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Sample records for lateral flare design

  1. HINODE OBSERVATIONS OF COHERENT LATERAL MOTION OF PENUMBRAL FILAMENTS DURING AN X-CLASS FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Gosain, S.; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar

    2009-12-01

    The X-3.4 class flare of 2006 December 13 was observed with a high cadence of 2 minutes at 0.2 arcsec resolution by HINODE/SOT FG instrument. The flare ribbons could be seen in G-band images also. A careful analysis of these observations after proper registration of images shows flare-related changes in penumbral filaments of the associated sunspot for the first time. The observations of sunspot deformation, decay of penumbral area, and changes in magnetic flux during large flares have been reported earlier in the literature. In this Letter, we report lateral motion of the penumbral filaments in a sheared region of the delta-sunspot during the X-class flare. Such shifts have not been seen earlier. The lateral motion occurs in two phases: (1) motion before the flare ribbons move across the penumbral filaments and (2) motion afterward. The former motion is directed away from expanding flare ribbons and lasts for about 4 minutes. The latter motion is directed in the opposite direction and lasts for more than 40 minutes. Further, we locate a patch in adjacent opposite polarity spot moving in opposite direction to the penumbral filaments. Together these patches represent conjugate footpoints on either side of the polarity inversion line, moving toward each other. This converging motion could be interpreted as shrinkage of field lines.

  2. Coherent Lateral Motion of Penumbral Filaments during the X-class Flare of 13 December 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosain, S.; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Tiwari, S. K.

    2012-08-01

    The high-resolution pictures of the solar photosphere from space based 50 cm Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard Hinode spacecraft, are now routinely observed. Such images of a δ-sunspot in NOAA 10930 were obtained by Hinode during 13 December 2006 while a X-class flare occurred in this active region. Two bright ribbons were visible even in white light and G-band images apart from chromospheric Ca II H images. We register the sunspot globally using cross-correlation technique and analyse local effects during flare interval. We find that during flare the penumbral filaments show lateral motion. Also, we locate two patches, one in either polarity, which show converging motion towards the polarity inversion line (PIL). In Ca II H images we find kernel with pre-flare brightening which lie along the PIL.

  3. Flare Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczak, M.; Dubieniecki, P.

    2015-12-01

    On the basis of the Solar Maximum Mission observations, Švestka ( Solar Phys. 121, 399, 1989) introduced a new class of flares, the so-called flare hybrids. When they start, they look like typical compact flares (phase 1), but later on, they look like flares with arcades of magnetic loops (phase 2). We summarize the characteristic features of flare hybrids in soft and hard X-rays as well as in the extreme ultraviolet; these features allow us to distinguish flare hybrids from other flares. In this article, additional energy release or long plasma cooling timescales are suggested as possible causes of phase 2. We estimate the frequency of flare hybrids, and study the magnetic configurations favorable for flare hybrid occurrence. Flare hybrids appear to be quite frequent, and the difference between the lengths of magnetic loops in the two interacting loop systems seem to be a crucial parameter for determining their characteristics.

  4. The Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) and its Contributions to Space Weather Research, the Flare Energy Budget, and Instrument Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Phillip

    2008-01-01

    The Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) is an empirical model of the solar irradiance spectrum from 0.1 to 190 nm at 1 nm spectral resolution and on a 1-minute time cadence. The goal of FISM is to provide accurate solar spectral irradiances over the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV: 0-200 nm) range as input for ionospheric and thermospheric models. The seminar will begin with a brief overview of the FISM model, and also how the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) will contribute to improving FISM. Some current studies will then be presented that use FISM estimations of the solar VUV irradiance to quantify the contributions of the increased irradiance from flares to Earth's increased thermospheric and ionospheric densites. Initial results will also be presented from a study looking at the electron density increases in the Martian atmosphere during a solar flare. Results will also be shown quantifying the VUV contributions to the total flare energy budget for both the impulsive and gradual phases of solar flares. Lastly, an example of how FISM can be used to simplify the design of future solar VUV irradiance instruments will be discussed, using the future NOAA GOES-R Extreme Ultraviolet and X-Ray Sensors (EXIS) space weather instrument.

  5. Model to Design Drip Hose Lateral Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Rafael; Cury Saad, João Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Introduction The design criterion for non-pressure compensating drip hose is normally to have 10% of flow variation (Δq) in the lateral line, corresponding to 20% of head pressure variation (ΔH). Longer lateral lines in drip irrigation systems using conventional drippers provide cost reduction, but it is necessary to obtain to the uniformity of irrigation [1]. The use of Δq higher levels can provide longer lateral lines. [4] proposes the use of a 30% Δq and he found that this value resulted in distribution uniformity over 80%. [1] considered it is possible to extend the lateral line length using two emitters spacing in different section. He assumed that the spacing changing point would be at 40% of the total length, because this is approximately the location of the average flow according with [2]. [3] found that, for practical purposes, the average pressure is located at 40% of the length of the lateral line and that until this point it has already consumed 75% of total pressure head loss (hf ). In this case, the challenge for designers is getting longer lateral lines with high values of uniformity. Objective The objective of this study was to develop a model to design longer lateral lines using non-pressure compensating drip hose. Using the developed model, the hypotheses to be evaluated were: a) the use of two different spacing between emitters in the same lateral line allows longer length; b) it is possible to get longer lateral lines using high values of pressure variation in the lateral lines since the distribution uniformity stays below allowable limits. Methodology A computer program was developed in Delphi® based on the model developed and it is able to design lateral lines in level using non-pressure compensating drip hose. The input data are: desired distribution uniformity (DU); initial and final pressure in the lateral line; coefficients of relationship between emitter discharge and pressure head; hose internal diameter; pipe cross-sectional area

  6. Design of smoothed multi-flared antenna for multi-frequency reception of direct transmission from meteorological satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasodha, Polisetti; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Kesarkar, Amit P.; Thawait, Prateek

    2016-07-01

    The direct radiance data assimilation is found to be advantageous for the numerical weather prediction over short and medium range. Therefore reception of satellite radiance in real time is important. Satellite earth station is the preferred choice for direct reception of this data, which is voluminous. High Rate Information being transmitted from these satellites operating in L, S, C and X bands needs to be received. A commercial wide band antenna is not preferred for such application, as it operates uniformly over the entire frequency range in these bands and may create interference over the unwanted frequencies. As the frequencies of interest occupy only a small portion of these bands, it is essential to design a horn antenna, which receives only specified frequencies and filter other frequencies. In this work, we have designed a multi-flare multi-frequency cylindrical horn antenna for reception of direct transmission from meteorological satellites. This earth station antenna tracks selected satellites working over specified frequency ranges, which are 1.694-1.703 GHz, 2.0-2.06 GHz, 4.5-4.6 GHz and 7.8-7.9 GHz in L, S, C and X bands respectively. Cylindrical waveguides for the frequencies, 1.6, 2, 4.5 and 8 GHz are designed and they are joined in the increasing order of radius with suitable conical shapes. The slope of the cones is adjusted experimentally. With this design, the return loss is simulated and found to be better than 20 dB upto 4.5 GHz and later it became poor. To overcome this difficulty, the abrupt transitions at the joints of the conical and cylindrical waveguides are made smoothen by increasing the diameter of one mouth of the cylinder and reducing the other mouth to match with the cylinders corresponding to next higher and lower frequency respectively. As a result, a smooth flared antenna is obtained and the simulated results are satisfactory. A parabolic reflector of 4 m diameter is designed and the smooth multi-flared antenna is kept at the

  7. LATERAL OFFSET OF THE CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS FROM THE X-FLARE OF 2006 DECEMBER 13 AND ITS TWO PRECURSOR ERUPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Harra, Louise K. E-mail: ron.moore@nasa.gov

    2011-12-10

    Two GOES sub-C-class precursor eruptions occurred within {approx}10 hr prior to and from the same active region as the 2006 December 13 X4.3-class flare. Each eruption generated a coronal mass ejection (CME) with center laterally far offset ({approx}> 45 Degree-Sign ) from the co-produced bright flare. Explaining such CME-to-flare lateral offsets in terms of the standard model for solar eruptions has been controversial. Using Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) data, and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) and Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) data, we find or infer the following. (1) The first precursor was a 'magnetic-arch-blowout' event, where an initial standard-model eruption of the active region's core field blew out a lobe on one side of the active region's field. (2) The second precursor began similarly, but the core-field eruption stalled in the side-lobe field, with the side-lobe field erupting {approx}1 hr later to make the CME either by finally being blown out or by destabilizing and undergoing a standard-model eruption. (3) The third eruption, the X-flare event, blew out side lobes on both sides of the active region and clearly displayed characteristics of the standard model. (4) The two precursors were offset due in part to the CME originating from a side-lobe coronal arcade that was offset from the active region's core. The main eruption (and to some extent probably the precursor eruptions) was offset primarily because it pushed against the field of the large sunspot as it escaped outward. (5) All three CMEs were plausibly produced by a suitable version of the standard model.

  8. Design and Development of Lateral Flight Director

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudlinski, Kim E.; Ragsdale, William A.

    1999-01-01

    The current control law used for the flight director in the Boeing 737 simulator is inadequate with large localizer deviations near the middle marker. Eight different control laws are investigated. A heuristic method is used to design control laws that meet specific performance criteria. The design of each is described in detail. Several tests were performed and compared with the current control law for the flight director. The goal was to design a control law for the flight director that can be used with large localizer deviations near the middle marker, which could be caused by winds or wake turbulence, without increasing its level of complexity.

  9. Development, analysis and design of a 292 ft tall self-erecting flare tower for offshore application

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, V.; Srinivasan, N.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the development of a 292 ft tall flare tower applicable for large offshore production facilities. First of its kind in a flare tower design, an innovative but well proven self-erecting technique is used. The technique aimed eliminating the transportation and erection costs. The structural concept is known as Self-Erecting Flare Tower (SEFT). In SEFT concept, the tower is segmented into a number of small manageable sections. A jacket type bottom section is used to support telescoping the tower sections. The design erection procedure, technical and functional feasibility of SEFT concept are discussed. At the end of this paper, a cost comparison study with conventional flare tower is given.

  10. Flared landing approach flying qualities. Volume 1: Experiment design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weingarten, Norman C.; Berthe, Charles J., Jr.; Rynaski, Edmund G.; Sarrafian, Shahan K.

    1986-01-01

    An inflight research study was conducted utilizing the USAF Total Inflight Simulator (TIFS) to investigate longitudinal flying qualities for the flared landing approach phase of flight. The purpose of the experiment was to generate a consistent set of data for: (1) determining what kind of commanded response the pilot prefers in order to flare and land an airplane with precision, and (2) refining a time history criterion that took into account all the necessary variables and their characteristics that would accurately predict flying qualities. The result of the first part provides guidelines to the flight control system designer, using MIL-F-8785-(C) as a guide, that yield the dynamic behavior pilots perfer in flared landings. The results of the second part provides the flying qualities engineer with a newly derived flying qualities predictive tool which appears to be highly accurate. This time domain predictive flying qualities criterion was applied to the flight data as well as six previous flying qualities studies, and the results indicate that the criterion predicted the flying qualities level 81% of the time and the Cooper-Harper pilot rating, within + or - 1, 60% of the time.

  11. Diffractive Optical Element design for lateral spectrum splitting photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorndran, Shelby D.

    In this work, two distinct types of Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) are designed to laterally distribute the solar spectrum across multiple photovoltaic (PV) cells. Each PV cell receives a spectral band near its bandgap energy to maximize overall solar-to-electric conversion efficiency of the system. The first DOE is an off-axis volume holographic lens. Design parameters include lateral grating period and slant angle, index modulation, film thickness, and control of swelling and index modulation attenuation in the film development process. Diffraction efficiency across the holographic lens is simulated using Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA). A full system model is created, and non-sequential ray tracing is performed. Performance is evaluated under AM 1.5 conditions and annual insolation in Tucson, AZ, and Seattle, WA. A proof-of-concept off-axis holographic lens is fabricated and its performance is measured to confirm the optical properties of this system. The second DOE is an algorithmically-designed freeform surface relief structure. The Gerchberg-Saxton design algorithm is expanded to consider multiple wavelengths, resulting in a Broadband Gerchberg-Saxton (BGS) algorithm. All design variables are evaluated in a parametric study of the algorithm. Several DOE designs are proposed for spectrum splitting, and two of these designs are fabricated and measured. Additional considerations, such as finite sampling of the discrete Fourier transform, fabrication error, and solar divergence are addressed. The dissertation will conclude with a summary of spectrum splitting performance of all proposed DOEs, as well as a comparison to ideal spectrum splitting performance and discussion of areas for improvement and future work.

  12. Improved design of micromachined lateral suspensions using intermediate frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, W. T.; Kumar, S.

    2007-08-01

    A complete analysis of the translational and rotational modes of a model lateral suspension is presented. The derived formulae quantify spurious-mode resonant frequencies for cross-axis translation and rotation, and on-axis translation, and can provide very simple expressions for the rejection ratios in terms of the geometry of the suspensions. It is shown that the introduction of intermediate frames, coupling equivalent points of the lateral suspension either side of the suspended mass, can provide much improved dynamics. To investigate the derived relationships, suspensions have been fabricated using through-wafer deep reactive-ion etching (DRIE). Using analysis of the suspension dynamics under the rastered beam of a scanning electron microscope, the various modes of the suspension have been visualized and quantified. These observations are in good agreement with the derived formulae, taking into account the actual profile of the beams fabricated in DRIE. Further finite element analysis across a broad range of suspensions is consistent with the derived formulae. A design heuristic is provided for rapidly optimizing micromachined lateral suspensions by incorporating intermediate frames.

  13. Solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1974-01-01

    A review of the knowledge about solar flares which has been obtained through observations from the earth and from space by various methods. High-resolution cinematography is best carried out at H-alpha wavelengths to reveal the structure, time history, and location of flares. The classification flares in H alpha according to either physical or morphological criteria is discussed. The study of flare morphology, which shows where, when, and how flares occur, is important for evaluating theories of flares. Consideration is given to studies of flares by optical spectroscopy, radio emissions, and at X-ray and XUV wavelengths. Research has shown where and possibly why flares occur, but the physics of the instability involved, of the particle acceleration, and of the heating are still not understood.

  14. Design and microfabrication of a lateral excited gallium arsenide biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienaime, A.; Liu, L.; Elie-Caille, C.; Leblois, T.

    2012-02-01

    GaAs crystal presents some interesting perspectives for resonant biosensors due to its piezoelectric and good mechanical properties and the opportunity to bio-functionalize the surface. Moreover, GaAs can be micromachined by wet etching in several solutions, which constitutes a batch and low-cost process of fabrication. The lateral field excitation (LFE) is used to generate bulk acoustic waves. The main advantage of LFE is the possibility to measure in liquid media, moreover reduced aging and increased frequency stability are also ensured. In this study, an analytical modelization is used to determine the orientations of the vibrating membrane and the electric field that give satisfactory metrological performances. Electrical performances are discussed as a function of geometrical parameters. A simulation based on a Finite Element Modelization is performed in order to optimize the design of the resonant structure. The microfabrication process of the structure is presented. The choice of etchants is discussed in terms of etching rates and surface textures. Several steps of the fabrication of the sensing area structure are shown and characterized. Finally, the active area is fabricated according to the theoretical and experimental results of this study.

  15. Design of lateral heterostructure from arsenene and antimonene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qilong; Dai, Ying; Ma, Yandong; Yin, Na; Wei, Wei; Yu, Lin; Huang, Baibiao

    2016-09-01

    Lateral heterostructures fabricated by two-dimensional building blocks have opened up exciting realms in material science and device physics. Identifying suitable materials for creating such heterostructures is urgently needed for the next-generation devices. Here, we demonstrate a novel type of seamless lateral heterostructures with excellent stabilities formed within pristine arsenene and antimonene. We find that these heterostructures could possess direct and reduced energy gaps without any modulations. Moreover, the highly coveted type-II alignment and the high carrier mobility are also identified, marking the enhanced quantum efficiency. The tensile strain can result in efficient bandgap engineering. Besides, the proposed critical condition for favored direct energy gaps would have a guiding significance on the subsequent works. Generally, our predictions not only introduce new vitality into lateral heterostructures, enriching available candidate materials in this field, but also highlight the potential of these lateral heterostructures as appealing materials for future devices.

  16. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Because the Earth resides in the atmosphere of our nearest stellar neighbor, events occurring on the Sun's surface directly affect us by interfering with satellite operations and communications, astronaut safety, and, in extreme circumstances, power grid stability. Solar flares, the most energetic events in our solar system, are a substantial source of hazardous space weather affecting our increasingly technology-dependent society. While flares have been observed using ground-based telescopes for over 150 years, modern space-bourne observatories have provided nearly continuous multi-wavelength flare coverage that cannot be obtained from the ground. We can now probe the origins and evolution of flares by tracking particle acceleration, changes in ionized plasma, and the reorganization of magnetic fields. I will walk through our current understanding of why flares occur and how they affect the Earth and also show several examples of these fantastic explosions.

  17. Yokoi's Theory of Lateral Innovation: Applications for Learning Game Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Scott J.; Jones, Greg

    2008-01-01

    There are several major challenges for instructional designers seeking to design learning games. These include the lack of access, the cost of rapidly advancing/expensive technology tools that make developing games uneconomical, the institutional time constraints limiting game use, and the concerns that schools lack sufficiently robust computer…

  18. Solar flare model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flare model atmospheres computed under the assumption of energetic equilibrium in the chromosphere are presented. The models use a static, one-dimensional plane parallel geometry and are designed within a physically self-consistent coronal loop. Assumed flare heating mechanisms include collisions from a flux of non-thermal electrons and x-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona. The heating by energetic electrons accounts explicitly for variations of the ionized fraction with depth in the atmosphere. X-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona incorporates a flare loop geometry by approximating distant portions of the loop with a series of point sources, while treating the loop leg closest to the chromospheric footpoint in the plane-parallel approximation. Coronal flare heating leads to increased heat conduction, chromospheric evaporation and subsequent changes in coronal pressure; these effects are included self-consistently in the models. Cooling in the chromosphere is computed in detail for the important optically thick HI, CaII and MgII transitions using the non-LTE prescription in the program MULTI. Hydrogen ionization rates from x-ray photo-ionization and collisional ionization by non-thermal electrons are included explicitly in the rate equations. The models are computed in the 'impulsive' and 'equilibrium' limits, and in a set of intermediate 'evolving' states. The impulsive atmospheres have the density distribution frozen in pre-flare configuration, while the equilibrium models assume the entire atmosphere is in hydrostatic and energetic equilibrium. The evolving atmospheres represent intermediate stages where hydrostatic equilibrium has been established in the chromosphere and corona, but the corona is not yet in energetic equilibrium with the flare heating source. Thus, for example, chromospheric evaporation is still in the process of occurring.

  19. The landing flare: An analysis and flight-test investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seckel, E.

    1975-01-01

    Results are given of an extensive investigation of conventional landing flares in general aviation type airplanes. A wide range of parameters influencing flare behavior are simulated in experimental landings in a variable-stability Navion. The most important feature of the flare is found to be the airplane's deceleration in the flare. Various effects on this are correlated in terms of the average flare load factor. Piloting technique is extensively discussed. Design criteria are presented.

  20. Flare models: Chapter 9 of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    By reviewing the properties of solar flares analyzed by each of the seven teams of the Skylab workshop, a set of primary and secondary requirements of flare models are derived. A number of flare models are described briefly and their properties compared with the primary requirements. It appears that, at this time, each flare model has some strong points and some weak points. It has not yet been demonstrated that any one flare model meets all the proposed requirements.

  1. The sun's spots and flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, David M.

    1987-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), designed to study the solar activity, was launched on February 14, 1980, just before the 1980 peak of sunspot and flare activity. The seven instruments aboard the SMM, information received by each of the instruments, and the performance of these instruments are described, together with the repair mission carried out to replace the attitude control module and the defective electronics in the satellite's observatory. The highlights of the scientific results obtained by the SMM mission and the new discoveries made are discussed, with special attention given to the flare loops, flare loop interactions, and the mass ejection events recorded.

  2. Building Big Flares: Constraining Generating Processes of Solar Flare Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyse Jackson, T.; Kashyap, V.; McKillop, S.

    2015-12-01

    We address mechanisms which seek to explain the observed solar flare distribution, dN/dE ~ E1.8. We have compiled a comprehensive database, from GOES, NOAA, XRT, and AIA data, of solar flares and their characteristics, covering the year 2013. These datasets allow us to probe how stored magnetic energy is released over the course of an active region's evolution. We fit power-laws to flare distributions over various attribute groupings. For instance, we compare flares that occur before and after an active region reaches its maximum area, and show that the corresponding flare distributions are indistinguishable; thus, the processes that lead to magnetic reconnection are similar in both cases. A turnover in the distribution is not detectable at the energies accessible to our study, suggesting that a self-organized critical (SOC) process is a valid mechanism. However, we find changes in the distributions that suggest that the simple picture of an SOC where flares draw energy from an inexhaustible reservoir of stored magnetic energy is incomplete. Following the evolution of the flare distribution over the lifetimes of active regions, we find that the distribution flattens with time, and for larger active regions, and that a single power-law model is insufficient. This implies that flares that occur later in the lifetime of the active region tend towards higher energies. We conclude that the SOC process must have an upper bound. Increasing the scope of the study to include data from other years and more instruments will increase the robustness of these results. This work was supported by the NSF-REU Solar Physics Program at SAO, grant number AGS 1263241, NASA Contract NAS8-03060 to the Chandra X-ray Center and by NASA Hinode/XRT contract NNM07AB07C to SAO

  3. FLARE: The Far Side Lunar Research Expedition. A design of a far side lunar observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, David W.; Chakrabarty, Rudhmala P.; Hannula, Dawn M.; Hargus, William A., Jr.; Melendrez, A. Dean; Niemann, Christopher J.; Neuenschwander, Amy L.; Padgett, Brett D.; Patel, Sanjiv R.; Wiesehuegel, Leland J.

    1991-01-01

    This document outlines the design completed by members of Lone Star Aerospace, Inc. (L.S.A.) of a lunar observatory on the far side of the Moon. Such a base would not only establish a long term human presence on the Moon, but would also allow more accurate astronomical data to be obtained. A lunar observatory is more desirable than an Earth based observatory for the following reasons: instrument weight is reduced due to the Moon's weaker gravity; near vacuum conditions exist on the Moon; the Moon has slow rotation to reveal the entire sky; and the lunar surface is stable for long baseline instruments. All the conditions listed above are favorable for astronomical data recording. The technical aspects investigated in the completion of this project included site selection, mission scenario, scientific instruments, communication and power systems, habitation and transportation, cargo spacecraft design, thermal systems, robotic systems, and trajectory analysis. The site selection group focused its efforts on finding a suitable location for the observatory. Hertzsprung, a large equatorial crater on the eastern limb, was chosen as the base site.

  4. Modal control theory and application to aircraft lateral handling qualities design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinathkumar, S.

    1978-01-01

    A multivariable synthesis procedure based on eigenvalue/eigenvector assignment is reviewed and is employed to develop a systematic design procedure to meet the lateral handling qualities design objectives of a fighter aircraft over a wide range of flight conditions. The closed loop modal characterization developed provides significant insight into the design process and plays a pivotal role in the synthesis of robust feedback systems. The simplicity of the synthesis algorithm yields an efficient computer aided interactive design tool for flight control system synthesis.

  5. Solar Flare Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, Edward J.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    2000-01-01

    During the past year we have been working with the HESSI (High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) team in preparation for launch in early 2001. HESSI has as its primary scientific goal photometric imaging and spectroscopy of solar flares in hard X-rays and gamma-rays with an approx. 2 sec angular resolution, approx. keV energy resolution and approx. 2 s time resolution over the 6 keV to 15 MeV energy range. We have performed tests of the imager using a specially designed experiment which exploits the second-harmonic response of HESSI's sub-collimators to an artificial X-ray source at a distance of 1550 cm from its front grids. Figures show the response to X-rays at energies in the range where HESSI is expected to image solar flares. To prepare the team and the solar user community for imaging flares with HESSI, we have written a description of the major imaging concepts. This paper will be submitted for publication in a referred journal.

  6. On the relationship between sunspots number and the flare index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    During the years 1976-1991, sunspot number and the Kleczek flare index have displayed a strong linear correlation (r = 0.94), one that can be described by the equation y = -0.15 + 0.10 x, where x denotes annual sunspot number. While true, the temporal behaviors of the two parameters have differed, with sunspot number peaking first in 1979 and the flare index peaking much later in 1982 during cycle 21 and with more contemporaneous behavior in cycle 22 (both peaking in 1989, with a secondary peak in 1991). The difference appears to be directly attributable to the way in which the Kleczek flare index has been defined; namely, the annual flare index is the sum of the product of each flare's intensity (importance) times its duration (in minutes) divided by the total number of flares during the year. Because the number of 'major' flares (those of importance greater than or equal to 2) and flares of very long duration (duration greater than or equal to 100 min) both peaked after sunspot maximum (1982/81, respectively) in cycle 21, one should have expected the flare index to also peak (which it did). Likewise, because the number of major flares and flares of very long duration peaked simultaneously with sunspot number (1989) in cycle 22, one should have expected the flare index to also peak (which it did).

  7. SECONDARY FLARE RIBBONS OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Yang, Shuhong E-mail: liting@nao.cas.cn

    2014-02-20

    Using the observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we statistically investigate the flare ribbons (FRs) of 19 X-class flares of the 24th solar cycle from 2010 June to 2013 August. Of these 19 flares, the source regions of 16 can be observed by AIA and the FRs of each flare are well detected, and 11 of the 16 display multiple ribbons. Based on the ribbon brightness and the relationship between the ribbons and post-flare loops, we divide the multiple ribbons into two types: normal FRs, which are connected by post-flare loops and have been extensively investigated, and secondary flare ribbons (SFRs), which are weaker than the FRs, not connected by post-flare loops, and always have a short lifetime. Of the 11 SFRs, 10 appear simultaneously with the FRs, and none of them have post-flare loops. The last one, on the other hand, appears 80 minutes later than the FR, lasts almost two hours, and also has no post-flare loops detected. We suggest that the magnetic reconnection associated with this SFR is triggered by the blast wave that results from the main flare. These observations imply that in some flare processes, more than two sets of magnetic loops or more than twice the number of magnetic reconnections are involved.

  8. Effects of eccentricities and lateral pressure on the design of stiffened compression panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, G. L.; Anderson, M. S.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis for determining the effects of eccentricities and lateral pressure on the design of stiffened compression panels is presented. The four types of panel stiffeners considered are integral, zee, integral zee, and integral tee. Mass-strength curves, which give the mass of the panel necessary to carry a specified load, are given along with related design equations needed to calculate the cross-sectional dimensions of the minimum-mass-stiffened panel. The results of the study indicate that the proportions of the panels are geometrically similar to the proportions of panels designed for no eccentricity or lateral pressure, but no cross-sectional dimensions are greater, resulting in significantly increased mass. The analytical minimum-mass designs of zee-stiffened panels are compared with designs from experimentally derived charts. An assumed eccentricity of 0.001 times the length of the panel is used to correlate the analytical and experimental data. Good correlation between the experimentally derived and the analytical curves is obtained for the range of loading where materials yield governs the design. At lower loads the mass given by the analytical curve using this assumed eccentricity is greater than that given by the experimental results.

  9. Weight optimal design of lateral wing upper covers made of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkanov, Evgeny; Eglītis, Edgars; Almeida, Filipe; Bowering, Mark C.; Watson, Glenn

    2016-09-01

    The present investigation is devoted to the development of a new optimal design of lateral wing upper covers made of advanced composite materials, with special emphasis on closer conformity of the developed finite element analysis and operational requirements for aircraft wing panels. In the first stage, 24 weight optimization problems based on linear buckling analysis were solved for the laminated composite panels with three types of stiffener, two stiffener pitches and four load levels, taking into account manufacturing, reparability and damage tolerance requirements. In the second stage, a composite panel with the best weight/design performance from the previous study was verified by nonlinear buckling analysis and optimization to investigate the effect of shear and fuel pressure on the performance of stiffened panels, and their behaviour under skin post-buckling. Three rib-bay laminated composite panels with T-, I- and HAT-stiffeners were modelled with ANSYS, NASTRAN and ABAQUS finite element codes to study their buckling behaviour as a function of skin and stiffener lay-ups, stiffener height, stiffener top and root width. Owing to the large dimension of numerical problems to be solved, an optimization methodology was developed employing the method of experimental design and response surface technique. Optimal results obtained in terms of cross-sectional areas were verified successfully using ANSYS and ABAQUS shared-node models and a NASTRAN rigid-linked model, and were used later to estimate the weight of the Advanced Low Cost Aircraft Structures (ALCAS) lateral wing upper cover.

  10. Understanding Solar Flare Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, M. S.

    2005-12-01

    A review is presented of work aimed at understanding solar flare statistics, with emphasis on the well known flare power-law size distribution. Although avalanche models are perhaps the favoured model to describe flare statistics, their physical basis is unclear, and they are divorced from developing ideas in large-scale reconnection theory. An alternative model, aimed at reconciling large-scale reconnection models with solar flare statistics, is revisited. The solar flare waiting-time distribution has also attracted recent attention. Observed waiting-time distributions are described, together with what they might tell us about the flare phenomenon. Finally, a practical application of flare statistics to flare prediction is described in detail, including the results of a year of automated (web-based) predictions from the method.

  11. The predicted giant flare of Cyg X-3 occurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushkin, S. A.; Nizhelskij, N. A.; Tsybulev, P. G.; Zhekanis, G. V.

    2016-09-01

    Three weeks ago we predicted (ATel #9416) that Cyg X-3 entered in the ''ultra-soft'' X-ray state and a giant flare are very probable. Later Cyg X-3 has indeed shown the relatively bright flare (ATel #9444), maximal fluxes were lower 700 mJy at 4-22 GHz and then the microquasar had again quenched.

  12. KEPLER FLARES. I. ACTIVE AND INACTIVE M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Davenport, James R. A.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Wisniewski, John P.; Deitrick, Russell; Hilton, Eric J.; Hebb, Leslie

    2014-12-20

    We analyzed Kepler short-cadence M dwarf observations. Spectra from the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 m telescope identify magnetically active (Hα in emission) stars. The active stars are of mid-M spectral type, have numerous flares, and have well-defined rotational modulation due to starspots. The inactive stars are of early M type, exhibit less starspot signature, and have fewer flares. A Kepler to U-band energy scaling allows comparison of the Kepler flare frequency distributions with previous ground-based data. M dwarfs span a large range of flare frequency and energy, blurring the distinction between active and inactive stars designated solely by the presence of Hα. We analyzed classical and complex (multiple peak) flares on GJ 1243, finding strong correlations between flare energy, amplitude, duration, and decay time, with only a weak dependence on rise time. Complex flares last longer and have higher energy at the same amplitude, and higher energy flares are more likely to be complex. A power law fits the energy distribution for flares with log E{sub K{sub p}}> 31 erg, but the predicted number of low-energy flares far exceeds the number observed, at energies where flares are still easily detectable, indicating that the power-law distribution may flatten at low energy. There is no correlation of flare occurrence or energy with starspot phase, the flare waiting time distribution is consistent with flares occurring randomly in time, and the energies of consecutive flares are uncorrelated. These observations support a scenario where many independent active regions on the stellar surface are contributing to the observed flare rate.

  13. An analysis of lateral stability in power-off flight with charts for use in design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Charles H

    1937-01-01

    The aerodynamic and mass factors governing lateral stability are discussed and formulas are given for their estimation. Relatively simple relationships between the governing factors and the resulting stability characteristics are presented. A series of charts is included with which approximate stability characteristics may be rapidly estimated. The effects of the various governing factors upon the stability characteristics are discussed in detail. It is pointed out that much additional research is necessary both to correlate stability characteristics with riding, flying, and handling qualities and to provide suitable data for accurate estimates of those characteristics of an airplane while it is in the design stage.

  14. Design, fabrication and testing of laterally driven electrostatic motors employing walking motion and mechanical leverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tas, N. R.; Sonnenberg, T.; Molenaar, R.; Elwenspoek, M.

    2003-01-01

    Laterally driven linear electrostatic micromotors have been fabricated by standard surface micromachining. We attempt to employ mechanical leverage with the aim to increase the force from the order of 1 μN up to the order of 0.1 mN, in combination with walking motion to increase the stroke to virtually unlimited. Three designs have been made and tested. We conclude that mechanical levers with proper stiffness characteristics to be driven by electrostatic actuators are feasible. Friction as a function of the applied electrostatic clamp force has been measured, showing that there is a significant adhesion in the clamps. Walking motion has been successfully generated in one of the designs, generating a stroke of 15 μm and a force of 3 μN. Improvement of the clamping is needed to benefit from the implemented levers to increase the generated force.

  15. A design of digital processing circuit for the duo-lateral PSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weixiang; Liang, Yanbing; Wang, Xiaoyang

    2015-10-01

    Beam pointing stability control technology detecting the vibration of the optical platform by detectors, using the fast steering mirror compensated the vibration displacement, thereby maintaining a stable beam. Position Sensitive Detector (PSD) as a sensitive position detection system components, its performance significantly affect the overall accuracy of the test system. This article selects Sitek's two-dimensional duo-lateral PSD: 2L20_CP7. By analyzing the measurement principle of the PSD, we designed a reverse bias circuit, I-V converted circuit, A / D converted circuit and control circuit which FPGA as a controller, testing the output current value to verify the reasonableness of the circuit design, and calculate the location information according to formula. We also made a measured grid chart diagram and distortion based on the application of computer, so dose error analysis. We concluded that the linearity of this PSD is better, and it can be applied in the high-precision systems.

  16. A Scrutiny of the Equivalent Static Lateral Load Method of Design for Multistory Masonry Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Touqan, A. R.; Helou, S. H.

    2008-07-08

    Building structures with a soft storey are gaining widespread popularity in urban areas due to the scarcity of land and due to the pressing need for wide open spaces at the entrance level. In earthquake prone zones dynamic analysis based on the Equivalent Static Lateral Load method is attractive to the novice and the design codes leave the choice of the analysis procedure up to the discretion of the designer. The following is a comparison of the said method with the more elaborate Response Spectrum Method of analysis as they apply to a repertoire of different structural models. The results clearly show that the former provides similar results of response in structures with gradual change in storey stiffness; while it is over conservative for a bare frame structure. It is however less conservative for structures with a soft storey.

  17. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Magara, Tetsuya

    2011-12-01

    This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 10^32 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence), local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet), and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection) that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely), while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  18. Emergency flare tip repair

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, G.A.

    1982-07-01

    Two damaged propane storage tank flares serving a large LPG storage facility near the Arabian Gulf were given emergency service. A diagram of over-all layout and spatial relationships between tanks and piping, and tables with general information relevant to selecting an acceptable radiant heat load factor and flare line flow characteristics were presented. The general equation for predicting radiant heat flux from a point source was used. The ignition of the temporary flare was discussed.

  19. Solar Flare Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, Edward J.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    1998-01-01

    We have continued our previous efforts in studies of fourier imaging methods applied to hard X-ray flares. We have performed physical and theoretical analysis of rotating collimator grids submitted to GSFC(Goddard Space Flight Center) for the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI). We have produced simulation algorithms which are currently being used to test imaging software and hardware for HESSI. We have developed Maximum-Entropy, Maximum-Likelihood, and "CLEAN" methods for reconstructing HESSI images from count-rate profiles. This work is expected to continue through the launch of HESSI in July, 2000. Section 1 shows a poster presentation "Image Reconstruction from HESSI Photon Lists" at the Solar Physics Division Meeting, June 1998; Section 2 shows the text and viewgraphs prepared for "Imaging Simulations" at HESSI's Preliminary Design Review on July 30, 1998.

  20. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  1. Solar flares. [plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with explosions in a magnetized solar plasma, known as flares, whose effects are seen throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma-rays through the visible and to the radio band. The diverse phenomena associated with flares are discussed, along with the physical mechanisms that have been advanced to explain them. The impact of solar flare research on the development of plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics is noted. The rapid development of solar flare research during the past 20 years, owing to the availability of high-resolution images, detailed magnetic field measurements, and improved spectral data, is illustrated.

  2. Flared tube attachment fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkire, I. D.; King, J. P., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Tubes can be flared first, then attached to valves and other flow line components, with new fitting that can be disassembled and reused. Installed fitting can be disassembled so parts can be inspected. It can be salvaged and reused without damaging flared tube; tube can be coated, tempered, or otherwise treated after it has been flared, rather than before, as was previously required. Fitting consists of threaded male portion with conical seating surface, hexagonal nut with hole larger than other diameter of flared end of tube, and split ferrule.

  3. Design and construction of a point-contact spectroscopy rig with lateral scanning capability.

    PubMed

    Tortello, M; Park, W K; Ascencio, C O; Saraf, P; Greene, L H

    2016-06-01

    The design and realization of a cryogenic rig for point-contact spectroscopy measurements in the needle-anvil configuration is presented. Thanks to the use of two piezoelectric nano-positioners, the tip can move along the vertical (z) and horizontal (x) direction and thus the rig is suitable to probe different regions of a sample in situ. Moreover, it can also form double point-contacts on different facets of a single crystal for achieving, e.g., an interferometer configuration for phase-sensitive measurements. For the later purpose, the sample holder can also host a Helmholtz coil for applying a small transverse magnetic field to the junction. A semi-rigid coaxial cable can be easily added for studying the behavior of Josephson junctions under microwave irradiation. The rig can be detached from the probe and thus used with different cryostats. The performance of this new probe has been tested in a Quantum Design PPMS system by conducting point-contact Andreev reflection measurements on Nb thin films over large areas as a function of temperature and magnetic field.

  4. Design and construction of a point-contact spectroscopy rig with lateral scanning capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortello, M.; Park, W. K.; Ascencio, C. O.; Saraf, P.; Greene, L. H.

    2016-06-01

    The design and realization of a cryogenic rig for point-contact spectroscopy measurements in the needle-anvil configuration is presented. Thanks to the use of two piezoelectric nano-positioners, the tip can move along the vertical (z) and horizontal (x) direction and thus the rig is suitable to probe different regions of a sample in situ. Moreover, it can also form double point-contacts on different facets of a single crystal for achieving, e.g., an interferometer configuration for phase-sensitive measurements. For the later purpose, the sample holder can also host a Helmholtz coil for applying a small transverse magnetic field to the junction. A semi-rigid coaxial cable can be easily added for studying the behavior of Josephson junctions under microwave irradiation. The rig can be detached from the probe and thus used with different cryostats. The performance of this new probe has been tested in a Quantum Design PPMS system by conducting point-contact Andreev reflection measurements on Nb thin films over large areas as a function of temperature and magnetic field.

  5. Design and construction of a point-contact spectroscopy rig with lateral scanning capability.

    PubMed

    Tortello, M; Park, W K; Ascencio, C O; Saraf, P; Greene, L H

    2016-06-01

    The design and realization of a cryogenic rig for point-contact spectroscopy measurements in the needle-anvil configuration is presented. Thanks to the use of two piezoelectric nano-positioners, the tip can move along the vertical (z) and horizontal (x) direction and thus the rig is suitable to probe different regions of a sample in situ. Moreover, it can also form double point-contacts on different facets of a single crystal for achieving, e.g., an interferometer configuration for phase-sensitive measurements. For the later purpose, the sample holder can also host a Helmholtz coil for applying a small transverse magnetic field to the junction. A semi-rigid coaxial cable can be easily added for studying the behavior of Josephson junctions under microwave irradiation. The rig can be detached from the probe and thus used with different cryostats. The performance of this new probe has been tested in a Quantum Design PPMS system by conducting point-contact Andreev reflection measurements on Nb thin films over large areas as a function of temperature and magnetic field. PMID:27370466

  6. Preventing Depression in Later Life: Translation From Concept to Experimental Design and Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Sriwattanakomen, Roy; Ford, Angela F.; Thomas, Stephen B.; Miller, Mark D.; Stack, Jacqueline A.; Morse, Jennifer Q.; Kasckow, John; Brown, Charlotte; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The authors detail the public health need for depression prevention research and the decisions made in designing an experiment testing problem solving therapy as “indicated” preventive intervention for high-risk older adults with subsyndromal depression. Special attention is given to the recruitment of African Americans because of well-documented inequalities in mental health services and depression treatment outcomes between races. Methods A total of 306 subjects (half white, half African American) with scores of 16 or higher on the Center for Epidemiological Studies of Depression Scale, but with no history of major depressive disorder in the past 12 months, are being recruited and randomly assigned to either problem solving therapy-primary care or to a dietary education control condition. Time to, and rate of, incident episodes of major depressive disorder are to be modeled using survival analysis. Level of depressive symptoms will be analyzed via a mixed models approach. Results Twenty-two subjects have been recruited into the study, and to date eight have completed the randomly assigned intervention and postintervention assessment. Four of 22 have exited after developing major depressive episodes. None have complained about study procedures or demands. Implementation in a variety of community settings is going well. Conclusion The data collected to date support the feasibility of translating from epidemiology to RCT design and implementation of empirical depression prevention research in later life. PMID:18515690

  7. Design and simulation of oxide and doping engineered lateral bipolar junction transistors for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loan, Sajad A.; Bashir, Faisal; Akhoon, M. Saqib; Alamoud, Abdulrahman M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose new structures of lateral bipolar junction transistor (LBJT) on silicon on insulator (SOI) with improved performance. The proposed devices are lateral bipolar transistors with multi doping zone collector drift region and a thick buried oxide under the collector region. Calibrated simulation studies have revealed that the proposed devices have higher breakdown voltage than the conventional device, that too at higher drift doping concentration. This has resulted in improved tradeoff between the on-resistance and the breakdown voltage of the proposed devices. It has been observed that the proposed device with two collector drift doping zones and a buried oxide thick step results in ∼190% increase in the breakdown voltage than the conventional device. The further increase in the number of collector drift doping zones from two to three has increased the breakdown voltage by 260% than the conventional one. On comparing the proposed devices with the buried oxide double step devices, it has been found that an increase of ∼15-19% in the breakdown voltage is observed in the proposed devices even at higher drift doping concentrations. The use of higher drift doping concentration reduces the on-resistance of the proposed device and thus improves the tradeoff between the breakdown voltage and the on-resistance of the proposed device in comparison to buried oxide double step devices. Further, the use of step doping in the collector drift region has resulted in the reduction of kink effect in the proposed device. Using the mixed mode simulations, the proposed devices have been tested at the circuit level, by designing and simulating inverting amplifiers employing the proposed devices. Both DC and AC analyses of the inverting amplifiers have shown that the proposed devices work well at the circuit level. It has been observed that there is a slight increase in ON delay in the proposed device; however, the OFF delay is more or less same as that of the

  8. Flares in childhood eczema.

    PubMed

    Langan, S M

    2009-01-01

    Eczema is a major public health problem affecting children worldwide. Few studies have directly assessed triggers for disease flares. This paper presents evidence from a published systematic review and a prospective cohort study looking at flare factors in eczema. This systematic review suggested that foodstuffs in selected groups, dust exposure, unfamiliar pets, seasonal variation, stress, and irritants may be important in eczema flares. We performed a prospective cohort study that focused on environmental factors and identified associations between exposure to nylon clothing, dust, unfamiliar pets, sweating, shampoo, and eczema flares. Results from this study also demonstrated some new key findings. First, the effect of shampoo was found to increase in cold weather, and second, combinations of environmental factors were associated with disease exacerbation, supporting a multiple component disease model. This information is likely to be useful to families and may lead to the ability to reduce disease flares in the future. PMID:20054505

  9. Hammerhead and nose-cylinder-flare aeroelastic stability revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reding, J. Peter; Ericsson, Lars E.

    1995-01-01

    The flow mechanism responsible for the recently discovered buffet-producing critical cylinder length for hammerheads is discussed. For short cylinder lengths, the upstream effects of the hammerhead wake are able to affect the terminal shock location, driving flow separation to the nose-cylinder shoulder. This has the potential to cause aeroelastic instability leading to structural failure. A similar critical-cylinder-length effect exists for cone-cylinder-flare configurations. This too involves an upstream flow effect. In this case the flare-induced pressure rise drives the shock-induced flow separation to the cone-cylinder shoulder. Neither of these effects is recognized in the existing NASA guidelines for elastic vehicle design. Some currently proposed designs for heavy lift launch vehicles incorporate dangerously blunt noses, in violation of the NASA aeroelastic design criterion. A reexamination of these nose effects indicates the possibility of aeroelastic instability and structural failure. It is the conclusion of this study that it is imperative to consider aeroelastic stability effects early in the design process in order to avoid the possibility of a flight failure or a costly redesign later in the development cycle if the presence of an aeroelastic stability problem is discovered.

  10. Detecting Solar Neutrino Flares and Flavors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, D.

    2004-06-01

    Most power-full solar flare as the ones occurred on 23th February 1956, September 29th 1989 and recent ones occurred on 28th October, on 2nd-4th and 13th November 2003 have been respectively recorded by Radio-X- and Cosmic Rays detectors. These flares took place most in the open or in the edge and in the hidden solar disk (as for the September 29th, 1989 beyond 105Wo and for last November 2003 flare events). The 4th November event was the most powerful X event in the highest known rank category X28. The observed and estimated total flare energy E = 1031-1033 erg should be a source also of a prompt secondary neutrino burst originated, by proton-proton-pion production on the sun itself; a more delayed and spread neutrino flux signal arise later on the terrestrial atmosphere. These first earliest prompt solar neutrino burst might be already recorde, in a few neutrino clustered events, in largest neutrino underground detectors as Super-Kamiokande one, in time correlation with the sharp X-Radio flare onset. Our first estimate at the Super-Kamiokande II Laboratory is found to be a few (1-5) events. Their discover (or absence) should constrains the solar flare acceleration, energetic and its inner environment. Any large neutrino flare event might even verify the expected neutrino flavour mixing leading to comparable electron- muon event as well as a comparable energy fluence and spectra. Rare Tau appearence by neutrino muon into tau conversion might also arise.

  11. COMPTEL solar flare observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Debrunner, H.; Devries, C.; Denherder, J. W.; Eymann, G.; Forrest, D. J.; Diehl, R.; Hermsen, W.

    1992-01-01

    COMPTEL as part of a solar target of opportunity campaign observed the sun during the period of high solar activity from 7-15 Jun. 1991. Major flares were observed on 9 and 11 Jun. Although both flares were large GOES events (greater than or = X10), they were not extraordinary in terms of gamma-ray emission. Only the decay phase of the 15 Jun. flare was observed by COMPTEL. We report the preliminary analysis of data from these flares, including the first spectroscopic measurement of solar flare neutrons. The deuterium formation line at 2.223 MeV was present in both events and for at least the 9 Jun. event, was comparable to the flux in the nuclear line region of 4-8 MeV, consistent with Solar-Maximum Mission (SSM) Observations. A clear neutron signal was present in the flare of 9 Jun. with the spectrum extending up to 80 MeV and consistent in time with the emission of gamma-rays, confirming the utility of COMPTEL in measuring the solar neutron flux at low energies. The neutron flux below 100 MeV appears to be lower than that of the 3 Jun. 1982 flare by more than an order of magnitude. The neutron signal of the 11 Jun. event is under study. Severe dead time effects resulting from the intense thermal x-rays require significant corrections to the measured flux which increase the magnitude of the associated systematic uncertainties.

  12. Tube flare inspection tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meunier, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    Flare angle and symmetry of tube ends can be checked by simple tool that consists of two stainless steel pins bonded to rubber plug. Primary function of tool is to inspect tubes before they are installed, thereby eliminating expense and inconvenience of repairing leaks caused by imperfect flares. Measuring hole tapers, countersink angles, and bearing race angles are other possible uses. Tool is used with optical comparator. Axis of tool is alined with centerline of tube. Shadow of seated pins on comparator screen allows operator to verify flare angle is within tolerance.

  13. Design and optimization of push-pull-shear lateral support of thin meniscus mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fu-lin; Zhang, Jing-xu; Wu, Xiao-xia; Fan, Lei; Zhao, Hong-chao

    2012-09-01

    Lateral support has a significant effect on the deformation of thin primary mirror. This paper deals with the analysis and optimization procedure on the "push-pull-shear" lateral support of thin meniscus mirror. Three steps were carried out in the lateral support optimization. Firstly a finite element model (FEM) was build for further analysis, then according to its structural characteristic, the ratio between the tangential force and the radial force was analyzed during the first optimization; In order to make the lateral forces with the same value, equal angle distance was changed to different angle distances during the second optimization, also lateral support position and magnitude of the lateral forces were given; during the last analysis, a portion of axial force was exerted at the inner ring, the response curve between the inner ring axial force and the RMS in Z direction of the mirror was plotted. The final result showed that the RMS value was decreased from 12.168nm to 3.253nm in Z direction. The optimization procedure provided a feasible way for lateral support of thin meniscus mirror.

  14. What Causes Lupus Flares?

    PubMed

    Fernandez, David; Kirou, Kyriakos A

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the prototypic systemic autoimmune disease, follows a chronic disease course, punctuated by flares. Disease flares often occur without apparent cause, perhaps from progressive inherent buildup of autoimmunity. However, there is evidence that certain environmental factors may trigger the disease. These include exposure to UV light, infections, certain hormones, and drugs which may activate the innate and adaptive immune system, resulting in inflammation, cytotoxic effects, and clinical symptoms. Uncontrolled disease flares, as well as their treatment, especially with glucocorticoids, can cause significant organ damage. Tight surveillance and timely control of lupus flares with judicial use of effective treatments to adequately suppress the excessive immune system activation are required to bring about long term remission of the disease. We hope that new clinical trials will soon offer additional effective and target-specific biologic treatments for SLE.

  15. The Carrington solar flares of 1859: consequences on life.

    PubMed

    Muller, C

    2014-09-01

    The beginning of September 1859 was the occasion of the first and unique observation of a giant solar white light flare, auroral displays were observed at low latitudes and geomagnetic observatories recorded exceptional storms. This paper reviews the impact of the event on the earth system with a special emphasis on living processes using the historical record and current scientific analysis. The data used includes reports from the telegraph operators, mortality and morbidity records, proxies as agricultural production. Comparisons with later solar flare events will be attempted on the basis of the record and the consequences of an event of comparable magnitude to the 1859 set of flares will be discussed.

  16. The Carrington Solar Flares of 1859: Consequences on Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, C.

    2014-09-01

    The beginning of September 1859 was the occasion of the first and unique observation of a giant solar white light flare, auroral displays were observed at low latitudes and geomagnetic observatories recorded exceptional storms. This paper reviews the impact of the event on the earth system with a special emphasis on living processes using the historical record and current scientific analysis. The data used includes reports from the telegraph operators, mortality and morbidity records, proxies as agricultural production. Comparisons with later solar flare events will be attempted on the basis of the record and the consequences of an event of comparable magnitude to the 1859 set of flares will be discussed.

  17. The Carrington solar flares of 1859: consequences on life.

    PubMed

    Muller, C

    2014-09-01

    The beginning of September 1859 was the occasion of the first and unique observation of a giant solar white light flare, auroral displays were observed at low latitudes and geomagnetic observatories recorded exceptional storms. This paper reviews the impact of the event on the earth system with a special emphasis on living processes using the historical record and current scientific analysis. The data used includes reports from the telegraph operators, mortality and morbidity records, proxies as agricultural production. Comparisons with later solar flare events will be attempted on the basis of the record and the consequences of an event of comparable magnitude to the 1859 set of flares will be discussed. PMID:25351684

  18. The solar flare myth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Many years of research have demonstrated that large, nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms, shock wave disturbances in the solar wind, and energetic particle events in interplanetary space often occur in close association with large solar flares. This result has led to a pradigm of cause and effect - that large solar flares are the fundamental cause of these events in the near-Earth space environmemt. This paradigm, which I call 'the solar flare myth,' dominates the popular perception of the relationship between solar activity and interplanetary and geomagnetic events and has provided much of the pragmatic rationale for the study of the solar flare phenomenon. Yet there is good evidence that this paradigm is wrong and that flares do not generally play a central role in producing major transient disturbances in the near-Earth space environment. In this paper I outline a different paradigm of cause and effect that removes solar flares from their central position in the chain of events leading from the Sun to near-Earth space. Instead, this central role is given to events known as coronal mass ejections.

  19. Regional Changes in Word-Production Laterality after a Naming Treatment Designed to Produce a Rightward Shift in Frontal Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosson, Bruce; Moore, Anna Bacon; McGregor, Keith M.; Chang, Yu-Ling; Benjamin, Michelle; Gopinath, Kaundinya; Sherod, Megan E.; Wierenga, Christina E.; Peck, Kyung K.; Briggs, Richard W.; Rothi, Leslie J. Gonzalez; White, Keith D.

    2009-01-01

    Five nonfluent aphasia patients participated in a picture-naming treatment that used an intention manipulation (opening a box and pressing a button on a device in the box with the left hand) to initiate naming trials and was designed to re-lateralize word production mechanisms from the left to the right frontal lobe. To test the underlying…

  20. Lateral control system design for VTOL landing on a DD963 in high sea states. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodson, M.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of designing lateral control systems for the safe landing of VTOL aircraft on small ships is addressed. A ship model is derived. The issues of estimation and prediction of ship motions are discussed, using optimal linear linear estimation techniques. The roll motion is the most important of the lateral motions, and it is found that it can be predicted for up to 10 seconds in perfect conditions. The automatic landing of the VTOL aircraft is considered, and a lateral controller, defined as a ship motion tracker, is designed, using optimal control techniqes. The tradeoffs between the tracking errors and the control authority are obtained. The important couplings between the lateral motions and controls are demonstrated, and it is shown that the adverse couplings between the sway and the roll motion at the landing pad are significant constraints in the tracking of the lateral ship motions. The robustness of the control system, including the optimal estimator, is studied, using the singular values analysis. Through a robustification procedure, a robust control system is obtained, and the usefulness of the singular values to define stability margins that take into account general types of unstructured modelling errors is demonstrated. The minimal destabilizing perturbations indicated by the singular values analysis are interpreted and related to the multivariable Nyquist diagrams.

  1. Design and comparative study of lateral and vertical LEDs with graphene as current spreading layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palakurthy, Shivani; Singh, Sumitra; Pal, Suchandan; Dhanavantri, Chenna

    2015-10-01

    This study analyzes the current spreading effect of graphene on lateral and vertical light emitting diodes (LEDs). We observe an improvement in uniformity of current distribution, light output power and wall-plug efficiency in lateral LEDs (L-LEDs) with graphene current spreading layer (CSL) as compared to those with indium tin oxide (ITO) CSL. From the results we conclude that graphene CSL may be better alternative to ITO CSL. We further carried out a comparative study of lateral and vertical LEDs with graphene CSL. We observe 17% higher light output power, 16% higher wall-plug efficiency and 62% lower series resistance in the case of V-LEDs with graphene CSL when compared to that of L-LEDs with a graphene CSL. Reasons behind these results have been discussed.

  2. Flares and habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrevaya, Ximena C.; Cortón, Eduardo; Mauas, Pablo J. D.

    2012-07-01

    At present, dwarf M stars are being considered as potential hosts for habitable planets. However, an important fraction of these stars are flare stars, which among other kind of radiation, emit large amounts of UV radiation during flares, and it is unknown how this events can affect life, since biological systems are particularly vulnerable to UV. In this work we evaluate a well known dMe star, EV Lacertae (GJ 873) as a potential host for the emergence and evolution of life, focusing on the effects of the UV emission associated with flare activity. Since UV-C is particularly harmful for living organisms, we studied the effect of UV-C radiation on halophile archaea cultures. The halophile archaea or haloarchaea are extremophile microorganisms, which inhabit in hypersaline environments and which show several mechanisms to cope with UV radiation since they are naturally exposed to intense solar UV radiation on Earth. To select the irradiance to be tested, we considered a moderate flare on this star. We obtained the mean value for the UV-C irradiance integrating the IUE spectrum in the impulsive phase, and considering a hypothetical planet in the center of the liquid water habitability zone. To select the irradiation times we took the most frequent duration of flares on this star which is from 9 to 27 minutes. Our results show that even after considerable UV damage, the haloarchaeal cells survive at the tested doses, showing that this kind of life could survive in a relatively hostile UV environment.

  3. FLARING PATTERNS IN BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Paggi, A.; Cavaliere, A.; Tavani, M.; Vittorini, V.; D'Ammando, F.

    2011-08-01

    Blazars radiate from relativistic jets launched by a supermassive black hole along our line of sight; the subclass of flat spectrum radio quasars exhibits broad emission lines, a telltale sign of a gas-rich environment and high accretion rate, contrary to the other subclass of the BL Lacertae objects. We show that this dichotomy of the sources in physical properties is enhanced in their flaring activity. The BL Lac flares yielded spectral evidence of being driven by further acceleration of highly relativistic electrons in the jet. Here, we discuss spectral fits of multi-{lambda} data concerning strong flares of the two flat spectrum radio quasars 3C 454.3 and 3C 279 recently detected in {gamma}-rays by the AGILE and Fermi satellites. We find that optimal spectral fits are provided by external Compton radiation enhanced by increasing production of thermal seed photons by growing accretion. We find such flares to trace patterns on the jet-power-electron-energy plane that diverge from those followed by flaring BL Lac objects and discuss why these occur.

  4. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  5. Comprehensive Study of the X-Ray Flares from Gamma-ray Bursts Observed by Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Xi, Shao-Qiang; Yu, Hai; Wang, F. Y.; Mu, Hui-Jun; Lü, Lian-Zhong; Liang, En-Wei

    2016-06-01

    X-ray flares are generally supposed to be produced by later activities of the central engine, and may share a similar physical origin with the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this paper, we have analyzed all significant X-ray flares from the GRBs observed by Swift from 2005 April to 2015 March. The catalog contains 468 bright X-ray flares, including 200 flares with redshifts. We obtain the fitting results of X-ray flares, such as start time, peak time, duration, peak flux, fluence, peak luminosity, and mean luminosity. The peak luminosity decreases with peak time, following a power-law behavior {L}{{p}}\\propto {T}{peak,z}-1.27. The flare duration increases with peak time. The 0.3–10 keV isotropic energy of the distribution of X-ray flares is a log-normal peaked at {10}51.2 erg. We also study the frequency distributions of flare parameters, including energies, durations, peak fluxes, rise times, decay times, and waiting times. Power-law distributions of energies, durations, peak fluxes, and waiting times are found in GRB X-ray flares and solar flares. These distributions could be well explained by a fractal-diffusive, self-organized criticality model. Some theoretical models based on magnetic reconnection have been proposed to explain X-ray flares. Our result shows that the relativistic jets of GRBs may be dominated by Poynting flux.

  6. Comprehensive Study of the X-Ray Flares from Gamma-ray Bursts Observed by Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Xi, Shao-Qiang; Yu, Hai; Wang, F. Y.; Mu, Hui-Jun; Lü, Lian-Zhong; Liang, En-Wei

    2016-06-01

    X-ray flares are generally supposed to be produced by later activities of the central engine, and may share a similar physical origin with the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this paper, we have analyzed all significant X-ray flares from the GRBs observed by Swift from 2005 April to 2015 March. The catalog contains 468 bright X-ray flares, including 200 flares with redshifts. We obtain the fitting results of X-ray flares, such as start time, peak time, duration, peak flux, fluence, peak luminosity, and mean luminosity. The peak luminosity decreases with peak time, following a power-law behavior {L}{{p}}\\propto {T}{peak,z}-1.27. The flare duration increases with peak time. The 0.3-10 keV isotropic energy of the distribution of X-ray flares is a log-normal peaked at {10}51.2 erg. We also study the frequency distributions of flare parameters, including energies, durations, peak fluxes, rise times, decay times, and waiting times. Power-law distributions of energies, durations, peak fluxes, and waiting times are found in GRB X-ray flares and solar flares. These distributions could be well explained by a fractal-diffusive, self-organized criticality model. Some theoretical models based on magnetic reconnection have been proposed to explain X-ray flares. Our result shows that the relativistic jets of GRBs may be dominated by Poynting flux.

  7. Novel Neuroprotective Multicomponent Therapy for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Designed by Networked Systems

    PubMed Central

    Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Mulet, Roger; Pujol, Albert; Mas, José Manuel; Navarro, Xavier; Aloy, Patrick; Coma, Mireia; Casas, Caty

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of motor neuron function for which there is no effective treatment. One of the main difficulties in developing new therapies lies on the multiple events that contribute to motor neuron death in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Several pathological mechanisms have been identified as underlying events of the disease process, including excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, altered axonal transport, proteasome dysfunction, synaptic deficits, glial cell contribution, and disrupted clearance of misfolded proteins. Our approach in this study was based on a holistic vision of these mechanisms and the use of computational tools to identify polypharmacology for targeting multiple etiopathogenic pathways. By using a repositioning analysis based on systems biology approach (TPMS technology), we identified and validated the neuroprotective potential of two new drug combinations: Aliretinoin and Pranlukast, and Aliretinoin and Mefloquine. In addition, we estimated their molecular mechanisms of action in silico and validated some of these results in a well-established in vitro model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis based on cultured spinal cord slices. The results verified that Aliretinoin and Pranlukast, and Aliretinoin and Mefloquine promote neuroprotection of motor neurons and reduce microgliosis. PMID:26807587

  8. Fields, Flares, And Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucheron, L.; Al-Ghraibah, Amani; McAteer, J.; Cao, H.; Jackiewicz, J.; McNamara, B.; Voelz, D.; Calabro, B.; DeGrave, K.; Kirk, M.; Madadi, A.; Petsov, A.; Taylor, G.

    2011-05-01

    Solar active regions are the source of many energetic and geo-effective events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Understanding how these complex source regions evolve and produce these events is of fundamental importance, not only to solar physics, but also to the demands of space weather forecasting. We propose to investigate the physical properties of active region magnetic fields using fractal-, gradient-, neutral line-, emerging flux-, wavelet- and general image-based techniques, and to correlate them to solar activity. The combination of these projects with solarmonitor.org and the international Max Millenium Campaign presents an opportunity for accurate and timely flare predictions for the first time. Many studies have attempted to relate solar flares to their concomitant magnetic field distributions. However, a consistent, causal relationship between the magnetic field on the photosphere and the production of solar flares is unknown. Often the local properties of the active region magnetic field - critical in many theories of activity - are lost in the global definition of their diagnostics, in effect smoothing out variations that occur on small spatial scales. Mindful of this, our overall goal is to create measures that are sensitive to both the global and the small-scale nature of energy storage and release in the solar atmosphere in order to study solar flare prediction. This set of active region characteristics will be automatically explored for discriminating features through the use of feature selection methods. Such methods search a feature space while optimizing a criterion - the prediction of a flare in this case. The large size of the datasets used in this project make it well suited for an exploration of a large feature space. This work is funded through a New Mexico State University Interdisciplinary Research Grant.

  9. Valentines Day X2 Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    Active region 1158 let loose with an X2.2 flare at 0153 UT or 8:50 pm ET on February 15, 2011, the largest flare since Dec. 2006 and the biggest flare so far in Solar Cycle 24. This video was taken...

  10. BATSE Solar Flare Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    This final report describes the progress originally proposed: (1) the continued improvement of a software and database environment capable of supporting all users of BATSE solar data as well as providing scientific expertise and effort to the BATSE solar community; (2) the continued participation with the PI team and other guest investigators in the detailed analysis of the BATSE detectors' response at low energies; (3) using spectroscopic techniques to fully exploit the potential of electron time-of-flight studies; and, (4) a full search for flare gamma-ray line emission at 2.2 MeV from all GOES X-class flares observed with BATSE.

  11. Solar Flares and the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solar flares are the biggest explosions in the solar system. They are important both for understanding explosive events in the Universe and for their impact on human technology and communications. The satellite-based HESSI is designed to study the explosive release of energy and the acceleration of electrons, protons, and other charged particles to high energies in solar flares. HESSI produces "color" movies of the Sun in high-energy X rays and gamma rays radiated by these energetic particles. HESSI's X-ray and gamma-ray images of flares are obtained using techniques similar to those used in radio interferometry. Ground-based radio observations of the Sun provide an important complement to the HESSI observations of solar flares. I will describe the HESSI Project and the high-energy aspects of solar flares, and how these relate to radio astronomy techniques and observations.

  12. GAMMA-RAY BURST FLARES: ULTRAVIOLET/OPTICAL FLARING. I

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.; De Pasquale, M.; Oates, S. R.

    2013-09-01

    We present a previously unused method for the detection of flares in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves and use this method to detect flares in the ultraviolet/optical. The algorithm makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of the fitted light curve, removing all major features, and to determine the statistically best fit to the data by iteratively adding additional ''breaks'' to the light curve. These additional breaks represent the individual components of the detected flares: T{sub start}, T{sub stop}, and T{sub peak}. We present the detection of 119 unique flaring periods detected by applying this algorithm to light curves taken from the Second Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) GRB Afterglow Catalog. We analyzed 201 UVOT GRB light curves and found episodes of flaring in 68 of the light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of {approx}2 flares per GRB. Flaring is generally restricted to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be observed and detected beyond 10{sup 5} s. More than 80% of the flares detected are short in duration with {Delta}t/t of <0.5. Flares were observed with flux ratios relative to the underlying light curve of between 0.04 and 55.42. Many of the strongest flares were also seen at greater than 1000 s after the burst.

  13. Statistical aspects of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of the statistical properties of 850 H alpha solar flares during 1975 is presented. Comparison of the results found here with those reported elsewhere for different epochs is accomplished. Distributions of rise time, decay time, and duration are given, as are the mean, mode, median, and 90th percentile values. Proportions by selected groupings are also determined. For flares in general, mean values for rise time, decay time, and duration are 5.2 + or - 0.4 min, and 18.1 + or 1.1 min, respectively. Subflares, accounting for nearly 90 percent of the flares, had mean values lower than those found for flares of H alpha importance greater than 1, and the differences are statistically significant. Likewise, flares of bright and normal relative brightness have mean values of decay time and duration that are significantly longer than those computed for faint flares, and mass-motion related flares are significantly longer than non-mass-motion related flares. Seventy-three percent of the mass-motion related flares are categorized as being a two-ribbon flare and/or being accompanied by a high-speed dark filament. Slow rise time flares (rise time greater than 5 min) have a mean value for duration that is significantly longer than that computed for fast rise time flares, and long-lived duration flares (duration greater than 18 min) have a mean value for rise time that is significantly longer than that computed for short-lived duration flares, suggesting a positive linear relationship between rise time and duration for flares. Monthly occurrence rates for flares in general and by group are found to be linearly related in a positive sense to monthly sunspot number. Statistical testing reveals the association between sunspot number and numbers of flares to be significant at the 95 percent level of confidence, and the t statistic for slope is significant at greater than 99 percent level of confidence. Dependent upon the specific fit, between 58 percent and 94 percent of

  14. Electron beams in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Dennis, Brian R.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1994-01-01

    A list of publications resulting from this program includes 'The Timing of Electron Beam Signatures in Hard X-Ray and Radio: Solar Flare Observations by BATSE/Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory and PHOENIX'; 'Coherent-Phase or Random-Phase Acceleration of Electron Beams in Solar Flares'; 'Particle Acceleration in Flares'; 'Chromospheric Evaporation and Decimetric Radio Emission in Solar Flares'; 'Sequences of Correlated Hard X-Ray and Type 3 Bursts During Solar Flares'; and 'Solar Electron Beams Detected in Hard X-Rays and Radiowaves.' Abstracts and reprints of each are attached to this report.

  15. Solar flares: an overview.

    PubMed

    Rust, D M

    1992-01-01

    This is a survey of solar phenomena and physical models that may be useful for improving forecasts of solar flares and proton storms in interplanetary space. Knowledge of the physical processes that accelerate protons has advanced because of gamma-ray and X-ray observations from the Solar Maximum Mission telescopes. Protons are accelerated at the onset of flares, but the duration of any subsequent proton storm at 1 AU depends on the structure of the interplanetary fields. X-ray images of the solar corona show possible fast proton escape paths. Magnetographs and high-resolution visible-band images show the magnetic field structure near the acceleration region and the heating effects of sunward-directed protons. Preflare magnetic field growth and shear may be the most important clues to the physical processes that generate high energy solar particles. Any dramatic improvement in flare forecasts will require high resolution solar telescopes in space. Several possibilities for improvements in the art of flare forecasting are presented, among them: the use of acoustic tomography to probe for subsurface magnetic fields; a satellite-borne solar magnetograph; and an X-ray telescope to monitor the corona for eruptions.

  16. Predicting large solar flares with data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strugarek, Antoine; Charbonneau, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Solar and stellar flares are magnetically-driven, scale-invariant energy release events spanning over 8 orders of magnitude in energy. The prediction of the largest solar flares, of class X, is a particularly hard task due the scarcity of such events. The detailed 3D modelling of flaring active regions still requires today too much numerical resources to be routinely used for near real-time predictions. Alternative, empirical models hence have to be designed to perform such predictions. Among the models that adequately reproduce the power-law distribution in flare sizes, avalanche models have the advantage of being numerically cheap to operate. However, they usually rely on a stochastic driver, which can be expected to degrade their predictive capabilities. Building on the pioneering work of Lu and Hamilton, we develop a class of avalanche models which succeed in minimizing the built-in stochastic ingredients while retaining the solar flares power-law distribution. We show that the largest avalanches occurring in these models are robust with respect to the stochastic realization, which opens new perspectives for the prediction of the largest (and most dangerous) solar flares.We further combine data assimilation of the GOES X-ray flux with our avalanche models to carry out actual predictions. The GOES X-ray flux is transformed into a series of peaks that is fed to the model, which automatically finds an initial condition that is compatible with the observed series of events. We then test our prediction model against past GOES large events and discuss the possibility to use our data assimilation package in near real-time applications.

  17. The Myth of Long Duration Flare Emission: Slow Heating or Slow Cooling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jiong; Longcope, Dana; Klimchuk, James A.

    2015-04-01

    Long duration flare emissions lasting for a few hours are likely governed by magnetic reconnection that continuously heats flare plasmas in continuously formed flare loops. In this study, we confirm that this process leads to the long-duration total emission for up to four hours in a C2.9 flare on 2011 September 13. Observed by AIA, the flare exhibits an ordered spread of flare UV ribbons along the polarity inversion line, followed by the sequential formation of post-flare loops in EUV emissions. We infer heating rates of thousands of flare loops from the UV light curves at the flare foot-points, and model the flare total emission with the 0d EBTEL model, which reproduces the global evolution pattern of the long-duration flare EUV emissions as the result of superposition of continuously formed and heated flare loops. However, observations at single loop pixels also show long duration EUV emission at 10 MK, long cooling time from 10 MK to 3 MK, and later on very short duration of EUV emission at 1-2 MK. All of these signatures cannot be produced by superposition of multiple impulsive heating events. Our experiments, with both the 0d EBTEL model and a 1d hydrodynamic model, have demonstrated that a heating profile in a single loop consisting of two parts, an intense impulsive heating followed by a low-rate heating 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller that is attenuated over 20-30 minutes, is required to produce the observed time evolution signatures in a single loop. The total energy in the gradual heating phase is comparable with that in the impulsive heating phase in a flare loop. We discuss viable physical mechanisms for such two-phase heating in a post-reconnection flare loop.

  18. Characterization and Modeling of 4H-SiC Lateral MOSFETs for Integrated Circuit Design

    SciTech Connect

    Mudholkar, M; Mantooth, HA

    2013-06-01

    A new process in 4H-SiC is developed that features n-type buried and inversion channel lateral MOSFETs that are fabricated with several different channel lengths (2-8 mu m) and widths (8-32 mu m) and characterized over a wide temperature range (25 degrees C-225 degrees C). It is shown that the on-resistance of enhancement-mode SiC MOSFETs reduces with temperature despite a reduction in inversion mobility because of the interaction of interface states with temperature. To enable integrated circuit development using the developed MOSFETs, their electrical characteristics are modeled over geometry and temperature using the industry standard PSP MOSFET model. A new mathematical formulation to describe the presence of the interface states is also developed and implemented in the PSP model, and excellent agreement is shown between measurement and simulation using the modified PSP model.

  19. Design issues for lateral double-diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor with higher breakdown voltage.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kunsik; Won, Taeyoung

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss a new High-Side nLDMOSFET whose breakdown voltage is over 100 V while meeting the thermal budget for the conventional process. The proposed n-channel lateral double-diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (LDMOSFET) has a feature in that the structure comprises a gap of 5 microm between the DEEP N-WELL and the center of the source, the surface of which is implanted by the NADJUST-layer for high breakdown voltage and simultaneously the low specific on-resistance. The computer simulation of the proposed High-Side nLDMOS exhibits BVdss of 126 V and R(ON,sp) of as low as 2.50 m(omega) x cm2. The NBL, which plays a significant role as a blocking layer against the punch-through seems to function as a hurdle for increasing the breakdown voltage. PMID:23858840

  20. Designing for Change: Minimizing the Impact of Changing Requirements in the Later Stages of a Spaceflight Software Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, B. Danette

    1998-01-01

    In the traditional 'waterfall' model of the software project life cycle, the Requirements Phase ends and flows into the Design Phase, which ends and flows into the Development Phase. Unfortunately, the process rarely, if ever, works so smoothly in practice. Instead, software developers often receive new requirements, or modifications to the original requirements, well after the earlier project phases have been completed. In particular, projects with shorter than ideal schedules are highly susceptible to frequent requirements changes, as the software requirements analysis phase is often forced to begin before the overall system requirements and top-level design are complete. This results in later modifications to the software requirements, even though the software design and development phases may be complete. Requirements changes received in the later stages of a software project inevitably lead to modification of existing developed software. Presented here is a series of software design techniques that can greatly reduce the impact of last-minute requirements changes. These techniques were successfully used to add built-in flexibility to two complex software systems in which the requirements were expected to (and did) change frequently. These large, real-time systems were developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to test and control the Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) instrument which flew aboard the space shuttle Discovery as the primary payload on the STS-64 mission.

  1. Design and application of a fish-shaped lateral line probe for flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuhtan, J. A.; Fuentes-Pérez, J. F.; Strokina, N.; Toming, G.; Musall, M.; Noack, M.; Kämäräinen, J. K.; Kruusmaa, M.

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the lateral line probe (LLP) as a measurement device for natural flows. Hydraulic surveys in rivers and hydraulic structures are currently based on time-averaged velocity measurements using propellers or acoustic Doppler devices. The long-term goal is thus to develop a sensor system, which includes spatial gradients of the flow field along a fish-shaped sensor body. Interpreting the biological relevance of a collection of point velocity measurements is complicated by the fact that fish and other aquatic vertebrates experience the flow field through highly dynamic fluid-body interactions. To collect body-centric flow data, a bioinspired fish-shaped probe is equipped with a lateral line pressure sensing array, which can be applied both in the laboratory and in the field. Our objective is to introduce a new type of measurement device for body-centric data and compare its output to estimates of conventional point-based technologies. We first provide the calibration workflow for laboratory investigations. We then provide a review of two velocity estimation workflows, independent of calibration. Such workflows are required as existing field investigations consist of measurements in environments where calibration is not feasible. The mean difference for uncalibrated LLP velocity estimates from 0 to 50 cm/s under in a closed flow tunnel and open channel flume was within 4 cm/s when compared to conventional measurement techniques. Finally, spatial flow maps in a scale vertical slot fishway are compared for the LLP, direct measurements, and 3D numerical models where it was found that the LLP provided a slight overestimation of the current velocity in the jet and underestimated the velocity in the recirculation zone.

  2. Design and application of a fish-shaped lateral line probe for flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Tuhtan, J A; Fuentes-Pérez, J F; Strokina, N; Toming, G; Musall, M; Noack, M; Kämäräinen, J K; Kruusmaa, M

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the lateral line probe (LLP) as a measurement device for natural flows. Hydraulic surveys in rivers and hydraulic structures are currently based on time-averaged velocity measurements using propellers or acoustic Doppler devices. The long-term goal is thus to develop a sensor system, which includes spatial gradients of the flow field along a fish-shaped sensor body. Interpreting the biological relevance of a collection of point velocity measurements is complicated by the fact that fish and other aquatic vertebrates experience the flow field through highly dynamic fluid-body interactions. To collect body-centric flow data, a bioinspired fish-shaped probe is equipped with a lateral line pressure sensing array, which can be applied both in the laboratory and in the field. Our objective is to introduce a new type of measurement device for body-centric data and compare its output to estimates of conventional point-based technologies. We first provide the calibration workflow for laboratory investigations. We then provide a review of two velocity estimation workflows, independent of calibration. Such workflows are required as existing field investigations consist of measurements in environments where calibration is not feasible. The mean difference for uncalibrated LLP velocity estimates from 0 to 50 cm/s under in a closed flow tunnel and open channel flume was within 4 cm/s when compared to conventional measurement techniques. Finally, spatial flow maps in a scale vertical slot fishway are compared for the LLP, direct measurements, and 3D numerical models where it was found that the LLP provided a slight overestimation of the current velocity in the jet and underestimated the velocity in the recirculation zone.

  3. Design and application of a fish-shaped lateral line probe for flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Tuhtan, J A; Fuentes-Pérez, J F; Strokina, N; Toming, G; Musall, M; Noack, M; Kämäräinen, J K; Kruusmaa, M

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the lateral line probe (LLP) as a measurement device for natural flows. Hydraulic surveys in rivers and hydraulic structures are currently based on time-averaged velocity measurements using propellers or acoustic Doppler devices. The long-term goal is thus to develop a sensor system, which includes spatial gradients of the flow field along a fish-shaped sensor body. Interpreting the biological relevance of a collection of point velocity measurements is complicated by the fact that fish and other aquatic vertebrates experience the flow field through highly dynamic fluid-body interactions. To collect body-centric flow data, a bioinspired fish-shaped probe is equipped with a lateral line pressure sensing array, which can be applied both in the laboratory and in the field. Our objective is to introduce a new type of measurement device for body-centric data and compare its output to estimates of conventional point-based technologies. We first provide the calibration workflow for laboratory investigations. We then provide a review of two velocity estimation workflows, independent of calibration. Such workflows are required as existing field investigations consist of measurements in environments where calibration is not feasible. The mean difference for uncalibrated LLP velocity estimates from 0 to 50 cm/s under in a closed flow tunnel and open channel flume was within 4 cm/s when compared to conventional measurement techniques. Finally, spatial flow maps in a scale vertical slot fishway are compared for the LLP, direct measurements, and 3D numerical models where it was found that the LLP provided a slight overestimation of the current velocity in the jet and underestimated the velocity in the recirculation zone. PMID:27131710

  4. Gamma-ray burst flares: X-ray flaring. II

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.

    2014-06-10

    We present a catalog of 498 flaring periods found in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves taken from the online Swift X-Ray Telescope GRB Catalogue. We analyzed 680 individual light curves using a flare detection method developed and used on our UV/optical GRB Flare Catalog. This method makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of fitted GRB light curves and statistically determines the optimal fit to the light curve residuals in an attempt to identify any additional features. These features, which we classify as flares, are identified by iteratively adding additional 'breaks' to the light curve. We find evidence of flaring in 326 of the analyzed light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ∼1.5 flares per GRB. As with the UV/optical, flaring in our sample is generally confined to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be detected to beyond 10{sup 5} s. Only ∼50% of the detected flares follow the 'classical' definition of Δt/t ≤ 0.5, with many of the largest flares exceeding this value.

  5. Multi-wavelength Solar Flare Observations with Ground- and Space-based Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleint, Lucia

    2016-07-01

    Solar flares affect a wide range of atmospheric heights from the corona to the photosphere. Solar instruments are generally designed for high-resolution observations in limited spectral windows and therefore only capture part of the flare. To obtain a more complete flare picture from coronal reconnection to the atmospheric response of the chromosphere and photosphere, it is necessary to combine data from multiple instruments. I will review multi-wavelength flare observations with ground- and space-based observatories. By taking the X1 flare on March 29, 2014 as an example, which was observed with an unprecedented number of telescopes, I will demonstrate how to investigate the origin of the flare by looking at a filament eruption, the chromospheric evaporation by means of spectroscopy, the flare heating by analyzing continuum emission, and the changes of chromospheric magnetic fields using polarimetric data.

  6. A More Realistic Lateral Load Pattern for Design of Reinforced Concrete Buildings with Moment Frames and Shear Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Hosseini, Mahmood

    2008-07-08

    In this research it has been tried to find a more realistic distribution pattern for the seismic load in reinforced concrete (R/C) buildings, having moment frames with shear walls as their lateral resisting system, by using Nonlinear Time History Analyses (NLTHA). Having shear wall as lateral load bearing system decreases the effect of infill walls in the seismic behavior of the building, and therefore the case of buildings with shear walls has been considered for this study as the first stage of the studies on lateral load patterns for R/C buildings. For this purpose, by assuming three different numbers of bays in each direction and also three different numbers of stories for the buildings, several R/C buildings, have been studied. At first, the buildings have been designed by the Iranian National Code for R/C Buildings. Then they have been analyzed by a NLTHA software using the accelerograms of some well-known earthquakes. The used accelerograms have been also scaled to various levels of peak ground acceleration (PGA) such as 0.35 g, 0.50 g, and 0.70 g, to find out the effect of PGA in the seismic response. Numerical results have shown that firstly the values of natural period of the building and their shear force values, calculated by the code, are not appropriate in all cases. Secondly, it has been found out that the real lateral load pattern is quite different with the one suggested by the seismic code. Based on the NLTHA results a new lateral load pattern has been suggested for this kind of buildings, in the form of some story-dependent modification factors applied to the existing code formula. The effects of building's natural period, as well as its number of stories, are taken into account explicitly in the proposed new load pattern. The proposed load pattern has been employed to redesign the buildings and again by NLTHA the real lateral load distribution in each case has been obtained which has shown very good agreement with the proposed pattern.

  7. Flares as Avalanches?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, P.

    2003-05-01

    In 1991, E.T. Lu and R. Hamilton (ApJ 380, L89) suggested that flares could be interpreted as avalanches of reconnection events in coronal magnetic structures driven to a self-organized critical state. Physical underpinning for the simple cellular automaton model they used to illustrate their idea can be readily found in the nanoflare conjecture for coronal heating championed over the past two decades by E.N. Parker (e.g., ApJ 330, 474 [1988]). In this lecture I will give a brief overview of Lu & Hamilton's avalanche model, and describe how it can be physically interpreted in the context of Parker's nanoflare conjecture. After discussing some illustrative model results, I will focus on recent comparisons of the model's predictions with flare observations. Finally, I will discuss some recent attempts at quantitatively exploring the physical relationship between model components and the physics of magnetic reconnection.

  8. PRECURSOR FLARES IN OJ 287

    SciTech Connect

    Pihajoki, P.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpaeae, A.; Takalo, L.; Valtonen, M.; Nilsson, K.; Zola, S.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D.; Liakos, A.; Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W.; Provencal, J.; Santangelo, M. M. M.; Salo, H.; Chandra, S.; Ganesh, S.; Baliyan, K. S.; and others

    2013-02-10

    We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black hole descending toward the accretion disk of the primary black hole from the observed side, with a mean z-component of approximately z{sub c} = 4000 AU. We use this model of precursor flares to predict that precursor flare of similar nature should happen around 2020.96 before the next major outburst in 2022.

  9. Design of a Pressure Sensor Based on Optical Fiber Bragg Grating Lateral Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Frantisek; Kadlec, Jaroslav; Vlach, Radek; Kuchta, Radek

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes steps involved in the design and realization of a new type of pressure sensor based on the optical fiber Bragg grating. A traditional pressure sensor has very limited usage in heavy industrial environments, particularly in explosive or electromagnetically noisy environments. Utilization of optics in these environments eliminates all surrounding influences. An initial motivation for our development was the research, experimental validation, and realization of a complex smart pressure sensor based on the optical principle. The main benefit of this solution consists of increasing sensitivity, resistance to electromagnetic interference, dimensions, and potential increased accuracy. PMID:22163521

  10. Energy release in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.; Correia, Emilia; Farnik, Frantisek; Garcia, Howard; Henoux, Jean-Claude; La Rosa, Ted N.; Machado, Marcos E. (Compiler); Nakajima, Hiroshi; Priest, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    Team 2 of the Ottawa Flares 22 Workshop dealt with observational and theoretical aspects of the characteristics and processes of energy release in flares. Main results summarized in this article stress the global character of the flaring phenomenon in active regions, the importance of discontinuities in magnetic connectivity, the role of field-aligned currents in free energy storage, and the fragmentation of energy release in time and space.

  11. Optical flares in SS433

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irsmambetova, T. R.

    2014-03-01

    An analysis of the precessional and orbital variability separately in active and quiescent states was carried out by using the photometric database in V-band of the SAI. The main orbital light curves in the active and quiet states in different precessional phases are approximately the same - primary and secondary eclipses are also observed. There are 30 most bright flares that have been studied on phase diagrams. The phase diagrams show the dependence of the flares' appearance on combination between the nodding phases and the precession phases. An analysis of the above results suggests that the flares originate in jets. Perhaps variations in jet speed cause flares activity in SS433.

  12. The flares of August 1972. [solar flare characteristics and spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra, are analyzed. The region (McMath 11976) showed inverted polarity from its inception on July 11; the great activity was due to extremely high shear and gradients in the magnetic field, as well as a constant invasion of one polarity into the opposite; observations in lambda 3835 show remarkable fast flashes in the impulsive flare of 18:38 UT on Aug. 2 with lifetimes of 5 sec, which may be due to dumping of particles in the lower chromosphere. Flare loops show evolutionary increases of their tilts to the neutral line in the flares of Aug. 4 and 7. Spectroscopic observations show red asymmetry and red shift of the H alpha emission in the flash phase of the Aug. 7 flare, as well as substantial velocity shear in the photosphere during the flare, somewhat like earthquake movement along a fault. Finally the total H alpha emission of the Aug. 7 flare could be measured accurately as about 2.5 x 10 to the 30th power erg, considerably less than coarser previous estimates for great flares.

  13. A Cold Flare with Delayed Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Pal'shin, Valentin D.; Meshalkina, Natalia; Lysenko, Alexandra L.; Kashapova, Larisa K.; Altyntsev, Alexander T.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, a number of peculiar flares have been reported that demonstrate significant nonthermal particle signatures with low, if any, thermal emission, which implies a close association of the observed emission with the primary energy release/electron acceleration region. This paper presents a flare that appears “cold” at the impulsive phase, while displaying delayed heating later on. Using hard X-ray data from Konus-Wind, microwave observations by SSRT, RSTN, NoRH, and NoRP, context observations, and three-dimensional modeling, we study the energy release, particle acceleration, and transport, and the relationships between the nonthermal and thermal signatures. The flaring process is found to involve the interaction between a small loop and a big loop with the accelerated particles divided roughly equally between them. Precipitation of the electrons from the small loop produced only a weak thermal response because the loop volume was small, while the electrons trapped in the big loop lost most of their energy in the coronal part of the loop, which resulted in coronal plasma heating but no or only weak chromospheric evaporation, and thus unusually weak soft X-ray emission. The energy losses of the fast electrons in the big tenuous loop were slow, which resulted in the observed delay of the plasma heating. We determined that the impulsively accelerated electron population had a beamed angular distribution in the direction of the electric force along the magnetic field of the small loop. The accelerated particle transport in the big loop was primarily mediated by turbulent waves, which is similar to other reported cold flares.

  14. Ion energy storage for post-flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    Low-energy non-thermal protons may have long lifetimes in coronal loops with low density and high temperature. If energy were stored in such protons in the initial phases of a solar flare, it could be released slowly during the later phases. Within the present observational limits for post-flare loops, this mechanism should be considered in addition to a field-line reconnection theory of the Kopp and Pneuman type. The thin-target gamma ray emission from the trapped protons is below present limits, but more sensitive observations can test the hypothesis.

  15. Imaging X-Ray Polarimeter for Solar Flares (IXPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosack, Michael; Black, J. Kevin; Deines-Jones, Philip; Dennis, Brian R.; Hill, Joanne E.; Jahoda, Keith; Shih, Albert Y.; Urba, Christian E.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design of a balloon-borne Imaging X-ray Polarimeter for Solar flares (IX PS). This novel instrument, a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for photoelectric polarimetry, will be capable of measuring polarization at the few percent level in the 20-50 keV energy range during an M- or X class flare, and will provide imaging information at the approx.10 arcsec level. The primary objective of such observations is to determine the directivity of nonthermal high-energy electrons producing solar hard X-rays, and hence to learn about the particle acceleration and energy release processes in solar flares. Secondary objectives include the separation of the thermal and nonthermal components of the flare X-ray emissions and the separation of photospheric albedo fluxes from direct emissions.

  16. Design of integrated pitch axis for autopilot/autothrottle and integrated lateral axis for autopilot/yaw damper for NASA TSRV airplane using integral LQG methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaminer, Isaac; Benson, Russell A.; Coleman, Edward E.; Ebrahimi, Yaghoob S.

    1990-01-01

    Two designs are presented for control systems for the NASA Transport System Research Vehicle (TSRV) using integral Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) methodology. The first is an integrated longitudinal autopilot/autothrottle design and the second design is an integrated lateral autopilot/yaw damper/sideslip controller design. It is shown that a systematic top-down approach to a complex design problem combined with proper application of modern control synthesis techniques yields a satisfactory solution in a reasonable period of time.

  17. Solar flare discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers the discoveries that have appreciably changed our understanding of the physics of solar flares. A total of 42 discoveries from all disciplines, ranging from Galileo's initial observation of faculae to the recent discovery of strong limb brightening in 10-MeV gamma-radiation, are identified. The rate of discovery increased dramatically over the past four decades as new observational tools became available. The assessment of significance suggests that recent discoveries -though more numerous - are individually less significant; perhaps this is because the minor early discoveries tend to be taken for granted.

  18. Parameterization of solar flare dose

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarche, A.H.; Poston, J.W.

    1996-12-31

    A critical aspect of missions to the moon or Mars will be the safety and health of the crew. Radiation in space is a hazard for astronauts, especially high-energy radiation following certain types of solar flares. A solar flare event can be very dangerous if astronauts are not adequately shielded because flares can deliver a very high dose in a short period of time. The goal of this research was to parameterize solar flare dose as a function of time to see if it was possible to predict solar flare occurrence, thus providing a warning time. This would allow astronauts to take corrective action and avoid receiving a dose greater than the recommended limit set by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP).

  19. Fine Structure in Solar Flares.

    PubMed

    Warren

    2000-06-20

    We present observations of several large two-ribbon flares observed with both the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and the soft X-ray telescope on Yohkoh. The high spatial resolution TRACE observations show that solar flare plasma is generally not confined to a single loop or even a few isolated loops but to a multitude of fine coronal structures. These observations also suggest that the high-temperature flare plasma generally appears diffuse while the cooler ( less, similar2 MK) postflare plasma is looplike. We conjecture that the diffuse appearance of the high-temperature flare emission seen with TRACE is due to a combination of the emission measure structure of these flares and the instrumental temperature response and does not reflect fundamental differences in plasma morphology at the different temperatures.

  20. Solar Flares and the Chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-08-01

    During a solar flare, the chromosphere emits across a large fraction of the electromagnetic spectrum, providing diagnostic information on heating, dynamics and flare energy transport by both thermal and non-thermal means. The evolution of chromospheric ribbons and footpoints also traces the progress of coronal reconnection, and links radiation output with magnetic evolution. Since the chromosphere emits the majority of a flare's radiation, the current emphasis on chromospheric observations by missions such as IRIS, and future large facilities such as the DKIST, is very beneficial to flare research. In this talk I will overview recent developments in observations and theory of flaring chromospheres and make some suggestions about profitable future avenues for research.

  1. Evolution of two Flaring Active Regions With CME Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, J. K.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2008-12-01

    We study the coronal magnetic field structure of two active regions, one during solar activity minimum (June 2007) and another one during a more active time (January 2004). The temporal evolution was explored with the help of nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field extrapolations of SOLIS/VSM and NAOJ/SFT photospheric vector magnetograms. We study the active region NOAA 10960 observed on 2007 June 7 with three SOLIS/VSM snapshots taken during a small C1.0 flare of time cadence 10 minutes and six snapshots during a quiet period. The total magnetic energy in the active region was approximately 3 × 1025 J. Before the flare the free magnetic energy was about 5~% of the potential field energy. A part of this excess energy was released during the flare, producing almost a potential configuration at the beginning of the quiet period. The return to an almost potential structure can be assigned to a CME as recorded by the SoHO/LASCO instrument on 2007 June 07 around 10 minutes after the flare peaked, so that whatever magnetic helicity was bodily removed from the structure. This was compared with active region 10540 observed on 2004 January 18 -- 21, which was analyzed with the help of vector magnetograph data from the Solar Flare Telescope in Japan of time cadence of about 1 day. The free energy was Efree≈ 66~% of the total energy which was sufficiently high to power a M6.1 flare on January 20, which was associated with a CME 20 minutes later. The activity of AR 10540 was significantly higher than for AR 10960, as was the total magnetic energy. Furthermore, we found the common feature that magnetic energy accumulates before the flare/CME and a significant part of the excess energy is released during the eruption.

  2. Gage tests tube flares quickly and accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, F. D.

    1966-01-01

    Flared tube gage with a test cone that is precisely made with a tapering surface to complement the tube flare is capable of determining the accuracy of a tube flare efficiently and economically. This device should improve the speed, efficiency, and accuracy of tube flare inspections.

  3. Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Test of a Flare-type Membrane Aeroshell for Atmospheric Entry Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kazuhiko; Koyama, Masashi; Kimura, Yusuke; Suzuki, Kojiro; Abe, Takashi; Koichi Hayashi, A.

    A flexible aeroshell for atmospheric entry vehicles has attracted attention as an innovative space transportation system. In this study, hypersonic wind tunnel tests were carried out to investigate the behavior, aerodynamic characteristics and aerodynamic heating environment in hypersonic flow for a previously developed capsule-type vehicle with a flare-type membrane aeroshell made of ZYLON textile sustained by a rigid torus frame. Two different models with different flare angles (45º and 60º) were tested to experimentally clarify the effect of flare angle. Results indicate that flare angle of aeroshell has significant and complicate effect on flow field and aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flow at Mach 9.45 and the flare angle is very important parameter for vehicle design with the flare-type membrane aeroshell.

  4. Solar flare predictions and warnings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, K. P., III

    1972-01-01

    The real-time solar monitoring information supplied to support SPARCS equipped rocket launches, the routine collection and analysis of 3.3-mm solar radio maps, short-term flare forecasts based on these maps, longer-term forecasts based on the recurrence of active regions, and an extension of the flare forecasting technique are summarized. Forecasts for expectation of a solar flare of class or = 2F are given and compared with observed flares. A total of 52 plage regions produced all the flares of class or = 1N during the study period. The following results are indicated: of the total of 21 positive forecasts, 3 were correct and 18 were incorrect; of the total of 31 negative forecasts, 3 were incorrect and 28 were correct; of a total of 6 plage regions producing large flares, 3 were correctly forecast and 3 were missed; and of 46 regions not producing any large flares, 18 were incorrectly forecast and 28 were correctly forecast.

  5. SCATTERING POLARIZATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Štěpán, Jiří; Heinzel, Petr

    2013-11-20

    There is ongoing debate about the origin and even the very existence of a high degree of linear polarization of some chromospheric spectral lines observed in solar flares. The standard explanation of these measurements is in terms of the impact polarization caused by non-thermal proton and/or electron beams. In this work, we study the possible role of resonance line polarization due to radiation anisotropy in the inhomogeneous medium of the flare ribbons. We consider a simple two-dimensional model of the flaring chromosphere and we self-consistently solve the non-LTE problem taking into account the role of resonant scattering polarization and of the Hanle effect. Our calculations show that the horizontal plasma inhomogeneities at the boundary of the flare ribbons can lead to a significant radiation anisotropy in the line formation region and, consequently, to a fractional linear polarization of the emergent radiation of the order of several percent. Neglecting the effects of impact polarization, our model can provide a clue for resolving some of the common observational findings, namely: (1) why a high degree of polarization appears mainly at the edges of the flare ribbons; (2) why polarization can also be observed during the gradual phase of a flare; and (3) why polarization is mostly radial or tangential. We conclude that radiation transfer in realistic multi-dimensional models of solar flares needs to be considered as an essential ingredient for understanding the observed spectral line polarization.

  6. The Discriminant Analysis Flare Forecasting System (DAFFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leka, K. D.; Barnes, Graham; Wagner, Eric; Hill, Frank; Marble, Andrew R.

    2016-05-01

    The Discriminant Analysis Flare Forecasting System (DAFFS) has been developed under NOAA/Small Business Innovative Research funds to quantitatively improve upon the NOAA/SWPC flare prediction. In the Phase-I of this project, it was demonstrated that DAFFS could indeed improve by the requested 25% most of the standard flare prediction data products from NOAA/SWPC. In the Phase-II of this project, a prototype has been developed and is presently running autonomously at NWRA.DAFFS uses near-real-time data from NOAA/GOES, SDO/HMI, and the NSO/GONG network to issue both region- and full-disk forecasts of solar flares, based on multi-variable non-parametric Discriminant Analysis. Presently, DAFFS provides forecasts which match those provided by NOAA/SWPC in terms of thresholds and validity periods (including 1-, 2-, and 3- day forecasts), although issued twice daily. Of particular note regarding DAFFS capabilities are the redundant system design, automatically-generated validation statistics and the large range of customizable options available. As part of this poster, a description of the data used, algorithm, performance and customizable options will be presented, as well as a demonstration of the DAFFS prototype.DAFFS development at NWRA is supported by NOAA/SBIR contracts WC-133R-13-CN-0079 and WC-133R-14-CN-0103, with additional support from NASA contract NNH12CG10C, plus acknowledgment to the SDO/HMI and NSO/GONG facilities and NOAA/SWPC personnel for data products, support, and feedback. DAFFS is presently ready for Phase-III development.

  7. [Proposal for an auxiliary tool designed to reduce retake rates for lateral radiography of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Yu; Sato, Hisaya; Ohsawa, Miwa; Takahashi, Kanji; Noda, Chikara; Sai, Syogo; Sukezaki, Fumio; Nakazawa, Yasuo

    2013-10-01

    The reproducibility of lateral radiography of the knee joint in the lateral position is low because patient positioning can be easily affected by passive rotation of the knee joint. We calculated the correction angle of the femoral external rotation and the lower leg elevation and developed our own auxiliary tool for obtaining a lateral view image. We were able to obtain, in a single attempt, an image with misalignment of the condyle limited to less than 7 mm. Our tool also contributed to the reduction of the re-imaging rate, suggesting its usefulness in contributing to a lower re-imaging rate for lateral radiography of the knee joint.

  8. Radiation hydrodynamics in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, G.H.

    1985-10-18

    Solar flares are rather violent and extremely complicated phenomena, and it should be made clear at the outset that a physically complete picture describing all aspects of flares does not exist. From the wealth of data which is available, it is apparent that many different types of physical processes are involved during flares: energetic particle acceleration, rapid magnetohydrodynamic motion of complex field structures, magnetic reconnection, violent mass motion along magnetic field lines, and the heating of plasma to tens of millions of degrees, to name a few. The goal of this paper is to explore just one aspect of solar flares, namely, the interaction of hydrodynamics and radiation processes in fluid being rapidly heated along closed magnetic field lines. The models discussed are therefore necessarily restrictive, and will address only a few of the observed or observable phenomena. 46 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Chandra Monitors the Flaring Crab

    NASA Video Gallery

    Scientists hoped that NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory would locate X-ray sources correlated to the gamma-ray flares seen by Fermi and Italy's AGILE satellites. Two observations were made during th...

  10. Mass ejections. [during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Hildner, E.; Hansen, R. T.; Dryer, M.; Mcclymont, A. N.; Mckenna-Lawlor, S. M. P.; Mclean, D. J.; Schmahl, E. J.; Steinolfson, R. S.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1980-01-01

    Observations and model simulations of solar mass ejection phenomena are examined in an investigation of flare processes. Consideration is given to Skylab and other observations of flare-associated sprays, eruptive prominences, surges and coronal transients, and to MHD, gas dynamic and magnetic loop models developed to account for them. Magnetic forces are found to confine spray material, which originates in preexisting active-region filaments, within steadily expanding loops, while surges follow unmoving, preexisting magnetic field lines. Simulations of effects of a sudden pressure pulse at the bottom of the corona are found to exhibit many characteristics of coronal transients associated with flares, and impulsive heating low in the chromosphere is found to be able to account for surges. The importance of the magnetic field as the ultimate source of energy which drives eruptive phenomena as well as flares is pointed out.

  11. Soft X-Ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, P. J. A.; Hudson, H. S.; Fletcher, L.

    2015-12-01

    The soft X-ray emissions ( hν>1.5 keV) of solar flares mainly come from the bright coronal loops at the highest temperatures normally achieved in the flare process. Their ubiquity has led to their use as a standard measure of flare occurrence and energy, although the overwhelming bulk of the total flare energy goes elsewhere. Recently Dolla et al. ( Astrophys. J. Lett. 749, L16, 2012) noted quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in the soft X-ray signature of the X-class flare SOL2011-02-15, as observed by the standard photometric data from the GOES ( Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) spacecraft. In this article we analyse the suitability of the GOES data for this type of analysis and find them to be generally valuable after September, 2010 (GOES-15). We then extend the result of Dolla et al. to a complete list of X-class flares from Cycle 24 and show that most of them (80 %) display QPPs in the impulsive phase. The pulsations show up cleanly in both channels of the GOES data, making use of time-series of irradiance differences (the digital time derivative on the 2-s sampling). We deploy different techniques to characterise the periodicity of GOES pulsations, considering the red-noise properties of the flare signals, finding a range of characteristic time scales of the QPPs for each event, but usually with no strong signature of a single period dominating in the power spectrum. The QPP may also appear on somewhat longer time scales during the later gradual phase, possibly with a greater tendency towards coherence, but the sampling noise in GOES difference data for high irradiance values (X-class flares) makes these more uncertain. We show that there is minimal phase difference between the differenced GOES energy channels, or between them and the hard X-ray variations on short time scales. During the impulsive phase, the footpoints of the newly forming flare loops may also contribute to the observed soft X-ray variations.

  12. Particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Forman, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    The most direct signatures of particle acceleration in flares are energetic particles detected in interplanetary space and in the Earth atmosphere, and gamma rays, neutrons, hard X-rays, and radio emissions produced by the energetic particles in the solar atmosphere. The stochastic and shock acceleration theories in flares are reviewed and the implications of observations on particle energy spectra, particle confinement and escape, multiple acceleration phases, particle anistropies, and solar atmospheric abundances are discussed.

  13. Simulating VIIRS Observed Gas Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, F. C.

    2015-12-01

    VIIRS Nightfire (VNF) had been proved being able to effectively detect gas flares at night, and characterize their temperature and source size. [1] However, limited access to generally confidential gas flare operation measurements made it difficult to verify the output. Although flared gas volume is occasionally available, it is not common to log the temperature and flames size which directly links to VNF output. To understand the mechanism of gas flare and how VIIRS perceives the event, a platform is proposed to simulate the gas flare being observed by VIIRS. The methodology can be described in three steps. (1) Use CFD simulation software ISIS-3D to simulate a simple gas flare. [2] Scalar fields of temperature and species concentration related to combustion are extracted from the simulation. The instantaneous scalar can be determined from time-averaging or guess by stochastic time and space series (TASS) from single-point statistics [3]. (2) Model spectral radiance intensity of simulated gas flare using RADCAL. [4] RADCAL developed by NIST can accurately model the spectral radiance emitted on the direction of lineof-sight given the spatial profile of temperature and concentration of species. (3) Use radiative transfer modeling to calculate the energy propagated to VIIRS. The modeled radiation will then be weighted by the MODTRAN [5] modeled transmissivity over predefined atmosphere to the satellite, with geometrical effects considered. Such platform can help understanding how exactly VNF is measuring gas flares, and thus lead to more precise characterization of combustion events. [1] C. D. Elvidge et al, Remote Sensing, 2013[2] IRSN ISIS-3D[3] M. E. Kounalakis et al, ASME J. Heat Transfer, 1991 [4] W. L. Grosshandler, NIST Technical Note 1402, 1993 [5] A. Berk et al, MODTRAN 5.2.0.0 User's Manual

  14. Rapid fluctuations in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, Peter A.

    1986-01-01

    Study of rapid fluctuations in the emission of radiation from solar flares provides a promising approach for probing the magneto-plasma structure and plasma processes that are responsible for a flare. It is proposed that elementary flare bursts in X-ray and microwave emission may be attributed to fine structure of the coronal magnetic field, related to the aggregation of photospheric magnetic field into magnetic knots. Fluctuations that occur on a subsecond time-scale may be due to magnetic islands that develop in current sheets during magnetic reconnection. The impulsive phase may sometimes represent the superposition of a large number of the elementary energy-release processes responsible for elementary flare bursts. If so, the challenge of trying to explain the properties of the impulsive phase in terms of the properties of the elementary processes must be faced. Magnetic field configurations that might produce solar flares are divided into a number of categories, depending on: whether or not there is a filament; whether there is no current sheet, a closed current sheet, or an open current sheet; and whether the filament erupts into the corona, or is ejected completely from the Sun's atmosphere. Analysis of the properties of these possible configurations is compared with different types of flares, and to Bai's subdivision of gamma-ray/proton events.

  15. F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) parameter identification flight test maneuvers for optimal input design validation and lateral control effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1995-01-01

    Flight test maneuvers are specified for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The maneuvers were designed for open loop parameter identification purposes, specifically for optimal input design validation at 5 degrees angle of attack, identification of individual strake effectiveness at 40 and 50 degrees angle of attack, and study of lateral dynamics and lateral control effectiveness at 40 and 50 degrees angle of attack. Each maneuver is to be realized by applying square wave inputs to specific control effectors using the On-Board Excitation System (OBES). Maneuver descriptions and complete specifications of the time/amplitude points define each input are included, along with plots of the input time histories.

  16. Analysis of flares in the chromosphere and corona of main- and pre-main-sequence M-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Chacón, I.

    2015-11-01

    having an accretion disk) we carry out a detailed analysis of an extremely long rise phase and of a shorter, weaker flare (allowing us to compare the results with those reported for young stars but surrounded by disks). Assuming multitemperature models to describe the coronal flaring plasma, we have calculated the metal abundance, the electron temperatures and the respective emission measures by fitting the spectra with the Astrophysical Plasma Emission Code included in the XSPEC software, which calculates spectral models for hot, optically thin plasmas. Moreover, we are able to estimate the size of the flaring loops by using theoretical models. These sizes give us an idea about the extent of the corona. For those flares in which heating does not entirely drive the flare evolution we use the models reported by Reale (2007) and Reale et al. (1997) for the rise and decay phases, respectively, including the effect of sustained heating during the decay. Instead, the stellar version of the Kopp & Poletto (1984)'s solar two-ribbon flare model (Poletto et al. 1988) is used when the residual heating completely drives the flare over the plasma cooling. Later, we apply the so-called RTV scaling laws (Rosner et al. 1978) and other fundamental laws of physics to determine additional characteristics of the plasma contained in the flaring loops (electron density and pressure), as well as the volume of the flaring region, the heating rate per unit volume, and the strength of the magnetic field required to confine this plasma. Making some assumptions we are also able to estimate the number of loops involved in the observed flares and the kind of magnetic structures present in the atmosphere of these types of stars. Finally, we discuss and interpret the results in the context of solar and stellar flares reported so far.

  17. A comparative study between clinical grading of anterior chamber flare and flare reading using the Kowa laser flare meter.

    PubMed

    Konstantopoulou, Kallirroi; Del'Omo, Roberto; Morley, Anne M; Karagiannis, Dimitris; Bunce, Catey; Pavesio, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    To assess the accuracy of standard clinical grading of aqueous flare in uveitis according to the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature consensus, and compare the results with the readings of the laser flare meter, Kowa 500. Two examiners clinically graded the flare in 110 eyes. The flare was then measured using the Kowa laser flare meter. Twenty-nine eyes were graded as anterior chamber flare +2; for 18 of these, the clinicians were in agreement, the rest differed by the order of one grade. The range of the laser flare meter for these eyes was 5.2-899.1 photons/ms. The median value was 41.4. Seventy-four eyes were graded with flare +1. Agreement was established in 51 of these eyes. Disagreement for the rest was again by the order of 1, and the flare meter range was 1.1-169.9 photons/ms, median value 18.4. For the clinical measure of flare 0, the clinicians disagreed on three out of five eyes. The flare meter readings ranged from 2.5 to 14.1 photons/ms, median value 9.9. Only two eyes were graded with flare +3 and there was one step disagreement on both of them. We found little evidence of association between the flare readings and intraocular pressure or age. Our findings suggest that clinical evaluation of aqueous flare is subjective. Compared with the Kowa laser flare meter's numeric readings, the discrepancies observed indicate that clinical grading is an approximate science. The laser flare meter provides an accurate, reproducible, non-invasive assessment of aqueous flare that can prove valuable in research and clinical decisions.

  18. Optical follow-up of ongoing flaring of BL Lacertae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, S.; Ganesh, S.; Baliyan, K. S.; Ahmad, N.; Jain, J. K.; Rajpurohit, G. S.

    2013-11-01

    We report the optical photometry of blazar BL Lacertae and confirm its ongoing flaring activity. This object was reported with flux enhancements in H band observations (ATel #5518, Carrasco et al). Later observations reported by many other groups present an increasing trend in NIR/Optical flux starting from mid October, 2013 (ATel 5550,5558). Historical peak flux was reported by Larionov et al. (ATel:#5597, R~12.34 mag) on 23rd November 2013.

  19. Status and Plans for the FLARE (Facility for Laboratory Reconnection Experiments) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, H.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Prager, S.; Daughton, W.; Bale, S.; Carter, T.; Crocker, N.; Drake, J.; Egedal, J.; Sarff, J.; Wallace, J.; Chen, Y.; Cutler, R.; Fox, W.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Kalish, M.; Jara-Almonte, J.; Myers, C.; Ren, Y.; Yamada, M.; Yoo, J.

    2015-11-01

    The FLARE device (flare.pppl.gov) is a new intermediate-scale plasma experiment under construction at Princeton to study magnetic reconnection in regimes directly relevant to space, solar, astrophysical, and fusion plasmas. The existing small-scale experiments have been focusing on the single X-line reconnection process either with small effective sizes or at low Lundquist numbers, but both of which are typically very large in natural and fusion plasmas. The design of the FLARE device is motivated to provide experimental access to the new regimes involving multiple X-lines, as guided by a reconnection ``phase diagram'' [Ji & Daughton, PoP (2011)]. Most of major components of the FLARE device have been designed and are under construction. The device will be assembled and installed in 2016, followed by commissioning and operation in 2017. The planned research on FLARE as a user facility will be discussed. Supported by NSF.

  20. Starspots on flare stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Sizes of starspots on flare stars can be derived from the author's convection-cell hypothesis. The sizes are in fair agreement with those observed on YY Gem, CC Eri, and BY Dra by Bopp and Evans (1973). The hypothesis predicts that periodic brightness variations due to starspots are restricted to stars brighter than a critical absolute visual magnitude. A convective model of a starspot on YY Gem has been computed, assuming that the missing flux is in the form of Alfven waves. It is found that the surface field must exceed 10,000 G, and is probably less than about 30,000 G. With a surface field of 20,000 G, the effective temperature of the spot is in the range from 1590 to 1890 K, depending on the field gradient. These figures are to be compared with an effective temperature of 2000 K estimated from observations by Bopp and Evans. Efficient dynamo action is shown to be a possible mechanism for generating such large surface fields. There is a possibility that tidal effects may influence starspot formation.

  1. The Natural History of Flare-Ups in Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva (FOP): A Comprehensive Global Assessment.

    PubMed

    Pignolo, Robert J; Bedford-Gay, Christopher; Liljesthröm, Moira; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe P; Shore, Eileen M; Rocke, David M; Kaplan, Frederick S

    2016-03-01

    glucocorticoids. This study is the first comprehensive global assessment of FOP flare-ups and establishes a critical foundation for the design and evaluation of future clinical trials.

  2. 3-D Structure of Arcade Type Flares Deduced from Soft X-Ray Observations of a Homologous Flare Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, S.; Uchida, Y.; Hirose, S.

    2002-01-01

    In the solar flare problems, no ultimate model that matches observations has been established. One of the reasons for this is due to the restrictions in the observational data lacking information about the third dimension. Thus, many researchers have tried to get information about the three dimensional (3-D) coronal structures by using various techniques or ideas; like movie analysis, calculations using vector or line-of-sight components of photospheric magnetic data, and etc.. In the near future, a mission named STEREO which will obtain information about the 3-D coronal structures from two satellites, is planned. In the present paper, we noted the homology in a homologous flare series of February 1992. We derived a 3-D coronal structures by making use of the images obtained from the three different sight-lines at some common phases in them with Yohkoh SXT. The result of this analysis has made it clear that the so-called ``cusped arcade'' at the maximum phase in the well-known 1992 February 21 flare is, contrary to the general views, an ``elongated arch'' seen with a shallow oblique angle. It is not the ``flare arcade'' seen axis-on as widely conceived. This elongated arch coincides roughly with a diagonal of the main body of the "soft X-ray arcade" that came up later. The magnetic structure causing the flare as a whole turned out in this analysis to be a structure with quadruple magnetic sources. The relative locations of these four characteristic sources stayed almost the same throughout the period of this homologous flare series, determining the fundamental shape of this homologous series. We also examined the corresponding features for other similar events, also using information from other satellites, and will report the results.

  3. Rapid TeV Gamma-Ray Flaring of BL Lacertae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Dumm, J.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Humensky, T. B.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Maier, G.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nelson, T.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Orr, M.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Saxon, D. B.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tešić, G.; Theiling, M.; Tsurusaki, K.; Varlotta, A.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Welsing, R.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.; VERITAS Collaboration; Jorstad, S. G.; MacDonald, N. R.; Marscher, A. P.; Smith, P. S.; Walker, R. C.; Hovatta, T.; Richards, J.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Readhead, A.; Lister, M. L.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Pushkarev, A. B.; Gurwell, M. A.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Nieppola, E.; Tornikoski, M.; Järvelä, E.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the detection of a very rapid TeV gamma-ray flare from BL Lacertae on 2011 June 28 with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS). The flaring activity was observed during a 34.6 minute exposure, when the integral flux above 200 GeV reached (3.4 ± 0.6) × 10-6 photons m-2 s-1, roughly 125% of the Crab Nebula flux measured by VERITAS. The light curve indicates that the observations missed the rising phase of the flare but covered a significant portion of the decaying phase. The exponential decay time was determined to be 13 ± 4 minutes, making it one of the most rapid gamma-ray flares seen from a TeV blazar. The gamma-ray spectrum of BL Lacertae during the flare was soft, with a photon index of 3.6 ± 0.4, which is in agreement with the measurement made previously by MAGIC in a lower flaring state. Contemporaneous radio observations of the source with the Very Long Baseline Array revealed the emergence of a new, superluminal component from the core around the time of the TeV gamma-ray flare, accompanied by changes in the optical polarization angle. Changes in flux also appear to have occurred at optical, UV, and GeV gamma-ray wavelengths at the time of the flare, although they are difficult to quantify precisely due to sparse coverage. A strong flare was seen at radio wavelengths roughly four months later, which might be related to the gamma-ray flaring activities. We discuss the implications of these multiwavelength results.

  4. Spectrometers for fast neutrons from solar flares.

    PubMed

    Slobodrian, R J; Potvin, L; Rioux, C

    1994-10-01

    Neutrons with energies exceeding 1 GeV are emitted in the course of solar flares. Suitable dedicated neutron spectrometers with directional characteristics are necessary for a systematic spectroscopy of solar neutrons. We report here a study of instruments based on the detection of proton recoils from hydrogenous media, with double scattering in order to provide directional information, and also a novel scheme based on the detection of radiation from the neutron magnetic dipole moment, permitting also directional detection of neutrons. Specific designs and detection systems are discussed.

  5. THE SOLAR FLARE IRON ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Dennis, B. R. E-mail: Brian.R.Dennis@nasa.gov

    2012-03-20

    The abundance of iron is measured from emission line complexes at 6.65 keV (Fe line) and 8 keV (Fe/Ni line) in RHESSI X-ray spectra during solar flares. Spectra during long-duration flares with steady declines were selected, with an isothermal assumption and improved data analysis methods over previous work. Two spectral fitting models give comparable results, viz., an iron abundance that is lower than previous coronal values but higher than photospheric values. In the preferred method, the estimated Fe abundance is A(Fe) = 7.91 {+-} 0.10 (on a logarithmic scale, with A(H) = 12) or 2.6 {+-} 0.6 times the photospheric Fe abundance. Our estimate is based on a detailed analysis of 1898 spectra taken during 20 flares. No variation from flare to flare is indicated. This argues for a fractionation mechanism similar to quiet-Sun plasma. The new value of A(Fe) has important implications for radiation loss curves, which are estimated.

  6. Largest Solar Flare on Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The largest solar flare ever recorded occurred at 4:51 p.m. EDT, on Monday, April 2, 2001. as Observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. Solar flares, among the solar systems mightiest eruptions, are tremendous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun capable of releasing as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT. Caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy, in just a few seconds, solar flares can accelerate solar particles to very high velocities, almost to the speed of light, and heat solar material to tens of millions of degrees. The recent explosion from the active region near the sun's northwest limb hurled a coronal mass ejection into space at a whopping speed of roughly 7.2 million kilometers per hour. Luckily, the flare was not aimed directly towards Earth. Second to the most severe R5 classification of radio blackout, this flare produced an R4 blackout as rated by the NOAA SEC. This classification measures the disruption in radio communications. Launched December 2, 1995 atop an ATLAS-IIAS expendable launch vehicle, the SOHO is a cooperative effort involving NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). (Image courtesy NASA Goddard SOHO Project office)

  7. Astrophysics: Unexpected X-ray flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    Two sources of highly energetic flares have been discovered in archival X-ray data of 70 nearby galaxies. These flares have an undetermined origin and might represent previously unknown astrophysical phenomena. See Letter p.356

  8. What's an Asthma Flare-Up?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy What's an Asthma Flare-Up? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's an Asthma ... of a straw that's being pinched. Causes of Asthma Flare-Ups People with asthma have airways that ...

  9. The Flare Genesis Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    Using the Flare Genesis Experiment (FGE), a balloon-borne observatory with an 80-cm solar telescope we observed the active region NOAA 8844 on January 25, 2000 for several hours. FGE was equipped with a vector polarimeter and a tunable Fabry-Perot narrow-band filter. It recorded time series of filtergrams, vector magnetograms, and Dopplergrams at the Ca(I) 6122.2 angstrom line, and H-alpha filtergrams with a cadence between 2.5 and 7.5 minutes. At the time of the observations, NOAA 8844 was located at approximately 5 N 30 W. The region was rapidly growing during the observations; new magnetic flux was constantly emerging in three supergranules near its center. We describe in detail how the FGE data were analyzed and report on the structure and behavior of peculiar moving dipolar features (MDFs) observed in the active region. In longitudinal magnetograms, the MDFs appeared to be small dipoles in the emerging fields. The east-west orientation of their polarities was opposite that of the sunspots. The dipoles were oriented parallel to their direction of motion, which was in most cases towards the sunspots. Previously, dipolar moving magnetic features have only been observed flowing out from sunspots. Vector magnetograms show that the magnetic field of each MDF negative part was less inclined to the local horizontal than the ones of the positive part. We identify the MDFs as undulations, or stitches, where the emerging flux ropes are still tied to the photosphere. We present a U-loop model that can account for their unusual structure and behavior, and it shows how emerging flux can shed its entrained mass.

  10. Chasing White-Light Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    2016-05-01

    In this memoir I describe my life in research, mostly in the area of solar physics. The recurring theme is "white-light flares," and several sections of this paper deal with this and related phenomena; I wind up describing how I see the state of the art in this still-interesting and crucially important (as it has been since 1859) area of flare research. I also describe my participation in two long-lived satellite programs dedicated to solar observations ( Yohkoh and RHESSI) and elaborate on their discoveries. These have both helped with white-light flares both directly and also with closely related X-ray and γ-ray emissions), with the result that this article leans heavily in that direction.

  11. 6Li from Solar Flares.

    PubMed

    Ramaty; Tatischeff; Thibaud; Kozlovsky; Mandzhavidze

    2000-05-10

    By introducing a hitherto ignored 6Li producing process, due to accelerated 3He reactions with 4He, we show that accelerated particle interactions in solar flares produce much more 6Li than 7Li. By normalizing our calculations to gamma-ray data, we demonstrate that the 6Li produced in solar flares, combined with photospheric 7Li, can account for the recently determined solar wind lithium isotopic ratio, obtained from measurements in lunar soil, provided that the bulk of the flare-produced lithium is evacuated by the solar wind. Further research in this area could provide unique information on a variety of problems, including solar atmospheric transport and mixing, solar convection and the lithium depletion issue, and solar wind and solar particle acceleration.

  12. The smallest hard X-ray flare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Sam; Hannah, Iain; Smith, David M.; Grefenstette, Brian; Marsh, Andrew; Hudson, Hugh S.; White, Stephen M.; Chen, Bin

    2016-05-01

    We report a NuSTAR observation of a small solar flare on 2015 September 1, estimated to be on the order of a GOES class A.05 flare in brightness. This flare is fainter than any hard X-ray (HXR) flares in the existing literature, and with a peak rate of only ˜5 counts s-1 detector-1 observed by RHESSI, is effectively the smallest that can just barely be detected by the current standard (indirectly imaging) solar HXR instrumentation, though we expect that smaller flares will continue to be discovered as instrumental and observational techniques progress. The flare occurred during a solar observation by the highly sensitive NuSTAR astrophysical HXR spacecraft, which used its direct focusing optics to produce detailed flare spectra and images. The flare exhibits properties commonly observed in larger flares, including a fast rise and more gradual decay, and similar spatial dimensions to the RHESSI microflares. We will discuss the presence of non-thermal (flare-accelerated) electrons during the impulsive phase. The flare is small in emission measure, temperature, and energy, though not in physical dimensions. Its presence is an indication that flares do indeed scale down to smaller energies and retain what we customarily think of as “flarelike” properties.

  13. Forming tool improves quality of tubing flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Punch and die set improves the quality of tubing flares for use with standard flared-tube fittings in high-pressure systems. It forges a dimensionally accurate flare in the tubing and forces more tubing material into the high-stress areas to improve the strength and tightness of the tubing connection.

  14. Arches showing UV flaring activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The UVSP data obtained in the previous maximum activity cycle show the frequent appearance of flaring events in the UV. In many cases these flaring events are characterized by at least two footpoints which show compact impulsive non-simultaneous brightenings and a fainter but clearly observed arch developes between the footpoints. These arches and footpoints are observed in line corresponding to different temperatures, as Lyman alpha, N V, and C IV, and when observed above the limb display large Doppler shifts at some stages. The size of the arches can be larger than 20 arcsec.

  15. Relationship between Hyperactivity of Depressor Septi Nasi Muscle and Changes of Alar Base and Flaring during Smile

    PubMed Central

    Beiraghi-Toosi, Arash; Rezaei, Ezatollah; Zanjani, Elham

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hyperactivity of depressor septi nasi muscle leads to smiling deformity and nasal tip depression. Lateral fascicles of this muscle help in widening the nostrils. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the nasal length changes and the alar base and the alar flaring changes during smile. METHODS Standard photographs are performed in the face and lateral views with forward gaze in the repose and maximum smile. Nasal length, alar base, and alar flaring were measured on the prints of the photographs. To decrease possible errors in the size of the printed photographs, middle face height from glabella to ANS was measured in the lateral view and the interpupil distance in the face view to standardize the measurements. RESULTS Fifty cases were enrolled in this study. In 39 cases (78%), the nasal length was increased during smile. Forty-six cases (92%) had an increase in alar base diameter during smile. Alar flaring during smile increased in 48 cases (96%). Nasal length and alar base changes during smiling were not significantly correlated. Nasal length and alar flaring changes during smiling were not significantly related too. On the other hand, alar base and alar flaring changes during smile showed correlation. Alar base and alar flaring changes during smile were not significantly different in hyperactive and non-hyperactive cases. CONCLUSION Nasal length change during smiling and hypertrophy of the medial fascicles of depressor septi nasi were not related to alar base or alar flaring change during smile. PMID:27308240

  16. A dynamic flare with anomalously dense flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svestka, Z.; Fontenla, J. M.; Machado, M. E.; Martin, S. F.; Neidig, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    The dynamic flare of November 6, 1980 developed a rich system of growing loops which could be followed in H-alpha for 1.5 hours. Throughout the flare, these loops, near the limb, were seen in emission against the disk. Theoretical computations of b-values for a hydrogen atom reveal that this requires electron densities in the loops to be close to 10 to the 12th per cu cm. From measured widths of higher Balmer lines the density at the tops of the loops was found to be 4 x 10 to the 12th per cu cm if no nonthermal motions were present. It is now general knowledge that flare loops are initially observed in X-rays and become visible in H-alpha only after cooling. For such a high density a loop would cool through radiation from 10 to the 7th K to 10 to the 4th K within a few minutes so that the dense H-alpha loops should have heights very close to the heights of the X-ray loops. This, however, contradicts the observations obtained by the HXIS and FCS instruments on board SMM which show the X-ray loops at much higher altitudes than the loops in H-alpha. Therefore, the density must have been significantly smaller when the loops were formed and the flare loops were apparently both shrinking and becoming denser while cooling.

  17. PREDICTION OF SOLAR FLARE SIZE AND TIME-TO-FLARE USING SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINE REGRESSION

    SciTech Connect

    Boucheron, Laura E.; Al-Ghraibah, Amani; McAteer, R. T. James

    2015-10-10

    We study the prediction of solar flare size and time-to-flare using 38 features describing magnetic complexity of the photospheric magnetic field. This work uses support vector regression to formulate a mapping from the 38-dimensional feature space to a continuous-valued label vector representing flare size or time-to-flare. When we consider flaring regions only, we find an average error in estimating flare size of approximately half a geostationary operational environmental satellite (GOES) class. When we additionally consider non-flaring regions, we find an increased average error of approximately three-fourths a GOES class. We also consider thresholding the regressed flare size for the experiment containing both flaring and non-flaring regions and find a true positive rate of 0.69 and a true negative rate of 0.86 for flare prediction. The results for both of these size regression experiments are consistent across a wide range of predictive time windows, indicating that the magnetic complexity features may be persistent in appearance long before flare activity. This is supported by our larger error rates of some 40 hr in the time-to-flare regression problem. The 38 magnetic complexity features considered here appear to have discriminative potential for flare size, but their persistence in time makes them less discriminative for the time-to-flare problem.

  18. The Interface of Creativity, Fluency, Lateral Thinking, and Technology While Designing Serious Educational Games in a Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Richard; Annetta, Leonard; Vallett, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Creativity is the production of the new, original, unique, and divergent products and ideas mediated through lateral thinking. Evidence suggests that high levels of creativity and fluency are important in the continued development of student interest, efficacy and ultimately career impact in the sciences. Method: In this study, 559…

  19. Biggest Solar Flare on Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    View an animation from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT). At 4:51 p.m. EDT, on Monday, April 2, 2001, the sun unleashed the biggest solar flare ever recorded, as observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. The flare was definitely more powerful than the famous solar flare on March 6, 1989, which was related to the disruption of power grids in Canada. This recent explosion from the active region near the sun's northwest limb hurled a coronal mass ejection into space at a whopping speed of roughly 7.2 million kilometers per hour. Luckily, the flare was not aimed directly towards Earth. Solar flares, among the solar system's mightiest eruptions, are tremendous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun capable of releasing as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT. Caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy, in just a few seconds flares can accelerate solar particles to very high velocities, almost to the speed of light, and heat solar material to tens of millions of degrees. Solar ejections are often associated with flares and sometimes occur shortly after the flare explosion. Coronal mass ejections are clouds of electrified, magnetic gas weighing billions of tons ejected from the Sun and hurled into space with speeds ranging from 12 to 1,250 miles per second. Depending on the orientation of the magnetic fields carried by the ejection cloud, Earth-directed coronal mass ejections cause magnetic storms by interacting with the Earth's magnetic field, distorting its shape, and accelerating electrically charged particles (electrons and atomic nuclei) trapped within. Severe solar weather is often heralded by dramatic auroral displays, northern and southern lights, and magnetic storms that occasionally affect satellites, radio communications and power systems. The flare and solar ejection has also generated a storm of high-velocity particles, and the number of particles with ten million electron-volts of energy in the space near

  20. 46 CFR 56.30-25 - Flared, flareless, and compression fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... devices, and shape memory alloys. Fittings to which this section applies must be designed, constructed... copper nickel alloy. When using copper or copper zinc alloy, flared fittings are required. (See also §...

  1. 46 CFR 56.30-25 - Flared, flareless, and compression fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... devices, and shape memory alloys. Fittings to which this section applies must be designed, constructed... copper nickel alloy. When using copper or copper zinc alloy, flared fittings are required. (See also §...

  2. Large-scale brightenings associated with flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandrini, Cristina H.; Machado, Marcos E.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that large-scale brightenings (LSBs) associated with solar flares, similar to the 'giant arches' discovered by Svestka et al. (1982) in images obtained by the SSM HXIS hours after the onset of two-ribbon flares, can also occur in association with confined flares in complex active regions. For these events, a clear link between the LSB and the underlying flare is clearly evident from the active-region magnetic field topology. The implications of these findings are discussed within the framework of the interacting loops of flares and the giant arch phenomenology.

  3. X-Ray Flaring on the dMe Star, Ross 154

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wargelin, B. J.; Kashyap, V. L.; Drake, J. J.; García-Alvarez, D.; Ratzlaff, P. W.

    2008-03-01

    We present results from two Chandra imaging observations of Ross 154, a nearby flaring M dwarf star. During a 61 ks ACIS-S exposure, a very large flare occurred (the equivalent of a solar X3400 event, with LX = 1.8 × 1030 ergs s-1) in which the count rate increased by a factor of over 100. The early phase of the flare shows evidence for the Neupert effect, followed by a further rise and then a two-component exponential decay. A large flare was also observed at the end of a later 48 ks HRC-I observation. Emission from the nonflaring phases of both observations was analyzed for evidence of low-level flaring. From these temporal studies we find that microflaring probably accounts for most of the "quiescent" emission and that, unlike for the Sun and the handful of other stars that have been studied, the distribution of flare intensities does not appear to follow a power law with a single index. Analysis of the ACIS spectra, which was complicated by exclusion of the heavily piled-up source core, suggests that the quiescent Ne/O abundance ratio is enhanced by a factor of ~2.5 compared to the commonly adopted solar abundance ratio and that the Ne/O ratio and overall coronal metallicity during the flare appear to be enhanced relative to quiescent abundances. Based on the temperatures and emission measures derived from the spectral fits, we estimate the length scales and plasma densities in the flaring volume and also track the evolution of the flare in color-intensity space. Lastly, we searched for a stellar wind charge exchange X-ray halo around the star but without success; because of the relationship between mass-loss rate and the halo surface brightness, not even an upper limit on the stellar mass-loss rate can be determined.

  4. Magnetic Reconnection in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Terry G.

    2016-05-01

    Reconnection has at least three possible roles in solar flares: First, it may contribute to the build-up of magnetic energy in the solar corona prior to flare onset; second, it may directly trigger the onset of the flare; and third, it may allow the release of magnetic energy by relaxing the magnetic field configuration to a lower energy state. Although observational support for the first two roles is somewhat limited, there is now ample support for the third. Within the last few years EUV and X-ray instruments have directly observed the kind of plasma flows and heating indicative of reconnection. Continued improvements in instrumentation will greatly help to determine the detailed physics of the reconnection process in the solar atmosphere. Careful measurement of the reconnection outflows will be especially helpful in this regard. Current observations suggest that in some flares the jet outflows are accelerated within a short diffusion region that is more characteristic of Petschek-type reconnection than Sweet-Parker reconnection. Recent resistive MHD theoretical and numerical analyses predict that the length of the diffusion region should be just within the resolution range of current X-ray and EUV telescopes if the resistivity is uniform. On the other hand, if the resistivity is not uniform, the length of the diffusion region could be too short for the outflow acceleration region to be observable.

  5. Solar Flare Aimed at Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    At the height of the solar cycle, the Sun is finally displaying some fireworks. This image from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) shows a large solar flare from June 6, 2000 at 1424 Universal Time (10:24 AM Eastern Daylight Savings Time). Associated with the flare was a coronal mass ejection that sent a wave of fast moving charged particles straight towards Earth. (The image was acquired by the Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), one of 12 instruments aboard SOHO) Solar activity affects the Earth in several ways. The particles generated by flares can disrupt satellite communications and interfere with power transmission on the Earth's surface. Earth's climate is tied to the total energy emitted by the sun, cooling when the sun radiates less energy and warming when solar output increases. Solar radiation also produces ozone in the stratosphere, so total ozone levels tend to increase during the solar maximum. For more information about these solar flares and the SOHO mission, see NASA Science News or the SOHO home page. For more about the links between the sun and climate change, see Sunspots and the Solar Max. Image courtesy SOHO Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope, ESA/NASA

  6. Sunspot 1504 is Spitting Flares

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) shows the M class flare on June 14, 2012 from 9:15 AM to 2:00 PM EDT. The sun is shown here in teal as this is the color typically used to repre...

  7. A FLARE for the Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aschbacher, Pamela

    1996-01-01

    Although arts programs have been cut from many school budgets, an innovative program in Pasadena, California, is keeping art and artists in classrooms. Project FLARE (Fun with Language, Arts, and Reading) pairs classroom teachers with local artists, who together develop an integrated language and visual arts curriculum. Students also take field…

  8. KEPLER FLARES. II. THE TEMPORAL MORPHOLOGY OF WHITE-LIGHT FLARES ON GJ 1243

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, James R. A.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Johnson, Emily C.; Peraza, Jesus; Jansen, Tiffany C.; Larsen, Daniel M.; Hebb, Leslie; Wisniewski, John P.; Malatesta, Michael; Keil, Marcus; Silverberg, Steven M.; Scheffler, Matthew S.; Berdis, Jodi R.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Hilton, Eric J.

    2014-12-20

    We present the largest sample of flares ever compiled for a single M dwarf, the active M4 star GJ 1243. Over 6100 individual flare events, with energies ranging from 10{sup 29} to 10{sup 33} erg, are found in 11 months of 1 minute cadence data from Kepler. This sample is unique for its completeness and dynamic range. We have developed automated tools for finding flares in short-cadence Kepler light curves, and performed extensive validation and classification of the sample by eye. From this pristine sample of flares we generate a median flare template. This template shows that two exponential cooling phases are present during the white-light flare decay, providing fundamental constraints for models of flare physics. The template is also used as a basis function to decompose complex multi-peaked flares, allowing us to study the energy distribution of these events. Only a small number of flare events are not well fit by our template. We find that complex, multi-peaked flares occur in over 80% of flares with a duration of 50 minutes or greater. The underlying distribution of flare durations for events 10 minutes and longer appears to follow a broken power law. Our results support the idea that sympathetic flaring may be responsible for some complex flare events.

  9. Statistical study of spatio-temporal distribution of precursor solar flares associated with major flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyenge, N.; Ballai, I.; Baranyi, T.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to study the spatio-temporal distribution of precursor flares during the 24 h interval preceding M- and X-class major flares and the evolution of follower flares. Information on associated (precursor and follower) flares is provided by Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Flare list, while the major flares are observed by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) system satellites between 2002 and 2014. There are distinct evolutionary differences between the spatio-temporal distributions of associated flares in about one-day period depending on the type of the main flare. The spatial distribution was characterized by the normalized frequency distribution of the quantity δ (the distance between the major flare and its precursor flare normalized by the sunspot group diameter) in four 6 h time intervals before the major event. The precursors of X-class flares have a double-peaked spatial distribution for more than half a day prior to the major flare, but it changes to a lognormal-like distribution roughly 6 h prior to the event. The precursors of M-class flares show lognormal-like distribution in each 6 h subinterval. The most frequent sites of the precursors in the active region are within a distance of about 0.1 diameter of sunspot group from the site of the major flare in each case. Our investigation shows that the build-up of energy is more effective than the release of energy because of precursors.

  10. An extended superhot solar flare X-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Ohki, K. I.; Tsuneta, S.

    1985-01-01

    A superhot hard X-ray source in a solar flare occulted by the solar limb was identified. Its hard X-ray image was found to show great horizontal extent but little vertical extent. An H alpha brightening at the same limb position about an hour later suggests a multi-component loop prominence system, so that it appears that a superhot source can evolve in the same manner as a normal solar soft X-ray source. The assignment of plausiable values to physical parameters in the source suggests (from the simplest form of classical thermal-conduction theory) that either new physics will be required to suppress conduction, or else that gradual energy release well after the impulsive phase of the flare must occur. In this respect too, the superhot source appears to resemble ordinary soft X-ray sources, except of course that its temperature is higher.

  11. An extended superhot solar flare X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Ohki, K. I.; Tsuneta, S.

    1985-08-01

    A superhot hard X-ray source in a solar flare occulted by the solar limb was identified. Its hard X-ray image was found to show great horizontal extent but little vertical extent. An H alpha brightening at the same limb position about an hour later suggests a multi-component loop prominence system, so that it appears that a superhot source can evolve in the same manner as a normal solar soft X-ray source. The assignment of plausiable values to physical parameters in the source suggests (from the simplest form of classical thermal-conduction theory) that either new physics will be required to suppress conduction, or else that gradual energy release well after the impulsive phase of the flare must occur. In this respect too, the superhot source appears to resemble ordinary soft X-ray sources, except of course that its temperature is higher.

  12. Comparative study of flare control laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadkarni, A. A.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a digital, three dimensional, automatic control law designed to achieve an optimal transition of a B-737 aircraft between glide slope conditions and the desired final touchdown condition is presented. The digital control law is a time invariant, state estimate feedback law, and the design is capable of using the microwave landing system. Major emphasis is placed on the reduction of aircraft noise in communities surroundings airports, the reduction of fuel consumption, the reduction of the effects of adverse weather conditions on aircraft operations, and the efficient use of airspace in congested terminal areas. Attention is also given to the development of the capability to perform automatic flares from steep glide slopes to precise touchdown locations.

  13. Flare-antenna unit for system in which flare is remotely activated by radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltz, Frederick F.; Wilson, Charles E.

    1995-06-01

    A flare-antenna assembly has flare material enclosed in a cylindrical antenna and forms part of a marker beacon. The flare aids in the search for the marker beacon by providing means for both visual and infrared detection. The flare is actuated in response to a specific remote radio signal being received by the antenna. The received signal is decoded by the electronic system within the marker beacon. If the received signal meets the necessary criteria the electronic system generates an electrical signal that detonates a squib embedded in the flare material. The detonation of the squib activates the flare.

  14. Over-and-Out Coronal Mass Ejections: Blowouts of Magnetic Arches by Ejective Flares in One Foot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2006-01-01

    Streamer puffs from compact ejective flares in the foot of an outer loop of the magnetic arcade under a streamer were recently identified as a new variety of coronal mass ejection (CME) (Bemporad, Sterling, Moore, & Poletto 2006, ApJ Letters, in press). In the reported examples, the compact flares produced only weak to moderate soft X-ray bursts having peak intensities no stronger than GOES class C3. Here, we present two examples of this type of CME in which the compact flare in the flank of the steamer base is much stronger (one M-class, the other X-class in GOES X-rays) and the resulting streamer puff is wider and brighter than in the discovery examples. Coronal dimming observed in SOHOBIT Fe XII images in the launching of each of these two CMEs M e r supports the view that these CMEs are produced by a high loop of the steamer arcade being blown out by magnetoplasma ejecta exploding up the leg of the loop from the flare. In addition, we present evidence that this same type of CME occurs on larger scales than in the above examples. We examine a sequence of flare eruptions seated on the north side of AR 8210 as it rotated across the southern hemisphere in late April and early May 1998. Each flare occurs in synchrony with the launching of a large CME centered on the equator. Coronal dimming in EIT Fe XII images shows the trans-equatorial footprints of these CMEs extending north from the flare site. The set of flare-with-CME events includes the trans-equatorial loop eruptions reported by Khan & Hudson (1998, GRL, 27, 1083). Our observations indicate that these CMEs were not driven by the self-eruption of the transequatorial loops, but that these loops were part of a trans-equatorial magnetic arch that was blown open by ejecta from the flares on the north side of AR 8210. Thus, a relatively compact ejective flare can be the driver of a CME that is much larger in lateral extent than the flare and is laterally far offset from the flare. It has previously been thought

  15. The Kepler Catalog of Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, James R. A.

    2016-09-01

    A homogeneous search for stellar flares has been performed using every available Kepler light curve. An iterative light curve de-trending approach was used to filter out both astrophysical and systematic variability to detect flares. The flare recovery completeness has also been computed throughout each light curve using artificial flare injection tests, and the tools for this work have been made publicly available. The final sample contains 851,168 candidate flare events recovered above the 68% completeness threshold, which were detected from 4041 stars, or 1.9% of the stars in the Kepler database. The average flare energy detected is ˜1035 erg. The net fraction of flare stars increases with g - i color, or decreasing stellar mass. For stars in this sample with previously measured rotation periods, the total relative flare luminosity is compared to the Rossby number. A tentative detection of flare activity saturation for low-mass stars with rapid rotation below a Rossby number of ˜0.03 is found. A power-law decay in flare activity with Rossby number is found with a slope of -1, shallower than typical measurements for X-ray activity decay with Rossby number.

  16. The Effects of Flare Definitions on the Statistics of Derived Flare Distrubtions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Daniel; Dominique, Marie; Seaton, Daniel B.; Stegen, Koen; White, Arthur

    2016-05-01

    The statistical examination of solar flares is crucial to revealing their global characteristics and behaviour. However, statistical flare studies are often performed using standard but basic flare detection algorithms relying on arbitrary thresholds which may affect the derived flare distributions. We explore the effect of the arbitrary thresholds used in the GOES event list and LYRA Flare Finder algorithms. We find that there is a small but significant relationship between the power law exponent of the GOES flare peak flux frequency distribution and the algorithms’ flare start thresholds. We also find that the power law exponents of these distributions are not stable but appear to steepen with increasing peak flux. This implies that the observed flare size distribution may not be a power law at all. We show that depending on the true value of the exponent of the flare size distribution, this deviation from a power law may be due to flares missed by the flare detection algorithms. However, it is not possible determine the true exponent from GOES/XRS observations. Additionally we find that the PROBA2/LYRA flare size distributions are clearly non-power law. We show that this is consistent with an insufficient degradation correction which causes LYRA absolute irradiance values to be unreliable. This means that they should not be used for flare statistics or energetics unless degradation is adequately accounted for. However they can be used to study time variations over shorter timescales and for space weather monitoring.

  17. X-ray polarimetry: the measurement of the polarization of solar flare x-rays and the design of a Compton polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Tramiel, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    A Compton polarimeter was designed for use in x-ray astrophysics. This device utilizes the anisotropic Compton scattering of polarized x-rays to determine their polarization. This instrument incorporates an intrinisic coincidence rejection scheme to reduce the non x-ray background. The Compton polarimeter is sensitive to x-rays from 30 to 100 keV. Another class of x-ray polarimeter, the photoelectric polarimeter with an energy range 5 to 100 keV, is discussed. This class of devices detects the anisotropic distribution of photoelectrons ejected by polarized x-rays. Previous work on this class of device, which indicated some promise of a useful instrument, is reviewed. An analysis of electron scattering, a complicating effect for these devices, is presented. This analysis indicates a severe limitation on the utility of photoelectric polarimeters. This theoretical work is reconciled with the previous experiments. One implementation, using an imaging proportional counter, was tested in the laboratory. No polarization effects were seen.

  18. Helium (3) Rich Solar Flares

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Colgate, S. A.; Audouze, J.; Fowler, W. A.

    1977-05-03

    The extreme enrichment of {sup 3} He {sup 4} He greater than or equal to 1 in some solar flares as due to spallation and the subsequent confinement of the products in a high temperature, kT approx. = 200 keV, high density, n{sub e} approx. = 3 x 10{sup 15} cm {sup -3} plasma associated with the magnetic instability producing the flare is interpreted. The pinch or filament is a current of high energy protons that creates the spallation and maintains the temperature that produces the high energy x-ray spectrum and depletes other isotopes D, Li, Be, and B as observed. Finally the high temperature plasma is a uniquely efficient spallation target that is powered by the interaction of stellar convection and self generated magnetic field.

  19. Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, V.

    Several new observations notably high spatial and spectral X-ray observations of impulsive phase of solar flares by YOHKOH and RHESSI, and Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) spectra by ACE have provided strong evidence in favor of stochastic acceleration of electrons, protons and other ions by plasma waves or turbulence. Theoretical arguments also favor such a model if the seed particles come from the background thermal plasma. I will describe these evidences and the theoretical framework for evaluation of the accelerated particle spectra, their transport and radiation. The predictions of the models will be compared with several features of the observations with specific emphasize on heating vs acceleration by turbulence, thermal vs nonthermal electron spectra, looptop vs footpoint emission fro flaring loops, electron vs proton acceleration rates and 3He vs 4He (and other ion) abundances in SEPs.

  20. Acceleration of solar cosmic rays in a flare current sheet and their propagation in interplanetary space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, A. I.; Podgorny, I. M.

    2015-09-01

    Analyses of GOES spacecraft data show that the prompt component of high-energy protons arrive at the Earth after a time corresponding to their generation in flares in the western part of the solar disk, while the delayed component is detected several hours later. All protons in flares are accelerated by a single mechanism. The particles of the prompt component propagate along magnetic lines of the Archimedean spiral connectng the flare with the Earth. The prompt component generated by flares in the eastern part of the solar disk is not observed at the Earth, since particles accelerated by these flares do not intersect magnetic-field lines connecting the flare with the Earth. These particles arrive at the Earth via their motion across the interplanetary magnetic field. These particles are trapped by the magnetic field and transported by the solar wind, since the interplanetary magnetic field is frozen in the wind plasma, and these particles also diffuse across the field. The duration of the delay reaches several days.

  1. THE CONFINED X-CLASS FLARES OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGION 2192

    SciTech Connect

    Thalmann, J. K.; Su, Y.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.

    2015-03-10

    The unusually large active region (AR) NOAA 2192, observed in 2014 October, was outstanding in its productivity of major two-ribbon flares without coronal mass ejections. On a large scale, a predominantly north–south oriented magnetic system of arcade fields served as a strong top and lateral confinement for a series of large two-ribbon flares originating from the core of the AR. The large initial separation of the flare ribbons, together with an almost absent growth in ribbon separation, suggests a confined reconnection site high up in the corona. Based on a detailed analysis of the confined X1.6 flare on October 22, we show how exceptional the flaring of this AR was. We provide evidence for repeated energy release, indicating that the same magnetic field structures were repeatedly involved in magnetic reconnection. We find that a large number of electrons was accelerated to non-thermal energies, revealing a steep power-law spectrum, but that only a small fraction was accelerated to high energies. The total non-thermal energy in electrons derived (on the order of 10{sup 25} J) is considerably higher than that in eruptive flares of class X1, and corresponds to about 10% of the excess magnetic energy present in the active-region corona.

  2. Validation of Slosh Model Parameters and Anti-Slosh Baffle Designs of Propellant Tanks by Using Lateral Slosh Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Jose G.; Parks, Russel, A.; Lazor, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    The slosh dynamics of propellant tanks can be represented by an equivalent mass-pendulum-dashpot mechanical model. The parameters of this equivalent model, identified as slosh mechanical model parameters, are slosh frequency, slosh mass, and pendulum hinge point location. They can be obtained by both analysis and testing for discrete fill levels. Anti-slosh baffles are usually needed in propellant tanks to control the movement of the fluid inside the tank. Lateral slosh testing, involving both random excitation testing and free-decay testing, are performed to validate the slosh mechanical model parameters and the damping added to the fluid by the anti-slosh baffles. Traditional modal analysis procedures were used to extract the parameters from the experimental data. Test setup of sub-scale tanks will be described. A comparison between experimental results and analysis will be presented.

  3. Validation of Slosh Model Parameters and Anti-Slosh Baffle Designs of Propellant Tanks by Using Lateral Slosh Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Jose G.; Parks, Russel A.; Lazor, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    The slosh dynamics of propellant tanks can be represented by an equivalent pendulum-mass mechanical model. The parameters of this equivalent model, identified as slosh model parameters, are slosh mass, slosh mass center of gravity, slosh frequency, and smooth-wall damping. They can be obtained by both analysis and testing for discrete fill heights. Anti-slosh baffles are usually needed in propellant tanks to control the movement of the fluid inside the tank. Lateral slosh testing, involving both random testing and free-decay testing, are performed to validate the slosh model parameters and the damping added to the fluid by the anti-slosh baffles. Traditional modal analysis procedures are used to extract the parameters from the experimental data. Test setup of sub-scale test articles of cylindrical and spherical shapes will be described. A comparison between experimental results and analysis will be presented.

  4. Terahertz Photometer to Observe Solar Flares in Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcon, Rogerio; Kaufmann, Pierre; Fernandes, Luis Olavo T.; Godoy, Rodolfo; Marun, Adolfo; Bortolucci, Emilio C.; Zakia, Maria Beny; Diniz, José Alexandre; Kudaka, Amauri S.

    2012-02-01

    Solar observations at sub-THz frequencies detected a new flare spectral component peaking in the THz range, simultaneously with the well known microwaves component, bringing challenging constraints for interpretation. Higher THz frequencies observations are needed to understand the nature of the mechanisms occurring in flares. A THz photometer system was developed to observe outside the terrestrial atmosphere on stratospheric balloons or satellites, or at exceptionally transparent ground stations. The telescope was designed to observe the whole solar disk detecting small relative changes in input temperature caused by flares at localized positions. A Golay cell detector is preceded by low-pass filters to suppress visible and near IR radiation, a band-pass filter, and a chopper. A prototype was assembled to demonstrate the new concept and the system performance. It can detect temperature variations smaller than 1 K for data sampled at a rate of 10/s, smoothed for intervals larger than 4 s. For a 76 mm aperture, this corresponds to small solar burst intensities at THz frequencies. A system with 3 and 7 THz photometers is being built for solar flare observations on board of stratospheric balloon missions.

  5. FlareLab: early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltwisch, H.; Kempkes, P.; Mackel, F.; Stein, H.; Tenfelde, J.; Arnold, L.; Dreher, J.; Grauer, R.

    2010-12-01

    The FlareLab experiment at Bochum University has been constructed to generate and investigate plasma-filled magnetic flux tubes similar to arch-shaped solar prominences, which often result in coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In its first version, the device has been used to reproduce and extend previous studies of Bellan et al (1998 Phys. Plasmas 5 1991). Here the plasma source consists of two electrodes, which can be connected to a 1.0 kJ capacitor bank, and of a horseshoe magnet, which provides an arch-shaped guiding field. The discharge is ignited in a cloud of hydrogen gas that has been puffed into the space above the electrodes. In the first few microseconds the plasma current rises at a rate of several kA µs-1, causing the plasma column to pinch along the guiding B-field and to form an expanding loop structure. The observed dynamics of the magnetic flux tubes is analysed by means of three-dimensional MHD simulations in order to determine the influence of parameters like the initial magnetic field geometry on magnetic stability. At present, FlareLab is redesigned to mimic a model that was proposed by Titov and Démoulin (1999 Astron. Astrophys. 351 707) to investigate twisted magnetic configurations in solar flares.

  6. Electron acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Droge, Wolfgang; Meyer, Peter; Evenson, Paul; Moses, Dan

    1989-01-01

    For the period Spetember 1978 to December 1982, 55 solar flare particle events for which the instruments on board the ISEE-3 spacecraft detected electrons above 10 MeV. Combining data with those from the ULEWAT spectrometer electron spectra in the range from 0.1 to 100 MeV were obtained. The observed spectral shapes can be divided into two classes. The spectra of the one class can be fit by a single power law in rigidity over the entire observed range. The spectra of the other class deviate from a power law, instead exhibiting a steepening at low rigidities and a flattening at high rigidities. Events with power-law spectra are associated with impulsive (less than 1 hr duration) soft X-ray emission, whereas events with hardening spectra are associated with long-duration (more than 1 hr) soft X-ray emission. The characteristics of long-duration events are consistent with diffusive shock acceleration taking place high in the corona. Electron spectra of short-duration flares are well reproduced by the distribution functions derived from a model assuming simultaneous second-order Fermi acceleration and Coulomb losses operating in closed flare loops.

  7. Modeling Repeatedly Flaring δ Sunspots.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-03-11

    Active regions (ARs) appearing on the surface of the Sun are classified into α, β, γ, and δ by the rules of the Mount Wilson Observatory, California on the basis of their topological complexity. Amongst these, the δ sunspots are known to be superactive and produce the most x-ray flares. Here, we present results from a simulation of the Sun by mimicking the upper layers and the corona, but starting at a more primitive stage than any earlier treatment. We find that this initial state consisting of only a thin subphotospheric magnetic sheet breaks into multiple flux tubes which evolve into a colliding-merging system of spots of opposite polarity upon surface emergence, similar to those often seen on the Sun. The simulation goes on to produce many exotic δ sunspot associated phenomena: repeated flaring in the range of typical solar flare energy release and ejective helical flux ropes with embedded cool-dense plasma filaments resembling solar coronal mass ejections.

  8. Solar flares and energetic particles.

    PubMed

    Vilmer, Nicole

    2012-07-13

    Solar flares are now observed at all wavelengths from γ-rays to decametre radio waves. They are commonly associated with efficient production of energetic particles at all energies. These particles play a major role in the active Sun because they contain a large amount of the energy released during flares. Energetic electrons and ions interact with the solar atmosphere and produce high-energy X-rays and γ-rays. Energetic particles can also escape to the corona and interplanetary medium, produce radio emissions (electrons) and may eventually reach the Earth's orbit. I shall review here the available information on energetic particles provided by X-ray/γ-ray observations, with particular emphasis on the results obtained recently by the mission Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. I shall also illustrate how radio observations contribute to our understanding of the electron acceleration sites and to our knowledge on the origin and propagation of energetic particles in the interplanetary medium. I shall finally briefly review some recent progress in the theories of particle acceleration in solar flares and comment on the still challenging issue of connecting particle acceleration processes to the topology of the complex magnetic structures present in the corona.

  9. Characteristics of gamma-ray line flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.; Dennis, B.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of solar gamma rays by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) demonstrate that energetic protons and ions are rapidly accelerated during the impulsive phase. To understand the acceleration mechanisms for these particles, the characteristics of the gamma ray line flares observed by SMM were studied. Some very intense hard X-ray flares without detectable gamma ray lines were also investigated. Gamma ray line flares are distinguished from other flares by: (1) intense hard X-ray and microwave emissions; (2) delay of high energy hard X-rays; (3) emission of type 2 and/or type 4 radio bursts; and (4) flat hard X-ray spectra (average power law index: 3.1). The majority of the gamma ray line flares shared all these characteristics, and the remainder shared at least three of them. Positive correlations were found between durations of spike bursts and spatial sizes of flare loops as well as between delay times and durations of spike bursts.

  10. Pre-flare dynamics of sunspot groups

    SciTech Connect

    Korsós, M. B.; Baranyi, T.; Ludmány, A. E-mail: baranyi.tunde@csfk.mta.hu

    2014-07-10

    Several papers provide evidence that the most probable sites of flare onset are the regions of high horizontal magnetic field gradients in solar active regions. Besides the localization of flare-producing areas, this work intends to reveal the characteristic temporal variations in these regions prior to flares. This study uses sunspot data instead of magnetograms and follows the behavior of a suitable defined proxy measure representing the horizontal magnetic field gradient. The source of the data is the SDD (SOHO/MDI-Debrecen Data) sunspot catalog. The most promising pre-flare signatures are the following properties of gradient variation: (1) steep increase, (2) high maximum, (3) significant fluctuation, and (4) a gradual decrease between the maximum and the flare onset that can be related to the 'pull mode' of the current layer. These properties may yield a tool for the assessment of flare probability and intensity within the following 8-10 hr.

  11. Monitoring of Cyg X-3 giant flare with Medicina and the Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egron, E.; Pellizzoni, A.; Giroletti, M.; Righini, S.; Orlati, A.; Iacolina, M. N.; Navarrini, A.; Buttu, M.; Migoni, C.; Melis, A.; Concu, R.; Vargiu, G. P.; Bachetti, M.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Loru, S.; Marongiu, M.

    2016-09-01

    Following the detection of Cyg X-3 entering in an ultra soft X-ray state, a forthcoming giant flare was predicted by Trushkin et al. (ATel #9416). In fact, a significant radio flux increase was detected three weeks later, on 14-16 September 2016 (ATel #9502).

  12. Interplanetary shock waves associated with solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, J. K.; Sakurai, K.

    1974-01-01

    The interaction of the earth's magnetic field with the solar wind is discussed with emphasis on the influence of solar flares. The geomagnetic storms are considerered to be the result of the arrival of shock wave generated by solar flares in interplanetary space. Basic processes in the solar atmosphere and interplanetary space, and hydromagnetic disturbances associated with the solar flares are discussed along with observational and theoretical problems of interplanetary shock waves. The origin of interplanetary shock waves is also discussed.

  13. OBSERVATIONS OF CHROMOSPHERIC FLARE RE-BRIGHTENINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Miklenic, C. H.; Veronig, A. M.; Vrsnak, B.; Barta, M.

    2010-08-20

    We investigate an active region that produced three C-class flares and one M-class flare within 2.5 hr. The morphology and location of the C-flares indicate that these events constitute a set of homologous flares. Radio observations indicate the occurrence of a downward-moving plasmoid during the impulsive phase of the M flare. We use TRACE 1700 A filtergrams and SOHO Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms to examine the character of the UV brightenings; i.e., we search for re-brightenings of former flare areas both across the series of events and within one and the same event. We find that essentially the same footpoints re-brighten in each C flare. Based on the progression of both the derived magnetic flux change rate and the observed Radio Solar Telescope Network microwave emission, we speculate about a further re-brightening during the decay phase of the M flare as a further member of the series of homologous flares. We conclude that the 'postflare' field is driven to repeated eruption by continuous, shear-increasing, horizontal, photospheric flows, as one end of the involved magnetic arcade is anchored in the penumbra of a large sunspot. The observed motion pattern of the UV kernels indicates that the arcade evolves during the series of events from a both highly sheared and heavily entangled state to a still sheared but more organized state.

  14. Densities of Stellar Flares from Spectral Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra-Kraev, U.

    2006-08-01

    We present detailed analyses of spectral changes during X-ray flares. During flares the plasma is known to become hotter, but also changes in density are anticipated, as flares will rather be compact and dense than large and tenuous. We search for indications of changes in density in the spectra of Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) data. However, as flares usually last for at most up to one hour, only very bright flares will produce enough photons for a sufficiently well exposed spectrum. We chose long Chandra observations of flare stars which covered periods of time with flare activity that can be combined to compile one quiescent-only spectrum to be compared with a spectrum that is affected by flare activity. We show that with careful data analysis it is possible with the presently available instruments to detect spectral line changes between quiescent and flaring states, notably in the density- and temperature-sensitive lines of the He-like OVII triplet (21.6/21.8/22.1 A). Using cumulative distribution functions, we are also able to give solid statistical confidence limits. We also briefly discuss the diagnostic capabilities of other He-like line triplets and of observations carried out with the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS).

  15. Interstrand side chain--side chain interactions in a designed beta-hairpin: significance of both lateral and diagonal pairings.

    PubMed

    Syud, F A; Stanger, H E; Gellman, S H

    2001-09-12

    The contributions of interstrand side chain-side chain contacts to beta-sheet stability have been examined with an autonomously folding beta-hairpin model system. RYVEV(D)PGOKILQ-NH2 ((D)P = D-proline, O = ornithine) has previously been shown to adopt a beta-hairpin conformation in aqueous solution, with a two-residue loop at D-Pro-Gly. In the present study, side chains that display interstrand NOEs (Tyr-2, Lys-9, and Leu-11) are mutated to alanine or serine, and the conformational impact of the mutations is assessed. In the beta-hairpin conformation Tyr-2 and Leu-11 are directly across from one another (non-hydrogen bonded pair). This "lateral" juxtaposition of two hydrophobic side chains appears to contribute to beta-hairpin conformational stability, which is consistent with results from other beta-sheet model studies and with statistical analyses of interstrand residue contacts in protein crystal structures. Interaction between the side chains of Tyr-2 and Lys-9 also stabilizes the beta-hairpin conformation. Tyr-2/Lys-9 is a "diagonal" interstrand juxtaposition because these residues are not directly across from one another in terms of the hydrogen bonding registry between the strands. This diagonal interaction arises from the right-handed twist that is commonly observed among beta-sheets. Evidence of diagonal side chain-side chain contacts has been observed in other autonomously folding beta-sheet model systems, but we are not aware of other efforts to determine whether a diagonal interaction contributes to beta-sheet stability.

  16. CIRCULAR RIBBON FLARES AND HOMOLOGOUS JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Haimin; Liu Chang

    2012-12-01

    Solar flare emissions in the chromosphere often appear as elongated ribbons on both sides of the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), which has been regarded as evidence of a typical configuration of magnetic reconnection. However, flares having a circular ribbon have rarely been reported, although it is expected in the fan-spine magnetic topology involving reconnection at a three-dimensional (3D) coronal null point. We present five circular ribbon flares with associated surges, using high-resolution and high-cadence H{alpha} blue wing observations obtained from the recently digitized films of Big Bear Solar Observatory. In all the events, a central parasitic magnetic field is encompassed by the opposite polarity, forming a circular PIL traced by filament material. Consequently, a flare kernel at the center is surrounded by a circular flare ribbon. The four homologous jet-related flares on 1991 March 17 and 18 are of particular interest, as (1) the circular ribbons brighten sequentially, with cospatial surges, rather than simultaneously, (2) the central flare kernels show an intriguing 'round-trip' motion and become elongated, and (3) remote brightenings occur at a region with the same magnetic polarity as the central parasitic field and are co-temporal with a separate phase of flare emissions. In another flare on 1991 February 25, the circular flare emission and surge activity occur successively, and the event could be associated with magnetic flux cancellation across the circular PIL. We discuss the implications of these observations combining circular flare ribbons, homologous jets, and remote brightenings for understanding the dynamics of 3D magnetic restructuring.

  17. Lateral genomics.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, W F

    1999-12-01

    More than 20 complete prokaryotic genome sequences are now publicly available, each by itself an unparalleled resource for understanding organismal biology. Collectively, these data are even more powerful: they could force a dramatic reworking of the framework in which we understand biological evolution. It is possible that a single universal phylogenetic tree is not the best way to depict relationships between all living and extinct species. Instead a web- or net-like pattern, reflecting the importance of horizontal or lateral gene transfer between lineages of organisms, might provide a more appropriate visual metaphor. Here, I ask whether this way of thinking is really justified, and explore its implications.

  18. Perimenstrual Flare of Adult Acne

    PubMed Central

    Geller, Lauren; Rosen, Jamie; Frankel, Amylynne; Goldenberg, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acne is typically regarded as an adolescent disease. A significant body of literature suggests a post-adolescent or adult form of acne. Female patients are known to experience perimenstrual acne flares, the exact prevalence of which is unknown. Objective: To establish a pattern of perimenstrual acne flare in adult women in order to better characterize the disorder. Methods: Subjects aged 18 and over were recruited during previously scheduled visits with their dermatologist at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. An anonymous survey was distributed to women who reported their first menses at least six months earlier and had a complaint of acne within the last 30 days. Women <18 years of age and postmenopausal women were excluded from the study population. Results: Participants included women 18- to 29-years old (67%) and women 30- to 49-years old (33%). The ethnicity of respondents was Caucasian (50%), African American (20%), Latino (19%), Asian (5%), and Other (6%). The majority of participants with perimenstrual acne reported the onset of acne between the ages of 12 and 18 years. Sixty-five percent of participants reported that their acne symptoms were worse with their menses. Of those who reported perimenstrual acne symptoms, 56 percent reported worsening symptoms in the week preceding their menses, 17 percent reported worsening symptoms during their menses, three percent reported worsening symptoms after their menses, and 24 percent reported worsening symptoms throughout their cycle. Thirty-five percent of patients with perimenstrual acne reported oral contraceptive pill use. Conclusion: A significant number of adult women have perimenstrual acne symptoms. This study has proven to be useful in characterizing perimenstrual acne flare and is one of the first qualitative documentations of the presence and degree of this disorder. PMID:25161758

  19. Assessment of flares in lupus patients enrolled in a phase II/III study of rituximab (EXPLORER).

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jt; Buyon, Jp; Furie, Ra; Latinis, Km; Gordon, C; Hsieh, H-J; Brunetta, P

    2011-06-01

    The EXPLORER study was designed to assess the response to rituximab versus placebo in patients with moderate to severe extrarenal systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) receiving background immunosuppression. The definition of response required reduced clinical activity without subsequent flares over 52 weeks, and the study did not meet its efficacy endpoint. The current exploratory analysis assessed flare rates in patients who achieved initial low disease activity response (British Isles Lupus Assessment Group [BILAG] C or better in all organs) during the study. Exploratory reanalysis of data from the EXPLORER trial was conducted, considering alternative definitions for flare. No difference was found between rituximab and placebo in preventing or delaying moderate to severe flares. However, when severe (BILAG A) flares alone were examined, rituximab reduced the risk of a subsequent first A flare (hazard ratio = 0.61; p = 0.052) and lowered mean ± SD annualized A flare rates (0.86 ± 1.47 vs. 1.41 ± 2.14; p = 0.038). Eighty-four (49.7%) rituximab-treated patients achieved low disease activity without subsequent A flares versus 31 (35.2%) placebo-treated patients (p = 0.027). Prednisone rescue for A flares was similar in rituximab- (24%) and placebo-treated (14%) patients (p = 0.204). This post hoc analysis evaluates the hypothesis that assessment of BILAG A flares may distinguish potential treatment effects with greater sensitivity than assessment of BILAG B flares.

  20. Particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klecker, Berndt; Cliver, Ed; Kahler, Steve; Cane, Hilary

    Particle acceleration in solar flares was the topic of a workshop held at the University of Tasmania in Hobart, Australia, January 24-26, 1990. The workshop was held in conjunction with the 21st International Cosmic Ray Conference in Adelaide, South Australia, January 6-19, 1990. Forty-six scientists participated in the workshop, which was organized by Hilary Cane and John Humble of the University of Tasmania; Marc Duldig, Australian Antarctic Division, University of Tasmania; Ed Cliver, Geophysics Laboratory, U.S. Air Force Systems Command; and Steve Kahler, Boston College, Mass.

  1. Sun Releases X-class Solar Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie shows the July 6, 2012 X1.1 flare in the 171 Angstrom wavelength as captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). AR1515 was the source for this flare. AR1515 has been active ...

  2. Flares and Their Underlying Magnetic Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell, Alexander J.; Siarkowski, Marek; Gryciuk, Magda; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    SphinX (Solar PHotometer IN X-rays), a full-disk-integrated spectrometer, observed 137 flare-like/transient events with active region (AR) 11024 being the only AR on disk. The Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and Solar Optical Telescope observe 67 of these events and identified their location from 12:00 UT on July 3 through 24:00 UT 2009 July 7. We find that the predominant mechanisms for flares observed by XRT are (1) flux cancellation and (2) the shearing of underlying magnetic elements. Point- and cusp-like flare morphologies seen by XRT all occur in a magnetic environment where one polarity is impeded by the opposite polarity and vice versa, forcing the flux cancellation process. The shearing is either caused by flux emergence at the center of the AR and separation of polarities along a neutral line or by individual magnetic elements having a rotational motion. Both mechanisms are observed to contribute to single- and multiple-loop flares. We observe that most loop flares occur along a large portion of a polarity inversion line. Point- and cusp-like flares become more infrequent as the AR becomes organized with separation of the positive and negative polarities. SphinX, which allows us to identify when these flares occur, provides us with a statistically significant temperature and emission scaling law for A and B class flares: EM = 6.1 × 1033 T 1.9±0.1.

  3. AR 1121 Unleases X-ray Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    Increasingly active sunspot 1121 has unleashed one of the brightest x-ray solar flares in years, an M5.4-class eruption at 15:36 UT on Nov. 6th. This close-up video shows the detail of the flare an...

  4. FLARES AND THEIR UNDERLYING MAGNETIC COMPLEXITY

    SciTech Connect

    Engell, Alexander J.; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Siarkowski, Marek; Gryciuk, Magda; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    SphinX (Solar PHotometer IN X-rays), a full-disk-integrated spectrometer, observed 137 flare-like/transient events with active region (AR) 11024 being the only AR on disk. The Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and Solar Optical Telescope observe 67 of these events and identified their location from 12:00 UT on July 3 through 24:00 UT 2009 July 7. We find that the predominant mechanisms for flares observed by XRT are (1) flux cancellation and (2) the shearing of underlying magnetic elements. Point- and cusp-like flare morphologies seen by XRT all occur in a magnetic environment where one polarity is impeded by the opposite polarity and vice versa, forcing the flux cancellation process. The shearing is either caused by flux emergence at the center of the AR and separation of polarities along a neutral line or by individual magnetic elements having a rotational motion. Both mechanisms are observed to contribute to single- and multiple-loop flares. We observe that most loop flares occur along a large portion of a polarity inversion line. Point- and cusp-like flares become more infrequent as the AR becomes organized with separation of the positive and negative polarities. SphinX, which allows us to identify when these flares occur, provides us with a statistically significant temperature and emission scaling law for A and B class flares: EM = 6.1 x 10{sup 33} T{sup 1.9{+-}0.1}.

  5. The Aerodynamics of Curved Jets and Breakaway in Coanda Flares.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senior, Peter

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. An investigation was carried out into external -Coanda Effect flares designed by British Petroleum International plc. The phenomenon of interest was breakaway of an underexpanded axisymmetric curved wall jet from the guiding surface due to high blowing pressure. A survey of investigations of similar flows suggested very complex jet fluid dynamics. Strong cell structure including shock waves was present giving bulk and discrete compression and bulk dilatation. More expansion was imposed by the radial velocity components. Wall curvature and a rear-facing step added further significant influences. The combination of these factors is known to produce highly non-linear turbulence, and this constitutes a major difficulty for the application of computational methods to the flare. In view of the amount of resources required to eliminate the problems of using a Navier-Stokes code, an economical approach was adopted, matching the Method of Characteristics to various simplified models and an integral boundary layer. In the experimental work, a planar model of the flare was constructed and studied using a wide range of methods in order to achieve accuracy and provide comparability with other work. An axisymmetric model was designed and investigated in a similar manner, so that the influence of this geometry could be clearly distinguished. A full -scale flare was subjected to a restricted range of tests to compare the laboratory results with the industrial application. The results from all the experiments demonstrated good correspondence. The main conclusion was that amalgamation of separation bubbles is crucial for breakaway. These are present long before breakaway, and are strongly reduced by decreasing the cell scale, adding a rear-facing step and axisymmetry, which leads to improved breakaway performance. Although the computational methods did not prove robust enough for all design purposes

  6. The CME Flare Arcade and the Width of the CME in the Outer Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2008-01-01

    Moore, Sterling, & Suess (2007, ApJ, 668, 1221) present evidence that (1) a CME is typically a magnetic bubble, a low-beta gplasmoid with legs h having roughly the 3D shape of a light bulb, and (2) in the outer corona the CME plasmoid is in lateral pressure equilibrium with the ambient magnetic field. They present three CMEs observed by SOHO/LASCO, each from a very different source located near the limb. One of these CMEs came from a compact ejective eruption from a small part of a sunspot active region, another came from a large quiet-region filament eruption, and the third CME, an extremely large and fast one, was produced in tandem with an X20 flare arcade that was centered on a huge delta sunspot. Each of these CMEs had more or less the classic lightbulb silhouette and attained a constant heliocentric angular width in the outer corona. This indicates that the CME plasmoid attained lateral magnetic pressure balance with the ambient radial magnetic field in the outer corona. This lateral pressure balance, together with the standard scenario for CME production by the eruption of a sheared-core magnetic arcade, yields the following simple estimate of the strength B(sub Flare) of the magnetic field in the flare arcade produced together with the CME: B(sub Flare) 1.4(theta CME/theta Flare)sup 2 G, where theta (sub CME) is the heliocentric angular width of the CME plasmoid in the outer corona and theta (sub Flare) is the heliocentric angular width of the full-grown flare arcade. Conversely, theta (sub CME) approximately equal to (R(sub Sun)sup -1(phi(sub Flare)/1.4)sup 1/2 radians, where Flare is the magnetic flux covered by the full-grown flare arcade. In addition to presenting the three CMEs of Moore, Sterling, & Suess (2007) and their agreement with this relation between CME and Flare, we present a further empirical test of this relation. For CMEs that erupt from active regions, the co-produced flare arcade seldom if ever covers the entire active region: if AR is

  7. Vehicular Causation Factors and Conceptual Design Modifications to Reduce Aortic Strain in Numerically Reconstructed Real World Nearside Lateral Automotive Crashes.

    PubMed

    Belwadi, Aditya; Yang, King H

    2015-01-01

    Aortic injury (AI) leading to disruption of the aorta is an uncommon but highly lethal consequence of trauma in modern society. Most recent estimates range from 7,500 to 8,000 cases per year from a variety of causes. It is observed that more than 80% of occupants who suffer an aortic injury die at the scene due to exsanguination into the chest cavity. It is evident that effective means of substantially improving the outcome of motor vehicle crash-induced AIs is by preventing the injury in the first place. In the current study, 16 design of computer experiments (DOCE) were carried out with varying levels of principal direction of force (PDOF), impact velocity, impact height, and impact position of the bullet vehicle combined with occupant seating positions in the case vehicle to determine the effects of these factors on aortic injury. Further, a combination of real world crash data reported in the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) database, Finite Element (FE) vehicle models, and the Wayne State Human Body Model-II (WSHBM-II) indicates that occupant seating position, impact height, and PDOF, in that order play, a primary role in aortic injury. PMID:26448781

  8. Vehicular Causation Factors and Conceptual Design Modifications to Reduce Aortic Strain in Numerically Reconstructed Real World Nearside Lateral Automotive Crashes.

    PubMed

    Belwadi, Aditya; Yang, King H

    2015-01-01

    Aortic injury (AI) leading to disruption of the aorta is an uncommon but highly lethal consequence of trauma in modern society. Most recent estimates range from 7,500 to 8,000 cases per year from a variety of causes. It is observed that more than 80% of occupants who suffer an aortic injury die at the scene due to exsanguination into the chest cavity. It is evident that effective means of substantially improving the outcome of motor vehicle crash-induced AIs is by preventing the injury in the first place. In the current study, 16 design of computer experiments (DOCE) were carried out with varying levels of principal direction of force (PDOF), impact velocity, impact height, and impact position of the bullet vehicle combined with occupant seating positions in the case vehicle to determine the effects of these factors on aortic injury. Further, a combination of real world crash data reported in the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) database, Finite Element (FE) vehicle models, and the Wayne State Human Body Model-II (WSHBM-II) indicates that occupant seating position, impact height, and PDOF, in that order play, a primary role in aortic injury.

  9. THERMAL FRONTS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  10. Thermal Fronts in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  11. Millimeter emission of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagnibeda, V. G.; Smirnova, V. V.; Ryzhov, V. S.; Zhiltsov, A. V.

    2013-06-01

    We analyzed two unique radio observations of millimeter solar flares at 93 and 140 GHz with the THz component in these spectra. Data were obtained from ground-based radio-telescope RT-7.5 operated by Bauman Moscow State Technical University (BMSTU) with the spacial resolution of 2.5 and 1.5 arc-minutes. We analyzed temporal structure of observed radio-bursts and their dynamics in comparison with soft and hard X-ray light-curves obtained from GOES and RHESSI space-based observations. It was found the 140 GHz emission enhancement at the spectra that is new independent confirmation of the THz component existance. Also, we analyzed data of microwave solar flares with the emission enhanced at 35 GHz obtained from Nobeyama radioheliograph (NoRH) and radiopolarimeter (NoRP). It was found that the maximum of the flux density spectra was shifted toward high frequencies that didn't agree with the model spectrum obtained from microwave observations. We assumed, that such kind of spectra are associated with the gyro-synchrotron radiation of the significant number of high-energetic electrons emission with energies of about 500 keV. The emission mechanism at millimeter waves is the gyro-synchrotron radiation. However, if the energetic electrons are not enough the thermal emission mechanism could be dominant factor at millimeter radiation that could also explain the spectral maximum shift to high frequencies.

  12. Onset of solar flares as predicted by two-dimensional MHD-models of quiescent prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindotrejo, J.

    1985-01-01

    The close connection between the sudden disapperance (disparition brusque) of the quiescent prominences and the two-ribbon flares are well known. During this dynamic phase the prominence ascends rapidly (typically with a velocity about 100 Km/sec) and disappears. In another later stage is observed material falling back into the chromosphere. The impact of this downfalling matter on the chromosphere produces the H brightening, which shows the symmetric double pattern. The occurence of the disparition brusque is thought to be a consequence of a plasma instability of magnetohydrostatic (MHD) structures. By means of the MHD-energy principle, the stability properties of four prominence models are analyzed. It is shown that all considered models undergo instabilities for parameters outside of the observed range at quiescent prominences. The possibility that such instabilities in the flare parameter range may indicate just the onset of a flare is considered.

  13. Design and Initial Results of a Multi-Phase Randomized Trial of Ceftriaxone in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Berry, James D.; Shefner, Jeremy M.; Conwit, Robin; Schoenfeld, David; Keroack, Myles; Felsenstein, Donna; Krivickas, Lisa; David, William S.; Vriesendorp, Francine; Pestronk, Alan; Caress, James B.; Katz, Jonathan; Simpson, Ericka; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Pascuzzi, Robert; Glass, Jonathan; Rezania, Kourosh; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.; Greenblatt, David J.; Cudkowicz, Merit E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Ceftriaxone increases expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter, EAAT2, which might protect from glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity. A trial using a novel three stage nonstop design, incorporating Phases I-III, tested ceftriaxone in ALS. Stage 1 determined the cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of ceftriaxone in subjects with ALS. Stage 2 evaluated safety and tolerability for 20-weeks. Analysis of the pharmacokinetics, tolerability, and safety was used to determine the ceftriaxone dosage for Stage 3 efficacy testing. Methods In Stage 1, 66 subjects at ten clinical sites were enrolled and randomized equally into three study groups receiving intravenous placebo, ceftriaxone 2 grams daily or ceftriaxone 4 grams daily divided BID. Participants provided serum and cerebrospinal fluid for pharmacokinetic analysis on study day 7. Participants continued their assigned treatment in Stage 2. The Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) reviewed the data after the last participants completed 20 weeks on study drug. Results Stage 1 analysis revealed linear pharmacokinetics, and CSF trough levels for both dosage levels exceeding the pre-specified target trough level of 1 µM (0.55 µg/mL). Tolerability (Stages 1 and 2) results showed that ceftriaxone at dosages up to 4 grams/day was well tolerated at 20 weeks. Biliary adverse events were more common with ceftriaxone but not dose-dependent and improved with ursodeoxycholic (ursodiol) therapy. Conclusions The goals of Stages 1 and 2 of the ceftriaxone trial were successfully achieved. Based on the pre-specified decision rules, the DSMB recommended the use of ceftriaxone 4 g/d (divided BID) for Stage 3, which recently closed. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00349622. PMID:23613806

  14. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET LATE PHASE OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Kai; Wang Yuming; Zhang Jie; Cheng Xin

    2013-05-10

    Solar flares typically have an impulsive phase that is followed by a gradual phase as best seen in soft X-ray emissions. A recent discovery based on the EUV Variability Experiment observations on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) reveals that some flares exhibit a second large peak separated from the first main phase peak by tens of minutes to hours, which is coined as the flare's EUV late phase. In this paper, we address the origin of the EUV late phase by analyzing in detail two late phase flares, an M2.9 flare on 2010 October 16 and an M1.4 flare on 2011 February 18, using multi-passband imaging observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board SDO. We find that (1) the late phase emission originates from a different magnetic loop system, which is much larger and higher than the main phase loop system. (2) The two loop systems have different thermal evolution. While the late phase loop arcade reaches its peak brightness progressively at a later time spanning for more than one hour from high to low temperatures, the main phase loop arcade reaches its peak brightness at almost the same time (within several minutes) in all temperatures. (3) Nevertheless, the two loop systems seem to be connected magnetically, forming an asymmetric magnetic quadruple configuration. (4) Further, the footpoint brightenings in UV wavelengths show a systematic delay of about one minute from the main flare region to the remote footpoint of the late phase arcade system. We argue that the EUV late phase is the result of a long-lasting cooling process in the larger magnetic arcade system.

  15. CO2 geological storage into a lateral aquifer of an offshore gas field in the South China Sea: storage safety and project design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Li, Dexiang; Ezekiel, Justin; Zhang, Weidong; Mi, Honggang; Ren, Shaoran

    2015-06-01

    The DF1-1 gas field, located in the western South China Sea, contains a high concentration of CO2, thus there is great concern about the need to reduce the CO2 emissions. Many options have been considered in recent years to dispose of the CO2 separated from the natural gas stream on the Hainan Island. In this study, the feasibility of CO2 storage in the lateral saline aquifer of the DF1-1 gas field is assessed, including aquifer selection and geological assessment, CO2 migration and storage safety, project design, and economic analysis. Six offshore aquifers have been investigated for CO2 geological storage. The lateral aquifer of the DF1-1 gas field has been selected as the best target for CO2 injection and storage because of its proven sealing ability, and the large storage capacity of the combined aquifer and hydrocarbon reservoir geological structure. The separated CO2 will be dehydrated on the Hainan Island and transported by a long-distance subsea pipeline in supercritical or liquid state to the central platform of the DF1-1 gas field for pressure adjustment. The CO2 will then be injected into the lateral aquifer via a subsea well-head through a horizontal well. Reservoir simulations suggest that the injected CO2 will migrate slowly upwards in the aquifer without disturbing the natural gas production. The scoping economic analysis shows that the unit storage cost of the project is approximately US26-31/ton CO2 with the subsea pipeline as the main contributor to capital expenditure (CAPEX), and the dehydration system as the main factor of operating expenditure (OPEX).

  16. Heating and Cooling of Flare Loops in a C5.7 Two-ribbon Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Sarah; Qiu, Jiong

    2016-05-01

    Heating and cooling of flare plasmas can be studied using models constrained by observations. In this work, we analyze and model thermal evolution of a C5.7 two-ribbon flare that occurred on December 26, 2011. The flare was observed by AIA. Two hundred flare loops are identified, which formed sequentially during one hour. Light curves of these flare loops in multiple EUV bands are analyzed to derive the duration and timing of flare emission in each bandpass. These timescales usually reflect cooling of flare plasmas from 10~MK to successively lower temperatures. We then use a zero-dimensional enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops (EBTEL) model to study flare heating and cooling. Several variations on the EBTEL model are assessed. The first model uses an impulsive heating function inferred from the rapid rise of the foot-point UV emission. Synthetic emission from this model evolves and decays more quickly than the observations, as many models do. Two other variations on the model are analyzed, in an attempt to counter this. In one variation the heating function is a combination of an impulsive pulse followed by an extended tail (i.e., continuous heating). The other model uses reduced thermal conduction to slow the flares evolution. These models are compared with one another and the observations, to evaluate effects of different mechanisms governing the thermal evolution of flare plasmas.

  17. A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF GAMMA-RAY BURST OPTICAL EMISSION. I. FLARES AND EARLY SHALLOW-DECAY COMPONENT

    SciTech Connect

    Li Liang; Liang Enwei; Tang Qingwen; Chen Jiemin; Xi Shaoqiang; Zhang Bing; Lu Ruijing; Lue Lianzhong; Lue Houjun; Gao He; Zhang Jin; Wei Jianyan; Yi Shuangxi E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2012-10-10

    Well-sampled optical light curves of 146 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are compiled from the literature. By empirical fitting, we identify eight possible emission components and summarize the results in a 'synthetic' light curve. Both optical flare and early shallow-decay components are likely related to long-term central engine activities. We focus on their statistical properties in this paper. Twenty-four optical flares are obtained from 19 GRBs. The isotropic R-band energy is smaller than 1% of E{sub {gamma},iso}. The relation between the isotropic luminosities of the flares and gamma rays follows L{sup F}{sub R,iso}{proportional_to}L {sup 1.11{+-}0.27}{sub {gamma},iso}. Later flares tend to be wider and dimmer, i.e., w{sup F} {approx} t{sup F}{sub p}/2 and L{sup F}{sub R,iso}{proportional_to}[t{sup F}{sub p}/(1 + z)]{sup -1.15{+-}0.15}. The detection probability of the optical flares is much smaller than that of X-ray flares. An optical shallow-decay segment is observed in 39 GRBs. The relation between the break time and break luminosity is a power law, with an index of -0.78 {+-} 0.08, similar to that derived from X-ray flares. The X-ray and optical breaks are usually chromatic, but a tentative correlation is found. We suggest that similar to the prompt optical emission that tracks {gamma}-rays, the optical flares are also related to the erratic behavior of the central engine. The shallow-decay component is likely related to a long-lasting spinning-down central engine or piling up of flare materials onto the blast wave. Mixing of different emission components may be the reason for the diverse chromatic afterglow behaviors.

  18. GRADUAL MAGNETIC EVOLUTION OF SUNSPOT STRUCTURE AND FILAMENT–CORONA DYNAMICS ASSOCIATED WITH THE X1.8 FLARE IN AR11283

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, Guiping; Chen, Yao; Wang, Haimin

    2015-10-20

    In this paper, we present a study of the persistent and gradual penumbral decay and the correlated decline of the photospheric transverse field component 10–20 hr before a major flare (X1.8) eruption on 2011 September 7. This long-term pre-eruption behavior is corroborated by the well-imaged pre-flare filament rising, the consistent expansion of the coronal arcades overlying the filament, and the nonlinear force-free field modeling results in the literature. We suggest that both the long-term pre-flare penumbral decay and the transverse field decline are photospheric manifestations of the gradual rise of the coronal filament–flux rope system. We also suggest that the C3 flare and the subsequent reconnection process preceding the X1.8 flare play an important role in triggering the later major eruption.

  19. X-ray and ultraviolet investigation into the magnetic connectivity of a solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, H. A. S.; Vilmer, N.; Aulanier, G.; Pariat, E.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the X-ray and UV emission detected by RHESSI and TRACE in the context of a solar flare on the 16th November 2002 with the goal of better understanding the evolution of the flare. We analysed the characteristics of the X-ray emission in the 12-25 and 25-50 keV energy range while we looked at the UV emission at 1600 Å . The flare appears to have two distinct phases of emission separated by a 25-s time delay, with the first phase being energetically more important. We found good temporal and spatial agreement between the 25-50 keV X-rays and the most intense areas of the 1600 Å UV emission. We also observed an extended 100-arcsec < 25 keV source that appears coronal in nature and connects two separated UV ribbons later in the flare. Using the observational properties in X-ray and UV wavelengths, we propose two explanations for the flare evolution in relation to the spine/fan magnetic field topology and the accelerated electrons. We find that a combination of quasi separatrix layer reconnection and null-point reconnection is required to account for the observed properties of the X-ray and UV emission.

  20. The evolution of energetic particles and the emitted radiation in solar flares. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Edward Tsang

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of accelerated particle distributions in a magnetized plasma and the resulting radiation are calculated, and the results are applied to solar flares. To study the radiation on timescales of order the particle lifetimes, the evolution of the particle distribution is determined by the use of the Fokker-Planck equation including Coulomb collisions and magnetic mirroring. Analytic solution to the equations are obtained for limiting cases such as homogeneous injection in a homogeneous plasma, and for small pitch angle. These analytic solutions are then used to place constraints on flare parameters such as density, loop length, and the injection timescale for very short implusive solar flares. For general particle distributions in arbitrary magnetic field and background density, the equation is solved numerically. The relative timing of microwaves and X-rays during individual flares is investigated. A number of possible sources for excessive microwave flux are discussed including a flattening in the electron spectrum above hard X-ray energies, thermal synchrotron emission, and trapping of electron by converging magnetic fields. Over shorter timescales, the Fokker-Planck equation is solved numerically to calculate the temporal evolution of microwaves and X-rays from nonthermal thick target models. It is shown that magnetic trapping will not account for the observed correlation of microwaves of approximately 0.15 seconds behind X-rays in flares with rapid time variation, and thus higher energy electrons must be accelerated later than lower energy electrons.

  1. Solar flare leaves sun quaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-05-01

    Dr. Alexander G. Kosovichev, a senior research scientist from Stanford University, and Dr. Valentina V. Zharkova from Glasgow (United Kingdom) University found the tell-tale seismic signature in data on the Sun's surface collected by the Michelson Doppler Imager onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft immediately following a moderate-sized flare on July 9, 1996. "Although the flare was a moderate one, it still released an immense amount of energy," said Dr. Craig Deforest, a researcher with the SOHO project. "The energy released is equal to completely covering the Earth's continents with a yard of dynamite and detonating it all at once." SOHO is a joint project of the European Space Agency and NASA. The finding is reported in the May 28 issue of the journal Nature, and is the subject of a press conference at the spring meeting of the American Geophysical Union in Boston, Mass., May 27. The solar quake that the science team recorded looks much like ripples spreading from a rock dropped into a pool of water. But over the course of an hour, the solar waves traveled for a distance equal to 10 Earth diameters before fading into the fiery background of the Sun's photosphere. Unlike water ripples that travel outward at a constant velocity, the solar waves accelerated from an initial speed of 22,000 miles per hour to a maximum of 250,000 miles per hour before disappearing. "People have looked for evidence of seismic waves from flares before, but they didn't have a theory so they didn't know where to look," says Kosovichev. Several years ago Kosovichev and Zharkova developed a theory that can explain how a flare, which explodes in space above the Sun's surface, can generate a major seismic wave in the Sun's interior. According to the currently accepted model of solar flares, the primary explosion creates high-energy electrons (electrically charged subatomic particles). These are funneled down into a magnetic flux tube, an invisible tube of magnetic

  2. Influenza-like viral illnesses and flare-ups of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva.

    PubMed

    Scarlett, Richard F; Rocke, David M; Kantanie, Sharon; Patel, Jean B; Shore, Eileen M; Kaplan, Frederick S

    2004-06-01

    Flare-ups of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva are most commonly triggered by soft tissue trauma. After observing severe flare-ups of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva in two half-sisters with culture-confirmed influenza B infections, we hypothesized that influenza-like viral illnesses also can trigger fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva flare-ups. To address this hypothesis, we designed a questionnaire to assess whether patients with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva experienced influenza symptoms during the 2000 to 2001 influenza season, and whether these symptoms were correlated with flare-ups of the condition. The questionnaire was sent to patients with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva worldwide. Of the 264 patients surveyed, 123 (47%) responded. The survey revealed that the risk of a disease flare-up of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva during an influenza-like viral illness was increased at least threefold and possibly much more. The survey data strongly supported the hypothesis that influenza-like viral illnesses are associated with disease flare-ups in patients who have fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva. Influenza-like viral illnesses may be a source of previously unrecognized muscle injury leading to heterotopic ossification and permanent loss of mobility in these patients. These findings have important implications for understanding and preventing environmental triggers of disease activity in this population of patients genetically susceptible to progressive heterotopic ossification.

  3. Measurements of Continuum Flux in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrč, P.; Heinzel, P.; Procházka, O.

    2016-04-01

    A broad-band diagnostics of chromospheric flare plasma needs to analyze spectra covering many spectral lines and various continuum features. The flare spectra are well detected on the background of the solar disk, but the detection of flare line emission from the Sun-as-a-star in optical is much more difficult due to a strong background radiation. When the flare/background radiation contrast is strong enough to be detected, we need a device for measuring the flux from a selected part of the flaring region. Here we present technical demands for such an instrument and its brief description. This device denoted as Image Selector is a post-focus instrument installed at the horizontal solar telescope HSFA2 of the Ondřejov observatory, described by Kotrč (2009). Its core consists of a system of diaphragms, imaging Hα telescope and a fast spectrometer with dispersion of 3 px per Å but with cadency reaching up to 50 frames per second. The first solar flares observed recently by this novel technique provide quite interesting results. Our analysis of the data proves that the described device is sufficiently sensitive to detect variations in the Balmer continuum during solar flares.

  4. Solar Flares and their Effects on Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward Francis; Engle, Scott G.

    2015-08-01

    The effects of flares from the Sun on Earth and other solar-system planets are discussed. The strong X-ray - UV radiation and high plasma fluxes from flares can strongly effect solar system planets even as far out as the Jovian planets and their moons. Data from our "Sun in Time" program are used to study the flare properties of the Sun and solar-type stars from youth to old age. These data imply that the young Sun had numerous, very powerful flares that may have played major roles in the development and evolution of the early atmospheres of Earth and other terrestiral planets. These strong X-UV fluxes from flares can greatly effect the photochemistry of planetary atmospheres as well as ionizing and possibly eroding their atmospheres. Some examples are given. Also briefly discussed are effects of large flares from the present Sun on the Earth. Even though strong solar flares are rarer and less powerful than from the youthful Sun, they can cause significant damage to our communication and satellite systems, electrical networks, and threaten the lives of astronauts in space.This research is supported by grants from NASA (HST and Chandra) and NSF. We gratefully acknowledge this support

  5. How big was the Carrington 1859 Flare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Svalgaard, L.; Neidig, D. F.

    2004-05-01

    The 1859 space weather event was distinguished by its great geomagnetic storm, widespread low-latitude aurora, and intense solar energetic particle event (inferred from the NO3 concentration in polar ice cores). Arguably each of these three effects was the largest ever observed. What can we say about the size of the associated solar flare? We have two observations with which to make such an assessment: (1) Carrington's and Hodgson's report of the white-light flare and (2) the solar flare effect or magnetic crochet observed in the Kew and Greenwich magnetograms. Estimates of the area, duration, spectrum, and intensity of the white-light emission indicate a large (~2 x 1030 erg) but not unequalled event (the white-light emission of the 24 April 1984 >X13 flare contained ~6 x 1030 erg). The magnetic crochet of 130 nT in the horizontal force, however, exceeds that for all >X10 soft X-ray flares observed from 1984-2002 (we are presently compiling magnetic data for the recent October-November 2003 activity for comparison with the 1859 event). Thus at this point, we can conservatively say that Carrington's flare likely had a soft X-ray classification >X10 and was at least comparable to the largest flares recorded during the spacecraft era.

  6. Avalanches and the distribution of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Edward T.; Hamilton, Russell J.

    1991-01-01

    The solar coronal magnetic field is proposed to be in a self-organized critical state, thus explaining the observed power-law dependence of solar-flare-occurrence rate on flare size which extends over more than five orders of magnitude in peak flux. The physical picture that arises is that solar flares are avalanches of many small reconnection events, analogous to avalanches of sand in the models published by Bak and colleagues in 1987 and 1988. Flares of all sizes are manifestations of the same physical processes, where the size of a given flare is determined by the number of elementary reconnection events. The relation between small-scale processes and the statistics of global-flare properties which follows from the self-organized magnetic-field configuration provides a way to learn about the physics of the unobservable small-scale reconnection processes. A simple lattice-reconnection model is presented which is consistent with the observed flare statistics. The implications for coronal heating are discussed and some observational tests of this picture are given.

  7. Identification of Candidate Predictors of Lupus Flare.

    PubMed

    Crow, Mary K; Olferiev, Mikhail; Kirou, Kyriakos A

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus, the prototype systemic autoimmune disease, is characterized by extensive self-reactivity, inflammation, and organ system damage. Sustained production of type I interferon is seen in many patients and contributes to immune dysregulation. Disease activity fluctuates with periods of relative quiescence or effective management by immunosuppressive drugs, followed by disease flares. Tissue damage accumulates over time, with kidneys and cardiovascular system particularly affected. Identification of the underlying molecular mechanisms that precede clinical exacerbations, allowing prediction of future flare, could lead to therapeutic interventions that prevent severe disease. We generated gene expression data from a longitudinal cohort of lupus patients, some showing at least one period of severe flare and others with relatively stable disease over the period of study. Candidate predictors of future clinical flare were identified based on analysis of differentially expressed gene transcripts between the flare and non-flare groups at a time when all patients had relatively quiescent clinical disease activity. Our results suggest the hypothesis that altered regulation of genome stability and nucleic acid fidelity may be important molecular precursors of future clinical flare, generating endogenous nucleic acid triggers that engage intracellular mechanisms that mimic a chronic host response to viral infection.

  8. Impact of lateral force-resisting system and design/construction practices on seismic performance and cost of tall buildings in Dubai, UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlHamaydeh, Mohammad; Galal, Khaled; Yehia, Sherif

    2013-09-01

    The local design and construction practices in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), together with Dubai's unique rate of development, warrant special attention to the selection of Lateral Force-Resisting Systems (LFRS). This research proposes four different feasible solutions for the selection of the LFRS for tall buildings and quantifies the impact of these selections on seismic performance and cost. The systems considered are: Steel Special Moment-Resisting Frame (SMRF), Concrete SMRF, Steel Dual System (SMRF with Special Steel Plates Shear Wall, SPSW), and Concrete Dual System (SMRF with Special Concrete Shear Wall, SCSW). The LFRS selection is driven by seismic setup as well as the adopted design and construction practices in Dubai. It is found that the concrete design alternatives are consistently less expensive than their steel counterparts. The steel dual system is expected to have the least damage based on its relatively lesser interstory drifts. However, this preferred performance comes at a higher initial construction cost. Conversely, the steel SMRF system is expected to have the most damage and associated repair cost due to its excessive flexibility. The two concrete alternatives are expected to have relatively moderate damage and repair costs in addition to their lesser initial construction cost.

  9. The flare kernel in the impulsive phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejager, C.

    1986-01-01

    The impulsive phase of a flare is characterized by impulsive bursts of X-ray and microwave radiation, related to impulsive footpoint heating up to 50 or 60 MK, by upward gas velocities (150 to 400 km/sec) and by a gradual increase of the flare's thermal energy content. These phenomena, as well as non-thermal effects, are all related to the impulsive energy injection into the flare. The available observations are also quantitatively consistent with a model in which energy is injected into the flare by beams of energetic electrons, causing ablation of chromospheric gas, followed by convective rise of gas. Thus, a hole is burned into the chromosphere; at the end of impulsive phase of an average flare the lower part of that hole is situated about 1800 km above the photosphere. H alpha and other optical and UV line emission is radiated by a thin layer (approx. 20 km) at the bottom of the flare kernel. The upward rising and outward streaming gas cools down by conduction in about 45 s. The non-thermal effects in the initial phase are due to curtailing of the energy distribution function by escape of energetic electrons. The single flux tube model of a flare does not fit with these observations; instead we propose the spaghetti-bundle model. Microwave and gamma-ray observations suggest the occurrence of dense flare knots of approx. 800 km diameter, and of high temperature. Future observations should concentrate on locating the microwave/gamma-ray sources, and on determining the kernel's fine structure and the related multi-loop structure of the flaring area.

  10. Bayesian model comparison of solar flare spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, J.; Holman, G.

    2012-12-01

    The detailed understanding of solar flares requires an understanding of the physics of accelerated electrons, since electrons carry a large fraction of the total energy released in a flare. Hard X-ray energy flux spectral observations of solar flares can be fit with different parameterized models of the interaction of the flare-accelerated electrons with the solar plasma. Each model describes different possible physical effects that may occur in solar flares. Bayesian model comparison provides a technique for assessing which model best describes the data. The advantage of this technique over others is that it can fully account for the different number and type of parameters in each model. We demonstrate this using Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) spectral data from the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) X4.8 flare of 23-July-2002. We suggest that the observed spectrum can be reproduced using two different parameterized models of the flare electron content. The first model assumes that the flare-accelerated electron spectrum consisting of a single power law with a fixed low energy cutoff assumed to be below the range of fitted X-ray energies, interacting with a non-uniformly ionized target. The second model assumes that the flare-accelerated electron spectrum has a broken power law and a low energy cutoff, which interacts with a fully ionized target plasma. The low energy cutoff in this model is a parameter used in fitting the data. We will introduce and use Bayesian model comparison techniques to decide which model best explains the observed data. This work is funded by the NASA Solar and Heliospheric Physics program.

  11. New flare diagnostics from loop modeling of a stellar flare observedwith XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, F.

    XMM-Newton data of an X-ray flare observed on Proxima Centauri provide detailed and challenging constraints for flare modeling. The comparison of the data with the results of time-dependent hydrodynamic loop modeling of this flare allows us to constrain not only the loop morphology, but also the details of the heating function. The results show that even a complex flare event like this can be described with a relatively few - though constrained - components: two loop systems, i.e. a single loop and an arcade, and two heat components, an intense pulse probably located at the loop footpoints followed by a low gradual decay distributed in the coronal part of the loop. The similarity to at least one solar event (the Bastille Day flare in 2000) indicate that this pattern may be common to solar and stellar flares.

  12. Flare diagnostics from loop modeling of a stellar flare observed with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, Fabio

    2006-01-01

    XMM-Newton data of an X-ray flare observed on Proxima Centauri provide detailed and challenging constraints for flare modeling. The comparison of the data with the results of time-dependent hydrodynamic loop modeling of this flare allows us to constrain not only the loop morphology, but also the details of the heating function. The results show that even a complex flare event like this can be described with a relatively few though constrained components: two loop systems, i.e., a single loop and an arcade, and two heat components, an intense pulse probably located at the loop footpoints followed by a low gradual decay distributed in the coronal part of the loop. The similarity to at least one solar event (the Bastille Day flare in 2000) indicates that this pattern may be common to solar and stellar flares.

  13. He-3-rich flares - A possible explanation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    A plasma mechanism is proposed to explain the dramatic enhancements in He-3 observed in He-3-rich flares. It is shown that a common current instability in the corona may heat ambient He-3(2+) over any other ion and thus may preferentially inject He-3 into the flare acceleration process. This mechanism operates when the abundance of He-4 and heavier elements is larger than normal in the coronal plasma. It may also preferentially heat and thus inject certain ions of iron. The mechanism thus provides a possible explanation for the observed correlation between He-3 and heavy enhancements in He-3-rich flares.

  14. Neutrons and Gamma Rays from Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The theory of neutron and gamma-ray production in flares is reviewed and comparisons of the calculations with data are made. The principal conclusions pertain to the accelerated proton and electron numbers and spectra in flares and to the interaction site of these particles in the solar atmosphere. For the June 21, 1980 flare, from which high-energy neutrons and high-energy ( MeV) photons were seen, the electron-to-proton ratio is energy dependent and much smaller than unity at energies greater than 1 MeV. The interaction site of these particles appears to be the solar chromosphere.

  15. Design and characterization of a laterally mounted phased-array transducer breast-specific MRgHIFU device with integrated 11-channel receiver array

    PubMed Central

    Payne, A.; Merrill, R.; Minalga, E.; Vyas, U.; Bever, J. de; Todd, N.; Hadley, R.; Dumont, E.; Neumayer, L.; Christensen, D.; Roemer, R.; Parker, D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This work presents the design and preliminary evaluation of a new laterally mounted phased-array MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) system with an integrated 11-channel phased-array radio frequency (RF) coil intended for breast cancer treatment. The design goals for the system included the ability to treat the majority of tumor locations, to increase the MR image’s signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) throughout the treatment volume and to provide adequate comfort for the patient. Methods: In order to treat the majority of the breast volume, the device was designed such that the treated breast is suspended in a 17-cm diameter treatment cylinder. A laterally shooting 1-MHz, 256-element phased-array ultrasound transducer with flexible positioning is mounted outside the treatment cylinder. This configuration achieves a reduced water volume to minimize RF coil loading effects, to position the coils closer to the breast for increased signal sensitivity, and to reduce the MR image noise associated with using water as the coupling fluid. This design uses an 11-channel phased-array RF coil that is placed on the outer surface of the cylinder surrounding the breast. Mechanical positioning of the transducer and electronic steering of the focal spot enable placement of the ultrasound focus at arbitrary locations throughout the suspended breast. The treatment platform allows the patient to lie prone in a face-down position. The system was tested for comfort with 18 normal volunteers and SNR capabilities in one normal volunteer and for heating accuracy and stability in homogeneous phantom and inhomogeneous ex vivo porcine tissue. Results: There was a 61% increase in mean relative SNR achieved in a homogeneous phantom using the 11-channel RF coil when compared to using only a single-loop coil around the chest wall. The repeatability of the system’s energy delivery in a single location was excellent, with less than 3% variability between repeated

  16. Explosive evaporation in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, George H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper develops a simple analytical model for the phenomenon of 'explosive evaporation' driven by nonthermal electron heating in solar flares. The model relates the electron energy flux and spectrum, plus details of the preflare atmosphere, to the time scale for explosive evaporation to occur, the maximum pressure and temperature to be reached, rough estimates for the UV pulse emission flux and duration, and the evolution of the blueshifted component of the soft X-ray lines. An expression is given for the time scale for buildup to maximum pressures and the onset of rapid motion of the explosively evaporating plasma. This evaporation can excite a rapid response of UV line and continuum emission. The emission lines formed in the plasma approach a given emissivity-weighted blueshift speed.

  17. Positron annihilation in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Ramaty, R.; Werntz, C.

    1975-01-01

    The gamma ray line at 0.51 MeV originates from the annihilation of positrons. When a fraction of the positrons annihilate from bound states of positronium, the 0.51-MeV line is accompanied by a continuum of 3-gamma annihilation radiation at energies up to 0.51 MeV. Accurate calculations of the rates of free annihilation and positronium formation in a solar flare plasma are presented and positronium formation by charge exchange is discussed. The observability of the 3-gamma annihilation is increased by the inherent delay in the production and slowing down time of the positrons. It was concluded that such radiation could be detected at times late in solar gamma ray events when the continuum and prompt line emissions have essentially disappeared.

  18. Development of Daily Solar Maximum Flare Flux Forecast Models for Strong Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seulki; Chu, Hyoungseok

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a set of daily solar maximum flare flux forecast models for strong flares using Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) methods. We consider input parameters as solar activity data from January 1996 to December 2013 such as sunspot area, X-ray maximum flare flux and weighted total flux of the previous day, and mean flare rates of McIntosh sunspot group (Zpc) and Mount Wilson magnetic classification. For a training data set, we use the same number of 61 events for each C-, M-, and X-class from Jan. 1996 to Dec. 2004, while other previous models use all flares. For a testing data set, we use all flares from Jan. 2005 to Nov. 2013. The statistical parameters from contingency tables show that the ANN models are better for maximum flare flux forecasting than the MLR models. A comparison between our maximum flare flux models and the previous ones based on Heidke Skill Score (HSS) shows that our all models for X-class flare are much better than the other models. According to the Hitting Fraction (HF), which is defined as a fraction of events satisfying that the absolute differences of predicted and observed flare flux in logarithm scale are less than equal to 0.5, our models successfully forecast the maximum flare flux of about two-third events for strong flares. Since all input parameters for our models are easily available, the models can be operated steadily and automatically on daily basis for space weather service.

  19. Solar flare count periodicities in different X-ray flare classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng-Xin; Xu, Jing-Chen

    2016-04-01

    Using the Morlet wavelet transform and the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), we investigate the periodic behaviours of C, M and X-class flare counts, respectively, recorded by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) from 1983 May to 2014 December, which cover the two complete solar cycles (SCs) 22 and 23 as well as the part of declining phase of SC 21 and rise and maximum phases of SC 24. Analyses show that the periodic behaviours of various class flare counts are different. (1) Not all periods of various class flare counts appear dominant during the cycle maxima. For C-class flares, during SC 23, periods appear dominant during the maximum phase, however, compared to those during SC 23, there are more periods during the declining phase of SC 22; for M-class flares, during SCs 22 and 23, periods appear dominant during the cycle maxima; for X-class flares, during SC 22, almost all periods appear during the maximum phase; however, during SC 23, there are more periods during the declining phase compared to those during SC 22. (2) For C-class flares, the appearance of periods do not follow the amplitude of C-class flare cycles; while, for M and X-class flares, the appearance of periods follows the amplitude of the investigated corresponding class flare cycles. (3) From the overall trends, the 10 yr and longer time-scale trends of the monthly numbers of M and X-class flares, we can infer that the maximum values of the monthly M and X-class flare numbers would increase during SC 25.

  20. Evolution of the X-ray spectrum in the flare model of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, S.; Coupé, S.; Dumont, A.-M.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Różańska, A.

    2003-03-01

    Nayakshin & Kazanas (\\cite{Nayakshin02}) have considered the time-dependent illumination of an accretion disc in Active Galactic Nuclei, in the lamppost model, where it is assumed that an X-ray source illuminates the whole inner-disc region in a relatively steady way. We extend their study to the flare model, which postulates the release of a large X-ray flux above a small region of the accretion disc. A fundamental difference to the lamppost model is that the region of the disc below the flare is not illuminated before the onset of the flare. After the onset, the temperature and the ionization state of the irradiated skin respond immediately to the increase of the continuum, but pressure equilibrium is achieved later. A few typical test models show that the reflected spectrum that follows immediately the increase in continuum flux should always display the characteristics of a highly illuminated but dense gas, i.e. very intense X-ray emission lines and ionization edges in the soft X-ray range. The behaviour of the iron line is however different in the case of a ``moderate" and a ``strong'' flare: for a moderate flare, the spectrum displays a neutral component of the Fe Kalpha line at 6.4 keV, gradually leading to more highly ionized lines. For a strong flare, the lines are already emitted by FeXXV (around 6.7 keV) after the onset, and are very intense, with an equivalent width of several hundreds eV. A strong flare is also characterized by a steep soft X-ray spectrum. The variation timescale in the flare model is likely smaller than in the lamppost model, due to the smaller dimension of the emission region, so the timescale for pressure equilibrium is long compared to the duration of a flare. It is therefore highly probable that several flares contribute at the same time to the luminosity. We find that the observed correlations between R, Gamma , and the X-ray flux are well accounted for by a combination of flares having not achieved pressure equilibrium, also

  1. Exceptions to the rule: the X-flares of AR 2192 Lacking Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, J. K.; Su, Y.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.

    2016-04-01

    NOAA Active region (AR) 2192, that was present on the Sun in October 2014, was the largest region which occurred since November 1990 (see Figure 1). The huge size accompanied by a very high activity level, was quite unexpected as it appeared during the unusually weak solar cycle 24. Nevertheless, the AR turned out to be one of the most prolific flaring ARs of cycle 24. It produced in total 6 X, 29 M, 79 C flares during its disk passage from October 18-29, 2014 (see Figure 2). Surprisingly, all flares greater than GOES class M5 and X were confined, i.e. had no coronal mass ejections (CME) associated. All the flare events had some obvious similarity in morphology, as they were located in the core of the AR and revealed only minor separation motion away from the neutral line but a large initial separation of the conjugate flare ribbons. In the paper by Thalmann et al. (2015) we describe the series of flares and give details about the confined X1.6 flare event from October 22, 2014 as well as the single eruptive M4.0 flare event from October 24, 2014. The study of the X1.6 flare revealed a large initial separation of flare ribbons together with recurrent flare brightenings, which were related to two episodes of enhanced hard X-ray emission as derived from RHESSI observations. This suggests that magnetic field structures connected to specific regions were repeatedly involved in the process of reconnection and energy release. Opposite to the central location of the sequence of confined events within the AR, a single eruptive (M4.0) event occurred on the outskirt of the AR in the vicinity of open magnetic fields. Our investigations revealed a predominantly north-south oriented magnetic system of arcade fields overlying the AR that could have preserved the magnetic arcade to erupt, and consequently kept the energy release trapped in a localized volume of magnetic field high up in the corona (as supported by the absence of a lateral motion of the flare ribbons and the

  2. Automated Feature Detection and Solar Flare Prediction Using SDO Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qahwaji, Rami; Ahmed, Omar; Colak, Tufan

    The importance of real-time processing of solar data especially for space weather applica-tions is increasing continuously, especially with the launch of SDO which will provide sev-eral times more data compared to previous solar satellites. In this paper, we will show the initial results of applying our Automated Solar Activity Prediction (ASAP) system for the short-term prediction of significant solar flares to SDO data. This automated system is cur-rently working in real-time mode with SOHO/MDI images and its results are available online (http://spaceweather.inf.brad.ac.uk/) whenever a new solar image available. This system inte-grates image processing and machine learning to deliver these predictions. A machine learning-based system is designed to analyse years of sunspots and flares data to extract knowledge and to create associations that can be represented using computer-based learning rules. An imaging-based real time system that provides automated detection, grouping and then clas-sification of recent sunspots based on the McIntosh classification and integrated within this system. The results of current feature detections and flare predictions of ASAP using SOHO data will be compared to those results of ASAP using SDO data and will also be presented in this paper.

  3. Development of Daily Maximum Flare-Flux Forecast Models for Strong Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seulki; Lee, Jin-Yi; Moon, Yong-Jae; Chu, Hyoungseok; Park, Jongyeob

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a set of daily maximum flare-flux forecast models for strong flares (M- and X-class) using multiple linear regression (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) methods. Our input parameters are solar-activity data from January 1996 to December 2013 such as sunspot area, X-ray maximum, and weighted total flare flux of the previous day, as well as mean flare rates of McIntosh sunspot group (Zpc) and Mount Wilson magnetic classifications. For a training dataset, we used 61 events each of C-, M-, and X-class from January 1996 to December 2004. For a testing dataset, we used all events from January 2005 to November 2013. A comparison between our maximum flare-flux models and NOAA model based on true skill statistics (TSS) shows that the MLR model for X-class and the average of all flares (M{+}X-class) are much better than the NOAA model. According to the hitting fraction (HF), which is defined as a fraction of events satisfying the condition that the absolute differences of predicted and observed flare flux on a logarithm scale are smaller than or equal to 0.5, our models successfully forecast the maximum flare flux of about two-thirds of the events for strong flares. Since all input parameters for our models are easily available, the models can be operated steadily and automatically on a daily basis for space-weather services.

  4. Xrt And Shinx Joint Flare Study: Ar 11024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell, Alexander; Sylwester, J.; Siarkowski, M.

    2010-05-01

    From 12:00 UT on July 3 through July 7, 2009 SphinX (Solar Photometer IN X-rays) observes 130 flares with active region (AR) 11024 being the only AR on disk. XRT (X-Ray Telescope) is able to observe 64 of these flare events. The combination of both instruments results in a flare study revealing (1) a relationship between flux emergence and flare rate, (2) that the presence of active region loops typically results in different flare morphologies (single and multiple loop flares) then when there is a lack of an active region loop environment where more cusp and point-like flares are observed, (3) cusp and point-like flares often originate from the same location, and (4) a distribution of flare temperatures corresponding to the different flare morphologies. The differences between the observed flare morphologies may occur as the result of the heated plasma through the flaring process being confined by the proximity of loop structures as for the single and multiple loop flares, while for cusp and point-like flares they occur in an early-phase environment that lack loop presence. The continuing flux emergence of AR 11024 likely provides different magnetic interactions and may be the source responsible for all of the flares.

  5. Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES Project)

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel Henderson; Robert Fickes

    2007-12-31

    The Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES) project was developed in response to a cooperative agreement offering by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Preferred Upstream Management Projects (PUMP III). Project partners included the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) as lead agency working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Oil Producers Electric Cooperative (COPE). The project was designed to demonstrate that the entire range of oilfield 'stranded gases' (gas production that can not be delivered to a commercial market because it is poor quality, or the quantity is too small to be economically sold, or there are no pipeline facilities to transport it to market) can be cost-effectively harnessed to make electricity. The utilization of existing, proven distribution generation (DG) technologies to generate electricity was field-tested successfully at four marginal well sites, selected to cover a variety of potential scenarios: high Btu, medium Btu, ultra-low Btu gas, as well as a 'harsh', or high contaminant, gas. Two of the four sites for the OFFGASES project were idle wells that were shut in because of a lack of viable solutions for the stranded noncommercial gas that they produced. Converting stranded gas to useable electrical energy eliminates a waste stream that has potential negative environmental impacts to the oil production operation. The electricity produced will offset that which normally would be purchased from an electric utility, potentially lowering operating costs and extending the economic life of the oil wells. Of the piloted sites, the most promising technologies to handle the range were microturbines that have very low emissions. One recently developed product, the Flex-Microturbine, has the potential to handle the entire range of oilfield gases. It is deployed at an oilfield near Santa Barbara to run on waste gas that is only 4% the

  6. AR1429 Releases X1 Class Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory captured the X1 flare, shown here in the 171 Angstrom wavelength, a wavelength typically shown in the color gold. This movie runs from 10 PM ET March 4 to 3 AM March ...

  7. Solar Eruptions: Coronal Mass Ejections and Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This lecture introduces the topic of Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, collectively known as solar eruptions. During solar eruptions, the released energy flows out from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. Flares can be eruptive or confined. Eruptive flares accompany CMEs, while confined flares hav only electromagnetic signature. CMEs can drive MHD shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. CMEs heading in the direction of Earth arrive in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currnts that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines

  8. 2011 Valentines Day X-Class Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    The video clip of the large X2 flare seen by Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) in extreme ultraviolet light on February 15, 2011, has been enlarged and superimposed on a video of SOHO's C2 coronagra...

  9. Neutral pion production in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, D. J.; Vestrand, W. T.; Chupp, E. L.; Rieger, E.; Cooper, J. F.; Share, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on SMM has detected more than 130 flares with emission approx 300 keV. More than 10 of these flares were detected at photon energies 10 MeV. Although the majority of the emission at 10 MeV must be from electron bremsstrahlung, at least two of the flares have spectral properties 40 MeV that require gamma rays from the decay of neutral pions. It is found that pion production can occur early in the impulsive phase as defined by hard X-rays near 100 keV. It is also found in one of these flares that a significant portion of this high-energy emission is produced well after the impulsive phase. This extended production phase, most clearly observed at high energies, may be a signature of the acceleration process which produces solar energetic particles (SEP's) in space.

  10. SDO Sees Late Phase in Solar Flares

    NASA Video Gallery

    On May 5, 2010, shortly after the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) began normal operation, the sun erupted with numerous coronal loops and flares. Many of these showed a previously unseen "late pha...

  11. C3-class Solar Flare Eruption

    NASA Video Gallery

    Just as sunspot 1105 was turning away from Earth on Sept. 8, the active region erupted, producing a C3-class solar flare (peak @ 2330 UT) and a fantastic prominence. This is a three color closeup o...

  12. Magnetic Variations Associated With Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, Vahe

    2005-01-01

    A report summarizes an investigation of helioseismic waves and magnetic variations associated with solar flares, involving analysis of data acquired by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) aboard the Solar and Heliocentric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft, the Yohkoh spacecraft, and the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) spacecraft. Reconstruction of x-ray flare images from RHESSI data and comparison of them with MDI magnetic maps were performed in an attempt to infer the changes in the geometry of the magnetic field. It was established that in most flares observed with MDI, downward propagating shocks were much weaker than was one observed in the July 9, 1996 flare, which caused a strong helioseismic response. It was concluded that most of the observed impulsive variations result from direct impact of high-energy particles. Computer codes were developed for further study of these phenomena.

  13. Magnetic Fields in Limb Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozitsky, V. G.; Lozitska, N. I.; Botygina, O. A.

    2013-02-01

    Two limb solar flares, of 14 July 2005 and 19 July 2012, of importance X1.2 and M7.7, are analyzed at present work. Magnetic field strength in named flares are investigated by Stokes I±V profiles of Hα and D3 HeI lines. There are direct evidences to the magnetic field inhomogeneity in flares, in particular, non-paralelism of bisectors in I+V and I-V profiles. In some flare places, the local maximums of bisectors splitting were found in both lines. If these bisector splittings are interpreted as Zeeman effect manifestation, the following magnetic field strengths reach up to 2200 G in Hα and 1300 G in D3. According to calculations, the observed peculiarities of line profiles may indicate the existence of optically thick emissive small-scale elements with strong magnetic fields and lowered temperature.

  14. Can we explain atypical solar flares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmasse, K.; Chandra, R.; Schmieder, B.; Aulanier, G.

    2015-02-01

    Context. We used multiwavelength high-resolution data from ARIES, THEMIS, and SDO instruments to analyze a non-standard, C3.3 class flare produced within the active region NOAA 11589 on 2012 October 16. Magnetic flux emergence and cancellation were continuously detected within the active region, the latter leading to the formation of two filaments. Aims: Our aim is to identify the origins of the flare taking the complex dynamics of its close surroundings into account. Methods: We analyzed the magnetic topology of the active region using a linear force-free field extrapolation to derive its 3D magnetic configuration and the location of quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs), which are preferred sites for flaring activity. Because the active region's magnetic field was nonlinear force-free, we completed a parametric study using different linear force-free field extrapolations to demonstrate the robustness of the derived QSLs. Results: The topological analysis shows that the active region presented a complex magnetic configuration comprising several QSLs. The considered data set suggests that an emerging flux episode played a key role in triggering the flare. The emerging flux probably activated the complex system of QSLs, leading to multiple coronal magnetic reconnections within the QSLs. This scenario accounts for the observed signatures: the two extended flare ribbons developed at locations matched by the photospheric footprints of the QSLs and were accompanied with flare loops that formed above the two filaments, which played no important role in the flare dynamics. Conclusions: This is a typical example of a complex flare that can a priori show standard flare signatures that are nevertheless impossible to interpret with any standard model of eruptive or confined flare. We find that a topological analysis, however, permitted us to unveil the development of such complex sets of flare signatures. Movies associated to Figs. 1, 3, and 9 are only available at the CDS via

  15. Optically thick line widths in pyrotechnic flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douda, B. E.; Exton, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Experimentally determined sodium line widths for pyrotechnic flares are compared with simple analytical, optically-thick-line-shape calculations. Three ambient pressure levels are considered (760, 150 and 30 torr) for three different flare compositions. The measured line widths range from 1.3 to 481 A. The analytic procedure emphasizes the Lorentz line shape as observed under optically-thick conditions. Calculated widths are in good agreement with the measured values over the entire range.

  16. Composition of energetic particles from solar flares.

    PubMed

    Garrard, T L; Stone, E C

    1994-10-01

    We present a model for composition of heavy ions in the solar energetic particles (SEP). The SEP composition in a typical large solar particle event reflects the composition of the Sun, with adjustments due to fractionation effects which depend on the first ionization potential (FIP) of the ion and on the ratio of ionic charge to mass (Q/M). Flare-to-flare variations in composition are represented by parameters describing these fractionation effects and the distributions of these parameters are presented.

  17. The EVE Doppler Sensitivity and Flare Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Woods, T. N.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Didkovsky, L.; Del Zanna, G.

    2011-01-01

    The Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) obtains continuous EUV spectra of the Sun viewed as a star. Its primary objective is the characterization of solar spectral irradiance, but its sensitivity and stability make it extremely interesting for observations of variability on time scales down to the limit imposed by its basic 10 s sample interval. In this paper we characterize the Doppler sensitivity of the EVE data. We find that the 30.4 nm line of He II has a random Doppler error below 0.001 nm (1 pm, better than 10 km/s as a redshift), with ample stability to detect the orbital motion of its satellite, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Solar flares also displace the spectrum, both because of Doppler shifts and because of EVE's optical layout, which (as with a slitless spectrograph) confuses position and wavelength. As a flare develops, the centroid of the line displays variations that reflect Doppler shifts and therefore flare dynamics. For the impulsive phase of the flare SOL2010-06-12, we find the line centroid to have a redshift of 16.8 +/- 5.9 km/s relative to that of the flare gradual phase (statistical errors only). We find also that high-temperature lines, such as Fe XXIV 19.2 nm, have well-determined Doppler components for major flares, with decreasing apparent blueshifts as expected from chromospheric evaporation flows.

  18. Global ionospheric flare detection system (GIFDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Daniela; Jakowski, Norbert; Berdermann, Jens; Mayer, Christoph; Valladares, Cesar; Heber, Bernd

    2016-02-01

    The Global Ionospheric Flare Detection System (GIFDS) is currently under development at the German Aerospace Center as a ground based detector for continuous monitoring of the solar flare activity in order to provide real time warnings on solar X-ray events. GIFDS is using Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio transmissions in the northern hemisphere which respond to enhanced ionization in the bottomside ionosphere caused by X-ray flares. Since solar flares can only be detected during daytime, VLF receivers have to be installed around the globe to guarantee continuous records at the dayside sector. GIFDS consists of a network of Perseus SDR (Software Defined Radio) receivers equipped with a MiniWhip antenna each. Reliable detection of solar flares is ensured by recording multiple frequency channels ranging from 0 to 500 kHz. The applicability of the system is demonstrated in a first analysis by comparing VLF measurements with GOES's (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) X-ray flux data. The high potential of GIFDS for a permanent monitoring of solar flares in near real time is discussed.

  19. The energy spectra of solar flare electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, P. A.; Hovestadt, D.; Meyer, P.; Moses, D.

    1985-01-01

    A survey of 50 electron energy spectra from .1 to 100 MeV originating from solar flares was made by the combination of data from two spectrometers onboard the International Sun Earth Explorer-3 spacecraft. The observed spectral shapes of flare events can be divided into two classes through the criteria of fit to an acceleration model. This standard two step acceleration model, which fits the spectral shape of the first class of flares, involves an impulsive step that accelerates particles up to 100 keV and a second step that further accelerates these particles up to 100 MeV by a single shock. This fit fails for the second class of flares that can be characterized as having excessively hard spectra above 1 MeV relative to the predictions of the model. Correlations with soft X-ray and meter radio observations imply that the acceleration of the high energy particles in the second class of flares is dominated by the impulsive phase of the flares.

  20. Cosmetic Lateral Canthoplasty: Preserving the Lateral Canthal Angle

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu Ho; Choi, Hong Lim; Jeong, Eui Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Cosmetic lateral canthoplasty, in which the size of the eye is increased by extending the palpebral fissure and decreasing the degree of the eye slant, has become a prevalent procedure for East Asians. However, it is not uncommon for there to be complications or unfavorable results after the surgery. With this in mind, the authors have designed a surgical method to reduce complications in cosmetic lateral canthoplasty by preserving the lateral canthal angle. We discuss here the anatomy required for surgery, the surgical methods, and methods for reducing complications during cosmetic lateral canthoplasty. PMID:27462563

  1. Using Two-Ribbon Flare Observations and MHD Simulations to Constrain Flare Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Lynch, Benjamin J.; Welsch, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Flare ribbons are emission structures that are frequently observed during flares in transition-region and chromospheric radiation. These typically straddle a polarity inversion line (PIL) of the radial magnetic field at the photosphere, and move apart as the flare progresses. The ribbon flux - the amount of unsigned photospheric magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons - is thought to be related to the amount coronal magnetic reconnection, and hence provides a key diagnostic tool for understanding the physical processes at work in flares and CMEs. Previous measurements of the magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons required time-consuming co-alignment between magnetograph and intensity data from different instruments, explaining why those studies only analyzed, at most, a few events. The launch of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), both aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), presented a rare opportunity to compile a much larger sample of flare-ribbon events than could readily be assembled before. We created a dataset of 363 events of both flare ribbon positions and fluxes, as a function of time, for all C9.-class and greater flares within 45 degrees of disk center observed by SDO from June 2010 till April 2015. For this purpose, we used vector magnetograms (2D magnetic field maps) from HMI and UV images from AIA. A critical problem with using unprocessed AIA data is the existence of spurious intensities in AIA data associated with strong flare emission, most notably "blooming" (spurious smearing of saturated signal into neighboring pixels, often in streaks). To overcome this difficulty, we have developed an algorithmic procedure that effectively excludes artifacts like blooming. We present our database and compare statistical properties of flare ribbons, e.g. evolutions of ribbon reconnection fluxes, reconnection flux rates and vertical currents with the properties from MHD simulations.

  2. Effects of flare definitions on the statistics of derived flare distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, D. F.; Dominique, M.; Seaton, D.; Stegen, K.; White, A.

    2016-08-01

    The statistical examination of solar flares is crucial to revealing their global characteristics and behaviour. Such examinations can tackle large-scale science questions or give context to detailed single-event studies. However, they are often performed using standard but basic flare detection algorithms relying on arbitrary thresholds. This arbitrariness may lead to important scientific conclusions being drawn from results caused by subjective choices in algorithms rather than the true nature of the Sun. In this paper, we explore the effect of the arbitrary thresholds used in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) event list and Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) Flare Finder algorithms. We find that there is a small but significant relationship between the power law exponent of the GOES flare peak flux frequency distribution and the flare start thresholds of the algorithms. We also find that the power law exponents of these distributions are not stable, but appear to steepen with increasing peak flux. This implies that the observed flare size distribution may not be a power law at all. We show that depending on the true value of the exponent of the flare size distribution, this deviation from a power law may be due to flares missed by the flare detection algorithms. However, it is not possible determine the true exponent from GOES/XRS observations. Additionally we find that the PROBA2/LYRA flare size distributions are artificially steep and clearly non-power law. We show that this is consistent with an insufficient degradation correction. This means that PROBA2/LYRA should not be used for flare statistics or energetics unless degradation is adequately accounted for. However, it can be used to study variations over shorter timescales and for space weather monitoring.

  3. Slipping Magnetic Reconnection of Flux-rope Structures as a Precursor to an Eruptive X-class Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting; Yang, Kai; Hou, Yijun; Zhang, Jun

    2016-10-01

    We present the quasi-periodic slipping motion of flux-rope structures prior to the onset of an eruptive X-class flare on 2015 March 11, obtained by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The slipping motion occurred at the north part of the flux rope and seemed to successively peel off the flux rope. The speed of the slippage was 30‑40 km s‑1, with an average period of 130 ± 30 s. The Si iv λ1402.77 line showed a redshift of 10‑30 km s‑1 and a line width of 50‑120 km s‑1 at the west legs of slipping structures, indicative of reconnection downflow. The slipping motion lasted about 40 minutes, and the flux rope started to rise up slowly at the late stage of the slippage. Then an X2.1 flare was initiated, and the flux rope was impulsively accelerated. One of the flare ribbons swept across a negative-polarity sunspot, and the penumbral segments of the sunspot decayed rapidly after the flare. We studied the magnetic topology at the flaring region, and the results showed the existence of a twisted flux rope, together with quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) structures binding the flux rope. Our observations imply that quasi-periodic slipping magnetic reconnection occurs along the flux-rope-related QSLs in the preflare stage, which drives the later eruption of the flux rope and the associated flare.

  4. Assessing the influence of the vertical epitaxial layer design on the lateral beam quality of high-power broad area diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterfeldt, M.; Rieprich, J.; Knigge, S.; Maaßdorf, A.; Hempel, M.; Kernke, R.; Tomm, J. W.; Erbert, G.; Crump, P.

    2016-03-01

    GaAs-based high-power broad-area diode lasers deliver optical output powers Popt > 10W with efficiency > 60%. However, their application is limited due to poor in-plane beam parameter product BPPlat=0.25×Θ95%×w95% (Θ95% and w95% are emission angle and aperture, 95% power content). We present experimental investigations on λ = 9xx nm broad area lasers that aim to identify regulating factors of the BPPlat connected to the epitaxial layer design. First, we assess the thermal lens of vertical designs with varying asymmetry, using thermal camera images to determine its strength. Under study are an extreme-double-asymmetric (EDAS) vertical structure and a reference (i.e. more symmetric) design. The lateral thermal profiles clearly show that BPPlat increase is correlated to the bowing of the thermal lens. The latter is derived out of a quadratic temperature fit in the active region beneath the current injection of the laser device and depends on the details of the epitaxial layers. Second, we test the benefit of low modal gain factor Γg0, predicted to improve BPPlat via a suppression of filamentation. EDAS-based lasers with single quantum well (SQW) and double quantum well (DQW) active regions were compared, with 2.5x reduced Γg0, for 2.2x reduced filament gain. However, no difference is seen in measured BPPlat, giving evidence that filamentary processes are no longer a limit. In contrast, devices with lower Γg0 demonstrate an up to twofold reduced near field modulation depth, potentially enabling higher facet loads and increased device facet reliability, when operated near to the COD limit.

  5. Study of Multiple Scale Physics of Magnetic Reconnection on the FLARE (Facility for Laboratory Reconnection Experiments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, H.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Prager, S.; Daughton, W. S.; Bale, S. D.; Carter, T. A.; Crocker, N.; Drake, J. F.; Egedal, J.; Sarff, J.; Wallace, J.; Chen, Y.; Cutler, R.; Fox, W. R., II; Heitzenroeder, P.; Kalish, M.; Jara-Almonte, J.; Myers, C. E.; Ren, Y.; Yamada, M.; Yoo, J.

    2015-12-01

    The FLARE device (flare.pppl.gov) is a new intermediate-scale plasma experiment under construction at Princeton to study magnetic reconnection in regimes directly relevant to space, solar and astrophysical plasmas. The existing small-scale experiments have been focusing on the single X-line reconnection process either with small effective sizes or at low Lundquist numbers, but both of which are typically very large in natural plasmas. The configuration of the FLARE device is designed to provide experimental access to the new regimes involving multiple X-lines, as guided by a reconnection "phase diagram" [Ji & Daughton, PoP (2011)]. Most of major components of the FLARE device have been designed and are under construction. The device will be assembled and installed in 2016, followed by commissioning and operation in 2017. The planned research on FLARE as a user facility will be discussed on topics including the multiple scale nature of magnetic reconnection from global fluid scales to ion and electron kinetic scales. Results from scoping simulations based on particle and fluid codes and possible comparative research with space measurements will be presented.

  6. Temporal and Spatial Relationship of Flare Signatures and the Force-free Coronal Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, J. K.; Veronig, A.; Su, Y.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the plasma and magnetic environment of active region NOAA 11261 on 2011 August 2 around a GOES M1.4 flare/CME (SOL2011-08-02T06:19). We compare coronal emission at the (extreme) ultraviolet and X-ray wavelengths, using SDO AIA and RHESSI images, in order to identify the relative timing and locations of reconnection-related sources. We trace flare ribbon signatures at ultraviolet wavelengths in order to pin down the intersection of previously reconnected flaring loops in the lower solar atmosphere. These locations are used to calculate field lines from three-dimensional (3D) nonlinear force-free magnetic field models, established on the basis of SDO HMI photospheric vector magnetic field maps. Using this procedure, we analyze the quasi-static time evolution of the coronal model magnetic field previously involved in magnetic reconnection. This allows us, for the first time, to estimate the elevation speed of the current sheet’s lower tip during an on-disk observed flare as a few kilometers per second. A comparison to post-flare loops observed later above the limb in STEREO EUVI images supports this velocity estimate. Furthermore, we provide evidence for an implosion of parts of the flaring coronal model magnetic field, and identify the corresponding coronal sub-volumes associated with the loss of magnetic energy. Finally, we spatially relate the build up of magnetic energy in the 3D models to highly sheared fields, established due to the dynamic relative motions of polarity patches within the active region.

  7. Observations of an X-shaped Ribbon Flare and Its Three-dimensional Magnetic Reconnection with IRIS and SDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Qiu, Jiong; Longcope, Dana; Ding, Mingde

    2016-05-01

    We report evolution of an atypical X-shaped flare ribbon which provides novel observational evidence of three-dimensional (3D) magnetic reconnection at a separator. The flare occurred on 2014 November 9, and high-resolution slit-jaw 1330 images from IRIS reveal four chromospheric flare ribbons that converge and form an X-shape. These four ribbons are located in a quadrupolar magnetic field. Reconstruction of magnetic topology in the active region suggests the presence of a separator connecting to the X-point outlined by the ribbons. The inward motion of flare ribbons, as well as coronal loops observed by the SDO/AIA, indicates 3D magnetic reconnection between two sets of non-coplanar loops that approach laterally, and the reconnection proceeds downward to a very low height. We also study spectra of Si IV, C II, and Mg II observed with the IRIS slit, which cuts across the flare ribbons near the X-point. We have found two distinct types of line profiles. At the flare ribbon, all the lines show evident redshifts with a velocity up to 50 km/s, and the redshifts are well correlated with the line intensity and width. These redshifts suggest chromospheric condensation caused by impulsive energy deposition from the separator reconnection. While right outside the flare ribbon, the lines exhibit unshifted, symmetric, yet broadened profiles; in particular, the Si IV line is significantly broadened at the far wing. The line broadening persists for 20 minutes till after the end of the flare. The distinct spectral features near the X-point indicate different dynamics associated with the separator reconnection.

  8. Feasibility of flare gas reformation to practical energy in Farashband gas refinery: no gas flaring.

    PubMed

    Rahimpour, Mohammad Reaza; Jokar, Seyyed Mohammad

    2012-03-30

    A suggested method for controlling the level of hazardous materials in the atmosphere is prevention of combustion in flare. In this work, three methods are proposed to recover flare gas instead of conventional gas-burning in flare at the Farashband gas refinery. These methods aim to minimize environmental and economical disadvantages of burning flare gas. The proposed methods are: (1) gas to liquid (GTL) production, (2) electricity generation with a gas turbine and, (3) compression and injection into the refinery pipelines. To find the most suitable method, the refinery units that send gas to the flare as well as the required equipment for the three aforementioned methods are simulated. These simulations determine the amount of flare gas, the number of GTL barrels, the power generated by the gas turbine and the required compression horsepower. The results of simulation show that 563 barrels/day of valuable GTL products is produced by the first method. The second method provides 25 MW electricity and the third method provides a compressed natural gas with 129 bar pressure for injection to the refinery pipelines. In addition, the economics of flare gas recovery methods are studied and compared. The results show that for the 4.176MMSCFD of gas flared from the Farashband gas refinery, the electricity production gives the highest rate of return (ROR), the lowest payback period, the highest annual profit and mild capital investment. Therefore, the electricity production is the superior method economically.

  9. Multispacecraft Observations of Solar Flare Particles in the Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wibberenz, G.; Cane, H. V.

    2007-01-01

    For a number of impulsive solar particle events we examine variations of maximum intensities and times to maximum intensity as a function of longitude, using observations from the two Helios spacecraft and near the Earth. We find that electrons in the MeV range can be detected more than 80 deg. from the flare longitude, corresponding to a considerably wider "well connected" region than that (approx. 20 deg. half width) reported for He-3-rich impulsive solar events. This wide range and the decrease of peak intensities with increasing connection angle revive the concept of some propagation process in the low corona that has a diffusive nature. Delays to the intensity maximum are not systematically correlated with connection angles. We argue that interplanetary scattering parallel to the average interplanetary magnetic field, that varies with position in space, plays an important role in flare particle events. In a specific case variations of the time profiles with radial distance and with particle rigidity are used to quantitatively confirm spatial diffusion. For a few cases near the edges of the well connected region the very long times to maximum intensity might result from interplanetary lateral transport.

  10. Flare energetics: analysis of a large flare on YZ Canis Minoris observed simultaneously in the ultraviolet, optical and radio.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Oord, G. H. J.; Doyle, J. G.; Rodono, M.; Gary, D. E.; Henry, G. W.; Byrne, P. B.; Linsky, J. L.; Haisch, B. M.; Pagano, I.; Leto, G.

    1996-06-01

    The results of coordinated observations of the dMe star YZ CMi at optical, UV and radio wavelengths during 3-7 February 1983 are presented. YZ CMi showed repeated optical flaring with the largest flare having a magnitude of 3.8 in the U-band. This flare coincided with an IUE exposure which permits a comparison of the emission measure curves of YZ CMi in its flaring and quiescent state. During the flare a downward shift of the transition zone is observed while the radiative losses in the range 10^4^-10^7^K strongly increase. The optical flare is accompanied with a radio flare at 6cm, while at 20cm no emission is detected. The flare is interpreted in terms of optically thick synchrotron emission. We present a combined interpretation of the optical/radio flare and show that the flare can be interpreted within the context of solar two-ribbon/white-light flares. Special attention is paid to the bombardment of dMe atmospheres by particle beams. We show that the characteristic temperature of the heated atmosphere is almost independent of the beam flux and lies within the range of solar white-light flare temperatures. We also show that it is unlikely that stellar flares emit black-body spectra. The fraction of accelerated particles, as follows from our combined optical/radio interpretation is in good agreement with the fraction determined by two-ribbon flare reconnection models.

  11. Reverse Current in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. W., III

    1978-01-01

    An idealized steady state model of a stream of energetic electrons neutralized by a reverse current in the pre-flare solar plasma was developed. These calculations indicate that, in some cases, a significant fraction of the beam energy may be dissipated by the reverse current. Joule heating by the reverse current is a more effective mechanism for heating the plasma than collisional losses from the energetic electrons because the Ohmic losses are caused by thermal electrons in the reverse current which have much shorter mean free paths than the energetic electrons. The heating due to reverse currents is calculated for two injected energetic electron fluxes. For the smaller injected flux, the temperature of the coronal plasma is raised by about a factor of two. The larger flux causes the reverse current drift velocity to exceed the critical velocity for the onset of ion cyclotron turbulence, producing anomalous resistivity and an order of magnitude increase in the temperature. The heating is so rapid that the lack of ionization equilibrium may produce a soft X-ray and EUV pulse from the corona.

  12. An auroral flare at Jupiter.

    PubMed

    Waite, J H; Gladstone, G R; Lewis, W S; Goldstein, R; McComas, D J; Riley, P; Walker, R J; Robertson, P; Desai, S; Clarke, J T; Young, D T

    2001-04-12

    Jupiter's aurora is the most powerful in the Solar System. It is powered largely by energy extracted from planetary rotation, although there seems also to be a contribution from the solar wind. This contrasts with Earth's aurora, which is generated through the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetosphere. The major features of Jupiter's aurora (based on far-ultraviolet, near-infrared and visible-wavelength observations) include a main oval that generally corotates with the planet and a region of patchy, diffuse emission inside the oval on Jupiter's dusk side. Here we report the discovery of a rapidly evolving, very bright and localized emission poleward of the northern main oval, in a region connected magnetically to Jupiter's outer magnetosphere. The intensity of the emission increased by a factor of 30 within 70 s, and then decreased on a similar timescale, all captured during a single four-minute exposure. This type of flaring emission has not previously been reported for Jupiter (similar, but smaller, transient events have been observed at Earth), and it may be related directly to changes in the solar wind.

  13. Enclosed ground-flare incinerator

    DOEpatents

    Wiseman, Thomas R.

    2000-01-01

    An improved ground flare is provided comprising a stack, two or more burner assemblies, and a servicing port so that some of the burner assemblies can be serviced while others remain in operation. The burner assemblies comprise a burner conduit and nozzles which are individually fitted to the stack's burner chamber and are each removably supported in the chamber. Each burner conduit is sealed to and sandwiched between a waste gas inlet port and a matching a closure port on the other side of the stack. The closure port can be opened for physically releasing the burner conduit and supplying sufficient axial movement room for extracting the conduit from the socket, thereby releasing the conduit for hand removal through a servicing port. Preferably, the lower end of the stack is formed of one or more axially displaced lower tubular shells which are concentrically spaced for forming annular inlets for admitting combustion air. An upper tubular exhaust stack, similarly formed, admits additional combustion air for increasing the efficiency of combustion, increasing the flow of exhausted for improved atmospheric dispersion and for cooling the upper stack.

  14. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis: reliability and construct validation of the OMERACT RA Flare Core Domain Set

    PubMed Central

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H; Lin, Daming; Alten, Rieke; Christensen, Robin; Furst, Daniel E; Hewlett, Sarah; Leong, Amye; March, Lyn; Woodworth, Thasia; Boire, Gilles; Haraoui, Boulos; Hitchon, Carol; Jamal, Shahin; Keystone, Edward C; Pope, Janet; Tin, Diane; Thorne, J Carter

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the reliability of concurrent flare identification using 3 methods (patient, rheumatologist and Disease Activity Score (DAS)28 criteria), and construct validity of candidate items representing the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) RA Flare Core Domain Set. Methods Candidate flare questions and legacy measures were administered at consecutive visits to Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) patients between November 2011 and November 2014. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) core set indicators were recorded. Concordance to identify flares was assessed using the agreement coefficient. Construct validity of flare questions was examined: convergent (Spearman's r); discriminant (mean differences between flaring/non-flaring patients); and consequential (proportions with prior treatment reductions and intended therapeutic change postflare). Results The 849 patients were 75% female, 81% white, 42% were in remission/low disease activity (R/LDA), and 16–32% were flaring at the second visit. Agreement of flare status was low–strong (κ's 0.17–0.88) and inversely related to RA disease activity level. Flare domains correlated highly (r's≥0.70) with each other, patient global (r's≥0.66) and corresponding measures (r's 0.49–0.92); and moderately highly with MD and patient-reported joint counts (r's 0.29–0.62). When MD/patients agreed the patient was flaring, mean flare domain between-group differences were 2.1–3.0; 36% had treatment reductions prior to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. Conclusions Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients with/without flare and have strong evidence of construct and consequential validity. Ongoing work will identify optimal scoring and cut points to identify RA flares. PMID

  15. SPECTROPOLARIMETRY OF C-CLASS FLARE FOOTPOINTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kleint, L.

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the decay phase of a C-class flare in full-Stokes imaging spectropolarimetry with quasi-simultaneous measurements in the photosphere (6302.5 A line) and in the chromosphere (8542 A line) with the IBIS instrument. We analyze data from two fields of view, each spanning about 40'' Multiplication-Sign 80'' and targeting the two footpoints of the flare. A region of interest is identified from V/I images: a patch of opposite polarity in the smaller sunspot's penumbra. We find unusual flows in this patch at photospheric levels: a Doppler shift of -4 km s{sup -1}, but also a possible radial inflow into the sunspot of 4 km s{sup -1}. Such patches seem to be common during flares, but only high-resolution observations allowed us to see the inflow, which may be related to future flares observed in this region. Chromospheric images show variable overlying emission and flows and unusual Stokes profiles. We also investigate the irregular penumbra, whose formation may be blocked by the opposite polarity patch and flux emergence. The 40 minute temporal evolution depicts the larger of the flare ribbons becoming fainter and changing its shape. Measurable photospheric magnetic fields remain constant and we do not detect flare energy transport down from the chromosphere. We find no clear indications of impact polarization in the 8542 A line. We cannot exclude the possibility of impact polarization, because weaker signals may be buried in the prominent Zeeman signatures or it may have been present earlier during the flare.

  16. A solar tornado triggered by flares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, N. K.; Innes, D. E.; Tiwari, S. K.; Low, B. C.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Solar tornados are dynamical, conspicuously helical magnetic structures that are mainly observed as a prominence activity. Aims: We investigate and propose a triggering mechanism for the solar tornado observed in a prominence cavity by SDO/AIA on September 25, 2011. Methods: High-cadence EUV images from the SDO/AIA and the Ahead spacecraft of STEREO/EUVI are used to correlate three flares in the neighbouring active-region (NOAA 11303) and their EUV waves with the dynamical developments of the tornado. The timings of the flares and EUV waves observed on-disk in 195 Å are analysed in relation to the tornado activities observed at the limb in 171 Å. Results: Each of the three flares and its related EUV wave occurred within ten hours of the onset of the tornado. They have an observed causal relationship with the commencement of activity in the prominence where the tornado develops. Tornado-like rotations along the side of the prominence start after the second flare. The prominence cavity expands with the accelerating tornado motion after the third flare. Conclusions: Flares in the neighbouring active region may have affected the cavity prominence system and triggered the solar tornado. A plausible mechanism is that the active-region coronal field contracted by the "Hudson effect" through the loss of magnetic energy as flares. Subsequently, the cavity expanded by its magnetic pressure to fill the surrounding low corona. We suggest that the tornado is the dynamical response of the helical prominence field to the cavity expansion. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. FLARES PRODUCING WELL-ORGANIZED POST-FLARE ARCADES (SLINKIES) HAVE EARLY PRECURSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutova, M. P.

    2011-06-01

    Exploding loop systems producing X-ray flares often, but not always, bifurcate into a long-living, well-organized system of multi-threaded loop arcades resembling solenoidal slinkies. The physical conditions that cause or prevent this process are not known. To address this problem, we examined most of the major (X-class) flares that occurred during the last decade and found that the flares that bifurcate into long-living slinky arcades have different signatures than those that do not 'produce' such structures. The most striking difference is that, in all cases of slinky formation, GOES high energy proton flux becomes significantly enhanced 10-24 hr before the flare occurs. No such effect was found prior to the 'non-slinky' flares. This fact may be associated with the difference between energy production by a given active region and the amount of energy required to bring the entire system into the form of well-organized, self-similar loop arcades. As an example illustrating the process of post-flare slinky formation, we present observations taken with the Hinode satellite, in several wavelengths, showing a time sequence of pre-flare and flare activity, followed by the formation of dynamically stable, well-organized structures. One of the important features revealed is that post-flare coronal slinky formation is preceded by scale invariant structure formation in the underlying chromosphere/transition region. We suggest that the observed regularities can be understood within the framework of self-organized critical dynamics characterized by scale invariant structure formation with critical parameters largely determined by energy saturation level. The observed regularities per se may serve as a long-term precursor of strong flares and may help to study predictability of system behavior.

  18. SphinX catalogue of small flares and brightenings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryciuk, Magdalena; Sylwester, Janusz; Gburek, Szymon; Siarkowski, Marek; Mrozek, Tomasz; Kepa, Anna

    The Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) was designed to measure soft X-ray solar emission in the energy range between 1 keV and 15 keV. The instrument operated from February until November 2009 aboard CORONAS-Photon satellite, during the phase of extraordinary low minimum of solar activity. Thanks to its very high sensitivity SphinX was able to record large number of tiny flares and brightenings. A catalogue of events observed by SphinX will be presented. Results of statistical analysis of events’ characteristics will be discussed.

  19. Lateral Attitude Change.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Tina; Dickel, Nina; Liersch, Benjamin; Rees, Jonas; Süssenbach, Philipp; Bohner, Gerd

    2015-08-01

    The authors propose a framework distinguishing two types of lateral attitude change (LAC): (a) generalization effects, where attitude change toward a focal object transfers to related objects, and (b) displacement effects, where only related attitudes change but the focal attitude does not change. They bring together examples of LAC from various domains of research, outline the conditions and underlying processes of each type of LAC, and develop a theoretical framework that enables researchers to study LAC more systematically in the future. Compared with established theories of attitude change, the LAC framework focuses on lateral instead of focal attitude change and encompasses both generalization and displacement. Novel predictions and designs for studying LAC are presented.

  20. Short-term predictions of solar flares.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, V. A.

    1990-02-01

    A review of present-day theoretical investigations of the problem of the accumulation and release of energy in solar flares permits advancing the opinion that only individual flare events are described by a concrete model and that a single model alone does not describe the entire diversity of flares. Consideration of the observational data does not permit claiming the existence of a single universal mechanism known today of flare events. It appears possible to treat the problem of prediction in terms of the algebra of logic (Boolean logic) and to compare the truth table with the often-used contingency table. The introduction of a number of very general assumptions permits forming a general approach to the development of predictive schemes and selection of the individual elements of the models and informative criteria. Experimental results are given on the testing of some prediction procedures. The author's procedure of routine short-term prediction of flares on the basis of the methods of instruction on pattern recognition implemented in the form of a set of programs is outlined. The results of the application of this procedure in 1986 - 1988 are presented.

  1. Flare differentially rotates sunspot on Sun's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Hudson, Hugh S.; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Jiasheng; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2016-10-01

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere). It was considered implausible that solar flares, as resulted from magnetic reconnection in the tenuous corona, would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden flare-induced rotation of a sunspot using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, supplemented by magnetic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. It is clearly observed that the rotation is non-uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to ~50° h-1) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The rotation may be driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the back reaction of coronal magnetic restructuring and is accompanied by a downward Poynting flux. These results have direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum transportation in the flare-related phenomena.

  2. Flare differentially rotates sunspot on Sun's surface

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Hudson, Hugh S.; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Jiasheng; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere). It was considered implausible that solar flares, as resulted from magnetic reconnection in the tenuous corona, would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden flare-induced rotation of a sunspot using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, supplemented by magnetic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. It is clearly observed that the rotation is non-uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to ∼50° h−1) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The rotation may be driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the back reaction of coronal magnetic restructuring and is accompanied by a downward Poynting flux. These results have direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum transportation in the flare-related phenomena. PMID:27721463

  3. Characteristics of energetic solar flare electron spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Dan; Droege, Wolfgang; Meyer, Peter; Evenson, Paul

    1989-01-01

    A 55 event survey of energy spectra of 0.1-100 MeV interplanetary electrons originating from solar flares as measured by two spectrometers onboard the ISEE 3 (ICE) spacecraft for the years 1978-1982 has been completed. Spectra generated using the maximum flux of a given event in each energy channel were restricted to events with a well-defined flux rise time. Two broad groups of electron spectra are considered. In one group, the spectra are well represented by a single power law in rigidity with spectral index in the range 3-4.5. The spectra in the other group deviate from a power law in rigidity systematically in that they harden with increasing rigidity. Events with near power-law spectra are found to be correlated with long-duration soft X-ray events, whereas those with hardening spectra are correlated with short-duration events. The possible variation of acceleration and propagation processes with the properties of the flare site is discussed, using the duration of the soft X-ray flare emission as an indicator of the physical parameters of the flare site (flare volume, density, coronal height, and magnetic field geometry).

  4. Radiative transfer simulations of magnetar flare beaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Putten, T.; Watts, A. L.; Baring, M. G.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetar giant flares show oscillatory modulations in the tails of their light curves, which can only be explained via some form of beaming. The fireball model for magnetar bursts has been used successfully to fit the phase-averaged light curves of the tails of giant flares, but so far no attempts have been made to fit the pulsations. We present a relatively simple numerical model to simulate beaming of magnetar flare emission. In our simulations, radiation escapes from the base of a fireball trapped in a dipolar magnetic field, and is scattered through the optically thick magnetosphere of the magnetar until it escapes. Beaming is provided by the presence of a relativistic outflow, as well as by the geometry of the system. We find that a simple picture for the relativistic outflow is enough to create the pulse fraction and sharp peaks observed in pulse profiles of magnetar flares, while without a relativistic outflow the beaming is insufficient to explain giant flare rotational modulations.

  5. An MHD model for magnetar giant flares

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Y.; Lin, J.; Zhang, Q. S.; Zhang, L.; Reeves, K. K.; Yuan, F. E-mail: jlin@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-04-10

    Giant flares on soft gamma-ray repeaters that are thought to take place on magnetars release enormous energy in a short time interval. Their power can be explained by catastrophic instabilities occurring in the magnetic field configuration and the subsequent magnetic reconnection. By analogy with the coronal mass ejection events on the Sun, we develop a theoretical model via an analytic approach for magnetar giant flares. In this model, the rotation and/or displacement of the crust causes the field to twist and deform, leading to flux rope formation in the magnetosphere and energy accumulation in the related configuration. When the energy and helicity stored in the configuration reach a threshold, the system loses its equilibrium, the flux rope is ejected outward in a catastrophic way, and magnetic reconnection helps the catastrophe develop to a plausible eruption. By taking SGR 1806–20 as an example, we calculate the free magnetic energy released in such an eruptive process and find that it is more than 10{sup 47} erg, which is enough to power a giant flare. The released free magnetic energy is converted into radiative energy, kinetic energy, and gravitational energy of the flux rope. We calculated the light curves of the eruptive processes for the giant flares of SGR 1806–20, SGR 0526–66, and SGR 1900+14, and compared them with the observational data. The calculated light curves are in good agreement with the observed light curves of giant flares.

  6. INVESTIGATION OF CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN A NEUPERT-TYPE SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Ning Zongjun; Cao Wenda

    2010-07-10

    The Neupert effect implies a flare model in which the hard X-rays (HXRs) are produced by energetic electrons via electron-ion bremsstrahlung as they lose their energies in the chromosphere, while the soft X-rays (SXRs) are produced by thermal bremsstrahlung from 'chromospheric evaporation' due to plasma being heated by those same electrons. Based on this concept, we investigate the evidence for chromospheric evaporation in a Neupert-type flare on 2004 October 30. First, we demonstrate that this event is consistent with the Neupert effect. Using the RHESSI data, both thermal and nonthermal energies are derived after the onset of this flare. The high correlation between the derivative of the SXRs and HXRs and between the derivative of the thermal energy and nonthermal energy indicates that the 2004 October 30 flare is a Neupert-type event. Second, chromospheric evaporation is necessarily expected during the flare's rising phase. We analyze RHESSI images at different energies and different times around the flare maximum. The HXR emission tends to move the footpoints close to each other, finally merging them into a single source with the same position as the loop-top source. When the projection effect (due to this event being near the disk center) is taken into account, this fact can be regarded as the signature of chromospheric evaporation in the X-ray observations. RHESSI observations show three kinds of evidence that are consistent with the evaporation model. First, at a given instant, the higher energy X-rays originate from the deeper layers of the atmosphere or further away from the loop top. Second, in a given energy band, i.e., at 20-30 keV, the earlier X-rays originate from the deeper layers or further away from the loop top. Third, the X-ray footpoint sources at higher energies disappear at later times. Based on these characteristics, chromospheric evaporation took about 100 s for the 2004 October 30 flare. X-rays at all energy bands do not show evidence of

  7. 46 CFR 117.68 - Distress flares and smoke signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... (1) A rocket parachute flare approved in accordance with § 160.036 in subchapter Q of this chapter... section: (i) A rocket parachute flare approved in accordance with § 160.036 in subchapter Q of...

  8. 46 CFR 117.68 - Distress flares and smoke signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... (1) A rocket parachute flare approved in accordance with § 160.036 in subchapter Q of this chapter... section: (i) A rocket parachute flare approved in accordance with § 160.036 in subchapter Q of...

  9. 46 CFR 180.68 - Distress flares and smoke signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Substitutions. (1) A rocket parachute flare approved in accordance with § 160.036 in subchapter Q of this... section: (i) A rocket parachute flare approved in accordance with § 160.036 in subchapter Q of...

  10. 46 CFR 180.68 - Distress flares and smoke signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Substitutions. (1) A rocket parachute flare approved in accordance with § 160.036 in subchapter Q of this... section: (i) A rocket parachute flare approved in accordance with § 160.036 in subchapter Q of...

  11. 46 CFR 180.68 - Distress flares and smoke signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Substitutions. (1) A rocket parachute flare approved in accordance with § 160.036 in subchapter Q of this... section: (i) A rocket parachute flare approved in accordance with § 160.036 in subchapter Q of...

  12. 46 CFR 117.68 - Distress flares and smoke signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... (1) A rocket parachute flare approved in accordance with § 160.036 in subchapter Q of this chapter... section: (i) A rocket parachute flare approved in accordance with § 160.036 in subchapter Q of...

  13. X-Class: A Guide to Solar Flares

    NASA Video Gallery

    Solar flares are classified according to their strength. The smallest ones are B-class, followed by C, M and X, the largest. A powerful X-class flare can create long lasting radiation storms, which...

  14. The Origin of the Solar Flare Waiting-Time Distribution.

    PubMed

    Wheatland

    2000-06-20

    It was recently pointed out that the distribution of times between solar flares (the flare waiting-time distribution) follows a power law for long waiting times. Based on 25 years of soft X-ray flares observed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite instruments, it is shown that (1) the waiting-time distribution of flares is consistent with a time-dependent Poisson process and (2) the fraction of time the Sun spends with different flaring rates approximately follows an exponential distribution. The second result is a new phenomenological law for flares. It is shown analytically how the observed power-law behavior of the waiting times originates in the exponential distribution of flaring rates. These results are argued to be consistent with a nonstationary avalanche model for flares.

  15. CHROMOSPHERIC AND CORONAL OBSERVATIONS OF SOLAR FLARES WITH THE HELIOSEISMIC AND MAGNETIC IMAGER

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez Oliveros, Juan-Carlos; Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh S.; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Bain, Hazel; Lindsey, Charles; Bogart, Rick; Couvidat, Sebastien; Scherrer, Phil; Schou, Jesper

    2014-01-10

    We report observations of white-light ejecta in the low corona, for two X-class flares on 2013 May 13, using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory. At least two distinct kinds of sources appeared (chromospheric and coronal), in the early and later phases of flare development, in addition to the white-light footpoint sources commonly observed in the lower atmosphere. The gradual emissions have a clear identification with the classical loop-prominence system, but are brighter than expected and possibly seen here in the continuum rather than line emission. We find the HMI flux exceeds the radio/X-ray interpolation of the bremsstrahlung produced in the flare soft X-ray sources by at least one order of magnitude. This implies the participation of cooler sources that can produce free-bound continua and possibly line emission detectable by HMI. One of the early sources dynamically resembles {sup c}oronal rain{sup ,} appearing at a maximum apparent height and moving toward the photosphere at an apparent constant projected speed of 134 ± 8 km s{sup –1}. Not much literature exists on the detection of optical continuum sources above the limb of the Sun by non-coronagraphic instruments and these observations have potential implications for our basic understanding of flare development, since visible observations can in principle provide high spatial and temporal resolution.

  16. Influence of solar flares on the X-ray corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Batchelor, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Sequences of X-ray images of solar flares, obtained with the Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer on the SMM spacecraft, reveal many dynamical phenomena. Movies of 20 flares recorded with 6-sec time resolution were examined. A preliminary analysis of the events as a group are presented, and some new aspects of the well-studied May 21, 1980 flare and a November 6, 1980 flare are discussed.

  17. A solar tornado caused by flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, N. K.; Innes, D. E.; Tiwari, S. K.; Low, B. C.

    2014-01-01

    An enormous solar tornado was observed by SDO/AIA on 25 September 2011. It was mainly associated with a quiescent prominence with an overlying coronal cavity. We investigate the triggering mechanism of the solar tornado by using the data from two instruments: SDO/AIA and STEREO-A/EUVI, covering the Sun from two directions. The tornado appeared near to the active region NOAA 11303 that produced three flares. The flares directly influenced the prominence-cavity system. The release of free magnetic energy from the active region by flares resulted in the contraction of the active region field. The cavity, owing to its superior magnetic pressure, expanded to fill this vacated space in the corona. We propose that the tornado developed on the top of the prominence due to the expansion of the prominence-cavity system.

  18. Observations of particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    1979-01-01

    Solar flares provide several examples of nonthermal particle acceleration. The paper reviews the information gained about these processes via X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, which can presently distinguish among three separate particle-acceleration processes at the sun: an impulsive accelerator of more than 20 keV electrons, a gradual accelerator of more than 20 keV electrons, and a gradual accelerator of more than 10 MeV ions. The acceleration energy efficiency (total particle energy divided by total flare energy) of any of these mechanisms cannot be less than about 0.1%, although the gradual acceleration does not occur in every flare. The observational material suggests that both the impulsive and gradual accelerations take place preferentially in closed magnetic-field structures, but that the electrons decay in these traps before they can escape. The ions escape very efficiently.

  19. Microsecond flares in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Cohen, Justin; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Cline, Thomas L.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Matteson, James L.

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested that gamma-ray burst light curves may consist of many superposed flares with a duration shorter than 30/microsec. If true, the implications for the interpretation of burst data are enormous. With the launch of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, four predictions of Mitrofanov's (1989) suggestion can be tested. Our results which contradict this suggestion are (1) the photon arrival times are not correlated between independent detectors, (2) the spectral hardness and intensity does not depend on the detector area, (3) the bursts seen by detectors which measure photon positions do not see microsecond flares, and (4) burst positions deduced from detectors with different projected areas are close to the positions deduced from time-of-flight differences between separated spacecraft. We conclude, therefore, that gamma-ray bursts are not composed of microsecond flares.

  20. Active Region Emergence and Remote Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yixing; Welsch, Brian T.

    2016-02-01

    We study the effect of new emerging solar active regions on the large-scale magnetic environment of existing regions. We first present a theoretical approach to quantify the "interaction energy" between new and pre-existing regions as the difference between i) the summed magnetic energies of their individual potential fields and ii) the energy of their superposed potential fields. We expect that this interaction energy can, depending upon the relative arrangements of newly emerged and pre-existing magnetic flux, indicate the existence of "topological" free magnetic energy in the global coronal field that is independent of any "internal" free magnetic energy due to coronal electric currents flowing within the newly emerged and pre-existing flux systems. We then examine the interaction energy in two well-studied cases of flux emergence, but find that the predicted energetic perturbation is relatively small compared to energies released in large solar flares. Next, we present an observational study of the influence of the emergence of new active regions on flare statistics in pre-existing active regions, using NOAA's Solar Region Summary and GOES flare databases. As part of an effort to precisely determine the emergence time of active regions in a large event sample, we find that emergence in about half of these regions exhibits a two-stage behavior, with an initial gradual phase followed by a more rapid phase. Regarding flaring, we find that the emergence of new regions is associated with a significant increase in the occurrence rate of X- and M-class flares in pre-existing regions. This effect tends to be more significant when pre-existing and new emerging active regions are closer. Given the relative weakness of the interaction energy, this effect suggests that perturbations in the large-scale magnetic field, such as topology changes invoked in the "breakout" model of coronal mass ejections, might play a significant role in the occurrence of some flares.

  1. Diagnostics of Solar Flare Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, Procheta; Brown, J. C.; MacKinnon, A. L.

    2009-05-01

    For work on my thesis dissertation, we have been studying some energetic processes in solar flares. On our work on Hard X-ray (HXR) emission from flares, we have shown that recombination emission can exceed the bremsstrahlung HXR flux for certain flare conditions. We will show some spectral features characteristic of non-thermal recombination HXR emission and will suggest how it plays a significant role in the flare HXR continuum, something that has been ignored in the past. It is important to note that these results could demand a reconsideration of the numbers of accelerated electrons since recombination can be much more efficient in producing HXR photons than bremsstrahlung. In related work on diagnosing particle acceleration in flares, we also have an interest in studying solar neutrons. To this end, we will present our work done with new-age neutron detectors developed by our colleagues at the University of New Hampshire. Using laboratory and simulated data from the detector to produce its response matrix, we then employ regularisation and deconvolution techniques to produce encouraging results for data inversion. As a corollary, we have also been reconsidering the role of inverse Compton (IC) scattering of photospheric photons. Gamma-ray observations clearly show the presence of 100 MeV electrons and positrons in the solar corona, by-products of GeV energy ions. Here we will present results of IC scattering of such photons taking proper account of radiation field geometry near the solar surface. If observed, such radiation would let us determine the number of secondary positrons produced in large flares, contributing to a full picture of ion acceleration and to predicting neutron fluxes to be encountered by future inner heliosphere space missions. This work is supported by a UK STFC Rolling Grant and a Dorothy Hodgkin's Scholarship (PM).

  2. Universality in Solar Flare and Earthquake Occurrence

    SciTech Connect

    De Arcangelis, L.; Godano, C.; Lippiello, E.; Nicodemi, M.

    2006-02-10

    Earthquakes and solar flares are phenomena involving huge and rapid releases of energy characterized by complex temporal occurrence. By analyzing available experimental catalogs, we show that the stochastic processes underlying these apparently different phenomena have universal properties. Namely, both problems exhibit the same distributions of sizes, interoccurrence times, and the same temporal clustering: We find after flare sequences with power law temporal correlations as the Omori law for seismic sequences. The observed universality suggests a common approach to the interpretation of both phenomena in terms of the same driving physical mechanism.

  3. The solar-flare induced earth's environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Dryer, M.; Han, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    A composite numerical simulation model developed from a series of MHD models was used to compute the solar-flare-generated disturbances of physical parameters, such as density, temperature, velocity, and magnetic field from the solar surface (i.e., the photospheric level) to the earth's environment. It is shown that the disturbed earth's environment at high latitudes can be approximated by starting with the knowledge of the occurrence and the strength of a solar flare, then simulating the evolutionary consequences of the solar disturbance through interplanetary space up to and through the magnetosphere.

  4. Carbon-poor solar flare events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.

    1979-01-01

    Energetic particle flux enhancements over the period October 1973 - December 1977 were surveyed using ULET sensor on the IMP-8 spacecraft. During the four year period the most extreme periods of Fe enrichment compared to oxygen were during solar flare events in February 1974 and May 1974. In these same events, the carbon abundance with respect to oxygen was significantly depleted when compared with a value C:0 is approximately 0.45:1 for typical solar flares. These observations, taken together with previously reported He-3 enrichment in these events, give strong evidence for the importance of a wave-particle interaction in the pre-injection heating of the ambient matter.

  5. Universality in solar flare and earthquake occurrence.

    PubMed

    de Arcangelis, L; Godano, C; Lippiello, E; Nicodemi, M

    2006-02-10

    Earthquakes and solar flares are phenomena involving huge and rapid releases of energy characterized by complex temporal occurrence. By analyzing available experimental catalogs, we show that the stochastic processes underlying these apparently different phenomena have universal properties. Namely, both problems exhibit the same distributions of sizes, interoccurrence times, and the same temporal clustering: We find after flare sequences with power law temporal correlations as the Omori law for seismic sequences. The observed universality suggests a common approach to the interpretation of both phenomena in terms of the same driving physical mechanism.

  6. On Solar Flares and Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossobokov, Vladimir; Le Mouël, Jean-Louis; Courtillot, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    The anomalous character of Solar Cycle 23, which ended in the Summer of 2009, has been pointed out by many authors. It has even been proposed that the solar dynamo is undergoing a transition from a state of “grand maximum” to one of “regular oscillations”. We analyze the temporal distribution of the number and energy of solar flares, and the duration of intervals between them, over Cycles 21 to 23. We consider 32 355 flares of class C2 and larger (C2+) from the GOES catalogue. Daily values of X-ray flux (wavelengths 1 to 8 Å) have been computed by summing the energy proxies of the events. The series of daily numbers of C2+ solar flares are strongly correlated with their daily energy flux. The long duration of Cycle 23 (12.8 years based on sunspots, 13.2 years based on flares) and the long interval with no C2+ flare between the end of Cycle 23, and the start of Cycle 24 (466 days) are remarkable compared to the two earlier cycles. The amplitudes of extreme flares increase when the mean flux decreases. We have calculated running averages of energy flux over intervals going from 7 to 365 days. The singular shape of Cycle 23 is increasingly striking with increasing interval: in the first ≈ 70% of the cycle (displayed on a logarithmic scale) we see linearly rising maxima, whereas minima are aligned along a descending slope for the latter part of the cycle. The energy flux oscillates between these and takes the shape of a bifurcation, starting near 2002 (a time when it is suggested that photospheric fields were abruptly reduced). Inter-event intervals between successive C2+ flares undergo quasi-periodic (≈ 11 years) oscillations between two distinct states, which we call “active” and “quiet”, with extremely sharp onset and termination. The ratio of time spent in the active vs. quiet states ranges from 1.8 to 1.4 for Cycles 21 to 23, Cycle 23 having the longest quiet period. It has been proposed that anomalous Cycle 23 resembles Cycle 4, which was

  7. IMPLICATIONS OF TEMPORAL DEVELOPMENT OF LOCALIZED ULTRAVIOLET AND HARD X-RAY EMISSION FOR LARGE SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Coyner, Aaron J.; Alexander, David

    2009-11-01

    . In four of the events, we observe late developing UV sources which show no relationship with the HXR emission. In these events, the emission sources show a strong relationship with lower energy, more spatially extended X-ray emission believed to be of thermal origin. This suggests that, in the later phase of these complex flares, emission from thermal processes comes to dominate non-thermal processes in the production of the UV emission.

  8. Quasi-Periodic Pulsations with Varying Period in Multi-Wavelength Observations of an X-class Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jing; Tan, Baolin; Zhang, Yin; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana

    2014-08-01

    This work presents an interesting phenomenon of the period variation in quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) observed during the impulsive phase of a coronal mass ejection-related X1.1 class flare on 2012 July 6. The period of QPPs was changed from 21 s at soft X-rays (SXR) to 22-23 s at microwaves, to ~24 s at extreme ultraviolet emissions (EUV), and to 27-32 s at metric-decimetric waves. The microwave, EUV, and SXR QPPs, emitted from flare loops of different heights, were oscillating in phase. Fast kink mode oscillations were proposed to be the modulation mechanism, which may exist in a wide region in the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to the upper corona or even to the interplanetary space. Changed parameters of flare loops through the solar atmosphere could result in the varying period of QPPs at different wavelengths. The first appearing microwave QPPs and quasi-periodic metric-decimetric type III bursts were generated by energetic electrons. This may imply that particle acceleration or magnetic reconnection were located between these two non-thermal emission sources. Thermal QPPs (in SXR and EUV emissions) occurred later than the nonthermal ones, which would suggest a some time for plasma heating or energy dissipation in flare loops during burst processes. At the beginning of flare, a sudden collapse and expansion of two separated flare loop structures occurred simultaneously with the multi-wavelength QPPs. An implosion in the corona, including both collapse and expansion of flare loops, could be a trigger of loop oscillations in a very large region in the solar atmosphere.

  9. Quasi-periodic pulsations with varying period in multi-wavelength observations of an X-class flare

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jing; Tan, Baolin; Zhang, Yin; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana

    2014-08-10

    This work presents an interesting phenomenon of the period variation in quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) observed during the impulsive phase of a coronal mass ejection-related X1.1 class flare on 2012 July 6. The period of QPPs was changed from 21 s at soft X-rays (SXR) to 22-23 s at microwaves, to ∼24 s at extreme ultraviolet emissions (EUV), and to 27-32 s at metric-decimetric waves. The microwave, EUV, and SXR QPPs, emitted from flare loops of different heights, were oscillating in phase. Fast kink mode oscillations were proposed to be the modulation mechanism, which may exist in a wide region in the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to the upper corona or even to the interplanetary space. Changed parameters of flare loops through the solar atmosphere could result in the varying period of QPPs at different wavelengths. The first appearing microwave QPPs and quasi-periodic metric-decimetric type III bursts were generated by energetic electrons. This may imply that particle acceleration or magnetic reconnection were located between these two non-thermal emission sources. Thermal QPPs (in SXR and EUV emissions) occurred later than the nonthermal ones, which would suggest a some time for plasma heating or energy dissipation in flare loops during burst processes. At the beginning of flare, a sudden collapse and expansion of two separated flare loop structures occurred simultaneously with the multi-wavelength QPPs. An implosion in the corona, including both collapse and expansion of flare loops, could be a trigger of loop oscillations in a very large region in the solar atmosphere.

  10. Photospheric Magnetic Field Properties of Flaring versus Flare-quiet Active Regions. II. Discriminant Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leka, K. D.; Barnes, G.

    2003-10-01

    We apply statistical tests based on discriminant analysis to the wide range of photospheric magnetic parameters described in a companion paper by Leka & Barnes, with the goal of identifying those properties that are important for the production of energetic events such as solar flares. The photospheric vector magnetic field data from the University of Hawai'i Imaging Vector Magnetograph are well sampled both temporally and spatially, and we include here data covering 24 flare-event and flare-quiet epochs taken from seven active regions. The mean value and rate of change of each magnetic parameter are treated as separate variables, thus evaluating both the parameter's state and its evolution, to determine which properties are associated with flaring. Considering single variables first, Hotelling's T2-tests show small statistical differences between flare-producing and flare-quiet epochs. Even pairs of variables considered simultaneously, which do show a statistical difference for a number of properties, have high error rates, implying a large degree of overlap of the samples. To better distinguish between flare-producing and flare-quiet populations, larger numbers of variables are simultaneously considered; lower error rates result, but no unique combination of variables is clearly the best discriminator. The sample size is too small to directly compare the predictive power of large numbers of variables simultaneously. Instead, we rank all possible four-variable permutations based on Hotelling's T2-test and look for the most frequently appearing variables in the best permutations, with the interpretation that they are most likely to be associated with flaring. These variables include an increasing kurtosis of the twist parameter and a larger standard deviation of the twist parameter, but a smaller standard deviation of the distribution of the horizontal shear angle and a horizontal field that has a smaller standard deviation but a larger kurtosis. To support the

  11. Transport and containment of plasma, particles and energy within flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. W.; Brown, W. A.; Bruner, M. E. C.; Haisch, B. M.; Strong, K. T.

    1983-01-01

    Results from the analysis of flares observed by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and a recent rocket experiment are discussed. Evidence for primary energy release in the corona through the interaction of magnetic structures, particle and plasma transport into more than a single magnetic structure at the time of a flare and a complex and changing magnetic topology during the course of a flare is found. The rocket data are examined for constraints on flare cooling, within the context of simple loop models. These results form a basis for comments on the limitations of simple loop models for flares.

  12. Outer Atmospheres of Low Mass Stars — Flare Characteristics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalitha, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2013-04-01

    We compare the coronal properties during flares on active low mass stars CN Leonis, AB Doradus A and Proxima Centauri observed with XMM-Newton. From the X-ray data we analyze the temporal evolution of temperature, emission measure and coronal abundance. The nature of these flares are with secondary events following the first flare peak in the light curve, raising the question regarding the involved magnetic structure. We infer from the plasma properties and the geometry of the flaring structure that the flare originates from a compact arcade rather than in a single loop.

  13. The H-alpha/H-beta ratio in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Liggett, M.; Patterson, A.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation involves the study of an extensive body of data accumulated of simultaneous H-alpha and H-beta cinematography of flares. The data were obtained with two telescopes simultaneously photographing flares in H-alpha and H-beta. The results of measurements in a number of flares are presented in a table. The flares were selected purely by optical quality of the data. That the measured ratios are not too different from those in stellar flares is suggested by the last two columns of the table. These columns show that a variety of possible line width ratios could give an integrated intensity ratio of less than unity.

  14. IUE spectra of a flare in HR 5110: A flaring RS CVn or Algol system?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, T.; Linsky, J. L.; Schiffer, F. H., III

    1981-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectra of the RS CVn type binary system HR 5110 were obtained with IUE on May 31, 1979 during a period of intense radio flaring of this star. High temperature transition region lines are present, but are not enhanced above observed quiescent strengths. The similarities of HR 5110 to the Algol system, As Eri, suggest that the 1979 May to June flare may involve mass exchange rather than annihilation of coronal magnetic fields.

  15. Impulsive energy release and non-thermal emission in a confined M4.0 flare triggered by rapidly evolving magnetic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kushwaha, Upendra; Joshi, Bhuwan; Mathew, S. K.; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Veronig, Astrid

    2014-08-10

    We present observations of a confined M4.0 flare from NOAA 11302 on 2011 September 26. Observations at high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, and Nobeyama Radioheliograph observations enabled us to explore the possible triggering and energy release processes of this flare despite its very impulsive behavior and compact morphology. The flare light curves exhibit an abrupt rise of non-thermal emission with co-temporal hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) bursts that peaked instantly without any precursor emission. This stage was associated with HXR emission up to 200 keV that followed a power law with photon spectral index (γ) ∼ 3. Another non-thermal peak, observed 32 s later, was more pronounced in the MW flux than the HXR profiles. Dual peaked structures in the MW and HXR light curves suggest a two-step magnetic reconnection process. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images exhibit a sequential evolution of the inner and outer core regions of magnetic loop systems while the overlying loop configuration remained unaltered. Combined observations in HXR, (E)UV, and Hα provide support for flare models involving the interaction of coronal loops. The magnetograms obtained by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager reveal emergence of magnetic flux that began ∼five hr before the flare. However, the more crucial changes in the photospheric magnetic flux occurred about one minute prior to the flare onset with opposite polarity magnetic transients appearing at the early flare location within the inner core region. The spectral, temporal, and spatial properties of magnetic transients suggest that the sudden changes in the small-scale magnetic field have likely triggered the flare by destabilizing the highly sheared pre-flare magnetic configuration.

  16. Designing an Internationally Accessible Web-Based Questionnaire to Discover Risk Factors for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Parkin Kullmann, Jane Alana; Hayes, Susan; Wang, Min-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with a typical survival of three to five years. Epidemiological studies using paper-based questionnaires in individual countries or continents have failed to find widely accepted risk factors for the disease. The advantages of online versus paper-based questionnaires have been extensively reviewed, but few online epidemiological studies into human neurodegenerative diseases have so far been undertaken. Objective To design a Web-based questionnaire to identify environmental risk factors for ALS and enable international comparisons of these risk factors. Methods A Web-based epidemiological questionnaire for ALS has been developed based on experience gained from administering a previous continent-wide paper-based questionnaire for this disease. New and modified questions have been added from our previous paper-based questionnaire, from literature searches, and from validated ALS questionnaires supplied by other investigators. New criteria to allow the separation of familial and sporadic ALS cases have been included. The questionnaire addresses many risk factors that have already been proposed for ALS, as well as a number that have not yet been rigorously examined. To encourage participation, responses are collected anonymously and no personally identifiable information is requested. The survey is being translated into a number of languages which will allow many people around the world to read and answer it in their own language. Results After the questionnaire had been online for 4 months, it had 379 respondents compared to only 46 respondents for the same initial period using a paper-based questionnaire. The average age of the first 379 web questionnaire respondents was 54 years compared to the average age of 60 years for the first 379 paper questionnaire respondents. The questionnaire is soon to be promoted in a number of countries through ALS associations and disease

  17. Design and Fabrication of Monolithically-Integrated Laterally-Arrayed Multiple Band Gap Solar Cells using Composition-Graded Alloy Nanowires for Spectrum-Splitting Photovoltaic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselli, Derek

    This dissertation aims to demonstrate a new approach to fabricating solar cells for spectrum-splitting photovoltaic systems with the potential to reduce their cost and complexity of manufacturing, called Monolithically Integrated Laterally Arrayed Multiple Band gap (MILAMB) solar cells. Single crystal semiconductor alloy nanowire (NW) ensembles are grown with the alloy composition and band gap changing continuously across a broad range over the surface of a single substrate in a single, inexpensive growth step by the Dual-Gradient Method. The nanowire ensembles then serve as the absorbing materials in a set of solar cells for spectrum-splitting photovoltaic systems. Preliminary design and simulation studies based on Anderson's model band line-ups were undertaken for CdPbS and InGaN alloys. Systems of six subcells obtained efficiencies in the 32-38% range for CdPbS and 34-40% for InGaN at 1-240 suns, though both materials systems require significant development before these results could be achieved experimentally. For an experimental demonstration, CdSSe was selected due to its availability. Proof-of-concept CdSSe nanowire ensemble solar cells with two subcells were fabricated simultaneously on one substrate. I-V characterization under 1 sun AM1.5G conditions yielded open-circuit voltages (Voc) up to 307 and 173 mV and short-circuit current densities (Jsc) up to 0.091 and 0.974 mA/cm2 for the CdS- and CdSe-rich cells, respectively. Similar thin film cells were also fabricated for comparison. The nanowire cells showed substantially higher Voc than the film cells, which was attributed to higher material quality in the CdSSe absorber. I-V measurements were also conducted with optical filters to simulate a simple form of spectrum-splitting. The CdS-rich cells showed uniformly higher Voc and fill factor (FF) than the CdSe-rich cells, as expected due to their larger band gaps. This suggested higher power density was produced by the CdS-rich cells on the single

  18. THE 2010 MAY FLARING EPISODE OF CYGNUS X-3 IN RADIO, X-RAYS, AND {gamma}-RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Peter K. G.; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Pooley, Guy G.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Rodriguez, Jerome; Migliari, Simone; Trushkin, Sergei A.

    2011-06-01

    In 2009, Cygnus X-3 (Cyg X-3) became the first microquasar to be detected in the GeV {gamma}-ray regime, via the satellites Fermi and AGILE. The addition of this new band to the observational toolbox holds promise for building a more detailed understanding of the relativistic jets of this and other systems. We present a rich data set of radio, hard and soft X-ray, and {gamma}-ray observations of Cyg X-3 made during a flaring episode in 2010 May. We detect a {approx}3 day softening and recovery of the X-ray emission, followed almost immediately by a {approx}1 Jy radio flare at 15 GHz, followed by a 4.3{sigma} {gamma}-ray flare (E > 100 MeV) {approx}1.5 days later. The radio sampling is sparse, but we use archival data to argue that it is unlikely the {gamma}-ray flare was followed by any significant unobserved radio flares. In this case, the sequencing of the observed events is difficult to explain in a model in which the {gamma}-ray emission is due to inverse Compton scattering of the companion star's radiation field. Our observations suggest that other mechanisms may also be responsible for {gamma}-ray emission from Cyg X-3.

  19. Observations of an X-shaped Ribbon Flare in the Sun and Its Three-dimensional Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Qiu, J.; Longcope, D. W.; Ding, M. D.; Yang, K.

    2016-05-01

    We report evolution of an atypical X-shaped flare ribbon that provides novel observational evidence of three-dimensional (3D) magnetic reconnection at a separator. The flare occurred on 2014 November 9. High-resolution slit-jaw 1330 Å images from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph reveal four chromospheric flare ribbons that converge and form an X-shape. Flare brightening in the upper chromosphere spreads along the ribbons toward the center of the “X” (the X-point), and then spreads outward in a direction more perpendicular to the ribbons. These four ribbons are located in a quadrupolar magnetic field. Reconstruction of magnetic topology in the active region suggests the presence of a separator connecting to the X-point outlined by the ribbons. The inward motion of flare ribbons in the early stage therefore indicates 3D magnetic reconnection between two sets of non-coplanar loops that approach laterally, and reconnection proceeds downward along a section of vertical current sheet. Coronal loops are also observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory confirming the reconnection morphology illustrated by ribbon evolution.

  20. The 2010 May Flaring Episode of Cygnus X-3 in Radio, X-Rays, and gamma-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Peter K. G.; Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Pooley, Guy G.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Rodriguez, Jerome; Wilms, Joern; Migliari, Simone; Trushkin, Sergei A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, Cygnus X-3 (Cyg X-3) became the first microquasar to be detected in the GeV gamma-ray regime, via the satellites Fermi and AGILE. The addition of this new band to the observational toolbox holds promise for building a more detailed understanding of the relativistic jets of this and other systems. We present a rich dataset of radio, hard and soft X-ray, and gamma-ray observations of Cyg X-3 made during a flaring episode in 2010 May. We detect a approx.3-d softening and recovery of the X-ray emission, followed almost immediately by a approx.1-Jy radio flare at 15 GHz, followed by a 4.3sigma gamma-ray flare (E > 100 MeV) approx.1.5 d later. The radio sampling is sparse, but we use archival data to argue that it is unlikely the gamma-ray flare was followed by any significant unobserved radio flares. In this case, the sequencing of the observed events is difficult to explain in a model in which the gamma-ray emission is due to inverse Compton scattering of the companion star's radiation field. Our observations suggest that other mechanisms may also be responsible for gamma-ray emission from Cyg X-3.

  1. Study of non-thermal photon production under different scenarios in solar flares. 1: Scenarios and formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez, M.; Gallegos, A.

    1985-01-01

    In order to study the overall phenomenology involved in solar flares, it is necessary to understand their individual manifestation before building a corresponding description of the global phenomenon. Here the concern is with the production of X and gamma rays in solar flares. Flares are initiated very often within the closed magnetic field configurations of active centers. According (2) when beta = kinetic energy density/magnetic energy density approximately 0.2, the magnetic trap configuration is destructed within the time scale of the impulsive phase of flares ( 100 s). A first particle acceleration stage occurs during this phase as indicated by impulsive microwave and hard X-rays bursts. In some flare events, when the field strength beta is very high, the broken field lines may close again, such that later, in the course of the flash and main phases more hot plasma of very high conductivity is created, and so, the field and frozen plasma expand outward, as the kinetic pressure inside the closed loops increases. The magnetically trapped particles excite strong Alfven wave turbulence of small transverse scale.

  2. Flare evolution and magnetic configuration study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlicki, A.; Schmieder, B.; Aulanier, G.; Vilmer, N.; Yan, Y. H.

    We will present the analysis of M1.0 confined flare emission and evolution in the context of the topology of the coronal magnetic field. This flare was observed in NOAA 0162 on 22 October 2002. The multiwavelength data were taken during a coordinated observational campaign between ground based instruments and space observatories. The photospheric line-of-sight magnetic field observations were obtained with THEMIS and SOHO/MDI. We used these data to perform linear force-free field extrapolation of magnetic field into the corona. Our extrapolation provides an explanation of the appearance of H-alpha flare ribbons. An elongated shape of X-ray emission observed by Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) also follow the predicted shape of extrapolated field lines. Moreover, the X-ray emission observed by RHESSI permit to see thermal emission of coronal loops heated probably by non-thermal electrons, accelerated during the reconnection processes. The presence of non-thermal particles can be deduced from RHESSI X-ray spectra reconstructed during the gradual phase of the flare. On Huairou vector magnetograms of the AR we see that there was strong shear between one of main negative spot and the north small positive spot. The extrapolation with non-constant alpha force-free field model did not obtain any loop to connect these two spots.

  3. 40 CFR 65.147 - Flares.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Flares shall be used only when the net heating value of the gas being combusted is 11.2 megajoules per...-assisted or air-assisted, or when the net heating value of the gas being combusted is 7.45 megajoules per... nonassisted. The net heating value of the gas being combusted shall be determined by the methods specified...

  4. 40 CFR 63.987 - Flare requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... additional cycles. (ii) The net heating value of the gas being combusted in a flare shall be calculated using Equation 1: ER29JN99.000 Where: HT = Net heating value of the sample, megajoules per standard cubic meter... subject to this subpart shall meet the performance requirements in 40 CFR 63.11(b) (General...

  5. 40 CFR 65.147 - Flares.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Flares shall be used only when the net heating value of the gas being combusted is 11.2 megajoules per...-assisted or air-assisted, or when the net heating value of the gas being combusted is 7.45 megajoules per... nonassisted. The net heating value of the gas being combusted shall be determined by the methods specified...

  6. 40 CFR 63.987 - Flare requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... additional cycles. (ii) The net heating value of the gas being combusted in a flare shall be calculated using Equation 1: ER29JN99.000 Where: HT = Net heating value of the sample, megajoules per standard cubic meter... subject to this subpart shall meet the performance requirements in 40 CFR 63.11(b) (General...

  7. 40 CFR 63.987 - Flare requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... additional cycles. (ii) The net heating value of the gas being combusted in a flare shall be calculated using Equation 1: ER29JN99.000 Where: HT = Net heating value of the sample, megajoules per standard cubic meter... subject to this subpart shall meet the performance requirements in 40 CFR 63.11(b) (General...

  8. Energetic electrons generated during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Gottfried

    2015-12-01

    > electrons are accelerated up to energies beyond 30 keV is one of the open questions in solar physics. A flare is considered as the manifestation of magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Which mechanisms lead to the production of energetic electrons in the magnetic reconnection region is discussed in this paper. Two of them are described in more detail.

  9. What's an Asthma Flare-Up?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Back-to-School Butterflies? ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What's an Asthma Flare-Up? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's ...

  10. Transient particle acceleration associated with solar flares.

    PubMed

    Chupp, E L

    1990-10-12

    Understanding how individual charged particles can be accelerated to extreme energies (10(20) electron volts), remains a foremost problem in astrophysics. Within our solar system, the active sun is capable of producing, on a short time scale, ions with energies higher than 25 gigaelectron volts. Satellite and ground-based observation over the past 30 years have greatly increased our knowledge of the properties of transient bursts of energetic particles emitted from the sun in association with solar flares, but a real understanding of the solar flare particle acceleration process requires greatly refined experimental data. On the practical side, it is also imperative that this problem be solved if man is to venture, for long periods of time, beyond the protective umbrella of Earth's magnetic field, which excludes much of the biologically damaging solar energetic particles. It is only through an understanding of the basic acceleration problem that we can expect to be able to predict the occurrence of a solar flare with lethal solar radiations. For our knowledge of these effects to advance, a new space mission dedicated to studying the high-energy aspects of solar flares at high spatial and energy resolution will be required.

  11. MEASUREMENTS OF ABSOLUTE ABUNDANCES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Harry P.

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (f). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is f = 1.17 ± 0.22. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation occurs.

  12. Dust Reprocessing of Stellar Tidal Disruption Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Velzen, Sjoert; Gorjian, Varoujan; Krolik, Julian; Mendez, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    A stellar tidal disruption flare (TDF) occurs when a star gets too close to a supermassive black hole and is shredded into streams that are accreted. Traditionally, TDFs are observed at optical to soft X-ray wavelengths. We have recently made a discovery that opens a new (and unexpected) wavelength regime for the study of these flares: transient emission at 3.4 micron in WISE multi-epoch imaging. This dust reprocessing signal was not previously predicted, but will likely be of great importance to further our (limited) understanding the TDF emission mechanism. Since the radius of the IR-emitting shell is determined by the dust sublimation temperature, the break in the IR light curve can be used to measure the bolometric luminosity of the tidal flare. With the low-cadence WISE observations as a proof-of-concept, the time is ripe to use warm Spitzer observations to make a major breakthrough: we wish to obtain the first well-sampled light curve of dust reverberation by a stellar tidal flare. If successful, these observations will have lasting impact; near-future synoptic surveys (ZTF, LSST) will find thousands of TDFs per year, which can be followed-up by IR missions (JWST, WFIRST) to obtain a census of dust within the sphere of influence of quiescent supermassive black holes.

  13. 40 CFR 65.147 - Flares.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... basis, as measured for organics by Method 18 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 and measured for hydrogen... and pressure), as determined by Method 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 as appropriate... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Flares. 65.147 Section...

  14. 40 CFR 65.147 - Flares.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... basis, as measured for organics by Method 18 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 and measured for hydrogen... and pressure), as determined by Method 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 as appropriate... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Flares. 65.147 Section...

  15. Solar gamma rays. [in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The theory of gamma ray production in solar flares is treated in detail. Both lines and continuum are produced. Results show that the strongest line predicted at 2.225 MeV with a width of less than 100 eV and detected at 2.24 + or - 2.02 MeV, is due to neutron capture by protons in the photosphere. Its intensity is dependent on the photospheric He-3 abundance. The neutrons are produced in nuclear reactions of flare accelerated particles which also produce positrons and prompt nuclear deexcitation lines. The strongest prompt lines are at 4.43 MeV from c-12 and at approximately 6.2 from 0-16 and N-15. The gamma ray continuum, produced by electron bremsstrahlung, allows the determination of the spectrum and number of accelerated electrons in the MeV region. From the comparison of the line and continuum intensities a proton-to-electron ratio of about 10 to 100 at the same energy for the 1972, August 4 flare. For the same flare the protons above 2.5 MeV which are responsible for the gamma ray emission produce a few percent of the heat generated by the electrons which make the hard X rays above 20 keV.

  16. Dependence of Sunspot Properties on Flare Occurrence and Flare-CME Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ya-Hui

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies showed that the intense flares tend to erupt from the large sunspot region with complex magnetic configuration and strong magnetic field. However, note that not all the active regions (ARs) classified as βγδ would produce X-class flares. To clarify the significance of sunspot properties on solar explosive events, we reexamine the dependence of flare magnitude on sunspot size and magnetic type during 1996-2014 based on the report of NOAA Solar Region Summary and the measurements of GOES soft X-ray flux. In particular, we focus on the βγδ-type ARs to relate the flare productivity to the sunspot area and magnetic field strength by means of the line-of-sight magnetograms from SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI. Two flare-productive ARs, 10486 and 12192, with βγδ magnetic configuration during most periods of their disk passages are further investigated to characterize the sunspots and flare-CME association.

  17. SUNSPOT ROTATION, FLARE ENERGETICS, AND FLUX ROPE HELICITY: THE HALLOWEEN FLARE ON 2003 OCTOBER 28

    SciTech Connect

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Canfield, Richard C.; Longcope, Dana W.; Qiu Jiong

    2010-10-20

    We study the X17 eruptive flare on 2003 October 28 using Michelson Doppler Imager observations of photospheric magnetic and velocity fields and TRACE 1600 A images of the flare in a three-dimensional model of energy buildup and release in NOAA 10486. The most dramatic feature of this active region is the 123{sup 0} rotation of a large positive sunspot over 46 hr prior to the event. We apply a method for including such rotation in the framework of the minimum current corona model of the buildup of energy and helicity due to the observed motions. We distinguish between helicity and energy stored in the whole active region and that released in the flare itself. We find that while the rotation of a sunspot contributes significantly to the energy and helicity budgets of the whole active region, it makes only a minor contribution to that part of the region that flares. We conclude that in spite of the fast rotation, shearing motions alone store sufficient energy and helicity to account for the flare energetics and interplanetary coronal mass ejection helicity content within their observational uncertainties. Our analysis demonstrates that the relative importance of shearing and rotation in this flare depends critically on their location within the parent active region topology.

  18. MOST Observations of Our Nearest Neighbor: Flares on Proxima Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, James R. A.; Kipping, David M.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Cameron, Chris

    2016-10-01

    We present a study of white-light flares from the active M5.5 dwarf Proxima Centauri using the Canadian microsatellite Microvariability and Oscillations of STars. Using 37.6 days of monitoring data from 2014 to 2015, we have detected 66 individual flare events, the largest number of white-light flares observed to date on Proxima Cen. Flare energies in our sample range from 1029 to 1031.5 erg. The flare rate is lower than that of other classic flare stars of a similar spectral type, such as UV Ceti, which may indicate Proxima Cen had a higher flare rate in its youth. Proxima Cen does have an unusually high flare rate given its slow rotation period, however. Extending the observed power-law occurrence distribution down to 1028 erg, we show that flares with flux amplitudes of 0.5% occur 63 times per day, while superflares with energies of 1033 erg occur ∼8 times per year. Small flares may therefore pose a great difficulty in searches for transits from the recently announced 1.27 M ⊕ Proxima b, while frequent large flares could have significant impact on the planetary atmosphere.

  19. White-light Flares on Close Binaries Observed with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qing; Xin, Yu; Liu, Ji-Feng; Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Gao, Shuang

    2016-06-01

    Based on Kepler data, we present the results of a search for white light flares on 1049 close binaries. We identify 234 flare binaries, of which 6818 flares are detected. We compare the flare-binary fraction in different binary morphologies (“detachedness”). The result shows that the fractions in over-contact and ellipsoidal binaries are approximately 10%-20% lower than those in detached and semi-detached systems. We calculate the binary flare activity level (AL) of all the flare binaries, and discuss its variations along the orbital period (P orb) and rotation period (P rot, calculated for only detached binaries). We find that the AL increases with decreasing P orb or P rot, up to the critical values at P orb ˜ 3 days or P rot ˜ 1.5 days, and thereafter the AL starts decreasing no matter how fast the stars rotate. We examine the flaring rate as a function of orbital phase in two eclipsing binaries on which a large number of flares are detected. It appears that there is no correlation between flaring rate and orbital phase in these two binaries. In contrast, when we examine the function with 203 flares on 20 non-eclipse ellipsoidal binaries, bimodal distribution of amplitude-weighted flare numbers shows up at orbital phases 0.25 and 0.75. Such variation could be larger than what is expected from the cross section modification.

  20. On Flare and CME Predictability Based on Sunspot Group Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsós, M. B.; Ruderman, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    We propose to apply the weighted horizontal magnetic gradient (WGM), introduced in Korsós et al. (2015), for analysing the pre-flare and pre-CME behaviour and evolution of Active Regions (ARs) using the SDO/HMI-Debrecen Data catalogue. To demonstrate the power of investigative capabilities of the WGM method in terms of flare/CME eruptions, we show the results of studying three typical active regions, namely, AR11818, AR12017 and AR11495. The choice of ARs represent typical cases of flaring with a fast CME, flare eruption without a CME and non-flaring cases, respectively. AR11818 produced an M1.4 energetic flare with a fast "halo" CME (vlinear=1202 km/s) while in AR12017 occurred an X1.0 flare without a CME. The AR11495 is a good example for non-flaring ARs. The value and temporal variation of WGM is found to possess potentially important diagnostic information about the intensity of expected flares. However, this test turns out not only to provide information about the intensity of expected flares but may also show whether a flare will occur with/without a fast CME.

  1. Metabolic flare phenomenon on 18 fluoride-fluorodeoxy glucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans in a patient with bilateral breast cancer treated with second-line chemotherapy and bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian Harisankar, Chidambaram Natrajan; Preethi, Rajalakshmi; John, Jijoe

    2015-01-01

    Increase in radiopharmaceutical uptake is an indicator of progression of disease. Paradoxical increase in the radiopharmaceutical uptake also occurs during favorable response to therapy, which is designated as flare phenomenon. Flare phenomenon is well documented on bone scinitgraphy when initially noted lesions show increased radiotracer uptake after therapy is instituted. This happens despite favorable response to the treatment. The osteoblastic activity associated with healing response of bone tumors is the cause of flare phenomenon. Recently, metabolic flare phenomenon has been described in patients with breast cancer who undergo hormonal therapy. Changes in the hormonal level during initial part of the treatment is the cause of metabolic flare. We describe a patient with bilateral breast cancer who underwent second line chemotherapy along with bevacizumab. Serial positron emission tomography scans done showed interesting phenomenon of metabolic flare. PMID:25829734

  2. Metabolic flare phenomenon on 18 fluoride-fluorodeoxy glucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans in a patient with bilateral breast cancer treated with second-line chemotherapy and bevacizumab

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian Harisankar, Chidambaram Natrajan; Preethi, Rajalakshmi; John, Jijoe

    2015-01-01

    Increase in radiopharmaceutical uptake is an indicator of progression of disease. Paradoxical increase in the radiopharmaceutical uptake also occurs during favorable response to therapy, which is designated as flare phenomenon. Flare phenomenon is well documented on bone scinitgraphy when initially noted lesions show increased radiotracer uptake after therapy is instituted. This happens despite favorable response to the treatment. The osteoblastic activity associated with healing response of bone tumors is the cause of flare phenomenon. Recently, metabolic flare phenomenon has been described in patients with breast cancer who undergo hormonal therapy. Changes in the hormonal level during initial part of the treatment is the cause of metabolic flare. We describe a patient with bilateral breast cancer who underwent second line chemotherapy along with bevacizumab. Serial positron emission tomography scans done showed interesting phenomenon of metabolic flare. PMID:25829734

  3. On Solar Flares and Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossobokov, V. G.; Le Mouel, J.; Courtillot, V.

    2011-12-01

    The anomalous character of solar cycle 23 has been pointed out. It is proposed that the solar dynamo is undergoing a transition from a state of "grand maximum" to one of "regular oscillations". In this study, we analyze the time distribution of the number and energy of solar flares, and the duration of intervals between them, from cycle 21 to 23. We consider 32355 flares of class C2 and larger (C2+) from the GOES catalogue. Daily values of X-ray flux (wavelengths 1-8Å) have been computed by summing the energy proxies of the events. The series of daily numbers of C2+ solar flares are strongly correlated to their daily energy flux. The long duration of cycle 23 (~13 years), the long interval with no C2+ flare between the end of cycle 23 and the start of cycle 24 (466 days) are remarkable compared to the two earlier cycles. Amplitudes of extreme flares increase when mean flux decreases. We have calculated running averages of energy flux over intervals going from 7 to 365 days: the singular shape of cycle 23 is increasingly striking with increasing interval: the first ~70% of the cycle display (in logarithmic scale) linearly rising maxima, whereas minima are aligned along a descending slope for the latter part of the cycle. Energy flux oscillates between these and takes the shape of a bifurcation, starting near 2002. Durations of inter-event intervals between successive C2+ flares undergo quasi-periodic (~11yr) oscillations between two distinct states, which we call "active" and "quiet", with sharp onset and termination. The ratio of time spent in the active vs quiet states ranges from 1.8 to 1.4 for cycles 21 to 23, cycle 23 having the longest quiet period. It has been proposed that anomalous cycle 23 resembles cycle 4, which was followed by reduced cycles 5 and 6 at the time of the Dalton-minimum in solar activity, often associated with a cooler global climate. It will be interesting to monitor the evolution of solar flares in cycle 24, in order to further our

  4. Compensation of flare-induced CD changes EUVL

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkholm, John E.; Stearns, Daniel G.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Tichenor, Daniel A.; Hector, Scott D.

    2004-11-09

    A method for compensating for flare-induced critical dimensions (CD) changes in photolithography. Changes in the flare level results in undesirable CD changes. The method when used in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography essentially eliminates the unwanted CD changes. The method is based on the recognition that the intrinsic level of flare for an EUV camera (the flare level for an isolated sub-resolution opaque dot in a bright field mask) is essentially constant over the image field. The method involves calculating the flare and its variation over the area of a patterned mask that will be imaged and then using mask biasing to largely eliminate the CD variations that the flare and its variations would otherwise cause. This method would be difficult to apply to optical or DUV lithography since the intrinsic flare for those lithographies is not constant over the image field.

  5. Ultraviolet and radio flares from UX Arietis and HR 1099

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, K.R.; Willson, R.F.

    1988-05-01

    Simultaneous observations of the RS CVn systems UX Ari and HR 1099 with the IUE satellite and the VLA are presented. Flaring activity is observed at ultraviolet wavelengths with the IUE when none is detected at radio wavelengths with the VLA. Radio flares with no detectable ultraviolet activity have also been observed. Thus, flares in the two spectral regions are either uncorrelated or weakly correlated. The flaring emission probably originates in different regions at the two wavelengths. Radio flares from RS CVn stars may originate in sources that are larger than, or comparable to, a star in size. This is in sharp contrast to compact, coherent radio flares from dwarf M stars. The ultraviolet flares from RS CVn stars probably originate in sources that are smaller than a component star. 18 references.

  6. In-progress X-ray Flare Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Winter, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Solar X-ray flares release intense amounts of radiation and can be associated with subsequent changes in the geomagnetic field as well as a large influx of solar energetic particles. From analyses of 50,000 flares detected with the NOAA GOES satellites over the past 40 years, Winter & Balasubramaniam (2015) introduced a flare phase diagram where X-ray observables indicating flare temperature and background solar activity levels can be used to separate flares of different peak flux. We present results from adapting this method into a real-time forecast tool. Real-time GOES X-ray observations are used to predict expected flare class, with updates made every 1-minute. KSB, in part by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research on "the Physics of Coupled Flares and CME Systems". LM was supported by AER, and in part by a contract supported by AFRL/RV

  7. COMPARISON OF PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY BEFORE AND AFTER STELLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Karoff, C.

    2014-01-20

    The energy in the solar acoustic spectrum is known to be correlated with flares, but it is not known if the same is true for stellar flares. In order to answer this question, we have analyzed 73 flares in 39 solar-like stars. These flares were identified in the 854 solar-like stars observed by the Kepler spacecraft that have stellar parameters measured with asteroseismology. Though we were not able to identify a statistically significant enhancement of the energy in the high-frequency part of the post-flare acoustic spectra compared to the pre-flare spectra of these stars, we did identify a larger variability between the energy in the high-frequency part of the post- and pre-flare acoustic spectra compared to spectra taken at random times.

  8. Multi-wavelength diagnostics and modelling of the emission during a B6.4 flare of August 20, 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, Arun Kumar; Berlicki, Arkadiusz; Rudawy, Powel; Heinzel, Petr

    2015-08-01

    We study the temporal, spatial and spectral evolution of multi-wavelength emission observed during a B6.4 flare occurred on August 20, 2005 with the motivation to outline the thermal and non-thermal processes during the precursor and gradual phase of the flare. Precursor phase is designated as the gradual enhancement of soft X-ray emission prior to onset of the impulsive phase. Observations from several space and ground based observatories viz. RHESSI, TRACE, GONG, SoHO/EIT and NoRP are included in this study. Temporal evolution of X-ray emission does not show the presence of hard X-rays (>12 keV) emission during the precursor phase of the flare. We synthesized X-ray images in 6-12 keV from RHESSI observations, which show several discrete sources during the precursor phase. Following to this, one of these sources pronounced during the main phase of the flare. We carry out in-depth analysis of chromospheric response in various phases of the flare employing high temporal cadence images of the Sun in Hα line centre as well as wings obtained from the Multi-channel Subtractive Double Pass Spectrograph (MSDP) at the Bialkow Observatory of the University of Wroclaw, Poland. Our analysis of Hα images during the main phase of the flare suggests localized emission in the form of kernels. On the contrary, we note extended and diffused source morphology of emitting region during the precursor phase of the flare. We also study various kinematic properties of different structures visible in the Hα images in the line centre as well as wings. In addition, the correlation of the relative timing of X-ray and Hα emission profile is performed to estimate the delay in the chromospheric response during different phases of flare. Further, we employ thermal plasma parameters estimated during the precursor and gradual phase to model the associated Hα emission. For the modeling we employ NLTE numerical codes modified for flare conditions. The modeled and observed flare emission

  9. Hemispheric Laterality in Music and Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szirony, Gary Michael; Burgin, John S.; Pearson, L. Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    Hemispheric laterality may be a useful concept in teaching, learning, training, and in understanding more about human development. To address this issue, a measure of hemispheric laterality was compared to musical and mathematical ability. The Human Information Processing Survey (HIPS) instrument, designed to measure hemispheric laterality, was…

  10. RHESSI and Trace Observations of the 21 April 2002 X1.5 Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Peter T.; Dennis, Brian R.; Krucker, Saem; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, A. Kimberly

    2002-01-01

    Observations of the X1.5 flare on 21 April 2002 are reviewed using the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE). The major findings are as follows: 1. The 3-25 keV X-rays started 54 mins before the EUV (195 A) emission suggesting that the initial energy release heated plasma directly to 220 MK, well above the 1.6 MK needed to produce the Fe XII (195 A) line. 2. Using coaligned 12-25 keV RHESSI and TRACE images, further evidence is found for the existence of hot (15-20 MK) plasma in the 195 A passband. This hot, diffuse emission is attributed to the presence of the Fe XXIV (192 A) line within the TRACE 195 A passband. 3. The 12-25 keV source centroid moves away from the limb with an apparent velocity of approx. 9.9 km/ s, slowing to approx. 1.7 km/ s after 3 hours, its find altitude being approx. 120 Mm after approx. 12 hours. This suggests that the energy release site moves to higher altitudes in agreement with classical flare models. 4. The 50-100 keV emission correlates well with EUV flare ribbons, suggesting thick-target interactions at the footpoints of the magnetic arcade. The 50-100 keV time profile matches the time derivative of the GOES light curve (Neupert effect), which suggests that the same electrons that produced the thick-target hard X-ray emission also heat the plasma seen in soft X-rays. 5. X-ray footpoint emission has an E(sup -3) spectrum down to approx. 10 keV suggesting a lower electron cutoff energy than previously thought. 6. The hard X-ray (25-200 keV) peaks have FWHM durations of approx. 1 min suggesting a more gradual energy release process than expected. 7. The TRACE images reveal a bright symmetric front propagating away from the main flare site at speeds of greater than or = 120 km/ s. This may be associated with fast CME observed several minutes later by LASCO. 8. Dark sinuous lanes are observed in the TRACE images that extend almost radially from the post-flare loop

  11. RE-FLARING OF A POST-FLARE LOOP SYSTEM DRIVEN BY FLUX ROPE EMERGENCE AND TWISTING

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Guo, Y.; Zhang, J.; Jing, J.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2010-06-10

    In this Letter, we study in detail the evolution of the post-flare loops on 2005 January 15 that occurred between two consecutive solar eruption events, both of which generated a fast halo coronal mass ejection (CME) and a major flare. The post-flare loop system, formed after the first CME/flare eruption, evolved rapidly, as manifested by the unusual accelerating rise motion of the loops. Through nonlinear force-free field models, we obtain the magnetic structure over the active region. It clearly shows that the flux rope below the loops also kept rising, accompanied with increasing twist and length. Finally, the post-flare magnetic configuration evolved to a state that resulted in the second CME/flare eruption. This is an event in which the post-flare loops can re-flare in a short period of {approx}16 hr following the first CME/flare eruption. The observed re-flaring at the same location is likely driven by the rapid evolution of the flux rope caused by the magnetic flux emergence and the rotation of the sunspot. This observation provides valuable information on CME/flare models and their prediction.

  12. Origin of the Universal Correlation between the Flare Temperature and the Emission Measure for Solar and Stellar Flares.

    PubMed

    Shibata; Yokoyama

    1999-11-20

    We present a theory to explain the observed universal correlation between flare temperature T and emission measure EM=n2V for solar and stellar flares (including solar microflares observed by Yohkoh as well as protostellar flares observed by ASCA), where n is the electron density and V is the volume. The theory is based on a magnetic reconnection model with heat conduction and chromospheric evaporation, assuming that the gas pressure of a flare loop is comparable to the magnetic pressure. This theory predicts the relation EM~B-5T17/2, which explains well the observed correlation between EM and T in the range of 6x106 K < T<108 K and 1044flares, if the magnetic field strength B of a flare loop is nearly constant for solar and stellar flares.

  13. Feasibility and Domain Validation of RA Flare Core Domain Set: A Report of the OMERACT 2014 RA Flare Group Plenary

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Susan J.; Bykerk, Vivian P.; Cooksey, Roxanne; Choy, Ernest H.; Alten, Rieke; Christensen, Robin; Furst, Daniel E.; Guillemin, Francis; Halls, Serena; Hewlett, Sarah; Leong, Amye L.; Lyddiatt, Anne; March, Lyn; Montie, Pamela; Orbai, Ana Maria; Pohl, Christoph; Voshaar, Marieke Scholte; Woodworth, Thasia G.; Bingham, Clifton O.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The OMERACT RA Flare Group was established to develop an approach to identify and measure rheumatoid arthritis (RA) flares. Here, we provide an overview of our OMERACT 2014 plenary. Methods Feasibility and validity of flare domains endorsed at OMERACT 11 (2012) were described based on initial data from three international studies collected using a common set of questions specific to RA flare. Mean flare frequency, severity, and duration data were presented, and domain scores were compared by flare status to examine known-groups validity. Breakout groups provided input for stiffness, self-management, contextual factors, and measurement considerations. Results Flare data from 501 patients in a observational study indicated 39% were in a flare, with mean (SD) severity of 6.0 (2.6) and 55% lasting > 14 days. Pain, physical function, fatigue, participation and stiffness scores averaged ≥ 2 times higher (2 of 11 points) in flaring individuals. Correlations between flare domains and corresponding legacy instruments were r’s from 0.46 to 0.93. A combined definition (patient-report of flare and DAS28 increase) was evaluated in two other trials with similar results. Breakout groups debated specific measurement issues. Conclusion These data contribute initial evidence of feasibility and content validation of the OMERACT RA Flare Core Domain Set. Our research agenda for OMERACT 2016 includes establishing duration/intensity criteria and developing criteria to identify RA flares using existing disease activity measures. Ongoing work will also address discordance between patients and physician ratings, facilitate applications to clinical care, elucidate the role of self-management and help finalize recommendations for RA flare measurement. PMID:25684764

  14. THE FLARE-ONA OF EK DRACONIS

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2015-07-15

    EK Draconis (HD 129333: G1.5 V) is a well-known young (50 Myr) solar analog. In 2012, Hubble Space Telescope returned to EK Dra to follow up a far-ultraviolet (FUV) SNAPshot visit by Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) two years earlier. The brief SNAP pointing had found surprisingly redshifted, impulsively variable subcoronal “hot-line” emission of Si iv 1400 Å (T ∼ 8 × 10{sup 4} K). Serendipitously, the 2012 follow-on program witnessed one of the largest FUV flares ever recorded on a sunlike star, which again displayed strong redshifts (downflows) of 30–40 km s{sup −1}, even after compensating for small systematics in the COS velocity scales, uncovered through a cross-calibration by Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). The (now reduced, but still substantial) ∼10 km s{sup −1} hot-line redshifts outside the flaring interval did not vary with rotational phase, so cannot be caused by “Doppler imaging” (bright surface patches near a receding limb). Density diagnostic O iv] 1400 Å multiplet line ratios of EK Dra suggest n{sub e} ∼ 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3}, an order of magnitude larger than in low-activity solar twin α Centauri A, but typical of densities inferred in large stellar soft X-ray events. The self-similar FUV hot-line profiles between the flare decay and the subsequent more quiet periods, and the unchanging but high densities, reinforce a long-standing idea that the coronae of hyperactive dwarfs are flaring all the time, in a scale-free way; a flare-ona if you will. In this picture, the subsonic hot-line downflows probably are a byproduct of the post-flare cooling process, something like “coronal rain” on the Sun. All in all, the new STIS/COS program documents a complex, energetic, dynamic outer atmosphere of the young sunlike star.

  15. A TRIO OF CONFINED FLARES IN AR 11087

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Anand D.; Park, Sung-Hong; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Forbes, Terry G. E-mail: freemler@kasi.re.kr E-mail: terry.forbes@unh.edu

    2015-01-10

    We investigate three flares that occurred in active region, AR 11087, observed by the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) on 2010 July 13, in a span of three hours. The first two flares have soft X-ray class B3, whereas the third flare has class C3. The third flare not only was the largest in terms of area and brightness but also showed a very faint coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with it, while the earlier two flares had no associated CME. The active region, located at 27° N, 26° E, has a small U-shaped active region filament to the south of the sunspot, and a quiescent filament is located to its west. Hα observations from DOT, as well as extreme-ultraviolet images and magnetograms from the STEREO spacecraft and Solar Dynamics Observatory, are used to study the dynamics of the active region during the three flares. Our observations imply that the first two flares are confined and that some filament material drains to the surface during these flares. At the onset of the third flare downflows are again observed within the active region, but a strong upflow is also observed at the northern end of the adjacent quiescent filament to the west. It is at the latter location that the CME originates. The temporal evolution of the flare ribbons and the dynamics of the filaments are both consistent with the idea that reconnection in a pre-existing current sheet leads to a loss of equilibrium.

  16. FINE STRUCTURES AND OVERLYING LOOPS OF CONFINED SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2014-10-01

    Using the Hα observations from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope at the Fuxian Solar Observatory, we focus on the fine structures of three confined flares and the issue why all the three flares are confined instead of eruptive. All the three confined flares take place successively at the same location and have similar morphologies, so can be termed homologous confined flares. In the simultaneous images obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, many large-scale coronal loops above the confined flares are clearly observed in multi-wavelengths. At the pre-flare stage, two dipoles emerge near the negative sunspot, and the dipolar patches are connected by small loops appearing as arch-shaped Hα fibrils. There exists a reconnection between the small loops, and thus the Hα fibrils change their configuration. The reconnection also occurs between a set of emerging Hα fibrils and a set of pre-existing large loops, which are rooted in the negative sunspot, a nearby positive patch, and some remote positive faculae, forming a typical three-legged structure. During the flare processes, the overlying loops, some of which are tracked by activated dark materials, do not break out. These direct observations may illustrate the physical mechanism of confined flares, i.e., magnetic reconnection between the emerging loops and the pre-existing loops triggers flares and the overlying loops prevent the flares from being eruptive.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of lupus nephritis flares--an update.

    PubMed

    Sprangers, Ben; Monahan, Marianne; Appel, Gerald B

    2012-12-01

    Relapses or flares of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are frequent and observed in 27-66% of patients. SLE flares are defined as an increase in disease activity, in general, requiring alternative treatment or intensification of therapy. A renal flare is indicated by an increase in proteinuria and/or serum creatinine concentration, abnormal urine sediment or a reduction in creatinine clearance rate as a result of active disease. The morbidity associated with renal flares is derived from both the kidney damage due to lupus nephritis and treatment-related toxic effects. Current induction treatment protocols achieve remission in the majority of patients with lupus nephritis; however, few studies focus on treatment interventions for renal flares in these patients. The available data, however, suggest that remission can be induced again in a substantial percentage of patients experiencing a lupus nephritis flare. Lupus nephritis flares are independently associated with an increased risk of deterioration in renal function; prevention of renal flares might, therefore, also decrease long-term morbidity and mortality. Appropriate immunosuppressive maintenance therapy might lead to a decrease in the occurrence of renal and extrarenal flares in patients with SLE, and monitoring for the early detection and treatment of renal flares could improve their outcomes.

  18. ASCA Observations of the Barnard 209 Dark Cloud and an Intense X-Ray Flare on V773 Tauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Guedel, Manuel; Koyama, Katsuji; Yamauchi, Shigeo

    1997-01-01

    ASCA (Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics) detected an intense X-ray flare on the weak-lined T Tauri star V773 Tau (=HD 283447) during a 30 ks observation of the Barnard 209 dark cloud in 1995 September. This star is a spectroscopic binary and shows signs of strong magnetic surface activity including a spot-modulated optical light curve. The flare was seen only during its decay phase but is still one of the strongest ever recorded from a T Tauri star with a peak luminosity L(sub x) = 10(exp 32.4) ergs/s (0.5-10 keV), a maximum temperature of at least 42 million K, and energy release of greater than 10(exp 37) ergs. A shorter ASCA observation taken five months later showed V773 Tau in a quiescent state (L(sub x)= 10(exp 31.0) ergs/s) and detected variable emission from the infrared binary IRAS 04113+2758. The differential emission measure (DEM) distribution during the V773 Tau flare shows a bimodal temperature structure that is almost totally dominated by hot plasma at an average temperature of approx. 37 million K. Using information from time-resolved spectra, we examine the flare decay in terms of solar flare models (cooling loops and two-ribbon flares) and also consider possible nonsolar behavior (interbinary flares, star-disk flares, and rotational X-ray modulation). Solar models are unable to reproduce the unusual convex-shaped X-ray light curve, which decays slowly over a timespan of at least 1 day. However, the light curve decay is accurately modeled as a sinusoid with an inferred X-ray period of 2.97 days, which is nearly identical to the optical rotation period(s) of the two K-type components. This provides tantalizing evidence that the flaring region was undergoing rotational occultation, but periodic X-ray variability is not yet proven since our ASCA observation spans only one-third of a rotation cycle.

  19. Lateral Flow Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Ching, Kathryn H

    2015-01-01

    Lateral flow immunoassays (LFIAs) are a staple in the field of rapid diagnostics. These small handheld devices require no specialized training or equipment to operate, and generate a result within minutes of sample application. They are an ideal format for many types of home test kits, for emergency responders and for food manufacturers and producers looking for a quick evaluation of a given sample. LFIAs rely on high quality monoclonal antibodies that recognize the analyte of interest. As monoclonal antibody technology becomes more accessible to smaller laboratories, there has been increased interest in developing LFIA prototypes for potential commercial manufacture. In this chapter, the basics of designing and building an LFIA prototype are described. PMID:26160571

  20. Slipping Magnetic Reconnections with Multiple Flare Ribbons during an X-class Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Wang, Bing

    2016-06-01

    With the observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present the slipping magnetic reconnections with multiple flare ribbons (FRs) during an X1.2 eruptive flare on 2014 January 7. A center negative polarity was surrounded by several positive ones, and three FRs appeared. The three FRs showed apparent slipping motions, and hook structures formed at their ends. Due to the moving footpoints of the erupting structures, one tight semi-circular hook disappeared after the slippage along its inner and outer edges, and coronal dimmings formed within the hook. The east hook also faded as a result of the magnetic reconnection between the arcades of a remote filament and a hot loop that was impulsively heated by the under flare loops. Our results are accordant with the slipping magnetic reconnection regime in three-dimensional standard model for eruptive flares. We suggest that the complex structures of the flare are likely a consequence of the more complex flux distribution in the photosphere, and the eruption involves at least two magnetic reconnections.

  1. A phenomenological model of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colgate, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    The energy of solar flares is derived from the magnetic energy of fields convected to the sun's surface and subsequently converted to heat and energetic particles within the chromosphere. The circumstances of this conversion in most current models is magnetic flux annihilation at a neutral sheet. An analysis is conducted of the constraints of flux annihilation. It is shown that the present evidence of solar cosmic rays, X-rays, gamma-rays, and total energy suggests a choice of annihilation not at a neutral point, but by an enhanced dissipation of a field-aligned current. The field configuration is related both to its origin and to the extensive theory and laboratory experiments concerned with this configuration in magnetic fusion. The magnetic field model is applied to the August 4 flare. It is shown how the plasma heating in the annihilation region balanced by thermal conduction leads to a plasma temperature of about 20 million deg K.

  2. Millimeter Observation of Solar Flares with Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, D. F.; Valio, A. B. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present the investigation of two solar flares on February 17 and May 13, 2013, studied in radio from 5 to 405 GHz (RSTN, POEMAS, SST), and in X-rays up to 300 keV (FERMI and RHESSI). The objective of this work is to study the evolution and energy distribution of the population of accelerated electrons and the magnetic field configuration. For this we constructed and fit the radio spectrum by a gyro synchrotron model. The optically thin spectral indices from radio observations were compared to that of the hard X-rays, showing that the radio spectral index is harder than the latter by 2. These flares also presented 10-15 % circular polarized emission at 45 and 90 GHz that suggests that the sources are located at different legs of an asymmetric loop.

  3. A slingshot model for solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Gregory

    1991-01-01

    Recent observations of intense, impulsive gamma-ray and X-ray-emitting solar flares underline the suddenness of these events. The simultaneous emission of X-rays greater than 40 keV from electron bremsstrahlung and gamma-rays requiring several MeV protons shows that all particles must be accelerated in less than 5 s. This paper proposes a simple model to explain such events, using the energy stored in the stretched field lines of a coronal arch. When reconnection occurs at the top of the arch, field lines retract like stretched rubber bands, sweeping up plasma and acting like a piston or slingshot. When the slug of plasma caught in the magnetic fields strikes the photosphere, it deposits its considerable kinetic energy, heating and compressing the intruding slug. Ten slugs of 100 km radius striking the photosphere may account for the 10 to the 29th ergs radiation from loop flares.

  4. High energy flare physics group summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Kurfess, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    The contributions of the High Energy Flare Physics Special Session in the American Astronomical Society Solar Physics Division Meeting are reviewed. Oral and poster papers were presented on observatories and instruments available for the upcoming solar maximum. Among these are the space-based Gamma Ray Observatory, the Solar Flare and Cosmic Burst Gamma Ray Experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft, the Soft X Ray Telescope on the spacecraft Solar-A, and the balloon-based Gamma Ray Imaging Device. Ground based observatories with new capabilities include the BIMA mm-wave interferometer (Univ. of California, Berkeley; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Maryland), Owens Valley Radio Observatory and the Very Large Array. The highlights of the various instrument performances are reported and potential data correlations and collaborations are suggested.

  5. Solar flare irradiation records in Antarctic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    The observation of tracks from solar flare heavy nuclei in Antarctic meteorite samples is reported. In an analysis of nuclear track densities in eight L and H chondrites of low metamorphic grade, it was found that two interior specimens of sample 77216, an L-3 chondrite, contain olivine grains with track densities much higher than the average track densities, indicating precompaction irradiation by solar flares in different shielding conditions. Preliminary data from mass spectroscopic analyses show a large excess of noble gases, with a Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio of greater than or equal to 10, indicating the presence of solar-type noble gas. Results of track density measurements in the other Antarctic meteorites range from 10,000 to 4,000,000/sq cm, which is within the range observed in non-Antarctic L-group meteorites

  6. Carbon-poor solar flare events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of energetic particle flux enhancements over the period from October 1973 to December 1977 has been performed by using the University of Maryland/Max-Planck-Institut ULET sensor on the IMP 8 spacecraft. During the four-year period of the study, it is found that the most extreme periods of Fe enrichment compared with oxygen were during solar flare events in February 1974 and May 1974. In these same events, the carbon abundance with respect to oxygen was significantly depleted when compared with a value C:O of about 0.45:1 for typical solar flares. These observations, taken together with previously reported He-3 enrichment in these events, give strong evidence for the importance of a wave-particle interaction in the preinjection heating of the ambient matter.

  7. Observational Constraints on Stellar Flares and Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarnio, Alicia

    2016-07-01

    Multi-wavelength surveys have catalogued a wealth of stellar flare data for stars representing a broad range of masses and ages. Young solar analogs inform our understanding of the Sun's evolution and the influence of its activity on early solar system formation, while field star observations allow us to place its current activity into context within a statistical ensemble of main-sequence G-type stars. At the same time, stellar observations probe a variety of interior and coronal conditions, providing constraints on models of equilibrium (and loss thereof!) for magnetic structures. In this review, I will focus on our current understanding of stellar flares, prominences, and coronal mass ejections as a function of stellar parameters. As our interpretation of stellar data relies heavily on solar-stellar analogy, I will explore how far into extreme stellar parameter spaces this comparison can be invoked.

  8. Dynamics of flare sprays. [in sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Martin, S. F.; Hansen, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    During solar cycle No. 20 new insight into the flare-spray phenomenon has been attained due to several innovations in solar optical-observing techniques (higher spatial resolution cinema-photography, tunable passband filters, multislit spectroscopy and extended angular field coronagraphs). From combined analysis of 13 well-observed sprays which occurred between 1969-1974 it is concluded that (1) the spray material originates from a preexisting active region filament which undergoes increased absorption some tens of minutes prior to the abrupt chromospheric brightening at the 'flare-start', and (2) the spray material is confined within a steadily expanding, loop-shaped (presumable magnetically controlled) envelope with part of the materials draining back down along one or both legs of the loop.

  9. A NEW METHOD FOR CLASSIFYING FLARES OF UV Ceti TYPE STARS: DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SLOW AND FAST FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Dal, H. A.; Evren, S.

    2010-08-15

    In this study, a new method is presented to classify flares derived from the photoelectric photometry of UV Ceti type stars. This method is based on statistical analyses using an independent samples t-test. The data used in analyses were obtained from four flare stars observed between 2004 and 2007. The total number of flares obtained in the observations of AD Leo, EV Lac, EQ Peg, and V1054 Oph is 321 in the standard Johnson U band. As a result flares can be separated into two types, slow and fast, depending on the ratio of flare decay time to flare rise time. The ratio is below 3.5 for all slow flares, while it is above 3.5 for all fast flares. Also, according to the independent samples t-test, there is a difference of about 157 s between equivalent durations of slow and fast flares. In addition, there are significant differences between amplitudes and rise times of slow and fast flares.

  10. X-rays Flares and Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    2011-04-01

    X-ray observations of star forming regions show that magnetic reconnection flares are powerful and frequent in pre-main sequence solar-type stars. Well-defined samples in the Orion Nebula Cluster and Taurus clouds exhibit flares with peak X- ray luminosities Lx˜10^29 - 10^32 erg/s, orders of magnitude stronger and more frequent than contemporary solar flares. X-rays are emitted in magnetic loops extending 0.1-10 R * above the stellar surface and thus have a favorable geometry to irradiate the protoplanetary disk. Several lines of evidence - fluorescent iron X-ray emission line, forbidden [NeII] infrared line, and excited molecular bands - support X-ray irradiation of cold material in some young systems. Several astrophysical consequences of X-ray irradiation are outlined. As ionization fractions need only reach 10-12 to induce the magnetorotational instability and associated turbulence, X-rays may be the principal determinant of the extent of the viscous "active zone" and laminar "dead zone" in the layered accretion disk. X-ray irradiation may thus play a major role in planet formation processes: particle settling; meter-size inspiral; protoplanetary migration; and dissipation of the gaseous disk.

  11. Explosive plasma flows in a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, Dominic M.; Canfield, Richard C.; Metcalf, Thomas R.; Strong, Keith T.

    1988-01-01

    Solar Maximum Mission soft X-ray data and Sacramento Peak Observatory H-alpha observations are combined in a study of the impulsive phase of a solar flare. A blue asymmetry, indicative of upflows, was observed in the coronal Ca XIX line during the soft X-ray rise phase. A red asymmetry, indicative of downflows, was observed simultaneously in chromospheric H-alpha emitted from bright flare kernels during the period of hard X-ray emission. Combining the velocity data with a measurement of coronal electron density, it is shown that the impulsive phase momentum of upflowing soft X-ray-emitting plasma equalled that of the downflowing H-alpha-emitting plasma to within one order of magnitude. In particular, the momentum of the upflowing plasma was 2 x 10 to the 21st g cm/s while that of the downflowing plasma was 7 x 10 to the 21st g cm/s, with a factor of 2 uncertainty on each value. This equality supports the explosive chromospheric evaporation model of solar flares, in which a sudden pressure increase at the footprint of a coronal loop produces oppositely directed flows in the heated plasma.

  12. Solar Aurora and a White Light Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    A white light flare analyzed by Krucker et al. (2011) poses a severe challenge to the solar physicist because of the high energy fluxes implied by a hitherto not achieved spatial resolution of simultaneous observations with Hinode and RHESSI. A scenario based on the auroral acceleration mechanism applied to flare conditions, 'Solar Aurora', is able to reproduce the observations, but implies several far-reaching assumptions on the mechanism as well as on the environmental parameters. Unavoidable consequences exist with regard to the spatial and temporal scales. They are extremely short because of the high density of the corona and the need for an energy conversion process involving some kind of anomalous resistivity, i.e. extremely high electric current densities. A further postulate is that of spontaneous propagation of an energy conversion front (ENF), once established, in three dimensions. It is assumed that about one half of the converted energy appears in form of runaway electrons. Obliqueness of the ENFs prevents the existence of a return current problem for the emerging runaway electrons. The key flare parameters are formulated quantitatively in terms of the environmental properties. Transverse length scales turn out to be in the ten centimeter range, time-scales in the range of one millisecond. The energy conversion occurs in 10E3 -10E4 ENFs just above the transition region in a background field of the order of 2000 G. Observational consequences are being discussed.

  13. Structures in the Algol Corona: Searching for Flare Eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favata, Fabio

    Our recent successful observation of a total eclipse of a large flare on Algol (with BeppoSAX) has demonstrated the diagnostic power of flare eclipses, allowing for the first time to derive the size of the coronal structure responsible for a stellar flare (and thus by inference the size of coronal structures in general) on purely geometrical grounds. The loop is compact, much smaller than deduced by the analysis of the flare decay, and located on the pole of the active star. We propose to observe Algol for two binary orbits searching for similar flare eclipses. Further detections of flare eclipses (for which RXTE, with its large effective area is ideally suited) will allow to directly constrain the characteristic sized of structures in the Algol corona.

  14. Nonpotential magnetic fields at sites of gamma-ray flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Smith, J. B., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The relation between the degree of nonpotentiality of photospheric magnetic fields and the occurrence of gama-ray flares is examined to determine whether there are special signatures of the stressed fields for this type of flare. Observations of the flares in the active region of April 1984 (AR 4474) are analyzed, showing that the big flare initiated at the location on the magnetic neutral line where the field deviated the most from a potential field. The nonpotential signatures of AR 4474 are compared with those of four other regions. The results suggest that gamma-ray flares are associated with strongly nonpotential fields that extend over relatively larger lengths of the magnetic neutral line that the fields associated with flares that do not produce gamma-ray events.

  15. Nonpotential magnetic fields at sites of gamma-ray flares

    SciTech Connect

    Hagyard, M.J.; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Smith, J.B. Jr.

    1990-06-01

    The relation between the degree of nonpotentiality of photospheric magnetic fields and the occurrence of gama-ray flares is examined to determine whether there are special signatures of the stressed fields for this type of flare. Observations of the flares in the active region of April 1984 (AR 4474) are analyzed, showing that the big flare initiated at the location on the magnetic neutral line where the field deviated the most from a potential field. The nonpotential signatures of AR 4474 are compared with those of four other regions. The results suggest that gamma-ray flares are associated with strongly nonpotential fields that extend over relatively larger lengths of the magnetic neutral line that the fields associated with flares that do not produce gamma-ray events. 9 refs.

  16. Black Carbon Emissions from Associated Natural Gas Flaring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyant, C.; Shepson, P. B.; Subramanian, R.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Mccabe, D. C.; Baum, E. K.; Caulton, D.; Heimburger, A. M. F.; Bond, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    Approximately 150 billion cubic meters (BCM) of associated natural gas is flared and vented in the world, annually, emitting greenhouse gases and other pollutants with no energy benefit. Based on estimates from satellite observations, the United States flares about 7 BCM of gas, annually (the 5th highest flaring volume worldwide). The volume of gas flared in the US is growing, largely due to flaring in the Bakken formation in North Dakota. Black carbon (BC), a combustion by-product from gas flaring, is a short-term climate pollutant that absorbs shortwave radiation both in the atmosphere and on snow and ice surfaces. Flaring may be a significant source of global BC climate effects. For example, modeling estimates suggest that associated gas flares are the source of a significant percentage of BC surface concentrations in the Arctic, where BC-induced ice melting occurs. However, there are no direct field measurements of BC emission factors from associated gas flares. Emission measurements of BC that include a range of flaring conditions are needed to ascertain the magnitude of BC emissions from this source. Over one hundred flare plumes were sampled in the Bakken formation using a small aircraft. Methane, carbon dioxide, and BC were measured simultaneously, allowing the calculation of BC mass emission factors using the carbon balance method. BC was measured using two methods; optical absorption was measured using a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) and BC particle number and mass concentrations were measured with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Simultaneous sampling of BC absorption and mass allows for the calculation of the BC mass absorption cross-section. Results indicate that emission factor variability between flares in the region is significant; there are two orders of magnitude variation in the BC emission factors.

  17. Astro-D observations of flares: Detecting the impulsive phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, Bernhard

    1995-01-01

    The flare star Proxima Centauri was observed by the satellite for approximately 50 ks and a number of flares were successfully detected. The scientific results were presented at several meetings and were discussed in articles, primarily in 'Solar-like M-Class X-ray Flares on Proxima Centauri Observed by the ASCA Satellite' by Haisch, Antunes and Schmitt, Science, Vol. 268, pp. 1327-1329, attached to the report.

  18. A swirling flare-related EUV jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. M.; Ji, H. S.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We report our observations of a swirling flare-related extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jet on 2011 October 15 at the edge of NOAA active region 11314. Methods: We used the multiwavelength observations in the EUV passbands from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We extracted a wide slit along the jet axis and 12 thin slits across its axis to investigate the longitudinal motion and transverse rotation. We also used data from the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) aboard the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the jet. Ground-based Hα images from the El Teide Observatory, a member of the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG), provide a good opportunity to explore the relationship between the cool surge and the hot jet. Line-of-sight magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard SDO enable us to study the magnetic evolution of the flare/jet event. We carried out potential-field extrapolation to calculate the magnetic configuration associated with the jet. Results: The onset of jet eruption coincided with the start time of the C1.6 flare impulsive phase. The initial velocity and acceleration of the longitudinal motion were 254 ± 10 km s-1 and -97 ± 5 m s-2, respectively. The jet presented helical structure and transverse swirling motion at the beginning of its eruption. The counter-clockwise rotation slowed down from an average velocity of ~122 km s-1 to ~80 km s-1. The interwinding thick threads of the jet untwisted into multiple thin threads during the rotation that lasted for one cycle with a period of ~7 min and an amplitude that increases from ~3.2 Mm at the bottom to ~11 Mm at the upper part. Afterwards, the curtain-like leading edge of the jet continued rising without rotation, leaving a dimming region behind, before falling back to the solar surface. The appearance/disappearance of dimming corresponded to the

  19. Sun Unleashes an X-Class Flare on March 11, 2015

    NASA Video Gallery

    The sun released an X-class flare, an X2.2, on March 11, 2015. In this video, the flare itself is not very impressive. However, solar material can be seen blasting away from the flare location. Cre...

  20. Analysis of coordinated observations of a giant stellar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, David L.

    1989-01-01

    Multi-wavelength observations of a giant flare on the star AD Leo were obtained with the 2.1 m and 0.9 m telescopes at McDonald Observatory and the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite. The quality, spectral coverage, and time resolution of the data represented a major improvement over any published stellar flare data. Two theoretical, quantitative flare models were developed. Combining the models, the chromospheric emission model predictions in the hydrogen Balmer lines, Da II K, Mg II h + k and the optical continuum were compared to the observations, with the result that much of the gradual phase flare emission could be produced by the x ray and conductive heated atmospheres. The models lend insight into the impulsive phase flare emission, but do not reproduce it. Soft x ray and conductive heating of the chromosphere is a natural consequence of the coronal temperatures that have been observed during the gradual phase of flares on the sun and on M dwarf stars. The improved flare observations and quantitative flare models presented here show that these heating mechanisms can produce atmospheres whose emission matches many of the observed stellar flare features.

  1. Investigation of physical parameters in stellar flares observed by GINGA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    This program involves analysis and interpretation of results from GINGA Large Area Counter (LAC) observations from a group of large stellar X-ray flares. All LAC data are re-extracted using the standard Hayashida method of LAC background subtraction and analyzed using various models available with the XSPEC spectral fitting program.Temperature-emission measure histories are available for a total of 5 flares observed by GINGA. These will be used to compare physical parameters of these flares with solar and stellar flare models.

  2. Investigation of physical parameters in stellar flares observed by GINGA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    This program involves analysis and interpretation of results from GINGA Large Area Counter (LAC) observations from a group of large stellar x-ray flares. All LAC data are re-extracted using the standard Hayashida method of LAC background subtraction and analyzed using various models available with the XSPEC spectral fitting program. Temperature-emission measure histories are available for a total of 5 flares observed by GINGA. These will be used to compare physical parameters of these flares with solar and stellar flare models.

  3. The cooling and condensation of flare coronal plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    A model is investigated for the decay of flare heated coronal loops in which rapid radiative cooling at the loop base creates strong pressure gradients which, in turn, generate large (supersonic) downward flows. The coronal material cools and 'condenses' onto the flare chromosphere. The features which distinguish this model from previous models of flare cooling are: (1) most of the thermal energy of the coronal plasma may be lost by mass motion rather than by conduction or coronal radiation; (2) flare loops are not isobaric during their decay phase, and large downward velocities are present near the footpoints; (3) the differential emission measure q has a strong temperature dependence.

  4. Nucleosynthesis of Li-7 in flares on UV Ceti stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, J. T.; Worden, S. P.

    1979-01-01

    The possible production of Li-7 by nuclear reactions in UV Ceti flares has been considered. By utilizing solar observations and theory, a relationship is derived between flare energy and production rates for Li-7; approximately 100 erg of total flare energy is found to denote the formation of a Li-7 atom. Based on this value and best estimates of UV Ceti-type flare rates, it is concluded that less than 10% of the Li-7 observed in the intestellar medium may have been produced by this mechanism. Formation of significant amounts of interstellar deuterium by this method is ruled out.

  5. Some properties of flare-not-associated Forbush decreases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iucci, N.; Parisi, M.; Signorini, C.; Storini, M.; Villoresi, G.

    1984-07-01

    All non flare-associated Forbush decreases (N Ass Fds) over the period 1957 to 1979 are investigated. The connection between N Ass Fds occurrence and the central meridian passage of strong active regions producing great flare associated Fds shows the flare origin of the N Ass Fds. The interplanetary perturbations at the eastern and western boundaries of the modulated region are found to be long living corotating structures. These structures mark the boundaries of the region in which the (1 to 4 Mev) protons accelerated by interplanetary flare generated shocks are confined.

  6. Comment on 'The solar flare myth' by J. T. Gosling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh; Haisch, Bernhard; Strong, Keith T.

    1995-01-01

    In a recent paper Gosling (1993) claims that solar flares are relatively unimportant for understanding the terrestrial consequences of solar activity, and argues that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) produce the most powerful terrestrial disturbances. This opinion conflicts with observation, as it is well known that CMEs and flares are closely associated, and we disagree with Gosling's insistence on a simplistic cause-and-effect description of the interrelated phenomena of a solar flare. In this brief response we present new Yohkoh data and review older results that demonstrate the close relationships among CMEs, flares, filament eruptions, and other forms of energy release such as particle acceleration.

  7. Nuclear processes and neutrino production in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, R. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, S.

    1985-01-01

    The determination of flare neutrino flux is approached from the standpoint of recent observations and theoretical results on the nuclear processes in solar flares. Attention is given to the energy spectra and total numbers of accelerated particles in flares, as well as their resulting production of beta(+)-emitting radionuclei and pions; these should be the primary sources of neutrinos. The observed 0.511 MeV line flux for the June 21, 1980 flare is compared with the expected from the number and spectrum of accelerated particles.

  8. TOWARD RELIABLE BENCHMARKING OF SOLAR FLARE FORECASTING METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, D. Shaun; Higgins, Paul A.; Gallagher, Peter T.; McAteer, R. T. James

    2012-03-10

    Solar flares occur in complex sunspot groups, but it remains unclear how the probability of producing a flare of a given magnitude relates to the characteristics of the sunspot group. Here, we use Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite X-ray flares and McIntosh group classifications from solar cycles 21 and 22 to calculate average flare rates for each McIntosh class and use these to determine Poisson probabilities for different flare magnitudes. Forecast verification measures are studied to find optimum thresholds to convert Poisson flare probabilities into yes/no predictions of cycle 23 flares. A case is presented to adopt the true skill statistic (TSS) as a standard for forecast comparison over the commonly used Heidke skill score (HSS). In predicting flares over 24 hr, the maximum values of TSS achieved are 0.44 (C-class), 0.53 (M-class), 0.74 (X-class), 0.54 ({>=}M1.0), and 0.46 ({>=}C1.0). The maximum values of HSS are 0.38 (C-class), 0.27 (M-class), 0.14 (X-class), 0.28 ({>=}M1.0), and 0.41 ({>=}C1.0). These show that Poisson probabilities perform comparably to some more complex prediction systems, but the overall inaccuracy highlights the problem with using average values to represent flaring rate distributions.

  9. Ultraviolet Events Observed in Active Regions. 2; An Interpretation of Flaring Arches and Associated Small Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, J.; Rovira, M.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1997-01-01

    We analyze Hz, UV, and X-ray emissions in and around the spectacular arch system seen in the corona on 1980 March 27 during the Solar Maximum Mission. The flaring of the arch plasma is studied, and its dependence on triggering mechanisms related to the observed small limb flare in the arch footpoint is analyzed. To drive these events, we propose a mechanism in which small electric current circuits and the localized magnetic free energy are continuously generated at a magnetic null by a pressure gradient, which then compress or expand the plasma. This free energy dissipates by Joule effect and upward transport.

  10. Multiwavelength Observations of an Eruptive Flare: Evidence for Blast Waves and Break-Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Innes, D. E.

    2013-11-01

    Images of an east-limb flare on 3 November 2010 taken in the 131 Å channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory provide a convincing example of a long current sheet below an erupting plasmoid, as predicted by the standard magnetic reconnection model of eruptive flares. However, the 171 Å and 193 Å channel images hint at an alternative scenario. These images reveal that large-scale waves with velocity greater than 1000 km s-1 propagated alongside and ahead of the erupting plasmoid. Just south of the plasmoid, the waves coincided with type-II radio emission, and to the north, where the waves propagated along plume-like structures, there was increased decimetric emission. Initially, the cavity around the hot plasmoid expanded. Later, when the erupting plasmoid reached the height of an overlying arcade system, the plasmoid structure changed, and the lower parts of the cavity collapsed inwards. Hot loops appeared alongside and below the erupting plasmoid. We consider a scenario in which the fast waves and the type-II emission were a consequence of a flare blast wave, and the cavity collapse and the hot loops resulted from the break-out of the flux rope through an overlying coronal arcade.

  11. Flares from a candidate Galactic magnetar suggest a missing link to dim isolated neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Castro-Tirado, A J; de Ugarte Postigo, A; Gorosabel, J; Jelínek, M; Fatkhullin, T A; Sokolov, V V; Ferrero, P; Kann, D A; Klose, S; Sluse, D; Bremer, M; Winters, J M; Nuernberger, D; Pérez-Ramírez, D; Guerrero, M A; French, J; Melady, G; Hanlon, L; McBreen, B; Leventis, K; Markoff, S B; Leon, S; Kraus, A; Aceituno, F J; Cunniffe, R; Kubánek, P; Vítek, S; Schulze, S; Wilson, A C; Hudec, R; Durant, M; González-Pérez, J M; Shahbaz, T; Guziy, S; Pandey, S B; Pavlenko, L; Sonbas, E; Trushkin, S A; Bursov, N N; Nizhelskij, N A; Sánchez-Fernández, C; Sabau-Graziati, L

    2008-09-25

    Magnetars are young neutron stars with very strong magnetic fields of the order of 10(14)-10(15) G. They are detected in our Galaxy either as soft gamma-ray repeaters or anomalous X-ray pulsars. Soft gamma-ray repeaters are a rare type of gamma-ray transient sources that are occasionally detected as bursters in the high-energy sky. No optical counterpart to the gamma-ray flares or the quiescent source has yet been identified. Here we report multi-wavelength observations of a puzzling source, SWIFT J195509+261406. We detected more than 40 flaring episodes in the optical band over a time span of three days, and a faint infrared flare 11 days later, after which the source returned to quiescence. Our radio observations confirm a Galactic nature and establish a lower distance limit of approximately 3.7 kpc. We suggest that SWIFT J195509+261406 could be an isolated magnetar whose bursting activity has been detected at optical wavelengths, and for which the long-term X-ray emission is short-lived. In this case, a new manifestation of magnetar activity has been recorded and we can consider SWIFT J195509+261406 to be a link between the 'persistent' soft gamma-ray repeaters/anomalous X-ray pulsars and dim isolated neutron stars.

  12. The Driving Magnetic Field and Reconnection in CME/Flare Eruptions and Coronal Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    Signatures of reconnection in major CME (coronal mass ejection)/flare eruptions and in coronal X-ray jets are illustrated and interpreted. The signatures are magnetic field lines and their feet that brighten in flare emission. CME/flare eruptions are magnetic explosions in which: 1. The field that erupts is initially a closed arcade. 2. At eruption onset, most of the free magnetic energy to be released is not stored in field bracketing a current sheet, but in sheared field in the core of the arcade. 3. The sheared core field erupts by a process that from its start or soon after involves fast "tether-cutting" reconnection at an initially small current sheet low in the sheared core field. If the arcade has oppositely-directed field over it, the eruption process from its start or soon after also involves fast "breakout" reconnection at an initially small current sheet between the arcade and the overarching field. These aspects are shown by the small area of the bright field lines and foot-point flare ribbons in the onset of the eruption. 4. At either small current sheet, the fast reconnection progressively unleashes the erupting core field to erupt with progressively greater force. In turn, the erupting core field drives the current sheet to become progressively larger and to undergo progressively greater fast reconnection in the explosive phase of the eruption, and the flare arcade and ribbons grow to become comparable to the pre-eruption arcade in lateral extent. In coronal X-ray jets: 1. The magnetic energy released in the jet is built up by the emergence of a magnetic arcade into surrounding unipolar "open" field. 2. A simple jet is produced when a burst of reconnection occurs at the current sheet between the arcade and the open field. This produces a bright reconnection jet and a bright reconnection arcade that are both much smaller in diameter that the driving arcade. 3. A more complex jet is produced when the arcade has a sheared core field and undergoes an

  13. Lateral flow strip assay

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Benett, William J.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  14. Lateral Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral abdominal wall (LAW) defects can manifest as a flank hernias, myofascial laxity/bulges, or full-thickness defects. These defects are quite different from those in the anterior abdominal wall defects and the complexity and limited surgical options make repairing the LAW a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. LAW reconstruction requires an understanding of the anatomy, physiologic forces, and the impact of deinnervation injury to design and perform successful reconstructions of hernia, bulge, and full-thickness defects. Reconstructive strategies must be tailored to address the inguinal ligament, retroperitoneum, chest wall, and diaphragm. Operative technique must focus on stabilization of the LAW to nonyielding points of fixation at the anatomic borders of the LAW far beyond the musculofascial borders of the defect itself. Thus, hernias, bulges, and full-thickness defects are approached in a similar fashion. Mesh reinforcement is uniformly required in lateral abdominal wall reconstruction. Inlay mesh placement with overlying myofascial coverage is preferred as a first-line option as is the case in anterior abdominal wall reconstruction. However, interposition bridging repairs are often performed as the surrounding myofascial tissue precludes a dual layered closure. The decision to place bioprosthetic or prosthetic mesh depends on surgeon preference, patient comorbidities, and clinical factors of the repair. Regardless of mesh type, the overlying soft tissue must provide stable cutaneous coverage and obliteration of dead space. In cases where the fasciocutaneous flaps surrounding the defect are inadequate for closure, regional pedicled flaps or free flaps are recruited to achieve stable soft tissue coverage. PMID:23372458

  15. MULTIWAVELENGTH IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN AN M-CLASS SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Veronig, A. M.; Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Temmer, M.; Rybak, J.; Goemoery, P.; Otruba, W.; Poetzi, W.; Baumgartner, D.

    2010-08-10

    We study spectroscopic observations of chromospheric evaporation mass flows in comparison with the energy input by electron beams derived from hard X-ray (HXR) data for the white-light M2.5 flare of 2006 July 6. The event was captured in high-cadence spectroscopic observing mode by SOHO/CDS combined with high-cadence imaging at various wavelengths in the visible, extreme ultraviolet, and X-ray domain during the joint observing campaign JOP171. During the flare peak, we observe downflows in the He I and O V lines formed in the chromosphere and transition region, respectively, and simultaneous upflows in the hot coronal Si XII line. The energy deposition rate by electron beams derived from RHESSI HXR observations is suggestive of explosive chromospheric evaporation, consistent with the observed plasma motions. However, for a later distinct X-ray burst, where the site of the strongest energy deposition is exactly located on the Coronal Diagnostics Spectrometer (CDS) slit, the situation is intriguing. The O V transition region line spectra show the evolution of double components, indicative of the superposition of a stationary plasma volume and upflowing plasma elements with high velocities (up to 280 km s{sup -1}) in single CDS pixels on the flare ribbon. However, the energy input by electrons during this period is too small to drive explosive chromospheric evaporation. These unexpected findings indicate that the flaring transition region is much more dynamic, complex, and fine structured than is captured in single-loop hydrodynamic simulations.

  16. Radio Spectroscopic Imaging of Bi-directional Electron Beam Pairs in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Wang, Zhitao; Gary, Dale E.

    2016-05-01

    In solar flares, energetic electrons are believed to be accelerated at or near the magnetic reconnection site. They propagate outward along newly reconnected field lines usually in the form of electron beams. These beams can emit radio waves commonly known as type III radio bursts. An important feature of these bursts is that they are emitted near the local plasma frequency or its harmonic, which is only a function of the ambient plasma density. In particular, an electron beam propagating upward in the corona encounters plasma with lower and lower density, producing a radio burst with a “normal” frequency slope (whose frequency decreases in time). Similarly, a downward propagating beam produces a reverse-slope burst. Sometimes both the normal- and reverse-slope type III bursts are observed simultaneously. These type III burst with opposite slopes have been considered to be the signature of a pair of bi-directional electron beams emerging from a common acceleration site. However, previous studies had no imaging capability to locate these bursts and put them in the flare context. Here we report observations of decimetric type III burst pairs by the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) during the impulsive phase of a C5.6 flare. Using VLA’s unprecedented ultra-high-cadence spectroscopic imaging capability, we demonstrate that the type III burst pairs indeed correspond to high speed (~0.1c), bi-directional electron beams emerging from a common site in the corona where post-flare loops appeared later on. Implications of our results on magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration will be briefly discussed.

  17. Extreme-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Observation of Direct Coronal Heating During a C-Class Solar Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    With the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer operating in rapid cadence (9.8 s) stare mode during a C6.6 flare on the solar disk, we observed a sudden brightening of Fe xix line emission (formed at temperature T ˜ 8 MK) above the pre-flare noise without a corresponding brightening of emission from ions formed at lower temperatures, including He i (0.01 MK), Ov (0.25 MK), and Si xii (2 MK). The sudden brightening persisted as a plateau of Fe xix intensity that endured more than 11 minutes. The Fe xix emission at the rise and during the life of the plateau showed no evidence of significant bulk velocity flows, and hence cannot be attributed to chromospheric evaporation. However, the line width showed a significant broadening at the rise of the plateau, corresponding to nonthermal velocities of at least 89 km s-1 due to reconnection outflows or turbulence. During the plateau He i, Ov, and Si xii brightened at successively later times starting about 3.5 minutes after Fe xix, which suggests that these brightenings were produced by thermal conduction from the plasma that produced the Fe xix line emission; however, we cannot rule out the possibility that they were produced by a weak beam of nonthermal particles. We interpret an observed shortening of the Ov wavelength for about 1.5 minutes toward the middle of the plateau to indicate new upward motions driven by the flare, as occurs during gentle chromospheric evaporation; relative to a quiescent interval shortly before the flare, the Ov upward velocity was around -10 km s-1.

  18. EVIDENCE OF MULTIPLE SLOW ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS IN THE STELLAR FLARING LOOPS OF PROXIMA CENTAURI

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, A. K.; Pandey, J. C.; Lalitha, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first observational evidence of multiple slow acoustic oscillations in the post-flaring loops of the corona of Proxima Centauri using XMM-Newton observations. We find the signature of periodic oscillations localized in the decay phase of the flare in its soft (0.3-10.0 keV) X-ray emissions. Using the standard wavelet tool, we find multiple periodicities of 1261 s and 687 s. These bursty oscillations persist for durations of 90 minutes and 50 minutes, respectively, for more than three cycles. The intensity oscillations with a period of 1261 s may be the signature of the fundamental mode of slow magnetoacoustic waves with a phase speed of 119 km s{sup –1} in a loop of length 7.5 × 10{sup 9} cm, which is initially heated, producing the flare peak temperature of 33 MK and later cooled down in the decay phase and maintained at an average temperature of 7.2 MK. The other period of 687 s may be associated with the first overtone of slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in the flaring loop. The fundamental mode oscillations show dissipation with a damping time of 47 minutes. The period ratio P {sub 1}/P {sub 2} is found to be 1.83, indicating that such oscillations are most likely excited in longitudinal density stratified stellar loops. We estimate the density scale height of the stellar loop system as ∼23 Mm, which is smaller than the hydrostatic scale height of the hot loop system, and implies the existence of non-equilibrium conditions.

  19. Evidence of Multiple Slow Acoustic Oscillations in the Stellar Flaring Loops of Proxima Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A. K.; Lalitha, S.; Pandey, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first observational evidence of multiple slow acoustic oscillations in the post-flaring loops of the corona of Proxima Centauri using XMM-Newton observations. We find the signature of periodic oscillations localized in the decay phase of the flare in its soft (0.3-10.0 keV) X-ray emissions. Using the standard wavelet tool, we find multiple periodicities of 1261 s and 687 s. These bursty oscillations persist for durations of 90 minutes and 50 minutes, respectively, for more than three cycles. The intensity oscillations with a period of 1261 s may be the signature of the fundamental mode of slow magnetoacoustic waves with a phase speed of 119 km s-1 in a loop of length 7.5 × 109 cm, which is initially heated, producing the flare peak temperature of 33 MK and later cooled down in the decay phase and maintained at an average temperature of 7.2 MK. The other period of 687 s may be associated with the first overtone of slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in the flaring loop. The fundamental mode oscillations show dissipation with a damping time of 47 minutes. The period ratio P 1/P 2 is found to be 1.83, indicating that such oscillations are most likely excited in longitudinal density stratified stellar loops. We estimate the density scale height of the stellar loop system as ~23 Mm, which is smaller than the hydrostatic scale height of the hot loop system, and implies the existence of non-equilibrium conditions.

  20. The Senior Connection: Design and rationale of a randomized trial of peer companionship to reduce suicide risk in later life✰,✰✰

    PubMed Central

    Van Orden, Kimberly A.; Stone, Deborah M.; Rowe, Jody; McIntosh, Wendy L.; Podgorski, Carol; Conwell, Yeates

    2013-01-01

    There is a pressing public health need to find interventions that reduce suicide risk in later life. Psychiatric and physical illness, functional decline, and social factors place seniors at risk for suicide. Reflecting this body of evidence, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified the promotion and strengthening of social connectedness, between and within the individual, family, community, and broader societal levels, as a key strategy for suicide prevention. The Senior Connection, a randomized trial of peer companionship for older adults, is described here, with an emphasis on the most novel features of the study design—grounding in a psychological theory of suicide and intervening at an early stage in the suicide risk trajectory by linking primary care patients with the Aging Services Provider Network. PMID:23506973

  1. Nonpotential magnetic fields at sites of gamma ray flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Smith, J. B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The relation between the degree of nonpotentiality of photospheric magnetic fields and the occurrence of gamma ray flares is examined. The parameter delta phi (magnetic shear) and the strength of the magnetic field intensity are used as measures of the degree of nonpotentiality, where delta phi is defined as the angular difference between the observed direction of the transverse component of the photospheric field and the direction of the potential field prescribed by the distribution of measured photospheric flux. An analysis of the great flare of April 24 to 25, 1984 is presented as an example of this technique to quantify the nonpotential characteristics of the pre-flare magnetic field. For this flare, which produced a large gamma ray event, strong shear and high field strengths prevailed over an extended length of the magnetic neutral line where the flare occurred. Moreover, the flare began near the area of strongest measured shear (89 to 90 deg). Four other flaring regions were analyzed; one of these produced a moderate gamma ray event while the other three did not produce detectable gamma rays. For all four regions the flares were located in the area where the field was not nonpotential, regardless of the class of flare. The fields of the gamma ray flares were compared with those associated with the flares without gamma rays, and little distinction was found in the degree of magnetic shear. The major difference is seen in the extent of the sheared field: for gamma ray events, the field is sheared over a longer length of the neutral line.

  2. Lateral canthal surgery.

    PubMed

    Chong, Kelvin Kam-Lung; Goldberg, Robert A

    2010-08-01

    The lateral canthus is a delicate and complicated three-dimensional structure with function relevant to the health of the ocular surface. Dysfunction of the lateral canthus, due to aging changes or iatrogenic trauma, results in ocular morbidity ranging from chronic irritation to tearing to recalcitrant keratopathy. From an aesthetic standpoint, symmetric, normally positioned lateral canthi are cornerstones of youthful periorbital appearance, disruption of which leads to cosmetically significant deformity or asymmetry. Reconstruction of the lateral canthus is important in the rehabilitation of the aging eyelid and an unfortunate necessity after failed lateral canthal surgery. The common methods for improving or maintaining position, tone, and shape of the lower eyelid and lateral canthus use tightening or shortening the lower eyelid horizontally, keeping the canthal angle in an appropriate vertical level, and hugging the ocular surface. Many techniques have been described for the reconstruction of the lateral canthus in functional conditions or for aesthetic purposes. These methods have met with varying success. In this article, we begin with a discussion of the anatomy and physiology of the lateral canthus, followed by clinical examples of lateral canthal abnormalities and underlying pathophysiologies. A review of surgical options for the lateral canthus is presented with concluding remarks on postoperative complications. PMID:20524167

  3. STUDYING THE POLARIZATION OF HARD X-RAY SOLAR FLARES WITH THE GAMMA RAY POLARIMETER EXPERIMENT (GRAPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertley, Camden

    2014-01-01

    The degree of linear polarization of hard X-rays (50-500 keV) can provide a better understanding of the particle acceleration mechanisms and the emission of radiation during solar flares. Difficulties in measuring the linear polarization has limited the ability of past experiments to place constraints on solar flare models. The Gamma RAy Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) is a balloon-borne Compton polarimeter designed to measure polarization in the 50 - 500 keV energy range. This energy range minimizes the thermal contamination that can potentially affect measurements at lower energies. This research focuses on the analysis of data acquired during the first high altitude balloon flight of the GRAPE payload in 2011. During this 26 hour balloon flight two M-class flares were observed. The analysis effort includes the development of a Monte Carlo simulation of the full instrument payload with the GEANT4 toolkit. The simulations were used in understanding the background environment, creating a response matrix for the deconvolution of the energy loss spectra, and determining the modulation factor for a 100% linearly polarized source. We report on the results from the polarization analysis of the solar flare data. The polarization and spectral data can be used to further our understanding of particle acceleration in the context of current solar flare models.

  4. Flare heating and ionization of the low solar chromosphere. II - Observations of five solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.; Canfield, Richard C.; Saba, Julia L. R.

    1990-01-01

    Two neutral Mg spectral lines formed in the temperature-minimum region and the low chromosphere, at 4571 and 5173 A, are used to quantify the changes in the atmospheric structure as a function of time during five solar flares. Eight proposed flare heating and ionization mechanisms and predictions of the effects of each on the temperature minimum region are discussed. Two Mg spectral observations made at the National Solar Observatory (Sacramento Peak), along with observations of hard and soft X-rays from the SMM and GOES satellites, are compared to the predictions of the eight proposed mechanisms. The initial effects in all five flares are consistent with backwarming by enhanced Balmer- and Paschen-continuum radiation originating in the upper chromosphere. Extended heating observed in two of the flares is most likely due to UV irradiation. In all cases heating by the dissipation of nonreversed electric currents, collisions with an electron or proton beam, irradiation by soft X-rays, and dissipation of Alfven waves are eliminated.

  5. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1998-01-01

    The accomplishments of the participation in the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest investigator program is summarized in this report. The work involved the study of Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET)/Total Absorption Shower Counter(TASC) flare data. The specific accomplishments were the use of the accelerator neutron measurements obtained at the University of New Hampshire to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution, and to determine a high energy neutron contribution to the emissions from the 1991 June 11, solar flare. The next step in the analysis of this event was doing fits to the TASC energy-loss spectra as a function of time. A significant hardening of the solar proton spectrum over time was found for the flare. Further data was obtained from the Yohkoh HXT time histories and images for the 1991 October 27 flare. The results to date demonstrate that the TASC spectral analysis contributes crucial information on the particle spectrum interacting at the Sun. The report includes a paper accepted for publication, a draft of a paper to be delivered at the 26th International Cosmic Ray Conference and an abstract of a paper to be presented at the Meeting of the American Physical Society.

  6. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1997-01-01

    UNH was assigned the responsibility to use their accelerator neutron measurements to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution. Direct accelerator-based measurements by UNH of the energy-dependent efficiencies for detecting neutrons with energies from 36 to 720 MeV in NaI were compared with Monte Carlo TASC calculations. The calculated TASC efficiencies are somewhat lower (by about 20%) than the accelerator results in the energy range 70-300 MeV. The measured energy-loss spectrum for 207 MeV neutron interactions in NaI were compared with the Monte Carlo response for 200 MeV neutrons in the TASC indicating good agreement. Based on this agreement, the simulation was considered to be sufficiently accurate to generate a neutron response library to be used by UNH in modifying the TASC fitting program to include a neutron component in the flare spectrum modeling. TASC energy-loss data on the 1991 June 11 flare was transferred to UNH. Also included appendix: Gamma-rays and neutrons as a probe of flare proton spectra: the solar flare of 11 June 1991.

  7. Flare Comparisons of the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) to Preliminary SDO EVE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlon, Phillip C.

    2010-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) launched February 11, 2010 from Kennedy Space Center and started normal science operations in April 2010. One of the instruments onboard SDO, the EUV Variability- Experiment (EVE), will measure the solar EUV irradiance from 0.1-105 nm with 0.1 nm spectral resolution as well as a measure of the broad-band Lyman-Alpha emission (121.0 rim), all with less than 10 percent uncertainties. One of the biggest improvements of EVE over its predecessors is its ability to continuously measure the complete spectrum ever y 10 seconds, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. This temporal coverage and cadence will greatly enhance the knowledge of the solar EUV variations during solar flares. This paper will present a comparison of the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM), which can produce an estimated EUV spectrum at 10 seconds temporal resolution, to the preliminary flare observation results from SDO EVE. The discussion will focus on the short-term EUV flare variations and evolution.

  8. New Technology CZT Detectors for High-Energy Flare Spectroscopy: The Room Temperature Semiconductor Spectrometer for JAWSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vestrand, W. Thomas

    1999-01-01

    The goal of our Room Temperature Semiconductor Spectrometer (RTeSS) project is to develop a small high-energy solar flare spectrometer employing semiconductor detectors that do not require significant cooling when used as high-energy solar flare spectrometers. Specifically, the goal is to test Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors with coplanar grid electrodes as x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers and to design an experiment that can be flown as a "piggy-back" payload on a satellite mission during the next solar maximum.

  9. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF A SLOW-RISE, MULTISTEP X1.6 FLARE AND THE ASSOCIATED ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Yurchyshyn, V.; Kumar, P.; Cho, K.-S.; Lim, E.-K.; Abramenko, V. I.

    2015-10-20

    Using multiwavelength observations, we studied a slow-rise, multistep X1.6 flare that began on 2014 November 7 as a localized eruption of core fields inside a δ-sunspot and later engulfed the entire active region (AR). This flare event was associated with formation of two systems of post-eruption arcades (PEAs) and several J-shaped flare ribbons showing extremely fine details, irreversible changes in the photospheric magnetic fields, and it was accompanied by a fast and wide coronal mass ejection. Data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory and IRIS spacecraft, along with the ground-based data from the New Solar Telescope, present evidence that (i) the flare and the eruption were directly triggered by a flux emergence that occurred inside a δ-sunspot at the boundary between two umbrae; (ii) this event represented an example of the formation of an unstable flux rope observed only in hot AIA channels (131 and 94 Å) and LASCO C2 coronagraph images; (iii) the global PEA spanned the entire AR and was due to global-scale reconnection occurring at heights of about one solar radius, indicating the global spatial and temporal scale of the eruption.

  10. CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN SOLAR FLARE LOOP STRANDS OBSERVED WITH THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER ON BOARD HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-10

    The entire profile of the Fe XXIII line at 263.8 A, formed at temperature Almost-Equal-To 14 MK, was blueshifted by an upward velocity -122 {+-} 33 km s{sup -1} when it was first detected by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer operating in rapid cadence (11.18 s) stare mode during a C1 solar flare. The entire profile became even more blueshifted over the next two exposures, when the upward velocity reached its maximum of -208 {+-} 14 km s{sup -1} before decreasing to zero over the next 12 exposures. After that, a weak, secondary blueshifted component appeared for five exposures, reached a maximum upward velocity of -206 {+-} 33 km s{sup -1}, and disappeared after the maximum line intensity (stationary plus blueshifted) was achieved. Velocities were measured relative to the intense stationary profile observed near the flare's peak and early during its decline. The initial episode during which the entire profile was blueshifted lasted about 156 s, while the following episode during which a secondary blueshifted component was detected lasted about 56 s. The first episode likely corresponds to chromospheric evaporation in a single loop strand, while the second corresponds to evaporation in an additional strand, as described in multi-strand flare loop models proposed by Hori et al. and Warren and Doschek. Line emission from progressively cooler ions (Fe XVII, XVI, and XIV) brightened at successively later times, consistent with cooling of flare-heated plasma.

  11. Multiwavelength Observations of a Slow Raise, Multi-Step X1.6 Flare and the Associated Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchyshyn, V.

    2015-12-01

    Using multi-wavelength observations we studied a slow rise, multi-step X1.6 flare that began on November 7, 2014 as a localized eruption of core fields inside a δ-sunspot and later engulfed the entire active region. This flare event was associated with formation of two systems of post eruption arcades (PEAs) and several J-shaped flare ribbons showing extremely fine details, irreversible changes in the photospheric magnetic fields, and it was accompanied by a fast and wide coronal mass ejection. Data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, IRIS spacecraft along with the ground based data from the New Solar Telescope (NST) present evidence that i) the flare and the eruption were directly triggered by a flux emergence that occurred inside a δ--sunspot at the boundary between two umbrae; ii) this event represented an example of an in-situ formation of an unstable flux rope observed only in hot AIA channels (131 and 94Å) and LASCO C2 coronagraph images; iii) the global PEA system spanned the entire AR and was due to global scale reconnection occurring at heights of about one solar radii, indicating on the global spatial and temporal scale of the eruption.

  12. Multiwavelength Observations of a Slow-rise, Multistep X1.6 Flare and the Associated Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchyshyn, V.; Kumar, P.; Cho, K.-S.; Lim, E.-K.; Abramenko, V. I.

    2015-10-01

    Using multiwavelength observations, we studied a slow-rise, multistep X1.6 flare that began on 2014 November 7 as a localized eruption of core fields inside a δ-sunspot and later engulfed the entire active region (AR). This flare event was associated with formation of two systems of post-eruption arcades (PEAs) and several J-shaped flare ribbons showing extremely fine details, irreversible changes in the photospheric magnetic fields, and it was accompanied by a fast and wide coronal mass ejection. Data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory and IRIS spacecraft, along with the ground-based data from the New Solar Telescope, present evidence that (i) the flare and the eruption were directly triggered by a flux emergence that occurred inside a δ-sunspot at the boundary between two umbrae; (ii) this event represented an example of the formation of an unstable flux rope observed only in hot AIA channels (131 and 94 Å) and LASCO C2 coronagraph images; (iii) the global PEA spanned the entire AR and was due to global-scale reconnection occurring at heights of about one solar radius, indicating the global spatial and temporal scale of the eruption.

  13. Control augmentation for lateral control wheel steering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulkes, R. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Flight control system design for lateral control wheel steering is discussed. Two alternate designs are presented. The first design is a roll-rate command, bank-angle hold system with a wings-level track-hold submode. The second is a curved-track-hold system. Design details and real-time flight simulator results are included.

  14. Summary of lateral-control research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toll, Thomas A

    1947-01-01

    A summary has been made of the available information on lateral control. A discussion is given of the criterions used in lateral-control specifications, of the factors involved in obtaining satisfactory lateral control, and of the methods employed in making lateral-control investigations in flight and in wind tunnels. The available data on conventional flap-type ailerons having various types of aerodynamic balance are presented in a form convenient for use in design. The characteristics of spoiler devices and booster mechanisms are discussed. The effects of Mach number, boundary layer, and distortion of the wing or of the lateral-control system are considered insofar as the available information permits. An example is included to illustrate the use of the design data. The limitations of the available information and some of the lateral-control problems that remain to be solved are indicated.

  15. Data Set of Flare-Ribbon Reconnected Magnetic Fluxes: A Critical Tool for Understanding Solar Flares and Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazachenko, M.; Lynch, B. J.; Welsch, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Flare ribbons are emission structures that are frequently observed during flares in transition-region and chromospheric radiation. These typically straddle a polarity inversion line (PIL) of the radial magnetic field at the photosphere, and move apart as the flare progresses. The ribbon flux - the amount of unsigned photospheric magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons - is thought to be related to the amount coronal magnetic reconnection, and hence provides a key diagnostic tool for understanding the physical processes at work in flares and CMEs. Previous measurements of the magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons required time-consuming co-alignment between magnetograph and intensity data from different instruments, explaining why those studies only analyzed, at most, a few events. The launch of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), both aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), presented a rare opportunity to compile a much larger sample of flare-ribbon events than could readily be assembled before. We created a dataset of 141 events of both flare ribbon positions and fluxes, as a function of time, for all C9.-class and greater flares within 45 degrees of disk center observed by SDO from January 2013 till April 2015. For this purpose, we used vector magnetograms (2D magnetic field maps) from HMI and UV images from AIA. A critical problem with using unprocessed AIA data is the existence of spurious intensities in AIA data associated with strong flare emission, most notably "blooming" (spurious smearing of saturated signal into neighboring pixels, often in streaks). To overcome this difficulty, we have developed an algorithmic procedure that effectively excludes artifacts like blooming. We present our database and compare statistical properties of flare ribbons, e.g. evolutions of ribbon reconnection fluxes and reconnection flux rates, with the properties from theoretical models.

  16. NIR Flare of PKS2032+107

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, L.; Miramon, J.; Recillas, E.; Porras, A.; Chabushyan, V.; Carraminana, A.; Mayya, D.

    2013-11-01

    We have observed a recent NIR flare of the intermediate redshift quasar PKS2032+107. This radio source is cross identified with the gamma ray source 2FGLJ2035.4+1058 and the optical source BZQJ2035+1056. From observations carried out on November 12th, 2013 (JD 2456608.603380), we determined the following photometric values H = 13.452 +/- 0.03, J = 14.628 +/- 0.03 and Ks = 12.777 +/- 0.05. Our previous NIR photometry of the object (JD2456595.644780) yielded the value: H = 15.012 =/- 0.05.

  17. Proxima Centauri: Rotation, Chromosperic Activity, and Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, E. F.; Morgan, N. D.

    1996-05-01

    At a distance of 4.3 LY, Proxima Centauri (= Alpha Cen C; V645 Cen) is the nearest known star to the Sun. This M5 V flare star is the faintest member of the Alpha Cen triple star system (or moving group) and lies about 1400 AU nearer to the Earth than its brighter G2 V and K2 V companions. Because of its proximity and its membership in the triple system, Proxima has well determined physical properties that includes an age of 5-6 Gyr. In spite of its old age, Proxima is a chromospherically active star with strong Mg II h+k (280nm) emission as well as being a flare star. This star is of great importance to magnetic dynamo theory because it is expected to have a fully convective envelope. One quantity, not well determined yet vital to understanding Proxima's magnetic behavior, is its rotation period. During May-August 1995, Proxima was observed about twice a week with the IUE Satellite. Low resolution LWP (200-320nm) spectra were obtained chiefly to observe the chromospheric Mg II emission and use it to measure Proxima's rotation period as active plage regions on the star's surface rotate in and out of view. The IUE data have been analyzed and the Mg II emission shows 20-25% variations with a period of 31.5+/-1.5 days. This period is assumed to be the star's rotation period. In addition, several flare events were observed and evidence was found for rather fast changes (on a time-scale of weeks) in the plage activity and distribution. Also, comparison of the 1995 data with earlier IUE archival data shows that Proxima probably has an activity cycle and that during 1995 it was near a minimum of activity. Nonetheless, 4 flares were detected. We will present the results of the IUE study and also compare the rotation determination with previous attempts such as that of Benedict et al. (1994). This study is supported from NASA grant NAG 5-2160 and NSF grant AST-9315365, which we gratefully acknowledge.

  18. Acceleration of electrons during the flash phase of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the electron acceleration process operating during the flash phase of solar flares are deduced from the high time resolution observations of impulsive solar X rays greater than or equal to 10 keV and other flash phase emissions from small solar flares, and the implications of these findings are discussed.

  19. 46 CFR 117.68 - Distress flares and smoke signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Distress flares and smoke signals. 117.68 Section 117.68... AND ARRANGEMENTS Emergency Communications § 117.68 Distress flares and smoke signals. (a) Oceans... hand orange smoke distress signals approved in accordance with § 160.037 in subchapter Q of...

  20. 46 CFR 180.68 - Distress flares and smoke signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Distress flares and smoke signals. 180.68 Section 180.68... TONS) LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS Emergency Communications § 180.68 Distress flares and smoke... Commandant; and (2) Six hand orange smoke distress signals approved in accordance with § 160.037...

  1. 46 CFR 117.68 - Distress flares and smoke signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Distress flares and smoke signals. 117.68 Section 117.68... AND ARRANGEMENTS Emergency Communications § 117.68 Distress flares and smoke signals. (a) Oceans... hand orange smoke distress signals approved in accordance with § 160.037 in subchapter Q of...

  2. 46 CFR 180.68 - Distress flares and smoke signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Distress flares and smoke signals. 180.68 Section 180.68... TONS) LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS Emergency Communications § 180.68 Distress flares and smoke... Commandant; and (2) Six hand orange smoke distress signals approved in accordance with § 160.037...

  3. A common stochastic process in solar and stellar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Fang, Cheng

    2015-08-01

    Solar flares, with energies of 1027 - 1032 ergs, are believed to be powered by sudden release of magnetic energy stored in the corona. Stellar flares, observationally 102 - 106 more intense than solar flares, are generally assumed to release energy through the same underlying mechanism: magnetic reconnection. It is thus expected similar statistical properties between two groups of flares. The selected candidates are 23400 solar flares observed over one solar cycle by GOES spacecraft and 3140 stellar flares from Kepler data adapted from the catalog of Balona (MNRAS, 447, 2714, 2015). We examine the flare frequency as a function of duration, energy, and waiting time. The distributions of flare duration and energy can be well understood in the context of the avalanche model of a self-organized criticality (SOC) system (Aschwanden, A&A, 539, 2, 2012). The waiting time distribution of the SOC system can be explained by a non-stationary Poisson process (Li et al. ApJ Letters, 792, 26, 2014).

  4. Searching for Missing Pieces for Solar Flare Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leka, K. D.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the state of the solar photospheric magnetic field at a single instant in time does not appear sufficient to uniquely predict the size and timing of impending solar flares. Such knowledge may provide necessary conditions, such as estimates of the magnetic energy needed for a flare to occur. Given the necessary conditions, it is often assumed that the evolution of the field, possibly by only a small amount, may trigger the onset of a flare. We present the results of a study using time series of photospheric vector field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to quantitatively parameterize both the state and evolution of solar active regions - their complexity, magnetic topology and energy - as related to solar flare events. We examine both extensive and intensive parameters and their short-term temporal behavior, in the context of predicting flares at various thresholds. Statistical tests based on nonparametric Discriminant Analysis are used to compare pre-flare epochs to a control group of flare-quiet epochs and active regions. Results regarding the type of photospheric signature examined and the efficacy of using the present state vs. temporal evolution to predict solar flares is quantified by standard skill scores. This work is made possible by contracts NASA NNH12CG10C and NOAA/SBIR WC-133R-13-CN-0079.

  5. The Conundrum of the Solar Pre-Flare Photospheric State.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leka, KD; Barnes, Graham; Wagner, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Knowledge of the state of the solar photospheric magnetic field at a single instant in time does not appear sufficient to predict the size and timing of impending solar flares. Such knowledge may provide necessary conditions, such as the free magnetic energy needed for a flare to occur. Given the necessary conditions, it is often assumed that the evolution of the field, possibly by only a small amount, may trigger the onset of a flare. We present the results of a study using time series of photospheric vector field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to quantitatively parameterize both the state and evolution of solar active regions - their complexity, magnetic topology and energy - as related to solar flare events. We examine both extensive and intensive parameters and their temporal behavior, in the context of both large and small flaring episodes. Statistical tests based on nonparametric Discriminant Analysis are used to compare pre-flare epochs to a control group of flare-quiet epochs and active regions. Results regarding the type of photospheric signature examined and the efficacy of using the present state vs. temporal evolution to predict solar flares is quantified by standard skill scores.This work is made possible by contracts NASA NNH12CG10C and NOAA/SBIR WC-133R-13-CN-0079.

  6. STATISTICAL ANALYSES ON THERMAL ASPECTS OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. P.; Gan, W. Q.; Feng, L.

    2012-03-10

    The frequency distribution of flare energies provides a crucial diagnostic to calculate the overall energy residing in flares and to estimate the role of flares in coronal heating. It often takes a power law as its functional form. We have analyzed various variables, including the thermal energies E{sub th} of 1843 flares at their peak time. They were recorded by both Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites and Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager during the time period from 2002 to 2009 and are classified as flares greater than C 1.0. The relationship between different flare parameters is investigated. It is found that fitting the frequency distribution of E{sub th} to a power law results in an index of -2.38. We also investigate the corrected thermal energy E{sub cth}, which represents the flare total thermal energy including the energy loss in the rising phase. Its corresponding power-law slope is -2.35. Compilation of the frequency distributions of the thermal energies from nanoflares, microflares, and flares in the present work and from other authors shows that power-law indices below -2.0 have covered the range from 10{sup 24} to 10{sup 32} erg. Whether this frequency distribution can provide sufficient energy to coronal heatings in active regions and the quiet Sun is discussed.

  7. Large X-class Flare Erupting on Jan. 27

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Jan. 27, 2012 a large X-class flare erupted from an active region near the solar west limb. Seen here is a time series of the flare captured by the X-ray telescope on Hinode. These images repres...

  8. 6. View, flare and oxygen burner pad near southwest side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View, flare and oxygen burner pad near southwest side of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking northeast. Uphill and to the left of the flare is the Oxidizer Conditioning Structure (T-28D) and the Long-Term Oxidizer Silo (T-28B). - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  9. Hα LINE PROFILE ASYMMETRIES AND THE CHROMOSPHERIC FLARE VELOCITY FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Kennedy, M.; Keenan, F. P.; Simões, P. J. A.; Voort, L. Rouppe van der; Fletcher, L.; Carlsson, M.; Jafarzadeh, S.; Allred, J. C.; Kowalski, A. F.; Graham, D.

    2015-11-10

    The asymmetries observed in the line profiles of solar flares can provide important diagnostics of the properties and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper the evolution of the Hα and Ca ii λ8542 lines are studied using high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution ground-based observations of an M1.1 flare obtained with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. The temporal evolution of the Hα line profiles from the flare kernel shows excess emission in the red wing (red asymmetry) before flare maximum and excess in the blue wing (blue asymmetry) after maximum. However, the Ca ii λ8542 line does not follow the same pattern, showing only a weak red asymmetry during the flare. RADYN simulations are used to synthesize spectral line profiles for the flaring atmosphere, and good agreement is found with the observations. We show that the red asymmetry observed in Hα is not necessarily associated with plasma downflows, and the blue asymmetry may not be related to plasma upflows. Indeed, we conclude that the steep velocity gradients in the flaring chromosphere modify the wavelength of the central reversal in the Hα line profile. The shift in the wavelength of maximum opacity to shorter and longer wavelengths generates the red and blue asymmetries, respectively.

  10. The aerodynamics of curved jets and breakaway in Coanda flares, volumes 1 and 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senior, Peter

    1991-02-01

    An investigation was carried out into external-Coanda Effect flares designed by British Petroleum International plc. The phenomenon of interest was breakaway of an underexpanded axisymmetric curved wall jet from the guiding surface due to high blowing pressure. A survey of investigations of similar flows suggested very complex jet fluid dynamics. Strong cell structure including shock waves was present giving buok and discrete compression and bulk dilatation. More expansion was imposed by the radial velocity components. Wall curvature and a rear-facing step added further significant influences. The combination of these factors is known to produce highly non-linear turbulence, and this constitutes a major difficulty for the application of computational methods to the flare. In view of the amount of resources required to eliminate the problems of using a Navier-Stokes code, an economical approach was adopted, matching the Method of Characteristics to various simplified models and an integral boundary layer. In this experimental work, a planar model of the flare was constructed and studied using a wide range of methods in order to achieve accuracy and provide comparability with other work. An axisymmetric model was designed and investigated in a similar manner, so that the influence of this geometry could be clearly distinguished. A full-scale flare was subjected to a restricted range of tests to compare the laboratory results with the industrial application. The results from all the experiments demonstrated good correspondence. The main conclusion was that amalgamation of separation bubbles is crucial for breakaway. These are present long before breakaway, and are strongly reduced by decreasing the cell scale, adding a rear-facing step and axisymmetry, which leads to improved breakaway performance. Although the computational methods did not prove robust enough for all design purposes, they did permit significant insights into the mechanisms of breakaway.

  11. Multi-wavelength flare study and magnetic configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Brigitte; Berlicki, A.; Vilmer, N.; Aulanier, G.; Démoulin, P.; Mein, P.; Mandrini, C.; Deluca, E.

    Recent results of two observation campaigns (October 2002 and October 2003) are presented with the objective of understanding the onset of flares and CMEs. The magnetic field was observed with THEMIS and MDI, the chromosphere with the MSDP operating on the German telescope VTT and on THEMIS, the EUV images with SOHO/CDS and TRACE, the X-ray with RHESSI. We show how important is the magnetic configuration of the active region to produce CMEs using two examples: the October 28 2003 X 17 flare and the October 22 2002 M 1.1 flare. The X 17 flare gave a halo CME while the M 1.1 flare has no corresponding CME. The magnetic topology analysis of the active regions is processed with a linear-force-free field configuration.

  12. Flare asymmetry as seen in offband H-alpha filtergrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, F.

    1983-01-01

    Narrow-band H-alpha filtergrams at + or - 1 A and + or - 2 A from the line center were used to study the asymmetry of flares. Of the 60 flares studied, 92% show red asymmetry while 5% show blue asymmetry. Typically, the filtergrams show a striking dominance of the red wing over the blue wing from onset until late in the decay phase. The difference in intensity of the flare emissions is further augmented by the extensiveness of the emission area in the brighter wing. New kernel-like emissions were often found many minutes after the flare maximum. Spatially, they are displaced from the previous kernels. The late emissions show the same asymmetry as that of the earlier part of the flare.

  13. EVIDENCE FOR HOT FAST FLOW ABOVE A SOLAR FLARE ARCADE

    SciTech Connect

    Imada, S.; Aoki, K.; Hara, H.; Watanabe, T.; Harra, L. K.; Shimizu, T.

    2013-10-10

    Solar flares are one of the main forces behind space weather events. However, the mechanism that drives such energetic phenomena is not fully understood. The standard eruptive flare model predicts that magnetic reconnection occurs high in the corona where hot fast flows are created. Some imaging or spectroscopic observations have indicated the presence of these hot fast flows, but there have been no spectroscopic scanning observations to date to measure the two-dimensional structure quantitatively. We analyzed a flare that occurred on the west solar limb on 2012 January 27 observed by the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and found that the hot (∼30MK) fast (>500 km s{sup –1}) component was located above the flare loop. This is consistent with magnetic reconnection taking place above the flare loop.

  14. A BLAZAR-LIKE RADIO FLARE IN MRK 231

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Cormac; Hurley-Walker, Natasha; Punsly, Brian; O'Dea, Christopher P. E-mail: brian.punsly@comdev-usa.com

    2013-10-20

    Radio monitoring of the broad absorption line quasar (BALQSO) Mrk 231 from 13.9 GHz to 17.6 GHz detected a strong flat spectrum flare. Even though BALQSOs are typically weak radio sources, the 17.6 GHz flux density doubled in ≈150 days, from ≈135 mJy to ≈270 mJy. It is demonstrated that the elapsed rise time in the quasar rest frame and the relative magnitude of the flare is typical of some of the stronger flares in blazars that are usually associated with the ejection of discrete components on parsec scales. The decay of a similar flare was found in a previous monitoring campaign at 22 GHz. We conclude that these flares are not rare. The implication is that Mrk 231 seems to be a quasar in which the physical mechanism that produces the broad absorption line wind is in tension with the emergence of a fledgling blazar.

  15. COMPLEX FLARE DYNAMICS INITIATED BY A FILAMENT–FILAMENT INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Chunming; McAteer, R. T. James; Liu, Rui; Alexander, David; Sun, Xudong

    2015-11-01

    We report on an eruption involving a relatively rare filament–filament interaction on 2013 June 21, observed by SDO and STEREO-B. The two filaments were separated in height with a “double-decker” configuration. The eruption of the lower filament began simultaneously with a descent of the upper filament, resulting in a convergence and direct interaction of the two filaments. The interaction was accompanied by the heating of surrounding plasma and an apparent crossing of a loop-like structure through the upper filament. The subsequent coalescence of the filaments drove a bright front ahead of the erupting structures. The whole process was associated with a C3.0 flare followed immediately by an M2.9 flare. Shrinking loops and descending dark voids were observed during the M2.9 flare at different locations above a C-shaped flare arcade as part of the energy release, giving us unique insight into the flare dynamics.

  16. A COLD, TENUOUS SOLAR FLARE: ACCELERATION WITHOUT HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Nita, Gelu M.; Gary, Dale E.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2011-04-10

    We report the observation of an unusual cold, tenuous solar flare, which reveals itself via numerous and prominent non-thermal manifestations, while lacking any noticeable thermal emission signature. RHESSI hard X-rays and 0.1-18 GHz radio data from OVSA and Phoenix-2 show copious electron acceleration (10{sup 35} electrons s{sup -1} above 10 keV) typical for GOES M-class flares with electrons energies up to 100 keV, but GOES temperatures not exceeding 6.1 MK. The imaging, temporal, and spectral characteristics of the flare have led us to a firm conclusion that the bulk of the microwave continuum emission from this flare was produced directly in the acceleration region. The implications of this finding for the flaring energy release and particle acceleration are discussed.

  17. A statistic study of ionospheric solar flare activity indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Bo; Ding, Feng; Ning, Baiqi; Wan, Weixing; Yu, You; Hu, Lianhuan

    According to the Chapman ionization theory, an ionospheric solar flare activity indicator (ISFAI) is given by the solar zenith angle and the variation rate of ionospheric vertical total electron content, which is measured from a global network of dual-frequency GPS receivers. The ISFAI is utilized to statistically analyze the ionospheric responses to 1439 M-class and 126 X-class solar flares during solar cycle 23 (1996-2008). The statistical results show that the occurrence of ISFAI peak increases obviously at 3.2 total electron content unit (TECU)/h (1 TECU = 1016 elm-2) and reaches the maximum at 10 TECU/h during M-class flares and 10 TECU/h and 40 TECU/h for X-class flares. ISFAI is closely correlated with the 26-34 nm extreme ultraviolet flux but poorly related to the 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray flux. The central meridian distance (CMD) of flare location is an important reason for depressing relationship between ISFAI and X-ray Flux. Through the CMD effect modification, the ISFAI has a significant dependence on the X-ray flux with a correlation coefficient of 0.76. The ISFAI sensitivity enables to detect the extreme X-class flares, as well as the variations of one order of magnitude or even smaller (such as for C-class flares). Meanwhile, ISFAI is helpful to the calibration of the X-ray flux at 0.1-0.8 nm observed by GOES during some flares. In addition, statistical results demonstrate that ISFAI can detect 80% of all M-class flares and 92% for all X-class ones during 1996-2008. Owing to the high sensitivity and temporal resolution, ISFAI can be utilized as a solar flare detection parameter to monitor space weather.

  18. Large solar flares and their ionospheric D region enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Neil R.; Rodger, Craig J.; Clilverd, Mark A.

    2005-06-01

    On 4 November 2003, the largest solar flare ever recorded saturated the GOES satellite X-ray detectors, making an assessment of its size difficult. However, VLF radio phase advances effectively recorded the lowering of the VLF reflection height and hence the lowest edge of the Earth's ionosphere. Previously, these phase advances were used to extrapolate the GOES 0.1-0.8 nm ("XL") fluxes from saturation at X17 to give a peak magnitude of X45 ± 5 for this great flare. Here it is shown that a similar extrapolation, but using the other GOES X-ray band, 0.05-0.4 nm ("XS"), is also consistent with a magnitude of X45. Also reported here are VLF phase measurements from two paths near dawn: "Omega Australia" to Dunedin, New Zealand (only just all sunlit) and NPM, Hawaii, to Ny Alesund, Svalbard (only partly sunlit), which also give remarkably good extrapolations of the flare flux, suggesting that VLF paths monitoring flares do not necessarily need to be in full daylight. D region electron densities are modeled as functions of X-ray flux up to the level of the great X45 flare by using flare-induced VLF amplitudes together with the VLF phase changes. During this great flare, the "Wait" reflection height, H', was found to have been lowered to ˜53 km or ˜17 km below the normal midday value of ˜70 km. Finally, XL/XS ratios are examined during some large flares, including the great flare. Plots of such ratios against XL can give quite good estimates of the great flare's size (X45) but without use of VLF measurements.

  19. ABRUPT LONGITUDINAL MAGNETIC FIELD CHANGES IN FLARING ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.; Sudol, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    We characterize the changes in the longitudinal photospheric magnetic field during 38 X-class and 39 M-class flares within 65{sup 0} of disk center using 1 minute GONG magnetograms. In all 77 cases, we identify at least one site in the flaring active region where clear, permanent, stepwise field changes occurred. The median duration of the field changes was about 15 minutes and was approximately equal for X-class and for M-class flares. The absolute values of the field changes ranged from the detection limit of {approx}10 G to as high as {approx}450 G in two exceptional cases. The median value was 69 G. Field changes were significantly stronger for X-class than for M-class flares and for limb flares than for disk-center flares. Longitudinal field changes less than 100 G tended to decrease longitudinal field strengths, both close to disk center and close to the limb, while field changes greater than 100 G showed no such pattern. Likewise, longitudinal flux strengths tended to decrease during flares. Flux changes, particularly net flux changes near disk center, correlated better than local field changes with GOES peak X-ray flux. The strongest longitudinal field and flux changes occurred in flares observed close to the limb. We estimate the change of Lorentz force associated with each flare and find that this is large enough in some cases to power seismic waves. We find that longitudinal field decreases would likely outnumber increases at all parts of the solar disk within 65{sup 0} of disk center, as in our observations, if photospheric field tilts increase during flares as predicted by Hudson et al.

  20. Reading Disability and Laterality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparrow, Sara S.

    The purpose of this study was to determine how retarded readers differed from normal readers in the various ways laterality is manifested. An additional purpose was to investigate the development of laterality as seen across several age levels. Subjects were 80 white male 9-, 10-, 11-, and 12-year-olds from regular classrooms in suburban…

  1. Testing Solar Flare Models with BATSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, Dominic M.

    1995-01-01

    We propose to use high-sensitivity Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) hard X-ray observations to test the thick-target and electric field acceleration models of solar flares. We will compare the predictions made by these models with hard X-ray spectral observations obtained with BATSE and simultaneous soft X-ray Ca XIX emission observed with the Yohkoh Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS). The increased sensitivities of the BATSE and BCS (relative to previous detectors) permits a renewed study of the relationship between heating and dynamical motions during the crucial rise phase of flares. With these observations, we will: (1) investigate the ability of the thick-target model to explain the temporal evolution of hard X-ray emission relative to the soft X-ray blueshift during the earliest stages of the impulsive phase; and (2) search for evidence of electric-field acceleration as implied by temporal correlations between hard X-ray spectral breaks and the Ca XIX blueshift. The proposed study will utilize hard X-ray lightcurve and spectral measurements in the 10-100 keV energy range obtained with the BATSE Large Area Detectors (LAD). The DISCLA and CONT data will be the primary data products used in this analysis.

  2. Stochastic particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Droege, W.; Schlickeiser, R.

    1985-01-01

    It is proposed that particles during the second phase of solar flares are accelerated by stochastic resonant scattering off hydromagnetic waves and first order Fermi acceleration in shock waves generated in the impulsive phase of the flare. Solutions allow arbitrary power law momentum dependences of the momentum diffusion coefficient as well as the momentum diffusion coefficient as well as the momentum loss time. The acceleration time scale to a characteristic energy approximately 100 keV for protons can be as short as 5s. The resulting electron spectra show a characteristic double power law with a transition around 200 keV and are correlated to the proton spectra evaluated under equal boundary conditions, indicating that electrons and protons are accelerated by the same mechanism. The correlation between the different spectral indices in the electron double power law and between electron and proton spectra are governed by the ratio of first to second order acceleration and therefore allow a determination of the Alfven Mach number of the shock wave.

  3. Space observations of comets during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadov, Subhon; Ibodov, Firuz S.

    Problems connected with mechanisms for comet outbursts as well as for gamma-ray bursts remain open. Meantime, calculations show that an irradiation of a certain class of cometary nuclei, having high specific electric resistance, by intense fluxes of energetic protons and posi-tively charged ions with kinetic energies more than 1 MeV/nucleon, ejected from the Sun during strong solar flares, can produce a macroscopic high-voltage electric double layer with positive charge in the subsurface region of the nucleus, during irradiation time of the order of 10-100 hours at heliocentric distances around 1-10 AU. The maximum electric energy accumulated in such layer will be restricted by discharge potential of the layer material. For the comet nuclei with the typical radius of the order of 1-10 km the accumulated energy of such natural electric capacitor is comparable to the energy of large comet outbursts that are estimated on the basis of ground-based optical observations of comets. The impulse X-ray radiation anticipated from the high-voltage electric discharge of the capacitor may serve as an indicator of realization of the processes above considered. Therefore, space observations of comets and pseudo-asteroids of cometary origin, having brightness correlation with solar activity, using space X-ray obser-vatories during strong solar flares are very interesting for the physics of comets as well as for high energy astrophysics.

  4. The Mysterious Origins of Solar Flares: New observations are beginning to reveal what triggers these hughes explosions of the sun's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2006-01-01

    Solar flares can release the energy equivalent of billions of atomic bombs in the span of just a few minutes. These explosions give off a burst of x-rays and charged particles, some of which may later hit Earth, endangering satellites and causing power outages. The sun's tumultuous magnetic fields provide the fuel of flares. The sudden release of energy in a flare results from a process called reconnection, whereby oppositely directed magnetic field lines come together and partially annihilate each other. Although theoretical studies of magnetic reconnection on the sun have been carried out for decades, only recently have space probes uncovered observational evidence for this phenomenon. The telltale signs include pointed magnetic loops located below the spot where magnetic reconnection is taking place.

  5. Lateral subtalar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Sharda, Praveen; DuFosse, Julian

    2008-07-01

    Subtalar dislocations are rare in routine orthopedic practice. While many of these dislocations are a result of high-energy injuries such as fall from a height or traffic accidents, it is not uncommon for patients to present after slipping down a few stairs. Two types of dislocation have been described, medial and lateral. The type of dislocation is described according to the position of the foot. In lateral subtalar dislocation the head of talus is found medially and the calcaneus is dislocated laterally. The navicular may lie dorsolateral to the talus. The reverse is true of lateral dislocation. Medial dislocation has been referred to as "basketball foot" due to its preponderance in basketball players.4 The deciding factor is the inverted or everted position of the foot when the force is dissipated through the weak talonavicular and talocalcaneal ligaments. This article presents a case of an adult with lateral subtalar dislocation following a fall.

  6. Analyzing the flared landing task with pitch-rate flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Ronald A.; Yousefpor, Marduke

    1990-01-01

    A closed-loop handling qualities methodology is applied to an analysis of the flared landing task with pitch-rate flight control systems. A model of pilot behavior throughout approach and flare is developed which postulates the manner in which the pilot may move from pitch attitude to flight path angle control. Twenty-five configurations flight tested on the NC-131H Total In-flight Simulator aircraft are analyzed using a structural pilot model ad a handling qualities methodology previously reported in the literature. Closed-loop simulation of the simplified landing task is undertaken using the structural model. The pilot ratings from flight test extended the data base supporting the utility of a model-based handling qualities metric. A handling qualities sensitivity function is introduced which may have potential as a design tool.

  7. Particle kinematics in solar flares: observations and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Marina

    2008-12-01

    This thesis is devoted to the study of particle acceleration and propagation processes in solar flares. Solar flares are amongst the most powerful and energetic activity phenomena our Sun exhibits. They release energy of the order of 10(32) erg in seconds to minutes. In the process, electrons and protons are accelerated to relativistic energies, making flares very efficient particle accelerators. The most compelling observational signatures of flares can be found in X-rays and extreme ultra-violet wavelengths. Due to atmospheric absorption, those wavelengths can only be studied from space. Since the beginning of the space age, countless flares have been observed by satellites. The present work is largely based on observations by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), an X-ray satellite which has been observing the Sun since February 2002. It is a NASA mission with substantial Swiss hardware and software contribution. Using RHESSI observations of flares of different intensity, a deeper understanding of the particle transport and energy transport processes in flare loops, as well as the acceleration site and acceleration mechanism is sought. The time evolution of images and spectra is studied along with the quantitative relations between X-ray sources observed in the corona (coronal sources) and from the chromosphere (footpoints). The spectral relations found between coronal sources and footpoints are compared to the so-called ``intermediate thin-thick target model'', which was based on observations by the satellite Yohkoh. We show that the spectral relations between coronal sources and footpoints observed with RHESSI cannot be explained by the intermediate thin-thick target model. In a next step, return currents in the flare loop were considered. With this extension to the existing model, the spectra of the coronal source and the footpoints, as well as the relations between them can be explained, indicating the importance of return currents in

  8. Solar and Stellar Flares and Their Effects on Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-08-01

    Recent space observations of the Sun revealed that the solar atmosphere is full of explosions, such as flares and flare-like phenomena. These flares generate not only strong electromagnetic emissions but also nonthermal particles and bulk plasma ejections, which sometimes lead to geomagnetic storms and affect terrestrial environment and our civilization, damaging satellite, power-grids, radio communication etc. Solar flares are prototype of various explosions in our universe, and hence are important not only for geophysics and environmental science but also for astrophysics. The energy source of solar flares is now established to be magnetic energy stored near sunspots. There is now increasing observational evidence that solar flares are caused by magnetic reconnection, merging of anti-parallel magnetic field lines and associated magneto-plasma dynamics (Shibata and Magara 2011, Living Review). It has also been known that many stars show flares similar to solar flares, and often such stellar flares are much more energetic than solar flares. The total energy of a solar flare is typically 10^29 - 10^32 erg. On the other hand, there are much more energetic flares (10^33 - 10^38 erg) in stars, especially in young stars. These are called superflares. We argue that these superflares on stars can also be understood in a unified way based on the reconnection mechanism. Finally we show evidence of occurrence of superflares on Sun-like stars according to recent stellar observations (Maehara et al. 2012, Nature, Shibayama et al. 2013), which revealed that superflares with energy of 10^34 - 10^35 erg (100 - 1000 times of the largest solar flares) occur with frequency of once in 800 - 5000 years on Sun-like stars which are very similar to our Sun. Against the previous belief, these new observations as well as theory (Shibata et al. 2013) suggest that we cannot deny the possibility of superflares on the present Sun. Finally, we shall discuss possible impacts of these superflares

  9. Artificial lateral line canal for hydrodynamic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yingchen; Klein, Adrian; Bleckmann, Horst; Liu, Chang

    2011-07-01

    Fish use their lateral line system to detect minute water motions. The lateral line consists of superficial neuromasts and canal neuromasts. The response properties of canal neuromasts differ from those of superficial ones. Here, we report the design, fabrication, and characterization of an artificial lateral line canal system. The characterization was done under various fluid conditions, including dipolar excitation and turbulent flow. The experimental results with dipole excitation match well with a mathematical model. Canal sensors also demonstrate significantly better noise immunity compared with superficial ones. Canal-type artificial lateral lines may become important for underwater flow sensing.

  10. Solar Flares, Type III Radio Bursts, Coronal Mass Ejections, and Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, Hilary V.; Erickson, W. C.; Prestage, N. P.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this correlative study between greater than 20 MeV solar proton events, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and radio bursts it is found that essentially all of the proton events are preceded by groups of type III bursts and all are preceded by CMEs. These type III bursts (that are a flare phenomenon) usually are long-lasting, intense bursts seen in the low-frequency observations made from space. They are caused by streams of electrons traveling from close to the solar surface out to 1 AU. In most events the type III emissions extend into, or originate at, the time when type II and type IV bursts are reported (some 5 to 10 minutes after the start of the associated soft X-ray flare) and have starting frequencies in the 500 to approximately 100 MHz range that often get lower as a function of time. These later type III emissions are often not reported by ground-based observers, probably because of undue attention to type II bursts. It is suggested to call them type III-1. Type III-1 bursts have previously been called shock accelerated (SA) events, but an examination of radio dynamic spectra over an extended frequency range shows that the type III-1 bursts usually start at frequencies above any type II burst that may be present. The bursts sometimes continue beyond the time when type II emission is seen and, furthermore, sometimes occur in the absence of any type II emission. Thus the causative electrons are unlikely to be shock accelerated and probably originate in the reconnection regions below fast CMEs. A search did not find any type III-1 bursts that were not associated with CMEs. The existence of low-frequency type III bursts proves that open field lines extend from within 0.5 radius of the Sun into the interplanetary medium (the bursts start above 100 MHz, and such emission originates within 0.5 solar radius of the solar surface). Thus it is not valid to assume that only closed field lines exist in the flaring regions associated with CMEs and some

  11. Recent Developments: The Gamma Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) Imaging and Detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Nicole; Shih, A. Y.; Hurford, G. J.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Bain, H.; Zoglauer, A.; Lin, R. P.; Boggs, S. E.

    2013-07-01

    In two of the best-observed flares of the last cycle, the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) satellite found the centroids of ion and relativistic electron emission to have a significant displacement. This result is surprising; co-spatially accelerated ions and electrons are thought to be transported along the same field lines, implying they would enter the chromosphere together and have similar emission locations. The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) balloon instrument will investigate particle transport in solar flares by providing enhanced imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry of gamma/HXR flare emission (20keV - 10MeV). GRIPS’ key technological improvements over the solar state of the art in HXR/gamma ray energies (RHESSI) include three-dimensional position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs) and a single-grid modulating collimator, the multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM). The 3D-GeDs allow GRIPS to Compton track energy deposition within the crystal. This capability (1) enables the MPRM design by acting as a second modulation grid, (2) provides significant background rejection and (3) makes solar polarization measurements possible. The MPRM imager provides quasi-continuous resolution from 12.5 - 162 arcsecs with 2x the throughput of a dual grid collimator system like RHESSI. This spatial resolution can resolve the separate footpoints of many flare sizes. In comparison, RHESSI images with a minimum of 35 arcsecs for gamma-rays, making these footpoints resolvable in only the largest flares. Here, we present the intial calibration of GRIPS’ 3D-GED detectors using laboratory radioactive sources. We evaluate charge sharing between adjacent strips, the detection of coincidences and preliminary depth measurements. The detectors have been shown to have a linear response and resolve line emission. The MPRM modulation grid is constructed and we present initial results from calibration. GRIPS is scheduled for a

  12. The Vertical-current Approximation Nonlinear Force-free Field Code—Description, Performance Tests, and Measurements of Magnetic Energies Dissipated in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we provide an updated description of the Vertical-Current Approximation Nonlinear Force-Free Field (VCA-NLFFF) code, which is designed to measure the evolution of the potential, non-potential, free energies, and the dissipated magnetic energies during solar flares. This code provides a complementary and alternative method to existing traditional NLFFF codes. The chief advantages of the VCA-NLFFF code over traditional NLFFF codes are the circumvention of the unrealistic assumption of a force-free photosphere in the magnetic field extrapolation method, the capability to minimize the misalignment angles between observed coronal loops (or chromospheric fibril structures) and theoretical model field lines, as well as computational speed. In performance tests of the VCA-NLFFF code, by comparing with the NLFFF code of Wiegelmann, we find agreement in the potential, non-potential, and free energy within a factor of ≲ 1.3, but the Wiegelmann code yields in the average a factor of 2 lower flare energies. The VCA-NLFFF code is found to detect decreases in flare energies in most X, M, and C-class flares. The successful detection of energy decreases during a variety of flares with the VCA-NLFFF code indicates that current-driven twisting and untwisting of the magnetic field is an adequate model to quantify the storage of magnetic energies in active regions and their dissipation during flares. The VCA-NLFFF code is also publicly available in the Solar SoftWare.

  13. Study of the 3D Coronal Magnetic Field of Active Region 11117 Around the Time of a Confined Flare Using a Data-Driven CESE-MHD Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Feng, X.; Wu, S.; Hu, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Non-potentiality of the solar coronal magnetic field accounts for the solar explosion like flares and CMEs. We apply a data-driven CESE-MHD model to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) coronal magnetic field of NOAA active region (AR) 11117 around the time of a C-class confined flare occurred on 2010 October 25. The CESE-MHD model, based on the spacetime conservation-element and solution-element scheme, is designed to focus on the magnetic-field evolution and to consider a simplified solar atomsphere with finite plasma β. Magnetic vector-field data derived from the observations at the photoshpere is inputted directly to constrain the model. Assuming that the dynamic evolution of the coronal magnetic field can be approximated by successive equilibria, we solve a time sequence of MHD equilibria basing on a set of vector magnetograms for AR 11117 taken by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) around the time of flare. The model qualitatively reproduces the basic structures of the 3D magnetic field, as supported by the visual similarity between the field lines and the coronal loops observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), which shows that the coronal field can indeed be well characterized by the MHD equilibrium in most time. The magnetic configuration changes very limited during the studied time interval of two hours. A topological analysis reveals that the small flare is correlated with a bald patch (BP, where the magnetic field is tangent to the photoshpere), suggesting that the energy release of the flare can be understood by magnetic reconnection associated with the BP separatrices. The total magnetic flux and energy keep increasing slightly in spite of the flare, while the magnetic free energy drops during the flare with an amount of 1.7 × 1030 erg, which can be interpreted as the energy budget released by the minor C-class flare.

  14. Lateral superlattice solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, A.; Zhang, Y.; Millunchick, J.M.; Twesten, R.D.; Jones, E.D.

    1997-10-01

    A novel structure which comprises of a lateral superlattice as the active layer of a solar cell is proposed. If the alternating regions A and B of a lateral superlattice ABABAB... are chosen to have a Type-II band offset, it is shown that the performance of the active absorbing region of the solar cell is optimized. In essence, the Type-II lateral superlattice region can satisfy the material requirements for an ideal solar cells active absorbing region, i.e. simultaneously having a very high transition probability for photogeneration and a very long minority carrier recombination lifetime.

  15. Size Distributions of Solar Flares and Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-01-01

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast (much > 1000 km/s) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes (alpha values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes much > 1 pr/sq cm/s/sr) and (b) fast CMEs were approx 1.3-1.4 compared to approx 1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and approx 2 for the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of approx 0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  16. Gas Flaring Volume Estimates with Multiple Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziskin, D. C.; Elvidge, C.; Baugh, K.; Ghosh, T.; Hsu, F. C.

    2010-12-01

    Flammable gases (primarily methane) are a common bi-product associated with oil wells. Where there is no infrastructure to use the gas or bring it to market, the gases are typically flared off. This practice is more common at remote sites, such as an offshore drilling platform. The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) is a series of satellites with a low-light imager called the Operational Linescan System (OLS). The OLS, which detects the flares at night, has been a valuable tool in the estimation of flared gas volume [Elvidge et al, 2009]. The use of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire product has been processed to create products suitable for an independent estimate of gas flaring on land. We are presenting the MODIS flare product, the results of our MODIS gas flare volume analysis, and independent validation of the published DMSP estimates. Elvidge, C. D., Ziskin, D., Baugh, K. E., Tuttle, B. T., Ghosh, T., Pack, D. W., Erwin, E. H., Zhizhin, M., 2009, "A Fifteen Year Record of Global Natural Gas Flaring Derived from Satellite Data", Energies, 2 (3), 595-622

  17. OBSERVATIONS OF THERMAL FLARE PLASMA WITH THE EUV VARIABILITY EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Harry P.; Doschek, George A.; Mariska, John T.

    2013-06-20

    One of the defining characteristics of a solar flare is the impulsive formation of very high temperature plasma. The properties of the thermal emission are not well understood, however, and the analysis of solar flare observations is often predicated on the assumption that the flare plasma is isothermal. The EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory provides spectrally resolved observations of emission lines that span a wide range of temperatures (e.g., Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and allow for thermal flare plasma to be studied in detail. In this paper we describe a method for computing the differential emission measure distribution in a flare using EVE observations and apply it to several representative events. We find that in all phases of the flare the differential emission measure distribution is broad. Comparisons of EVE spectra with calculations based on parameters derived from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites soft X-ray fluxes indicate that the isothermal approximation is generally a poor representation of the thermal structure of a flare.

  18. CONSTRAINING SOLAR FLARE DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURES WITH EVE AND RHESSI

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M.; Warren, Harry P.

    2014-06-20

    Deriving a well-constrained differential emission measure (DEM) distribution for solar flares has historically been difficult, primarily because no single instrument is sensitive to the full range of coronal temperatures observed in flares, from ≲2 to ≳50 MK. We present a new technique, combining extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory with X-ray spectra from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), to derive, for the first time, a self-consistent, well-constrained DEM for jointly observed solar flares. EVE is sensitive to ∼2-25 MK thermal plasma emission, and RHESSI to ≳10 MK; together, the two instruments cover the full range of flare coronal plasma temperatures. We have validated the new technique on artificial test data, and apply it to two X-class flares from solar cycle 24 to determine the flare DEM and its temporal evolution; the constraints on the thermal emission derived from the EVE data also constrain the low energy cutoff of the non-thermal electrons, a crucial parameter for flare energetics. The DEM analysis can also be used to predict the soft X-ray flux in the poorly observed ∼0.4-5 nm range, with important applications for geospace science.

  19. Differential rotation, flares and coronae in A to M stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balona, L. A.; Švanda, M.; Karlický, M.

    2016-08-01

    Kepler data are used to investigate flares in stars of all spectral types. There is a strong tendency across all spectral types for the most energetic flares to occur among the most rapidly rotating stars. Differential rotation could conceivably play an important role in enhancing flare energies. This idea was investigated, but no correlation could be found between rotational shear and the incidence of flares. Inspection of Kepler light curves shows that rotational modulation is very common over the whole spectral type range. Using the rotational light amplitude, the size distribution of starspots was investigated. Our analysis suggests that stars with detectable flares have spots significantly larger than non-flare stars, indicating that flare energies are correlated with the size of the active region. Further evidence of the existence of spots on A stars is shown by the correlation between the photometric period and the projected rotational velocity. The existence of spots indicates the presence of magnetic fields, but the fact that A stars lack coronae implies that surface convection is a necessary condition for the formation of the corona.

  20. Temperature Dependence of the Flare Fluence Scaling Exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretzschmar, M.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares result in an increase of the solar irradiance at all wavelengths. While the distribution of the flare fluence observed in coronal emission has been widely studied and found to scale as f(E)˜ E^{-α}, with α slightly below 2, the distribution of the flare fluence in chromospheric lines is poorly known. We used the solar irradiance measurements observed by the SDO/EVE instrument at a 10 s cadence to investigate the dependency of the scaling exponent on the formation region of the lines (or temperature). We analyzed all flares above the C1 level since the start of the EVE observations (May 2010) to determine the flare fluence distribution in 16 lines covering a wide range of temperatures, several of which were not studied before. Our results show a weak downward trend with temperature of the scaling exponent of the PDF that reaches from above 2 at lower temperature (a few 104 K) to {˜ }1.8 for hot coronal emission (several 106 K). However, because colder lines also have fainter contrast, we cannot exclude that this behavior is caused by including more noise for smaller flares for these lines. We discuss the method and its limitations and tentatively associate this possible trend with the different mechanisms responsible for the heating of the chromosphere and corona during flares.

  1. An X-ray flare from 47 Cas

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Jeewan C.; Karmakar, Subhajeet

    2015-02-01

    Using XMM-Newton observations, we investigate properties of a flare from the very active but poorly known stellar system 47 Cas. The luminosity at the peak of the flare is found to be 3.54 × 10{sup 30} erg s{sup −1}, which is ∼2 times higher than that at a quiescent state. The quiescent state corona of 47 Cas can be represented by two temperature plasma: 3.7 and 11.0 MK. The time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of the flare show the variable nature of the temperature, the emission measure, and the abundance. The maximum temperature during the flare is derived as 72.8 MK. We infer the length of a flaring loop to be 3.3 × 10{sup 10} cm using a hydrodynamic loop model. Using the RGS spectra, the density during the flare is estimated as 4.0 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3}. The loop scaling laws are also applied when deriving physical parameters of the flaring plasma.

  2. SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOLAR FLARES AND SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-09-10

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast ({>=}1000 km s{sup -1}) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes ({alpha} values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 A fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes {>=}1 pr cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1}) and (b) fast CMEs were {approx}1.3-1.4 compared to {approx}1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and {approx}2 for the peak 1-8 A fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of {approx}0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  3. RAPID TRANSITION OF UNCOMBED PENUMBRAE TO FACULAE DURING LARGE FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Haimin; Deng Na; Liu Chang

    2012-04-01

    In the past two decades, the complex nature of sunspots has been disclosed with high-resolution observations. One of the most important findings is the 'uncombed' penumbral structure, where a more horizontal magnetic component carrying most of Evershed flows is embedded in a more vertical magnetic background. The penumbral bright grains are locations of hot upflows and dark fibrils are locations of horizontal flows that are guided by a nearly horizontal magnetic field. On the other hand, it was found that flares may change the topology of sunspots in {delta} configuration: the structure at the flaring polarity inversion line becomes darkened while sections of peripheral penumbrae may disappear quickly and permanently associated with flares. The high spatial and temporal resolution observations obtained with the Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope provide an excellent opportunity to study the evolution of penumbral fine structures associated with major flares. Taking advantage of two near-limb events, we found that in sections of peripheral penumbrae swept by flare ribbons the dark fibrils completely disappear, while the bright grains evolve into faculae that are signatures of vertical magnetic flux tubes. The corresponding magnetic fluxes measured in the decaying penumbrae show stepwise changes temporally correlated with the flares. These observations suggest that the horizontal magnetic field component of the penumbra could be straightened upward (i.e., turning from horizontal to vertical) due to magnetic field restructuring associated with flares, which results in the transition of penumbrae to faculae.

  4. Near-source air quality impacts of large olefin flares.

    PubMed

    Olaguer, Eduardo P

    2012-08-01

    Large petrochemicalflares, common in the Houston Ship Channel (the Ship Channel) and other industrialized areas in the Gulfof Mexico region, emit hundreds to thousands of pounds per hour of highly reactive volatile organic compounds (HRVOCs). We employedfine horizontal resolution (200 mx200 m) in a three-dimensional (3D) Eulerian chemical transport model to simulate two historical Ship Channel flares. The model reasonably reproduced the observed ozone rise at the nearest monitoring stations downwind of the flares. The larger of the two flares had an olefin emission rate exceeding 1400 lb/hr. In this case, the model simulated a rate of increase in peak ozone greater than 40 ppb/hr over a 12 kmx12 km horizontal domain without any unusual meteorological conditions. In this larger flare, formaldehyde emissions typically neglected in official inventories enhanced peak ozone by as much as 16 ppb and contributed over 10 ppb to ambient formaldehyde up to approximately 8 km downwind of the flare. The intense horizontal gradients in large flare plumes cannot be simulated by coarse models typically used to demonstrate ozone attainment. Moreover even the relatively dense monitoring network in the Ship Channel may not be able to detect many transient high ozone events (THOEs) caused by industrial flare emissions in the absence of stagnant air recirculation or stalled sea breeze fronts, even though such conditions are unnecessary for the occurrence of THOEs.

  5. HEATING OF FLARE LOOPS WITH OBSERVATIONALLY CONSTRAINED HEATING FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Jiong; Liu Wenjuan; Longcope, Dana W.

    2012-06-20

    We analyze high-cadence high-resolution observations of a C3.2 flare obtained by AIA/SDO on 2010 August 1. The flare is a long-duration event with soft X-ray and EUV radiation lasting for over 4 hr. Analysis suggests that magnetic reconnection and formation of new loops continue for more than 2 hr. Furthermore, the UV 1600 Angstrom-Sign observations show that each of the individual pixels at the feet of flare loops is brightened instantaneously with a timescale of a few minutes, and decays over a much longer timescale of more than 30 minutes. We use these spatially resolved UV light curves during the rise phase to construct empirical heating functions for individual flare loops, and model heating of coronal plasmas in these loops. The total coronal radiation of these flare loops are compared with soft X-ray and EUV radiation fluxes measured by GOES and AIA. This study presents a method to observationally infer heating functions in numerous flare loops that are formed and heated sequentially by reconnection throughout the flare, and provides a very useful constraint to coronal heating models.

  6. Risk factors of systemic lupus erythematosus flares during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jara, Luis J; Medina, Gabriela; Cruz-Dominguez, Pilar; Navarro, Carmen; Vera-Lastra, Olga; Saavedra, Miguel A

    2014-12-01

    This review examines the risk factors for the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) flares during pregnancy. In preconception, anti-DNA, hypocomplementemia, previous thrombosis, triple antiphospholipid (aPL) antibody positivity, active lupus nephritis and discontinuation of medications such as hydroxychloroquine and azathioprine are factors associated with pregnancy failure. During pregnancy, SLE flares are associated with aPL antibodies, synergic changes of pregnancy on Th1 and TH2 cytokines, other cytokines and chemokines that interact with hormones such as estrogen and prolactin that amplify the inflammatory effect. From the clinical point of view, SLE activity at pregnancy onset, thrombocytopenia, lupus nephritis, arterial hypertension, aPL syndromes, preeclampsia is associated with lupus flares and fetal complications. In puerperium, the risk factors of flares are similar to pregnancy. Hyperactivity of immune system, autoantibodies, hyperprolactinemia, active lupus nephritis, decrease in TH2 cytokines with increase in TH1 cytokines probably participate in SLE flare. The SLE flares during pregnancy make the difference between an uncomplicated pregnancy and pregnancy with maternal and fetal complications. Therefore, the knowledge of risk factors leads the best treatment strategies to reduce flares and fetal complications in SLE patients.

  7. Implications of RHESSI Observations for Solar Flare Models and Energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2006-01-01

    Observations of solar flares in X-rays and gamma-rays provide the most direct information about the hottest plasma and energetic electrons and ions accelerated in flares. The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has observed over 18000 solar flares in X-rays and gamma-rays since its launch in February of 2002. RHESSI observes the full Sun at photon energies from as low as 3 keV to as high as 17 MeV with a spectral resolution on the order of 1 keV. It also provides images in arbitrary bands within this energy range with spatial resolution as good as 3 seconds of arc. Full images are typically produced every 4 seconds, although higher time resolution is possible. This unprecedented combination of spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution, spectral range and flexibility has led to fundamental advances in our understanding of flares. I will show RHESSI and coordinated observations that confirm coronal magnetic reconnection models for eruptive flares and coronal mass ejections, but also present new puzzles for these models. I will demonstrate how the analysis of RHESSI spectra has led to a better determination of the energy flux and total energy in accelerated electrons, and of the energy in the hot, thermal flare plasma. I will discuss how these energies compare with each other and with the energy contained in other flare-related phenomena such as interplanetary particles and coronal mass ejections.

  8. Dual frequency observations of flares with the VLA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, G. A.; Bastian, T. S.; Hurford, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    Observations are presented of two subflares near the limb on 21 and 22 November 1981 and an M7.7 flare on 8 May 1981 made at 5 and 15 GHz using the VLA. One of the November flares produced no 5 GHz radiation, while the 15 GHz radiation in the other flare emanated from a source which was smaller, lower, and displaced from the 5 GHz source. The flare occurring on 8 May was intense and complex, and contained two or more sources at both 5 and 15 GHz. Prior to the peak of the flare, the sources were found to grow in size, after which time only weak subsources were visible to the VLA. These subsources were found to be located between or at the edge of the H-alpha ribbons and the two hard X-ray sources imaged by the Hinotori satellite. Highly polarized, bursty radiation was observed at 1 and 2 GHz, which indicated that an electron-cyclotron maser operated during the flare. The maximum field strength in flaring loops is estimated to be 360-600 gauss.

  9. The relationship between energetic particles and flare properties for impulsive solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Cane, H.V.; Reames, D.V.

    1990-06-01

    The impulsive mode of particle acceleration is studied by searching for 0.2-2 MeV electron increases associated with intense type III/V bursts. It is found that the presence of a type III/V burst in association with a relatively intense flare event indicates the acceleration and escape of greater than 100 KeV electrons. A list of type III/V electron events is compiled, showing that the majority included greater than 10 MeV proton increases, although they were not followed by a type II burst. The results suggest that there are two different modes of proton acceleration with the second mode becoming significant only for larger, gradual flares. 19 refs.

  10. Evolution of flare ribbons, electric currents, and quasi-separatrix layers during an X-class flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janvier, M.; Savcheva, A.; Pariat, E.; Tassev, S.; Millholland, S.; Bommier, V.; McCauley, P.; McKillop, S.; Dougan, F.

    2016-07-01

    Context. The standard model for eruptive flares has been extended to three dimensions (3D) in the past few years. This model predicts typical J-shaped photospheric footprints of the coronal current layer, forming at similar locations as the quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs). Such a morphology is also found for flare ribbons observed in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) band, and in nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) magnetic field extrapolations and models. Aims: We study the evolution of the photospheric traces of the current density and flare ribbons, both obtained with the Solar Dynamics Observatory instruments. We aim to compare their morphology and their time evolution, before and during the flare, with the topological features found in a NLFFF model. Methods: We investigated the photospheric current evolution during the 06 September 2011 X-class flare (SOL2011-09-06T22:20) occurring in NOAA AR 11283 from observational data of the magnetic field obtained with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We compared this evolution with that of the flare ribbons observed in the EUV filters of the Atmospheric Imager Assembly. We also compared the observed electric current density and the flare ribbon morphology with that of the QSLs computed from the flux rope insertion method-NLFFF model. Results: The NLFFF model shows the presence of a fan-spine configuration of overlying field lines, due to the presence of a parasitic polarity, embedding an elongated flux rope that appears in the observations as two parts of a filament. The QSL signatures of the fan configuration appear as a circular flare ribbon that encircles the J-shaped ribbons related to the filament ejection. The QSLs, evolved via a magnetofrictional method, also show similar morphology and evolution as both the current ribbons and the EUV flare ribbons obtained several times during the flare. Conclusions: For the first time, we propose a combined analysis of the photospheric

  11. Stochastic Particle Acceleration in Impulsive Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    2001-01-01

    The acceleration of a huge number of electrons and ions to relativistic energies over timescales ranging from several seconds to several tens of seconds is the fundamental problem in high-energy solar physics. The cascading turbulence model we have developed has been shown previously (e.g., Miller 2000; Miller & Roberts 1995; Miner, LaRosa, & Moore 1996) to account for all the bulk features (such as acceleration timescales, fluxes, total number of energetic particles, and maximum energies) of electron and proton acceleration in impulsive solar flares. While the simulation of this acceleration process is involved, the essential idea of the model is quite simple, and consists of just a few parts: 1. During the primary flare energy release phase, we assume that low-amplitude MHD Alfven and fast mode waves are excited at long wavelengths, say comparable to the size of the event (although the results are actually insensitive to this initial wavelength). While an assumption, this appears reasonable in light of the likely highly turbulent nature of the flare. 2. These waves then cascade in a Kolmogorov-like fashion to smaller wavelengths (e.g., Verma et al. 1996), forming a power-law spectral density in wavenumber space through the inertial range. 3. When the mean wavenumber of the fast mode waves has increased sufficiently, the transit-time acceleration rate (Miller 1997) for superAlfvenic electrons can overcome Coulomb energy losses, and these electrons are accelerated out of the thermal distribution and to relativistic energies (Miller et al. 1996). As the Alfven waves cascade to higher wavenumbers, they can cyclotron resonate with progressively lower energy protons. Eventually, they will resonate with protons in the tail of the thermal distribution, which will then be accelerated to relativistic energies as well (Miller & Roberts 1995). Hence, both ions and electrons are stochastically accelerated, albeit by different mechanisms and different waves. 4. When the

  12. SPE in Solar Cycle 24 : Flare and CME characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neflia, Neflia

    SPE is one of the most severe hazards in the space environment. Such events, tend to occur during periods of intense solar activity, and can lead to high radiation doses in short time intervals. The proton enhancements produced by these solar events may last several days and are very hard to predict in advance and they also can cause harm to both satellite and human in space. The most significant sources of proton in the interplanetary medium are both solar flares and interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In this study, I try to find the characteristic of Flare and CME that can cause the proton events in interplanetary medium. For my preliminary study, I will search flare characteristic such as class and position as an SPE causes. I also did the research with CME characteristic such as Angular Width (AW) and linier velocity. During solar cycle 24, the solar activity remain very low with several large flare and Halo CME. This low activity also occur on solar proton events in interplanetary medium. From January 2009 to May 2013, there are 25 SPEs with flux range from 12 - 6530 sfu (10 MeV). The solar flare during these events varies from C to X- class flare. From 27 X-class flare that occur during 2009 - May 2013, only 7 flares cause the SPE. Most of active region location are at solar Western Hemisphere (16/25). only 24 from 139 halo CME (AW=360) cause SPE. Although the probability of SPE from all flare and CME during this range of time is small but they have 3 common characteristics, ie, most of the SPE have active region position at Solar Western Hemisphere, the CME have AW=360 and they have a high linier velocity.

  13. A statistic study of ionospheric solar flare activity indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Bo; Wan, Weixing; Ning, Baiqi; Ding, Feng; Hu, Lianhuan; Yu, You

    2014-01-01

    According to the Chapman ionization theory, an ionospheric solar flare activity indicator (ISFAI) is given by the solar zenith angle and the variation rate of ionospheric vertical total electron content, which is measured from a global network of dual-frequency GPS receivers. The ISFAI is utilized to statistically analyze the ionospheric responses to 1439 M-class and 126 X-class solar flares during solar cycle 23 (1996-2008). The statistical results show that the occurrence of ISFAI peak increases obviously at 3.2 total electron content unit (TECU)/h (1 TECU = 1016 el m-2) and reaches the maximum at 10 TECU/h during M-class flares and 10 TECU/h and 40 TECU/h for X-class flares. ISFAI is closely correlated with the 26-34 nm extreme ultraviolet flux but poorly related to the 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray flux. The central meridian distance (CMD) of flare location is an important reason for depressing relationship between ISFAI and X-ray Flux. Through the CMD effect modification, the ISFAI has a significant dependence on the X-ray flux with a correlation coefficient of 0.76. The ISFAI sensitivity enables to detect the extreme X-class flares, as well as the variations of one order of magnitude or even smaller (such as for C-class flares). Meanwhile, ISFAI is helpful to the calibration of the X-ray flux at 0.1-0.8 nm observed by GOES during some flares. In addition, the statistical results demonstrate that ISFAI can detect 80% of all M-class flares and 92% for all X-class ones during 1996-2008.

  14. Blazar flares powered by plasmoids in relativistic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, Maria; Giannios, Dimitrios; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2016-11-01

    Powerful flares from blazars with short (˜min) variability time-scales are challenging for current models of blazar emission. Here, we present a physically motivated ab initio model for blazar flares based on the results of recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of relativistic magnetic reconnection. PIC simulations demonstrate that quasi-spherical plasmoids filled with high-energy particles and magnetic fields are a self-consistent by-product of the reconnection process. By coupling our PIC-based results (i.e. plasmoid growth, acceleration profile, particle and magnetic content) with a kinetic equation for the evolution of the electron distribution function we demonstrate that relativistic reconnection in blazar jets can produce powerful flares whose temporal and spectral properties are consistent with the observations. In particular, our model predicts correlated synchrotron and synchrotron self-Compton flares of duration of several hours-days powered by the largest and slowest moving plasmoids that form in the reconnection layer. Smaller and faster plasmoids produce flares of sub-hour duration with higher peak luminosities than those powered by the largest plasmoids. Yet, the observed fluence in both types of flares is similar. Multiple flares with a range of flux-doubling time-scales (minutes to several hours) observed over a longer period of flaring activity (days or longer) may be used as a probe of the reconnection layer's orientation and the jet's magnetization. Our model shows that blazar flares are naturally expected as a result of magnetic reconnection in a magnetically dominated jet.

  15. TIME-DEPENDENT MODELS OF FLARES FROM SAGITTARIUS A*

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds-Eden, Katie; Genzel, Reinhard; Gillessen, Stefan; Eisenhauer, Frank; Sharma, Prateek; Quataert, Eliot; Porquet, Delphine

    2010-12-10

    The emission from Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole in the Galactic Center, shows order of magnitude variability ('flares') a few times a day that is particularly prominent in the near-infrared (NIR) and X-rays. We present a time-dependent model for these flares motivated by the hypothesis that dissipation of magnetic energy powers the flares. We show that episodic magnetic reconnection can occur near the last stable circular orbit in time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic simulations of black hole accretion-the timescales and energetics of these events are broadly consistent with the flares from Sgr A*. Motivated by these results, we present a spatially one-zone time-dependent model for the electron distribution function in flares, including energy loss due to synchrotron cooling and adiabatic expansion. Synchrotron emission from transiently accelerated particles can explain the NIR/X-ray light curves and spectra of a luminous flare observed on 2007 April 4. A significant decrease in the magnetic field strength during the flare (coincident with the electron acceleration) is required to explain the simultaneity and symmetry of the simultaneous light curves. Our models predict that the NIR and X-ray spectral indices are related by {Delta}{alpha} {approx_equal} 0.5 (where {nu}F{sub {nu}} {proportional_to} {nu}{sup {alpha}}) and that there is only modest variation in the spectral index during flares. We also explore implications of this model for longer wavelength (radio-submillimeter) emission seemingly associated with X-ray and NIR flares; we argue that a few hour decrease in the submillimeter emission is a more generic consequence of large-scale magnetic reconnection than delayed radio emission from adiabatic expansion.

  16. Solar energetic particle event and radio bursts associated with the 1996 July 9 flare and coronal mass ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laitinen, T.; Klein, K.-L.; Kocharov, L.; Torsti, J.; Trottet, G.; Bothmer, V.; Kaiser, M. L.; Rank, G.; Reiner, M. J.

    2000-08-01

    Using spaceborne particle and gamma-ray detection and radio diagnostics we study solar energetic particle (SEP) production in the 1996 July 9 event. This event is associated with an impulsive soft X-ray flare (9:10 UT) and a coronal mass ejection (CME). In a global classification the event is considered as mixed-impulsive. A sequence of acceleration processes is identified, starting early in the flare impulsive phase and continuing throughout the period when the CME propagated up to several Rsolar above the photosphere: (1) Gamma-ray, hard X-ray and cm-wave emitting particles seen during the flare impulsive phase in the low corona had no counterpart at the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SoHO) spacecraft. (2) Electrons accelerated at a coronal shock wave were revealed by decimetric- to-metric type II radio emission and by simultaneous radio signatures of beams traveling to 1 AU. (3) Mildly relativistic (>=250 keV) electrons detected by SoHO did not correspond to these shock-accelerated populations, but to later mainly impulsive injection which was associated with radio brightenings over a large range of coronal altitudes. (4) Energetic protons detected by SoHO were accelerated during about 100 min after the flare impulsive phase with a gradually evolving production profile that bore some similarity with the time profile of broadband metric (type IV) emission. (5) While all other particle signatures decayed, a second period of interplanetary proton production took place >=2 hours after flare onset. The first, 100 min period of SEP acceleration, post-impulsive phase coronal acceleration, is definitely dominant in mildly relativistic electrons. Two acceleration periods nearly equally contribute to the production of ~ 20 MeV protons. However, the second period is more productive in low energy, ~ 1 MeV, protons. The timing of the SEP injections indicates that neither the impulsive flare acceleration in the low corona nor the interplanetary CME at >= 10 Rsolar are

  17. DETECTION OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION DURING THE X-RAY FLARING ACTIVITY IN GRB 100728A

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Ballet, J.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Bouvier, A.; Brigida, M. E-mail: Julie.E.McEnery@nasa.gov E-mail: vlasios.vasileiou@univ-montp2.fr

    2011-06-20

    We present the simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of the bright GRB 100728A and its afterglow. The early X-ray emission is dominated by a vigorous flaring activity continuing until 1 ks after the burst. In the same time interval, high-energy emission is significantly detected by the Fermi/Large Area Telescope. Marginal evidence of GeV emission is observed up to later times. We discuss the broadband properties of this burst within both the internal and external shock scenarios, with a particular emphasis on the relation between X-ray flares, the GeV emission, and a continued long-duration central engine activity as their power source.

  18. Gas dynamics in the impulsive phase of solar flares. I. Thick-target heating by nonthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, F.; Emslie, A.G.

    1984-04-15

    In this paper we investigate numerically the gas dynamical response of the solar atmosphere to a flare energy input in the form of precipitating nonthermal electrons. The origin of these electrons is not addressed: the spectral and temporal characteristics of the injected flux are instead inferred through a thick-target model of hard X-ray bremsstrahlung production. The electrons are assumed to spiral about preexisting magnetic field lines, enabling a one-dimensional spatial treatment to be preformed. All electron energy losses are assumed to be due to Coulomb collisions with ambient particles; i.e., we neglect return-current ohmic effects and collective plasma processes. One of the main aims of the study is to contrast our results with earlier work on conductive heating of the flare atmosphere; detailed consideration of this issue will bepresented in later papers.

  19. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a nervous system disease that attacks nerve cells called neurons in your ... people with ALS die from respiratory failure. The disease usually strikes between age 40 and 60. More ...

  20. Lateral orientation (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest, and the ears are lateral to the head. A medial orientation is a position toward the midline of the body. An example of medial orientation is the eyes, which are medial to the ears on the head.

  1. Solar flare protection for manned lunar missions - Analysis of the October 1989 proton flare event

    SciTech Connect

    Simonsen, L.C.; Nealy, J.E.; Townsend, L.W.; Sauer, H.H. NOAA, Space Environment Laboratory, Boulder, CL )

    1991-07-01

    Several large solar proton events occurred in the latter half of 1989. For a moderately shielded spacecraft in free space, the potential exposure would have been greatest for the flare which occurred between October 19 to 27, 1989. The temporal variations of the proton energy spectra at approximately 1 AU were monitored by the GOES-7 satellite. These data, recorded and processed at the NOAA-Boulder Space Environment Laboratory, provide the opportunity to analyze dose rates and cumulative doses which might be incurred by astronauts in transit to, or on, the moon. Of particular importance in such an event is the time development of exposure in the early phases of the flare, for which dose rates may range over many orders of magnitude in the first few hours. The cumulative dose as a function of time for the entire event is also predicted. In addition to basic shield calculations, dose rate contours are constructed for flare shelters in free-space and on the lunar surface. 14 refs.

  2. SUNSPOT ROTATION, FLARE ENERGETICS, AND FLUX ROPE HELICITY: THE ERUPTIVE FLARE ON 2005 MAY 13

    SciTech Connect

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Canfield, Richard C.; Longcope, Dana W.; Qiu, Jiong; DesJardins, Angela; Nightingale, Richard W.

    2009-10-20

    We use the Michelson Doppler Imager and TRACE observations of photospheric magnetic and velocity fields in NOAA 10759 to build a three-dimensional coronal magnetic field model. The most dramatic feature of this active region is the 34{sup 0} rotation of its leading polarity sunspot over 40 hr. We describe a method for including such rotation in the framework of the Minimum Current Corona model. We apply this method to the buildup of energy and helicity associated with the eruptive flare of 2005 May 13. We find that including the sunspot rotation almost triples the modeled flare energy (1.0 x 10{sup 31} erg) and flux rope self-helicity (-7.1 x 10{sup 42} Mx{sup 2}). This makes the results consistent with observations: the energy derived from GOES is 1.0 x 10{sup 31} erg, the magnetic cloud helicity from WIND is -5 x 10{sup 42} Mx{sup 2}. Our combined analysis yields the first quantitative picture of the helicity and energy content processed through a flare in an active region with an obviously rotating sunspot and shows that rotation dominates the energy and helicity budget of this event.

  3. Flare fragmentation and type III productivity in the 1980 June 27 flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, M. J.; Schwartz, R. A.; Benz, A. O.; Lin, R. P.; Pelling, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of the solar flare on June 27, 1980 were presented, 16:14-16:33 UT, which was observed by a balloon-borne 300 sq cm phoswich hard X-ray detector and by the IKARUS radio spectrometer. This flare shows intense hard X-ray (HXR) emission and an extreme productivity of (at least 754) type III bursts at 200-400 MHz. A linear correlation was found between the type III burst rate and the HXR fluence. The occurrence of about 10 type III bursts/second, and also the even higher rate of millisecond spikes, suggests a high degree of fragmentation in the acceleration region. This high quantization of injected beams, assuming the thick-target model, shows up in a linear relationship between hard X-ray fluence and the type III rate, but not as fine structures in the HXR time profile. The generation of a superhot isothermal HXR component in the decay phase of the flare coincides with the fade-out of type III production.

  4. Prevention of depression and anxiety in later life: design of a randomized controlled trial for the clinical and economic evaluation of a life-review intervention

    PubMed Central

    Korte, Jojanneke; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T; Smit, Filip

    2009-01-01

    Background Depressive and anxiety symptoms in older adults could develop into significant health problems with detrimental effects on quality of life and a possibly poor prognosis. Therefore, there is a need for preventive interventions which are at once effective, acceptable and economic affordable. Methods and design This paper describes the design of a study evaluating "The stories we live by", a preventive life-review group intervention, which was recently developed for adults of 55 years and over with depressive and anxiety symptoms. Both clinical and economic effectiveness will be evaluated in a pragmatic randomized controlled trial. The participants in the intervention condition will receive the 8-session preventive intervention. The participants in the control condition will have access to usual care. Clinical end-terms are depressive and anxiety symptoms, current major depressive episode, quality of life and positive mental health post-treatment (3 months after baseline) and at follow-ups (6 and 12 months after baseline). Additional goals of this study are to identify groups for whom the intervention is particularly effective and to identify the therapeutic pathways that are vital in inducing clinical change. This will be done by analyzing if treatment response is moderated by demographics, personality, past major depressive episodes, important life events and chronically disease, and mediated by reminiscence functions, perceived control, automatic positive thoughts and meaning in life. Finally the cost-effectiveness of the intervention relative to care as usual will be assessed by computing incremental costs per case of depression and anxiety avoided (cost-effectiveness) and per quality adjusted life year (QALY) (cost utility). Discussion It is expected that both the life-review intervention and its evaluation will contribute to the existing body of knowledge in several ways. First, the intervention is unique in linking life-review with narrative therapy

  5. Efficiency of Natural Gas Flares Associated with Shale Formation Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stirm, B.; Caulton, D.; Shepson, P.; Cambaliza, M. L.; Mccabe, D. C.; Baum, E.

    2012-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has increased access and economic viability of shale oil reserves. Currently the Bakken Oil field in North Dakota is experiencing a rapid increase in the drilling of shale oil wells. However, this process typically results in the simultaneous release of natural gas. Low natural gas prices and the lack of local gas pipeline infrastructure have decreased the incentive for companies to capture this natural gas, with many opting to vent or flare the natural gas instead. The impact of these operations on greenhouse gas emissions has not been well characterized. An undocumented variable of interest is the destruction efficiency of methane in active oil field flares. In situ measurements of flare efficiency are difficult to obtain because of the inaccessibility of the flares. In June of 2012 we conducted flights over shale oil wells and flares in the Bakken Formation near Williston, ND using Purdue University's Airborne Laboratory for Atmospheric Research (ALAR) which is equipped with a 0.5 Hz Picarro CO2/CH4/H2O analyzer and a Best Air Turbulence (BAT) probe that measures the wind vectors. In addition, one flare in the Marcellus Formation near Washington, PA was also sampled. Flare signals were identified based on the enhancements of CO2 above the ambient background signal and the corresponding colocated CH4 concentration. Enhancements were isolated by subtracting the background concentrations of CO2 and CH4 to obtain delta CO2 and delta CH4 values. Emission factors to be reported are obtained as the ratio delta CH4 divided by delta CO2. We will report first in situ measurements of natural gas flare efficiency. We observed a variety of meteorological conditions with winds ranging from 4 to 15 m/s and will report on the relationship between wind speed and flare efficiency. We observed very high flare efficiency even under strong winds (at least 99.8% CO2 for all flares). During flare sampling, we observed a number of CH4 enhancements that were

  6. Observations of solar flare gamma-rays and protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshimori, M.; Watanabe, H.

    1985-01-01

    Solar flare gamma-rays (4 to 7 MeV) and protons (8 to 500 MeV) were simultaneously observed from six flares on 1 Apr., 4 Apr., 27, Apr. 13, May 1981, 1 Feb. and 6 June 1982 by the Hinotori and GMS satellites. The relationship between 4 to 7 MeV gamma-ray fluences and peak 16 to 34 MeV proton fluxes for these flares are analyzed. It does not reveal an apparent correlation between these two parameters. The present result implies that the protons producing gamma-rays and the protons observed near the Earth do not always belong to the same population.

  7. Studying the thermal/non-thermal crossover in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes work performed under contract NAS5-32584 for Phase 3 of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) from 1 November 1993 through 1 November 1994. We have made spectral observations of the hard x-ray and gamma-ray bremsstrahlung emissions from solar flares using the Burst and Transit Source Experiment (BASTE) on CGRO. These measurements of their spectrum and time profile provided valuable information on the fundamental flare processes of energy release, particle acceleration, and energy transport. Our scientific objective was to study both the thermal and non-thermal sources of solar flare hard x-ray and gamma-ray emission.

  8. Solar flares, proton showers, and the space shuttle.

    PubMed

    Rust, D M

    1982-05-28

    The space shuttle era will focus renewed attention on the hazards of the space environment to human habitation. The chief unpredictable hazard for astronauts is energetic proton radiation from solar flares. In some orbits, there is no reasonable level of shielding material that will protect shuttle occupants from potentially lethal doses of radiation. The effects of a solar flare that occurred druing the first flight of the Columbia are discussed and current flare research reviewed. The emphasis is on progress made during the recent international Solar Maximum Year toward understanding the origins of proton showers.

  9. Energetics and dynamics of simple impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, R.; Heindl, W. A.; Crannell, C. J.; Thomas, R. J.; Batchelor, D. A.; Magun, A.

    1987-01-01

    Flare energetics and dynamics were studied using observations of simple impulsive spike bursts. A large, homogeneous set of events was selected to enable the most definite tests possible of competing flare models, in the absence of spatially resolved observations. The emission mechanisms and specific flare models that were considered in this investigation are described, and the derivations of the parameters that were tested are presented. Results of the correlation analysis between soft and hard X-ray energetics are also presented. The ion conduction front model and tests of that model with the well-observed spike bursts are described. Finally, conclusions drawn from this investigation and suggestions for future studies are discussed.

  10. Excitation of Resonant Helioseimic Modes by Solar Flares.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibacher, John W.; Baudin, Frédéric; Rabello Soares,, Maria Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Flares are known to excite propagating sound waves in the solar atmosphere, and Maurya et al. (2009), using a local analysis (ring diagrams) of the 2003 Halloween flare, showed that they excite resonant p-modes as well. We confirm and extend here these results by:-applying the same analysis to other locations on the Sun at the time of the Halloween flare-analyzing other events also showing a signature of p-mode excitation-looking in detail at the results of the ring diagrams analysis in terms of noise fitting and the center-to-limb variation of ring-diagram power.

  11. Excitation of Resonant Helioseimic Modes by Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibacher, John William; Baudin, Frédéric; Rabello Soares, Maria Cristina

    2015-04-01

    Flares are known to excite propagating sound waves in the solar atmosphere, and Maurya et al. (2009), using a local analysis (ring diagrams) of the 2003 Halloween flare, showed that they excite resonant p-modes as well. We confirm and extend here these results by: applying the same analysis to other locations on the Sun at the time of the Halloween flare, analyzing other events also showing a signature of p-mode excitation, looking in detail at the results of the ring diagrams analysis in terms of noise fitting and the center-to-limb variation of ring-diagram power.

  12. Preventing errors in laterality.

    PubMed

    Landau, Elliot; Hirschorn, David; Koutras, Iakovos; Malek, Alexander; Demissie, Seleshie

    2015-04-01

    An error in laterality is the reporting of a finding that is present on the right side as on the left or vice versa. While different medical and surgical specialties have implemented protocols to help prevent such errors, very few studies have been published that describe these errors in radiology reports and ways to prevent them. We devised a system that allows the radiologist to view reports in a separate window, displayed in a simple font and with all terms of laterality highlighted in separate colors. This allows the radiologist to correlate all detected laterality terms of the report with the images open in PACS and correct them before the report is finalized. The system is monitored every time an error in laterality was detected. The system detected 32 errors in laterality over a 7-month period (rate of 0.0007 %), with CT containing the highest error detection rate of all modalities. Significantly, more errors were detected in male patients compared with female patients. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that with our system, laterality errors can be detected and corrected prior to finalizing reports.

  13. Magnetic shielding of interplanetary spacecraft against solar flare radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocks, Franklin H.; Watkins, Seth

    1993-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this work is to design, build, and fly a dual-purpose, piggyback payload whose function is to produce a large volume, low intensity magnetic field and to test the concept of using such a magnetic field (1) to protect spacecraft against solar flare protons, (2) to produce a thrust of sufficient magnitude to stabilize low satellite orbits against orbital decay from atmospheric drag, and (3) to test the magsail concept. These all appear to be capable of being tested using the same deployed high temperature superconducting coil. In certain orbits, high temperature superconducting wire, which has now been developed to the point where silver-sheathed high T sub c wires one mm in diameter are commercially available, can be used to produce the magnetic moments required for shielding without requiring any mechanical cooling system. The potential benefits of this concept apply directly to both earth-orbital and interplanetary missions. The usefulness of a protective shield for manned missions needs scarcely to be emphasized. Similarly, the usefulness of increasing orbit perigee without expenditure of propellant is obvious. This payload would be a first step in assessing the true potential of large volume magnetic fields in the US space program. The objective of this design research is to develop an innovative, prototype deployed high temperature superconducting coil (DHTSC) system.

  14. Electron precipitation in solar flares - Collisionless effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Rowland, H. L.

    1984-01-01

    A large fraction of the electrons which are accelerated during the impulsive phase of solar flares stream towards the chromosphere and are unstable to the growth of plasma waves. The linear and nonlinear evolution of plasma waves as a function of time is analyzed with a set of rate equations that follows, in time, the nonlinearly coupled system of plasma waves-ion fluctuations. As an outcome of the fast transfer of wave energy from the beam to the ambient plasma, nonthermal electron tails are formed which can stabilize the anomalous Doppler resonance instability responsible for the pitch angle scattering of the beam electrons. The non-collisional losses of the precipitating electrons are estimated, and the observational implication of these results are discussed.

  15. Thermal instability in post-flare plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.

    1976-01-01

    The cooling of post-flare plasmas is discussed and the formation of loop prominences is explained as due to a thermal instability. A one-dimensional model was developed for active loop prominences. Only the motion and heat fluxes parallel to the existing magnetic fields are considered. The relevant size scales and time scales are such that single-fluid MHD equations are valid. The effects of gravity, the geometry of the field and conduction losses to the chromosphere are included. A computer code was constructed to solve the model equations. Basically, the system is treated as an initial value problem (with certain boundary conditions at the chromosphere-corona transition region), and a two-step time differencing scheme is used.

  16. BLAZAR FLARES FROM COMPTON DRAGGED SHELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Omri; Levinson, Amir

    2015-08-10

    We compute the dynamics and emission of dissipative shells that are subject to a strong Compton drag, under simplifying assumptions about the dissipation mechanism. We show that under conditions prevailing in blazars, substantial deceleration is anticipated on sub-parsec and parsec scales in cases of rapid dissipation. Such episodes may be the origin of some of the flaring activity occasionally observed in gamma-ray blazars. The shape of the light curves thereby produced reflects the geometry of the emitting surface if the deceleration is very rapid, or the dynamics of the shell if the deceleration is delayed, or initially more gradual, owing, e.g., to continuous injection of energy and momentum.

  17. Ultraheavy element enrichment in impulsive solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, David

    2014-10-10

    Particle acceleration by cascading Alfvén wave turbulence was suggested as being responsible for energetic particle populations in {sup 3}He-rich solar flares. In particular, it was noted that the damping of the turbulence by the tail of the particle distribution in rigidity naturally leads to the dramatic enhancement of a pre-accelerated species—as {sup 3}He is posited to be—and superheavy elements. The subsequent detection of large enrichment of ultraheavies, relative to iron, has apparently confirmed this prediction, lending support to the original idea. It is shown here that this picture could be somewhat sharpened by progress in understanding the three-dimensional geometrical details of cascading Alfvén turbulence. The mechanism may be relevant in other astrophysical environments where the source of turbulence is nonmagnetic, such as clusters of galaxies.

  18. Stochastic acceleration of solar flare protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    The acceleration of solar flare protons is considered by cyclotron damping of intense Alfven wave turbulence in a magnetic trap. The energy diffusion coefficient is computed for a near-isotropic distribution of super-Alfvenic protons and a steady-state solution for the particle spectrum is found for both transit-time and diffusive losses out of the ends of the trap. The acceleration time to a characteristic energy approximately 20 Mev/nucl can be as short as 10 sec. On the basis of phenomenological arguments an omega/2 frequency dependence for the Alfven wave spectrum is inferred. The correlation time of the turbulence lies in the range .0005 less than tau/corr less than .05s.

  19. Modern observations and models of Solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyk, Pavel; Somov, Boris

    As well known, that fast particles propagating along flare loop generate bremsstrahlung hard x-ray emission and gyro-synchrotron microwave emission. We present the self-consistent kinetic description of propagation accelerated particles. The key point of this approach is taking into account the effect of reverse current. In our two-dimensional model the electric field of reverse current has the strong influence to the beam of accelerated particles. It decelerates part of the electrons in the beam and turns back other part of them without significant energy loss. The exact analytical solution for the appropriate kinetic equation with Landau collision integral was found. Using derived distribution function of electrons we’ve calculated evolution of their energy spectrum and plasma heating, coronal microwave emission and characteristics of hard x-ray emission in the corona and in the chromosphere. All results were compared with modern high precision space observations.

  20. The first observed stellar X-ray flare oscillation: Constraints on the flare loop length and the magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra-Kraev, U.; Harra, L. K.; Williams, D. R.; Kraev, E.

    2005-06-01

    We present the first X-ray observation of an oscillation during a stellar flare. The flare occurred on the active M-type dwarf AT Mic and was observed with XMM-Newton. The soft X-ray light curve (0.2-12 keV) is investigated with wavelet analysis. The flare's extended, flat peak shows clear evidence for a damped oscillation with a period of around 750 s, an exponential damping time of around 2000 s, and an initial, relative peak-to-peak amplitude of around 15%. We suggest that the oscillation is a standing magneto-acoustic wave tied to the flare loop, and find that the most likely interpretation is a longitudinal, slow-mode wave, with a resulting loop length of (2.5 ± 0.2)×1010 cm. The local magnetic field strength is found to be 105 ± 50 G. These values are consistent with (oscillation-independent) flare cooling time models and pressure balance scaling laws. Such a flare oscillation provides an excellent opportunity to obtain coronal properties like the size of a flare loop or the local magnetic field strength for the otherwise spatially-unresolved star.

  1. Energetic electrons in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchelor, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A new analysis was made of a thermal flare model proposed by Brown, Melrose, and Spicer (1979) and Smith and Lilliequist (1979). They assumed the source of impulsive hard X-rays to be a plasma at a temperature of order 10 to the 8th power K, initially located at the apex of a coronal arch, and confined by ion-acoustic turbulence in a collisionless conduction front. Such a source would expand at approximately the ion-sound speed, C sub S = square root of (k T sub e/m sub i), until it filled the arch. Brown, Melrose, and Spicer and Smith and Brown (1980) argued that the source assumed in this model would not explain the simultaneous impulsive microwave emission. In contrast, the new results presented herein suggest that this model leads to the development of a quasi-Maxwellian distribution of electrons that explains both the hard X-ray and microwave emissions. This implies that the source sizes can be determined from observations of the optically-thick portions of microwave spectra and the temperatures obtained from associated hard X-ray observations. In this model, the burst emission would rise to a maximum in a time, t sub r, approximately equal to L/c sub s, where L is the half-length of the arch. New observations of these impulsive flare emissions were analyzed herein to test this prediction of the model. Observations made with the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft and the Bern Radio Observatory are in good agreement with the model.

  2. Electron acceleration in impulsive solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, S.R.; Benz, A.O.; Treumann, R.A.

    1982-12-01

    Simultaneous observations of the hard X-ray, microwave, and type III and DCIM (decimetric)radio bursts associated with the 1978 December 4 solar flare have been used to study the physical parameters relevant to the acceleration and propagation of energetic electrons during the impulsive phase of a solar flare. The hard X-ray observations were made with the X-ray spectrometer aboard the ISEE 3 spacecraft. The radio spectra in metric and decimetric bands were recorded with the radiospectrograph located at Durnten, near Zurich, Switzerland. The microwave observations were made at the Sagamore Hill and Bern observatories. The three metric type III bursts coincided with the three most prominent hard X-ray peaks. This is the fist time a clear one-to-one association between single type III bursts and hard X-ray peaks has been established. The average delay of the type III bursts with respect to the X-ray peaks was 0.5 s. The harder the X-ray spectrum, the higher was the drift rate of the associated type III burst. The characteristic electron energies inferred from the drift rate are of the order of 70 keV. The observed increase in the high-frequency cutoff of the metric type III bursts during the impulsive phase has been examined in terms of the decreasing altitude of the electron acceleration/injection region, the increasing hardness of the electron spectrum, and the decreasing acceleration time. A pulsating decimetric continuum (DCIM) was also found to be present during and before the impulsive phase. The DCIM source seems to coincide spatially with the electron acceleration region and the (projected) origin of the associated type II shock.ction region.

  3. High-performance laterally-arranged multiple-bandgap solar cells using spatially composition-graded CdxPb1-xS nanowires on a single substrate: a design study.

    PubMed

    Caselli, D A; Ning, C Z

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, laterally arranged multiple bandgap (LAMB) solar cells based on CdxPb1-xS alloy nanowires of varying composition on a single substrate are designed to be used together with a dispersive concentrator. Simulation results for a design with six subcells in series connection are presented. The design is based on a unique materials capability achieved in our recent research. An efficiency of 34.9% was obtained for operation without solar concentration, which increased to 40.5%, 41.7%, and 42.7% for concentration ratios of 25, 100, and 240 respectively. The device was also simulated with decreased carrier mobilities to model the possible reduction in absorber conductivity, depending on the nanowire geometry and configuration. For a concentration ratio of unity, decreasing the mobilities to 25% of their original values caused less than a 2.5% absolute drop in efficiency. The LAMB design offers the advantages of an integrated cell platform and the potential for low-cost, high efficiency photovoltaic systems.

  4. Pre-flare Activity and Magnetic Reconnection during the Evolutionary Stages of Energy Release in a Solar Eruptive Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhuwan; Veronig, Astrid M.; Lee, Jeongwoo; Bong, Su-Chan; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we present a multi-wavelength analysis of an eruptive white-light M3.2 flare that occurred in active region NOAA 10486 on 2003 November 1. The excellent set of high-resolution observations made by RHESSI and the TRACE provides clear evidence of significant pre-flare activities for ~9 minutes in the form of an initiation phase observed at EUV/UV wavelengths followed by an X-ray precursor phase. During the initiation phase, we observed localized brightenings in the highly sheared core region close to the filament and interactions among short EUV loops overlying the filament, which led to the opening of magnetic field lines. The X-ray precursor phase is manifested in RHESSI measurements below ~30 keV and coincided with the beginning of flux emergence at the flaring location along with early signatures of the eruption. The RHESSI observations reveal that both plasma heating and electron acceleration occurred during the precursor phase. The main flare is consistent with the standard flare model. However, after the impulsive phase, an intense hard X-ray (HXR) looptop source was observed without significant footpoint emission. More intriguingly, for a brief period, the looptop source exhibited strong HXR emission with energies up to ~50-100 keV and significant non-thermal characteristics. The present study indicates a causal relation between the activities in the pre-flare and the main flare. We also conclude that pre-flare activities, occurring in the form of subtle magnetic reorganization along with localized magnetic reconnection, played a crucial role in destabilizing the active region filament, leading to a solar eruptive flare and associated large-scale phenomena.

  5. An Experiment to Locate the Site of TeV Flaring in M87

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.E.; Massaro, F.; Cheung, C.C.; Horns, D.; Raue, M.; Stawarz, L.; Wagner, S.; Colin, P.; Mazin, D.; Wagner, R.; Beilicke, M.; LeBohec, S.; Hui, M.; Mukherjee, R.; /Barnard Coll.

    2012-05-18

    We describe a Chandra X-ray target-of-opportunity project designed to isolate the site of TeV flaring in the radio galaxy M87. To date, we have triggered the Chandra observations only once (2010 April) and by the time of the first of our nine observations, the TeV flare had ended. However, we found that the X-ray intensity of the unresolved nucleus was at an elevated level for our first observation. Of the more than 60 Chandra observations we have made of the M87 jet covering nine years, the nucleus was measured at a comparably high level only three times. Two of these occasions can be associated with TeV flaring, and at the time of the third event, there were no TeV monitoring activities. From the rapidity of the intensity drop of the nucleus, we infer that the size of the emitting region is of order a few light days x the unknown beaming factor; comparable to the same sort of estimate for the TeV emitting region. We also find evidence of spectral evolution in the X-ray band which seems consistent with radiative losses affecting the non-thermal population of the emitting electrons within the unresolved nucleus.

  6. Evaluation the effect of energetic particles in solar flares on satellite's life time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Z.; Davoudifar, P.

    2016-09-01

    As the satellites have a multiple role in the humans' life, their damages and therefore logical failures of their segment causes problems and lots of expenses. So evaluating different types of failures in their segments has a crustal role. Solar particles are one of the most important reasons of segment damages (hard and soft) during a solar event or in usual times. During a solar event these particle may cause extensive damages which are even permanent (hard errors). To avoid these effects and design shielding mediums, we need to know SEP (solar energetic particles) flux and MTTF (mean time between two failures) of segments. In the present work, we calculated SEP flux witch collide the satellite in common times, in different altitudes. OMERE software was used to determine the coordinates and specifications of a satellite which in simulations has been launched to space. Then we considered a common electronic computer part and calculated MTTF for it. In the same way the SEP fluxes were calculated during different solar flares of different solar cycles and MTFFs were evaluated during occurring of solar flares. Thus a relation between solar flare energy and life time of the satellite electronic part (hours) was obtained.

  7. Solar Demon - an approach to detecting flares, dimmings, and EUV waves on SDO/AIA images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraaikamp, Emil; Verbeeck, Cis

    2015-06-01

    Flares, dimmings, and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) waves are three types of eruptive phenomena on the Sun, which are main drivers of space weather. Fast and reliable detection of these phenomena helps augment space weather predictions. In the current paper, we introduce Solar Demon, the first software that detects all three phenomena, using a modular design to exploit synergies. While Solar Demon runs in near real-time on SDO/AIA synoptic quick-look images to provide fast detections of flares, dimmings, and EUV waves for space weather purposes, it also processes new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) synoptic science images on a regular basis to build dedicated science quality catalogs. An overview of Solar Demon is given, with a focus on the algorithms for EUV wave detection and characterization. Several first results, such as flare and dimming butterfly diagrams for the rising part of Solar Cycle 24, are presented. The main advantages, challenges, and future prospects for Solar Demon are outlined in the Section 5.

  8. Analysis of X-15 Landing Approach and Flare Characteristics Determined from the First 30 Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matranga, Gene J.

    1961-01-01

    The approach and flare maneuvers for the first 30 flights of the X-15 airplane and the various control problems encountered are discussed. The results afford a relatively good cross section of landing conditions that might be experienced with future glide vehicles having low lift-drag ratios. Flight-derived drag data show that preflight predictions based on wind-tunnel tests were, in general, somewhat higher than the values measured in flight. Depending on configuration, the peak lift-drag ratios from flight varied from 3.5 to 4.5 as compared with a predicted range of from 3.0 to 4.2. By employing overhead, spiral-type patterns beginning at altitudes as high as 40,000 feet, the pilots were consistently able to touch down within about +/-1,000 feet of a designated point. A typical flare was initiated at a "comfortable" altitude of about 800 feet and an indicated airspeed of approximately 300 knots., which allowed a margin of excess speed. The flap and gear were extended when the flare was essentially completed, and an average touchdown was accomplished at a speed of about 185 knots indicated airspeed, an angle of attack of about 7 deg, and a rate of descent of about 4 feet per second. In general, the approach and landing characteristics were predicted with good accuracy in extensive preflight simulations. F-104 airplanes which simulated the X-15 landing characteristics were particularly valuable for pilot training.

  9. Solar flares X-ray polarimetry in a wide energy band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiani, Sergio; Campana, Riccardo; Costa, Enrico; Muleri, Fabio; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Soffitta, Paolo; Del Monte, Ettore; Rubini, Alda

    2012-07-01

    Polarimetry of solar flares X-ray emission is an additional tool for investigating particles dynamics within the solar atmosphere. Accelerated electrons by magnetic reconnection in the corona produce bremsstrahlung radiation as primary emission in the footpoints of a solar flare which has moreover the possibility to be Compton backscattered resulting in albedo emission. Non-thermal bremsstrahlung emission is expected to be a significant above 15 keV and highly polarized. The albedo component peaks between 20 and 50 keV, its polarization properties depend on the Compton scattering angle. Such a diffusion modifies the spectrum and the polarization of the primary bremsstrahlung emission. Hard X-ray polarimetry, spectroscopy and imaging are therefore necessary to disentangle and modeling the different components in a solar flare. We present a non imaging Compton polarimeter sensitive from 20 keV designed as a single scattering unit surrounded by absorbers of high atomic number. A photelectric polarimeter based on the Gas Pixel Detector technology sensitive in the 15-35 keV energy band can be coupled for imaging.

  10. Exploring lifetime occupational exposure and SLE flare: a patient-focussed pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Squance, Marline L; Guest, Maya; Reeves, Glenn; Attia, John; Bridgman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Environmental effectors, such as ultraviolet radiation exposure, infection and stress, have been established as having a role in exacerbating lupus symptoms. However, unpredictable patterns of flare events still remain a mystery. Occupational effectors have also been suggested as having a contributing role; however, they are not widely researched. In this paper we report a pilot study designed to generate focus areas for future research regarding occupational exposures and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods The study explored potential links between exposures and the occurrence of patient-reported flare events in 80 Australian women with SLE (American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria classified). Specifically, the study assessed the hypothesis that occupational exposure is associated with significant changes in the likelihood of lupus flares. Lifetime employment history was analysed with the Finnish Job Exposure Matrix (FINJEM), 40 different semiquantified exposure class estimates for a wide number of occupations based on probability of exposure (p≥5%=exposed) were analysed with the construction of negative binomial regression models to test relationships between occupational agents and flare days. A backward stepwise elimination was used to generate a parsimonious model. Results Significant associations were noted for exposure classes of manual handling burden, (p=0.02, incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.01), Iron (p=0.00, IRR 1.37), wood dust (p=0.00, IRR 3.34) and asbestos (p=0.03, IRR 2.48). Conclusion Exposure assessment results indicated that occupations, such as nursing, with a high manual handling burden, posed increased risk to patients with SLE, however, the greatest risk was associated with wood dust and iron exposure with teachers and specialist labourers. PMID:25379190

  11. Interferometric at-wavelength flare characterization of EUV optical systems

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2001-01-01

    The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) provides the high-accuracy wavefront characterization critical to the development of EUV lithography systems. Enhancing the implementation of the PS/PDI can significantly extend its spatial-frequency measurement bandwidth. The enhanced PS/PDI is capable of simultaneously characterizing both wavefront and flare. The enhanced technique employs a hybrid spatial/temporal-domain point diffraction interferometer (referred to as the dual-domain PS/PDI) that is capable of suppressing the scattered-reference-light noise that hinders the conventional PS/PDI. Using the dual-domain technique in combination with a flare-measurement-optimized mask and an iterative calculation process for removing flare contribution caused by higher order grating diffraction terms, the enhanced PS/PDI can be used to simultaneously measure both figure and flare in optical systems.

  12. SDO's View of May 5, 2010 Solar Flare - With Timeline

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows a composite view of the solar flare on May 5, 2010, taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory's (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) cameras in multiple wavelengths (211, 193, 17...

  13. The Solar Flare Myth in solar-terrestrial physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.

    1993-07-01

    Early observations of associations between solar flares and large non- recurrent geomagnetic storms, large {open_quote}solar{close_quote} energetic particle events, and transient shock wave disturbances in the solar wind led to a paradigm of cause and effect that gave flares a central position in the chain of events leading from solar activity to major transient disturbances in the near-earth space environment. However, research in the last two decades shows that this emphasis on flares is misplaced. In this paper the author outlines briefly the rationale for a different paradigm of cause and effect in solar- terrestrial physics that removes solar flares from their central position as the {open_quote}cause{close_quote} of major disturbances in the near-earth space environment. Instead, this central role of {open_quote}cause{close_quote} is played by events now known as coronal mass ejections, or CMEs.

  14. 213. 'SAFTEY FLARED INTERSECTION' NEAR COLLINGWOOD, 1932. ORIGINAL CAPTION READ ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    213. 'SAFTEY FLARED INTERSECTION' NEAR COLLINGWOOD, 1932. ORIGINAL CAPTION READ ''STREAMLINING' THE MOVEMENT OF HIGH SPEED MODERN TRAFFIC. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  15. Highlights of the study of energy release in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Batchelor, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    From February 26 to March 1, 1979, 32 solar flare investigators attended a workshop at Cambridge, MA to define objectives and devise a scientific program for the study of energy release in flares (SERF) during the coming solar maximum. Herein, some major results of the ensuing five-year effort to observe and understand the flare energy release process and its effects (energetic particle production, coronal and chromospheric heating, electromagnetic radiations, and mass motions and ejections) are reviewed. The central issue - what processes store and release the energy liberated in flares - remains unresolved except in the most general terms (e.g., it is generally agreed that the energy is stored in sheared or stressed magnetic fields and released by field annihilation during some MHD instability). Resolving that issue is still one of the most important goals in solar physics, but the advances during the SERF program have brought it closer.

  16. Solar flares, proton showers, and the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    Attention is given the hazards posed to Space Shuttle crews by energetic proton radiation from inherently unpredictable solar flares, such as that of April 10-13, 1981, which was experienced by the Space Shuttle Columbia. The most energetic protons from this flare reached the earth's atmosphere an hour after flare onset, and would have posed a potentially lethal threat to astronauts engaged in extravehicular activity in a polar or geosynchronous orbit rather than the low-latitude, low-altitude orbit of this mission. It is shown that proton-producing flares are associated with energization in shocks, many of which are driven by coronal mass ejections. Insights gained from the Solar Maximum Year programs allow reconsideration of proton shower forecasting, which will be essential in the prediction of the weather that Space Shuttle astronauts will encounter during extravehicular activities.

  17. Optical microflaring on the nearby flare star binary UV Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Kanbach, G.; Rau, A.; Steinle, H.

    2016-05-01

    We present extremely high time resolution observations of the visual flare star binary UV Cet obtained with the Optical Pulsar Timing Analyzer (OPTIMA) at the 1.3 m telescope at Skinakas Observatory (SKO) in Crete, Greece. OPTIMA is a fiber-fed optical instrument that uses Single Photon Avalanche Diodes to measure the arrival times of individual optical photons. The time resolution of the observations presented here was 4 μs, allowing to resolve the typical millisecond variability time scales associated with stellar flares. We report the detection of very short impulsive bursts in the blue band with well resolved rise and decay time scales of about 2 s. The overall energetics put these flares at the lower end of the known flare distribution of UV Cet.

  18. Particle acceleration by a solar flare termination shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Bastian, Timothy S; Shen, Chengcai; Gary, Dale E; Krucker, Säm; Glesener, Lindsay

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares--the most powerful explosions in the solar system--are also efficient particle accelerators, capable of energizing a large number of charged particles to relativistic speeds. A termination shock is often invoked in the standard model of solar flares as a possible driver for particle acceleration, yet its existence and role have remained controversial. We present observations of a solar flare termination shock and trace its morphology and dynamics using high-cadence radio imaging spectroscopy. We show that a disruption of the shock coincides with an abrupt reduction of the energetic electron population. The observed properties of the shock are well reproduced by simulations. These results strongly suggest that a termination shock is responsible, at least in part, for accelerating energetic electrons in solar flares.

  19. Do Large-Scale Topological Features Correlate with Flare Properties?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeRosa, Marc L.; Barnes, Graham

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we aim to identify whether the presence or absence of particular topological features in the large-scale coronal magnetic field are correlated with whether a flare is confined or eruptive. To this end, we first determine the locations of null points, spine lines, and separatrix surfaces within the potential fields associated with the locations of several strong flares from the current and previous sunspot cycles. We then validate the topological skeletons against large-scale features in observations, such as the locations of streamers and pseudostreamers in coronagraph images. Finally, we characterize the topological environment in the vicinity of the flaring active regions and identify the trends involving their large-scale topologies and the properties of the associated flares.

  20. Fast X-ray Oscillations During Magnetar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, T.

    2006-01-01

    "We report on recent studies of high frequency variability during magnetar giant flares. These oscillations may represent the first observations of global shear oscillations in neutron star crusts, and can provide a new tools to study neutron star structure.