and decreases the eversion/inversion ratio at angular velocities 60 and 120°/s. Therefore, the restoration of a normal eccentric inversion, eversion, and plantarflexion strength may prevent recurrent lateral ankle ligament sprain.

  12. Sprains and Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ankle — Walking or exercising on an uneven surface Knee — Pivoting during an athletic activity Wrist — Landing on ... your doctor may immobilize the area with a brace or splint. Surgery In some cases, such as ...

  13. Difference Between Strain and Sprain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Provided in this description of the differences between a strain (damage to the muscle or tendon) and a sprain (damage to the ligament) are definitions of mild, moderate, and severe (first, second, and third degree) strains and sprains. A final caution is given that these are two separate and distinct problems and should be treated as such. (DC)

  14. Difference Between Strain and Sprain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Provided in this description of the differences between a strain (damage to the muscle or tendon) and a sprain (damage to the ligament) are definitions of mild, moderate, and severe (first, second, and third degree) strains and sprains. A final caution is given that these are two separate and distinct problems and should be treated as such. (DC)

  15. Evaluating Postural Control and Ankle Laxity between Taping and High-Top Cleats in Interscholastic Football Players.

    PubMed

    Pizac, Douglas Arthur; Swanik, Charles Buz; Glutting, Joseph; Kaminski, Thomas

    2016-12-19

    Lateral ankle sprains are the most common injuries in high school sports. While ankle taping is a preferred method of external prophylactic support, its restrictive properties decline during exercise. The Under Armour® Highlight cleat is marketed on the premise that itprovides added support without the need for additional ankle taping. To determine if differences in ankle joint laxity and postural control exist between football players wearing the Under Armour® Highlight cleat (Baltimore, MD) as compared to a low/mid-top cleat with ankle tape. Crossover trial. Athletic training room and football practice field sideline. Thirty-two interscholastic football players (15.8±1.0 yrs.; 178.9±7.4 cm; 87.1±21.4 kg). Ankle laxity was assessed using an instrumented ankle arthrometer (Blue Bay Research Inc., Milton, FL), while postural control testing was performed on the Tekscan MobileMat™ Balanced Error Scoring System (BESS) (South Boston, MA). The two treatments included Under Armour® Highlight cleats and a low/mid-top cleat with ankle tape applied to the non-dominant ankle only. Measurements were taken before and immediately after practice. The independent variable was treatment (Highlight vs low/mid with ankle tape). Dependent variables included ankle arthrometry measures of anterior displacement (mm), inversion/eversion rotation (deg); and the modified BESS error scores. A linear mixed-effects model was used for analysis. The mid/low-cut cleat with tape condition had significantly higher inversion range-of-motion (ROM) and inversion/eversion rotation post-exercise when compared to the Highlight cleat (p<0.05). The results of this study provide some evidence that the Under Armour® Highlight cleat restricts ankle ROM following a training session better than the taped low/mid-top cleat. Further study is warranted to determine if this high-top style of football cleat can reduce the incidence of ankle sprains and how it might compare to spat taping.

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries: development of an evidence-based algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Polzer, Hans; Kanz, Karl Georg; Prall, Wolf Christian; Haasters, Florian; Ockert, Ben; Mutschler, Wolf; Grote, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Acute ankle injuries are among the most common injuries in emergency departments. However, there are still no standardized examination procedures or evidence-based treatment. Therefore, the aim of this study was to systematically search the current literature, classify the evidence, and develop an algorithm for the diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries. We systematically searched PubMed and the Cochrane Database for randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, systematic reviews or, if applicable, observational studies and classified them according to their level of evidence. According to the currently available literature, the following recommendations have been formulated: i) the Ottawa Ankle/Foot Rule should be applied in order to rule out fractures; ii) physical examination is sufficient for diagnosing injuries to the lateral ligament complex; iii) classification into stable and unstable injuries is applicable and of clinical importance; iv) the squeeze-, crossed leg- and external rotation test are indicative for injuries of the syndesmosis; v) magnetic resonance imaging is recommended to verify injuries of the syndesmosis; vi) stable ankle sprains have a good prognosis while for unstable ankle sprains, conservative treatment is at least as effective as operative treatment without the related possible complications; vii) early functional treatment leads to the fastest recovery and the least rate of reinjury; viii) supervised rehabilitation reduces residual symptoms and re-injuries. Taken these recommendations into account, we present an applicable and evidence-based, step by step, decision pathway for the diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries, which can be implemented in any emergency department or doctor's practice. It provides quality assurance for the patient and promotes confidence in the attending physician. PMID:22577506

  17. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF US HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS-RELATED LIGAMENTOUS ANKLE INJURIES, 2005/06-2010/11

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, David M.; Collins, Christy L.; Fields, Sarah K.; Comstock, R. Dawn

    2013-01-01

    Objective Describe ankle injury epidemiology among US high school athletes in 20 sports. Design Descriptive prospective epidemiology study. Setting Sports injury data for the 2005/06–2010/11 academic years were collected using an internet-based injury surveillance system, Reporting Information Online (RIO). Participants A nationwide convenience sample of US high schools. Assessment of Risk Factors Injuries sustained as a function of sport and gender. Main Outcome Measures Ankle sprain rates and patterns, outcomes, and mechanisms. Results From 2005/06–2010/11, certified athletic trainers reported 5,373 ankle sprains in 17,172,376 athlete exposures [AEs], for a rate of 3.13 ankle sprains per 10,000 AEs. Rates were higher for girls than boys (RR 1.25, 95% CI 1.17–1.34) in gender-comparable sports and higher in competition than practice for boys (RR 3.42, 95% CI 3.20–3.66) and girls (RR 2.71, 95% CI 2.48–2.95). The anterior talofibular ligament was most commonly injured (involved in 85.3% of sprains). Overall, 49.7% of sprains resulted in loss of participation from 1–6 days. While 0.5% of all ankle sprains required surgery, 6.6% of those involving the deltoid ligament required surgery. Athletes were wearing ankle braces in 10.6% of all sprains. The most common injury mechanism was contact with another person (42.4% of all ankle sprains). Conclusions Ankle sprains are a serious problem in high school sports, with high rates of recurrent injury and loss of participation from sport. PMID:23328403

  18. Measuring Ankle Instability in Pediatric Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

    PubMed

    Mandarakas, Melissa; Hiller, Claire E; Rose, Kristy J; Burns, Joshua

    2013-11-01

    Children with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease frequently suffer ankle sprain and experience chronic ankle instability; however, no pediatric self-reported measures of chronic ankle instability exist. The aim was to modify and validate the most reliable measure of chronic ankle instability in adults: the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool-Youth was tested for reliability, construct validity, and sensitivity to discriminate between 104 children aged 8 to 16 years: 31 children with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, 31 unaffected children with a history of ankle sprains, and 42 controls. Children with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease had lower scores compared to unaffected children with a history of sprains (χ(2) = 15.10; P < .001) and controls (χ(2) = 33.69; P < .001). Scores moderately correlated to visual analog scale scores of ankle steadiness (r s = 0.684; P < .001), and "good" test-retest reliability was identified (ICC2,1 = 0.73). The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool-Youth demonstrated excellent sensitivity and construct validity, identifying chronic ankle instability as a common problem for children with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

  19. Arthroscopic-assisted Broström-Gould for chronic ankle instability: a long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Nery, Caio; Raduan, Fernando; Del Buono, Angelo; Asaumi, Inacio Diogo; Cohen, Moises; Maffulli, Nicola

    2011-11-01

    Lateral ankle sprains account for 85% of ankle lesions. Combined open and arthroscopic procedures could improve the diagnosis and management of intra-articular lesions and allow surgeons to perform minimally invasive anatomic reconstruction of the lateral ligament complex. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Forty consecutive patients underwent ankle arthroscopy for recurrent (2 or more episodes) lateral ankle instability unresponsive to nonoperative measures. The clinical diagnosis of mechanical instability was confirmed at imaging (plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) and arthroscopic assessment. All patients underwent arthroscopic Broström-Gould repair for management of lateral ankle instability; secondary lesions were also managed. Postoperatively, the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score was administered to assess the functional status; clinical examination and conventional radiographs were performed in all patients. Thirty-eight patients were reviewed at an average postoperative follow-up of 9.8 years. The mean AOFAS score was 90 (range, 44-100) at the last follow-up. No significantly different outcomes were found in patients who had undergone microfractures for management of grade III to IV cartilage lesions compared with patients with no cartilage lesions. Postoperative AOFAS scores were graded as excellent and good in almost all patients (94.7%). Concerning failure rate, 2 patients (5.3%) reported a low AOFAS score: one patient underwent soft tissue removal for anterior impingement, and one received simultaneous medial ankle instability repair. The arthroscopic Broström-Gould-assisted technique could be a viable alternative to the gold-standard Broström-Gould procedure for anatomic repair of chronic lateral ankle instability and management of intra-articular lesions. Prospective randomized controlled trials are needed.

  20. Ankle arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... ankle - arthroscopy; Surgery - ankle - arthroscopic References Cerrato R, Campbell J, Triche R. Ankle arthroscopy. In: Miller MD, ... and ankle. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  1. Lateral distribution and the energy determination of showers along the ankle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, G.; Medina-Tanco, G.A.; De Donato, C.; del Peral, L.; Rodríguez-Frías, D.; D'Olivo, J.C.; Valdés-Galicia, J.F.; Arqueros, F.

    The normalization constant of the lateral distribution function (LDF) of an extensive air shower is a monotonous (almost linear) increasing function of the energy of the primary, as well as a monotonous decreasing function of the distance from the shower core. Therefore, the interpolated signal at some fixed distance from the core can be calibrated to estimate the energy of the shower. There is, somehow surprisingly, a reconstructed optimal distance, r_opt, at which the effects on the inferred signal, S(r_opt), of the uncertainties on true core location, LDF functional form and shower-to-shower fluctuations are minimized. We calculate the value of r_opt and study the robustness of the method as a function of surface detector separation (400 m to 1500 m), energy (0.1 EeV to 10 EeV) and zenith angle (0 to 60 deg) for a realistic distribution of core determination errors along the space parameter used. We also investigate the effects of silent and saturated stations and give a rough estimate of the systematic errors introduced by varying cosmic ray composition inside the considered energy range.

  2. Rehabilitation of Ankle and Foot Injuries in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Chinn, Lisa; Hertel, Jay

    2009-01-01

    Foot and ankle injuries are extremely common among athletes and other physically active individuals. Rehabilitation programs that emphasize the use of therapeutic exercise to restore joint range of motion, muscle strength, neuromuscular coordination, and gait mechanics have been shown to have clinical success for patients suffering various foot and ankle pathologies. Rehabilitation programs are discussed for ankle sprains, plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, and turf toe. PMID:19945591

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic ankle pain.

    PubMed

    Wukich, Dane K; Tuason, Dominick A

    2011-01-01

    The differential diagnosis for chronic ankle pain is quite broad. Ankle pain can be caused by intra-articular or extra-articular pathology and may be a result of a traumatic or nontraumatic event. A detailed patient history and physical examination, coupled with judicious selection of the appropriate imaging modalities, are vital in making an accurate diagnosis and providing effective treatment. Chronic ankle pain can affect all age groups, ranging from young athletes to elderly patients with degenerative joint and soft-tissue disorders. It has been estimated that 23,000 ankle sprains occur each day in the United States, representing approximately 1 sprain per 10,000 people per day. Because nearly one in five ankle injuries result in chronic symptoms, orthopaedic surgeons are likely to see patients with chronic ankle pain. Many patients with chronic ankle pain do not recall any history of trauma. Reviewing the management of the various disorders that can cause chronic ankle pain will help orthopaedic surgeons provide the best treatment for their patients.

  4. Foot and ankle injuries in theatrical dancers.

    PubMed

    Hardaker, W T; Margello, S; Goldner, J L

    1985-10-01

    The theatrical dancer is a unique combination of athlete and artist. The physical demands of dance class, rehearsal, and performance can lead to injury, particularly to the foot and ankle. Ankle sprains are the most common acute injury. Chronic injuries predominate and relate primarily to the repeated impact loading of the foot and ankle on the dance floor. Contributing factors include anatomic variation, improper technique, and fatigue. Early and aggressive conservative management is usually successful and surgery is rarely indicated. Orthotics play a limited but potentially useful role in treatment. Following treatment, a structured rehabilitation program is fundamental to the successful return to dance.

  5. A multimodal approach to ankle instability: Interrelations between subjective and objective assessments of ankle status in athletes.

    PubMed

    Golditz, Tobias; Welsch, Goetz H; Pachowsky, Milena; Hennig, Friedrich F; Pfeifer, Klaus; Steib, Simon

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective cohort study is to investigate the association between different subjective and objective assessments of ankle function in a population of athletes with or without functional ankle instability (FAI). 29 athletes with a history of ankle spraining were divided into two groups according to their ankle status: 16 with FAI (initial ankle sprain with residual functional instability) (age 24.6 ± 3.1 years), and 13 COPERS (initial ankle sprain without residual instability) (age 25.3 ± 4.4 years). The assessment of each individual's ankle function was based on three approaches: The "functional-ankle-ability-measure" (FAAM) assessing subjective ankle functionality, measures of sensorimotor control as objective functional measurements and MRI-based T2-mapping as a quantitative marker of compositional joint status. Pearson's product-moment-correlation coefficient, student's t-test and analysis-of-variance were used for statistical analysis. Significant group differences existed for subjective ankle function (FAAM, p = 0.04) and MRI-data mainly in the medial compartment of the ankle joint (p ≤ 0.05). We found unique associations between T2-mapping results and sensorimotor scores in the COPER (r = -0.756-0.849), and "FAI"-group (r = 0.630-0.657). The location and magnitude differed between groups. No correlations existed between these measures and the FAAM. This exploratory study provides preliminary evidence for potential interrelations between various diagnostic measures of ankle function and structure in individuals with and without FAI. We found associations between MRI-results and selected measures of sensorimotor control, indicating a potential link between loss of ankle function and early joint degeneration. Despite these interrelations, each of the different assessment options appears to contain unique information on ankle functionality important in a clinical assessment. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley

  6. Effect of foot orthotics on single- and double-limb dynamic balance tasks in patients with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Sesma, Amelia R; Mattacola, Carl G; Uhl, Tim L; Nitz, Arthur J; McKeon, Patrick O

    2008-12-01

    Deficits have been observed in patients with chronic ankle instability while performing dynamic balance tasks. Foot orthotic intervention has demonstrated improvements in static balance following lateral ankle sprain, but the effect is unknown in patients with chronic ankle instability during dynamic balance tasks. Twenty patients with self-reported unilateral chronic ankle instability volunteered for participation. They completed a familiarization session and 2 test sessions separated by 4 weeks. The familiarization session consisted of practice trials of the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) and Limits of Stability (LOS) test, orthotic fitting, and the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT) questionnaire. Patients were instructed to wear the custom-fitted orthotics for at least 4 hours a day to a preferred 8 hours a day for the 4 weeks between sessions. There was an increase in distance reached in the posterolateral direction over the 4-week period in the orthotic condition. There was an increase in distance reached in the medial direction, demonstrating an improvement on the injured side in the orthotic condition after 4 weeks of orthotic intervention. No consistent, meaningful results were observed in the LOS. The involved leg had a significantly lower CAIT score than the uninvolved leg during both sessions, but the involved leg CAIT scores significantly improved over 4 weeks compared with the baseline measure. Orthotic intervention may prove beneficial for improving dynamic balance as measured by the SEBT in individuals with chronic ankle instability and may be a useful adjunct to clinical and sport interventions.

  7. Chronic Ankle Instability: Evolution of the Model

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Claire E.; Kilbreath, Sharon L.; Refshauge, Kathryn M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: The Hertel model of chronic ankle instability (CAI) is commonly used in research but may not be sufficiently comprehensive. Mechanical instability and functional instability are considered part of a continuum, and recurrent sprain occurs when both conditions are present. A modification of the Hertel model is proposed whereby these 3 components can exist independently or in combination. Objective: To examine the fit of data from people with CAI to 2 CAI models and to explore whether the different subgroups display impairments when compared with a control group. Design: Cross-sectional study. Patients or Other Participants: Community-dwelling adults and adolescent dancers were recruited: 137 ankles with ankle sprain for objective 1 and 81 with CAI and 43 controls for objective 2. Intervention(s): Two balance tasks and time to recover from an inversion perturbation were assessed to determine if the subgroups demonstrated impairments when compared with a control group (objective 2). Main Outcome Measure(s): For objective 1 (fit to the 2 models), outcomes were Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score, anterior drawer test results, and number of sprains. For objective 2, outcomes were 2 balance tasks (number of foot lifts in 30 seconds, ability to balance on the ball of the foot) and time to recover from an inversion perturbation. The Cohen d was calculated to compare each subgroup with the control group. Results: A total of 56.5% of ankles (n = 61) fit the Hertel model, whereas all ankles (n = 108) fit the proposed model. In the proposed model, 42.6% of ankles were classified as perceived instability, 30.5% as recurrent sprain and perceived instability, and 26.9% as among the remaining groups. All CAI subgroups performed more poorly on the balance and inversion-perturbation tasks than the control group. Subgroups with perceived instability had greater impairment in single-leg stance, whereas participants with recurrent sprain performed more poorly than

  8. Value of ultrasonography for detecting ligament damage in athletes with chronic ankle instability compared to computed arthrotomography.

    PubMed

    Guillodo, Yannick; Varache, Sophie; Saraux, Alain

    2010-12-01

    Ankle sprains may be followed by chronic pain and/or instability, which may induce substantial disability, most notably in athletes. Chronic ankle instability promotes the development of cartilage lesions in athletes. Therefore, accurate evaluation of the ankle ligaments is crucial to the optimal management of chronic ankle instability after a sprain. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of ultrasonography in assessing damage to the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) in athletes with chronic ankle instability after a sprain. Consecutive patients seen at the author's clinic for ankle instability more than 3 months after a sprain underwent ultrasonography and computed arthrotomography after a clinical anterior drawer stress test. Cohen's kappa was computed to evaluate agreement between the 2 imaging modalities. This study included 56 patients, 46 men and 10 women, aged 15 to 69 years (mean, 30.1 ± 10.6 years). Mean time from the sprain to imaging was 7.6 ± 4.02 months. ATFL damage was found by ultrasonography in 34 (61%) of 56 patients and by computed arthrotomography in 39 of 55 patients (71%; κ = 0.76). Cartilage damage was visualized by computed arthrotomography in 14 (25%) patients, all of whom had ATFL damage. Agreement was substantial (κ = 0.76) between ultrasonography and computed arthrotomography for assessing the ATFL. The data support the use of ultra-sonography as the second-line investigation after a standard radiographic assessment in athletes with chronic ankle instability after a sprain.

  9. Simultaneous strain measurement with determination of a zero strain reference for the medial and lateral ligaments of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Satoru; Yasuda, Kazunori; Kaneda, Kiyoshi; Yamakoshi, Kenichi; Yamanoi, Takahiro

    2002-09-01

    The strain changes of the central part of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL), the posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL), the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL), and the tibiocalcaneal ligament (TCL) were measured simultaneously for a full range of ankle motion. Twelve fresh frozen amputated ankles were used. To measure the strain changes of the ligaments, a Galium-Indium-filled silastic strain transducer was implanted in the center of each ligament. The zero strain reference was determined immediately after the measurement of strain changes in five of the 12 ankles by tensile testing of each bone-ligament-bone preparation. The maximum strain change of the ATFL, the PTFL, the CFL and the TFL were 7.9%, 5.9%, 5.3% and 5.2%, respectively. The ATFL was elongated in plantar flexion and shortened in dorsiflexion. The PTFL and the CFL were shortened in plantar flexion and elongated in dorsiflexion. The TCL was the longest around the neutral position and became shorter in planter flexion and dorsiflexion. The results showed that the ATFL was taut in plantar flexion over 16.2 degrees, the PTFL and the CFL were taut in dorsiflexion over 18 degrees and 17.8 degrees respectively, and the TCL was taut between 9.5 degrees of dorsiflexion and 9.5 degrees of plantar flexion. The length change pattern was different among the ankle ligaments, although there was only a slight difference between that of the PTFL and the CFL. This study provides fundamental data useful in studying ankle ligament reconstruction.

  10. Position versus force control: using the 2-DOF robotic ankle trainer to assess ankle's motor control.

    PubMed

    Farjadian, Amir B; Nabian, Mohsen; Hartman, Amber; Corsino, Johnathan; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Holden, Maureen K

    2014-01-01

    An estimated of 2,000,000 acute ankle sprains occur annually in the United States. Furthermore, ankle disabilities are caused by neurological impairments such as traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy and stroke. The virtually interfaced robotic ankle and balance trainer (vi-RABT) was introduced as a cost-effective platform-based rehabilitation robot to improve overall ankle/balance strength, mobility and control. The system is equipped with 2 degrees of freedom (2-DOF) controlled actuation along with complete means of angle and torque measurement mechanisms. Vi-RABT was used to assess ankle strength, flexibility and motor control in healthy human subjects, while playing interactive virtual reality games on the screen. The results suggest that in the task with 2-DOF, subjects have better control over ankle's position vs. force.

  11. The effect of combined mechanism ankle support on postural control of patients with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Hadadi, Mohammad; Ebrahimi, Ismaeil; Mousavi, Mohammad Ebrahim; Aminian, Gholamreza; Esteki, Ali; Rahgozar, Mehdi

    2017-02-01

    Chronic ankle instability is associated with neuromechanical changes and poor postural stability. Despite variety of mechanisms of foot and ankle orthoses, almost none apply comprehensive mechanisms to improve postural control in all subgroups of chronic ankle instability patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an ankle support implementing combined mechanisms to improve postural control in chronic ankle instability patients. Cross-sectional study. An ankle support with combined mechanism was designed based on most effective action mechanisms of foot and ankle orthoses. The effect of this orthosis on postural control was evaluated in 20 participants with chronic ankle instability and 20 matched healthy participants. The single-limb stance balance test was measured in both groups with and without the new orthosis using a force platform. The results showed that application of combined mechanism ankle support significantly improved all postural sway parameters in chronic ankle instability patients. There were no differences in means of investigated parameters with and without the orthosis in the healthy group. No statistically significant differences were found in postural sway between chronic ankle instability patients and healthy participants after applying the combined mechanism ankle support. The combined mechanism ankle support is effective in improving static postural control of chronic ankle instability patients to close to the postural sway of healthy individual. the orthosis had no adverse effects on balance performance of healthy individuals. Clinical relevance Application of the combined mechanism ankle support for patients with chronic ankle instability is effective in improving static balance. This may be helpful in reduction of recurrence of ankle sprain although further research about dynamic conditions is needed.

  12. Fatigue's effect on eversion force sense in individuals with and without functional ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Wright, Cynthia J; Arnold, Brent L

    2012-05-01

    Force sense (FS), the proprioceptive ability to detect muscle-force generation, has been shown to be impaired in individuals with functional ankle instability (FAI). Fatigue can also impair FS in healthy individuals, but it is unknown how fatigue affects FS in individuals with FAI. To assess the effect of fatigue on ankle-eversion force-sense error in individuals with and without FAI. Case control with repeated measures. Sports medicine research laboratory. 32 individuals with FAI and 32 individuals with no ankle sprains or instability in their lifetime. FAI subjects had a history of ≥1 lateral ankle sprain and giving-way ≥1 episode per month. Three eversion FS trials were captured per load (10% and 30% of maximal voluntary isometric contraction) using a load cell before and after a concentric eversion fatigue protocol. Trial error was the difference between the target and reproduction forces. Constant error (CE), absolute error (AE), and variable error (VE) were calculated from 3 trial errors. A Group × Fatigue × Load repeated-measures ANOVA was performed for each error. There were no significant 3-way interactions or 2-way interactions involving group (all P > .05). CE and AE had a significant 2-way interaction between load and fatigue (CE: F1,62 = 8.704, P = .004; AE: F1,62 = 4.024, P = .049), and VE had a significant main effect for fatigue (F1,62 = 5.130, P = .027), all of which indicated increased FS error with fatigue at 10% load. However, at 30% load only VE increased with fatigue. The FAI group had greater error as measured by AE (F1,62 = 4.571, P = .036) but not CE or VE (P > .05). Greater AE indicates that FAI individuals are less accurate in their force production. Fatigue impaired force sense in all subjects equally. These deficits provide evidence of impaired proprioception with fatigue and in individuals with FAI.

  13. Treatment of anterolateral impingements of the ankle joint by arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Al-Husseiny Moustafa

    2007-09-01

    Impingement syndromes of the ankle joint are among the most common intraarticular ankle lesions. Soft tissue impingement lesions of the ankle usually occur as a result of synovial, or capsular irritation secondary to traumatic injuries, usually ankle sprains, leading to chronic ankle pain. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate arthroscopic debridement of an anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle. During the period between October 2000 and February 2004, 23 patients with residual complaints after an ankle sprain were diagnosed as anterolateral impingement of the ankle, and were treated by arthroscopic debridement. At a minimum of 6 months follow up, patients were asked to complete an American orthopaedic foot and ankle society (AOFAS) ankle and hind foot score. The average follow-up was 25 months (range 12-38). The average pre-operative patient assessed AOFAS score was 34 (range 4-57). At the end of follow-up the mean AOFAS score was 89 (range 60-100). In terms of patient satisfaction 22 patients said they would accept the same arthroscopic procedure again for the same complaints. At the end of follow-up, 7 patients had excellent results, and 14 patients had good results while two patients had fair results. We believe that arthroscopic debridement of the anterolateral impingement soft tissues are a good, and effective method of treatment.

  14. POPLITEUS STRAIN WITH CONCURRENT DELTOID LIGAMENT SPRAIN IN AN ELITE SOCCER ATHLETE: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Josh; Tarnay, Lorena; Silvers, Holly

    2013-01-01

    Study Design: Case Report (Differential diagnosis) Background and Purpose: Differential diagnosis of knee pathology after trauma may be difficult when diagnosing an isolated popliteus strain and concurrent medial deltoid ligament sprain. Upon a thorough search of the published literature, the authors found no reports delineating a popliteus strain in professional soccer in the United States. The joints most affected by injury in soccer players are the knee and ankle joints. The purpose of this case report is to describe the presentation of and difficulties encountered in diagnosing a popliteus strain in a Major League Soccer athlete. Case Description: During an in-season away game, an outside defender was slide-tackled from behind when his right shank was caught in an externally rotated position underneath himself and the opposing player. The initial point of contact was made to the proximal third of the posterior right shank with an anteromedially directed force. The medial longitudinal arch of the foot was forced into a more midfoot pronated position and the subtalar joint was forced into eversion. Diagnosis: The athlete was diagnosed with a moderate strain of the right popliteus muscle with a concurrent medial deltoid ligament sprain of the right ankle. This mechanism of injury, pain with passive knee flexion and internal rotation during McMurray's test, pain with Garrick's Test and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study confirmed the diagnosis. The athlete returned to full ninety-minute game participation after an intensive 15-day rehabilitation program. Discussion: This case is unique because the injury manifested itself at multiple joints and specifically involved the popliteus muscle. The mechanism of injury can be associated with many other soft tissue injuries to the knee, and thus, may not lead the clinician initially to consider the diagnosis of a popliteus strain. Diagnosis of this entity may be difficult due to the possible shared attachment of the

  15. Two-View Gravity Stress Imaging Protocol for Nondisplaced Type II Supination External Rotation Ankle Fractures: Introducing the Gravity Stress Cross-Table Lateral View.

    PubMed

    Boffeli, Troy J; Collier, Rachel C; Gervais, Samuel J

    Assessing ankle stability in nondisplaced Lauge-Hansen supination external rotation type II injuries requires stress imaging. Gravity stress mortise imaging is routinely used as an alternative to manual stress imaging to assess deltoid integrity with the goal of differentiating type II from type IV injuries in cases without a posterior or medial fracture. A type II injury with a nondisplaced fibula fracture is typically treated with cast immobilization, and a type IV injury is considered unstable and often requires operative repair. The present case series (two patients) highlights a standardized 2-view gravity stress imaging protocol and introduces the gravity stress cross-table lateral view. The gravity stress cross-table lateral view provides a more thorough evaluation of the posterior malleolus owing to the slight external rotation and posteriorly directed stress. External rotation also creates less bony overlap between the tibia and fibula, allowing for better visualization of the fibula fracture. Gravity stress imaging confirmed medial-sided injury in both cases, confirming the presence of supination external rotation type IV or bimalleolar equivalent fractures. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed, and both patients achieved radiographic union. No further treatment was required at 21 and 33 months postoperatively. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. ANKLE JOINT CONTROL DURING SINGLE-LEGGED BALANCE USING COMMON BALANCE TRAINING DEVICES – IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION STRATEGIES

    PubMed Central

    Strøm, Mark; Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, Thomas; Tang, Lars; Zebis, Mette; Nielsen, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background A lateral ankle sprain is the most prevalent musculoskeletal injury in sports. Exercises that aim to improve balance are a standard part of the ankle rehabilitation process. In an optimal progression model for ankle rehabilitation and prevention of future ankle sprains, it is important to characterize different balance exercises based on level of difficulty and sensori-motor training stimulus. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate frontal-plane ankle kinematics and associated peroneal muscle activity during single-legged balance on stable surface (floor) and three commonly used balance devices (Airex®, BOSU® Ball and wobble board). Design Descriptive exploratory laboratory study. Methods Nineteen healthy subjects performed single-legged balance with eyes open on an Airex® mat, BOSU® Ball, wobble board, and floor (reference condition). Ankle kinematics were measured using reflective markers and 3-dimensional recordings and expressed as inversion-eversion range of motion variability, peak velocity of inversion and number of inversion-eversion direction changes. Peroneus longus EMG activity was averaged and normalized to maximal activity during maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and in addition amplitude probability distribution function (APDF) between 90 and 10% was calculated as a measure of muscle activation variability. Results Balancing on BOSU® Ball and wobble board generally resulted in increased ankle kinematic and muscle activity variables, compared to the other surfaces. BOSU® Ball was the most challenging in terms of inversion-eversion variability while wobble board was associated with a higher number of inversion-eversion direction changes. No differences in average muscle activation level were found between these two surfaces, but the BOSU® Ball did show a more variable activation pattern in terms of APDF. Conclusion The results showed large kinematic variability among different balance training devices and

  17. Parachute ankle brace and extrinsic injury risk factors during parachuting.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J; Darakjy, Salima; Swedler, David; Amoroso, Paul; Jones, Bruce H

    2008-04-01

    This study examined the injury prevention effectiveness of the parachute ankle brace (PAB) while controlling for known extrinsic risk factors. Injuries among airborne students who wore the PAB during parachute descents were compared with injuries among those who did not. Injury risk factors from administrative records included wind speed, combat loads, and time of day (day/night). Injuries were collected in the drop zone. A total of 596 injuries occurred in 102,784 parachute descents. In univariate analysis, students not wearing the PAB (Controls) were 2.00 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.32-3.02] times more likely to experience an ankle sprain, 1.83 (95% CI = 1.04-3.24) times more likely to experience an ankle fracture, and 1.92 (95% CI = 1.38-2.67) times more likely to experience an ankle injury of any type. PAB wearers and Controls had a similar incidence of lower body injuries exclusive of the ankle [risk ratio (Control/PAB) = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.65-1.30]. After accounting for known extrinsic injury risk factors, Controls were 1.90 (95% CI = 1.24-2.90) times more likely than PAB wearers to experience an ankle sprain, 1.47 (95% CI = 0.82- 2.63) times more likely to experience an ankle fracture, and 1.75 (95% CI = 1.25-2.48) times more likely to experience an ankle injury of any type. The incidence of parachute entanglements that persisted until the jumpers reached the ground were similar among PAB wearers and Controls IRR (Control/PAB) = 1.17, 95% CI = 0.61-2.29]. After controlling for known injury risk factors, the PAB protected against ankle injuries, and especially ankle sprains, while not influencing parachute entanglements or lower body injuries exclusive of the ankle.

  18. The influence of a medio-lateral unstable sole on invertor and evertor activation while descending stairs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ki-sik; Park, Kyungyeon; Choi, Bo-ram

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of a medio-lateral unstable sole on invertor and evertor activation while descending stairs. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 university students with no history of ankle sprain. They descended stairs while wearing the medio-lateral unstable sole or with bare feet. Electromyography was used to record the activity of the tibialis anterior and peroneus longus and brevis muscles and paired t-tests were used to assess statistical significance. [Results] The medio-lateral unstable sole group showed increased tibialis anterior and peroneus longus and brevis muscle activation compared to the barefoot group. [Conclusion] Medio-lateral unstable sole can be used with exercises to prevent further ankle damage by activating both the inversion and eversion muscles. PMID:27630412

  19. The influence of a medio-lateral unstable sole on invertor and evertor activation while descending stairs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ki-Sik; Park, Kyungyeon; Choi, Bo-Ram

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of a medio-lateral unstable sole on invertor and evertor activation while descending stairs. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 university students with no history of ankle sprain. They descended stairs while wearing the medio-lateral unstable sole or with bare feet. Electromyography was used to record the activity of the tibialis anterior and peroneus longus and brevis muscles and paired t-tests were used to assess statistical significance. [Results] The medio-lateral unstable sole group showed increased tibialis anterior and peroneus longus and brevis muscle activation compared to the barefoot group. [Conclusion] Medio-lateral unstable sole can be used with exercises to prevent further ankle damage by activating both the inversion and eversion muscles.

  20. Ankle proprioception is not targeted by exercises on an unstable surface.

    PubMed

    Kiers, Henri; Brumagne, Simon; van Dieën, Jaap; van der Wees, Philip; Vanhees, Luc

    2012-04-01

    Laboratory study using a repeated measures design. The aim of this study was to determine if ankle proprioception is targeted in exercises on unstable surfaces. Lateral ankle sprain (LAS) has recurrence rates over 70%, which are believed to be due to a reduced accuracy of proprioceptive signals from the ankle. Proprioceptive exercises in rehabilitation of LAS mostly consist of balancing activities on an unstable surface. The methods include 100 healthy adults stood barefoot on a solid surface and a foam pad over a force plate, with occluded vision. Mechanical vibration was used to stimulate proprioceptive output of muscle spindles of triceps surae and lumbar paraspinal musculature. Each trial lasted for 60 s; vibration was applied from the 15th till the 30th second. Changes in mean velocity and mean position of the center of pressure (CoP) as a result of muscle vibration were calculated. Results show that on foam, the effect of triceps surae vibration on mean CoP velocity was significantly smaller than on a solid surface, while for paraspinal musculature vibration the effect was bigger on foam than on solid surface. Similar effects were seen for mean CoP displacement as outcome. Exercises on unstable surfaces appear not to target peripheral ankle proprioception. Exercises on an unstable surface may challenge the capacity of the central nervous system to shift the weighting of sources of proprioceptive signals on balance.

  1. Peroneal Tendon Reconstruction and Coverage for Treatment of Septic Peroneal Tenosynovitis: A Devastating Complication of Lateral Ankle Ligament Reconstruction With a Tendon Allograft.

    PubMed

    Schade, Valerie L; Harsha, Wayne; Rodman, Caitlin; Roukis, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Septic peroneal tenosynovitis is a rare and significant challenge. A search of peer-reviewed published studies revealed only 5 case reports to guide treatment, none of which resulted in significant loss of both peroneal tendons necessitating reconstruction. No clear guidance is available regarding how to provide reliable reconstruction of both peroneal tendons after a significant loss secondary to septic tenosynovitis. In the present report, we describe the case of a young, active-duty soldier who underwent lateral ankle ligament reconstruction with a tendon allograft whose postoperative course was complicated by septic peroneal tenosynovitis resulting in significant loss of both peroneal tendons. Reconstruction was achieved in a staged fashion with the use of silicone rods and external fixation to maintain physiologic tension and preserve peroneal tendon function, followed by reconstruction of both peroneal tendons and the superior peroneal retinaculum with a tensor fascia lata autograft. Soft tissue coverage was obtained with an anterolateral thigh free tissue transfer and a split-thickness skin graft. The patient returned to full activity as an active-duty soldier with minimal pain and no instability of the right lower extremity. The muscle strength of both peroneal tendons remained at 5 of 5, and no objective findings of ankle instability were seen at 3.5 years postoperatively. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Ankle injuries. Tips from sports medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Swain, R A; Holt, W S

    1993-02-15

    In dealing with an ankle sprain, worrisome features are few but important to recognize. A "pop" heard or felt at the time of injury, a prolonged course, or a history of several previous injuries are all of concern. Medial tenderness on palpation, positive results on a squeeze test, or markedly positive results on stress testing are also indicators of severe injuries, which may require referral for treatment. Stress testing by an experienced clinician is appropriate for chronic or severe cases. Otherwise, treatment of the acute, uncomplicated ankle injury is straightforward, focusing on early mobilization, rehabilitation, and protection.

  3. Epidemiology of strain/sprain injuries among cheerleaders in the United States.

    PubMed

    Shields, Brenda J; Smith, Gary A

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the epidemiology of cheerleading-related strain/sprain injuries by type of cheerleading team and type of event. Athlete exposure (AE) and injury data were collected from 412 United States cheerleading teams via the Cheerleading Reporting Information Online surveillance tool, and injury rates were calculated. Strains/Sprains were the most common injury (53%; 0.5 injuries per 1000 AEs) sustained by cheerleaders during our 1-year study. The lower extremities (42%), particularly the ankles (28%), were injured most often. Most injuries occurred during practice (82%); however, the rate of injury was higher during competition (0.8 injuries per 1000 AEs; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.6-1.0) than during practice (0.6 injuries per 1000 AEs; 95% CI, 0.5-0.6) for all team types. Injuries were sustained most frequently by high school cheerleaders (51%), although college cheerleaders had the highest injury rate (1.2 injuries per 1000 AEs). Strains/Sprains occurred most frequently while attempting a stunt (34%) or while tumbling (32%). Spotting/Basing other cheerleaders (19%) was the most common mechanism of injury and was more likely to result in a lower back strain/sprain than other mechanisms of injury (odds ratio, 3.38; 95% CI, 1.41-8.09; P < .01). Cheerleaders should increase their focus on conditioning and strength-building training, which may help to prevent strain/sprain injuries. Spotters and bases should additionally focus on proper lifting technique to help avoid back injury. Guidelines may need to be developed for return-to-play after cheerleading-related strain/sprain injuries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ankle Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... or outside of your ankle or along the Achilles tendon, which connects the muscles in your lower ... home. Accessed Dec. 15, 2015. Draper TR. Non-Achilles ankle tendinopathy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed ...

  5. The effect of ankle bracing on athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Bot, S D; van Mechelen, W

    1999-03-01

    Ankle braces in sports are used for prevention of ankle sprains. Besides restricting inversion and eversion, it is possible that an ankle brace also reduces the functional range of motion of the ankle joint. Consequently, their use could also impair athletic performance. It is unlikely that prophylactic ankle bracing will gain wide acceptance if bracing hinders athletic performance. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on the effect of ankle bracing on vertical jump height, running speed, agility and broad jump performance. In 2 studies, 2 ankle braces negatively affected vertical jump height. Other studies did not find a significant effect on vertical jump performance when wearing an ankle brace. One study found a negative effect on running speed and broad jump performance when wearing a lace-on brace. In other studies, no effects on running speed and broad jump were found. In 1 study, agility was negatively affected when wearing an ankle brace, although agility was not significantly affected in other studies. The effect of prolonged use of an ankle brace is un-known, but could possibly influence ankle musculature and ligament function. Further research is necessary to study the effect of prolonged ankle bracing on performance.

  6. Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... JJ. Bursitis, tendinitis, and other periarticular disorders and sports medicine. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ... MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ...

  7. True submalleolar accessory ossicles causing impingement of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Vega, Jordi; Marimón, Jesús; Golanó, Pau; Pérez-Carro, Luis; Salmerón, Jorge; Aguilera, Josep Maria

    2010-02-01

    True ossicle in the distal portion of the malleolus is only sporadically observed, and related disease has been rarely reported. We present two cases of atypical ankle impingement resulting from an ankle sprain. Plain radiographs revealed true submalleolar ossicles. Conservative treatment failed, and arthroscopy was performed. Instability of the ossicle and surrounding fibrotic soft tissue was evident; a gap between the ossicle and the tip of the malleolus seen during plantar flexion of the ankle disappeared in dorsal flexion, resulting in compression of the surrounding soft tissue. Arthroscopic excision of the accessory ossicle relieved the symptoms and enabled both patients to return to full preinjury activities.

  8. Relationship between two proprioceptive measures and stiffness at the ankle.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Carrie L; Arnold, Brent L; Zinder, Steven M; Granata, Kevin; Gansneder, Bruce M

    2004-06-01

    Previous research has investigated the role of proprioception and stiffness in the control of joint stability. However, to date, no research has been done on the relationship between proprioception and stiffness. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between force sense, joint reposition sense, and stiffness at the ankle. A heterogeneous sample was obtained for this study; 20 of the 40 participants had a history of ankle sprains, and 13 of the 20 had been diagnosed by a physician (two mild ankle sprains, seven moderate sprains, four severe sprains). All subjects were asymptomatic and active at the time of the study. Active joint reposition sense was measured using a custom-built ankle goniometer, force sense was measured unilaterally and contralaterally with a load cell, and ankle muscle stiffness was measured via transient oscillation using a custom-built inversion-eversion cradle. We found no significant correlations between stiffness and joint reposition sense, with values of r ranging from 0.01 to 0.21. Significant correlations were found between stiffness and force sense. Specifically, contralateral force sense reproduction was significantly correlated to stiffness in the injured or "involved" ankle (r's ranging from 0.47 to 0.65; P< or =0.008). Whether the decreased ability to appropriately sense force (increased error) sends information to the central nervous system to increase muscle stiffness in response to an unexpected loss of stability, or whether these two phenomena function independently and both change concurrently as a result of injury to the system requires further investigation.

  9. Broken Bones, Sprains, and Strains (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Broken Bones, Sprains, and Strains KidsHealth > For Parents > Broken Bones, ... home. What to Do: For a Suspected Broken Bone: Do not move a child whose injury involves ...

  10. Subtle Lisfranc Injury: Low Energy Midfoot Sprain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    higher in athletes. Meyer et al.3 reported an incidence of Lisfranc sprain in up to 4% per year among college football players, second only to turf...of the subtle radiographic signs, and understanding what constitutes an adequate radiographic workup will help military heath care providers to...3. Meyer SA, Callaghan JJ, Albright JP, Crowley ET, Powell JW. Midfoot sprains in collegiate football players. Am J Sports Med. 1994; 22:392-401

  11. Ankle impingement syndromes: a review of etiology and related implications.

    PubMed

    Hess, Gregory William

    2011-10-01

    Ankle injuries are common occurrences in athletics involving and requiring extreme ranges of motion. Ankle sprains specifically occur with a 1 in 10,000 person rate in active individuals each day. If trauma is repetitive, the ankle structures have potential to experience secondary injury and dysfunction. Included in this category of dysfunction are both anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes where disruption of the bony structures, joint capsule, ligaments, and tendons typically occurs. Ankle impingement is described as ankle pain that occurs during athletic activity, with recurrent, extreme dorsiflexion or plantar flexion with the joint under a load. Ankle impingements can be classified according to what structures become involved both anteriorly and posteriorly. Osseous impingement, soft tissue impingement, impingement of the distal fascicle of anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament, and meniscoid lesions are all documented causes of ankle impingement. These changes tend to be brought about and exacerbated by extreme ranges of motion. Understanding various impingement types will better enable the clinician to prevent, identify, treat, and rehabilitate affected ankles. Acknowledging activities that predispose to ankle impingement syndrome will enhance prevention and recovery processes. Description of ankle impingement etiology and pathology is the objective of the current review.

  12. The effectiveness of the parachutist ankle brace in reducing ankle injuries in an airborne ranger battalion.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, J T; Creedon, J F; Pope, R W

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the parachutist ankle brace (PAB) decreases the number and severity of ankle injuries in an airborne Ranger battalion. A retrospective study was performed covering a 38-month period. A computer database was used to track all jump injuries with a diagnosis of ankle pain, sprain, or fracture. The frequency was calculated for ankle injuries per 1,000 jumps and the average length of medically restricted duty per ankle injury. A total of 13,782 static line parachute jumps were conducted during the study period. Without the PAB, 35 ankle injuries were seen (4.5/1,000 jumps), with 9 fractures and 316 days of medical restriction per 1,000 jumps. Using the PAB, 9 ankle injuries were seen (1.5/1,000 jumps), with 3 fractures and 71 days of medical restriction per 1,000 jumps. The correct use of the PAB appeared to significantly decrease the incidence of ankle injuries in this battalion.

  13. Effects of 6-week whole body vibration training on the reflex response of the ankle muscles: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Fernando; Rubio, Jacobo A; Ramos, Domingo J; Esteban, Paula; Mendizábal, Susana; Jiménez, Fernando

    2013-02-01

    The ligament sprain of the lateral ankle is the most frequent injury that occurs when participating in sports. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a training method that has been recently introduced as a rehabilitative tool for treatment of athletes. It has been hypothesized that the transmission of mechanical oscillations from the vibrating platform may lead to physiological changes in muscle spindles, joint mechanoreceptors, as well as improve balance. [corrected] The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a 6-week WBV training program on the reflex response mechanism of the peroneus longus (PL), peroneus brevis (PB) and anterior tibialis (AT) muscles in ankle inversion at 30º from horizontal, in a static position. This study was a single-blinded and randomized controlled trial. Forty-four healthy, physically active participants were randomly split into two groups: the experimental group (n = 26) (the WBV training) and control group (n = 18). Reaction time (RT), maximum electromyographic (EMG) peak (peak EMG), time to the maximum peak EMG (peak EMG time) and reflex electrical activity of all the muscles were assessed before and after the WBV training through surface EMG. After 6-weeks WBV training, there were no significant changes in the variables analysed for all the muscles involved. A 6-week WBV training does not improve the reflex response mechanism of the lateral stabilizing muscles of the ankle. 1b.

  14. Contributing factors to chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Tricia J; Kramer, Lauren C; Denegar, Craig R; Hertel, Jay

    2007-03-01

    The development of repetitive ankle sprains and persistent symptoms after initial ankle sprain has been termed chronic ankle instability (CAI). There is no clear indication of which measures are most important in discriminating between individuals with and without CAI. Thirty subjects with unilateral CAI and controls had measures of ankle laxity and hypomobility, static and dynamic balance, ankle and hip strength, lower extremity alignments, and flexibility taken on both limbs. Based on comparisons of CAI ankles and side-matched limbs in controls, the measures significantly predictive of CAI were increased inversion laxity (r(2) change = 0.203), increased anterior laxity (r(2) change = 0.11), more missed balance trials (r(2) change = 0.094), and lower plantarflexion to dorsiflexion peak torque (r(2) change = 0.052). Symmetry indices comparing the side-to-side differences of each measure also were calculated for each dependent variable and compared between groups. The measures significantly predictive of CAI were decreased anterior reach (r(2) change = 0.185), decreased plantarflexion peak torque (r(2) change = 0.099), decreased posterior medial reach (r(2) change = 0.094), and increased inversion laxity (r(2) change = 0.041). The results of this study elucidate the specific measures that best discriminate between individuals with and without CAI. Both mechanical (anterior and inversion laxity) and functional (strength, dynamic balance) insufficiencies significantly contribute to the etiology of CAI. Prevention of CAI may be possible with proper initial management of the acute injury with rehabilitation aimed at those factors that best discriminate between individuals with and without CAI.

  15. Functional instability in non-contact ankle ligament injuries

    PubMed Central

    Rose, A.; Lee, R.; Williams, R.; Thomson, L.; Forsyth, A.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives—To measure objectively functional standing balance in the acute stages of non-contact ankle sprain, and to compare patients with controls. Methods—A Chattanooga balance machine was used to measure postural stability in patients with acute ankle sprain and uninjured controls over a two week period, in one and two legged stance, with eyes open and closed. Participants also completed the Olerud and Molander questionnaire to provide a subjective measure of ankle function. Results—There was a highly significant improvement in questionnaire scores for the patients during the study period (p<0.0001). Patients appeared to be less stable than controls in all balance tests, although the difference did not reach significance. There was evidence of improvement over time in the number of tests successfully completed on the injured leg in single legged stance with eyes closed (p = 0.043) between visits 1 and 3. Conclusions—The patient group showed a subjective improvement, which supports clinical experience of treating acute ankle injuries. There is some evidence that on average the patient group appeared to be less stable than controls in all balance tests, although the difference did not reach statistical significance, even on the uninjured leg. There is a need to carry out further studies to confirm the results found in this pilot study and to investigate the hypotheses generated. It would be useful to evaluate a simple test that could be used clinically to monitor progress after ankle injury, and also to identify athletes with decreased functional stability, who may be more at risk of sustaining ankle injury. Key Words: balance; ankle; sprain; postural stability; injury prevention PMID:11049145

  16. Association Between Years of Experience and Ankle Joint Disorder in Male Student Basketball Players Based on Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Yaeko

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The goal of the study was to survey ankle joint disorder in male senior high school and college student basketball players based on the results of an ultrasonographic medical check-up of the ankle joint. Materials and Methods The subjects were 17 senior high school student and 19 college student basketball players. Ultrasonography, evaluation of ATFL injury, and examination of the talocrural joint region were performed. The subjects were grouped based on the presence or absence of old ATFL injury, and subjects with ATFL injury were classified by the injured region: fibular insertion site, parenchyma, and talar insertion site. The talocrural joint region was evaluated based on the areas of the lateral margin, central region, and medial margin, and sites with an irregular bone contour and osteophyte were counted individually. The questionnaire asked about the patients’ history of ankle injuries. Results A questionnaire survey revealed that 70–79% of all subjects had experienced a sprain at least once and 21–29% had frequently sprained the left or right foot 10 or more times in the past. On ultrasonography, there was no significant difference in ligament injury or injured site between the senior high school and college students, but the number of osteochondral findings in the talocrural joint region was significantly higher in the college students. In addition, the number of injured sites significantly increased in those with 10 or more years of playing experience. Conclusion These results suggest that disorder of the talocrural joint region progresses with an increase in years of experience in student basketball players who do not take specific preventive measures against this injury. PMID:28603784

  17. Association Between Years of Experience and Ankle Joint Disorder in Male Student Basketball Players Based on Ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Yaeko

    2017-04-01

    The goal of the study was to survey ankle joint disorder in male senior high school and college student basketball players based on the results of an ultrasonographic medical check-up of the ankle joint. The subjects were 17 senior high school student and 19 college student basketball players. Ultrasonography, evaluation of ATFL injury, and examination of the talocrural joint region were performed. The subjects were grouped based on the presence or absence of old ATFL injury, and subjects with ATFL injury were classified by the injured region: fibular insertion site, parenchyma, and talar insertion site. The talocrural joint region was evaluated based on the areas of the lateral margin, central region, and medial margin, and sites with an irregular bone contour and osteophyte were counted individually. The questionnaire asked about the patients' history of ankle injuries. A questionnaire survey revealed that 70-79% of all subjects had experienced a sprain at least once and 21-29% had frequently sprained the left or right foot 10 or more times in the past. On ultrasonography, there was no significant difference in ligament injury or injured site between the senior high school and college students, but the number of osteochondral findings in the talocrural joint region was significantly higher in the college students. In addition, the number of injured sites significantly increased in those with 10 or more years of playing experience. These results suggest that disorder of the talocrural joint region progresses with an increase in years of experience in student basketball players who do not take specific preventive measures against this injury.

  18. Midfoot sprains in the National Football League.

    PubMed

    Osbahr, Daryl C; O'Loughlin, Padhraig F; Drakos, Mark C; Barnes, Ronnie P; Kennedy, John G; Warren, Russell F

    2014-12-01

    Midfoot sprains in the National Football League (NFL) are uncommon. There are few studies on midfoot sprains in professional athletes, as most studies focus on severe traumatic injuries resulting in Lisfranc fracture-dislocations. We conducted a study to evaluate midfoot sprains in NFL players to allow for better identification and management of these injuries. All midfoot sprains from a single NFL team database were reviewed over a 15-year period, and 32 NFL team physicians completed a questionnaire detailing their management approach. A comparative analysis was performed analyzing several variables, including diagnosis, treatment methods, and time lost from participation. Fifteen NFL players sustained midfoot sprains. Most injuries occurred during games as opposed to practice, and the injury typically resulted from direct impact rather than torsion. Twelve players had nonoperative treatment, and 3 had operative treatment. Nonoperative management resulted in a mean of 11.7 days of time lost from participation. However, there was a significant (P=.047) difference in mean (SD) time lost between the grade 1 sprain group, 3.1 (1.9) days, and the grade 2 sprain group, 36 (26.1) days. Of the 3 operative grade 3 patients, 1 returned in 73 days, and 2 were injured late in the season and returned the next season. Eleven (92%) of the 12 players who had nonoperative treatment had a successful return to play, and 10 (83%) of the 12 played more games and seasons after their midfoot injury. Depending on the diastasis category, NFL team physicians vary treatment: no diastasis (84% cam walker), latent diastasis (47% surgery, 34% cam walker), and frank diastasis (94% surgery). In the NFL, midfoot sprains can be a source of significant disability. Successful return to play can be achieved with nonoperative management for grade 1 injuries within 1 week and grade 2 injuries within 5 weeks. However, severe injuries with frank diastasis that require operative management will

  19. The effectiveness of exercise on recovery and clinical outcomes of soft tissue injuries of the leg, ankle, and foot: A systematic review by the Ontario Protocol for Traffic Injury Management (OPTIMa) Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Woitzik, Erin; Jacobs, Craig; Wong, Jessica J; Côté, Pierre; Shearer, Heather M; Randhawa, Kristi; Sutton, Deborah; Southerst, Danielle; Varatharajan, Sharanya; Brison, Robert J; Yu, Hainan; van der Velde, Gabrielle; Stern, Paula J; Taylor-Vaisey, Anne; Stupar, Maja; Mior, Silvano; Carroll, Linda J

    2015-10-01

    Soft tissue injuries of the leg, ankle, or foot are common and often treated by exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of exercise for the management of soft tissue injuries of the leg, ankle, or foot. A systematic review of the literature was conducted. We searched five databases from 1990 to 2015. Relevant articles were critically appraised using Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) criteria. The evidence from studies with low risk of bias was synthesized using the best-evidence synthesis methodology. We screened 7946 articles. We critically appraised ten randomized trials and six had a low risk of bias. The evidence suggests that for recent lateral ankle sprain: 1) rehabilitation exercises initiated immediately post-injury are as effective as a similar program initiated one week post-injury; and 2) supervised progressive exercise plus education/advice and home exercise lead to similar outcomes as education/advice and home exercise. Eccentric exercises may be more effective than an AirHeel brace but less effective than acupuncture for Achilles tendinopathy of more than two months duration. Finally, for plantar heel pain, static stretching of the calf muscles and sham ultrasound lead to similar outcomes, while static plantar fascia stretching provides short-term benefits compared to shockwave therapy. We found little evidence to support the use of early or supervised exercise interventions for lateral ankle sprains. Eccentric exercises may provide short-term benefits over a brace for persistent Achilles tendinopathy and plantar fascia stretching provides short-term benefits for plantar heel pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ankle replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... is surgery to replace the damaged bone and cartilage in the ankle joint. Artificial joint parts (prosthetics) ... Your surgeon will remove the damaged bone and cartilage. Your surgeon will replace the damaged part of: ...

  1. Clinical benefit of the FIFA 11 programme for the prevention of hamstring and lateral ankle ligament injuries among amateur soccer players.

    PubMed

    Nouni-Garcia, Rauf; Carratala-Munuera, Concepcion; Orozco-Beltran, Domingo; Lopez-Pineda, Adriana; Asensio-Garcia, María Rosario; Gil-Guillen, Vicente F

    2017-06-22

    To analyse the relationship between the implementation of 'the 11' protocol during the regular season in a men's amateur soccer team and the rate of hamstring and lateral ankle ligament (LAL) injuries, and to estimate the clinical benefit of the programme according to the type of injury and the position field. This cohort study was conducted in two different men's amateur soccer teams. During two seasons, the exposed group (43 players) performed 'the 11' protocol twice a week, and the unexposed group (43 players) performed the regular training programme. All players trained three times per week for 1.5 hours per day. Data collection was performed for every 1000 hours of play. 18 hamstring injuries (injury rate (IR) of 2.26 injuries/1000 training+competition hours) and 15 LAL injuries (IR of 1.88 injuries/1000) were registered in the exposed group. In the unexposed group, there were 25 LAL injuries (IR of 3.14 injuries/1000) and 35 hamstring injuries (IR of 4.39 injuries/1000). The number needed to treat to prevent one new case was 3.9 in LAL injuries, 3.31 in biceps femoris injuries and 10.7 in recurrent hamstring injuries. 'The 11' programme reduced the incidence of hamstring and LAL injuries in amateur players. According to the field position, the programme was effective for defenders and midfielders. In accordance with the type of injury, the exposed group had a lower risk of LAL, biceps femoris and hamstring injuries compared with those in the unexposed group. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Effect of exercise therapy combining electrical therapy and balance training on functional instability resulting from ankle sprain—focus on stability of jump landing

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Takaki; Tanino, Yoshitsugu; Suzuki, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Functional instability leads to a delay in the muscle reaction time and weakness of the peroneal muscles. The present study examined the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation during balance exercise on patients with functional instability of the ankles, including the ability to land after jumping at the center of foot pressure. [Subjects] The subjects were seven males with a history of ankle sprain. All had a sprained ankle score of ≤80 points on Karlson’s functional instability test. [Methods] They were asked to jump over a 20-cm-high platform sideways for 10 consecutive seconds on a force plate with one leg. The length of the center of pressure was measured for comparison of balance exercise and balance exercise with simultaneous transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. [Results] The length of the center of foot pressure on the sprain side was significantly greater than on the non-sprain side under both conditions. Under the balance exercise with simultaneous transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy condition, the length of the center of foot pressure on the sprain side was significantly reduced, with the values being 627.0 ± 235.4 and 551.8 ± 171.1 mm before and after the challenge, respectively. [Conclusion] Ankle instability on the sprain side was significantly reduced under the balance exercise with simultaneous transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy condition before and after the challenge. Peroneal muscles showed increased activity caused by common peroneal innervation. PMID:26644645

  3. A Survey of Parachute Ankle Brace Breakages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-10

    reduced since it was subject to abrasion from the concrete in the harness shed, asphalt on the loading ramp, and dirt on the drop zone. b. DJ...strap was also directly under the heel and subject to abrasion from concrete in the harness shed, asphalt on the loading ramp, and dirt on the drop...airborne injuries), airborne students who did not wear the brace were 1.90 times more likely to experience an ankle sprain, 1.47 times more likely to

  4. Reverse Evans peroneus brevis medial ankle stabilization for balancing valgus ankle contracture during total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S; Prissel, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Medial ankle instability secondary to deltoid ligament insufficiency is frequently encountered when performing total ankle replacement and remains a challenge. In the present techniques report, we describe a "reverse" Evans peroneus brevis tendon nonanatomic deltoid ligament reconstruction for medial ankle stabilization harvested through limited incisions using simple topographic anatomic landmarks. The harvested peroneus brevis tendon is brought through a drill hole in the talus from laterally to medially, aiming for the junction of the talar neck and body plantar to the midline. The tendon is the brought superiorly and obliquely to the anterior medial aspect of the distal tibia where it is secured under a plate and screw construct. This modified Evans peroneus brevis tendon nonanatomic deltoid ligament reconstruction is useful in providing medial ankle stability during or after primary and revision total ankle replacement.

  5. [Arthroscopic treatment of chondral lesions of the ankle joint. Evidence-based therapy].

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Jordan, M; Hamborg-Petersen, E

    2016-02-01

    Ankle sprains are the most relevant injuries of the lower extremities and can lead to damage to ligaments and osteochondral lesions. Up to 50 % of patients with a sprained ankle later develop a lesion of the cartilage in the ankle joint or an osteochondral lesion of the talus. This can lead to osteoarthritis of the injured ankle joint. Spontaneous healing is possible in all age groups in cases of a bone bruise in the subchondral bone but in isolated chondral injuries is only useful in pediatric patients. In many cases chondral and osteochondral injuries lead to increasing demarcation of the affected area and can result in progressive degeneration of the joint if not recognized in time. There also exist a certain number of osteochondral changes of the articular surface of the talus without any history of relevant trauma, which are collectively grouped under the term osteochondrosis dissecans. Perfusion disorders are discussed as one of many possible causes of these alterations. Nowadays, chondral and osteochondral defects can be treated earlier due to detection using very sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) techniques. The use of conservative treatment only has a chance of healing in pediatric patients. Conservative measures for adults should only be considered as adjuvant treatment to surgery.Based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, this article gives an overview and critical analysis of the current concepts for treatment of chondral and osteochondral injuries and lesions of the talus. With arthroscopic therapy curettage and microfracture of talar lesions are the predominant approaches or retrograde drilling of the defect is another option when the chondral coating is retained. Implantation of autologous chondral cells or homologous juvenile cartilage tissue is also possible with arthroscopic techniques. Osteochondral fractures (flake fracture) are usually performed as a mini-open procedure supported by

  6. A 4-week neuromuscular training program and gait patterns at the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Garrett; Caulfield, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Previous research into the rehabilitation of ankle sprains has primarily focused on outcome measures that do not replicate functional activities, thus making it difficult to extrapolate the results relative to the weight-bearing conditions under which most ankle sprains occur. To measure the effects of a training program on gait during walking and running in an active athletic population. Matched-pairs, controlled trial. University motion analysis laboratory. Ten subjects from an athletic population (7 healthy, 3 with functional ankle instability: age = 25.8 +/- 3.9 years, height = 177.6 +/- 6.1 cm, mass = 66.8 +/- 7.4 kg) and 10 controls matched for age, sex, activity, and ankle instability (7 healthy, 3 with functional ankle instability: age = 27.4 +/- 5.8 years, height = 178.7 +/- 10.8 cm, mass = 71.6 +/- 10.0 kg). A 4-week neuromuscular training program undertaken by the treatment group. We measured ankle position and velocity in the frontal (x) and sagittal (y) planes in all subjects during treadmill walking and running for the periods 100 milliseconds before heel strike, at heel strike, and 100 milliseconds after heel strike. A 4-week neuromuscular training program resulted in no significant changes in ankle position or velocity during treadmill walking and running. The mechanisms by which neuromuscular training improves function in normal subjects and those with functional ankle instability do not appear to result in measurable changes in gait kinematics. Our findings raise issues regarding methods of ankle sprain rehabilitation and the measurement of their effectiveness in improving functional activities. Further research in a larger population with functional ankle instability is necessary.

  7. A 4-Week Neuromuscular Training Program and Gait Patterns at the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Garrett; Caulfield, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Context: Previous research into the rehabilitation of ankle sprains has primarily focused on outcome measures that do not replicate functional activities, thus making it difficult to extrapolate the results relative to the weight-bearing conditions under which most ankle sprains occur. Objective: To measure the effects of a training program on gait during walking and running in an active athletic population. Design: Matched-pairs, controlled trial. Setting: University motion analysis laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten subjects from an athletic population (7 healthy, 3 with functional ankle instability: age = 25.8 ± 3.9 years, height = 177.6 ± 6.1 cm, mass = 66.8 ± 7.4 kg) and 10 controls matched for age, sex, activity, and ankle instability (7 healthy, 3 with functional ankle instability: age = 27.4 ± 5.8 years, height = 178.7 ± 10.8 cm, mass = 71.6 ± 10.0 kg). Intervention(s): A 4-week neuromuscular training program undertaken by the treatment group. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured ankle position and velocity in the frontal (x) and sagittal (y) planes in all subjects during treadmill walking and running for the periods 100 milliseconds before heel strike, at heel strike, and 100 milliseconds after heel strike. Results: A 4-week neuromuscular training program resulted in no significant changes in ankle position or velocity during treadmill walking and running. Conclusions: The mechanisms by which neuromuscular training improves function in normal subjects and those with functional ankle instability do not appear to result in measurable changes in gait kinematics. Our findings raise issues regarding methods of ankle sprain rehabilitation and the measurement of their effectiveness in improving functional activities. Further research in a larger population with functional ankle instability is necessary. PMID:17597944

  8. Effects of Tape and Exercise on Dynamic Ankle Inversion

    PubMed Central

    Ricard, Mark D.; Sherwood, Stephen M.; Schulthies, Shane S.; Knight, Kenneth L.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of tape, with and without prewrap, on dynamic ankle inversion before and after exercise. Design and Setting: Doubly multivariate analyses of variance were used to compare the taping and exercise conditions. Subjects were randomly assigned to a fixed treatment order as determined by a balanced latin square. The independent variables were tape application (no tape, tape with prewrap, tape to skin) and exercise (before and after). The dependent variables were average inversion velocity, total inversion, maximum inversion velocity, and time to maximum inversion. Subjects: Thirty college-age male and female students (17 males, 13 females; mean age = 24.9 ± 4.3 years, range, 19 to 39 years) were tested. Subjects were excluded from the study if they exhibited a painful gait or painful range of motion or had a past history of ankle surgery or an ankle sprain within the past 4 weeks. Measurements: We collected data using electronic goniometers while subjects balanced on the right leg on an inversion platform tilted about the medial-lateral axis to produce 15° of plantar flexion. Sudden ankle inversion was induced by pulling the inversion platform support, allowing the platform support base to rotate 37°. Ten satisfactory trials were recorded on the inversion platform before and after a prescribed exercise bout. We calculated total inversion, time to maximum inversion, average inversion velocity, and maximum inversion velocity after sudden inversion. Results: We found no significant differences between taping to the skin and taping over prewrap for any of the variables measured. There were significant differences between both taping conditions and no-tape postexercise for average inversion velocity, maximum inversion, maximum inversion velocity, and time to maximum inversion. The total inversion mean for no-tape postexercise was 38.8° ± 6.3°, whereas the means for tape and skin and for tape and prewrap were 28.3° ± 4.6° and 29.1°

  9. Revision anatomical reconstruction of the lateral ligaments of the ankle augmented with suture tape for patients with a failed Broström procedure.

    PubMed

    Cho, B K; Kim, Y M; Choi, S M; Park, H W; SooHoo, N F

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the intermediate-term outcomes after revision anatomical ankle ligament reconstruction augmented with suture tape for a failed modified Broström procedure. A total of 30 patients with persistent instability of the ankle after a Broström procedure underwent revision augmented with suture tape. Of these, 24 patients who were followed up for more than two years were included in the study. There were 13 men and 11 women. Their mean age was 31.8 years (23 to 44). The mean follow-up was 38.5 months (24 to 56) The clinical outcome was assessed using the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) and the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) score. The stability of the ankle was assessed using stress radiographs. The mean FAOS and FAAM scores improved significantly to 87.5 (73 to 94) and 85.1 (70 to 95) points at final follow-up, respectively (p < 0.001). The mean angle of talar tilt and anterior talar translation improved significantly to 2.8° (0° to 6°) and 4.1 mm (2 to 7) at final follow-up, respectively (p < 0.001). Side to side comparison in stress radiographs at final follow-up showed no significant difference. The revision failed in one patient who underwent a further revision using allograft tendon. The revision modified Broström procedure augmented with suture tape is an effective form of treatment for recurrent instability of the ankle following a failed Broström procedure. This technique provides reliable stability and satisfactory clinical outcomes at intermediate-term follow-up. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1183-9. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  10. Cross-cultural adaptation, reliability, and validity of the Persian version of the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool.

    PubMed

    Hadadi, Mohammad; Ebrahimi Takamjani, Ismail; Ebrahim Mosavi, Mohammad; Aminian, Gholamreza; Fardipour, Shima; Abbasi, Faeze

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to translate and to cross-culturally adapt the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT) into Persian language and to evaluate its psychometric properties. The International Quality of Life Assessment process was pursued to translate CAIT into Persian. Two groups of Persian-speaking individuals, 105 participants with a history of ankle sprain and 30 participants with no history of ankle sprain, were asked to fill out Persian version of CAIT (CAIT-P), Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM), and Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Data obtained from the first administration of CAIT were used to evaluate floor and ceiling effects, internal consistency, dimensionality, and criterion validity. To determine the test-retest reliability, 45 individuals re-filled CAIT 5-7 days after the first session. Cronbach's alpha was over the cutoff point of 0.70 for both ankles and in both groups. The intra-class correlation coefficient was high for right (0.95) and left (0.91) ankles. There was a strong correlation between each item and the total score of the CAIT-P. Although the CAIT-P had strong correlation with VAS, its correlation with both subscales of FAAM was moderate. The CAIT-P has good validity and reliability and it can be used by clinicians and researchers for identification and investigation of functional ankle instability. Implications for Rehabilitation Chronic ankle instability is one of the most common consequences of acute ankle sprain. Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool is an acceptable measure to determine functional ankle instability and its severity. The Persian version of Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool is a valid and reliable tool for clinical and research purpose in Persian-speaking individuals.

  11. Role of external prophylactic support in restricting accessory ankle motion after exercise.

    PubMed

    Miller, Heather; Needle, Alan R; Swanik, C Buz; Gustavsen, Geoffrey A; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2012-10-01

    To both prevent and accelerate recovery and return-to-play from ankle sprains, clinicians frequently employ the use of external prophylactic support (EPS), such as taping and bracing, to provide mechanical support to the ankle joint. While common practice clinically, research has been inconclusive in demonstrating the effectiveness of EPS in restricting accessory motion (laxity) throughout activity, as well as its efficacy in restricting laxity in patients with complaints of ankle instability, and patients with a history of ankle sprain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of EPS type (None, Tape, Brace) on ankle laxity before and after exercise in subjects with varying degrees of previous ankle injury. Ankles from 24 participants (age, 20.6 ± 1.6 years; height, 173.6 ± 8.3 cm; mass, 72.8 ± 12.2 kg) were placed into one of three groups: healthy control (CON), potential coper (COP), and functionally unstable (UNS). Ankle laxity was assessed using an ankle arthrometer at 4 points in time; prior to EPS application, immediately following EPS application, following a 20-minute functional exercise protocol with EPS, and following removal of EPS. Peak ankle anterior displacement (ANT), inversion rotation (INV), and eversion rotation (EVR) were compared between groups and across conditions using a three-way ANOVA. Taping and bracing each decreased laxity from pre-application to pre-exercise and post-exercise. Tape provided greater restriction post-exercise in inversion and eversion rotation. Additionally, the UNS group demonstrated significantly greater anterior displacement post-exercise following removal of the brace compared to other groups. Compared to pre-application and post-removal, EPS significantly decreased ankle laxity before and after physical activity, with taping providing better restriction in inversion and eversion rotation throughout exercise. Following EPS removal, bracing revealed a greater increase in post-exercise laxity

  12. Effect of ankle braces on lower extremity joint energetics in single-leg landings.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jacob K; McCaw, Steven T; Laudner, Kevin G; Smith, Peter J; Stafford, Lindsay N

    2012-06-01

    Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries in competitive and recreational athletics. Studies have shown that the use of prophylactic ankle braces effectively reduces the frequency of ankle sprains in athletes. However, although it is generally accepted that the ankle braces are effective at reducing frontal plane motion, some researchers report that the design of the brace may also reduce ankle sagittal plane motion. The purpose of this study was to quantify lower extremity joint contributions to energy absorption during single-legged drop landings in three ankle brace conditions (no brace, boot brace, and hinged brace). Eleven physically active females experienced in landing and free of lower extremity injury (age = 22.3 ± 1.7 yr, height = 1.66 ± 0.04 m, mass = 58.43 ± 5.83 kg) performed 10 single-leg drop landings in three conditions (one unbraced, two braced) from a 0.33-m height. Measurements taken were hip, knee, and ankle joint impulse; hip, knee, ankle, and total work; and hip, knee, and ankle joint relative work. Total energy absorption remained consistent across the braced conditions (P = 0.057). Wearing the boot brace reduced relative ankle work (P = 0.04, Cohen d = 0.43) but did not change relative knee (P = 0.08, Cohen d = 0.32) or hip (P = 0.14, Cohen d = 0.20) work compared with the no-brace condition. In an ankle-braced condition, ankle, knee, and hip energetics may be altered depending on the design of the brace.

  13. Foot and Ankle Injuries in Professional Soccer Players: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Expectations.

    PubMed

    Nery, Caio; Raduan, Fernando; Baumfeld, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Soccer is one of the most popular sports in the world. It has undergone many changes in recent years, mainly because of increased physical demands, and this has led to an increased injury risk. Direct contact accounts for half of all injuries in both indoor and outdoor soccer and ankle sprains are the most common foot and ankle injury. There is a spectrum of foot and ankle injuries and their treatment should be individualized in these high-demand patients. An injury prevention program is also important and should the players, the trainer, responsible physician, and physical therapists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Four Weeks of Balance Training does not Affect Ankle Joint Stiffness in Subjects with Unilateral Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Tarang Kumar; Wauneka, Clayton N.; Liu, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background Balance training has been shown to be effective in preventing ankle sprain recurrences in subjects with chronic ankle instability (CAI) but the biomechanical pathways underlying the clinical outcomes are still unknown. This study was conducted to determine if a 4-week balance training intervention can alter the mechanical characteristics in ankles with CAI. Methods Twenty-two recreationally active subjects with unilateral CAI were randomized to either a control (n = 11, 35.1 ± 9.3 years) or intervention (n = 11, 33.5 ± 6.6 years) group. Subjects in the intervention group were trained on the affected limb with static and dynamic components using a Biodex balance stability system for 4-weeks. The ankle joint stiffness and neutral zone in inversion and eversion directions on the involved and uninvolved limbs was measured at baseline and post-intervention using a dynamometer. Results At baseline, the mean values of the inversion stiffness (0.69 ± 0.37 Nm/degree) in the involved ankle was significantly lower (p < 0.011, 95% CI [0.563, 0.544]) than that of uninvolved contralateral ankle (0.99 ± 0.41 Nm/degree). With the available sample size, the eversion stiffness, inversion neutral zone, and eversion neutral zone were not found to be significantly different between the involved and uninvolved contralateral ankles. The 4-week balance training intervention failed to show any significant effect on the passive ankle stiffness and neutral zones in inversion and eversion. Conclusion Decreased inversion stiffness in the involved chronic unstable ankle was found that of uninvolved contralateral ankle. The 4-week balance training program intervention was ineffective in altering the mechanical characteristics of ankles with CAI. Level of evidence Randomized controlled clinical trial; Level of evidence, 1. PMID:27642647

  15. The effect of high-top and low-top shoes on ankle inversion kinematics and muscle activation in landing on a tilted surface

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is still uncertainty concerning the beneficial effects of shoe collar height for ankle sprain prevention and very few data are available in the literature regarding the effect of high-top and low-top shoes on muscle responses during landing. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of high-top and low-top shoes on ankle inversion kinematics and pre-landing EMG activation of ankle evertor muscles during landing on a tilted surface. Methods Thirteen physical education students landed on four types of surfaces wearing either high-top shoes (HS) or low-top shoes (LS). The four conditions were 15° inversion, 30° inversion, combined 25° inversion + 10° plantar flexion, and combined 25° inversion + 20° plantar flexion. Ankle inversion kinematics and EMG data of the tibialis anterior (TA), peroneus longus (PL), and peroneus brevis (PB) muscles were measured simultaneously. A 2 × 4 (shoe × surface) repeated measures ANOVA was performed to examine the effect of shoe and landing surfaces on ankle inversion and EMG responses. Results No significant differences were observed between the various types of shoes in the maximum ankle inversion angle, the ankle inversion range of motion, and the maximum ankle inversion angular velocity after foot contact for all conditions. However, the onset time of TA and PB muscles was significantly later wearing HS compared to LS for the 15° inversion condition. Meanwhile, the mean amplitude of the integrated EMG from the 50 ms prior to contact (aEMGpre) of TA was significantly lower with HS compared to LS for the 15° inversion condition and the combined 25° inversion + 20° plantarflexion condition. Similarly, the aEMGpre when wearing HS compared to LS also showed a 37.2% decrease in PL and a 31.0% decrease in PB for the combined 25° inversion + 20° plantarflexion condition and the 15° inversion condition, respectively. Conclusion These findings provide preliminary evidence

  16. The effect of high-top and low-top shoes on ankle inversion kinematics and muscle activation in landing on a tilted surface.

    PubMed

    Fu, Weijie; Fang, Ying; Liu, Yu; Hou, Jianfu

    2014-02-18

    There is still uncertainty concerning the beneficial effects of shoe collar height for ankle sprain prevention and very few data are available in the literature regarding the effect of high-top and low-top shoes on muscle responses during landing. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of high-top and low-top shoes on ankle inversion kinematics and pre-landing EMG activation of ankle evertor muscles during landing on a tilted surface. Thirteen physical education students landed on four types of surfaces wearing either high-top shoes (HS) or low-top shoes (LS). The four conditions were 15° inversion, 30° inversion, combined 25° inversion + 10° plantar flexion, and combined 25° inversion + 20° plantar flexion. Ankle inversion kinematics and EMG data of the tibialis anterior (TA), peroneus longus (PL), and peroneus brevis (PB) muscles were measured simultaneously. A 2 × 4 (shoe × surface) repeated measures ANOVA was performed to examine the effect of shoe and landing surfaces on ankle inversion and EMG responses. No significant differences were observed between the various types of shoes in the maximum ankle inversion angle, the ankle inversion range of motion, and the maximum ankle inversion angular velocity after foot contact for all conditions. However, the onset time of TA and PB muscles was significantly later wearing HS compared to LS for the 15° inversion condition. Meanwhile, the mean amplitude of the integrated EMG from the 50 ms prior to contact (aEMGpre) of TA was significantly lower with HS compared to LS for the 15° inversion condition and the combined 25° inversion + 20° plantarflexion condition. Similarly, the aEMGpre when wearing HS compared to LS also showed a 37.2% decrease in PL and a 31.0% decrease in PB for the combined 25° inversion + 20° plantarflexion condition and the 15° inversion condition, respectively. These findings provide preliminary evidence suggesting that wearing high-top shoes

  17. Diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility in the interpretation of Ottawa ankle and foot rules by specialized emergency nurses.

    PubMed

    Derksen, Robert-Jan; Bakker, Fred C; Geervliet, Pieter C; de Lange-de Klerk, Elly S M; Heilbron, Emil A; Veenings, Bart; Patka, Peter; Haarman, Henk J Th M

    2005-10-01

    The ED is often confronted with long waiting periods. Because of the progressive shortage in general practitioners, further growth is expected in the number of patients visiting the ED without consulting a general practitioner first. These patients mainly present with minor injuries suitable for a standardized diagnostic protocol. The question was raised whether these injuries can be treated by trained ED nurses (specialized emergency nurses [SENs]). The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility of SENs in assessing ankle sprains by applying the Ottawa Ankle Rules (OAR) and Ottawa Foot Rules (OFR). In a prospective study, all ankle sprains presented in the ED from April to July 2004 were assessed by both a SEN and a junior doctor (house officer [HO]) randomized for first observer. Before the study, SENs were trained in applying OAR and OFR. In all patients, radiography was performed (gold standard). The diagnostic accuracy for the application of OAR and OFR was calculated for both groups and was compared using z statistics. Furthermore, from the paired results, reproducibility was calculated using kappa statistics. In total, 106 injuries were assessed in pairs, of which 14 were ultimately found to concern acute fractures (prevalence, 13%). The sensitivity for the SEN group was 0.93 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.64-1.00) compared with 0.93 (95% CI, 0.64-1.00) for the HO group (no significance [ns]). The specificity of the nurses was 0.49 (95% CI, 0.38-0.60) compared with 0.39 (95% CI, 0.29-0.50) for the doctors (ns). The positive predictive value for the SEN group was 0.22 (95% CI, 0.13-0.35) compared with 0.19 (95% CI, 0.11-0.31) for the HO group (ns). The negative predictive value for the nurses was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.87-1.00) compared with 0.97 (95% CI, 0.84-1.00) for the doctors (ns). The interobserver agreement for the OAR and OFR subsets was kappa = 0.38 for the lateral malleolus; kappa = 0.30, medial malleolus; kappa = 0

  18. Predicting balance improvements following STARS treatments in chronic ankle instability participants.

    PubMed

    Wikstrom, Erik A; McKeon, Patrick O

    2017-04-01

    Sensory Targeted Ankle Rehabilitation Strategies that stimulate sensory receptors improve postural control in chronic ankle instability participants. However, not all participants have equal responses. Therefore, identifying predictors of treatment success is needed to improve clinician efficiency when treating chronic ankle instability. Therefore, the purpose was to identify predictors of successfully improving postural control in chronic ankle instability participants. Secondary data analysis. Fifty-nine participants with self-reported chronic ankle instability participated. The condition was defined as a history of at least two episodes of "giving way" within the past 6 months; and limitations in self-reported function as measured by the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure. Participants were randomized into three treatment groups (plantar massage, ankle joint mobilization, calf stretching) that received 6, 5-min treatment sessions over a 2-week period. The main outcome measure was treatment success, defined as a participant exceeding the minimal detectable change score for a clinician-oriented single limb balance test. Participants with ≥3 balance test errors had a 73% probability of treatment success following ankle joint mobilizations. Participants with a self-reported function between limb difference <16.07% and who made >2.5 errors had a 99% probability of treatment success following plantar massage. Those who sustained ≥11 ankle sprains had a 94% treatment success probability following calf stretching. Self-reported functional deficits, worse single limb balance, and number of previous ankle sprains are important characteristics when determining if chronic ankle instability participants will have an increased probability of treatment success. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ankle replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... ankle replacement. Your surgeon removed and reshaped damaged bones, and put in an artificial ankle joint. You received pain medicine and were shown how to treat swelling around your new ankle joint.

  20. [Interposition arthrodesis of the ankle].

    PubMed

    Vienne, Patrick

    2005-10-01

    Bony fusion of the ankle in a functionally favorable position for restitution of a painless weight bearing while avoiding a leg length discrepancy. Disabling, painful osteoarthritis of the ankle with extensive bone defect secondary to trauma, infection, or serious deformities such as congenital malformations or diabetic osteoarthropathies. Acute joint infection. Severe arterial occlusive disease of the involved limb. Lateral approach to the distal fibula. Fibular osteotomy 7 cm proximal to the tip of the lateral malleolus and posterior flipping of the distal fibula. Exposure of the ankle. Removal of all articular cartilage and debridement of the bone defect. Determination of the size of the defect and harvesting of a corresponding tricortical bone graft from the iliac crest. Also harvesting of autogenous cancellous bone either from the iliac crest or from the lateral part of the proximal tibia. Insertion of the tricortical bone graft and filling of the remaining defect with cancellous bone. Fixation with three 6.5-mm titanium lag screws. Depending on the extent of the defect additional stabilization of the bone graft with a titanium plate. Fixation of the lateral fibula on talus and tibia with two 3.5-mm titanium screws for additional support. Wound closure in layers. Split below-knee cast with the ankle in neutral position. Between January 2002 and January 2004 this technique was used in five patients with extensive bone defects (four women, one man, average age 57 years [42-77 years]). No intra- or early postoperative complications. The AOFAS (American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society) Score was improved from 23 points preoperatively to 76 points postoperatively (average follow-up time of 25 months). Two patients developed a nonunion and underwent a revision with an ankle arthrodesis nail. A valgus malposition after arthrodesis in one patient was corrected with a supramalleolar osteotomy.

  1. Localized Ankle Fatigue Development and Fatigue Perception in Adults With or Without Chronic Ankle Instability.

    PubMed

    Webster, Courtney A; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2016-06-02

    Fatigue could contribute to ankle-sprain injuries during sport, particularly for individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI). To examine whether adults with or without CAI develop fatigue at similar rates when performing ankle exercises at the same relative effort level and whether these groups differ in their subjective perceptions of fatigue. Controlled laboratory study. Biomechanics research laboratory. A total of 11 volunteers with CAI (1 man, 10 women; age = 23.5 ± 3.0 years, height = 168.0 ± 11.2 cm, mass = 64.3 ± 13.5 kg) were recruited for the unstable-ankle group, and 11 volunteers matched for age, height, mass, and sex (1 man, 10 women; age = 24.1 ± 2.1 years, height = 169.5 ± 9.7 cm, mass = 62.3 ± 9.7 kg) were recruited as control participants. Localized muscle fatigue (LMF) was induced in the ankle of the dominant limb using a custom fatigue protocol. Plantar-flexion and dorsiflexion exertions were completed at a rate of 12 cycles per minute at isotonic loads equal to 70% an