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Sample records for lateral talar dome

  1. Arthroscopic intralesional curettage for large benign talar dome cysts

    PubMed Central

    El Shazly, Ossama; Abou El Soud, Maged M.; Nasef Abdelatif, Nasef Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical management of large talar dome cysts is challenging due to increased morbidity by associated cartilage damage and malleolar osteotomy. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcome of endoscopic curettage and bone graft for large talar dome cysts. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of data for eight patients (eight feet) who were treated by arthroscopic curettage and grafting for large talar dome cysts. Seven cases were treated by posterior ankle arthroscopy as the lesion was located posteriorly while one case was treated by anterior ankle arthroscopy as the lesion was breached anteriorly. Results: The final diagnosis, was; large osteochondral lesion of talus (two cases), aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) (two case), intra-osseous ganglion (two cases), Chronic infection in talus (one case) and angiomatous lesion of the talus (one case). The mean follow up period was 18.3 (±3.06 SD) months (range 16–25 months). The median preoperative AOFAS score was 74.5 (±5.34 SD) points. The mean postoperative AOFAS score at one year follow up was 94.6 (±2.97 SD) points. None of the patient had recurrence of the lesion during follow up. Return to normal daily activity was achieved at 11.25 (±2.37 SD) weeks. Discussion: In this short case series study, large talar dome bony cysts of different pathologies including aneurysmal bone cysts could be treated effectively by endoscopic curettage and bone grafting with no recurrence no complications during the follow-up period. PMID:27163087

  2. Arthroscopic management of talar dome lesions using a transmalleolar approach.

    PubMed

    Grady, John; Hughes, David

    2006-01-01

    Surgical treatment of posteromedial talar dome lesions is frequently necessary for Berndt and Harty grade IV osteochondral defects and nondisplaced osteochondral fragments resistant to conservative modalities. When operative intervention is indicated, the approach and management can be complicated by the location and extent of the injury. The operative technique we advocate allows direct exposure of the lesion and minimizes damage to healthy articular cartilage and surrounding soft tissue. Use of a drill guide assists the surgeon in precisely placing a transmalleolar portal through the tibia for subchondral drilling of osteochondral defects when the lesions are inaccessible through traditional arthroscopic portals. PMID:16707640

  3. Mineral density and penetration strength of the subchondral bone plate of the talar dome: high correlation and specific distribution patterns.

    PubMed

    Leumann, André; Valderrabano, Victor; Hoechel, Sebastian; Göpfert, Beat; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    The subchondral bone plate plays an important role in stabilizing the osteochondral joint unit and in the pathomechanism of osteochondral lesions and osteoarthritis. The objective of the present study was to measure the mineral density distribution and subchondral bone plate penetration strength of the talar dome joint facet to display and compare the specific distribution patterns. Ten cadaver specimens were used for computed tomography (CT) scans, from which densitograms were derived using CT-osteoabsorptiometry, and for mechanical indentation testing from which the penetration strength was obtained. Our results showed 2 different distribution patterns for mineral density and penetration strength. Of the 10 specimens, 6 (60%) showed bicentric maxima (anteromedially and anterolaterally), and 4 (40%) showed a monocentric maximum (either anteromedially or anterolaterally). A highly significant correlation (p < .0001) for both methods confirmed that the mineral density relied on local load characteristics. In conclusion, the biomechanical properties of the subchondral bone plate of the talar dome joint facet showed specific distribution patterns. CT-osteoabsorptiometry is a reliable method to display the mineral density distribution noninvasively. We recommend CT-osteoabsorptiometry for noninvasive analysis of the biomechanical properties of the subchondral bone plate in osteochondral joint reconstruction and the prevention and treatment of osteoarthritis and osteochondral lesions.

  4. Fracture of the lateral tubercle of the posterior talar process caused by a rock-climbing fall: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Blanchette, Marc-André; Grenier, Julie-Marthe

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe the clinical presentation of a patient who suffered from a fracture of the lateral tubercle of the posterior talar process caused by a fall while rock-climbing. The initial evaluation revealed diffuse ankle swelling, tenderness, and pain at the distal aspect of both malleoli. Plain film radiography revealed a fracture of the posterior process of the talus. Computed tomography (CT) outlined the extension of the fracture line in the postero-lateral aspect of the body of the talus with minimal displacement. The patient was treated conservatively with an Aircast© walking boot for 6 weeks (non–weight-bearing) followed by a 2-week period of partial weight bearing. At the 8 week follow-up, he reported minimal tenderness and normal ankle function. Clinicians should be aware that talar fracture identification on plain films is difficult and computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging may be required. PMID:25202157

  5. Talar Dome Lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... side of the ankle. This condition often... Barefoot Running Barefoot running is running while barefoot, without wearing any shoes on the feet. Running in thin-soled, flexible shoes is related but ...

  6. Assessment of Ankle and Hindfoot Stability and Joint Pressures Using a Human Cadaveric Model of a Large Lateral Talar Process Excision

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Andrew; White, Charles; Blankstein, Michael; Zderic, Ivan; Wahl, Dieter; Ernst, Manuela; Windolf, Markus; Hagen, Jennifer E.; Richards, R. Geoff; Stoffel, Karl; Gueorguiev, Boyko

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lateral talar process fragment excision may be followed by hindfoot instability and altered biomechanics. There is controversy regarding the ideal fragment size for internal fixation versus excision and a concern that excision of a large fragment may lead to significant instability. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a simulated large lateral talar process excision on ankle and subtalar joint stability. A custom-made seesaw rig was designed to apply inversion/eversion stress loading on 7 fresh-frozen human cadaveric lower legs and investigate them in pre-excision, 5 cm3 and 10 cm3 lateral talar process fragment excision states. Anteroposterior radiographs were taken to assess ankle and subtalar joint tilt and calculate angular change from neutral hindfoot alignment to 10-kg forced inversion/eversion. Ankle joint pressures and contact areas were measured under 30-kg axial load in neutral hindfoot alignment. In comparison to the pre-excision state, no significantly different mediolateral angular change was observed in the subtalar joint after 5 and 10 cm3 lateral talar process fragment excision in inversion and eversion. With respect to the ankle joint, 10-cm3 fragment excision produced significantly bigger inversion tibiotalar tilt compared with the pre-excision state, P = .04. No significant change of the ankle joint pressure and contact area was detected after 5 and 10-cm3 excision in comparison with the pre-excison state. An excision of up to 10 cm3 of the lateral talar process does not cause a significant instability at the level of the subtalar joint but might be a destabilizing factor at the ankle joint under inversion stress. The latter could be related to extensive soft tissue dissection required for resection. PMID:25789950

  7. Talar neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Berlet, G C; Lee, T H; Massa, E G

    2001-01-01

    Clinical management of talar neck fractures is complex and fraught with complications. As Gaius Julius Caesar stated: "The die is cast"; often the outcome of a talar neck fracture is determined at the time of injury. The authors believe, however, that better results can be achieved by following some simple guidelines. The authors advocate prompt and precise anatomic surgical reduction, preferring the medial approach with secondary anterolateral approach. Preservation of blood supply can be achieved by a thorough understanding of vascular pathways and efforts to stay within appropriate surgical intervals. The authors advocate bone grafting of medial neck comminution (if present) to prevent varus malalignment and rigid internal fixation to allow for joint mobilization postoperatively. These guidelines may seem simple, but when dealing with the complexity of talar neck fractures, the foot and ankle surgeon needs to focus and rely on easily grasped concepts to reduce poor outcomes. PMID:11465133

  8. Talar fractures: three case studies.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, A L; Morgan, J H

    2001-09-01

    Three case studies of fractures are presented that demonstrate the potential morbidity that these injuries can cause as well as the acceptable outcomes if treated appropriately. Two of the cases are talar fracture dislocations; the third is an osteochondral fracture of the talus. The importance of early treatment with open reduction and internal fixation is demonstrated. Success following surgical intervention in a nonhealed osteochondral fracture of the talus is also demonstrated.

  9. Misdiagnosis of Talar Body or Neck Fractures as Ankle Sprains in Low Energy Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki-Won; Kim, Jin-Su; Cho, Hun-Ki; Choo, Ho-Sik; Park, Jang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background The talus has a very complex anatomical morphology and is mainly fractured by a major force caused by a fall or a traffic accident. Therefore, a talus fracture is not common. However, many recent reports have shown that minor injuries, such as sprains and slips during sports activities, can induce a talar fracture especially in the lateral or posterior process. Still, fractures to the main parts of the talus (neck and body) after ankle sprains have not been reported as occult fractures. Methods Of the total 102 cases from January 2005 to December 2012, 7 patients had confirmed cases of missed/delayed diagnosis of a talus body or neck fracture and were included in the study population. If available, medical records, X-rays, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging of the confirmed cases were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Results In the 7-patient population, there were 3 talar neck fractures and 4 talar body fractures (coronal shearing type). The mechanisms of injuries were all low energy trauma episodes. The causes of the injuries included twisting of the ankle during climbing (n = 2), jumping to the ground from a 1-m high wall (n = 2), and twisting of the ankle during daily activities (n = 3). Conclusions A talar body fracture and a talar neck fracture should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute and chronic ankle pain after a minor ankle injury. PMID:27583114

  10. Cartilage transplantation techniques for talar cartilage lesions.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Matthew E; Giza, Eric; Sullivan, Martin R

    2009-07-01

    Talar articular cartilage is known to differ significantly from knee cartilage. Even so, recommendations for the treatment of talar cartilage lesions have been based on strategies for the knee. Arthroscopic management of osteochondral lesions of the talus is well documented. Results have been favorable with reparative techniques such as débridement with curettage and débridement with drilling, whether undertaken via early open techniques or more recent arthroscopic procedures. Salvage of failed reparative techniques is controversial. Early efforts to salvage failed débridement focused on osteochondral allografts and autografts that used the knee as a donor site. Results of these restorative techniques have been favorable, but concerns have been raised regarding knee donor site morbidity, the use of malleolar osteotomy, and incomplete restoration of the talar articular surface. More recent restorative techniques developed for the knee have been adapted for the ankle, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation and matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation.

  11. Osteoid Osteoma of the Talar Neck With Subacute Presentation.

    PubMed

    Assafiri, Ibrahim; Sraj, Shafic

    2015-10-01

    Osteoid osteoma of the talar neck is a rare clinical entity that is frequently missed on initial assessment in patients with ankle pain. We present a case report of an adolescent with talar neck osteoid osteoma who presented with persistent pain after an injury. We review the differential diagnosis of persistent anterior ankle pain and review the treatment options for osteoid osteoma of the talar neck.

  12. Talar Neck Fracture after United Tibiotalar Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Platt, W.; Welck, M.; Rudge, B.

    2015-01-01

    Tibiotalar arthrodesis is a well-established treatment for tibiotalar arthritis, for example, in younger high demand patients. Talar neck fractures are less common though well-recognised sequelae of foot ankle trauma. Here we present the clinical case of a 69-year-old male who presented to our institution with a nonunion of a talar neck fracture, having undergone a left tibiotalar fusion 24 years previously. To the authors' knowledge, this injury has only been described once previously in the literature. However, the original case described a fracture sustained in the very early postoperative period following tibiotalar fusion, postulated to be secondary to postimmobilisation osteopaenia or stress risers from metalwork. The aetiology in this case is likely due to axial compression transmitted to the talar neck via the calcaneus. The predisposing factors for nonunion are discussed, highlighting the importance of vigilance for this injury in any patient with concomitant tibiotalar fusion and foot trauma. The management of this patient is discussed. PMID:26491589

  13. Dome Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirulli, Carol

    1999-01-01

    Back in 1988, Emmett, Idaho, built the first monolithic dome school. Now, school boards in Arizona, Missouri, Florida, Minnesota, and New Mexico are among those that have voted to build domed school buildings. A monolithic dome is a steel- reinforced, concrete structure with a smooth, round surface that is inspired by the shape of an egg. (MLF)

  14. Monolithic Domes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanham, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes how the energy savings, low cost, and near-absolute protection from tornadoes provided by monolithic domes is starting to appeal to school districts for athletic and other facilities, including the Italy (Texas) Independent School District. Provides an overview of monolithic dome construction. (EV)

  15. Three-dimensional geometric morphometric analysis of talar morphology in extant gorilla taxa from highland and lowland habitats.

    PubMed

    Knigge, Ryan P; Tocheri, Matthew W; Orr, Caley M; Mcnulty, Kieran P

    2015-01-01

    Western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) are known to climb significantly more often than eastern gorillas (Gorilla beringei), a behavioral distinction attributable to major differences in their respective habitats (i.e., highland vs. lowland). Genetic evidence suggests that the lineages leading to these taxa began diverging from one another between approximately 1 and 3 million years ago. Thus, gorillas offer a special opportunity to examine the degree to which morphology of recently diverged taxa may be "fine-tuned" to differing ecological requirements. Using three-dimensional (3D) geometric morphometrics, we compared talar morphology in a sample of 87 specimens including western (lowland), mountain (highland), and grauer gorillas (lowland and highland populations). Talar shape was captured with a series of landmarks and semilandmarks superimposed by generalized Procrustes analysis. A between-group principal components analysis of overall talar shape separates gorillas by ecological habitat and by taxon. An analysis of only the trochlea and lateral malleolar facet identifies subtle variations in trochlear shape between western lowland and lowland grauer gorillas, potentially indicative of convergent evolution of arboreal adaptations in the talus. Lastly, talar shape scales differently with centroid size for highland and lowland gorillas, suggesting that ankle morphology may track body-size mediated variation in arboreal behaviors differently depending on ecological setting. Several of the observed shape differences are linked biomechanically to the facilitation of climbing in lowland gorillas and to stability and load-bearing on terrestrial substrates in the highland taxa, providing an important comparative model for studying morphological variation in groups known only from fossils (e.g., early hominins).

  16. Tibial-talar dislocation without fracture: treatment principles and outcome.

    PubMed

    Finkemeier, C; Engebretsen, L; Gannon, J

    1995-01-01

    The incidence of tibial-talar dislocations without fracture is unknown and has been sparsely reported in the literature. The diagnosis of the injury is straightforward with the appropriate examination and roentgenograms. Good to excellent results can be achieved with open or closed dislocations treated by closed reduction and immobilization for 4-6 weeks. Although open dislocations require irrigation, debridement, and possibly delayed closure, controversy exists with regard to acute ligament repair. Because good to excellent results are possible without acute ligament repair, and delayed repair on reconstruction can be accomplished with good outcomes, we recommend treating these injuries without ligament repair.

  17. Peroneal spastic flatfoot in adolescents with accessory talar facet impingement: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Niki, Hisateru; Aoki, Haruhito; Hirano, Takaaki; Akiyama, Yui; Fujiya, Hiroto

    2015-07-01

    This study analyzed imaging, arthroscopic findings, and treatment responses for peroneal spastic flatfoot (PSFF) caused by talocalcaneal impingement at the accessory anterolateral talar facet (AALTF) (accessory talar facet impingement) in 13 adolescents without histories of trauma and tarsal coalition. The AALTF was determined with computed tomography and MRI. Focal abutting bone marrow edema (FABME) on MRI around the AALTF was confirmed. In seven patients who underwent AALTF resection, subtalar arthroscopy was performed. All experienced alleviation PSFF after treatment; reduction in FABME was observed. AALTF resection alone is beneficial for PSFF caused by accessory talar facet impingement when peroneal spasms are restored by an injection of local anesthesia.

  18. Late Oligocene to early Miocene lateral extrusion at the eastern border of the Lepontine dome of the central Alps (Bergell and Insubric areas, eastern central Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciancaleoni, Laurent; Marquer, Didier

    2008-07-01

    How the internal domain of the central Alps deformed during late stages of the continental collision remains poorly understood. To fill this gap in knowledge, we present new data constraining the late Alpine brittle and brittle-ductile tectonics in Oligocene intrusions of the Bergell Alps (eastern central Alps). Syncollisional late normal faulting is widespread at all investigated scales, but part of the deformation observed is also associated with oblique-slip and transcurrent displacements. The faults are explained by stress permutations in space and time implying the three principal stress axes and correspond to different homoaxial states of stress of one single transtensive tectonic event. Motion on these faults accommodated coeval orogen-parallel extension and orogen-perpendicular contraction, during oblique indentation by the Southern alpine crust. Extensional and transcurrent structures likely formed by lateral extrusion of the Bergell Alps via distributed eastward extrusion of imbricated wedge-shaped crustal blocks, during the late Oligocene and lower Miocene. A first-order wedge-shaped crustal block in the Bergell Alps is represented by three coeval segments of the Periadriatic Fault System (namely the Tonale, Engadine, and Forcola faults). The eastern central segment of the Alpine belt appears to have deformed during the late Oligocene and lower Miocene in a similar way to its extremities where lateral escape tectonics occurred at least until the upper Miocene, according to free boundary availabilities.

  19. Mechanical Comparison of Headless Screw Fixation and Locking Plate Fixation for Talar Neck Fractures.

    PubMed

    Karakasli, Ahmet; Hapa, Onur; Erduran, Mehmet; Dincer, Cemal; Cecen, Berivan; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    For talar neck fractures, open reduction and internal fixation have been thought to facilitate revascularization and prevent osteonecrosis. Newer screw systems allow for placement of cannulated headless screws, which provide compression by virtue of a variable pitch thread. The present study compared the biomechanical fixation strength of cannulated headless variable-pitch screw fixation and locking plate fixation. A reproducible talar neck fracture was created in 14 fresh cadaver talar necks. Talar head fixation was then performed using 2 cannulated headless variable-pitch 4-mm/5-mm diameter (4/5) screws (Acutrak; Acumed, Hillsboro, OR) and locking plate fixation. Headless variable-pitch screw fixation had lower failure displacement than did locking plate fixation. No statistically significant differences were found in failure stiffness, yield stiffness (p = .655), yield load (p = .142), or ultimate load between the 2 fixation techniques. Cannulated headless variable-pitch screw fixation resulted in better failure displacement than locking plate fixation in a cadaveric talus model and could be considered a viable option for talus fracture fixation. Headless, fully threaded, variable-pitch screw fixation has inherent advantages compared with locking plate fixation, because it might cause less damage to the articular surface and can compress the fracture for improved reduction. Additionally, plate fixation can increase the risk of avascular necrosis owing to the wider incision and dissection of soft tissues.

  20. Anatomic Total Talar Prosthesis Replacement Surgery and Ankle Arthroplasty: An Early Case Series in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about specific outcomes and early experiences of total talar prosthesis replacement surgery in the current literature, and ankle arthroplasty in Southeast Asia. This study reported on four patients with talar loss or ankle arthritis. Patients were treated with a custom total talar prosthesis (anatomic-metallic version) replacement (TPR, n=1) or with total ankle replacement (TAR, n=3). Baseline data, including Visual-Analog-Scale Foot and Ankle (VAS-FA) and Quality of Life scores via Short-Form-36 (SF-36), were collected for all patients. Mean follow-up time was 7.6 months. From preoperative to postoperative, VAS-FA score increased from 6.0 to 57.5, and SF-36 score increased from 19.3 to 73.7 in a patient with TPR. Mean VAS-FA scores increased from 51.5±15.6 to 85.7±4.7 (P=0.032), and mean SF-36 scores tended to increase from 65.2±13.3 to 99.3±1.2 (P=0.055) in TAR group. This study is the first report of anatomic-metallic TPR which appears to provide satisfactory outcomes for treatment of talar loss at a short-term follow-up. TAR also provides acceptable results for treatment of ankle arthritis at this point. PMID:25317313

  1. New Monolithic Dome Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Freda

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how the Grand Meadow (Minnesota) school district got more than twice the grant money asked for from the state's legislature as well as voter approval for five new $8 million monolithic domes for their K-12 facility. Three additional school district successes in developing monolithic domes for their schools are examined. (GR)

  2. Experimental Studies of Lava Dome Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R.; Sammonds, P. R.; Kilburn, C. R.

    2005-12-01

    Renewed extrusion at andesitic to dacitic lava domes and collapses of these domes are usually preceded by fracturing and frictional sliding of material in and around the lava dome and magma conduit. This is observed through the occurrence of shallow high frequency earthquakes. Samples of andesite from Mount Shasta in the Cascades, a typical material for both lava domes and shallow underlying country rock, have been deformed in compression and tension, at temperatures of up to 900°C, and under confining pressures of up to 70MPa. During these tests the axial load, sample deformation and acoustic emissions were recorded, in order to compare the results with field observations of deformation and short period seismicity at lava domes. Typical strengths at room temperature and pressure were 6MPa in tension, and 100MPa in compression. Increased temperatures increased the tensile strength, but reduced the compressive strength, whereas both strengths increased with increasing confining pressure. There were ~10 times more acoustic emissions at room temperature than at maximum test temperatures, indicating that increased temperatures favour ductile, rather than brittle, failure. These results suggest that young, hot lava domes may collapse or erupt with little precursory short period seismicity, whilst older, cooler domes are likely to exhibit stronger short period seismic precursors. However, hotter material is likely to exhibit more recognisable deformation precursors. This is consistent with the seismicity observed after the 18 May 1980 climactic eruption at Mount St Helens, where there was ~100 times more seismicity prior to eruptions in 1985 and 1986 than there was prior to eruptions in 1980 and 1981. During these later eruptions, the interior of the dome would still have been ductile due to its temperature and the overburden weight acting as a confining pressure, but the large amount of pre-failure deformation in this zone could drive fracturing of the cooler outer

  3. Pancakelike domes on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Dan; Ford, Peter G.; Liu, Fang; Pettengill, Gordon H.

    1992-01-01

    The shape of seven large domes on the plains of Venus, with volumes between 100 and 1000 cu km, is compared with that of an axisymmetric gravity current spreading over a rigid horizontal surface. Both the altimetric profiles and the horizontal projection of the line of intersection of domes on the SAR images agree well with the theoretical similarity solution for a newtonian fluid, but not with the shape calculated for a rigid-plastic rheology, nor with that for a static model with a strong skin. As a viscous current spreads, it generates an isotropic strain rate tensor whose magnitude is independent of radius. Such a flow can account for the randomly oriented cracks that are uniformly distributed on the surface of the domes. The stress induced by the flow in the plains material below is obtained, and is probably large enough to produce the short radial cracks in the surface of the plains beyond the domes. The viscosity of the domes can be estimated from their thermal time constants if spreading is possible only when the fluid is hot, and lies between 10(exp 14) and 10(exp 17) Pa s. Laboratory experiments show that such viscosities correspond to temperatures of 610 - 690 C in dry rhyolitic magmas. These temperatures agree with laboratory measurements of the solidus temperature of wet rhyolite. These results show that the development of the domes can be understood using simple fluid dynamical ideas, and that the magmas involved can be produced by wet melting at depths below 10 km, followed by eruption and degassing.

  4. Rigidity of lattice domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savelyev, V. A.

    1979-01-01

    The means of ensuring total rigidity of lattice domes, using comparison with solid shells of 1-3 layers are discussed. Irregularities of manufacture, processing, and other factors are considered, as they relate to diminution of rigidity. The discussion uses the concepts of upper and lower critical loads on the structure in question.

  5. Three-dimensional shape variation of talar surface morphology in hominoid primates.

    PubMed

    Parr, W C H; Soligo, C; Smaers, J; Chatterjee, H J; Ruto, A; Cornish, L; Wroe, S

    2014-07-01

    The hominoid foot is of particular interest to biological anthropologists, as changes in its anatomy through time reflect the adoption of terrestrial locomotion, particularly in species of Australopithecus and Homo. Understanding the osteological morphology associated with changes in whole foot function and the development of the plantar medial longitudinal foot arch are key to understanding the transition through habitual bipedalism in australopithecines to obligate bipedalism and long-distance running in Homo. The talus is ideal for studying relationships between morphology and function in this context, as it is a major contributor to the adduction-abduction, plantar-dorsal flexion and inversion-eversion of the foot, and transmits all forces encountered from the foot to the leg. The talar surface is predominantly covered by articular facets, which have different quantifiable morphological characters, including surface area, surface curvature and orientation. The talus also presents challenges to the investigator, as its globular shape is very difficult to quantify accurately and reproducibly. Here we apply a three-dimensional approach using type 3 landmarks (slid semilandmarks) that are geometrically homologous to determine overall talar shape variations in a range of living and fossil hominoid taxa. Additionally, we use novel approaches to quantify the relative orientations and curvatures of talar articular facets by determining the principal vectors of facet orientation and fitting spheres to articular facets. The resulting metrics are analysed using phylogenetic regressions and principal components analyses. Our results suggest that articular surface curvatures reflect locomotor specialisations with, in particular, orangutans having more highly curved facets in all but the calcaneal facet. Similarly, our approach to quantifying articular facet orientation appears to be effective in discriminating between extant hominoid species, and may therefore provide a

  6. Three-dimensional shape variation of talar surface morphology in hominoid primates

    PubMed Central

    Parr, W C H; Soligo, C; Smaers, J; Chatterjee, H J; Ruto, A; Cornish, L; Wroe, S

    2014-01-01

    The hominoid foot is of particular interest to biological anthropologists, as changes in its anatomy through time reflect the adoption of terrestrial locomotion, particularly in species of Australopithecus and Homo. Understanding the osteological morphology associated with changes in whole foot function and the development of the plantar medial longitudinal foot arch are key to understanding the transition through habitual bipedalism in australopithecines to obligate bipedalism and long-distance running in Homo. The talus is ideal for studying relationships between morphology and function in this context, as it is a major contributor to the adduction–abduction, plantar–dorsal flexion and inversion–eversion of the foot, and transmits all forces encountered from the foot to the leg. The talar surface is predominantly covered by articular facets, which have different quantifiable morphological characters, including surface area, surface curvature and orientation. The talus also presents challenges to the investigator, as its globular shape is very difficult to quantify accurately and reproducibly. Here we apply a three-dimensional approach using type 3 landmarks (slid semilandmarks) that are geometrically homologous to determine overall talar shape variations in a range of living and fossil hominoid taxa. Additionally, we use novel approaches to quantify the relative orientations and curvatures of talar articular facets by determining the principal vectors of facet orientation and fitting spheres to articular facets. The resulting metrics are analysed using phylogenetic regressions and principal components analyses. Our results suggest that articular surface curvatures reflect locomotor specialisations with, in particular, orang-utans having more highly curved facets in all but the calcaneal facet. Similarly, our approach to quantifying articular facet orientation appears to be effective in discriminating between extant hominoid species, and may therefore

  7. Three-dimensional shape variation of talar surface morphology in hominoid primates.

    PubMed

    Parr, W C H; Soligo, C; Smaers, J; Chatterjee, H J; Ruto, A; Cornish, L; Wroe, S

    2014-07-01

    The hominoid foot is of particular interest to biological anthropologists, as changes in its anatomy through time reflect the adoption of terrestrial locomotion, particularly in species of Australopithecus and Homo. Understanding the osteological morphology associated with changes in whole foot function and the development of the plantar medial longitudinal foot arch are key to understanding the transition through habitual bipedalism in australopithecines to obligate bipedalism and long-distance running in Homo. The talus is ideal for studying relationships between morphology and function in this context, as it is a major contributor to the adduction-abduction, plantar-dorsal flexion and inversion-eversion of the foot, and transmits all forces encountered from the foot to the leg. The talar surface is predominantly covered by articular facets, which have different quantifiable morphological characters, including surface area, surface curvature and orientation. The talus also presents challenges to the investigator, as its globular shape is very difficult to quantify accurately and reproducibly. Here we apply a three-dimensional approach using type 3 landmarks (slid semilandmarks) that are geometrically homologous to determine overall talar shape variations in a range of living and fossil hominoid taxa. Additionally, we use novel approaches to quantify the relative orientations and curvatures of talar articular facets by determining the principal vectors of facet orientation and fitting spheres to articular facets. The resulting metrics are analysed using phylogenetic regressions and principal components analyses. Our results suggest that articular surface curvatures reflect locomotor specialisations with, in particular, orangutans having more highly curved facets in all but the calcaneal facet. Similarly, our approach to quantifying articular facet orientation appears to be effective in discriminating between extant hominoid species, and may therefore provide a

  8. Extensor digitorum longus tenosynovitis caused by talar head impingement in an ultramarathon runner: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H; Sakurai, M; Kobayashi, T

    2007-08-01

    Stenosing tenosynovitis of the extensor digitorum longus tendon is an injury related to ultramarathon running. A 32-year-old male ultramarathon runner developed chronic tenosynovitis of the ankle dorsiflexors. He was diagnosed with extensor digitorum longus tenosynovitis caused by talar head impingement associated with exostosis. He failed to respond to non-operative management and decided to undergo tenosynovectomy of the extensor digitorum longus tendon. The pain was relieved without functional disturbance of the foot and ankle, and the patient returned to running 3 weeks postoperatively. At the 2-year follow-up, he was participating fully in ultramarathons. PMID:17709872

  9. Removal of osteoblastoma of the talar neck using standard anterior ankle Arthroscopy:A case report

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiao-jun; Yang, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Osteoblastoma of the talus, a benign tumor, is rare in orthopedics. The choice of treatment is usually open surgery for excision of tumor. Limited data is available concerning arthroscopic approaches. Presentation of case A 36-year-old male patient was evaluated for pain and swelling of the left ankle joint. Based on the findings of physical examination, X-rays and MRI investigations, the tumor was isolated. Standard anterior arthroscopic surgery was performed due to ankle pain. A diagnosis of osteoblastoma of the talar neck was made following the pathological survey. He had no recurrent pain and normal joint mobility 5 years postoperatively during he was regularly followed up. Discussion Osteoblastoma of the talar neck is slowly progressive and it is a palpable painful mass. Open or arthroscopic surgery can be performed. Treatment strategies are decided on according to the tumor's location, extent and size. Some advantages of arthroscopic surgery are wide visualization areas, minimally invasion, low morbidity, no necessity for casting and immobilization, early rehabilitation and quick recovery. Conclusion In conclusion, arthroscopic management can be successful in selected patients with small benign tumor localized to the ankle joint. PMID:27100951

  10. Interspecific scaling patterns of talar articular surfaces within primates and their closest living relatives

    PubMed Central

    Yapuncich, Gabriel S; Boyer, Doug M

    2014-01-01

    The articular facets of interosseous joints must transmit forces while maintaining relatively low stresses. To prevent overloading, joints that transmit higher forces should therefore have larger facet areas. The relative contributions of body mass and muscle-induced forces to joint stress are unclear, but generate opposing hypotheses. If mass-induced forces dominate, facet area should scale with positive allometry to body mass. Alternatively, muscle-induced forces should cause facets to scale isometrically with body mass. Within primates, both scaling patterns have been reported for articular surfaces of the femoral and humeral heads, but more distal elements are less well studied. Additionally, examination of complex articular surfaces has largely been limited to linear measurements, so that ‘true area' remains poorly assessed. To re-assess these scaling relationships, we examine the relationship between body size and articular surface areas of the talus. Area measurements were taken from microCT scan-generated surfaces of all talar facets from a comprehensive sample of extant euarchontan taxa (primates, treeshrews, and colugos). Log-transformed data were regressed on literature-derived log-body mass using reduced major axis and phylogenetic least squares regressions. We examine the scaling patterns of muscle mass and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) to body mass, as these relationships may complicate each model. Finally, we examine the scaling pattern of hindlimb muscle PCSA to talar articular surface area, a direct test of the effect of mass-induced forces on joint surfaces. Among most groups, there is an overall trend toward positive allometry for articular surfaces. The ectal (= posterior calcaneal) facet scales with positive allometry among all groups except ‘sundatherians', strepsirrhines, galagids, and lorisids. The medial tibial facet scales isometrically among all groups except lemuroids. Scaling coefficients are not correlated with sample

  11. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities int he Enolase Superfamily: L-Talarate/Galactarate Dehydratase from Salmonella typhimurium LT2

    SciTech Connect

    Yew,W.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2007-01-01

    We assigned L-talarate dehydratase (TalrD) and galactarate dehydratase (GalrD) functions to a group of orthologous proteins in the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily, focusing our characterization on the protein encoded by the Salmonella typhimurium LT2 genome (GI:16766982; STM3697). Like the homologous mandelate racemase, L-fuconate dehydratase, and D-tartrate dehydratase, the active site of TalrD/GalrD contains a general acid/base Lys 197 at the end of the second {beta}-strand in the ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 7}{beta}-barrel domain, Asp 226, Glu 252, and Glu 278 as ligands for the essential Mg{sup 2+} at the ends of the third, fourth, and fifth {sup {beta}}-strands, a general acid/base His 328-Asp 301 dyad at the ends of the seventh and sixth {beta}-strands, and an electrophilic Glu 348 at the end of the eighth {beta}-strand. We discovered the function of STM3697 by screening a library of acid sugars; it catalyzes the efficient dehydration of both L-talarate (k{sub cat} = 2.1 s{sup -1}, k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 9.1 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}) and galactarate (k{sub cat} = 3.5 s{sup -1}, k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 1.1 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). Because L-talarate is a previously unknown metabolite, we demonstrated that S. typhimurium LT2 can utilize L-talarate as carbon source. Insertional disruption of the gene encoding STM3697 abolishes this phenotype; this disruption also diminishes, but does not eliminate, the ability of the organism to utilize galactarate as carbon source. The dehydration of L-talarate is accompanied by competing epimerization to galactarate; little epimerization to L-talarate is observed in the dehydration of galactarate. On the basis of (1) structures of the wild type enzyme complexed with L-lyxarohydroxamate, an analogue of the enolate intermediate, and of the K197A mutant complexed with L-glucarate, a substrate for exchange of the {alpha}-proton, and (2) incorporation of solvent deuterium into galactarate in competition with

  12. The GREGOR dome, pathfinder for the EST dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschlag, Robert H.; Kommers, Johannes N.; Visser, Simon; Bettonvil, Felix C. M.; van Schie, Anton G. M.; van Leverink, Simon J.; Sliepen, Guus; Jägers, Aswin P. L.

    2012-09-01

    The completely open-foldable dome of the GREGOR telescope is a further development of the DOT dome, respectively 9 and 7 meter in diameter. New technical developments are implemented and tested at the GREGOR dome, that are important for the design of the much larger dome for the EST, which will be 28 meter in diameter. The GREGOR dome is the first with more than one clamp working simultaneously for closing the dome and bringing the membranes on the required high tension for storm resistance. The storm Delta with 245 km/h 1-minute mean maximum at the location of the GREGOR gave no problems nor did the storms afterwards. Opening and closing experiences are up to wind speeds of 90 km/h without problems. Good observing circumstances never occur with higher wind speeds. A double layer of membranes is applied in the GREGOR construction whereas the DOT dome is equipped with a single layer. Simultaneous climate measurements inside and outside the dome have proven the thermal-insulation capability of this double-layer construction. The experiences with the GREGOR showed that the elongation by tensioning of the prestrained membrane material is much lower than originally expected. In the meantime, more strong and stiff membrane material is available and applied in the EST design. As a consequence, the clamps of the EST can have a relatively much shorter length and there is no need anymore for simultaneous operation of the clamps and the main actuators in low speed with help of a frequency inverter. The clamps can close after the main bow operation is finished, which simplifies the electrical control.

  13. Geodesic Domes in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Charles

    1978-01-01

    Some practical, hands-on ways in which ideas about geodesic domes can be used in secondary school mathematics are described. Instructions for constructing a one-frequency geodesic sphere are given. (MP)

  14. A Dome Amidst the Hexagons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes the design of the gymnasium of York (South Carolina) Comprehensive High School, a circular 12,000 square foot structure with a prefabricated domed roof constructed of steel hubs and curved wooden beams. (JG)

  15. Lateral subtalar dislocation: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Veltman, Ewout S; Steller, Ernst JA; Wittich, Philippe; Keizer, Jort

    2016-01-01

    A case of complicated lateral subtalar dislocation is presented and the literature concerning this injury is reviewed. Subtalar joint dislocations are rare and often the result of a high-energy trauma. Complications include avascular necrosis of the talus, infection, posttraumatic osteoarthritis requiring arthrodesis and chronic subtalar instability. Negative prognostic factors include lateral and complicated dislocations, total talar extrusions, and associated fractures. A literature search was performed to identify studies describing outcome after lateral subtalar joint dislocation. Eight studies including fifty patients could be included, thirty out of 50 patients suffered a complicated injury. Mean follow-up was fifty-five months. Ankle function was reported as good in all patients with closed lateral subtalar dislocation. Thirteen out of thirty patients with complicated lateral subtalar joint dislocation developed a complication. Avascular necrosis was present in nine patients with complicated injury. Four patients with complicated lateral subtalar dislocation suffered deep infection requiring treatment with antibiotics. In case of uncomplicated lateral subtalar joint dislocation, excellent functional outcome after closed reduction and immobilization can be expected. In case of complicated lateral subtalar joint dislocation immediate reduction, wound debridement and if necessary (external) stabilisation are critical. Up to fifty percent of patients suffering complicated injury are at risk of developing complications such as avascular talar necrosis and infection. PMID:27672576

  16. Lateral subtalar dislocation: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Veltman, Ewout S; Steller, Ernst Ja; Wittich, Philippe; Keizer, Jort

    2016-09-18

    A case of complicated lateral subtalar dislocation is presented and the literature concerning this injury is reviewed. Subtalar joint dislocations are rare and often the result of a high-energy trauma. Complications include avascular necrosis of the talus, infection, posttraumatic osteoarthritis requiring arthrodesis and chronic subtalar instability. Negative prognostic factors include lateral and complicated dislocations, total talar extrusions, and associated fractures. A literature search was performed to identify studies describing outcome after lateral subtalar joint dislocation. Eight studies including fifty patients could be included, thirty out of 50 patients suffered a complicated injury. Mean follow-up was fifty-five months. Ankle function was reported as good in all patients with closed lateral subtalar dislocation. Thirteen out of thirty patients with complicated lateral subtalar joint dislocation developed a complication. Avascular necrosis was present in nine patients with complicated injury. Four patients with complicated lateral subtalar dislocation suffered deep infection requiring treatment with antibiotics. In case of uncomplicated lateral subtalar joint dislocation, excellent functional outcome after closed reduction and immobilization can be expected. In case of complicated lateral subtalar joint dislocation immediate reduction, wound debridement and if necessary (external) stabilisation are critical. Up to fifty percent of patients suffering complicated injury are at risk of developing complications such as avascular talar necrosis and infection. PMID:27672576

  17. Lateral subtalar dislocation: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Veltman, Ewout S; Steller, Ernst JA; Wittich, Philippe; Keizer, Jort

    2016-01-01

    A case of complicated lateral subtalar dislocation is presented and the literature concerning this injury is reviewed. Subtalar joint dislocations are rare and often the result of a high-energy trauma. Complications include avascular necrosis of the talus, infection, posttraumatic osteoarthritis requiring arthrodesis and chronic subtalar instability. Negative prognostic factors include lateral and complicated dislocations, total talar extrusions, and associated fractures. A literature search was performed to identify studies describing outcome after lateral subtalar joint dislocation. Eight studies including fifty patients could be included, thirty out of 50 patients suffered a complicated injury. Mean follow-up was fifty-five months. Ankle function was reported as good in all patients with closed lateral subtalar dislocation. Thirteen out of thirty patients with complicated lateral subtalar joint dislocation developed a complication. Avascular necrosis was present in nine patients with complicated injury. Four patients with complicated lateral subtalar dislocation suffered deep infection requiring treatment with antibiotics. In case of uncomplicated lateral subtalar joint dislocation, excellent functional outcome after closed reduction and immobilization can be expected. In case of complicated lateral subtalar joint dislocation immediate reduction, wound debridement and if necessary (external) stabilisation are critical. Up to fifty percent of patients suffering complicated injury are at risk of developing complications such as avascular talar necrosis and infection.

  18. Radar topography of domes on planetary surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neish, C.D.; Lorenz, R.D.; Kirk, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of measuring the heights and morphology of viscously emplaced domes using radar imagery. We accurately reproduce the known height and shape of a terrestrial salt dome, and estimate the heights of several venusian pancake domes to within a factor of two. The terrestrial salt dome is consistent with a Bingham flow, while the much larger venusian pancake domes are consistent with a Newtonian flow. Applying the same techniques to Ganesa Macula, a potential cryovolcanic dome on Titan, we estimate a height between 2.0-4.9 km. Additional factors such as variable roughness and composition might account for some of the discrepancies observed. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc.

  19. Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2009-03-01

    A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes for strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

  20. Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon; Herrick, Courtney Grant

    2010-06-01

    A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes in strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of a storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

  1. 'Heat Dome' Heats Up United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160028.html 'Heat Dome' Heats Up United States Much of the country to ... July 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- As a massive "heat dome" stretches across the United States this week, ...

  2. The lunar Gruithuisen silicic extrusive domes: Topographic configuration, morphology, ages, and internal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, M. A.; Head, J. W.; Bystrov, A.

    2016-07-01

    alternated with possible explosive activity (fine-grained materials). The spatial association of the Gruithuisen domes with the highland lava plains resembles the situation in which bimodal volcanism occur on Earth. The terrestrial association can be due to either fractional crystallization in basaltic magma reservoirs or remelting of high-silica crustal materials. In the first case, the evolved melts appear in later stages of volcanic activity and in the second case these melts are formed near the beginning of evolution of the magmatic systems. The age estimates of the Gruithuisen domes and the surrounding volcanic plains are more consistent with the crustal remelting scenario. However, remelting of primary anorthositic crust cannot readily produce the silica-rich melts and requires the presence of pre-existing granite-like materials. Formation of the domes by fractional crystallization avoids this difficulty but requires explanation of the older age of the domes relative to the volcanic plains in the surroundings. A third option is that the domes are unrelated genetically to the mare deposits.

  3. The Effectiveness of Modified Vertical Dome Division Technique in Reducing Nasal Tip Projection in Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gandomi, Behrooz; Arzaghi, Mohammad Hossein; Rafatbakhsh, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Background: The technique of vertical dome division or tip defining, involves incising the lateral crura and vestibular skin at or lateral to the dome or tip defining point. The incision divides the lower lateral cartilage into a lateral segment and a medial segment, which are advanced anteriorly and sutured together to increase tip projection. The present study aimed at assessing a new vertical dome division, which is a modified version of vertical dome technique to decrease nasal tip projection, and increase or decrease nasal tip rotation and other tip deformities. Methods: The medical files of patients undergone rhinoplasty from 2003 to 2008 were retrospectively analyzed. The files were selected from a computerized rhinoplasty database of patients, who had been operated using a modified vertical dome technique and followed-up for one year or more after the surgery. Results: A total of 3756 patients were operated. Complications related to the nasal tip such as bossae, bifidity, persistent tip projection or tip asymmetry was seen in 81 patients (2.1%). Revisions for tip-related problems were performed in 42 patients (1.1%). Conclusions: The findings suggest that the modified vertical dome technique is an effective method for nasal tip deprojection and narrowing via an open approach. The length of follow-up and the large sample size support effectiveness of the technique. PMID:23359623

  4. Photogrammetric monitoring of lava dome growth during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diefenbach, Angela K.; Bull, Katharine F.; Wessels, Rick L.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2013-06-01

    The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, began with a phreatic explosion on 15 March followed by a series of at least 19 explosive events and growth and destruction of at least two, and likely three, lava domes between 22 March and 4 April. On 4 April explosive activity gave way to continuous lava effusion within the summit crater. We present an analysis of post-4 April lava dome growth using an oblique photogrammetry approach that provides a safe, rapid, and accurate means of measuring dome growth. Photogrammetric analyses of oblique digital images acquired during helicopter observation flights and fixed-wing volcanic gas surveys produced a series of digital elevation models (DEMs) of the lava dome from 16 April to 23 September. The DEMs were used to calculate estimates of volume and time-averaged extrusion rates and to quantify morphological changes during dome growth. Effusion rates ranged from a maximum of 35 m3 s- 1 during the initial two weeks to a low of 2.2 m3 s- 1 in early summer 2009. The average effusion rate from April to July was 9.5 m3 s- 1. Early, rapid dome growth was characterized by extrusion of blocky lava that spread laterally within the summit crater. In mid-to-late April the volume of the dome had reached 36 × 106 m3, roughly half of the total volume, and dome growth within the summit crater began to be limited by confining crater walls to the south, east, and west. Once the dome reached the steep, north-sloping gorge that breaches the crater, growth decreased to the south, but the dome continued to inflate and extend northward down the gorge. Effusion slowed during 16 April-1 May, but in early May the rate increased again. This rate increase was accompanied by a transition to exogenous dome growth. From mid-May to July the effusion rate consistently declined. The decrease is consistent with observations of reduced seismicity, gas emission, and thermal anomalies, as well as declining rates of geodetic deflation or inflation. These trends

  5. Salt dome discoveries mounting in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Ericksen, R.L.

    1996-06-17

    Exploratory drilling around piercement salt domes in Mississippi has met with a string of successes in recent months. Exploration of these salt features is reported to have been initiated through the review of non-proprietary, 2D seismic data and subsurface control. This preliminary data and work were then selectively upgraded by the acquisition of additional, generally higher quality, conventional 2D seismic lines. This current flurry of successful exploration and ensuing development drilling by Amerada Hess Corp. on the flanks of salt domes in Mississippi has resulted in a number of significant Hosston discoveries/producers at: Carson salt dome in Jefferson Davis County; Dry Creek salt dome in Covington County, Midway salt dome in lamar County, Monticello salt dome in Lawrence County, and Prentiss salt dome in Jefferson Davis County. The resulting production from these fields is gas and condensate, with wells being completed on 640 acre production units.

  6. What factors control superficial lava dome explosivity?

    PubMed Central

    Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Villemant, Benoît; Morgan, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Dome-forming eruption is a frequent eruptive style and a major hazard on numerous volcanoes worldwide. Lava domes are built by slow extrusion of degassed, viscous magma and may be destroyed by gravitational collapse or explosion. The triggering of lava dome explosions is poorly understood: here we propose a new model of superficial lava-dome explosivity based upon a textural and geochemical study (vesicularity, microcrystallinity, cristobalite distribution, residual water contents, crystal transit times) of clasts produced by key eruptions. Superficial explosion of a growing lava dome may be promoted through porosity reduction caused by both vesicle flattening due to gas escape and syn-eruptive cristobalite precipitation. Both processes generate an impermeable and rigid carapace allowing overpressurisation of the inner parts of the lava dome by the rapid input of vesiculated magma batches. The relative thickness of the cristobalite-rich carapace is an inverse function of the external lava dome surface area. Explosive activity is thus more likely to occur at the onset of lava dome extrusion, in agreement with observations, as the likelihood of superficial lava dome explosions depends inversely on lava dome volume. This new result is of interest for the whole volcanological community and for risk management. PMID:26420069

  7. Programmable shape transformation of elastic spherical domes.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Arif M; Braun, Paul V; Hsia, K Jimmy

    2016-07-20

    We investigate mismatch strain driven programmable shape transformation of spherical domes and report the effects of different geometric and structural characteristics on dome behavior in response to applied mismatch strain. We envision a bilayer dome design where the differential swelling of the inner layer with respect to the passive outer layer in response to changes in dome surroundings (such as the introduction of an organic solvent) introduces mismatch strain within the bilayer system and causes dome shape transformation. Finite element analysis reveals that, in addition to snap-through, spherical domes undergo bifurcation buckling and eventually gradual bending to morph into cylinders with increasing mismatch strain. Besides demonstrating how the snap-through energy barrier depends on the spherical dome shape, our analysis identifies three distinct groups of dome geometries based on their mismatch strain-transformed configuration relationships. Our experiments with polymer-based elastic bilayer domes that exhibit differential swelling in organic solvents qualitatively confirm the finite element predictions. We establish that, in addition to externally applied stimuli (mismatch strain), bilayer spherical dome morphing can be tuned and hence programmed through its geometry and structural characteristics. Incorporation of an elastic instability mechanism such as snap-through within the framework of stimuli-responsive functional devices can improve their response time which is otherwise controlled by diffusion. Hence, our proposed design guidelines can be used to realize deployable, multi-functional, reconfigurable, and therefore, adaptive structures responsive to a diverse set of stimuli across multiple length scales.

  8. A Radar Survey of Lunar Dome Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Lynn M.; Campbell, Bruce A.; Hawke, B. Ray; Bussey, Ben

    2011-01-01

    The near side of the Moon has several areas with a high concentration of volcanic domes. These low relief structures are considerably different in morphology from terrestrial cinder cones, and some of the domes may be similar to some terrestrial shields formed through Hawaiian or Strombolian eruptions from a central pipe vent or small fissure [1]. The domes are evidence that some volcanic lavas were more viscous than the mare flood basalts that make up most of the lunar volcanic flows. It is still not known what types of volcanism lead to the creation of specific domes, or how much dome formation may have varied across the Moon. Prior work has shown that some domes have unusual radar polarization characteristics that may indicate a surface or subsurface structure that is different from that of other domes. Such differences might result from different styles of late-stage volcanism for some of the domes, or possibly from differences in how the erupted materials were altered over time (e.g. by subsequent volcanism or nearby cratering events). For example, many of the domes in the Marius Hills region have high circular polarization ratios (CPRs) in S-band (12.6 cm wavelength) and/or P-band (70 cm wavelength) radar data [2]. The high CPRs are indicative of rough surfaces, and suggest that these domes may have been built from overlapping blocky flows that in some cases have been covered by meters of regolith [2, 3]. In other cases, domes have low circular polarization ratios indicative of smooth, rock-poor surfaces or possibly pyroclastics. The 12 km diameter dome Manilius 1 in Mare Vaporum [1], has a CPR value of 0.20, which is significantly below values for the surrounding basalts [4]. To better understand the range of surface properties and styles of volcanism associated with the lunar domes, we are currently surveying lunar dome fields including the Marius Hills, Cauchy/Jansen dome field, the Gruithuisen domes, and domes near Hortensius and Vitruvius.

  9. Sustainable Outreach: Lessons Learned from Space Update and Discovery Dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, P. H.; Sumners, C.; Law, C. C.

    2009-12-01

    A sustainable program lives on past its initial funding cycle, and develops a network of users that ensures continued life, either by fees, advertising revenue, or by making the program more successful in later sponsored grants. Teachers like free things, so having a sponsor for products such as lithographs or CD-Roms is key to wide distribution. In 1994 we developed “Space Update®”, under the NASA “Public Use of the Internet” program. It has new editions annually, with over 40,000 distributed so far (many purchased but most free at teacher and student workshops). In 1996 we created a special edition “Space Weather®”, which includes the space weather module from Space Update plus other resources. Initially developed with funding from the IMAGE mission, it is now sponsored by Cluster and MMS. A new edition is published annually and distributed in the “Sun-Earth Day” packet; total distribution now exceeds 180,000. “Earth Update” was created in 1999 under cooperative agreement “Museums Teaching Planet Earth”. It now has a total distribution of over 20,000. Both Earth Update and Space Update were developed to be museum kiosk software, and more than 15 museums have them on display. Over 4,000 users are active in our e-Teacher network and 577 in our museum educator network. Although these can certainly be considered successful because of their longevity and user base, we have had a far more dramatic sustainable program arise in the last six years… the “Discovery Dome®”. Invented at HMNS and developed under NASA Cooperative Agreement “Immersive Earth”, this dome was the first digital portable planetarium that also showed fulldome movies with an interactive interface (first shown to the public at the Dec 2003 AGU meeting). The Discovery Dome network (tinyurl.com/DiscDome) has spun those initial 6 NASA-funded domes into over 90 installations in 22 states and 23 countries. Creating high quality content is quite expensive and so needs

  10. The hydrothermal alteration of cooling lava domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Jessica L.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Calder, Eliza S.; Valentine, Greg A.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal alteration is a recognized cause of volcanic instability and edifice collapse, including that of lava domes or dome complexes. Alteration by percolating fluids transforms primary minerals in dome lavas to weaker secondary products such as clay minerals; moreover, secondary mineral precipitation can affect the porosity and permeability of dome lithologies. The location and intensity of alteration in a dome depend heavily on fluid pathways and availability in conjunction with heat supply. Here we investigate postemplacement lava dome weakening by hydrothermal alteration using a finite element numerical model of water migration in simplified dome geometries. This is combined with the rock alteration index (RAI) to predict zones of alteration and secondary mineral precipitation. Our results show that alteration potential is highest at the interface between the hot core of a lava dome and its clastic talus carapace. The longest lived alteration potential fields occur in domes with persistent heat sources and permeabilities that allow sufficient infiltration of water for alteration processes, but not so much that domes cool quickly. This leads us to conclude that alteration-induced collapses are most likely to be shallow seated and originate in the talus or talus/core interface in domes which have a sustained supply of magmatic heat. Mineral precipitation at these zones of permeability contrast could create barriers to fluid flow, potentially causing gas pressurization which might promote deeper seated and larger volume collapses. This study contributes to our knowledge of how hydrothermal alteration can affect lava domes and provides constraints on potential sites for alteration-related collapses, which can be used to target hazard monitoring.

  11. FIRST OBSERVATIONS OF A DOME-SHAPED LARGE-SCALE CORONAL EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE

    SciTech Connect

    Veronig, A. M.; Muhr, N.; Kienreich, I. W.; Temmer, M.; Vrsnak, B.

    2010-06-10

    We present first observations of a dome-shaped large-scale extreme-ultraviolet coronal wave, recorded by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager instrument on board STEREO-B on 2010 January 17. The main arguments that the observed structure is the wave dome (and not the coronal mass ejection, CME) are (1) the spherical form and sharpness of the dome's outer edge and the erupting CME loops observed inside the dome; (2) the low-coronal wave signatures above the limb perfectly connecting to the on-disk signatures of the wave; (3) the lateral extent of the expanding dome which is much larger than that of the coronal dimming; and (4) the associated high-frequency type II burst indicating shock formation low in the corona. The velocity of the upward expansion of the wave dome (v {approx} 650 km s{sup -1}) is larger than that of the lateral expansion of the wave (v {approx} 280 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the upward dome expansion is driven all the time, and thus depends on the CME speed, whereas in the lateral direction it is freely propagating after the CME lateral expansion stops. We also examine the evolution of the perturbation characteristics: first the perturbation profile steepens and the amplitude increases. Thereafter, the amplitude decreases with r {sup -2.5{+-}0.3}, the width broadens, and the integral below the perturbation remains constant. Our findings are consistent with the spherical expansion and decay of a weakly shocked fast-mode MHD wave.

  12. Rehabilitation and return-to-sports activity after debridement and bone marrow stimulation of osteochondral talar defects.

    PubMed

    van Eekeren, Inge C M; Reilingh, Mikel L; van Dijk, C Niek

    2012-10-01

    An osteochondral defect (OD) is a lesion involving the articular cartilage and the underlying subchondral bone. ODs of the talus can severely impact on the quality of life of patients, who are usually young and athletic. The primary treatment for ODs that are too small for fixation, consists of arthroscopic debridement and bone marrow stimulation. This article delineates levels of activity, determines times for return to activity and reviews the factors that affect rehabilitation after arthroscopic debridement and bone marrow stimulation of a talar OD. Articles for review were obtained from a search of the MEDLINE database up to January 2012 using the search headings 'osteochondral defects', 'bone marrow stimulation', 'sports/activity', 'rehabilitation', various other related factors and 'talus'. English-, Dutch- and German-language studies were evaluated.The review revealed that there is no consensus in the existing literature about rehabilitation times or return-to-sports activity times, after treatment with bone marrow stimulation of ODs in the talus. Furthermore, scant research has been conducted on these issues. The literature also showed that potential factors that aid rehabilitation could include youth, lower body mass index, smaller OD size, mobilization and treatment with growth factors, platelet-rich plasma, biphosphonates, hyaluronic acid and pulse electromagnetic fields. However, most studies have been conducted in vitro or on animals. We propose a scheme, whereby return-to-sports activity is divided into four phases of increasing intensity: walking, jogging, return to non-contact sports (running without swerving) and return to contact sports (running with swerving and collision). We also recommend that research, conducted on actual sportsmen, of recovery times after treatment of talar ODs is warranted.

  13. Arthroscopic Excision of Bone Fragments in a Neglected Fracture of the Lateral Process of the Talus in a Junior Soccer Player

    PubMed Central

    Funasaki, Hiroki; Kato, Soki; Hayashi, Hiroteru; Marumo, Keishi

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of the lateral process of the talus are uncommon and often overlooked. Typically, they are found in adult snowboarders. We report the case of an 11-year-old male soccer player who complained of lateral ankle pain after an inversion injury 6 months earlier. He did not respond to conservative treatment and thus underwent arthroscopic excision of fragments of the talar lateral process. The ankle was approached through standard medial and anterolateral portals. A 2.7-mm-diameter 30° arthroscope was used. Soft tissues around the talus were cleared with a motorized shaver, and the lateral aspect of the talar process was then visualized. The lateral process presented as an osseous overgrowth, and a loose body was impinged between the talus and the calcaneus. The osseous overgrowth was resected piece by piece with a punch, and the loose body was removed en block. The patient returned to soccer 5 weeks after the operation. This case exemplifies 2 important points: (1) This type of fracture can develop even in children and not only in snowboarders. (2) Arthroscopic excision of talar lateral process fragments can be accomplished easily, and return to sports can be achieved in a relatively short time. PMID:25126497

  14. Seismicity associated with dome growth and collapse at the Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, A.D.; Stewart, R.C.; White, R.A.; Luckett, R.; Baptie, B.J.; Aspinall, W.P.; Latchman, J.L.; Lynch, L.L.; Voight, B.

    1998-01-01

    Varied seismicity has accompanied growth and collapse of the lava dome of the Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat. Earthquakes have been classified as either volcano-tectonic, long-period or hybrid, and daily variations in the numbers of events have mapped changes in the style of eruption. Repetitive hybrid earthquakes were common during the first months of dome growth. In July 1996 the style of seismicity changed and regular short-lived hybrid earthquake swarms became common. This change was probably caused by an increase in the magma flux. Earthquake swarms have preceded almost all major dome collapses, and have accompanied cyclical deformation, thought to be due to a built-up of pressure in the upper conduit which is later released by magma moving into the dome.Varied seismicity has accompanied growth and collapse of the lava dome of the Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat. Earthquakes have been classified as either volcano-tectonic, long-period or hybrid, and daily variations in the numbers of events have mapped changes in the style of eruption. Repetitive hybrid earthquakes were common during the first months of dome growth. In July 1996 the style of seismicity changed and regular, short-lived hybrid earthquake swarms became common. This change was probably caused by an increase in the magma flux. Earthquake swarms have preceded almost all major dome collapses, and have accompanied cyclical deformation, thought to be due to a build-up of pressure in the upper conduit which is later released by magma moving into the dome.

  15. Dome cities for extreme environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Raymond S.; Schwartz, Milton

    1992-01-01

    Extreme environments whether they be the frigid nights of the polar regions, the burning sands of the desert, or the harsh environment of space pose interesting challenges to the architect, the engineer, and the constructor in their efforts to create habitats for mankind. In space, the goals are to provide radiation protection while also providing an aesthetic living environment for long duration missions. Because of the need to provide both radiation protection and options for expansion of base facilities, a unique structural system which separates the radiation protection systems from the pressure envelope of the habitats was created. The system uses cable networks in a tensioned structural system, which supports the lunar regolith used for shielding above the facilities. The system is modular, easily expandable, and simple to construct. Additional innovations include the use of rock melting perpetrators for piles and anchoring deadmen, and various sized craters to provide side shielding. The reflective properties of the fabric used in the membrane are utilized to provide diffuse illumination. The use of craters along with the suspended shielding allows the dome to be utilized in fashions similar to those proposed by various designers unaware of the Moon's hostile radiation environment. Additional topics addressed deal with construction techniques for large domes, i.e., on the order of 100's to 1000's of meters, thermal control, the integration of tertiary water treatment schemes with architectural design, human factors, and its implications for the design of habitats for long term use in extreme environments.

  16. Environmental assessment: Richton Dome site, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Richton Dome site in Mississippi as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Richton Dome site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. The site is in the Gulf interior region, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains two other potentially acceptable sites--the Cypress Creek Dome site in Mississippi and the Vacherie Dome site in Louisiana. Although the Cypress Creek Dome and the Vacherie Dome sites are suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Richton Dome site is the preferred site in the Gulf interior region. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Richton Dome site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  17. Environmental assessment: Richton Dome Site, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Richton Dome site in Mississippi as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Richton Dome site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. The site is in the Gulf interior region, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains two other potentially acceptable sites--the Cypress Creek Dome site in Mississippi and the Vacherie Dome site in Louisiana. Although the Cypress Creek Dome and the Vacherie Dome sites are suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Richton Dome site is the preferred site in the Gulf interior region. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Richton Dome site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  18. Submarine Analogs to Venusian Pancake Domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, Nathan T.

    1995-01-01

    The morphology and dimensions of the large diameter, steep-sided, flat-topped "pancake domes" on Venus make them unlike any type of terrestrial subaerial volcano. Comparisons between images of Hawaiian seamounts and pancake domes show similarities in shapes and secondary features. The morphometry of pancake domes is closer to that of Pacific seamounts than subaerial lava domes. Considering both morphology and morphometry, seamounts seem a better analog to the pancake domes. The control of volatile exsolution by pressure on Venus and the seafloor can cause lavas to have similar viscosities and densities, although the latter will be counteracted by high buoyancy underwater. However, analogous effects of the Venusian and seafloor alone are probably not sufficient to produce similar volcanoes. Rather, Venusian lavas of various compositions may behave like basalt on the seafloor if appropriate rates and modes of extrusion and planetary thermal structure are also considered.

  19. Phenocryst fragments in rhyolitic lavas and lava domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, S. R.; McPhie, J.

    2003-08-01

    Although rhyolitic lavas and lava domes are characterised by evenly porphyritic textures, not all the phenocrysts are whole euhedra. We undertook image analysis of 46 rhyolitic lava and lava dome samples to determine the abundance and shape of quartz and feldspar phenocryst fragments. Phenocryst fragments were identified in nearly all samples. On average, fragments amount to ˜5% of the total phenocryst population, or ˜0.5 modal%. The abundance of fragments in lavas and lava domes is not related to the groundmass texture (whether vesicular, flow banded, massive, glassy or crystalline), nor to distance from source. Fragments are, however, more abundant in samples with higher phenocryst contents. The phenocryst fragments in rhyolitic lavas and lava domes are mainly medium to large (0.5-3.5 mm), almost euhedral crystals with only a small portion removed, or chunky, equant, subhedral fragments, and occur in near-jigsaw-fit or clast-rotated pairs or groups. The fragments probably formed in response to decompression of large melt inclusions. Shear during laminar flow then dismembered the phenocrysts; continued laminar shear separated and rotated the fragments. Fractures probably formed preferentially along weaknesses in the phenocrysts, such as zones of melt inclusions, cleavage planes and twin composition planes. Rare splintery fragments are also present, especially within devitrified domains. Splinters are attributed to comminution of solid lava adjacent to fractures that were later healed. For comparison, we measured crystal abundance in a further 12 rhyolite samples that include block and ash flow deposits and ignimbrite. Phenocryst fragments within clasts in the block and ash flow samples showed similar shapes and abundances to those fragments within the lava and lava domes. Crystal fragments are much more abundant in ignimbrite (exceeding 67% of the crystal population) however, and dominated by small, equant, anhedral chunks or splinters. The larger crystals in

  20. Identification, distribution and significance of lunar volcanic domes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. I.

    1973-01-01

    Over 300 previously unrecognized volcanic domes were identified on Lunar Orbiter photographs using the following criteria: (1) the recognition of land forms on the Moon similar in morphology to terrestrial volcanic domes, (2) structural control, (3) geomorphic discordance, and (4) the recognition of land forms modified by dome-like swellings. Many terrestrial volcanic domes are similar in morphology to lunar domes. This analogy suggests that some lunar hills are in fact extrusive volcanic domes. Many of the domes identified in this paper seem to be related to basins and craters, and with the exception of local tectonic grid control few domes are related to any observable Moon-wide pattern.

  1. A comparison between semi-spheroid- and dome-shaped quantum dots coupled to wetting layer

    SciTech Connect

    Shahzadeh, Mohammadreza; Sabaeian, Mohammad

    2014-06-15

    During the epitaxial growth method, self-assembled semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots (QDs) are formed on the wetting layer (WL). However for sake of simplicity, researchers sometimes assume semi-spheroid-shaped QDs to be dome-shaped (hemisphere). In this work, a detailed and comprehensive study on the difference between electronic and transition properties of dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots is presented. We will explain why the P-to-S intersubband transition behaves the way it does. The calculated results for intersubband P-to-S transition properties of quantum dots show two different trends for dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots. The results are interpreted using the probability of finding electron inside the dome/spheroid region, with emphasis on the effects of wetting layer. It is shown that dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots feature different electronic and transition properties, arising from the difference in lateral dimensions between dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped QDs. Moreover, an analogy is presented between the bound S-states in the quantum dots and a simple 3D quantum mechanical particle in a box, and effective sizes are calculated. The results of this work will benefit researchers to present more realistic models of coupled QD/WL systems and explain their properties more precisely.

  2. Arc jet testing of a Dynasil dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrell, Jack O.; Strobel, Forrest A.

    1999-07-01

    Arc jet testing of the Hera modified ballistic reentry vehicle - 1E (MBRV-1E) nosetip was conducted in June of 1998. The tests were conducted in the Air Force's Arnold Engineering Development Center HEAT-H1 arc plasma test facility in Tullahoma, Tennessee. The MBRV-1 vehicle is a separating short- to medium-range target. The MBRV-1E nosetip incorporates a custom designed quartz dome that is integrated into the nosetip stagnation region. The dome was bonded to the baseline nosetip material, a well characterized carbon-carbon composite material, using a silica based ceramic bond materials. The objectives of the test were to demonstrate the thermal performance and structural integrity of the nosetip design by exposing tip to arc plasma-heated flow simulating the reentry flight environment. Pre-test analysis of the Dynasil dome performed using finite element analysis predicted the dome would survive the test conditions with no failures. Post-test inspection of the dome revealed a hard, opaque coating on the outer surface of the dome. Once removed, the dome was shown to have numerous surface cracks near the stagnation region. In addition to the surface cracks, significant pitting on the surface was observed through both an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope. Post-test analyses were performed to determine the cause of these surface cracks. It was concluded that the cracks occurred during cooldown, and were a result of significant strength degradation which was caused by the surface pitting.

  3. Subsidence and collapse at Texas Salt Domes

    SciTech Connect

    Mullican, W.F.

    1989-01-01

    This book provides a description of the mechanisms and extent of natural and man-induced subsidence and collapse at Texas salt domes. In the Houston diapir province, Frasch mining has caused subsidence bowls and collapse sinkholes at 12 of the 14 sulfur-productive domes. Understanding the structural and hydrologic instability that results at the surface and subsurface is crucial in evaluating the suitability of salt domes as repositories for waste disposal. Part of the Bureau's Coastal Salt Dome Program, this study used aerial photographs, remote-sensing methods, historical and modern topographic maps, and field checks to detect subsidence and collapse associated with natural salt diapiric processes and commercial resource recovery and to determine which processes are likely to reduce the stability and integrity of hydrologic and structural barriers around salt diapirs. Figures and tables illustrating the extent and evolution of subsidence and collapse, along with photographs showing their effects, highlight the text discussion of the salt domes detailed in this study-Boling, Orchard, Moss Bluff, Spindletop, Hoskins Mound, Fannett, Long Point, Nash, High Island, Bryan Mound, Clemens, and Gulf. The author concludes that Frasch sulfur mining from cap rocks causes the most catastrophic subsidence and collapse and that subsidence over salt domes includes processes ranging from trough subsidence to various types of subsurface caving. He concludes that salt domes characterized by subsidence and collapse are unfavorable sites for storage/disposal of hazardous wastes.

  4. Eruptive Variations During the Emplacement of Cerro Pinto, an Ambitious Rhyolite Dome, Puebla, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, B.; Riggs, N.; Carrasco-Nunez, G.

    2006-12-01

    Cerro Pinto is a rhyolite dome complex located in the eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. The complex is composed of four tuff rings and four domes that were emplaced in three distinct eruptive stages marked by changes in vent location and eruptive character. Each of these stages contained eruptive sequences that follow simple rhyolite-dome models, in which a pyroclastic phase is followed immediately by effusive dome emplacement. However, some aspects of the eruptive history, such as the occurrence of explosive reactivation and dome destruction through a lateral blast are uncommon in small rhyolitic structures and are more commonly associated with polygenetic structures, such as stratovolcanoes or calderas. In these larger structures, new pulses of magma often initiate reactivation, but at Cerro Pinto the story is different. Major and trace element geochemistry suggest that Cerro Pinto was sourced by a small, isolated magma chamber, unassociated with any surrounding silicic centers and did not experience any change in chemical composition over the course of the eruption. Based on these data and field observations, it is inferred that Cerro Pinto's eruptive variations were not the result of the influx of a new magma batch, but were the result of both phreatomagmatic interactions and the presence of a small magma chamber that was zoned with respect to volatiles. Both of these factors are commonly encountered in volcanologic studies, but documentation of their influence on smaller structures is under represented. Rhyolite domes have long been considered relatively simple volcanic structures with only localized hazard implications. However, the eruptive variations displayed by Cerro Pinto suggest that isolated rhyolite dome evolutions can be much more complex with the potential for explosive reactivation and dome collapse; events that must be taken into consideration when making hazard assessments.

  5. Emplacement Scenarios for Volcanic Domes on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Steve M.; Stofan, Ellen R.

    2012-01-01

    One key to understanding the history of resurfacing on Venus is better constraints on the emplacement timescales for the range of volcanic features visible on the surface. A figure shows a Magellan radar image and topography for a putative lava dome on Venus. 175 such domes have been identified with diameters ranging from 19 - 94 km, and estimated thicknesses as great as 4 km. These domes are thought to be volcanic in origin and to have formed by the flow of viscous fluid (i.e., lava) on the surface.

  6. Pressure Dome for High-Pressure Electrolyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Timothy; Schmitt, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    A high-strength, low-weight pressure vessel dome was designed specifically to house a high-pressure [2,000 psi (approx. = 13.8 MPa)] electrolyzer. In operation, the dome is filled with an inert gas pressurized to roughly 100 psi (approx. = 690 kPa) above the high, balanced pressure product oxygen and hydrogen gas streams. The inert gas acts to reduce the clamping load on electrolyzer stack tie bolts since the dome pressure acting axially inward helps offset the outward axial forces from the stack gas pressure. Likewise, radial and circumferential stresses on electrolyzer frames are minimized. Because the dome is operated at a higher pressure than the electrolyzer product gas, any external electrolyzer leak prevents oxygen or hydrogen from leaking into the dome. Instead the affected stack gas stream pressure rises detectably, thereby enabling a system shutdown. All electrical and fluid connections to the stack are made inside the pressure dome and require special plumbing and electrical dome interfaces for this to be accomplished. Further benefits of the dome are that it can act as a containment shield in the unlikely event of a catastrophic failure. Studies indicate that, for a given active area (and hence, cell ID), frame outside diameter must become ever larger to support stresses at higher operating pressures. This can lead to a large footprint and increased costs associated with thicker and/or larger diameter end-plates, tie-rods, and the frames themselves. One solution is to employ rings that fit snugly around the frame. This complicates stack assembly and is sometimes difficult to achieve in practice, as its success is strongly dependent on frame and ring tolerances, gas pressure, and operating temperature. A pressure dome permits an otherwise low-pressure stack to operate at higher pressures without growing the electrolyzer hardware. The pressure dome consists of two machined segments. An O-ring is placed in an O-ring groove in the flange of the bottom

  7. Environmental assessment overview: Richton Dome site, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Richton Dome site in Mississippi as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Richton Dome site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The site is in the Gulf interior region, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Richton Dome site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Richton Dome site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. 3 figs.

  8. 'Heat Dome' Not Budging Until Week's End

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160083.html 'Heat Dome' Not Budging Until Week's End Eastern part of country still in its ... not be budging before the end of the week, weather forecasters said Tuesday. "With no strong pushes ...

  9. Yukimarimo at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petenko, Igor

    2015-04-01

    Natural frostballs called "yukimarimo" were observed at at Dome C, Antarctica, during the winter of 2014. Frostballs have spheroidal or lightly oblate form. Four cases of the yukimarimo were observed in the period April - August. The characteristics concerning their sizes, density, distribution over the surface varied for different cases. The diameters ranged from several millimetres to 120 mm, the density ranged from 15 to 60 kg/m3 . The heaviest one weighted 14 g and had a diameter of ≈90 mm. The initial "material" from which they formed resembles candy floss or fluff. In one case, only the initial stage of the small-yukimarimo formation was observed; the further development was interrupted. The meteorological conditions observed diuring the yukimarimo were not particular. The near-surface temperature varied between -70° and -60°C. Winds favouring to the yukimarimo formation were low, but not less than 2 m/s^1. A two-step mechanism of their formation and development is assumed: 1) at the initial stage, an electrostatic attraction favours the clumping of ice crystals to form some ice mass resembling floss structured in spherical pieces; 2) some pieces of ice floss are rolled by the wind and collect more ice crystals and increase in size like to a tumbleweed. Special comprehensive studies of electrical properties of the frost during the initial stage are necessary. Videos of moving yukimarimo at different stages of their formation are available.

  10. The design research of a spinel dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongwei; Hou, Tianjin; Zhu, Bin; Huang, Qiu; Gao, Zhifeng

    2011-08-01

    Based on the aerodynamic heating simulated results of a spinel middle-infrared (Mid IR) image guide missile dome flying at supersonic speed, a series of experiments are made and some methods of eliminating aero-heating effect are carried out successfully. First, a simulation experiment on the ground discarding an outside protective shell of a spinel dome is accomplished in order to inspect the withstanding impact ability of the dome. Second, an arc wind tunnel experiment is fulfilled to obtain thermal mechanics characteristic of the spinel dome, and a method to buildup obviously mechanics intensity is approved which is coating diamond protective layer on the external wall of the spinel dome. Third, two heated dome imaging experiments on the ground are made to study the aero-optical phenomenon. Finally, a rocket sled experiment of a guide missile head is made successfully. Experimental results show that when the guide missile head flies in a supersonic, by adjusting the frame integration time of detector etc. the aero-optic effect would decrease greatly.

  11. DOME-SHAPED EUV WAVES FROM ROTATING ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Selwa, M.; Poedts, S.; DeVore, C. R. E-mail: stefaan.poedts@wis.kuleuven.be

    2012-03-10

    Recent STEREO observations enabled the study of the properties of EUV waves in more detail. They were found to have a three-dimensional (3D) dome-shaped structure. We investigate, by means of 3D MHD simulations, the formation of EUV waves as the result of the interaction of twisted coronal magnetic loops. The numerical simulation is initialized with an idealized dipolar active region and is performed under coronal (low {beta}) conditions. A sheared rotational motion is applied to the central parts of both the positive and negative flux regions at the photosphere so that the flux tubes in between them become twisted. We find that the twisting motion results in a dome-shaped structure followed in space by a dimming and in time by an energy release (flare). The rotation of the sunspots is the trigger of the wave which initially consists of two fronts that later merge together. The resulting EUV wave propagates nearly isotropically on the disk and {approx}2 times faster in the upward direction. The initial stage of the evolution is determined by the driver, while later the wave propagates freely with a nearly Alfvenic speed.

  12. Dome, Sweet Dome--Geodesic Structures Teach Math, Science, and Technology Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shackelford, Ray; Fitzgerald, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Today, geodesic domes are found on playgrounds, homes, over radar installations, storage facilities, at Disney's Epcot Center, and at World's Fairs. The inventor of the design, Buckminster Fuller, thought that geodesic domes could be used to cover large areas and even designed one to cover all of New York's Manhattan Island. This article details…

  13. Statistical forecasting of repetitious dome failures during the waning eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, February-April 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, R.A.; Lahr, J.C.; Chouet, B.A.; Power, J.A.; Stephens, C.D.

    1994-01-01

    successful forecasts and two false alarms; no events would have been missed. On closer examination, the intervals between successive dome failures are not uniform but tend to increase with time. This increase attests to the continuous, slowly decreasing supply of magma to the surface vent during the waning phase of the eruption. The domes formed in a precarious position in a breach in the summit crater rim where they were susceptible to gravitational collapse. The instability of the February 15-April 21 domes relative to the earlier domes is attributed to reaming the lip of the vent by a laterally directed explosion during the major dome-destroying eruption of February 15, a process which would leave a less secure foundation for subsequent domes. ?? 1994.

  14. Dome forming eruptions: a global hazards database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogburn, S. E.; Loughlin, S.; Calder, E. S.; Ortiz, N.

    2009-12-01

    The analysis of global datasets of historical eruptions is a powerful tool for decision-making as well as for scientific discovery. Lava dome forming eruptions are common throughout the world, can extend for significant periods of time and have many associated hazards, thus providing a rich source of data to mine. A database on dome forming eruptions is under development with the view to aiding comparative studies, providing scientists with valuable data for analysis, and enabling advances in modeling of associated hazards. For new eruptive episodes in particular, and in the absence of monitoring data or a knowledge of a volcano’s eruptive history, global analysis can provide a method of understanding what might be expected based on similar eruptions in the past. Important scientific information has already been gleaned from disparate collections of dome-forming eruption hazard information, such as variation in the mobility of different types of pyroclastic flows, magma ascent and extrusion dynamics, and mechanisms of lava dome collapse. Further, modeling (both empirically-based and geophysically-based) of volcanic phenomena requires extensive data for development, calibration and validation. This study investigates the relationship between large explosive eruptions (VEI ≥ 4) and lava dome-growth from 1000 CE to present by development of a world-wide database of all relevant information, including dome growth duration, pauses between episodes of dome growth, and extrusion rates. Data sources include the database of volcanic activity maintained by the Smithsonian Institute (Global Volcanism Program) and all relevant published review papers, research papers and reports. For example, nearly all dome-forming eruptions have been associated with some level of explosive activity. Most explosions are vulcanian with eruption plumes reaching less than 15 km, and with a Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) <3. However large Plinian explosions with a VEI ≥ 4 can also occur

  15. Holodeck: Telepresence Dome Visualization System Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hite, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the simulation and consideration of different image-projection strategies for the Holodeck, a dome that will be used for highly immersive telepresence operations in future endeavors of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Its visualization system will include a full 360 degree projection onto the dome's interior walls in order to display video streams from both simulations and recorded video. Because humans innately trust their vision to precisely report their surroundings, the Holodeck's visualization system is crucial to its realism. This system will be rigged with an integrated hardware and software infrastructure-namely, a system of projectors that will relay with a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and computer to both project images onto the dome and correct warping in those projections in real-time. Using both Computer-Aided Design (CAD) and ray-tracing software, virtual models of various dome/projector geometries were created and simulated via tracking and analysis of virtual light sources, leading to the selection of two possible configurations for installation. Research into image warping and the generation of dome-ready video content was also conducted, including generation of fisheye images, distortion correction, and the generation of a reliable content-generation pipeline.

  16. Geology of Damon Mound Salt Dome, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.W.

    1989-01-01

    Geological investigation of the stratigraphy, cap-rock characteristics, deformation and growth history, and growth rate of a shallow coastal diapir. Damon Mound salt dome, located in Brazoria County, has salt less than 600 feet and cap rock less than 100 feet below the surface; a quarry over the dome provides excellent exposures of cap rock as well as overlying Oligocene to Pleistocene strata. These conditions make it ideal as a case study for other coastal diapirs that lack bedrock exposures. Such investigations are important because salt domes are currently being considered by chemical waste disposal companies as possible storage and disposal sites. In this book, the author reviews previous research, presents additional data on the subsurface and surface geology at Damon Mound, and evaluates Oligocene to post-Pleistocene diapir growth.

  17. Environmental assessment, Richton Dome site, Mississippi (US)

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 USC Sections 10101-10226) requires the environmental assessment of a potential site to include a statement of the basis for the nomination of a site as suitable for characterization. Volume 2 of this environmental assessment provides a detailed evaluation of the Richton Dome Site and its suitability as the site for a radioactive waste disposal facility under DOE siting guidelines, as well as a comparison of the Richton Dome site with other proposed sites. Evaluation of the Richton Dome site is based on the reference repository design, but the evaluation will not change if based on the Mission Plan repository concept. The comparative evaluation of proposed sites is required under DOE guidelines, but is not intended to directly support the subsequent recommendation of three sites for characterization as candidate sites. 428 refs., 24 figs., 62 tabs. (MHB)

  18. Internal ballistics model update for ASRM dome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, Mark H.; Jenkins, Billy Z.

    1991-01-01

    A previous report (no. 5-32279, contract NAS8-36955, DO 51) describes the measures taken to adapt the NASA Complex Burning Region Model and code so that is was applicable to the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor as envisioned at that time. The code so modified was called the CBRM-A. CBRM-A could calculate the port volume and burning area for the star, transition, and cylindrically perforated regions of the motor. Described here is a subsequent effort to add computation of port volume and burning area for the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor head dome. Sample output, input, and overview of the models are included. The software was configured in two forms - a stand alone head dome code and a code integrating the head dome solution with the CBRM-A.

  19. Mobility of the ankle joint: recording of rotatory movements in the talocrural joint in vitro with and without the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, O; Tovborg-Jensen, I

    1982-02-01

    A method for graphic recording of rotatory movements in osteoligamentous ankle preparations is described. By this method it is possible to record characteristic mobility patterns in two planes at the same time. The ankle is affected by a known torque, so that the individual mobility patterns are reproducible with unchanged condition of the ligaments. Six amputated legs were investigated in the sagittal and horizontal planes and another six in the sagittal and frontal planes. Mobility patterns were recorded with intact ligaments and after successive cutting of the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle in the anteroposterior direction. In the sagittal plane increased dorsiflexion was observed after total cutting of the lateral ligaments, while plantar flexion remained unchanged. In the horizontal plane the internal rotation of the talus increased in step with increasing injury to the ligament, particularly when the ankle was plantar flexed. When all collateral ligaments had been cut, an increase in external rotation occurred, especially in dorsiflexion. In the frontal plane the talar tilt increased gradually with increasing injury to the ligaments. Talar tilt was at a maximum in the neutral position of the ankle or in plantar flexion. After total severing of the collateral ligaments, however, talar tilt was most marked in dorsiflexion of the ankle.

  20. The longevity of lava dome eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolpert, Robert L.; Ogburn, Sarah E.; Calder, Eliza S.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the duration of past, ongoing, and future volcanic eruptions is an important scientific goal and a key societal need. We present a new methodology for forecasting the duration of ongoing and future lava dome eruptions based on a database (DomeHaz) recently compiled by the authors. The database includes duration and composition for 177 such eruptions, with "eruption" defined as the period encompassing individual episodes of dome growth along with associated quiescent periods during which extrusion pauses but unrest continues. In a key finding, we show that probability distributions for dome eruption durations are both heavy tailed and composition dependent. We construct objective Bayesian statistical models featuring heavy-tailed Generalized Pareto distributions with composition-specific parameters to make forecasts about the durations of new and ongoing eruptions that depend on both eruption duration to date and composition. Our Bayesian predictive distributions reflect both uncertainty about model parameter values (epistemic uncertainty) and the natural variability of the geologic processes (aleatoric uncertainty). The results are illustrated by presenting likely trajectories for 14 dome-building eruptions ongoing in 2015. Full representation of the uncertainty is presented for two key eruptions, Soufriére Hills Volcano in Montserrat (10-139 years, median 35 years) and Sinabung, Indonesia (1-17 years, median 4 years). Uncertainties are high but, importantly, quantifiable. This work provides for the first time a quantitative and transferable method and rationale on which to base long-term planning decisions for lava dome-forming volcanoes, with wide potential use and transferability to forecasts of other types of eruptions and other adverse events across the geohazard spectrum.

  1. After-Hours Science: Gee, A Dome!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, John G.

    1984-01-01

    Nature's Classroom (Southbridge, MA), which provides field experiences, academic classes, and activities in the natural sciences, has been recognized as an outstanding program by the National Science Teachers Association's Search for Excellence in Science Education project. Various program activities (including building a geodesic dome) are…

  2. Dome Storage of Farmer Stock Peanuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The small-scale farmer stock storage research facility at the National Peanut Research Laboratory in Dawson, GA consisting of four warehouses and four monolithic domes was used to conduct a 3-yr study looking at the effects of storing peanuts through the summer months following harvest. The study wa...

  3. Geodesic Dome Activity Provides Serious Fun!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Richard

    2009-01-01

    After the author's class completed last year's 44'-long timber-framed covered bridge project, he was pondering what other learning challenge he could pose to his students. He came across an article on geodesic dome construction in the September 2007 issue of "Tech Directions" and, he had his answer. In this article, the author and his students…

  4. The Urban Dust Dome: A Demonstration Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Ralph D.

    1973-01-01

    Working plans for an inexpensive urban dust dome model are presented together with some generalizations about urban atmosphere pollution. Theories and principles of atmospheric pollution which are introduced can be made meaningful to elementary students through classroom use of this model. (SM)

  5. 4. TURNOUT AND RETAINING WALL AT BASE OF TURTLEBACK DOME. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. TURNOUT AND RETAINING WALL AT BASE OF TURTLEBACK DOME. FACING EAST AT VIEW OF YOSEMITE VALLEY; EL CAPITAN ON LEFT, HALF DOME AT CENTER AND SENTINEL DOME AT LEFT REAR. POST AT LOWER LEFT MARKED 'W3' IS MARKER FOR SELF GUIDED TOUR TO PARK. - Wawona Road, Between South Entrance & Yosemite Valley, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  6. 49 CFR 178.255-3 - Expansion domes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Expansion domes. 178.255-3 Section 178.255-3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Portable Tanks § 178.255-3 Expansion domes. (a) Expansion domes, if applied, must have a minimum...

  7. 49 CFR 178.255-3 - Expansion domes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Expansion domes. 178.255-3 Section 178.255-3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Portable Tanks § 178.255-3 Expansion domes. (a) Expansion domes, if applied, must have a minimum...

  8. 49 CFR 178.255-3 - Expansion domes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Expansion domes. 178.255-3 Section 178.255-3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Portable Tanks § 178.255-3 Expansion domes. (a) Expansion domes, if applied, must have a minimum...

  9. 49 CFR 178.255-3 - Expansion domes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Expansion domes. 178.255-3 Section 178.255-3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Portable Tanks § 178.255-3 Expansion domes. (a) Expansion domes, if applied, must have a minimum...

  10. 49 CFR 178.255-3 - Expansion domes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Expansion domes. 178.255-3 Section 178.255-3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Specifications for Portable Tanks § 178.255-3 Expansion domes. (a) Expansion domes, if applied, must have...

  11. Tephra deposits associated with a large lava dome collapse, Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, 12 15 July 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, Marie; Herd, Richard A.; Strutt, Michael H.

    2006-05-01

    The 12-13 July 2003 dome collapse at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, was the largest event of its kind during the eruption thus far (1995-2005), involving the removal of 210 million m 3 of the lava dome complex over 18 h. Less than 2% of the total volume of material involved in the dome collapse was deposited on land. A pyroclastic density current deposit alongshore and inland from the Tar River Fan was generated from a single blast originating at the shoreline. The blast was caused by the interaction of pyroclastic flows with seawater. We propose that at the peak of the lava dome collapse, a sharp increase in the volume flux of pyroclastic flows caused substantial displacement of seawater from the shoreline, followed by inrush of seawater when the flux decreased a few minutes later. The tsunami allowed penetration of seawater into the main body of the pyroclastic flow at the shoreline, which led to explosive fragmentation of pyroclastic blocks. Tephra fall deposits accumulated at a high rate on Montserrat, causing extensive damage to vegetation and buildings. Their stratigraphy recorded fallout from high co-pyroclastic flow clouds, from a vulcanian explosion cloud at the peak in collapse rate (caused by the fragmentation of degassed lava dome) and from four vulcanian explosion clouds after the dome collapse (caused by fragmentation of bubbly magma in the conduit). The total tephra fall volume is estimated at 10-20 million m 3.

  12. Finite Element Model of a Two-Phase Non-Newtonian Thixotropic Fluid: Mount St. Helens Lava Dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, P.; Zevada, P.

    2011-12-01

    Extrusion of highly viscous lavas that spread laterally and form lava domes in the craters of large volcanoes is associated with significant volcanic hazards. Gas overpressure driven fragmentation of the lava dome or collapse and slumping of marginal sections or the entire mass of the dome can trigger dangerous pyroclastic flows that threaten surrounding populations up to tens of kilometers away. The rate of lava dome growth in the mature state of the dome evolution is often oscillatory. Relatively quiescent episodes are terminated by renewed extrusion and emplacement of exogenous "lobes" or "spines" of lava on the surface of the dome. Emplacement of new lobes is preceded by pressurization of magma in the magmatic conduit that can trigger volcanic eruptions and is preceded by crater floor deformation (e.g. Swanson and Holcombe, 1990). This oscillatory behavior was previously attributed primarily to crystallization kinetics and gas exsolution generating cyclic overpressure build-ups. Analogue modeling of the lava domes has revealed that the oscillatory growth rate can be reproduced by extrusion of isothermal, pseudoplastic and thixotropic plaster of Paris (analogue material for the magma) on a sand layer (analogue material for the unconsolidated deposits of the crater floor). The patterns of dome growth of these models closely correspond to both the 1980-1985 and 2004-2005 growth episodes of Mt. St. Helens lava dome (Swanson and Holcombe, 1990; Major et al., 2005). They also suggest that the oscillatory growth dynamics of the lavas can be explained by the mechanical interaction of the non-Newtonian magma with the frictional and deformable substrate below the lava dome rather than complex crystallization kinetics (e.g. Melnik and Sparks, 1999). In addition, these results suggest that the renewed growth episode of Mt. St. Helens dome in 2006 could be associated with an even higher degree of magma pressurization in the conduit than occurred during the 1980 - 1986

  13. Historical review: viruses, crystals and geodesic domes.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Gregory J

    2003-02-01

    In the mid 1950s, Francis Crick and James Watson attempted to explain the structure of spherical viruses. They hypothesized that spherical viruses consist of 60 identical equivalently situated subunits. Such an arrangement has icosahedral symmetry. Subsequent biophysical and electron micrographic data suggested that many viruses had >60 subunits. Drawing inspiration from architecture, Donald Caspar and Aaron Klug discovered a solution to the problem - they proposed that spherical viruses were structured like miniature geodesic domes.

  14. Underwater Calibration of Dome Port Pressure Housings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocerino, E.; Menna, F.; Fassi, F.; Remondino, F.

    2016-03-01

    Underwater photogrammetry using consumer grade photographic equipment can be feasible for different applications, e.g. archaeology, biology, industrial inspections, etc. The use of a camera underwater can be very different from its terrestrial use due to the optical phenomena involved. The presence of the water and camera pressure housing in front of the camera act as additional optical elements. Spherical dome ports are difficult to manufacture and consequently expensive but at the same time they are the most useful for underwater photogrammetry as they keep the main geometric characteristics of the lens unchanged. Nevertheless, the manufacturing and alignment of dome port pressure housing components can be the source of unexpected changes of radial and decentring distortion, source of systematic errors that can influence the final 3D measurements. The paper provides a brief introduction of underwater optical phenomena involved in underwater photography, then presents the main differences between flat and dome ports to finally discuss the effect of manufacturing on 3D measurements in two case studies.

  15. Fabric and texture at Siple Dome, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diprinzio, C.L.; Wilen, L.A.; Alley, R.B.; Fitzpatrick, J.J.; Spencer, M.K.; Gow, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    Preferred c-axis orientations are present in the firn at Siple Dome, West Antarctica, and recrystallization begins as shallow as 200 m depth in ice below -20??C, based on digital analysis of c-axis fabrics, grain-sizes and other characteristics of 52 vertical thin sections prepared in the field from the kilometer-long Siple Dome ice core. The shallowest section analyzed, from 22 m, shows clustering of c axes toward the vertical. By 200 m depth, girdle fabric and other features of recrystallized ice are evident in layers (or regions), separated by layers (regions) of typically finer-grained ice lacking evidence of recrystallization. Ice from about 700-780 m depth, which was deposited during the last ice age, is especially fine-grained, with strongly vertical c axes, but deeper ice shows much larger crystals and strong evidence of recrystallization. Azimuthal asymmetry of some c-axis fabrics, trends in grain-size, and other indicators reveal additional information on processes and history of ice flow at Siple Dome.

  16. Holocene regional gradients of dust provenance and flux between Talos Dome and Dome C, East Antarctica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmonte, B.; Andersson, P. S.; Baroni, C.; Narcisi, B.; Petit, J. R.; Salvatore, M. C.; Albani, S.; Maggi, V.

    2012-04-01

    Aeolian sequences from Central East Antarctic ice cores provide climate and environmental information of hemispheric significance. Close to the margins of the ice sheet, high-elevation ice-free terrains protruding above the ice sheet surface can provide an additional input of fine dust particles to the atmosphere, making peripheral locations particularly interesting for the study of the regional climate evolution. In the Talos Dome area of East Antarctica, entrainment and transport of local mineral particles is merely influenced by local wind direction and strength, which in turn is tuned by regional climate changes. We investigate the spatial variability of modern and Holocene dust flux, grain size and isotopic (Sr-Nd) composition along a hypothetic transect from Talos Dome all through the interior of the ice sheet (Dome C/Vostok area), and compare the geochemical fingerprint of dust extracted from firn and ice cores to the equivalent size fraction of regolith and glacial deposits from high altitude Victoria Land sources. This study aims to better understand the environmental gradients of dust flux and provenance from the marginal Talos Dome site to the higher Dome C drainage area, with implications for the regional atmospheric circulation, while documenting the isotopic composition of local exposed sediments.

  17. Posterior talar fracture with dislocation of both talo-navicular and subtalar joints: a variant type II of the Sneppens classification

    PubMed Central

    Galanopoulos, Ilias; Fogg, Quentin; Ashwood, Neil

    2012-01-01

    A 63-year-old man fell from a ladder, thus causing an axial compression injury to the right ankle. Severe deformity was evident and the ankle could not be reduced by simple manipulation. The skin was tented and appearing critically contused. Radiographs revealed an oblique fracture of the posterior aspect of the talar body with dislocation of both the talo-navicular and subtalar joints, an injury previously not described in the literature. The fracture–dislocation was anatomically reduced within 3 h of presentation and stability achieved with two headless buried compression screws. CT scan confirmed anatomical reduction and the patient remained non-weight bearing in a cast for 6 weeks. One year postoperatively, the patient remains pain-free with no radiological signs of avascular necrosis of the talus. This injury is unique and despite its severity and soft tissue compromise good quality reduction and internal fixation resulted in an excellent clinical outcome. PMID:22847568

  18. The longevity of lava dome eruptions: analysis of the global DomeHaz database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogburn, S. E.; Wolpert, R.; Calder, E.; Pallister, J. S.; Wright, H. M. N.

    2015-12-01

    The likely duration of ongoing volcanic eruptions is a topic of great interest to volcanologists, volcano observatories, and communities near volcanoes. Lava dome forming eruptions can last from days to centuries, and can produce violent, difficult-to-forecast activity including vulcanian to plinian explosions and pyroclastic density currents. Periods of active dome extrusion are often interspersed with periods of relative quiescence, during which extrusion may slow or pause altogether, but persistent volcanic unrest continues. This contribution focuses on the durations of these longer-term unrest phases, hereafter eruptions, that include periods of both lava extrusion and quiescence. A new database of lava dome eruptions, DomeHaz, provides characteristics of 228 eruptions at 127 volcanoes; for which 177 have duration information. We find that while 78% of dome-forming eruptions do not continue for more than 5 years, the remainder can be very long-lived. The probability distributions of eruption durations are shown to be heavy-tailed and vary by magma composition. For this reason, eruption durations are modeled with generalized Pareto distributions whose governing parameters depend on each volcano's composition and eruption duration to date. Bayesian predictive distributions and associated uncertainties are presented for the remaining duration of ongoing eruptions of specified composition and duration to date. Forecasts of such natural events will always have large uncertainties, but the ability to quantify such uncertainty is key to effective communication with stakeholders and to mitigation of hazards. Projections are made for the remaining eruption durations of ongoing eruptions, including those at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat and Sinabung, Indonesia. This work provides a quantitative, transferable method and rationale on which to base long-term planning decisions for dome forming volcanoes of different compositions, regardless of the quality of an

  19. Spatial and temporal patterns of dome extrusion during the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzer, J. T.; Denlinger, R. P.; Diefenbach, A. K.; Walter, T. R.

    2014-12-01

    Extensive efforts by the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory in response to the 2004-2008 dome building eruption at Mount St. Helens recorded the extrusion of seven dacite spines. Efforts included a network of time-lapse cameras. Published studies of decimated data from these cameras show strong correlations between (long-term) extrusion velocities determined from the camera imagery and ancillary geophysical data, such as dome tilt and RSAM seismicity. However, more detailed analysis of these data should provide better constraints on physical processes behind dome extrusion. Here we apply modern computer vision techniques to explore the spatiotemporal variability and interactions occurring during spine extrusion and dome growth. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) delineates the deformation field in a series of images at sub-pixel level, and quantifies dome, talus and glacier deformation at unprecedented resolution, revealing spatiotemporal variability of the strain field on the time scale of hours. We identify sharp boundaries between the vertically extruding spine, laterally displaced material, and downward-creeping talus. The spine growth at Mount St. Helens appears locally constrained and structurally separated into distinct segments. The velocities of different dome segments are generally correlated, but displacement patterns of the talus are more complex. We identify short term fluctuations with periods of hours to days superimposed on longer term fluctuations having periods of several weeks. The short term episodes of high displacement rates are often associated with strongly degassing plumes observed in the camera imagery. Over longer periods (days to weeks), extrusion rates form a sinusoidal fluctuating pattern, marked by sharp increases and gradual decreases in velocity. These observations substantiate the correlations with seismic and geodetic data shown in previous studies, but more closely constrain the velocity fluctuations of each spine. These fluctuations

  20. Conformal dome aberration correction by designing the inner surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wang; Chen, Shouqian; Fan, Zhigang

    2016-12-01

    The ray transmission models of optical domes were established, and the characteristics of the rays while passing through a hemispherical dome and a conformal dome were comparatively analysed. Acquiring the minimum deviated angles from the inner surface of the conformal dome was then determined to be the designing goal for reducing the dynamic aberrations. Based on this, the inner surface of the conformal dome was optimized and thus, the dynamic aberrations were reduced. Finally, a completely cooled conformal optical system was designed. The results show that the optical system have produced good imaging quality within all the fields of regard, which further illustrates that designing the inner surface of a conformal dome is an effective method for aberration correction.

  1. Small domes on Venus - Probable analogs of Icelandic lava shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, James B.; Williams, Richard S., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    On the basis of observed shapes and volumetric estimates, small, dome-like features on radar images of Venus are interpreted to be analogs of Icelandic lava-shield volcanoes. Morphometric data for Venusian domes in Aubele and Slyuta as well as measurements of representative dome volumes and areas from Tethus Regio are used to demonstrate that the characteristic aspect ratios and flank slopes of these features are consistent with a subclass of low Icelandic lava-shield volcanoes (LILS).

  2. Identifying suitable "piercement" salt domes for nuclear waste storage sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kehle, R.

    1980-08-01

    Piercement salt domes of the northern interior salt basins of the Gulf of Mexico are being considered as permanent storage sites for both nuclear and chemically toxic wastes. The suitable domes are stable and inactive, having reached their final evolutionary configuration at least 30 million years ago. They are buried to depths far below the level to which erosion will penetrate during the prescribed storage period and are not subject to possible future reactivation. The salt cores of these domes are themselves impermeable, permitting neither the entry nor exit of ground water or other unwanted materials. In part, a stable dome may be recognized by its present geometric configuration, but conclusive proof depends on establishing its evolutionary state. The evolutionary state of a dome is obtained by reconstructing the growth history of the dome as revealed by the configuration of sedimentary strata in a large area (commonly 3,000 square miles or more) surrounding the dome. A high quality, multifold CDP reflection seismic profile across a candidate dome will provide much of the necessary information when integrated with available subsurface control. Additional seismic profiles may be required to confirm an apparent configuration of the surrounding strata and an interpreted evolutionary history. High frequency seismic data collected in the near vicinity of a dome are also needed as a supplement to the CDP data to permit accurate depiction of the configuration of shallow strata. Such data must be tied to shallow drill hole control to confirm the geologic age at which dome growth ceased. If it is determined that a dome reached a terminal configuration many millions of years ago, such a dome is incapable of reactivation and thus constitutes a stable storage site for nuclear wastes.

  3. Percutaneous CT-Guided Ablation in the Hepatic Dome: Artificially Induced Pneumothorax for Safe Transpleural Access

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Leonardo Guedes Moreira; Rochal, Rafael Dahmer; Rahal, Antônio; Garcia, Rodrigo Gobbo

    2015-01-01

    Ablative therapies have become a great alternative to surgical treatment of hepatic nodules. Some technical difficulties may negatively influence the effectiveness of this therapy, such as lesions located near the diaphragm. The transthoracic approach is commonly used to access these lesions. However, it is associated with an increased risk of complications, such as pneumothorax, hemothorax, alveolar bleeding, and others. We report a case of a radiofrequency ablation of a lesion in the hepatic dome, where an artificially induced pneumothorax was performed to guarantee a safe and effective access. The air was easily injected by a spinal needle and later aspirated by a single-lumen catheter. Induced pneumothorax shoud be considered in ablation of hepatic dome lesions, mainly when the transhepatic access is not appropriate. PMID:26713179

  4. Dispersive thermohaline convection near salt domes: a case at Napoleonville Dome, southeast Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidzadeh, Zahra; Tsai, Frank T.-C.; Ghasemzadeh, Hasan; Mirbagheri, Seyed Ahmad; Barzi, Majid Tavangari; Hanor, Jeffrey S.

    2015-08-01

    Density-driven flow around salt domes is strongly influenced by salt concentration and temperature gradients. In this study, a thermohaline convection numerical modeling is developed to investigate flow, salinity, and heat transport around salt domes under the impact of fluid dispersivity and variable density and viscosity. `Dispersive fluid flux of total fluid mass' is introduced to the density-driven flow equation to improve thermohaline modeling in porous media. The dispersive fluid flux term is derived to account for an additional fluid flux driven by the density gradient and mechanical dispersion. The model is first tested by a hypothetical salt-dome problem, where a circulation of flow is induced by an overpressure and density effect. The result shows a distinct salt-transport change due to the inclusion of the dispersive fluid flux and temperature effect. Then, the model is applied to investigate changes of groundwater flow, salinity, and heat transport near the west of Napoleonville salt dome, southeastern Louisiana, USA, due to a salt cavern failure. The result shows that an instant overpressure assumed to be created by the salt-cavern wall breach has little impact on salinity near the ground surface within a period of 3 months. However, salinity is significantly elevated near the breach area of the salt cavern, caused by strong flow velocities.

  5. Syntectonic Extension and Dome Development during Formation of the NE-Chinese Pamir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiede, R. C.; Sobel, E. R.; Schoenbohm, L. M.; Chen, J.; Stockli, D. F.

    2011-12-01

    The geodynamic implications of the shift from orogen-perpendicular crustal shortening, growth and uplift within the Tibetan plateau during the early Cenozoic to orogen-parallel extrusion during the late Cenozoic are a longstanding conundrum. The Pamir Mountains, the NW-prolongation of Tibet, appear to have undergone a similar tectonic and morphologic history; however, this evolution is less well constrained. To address this problem we document the crustal kinematics over geologic time by analyzing the changing orientation of basement dome growth in the NE-Pamir during the late Cenozoic. The geologically young NE-Pamir is an excellent study location, as two generations of dome complexes are exposed. During the Oligocene-Miocene, the E-W-striking Muskul and Sares domes exhumed mid-crustal rocks to the surface. These are cross cut by late Miocene N-S-trending E-W-extension driving the rise of two giant basement domes, Kongur Shan (7719 m) and Muztagh Ata (7546 m). Both domes are situated in the footwall of the west dipping Kongur normal fault system (KNFS). Previous studies documented two generations of faults along the southwestern termination of Muztagh Ata dome: an early south dipping structure, the Shen-ti fault, later cross cut by the KNFS. Our goal is to better constrain the temporal and spatial variation of deformation and exhumation in order to track kinematic changes in upper crustal deformation. Twenty new apatite fission-track (AFT) as well as zircon U-Th/He (ZrHe) cooling ages from a series of vertical profiles in the footwall and spot hanging-wall-samples of the KNFS have been analyzed. This dataset is combined with published 40Ar-39Ar mica data. In general, our new AFT and ZrHe cooling ages show significantly younger cooling ages in the vicinity of the domes compared to samples analyzed further north or south in the footwall or in the hanging wall. The youngest ages, between <1 and 2 Ma, were obtained along the central portion of KNFS. Older ages of 2 to

  6. The Vaasa migmatitic complex: the birth, growth and death of a thermal dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopin, Francis; Korja, Annakaisa; Hölttä, Pentti; Eklund, Olav; Tapani Rämö, Osmo

    2015-04-01

    The Vaasa migmatitic complex, or Vaasa dome, is cored by diatexite migmatites and S-type granitoids and gradually mantled by metatexite migmatites and mica schist with thin metabasite-andesite intercalations. Previous geochemical studies have demonstrated that the metasediments are the sources of the melted core: it have been suggested that the complex have been formed by in-situ melting of a basin. Field work studies highlight the formation of a gently dipping metamorphic fabric with a lateral increase of the in-situ melt content towards the core of the dome (D1). This early layered and partially melted fabric is then affected by a regional N-S shortening forming km- to outcrop-scale E-W striking folds and new sub-vertical foliation (D2). Late sub-vertical shearing is visible along the dome border and within the diatexitic zone (D3). No late detachment structures have been observed. In the metamorphic belt, the grade increases from medium-T amphibolite facies to low-P granulite facies towards the core of the dome. Pseudosections in the MnNCKFMASHTO system have been performed in one mica schist (Grt+BtPl+Qz±Std+Sill+And) and one metatexite migmatite (Bt+Liq+Crd+Pl+Kfs+Grt+Qz±Sill+And). The metamorphic peaks are bracketed at 560°C at 5 kbar and 750-770°C at 4.5-5 kbar, respectively. The retrograde condition is situated at 540°C and <3 kbar for both lithologies. This implies an isobaric increase of the metamorphic grade towards the core of the dome. An isothermal decompression for the schist and a retrograde PT path for the migmatites are observed. Existing and new U/Pb monazite ages from mica schists, migmatites and clustered at 1860-1865 Ma whereas U/Pb ages from metamorphic and magmatic zircons are older and clustered at 1875 Ma. The latter might represent the peak of melting process and associated metamorphism whereas monazites ages might be related to the cooling of the orogenic middle crust. It has to be noticed that few monazites from metamorphic rocks of

  7. Precipitation regime and stable isotopes at Dome C and Dome Fuji, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, Elisabeth; Dittmann, Anna; Stenni, Barbara; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Powers, Jordan G.; Manning, Kevin W.; Raphael, Marilyn; Fujita, Koji; Werner, Martin; Valt, Mauro; Cagnati, Anselmo

    2016-04-01

    Dome Fuji and Dome C, both deep ice-core drilling sites in East Antarctica, are the only stations, for which direct daily precipitation measurements and stable isotope ratios of the precipitation samples are available. Whereas the Dome F series encompasses only one year of measurements, the Dome C series has been started in 2006 and is ongoing. For Dome C, the type of precipitation (diamond dust, hoar frost, snowfall) was determined based on crystal type analysis. The weather situations causing precipitation at the stations were analysed using data from the Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System (AMPS). At both sites, major snowfall events were always related to an amplification of Rossby waves in the circumpolar westerlies, which led to an increased meridional transport of moisture and energy. Furthermore, increased amounts of diamond dust were observed after such event-type precipitation. The stable isotope data of the precipitation samples were related to the different weather situations and precipitation types and also simulated using a simple Rayleigh-type model (MCIM) and compared to output from the global isotopic-enhanced model ECHAM5wiso. Possible moisture sources were estimated using the synoptic analysis combined with back-trajectory calculation. MCIM was better in reproducing the annual cycle of deuterium excess, whereas ECHAM5wiso generally showed a smaller bias of the isotope ratios. Hoar frost shows isotope signals very different from diamond dust and snowfall, which hints at a more local cycle of sublimation and deposition for this type of precipitation, whereas both snowfall and diamond dust are related to large-scale moisture transport. Contrary to the literature, a more northern moisture source was found to be not necessarily associated with more depleted snowfall. This is explained by the strong warm air advection accompanying snowfall events, which decreases the temperature difference between source area and deposition site and thus leads to

  8. Morphology and growth of the 2009 Redoubt Volcano lava dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, K. F.; Anderson, S. W.; Diefenbach, A. K.; Wessels, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    Redoubt Volcano began to extrude the third and final lava dome of the 2009 eruption on April 4. By July 1 the dome had filled the summit crater and ceased to grow, reaching a volume of 70M m3. The first 12 days of growth (4/4-16) produced blocky lava of unknown vesicularity that effused at a rate of 35 m3sec-1. Lava formed a round dome, and began to flow northward down a steep, glacial gorge. The effusion rate from 4/16-5/4 decreased to 4 m3sec-1. At that time, while blocky lava continued to be exposed on the margins and south side of the dome, more finely fragmented lava began to appear at the top of the dome directly above the vent. This material, more scoriaceous than the blocky lava was tracked by webcam images, and sampled in August, 2010. Dome growth continued for the next two months in the form of inflation and steep, north-directed flow. The effusion rate increased 5/4-16 to an average of 18 m3sec-1 and the surface area comprising fragmented, scoriaceous lava increased from 10 to 30%. This time period includes 2 days (5/14-16) of high effusion rate (27 m3sec-1) and an increase in the surface area of scoriaceous lava by 15%/day. Effusion rates decreased steadily to 2 m3sec-1 shortly before growth ceased around July 1. Fragmental, scoriaceous lava, however, continued to increase in area over the dome surface, spreading as a relatively cool carapace over the top of the dome. By 7/1 the fragmental carapace covered ~40% of the total dome area. Lava along the southern half, lower margins and northern toe of the dome appeared relatively dense and blocky. The hottest areas on the dome (~200-300°C) were found in blocky areas and along radial cracks that originate at the top of the dome, overlying the vent. We can gain insights regarding degassing processes by comparing similarities and differences in surface morphology of Redoubt’s dome with the 1980-86 Mount St. Helens (MSH) dome. The 1980-86 MSH dome displayed lobes with a predominantly scoriaceous carapace

  9. DOME: operational metrics under one roof

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primas, F.; Marteau, S.; Tacconi-Garman, L. E.; Mainieri, V.; Rejkuba, M.; Mysore, S.

    2012-09-01

    Thirteen VLT/I instruments plus some extra critical components like the block-scheduling of the Laser Guide Star Facility and VLTI baselines make for a rather complex machine that constantly challenges our operational efficiencies. DOME (Dashboard for Operational Metrics at ESO) is an ongoing project developed, implemented and maintained by the ESO User Support Department. It aims at providing an ESO-internal dashboard where key operational metrics are published and updated at regular intervals. Here, we will present the project and report on the indicators that have been looked at until now.ty and VLTI baselines make for a rather complex machine that constantly challenges our operational efficiencies. DOME (Dashboard for Operational Metrics at ESO) is an ongoing project developed, implemented and maintained by the ESO User Support Department. It aims at providing an ESO-internal dashboard where key operational metrics are published and updated at regular intervals. Here, we will present the project and report on the indicators that have been looked at until now.

  10. [PARTICULAR QUALITIES OF DIAGNOSTIC ACUTE LATERAL ANKLE LIGAMENT INJURIES].

    PubMed

    Krasnoperov, S N; Shishka, I V; Golovaha, M L

    2015-01-01

    Delayed diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligaments injury and subsequent inadequate treatment leads to the development of chronic instability and rapid progression of degenerative processes in the joint. The aim of our work was to improve treatment results by developing an diagnostic algorithm and treatment strategy of acute lateral ankle ligament injuries. The study included 48 patients with history of acute inversion ankle injury mechanism. Diagnostic protocol included clinical and radiological examination during 48 hours and after 7-10 days after injury. According to the high rate of inaccurate clinical diagnosis in the first 48 hours of the injury a short course of conservative treatment for 7-10 days is needed with follow-up and controlling clinical and radiographic instability tests. Clinical symptoms of ankle inversion injury showed that the combination of local tenderness in the projection of damaged ligaments, the presence of severe periarticular hematoma in the lateral department and positive anterior drawer and talar tilt tests in 7-10 days after the injury in 87% of cases shows the presence of ligament rupture. An algorithm for diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligament injury was developed, which allowed us to determine differential indications for surgical repair of the ligaments and conservative treatment of these patients.

  11. A Geohydrologic Analysis of an Upland-Dome Aquifer System, a Case Study of Ester Dome, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youcha, E. K.; Lilly, M. R.; Hinzman, L. D.

    2001-12-01

    We are investigating the Ester Dome upland-dome aquifer system located seven miles west of Fairbanks, Alaska. The bedrock of the Fairbanks area is composed primarily of pre-Cambrian to mid-Paleozoic metamorphic rocks of the Yukon-Tanana metamorphic complex (Forbes, 1982). Common geomorphic structures in the Tanana-Yukon Uplands are bedrock domes. Igneous intrusives underlie many of Interior Alaska's dome structures. The Fairbanks Mining District is dominated by either upland bedrock aquifers or valley alluvial aquifers. The geohydrology of an upland dome is characterized by open boundaries. A typical watershed approach is to define a drainage system and define no-flow boundaries. Alaska Interior dome systems are the inverse of this approach. Boundaries are more likely to be all discharging ground water and surface water. A ground-water monitoring network of 50 observation wells on Ester Dome allows us to obtain field data to help interpret upland-dome geohydrologic processes. Seasonal and pumping water-level fluctuations occur in several wells, but many wells show no seasonal or short-term variation in water levels. Geologic variation on Ester Dome helps explain these differences. Ester Dome consists of four major stratigraphic units: quaternary alluvial and eolian deposits, Fairbanks Schist, Muskox Amphibolite and Schist, and cretaceous plutonic rocks. Additionally, permafrost is present in much of the low-lying valleys and north-facing slopes of the dome. Water levels in wells will exhibit different responses since the hydrogeologic properties of each unit differ. Snow surveys and precipitation recorders were established at varying elevations on Ester Dome to examine the changes in precipitation spatially and to evaluate recharge processes. In general, precipitation on the dome increases with elevation. The amount of unknown information on Ester Dome makes simplified analysis approaches harder to evaluate taking into account all the possible geohydrologic models

  12. Evaluation of the structure and stratigraphy over Richton Dome, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, M.L.

    1986-05-01

    The structure and stratigraphy over Richton Salt Dome, Mississippi, have been evaluated from 70 borings that were completed to various depths above the dome. Seven lithologic units have been identified and tentatively correlated with the regional Tertiary stratigraphy. Structure-contour and thickness maps of the units show the effects of dome growth from Eocene through early Pliocene time. Growth of the salt stock from late Oligocene through early Pliocene is estimated to have averaged 0.6 to 2.6 centimeters (0.2 to 1.1 inches) per 1000 years. No dome growth has occurred since the early Pliocene. The late Oligocene to early Pliocene strata over and adjacent to the dome reflect arching over the entire salt stock; some additional arching over individual centers may represent pre-Quaternary differential movement in the salt stock. The lithology and structure of the caprock at the Richton Salt Dome indicate that the caprock probably was completely formed by late Oligocene. In late Oligocene, the caprock was fractured by arching and altered by gypsum veining. Since late Oligocene, there are no indications of significant hydrologic connections through the caprock - that is, there are no indications of dissolution collapse or further anhydrite caprock accumulation. This structural and stratigraphic analysis provides insights on dome growth history, dome geometry, and neardome hydrostratigraphy that will aid in planning site characterization field activities, including an exploratory shaft, and in the conceptual design of a high-level waste (HLW) repository.

  13. Astronaut Alan Bean doing acrobatics in OWS dome area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, doing acrobatics in the dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. The dome area is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  14. The Carrier Dome Controversy: Rewriting the Town-Gown Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    On December 16, 1986, a new Syracuse city administration and the university announced an agreement exempting the Syracuse University Carrier Dome from real estate taxes; in return the city would receive a share of ticket proceeds from nonacademic Dome events. This settled a controversy that began when the city demanded payment of city taxes in…

  15. The Mairan domes: silicic volcanic constructs on the Moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glotch, Timothy D.; Hagerty, Justin J.; Lucey, Paul G.; Hawke, B. Ray; Giguere, Thomas A.; Arnold, Jessica A.; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Paige, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The Mairan domes are four features located in northern Oceanus Procellarum at ∼312.3E, 41.4N on the Moon. High resolution visible imagery, visible-to-mid-IR spectra, and Lunar Prospector Th abundance data all indicate that these four domes have a composition that is consistent with derivation from a Si-rich, highly evolved magma.

  16. Astronaut Jack Lousma doing acrobatics in OWS dome area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, Skylab 3 pilot, doing acrobatics in the dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. The dome area is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  17. SOLUTION MINING IN SALT DOMES OF THE GULF COAST EMBAYMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Griswold, G. B.

    1981-02-01

    Following a description of salt resources in the salt domes of the gulf coast embayment, mining, particularly solution mining, is described. A scenario is constructed which could lead to release of radioactive waste stored in a salt dome via inadvertent solution mining and the consequences of this scenario are analyzed.

  18. A Multi-Aperture Scintillation Sensor for Dome A, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hualin; Pei, Chong; Yuan, Xiangyan

    2013-01-01

    Site-testing measurements by the Australian group has already shown that Dome C on the Antarctic plateau is one of the best ground-based astronomical sites. Furthermore, Dome A, the Antarctic Kunlun Station, as the highest point on Antarctic inland plateau, where a Chinese Antarctic scientific expedition team first reached in 2005, is widely predicted to be an even better astronomical site by the international astronomical community. Preliminary site-testing carried out by the Center for Antarctic Astronomy (CAS) also confirms Dome A as a potential astronomical site. Multi-aperture scintillation sensors (MASS) can measure the seeing and isoplantic angle, the turbulence profile, etc., which are very important site-testing parameters that we urgently need. The MASS site testing at Dome A is presented here, and includes the method of processing data and the hardware for the extreme conditions of Dome A, Antarctica.

  19. Effects of hypersonic vehicle's optical dome on infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenjun; Cao, Zhiguo; Wang, Wenwu

    2011-09-01

    When an optically guided hypersonic vehicle flies in the atmosphere, the scene is viewed through an optical dome. Because of hypersonic friction with the atmosphere, the optical dome is inevitably covered by a serious shock wave, which threatens to alter the dome's physical parameters and further induce wavefront distortion and degradation of images. By studying the physical phenomena occurring within the optical dome in such an adverse environment, this paper identifies the relationship between the variation of the dome's optical characteristics and the infrared image degradation. The research indicates that the image quality degrades sharply as the vehicle's Mach number increases. Simulations also show that while the thermo-optic effect, elastic-optic effect, thermal deformation, and variation of transmittance have little effect on the optical system, the thermal radiation severely degrades images when vehicles fly at hypersonic speeds. Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

  20. Baseline design and requirements for the LSST rotating enclosure (dome)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neill, D. R.; DeVries, J.; Hileman, E.; Sebag, J.; Gressler, W.; Wiecha, O.; Andrew, J.; Schoening, W.

    2014-07-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is a large (8.4 meter) wide-field (3.5 degree) survey telescope, which will be located on the Cerro Pachón summit in Chile. As a result of the wide field of view, its optical system is unusually susceptible to stray light; consequently besides protecting the telescope from the environment the rotating enclosure (Dome) also provides indispensible light baffling. All dome vents are covered with light baffles which simultaneously provide both essential dome flushing and stray light attenuation. The wind screen also (and primarily) functions as a light screen providing only a minimum clear aperture. Since the dome must operate continuously, and the drives produce significant heat, they are located on the fixed lower enclosure to facilitate glycol water cooling. To accommodate day time thermal control, a duct system channels cooling air provided by the facility when the dome is in its parked position.

  1. Phase competition in trisected superconducting dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishik, Inna

    2012-02-01

    The momentum-resolved nature of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has made it a key probe of emergent phases in the cuprates, such as superconductivity and the pseudogap, which have anisotropic momentum-space structure. ARPES can be used to infer the origin of spectral gaps from their distinct phenomenology---temperature, doping, and momentum dependence, and this principle has been used to argue that the pseudogap is a distinct phase from superconductivity, rather than a precursor [1]. We have studied Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212) using laser-ARPES, and our data give evidence for three distinct quantum phases comprising the superconducting ground state, accompanied by abrupt changes at p˜0.076 and p˜0.19 in the doping-and-temperature dependence of the gaps near the bond-diagonal (nodal) direction [2]. The latter doping likely marks the quantum critical point of the pseudogap, while the former represents a distinct competing phase at the edge of the superconducting dome. Additionally, we find that the pseudogap advances closer towards the node when superconductivity is weak, just below Tc or at low doping, and retreats towards the antinode well below Tc and at higher doping. This phase competition picture together with the two critical doping are synthesized into our proposed phase diagram, which also reconciles conflicting phase diagrams commonly used in the field. Our results underscore the importance of quantum critical phenomena to cuprate superconductivity, provide a microscopic picture of phase competition in momentum space, and predict the existence of phase boundaries inside the superconducting dome which are different from simple extrapolations from outside the dome. [4pt] [1] I. M. Vishik, W. S. Lee, R.-H. He, M. Hashimoto, Z. Hussain, T. P. Devereaux, and Z.-X. Shen. New J. Phys. 12, 105008 (2010). [0pt] [2] I. M. Vishik, M. Hashimoto, R.-H. He, W. S. Lee, F. Schmitt, D. H. Lu, R.G. Moore, C. Zhang, W. Meevasana, T. Sasagawa, S. Uchida, K

  2. Geologic study of Kettle dome, northeast Washington. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    This geologic study of Kettle dome, northeast Washington, encompasses an area of approximately 800 square miles (2048 sq km). The evaluation of uranium occurrences associated with the igneous and metamorphic rocks of the dome and the determination of the relationship between uranium mineralization and stratigraphic, structural, and metamorphic features of the dome are the principal objectives. Evaluation of the validity of a gneiss dome model is a specific objective. The principal sources of data are detailed geologic mapping, surface radiometric surveys, and chemical analyses of rock samples. Uranium mineralization is directly related to the presence of pegmatite dikes and sills in biotite gneiss and amphibolite. Other characteristics of the uranium occurrences include the associated migmatization and high-grade metamorphism of wallrock adjacent to the pegmatite and the abrupt decrease in uranium mineralization at the pegmatite-gneiss contact. Subtle chemical characteristics found in mineralized pegmatites include: (1) U increase as K/sub 2/O increases, (2) U decreases as Na/sub 2/O increases, and (3) U increases as CaO increases at CaO values above 3.8%. The concentration of uranium occurrences in biotite gneiss and amphibolite units results from the preferential intrusion of pegmitites into these well-foliated rocks. Structural zones of weakness along dome margins permit intrusive and migmatitic activity to affect higher structural levels of the dome complex. As a result, uranium mineralization is localized along dome margins. The uranium occurrences in the Kettle dome area are classified as pegmatitic. Sufficient geologic similarities exist between Kettle dome and the Rossing uranium deposit to propose the existence of economic uranium targets within Kettle dome.

  3. The Discovery Dome: A Tool for Increasing Student Engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Corinne

    2015-04-01

    The Discovery Dome is a portable full-dome theater that plays professionally-created science films. Developed by the Houston Museum of Natural Science and Rice University, this inflatable planetarium offers a state-of-the-art visual learning experience that can address many different fields of science for any grade level. It surrounds students with roaring dinosaurs, fascinating planets, and explosive storms - all immersive, engaging, and realistic. Dickinson State University has chosen to utilize its Discovery Dome to address Earth Science education at two levels. University courses across the science disciplines can use the Discovery Dome as part of their curriculum. The digital shows immerse the students in various topics ranging from astronomy to geology to weather and climate. The dome has proven to be a valuable tool for introducing new material to students as well as for reinforcing concepts previously covered in lectures or laboratory settings. The Discovery Dome also serves as an amazing science public-outreach tool. University students are trained to run the dome, and they travel with it to schools and libraries around the region. During the 2013-14 school year, our Discovery Dome visited over 30 locations. Many of the schools visited are in rural settings which offer students few opportunities to experience state-of-the-art science technology. The school kids are extremely excited when the Discovery Dome visits their community, and they will talk about the experience for many weeks. Traveling with the dome is also very valuable for the university students who get involved in the program. They become very familiar with the science content, and they gain experience working with teachers as well as the general public. They get to share their love of science, and they get to help inspire a new generation of scientists.

  4. Transdomes: Emplacement of Migmatite Domes in Oblique Tectonic Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, C. P.; Rey, P. F.; Whitney, D. L.; Mondy, L. S.; Roger, F.

    2014-12-01

    Many migmatite domes are emplaced within wrench corridors in which a combination of strike-slip and extensional detachment zones (pull-apart, extensional relay, or transfer zones) focus deep-crust exhumation. The Montagne Noire dome (France, Variscan Massif Central) exemplifies wrench-related dome formation and displays the following structural, metamorphic, and geochronologic characteristics of a 'transdome': the dome is elongate in the direction of extension; foliation outlines a double dome separated by a high-strain zone; lineation is shallowly plunging with a fairly uniform trend that parallels the strike of the high-strain zone; subdomes contain recumbent structures overprinted by upright folds that affected upward by flat shear zones associated with detachment tectonics; domes display a large syn-deformation metamorphic gradient from core (upper amphibolite facies migmatite) to margin (down to greenschist facies mylonite); some rocks in the dome core experienced isothermal decompression revealed by disequilibrium reaction textures, particularly in mafic rocks (including eclogite); and results of U-Pb geochrononology indicate a narrow range of metamorphic crystallization from core to mantling schist spanning ~10 Myr. 3D numerical modeling of transdomes show that the dome solicits a larger source region of partially molten lower crust compared to 2D models; this flowing crust creates a double-dome architecture as in 2D models but there are differences in the predicted thermal history and flow paths. In a transtension setting, flow lines converge at depth (radial-centripetal flow) toward the zone of extension and diverge at shallow levels in a more uniform direction that is imposed by upper crust motion and deformation. This evolution produces a characteristic pattern of strain history, progressive fabric overprint, and P-T paths that are comparable to observed dome rocks.

  5. Emplacement of Volcanic Domes on Venus and Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quick, Lynnae C.; Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Steve M.

    2015-01-01

    Placing firmer constraints on the emplacement timescales of visible volcanic features is essential to obtaining a better understanding of the resurfacing history of Venus. Fig. 1 shows a Magellan radar image and topography for a putative venusian lava dome. 175 such domes have been identified, having diameters that range from 19 - 94 km, and estimated thicknesses as great as 4 km [1-2]. These domes are thought to be volcanic in origin [3], having formed by the flow of a viscous fluid (i.e., lava) onto the surface. Among the unanswered questions surrounding the formation of Venus steep-sided domes are their emplacement duration, composition, and the rheology of the lava. Rheologically speaking, maintenance of extremely thick, 1-4 km flows necessitates higher viscosity lavas, while the domes' smooth upper surfaces imply the presence of lower viscosity lavas [2-3]. Further, numerous quantitative issues, such as the nature and duration of lava supply, how long the conduit remained open and capable of supplying lava, the volumetric flow rate, and the role of rigid crust in influencing flow and final morphology all have implications for subsurface magma ascent and local surface stress conditions. The surface of Jupiter's icy moon Europa exhibits many putative cryovolcanic constructs [5-7], and previous workers have suggested that domical positive relief features imaged by the Galileo spacecraft may be volcanic in origin [5,7-8] (Fig. 2). Though often smaller than Venus domes, if emplaced as a viscous fluid, formation mechanisms for europan domes may be similar to those of venusian domes [7]. Models for the emplacement of venusian lava domes (e.g. [9-10]) have been previously applied to the formation of putative cryolava domes on Europa [7].

  6. Models of the geomorphology, hydrology, and development of domed peat bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, R.B.

    1994-12-01

    Because peat accumulates only beneath the water table, the shape of a peat body should reflect the shape of its water table and thus the hydrology of the peat body. Three different models successfully reproduce the observed peat dome morphology, including a central bog plain. In the first model, the bog plain develops because peat accumulation is limited by anaerobic decay of peat beneath the water table. With certain simplifying assumptions, an analytic solution for this model can be obtained. The other two models are more easily investigated numerically. In the first model, the initial peat accumulation rate is limited only by plant growth and decay and is the maximum rate observed during peat dome development. As a peat dome expands laterally, peat accumulation slows because the water table ceases to rise fast enough to preserve all the available plant material. Eventually, anaerobic decay beneath the water table matches the rate of peat addition to the top of the peat body, and net peat accumulation ceases. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. The Lifferth Dome for Small Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B. L.; Olsen, C. S.; Iverson, E. P.; Paget, A.; Lifferth, W.; Brown, P. J.; Moody, J. W.

    2004-12-01

    The Lifferth Dome is a pull-off roof designed for small telescopes and other observational equipment. It was specifically designed for the needs of the ROVOR project. The roof itself is completely removed from the observatory housing walls and cranked off to the side below the optical horizon. This is done using two swing arms on either side of the observatory that work in unison to lift the roof off the structure and rotate down and away into a cleared location. The torque is provided by a threaded rod connected to an electric motor at the back of the building. As the motor rotates, the threads turn through a threaded sleeve connected directly to the support arms. Advantages to this design are no lost horizon, no roller surfaces to keep clean, low power and simple limit switches. Operation is by computer control using by National Instruments LabVIEW via the internet. We present its design and construction.

  8. Structural review of the Vredefort dome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colliston, W. P.; Reimold, W. U.

    1992-01-01

    The structure of the older-than-3.2-Ga Archean basement and Archean-to-Precambrian sedimentary/volcanic rocks (3.07 to ca. 2.2 Ga) in the center of the Witwatersrand Basin to the southwest of Johannesburg (South Africa) is dominated by the ca. 2.0-Ga megascopic Vredefort 'Dome' structure. The effect of the 'Vredefort event' is demonstrably large and is evident within a northerly arc of about 100 km radius around the granitic core of the structure. Northerly asymmetric overturning of the strata is observed within the first 17 km (strata is horizontal in the south), followed by a 40-km-wide rim synclinorium. Fold and fault structures (normal, reverse, and strike-slip) are locally as well as regionally concentrically arranged with respect to the northern and western sides of the structure. The unusual category of brittle deformation, the so-called 'shock deformation', observed in the collar strata has attracted worldwide attention over the past two decades. These deformation phenomena include the presence of coesite and stishovite, mylonites, and pseudotachylites, cataclasis at a microscopic scale, and the ubiquitous development of multiply striated joint surfaces (which include shatter cones, orthogonal, curviplanar, and conjugate fractures). The macroscopic to microscopic deformation features have led to the formulation of various hypotheses to account for the origin of the Vredefort structure: (1) tectonic hypotheses--deep crustal shear model, doming and N-directed thrust fault model, fold interference model, and diapir model; (2) the exogenous bolide impact hypothesis; and (3) the endogenous cryptoexplosion model.

  9. Geohydrology of the Keechi, Mount Sylvan, Oakwood, and Palestine salt domes in the northeast Texas salt-dome basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, Jerry E.; Halasz, Stephen J.; Peters, Henry B.

    1980-01-01

    Additional problems concerning the hydrologic stability of Oakwood and Palestine Salt Domes have resulted from the disposal of oil-field salinewater in the cap rock at the Oakwood Dome and previous solution mining of salt at the Palestine Dome Additional investigations are needed to determine if a selected dome is hydrologically stable. Needed investigations include: (1) A more complete comparative analysis of the regional and local geohydrologic system; (2) a site-specific drilling and sampling program to analyze the cap rock-aquifer boundary, sediment distribution, hydraulic-parameter variations, hydraulic-head relationships, and hydrochemical patterns; and (3) mass-transport computer modeling of ground-water flow at the domes.

  10. Domes, pits, and small chaos on Europa produced by water sills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaut, Chloé; Manga, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Pits, domes, and small chaos on Europa's surface are quasi-circular features a few to a few tens of kilometers in diameter. We examine if injection of water sills into Europa's ice shell and their subsequent evolution can induce successive surface deformations similar to the morphologies of these features. We study the dynamics of water spreading within the elastic part of the ice shell and show that the mechanical properties of ice exert a strong control on the lateral extent of the sill. At shallow depths, water makes room for itself by lifting the overlying ice layer and water weight promotes lateral spreading of the sill. In contrast, a deep sill bends the underlying elastic layer and its weight does not affect its spreading. In that case, the sill lateral extent is limited by the fracture toughness of ice and the sill can thicken substantially. After emplacement, cooling of the sill warms the surrounding ice and thins the overlying elastic ice layer. As a result, preexisting stresses in the elastic part of the ice shell increase locally to the point that they may disrupt the ice above the sill (small chaos). Disruption of the surface also allows for partial isostatic compensation of water weight, leading to a topographic depression at the surface (pit), of the order of ~102 m. Complete water solidification finally causes expansion of the initial sill volume and results in an uplifted topography (dome) of ~102m.

  11. Karst processes evidences on a Martian evaporite Dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baioni, D.; Zupan Hajna, N.; Wezel, F. C.

    2009-04-01

    In the eastern part of Tithonium Chasma (Mars) a body displaying a dome shape morphology is located. According to OMEGA mineralogical data (OMEGA data orbit 531_3) and further studies the dome appears to consist of kieserite, an evaporitic mineral also found on the Earth. Previous works highlighted the presence on the dome surface of karst-like landforms and morphologies that strongly resemble the evaporitic karst morphologies found on the Earth. Through the analysis of the new MRO HIRISE images we have investigated the Martian landform and the possible processes involved in their formation and shaping in great detail. The results of our study out show that the landforms observed clearly indicate the presence of solutional processes that also acted in a selective way just as in the evaporite rocks on the Earth. The analysis carried out highlight that the Martian dome can be also formed of different materials with different solutional proprieties. The dome quite probably it is constituted mainly by salts such as carnallite, kainite and halite (a mineral without spectral signatures that might be present in the dome). Our observation also suggest that on the dome liquid water must have existed in the past for enough time so that the solution features we investigated could be formed.

  12. First field identification of the Cuonadong dome in southern Tibet: implications for EW extension of the North Himalayan gneiss dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jiangang; Li, Guangming; Wang, Genhou; Huang, Yong; Zhang, Linkui; Dong, Suiliang; Liang, Wei

    2016-07-01

    The Cuonadong dome exposes in east-southern margin of the North Himalayan gneiss domes (NHGD), which is reported first time in this study. The Cuonadong dome is located at the southern part of the Zhaxikang ore concentration area, which is divided into three tectono-lithostratigraphic units by two curved faults around the dome geometry from upper to lower (or from outer to inner): the upper unit, middle unit and lower unit, and the outer fault is Nading fault, while the inner fault is Jisong fault. The Cuonadong dome is a magmatic orthogneiss and leucogranite mantled by orthogneiss and metasedimentary rocks, which in turn are overlain by Jurassic metasedimentary and sedimentary rocks. The grades of metamorphism and structural deformation increase towards the core, which is correspondence with the Ridang Formation low-metamorphic schist, tourmaline granitic-biotite gneiss, garnet-mica gneiss and mylonitic quartz-mica gneiss. The Cuonadong dome preserves evidences for four major deformational events: firstly top-to-S thrust (D1), early approximately N-S extensional deformation (D2), main approximately E-W extensional deformation (D3), and late collapse structural deformation (D4) around the core of the Cuonadong dome, which are consistent to three groups lineation: approximately N-S-trending lineation including L1 and L2, E-W trending L3, and L4 with plunging towards outside of the dome, respectively. The formation of the Cuonadong dome was probably resulted from the main E-W extensional deformation which is a result of eastward flow of middle or lower crust from beneath Tibet accommodated by northward oblique underthrusting of Indian crust beneath Tibet. The establishment of the Cuonadong dome enhanced the E-W extension of the NHGD, which is further divided into two structural dome zones according to the different extensional directions: approximately N-S extensional North Himalayan gneiss domes (NS-NHGD) and E-W extensional North Himalayan gneiss domes (EW

  13. Maximum potential erosion and inundation of seven interior salt domes

    SciTech Connect

    Aronow, S.

    1982-08-01

    Seven interior salt domes have been evaluated in regard to erosion or inundation due to natural events. The most likely possibility of either event occurring would be associated with continental glaciation. The domes were evaluated based on maximum previous sea level changes due to glaciation and effects caused by melting of existing ice sheets. Results are listed for each of the seven domes. Past history indicates a likelihood of returning to a glacial period. The subsequent fall of sea level may cause regrading of streams in the area. A conservative evaluation of this phenomenon was performed and the results are reported.

  14. 4. WASHBURN POINT VISTA AREA. HALF DOME AT CENTER REAR. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. WASHBURN POINT VISTA AREA. HALF DOME AT CENTER REAR. LOOKING NE. GIS: N-37 43 13.7 / W-119 34 23.0 - Glacier Point Road, Between Chinquapin Flat & Glacier Point, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  15. DETAIL OF DOMED BOTTOM, ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF DOMED BOTTOM, ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING EAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  16. DETAIL OF THE INTERIOR OF THE DOMED LID, ALTITUDE CHAMBER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE INTERIOR OF THE DOMED LID, ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  17. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE CRANE USED TO LIFT DOMED LIDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE CRANE USED TO LIFT DOMED LIDS OF THE ALTITUDE CHAMBERS, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  18. DETAIL OF THE EXTERIOR OF THE DOMED LID, ALTITUDE CHAMBER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE EXTERIOR OF THE DOMED LID, ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  19. DETAIL OF DOMED BOTTOM, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF DOMED BOTTOM, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  20. 4. FACING EAST ACROSS BRIDGE AT HALF DOME WITH BICYCLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. FACING EAST ACROSS BRIDGE AT HALF DOME WITH BICYCLE PATH MARKERS IN FOREGROUND AND ELECTRICAL TRANSFORMER FOR CAMPGROUND TO RIGHT. - Ahwahnee Bridge, Spanning Merced River on service road, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  1. 8. Detail view of steam dome attached to top of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Detail view of steam dome attached to top of Lancashire double flue boiler. - Hacienda Azucarera El Coto, Sugar Mill Ruins, .5 Mi. SW of Rt. 347 Bridge Over Guanajibo River, San German, San German Municipio, PR

  2. Geomorphogenesis and Carbon Fluxes of Tropical Peat Domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, A.; Hoyt, A.; Dommain, R.; Harvey, C. F.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical peatlands sequester and release globally significant quantities of carbon dioxide as peat domes grow and subside on millennial time scales. Research to date indicates that the hydrologic feedback between water table depth and peat accumulation is fundamentally similar across tropical peatlands, but peat accumulation and fluxes cannot always be spatially uniform across the landscape because peat accumulates in domes. We show that upscaling from local measurements to landscape fluxes of CO2 and CH4 requires (1) sampling in both the growing interiors and the static margins of peat domes, and (2) use of topographical data from the peatland. Similarly, inference of past carbon sequestration from dated peat cores requires a model for the partitioning of peatlands into domes by drainage networks.

  3. STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED BY ARCHITECTURAL FINISH. TENSION RING ROLLER SUPPORT AT COLUMN OBSCURED BY COLUMN COVERINGS. - Houston Astrodome, 8400 Kirby Drive, Houston, Harris County, TX

  4. 5. GLACIER POINT ROAD VIEW AT SENTINEL DOME PARKING AREA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. GLACIER POINT ROAD VIEW AT SENTINEL DOME PARKING AREA. LOOKING E. GIS: N-37 42 43.8 / W-119 35 12.1 - Glacier Point Road, Between Chinquapin Flat & Glacier Point, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  5. 1. PARKING LOT AT GLACIER POINT. HALF DOME AT CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. PARKING LOT AT GLACIER POINT. HALF DOME AT CENTER REAR. LOOKING NE. GIS: N-36 43 45.8 / W-119 34 14.1 - Glacier Point Road, Between Chinquapin Flat & Glacier Point, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  6. Dome shaped features on Europa's surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Solid State Imaging system aboard the spacecraft Galileo took this image of the surface of Europa on February 20, 1997 during its sixth orbit around Jupiter. The image is located near 16 North, 268 West; illumination is from the lower-right. The area covered is approximately 48 miles (80 kilometers) by 56 miles (95 kilometers) across. North is toward the top of the image.

    This image reveals that the icy surface of Europa has been disrupted by ridges and faults numerous times during its past. These ridges have themselves been disrupted by the localized formation of domes and other features that may be indicative of thermal upwelling of water from beneath the crust. These features provide strong evidence for the presence of subsurface liquid during Europa's recent past.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  7. Snodar: 2009 performance at Dome A, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonner, Colin S.; Ashley, Michael C. B.; Bradley, Stuart G.; Cui, Xiangqun; Feng, Longlong; Gong, Xuefei; Lawrence, Jon S.; Luong-van, Daniel M.; Shang, Zhaohui; Storey, John W. V.; Wang, Lifan; Yang, Huigen; Yang, Ji; Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Zhenxi

    2010-07-01

    Snodar is a high resolution acoustic radar designed specifically for profiling the atmospheric boundary layer on the high Antarctic plateau. Snodar profiles the atmospheric temperature structure function constant to a vertical resolution of 1 m or better with a minimum sample height of 8 m. The maximum sampling height is dependent on atmospheric conditions but is typically at least 100 m. Snodar uses a unique in-situ intensity calibration method that allows the instrument to be autonomously recalibrated throughout the year. The instrument is initially intensity calibrated against tower-mounted differential microthermal sensors. A calibration sphere is located in the near-field of the antenna to provide a fixed echo of known intensity, allowing the instrument to be continuously re-calibrated once deployed. This allows snow accumulation, transducer wear and system changes due to temperature to be monitored. Year-round power and communications are provided by the PLATO facility. This allows processed data to be downloaded every 6 hours while raw data is stored on-site for collection the following summer. Over 4 million processed samples have been downloaded through PLATO to date. We present signal attenuation from accumulation of snow and ice on Snodar's parabolic reflector during the 2009 at Dome A.

  8. Dome houses and energy conservation: an introductory bibliography. [38 references to dome efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    The appearance of geodesic domes in conventional neighborhoods is recent. The current popularity of these spherical designs is due to their energy efficiency. Some manufacturers have claimed over 40% efficiency improvement over conventional homes of the same size. A host of low utility bills across the country is now backing up these claims. This bibliography concentrates on the period from 1960 to the present, although there are a few entries from earlier periods. Most of the material is available in articles rather than books.

  9. Perforating domed plasmonic films for broadband and omnidirectional antireflection.

    PubMed

    Ai, Bin; Gu, Panpan; Möhwald, Helmuth; Zhang, Gang

    2016-08-25

    Domed Ag nano-hole/disk array films exhibit a reflectivity of less than 0.7% over a wide spectral range (400-1000 nm) and even lower values down to 0.05% with an oblique incidence angle; this unique optical response is attributed to three key factors: diffractive scattering loss on nanostructures, localized plasmonic absorption and curved surface (domed units). PMID:27510646

  10. Unique dome design for the SOAR telescope project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teran, Jose U.; Porter, David S.; Hileman, Edward A.; Neff, Daniel H.

    2000-08-01

    The SOAR telescope dome is a 20 meter diameter 5/8 spherical structure built on a rotating steel frame with an over the top nesting shutter and covered with a fiberglass panel system. The insulated fiberglass panel system can be self- supporting and is typically used for radomes on ground based tracking systems. The enclosed observing area is ventilated using a down draft ventilation system. The rotating steel frame is comprised of a ring beam and dual arch girders to provide support to the panel system sections and guide the shutter. The dual door shutter incorporates a unique differential drive system that reduces the complexity of the control system. The dome, shutter and windscreen `track' the telescope for maximum wind protection. The dome rotates on sixteen fixed compliant bogie assemblies. The dome is designed for assembly in sections off the facility and lifted into place for minimal impact on assembly of other telescope systems. The expected cost of the complete dome; including structure, drives, and controls is under 1.7 million. The details covered in this paper are the initial trade-offs and rationale required by SOAR to define the dome, the detailed design performed by M3 Engineering and Technology, and the choices made during the design.

  11. Anomalous zones in Gulf Coast Salt domes with special reference to Big Hill, TX, and Weeks Island, LA

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.; Magorian, T.R.; Thoms, R.L.; Autin, W.J.; McCulloh, R.P.; Denzler, S.; Byrne, K.O.

    1993-07-01

    Anomalous features in Gulf Coast Salt domes exhibit deviations from normally pure salt and vary widely in form from one dome to the next, ranging considerably in length and width. They have affected both conventional and solution mining in several ways. Gas outbursts, insolubles, and potash (especially carnallite) have led to the breakage of tubing in a number of caverns, and caused irregular shapes of many caverns through preferential leaching. Such anomalous features essentially have limited the lateral extent of conventional mining at several salt mines, and led to accidents and even the closing of several other mines. Such anomalous features, are often aligned in anomalous zones, and appear to be related to diapiric processes of salt dome development. Evidence indicates that anomalous zones are found between salt spines, where the differential salt intrusion accumulates other materials: Anhydrite bands which are relatively strong, and other, weaker impurities. Shear zones and fault displacement detected at Big Hill and Weeks Island domes have not yet had any known adverse impacts on SPR oil storage, but new caverns at these sites conceivably may encounter some potentially adverse conditions. Seismic reflection profiles at Big Hill dome have shown numerous fractures and faults in the caprock, and verified the earlier recognition of a major shear zone transecting the entire salt stock and forming a graben in the overlying caprock. Casing that is placed in such zones can be at risk. Knowledge of these zones should create awareness of possible effects rather than preclude the future emplacement of caverns. To the extent possible, major anomalous zones and salt stock boundaries should be avoided. Shear zones along overhangs may be particularly hazardous, and otherwise unknown valleys in the top of salt may occur along shear zones. These zones often can be mapped geophysically, especially with high-resolution seismic techniques.

  12. Geostrophic circulation between the Costa Rica Dome and Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenes, C. L.; Lavín, M. F.; Mascarenhas, Affonso S.

    2008-05-01

    The geostrophic circulation between the Costa Rica Dome and Central America is described from CTD observations collected in two surveys: (a) The Wet Cruise in September-October 1993, and the Jet Cruise in February-March 1994. Poleward coastal flow was present on both occasions, but the transition from flow around the dome to the poleward Costa Rica Coastal Current flow was quite tortuous because of the presence of mesoscale eddies. In particular, a warm anticyclonic eddy was found off the Gulf of Fonseca during both cruises, at an almost identical position and with similar dimensions (150 m deep, 250 km in diameter) and surface speed (0.5 m s -1). In the Gulf of Panama, poleward flow was also observed, weaker in February-March 1994 than in September-October 1993, when it penetrated to 600 m depth and transported 8.5 Sv. In September-October 1993, the current between the dome and the coast was mostly ˜100 m deep and weak (˜0.15 m s -1), although in its southern side it was deeper (˜450 m) and faster at 0.3 m s -1. The poleward transport between the dome and the coast was ˜7 Sv. In February-March 1994 the Costa Rica Dome was a closed ring adjacent to the continental shelf, ˜500 km in diameter, at least 400 m deep, had geostrophic surface speeds ˜0.25 m s -1, and subsurface maximum speed (0.15-0.20 m s -1) at ˜180 m depth; the associated uplift of the isotherms was ˜150 m. The flow in the south part of the dome splits into two branches, the weakest one going around the dome and the strongest one continuing east and turning south before reaching the Gulf of Panama.

  13. Lateral genomics.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, W F

    1999-12-01

    More than 20 complete prokaryotic genome sequences are now publicly available, each by itself an unparalleled resource for understanding organismal biology. Collectively, these data are even more powerful: they could force a dramatic reworking of the framework in which we understand biological evolution. It is possible that a single universal phylogenetic tree is not the best way to depict relationships between all living and extinct species. Instead a web- or net-like pattern, reflecting the importance of horizontal or lateral gene transfer between lineages of organisms, might provide a more appropriate visual metaphor. Here, I ask whether this way of thinking is really justified, and explore its implications.

  14. Wind tunnel study of an observatory dome with a circular aperture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Gregory G.; Cliffton, Ethan W.

    1990-01-01

    Results of a wind tunnel test of a new concept in observatory dome design, the Fixed Shutter Dome are presented. From an aerodynamic standpoint, the new dome configuration is similar in overall shape to conventional observatory domes, with the exception of the telescope viewing aperture. The new design consists of a circular aperture of reduced area in contrast to conventional domes with rectangular or slotted openings. Wind tunnel results of a side-by-side comparison of the new dome with a conventional dome demonstrate that the mean and fluctuating velocity through the aperture and in the center of the new dome configuration are lower than those of conventional domes, thus reducing the likelihood of telescope flow-induced vibration.

  15. Explosive activity associated with the growth of volcanic domes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newhall, C.G.; Melson, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Domes offer unique opportunities to measure or infer the characteristics of magmas that, at domes and elsewhere, control explosive activity. A review of explosive activity associated with historical dome growth shows that: 1. (1) explosive activity has occurred in close association with nearly all historical dome growth; 2. (2) whole-rock SiO2 content, a crude but widely reported indicator of magma viscosity, shows no systematic relationship to the timing and character of explosions; 3. (3) the average rate of dome growth, a crude indicator of the rate of supply of magma and volatiles to the near-surface enviornment, shows no systematic relationship to the timing or character of explosions; and 4. (4) new studies at Arenal and Mount St. Helens suggest that water content is the dominant control on explosions from water-rich magmas, whereas the crystal content and composition of the interstitial melt (and hence magma viscosity) are equally or more important controls on explosions from water-poor magmas. New efforts should be made to improve current, rather limited techniques for monitoring pre-eruption volatile content and magma viscosity, and thus the explosive potential of magmas. ?? 1983.

  16. Two types of superconducting domes in unconventional superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Tanmoy; Panagopoulos, Christos

    In this talk, we present a comprehensive analysis of the SC properties and phase diagrams across several families of unconventional superconductors within the copper-oxides, heavy-fermions, organics, and the recently discovered iron-pnictides, iron-chalcogenides, and oxybismuthides. We find that there are two types of SC domes present in all families of SC materials, arising sometimes as completely isolated, or merged into one, or in some materials only any one of them appears. One of the SC dome appearing at or near a possible QCP usually possesses a lower transition temperature (Tc) . The other SC dome appearing at a different value of the tuning parameter around a non-Fermi liquid (NFL) state often has higher Tc. Both SC domes are not necessarily linked to each other, and so does the QCP and NFL state. In materials, where both domes are present, they can be isolated by multiple tuning (such as such as disorder, or pressure, or magnetic field in addition to doping, and vice versa), giving a unique opportunity to decouple the relationship between QCP, NFL, and their role on superconductivity. The systematic study the NFL state might be a generic route to higher-Tc superconductivity.

  17. Fracture fillings and intrusive pyroclasts, Inyo Domes, California

    SciTech Connect

    Heiken, G.; Wohletz, K.; Eichelberger, J.

    1988-05-10

    Fractures containing juvenile magmatic pyroclasts were encountered during drilling into a 600-year-old feeder dike beneath the Inyo Domes chain, California. The Inyo Domes consist of a north-south trending, 10-km-long chain of domes, rhyolitic tuff rings, and phreatic craters. Boreholes were cored through the 51-m-diameter conduit of Obsidian Dome, the largest of the Inyo Domes, and through an unvented portion of the intrusion (dike) 1 km to the south. Pyroclast-bearing fractures were intersected in both holes: (1) 7- to 40-cm-thick fractures in welded basaltic scoria and quartz monzonite country rock are adjacent to the conduit at depths of 400--411 m and 492--533 m; they contain gray, clastic deposits, which show truncated cross bedding and convolute bedding; (2) adjacent to the dike, massive fracture fillings occur at depths of 289--302 m (129 m east of the dike) and 366--384 m (95--87 m east of the dike).

  18. The behaviour of repaired composite domes subjected to external pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, J.; Levy-Neto, F.

    1992-07-01

    Six hemispherical and four torispherical composite plastic domes reinforced with either carbon or E-glass woven fabrics or a combination of both have been tested under external pressure. The domes were prepared using male or female moulds and employed the hand lay-up/vacuum bag method for their manufacture. The domes were observed to fail either by buckling or as a result of material failure. Both modes of failure were usually located at the meridian having the minimum average thickness. These domes were then repaired using a recommended technique and retested. It has been shown that the integrity of the repaired zones was guaranteed and further damage to the domes during retesting moved to new locations usually corresponding to the areas of the new minimum average thickness meridian. Two computer programs based on finite difference and finite element methods were employed to predict the critical buckling or material failure loads. The theoretical predictions were shown to correlate very well with the experimental results.

  19. Upheaval Dome, An Analogue Site for Gale Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, P. G.; Eignebrode, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    We propose Upheaval Dome in southeastern Utah as an impact analogue site on Earth to Mars Science Laboratory candidate landing site Gale Crater. The genesis of Upheaval Dome was a mystery for some time--originally thought to be a salt dome. The 5 km crater was discovered to possess shocked quartz and other shock metamorphic features just a few years ago, compelling evidence that the crater was formed by impact, although the structural geology caused Shoemaker and Herkenhoff to speculate an impact origin some 25 years earlier. The lithology of the crater is sedimentary. The oldest rocks are exposed in the center of the dome, upper Permian sandstones, and progressively younger units are well exposed moving outward from the center. These are Triassic sandstones, siltstones and shales, which are intruded by clastic dikes. There are also other clay-rich strata down section, as is the case with Gale Crater. There is significant deformation in the center of the crater, with folding and steeply tilted beds, unlike the surrounding Canyonlands area, which is relatively undeformed. The rock units are well exposed at Upheaval Dome, and there are shatter cones, impactite fragments, shocked quartz grains and melt rocks present. The mineral shock features suggest that the grains were subjected to dynamic pressures> 10 GPa.

  20. M cells and granular mononuclear cells in Peyer's patch domes of mice depleted of their lymphocytes by total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ermak, T.H.; Steger, H.J.; Strober, S.; Owen, R.L.

    1989-03-01

    The cytoarchitecture of Peyer's patches that were depleted of their lymphocytes by total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) was examined with particular attention to the effects on M cells in the follicle epithelium and on mononuclear cells in follicle domes underlying the epithelium. Five-month-old, specific pathogen-free Balb/c mice were irradiated with 200-250 rad/day, five times a week to a total dose of 3400-4250, and their Peyer's patches were either fixed for electron microscopy or frozen for immunohistochemistry 1-4 days after completion of irradiation. Control mice were examined at the same time intervals. Follicle domes of TLI mice had approximately one fourth the epithelial surface area of domes of control mice. Within the epithelium, lymphoid cells were virtually depleted after TLI, and yet the epithelium contained M cells. In control mice, most M cells were accompanied by lymphoid cells in invaginations of the apical-lateral cell membrane. In TLI mice, most M cells did not have such apical-lateral invaginations and were columnar shaped. Other than lacking lymphocytes, these cells appeared to be mature M cells. Some M cells did have lymphoid cells or granular mononuclear cells below their basal membranes, adjacent to the basal lamina. Below the epithelium, the proportion of granular mononuclear cells was greatly increased following TLI. The retention of M cells and the increase in proportion of granular mononuclear cells in follicle domes are consistent with selective depletion of lymphocytes following TLI. Persistence of M cells without lymphocytic invaginations after TLI suggests that M cells can differentiate in the absence of, or at least in the presence of very few, lymphocytes, and that invagination by lymphocytes is not necessary to maintain mature M cell morphology.

  1. An assessment of hydrothermal alteration in the Santiaguito lava dome complex, Guatemala: implications for dome collapse hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, Jessica L.; Calder, Eliza S.; Hubbard, Bernard E.; Bernstein, Marc L.

    2013-01-01

    A combination of field mapping, geochemistry, and remote sensing methods has been employed to determine the extent of hydrothermal alteration and assess the potential for failure at the Santiaguito lava dome complex, Guatemala. The 90-year-old complex of four lava domes has only experienced relatively small and infrequent dome collapses in the past, which were associated with lava extrusion. However, existing evidence of an active hydrothermal system coupled with intense seasonal precipitation also presents ideal conditions for instability related to weakened clay-rich edifice rocks. Mapping of the Santiaguito dome complex identified structural features related to dome growth dynamics, potential areas of weakness related to erosion, and locations of fumarole fields. X-ray diffraction and backscattered electron images taken with scanning electron microscopy of dacite and ash samples collected from around fumaroles revealed only minor clay films, and little evidence of alteration. Mineral mapping using ASTER and Hyperion satellite images, however, suggest low-temperature (<150 °C) silicic alteration on erosional surfaces of the domes, but not the type of pervasive acid-sulfate alteration implicated in collapses of other altered edifices. To evaluate the possibility of internal alteration, we re-examined existing aqueous geochemical data from dome-fed hot springs. The data indicate significant water–rock interaction, but the Na–Mg–K geoindicator suggests only a short water residence time, and δ18O/δD ratios show only minor shifts from the meteoric water line with little precipitation of secondary (alteration) minerals. Based on available data, hydrothermal alteration on the dome complex appears to be restricted to surficial deposits of hydrous silica, but the study has highlighted, importantly, that the 1902 eruption crater headwall of Santa María does show more advanced argillic alteration. We also cannot rule out the possibility of advanced alteration

  2. An assessment of hydrothermal alteration in the Santiaguito lava dome complex, Guatemala: implications for dome collapse hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Jessica L.; Calder, Eliza S.; Hubbard, Bernard E.; Bernstein, Marc L.

    2013-01-01

    A combination of field mapping, geochemistry, and remote sensing methods has been employed to determine the extent of hydrothermal alteration and assess the potential for failure at the Santiaguito lava dome complex, Guatemala. The 90-year-old complex of four lava domes has only experienced relatively small and infrequent dome collapses in the past, which were associated with lava extrusion. However, existing evidence of an active hydrothermal system coupled with intense seasonal precipitation also presents ideal conditions for instability related to weakened clay-rich edifice rocks. Mapping of the Santiaguito dome complex identified structural features related to dome growth dynamics, potential areas of weakness related to erosion, and locations of fumarole fields. X-ray diffraction and backscattered electron images taken with scanning electron microscopy of dacite and ash samples collected from around fumaroles revealed only minor clay films, and little evidence of alteration. Mineral mapping using ASTER and Hyperion satellite images, however, suggest low-temperature (<150 °C) silicic alteration on erosional surfaces of the domes, but not the type of pervasive acid-sulfate alteration implicated in collapses of other altered edifices. To evaluate the possibility of internal alteration, we re-examined existing aqueous geochemical data from dome-fed hot springs. The data indicate significant water-rock interaction, but the Na-Mg-K geoindicator suggests only a short water residence time, and δ18O/δD ratios show only minor shifts from the meteoric water line with little precipitation of secondary (alteration) minerals. Based on available data, hydrothermal alteration on the dome complex appears to be restricted to surficial deposits of hydrous silica, but the study has highlighted, importantly, that the 1902 eruption crater headwall of Santa María does show more advanced argillic alteration. We also cannot rule out the possibility of advanced alteration within the

  3. Superconducting dome in a gate-tuned band insulator.

    PubMed

    Ye, J T; Zhang, Y J; Akashi, R; Bahramy, M S; Arita, R; Iwasa, Y

    2012-11-30

    A dome-shaped superconducting region appears in the phase diagrams of many unconventional superconductors. In doped band insulators, however, reaching optimal superconductivity by the fine-tuning of carriers has seldom been seen. We report the observation of a superconducting dome in the temperature-carrier density phase diagram of MoS(2), an archetypal band insulator. By quasi-continuous electrostatic carrier doping achieved through a combination of liquid and solid gating, we revealed a large enhancement in the transition temperature T(c) occurring at optimal doping in the chemically inaccessible low-carrier density regime. This observation indicates that the superconducting dome may arise even in doped band insulators.

  4. Geodesic-dome tank roof cuts water contamination, vapor losses

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, A.E. )

    1989-07-10

    Colonial Pipeline Co. has established an ongoing program for using geodesic-dome roofs on tanks in liquid petroleum-product service. As its standard, Colonial adopted geodesicodone roofs, in conjunction with internal floating decks, to replace worn external floating roofs on existing tanks used in gasoline service and for use on new tanks in all types of product service. Geodesic domes are clear-span structures requiring no internal-support columns. This feature allows the associated use of a floating deck that is as vapor tight as is possible to construct. Further, geodesic domes can practically eliminate rainwater contamination, eliminate wind-generated vapor losses, and greatly reduce filling losses associated with conventional external floating roofs.

  5. Dome-shaped PDC cutters drill harder rock effectively

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, D.P. )

    1992-12-14

    This paper reports that rock mechanics and sonic travel time log data indicate that bits with convex-shaped polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) cutters can drill harder rock formations than comparable bits with flat PDC cutters. The Dome-shaped cutters have drilled carbonate formations with sonic travel times as small as 50 [mu]sec/ft, compared to the standard cutoff of 75 [mu]sec/ft for flat PCD cutters. Recent field data from slim hole wells drilled in the Permian basin have shown successful applications of the 3/8-in. Dome cutter in the Grayburg dolomite with its sonic travel times as low as 50-55 [mu]sec/ft and compressive strengths significantly greater than the standard operating range for PDC bit applications. These field data indicate that the Dome cutters can successfully drill hard rock. The convex cutter shape as good impact resistance, cuttings removal, heat dissipation, and wear resistance.

  6. FLAMMABLE GAS DIFFUSION THROUGH SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) DOMES

    SciTech Connect

    MEACHAM, J.E.

    2003-11-10

    This report quantified potential hydrogen diffusion through Hanford Site Single-Shell tank (SST) domes if the SSTs were hypothetically sealed airtight. Results showed that diffusion would keep headspace flammable gas concentrations below the lower flammability limit in the 241-AX and 241-SX SST. The purpose of this document is to quantify the amount of hydrogen that could diffuse through the domes of the SSTs if they were hypothetically sealed airtight. Diffusion is assumed to be the only mechanism available to reduce flammable gas concentrations. The scope of this report is limited to the 149 SSTs.

  7. Exploring Learning through Audience Interaction in Virtual Reality Dome Theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolellis, Panagiotis; Daradoumis, Thanasis

    Informal learning in public spaces like museums, science centers and planetariums is increasingly popular during the last years. Recent advancements in large-scale displays allowed contemporary technology-enhanced museums to get equipped with digital domes, some with real-time capabilities like Virtual Reality systems. By conducting extensive literature review we have come to the conclusion that little to no research has been carried out on the leaning outcomes that the combination of VR and audience interaction can provide in the immersive environments of dome theaters. Thus, we propose that audience collaboration in immersive virtual reality environments presents a promising approach to support effective learning in groups of school aged children.

  8. Late Oligocene and Early Miocene Muroidea of the Zinda Pir Dome

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Everett H.; Flynn, Lawrence J.

    2016-01-01

    A series of Oligocene through Early Miocene terrestrial deposits preserved in the foothills of the Zinda Pir Dome of western Pakistan produce multiple, superposed fossil mammal localities. These include small mammal assemblages that shed light on the evolution of rodent lineages, especially Muroidea, in South Asia. Nine small mammal localities span approximately 28–19 Ma, an interval encompassing the Oligocene–Miocene boundary. The Early Miocene rodent fossil assemblages are dominated by muroid rodents, but muroids are uncommon and archaic in earlier Oligocene horizons. The Zinda Pir sequence includes the evolutionary transition to modern Muroidea at about the Oligocene–Miocene boundary. We review the muroid record for the Zinda Pir Dome, which includes the early radiation of primitive bamboo rats (Rhizomyinae) and early members of the modern muroid radiation, which lie near crown Cricetidae and Muridae. The Zinda Pir record dates diversification of modern muroids in the Indian Subcontintent and establishment by 19 Ma of muroid assemblages characteristic of the later Siwaliks. PMID:26681836

  9. Lateral blasts at Mount St. Helens and hazard zonation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crandell, D.R.; Hoblitt, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    Lateral blasts at andesitic and dacitic volcanoes can produce a variety of direct hazards, including ballistic projectiles which can be thrown to distances of at least 10 km and pyroclastic density flows which can travel at high speed to distances of more than 30 km. Indirect effect that may accompany such explosions include wind-borne ash, pyroclastic flows formed by the remobilization of rock debris thrown onto sloping ground, and lahars. Two lateral blasts occurred at a lava dome on the north flank of Mount St. Helens about 1200 years ago; the more energetic of these threw rock debris northeastward across a sector of about 30?? to a distance of at least 10 km. The ballistic debris fell onto an area estimated to be 50 km2, and wind-transported ash and lapilli derived from the lateral-blast cloud fell on an additional lobate area of at least 200 km2. In contrast, the vastly larger lateral blast of May 18, 1980, created a devastating pyroclastic density flow that covered a sector of as much as 180??, reached a maximum distance of 28 km, and within a few minutes directly affected an area of about 550 km2. The May 18 lateral blast resulted from the sudden, landslide-induced depressurization of a dacite cryptodome and the hydrothermal system that surrounded it within the volcano. We propose that lateral-blast hazard assessments for lava domes include an adjoining hazard zone with a radius of at least 10 km. Although a lateral blast can occur on any side of a dome, the sector directly affected by any one blast probably will be less than 180??. Nevertheless, a circular hazard zone centered on the dome is suggested because of the difficulty of predicting the direction of a lateral blast. For the purpose of long-term land-use planning, a hazard assessment for lateral blasts caused by explosions of magma bodies or pressurized hydrothermal systems within a symmetrical volcano could designate a circular potential hazard area with a radius of 35 km centered on the volcano

  10. LAMELLA DOME FRAMING DETAIL. NOTE CATWALK AT 12 O'CLOCK AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LAMELLA DOME FRAMING DETAIL. NOTE CATWALK AT 12 O'CLOCK AND SUSPENDED PENTAGONAL LIGHT RING GONDOLA. ALSO NOTE COMPRESSION RING AT CROWN OF DOME. - Houston Astrodome, 8400 Kirby Drive, Houston, Harris County, TX

  11. Shapes of Venusian 'pancake' domes imply episodic emplacement and silicic composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Jonathan H.; Bridges, Nathan T.; Grimm, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    The main evidence available for constraining the composition of the large circular 'pancake' domes on Venus is their gross morphology. Laboratory simulations using polyethylene glycol show that the height to diameter (aspect) ratios of domes of a given total volume depend critically on whether their extrusion was continuous or episodic, with more episodes leading to greater cooling and taller domes. Thus without observations of their emplacement, the compositions of Venusian domes cannot be uniquely constrained by their morphology. However, by considering a population of 51 Venusian domes to represent a sampling of many stages during the growth of domes with comparable histories, and by plotting aspect ratio versus total volume, we find that the shapes of the domes are most consistent with episodic emplacement. On Earth this mode of dome growth is found almost exclusively in lavas of dacite to rhyolite composition, strengthening earlier inferences about the presence of evolved magmas on Venus.

  12. Degassing processes during lava dome growth: Insights from Santiaguito lava dome, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, A. S. Peter; Watson, I. Matthew; Phillips, Jeremy C.; Caricchi, Luca; Dalton, Marika P.

    2011-04-01

    Eruptions of intermediate magma may be explosive or effusive. The development of open system degassing has been proposed as a pre-requisite for effusion of intermediate magma, however processes leading to open system degassing are poorly understood. To better understand degassing processes during lava dome extrusion we report high temporal-resolution SO 2 emission rate measurements collected with an ultra violet imaging camera at Santiaguito, Guatemala. Santiaguito is an ideal case study as the dome lava is compositionally very similar to products of the 1902 Plinian eruption of the parental Santa María volcano. We find that degassing is weak (0.4-1 kg s - 1 ) but continuous, and explosions are associated with small increases in emission rates (up to 2-3 kg s - 1 ). Continuous repose degassing occurs through a shallow cap rock which likely represents a proto-crust on the block lava flow which is extruded from the same vent. The continual permeability of the upper conduit argues against a mechanism of explosion triggering in which gas pressure builds beneath a viscous cap rock or plug. Rather, we consider degassing data better consistent with a model of shear-fracturing at the conduit margins. Using field constraints, we model the viscosity of Santiaguito magma as a function of depth and show that conditions for shear-fracturing are met from 150-600 m to the surface. This is in line with independent estimates of explosion initiation depth. We show that repose timescales are orders of magnitude longer than the timescale for shear fracture, and suggest that explosions are triggered when a continuous network of smaller-scale fractures develops, at which point decompression occurs and an explosion is triggered. Fracture healing occurs by viscous relaxation however near to the surface where viscosity is highest, an unconsolidated gouge layer may develop. Our model implies that the observed explosions are a by-product of extrusion. Shear-fracturing can drive open system

  13. Steep-sided domes on Venus - Characteristics, geologic setting, and eruption conditions from Magellan data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavri, Betina; Head, James W., III; Klose, K. B.; Wilson, Lionel

    1992-01-01

    A survey of more than 95 percent of the Venus surface reveals 145 steep-sided domes which can be subdivided into a variety of morphologic forms, the most common being shaped like inverted bowls or flat-topped domes. Results of a preliminary analysis of the distribution and geologic setting of the domes are presented. The relation of the domes to analogous terrestrial features is examined, and possible models for their mode of emplacement are outlined.

  14. 19. View of satcom communication dome with TR radome in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. View of satcom communication dome with TR radome in background right. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  15. The E-ELT project: the dome design status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchiori, G.; De Lorenzi, S.; Busatta, A.

    2012-09-01

    Further to the re-dimensioning of the E-ELT (European Extremely Large Telescope) telescope to 37 metres, the project of the dome has been completely reviewed, together with the Auxiliary Building and the Foundations. The Dome is now constituted by a structure with a steel hemispherical architecture, 79m.-high, with a 101m.-external pier diameter and a 42m-wide observing slit. These dimensions require the application of technologies for big structures (like stadiums, hangars, etc.) in order to comply with the manufacturing, transport and assembly constrains. The dome is characterized by an agglomerate of mechathronic technologies originated by the long experience matured by EIE in the industrial and astronomical fields. The solutions adopted for the NTT, the VLT, the LBT, the VST and the VISTA have demonstrated, along the years of service, their functionality, as well as their reliability and maintainability. Moreover, innovative technologies have been introduced, especially for what concerns the rotation systems of the Dome, the louvers, the windscreen, etc. The architecture of the control systems has been completed re-formulated, and they are now able to manage in real time all the exigencies of the E-ELT Observatory. All Project phases have been properly analysed and simulated, guaranteeing the completeness of the constructability and the maintainability. The entire work has been developed in close cooperation with ESO Project Team, further to a specific contract.

  16. [Analysis of the Basic Stress Pathway Above Acetabular Dome].

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Ma, Jun; Haung, Qiang; Hu, Qinsheng; Shi, Xiaojun; Pei, Fuxing

    2015-08-01

    The basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome is important for the maintenance of implant stability in acetabular reconstruction of total hip arthroplasty (THA). The purpose of this study was to describe the basic stress pathway to provide evidence for clinical acetabular reconstruction guidance of THA. A subject-specific finite element (FE) model was developed from CT data to generate 3 normal hip models and a convergence study was conducted to determine the number of pelvic trabecular bone material properties using 5 material assignment plans. In addition, in the range of 0 to 20 mm above the acetabular dome, the models were sectioned and the stress pathway was defined as two parts, i.e., 3D, trabecular bone stress distribution and quantified cortical bone stress level. The results showed that using 100 materials to define the material property of pelvic trabecular bone could assure both the accuracy and efficiency of the FE model. Under the same body weight condition, the 3D trabecular bone stress distributions above the acetabular dome were consistent, and especially the quantified cortical bone stress levels were all above 20 MPa and showed no statistically significant difference (P>0.05). Therefore, defining the basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome under certain body weight condition contributes to design accurate preoperative plan for acetabular reconstruction, thus helping restore the normal hip biomechanics and preserve the stability of the implants. PMID:26710451

  17. Laparoscopic ureteral reimplantation: a simplified dome advancement technique.

    PubMed

    Lima, Guilherme C; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Link, Richard E; Kavoussi, Louis R

    2005-12-01

    Laparoscopic Boari flap reimplantation has been used to treat long distal ureteral strictures. This technique requires extensive bladder mobilization and complex intracorporeal suturing. This demonstrates a novel laparoscopic bladder dome advancement approach for ureteral reimplantation. This technique obviates the need for bladder pedicle dissection and simplifies the required suturing.

  18. Lateral patellofemoral impingement: a cause of treatable pain after TKA.

    PubMed

    Cercek, Robert; Jacofsky, David; Kieffer, Karen; Larsen, Bethany; Jacofsky, Marc

    2011-09-01

    Multiple etiologies may cause anterior knee pain after total knee arthroplasty. While prior studies have addressed component positioning and surgical technique, no series in the literature describes lateral patellofemoral impingement as a source of the pain. Over a 2-year period at our institution, 18 patients with 19 painful total knee arthroplasties were diagnosed with lateral patellofemoral impingement. All underwent revision surgery with either lateral facetectomy or revision of the patellar dome. These patients were followed with Knee Society scores for 1 year. Knee Society scores were significantly improved at 8 weeks, 16 weeks, and 1 year. Lateral patellofemoral impingement should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of the painful total knee arthroplasty. This should be evaluated clinically through direct palpation of the lateral facet, and radiographically with the sunrise view. Lateral facetectomy or patellar revision can be performed with predictably good clinical results.

  19. Key variables influencing patterns of lava dome growth and collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, T.; Elsworth, D.; Voight, B.; Mattioli, G. S.; Jansma, P. E.

    2013-12-01

    Lava domes are conical structures that grow by the infusion of viscous silicic or intermediate composition magma from a central volcanic conduit. Dome growth can be characterized by repeated cycles of growth punctuated by collapse, as the structure becomes oversized for its composite strength. Within these cycles, deformation ranges from slow long term deformation to sudden deep-seated collapses. Collapses may range from small raveling failures to voluminous and fast-moving pyroclastic flows with rapid and long-downslope-reach from the edifice. Infusion rate and magma rheology together with crystallization temperature and volatile content govern the spatial distribution of strength in the structure. Solidification, driven by degassing-induced crystallization of magma leads to the formation of a continuously evolving frictional talus as a hard outer shell. This shell encapsulates the cohesion-dominated soft ductile core. Here we explore the mechanics of lava dome growth and failure using a two-dimensional particle-dynamics model. This meshless model follows the natural evolution of a brittle carapace formed by loss of volatiles and rheological stiffening and avoids difficulties of hour-glassing and mesh-entangelment typical in meshed models. We test the fidelity of the model against existing experimental and observational models of lava dome growth. The particle-dynamics model follows the natural development of dome growth and collapse which is infeasible using simple analytical models. The model provides insight into the triggers that lead to the transition in collapse mechasnism from shallow flank collapse to deep seated sector collapse. Increase in material stiffness due to decrease in infusion rate results in the transition of growth pattern from endogenous to exogenous. The material stiffness and strength are strongly controlled by the magma infusion rate. Increase in infusion rate decreases the time available for degassing induced crystallization leading to a

  20. Textural evidence for origin of salt dome anhydrite cap rocks, Winnfield Dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, M.R.; Kyle, J.R.; Price, P.E.

    1985-02-01

    Textures within anhydrite cap rock are products of repeated cycles of halie dissolution and residual anhydrite accretion at tops of salt stocks. Quarrying operations at Winnfield dome have exposed extensive portions of the anhydrite cap rock zone. This zone is composed primarily of unoriented, xenoblastic anhydrite crystals in laminae less than 1 mm to several centimeters thick. Laminations are defined by thin, dark sulfide accumulations and pressure solution of anhydrite. Deformed, banded anhydrite clasts are contained locally within laminae. Multiple-laminated, concave downward anhydrite mounds occur along some horizons. They may contain anhydrite breccia fragments or sulfides. Coarsely crystalline salt mounds, containing disseminated idioblastic anhydrite also occur along horizons. Mound morphologies vary from tall and thin to broad and squat; maximum dimensions range from less than 0.5 to about 2.0 m. These moundlike structures are related spatially and genetically. Moundlike structures are believed to form from salt spines along the salt-anhydrite contact. As the spine dissolves through several cycles of dissolution and accretion, a laminated anhydrite mound is preserved; if the spine becomes isolated from dissolution, then a salt inclusion is preserved. Anhydrite beds within the Louann Salt, deformed during diapirism, are preserved as deformed anhydrite clasts. Steeply dipping, bedded anhydrite zones within the salt stock may produce brecciated anhydrite mounds when incorporated into the cap rock. Sulfides record the movement of metalliferous fluids through the salt-anhydrite contact.

  1. Geology of the Upheaval Dome impact structure, southeast Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kriens, B.J.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Herkenhoff, K. E.

    1999-01-01

    Two vastly different phenomena, impact and salt diapirism, have been proposed for the origin of Upheaval Dome, a spectacular scenic feature in southeast Utah. Detailed geologic mapping and seismic refraction data indicate that the dome originated by collapse of a transient cavity formed by impact. Evidence is as follows: (1) sedimentary strata in the center of the structure are pervasively imbricated by top-toward-the-center thrust faulting and are complexly folded as well; (2) top-toward-the-center normal faults are found at the perimeter of the structure; (3) clastic dikes are widespread; (4) the top of the underlying salt horizon is at least 500 m below the surface at the center of the dome, and there are no exposures of salt or associated rocks of the Paradox Formation in the dome to support the possibility that a salt diapir has ascended through it; and (5) planar microstructures in quartz grains, fantailed fracture surfaces (shatter surfaces), and rare shatter cones are present near the center of the structure. We show that the dome formed mainly by centerward motion of rock units along listric faults. Outcrop-scale folding and upturning of beds, especially common in the center, are largely a consequence of this motion. We have also detected some centerward motion of fault-bounded wedges resulting from displacements on subhorizontal faults that conjoin and die out within horizontal bedding near the perimeter of the structure. The observed deformation corresponds to the central uplift and the encircling ring structural depression seen in complex impact craters. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Crustal influx, indentation, ductile thinning and gravity redistribution in a continental wedge: Building a Moldanubian mantled gneiss dome with underthrust Saxothuringian material (European Variscan belt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopin, F.; Schulmann, K.; Skrzypek, E.; Lehmann, J.; Dujardin, J. R.; Martelat, J. E.; Lexa, O.; Corsini, M.; Edel, J. B.; Å TíPská, P.; Pitra, P.

    2012-02-01

    The contribution of lateral forces, vertical load, gravity redistribution and erosion to the origin of mantled gneiss domes in internal zones of orogens remains debated. In the Orlica-Śnieżnik dome (Moldanubian zone, European Variscan belt), the polyphase tectono-metamorphic history is initially characterized by the development of subhorizontal fabrics associated with medium- to high-grade metamorphic conditions in different levels of the crust. It reflects the eastward influx of a Saxothuringian-type passive margin sequence below a Teplá-Barrandian upper plate. The ongoing influx of continental crust creates a thick felsic orogenic root with HP rocks and migmatitic orthogneiss. The orogenic wedge is subsequently indented by the eastern Brunia microcontinent producing a multiscale folding of the orogenic infrastructure. The resulting kilometre-scale folding is associated with the variable burial of the middle crust in synforms and the exhumation of the lower crust in antiforms. These localized vertical exchanges of material and heat are coeval with a larger crustal-scale folding of the whole infrastructure generating a general uplift of the dome. It is exemplified by increasing metamorphic conditions and younging of 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages toward the extruded migmatitic subdomes cored by HP rocks. The vertical growth of the dome induces exhumation by pure shear-dominated ductile thinning laterally evolving to non-coaxial detachment faulting, while erosion feeds the surrounding sedimentary basins. Modeling of the Bouguer anomaly grid is compatible with crustal-scale mass transfers between a dense superstructure and a lighter infrastructure. The model implies that the Moldanubian Orlica-Śnieżnik mantled gneiss dome derives from polyphase recycling of Saxothuringian material.

  3. Debris avalanches and slumps on the margins of volcanic domes on Venus: Characteristics of deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulmer, M. H.; Guest, J. E.; Beretan, K.; Michaels, Gregory A.; Saunders, R. Stephen

    1992-01-01

    Modified volcanic domes, referred to as collapsed margin domes, have diameters greater than those of terrestrial domes and were therefore thought to have no suitable terrestrial analogue. Comparison of the collapsed debris using the Magellan SAR images with volcanic debris avalanches on Earth has revealed morphological similarities. Some volcanic features identified on the seafloor from sonar images have diameters similar to those on Venus and also display scalloped margins, indicating modification by collapse. Examination of the SAR images of collapsed dome features reveals a number of distinct morphologies to the collapsed masses. Ten examples of collapsed margin domes displaying a range of differing morphologies and collapsed masses have been selected and examined.

  4. Timescales of texture development in a cooling lava dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Aulock, F. W.; Nichols, A. R. L.; Kennedy, B. M.; Oze, C.

    2013-08-01

    Crystal growth and crack development in cooling lava domes are both capable of redistributing and mobilizing water. Cracking and hydration decrease the stability of a dome, which may lead to hazards including partial dome collapse and block and ash flows. By examining the distribution of water around crystals and cracks, we identify and confine temperature and timescales of texture development in glassy rocks of volcanic domes. Four generations of textures have been identified: type a: spherulites, type b: cracks associated with spherulite growth, type c: perlitic cracks, and type d: disparate cracks. High-resolution imaging using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) performed on samples from the Ngongotaha dome, New Zealand, show an increase in H2O of up to 450% along gradients of around 100 μm up to 300 μm in length from perlitic cracks, spherulitic cracks and in haloes around spherulites. No gradients in water concentrations across the disparate cracks are present. Water diffusion models show potential timescale-temperature couples that coincide with textural observations and previous studies, and allow us to develop a conceptual model of spherulite growth and cracking in a cooling lava dome. Spherulite growth starts around the glass transition temperature (Tg) when the viscous melt cools to a brittle solid and proceeds with cracking related to volume changes at slightly lower temperatures and shorter timescales (days to weeks) compared to spherulite growth. Perlitic cracking happens at T≪Tg, allowing hydration of a permeable network within weeks to months. Low temperature (≲50 °C) cracks could not be hydrated in the time since eruption (≃230 ka). Our data show that textures in cooling glass develop during cooling below Tg within days, producing cracks and crystals that create inhomogeneities in the spatial distribution of water. The lengthscales of water diffusion away from spherulites, spherulite cracks, and perlite cracks suggest that most

  5. Site testing for submillimetre astronomy at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblin, P.; Minier, V.; Schneider, N.; Durand, G. Al.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Lawrence, J. S.; Luong-van, D. M.; Storey, J. W. V.; Durand, G. An.; Reinert, Y.; Veyssiere, C.; Walter, C.; Ade, P.; Calisse, P. G.; Challita, Z.; Fossat, E.; Sabbatini, L.; Pellegrini, A.; Ricaud, P.; Urban, J.

    2011-11-01

    Aims: Over the past few years a major effort has been put into the exploration of potential sites for the deployment of submillimetre astronomical facilities. Amongst the most important sites are Dome C and Dome A on the Antarctic Plateau, and the Chajnantor area in Chile. In this context, we report on measurements of the sky opacity at 200 μm over a period of three years at the French-Italian station, Concordia, at Dome C, Antarctica. We also present some solutions to the challenges of operating in the harsh polar environment. Methods: The 200-μm atmospheric opacity was measured with a tipper. The forward atmospheric model MOLIERE (Microwave Observation LIne Estimation and REtrieval) was used to calculate the atmospheric transmission and to evaluate the precipitable water vapour content (PWV) from the observed sky opacity. These results have been compared with satellite measurements from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on Metop-A, with balloon humidity sondes and with results obtained by a ground-based microwave radiometer (HAMSTRAD). In addition, a series of experiments has been designed to study frost formation on surfaces, and the temporal and spatial evolution of thermal gradients in the low atmosphere. Results: Dome C offers exceptional conditions in terms of absolute atmospheric transmission and stability for submillimetre astronomy. Over the austral winter the PWV exhibits long periods during which it is stable and at a very low level (0.1 to 0.3 mm). Higher values (0.2 to 0.8 mm) of PWV are observed during the short summer period. Based on observations over three years, a transmission of around 50% at 350 μm is achieved for 75% of the time. The 200-μm window opens with a typical transmission of 10% to 15% for 25% of the time. Conclusions: Dome C is one of the best accessible sites on Earth for submillimetre astronomy. Observations at 350 or 450 μm are possible all year round, and the 200-μm window opens long enough and with a

  6. Geological evaluation of Gulf Coast salt domes: overall assessment of the Gulf Interior Region

    SciTech Connect

    1981-10-01

    The three major phases in site characterization and selection are regional studies, area studies, and location studies. This report characterizes regional geologic aspects of the Gulf Coast salt dome basins. It includes general information from published sources on the regional geology; the tectonic, domal, and hydrologic stability; and a brief description the salt domes to be investigated. After a screening exercise, eight domes were chosen for further characterization: Keechi, Oakwood, and Palestine Domes in Texas; Vacherie and Rayburn's domes in North Louisiana; and Cypress Creek and Richton domes in Mississippi. A general description of each, maps of the location, property ownership, and surface geology, and a geologic cross section were presented for each dome.

  7. Features of West Hackberry SPR Caverns and Internal Structure Of the Salt Dome

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, Darrell Eugene

    2006-09-01

    The intent of this report is to examine the internal structure of the West Hackberry salt dome utilizing the information from the geometric configuration of the internal cavern surfaces obtained from graphical representations of sonar survey data. In a general sense, the caverns of West Hackberry are remarkable in the symmetry of their shapes. There are only rather moderate deviations from what would be considered an ideal cylindrical solution mining geometry in these caverns. This finding is in marked contrast to the directional solutioning found in the elliptical cross sectioned, sometimes winged, caverns of Big Hill. None of the persistent lineaments prevalent in Big Hill caverns are evident in West Hackberry caverns. Irregularities of the West Hackberry caverns are restricted to preferential solution formed pits and protuberances with moderate dimensions. In fact, the principal characteristic of West Hackberry caverns is the often large sections of smooth and cylindrical cavern wall. Differences in the cavern characteristics between West Hackberry and Big Hill suggest that the former dome is quite homogeneous, while the latter still retains strong remnants of the interbeds of the original bedded Louann salt. One possible explanation is that the source of the two domes, while both from the Louann mother salt, differs. While the source of the Big Hill dome is directly from the mother salt bed, it appears that the West Hackberry arises from a laterally extruded sill of the mother salt. Consequently, the amount of deformation, and hence, mixing of the salt and interbed material in the extruded sill is significantly greater than would be the case for the directly formed diapir. In West Hackberry, remnants of interbeds apparently no longer exist. An important aspect of the construction of the West Hackberry caverns is the evidence of an attempt to use a uniform solutioning construction practice. This uniformity involved the utilization of single well solutioning and

  8. Advanced imaging techniques III: a scalable and modular dome illumination system for scientific microphotography on a budget

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A scalable and modular LED illumination dome for microscopic scientific photography is described and illustrated, and methods for constructing such a dome are detailed. Dome illumination for insect specimens has become standard practice across the field of insect systematics, but many dome designs ...

  9. Analysis of the TMI-2 dome radiation monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M B; Mueller, G M; Jernigan, W C

    1985-08-01

    Questions have been raised regarding the accuracy of the in-containment radiation readings from the LOCA qualified, dome radiation monitor, HP-R-214 during the March 28, 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor. This report discusses the accuracy of the readings, gives the results of examining the radiation monitor itself, and estimates the radiation environment inside containment during the accident.

  10. Kaguyak dome field and its Holocene caldera, Alaska Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierstein, Judy; Hildreth, Wes

    2008-10-01

    Kaguyak Caldera lies in a remote corner of Katmai National Park, 375 km SW of Anchorage, Alaska. The 2.5-by-3-km caldera collapsed ~ 5.8 ± 0.2 ka ( 14C age) during emplacement of a radial apron of poorly pumiceous crystal-rich dacitic pyroclastic flows (61-67% SiO 2). Proximal pumice-fall deposits are thin and sparsely preserved, but an oxidized coignimbrite ash is found as far as the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, 80 km southwest. Postcaldera events include filling the 150-m-deep caldera lake, emplacement of two intracaldera domes (61.5-64.5% SiO 2), and phreatic ejection of lakefloor sediments onto the caldera rim. CO 2 and H 2S bubble up through the lake, weakly but widely. Geochemical analyses ( n = 148), including pre-and post-caldera lavas (53-74% SiO 2), define one of the lowest-K arc suites in Alaska. The precaldera edifice was not a stratocone but was, instead, nine contiguous but discrete clusters of lava domes, themselves stacks of rhyolite to basalt exogenous lobes and flows. Four extracaldera clusters are mid-to-late Pleistocene, but the other five are younger than 60 ka, were truncated by the collapse, and now make up the steep inner walls. The climactic ignimbrite was preceded by ~ 200 years by radial emplacement of a 100-m-thick sheet of block-rich glassy lava breccia (62-65.5% SiO 2). Filling the notches between the truncated dome clusters, the breccia now makes up three segments of the steep caldera wall, which beheads gullies incised into the breccia deposit prior to caldera formation. They were probably shed by a large lava dome extruding where the lake is today.

  11. Advances in spinel ceramic technology for large windows and domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepulveda, Juan L.; Loutfy, Raouf O.; Chang, Sekyung; Ibrahim, Sharly; Traggis, Nick

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes MER's recent advances on the development of high strength, transparent magnesium aluminum spinel technology for large IR windows and domes. The novel spinel material exhibits high optical and IR transparency in the 0.2 - 5.5 μm wavelength, is very resistant to abrasion, with density higher than 99.9% of theoretical, with very fine and uniform grain size, and flexural strength of 300 MPa. Spinel domes technology has been scaled up to produce hemispherical 180° aperture domes in sizes up to 7" in diameter using freeze casting technology to produce the green dome preforms. MER is also pursuing the production of large size spinel windows by either producing monolithic large single windows or by edge bonding several smaller size windows. Both approaches present challenges. Production of monolithic large size windows is limited by equipment size, availability, and investment capital while the edge bonding approach requires perfect transparency and strength at the bonded edge. MER together with Precision Photonics Corp. are developing high strength, edge bonded, transparent magnesium aluminum spinel windows for next generation aircraft and other defense armor applications which require windows as large as 30"x30"x0.5" at an affordable cost. MER has further improved strength of the spinel by accurate control of the average grain size and grain size scatter while remarkable transmission is obtained by elimination of the intergrain/intragrain porosity, and by eliminating all possible contamination. The spinel bonding technology under development consists of chemically activated direct bonding (CADB®), an epoxy-free solution-assisted optical-contacting process developed by Precision Photonics Corporation (PPC).

  12. Kaguyak dome field and its Holocene caldera, Alaska Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fierstein, J.; Hildreth, W.

    2008-01-01

    Kaguyak Caldera lies in a remote corner of Katmai National Park, 375??km SW of Anchorage, Alaska. The 2.5-by-3-km caldera collapsed ~ 5.8 ?? 0.2??ka (14C age) during emplacement of a radial apron of poorly pumiceous crystal-rich dacitic pyroclastic flows (61-67% SiO2). Proximal pumice-fall deposits are thin and sparsely preserved, but an oxidized coignimbrite ash is found as far as the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, 80??km southwest. Postcaldera events include filling the 150-m-deep caldera lake, emplacement of two intracaldera domes (61.5-64.5% SiO2), and phreatic ejection of lakefloor sediments onto the caldera rim. CO2 and H2S bubble up through the lake, weakly but widely. Geochemical analyses (n = 148), including pre-and post-caldera lavas (53-74% SiO2), define one of the lowest-K arc suites in Alaska. The precaldera edifice was not a stratocone but was, instead, nine contiguous but discrete clusters of lava domes, themselves stacks of rhyolite to basalt exogenous lobes and flows. Four extracaldera clusters are mid-to-late Pleistocene, but the other five are younger than 60??ka, were truncated by the collapse, and now make up the steep inner walls. The climactic ignimbrite was preceded by ~ 200??years by radial emplacement of a 100-m-thick sheet of block-rich glassy lava breccia (62-65.5% SiO2). Filling the notches between the truncated dome clusters, the breccia now makes up three segments of the steep caldera wall, which beheads gullies incised into the breccia deposit prior to caldera formation. They were probably shed by a large lava dome extruding where the lake is today.

  13. Upgrading, monitoring and operation of a dome drive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauman, Steven E.; Cruise, Bill; Look, Ivan; Matsushige, Grant; Roberts, Larry; Salmon, Derrick; Taroma, Ralph; Vermeulen, Tom; Richards, Krieg

    2014-08-01

    CFHT's decision to move away from classical observing prompted the development of a remote observing environment aimed at producing science observations from headquarters facility in Waimea, HI. This remote observing project commonly referred to as the Observatory Automation Project (OAP ) was completed at the end of January 2011 and has been providing the majority of science data ever since. A comprehensive feasibility study was conducted to determine the options available to achieve remote operations of the observatory dome drive system. After evaluation, the best option was to upgrade the original hydraulic system to utilize variable frequency drive (VFD) technology. The project upgraded the hydraulic drive system, which initially utilized a hydraulic power unit and three (3) identical drive units to rotate the dome. The new electric drive system replaced the hydraulic power unit with electric motor controllers, and each drive unit reuses the original drive and swaps one for one the original hydraulic motors with an electric motor. The motor controllers provide status and monitoring parameters for each drive unit which convey the functionality and health of the system. This paper will discuss the design upgrades to the dome drive rotation system, as well as some benefits, control, energy savings, and monitoring.

  14. An Operationally Based Vision Assessment Simulator for Domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archdeacon, John; Gaska, James; Timoner, Samson

    2012-01-01

    The Operational Based Vision Assessment (OBVA) simulator was designed and built by NASA and the United States Air Force (USAF) to provide the Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine (USAFSAM) with a scientific testing laboratory to study human vision and testing standards in an operationally relevant environment. This paper describes the general design objectives and implementation characteristics of the simulator visual system being created to meet these requirements. A key design objective for the OBVA research simulator is to develop a real-time computer image generator (IG) and display subsystem that can display and update at 120 frame s per second (design target), or at a minimum, 60 frames per second, with minimal transport delay using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) technology. There are three key parts of the OBVA simulator that are described in this paper: i) the real-time computer image generator, ii) the various COTS technology used to construct the simulator, and iii) the spherical dome display and real-time distortion correction subsystem. We describe the various issues, possible COTS solutions, and remaining problem areas identified by NASA and the USAF while designing and building the simulator for future vision research. We also describe the critically important relationship of the physical display components including distortion correction for the dome consistent with an objective of minimizing latency in the system. The performance of the automatic calibration system used in the dome is also described. Various recommendations for possible future implementations shall also be discussed.

  15. Radar scattering properties of steep-sided domes on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Peter G.

    1994-01-01

    More than 100 quasi-circular steep-sided volcanic domes, with diameters ranging from 6 to 60 km, have been observed on the surface of Venus by the Magellan radar mapper. Assuming that they have the shape of a solidified high-viscosity Newtonian fluid, their radar scattering properties can be studied in detail from Magellan images, since a typical radar swath resolves each dome into several tens of thousands of measurements of radar cross section at incidence angles varying fom 15 deg to 55 deg. Through examination of 20 domes in detail, it appears that many of those situated on lava plains scatter radar in a manner that is indistinguishable from that of the surrounding material, suggesting that either (1) they were formed of a relatively high-density high-viscosity material, e.g., andesite, rather than a lower-density one, e.g., rhyolite or dacite; or (2) that their surfaces share a common origin with those of their surroundings, e.g., through in situ weathering or aeolian deposition.

  16. Cybersickness Following Repeated Exposure to DOME and HMD Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Laura C.; Harm, Deborah L.; Kennedy, Robert S.; Reschke, Millard F.; Loftin, R. Bowen

    2011-01-01

    Virtual environments (VE) offer unique training opportunities, including training astronauts to preadapt them to the novel sensory conditions of microgravity. However, one unresolved issue with VE use is the occurrence of cybersickness during and following exposure to VE systems. Most individuals adapt and become less ill with repeated interaction with VEs. The goal of this investigation was to compare motion sickness symptoms (MSS) produced by dome and head-mounted (HMD) displays and to examine the effects of repeated exposures on MSS. Sixty-one subjects participated in the study. Three experimental sessions were performed each separated by one day. The subjects performed a navigation and pick and place task in either a dome or HMD VE. MSS were measured using a Simulator Sickness Questionnaire before, immediately after, and at 1, 2, 4 and 6 hours following exposure to the VEs. MSS data were normalized by calculating the natural log of each score and an analysis of variance was performed. We observed significant main effects for day and time and a significant day by time interaction for total sickness and for each of the subscales, nausea, oculomotor and disorientation. However, there was no significant main effect for device. In conclusion, subjects reported a large increase in MSS immediately following exposure to both the HMD and dome, followed by a rapid recovery across time. Sickness severity also decreased over days, which suggests that subjects become dual-adapted over time making VE training a viable pre-flight countermeasure for space motion sickness.

  17. Small domes on Venus: probable analogs of Icelandic lava shields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garvin, James B.; Williams, Richard S.

    1990-01-01

    On the basis of observed shapes and volumetric estimates, we interpret small, dome-like features on radar images of Venus to be analogs of Icelandic lava-shield volcanoes. Using morphometric data for venusian domes in Aubele and Slyuta (in press), as well as our own measurements of representative dome volumes and areas from Tethus Regio, we demonstrate that the characteristic aspect ratios and flank slopes of these features are consistent with a subclass of low Icelandic lava-shield volcanoes (LILS ). LILS are slightly convex in cross-section with typical flank slopes of ∼3°. Plausible lava-shield-production rates for the venusian plains suggest formation of ∼53 million shields over the past 0.25 Ga. The cumulative global volume of lava that would be associated with this predicted number of lava shields is only a factor of 3–4 times that of a single oceanic composite shield volcano such as Mauna Loa. The global volume of all venusian lava shields in the 0.5–20-km size range would only contribute a meter of resurfacing over geologically significant time scales. Thus, venusian analogs to LILS may represent the most abundant landform on the globally dominant plains of Venus, but would be insignificant with regard to the global volume of lava extruded. As in Iceland, associated lavas from fissure eruptions probably dominate plains volcanism and should be evident on the higher resolution Magellan radar images.

  18. Dome petroleum puts Lindbergh and Primrose Projects on hold

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    During 1985 Dome Petroleum Limited announced two new commercial oil sands projects in Alberta, Canada. The Lindbergh Commercial Project was to produce approximately 12,000 barrels per day (15,000 barrels per day total including pilot projects in the same area) by 1989. The Primrose Lake Project was to produce 25,000 barrels per day in 5000 barrels per day stages over a give year period. In June both projects were put on hold by Dome due to the dramatic decline in oil prices that has occurred since the beginning of 1986. At the Lindbergh Project, drilling on the first phase was halted after 31 wells were completed. These wells have been placed on primary production. Steaming, gathering, and processing equipment was committed prior to the oil price decline, and is being stored for use when the oil price recovers. With regard to the Primrose Lake Project, Dome has postponed the proposed 1986 drilling program completely. The project will be re-activated when oil prices return to levels that make it economically viable.

  19. Ice crystal precipitation at Dome C site (East Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santachiara, G.; Belosi, F.; Prodi, F.

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, falling ice crystals were collected on glass slides covered with a thin layer of 2% formvar in chloroform at the Dome Concordia site (Dome C), Antarctica. Samplings were performed in the framework of the 27th Italian Antarctica expedition of the Italian National Program for Research in Antarctica in the period 21 February-6 August 2012. Events of clear-sky precipitations and precipitations from clouds were considered and the replicas obtained were examined under Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Several shapes of ice crystals were identified, including "diamond dust" (plates, pyramids, hollow and solid columns), and crystal aggregates varying in complexity. Single events often contained both small (10 μm to 50 μm) and large (hundreds of microns) crystals, suggesting that crystals can form simultaneously near the ground (height of a few hundred metres) and at higher layers (height of thousands of metres). Images of sampled crystal replicas showed that single bullets are not produced separately, but by the disintegration of combinations of bullets. Rimed ice crystals were absent in the Dome C samples, i.e. the only mode of crystal growth was water vapour diffusion. On considering the aerosol in the sampled crystals, we reached the conclusion that inertial impaction, interception and Brownian motion were insufficient to explain the scavenged aerosol. We therefore presume that phoretic forces play a role in scavenging during the crystal growth process.

  20. Charged nano-domes and bubbles in epitaxial graphene.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, A Ben Gouider; Kusmartsev, F V; Robinson, B J; Ouerghi, A; Kusmartseva, O E; Kolosov, O V; Mazzocco, R; Gaifullin, Marat B; Oueslati, M

    2014-04-25

    For the first time, new epitaxial graphene nano-structures resembling charged 'bubbles' and 'domes' are reported. A strong influence, arising from the change in morphology, on the graphene layer's electronic, mechanical and optical properties has been shown. The morphological properties of these structures have been studied with atomic force microscopy (AFM), ultrasonic force microscopy (UFM) and Raman spectroscopy. After initial optical microscopy observation of the graphene, a detailed description of the surface morphology, via AFM and nanomechanical UFM measurements, was obtained. Here, graphene nano-structures, domes and bubbles, ranging from a few tens of nanometres (150–200 nm) to a few μm in size have been identified. The AFM topographical and UFM stiffness data implied the freestanding nature of the graphene layer within the domes and bubbles, with heights on the order of 5–12 nm. Raman spectroscopy mappings of G and 2D bands and their ratio confirm not only the graphene composition of these structures but also the existence of step bunching, defect variations and the carrier density distribution. In particular, inside the bubbles and substrate there arises complex charge redistribution; in fact, the graphene bubble–substrate interface forms a charged capacitance. We have determined the strength of the electric field inside the bubble–substrate interface, which may lead to a minigap of the order of 5 meV opening for epitaxial graphene grown on 4H-SiC face-terminated carbon.

  1. Granitoid magmatism of Alarmaut granite-metamorphic dome, West Chukotka, NE Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchitskaya, M. V.; Sokolov, S. D.; Bondarenko, G. E.; Katkov, S. M.

    2009-04-01

    Main tectonic elements of West Chukotka are Alazey-Oloy, South-Anyui and Anyui-Chukotka fold systems, formed as a result of collision between structures of North-Asian continent active margin and Chukotka microcontinent [1-3]. South-Anyui fold system, separating Alazey-Oloy and Anyui-Chukotka systems, is considered as suture zon, formed as a result of oceanic basin closing [4-6]. Continent-microcontinent collision resulted in formation of large orogen with of northern and southern vergent structures, complicated by strike-slip deformations [7, 8]. Within Anyui-Chukotka fold system several rises, where most ancient deposits (crystalline basement and Paleozoic cover of Chukotka microcontinent) are exposed, were distinguished [2, 9-11]. Later they were considered as granite-metamorphic domes [12-14]. Alarmaut dome is located at West Chukotka to the north from Bilibino city and is traced from south to north in more than 120 km. General direction of structure is discordant to prevailing NW extensions of tectonic elements of the region. Paleozoic-Triassic deposits are exposed within the Alarmaut dome: 1) D3-C1 - crystalline schists, quartz-feldspar metasandstones, quartzites, marbles (700 m) [11]; 2) C1 - marblized limestones, quartz-feldspar metasandstones, quartzites, amphibole-pyroxene crystalline schists. Limestones contain corals, indicating Visean age of deposits [11]. Metamorphism reaches amphibolite facies, maximum P-T conditions are 660°С and 5 kbar. Migmatites, indicating in situ partial melting, are observed. Intensity of deformations of Paleozoic rocks increases at the boundary with Triassic deposits [11]; in the western part of dome slices of Pz rocks are separated by blastomylonite horizons [14]. Within Alramaut dome granitoids of Lupveem batholith (central part of dome), Bystrinsky pluton (southeastern part), and small Koyvel' and Kelil'vun plutons were studied. New U-Pb SHRIMP zircon data indicate Early Cretaceous (117-112 m.a.) age of granitoids [15

  2. Advances in our Understanding of Lava-Dome Eruptions Arising From the Study of Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, M.

    2006-12-01

    The eruption of Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, began in July 1995 and is ongoing 11 years later. Over 0.6 km3 andesite lava has been erupted at rates of up to around 10 m3/s; more generally at rates of 1-3 m3/s. The style of eruption has been dominantly effusive: a lava dome has grown and repeatedly collapsed, generating pyroclastic flows and surges. The eruption has been the focus of intense international scientific study; as a result, there have been major advances in understanding how such volcanoes work that can be applied to other volcanoes in similar tectonic settings. The traditional concept of magma chambers containing stored, molten magma is inadequate for Soufrière Hills; instead, both petrological evidence and ground deformation suggests that hot, mafic magma rises from depth and re-melts the silicic, highly crystalline rocks beneath the volcano shortly before eruption. Even during pauses in lava eruption, magma continues to be supplied at depth beneath the volcano. The hot, mafic magma supplies a vapor phase as it degasses, which ascends to the surface and is erupted with the andesite. The vapor is rich in SO2 and HCl gases, the proportions of which vary with the rate and style of eruption. Extensive study at Soufrière Hills and elsewhere has revealed that intense shallow degassing, cooling and crystallization of magma causes development of large rheological gradients and overpressures. After the observation of pulsatory magma effusion and transitions between effusive and explosive styles of eruption, models were developed to describe pressurization, flow rate and escape of gas in the upper few hundred meters of the conduit. A number of large lava dome collapses have offered an opportunity to observe the phenomena associated with the instability of lava domes, volcanic flows and the interaction between these flows and seawater. Large- volume pyroclastic flows have entered the sea and caused hydrovolcanic activity and energetic surges. The rate

  3. Lunar Mare Dome Identification and Morphologic Properties Analysis Using Chang'E-2 Lunar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xingguo; Mu, Lingli; Li, Chunlai; Liu, Jianjun; Ren, Xin; Wang, Yuanyuan

    2016-04-01

    Identify the lunar mare dome and study the morphologic properties to know more knowledge about the structure will enhance the study of lunar volcanism. Traditionally, most lunar domes are identified by the scientists from exploring the images or topographic maps of the lunar surface with manual method, which already found out a bunch of lunar domes in specific local areas. For the purpose of getting more knowledge about global lunar dome, it is necessary to identify the lunar dome from the global lunar mare. However, it is hard to find new lunar domes from the global lunar mare only with manual method, since in that case, the large volume lunar data is needed and such work is too time consumed, so that, there are few researchers who have indentified and study the properties of the lunar dome from the perspective of lunar global scale. To solve the problem mentioned above, in this approach , CE-2 DEM, DOM data in 7m resolution were used in the detection and morphologic analysis of the lunar domes and a dome detection method based on topographic characteristics were developed.We firstly designed a method considering the morphologic characteristics to identify the lunar dome with Chang'E2(CE-2) lunar global data, after that, the initial identified result with properties is analyzed, and finally, by integrating the result with lunar domes already found by former researchers, we made some maps about the spatial distribution of the global lunar mare dome. With the CE-2 data covering the former lunar domes and the new found lunar domes, we surveyed and calculated some morphologic properties, and found that, lunar domes are circular or eclipse shaped, obviously different from background in topography,which has a average diameter between 3-25km, circular degree less than 1.54, with a average slope less than 10°, average height less than 650m and diameter/height less than 0.065. Almost all of the lunar domes are located in the extent of 58°N~54°S,167°W~180°E,and nearly

  4. Halogen Degassing during Emplacement and Crystallization of the Chaitén Rhyolitic Lava Dome(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Bleick, H.; Castro, J. M.; Pallister, J. S.; Eichelberger, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    Despite relatively modest ash emissions, the 2008-2009 eruption at Chaitén volcano severely damaged as much as 400 km2 of forest vegetation to the N, E and S of the volcano (Pallister et al., Eos, in press). We explored the possibility that near-surface crystallization of the 0.5-0.8 km3 rhyolite lava dome released sufficient halogens to effect vegetation as far as 15 km away. Electron microprobe analysis of glass from melt inclusions (MI), pumice fallout, lava-dome groundmass, and juvenile lithics reveals evidence for open-system behavior during “second boiling” of the lava dome. The 2008-09 eruptive pumices are crystal-poor (0.1 to 1.0 vol.%), with rare crystals of plagioclase, orthopyroxene, Ti-magnetite, and either biotite or hornblende (depending on the sample). The dome samples are similar, but have groundmass that is variably crystallized to fine-grained microlites (generally < 5 µm in width) of plagioclase, orthopyroxene, and Ti-magnetite. Biotite and amphibole are absent from the groundmass, presumably because H2O-pressures in the surface-degassed melt dropped sufficiently to destabilize these hydrous phases. S and F are uniformly low in MI and pumiceous glasses, averaging < 50 ppm in each, consistent with low measured SO2 emissions (Carn et al., Eos, 90:205). Cl is more variable. Pumiceous glass averages 860±90 ppm, similar to two glassy lithics interpreted as quenched melts quarried from the conduit. MI in plagioclase from a hornblende-bearing pumice and from biotite-bearing dome rocks contained 990±280 ppm Cl. Higher Cl values (~3000 ppm) were reported by Castro & Dingwell (Nature, 2009, 461:780) for MI in biotite-bearing pumice, consistent with additional syn-eruptive release of HCl during the early weeklong explosive phase. Analysis of matrix glasses in dome samples demonstrate trends of increasing K and Si during crystallization of groundmass, and decreasing Al, Mg, Fe, and Ca. The 45% increase in K implies at least that amount of

  5. Effective pine bark composting with the Dome Aeration Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Trois, Cristina . E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za; Polster, Andreas

    2007-07-01

    In South Africa garden refuse is primarily disposed of in domestic landfills. Due to the large quantities generated, any form of treatment would be beneficial for volume reduction, waste stabilization and resource recovery. Dome Aeration Technology (DAT) is an advanced process for aerobic biological degradation of garden refuse and general waste [Paar, S., Brummack, J., Gemende, B., 1999a. Advantages of dome aeration in mechanical-biological waste treatment. In: Proceedings of the 7th International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium, Cagliari, 4-8 October 1999; Paar, S., Brummack, J., Gemende, B., 1999b. Mechanical-biological waste stabilization by the dome aeration method. Environment Protection Engineering 25 (3/99). Mollekopf, N., Brummack, J., Paar, S., Vorster, K., 2002. Use of the Dome Aeration Technology for biochemical stabilization of waste prior to landfilling. In: Proceedings of the Wastecon 2002, Waste Congress and Exhibition, Durban, South Africa.]. It is a non-reactor open windrow composting process, with the main advantage being that the input material needs no periodic turning. A rotting time of only 3-4 months indicates the high efficiency. Additionally, the low capital/operational costs, low energy inputs and limited plant requirements provide potential for use in aerobic refuse stabilization. The innovation in the DAT process is the passive aeration achieved by thermally driven advection through open windrows caused by temperature differences between the degrading material and the outside environment. This paper investigates the application of Dome Aeration Technology to pine bark composting as part of an integrated waste management strategy. A full-scale field experiment was performed at the Bisasar Road Landfill Site in Durban to assess the influence of climate, waste composition and operational conditions on the process. A test windrow was constructed and measurements of temperature and airflow through the material were taken. The process

  6. Design and Development of a Composite Dome for Experimental Characterization of Material Permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estrada, Hector; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a carbon fiber reinforced plastic dome, including a description of the dome fabrication, method for sealing penetrations in the dome, and a summary of the planned test series. This dome will be used for the experimental permeability characterization and leakage validation of composite vessels pressurized using liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen at the Cryostat Test Facility at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The preliminary design of the dome was completed using membrane shell analysis. Due to the configuration of the test setup, the dome will experience some flexural stresses and stress concentrations in addition to membrane stresses. Also, a potential buckling condition exists for the dome due to external pressure during the leak testing of the cryostat facility lines. Thus, a finite element analysis was conducted to assess the overall strength and stability of the dome for each required test condition. Based on these results, additional plies of composite reinforcement material were applied to local regions on the dome to alleviate stress concentrations and limit deflections. The dome design includes a circular opening in the center for the installation of a polar boss, which introduces a geometric discontinuity that causes high stresses in the region near the hole. To attenuate these high stresses, a reinforcement system was designed using analytical and finite element analyses. The development of a low leakage polar boss system is also investigated.

  7. Integrated field and numerical modeling investigation of crustal flow mechanisms and trajectories in migmatite domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Donna; Teyssier, Christian; Rey, Patrice

    2016-04-01

    Integrated field-based and modeling studies provide information about the driving mechanisms and internal dynamics of migmatite domes, which are important structures for understanding the rheology of the lithosphere in orogens. Dome-forming processes range from extension (isostasy) driven flow to density (buoyancy) driven systems. Vertical flow (up or down) is on the scale of tens of km. End-member buoyancy-driven domes are typically Archean (e.g., Pilbara, Australia). Extension-driven systems include the migmatite domes in metamorphic core complexes of the northern North American Cordillera, as well as some domes in Variscan core complexes. The Entia dome of central Australia is a possible hybrid dome in which extension and density inversion were both involved in dome formation. The Entia is a "double dome", comprised of a steep high-strain zone bordered by high melt-fraction migmatite (subdomes). Field and numerical modeling studies show that these are characteristics of extension-driven domes, which form when flowing deep crust ascends beneath normal faults in the upper crust. Entia dome migmatite shows abundant evidence for extension, in addition to sequences of cascading, cuspate folds (well displayed in amphibolite) that are not present in the carapace of the dome, that do not have a consistent axial planar fabric, and that developed primarily at subsolidus conditions. We propose that these folds developed in mafic layers that had a density contrast with granodioritic migmatite, and that they formed during sinking of a denser layer above the rising migmatite subdomes. Extension-driven flow of partially molten (granodioritic) crust was therefore accompanied by sinking of a dense, mafic, mid-crustal layer, resulting in complex P-T-d paths of different lithologic units within the dome. This scenario is consistent with field and 2D modeling results, which together show how a combination of structural geology, metamorphic petrology, and modeling can illuminate the

  8. Selected hydrologic data from the vicinity of Rayburns and Vacherie salt domes, northern Louisiana salt-dome basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryals, G.N.; Hosman, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is considering salt domes in northern Louisiana as possible sites for storage of nuclear waste. As part of this National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program, the U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a regional study of the geohydrology of the northern Louisiana salt-dome basin. Field studies involving the collection of data began in 1977. Data-collection networks were established for both ground- and surface- water sources, primarily in the vicinity of two salt domes, Rayburns and Vacherie. Groundwater data collection involved measuring water levels and sampling existing production wells and test wells drilled by the Louisiana State University for Environmental Studies. Samples were analyzed for one or more of the following categories of chemical constituents: inorganic, trace metal, and radiochemical. A network of surface-water stations was set up for measuring discharge and collecting periodic samples. Initial sampling was for analysis for inorganic chemical constituents and radioactive elements. Subsequent sampling has been for inorganic chemical constituents. (USGS)

  9. RADIOGRAPHIC ABNORMALITIES OF THE TALUS IN PATIENTS WITH CLUBFOOT AFTER SURGICAL RELEASE USING THE MCKAY TECHNIQUE

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, José Antonio; Hernandes, Andréa Canizares; Buchaim, Thais Paula; Blumetti, Francesco Camara; Chertman, Carla; Yamane, Patrícia Corey; da Rocha Corrêa Fernandes, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze morphological abnormalities of the talus in patients with clubfoot after surgical treatment using the McKay technique. Method: Lateral standing-position radiographs of the feet of 14 patients with unilateral clubfoot who underwent treatment by means of the doubleincision McKay technique were retrospectively analyzed. All the patients were operated by the same surgeon, with an average of 6.53 years between surgery and the radiograph. We compared the radiographic characteristics of the talus between the operated and the contralateral foot. We assessed the presence of deformity of the talar dome and head (sphericity evaluation); the talar length and height; the percentage and degree of navicular subluxation; abnormalities of the Gissane angle; and the trabecular bone pattern. Results: Abnormalities of the talar head occurred in 92.8% of the patients; of the talar dome in 92.8%; and of the trabecular pattern in 100%. The talar length ratio between the operated and the contralateral foot ranged from 0.61 to 0.88 (mean 0.79; SD = 0.09), while the height ratio ranged from 0.57 to 0.98 (mean 0.82; SD = 0.12). The Gissane angle was greater in all of the operated feet, and all of them also showed navicular subluxation, at a rate ranging from 6.43 to 59.75% (mean 26.34%; SD = 16.66%). Conclusion: Talar abnormalities occurred in 100% of the feet treated using the McKay technique. It was shown that establishing radiographic parameters to describe and quantify these deformities was feasible, through simple and easy-to-perform techniques. PMID:27047821

  10. The 1984 to 1996 cyclic activity of Lascar Volcano, northern Chile: cycles of dome growth, dome subsidence, degassing and explosive eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Stephen J.; Gardeweg, Moyra C.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.

    Lascar Volcano (5592m 23°22'S, 67°44'W) entered a new period of vigorous activity in 1984, culminating in a major explosive eruption in April 1993. Activity since 1984 has been characterised by cyclic behaviour with recognition of four cycles up to the end of 1993. In each cycle a lava dome is extruded in the active crater, accompanied by vigorous degassing through high-temperature, high-velocity fumaroles distributed on and around the dome. The fumaroles are the source of a sustained steam plume above the volcano. The dome then subsides back into the conduit. During the subsidence phase the velocity and gas output of the fumaroles decrease, and the cycle is completed by violent explosive activity. Subsidence of both the dome and the crater floor is accommodated by movement on concentric, cylindrical or inward-dipping conical fractures. The observations are consistent with a model in which gas loss from the dome is progressively inhibited during a cycle and gas pressure increases within and below the lava dome, triggering a large explosive eruption. Factors that can lead to a decrease in gas loss include a decrease in magma permeability by foam collapse, reduction in permeability due to precipitation of hydrothermal minerals in the pores and fractures within the dome and in country rock surrounding the conduit, and closure of open fractures during subsidence of the dome and crater floor. Dome subsidence may be a consequence of reduction in magma porosity (foam collapse) as degassing occurs and pressurisation develops as the permeability of the dome and conduit system decreases. Superimposed upon this activity are small explosive events of shallow origin. These we interpret as subsidence events on the concentric fractures leading to short-term pressure increases just below the crater floor.

  11. Structural analysis of the collar of the Vredefort Dome, South Africa—Significance for impact-related deformation and central uplift formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieland, Frank; Gibson, Roger L.; Reimold, Wolf Uwe

    2005-10-01

    Landsat TM, aerial photograph image analysis, and field mapping of Witwatersrand supergroup meta-sedimentary strata in the collar of the Vredefort Dome reveals a highly heterogeneous internal structure involving folds, faults, fractures, and melt breccias that are interpreted as the product of shock deformation and central uplift formation during the 2.02 Ga Vredefort impact event. Broadly radially oriented symmetric and asymmetric folds with wavelengths ranging from tens of meters to kilometers and conjugate radial to oblique faults with strike-slip displacements of, typically, tens to hundreds of meters accommodated tangential shortening of the collar of the dome that decreased from ˜17% at a radius from the dome center of 21 km to <5% at a radius of 29 km. Ubiquitous shear fractures containing pseudotachylitic breccia, particularly in the metapelitic units, display local slip senses consistent with either tangential shortening or tangential extension; however, it is uncertain whether they formed at the same time as the larger faults or earlier, during the shock pulse. In addition to shatter cones, quartzite units show two fracture types—a cmspaced rhomboidal to orthogonal type that may be the product of shock-induced deformation and later joints accomplishing tangential and radial extension. The occurrence of pseudotachylitic breccia within some of these later joints, and the presence of radial and tangential dikes of impact melt rock, confirm the impact timing of these features and are suggestive of late-stage collapse of the central uplift.

  12. Venus pancake dome formation: Morphologic effects of a cooling-induced variable viscosity during emplacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Zuber, M. T.

    1993-01-01

    The distinctive steep-sided 'pancake' domes discovered in the Magellan images of Venus have morphologies that suggest formation by a single continuous emplacement of a high viscosity magma. A resemblance of the venusian domes to much smaller terrestrial rhyolite and dacite volcanic domes has prompted some authors to suggest that the domes on Venus also have high silica compositions and thus, high viscosities. However, viscosity is a function of crystallinity as well as silica content in a magma, and thus increases as a result of magmatic cooling. To investigate the effect of a cooling-induced viscosity increase on dome morphology, we have modeled the domes as radial viscous gravity currents that cool during emplacement. Various aspects of the investigation are discussed.

  13. Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a salt dome repository: a technical memorandum

    SciTech Connect

    Kier, R.S.; Showalter, P.A.; Dettinger, M.D.

    1980-05-30

    Disposal of high-level radioactive wastes is a major environmental problem influencing further development of nuclear energy in this country. Salt domes in the Gulf Coast Basin are being investigated as repository sites. A major concern is geologic and hydrologic stability of candidate domes and potential transport of radionuclides by groundwater to the biosphere prior to their degradation to harmless levels of activity. This report conceptualizes a regional geohydrologic model for transport of radionuclides from a salt dome repository. The model considers transport pathways and the physical and chemical changes that would occur through time prior to the radionuclides reaching the biosphere. Necessary, but unknown inputs to the regional model involve entry and movement of fluids through the repository dome and across the dome-country rock interface and the effect on the dome and surrounding strata of heat generated by the radioactive wastes.

  14. Variations in Iron Fluxes across Antarctica: a new record from Talos Dome in Victoria Land, Antarctica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallelonga, P.; Barbante, C.; Cozzi, G.; Gabrieli, J.; Gaspari, V.; Spolaor, A.; Turetta, C.

    2012-04-01

    A new record of Iron (Fe) fluxes are presented from a coastal Antarctic site, Talos Dome. The Talos Dome ice core was drilled from 2005-2007, to a depth of 1620 m, covering more than 250 ky of climate variability. Iron fluxes at Talos Dome were consistently greater than at Dome C, particularly during interglacials when Talos Dome receives dust deflated from proximal ice-free areas. The 50-fold changes in Fe concentration variability over glacial-interglacial cycles, observed at Dome C, are not representative of deposition at this coastal site. Iron fluxes vary greatly from dust and calcium, which have been previously used as proxies for micronutrient deposition reconstructions. These differences in trace element fluxes across Antarctica are relevant for the reconstruction of Southern Ocean paleoproductivity and potential impacts on atmospheric CO2 drawdown over glacial-interglacial timescales.

  15. Geologic technical assessment of the Stratton Ridge salt dome, Texas, for potential expansion of the U.S. strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Snider, Anna C.; Looff, Karl M.

    2006-11-01

    difficult to come by, widely accepted industry rumors are that numerous existing caverns have experienced major operational problems, including salt falls, sheared casings, and unintended releases of stored product(s). Many of these difficulties may be related to on-going differential movement of individual salt spines or to lateral movement at the caprock-salt interface. The history of operational problems, only some of which appear to be a matter of public record, combined with the potential for encountering escaped product from other operations, renders the Stratton Ridge salt dome a less-than-desirable site for SPR purposes.

  16. The control of overburden thickness on resurgent domes: insights from analogue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acocella, V.; Cifelli, F.; Funiciello, R.

    2001-11-01

    Resurgent doming consists of the uplift, usually accompanied by volcanic activity, of part of a collapse caldera. Analogue models were used to investigate the architecture of resurgent domes. Dry sand simulates the brittle crust; uprising silicone, located at the base of the sand-pack, simulates magma. The deformation pattern depends mainly upon: (1) the ratio (aspect ratio) between the thickness of the sand overburden and the width of the silicone intrusion; (2) the duration of experiment. For aspect ratios ≈1, two concentric domes develop; the first-formed outer dome is bordered by inward-dipping reverse ring faults, while the inner dome by outward-dipping normal ring faults. The layers inside the dome are uniformly dipping. For aspect ratios ≈0.4, the dome shows a crestal depression, surrounded by radial fractures, followed by an apical extrusion of silicone. The internal structure of the dome is made up of domed layers. Independently from the aspect ratio, the duration of the experiment enhances silicone extrusion. A consistent structure is observed in most resurgent domes in nature. The comparison between experiments and nature suggests that two distinct resurgence modes occur, mainly depending on the aspect ratio (thickness/width) of the crust overlying the magma chamber. Aspect ratios ≈1 develop a resurgent block with uniformly-dipping layers and peripheral volcanic activity (Ischia and Pantelleria type). Aspect ratios ≈0.4 develop a resurgent dome with a crestal depression, domed layers within and peripheral and internal volcanic activity (Valles and Long Valley type).

  17. The geology and mechanics of formation of the Fort Rock Dome, Yavapai County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuis, Gary S.

    1996-01-01

    The Fort Rock Dome, a craterlike structure in northern Arizona, is the erosional product of a circular domal uplift associated with a Precambrian shear zone exposed within the crater and with Tertiary volcanism. A section of Precambrian to Quaternary rocks is described, and two Tertiary units, the Crater Pasture Formation and the Fort Rock Creek Rhyodacite, are named. A mathematical model of the doming process is developed that is consistent with the history of the Fort Rock Dome.

  18. Emplacement of the final lava dome of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Katharine F.; Anderson, Steven W.; Diefenbach, Angela K.; Wessels, Rick L.; Henton, Sarah M.

    2013-06-01

    After more than 8 months of precursory activity and over 20 explosions in 12 days, Redoubt Volcano, Alaska began to extrude the fourth and final lava dome of the 2009 eruption on April 4. By July 1 the dome had filled the pre-2009 summit crater and ceased to grow. By means of analysis and annotations of time-lapse webcam imagery, oblique-image photogrammetry techniques and capture and analysis of forward-looking infrared (FLIR) images, we tracked the volume, textural, effusive-style and temperature changes in near-real time over the entire growth period of the dome. The first month of growth (April 4-May 4) produced blocky intermediate- to high-silica andesite lava (59-62.3 wt.% SiO2) that initially formed a round dome, expanding by endogenous growth, breaking the surface crust in radial fractures and annealing them with warmer, fresh lava. On or around May 1, more finely fragmented and scoriaceous andesite lava (59.8-62.2 wt.% SiO2) began to appear at the top of the dome coincident with increased seismicity and gas emissions. The more scoriaceous lava spread radially over the dome surface, while the dome continued to expand from endogenous growth and blocky lava was exposed on the margins and south side of the dome. By mid-June the upper scoriaceous lava had covered 36% of the dome surface area. Vesicularity of the upper scoriaceous lava range from 55 to 66%, some of the highest vesicularity measurements recorded from a lava dome. We suggest that the stability of the final lava dome primarily resulted from sufficient fracturing and clearing of the conduit by preceding explosions that allowed efficient degassing of the magma during effusion. The dome was thus able to grow until it was large enough to exceed the magmastatic pressure in the chamber, effectively shutting off the eruption.

  19. A decade of dome growth at Mount St. Helens, 1980-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    The growth of the dacite dome at Mount St. Helens between 1980 and 1986 has been more intensively studied than that of any other dome-building eruption. The growth has been complex in detail, but remarkably regular overall. This paper summarizes some of what has been learned and provides many references to additional information. Whether dome building has ended is an open question, particularly in view of the renewed, though minor, explosive activity of late 1989 and early 1990. -Author

  20. Seafloor doming driven by active mantle degassing offshore Naples (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Guido; Passaro, Salvatore; Tamburrino, Stella; Vallefuoco, Mattia; Tassi, Franco; Vaselli, Orlando; Giannini, Luciano; Caliro, Stefano; Chiodini, Giovanni; Sacchi, Marco; Rizzo, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Structures and processes associated with shallow water hydrothermal fluid discharges on continental shelves are poorly known. We report geomorphological, geophysical, and geochemical evidences of a 5.5 x 5.3 km seabed doming located 5 km offshore the Naples harbor (Italy). The dome lies between 100 and 170 m of water depth and it is 15-20 m higher than the surrounding seafloor. It is characterized by a hummocky morphology due to 280 sub-circular to elliptical mounds, about 660 cones, and 30 pockmarks. The mounds and pockmarks alignments follow those of the main structural discontinuity affecting the Gulf of Naples. The seafloor swelling and breaching require relatively low pressures (about 2-3 MPa), and the sub-seafloor structures, which consists of 'pagodas' affecting the present-day seabed, record the active upraise, pressurization, and release of magmatic fluids. The gas composition of the sampled submarine emissions is consistent with that of the emissions from the hydrothermal systems of Ischia, CampiFlegrei and Somma-Vesuvius active volcanoes, and CO2 has a magmatic/thermometamorphic origin. The 3He/4He ratios (1.66-1.96 Ra) are slightly lower than in the Somma-Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei volcanoes (~2.6-3.0 Ra) indicating the contamination of fluids originated from the same magmatic source by crustal-derived radiogenic 4He. All these evidences concur to hypothesize an extended magmatic reservoir beneath Naples and its offshore. Seabed doming, faulting, and hydrothermal discharges are manifestations of non-volcanic unrests potentially preluding submarine eruptions and/or hydrothermal explosions. We conclude that seabed deformations and hydrothermal discharge must be included in the coastal hazard studies.

  1. A Scalable and Modular Dome Illumination System for Scientific Microphotography on a Budget

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Ricardo; Buffington, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    A scalable and modular LED illumination dome for microscopic scientific photography is described and illustrated, and methods for constructing such a dome are detailed. Dome illumination for insect specimens has become standard practice across the field of insect systematics, but many dome designs remain expensive and inflexible with respect to new LED technology. Further, a one-size-fits-all dome cannot accommodate the large breadth of insect size encountered in nature, forcing the photographer to adapt, in some cases, to a less than ideal dome design. The dome described here is scalable, as it is based on a isodecahedron, and the template for the dome is available as a downloaded file from the internet that can be printed on any printer, on the photographer’s choice of media. As a result, a photographer can afford, using this design, to produce a series of domes of various sizes and materials, and LED ring lights of various sizes and color temperatures, depending on the need. PMID:27138573

  2. Identifying and inventorying cypress domes in the Florida panhandle using Landsat imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calaminus, Andre Kyle

    Cypress domes are swamp ecosystems dominated by pond cypress (Taxodium ascendens), a conifer native to North America. Cypress domes can be found in flatland depressions throughout the southeast United States, hydrologically separated from other water bodies. Threatened by urbanization and land use change, these unique ecosystems have experienced degradation, destruction, and habitat loss over the past few decades. While many domes have been identified in central and southern Florida, literature is lacking on cypress domes found in the Florida panhandle. Cypress domes within the Florida panhandle were located, inventoried, and analyzed for landscape patterns, including size and shape. Additionally, the cypress dome areas were subject to pixel change detection for temporal comparison of dome size from 2000 to 2013. Using satellite imagery from the Landsat 8 spacecraft, support vector machine classification, and publicly available data, a total of 1,568 cypress domes were found to exist in the Florida panhandle, with a mean area of 1.28 hectares, ranging from a minimum of 0.13 ha to a maximum of 4.95 ha, occupying 19.79 km2, or 0.078% of the panhandle study area. A change detection analysis over the 13 year period show a net gain of 284.63 ha in cypress dome growth.

  3. A Scalable and Modular Dome Illumination System for Scientific Microphotography on a Budget.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Ricardo; Buffington, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    A scalable and modular LED illumination dome for microscopic scientific photography is described and illustrated, and methods for constructing such a dome are detailed. Dome illumination for insect specimens has become standard practice across the field of insect systematics, but many dome designs remain expensive and inflexible with respect to new LED technology. Further, a one-size-fits-all dome cannot accommodate the large breadth of insect size encountered in nature, forcing the photographer to adapt, in some cases, to a less than ideal dome design. The dome described here is scalable, as it is based on a isodecahedron, and the template for the dome is available as a downloaded file from the internet that can be printed on any printer, on the photographer's choice of media. As a result, a photographer can afford, using this design, to produce a series of domes of various sizes and materials, and LED ring lights of various sizes and color temperatures, depending on the need. PMID:27138573

  4. A preliminary report of the geohydrology of the Mississippi Salt-Dome Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spiers, C.A.; Gandl, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is investigating the suitability of salt domes in the Mississippi salt-dome basin as repositories for storing radioactive wastes. The Department of Energy has requested that the U.S. Geological Survey describe the groundwater hydrology of the Mississippi salt-dome basin, giving special attention to direction and rate of movement of water. In this first part of a continuing investigation the data obtained from one year of extensive literature search and data compilation are summarized. The regional groundwater hydrology in the salt-dome basin is defined with respect to (1) groundwater flow, (2) facies changes, (3) geological structure, (4) recharge and discharge, (5) freshwater-saltwater relations, and (6) identification of localities where additional data are needed. From the 50 piercement-type salt domes in the Mississippi salt-dome basin three domes (Richton, Cypress Creek, and Lampton) were selected for more intensive study. To further evaluate the geohydrology of Richton, Lampton, and Cypress Creek domes as possible sites for storage of radioactive waste, an intensive geohydrologic study based on a comprehensive test drilling program near the domes is planned. (USGS)

  5. Static analysis of a sonar dome rubber window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    The application of NASTRAN (level 16.0.1) to the static analysis of a sonar dome rubber window (SDRW) was demonstrated. The assessment of the conventional model (neglecting the enclosed fluid) for the stress analysis of the SDRW was made by comparing its results to those based on a sophisticated model (including the enclosed fluid). The fluid was modeled with isoparametric linear hexahedron elements with approximate material properties whose shear modulus was much smaller than its bulk modulus. The effect of the chosen material property for the fluid is discussed.

  6. Field Survey of Cactus Crater Storage Facility (Runit Dome)

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas Miller, Terence Holland

    2008-10-31

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Health and Safety (DOE/HS-10), requested that National Security Technologies, LLC, Environmental Management directorate (NSTec/EM) perform a field survey of the Cactus Crater Storage Facility (Runit Dome), similar to past surveys conducted at their request. This field survey was conducted in conjunction with a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) mission on Runit Island in the Enewetak Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). The survey was strictly a visual survey, backed up by digital photos and a written description of the current condition.

  7. Near-automatic generation of lava dome DEMs from photos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Varley, N.

    2012-04-01

    Acquiring accurate digital elevation models (DEMs) of growing lava domes is critical for hazard assessment. However, most techniques require expertise and time (e.g. photogrammetry) or expensive equipment (e.g. laser scanning and radar-based techniques). Here, we use a photo-based approach developed within the computer vision community that offers the potential for near-automatic DEM construction using a consumer-grade digital camera and freely available software. The technique is based on a combination of structure-from-motion and multi-view stereo algorithms (SfM-MVS) and can generate dense 3D point clouds (millions of points) from multiple photographs of a scene taken from different positions. Processing is carried out by automated 'reconstruction pipeline' software downloadable from the internet, e.g. http://blog.neonascent.net/archives/bundler-photogrammetry-package/. Such reconstructions are initally un-scaled and un-oriented so additional software (http://www.lancs.ac.uk/ staff/jamesm/software/sfm_georef.htm) has been developed to permit scaling or full georeferencing. Although this step requires the presence of some control points or knowledge of scale within the scene, it does not have the relatively strict image acquisition and control requirements of traditional photogrammetry. For accuracy and to allow error analysis, georeferencing observations are made within the image set, rather than requiring feature matching within the point cloud. Here we demonstrate the results of using the technique for deriving 3D models of the Volcán de Colima lava dome. 5 image sets have been collected by different people over a period of 12 months during overflights in a light aircraft. Although the resulting imagery is of variable quality for 3D reconstruction, useful data can be extracted from each set. Scaling and georeferencing is carried out using a combination of ortho-imagery (downloaded from Bing) and a few GPS points. Overall precisions are ~1 m and DEM qualities

  8. When something is not quite right: an ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    da Encarnação, António Paulo Martins

    2014-10-01

    Ankle sprains are a common musculoskeletal injury in sport. Older people are increasingly participating in sports such as running. The specificities of musculoskeletal injuries in older people pose a different diagnostic challenge from that in young people participating in the same activities. A clinical case is presented of a 64-year-old patient diagnosed with a grade 1, plantar flexion/inversion ankle sprain that was later diagnosed as a quite different and rare injury. Fractures of the fibular malleolus, talar neck and dome are possible differential diagnoses for an ankle sprain, as are talar dome chondral defects. Response to treatment may help to guide the diagnostic procedure when pain persists after appropriate treatment.

  9. Bayesian Inversion using Physics-based Models Applied to Dome Extrusion at Mount St. Helens 2004-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Y. Q.; Segall, P.; Anderson, K. R.; Bradley, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Physics-based models of volcanic eruptions have grown more sophisticated over the past few decades. These models, combined with Bayesian inversion, offer the potential of integrating diverse geological and geophysical datasets to better understand volcanic systems. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm with a physics-based conduit model, we invert data from the 2004-2008 dome-forming eruption at Mount St. Helens, USA. We extend the 1D cylindrical conduit model of Anderson and Segall [2011] to include vertical and lateral gas loss from the magma, as well as equilibrium crystallization. The melt viscosity increases strongly with crystal content. Magma permeability obeys the Kozeny-Carman law with a threshold porosity. Excess pressure in the magma chamber drives Newtonian flow of magma upwards until the viscous resistance to flow exceeds the rate-dependent frictional strength on the conduit wall, at which point the magma transitions from viscous flow to plug flow. We investigate the steady-state solutions for lava dome growth between March and December 2005, in which magma chamber pressure, initial water content, permeability and friction parameters are unknown model parameters. These parameters are constrained by: dome rock porosity, extrusion rate from photogrammetry, plug depth from drumbeat earthquakes, and crystallization pressure from petrologic studies. Posterior probability density functions (PDFs) reveal the constraints on the model parameters and their correlations. Assuming lithostatic normal stress on the plug, low coefficients of friction (0.1-0.3) are required to allow extrusion at the observed rate while maintaining reasonable magma chamber pressures. Lower effective normal stress or melt viscosity could allow for larger friction coefficients. Future work will investigate the time-dependent system, thereby allowing us to incorporate time-evolving geodetic and eruption rate data into the inversion.

  10. Formation of the giant Shakhdara migmatitic gneiss dome, Pamir, India-Asia collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stübner, Konstanze; Ratschbacher, Lothar; Hacker, Bradley; Dunkl, István; Gloaguen, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Cenozoic gneiss domes comprise one third of the surface exposure of the Pamir Mountains and provide a window into deep crustal processes of the India-Asia collision. The largest of these is the 350 × 90 km Shakhdara-Alichur composite dome of the southern Pamir, Tajikistan and Afghanistan. The Shakhdara and Alichur domes formed by footwall exhumation of two low-angle detachments: In the larger Shakhdara dome the top-to-S South Pamir shear zone (SPSZ) exhumed crust from 30-40 km depth; in the Alichur dome the top-to-N Alichur shear zone exhumed upper crustal rocks. The subdomes are separated by a low-strain horst. Non-coaxial shear in the Shakhdara dome is pervasive over the ~4 km thick SPSZ. The top of the shear zone is preserved at mountain peaks, the base is incised by the Panj gorge, which exposes the 'core' of the dome; total erosion is less than 4 km throughout most of the dome. We use a comprehensive geo-thermochronologic dataset of titanite, monazite, and zircon U/Th-Pb, mica Rb-Sr and 40Ar/39Ar, zircon and apatite fission track, and zircon (U-Th)/He ages to constrain the exhumation history of the southern Pamir domes. Doming started at ~21 Ma by crustal buckling and activation of a top-to-N normal shear zone (Gunt shear zone) along the northern rim of the Shakhdara dome, resulting in exhumation and cooling. The bulk of the exhumation was accomplished by northward extrusion of the SPSZ footwall, which was active from ~18-15 Ma to ~2 Ma; exhumation rates were 1-3 mm/yr. Erosion rates during and after the end of doming were 0.3-0.5 mm/yr within the domes and 0.1-0.3 mm/yr in the horst and in the SE Pamir plateau; incision rates of the major drainages were up to 1.0 mm/yr. Doming by footwall exhumation of the SPSZ resulted in up to 90 km N-S extension, coeval with ongoing N-S convergence between India and Asia. Extension opposes shortening along and above the reactivated Rushan-Pshart suture zone, a wide fold-thrust belt north of the Shakhdara-Alichur domes

  11. Highly Symmetric and Congruently Tiled Meshes for Shells and Domes

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Muhibur; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2016-01-01

    We describe the generation of all possible shell and dome shapes that can be uniquely meshed (tiled) using a single type of mesh face (tile), and following a single meshing (tiling) rule that governs the mesh (tile) arrangement with maximal vertex, edge and face symmetries. Such tiling arrangements or congruently tiled meshed shapes, are frequently found in chemical forms (fullerenes or Bucky balls, crystals, quasi-crystals, virus nano shells or capsids), and synthetic shapes (cages, sports domes, modern architectural facades). Congruently tiled meshes are both aesthetic and complete, as they support maximal mesh symmetries with minimal complexity and possess simple generation rules. Here, we generate congruent tilings and meshed shape layouts that satisfy these optimality conditions. Further, the congruent meshes are uniquely mappable to an almost regular 3D polyhedron (or its dual polyhedron) and which exhibits face-transitive (and edge-transitive) congruency with at most two types of vertices (each type transitive to the other). The family of all such congruently meshed polyhedra create a new class of meshed shapes, beyond the well-studied regular, semi-regular and quasi-regular classes, and their duals (platonic, Catalan and Johnson). While our new mesh class is infinite, we prove that there exists a unique mesh parametrization, where each member of the class can be represented by two integer lattice variables, and moreover efficiently constructable. PMID:27563368

  12. Seismic measurements of explosions in the Tatum Salt Dome, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borcherdt, Roger D.; Healy, J.H.; Jackson, W.H.; Warren, D.R.

    1967-01-01

    Project Sterling provided for the detonation of a nuclear device in the cavity resulting from the Salmon nuclear explosion in the Tatum salt dome in southern Mississippi. It also provided for a high explosive (HE) comparison shot in a nearby drill hole. The purpose of the experiment was to gather information on the seismic decoupling of a nuclear explosion in a cavity by comparing seismic signals from a nuclear shot in the Salmon cavity with seismic signals recorded from Salmon and with seismic signals recorded from a muall (about 2 tons) HE shot in the salt dome. Surface seismic measurements were made by the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, and the Air Force Technical Applications Center with coordination and overall direction by the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory. This report covers only the seismic measurements made by the U. S. Geological Survey. The first objective of this report is to describe the field recording procedures and the data obtained by the U. S. Geological Survey from these events. The second objective is to describe the spectral analyses which have been made on the data and the relative seismic amplitudes which have been determined from these analyses.

  13. Performance limits of planar phased array with dome lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geren, W. P.; Taylor, Michael

    1998-10-01

    Communication systems based on low-earth-orbit (LEO) satellites have generated a requirement for high-performance phased array antennas with exceptional gain, sidelobe levels, and axial ratio over broad scan angles and 360 degree azimuth coverage. One approach to mitigating the effects of scan dependence is to cover the planar array with a hemispherical lens, or dome, which implements passive or active phase correction of the scanned beam. The phase correction over the dome surface may be represented as the function (Delta) (Phi) ((theta) , (phi) ), with (theta) and (phi) the polar and azimuth angles in a coordinate system having z-axis normal to the array. The purpose of this study was to determine the performance improvement achievable with such an ideal lens. Three cases were considered: a conventional lens with fixed optimum phase correction, an active lens with scan-dependent phase correction a function of polar angle only, and an active lens with phase correction a function of polar and azimuthal angles. In all cases, the planar array distribution had a fixed radial Taylor amplitude distribution and a phase taper consisting of a linear beam-pointing term and a non-linear focusing term.

  14. Sediment distribution about salt domes and ridges on Louisiana slope

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrie, A.

    1984-09-01

    Salt ridges and domes underlie much of the present Louisiana slope. The bathymetric expression of underlying salt could be either a mound or a flattening of the normal rate of descent down the slope. The mounded salt features form barriers to the gravity-driven sediments from the shelf break. Much industrial research has been done in the search for reservoir sands about such an obstruction. Parallel-bedded sediments from foredrifts on the upcurrent side of a seamount. These foredrift sediments were deposited where the prevailing ocean bottom currents were locally decelerated by the obstructing seamount. Moats are found on the sides of the obstruction and are the result of erosion or nondeposition owing to acceleration of deflected waters. Leedrifts are found on the downcurrent side of the obstruction. Current gyres result from deceleration of accelerated currents along the obstruction's flanks, and a complex sedimentation pattern results. Flow over the obstruction's top is determined by size and shape of the obstruction relative to size and velocity of the bottom-following current. A turbulent wave will be set up which may have sufficient amplitude to influence sedimentation on the downcurrent side. If ocean bottoms currents equal gravity-driven terrigenous sediment movement and seamounts equal salt domes and ridges, then the result of deep ocean surveys are directly applicable to sedimentation on slopes with underlying salt basement. The salt-related sedimentation pattern of the present slope should be applicable to similar paleoenvironments.

  15. Characterization of Atmospheric Ekman Spirals at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rysman, Jean-François; Lahellec, Alain; Vignon, Etienne; Genthon, Christophe; Verrier, Sébastien

    2016-08-01

    We use wind speed and temperature measurements taken along a 45-m meteorological tower located at Dome C, Antarctica (75.06°S, 123.19°E) to highlight and characterize the Ekman spiral. Firstly, temperature records reveal that the atmospheric boundary layer at Dome C is stable during winter and summer nights (i.e., >85 % of the time). The wind vector, in both speed and direction, also shows a strong dependence with elevation. An Ekman model was then fitted to the measurements. Results show that the wind vector follows the Ekman spiral structure for more than 20 % of the year (2009). Most Ekman spirals have been detected during summer nights, that is, when the boundary layer is slightly stratified. During these episodes, the boundary-layer height ranged from 25 to 100 m, the eddy viscosity from 0.004 to 0.06 m^2 s^{-1}, and the Richardson number from zero to 1.6.

  16. PHOTOMETRY OF VARIABLE STARS FROM DOME A, ANTARCTICA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lingzhi; Macri, Lucas M.; Krisciunas, Kevin; Wang Lifan; Ashley, Michael C. B.; Lawrence, Jon S.; Luong-Van, Daniel; Storey, John W. V.; Cui Xiangqun; Gong Xuefei; Yuan Xiangyan; Feng Longlong; Yang Ji; Zhu Zhenxi; Liu Qiang; Zhou Xu; Pennypacker, Carl R.; Shang Zhaohui; Yang Huigen; York, Donald G.

    2011-11-15

    Dome A on the Antarctic plateau is likely one of the best observing sites on Earth thanks to the excellent atmospheric conditions present at the site during the long polar winter night. We present high-cadence time-series aperture photometry of 10,000 stars with i < 14.5 mag located in a 23 deg{sup 2} region centered on the south celestial pole. The photometry was obtained with one of the CSTAR telescopes during 128 days of the 2008 Antarctic winter. We used this photometric data set to derive site statistics for Dome A and to search for variable stars. Thanks to the nearly uninterrupted synoptic coverage, we found six times as many variables as previous surveys with similar magnitude limits. We detected 157 variable stars, of which 55% were unclassified, 27% were likely binaries, and 17% were likely pulsating stars. The latter category includes {delta} Scuti, {gamma} Doradus, and RR Lyrae variables. One variable may be a transiting exoplanet.

  17. Measurement of air quality within storage domes in technical area 54, areas G and L

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, E.

    1994-03-15

    The concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and tritium inside of storage domes at TA-54 were measured to assess worker exposure and support the Area G site characterization, including the Radioactive Air Emissions Management (RAEM) program. Samples were collected at 2-3 locations within Domes 48, 49, and 153 on up to six days during the summer of 1994. Samples were collected to evaluate three scenarios: (1) normal working activities with the domes open; (2) after domes were closed overnight; and (3) after domes were closed for three days. Eight-hour integrated samples were collected and analyzed in Radian`s Austin laboratories. Tritium activities from 17.1 to 69,900 pCi/m{sup 3} were measured. About two dozen individual VOCs were identified in each sample, but most of the concentration levels were very low (e.g.; < 1 to 10 ppbv). The highest concentrations measured were bromomethane (56.5 ppbv), 1, 1,1-trichloroethane (75.4 ppbv), propane (958 ppbv), methylene chloride (1,450 ppbv), and toluene (22.8). The measured VOC concentrations were well below the action levels developed by the New Mexico Environment Department and the measured tritium concentrations were well below the DOE`s derived air concentration (DAC). The variability in concentration within a dome during a single sampling episode was small. The concentrations were about an order of magnitude (i.e., 10x) higher after the domes had been closed overnight compared with the domes when open. Closing the domes over the weekend did not result in significantly higher concentrations (e.g.; > 20%) than when the domes were closed only overnight. The data were used to generate estimated annual dome emission rates of 0.3 Ci/yr of tritium and less than 100 lbs/yr of VOCs. The measured VOC concentrations were collected during the warmest months of the year and therefore should represent worst-case air impacts.

  18. The use of digital periapical radiographs to study the prevalence of alveolar domes

    PubMed Central

    Xambre, Pedro Augusto Oliveira Santos; Valerio, Claudia Scigliano; e Alves Cardoso, Claudia Assunção; Custódio, Antônio Luís Neto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we coined the term 'alveolar dome' and aimed to demonstrate the prevalence of alveolar domes through digital periapical radiographs. Materials and Methods This study examined 800 digital periapical radiographs in regard to the presence of alveolar domes. The periapical radiographs were acquired by a digital system using a photostimulable phosphor (PSP) plate. The χ2 test, with a significance level of 5%, was used to compare the prevalence of alveolar domes in the maxillary posterior teeth and, considering the same teeth, to verify the difference in the prevalence of dome-shaped phenomena between the roots. Results The prevalence of alveolar domes present in the first pre-molars was statistically lower as compared to the other maxillary posterior teeth (p<0.05). No statistically significant difference was observed in the prevalence of alveolar domes between the maxillary first and second molars. Considering the maxillary first and second molars, it was observed that the palatal root presented a lower prevalence of alveolar domes when compared to the distobuccal and mesiobuccal roots (p<0.05). Conclusion The present study coined the term 'alveolar dome', referring to the anatomical projection of the root into the floor of the maxillary sinus. The maxillary first and second molars presented a greater prevalence of alveolar domes, especially in the buccal roots, followed by the third molars and second pre-molars. Although the periapical radiograph is a two-dimensional method, it can provide dentists with the auxiliary information necessary to identify alveolar domes, thus improving diagnosis, planning, and treatment.

  19. The use of digital periapical radiographs to study the prevalence of alveolar domes

    PubMed Central

    Xambre, Pedro Augusto Oliveira Santos; Valerio, Claudia Scigliano; e Alves Cardoso, Claudia Assunção; Custódio, Antônio Luís Neto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we coined the term 'alveolar dome' and aimed to demonstrate the prevalence of alveolar domes through digital periapical radiographs. Materials and Methods This study examined 800 digital periapical radiographs in regard to the presence of alveolar domes. The periapical radiographs were acquired by a digital system using a photostimulable phosphor (PSP) plate. The χ2 test, with a significance level of 5%, was used to compare the prevalence of alveolar domes in the maxillary posterior teeth and, considering the same teeth, to verify the difference in the prevalence of dome-shaped phenomena between the roots. Results The prevalence of alveolar domes present in the first pre-molars was statistically lower as compared to the other maxillary posterior teeth (p<0.05). No statistically significant difference was observed in the prevalence of alveolar domes between the maxillary first and second molars. Considering the maxillary first and second molars, it was observed that the palatal root presented a lower prevalence of alveolar domes when compared to the distobuccal and mesiobuccal roots (p<0.05). Conclusion The present study coined the term 'alveolar dome', referring to the anatomical projection of the root into the floor of the maxillary sinus. The maxillary first and second molars presented a greater prevalence of alveolar domes, especially in the buccal roots, followed by the third molars and second pre-molars. Although the periapical radiograph is a two-dimensional method, it can provide dentists with the auxiliary information necessary to identify alveolar domes, thus improving diagnosis, planning, and treatment. PMID:27672614

  20. Generation of pyroclastic flows and surges by hot-rock avalanches from the dome of Mount St. Helens volcano, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellors, Robin A.; Waitt, Richard B.; Swanson, Donald A.

    1988-02-01

    Several hot-rock avalanches have occurred during the growth of the composite dome of Mount St. Helens, Washington between 1980 and 1987. One of these occurred on 9 May 1986 and produced a fan-shaped avalanche deposit of juvenile dacite debris together with a more extensive pyroclastic-flow deposit. Laterally thinning deposits and abrasion and baking of wooden and plastic objects show that a hot ash-cloud surge swept beyond the limits of the pyroclastic flow. Plumes that rose 2 3 km above the dome and vitric ash that fell downwind of the volcano were also effects of this event, but no explosion occurred. All the facies observed originated from a single avalanche. Erosion and melting of craterfloor snow by the hot debris caused debris flows in the crater, and a small flood that carried juvenile and other clasts north of the crater. A second, broadly similar event occured in October 1986. Larger events of this nature could present a significant volcanic hazard.

  1. Generation of pyroclastic flows and surges by hot-rock avalanches from the dome of Mount St. Helens volcano, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mellors, R.A.; Waitt, R.B.; Swanson, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Several hot-rock avalanches have occurred during the growth of the composite dome of Mount St. Helens, Washington between 1980 and 1987. One of these occurred on 9 May 1986 and produced a fan-shaped avalanche deposit of juvenile dacite debris together with a more extensive pyroclastic-flow deposit. Laterally thinning deposits and abrasion and baking of wooden and plastic objects show that a hot ash-cloud surge swept beyond the limits of the pyroclastic flow. Plumes that rose 2-3 km above the dome and vitric ash that fell downwind of the volcano were also effects of this event, but no explosion occurred. All the facies observed originated from a single avalanche. Erosion and melting of craterfloor snow by the hot debris caused debris flows in the crater, and a small flood that carried juvenile and other clasts north of the crater. A second, broadly similar event occured in October 1986. Larger events of this nature could present a significant volcanic hazard. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag.

  2. Application of CryoSat-2 data product for DEM generation in Dome-A summit area, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    fang, W.; Cheng, X.; Hui, F.

    2012-12-01

    Currently available Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of Dome A were originally derived from radar altimetry data (ERS-1/2, GLAS/ICESat), and later improved by GPS measurements. The relatively low resolution and coverage poses a problem, especially for the regional research. CryoSat-2 with SIRAL (SAR/Interferometric Altimeter) was launched on 8 April 2010, providing an alternative for high-density and high-accuracy acquisition of terrain point data. The inclination of the satellite's orbit is 92°, and the orbit can approach latitude of 88°. The repeat period of 369 days provides a high orbit crossover density (10 crossovers km-2 year-1 at 87°) with a 30-day sub-cycle. In this study, we collected ten months (March to December 2011) of successive CryoSat-2 Low Rate Mode level 2 (LRM L2) datasets. Two types of filters were applied to remove additional elevation outliers. These filtering procedures excluded 5.95% of the original data. According to the distribution of the point data, terrain modeling of grid DEM, interpolation method of Kriging (ordinary Kriging), and a grid resolution of 200m is chosen for DEM generation in this study. Finally, we used the satellite's monthly revisits with non-repeated coverage and present a novel DEM of 900 km2 in the Dome A region centered at Kunlun Station (80°25‧01″S, 77°06‧58″E). It shows that the topography of the Dome A region is saddle-shaped, with a northern peak and a southern peak. We used a subtraction method to compare the novel DEM with the previous DEM of GPS measurements. The elevation differences exhibit a positive average elevation bias. It may be due to the penetration of the Ku-band radar wave into the soft snow. As a first approximation based on the statistics of the height differences, we estimate that the average penetration depth of the CryoSat-2 Ku-band wave in this area is 1 m. Map of surface topography over the Dome A region generated from CryoSat-2 data. Contours are smoothed. The contour interval

  3. Mechanical and spatial determinants of cytoskeletal geodesic dome formation in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Entcheva, Emilia; Bien, Harold

    2009-02-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that the cell cytoskeletal (CSK) network can rearrange from geodesic dome type structures to stress fibers in response to microenvironmental cues. The CSK geodesic domes are highly organized actin microarchitectures within the cell, consisting of ordered polygonal elements. We studied primary neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts. The cues used to trigger the interconversion between the two CSK architectures (geodesic domes and stress fibers) included factors affecting spatial order and the degree of CSK tension in the cells. Microfabricated three-dimensional substrates with micrometre sized grooves and peaks were used to alter the spatial order of cell growth in culture. CSK tension was modified by 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime (BDM), cytochalasin D and the hyphae of Candida albicans. CSK geodesic domes occurred spontaneously in about 20% of the neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts used in this study. Microfabricated structured surfaces produced anisotropy in the cell CSK and effectively converted geodesic domes into stress fibers in a dose-dependent manner (dependence on the period of the features). Affectors of actin structure, inhibitors of CSK tension and cell motility, e.g. BDM, cytochalasin D and the hyphae of C. albicans, suppressed or eliminated the geodesic domes. Our data suggest that the geodesic domes, similar to actin stress fibers, require maintenance of CSK integrity and tension. However, microenvironments that promote structural anisotropy in tensed cells cause the transformation of the geodesic domes into stress fibers, consistent with topographic cell guidance and some previous CSK model predictions. PMID:20023805

  4. Mechanical and spatial determinants of cytoskeletal geodesic dome formation in cardiac fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Bien, Harold

    2015-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that the cell cytoskeletal (CSK) network can rearrange from geodesic dome type structures to stress fibers in response to microenvironmental cues. The CSK geodesic domes are highly organized actin microarchitectures within the cell, consisting of ordered polygonal elements. We studied primary neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts. The cues used to trigger the interconversion between the two CSK architectures (geodesic domes and stress fibers) included factors affecting spatial order and the degree of CSK tension in the cells. Microfabricated three-dimensional substrates with micrometre sized grooves and peaks were used to alter the spatial order of cell growth in culture. CSK tension was modified by 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime (BDM), cytochalasin D and the hyphae of Candida albicans. CSK geodesic domes occurred spontaneously in about 20% of the neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts used in this study. Microfabricated structured surfaces produced anisotropy in the cell CSK and effectively converted geodesic domes into stress fibers in a dose-dependent manner (dependence on the period of the features). Affectors of actin structure, inhibitors of CSK tension and cell motility, e.g. BDM, cytochalasin D and the hyphae of C. albicans, suppressed or eliminated the geodesic domes. Our data suggest that the geodesic domes, similar to actin stress fibers, require maintenance of CSK integrity and tension. However, microenvironments that promote structural anisotropy in tensed cells cause the transformation of the geodesic domes into stress fibers, consistent with topographic cell guidance and some previous CSK model predictions. PMID:20023805

  5. Iron fluxes to Talos Dome, Antarctica, over the past 200 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallelonga, P.; Barbante, C.; Cozzi, G.; Gabrieli, J.; Schüpbach, S.; Spolaor, A.; Turetta, C.

    2013-03-01

    Atmospheric fluxes of iron (Fe) over the past 200 kyr are reported for the coastal Antarctic Talos Dome ice core, based on acid leachable Fe concentrations. Fluxes of Fe to Talos Dome were consistently greater than those at Dome C, with the greatest difference observed during interglacial climates. We observe different Fe flux trends at Dome C and Talos Dome during the deglaciation and early Holocene, attributed to a combination of deglacial activation of dust sources local to Talos Dome and the reorganisation of atmospheric transport pathways with the retreat of the Ross Sea ice shelf. This supports similar findings based on dust particle sizes and fluxes and Rare Earth Element fluxes. We show that Ca and Fe should not be used as quantitative proxies for mineral dust, as they all demonstrate different deglacial trends at Talos Dome and Dome C. Considering that a 20 ppmv decrease in atmospheric CO2 at the coldest part of the last glacial maximum occurs contemporaneously with the period of greatest Fe and dust flux to Antarctica, we confirm that the maximum contribution of aeolian dust deposition to Southern Ocean sequestration of atmospheric CO2 is approximately 20 ppmv.

  6. Iron fluxes to Talos Dome, Antarctica, over the past 200 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallelonga, P.; Barbante, C.; Cozzi, G.; Gabrieli, J.; Schüpbach, S.; Spolaor, A.; Turetta, C.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric fluxes of iron (Fe) over the past 200 kyr are reported for the coastal Antarctic Talos Dome ice core, based on acid leachable Fe concentrations. Fluxes of Fe to Talos Dome were consistently greater than those at Dome C, with the greatest difference observed during interglacial climates. We observe different Fe flux trends at Dome C and Talos Dome during the deglaciation and early Holocene, attributed to a combination of deglacial activation of dust sources local to Talos Dome and reorganization of atmospheric transport pathways with the retreat of the Ross Sea ice shelf. This supports similar findings based on dust particle sizes and fluxes and Rare Earth Element fluxes. We show that Ca and Fe should not be used as quantitative proxies for mineral dust, as they all demonstrate different deglacial trends at Talos Dome and Dome C. Considering that a 20 ppmv decrease in atmospheric CO2 at the coldest part of the last glacial maximum occurs contemporaneously with the period of greatest Fe and dust flux to Antarctica, we conclude that the maximum contribution of aeolian dust deposition to Southern Ocean sequestration of atmospheric CO2 is approximately 20 ppmv.

  7. The ongoing dome emplacement and destruction cyclic process at Popocatépetl volcano, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Vazquez, Angel; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Mendoza-Rosas, Ana Teresa

    2016-09-01

    The ongoing eruptive activity of Popocatépetl volcano has been characterized by emplacement and subsequent destruction of a succession of lava domes. Between the onset of the current eruption in 1994 and the time of this submission, 38 episodes of lava dome formation and removal have been identified. Each dome has showed particular features related to the magma extrusion process. Among other manifestations, dome-emplacement events have been usually accompanied by relatively low-intensity, protracted explosions referred to as exhalations. After variable times of residence, emplacements have ended in partial or total destruction of the domes by strong vulcanian explosions that produced sizeable ash plumes, with most of them also ejecting incandescent debris onto the volcano flanks. Here, we present a detailed account for the observed activity related to the domes' growth and destruction, related seismic monitoring signals, and morphological features of the domes based on 19 years of visual observations and image analysis. We then discuss a model for the process of dome growth and destruction and its hazard implications.

  8. A novel nonintrusive method to resolve the thermal dome effect of pyranometers: Instrumentation and observational basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Qiang; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2010-04-01

    A new method for improving the ground-based pyranometer measurements of solar irradiance has been employed during the East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols and Impact on Regional Climate field experiment, Asian Monsoon Year in China in 2008. Depending on the temperature difference between its detector and domes, a pyranometer's thermal dome effect (TDE) can vary from a few W m-2 at night to over tens of W m-2 during daytime. Yet in traditional calibration procedures only a single calibration constant is determined, and consequently TDE is misrepresented. None of the methods that have been documented in the literature can capture TDE nonintrusively using the same instrument. For example, although adding a temperature sensor to the detector assembly is straightforward, attaching any sensor on a dome is intrusive and will affect its overall optical and physical properties. Furthermore, in response to the solar elevation and atmospheric variables, the dome temperature distribution is both dynamic and uneven, which makes it exceedingly difficult for locating a representative point on the dome for measuring TDE. However, the effective-dome-temperature is proportional to the pressure of the air trapped between the outer and the inner domes; therefore with a minor modification to a pyranometer, we can utilize the ideal gas law to gauge TDE without affecting the domes. Pyranometers can become climate-quality instruments once their TDE are nonintrusively determined.

  9. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) geological site characterization report, Big Hill Salt Dome

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, R.J.; Ortiz, T.S.; Magorian, T.R.

    1981-09-01

    Geological and geophysical analyses of the Big Hill Salt Dome were performed to determine the suitability of this site for use in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Development of 140 million barrels (MMB) of storage capacity in the Big Hill Salt Dome is planned as part of the SPR expansion to achieve 750 MMB of storage capacity. Objectives of the study were to: (1) Acquire, evaluate, and interpret existing data pertinent to geological characterization of the Big Hill Dome; (2) Characterize the surface and near-surface geology and hydrology; (3) Characterize the geology and hydrology of the overlying cap rock; (4) Define the geometry and geology of the dome; (5) Determine the feasibility of locating and constructing 14 10-MMB storage caverns in the south portion of the dome; and (6) Assess the effects of natural hazards on the SPR site. Recommendations are included. (DMC)

  10. Venusian pancake domes: Insights from terrestrial voluminous silicic lavas and thermal modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manley, Curtis R.

    1993-01-01

    The so-called 'pancake' domes, and several other volcanoes on Venus, appear to represent large extrusions of silicic lava. Similar voluminous rhyolite lava flows, often associated with mantle plumes, are known on Earth. Venus' high ambient temperature, and insulation by the dome's brecciated carapace, both act to prolong cooling of a dome's interior, allowing for episodic lava input over an extended period of time. Field relations and aspect ratios of terrestrial voluminous rhyolite lavas imply continuous, non-episodic growth, reflecting tapping of a large volume of dry, anatectic silicic magma. Petrogenetically, the venusian domes may be analogous to chains of small domes on Earth, which represent 'leakage' of evolved material from magma bodies fractionating from much more mafic liquids.

  11. Improved manufacturing techniques for rf and laser hardening of missile domes, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlewicz, W. T.; Mann, I. B.; Martin, P. M.; Hays, D. D.; Graybeal, A. G.

    1982-07-01

    The adaptation of an existing Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) optical coating capability developed for high power fusion laser applications to the case of RF and laser hardening of plastic missile domes used by US Army (MICOM) is reported. RF hardening of Hellfire and Copperhead 1.06 micron missile domes by use of transparent conductive Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) coatings is demonstrated. The project involved adaptation of a coating material and process developed for flat glass components used in fusion lasers to the case of hemispherical or conical heat sensitive plastic domes used on laser guided missiles. Specific ITO coating property goals are an electrical sheet resistance of 10 ohms/square, a coated dome transmission of 80% or more at 1.06 micron wavelength (compared to 90% for a bare dome), and good adhesion. The sheet resistance goal of 10 ohms/square was expected to result in an RF attenuation of 30 dB at the frequencies of importance.

  12. A structural outline of the Yenkahe volcanic resurgent dome (Tanna Island, Vanuatu Arc, South Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, O.; Brothelande, E.; Lénat, J.-F.; Bachèlery, P.; Garaébiti, E.

    2013-12-01

    A structural study has been conducted on the resurgent Yenkahe dome (5 km long by 3 km wide) located in the heart of the Siwi caldera of Tanna Island (Vanuatu arc, south Pacific). This spectacular resurgent dome hosts a small caldera and a very active strombolian cinder cone - the Yasur volcano - in the west and exhibits an intriguing graben in its central part. Detailed mapping and structural observations make it possible to unravel the volcano-tectonic history of the dome. It is shown that, following the early formation of a resurgent dome in the west, a complex collapse (caldera plus graben) occurred and this was associated with the recent uplift of the eastern part of the present dome. Eastward migration of the underlying magma related to regional tectonics is proposed to explain this evolution.

  13. The Hangay Dome, central Mongolia: A relict Mesozoic landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannell, K. T.; Zeitler, P. K.; Ancuta, L. D.; Idleman, B. D.; Boulton, S. L.; Wegmann, K. W.

    2014-12-01

    The Hangay Dome is a broad upland in central Mongolia characterized by a high elevation (>3000-4000 m), low relief landscape within the greater Mongolian Plateau (~2000 m avg. elevation) of central Asia. We have assessed the long-term, large-scale landscape evolution of the region using thermochronologic analysis. Detrital apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He samples from the Selenga River (n = 55) and Orkhon River (n = 15) basins north of the Hangay Dome yield central ages of 134.2 ± 6 and 131.3 ± 9.8 (1σ) Ma, respectively. The regional granitic bedrock apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He single grain age distribution is approximately 95 to 200 Ma, with a homogenized grain central age of 131.2 ± 6.1 Ma. These low-temperature data, in conjunction with K-feldspar MDD 40Ar/39Ar ages of ~200-230 Ma, suggest regional exhumation in the Mesozoic. HeFTy (Ketcham, 2005) modeling corroborates these data and suggests cooling rates of ~3°C/Ma from 220-185 Ma, and applying a geothermal gradient of 21 ± 3°C/km for central Mongolia (Lysak and Dorofeeva, 2003), rock uplift rates from Late Triassic to Mid-Late Jurassic are approximately 100 m/My and from the Early Cretaceous (130 Ma) to the present approximately ≤ 30 m/My. Regional bedrock age patterns, detrital age populations, and thermal modeling suggest that significant recent, rapid rock uplift in central Mongolia is unlikely. Pecube thermo-kinematic models (Braun, 2003) indicate that any rapid (> 500 m/My) event in the Late Miocene-Pliocene would produce Early-Mid Cenozoic cooling ages in lower elevations of the Selenga River drainage basin, which is not supported by the detrital age signal. Pecube modeling of slow rock uplift rates of <50 m/My since the Early Triassic produce regional ages in agreement with geomorphic and geochronologic data. Regional apatite helium age-elevation patterns suggest long-term thermal stability of the upper crust and possible lowering of relief since Mesozoic exhumation. Basalt total fusion 40Ar/39Ar ages

  14. Long-term landscape evolution in the Hangay Dome, Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannell, K. T.; Ancuta, L. D.; Smith, S. G.; Idleman, B. D.; Wegmann, K. W.; Zeitler, P. K.

    2013-12-01

    The Hangay Dome in central Mongolia is an example of high-elevation (>3000 m), low-relief topography in a continental interior between the thick Siberian craton to the north and the active Himalaya deformation belt to the far south. Detrital and granitic bedrock apatite (U-Th)/He samples yield ages of ~85-200 Ma and ~95-120 Ma, respectively. These low-temperature data in conjunction with K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar ages of ~200-225 Ma, raise questions about when this preserved, epeirogenic landscape was uplifted and how it has responded to minimal exhumation since the Mesozoic. Alpine cirques and intact moraine deposits are indicative of a more recent, climate-driven erosional signal in the higher elevation regions of the Hangay. Pecube modeling indicates that a recent, regional uplift signal produces younger, Early-Mid Cenozoic cooling ages in lower elevations of the Selenga River drainage basin to the north of the Hangay Dome. Modeled low exhumation rates of 0.038 mm/yr over 122 Ma generate cooling ages in agreement with preliminary geomorphic and geochronologic results. Basalt total fusion 40Ar/39Ar ages constrain the earliest surface exposure of the landscape to ~30 Ma in the Hangay, with flows as young as ~5 Ka present in a few areas. Geomorphic observations coupled with age-constrained basalt stratigraphy allow us to calculate minimum incision rates in the eastern Hangay for the Miocene and Late Pliocene-Holocene of 0.032 mm/yr and 0.039 mm/yr, respectively. In addition, basalt-bedrock contact mapping in one area places a ~10 Ma old basal flow erupted onto an undulated bedrock surface, suggesting the existence of topography at the time of eruption. Volumetric analysis reveals that rock removed in the past ~6 Ma (uppermost basalt flow age) yields a net erosion rate of 0.037 mm/yr. This rate is also comparable to our 10Be basin-averaged erosion rates from samples collected in adjacent drainages. In contrast to previous inferences that central Mongolia has undergone

  15. New U-Pb SHRIMP dating for the Leo Pargil gneiss dome, western Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leech, M. L.; Sas, R.

    2006-12-01

    The Leo Pargil gneiss dome is comprised of upper amphibolite-facies metasedimentary rocks of the lower Tethyan Himalayan sequence (the Haimantas unit) that are intruded by numerous small granitoid bodies and leucogranite dikes. The dome is exposed in northern India/southwestern Tibet at the confluence of the Sutlej and Spiti rivers west of the Zada basin. The dome is bound by generally N-S trending normal faults; the western boundary is termed the Kaurik-Chango normal fault and has a history of recent seismicity. The Leo Pargil dome differs from other North Himalayan domes in that it exhibits orogen-parallel stretching lineations and a uniform top-to-the-northwest sense-of-shear on its western flank (in contrast to approximately arc-normal stretching lineations and variable sense-of-shear in other North Himalayan domes; the youngest phase of Leo Pargil dome development is related to an orogen-parallel extensional structure similar to that which bounds the Gurla Mandhata dome to the southeast. New U-Pb SHRIMP dating of zircon yields Late Archean to Late Proterozoic ages for Leo Pargil paragneisses (c. 800-900 Ma and rarer 2-3 Ga zircons) and Late Oligocene to Early Miocene ages for granitoid intrusions (c. 27-16 Ma). These Oligocene to Miocene ages for Leo Pargil granitoids may correspond to magmatism associated with the widespread leucogranite bodies exposed througout the Himalaya. The Leo Pargil dome, like other similar Himalayan gneiss domes, may be exposures of a ductile mid-crustal channel.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Textile Composite Stamping On Double Dome

    SciTech Connect

    Xiongqi Peng; Zia Ur Rehman

    2011-05-04

    Stamping is one of the most effective ways to form textile composites in industry for providing high-strength, low-weight and cost-effective products. This paper presents a fully continuum mechanics-based approach for stamping simulation of textile fiber reinforced composites by using finite element (FE) method. A previously developed non-orthogonal constitutive model is used to represent the anisotropic mechanical behavior of textile composites under large deformation during stamping. Simulation are performed on a balanced plain weave composite with 0 deg./90 deg. and {+-}45 deg. as initial yarn orientation over a benchmark double dome device. Simulation results show good agreement with experimental output in terms of a number of parameters selected for comparison.

  17. A robotic reflective Schmidt telescope for Dome C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, K. G.; Andersen, M. I.; Steinbach, M.

    2004-10-01

    This paper lays out a wide-field robotic Schmidt telescope (RST) for the Antarctic site Dome C. The telescope is based on 80/120cm reflective Schmidt optics, built originally for a space project, and a mosaic of four 7.5k×7.5k 8-μm thinned CCDs from the PEPSI/LBT wafer run. The telescope's total field of view (FOV) would be 5o circular (minimum 3o× 3o square) with a plate scale of 0.7 arcsec per pixel. Limiting magnitude is expected to be V=21.5mag in 60 sec for a field of 9 square degrees.

  18. Strategies for estimating mirror and dome seeing for TMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogiatzis, Konstantinos; Angeli, George Z.

    2006-06-01

    Mirror and dome seeing greatly influence the optical performance of large ground-based telescopes. This study describes a strategy for modeling the effects of passive ventilation on the optical performance of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analyses are combined with thermal analyses to model the effects of turbulence and thermal variations within the airflow around the TMT telescope-enclosure configuration. An analytical thermal model based on Newton's cooling law and incorporating a conduction heat flux and a radiation term is used to track the primary mirror temperature throughout the night. A semi-empirical seeing model is used to relate mirror temperature and wind speed to seeing. Different external wind speeds, mirror heat fluxes and ambient thermal temporal gradients are investigated and comparisons are made.

  19. Tourmalinites from the Golden Dyke Dome, Northern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plimer, I. R.

    1986-10-01

    Tourmalinites occur at five stratigraphic levels within the low metamorphic grade multiply deformed Lower Proterozoic metasediments and metavolcanics of the Golden Dyke Dome. The geological setting, exhalite associations, sedimentary structures and tourmaline chemistry all preclude a granitic origin. Tourmalinite derived from the isochemical metamorphism of an exhalite comprising silica and tourmaline. Tourmalinite and other exhalites are hosted by carbonaceous pelitic metasediments and were deposited in deeper basinal areas. The ore fluid was probably dolerite-heated seawater which leached a thick pile of argillaceous sediments and acquired metals and boron by leaching. The first and second increase in geothermal gradient produced tourmalinite, the third produced auriferous tourmalinite and iron formations with tourmalinite and exhalative Pb-Zn deposits forming during the period of maximum geothermal gradient. More tourmalinite formed during the subsequent decline in geothermal gradient. Tourmalinites are regarded as B-rich iron formations which can be the host for or associated with exhalative deposits of Au and base metals.

  20. Prospective Type Ia Supernova Surveys From Dome A

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, A.; Bonissent, A.; Christiansen, J.L.; Ealet, A.; Faccioli, L.; Gladney, L.; Kushner, G.; Linder, E.; Stoughton, C.; Wang, L.; /Texas A-M /Purple Mountain Observ.

    2010-02-01

    Dome A, the highest plateau in Antarctica, is being developed as a site for an astronomical observatory. The planned telescopes and instrumentation and the unique site characteristics are conducive toward Type Ia supernova surveys for cosmology. A self-contained search and survey over five years can yield a spectro-photometric time series of {approx}1000 z < 0.08 supernovae. These can serve to anchor the Hubble diagram and quantify the relationship between luminosities and heterogeneities within the Type Ia supernova class, reducing systematics. Larger aperture ({approx}>4-m) telescopes are capable of discovering supernovae shortly after explosion out to z {approx} 3. These can be fed to space telescopes, and can isolate systematics and extend the redshift range over which we measure the expansion history of the universe.

  1. Prospective Type Ia supernova surveys from Dome A

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, A.; Bonissent, A.; Christiansen, J. L.; Ealet, A.; Faccioli, L.; Gladney, L.; Kushner, G.; Linder, E.; Stoughton, C.; Wang, L.

    2010-03-10

    Dome A, the highest plateau in Antarctica, is being developed as a site for an astronomical observatory. The planned telescopes and instrumentation and the unique site characteristics are conducive toward Type Ia supernova surveys for cosmology. A self-contained search and survey over 5 years can yield a spectro-photometric time series of ~;; 1000 z< 0:08 supernovae. These can serve to anchor the Hubble diagram and quantify the relationship between luminosities and heterogeneities within the Type Ia supernova class, reducing systematics. Larger aperture (>=4-m) telescopes are capable of discovering supernovae shortly after explosion out to z ~;; 3. These can be fed to space telescopes, and can isolate systematics and extend the redshift range over which we measure the expansion history of the universe.

  2. Sojourner Rover View of Shark and Half Dome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The rounded knobs (arrows) up to 3 or 4 cm wide on Shark (left; approximately 70 cm wide)) and Half Dome (upper right) and in the foreground could be pebbles in a cemented matrix of clays, silts, and sands; such rocks are called conglomerates. Well-rounded objects like these were not seen at the Viking sites.

    NOTE: original caption as published in Science Magazine.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  3. Acoustic and Elastodynamic Redatuming for VSP Salt Dome Flank Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, R.; Willis, M.; Toksoz, N.

    2007-12-01

    We apply an extension of the concept of Time Reversed Acoustics (TRA) for imaging salt dome flanks using Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) data. We demonstrate its performance and capabilities on both synthetic acoustic and elastic seismic data from a Gulf of Mexico (GOM) model. This target-oriented strategy eliminates the need for the traditional complex process of velocity estimation, model building, and iterative depth migration to remove the effects of the salt canopy and surrounding overburden. In this study, we use data from surface shots recorded in a well from a walkaway VSP survey. The method, called redatuming, creates a geometry as if the source and receiver pairs had been located in the borehole at the positions of the receivers. This process generates effective downhole shot gathers without any knowledge of the overburden velocity structure. The resulting shot gathers are less complex since the VSP ray paths from the surface source are shortened and moved to be as if they started in the borehole, then reflected off the salt flank region and captured in the borehole. After redatuming, we apply multiple passes of prestack migration from the reference datum of the borehole. In our example, the first pass migration, using only simple vertical velocity gradient model, reveals the outline of the salt edge. A second pass of reverse-time prestack depth migration using the full, two-way wave equation, is performed with an updated velocity model that now consists of the velocity gradient and the salt dome. The second pass migration brings out the dipping sediments abutting the salt flank because these reflectors were illuminated by energy that bounced off the salt flank forming prismatic reflections.

  4. Cambrian to Holocene structural and burial history of Nashville dome

    SciTech Connect

    Stearns, R.G.; Reesman, A.L.

    1986-02-01

    About 14,000 ft (4270 m) of strata covered basement over the present crest of the Nashville dome by the end of the Paleozoic (calculated by estimating the geothermal gradient, and using temperatures of veins in Stones River Group and Knox Dolomite). At least 7500 ft (2290 m) of post-Devonian strata have been removed by subsequent erosion. Estimates of other erosional episodes include 350 ft (107 m) of upper Knox (during the Middle Ordovician) and 500 ft (152 m) of Devonian-Ordovician (during the Late Devonian). Mesozoic to Holocene uplift was at least 6350 ft (1940 m), 1500 ft or 460 m (25%) of which occurred in the latest 100 m.y. and 450 ft or 140 m (7%) during the latest 2 m.y., a rate ranging from about 15 ft/m.y. (4.6 m/m.y.) for the longer term to over 225 ft/m.y. (70 m/m.y.) in the Pleistocene to Holocene. Earliest structure of the area was a series of elongate basins, probably rifts synchronous with Reelfoot rift to the west. Uplifts trending N10/sup 0/E moved about 40 mi (65 km) westward during the Middle Ordovician. These may relate to similar trending (and moving) Appalachian orogenic events. A change to uplifts trending N50/sup 0/E (parallel to strikes of Appalachian thrusts) occurred in the Late Ordovician and continued to the Devonian; this may reflect a similar Late Ordovician change in the orientation of Appalachian tectonism. In the interval from post-Mississippian to Late Cretaceous, the dome curved westward to join the Pascola arch in response to Ouachita activity. 11 figures, 3 tables.

  5. The 2005 and 2010 dome collapse driven block and ash flows on Shiveluch volcano, Kamchatka: Morphological analysis using satellite- and field-based data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krippner, J.; Belousov, A.; Belousova, M.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    A new multi-scale investigation of recent block and ash flow deposits on Shiveluch volcano, Kamchatka, using satellite- and field-based data has produced a detailed description of the surface deposits. In February, 2005 and October, 2010 Shiveluch produced large dome-collapse block and ash flows that travelled more than 19 km down the southern flanks. These deposits have now been interpreted using high-resolution (~0.5 m) WorldView-02 and QuickBird-02 panchromatic satellite data to describe surficial morphologies, block distributions, forest devastation and the subsequent tree deposition. These data reveal complex deposits composed of overlapping flows and lobes with diverse morphologies including channel and levee structures, varying lobate terminations, compaction features, ridges, small hummock-like features, arcuate scarps, as well as post-depositional erosion and reworking, which were later investigated in the field. The deposits are composed of poorly sorted, porphyritic, dome material which is largely oxidized with rare evidence of hydrothermal alteration, as well as lithics eroded from older deposits, all within an ash-lapilli matrix. Large dome blocks up to 12 m in diameter are deposited to the distal edges of the deposit and are dominantly sub-rounded, and composed of banded, porphyritic, poorly vesicular, variably oxidized dome material with mafic xenolith inclusions. Many of these display fracturing and impact scours. This study links satellite-based interpretations of large block and ash flow deposits to field observations, allowing the remote identification of morphological features. This multi-scale investigation of these morphologies can be applied elsewhere for the rapid and safe identification of fresh deposits in dangerous or remote locations.

  6. Lateral flow strip assay

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Benett, William J.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  7. Performance and applicability of a 2.5-D ice-flow model in the vicinity of a dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passalacqua, Olivier; Gagliardini, Olivier; Parrenin, Frédéric; Todd, Joe; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Ritz, Catherine

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional ice flow modelling requires a large number of computing resources and observation data, such that 2-D simulations are often preferable. However, when there is significant lateral divergence, this must be accounted for (2.5-D models), and a flow tube is considered (volume between two horizontal flowlines). In the absence of velocity observations, this flow tube can be derived assuming that the flowlines follow the steepest slope of the surface, under a few flow assumptions. This method typically consists of scanning a digital elevation model (DEM) with a moving window and computing the curvature at the centre of this window. The ability of the 2.5-D models to account properly for a 3-D state of strain and stress has not clearly been established, nor their sensitivity to the size of the scanning window and to the geometry of the ice surface, for example in the cases of sharp ridges. Here, we study the applicability of a 2.5-D ice flow model around a dome, typical of the East Antarctic plateau conditions. A twin experiment is carried out, comparing 3-D and 2.5-D computed velocities, on three dome geometries, for several scanning windows and thermal conditions. The chosen scanning window used to evaluate the ice surface curvature should be comparable to the typical radius of this curvature. For isothermal ice, the error made by the 2.5-D model is in the range 0-10 % for weakly diverging flows, but is 2 or 3 times higher for highly diverging flows and could lead to a non-physical ice surface at the dome. For non-isothermal ice, assuming a linear temperature profile, the presence of a sharp ridge makes the 2.5-D velocity field unrealistic. In such cases, the basal ice is warmer and more easily laterally strained than the upper one, the walls of the flow tube are not vertical, and the assumptions of the 2.5-D model are no longer valid.

  8. Real-Time Measurements of Aft Dome Insulation Erosion on Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWhorter, Bruce; Ewing, Mark; Albrechtsen, Kevin; Noble, Todd; Longaker, Matt

    2004-01-01

    Real-time erosion of aft dome internal insulation was measured with internal instrumentation on a static test of a lengthened version of the Space Shuffle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). This effort marks the first time that real-time aft dome insulation erosion (Le., erosion due to the combined effects of thermochemical ablation and mechanical abrasion) was measured in this kind of large motor static test [designated as Engineering Test Motor number 3 (ETM3)I. This paper presents data plots of the erosion depth versus time. The data indicates general erosion versus time behavior that is in contrast to what would be expected from earlier analyses. Engineers have long known that the thermal environment in the aft dome is severe and that the resulting aft dome insulation erosion is significant. Models of aft dome erosion involve a two-step process of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and material ablation modeling. This modeling effort is complex. The time- dependent effects are difficult to verify with only prefire and postfire insulation measurements. Nozzle vectoring, slag accumulation, and changing boundary conditions will affect the time dependence of aft dome erosion. Further study of this data and continued measurements on future motors will increase our understanding of the aft dome flow and erosion environment.

  9. Injection of vesicular magma into an andesitic dome at the effusive-explosive transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, B. J.; Di Muro, A.; Horwell, C. J.; Spieler, O.; Llewellin, E. W.

    2010-06-01

    A single, vesicular pyroclast collected from a major (11 × 106 m3) dome collapse eruption of the Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat (21st September 1997) was found to contain textural and Raman evidence for multiple decompression events and magma injection into the dome just prior to the onset of dome collapse. Quartz, plagioclase and hornblende phenocrysts contain closed and burst melt inclusions (MIs), the latter in the form of either foam or cylindrical melt extrusions from cavities on fracture surfaces. Fractures within ruptured quartz phenocrysts were infilled with glass, whereas those within plagioclase are entirely free of glass, indicating relatively early fracturing (decompression) of the quartz. This interpretation is supported by slightly higher measured H2OT in burst MIs in quartz (0.44 wt.% ± 0.07, 1 s.d.) compared with plagioclase (0.31 wt.% ± 0.05, 1 s.d.), indicating equilibration on rupturing of the quartz at higher PH2O. H2OT levels in glass from burst MIs in plagioclase are consistent with plagioclase fragmentation at H2O saturation pressures < 5 MPa, at an estimated depth of < 210 m, within the dome. The fragmentation occurred whilst the groundmass glass was still plastic, as evident from the presence of stretched vesicles in glass at fracture terminations. The fractures in plagioclase are empty of vapour phase precipitates (mainly cristobalite that infills matrix vesicles) which constrains the fracturing of plagioclase to the last depressurisation event recorded in the pyroclast, which was the dome collapse which led to the pyroclast being ejected from the dome. We suggest that our study provides the first direct (i.e. non seismic) evidence for the injection of gas-charged magma into the dome at the onset of dome collapse, marking the transition from effusive to explosive eruption, and that the magma injection could have provided the triggering mechanism for dome collapse.

  10. Formation of dome and basin structures: Results from scaled experiments using non-linear rock analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulauf, J.; Zulauf, G.; Zanella, F.

    2016-09-01

    Dome and basin folds are structures with circular or slightly elongate outcrop patterns, which can form during single- and polyphase deformation in various tectonic settings. We used power-law viscous rock analogues to simulate single-phase dome-and-basin folding of rocks undergoing dislocation creep. The viscosity ratio between a single competent layer and incompetent matrix was 5, and the stress exponent of both materials was 7. The samples underwent layer-parallel shortening under bulk pure constriction. Increasing initial layer thickness resulted in a decrease in the number of domes and basins and an increase in amplitude, A, arc-length, L, wavelength, λ, and layer thickness, Hf. Samples deformed incrementally show progressive development of domes and basins until a strain of eY=Z = -30% is attained. During the dome-and-basin formation the layer thickened permanently, while A, L, and λ increased. A dominant wavelength was not attained. The normalized amplitude (A/λ) increased almost linearly reaching a maximum of 0.12 at eY=Z = -30%. During the last increment of shortening (eY=Z = -30 to -40%) the domes and basins did not further grow, but were overprinted by a second generation of non-cylindrical folds. Most of the geometrical parameters of the previously formed domes and basins behaved stable or decreased during this phase. The normalized arc-length (L/Hf) of domes and basins is significantly higher than that of 2D cylindrical folds. For this reason, the normalized arc length can probably be used to identify domes and basins in the field, even if these structures are not fully exposed in 3D.

  11. Central Pit and Dome Formation as Seen in Occator Crater, Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Paul M.; Buczkowski, Debra; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Schmidt, Britney E.; O'Brien, David P.; Hiesinger, Harald; Sizemore, Hanna G.; Ammannito, Eleonora; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher T.; Dawn Science Team

    2016-10-01

    Dawn mapping of Ceres revealed that central depressions (or pits) are common in craters >75 km. The best preserved of these is Occator (D~92 km), where the pit is associated with a major bright deposit dominated by carbonates. The pit is ~9 km wide, 600-800 m deep and flanked by asymmetric massifs 0.7 to 1.3 km high. The pit is partially filled by a fractured central dome ~3 km wide and 700 m high. Fracturing could have been due to dome inflation by "magma" or by subsurface freezing of ice. Within the bright material, two color units are mapped, including a paler surface unit and a more yellowish to reddish unit exposed within the most fractured parts of the dome surface and at small bright spots, at least some of which could be post-Occator small craters. Some bright materials form as discrete small spots midslope along the pit wall and others avoid small hills, suggesting partial topographic control. Stratigraphic relations are ambiguous but suggest formation of a smooth carapace some meters thick that was subsequently disrupted by fractures crossing the floor of Occator, and by uplift of the dome surface. Pit and dome morphologies, including dome fracturing are potentially analogous to central pits and domes in many craters on Ganymede and Callisto, suggesting some commonality in formation processes. The absence of center pits or domes on Saturnian satellites could be related to much lower temperatures on those bodies. The prominence of central pits and domes on Ceres confirms the importance of volatile materials, mostly likely water ice, in the outer layers of Ceres, especially as compared to Vesta.

  12. Magma ascent dynamic through Ti diffusion in magnetites. Application to lava dome-forming eruptions. Implications to lava dome superifical explosivity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Morgan, Dan J.

    2016-04-01

    Superficial lava dome explosivity represents a major hazard during lava dome growth. But the origin of this explosive activity remains unclear until recently. By using geochemical (residual water content, silica abundance) and textural (vesicularity, microcristallinity) data, we constrain the occurrence of such hazard to the beginning of the lava dome activity. During the first stages of growth, the lava dome is small enough to develop an impermeable carapace that isolates a less degassed batch of magma inside, thus allowing an internal overpressurization of the volcano (Boudon et al., 2015). This study more precisely details the petrology and the texture of titano-magnetites as archive of magma ascent dynamic within the conduit. Titano-magnetites may exhibit two types of textures: exsolved or "limpid". When they are exsolved, no time constrain may be extracted as they re-equilibrate. On the contrary, when they are unexsolved, major element distribution, in particular Ti, may act as a powerful tool to decipher magma dynamic (differentiation, mixing) and estimate time that corresponds to the magma ascent time. The composition and elemental diffusion profiles are acquired by EPMA, following textural investigations by SEM. The time is then obtained by modelling the profile as a diffusion profile using the intracristalline diffusion coefficients published in literature. We applied this methodology to examples of lava dome superficial explosivity on Montagne Pelée in Martinique (Lesser Antilles Arc), and on Puy Chopine volcano in La Chaine des Puys, (French Massif Central). More precisely, the first phase of the Puy Chopine lava dome growth experienced a superficial explosion, as for Montagne Pelée, the first stages of the 1902 eruption (several superficial explosions occurred) and the 650 y. BP eruption (two superficial explosions destroyed the growing lava dome). We show that, for a single event, the vesiculated, undegassed batch of magma responsible of the

  13. Lateral canthal surgery.

    PubMed

    Chong, Kelvin Kam-Lung; Goldberg, Robert A

    2010-08-01

    The lateral canthus is a delicate and complicated three-dimensional structure with function relevant to the health of the ocular surface. Dysfunction of the lateral canthus, due to aging changes or iatrogenic trauma, results in ocular morbidity ranging from chronic irritation to tearing to recalcitrant keratopathy. From an aesthetic standpoint, symmetric, normally positioned lateral canthi are cornerstones of youthful periorbital appearance, disruption of which leads to cosmetically significant deformity or asymmetry. Reconstruction of the lateral canthus is important in the rehabilitation of the aging eyelid and an unfortunate necessity after failed lateral canthal surgery. The common methods for improving or maintaining position, tone, and shape of the lower eyelid and lateral canthus use tightening or shortening the lower eyelid horizontally, keeping the canthal angle in an appropriate vertical level, and hugging the ocular surface. Many techniques have been described for the reconstruction of the lateral canthus in functional conditions or for aesthetic purposes. These methods have met with varying success. In this article, we begin with a discussion of the anatomy and physiology of the lateral canthus, followed by clinical examples of lateral canthal abnormalities and underlying pathophysiologies. A review of surgical options for the lateral canthus is presented with concluding remarks on postoperative complications. PMID:20524167

  14. Target detection performance in helmet-mounted and conventional dome displays.

    PubMed

    Hettinger, L J; Nelson, W T; Haas, M W

    1996-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to assess visual target detection performance using a helmet-mounted display (HMD) and a conventional flight simulation dome display. Measures of workload and mood were also obtained. Participants in both viewing conditions scanned an area 120 degrees vertical by 240 degrees horizontal while attempting to locate targets that appeared to be approaching them from one of a possible 18 locations. Results indicated significantly superior performance in the conventional dome display. Workload and mood measures also showed a significant advantage for the dome display. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for the design and use of HMD systems as components of airborne virtual environment interfaces.

  15. High-resolution ground layer turbulence from inside the CFHT dome using a lunar scintillometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfrommer, T.; Hickson, P.

    2015-04-01

    For ground layer adaptive optics systems, knowledge of the local height- and time- resolved ground layer (GL) turbulence is crucial to link local topography with optical turbulence. Such turbulence profiles have been obtained in the years 2009 and 2010 over 250 hours on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Results from measurements inside the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) dome indicate severe degradation of image quality due to a poorly vented dome and thus provide input for dome modifications and design aspects for a new ground layer adaptive optics system. The outside median GL seeing above 6 metres was determined to be 0.48±0.01”.

  16. A history of semi-active laser dome and window materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Roger M.

    2014-05-01

    Semi-Active Laser (SAL) guidance systems were developed starting in the mid-1960's and today form an important class of precision guided weapons. The laser wavelengths generally fall in the short wave infrared region of the spectrum. Relative to passive, image based, infrared seekers the optical demands placed on the domes or windows of SAL seekers is very modest, allowing the use of low cost, easily manufactured materials, such as polycarbonate. This paper will examine the transition of SAL window and dome science and technology from the laboratory to battlefield, with special emphasis on the story of polycarbonate domes.

  17. Origin of Domes on Europa: The Role of Thermally Induced Compositional Buoyancy,

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Barr, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    The surface of Jupiter's moon Europa is peppered by topographic domes, interpreted as sites of intrusion and extrusion. Diapirism is consistent with dome morphology, but thermal buoyancy alone cannot produce sufficient driving pressures to create the observed dome elevations. Instead, diapirs may initiate by thermal convection that induces compositional segregation. Exclusion of impurities from warm upwellings allows sufficient buoyancy for icy plumes to create the observed surface topography, provided the ice shell has a small effective elastic thickness (0.2 to 0.5 km) and contains low-eutectic point impurities at the few percent level. This model suggests that the ice shell may be depleted in impurities over time.

  18. Non-Newtonian Convection and Compositional Buoyancy: Advances in Modeling Convection and Dome Formation on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Barr, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    Numerical modeling of non-Newtonian convection in ice shows that convection controlled by grain boundary sliding rheology may occur in Europa. This modeling confirms that thermal convection alone cannot produce significant dome elevations. Domes may instead be produced by diapirs initiated by thermal convection that in turn induces compositional segregation. Exclusion of impurities from warm upwellings would allow sufficient buoyancy for icy plumes to account for the observed approximately 100 m topography of domes, provided the ice shell has a small effective elastic thickness (approximately 0.2 to 0.5 km) and contains low eutectic-point impurities at the few percent level.

  19. Finite element analysis/hydroburst test data correlation for reverse dome integrated stage application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burson, K. S.; Nowakowski, M.; Tiwari, S.

    1993-02-01

    The U.S. Army's Missile Integrated Stage ('MIST') program has undertaken the development of an advanced strategic interceptor booster's solid-fueled rocket motor. The primary structural components of this booster are a composite case with full-diameter aft closure opening, a titanium reverse dome, and a forced-deflection nozzle plug housing. Attention is presently given to the correlation between the analytical models used in this program and the hydroburst test data obtained for the MIST reverse dome. It is found that the reverse dome exceeded the minimum required burst pressure of 2300 psig.

  20. Ordered domain lateral location, symmetry, and thermal stability in Ge:Si islands

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, M.-I.; Schülli, T. U.; Zhong, Z.; Metzger, T. H.; Renaud, G.

    2015-01-05

    Compositional atomic ordering is a crucial issue in the epitaxial growth of nanoparticles and thin films. Here, we report on a method based on x-ray diffuse scattering close to basis forbidden Bragg reflections to infer the lateral location, the symmetry, and the thermal stability of ordered domains in GeSi dome-shaped islands on Si(001) after growth and during annealing. We observe that atomic ordering does not disappear after annealing, demonstrating that it is a resilient metastable phenomenon.

  1. Internal Convection on Ceres: A Possible Explanation for Dome Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travis, B. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Sizemore, H. G.; O'Brien, D. P.; Sykes, M. V.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical 2-D whole-body simulations of the evolution of Ceres' internal dynamics and thermal structure over its history indicate that hydrothermal activity is very strong throughout the first half of Ceres' history, gradually weakening thereafter, but still active even today (Travis et al, 2015, 46th LPSC). Large-scale upwelling plumes of muddy water extend from the porous, permeable rocky core through an ocean layer and impinge on the bottom of the ice shell. These upwellings are very long-lasting. In addition, small scale, shorter-lived plumes frequently develop on the upper regions of the large plumes. The large-scale plumes occur at roughly +/- 25 o latitude. Recently, 3-D simulations of a sector of Ceres shows that the upwellings are indeed plumes and not sheets. In the 3-D model, plume diameters in the model are as small as 15-20 km in diameter, up to several 10s of km or more. Relating internal dynamics to surface features is challenging. Linkage to mounds seen on the surface may be possible. There appear to be two classes of mounds: Large domes (10s of km diameter) and small (<15 km diameter). Morphological evidence such as embayment relations imply that large mounds may be extrusive. The source of the small domes is less clear. They could be extrusive, or they could be pingo-like structures that form when large areas of melt are extruded or produced by impact, although they are larger than terrestrial or martian structures. Mound heights are typically no more than 1 - 5 km. One mechanism for generation of these mounds suggested by our modeling is extrusion of mud through fractures in the icy crust. Over-pressuring of upwelling plumes at the base of the icy crust from freezing of neighboring downwellings could generate fractures in a frozen mud crust. As plumes and icy crust cool, a significant volume expansion occurs due to freezing of water to ice. This pressurization is not uniform in space; the still-liquid upwellings will experience overpressure in

  2. Precipitation regime and stable isotopes at Dome Fuji, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, Anna; Schlosser, Elisabeth; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Powers, Jordan G.; Manning, Kevin W.; Werner, Martin; Fujita, Koji

    2016-06-01

    A unique set of 1-year precipitation and stable water isotope measurements from the Japanese Antarctic station, Dome Fuji, has been used to study the impact of the synoptic situation and the precipitation origin on the isotopic composition of precipitation on the Antarctic Plateau. The Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System (AMPS) archive data are used to analyse the synoptic situations that cause precipitation. These situations are investigated and divided into five categories. The most common weather situation during a precipitation event is an upper-level ridge that extends onto the Antarctic Plateau and causes strong northerly advection from the ocean. Most precipitation events are associated with an increase in temperature and wind speed, and a local maximum of δ18O. During the measurement period, 21 synoptically caused precipitation events caused 60 % of the total annual precipitation, whereas the remaining 40 % were predominantly attributed to diamond dust. By combining the synoptic analyses with 5-day back-trajectories, the moisture source regions for precipitation events were estimated. An average source region around a latitude of 55° S was found. The atmospheric conditions in the source region were used as initial conditions for running a Rayleigh-type isotopic model in order to reproduce the measured isotopic composition of fresh snow and to investigate the influence of the precipitation source region on the isotope ratios. The model represents the measured annual cycle of δ18O and the second-order isotopic parameter deuterium excess reasonably well, but yields on average too little fractionation along the transport/cooling path. While simulations with an isotopic general circulation model (GCM) (ECHAM5-wiso) for Dome Fuji are on average closer to the observations, this model cannot reproduce the annual cycle of deuterium excess. In the event-based analysis, no evidence of a correlation of the measured deuterium excess with the latitude of the

  3. Were the world's youngest eclogites (NW D'Entrecasteaux Islands, Papua New Guinea) exhumed in rising gneiss domes or by shear on a deep-seated fault?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, T. A.; Hacker, B.; Seward, G.

    2008-12-01

    nearly plate-motion parallel. Shear indicators diverge across the dome crests, suggesting of an inward flow of deeper rocks into the dome; or are locally variable, consistent with bulk irrotational deformation. In the gneisses (both core and carapace), conjugate shear-band microstructures and near-orthorhombic quartz LPOs, and back-rotation of mantled porphyroclasts indicate that ductile strain in domes was near plane, but that it was not simple shear (and included significant vertical shortening). The LPO's of the deepest rocks record activity of the high-T prism-[c] and prism- slip systems, whereas the outermost carapace rocks record basal- and rhomb- slip. The data reveal that deformational temperatures increased toward the dome centers, rather than outwardly into the carapace. Quartz LPO's in both dome and carapace are of uniformly modest intensity (~2-3 times random). Feldspar LPO's suggest slip on the (010)[001] or (010)[100] systems, and in some cases a shear sense opposite to quartz. While we cannot resolve how the eclogitic rocks ascended isothermally from the mantle into the lower crust, the simplest model invokes diapiric ascent (with decompression melting), ponding and lateral spreading along the Moho during early Woodlark Basin rifting. Subsequent exhumation of these rocks from the lower crust involved continued upward movement and vertical shortening of the gneisses combined with subhorizontal rift-parallel flow. Finally, normal faulting and minor erosion exhumed these rocks through the ultramafic cover to their present levels.

  4. Observation of Double-Dome Superconductivity in Potassium-Doped FeSe Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Song, Can-Li; Zhang, Hui-Min; Zhong, Yong; Hu, Xiao-Peng; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Wang, Lili; He, Ke; Ma, Xu-Cun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-04-15

    We report on the emergence of two disconnected superconducting domes in alkali-metal potassium- (K-)doped FeSe ultrathin films grown on graphitized SiC(0001). The superconductivity exhibits hypersensitivity to K dosage in the lower-T_{c} dome, whereas in the heavily electron-doped higher-T_{c} dome it becomes spatially homogeneous and robust against disorder, supportive of a conventional Cooper-pairing mechanism. Furthermore, the heavily K-doped multilayer FeSe films all reveal a large superconducting gap of ∼14  meV, irrespective of film thickness, verifying the higher-T_{c} superconductivity only in the topmost FeSe layer. The unusual finding of a double-dome superconducting phase is a step towards the mechanistic understanding of superconductivity in FeSe-derived superconductors.

  5. Hydrogen-isotope evidence for extrusion mechanisms of the Mount St Helens lava dome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Steven W.; Fink, Jonathan H.

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope analyses were used to determine water content and deuterium content for 18 samples of the Mount St Helens dome dacite in an attempt to identify the triggering mechanisms for periodic dome-building eruptions of lava. These isotope data, the first ever collected from an active lava dome, suggest a steady-state process of magma evolution combining crystallization-induced volatile production in the chamber with three different degassing mechanisms: closed-system volatile loss in the magma chamber, open-system volatile release during ascent, and kinetically controlled degassing upon eruption at the surface. The data suggest the future dome-building eruptions may require a new influx of volatile-rich magma into the chamber.

  6. Rheology of Lava Flows on Europa and the Emergence of Cryovolcanic Domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quick, Lynnae C.; Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Steve M.

    2015-01-01

    There is ample evidence that Europa is currently geologically active. Crater counts suggest that the surface is no more than 90 Myr old, and cryovolcanism may have played a role in resurfacing the satellite in recent geological times. Europa's surface exhibits many putative cryovolcanic features, and previous investigations have suggested that a number of domes imaged by the Galileo spacecraft may be volcanic in origin. Consequently, several Europa domes have been modeled as viscous effusions of cryolava. However, previous models for the formation of silicic domes on the terrestrial planets contain fundamental shortcomings. Many of these shortcomings have been alleviated in our new modeling approach, which warrants a re-assessment of the possibility of cryovolcanic domes on Europa.

  7. Salt-dome locations in the Gulf Coastal Plain, South-Central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beckman, J.D.; Williamson, A.K.

    1990-01-01

    Information on salt domes in Gulf of Mexico Coastal Plain, south-central United States and the adjacent Continental Shelf were compiled from major published sources, 1973-84. The location of 624 salt domes is shown on a map at a scale of 1:1 ,500,000. A color-coding system was used to show that the occurrence, size, shape, and location of these domes varies among sources. Two tables of additional data accompany the map and include other available information such as: identifying sources, depth to salt and caprock, diameter, volume, name, and uppermost zone of surrounding sediment that is penetrated, as well as the number of matches between sources. The locations of salt domes that penetrate specific zones within the gulf coast regional aquifer system are shown on maps. (USGS)

  8. High precision metrology of domes and aspheric optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Paul E.; Fleig, Jon; Forbes, Greg; Tricard, Marc

    2005-05-01

    Many defense systems have a critical need for high-precision, complex optics. However, fabrication of high quality, advanced optics is often seriously hampered by the lack of accurate and affordable metrology. QED's Subaperture Stitching Interferometer (SSI®) provides a breakthrough technology, enabling the automatic capture of precise metrology data for large and/or strongly curved (concave and convex) parts. QED"s SSI complements next-generation finishing technologies, such as Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF®), by extending the effective aperture, accuracy and dynamic range of a phase-shifting interferometer. This workstation performs automated sub-aperture stitching measurements of spheres, flats, and mild aspheres. It combines a six-axis precision stage system, a commercial Fizeau interferometer, and specially developed software that automates measurement design, data acquisition, and the reconstruction of the full-aperture figure error map. Aside from the correction of sub-aperture placement errors (such as tilts, optical power, and registration effects), our software also accounts for reference-wave error, distortion and other aberrations in the interferometer"s imaging optics. The SSI can automatically measure the full aperture of high numerical aperture surfaces (such as domes) to interferometric accuracy. The SSI extends the usability of a phase measuring interferometer and allows users with minimal training to produce full-aperture measurements of otherwise untestable parts. Work continues to extend this technology to measure aspheric shapes without the use of dedicated null optics. This SSI technology will be described, sample measurement results shown, and various manufacturing applications discussed.

  9. Blue Mountain and The Gas Rocks: Rear-Arc Dome Clusters on the Alaska Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, Wes; Fierstein, Judy; Calvert, Andrew T.

    2007-01-01

    Behind the single-file chain of stratovolcanoes on the Alaska Peninsula, independent rear-arc vents for mafic magmas are uncommon, and for silicic magmas rarer still. We report here the characteristics, compositions, and ages of two andesite-dacite dome clusters and of several nearby basaltic units, all near Becharof Lake and 15 to 20 km behind the volcanic front. Blue Mountain consists of 13 domes (58-68 weight percent SiO2) and The Gas Rocks of three domes (62-64.5 weight percent SiO2) and a mafic cone (52 weight percent SiO2). All 16 domes are amphibole-biotite-plagioclase felsite, and nearly all are phenocryst rich and quartz bearing. Although the two dome clusters are lithologically and chemically similar and only 25 km apart, they differ strikingly in age. The main central dome of Blue Mountain yields an 40Ar/39Ar age of 632?7 ka, and two of the Gas Rocks domes ages of 25.7?1.4 and 23.3?1.2 ka. Both clusters were severely eroded by glaciation; surviving volumes of Blue Mountain domes total ~1 km3, and of the Gas Rocks domes 0.035 km3. Three basaltic vents lie close to The Gas Rocks, another lies just south of Blue Mountain, and a fifth is near the north shore of Becharof Lake. A basaltic andesite vent 6 km southeast of The Gas Rocks appears to be a flank vent of the arc-front center Mount Peulik. The basalt of Ukinrek Maars has been called transitionally alkalic, but all the other basaltic rocks are subalkaline. CO2-rich gas emissions near the eponymous Gas Rocks domes are not related to the 25-ka dacite dome cluster but, rather, to intracrustal degassing of intrusive basalt, one batch of which erupted 3 km away in 1977. The felsic and mafic vents all lie along or near the Bruin Bay Fault where it intersects a broad transverse structural zone marked by topographic, volcanologic, and geophysical discontinuities.

  10. VLF electromagnetic investigations of the crater and central dome of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Towle, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    A very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic induction survey in the crater of Mount St. Helens has identified several electrically conductive structures that appear to be associated with thermal anomalies and ground water within the crater. The most interesting of these conductive structures lies beneath the central dome. It is probably a partial melt of dacite similar to that comprising the June 1981 lobe of the central dome. ?? 1983.

  11. Why there was a useful plausible analogy between geodesic domes and spherical viruses.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Gregory J

    2006-01-01

    In 1962, Donald Caspar and Aaron Klug published their classic theory of virus structure. They developed their theory with an explicit analogy between spherical viruses and Buckminster Fuller's geodesic domes. In this paper, I use the spherical virus-geodesic dome case to develop an account of analogy and deductive analogical inference based on the notion of an isomorphism. I also consider under what conditions there is a good reason to claim an experimentally untested analogy is plausible. PMID:17702504

  12. Results of water quality sampling near Richton, Cypress Creek and Lampton Salt Domes, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gandl, L.A.; Spiers, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    In the Mississippi salt basin in southern Mississippi, chemical quality studies of surface water and ground water have been made to determine present water-quality conditions near three salt domes being studied by the Department of Energy as potential repositories for radioactive wastes. Chloride concentrations in excess of 60 milligrams per liter in surface water and ground water in Perry County indicate that contamination could be occurring from industrial wastes, oil test wells, or dissolution of Richton or Cypress Creek domes. (USGS)

  13. Three-dimensional representations of salt-dome margins at four active strategic petroleum reserve sites.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Stein, Joshua S.

    2003-01-01

    Existing paper-based site characterization models of salt domes at the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been converted to digital format and visualized using modern computer software. The four sites are the Bayou Choctaw dome in Iberville Parish, Louisiana; the Big Hill dome in Jefferson County, Texas; the Bryan Mound dome in Brazoria County, Texas; and the West Hackberry dome in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. A new modeling algorithm has been developed to overcome limitations of many standard geological modeling software packages in order to deal with structurally overhanging salt margins that are typical of many salt domes. This algorithm, and the implementing computer program, make use of the existing interpretive modeling conducted manually using professional geological judgement and presented in two dimensions in the original site characterization reports as structure contour maps on the top of salt. The algorithm makes use of concepts of finite-element meshes of general engineering usage. Although the specific implementation of the algorithm described in this report and the resulting output files are tailored to the modeling and visualization software used to construct the figures contained herein, the algorithm itself is generic and other implementations and output formats are possible. The graphical visualizations of the salt domes at the four Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites are believed to be major improvements over the previously available two-dimensional representations of the domes via conventional geologic drawings (cross sections and contour maps). Additionally, the numerical mesh files produced by this modeling activity are available for import into and display by other software routines. The mesh data are not explicitly tabulated in this report; however an electronic version in simple ASCII format is included on a PC-based compact disk.

  14. Intrapelvic reduction and buttress screw stabilization of dome impaction of the acetabulum: a technical trick.

    PubMed

    Casstevens, Christopher; Archdeacon, Michael T; dʼHeurle, Albert; Finnan, Ryan

    2014-06-01

    Superomedial impaction of the anterior dome of the acetabulum is a known risk factor for poor outcomes after open reduction and internal fixation of acetabular fractures. The authors, using the anterior intrapelvic (modified Stoppa) approach to the acetabulum, describe a novel technique to help reduce and stabilize marginal impaction of the acetabular dome. In the senior author's experience, this technique has been helpful to achieve adequate reduction and stabilization.

  15. Reading Disability and Laterality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparrow, Sara S.

    The purpose of this study was to determine how retarded readers differed from normal readers in the various ways laterality is manifested. An additional purpose was to investigate the development of laterality as seen across several age levels. Subjects were 80 white male 9-, 10-, 11-, and 12-year-olds from regular classrooms in suburban…

  16. Lateral subtalar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Sharda, Praveen; DuFosse, Julian

    2008-07-01

    Subtalar dislocations are rare in routine orthopedic practice. While many of these dislocations are a result of high-energy injuries such as fall from a height or traffic accidents, it is not uncommon for patients to present after slipping down a few stairs. Two types of dislocation have been described, medial and lateral. The type of dislocation is described according to the position of the foot. In lateral subtalar dislocation the head of talus is found medially and the calcaneus is dislocated laterally. The navicular may lie dorsolateral to the talus. The reverse is true of lateral dislocation. Medial dislocation has been referred to as "basketball foot" due to its preponderance in basketball players.4 The deciding factor is the inverted or everted position of the foot when the force is dissipated through the weak talonavicular and talocalcaneal ligaments. This article presents a case of an adult with lateral subtalar dislocation following a fall.

  17. Reconnaissance and deep-drill site selection on Taylor Dome, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grootes, Pieter M.; Waddington, Edwin D.

    1993-01-01

    Taylor Dome is a small ice dome near the head of Taylor Valley, Southern Victoria Land. The location of the dome, just west of the Transantarctic Mountains, is expected to make the composition of the accumulating snow sensitive to changes in the extent of the Ross Ice Shelf. Thus, it is linked to the discharge of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet but protected against direct influences of glacial-interglacial sea-level rise. The record of past climatic and environmental changes in the ice provides a valuable complement to the radiocarbon-dated proxy record of climate derived from perched deltas, strandlines, and moraines that have been obtained in the nearby Dry Valleys. We carried out a reconnaissance of the Taylor Dome area over the past two field seasons to determine the most favorable location to obtain a deep core to bedrock. A stake network has been established with an 80-km line roughly along the crest of Taylor Dome, and 40-km lines parallel to it and offset by 10 km. These lines have been surveyed 1990/91, and the positions of 9 grid points have been determined with geoceivers. A higher density stake network was placed and surveyed around the most likely drill area in the second year. Ground-based radar soundings in both years provided details on bedrock topography and internal layering of the ice in the drill area. An airborne radar survey in January 1992, completed the radar coverage of the Taylor Dome field area.

  18. Final report on decommissioning boreholes and wellsite restoration, Gulf Coast Interior Salt Domes of Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    In 1978, eight salt domes in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi were identified for study as potential locations for a nuclear waste repository as part of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program. Three domes were selected in Mississippi for ``area characterization`` phase study as follows: Lampton Dome near Columbia, Cypress Creek Dome near New Augusta, and Richton Dome near Richton. The purpose of the studies was to acquire geologic and geohydrologic information from shallow and deep drilling investigations to enable selection of sites suitable for more intensive study. Eleven deep well sites were selected for multiple-well installations to acquire information on the lithologic and hydraulic properties of regional aquifers. In 1986, the Gulf Coast salt domes were eliminated from further consideration for repository development by the selection of three candidate sites in other regions of the country. In 1987, well plugging and restoration of these deferred sites became a closeout activity. The primary objectives of this activity are to plug and abandon all wells and boreholes in accordance with state regulations, restore all drilling sites to as near original condition as feasible, and convey to landowners any wells on their property that they choose to maintain. This report describes the activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives, as outlines in Activity Plan 1--2, ``Activity Plan for Well Plugging and Site Restoration of Test Hole Sites in Mississippi.``

  19. A user`s perspective on aluminum dome roofs for aboveground tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, P.E.

    1995-12-31

    There is a trend in the petroleum industry to install aluminum dome roofs on storage tanks of all kinds. Although most dome roofs have been installed on floating roof tanks, there is a trend to install them on fixed roof tanks as well, substituting the familiar shallow fixed cone roof with a geodesic dome. In part, this trend has been caused by EPA requirements causing a greater number of closed tanks to be vented to vapor recovery or vapor destruction systems. Both the aluminum roof manufacturing community and the user have moved into a whole new set of problems associated with the change in dome roof applications from atmospheric to those requiring internal pressure. New problems are just now being dealt with and solved because cost factors tend to make the aluminum dome an economic solution for many cases where sealed tank systems must be used. Because of the increased numbers of geodesic domes as either an alternative to a fixed cone roof tank or as a way to convert an external floating roof tank to an internal floating roof tank or as their potential to serve as tools in the environmental arena, it is the intent of this paper to examine them from the user`s perspective. In addition, some areas of research that should resolve some reliability and safety issues are presented for consideration and research by not only manufacturers but the users as well.

  20. Distributions of cranial pathologies provide evidence for head-butting in dome-headed dinosaurs (Pachycephalosauridae).

    PubMed

    Peterson, Joseph E; Dischler, Collin; Longrich, Nicholas R

    2013-01-01

    Pachycephalosaurids are small, herbivorous dinosaurs with domed skulls formed by massive thickening of the cranial roof. The function of the dome has been a focus of debate: the dome has variously been interpreted as the product of sexual selection, as an adaptation for species recognition, or as a weapon employed in intraspecific combat, where it was used in butting matches as in extant ungulates. This last hypothesis is supported by the recent identification of cranial pathologies in pachycephalosaurids, which appear to represent infections resulting from trauma. However, the frequency and distribution of pathologies have not been studied in a systematic fashion. Here, we show that pachycephalosaurids are characterized by a remarkably high incidence of cranial injury, where 22% of specimens have lesions on the dome. Frequency of injury shows no significant difference between different genera, but flat-headed morphs (here interpreted as juveniles or females) lack lesions. Mapping of injuries onto a digitial pachycephalosaurid skull shows that although lesions are distributed across the dome, they cluster near the apex, which is consistent with the hypothesis that the dome functioned for intraspecific butting matches.

  1. A Cascade of Wnt, Eda, and Shh Signaling Is Essential for Touch Dome Merkel Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Thoresen, Daniel T.; Miao, Lingling; Williams, Jonathan S.; Wang, Chaochen; Atit, Radhika P.; Wong, Sunny Y.

    2016-01-01

    The Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway regulates developmental, homeostatic, and repair processes throughout the body. In the skin, touch domes develop in tandem with primary hair follicles and contain sensory Merkel cells. The developmental signaling requirements for touch dome specification are largely unknown. We found dermal Wnt signaling and subsequent epidermal Eda/Edar signaling promoted Merkel cell morphogenesis by inducing Shh expression in early follicles. Lineage-specific gene deletions revealed intraepithelial Shh signaling was necessary for Merkel cell specification. Additionally, a Shh signaling agonist was sufficient to rescue Merkel cell differentiation in Edar-deficient skin. Moreover, Merkel cells formed in Fgf20 mutant skin where primary hair formation was defective but Shh production was preserved. Although developmentally associated with hair follicles, fate mapping demonstrated Merkel cells primarily originated outside the hair follicle lineage. These findings suggest that touch dome development requires Wnt-dependent mesenchymal signals to establish reciprocal signaling within the developing ectoderm, including Eda signaling to primary hair placodes and ultimately Shh signaling from primary follicles to extrafollicular Merkel cell progenitors. Shh signaling often demonstrates pleiotropic effects within a structure over time. In postnatal skin, Shh is known to regulate the self-renewal, but not the differentiation, of touch dome stem cells. Our findings relate the varied effects of Shh in the touch dome to the ligand source, with locally produced Shh acting as a morphogen essential for lineage specification during development and neural Shh regulating postnatal touch dome stem cell maintenance. PMID:27414798

  2. A Cascade of Wnt, Eda, and Shh Signaling Is Essential for Touch Dome Merkel Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Thoresen, Daniel T; Miao, Lingling; Williams, Jonathan S; Wang, Chaochen; Atit, Radhika P; Wong, Sunny Y; Brownell, Isaac

    2016-07-01

    The Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway regulates developmental, homeostatic, and repair processes throughout the body. In the skin, touch domes develop in tandem with primary hair follicles and contain sensory Merkel cells. The developmental signaling requirements for touch dome specification are largely unknown. We found dermal Wnt signaling and subsequent epidermal Eda/Edar signaling promoted Merkel cell morphogenesis by inducing Shh expression in early follicles. Lineage-specific gene deletions revealed intraepithelial Shh signaling was necessary for Merkel cell specification. Additionally, a Shh signaling agonist was sufficient to rescue Merkel cell differentiation in Edar-deficient skin. Moreover, Merkel cells formed in Fgf20 mutant skin where primary hair formation was defective but Shh production was preserved. Although developmentally associated with hair follicles, fate mapping demonstrated Merkel cells primarily originated outside the hair follicle lineage. These findings suggest that touch dome development requires Wnt-dependent mesenchymal signals to establish reciprocal signaling within the developing ectoderm, including Eda signaling to primary hair placodes and ultimately Shh signaling from primary follicles to extrafollicular Merkel cell progenitors. Shh signaling often demonstrates pleiotropic effects within a structure over time. In postnatal skin, Shh is known to regulate the self-renewal, but not the differentiation, of touch dome stem cells. Our findings relate the varied effects of Shh in the touch dome to the ligand source, with locally produced Shh acting as a morphogen essential for lineage specification during development and neural Shh regulating postnatal touch dome stem cell maintenance. PMID:27414798

  3. Percutaneous Ethanol Injection via an Artificially Induced Right Hydrothorax for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in the Hepatic Dome

    SciTech Connect

    Kume, Akimichi Nimura, Yuji; Kamiya, Junichi; Nagino, Masato; Kito, Yasushi

    2003-11-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of sonographically (US) guided percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) via an artificially induced right hydrothorax (transthoracic PEI) to treat US-invisible hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the hepatic dome. Five cirrhotic patients with US-invisible HCC in the hepatic dome, who were poor surgical candidates, underwent transthoracic PEI. An artificial right hydrothorax was created by instilling 500 ml saline, and absolute ethanol was injected transhydrothoracically into the hepatic dome lesion under local anesthesia. The success and complications were assessed radiologically. The patients were followed up serologically and radiologically for 12-44 (mean 28.4) months. Twenty-five hydrothoraces were induced. All hydrothoraces enabled US visualization of the entire hepatic dome. Eight of the nine small lesions were treated successfully by the treatment. Two of the three local recurrences were eradicated by repeat transthoracic PEI. One large lesion was treated by a combination of transthoracic and regular PEI. The only complication was one clinically insignificant pneumothorax. Induction of a right hydrothorax is feasible and safe. The hydrothorax enables US visualization of the entire hepatic dome and permits US-guided PEI for HCC in the hepatic dome that otherwise would not be possible.

  4. Features of Bayou Choctaw SPR caverns and internal structure of the salt dome.

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, Darrell E.

    2007-07-01

    The intent of this study is to examine the internal structure of the Bayou Choctaw salt dome utilizing the information obtained from graphical representations of sonar survey data of the internal cavern surfaces. Many of the Bayou Choctaw caverns have been abandoned. Some existing caverns were purchased by the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program and have rather convoluted histories and complex cavern geometries. In fact, these caverns are typically poorly documented and are not particularly constructive to this study. Only two Bayou Choctaw caverns, 101 and 102, which were constructed using well-controlled solutioning methods, are well documented. One of these was constructed by the SPR for their use while the other was constructed and traded for another existing cavern. Consequently, compared to the SPR caverns of the West Hackberry and Big Hill domes, it is more difficult to obtain a general impression of the stratigraphy of the dome. Indeed, caverns of Bayou Choctaw show features significantly different than those encountered in the other two SPR facilities. In the number of abandoned caverns, and some of those existing caverns purchased by the SPR, extremely irregular solutioning has occurred. The two SPR constructed caverns suggest that some sections of the caverns may have undergone very regular solutioning to form uniform cylindrical shapes. Although it is not usually productive to speculate, some suggestions that point to the behavior of the Bayou Choctaw dome are examined. Also the primary differences in the Bayou Choctaw dome and the other SPR domes are noted.

  5. Performance analysis of the retractable dome for the Chinese Large Telescope.

    PubMed

    Nian, Pan; Wen-Li, Ma

    2015-10-01

    In order to quantitatively assess the influence of the retractable dome on the observational performance of the 4-m Chinese Large Telescope (CLT), an integrated analysis method based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and sub-harmonic phase screen is proposed in this paper. The pressure, the temperature, and the speed of air surrounding the retractable dome are attained by CFD simulations, and then the fluctuation of refractive index of air is calculated. Based on sub-harmonic phase screen algorithm, three kinds of performance evaluation parameters are presented: irradiance, phase of the target, and Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM). The wind tunnel tests (WT) with a 1:120 scaled model of the retractable dome for the CLT are conducted to verify the calculated precision of the CFD. The results show that the fluctuation of air refractive index surrounding the CLT is mainly caused by the inhomogeneous distribution of temperature and speed, and with the help of pier's height the impact of inhomogeneous air temperature from the ground layer on the fluctuation of air refractive index can be effectively decreased. Furthermore, the lower of the air speed is, the better performance of the retractable dome will be, and when the speed of air is less than 5m/s, the dome seeing induced by the retractable dome on the observational wave front is less than 0.13 arcsec.

  6. Lateral superlattice solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, A.; Zhang, Y.; Millunchick, J.M.; Twesten, R.D.; Jones, E.D.

    1997-10-01

    A novel structure which comprises of a lateral superlattice as the active layer of a solar cell is proposed. If the alternating regions A and B of a lateral superlattice ABABAB... are chosen to have a Type-II band offset, it is shown that the performance of the active absorbing region of the solar cell is optimized. In essence, the Type-II lateral superlattice region can satisfy the material requirements for an ideal solar cells active absorbing region, i.e. simultaneously having a very high transition probability for photogeneration and a very long minority carrier recombination lifetime.

  7. Growth of intra-caldera lava domes controlled by various modes of caldera collapse, the Štiavnica volcano-plutonic complex, Western Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomek, Filip; Žák, Jiří; Holub, František V.; Chlupáčová, Marta; Verner, Kryštof

    2016-02-01

    The Štiavnica volcano-plutonic complex is an erosional relic of Miocene caldera-stratovolcano in the Western Carpathians. The complex exposes a vertical section from the volcano basement through subvolcanic intrusions and a ring fault to volcanic edifice, comprising mostly andesitic lava flows and domes. This paper examines internal structure, magnetic fabric as derived from the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), and emplacement dynamics of three intra-caldera andesite domes (referred to as Domes 1-3) located near the presumed ring fault. Magnetic fabrics, carried by multi-domain titanomagnetite and titanomaghemite, are interpreted as recording various mechanisms of dome growth controlled by active caldera collapse. Dome 1 is explained as a lava coulée, fed by conduits located along the ring fault, with a long lava outflow down the sloping caldera floor. Dome 2 represents an elongated, ring fault-parallel dome wherein the lava flowed a short distance over a flat floor. Dome 3 is interpreted as a composite dome fed from multiple linear fissures opened at a high angle to the ring fault. Subsequently, the dome was intruded by ring fault-parallel dikes that may have potentially fed overlying, now largely eroded lava domes and flows. Finally, we suggest that all domes formed during collapse of the Štiavnica caldera and the various mechanisms of their growth reflect different stages of the caldera evolution from piston (Dome 2) through trap-door (Dome 1) to piecemeal (Dome 3).

  8. Late Miocene uplift and doming of Madagascar: topographic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaunay, Antoine; Robin, Cecile; Guillocheau, François; Dall'Asta, Massimo; Calves, Gérôme

    2016-04-01

    and (3) a major stepping of dated planation surfaces. (3) The end result of this uplift is a convex up shape pattern for the end Cretaceous surface weathered during Eocene times, creating the present-day dome morphology (with a central plateau) of Madagascar. (4) The amplitude of this uplift can be estimated based on the present-day elevation of Late Eocene lagoonal sediments located 100 km north-east of Toliara and now at an elevation of 900m. If the absolute sea level was around 50 m (Miller et al., 2005) above present-day sea level during Late Eocene times, this means a surface uplift of around 850 m. (5) The mechanism of this uplift has to explain a very long wavelength deformation (x1000 km) necessary due to mantle dynamics. The relationships with the other East African domes (Ethiopia, East Africa, South Africa) are discussed. This study was founded by TOTAL and IFREMER in the frame of the research project PAMELA (Passive Margin Exploration Laboratories).

  9. Topaz rhyolites of Nathrop, Colorado: Lava domes or rheomorphic flows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, B. M.; Panter, K. S.; Van Der Voo, R.

    2013-12-01

    Deposits of topaz-bearing rhyolite at Ruby and Sugarloaf Mountains in central Colorado are considered to be remnants of lava domes. The deposits are part of the Late Eocene-Oligocene Central Colorado Volcanic Field [1] that lies along the eastern margin of the Arkansas Graben of the Rio Grande Rift. Topaz-bearing rhyolite lava domes and flows have been identified elsewhere in Colorado and the western U.S., but an assortment of geomorphological, lithostratigraphical, and textural features of Ruby and Sugarloaf Mountains call into question their strict classification as such. Alternatively, the lava flows may be interpreted as rheomorphic ignimbrites. The volcanic deposits encompass a sequence of steeply (~70°) west-dipping units that form two N-S elongated edifices ~0.5 km long and a few hundred meters high. Their common lithostratigraphy from bottom to top is tuff breccia, vitrophyre, and flow-banded rhyolite. The tuff breccia includes large (up to ~1 m) pumice blocks and lithics that vary from nearly absent to moderately abundant (10-20%). At Sugarloaf lithics include rare cobble-sized clasts of granite, but the majority consists of flow-banded rhyolite. The tuff breccia grades normally upward into the vitrophyre with increased welding and a eutaxitic fabric defined by fiamme with increasing aspect ratios. Lithics are abundant in the vitrophyre at Sugarloaf but are rare or absent in the vitrophyre at Ruby Mountain. The transition from the vitrophyre to the flow-banded rhyolite is abrupt (<1 m) at both locations, though the lower rhyolite is less competent. The flow-banded rhyolite at Sugarloaf is crystal-rich (up to 50%), containing plagioclase, sanidine, smoky quartz, and biotite, while at Ruby the rhyolite is relatively crystal poor (2-3%) and biotite is absent. Pumiceous zones and lithophysae occur within the rhyolite at both locations. Zones of auto-brecciation are often associated with convoluted flow banding, especially along a vertical contact with

  10. 238U-230Th crystallization ages for the oldest domes of the Mono Craters, eastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcaida, M.; Vazquez, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Mono Craters volcanic chain is one of the youngest areas of rhyolitic volcanism in the Mono Lake-Long Valley region of eastern California. Located just south of Mono Lake, the Mono Craters comprise at least 28 individual domes and flows (numbered 3-30, north to south); however, the timing and frequency of eruptions remain poorly resolved. The earliest signs of volcanic activity are preserved as numerous tephra layers (Ashes 1-19, top to bottom) in the late Pleistocene Wilson Creek formation of ancestral Mono Lake, which indicate that rhyolitic volcanism from Mono Craters began by at least ca. 62 ka [1]. Although the current chronology indicates that most of the Mono Craters are younger than ca. 20 ka [2-4], similar compositions of titanomagnetite from both pumice and lava potentially correlate several Wilson Creek tephras to porphyritic biotite-bearing domes 11, 24, and 19 of the Mono Craters [5], suggesting that multiple domes in the Mono Craters chain reflect volcanism older than ca. 20 ka. Ash 3 is correlated to dome 11 based on similar ca. 20 ka ages and titanomagnetite compositions [6]. More recently, we performed ion microprobe 238U-230Th dating of unpolished rims of allanite and zircon from domes 24 and 19, yielding isochron ages of ca. 38 ka and ca. 42 ka, respectively. The age of dome 24 is consistent with the ca. 38 ka age of its potential correlative tephra layers [1, 5], indicating that dome 24 is likely the extrusive equivalent of Ashes 9-10. Dome 19 has titanomagnetite crystals with similar bimodal chemistry to titanomagnetites from Ash 15 [5]. The age of dome 19 is indistinguishable from the 238U-230Th age of Ash 15 [1], which erupted during a prominent geomagnetic excursion, originally designated as the "Mono Lake" excursion. Combining geochronological and titanomagnetite compositional data confirms that Ash 15 and its extrusive equivalent, dome 19, erupted during the Laschamp excursion. [1] Vazquez, J.A. and Lidzbarski, M.I. (2012) EPSL 357

  11. In Situ Production of Methyl Chloride in Siple Dome and WAIS Divide Ice Cores from Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frausto-Vicencio, I.; Verhulst, K. R.; Aydin, M.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2013-12-01

    Methyl chloride (CH3Cl) is a naturally-occurring halocarbon with a global mean abundance of 550 pmol mol-1 and a lifetime of about 1 year. It constitutes about 16% of the total chlorine burden in the stratosphere. The sources of methyl chloride are mainly natural and include tropical vegetation, oceans and biomass burning. Oxidation with the hydroxyl radical is the primary removal mechanism with additional loss via microbial degradation in soils and in the oceans. Previous measurements suggest ice cores from cold Antarctic sites (Dome Fuji, South Pole, Taylor Dome) preserve a record of atmospheric CH3Cl variability during the Holocene (Saito et al., 2007; Williams et al., 2007; Verhulst et al., in review). However, measurements at Siple Dome displayed evidence of in situ enhancement (Saltzman et al., 2009). This study involves new CH3Cl measurements in 117 ice core samples from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide (WAIS-D) 06A ice core. Measurements from the Holocene are compared with earlier CH3Cl measurements from Taylor Dome and Siple Dome. In Late Holocene ice (5-0 ky BP), the WAIS-D and Siple Dome show evidence of in situ CH3Cl enrichment. The mean level and scatter are both larger than in Taylor Dome ice of the same age. The in situ enrichment is not time or depth-dependent. Interestingly, for most of the Early Holocene (11-5 ky BP), Siple Dome and WAIS-D exhibit less scatter and are closer to the Taylor Dome ice core data. In situ CH3Cl production may be purely chemical or involve biological reactions. Here, we investigate whether the excess CH3Cl in the Siple Dome and the WAIS-D ice cores can be explained by differences in ice chemistry between the various Antarctic sites. The results of this research will help establish the causes of CH3Cl production in ice cores and provide a basis to assess the possibility of studying long-term atmospheric CH3Cl variability using ice core data.

  12. Transiting planet candidates with ASTEP 400 at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mékarnia, D.; Guillot, T.; Rivet, J.-P.; Schmider, F.-X.; Abe, L.; Gonçalves, I.; Agabi, A.; Crouzet, N.; Fruth, T.; Barbieri, M.; Bayliss, D. D. R.; Zhou, G.; Aristidi, E.; Szulagyi, J.; Daban, J.-B.; Fanteï-Caujolle, Y.; Gouvret, C.; Erikson, A.; Rauer, H.; Bouchy, F.; Gerakis, J.; Bouchez, G.

    2016-08-01

    ASTEP 400, the main instrument of the ASTEP (Antarctica Search for Transiting ExoPlanets) programme, is a 40-cm telescope, designed to withstand the harsh conditions in Antarctica, achieving a photometric accuracy of a fraction of milli-magnitude on hourly timescales for planet-hosting southern bright (R˜12 mag) stars. We review the performances of this instrument, describe its operating conditions, and present results from the analysis of observations obtained during its first three years (2010-2012) of operation, before its repatriation in 2014. During this time, we observed a total of 22 stellar fields (1° × 1° FoV). Each field, in which we measured stars up to magnitude R=18 mag, was observed continuously during ˜7 to ˜30 days. More than 200 000 frames were recorded and 310 000 stars processed, using an implementation of the optimal image subtraction (OIS) photometry algorithm. We found 43 planetary transit candidates. Twenty of these candidates were observed using spectroscopic follow-ups including four targets classified as good planet candidates. Our results demonstrate that accurate near-continuous photometric observations are achievable from the Concordia station at Dome C in Antarctica, even if we were not able to reach the nominal photometric precision of the instrument. We conducted a correlation analysis between the RMS noise and a large number of external parameters and found that source of the ˜1 mmag correlated noise is not obvious and does not depend on a single parameter. However, our analysis provided some hints and guidance to increase the photometric accuracy of the instrument. These improvements should equip any future telescope operating in Antarctica.

  13. EPICA Dome C record of glacial and interglacial intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Delmotte, V.; Stenni, B.; Pol, K.; Braconnot, P.; Cattani, O.; Falourd, S.; Kageyama, M.; Jouzel, J.; Landais, A.; Minster, B.; Barnola, J. M.; Chappellaz, J.; Krinner, G.; Johnsen, S.; Röthlisberger, R.; Hansen, J.; Mikolajewicz, U.; Otto-Bliesner, B.

    2010-01-01

    Climate models show strong links between Antarctic and global temperature both in future and in glacial climate simulations. Past Antarctic temperatures can be estimated from measurements of water stable isotopes along the EPICA Dome C ice core over the past 800 000 years. Here we focus on the reliability of the relative intensities of glacial and interglacial periods derived from the stable isotope profile. The consistency between stable isotope-derived temperature and other environmental and climatic proxies measured along the EDC ice core is analysed at the orbital scale and compared with estimates of global ice volume. MIS 2, 12 and 16 appear as the strongest glacial maxima, while MIS 5.5 and 11 appear as the warmest interglacial maxima. The links between EDC temperature, global temperature, local and global radiative forcings are analysed. We show: (i) a strong but changing link between EDC temperature and greenhouse gas global radiative forcing in the first and second part of the record; (ii) a large residual signature of obliquity in EDC temperature with a 5 ky lag; (iii) the exceptional character of temperature variations within interglacial periods. Focusing on MIS 5.5, the warmest interglacial of EDC record, we show that orbitally forced coupled climate models only simulate a precession-induced shift of the Antarctic seasonal cycle of temperature. While they do capture annually persistent Greenland warmth, models fail to capture the warming indicated by Antarctic ice core δD. We suggest that the model-data mismatch may result from the lack of feedbacks between ice sheets and climate including both local Antarctic effects due to changes in ice sheet topography and global effects due to meltwater-thermohaline circulation interplays. An MIS 5.5 sensitivity study conducted with interactive Greenland melt indeed induces a slight Antarctic warming. We suggest that interglacial EDC optima are caused by transient heat transport redistribution comparable with

  14. Transiting planet candidates with ASTEP 400 at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mékarnia, D.; Guillot, T.; Rivet, J.-P.; Schmider, F.-X.; Abe, L.; Gonçalves, I.; Agabi, A.; Crouzet, N.; Fruth, T.; Barbieri, M.; Bayliss, D. D. R.; Zhou, G.; Aristidi, E.; Szulagyi, J.; Daban, J.-B.; Fanteï-Caujolle, Y.; Gouvret, C.; Erikson, A.; Rauer, H.; Bouchy, F.; Gerakis, J.; Bouchez, G.

    2016-11-01

    ASTEP 400, the main instrument of the ASTEP (Antarctica Search for Transiting ExoPlanets) programme, is a 40 cm telescope, designed to withstand the harsh conditions in Antarctica, achieving a photometric accuracy of a fraction of millimagnitude on hourly time-scales for planet-hosting southern bright (R ˜ 12 mag) stars. We review the performances of this instrument, describe its operating conditions, and present results from the analysis of observations obtained during its first three years (2010-2012) of operation, before its repatriation in 2014. During this time, we observed a total of 22 stellar fields (1° × 1° field of view). Each field, in which we measured stars up to magnitude R = 18 mag, was observed continuously during ˜7 to ˜30 d. More than 200 000 frames were recorded and 310 000 stars processed, using an implementation of the optimal image subtraction photometry algorithm. We found 43 planetary transit candidates. 20 of these candidates were observed using spectroscopic follow-ups including four targets classified as good planet candidates. Our results demonstrate that accurate near-continuous photometric observations are achievable from the Concordia station at Dome C in Antarctica, even if we were not able to reach the nominal photometric precision of the instrument. We conducted a correlation analysis between the rms noise and a large number of external parameters and found that source of the ˜1 mmag correlated noise is not obvious and does not depend on a single parameter. However, our analysis provided some hints and guidance to increase the photometric accuracy of the instrument. These improvements should equip any future telescope operating in Antarctica.

  15. Eclipsing Binaries From the CSTAR Project at Dome A, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ming; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Songhu; Zhou, Ji-Lin; Zhou, Xu; Wang, Lingzhi; Wang, Lifan; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Liu, Hui-Gen; Meng, Zeyang; Ashley, M. C. B.; Storey, J. W. V.; Bayliss, D.; Tinney, Chris; Wang, Ying; Wu, Donghong; Liang, Ensi; Yu, Zhouyi; Fan, Zhou; Feng, Long-Long; Gong, Xuefei; Lawrence, J. S.; Liu, Qiang; Luong-Van, D. M.; Ma, Jun; Wu, Zhenyu; Yan, Jun; Yang, Huigen; Yang, Ji; Yuan, Xiangyan; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhu, Zhenxi; Zou, Hu

    2015-04-01

    The Chinese Small Telescope ARray (CSTAR) has observed an area around the Celestial South Pole at Dome A since 2008. About 20,000 light curves in the i band were obtained during the observation season lasting from 2008 March to July. The photometric precision achieves about 4 mmag at i = 7.5 and 20 mmag at i = 12 within a 30 s exposure time. These light curves are analyzed using Lomb-Scargle, Phase Dispersion Minimization, and Box Least Squares methods to search for periodic signals. False positives may appear as a variable signature caused by contaminating stars and the observation mode of CSTAR. Therefore, the period and position of each variable candidate are checked to eliminate false positives. Eclipsing binaries are removed by visual inspection, frequency spectrum analysis, and a locally linear embedding technique. We identify 53 eclipsing binaries in the field of view of CSTAR, containing 24 detached binaries, 8 semi-detached binaries, 18 contact binaries, and 3 ellipsoidal variables. To derive the parameters of these binaries, we use the Eclipsing Binaries via Artificial Intelligence method. The primary and secondary eclipse timing variations (ETVs) for semi-detached and contact systems are analyzed. Correlated primary and secondary ETVs confirmed by false alarm tests may indicate an unseen perturbing companion. Through ETV analysis, we identify two triple systems (CSTAR J084612.64-883342.9 and CSTAR J220502.55-895206.7). The orbital parameters of the third body in CSTAR J220502.55-895206.7 are derived using a simple dynamical model.

  16. Public Education and Outreach Through Full-Dome Video Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, John

    2009-03-01

    My long-term goal is to enhance public understanding of complex systems that can be best demonstrated through richly detailed computer graphic animation displayed with full-dome video technology. My current focus is on health science advances that focus on regenerative medicine, which helps the body heal itself. Such topics facilitate science learning and health literacy. My team develops multi-media presentations that bring the scientific and medical advances to the public through immersive high-definition video animation. Implicit in treating the topics of regenerative medicine will be the need to address stem cell biology. The topics are clarified and presented from a platform of facts and balanced ethical consideration. The production process includes communicating scientific information about the excitement and importance of stem cell research. Principles of function are emphasized over specific facts or terminology by focusing on a limited, but fundamental set of concepts. To achieve this, visually rich, biologically accurate 3D computer graphic environments are created to illustrate the cells, tissues and organs of interest. A suite of films are produced, and evaluated in pre- post-surveys assessing attitudes, knowledge and learning. Each film uses engaging interactive demonstrations to illustrate biological functions, the things that go wrong due to disease and disability, and the remedy provided by regenerative medicine. While the images are rich and detailed, the language is accessible and appropriate to the audience. The digital, high-definition video is also re-edited for presentation in other ``flat screen'' formats, increasing our distribution potential. Show content is also presented in an interactive web space (www.sepa.duq.edu) with complementing teacher resource guides and student workbooks and companion video games.

  17. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a nervous system disease that attacks nerve cells called neurons in your ... people with ALS die from respiratory failure. The disease usually strikes between age 40 and 60. More ...

  18. Lateral orientation (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest, and the ears are lateral to the head. A medial orientation is a position toward the midline of the body. An example of medial orientation is the eyes, which are medial to the ears on the head.

  19. Preventing errors in laterality.

    PubMed

    Landau, Elliot; Hirschorn, David; Koutras, Iakovos; Malek, Alexander; Demissie, Seleshie

    2015-04-01

    An error in laterality is the reporting of a finding that is present on the right side as on the left or vice versa. While different medical and surgical specialties have implemented protocols to help prevent such errors, very few studies have been published that describe these errors in radiology reports and ways to prevent them. We devised a system that allows the radiologist to view reports in a separate window, displayed in a simple font and with all terms of laterality highlighted in separate colors. This allows the radiologist to correlate all detected laterality terms of the report with the images open in PACS and correct them before the report is finalized. The system is monitored every time an error in laterality was detected. The system detected 32 errors in laterality over a 7-month period (rate of 0.0007 %), with CT containing the highest error detection rate of all modalities. Significantly, more errors were detected in male patients compared with female patients. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that with our system, laterality errors can be detected and corrected prior to finalizing reports.

  20. Flexure and faulting of sedimentary host rocks during growth of igneous domes, Henry Mountains, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, M.D.; Pollard, D.D.

    1990-01-01

    A sequence of sedimentary rocks about 4 km thick was bent, stretched and uplifted during the growth of three igneous domes in the southern Henry Mountains. Mount Holmes, Mount Ellsworth and Mount Hillers are all about 12 km in diameter, but the amplitudes of their domes are about 1.2, 1.85 and 3.0 km, respectively. These mountains record successive stages in the inflation of near-surface diorite intrusions that are probably laccolithic in origin. The host rocks deformed along networks of outcrop-scale faults, or deformation bands, marked by crushed grains, consolidation of the porous sandstone and small displacements of sedimentary beds. Zones of deformation bands oriented parallel to the beds and formation contacts subdivided the overburden into thin mechanical layers that slipped over one another during doming. Measurements of outcrop-scale fault populations at the three mountains reveal a network of faults that strikes at high angles to sedimentary beds which themselves strike tangentially about the domes. These faults have normal and reverse components of slip that accommodated bending and stretching strains within the strata. An early stage of this deformation is displayed at Mount Holmes, where states of stress computed from three fault samples correlate with the theoretical distribution of stresses resulting from bending of thin, circular, elastic plates. Field observations and analysis of frictional driving stresses acting on horizontal planes above an opening-mode dislocation, as well as the paleostress analysis of faulting, indicate that bedding-plane slip and layer flexure were important components of the early deformation. As the amplitude of doming increased, radial and circumferential stretching of the strata and rotation of the older faults in the steepening limbs of the domes increased the complexity of the fault patterns. Steeply-dipping, map-scale faults with dip-slip displacements indicate a late-stage jostling of major blocks over the central

  1. LED package with Dome/side-emitting-enhancement silicone lens achieved by dispensing and geometry transferring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang Chien, Chien-Lin; Huang, Yu-Che; Hu, Syue-Fong; Sun, Chang-Wen; Chang, Chung-Min; Hsu, Chih-Peng; Yip, Ming-Chuen; Fang, Weileun

    2012-10-01

    This study presents a structure design and process method for lens type LED package. Dome type or side-emitting-enhancement silicone lens without molding process are achieved. The ceramic ring is adopted as the confine for the encapsulant. The surface intension along the sidewall of ceramic ring and silicone surface, the cohesion force and the gravity of silicone determine the shape of dome type silicone lens. The cone shape tooling coated with a releasing material is immersed into the dome type silicone lens before the silicone fully hardening. After curing simultaneously, to remove the tooling from package, the package with side-emitting-enhancement silicone lens is finished. With the mentioned architecture and process, this LED package herein has three merits, (1) to improve light extraction efficiency: reduce the chance of total internal reflection by the geometry of dome type silicone lens. (2)To enhance the flexibility of LED package design, the die placement location would be constrained by the mold in the traditional package process. (3) Mold-less side-emitting-enhancement silicone lens. Furthermore, two types of cone shape tooling are implemented and compared for side-emitting-enhancement silicone lens. Measurement results show the ratio between the lens high and lens radius could achieve 0.9:1. The view angles of dome type and side-emitting-enhancement LED packaged devices can reach 153° and 180 °, respectively. As using the same brightness grade of LED chip, the luminous flux is increasing 15% as compared the dome type package with the commercial PLCC (Plastic Leaded Chip Carrier) type package. The luminous flux of side-emitting-enhancement LED package decreases 8% as compared with the dome type one.

  2. Cranial Ontogeny in Stegoceras validum (Dinosauria: Pachycephalosauria): A Quantitative Model of Pachycephalosaur Dome Growth and Variation

    PubMed Central

    Schott, Ryan K.; Evans, David C.; Goodwin, Mark B.; Horner, John R.; Brown, Caleb Marshall; Longrich, Nicholas R.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, studies of pachycephalosaurs have recognized plesiomorphically flat-headed taxa and apomorphically domed taxa. More recently, it has been suggested that the expression of the frontoparietal dome is ontogenetic and derived from a flat-headed juvenile morphology. However, strong evidence to support this hypothesis has been lacking. Here we test this hypothesis in a large, stratigraphically constrained sample of specimens assigned to Stegoceras validum, the best known pachycephalosaur, using multiple independent lines of evidence including conserved morphology of ornamentation, landmark-based allometric analyses of frontoparietal shape, and cranial bone histology. New specimens show that the diagnostic ornamentation of the parietosquamosal bar is conserved throughout the size range of the sample, which links flat-headed specimens to domed S. validum. High-resolution CT scans of three frontoparietals reveal that vascularity decreases with size and document a pattern that is consistent with previously proposed histological changes during growth. Furthermore, aspects of dome shape and size are strongly correlated and indicative of ontogenetic growth. These results are complementary and strongly support the hypothesis that the sample represents a growth series of a single taxon. Cranial dome growth is positively allometric, proceeds from a flat-headed to a domed state, and confirms the synonymy of Ornatotholus browni as a juvenile Stegoceras. This dataset serves as the first detailed model of growth and variation in a pachycephalosaur. Flat-headed juveniles possess three characters (externally open cranial sutures, tuberculate dorsal surface texture, and open supratemporal fenestrae) that are reduced or eliminated during ontogeny. These characters also occur in putative flat-headed taxa, suggesting that they may also represent juveniles of domed taxa. However, open cranial sutures and supratemporal fenestrae are plesiomorphic within Ornithischia, and thus

  3. Low-temperature thermochronologic constraints on cooling and exhumation trends along conjugate margins, within core complexes and eclogite-bearing gneiss domes of the Woodlark rift system of eastern Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, P. G.; Baldwin, S.; Bermudez, M. A.; Miller, S. R.; Webb, L. E.; Little, T.

    2012-12-01

    Ma) and have mean lengths that are typically longer (11-13 μm). The CTLD's indicate cooling, then residence in an apatite partial annealing zone (PAZ) and significant partial annealing followed by rapid cooling. Inverse thermal models do not constrain well the timing of initial cooling into the PAZ, but core zone samples from higher elevations cooled earlier. Later thermal annealing was initiated ca 2-4 Ma (core earlier than shear zone) coincident with granodiorite intrusion, with subsequent very rapid cooling initiated ~0.5 Ma. This thermochronologic dataset indicates a complex thermal history and is being used to constrain thermokinematic models (PeCube) in order to test the relative roles of buoyancy and normal faulting during exhumation of eclogite-bearing domes within the Woodlark rift system.

  4. Petrology and emplacement dynamics of the intrusive and extrusive rhyolites of Obsidian Dome Inyo Craters volcanic chain, eastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, T.A.; Schuraytz, B.C.; Eichelberger, J.C.; Stockman, H.W.; Westrich, H.R.; Younker, L.W.; Horkowitz, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Drilling at Obsidian Dome has provided continuous core samples of the distal and proximal portions of Obsidian Dome, its conduit, and an associated feeder dike. Both the dome and conduit are chemically and mineralogically zoned and consist of a finely porphyritic, high-Ba, low-silica rhyolite occurring in the basal portion of the dome and margins of the conduit and a finely porphyritic, low-Ba, higher silica rhyolite in the upper portion of the dome and center of the conduit. The high-Ba rhyolite contains two distinct phenocrysts assemblages with two distinct compositions, and represents mingled magmas. The low-Ba rhyolite in the dome and conduit contains significantly fewer disequilibrium phenocrysts and is only slightly mingled. The dike, sampled at 600 m depth, as well as a related tephra fall from Obsidian Dome vent, are entirely low-Ba rhyolite that contain no evidence of magma mingling. End members of the mingled magma, calculated using two different methods, are a 63 percent silica end member, and a silicic end member identical in composition to the dike and tephra fall from Obsidian Dome vent. This silicic end member was the first magma emplaced in the dike, and comprised much or all of the first magma vented to the surface during formation of the Obsidian Dome vent when eruption rates were high. Magma mingling of mafic and rhyolite magmas occurred during formation of the conduit. 59 refs., 16 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Coeval doming and stretching of the eastern end of the India-Asia collision zone - Namche Barwa Syntaxis, Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharf, A.; Handy, M. R.; Crupi, P.

    2013-12-01

    The eastern part of the India-Asia collisional zone is marked by a N-plunging, non-cylindrical fold, the Namche Barwa Syntaxis (NBS) with a topographic relief of >7 km. The NBS exposes rapidly exhuming Indian- and parts of the overlying Asian crust. Structural, paleomagnetic and GPS studies reveal clockwise rotation of the crust and mantle around a steep axis located close to the mutual borders of India, China and Myanmar (e.g. Sol et al. 2007; Liebke et al. 2011). Teleseismic tomography beneath the NBS reveals 170 km thick Indian lithosphere that is not connected with a slab anomaly to the N beneath the Tibetan Plateau, but that appears laterally continuous with north and E-dipping slab anomalies along strike of the Himalayan chain, respectively, to the W and E of the NBS (Zhang et al. 2012). A closer look at available structural, geochronological, and petrological data reveals Late Oligocene, N-directed subduction of Indian continental lithosphere followed by two stages of pronounced exhumation in Late Oligocene to Miocene time and unroofing in Pliocene time. This history is intimately related to the mantle structure imaged beneath the NBS. Timing of subduction is not constraint in the NBS, but Booth et al. (2009) suggest Palaeocene to Eocene ages for subduction-related plutonism along strike of the India/Asia suture zone. High-pressure (HP) conditions in granulites in the western NBS at 25-24 Ma preceded decompression beginning no later than 18 Ma (Su et al. 2012). These granulites are separated from granulites without HP assemblages by a moderately W-dipping mylonitic fault, indicating that this fault was a thrust (Xu et al. 2012) which accommodated S to E directed exhumation of the HP granulites in its hangingwall. This first stage of exhumation coincided with peak temperatures at ~10 Ma (Booth et al. 2009). The granulites and their intervening thrust fault are folded by the NBS (Geng et al. 2006), indicating that this first stage of exhumation preceded doming

  6. Costa Rica's Chain of laterally collapsed volcanoes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, E.; Fernandez, E.

    2007-05-01

    From the NW extreme to the SW end of Costa Rica's volcanic backbone, a number of laterally collapsed volcanoes can be observed. Due to several factors, attention has been given to active volcanoes disregarding the importance of collapsed features in terms of assessing volcanic hazards for future generations around inhabited volcanoes. In several cases the typical horseshoe shape amphitheater-like depression can be easily observed. In other cases due to erosion, vegetation, topography, seismic activity or drastic weather such characteristics are not easily recognized. In the order mentioned above appear: Orosi-Cacao, Miravalles, Platanar, Congo, Von Frantzius, Cacho Negro and Turrialba volcanoes. Due to limited studies on these structures it is unknown if sector collapse occurred in one or several phases. Furthermore, in the few studied cases no evidence has been found to relate collapses to actual eruptive episodes. Detailed studies on the deposits and materials composing dome-like shapes will shed light on unsolved questions about petrological and chemical composition. Volume, form and distance traveled by deposits are part of the questions surrounding most of these collapsed volcanoes. Although most of these mentioned structures are extinct, at least Irazú volcano (active volcano) has faced partial lateral collapses recently. It did presented strombolian activity in the early 60s. Collapse scars show on the NW flank show important mass removal in historic and prehistoric times. Moreover, in 1994 a minor hydrothermal explosion provoked the weakening of a deeply altered wall that holds a crater lake (150m diameter, 2.6x106 ). A poster will depict images of the collapsed volcanoes named above with mayor descriptive characteristics. It will also focus on the importance of deeper studies to assess the collapse potential of Irazú volcano with related consequences. Finally, this initiative will invite researchers interested in such topic to join future studies in

  7. New approaches to inferences for steep-sided domes on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, Lynnae C.; Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Stephen M.; Stofan, Ellen R.

    2016-06-01

    New mathematical approaches for the relaxation and emplacement of viscous lava domes are presented and applied to steep-sided domes on Venus. A similarity solution approach is applied to the governing equation for fluid flow in a cylindrical geometry for two distinct scenarios. In the first scenario, dome relaxation is explored assuming a constant volume of fluid (i.e. lava) has been rapidly emplaced onto the surface. Cooling of lava is represented by a time-variable viscosity and singularities inherent in previous models for dome relaxation have been eliminated. At the onset of relaxation, bulk dynamic viscosities lie in the range between 1010-1016 Pa s, consistent with basaltic-andesite to rhyolitic compositions. Plausible relaxation times range from 5 to 5000 years, depending on initial lava viscosity. The first scenario, however, is only valid during the final stages of dome relaxation and does not consider the time taken for lava to be extruded onto the surface. In the second scenario, emplacement and growth of a steep-sided dome is considered when the volume of lava on the surface increases over time (i.e. time-variable volume approach). The volumetric flowrate may depend on an arbitrary power of the dome thickness, thus embracing Newtonian as well as other rheologies for describing terrestrial and planetary mass flows. The approach can be used to distinguish between basic flowrate models for fluid emplacement. The formalism results in radial expansion of a dome proportional to t1/2, consistent with the diffusive nature of the governing equation. The flow at the front is shown to thicken as the front advances for a constant rate of lava supply. Emplacement times are intimately correlated with the bulk rheology. Comparison of the theoretical profiles with the shape of a typical dome on Venus indicates that a Newtonian bulk rheology is most appropriate, consistent with prior studies. However, results here suggest a bulk dynamic viscosity of 1012-1013 Pa s and

  8. Structure and Kinematics of a Complex Crater: Upheaval Dome, Southeast, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriens, B. J.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Shoemaker, E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Two vastly different phenomena, extraterrestrial impact and salt diapirism, have been proposed for the origin of Upheaval Dome. Upheaval Dome is a about 2.5-km-diameter structural dome surrounded by a 5-km-diameter ring structural depression, which is in turn flanked by extensive, nearly flat-lying Colorado Plateau strata. Seismic refraction data and geologic mapping indicate that the dome originated by the collapse of a transient cavity formed by impact; data also show that rising salt has had a negligible influence on dome development. Evidence for this includes several factors: (1) a rare lag deposit of impactite is present; (2) fan-tailed fracture surfaces (shatter surfaces) and a few shattercones are present; (3) the top of the underlying salt horizon is at least 500 m below the center of the dome, with no exposures of salt in the dome to support the possibility that a salt diapir has ascended through it; (4) sedimentary strata in the center are significantly imbricated by top-to-the-center thrust faulting and are complexly folded; (5) top-to-the-center low-angle normal faults are found at the perimeter of the structure; and (6) clastic dikes are widespread. The scarcity of melt rocks and shock fabrics is attributed to approximately 0.5 km of erosion; the structures of the dome reflect processes of complex crater development at a depth of about 0.5 km below the crater floor. Based on mapping and kinematic analysis, we infer that the dome formed mainly by centerward motion of rock units along listric faults. Outcrop-scale folding and upturning of beds, especially common in the center, largely resulted from this motion. In addition, we have detected some centerward motion of fault-bounded wedges resulting from displacements on subhorizontal faults that conjoin and die out within horizontal bedding in the perimeter of the structure. Collectively, the observed deformation accounts for the creation of both the central uplift and the encircling ring syncline.

  9. Effects of lava-dome emplacement on the Mount St. Helens crater glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walder, J. S.; Schilling, S. P.; Denlinger, R. P.; Vallance, J. W.

    2004-12-01

    Since the end of the 1981-1986 episode of lava-dome growth at Mount St. Helens, an unusual glacier has grown rapidly within the crater of the volcano. The glacier, which is fed primarily by avalanching from the crater walls, contains about 30% rock debris by volume, has a maximum thickness of about 220 m and a volume of about 120 million cubic m, and forms a crescent that wraps around the old lava dome on both east and west sides. The new (October 2004) lava dome in the south of the crater began to grow centered roughly on the contact between the old lava dome and the glacier, in the process uplifting both ice and old dome rock. As the new dome is spreading to the south, the adjacent glacier is bulging upward. Firn layers on the outer flank of the glacier bulge have been warped upward almost vertically. In contrast, ice adjacent to the new dome has been thoroughly fractured. The overall style of deformation is reminiscent of that associated with salt-dome intrusion. Drawing an analogy to sand-box experiments, we suggest that the glacier is being deformed by high-angle reverse faults propagating upward from depth. Comparison of Lidar images of the glacier from September 2003 and October 2004 reveals not only the volcanogenic bulge but also elevated domains associated with the passage of kinematic waves, which are caused by glacier-mass-balance perturbations and have nothing to do with volcanic activity. As of 25 October 2004, growth of the new lava dome has had negligible hydrological consequences. Ice-surface cauldrons are common consequences of intense melting caused by either subglacial eruptions (as in Iceland) or subglacial venting of hot gases (as presently taking place at Mount Spurr, Alaska). However, there has been a notable absence of ice-surface cauldrons in the Mount St. Helens crater glacier, aside from a short-lived pond formed where the 1 October eruption pierced the glacier. We suggest that heat transfer to the glacier base is inefficient because

  10. Alteration minerals on the Santiaguito lava dome complex, Santa María volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. L.; Calder, E. S.; Giese, R.

    2010-12-01

    Santiaguito is a relatively young complex of four lava domes located at the foot of the Santa María volcano in Guatemala. The domes have been erupting intermittently since 1922, and have shown various degrees of hydrothermal activity throughout their development. Hydrothermal systems in older volcanic edifices (Casita in Nicaragua, La Soufriere of Guadeloupe) are known to weaken rock and promote collapses, but their effects and development in young lava domes is less well constrained. Santiaguito has experienced several relatively small dome collapses (≦ 3 million m3) in the past, but it is unclear what role hydrothermal processes have played in these collapses. Currently, low-temperature active fumaroles are present on the domes, indicating the presence of a hydrothermal system. Samples of unconsolidated ash and sediment and rock chips were collected from the interior of fumaroles on the El Brujo lava dome to determine if hydrothermal alteration minerals were present. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to identify the presence of clay minerals in the powdered samples. Additional semi-quantitative identification was obtained using backscattered electron images (BSE) collected with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Both analyses were performed at the University at Buffalo. Preliminary XRD analyses were unable to conclusively detect alteration minerals in powdered samples; however, BSE images of the same samples appeared to show alteration minerals (montmorillonite, saponite) adhering to individual ash grains. Further SEM analyses are being conducted on thin sections of the rock chips to determine if alteration minerals are present in dome rock as well as in the unconsolidated material. Development of alteration minerals on the relatively young (~50-90 year old) Santiaguito lava domes may indicate an increased risk for alteration-driven instabilities and collapses. Altered volcanic rocks are less competent, have lower shear strength and are more susceptible to

  11. Laterally bendable belt conveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, W.J.

    1982-09-24

    An endless, laterally flexible and bendable belt conveyor particularly adapted for coal mining applications in facilitating the transport of the extracted coal up- or downslope and around corners in a continuous manner is disclosed. The conveying means includes a flat rubber belt reinforced along the middle portion thereof along which the major portion of the belt tension is directed so as to cause rotation of the tubular shaped belt when trammed around lateral turns thus preventing excessive belt bulging distortion between adjacent belt supports which would inhibit belt transport. Pretension induced into the fabric reinforced flat rubber belt by conventional belt take-up means supports the load conveyed when the belt conveyor is making lateral turns. The carrying and return portions of the belt are supported and formed into a tubular shape by a plurality of shapers positioned along its length. Each shaper is supported from above by a monorail and includes clusters of idler rollers which support the belt. Additional cluster rollers in each shaper permit the belt supporting roller clusters to rotate in response to the belt's operating tension imposed upon the cluster rollers by induced lateral belt friction forces. The freely rotating roller clusters thus permit the belt to twist on lateral curves without damage to itself while precluding escape of the conveyed material by effectively enclosing it in the tube-shaped, inner belt transport length.

  12. Laterally closed lattice homomorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumi, Mohamed Ali; Toumi, Nedra

    2006-12-01

    Let A and B be two Archimedean vector lattices and let be a lattice homomorphism. We call that T is laterally closed if T(D) is a maximal orthogonal system in the band generated by T(A) in B, for each maximal orthogonal system D of A. In this paper we prove that any laterally closed lattice homomorphism T of an Archimedean vector lattice A with universal completion Au into a universally complete vector lattice B can be extended to a lattice homomorphism of Au into B, which is an improvement of a result of M. Duhoux and M. Meyer [M. Duhoux and M. Meyer, Extended orthomorphisms and lateral completion of Archimedean Riesz spaces, Ann. Soc. Sci. Bruxelles 98 (1984) 3-18], who established it for the order continuous lattice homomorphism case. Moreover, if in addition Au and B are with point separating order duals (Au)' and B' respectively, then the laterally closedness property becomes a necessary and sufficient condition for any lattice homomorphism to have a similar extension to the whole Au. As an application, we give a new representation theorem for laterally closed d-algebras from which we infer the existence of d-algebra multiplications on the universal completions of d-algebras.

  13. Laterally bendable belt conveyor

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, William J.

    1985-01-01

    An endless, laterally flexible and bendable belt conveyor particularly adapted for coal mining applications in facilitating the transport of the extracted coal up- or downslope and around corners in a continuous manner is disclosed. The conveying means includes a flat rubber belt reinforced along the middle portion thereof along which the major portion of the belt tension is directed so as to cause rotation of the tubular shaped belt when trammed around lateral turns thus preventing excessive belt bulging distortion between adjacent belt supports which would inhibit belt transport. Pretension induced into the fabric reinforced flat rubber belt by conventional belt take-up means supports the load conveyed when the belt conveyor is making lateral turns. The carrying and return portions of the belt are supported and formed into a tubular shape by a plurality of shapers positioned along its length. Each shaper is supported from above by a monorail and includes clusters of idler rollers which support the belt. Additional cluster rollers in each shaper permit the belt supporting roller clusters to rotate in response to the belt's operating tension imposed upon the cluster rollers by induced lateral belt friction forces. The freely rotating roller clusters thus permit the belt to twist on lateral curves without damage to itself while precluding escape of the conveyed material by effectively enclosing it in the tube-shaped, inner belt transport length.

  14. Degradation of Dome Cutting Minerals in Hanford Waste - 13100

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Jacob G.; Cooke, Gary A.; Huber, Heinz J.

    2013-07-01

    At the Hanford Tank Farms, recent changes in retrieval technology require cutting new risers in several single-shell tanks. The Hanford Tank Farm Operator is using water jet technology with abrasive silicate minerals such as garnet or olivine to cut through the concrete and rebar dome. The abrasiveness of these minerals, which become part of the high-level waste stream, may enhance the erosion of waste processing equipment. However, garnet and olivine are not thermodynamically stable in Hanford waste, slowly degrading over time. How likely these materials are to dissolve completely in the waste before the waste is processed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant can be evaluated using theoretical analysis for olivine and collected direct experimental evidence for garnet. Based on an extensive literature study, a large number of primary silicates decompose into sodalite and cancrinite when exposed to Hanford waste. Given sufficient time, the sodalite also degrades into cancrinite. Even though cancrinite has not been directly added to any Hanford tanks during process times, it is the most common silicate observed in current Hanford waste. By analogy, olivine and garnet are expected to ultimately also decompose into cancrinite. Garnet used in a concrete cutting demonstration was immersed in a simulated supernate representing the estimated composition of the liquid retrieving waste from Hanford tank 241-C-107 at both ambient and elevated temperatures. This simulant was amended with extra NaOH to determine if adding caustic would help enhance the degradation rate of garnet. The results showed that the garnet degradation rate was highest at the highest NaOH concentration and temperature. At the end of 12 weeks, however, the garnet grains were mostly intact, even when immersed in 2 molar NaOH at 80 deg. C. Cancrinite was identified as the degradation product on the surface of the garnet grains. In the case of olivine, the rate of degradation in the high

  15. Degradation of dome cutting minerals in Hanford waste

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Jacob G.; Huber, Heinz J.; Cooke, Gary A.

    2013-01-11

    At the Hanford Tank Farms, recent changes in retrieval technology require cutting new risers in several single-shell tanks. The Hanford Tank Farm Operator is using water jet technology with abrasive silicate minerals such as garnet or olivine to cut through the concrete and rebar dome. The abrasiveness of these minerals, which become part of the high-level waste stream, may enhance the erosion of waste processing equipment. However, garnet and olivine are not thermodynamically stable in Hanford waste, slowly degrading over time. How likely these materials are to dissolve completely in the waste before the waste is processed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant can be evaluated using theoretical analysis for olivine and collected direct experimental evidence for garnet. Based on an extensive literature study, a large number of primary silicates decompose into sodalite and cancrinite when exposed to Hanford waste. Given sufficient time, the sodalite also degrades into cancrinite. Even though cancrinite has not been directly added to any Hanford tanks during process times, it is the most common silicate observed in current Hanford waste. By analogy, olivine and garnet are expected to ultimately also decompose into cancrinite. Garnet used in a concrete cutting demonstration was immersed in a simulated supernate representing the estimated composition of the liquid retrieving waste from Hanford tank 241-C-107 at both ambient and elevated temperatures. This simulant was amended with extra NaOH to determine if adding caustic would help enhance the degradation rate of garnet. The results showed that the garnet degradation rate was highest at the highest NaOH concentration and temperature. At the end of 12 weeks, however, the garnet grains were mostly intact, even when immersed in 2 molar NaOH at 80 deg C. Cancrinite was identified as the degradation product on the surface of the garnet grains. In the case of olivine, the rate of degradation in the high-pH regimes

  16. Fragmentation and Cataclasis of Lava Domes: Field Evidence of Conduit-Margin Faulting and Cryptodome Unloading at Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallister, J. S.; Hagstrum, J.; Cashman, K.; Tuffen, H.

    2007-12-01

    for many of the earthquakes at MSH. Additionally, grain-flow textures in the bounding ultracataclasite fault zones suggest that observed periods of aseismic extrusion were accommodated by creep on these faults. In contrast, Pine Creek age (~2.5 ka) dome dacite exposed over a large area at the mouth of the MSH crater is pervasively fractured over paleo-depths of >300m. Like the dacite of the current eruption, this rock has a microcrystalline groundmass, indicative of extensive shallow crystallization and subsurface solidification. However, the extent and character of fragmentation is unrelated to shear along conduit margins. Instead, a multi- stage history of brittle deformation consists of: 1) early 10-20cm thick subhorizontal zones of sandy cataclasite that repeat at intervals of meters to tens of meters within pervasively shattered dacite, 2) early cross-cutting high- angle faults with slickensides and <1mm pseudotachylite seams, and 3) later cross-cutting planar faults. We suggest that early cataclasis was produced by rapid unloading of the still-hot dome during a Pine-Creek age sector collapse and that the early high-angle faults represent boundaries of large mega-blocks that had begun to detach within the source dome. Together with mapped Pine Creek avalanche deposts nearby (Hausback, 2000), these features suggest that a transition from avalanche to still-intact Pine-Creek age cryptodome is exposed in the mouth of the MSH crater.

  17. Crocodile-inspired dome-shaped pressure receptors for passive hydrodynamic sensing.

    PubMed

    Kanhere, Elgar; Wang, Nan; Kottapalli, Ajay Giri Prakash; Asadnia, Mohsen; Subramaniam, Vignesh; Miao, Jianmin; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Passive mechanosensing is an energy-efficient and effective recourse for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) for perceiving their surroundings. The passive sensory organs of aquatic animals have provided inspiration to biomimetic researchers for developing underwater passive sensing systems for AUVs. This work is inspired by the 'integumentary sensory organs' (ISOs) which are dispersed on the skin of crocodiles and are equipped with slowly adapting (SA) and rapidly adapting (RA) receptors. ISOs assist crocodiles in locating the origin of a disturbance, both on the water surface and under water, thereby enabling them to hunt prey even in a dark environment and turbid waters. In this study, we construct SA dome receptors embedded with microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) piezoresistive sensors to measure the steady-state pressures imparted by flows and RA dome receptors embedded with MEMS piezoelectric sensors to detect oscillatory pressures in water. Experimental results manifest the ability of SA and RA dome receptors to sense the direction of steady-state flows and oscillatory disturbances, respectively. As a proof of concept, the SA domes are tested on the hull of a kayak under various pressure variations owing to different types of movements of the hull. Our results indicate that the dome receptors are capable of discerning the angle of attack and speed of the flow. PMID:27545614

  18. Detailed studies of selected, well-exposed fracture zones in the Adirondack Mountains dome, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Wiener, R.W.; Isachsen, Y.W.

    1987-01-01

    The Adirondack Mountains constitute a relatively young (Mesozoic, Cenozoic) dome on the craton. The dome is undergoing contemporary uplift, based on geodetic releveling, and is seismically active. The breached dome provides a very large window through Paleozoic cover and thus permits ground study of the fracture systems that characterize the seismogenic basement and influence the patterns of brittle deformation that are found in overlying Paleozoic rocks of the platform. The predominant fracture zones are linear valleys that trend NNE to NE, parallel to the long axis of the dome. The 36 field studies of the lineament segments discussed in this report suggest that the prominent NE to NNE fracture systems in the eastern Adirondacks are dominantly high angle faults down-stepped to the east, whereas those in the central Adirondacks are dominantly zero-displacement crackle zones. The origin of these features is related to the rapid uplift of the Adirondack dome. Similar features can be expected to be found in other areas of domal uplift or rapid regional uplift.

  19. New radiometric ages on gneisses of the Oliverian domes in New Hampshire and Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Zartman, R.E.; Leo, G.W.

    1985-03-01

    Gneissic plutons of the Oliverian domes, mantled by Ammonoosuc Volcanics, are located along the axis of the Bronson Hill anticlinorium from New Hampshire to Connecticut. The contacts between the plutonic and volcanic rocks appear to be concordant on a regional scale, but gneiss intrudes the volcanics in several domes. Available radiometric and fossil evidence suggests that the Ammonoosuc Volcanics have a Middle Ordovician age but are somewhat older than the Oliverian gneisses. New U-Pb zircon data from Oliverian gneisses of six domes plot on a concordia diagram as an almost colinear array that yields an upper intercept age of about 444 m.y. The plotted data vary from nearly concordant to moderately discordant, the degree of discordance, correlating with /sup 207/Pb//sup 206/Pb ages that range from 459 to 415 m.y. The pattern of discordance does not relate to the uranium contents of the zircons nor to the geographic distribution of the domes. If /sup 207/Pb//sup 206/Pb ages are considered individually without an assumed consanguinity of the units, however, they do not find particular support in geologic relationships. Thus, they prefer the concordia intercept age of 444 +/- 8 m.y. for the suite as the best estimate for the time of crystallization of the Oliverian gneisses. Possibly, the Whitefield, Gneiss in the Jefferson dome represents a 10 to 15 m.y. older unit, although they are cautious about claiming such resolution with the present data.

  20. Improved manufacturing techniques for RF and laser hardening of missile domes. Phase I. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlewicz, W.T.; Mann, I.B.; Martin, P.M.; Hays, D.D.; Graybeal, A.G.

    1982-07-01

    This report summarizes key results and accomplishements during the first year of a Manufacturing Methods and Technology project to adapt an existing Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) optical coating capability developed for high-power fusion-laser applications to the case of rf and laser hardening of plastic missile domes used by the US Army (MICOM). The primary objective of the first year's work was to demonstrate rf hardening of Hellfire and Copperhead 1.06-micron missile domes by use of transparent conductive Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) coatings. The project thus involved adaptation of a coating material and process developed for flat glass components used in fusion lasers to the case of hemispherical or conical heat-sensitive plastic domes used on laser-guided missiles. Specific ITO coating property goals were an electrical sheet resistance of 10 Ohms/square, a coated-dome transmission of 80% or more at 1.06 micron wavelength (compared to 90% for a bare dome), and good adhesion. The sheet resistance goal of 10 Ohms/square was expected to result in an rf attenuation of 30 dB at the frequencies of importance.

  1. Parameter optimization of Dome A site testing DIMM by data mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lingzhe; Pei, Chong

    2012-10-01

    The extreme environment of Antarctic is valuable for astronomical observations. Dome C is proved has excellent seeing and transmission by site testing works. While the higher, colder inland plateau Dome A is widely predicted as even better astronomical site than Dome C. Preliminary site testing developed since the beginning of 2008 shows that Dome A has lower boundary layer and lower precipitable water vapour. Now the automated seeing monitor is urgently needed to quantify the site's optical character which is necessary for the telescope design and deployment. In addition, it has the requirement that DIMM must realize automatic measurement for nearly one year under the case of unmanned intervention during which a great quantity of data will be generated because of the limitation of Dome A. This paper aims at researching how to use the method of mining association rules to automatically analyze observation data, what the relationship between various parameters effecting on optical quality is, and improving the efficiency of telescope observation by parameter optimization. We have modified a commercial telescope with diameter of 35cm to function as site testing DIMM which has been installed at XingLong observation station of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, acquired long term observation data, and identified that this method is suitable for optimizing the parameters of DIMM system.

  2. Conceptual design of a 5-m terahertz telescope at Dome A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dehua; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Yi; Zhou, Guohua; Cheng, Jingquan; Li, Guoping

    2012-09-01

    A 5-meter terahertz telescope is proposed by the Chinese Center for Antarctic Astronomy (CCAA) for the East Antarctica site of the Dome A plateau. The Dome A 5-m terahertz telescope (DATE 5) will be operated at sub-millimeter waveband taking the unique advantage of the transparent atmospheric windows between 200 and 350 μm wavelengths at Dome A. A preliminary design has been conducted according to the given technical requirements and the special environmental conditions at Dome A. A symmetric R-C Cassegrain optical system is designed for the telescope, with a primary f-ratio of 0.4 and a wide field of view of 10 arcmin. The magnification of the sub-reflector is 9.4, leading to the final focal ratio of 3.76 and the focus 0.2 m below the vertex of the primary reflector. To ensure surface accuracy of the reflectors precise as small as 10 um RMS, we consider using Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) to build the backup structure (BUS) of the primary reflector and the sub-reflector itself. An alt-azimuthal mounting is adopted and a tall base structure beneath the telescope is set up to lift the telescope above the low atmosphere turbulent layer. All the mechanics, as well as control electronics, are strictly designed to fit the lower temperature operation in the Dome A environment. This paper is to generally present the mentioned systematic optical, structural and electronic design of the DATE 5 telescope.

  3. Unusual atypical language lateralization.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad T; Oghlakian, Roger; Koubeissi, Mohamad Z

    2016-01-01

    Determining the language-dominant hemisphere is essential for planning epilepsy surgery. A 60-year-old right-handed woman with epilepsy since age 16 failed a partial right anterior lobectomy at age 21. Later, a brain MRI found extensive right-sided cortical dysplasia and periventricular heterotopia. Subsequently, prolonged video-EEG monitoring localized her seizures to the right temporoparietal region. Functional MRI was inconclusive in lateralizing her language, prompting a Wada test, which strongly lateralized language to the right. This unique case of atypical language representation in a right-handed individual with an extensive right-hemispheric congenital malformation and seizure focus illustrates the important thorough presurgical language assessment. PMID:27668182

  4. The thermal regime in the resurgent dome of Long Valley Caldera, California: Inferences from precision temperature logs in deep wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurwitz, S.; Farrar, C.D.; Williams, C.F.

    2010-01-01

    Long Valley Caldera in eastern California formed 0.76Ma ago in a cataclysmic eruption that resulted in the deposition of 600km3 of Bishop Tuff. The total current heat flow from the caldera floor is estimated to be ~290MW, and a geothermal power plant in Casa Diablo on the flanks of the resurgent dome (RD) generates ~40MWe. The RD in the center of the caldera was uplifted by ~80cm between 1980 and 1999 and was explained by most models as a response to magma intrusion into the shallow crust. This unrest has led to extensive research on geothermal resources and volcanic hazards in the caldera. Here we present results from precise, high-resolution, temperature-depth profiles in five deep boreholes (327-1,158m) on the RD to assess its thermal state, and more specifically 1) to provide bounds on the advective heat transport as a guide for future geothermal exploration, 2) to provide constraints on the occurrence of magma at shallow crustal depths, and 3) to provide a baseline for future transient thermal phenomena in response to large earthquakes, volcanic activity, or geothermal production. The temperature profiles display substantial non-linearity within each profile and variability between the different profiles. All profiles display significant temperature reversals with depth and temperature gradients <50??C/km at their bottom. The maximum temperature in the individual boreholes ranges between 124.7??C and 129.5??C and bottom hole temperatures range between 99.4??C and 129.5??C. The high-temperature units in the three Fumarole Valley boreholes are at the approximate same elevation as the high-temperature unit in borehole M-1 in Casa Diablo indicating lateral or sub-lateral hydrothermal flow through the resurgent dome. Small differences in temperature between measurements in consecutive years in three of the wells suggest slow cooling of the shallow hydrothermal flow system. By matching theoretical curves to segments of the measured temperature profiles, we calculate

  5. Lateral Thinking of Prospective Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, A. S. Arul; Xavier, S. Amaladoss

    2013-01-01

    Edward de Bono who invented the term "lateral thinking" in 1967 is the pioneer of lateral thinking. Lateral thinking is concerned with the generation of new ideas. Liberation from old ideas and the stimulation of new ones are twin aspects of lateral thinking. Lateral thinking is a creative skills from which all people can benefit…

  6. Monitoring of the environmental conditions inside the dome of the 4m Blanco Telescope at CTIO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Els, S. G.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Bustos, E. B.; Seguel, J.; Walker, D. E.; Berdja, A.; Riddle, R.; Schöck, M.; Skidmore, W.; Travouillon, T.

    2010-07-01

    Between February and April 2009 a number of ultrasonic anemometers, temperature probes and dust sensors were operated inside the CTIO Blanco telescope dome. These sensors were distributed in a way that temperature and 3 dimensional wind speeds were monitored along the line of sight of the telescope. During telescope operations, occasional seeing measurements were obtained using the Mosaic CCD imager and the CTIO site monitoring MASS-DIMM system. In addition, also a Lunar Scintillometer (LuSci) was operated over the course of a few nights inside the dome. We describe the instrumental setup and first preliminary results on the linkage of the atmospheric conditions inside the dome to the overall image quality.

  7. Intrusive and extrusive growth of the Mount St Helens lava dome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Jonathan H.; Malin, Michael C.; Anderson, Steven W.

    1990-01-01

    High-resolution, digital topographic maps of the Mount St. Helens dome derived from aerial photographs are used here to make a quantitative assessment of the partitioning of magma into endogenous intrusion and exogenous lobes. The endogenous growth is found to be predictable, which shows that the cooling dome controls its own development independently of such deep-seated factors as magma overpressure and extrusion rate. The observed regular decrease in exogenous growth rate also allows volume prediction. Knowledge of the volume can be used to determine when an ongoing eruptive event should end. Finally, the observed transition from predominantly exogenous to predominantly endogenous growth reflects the increase in crust thickness, which in turn seems to depend on long repose periods rather than some fundamental change in the character of the dome.

  8. A Neogene structural dome in the Klamath Mountains, California and Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortimer, N.; Coleman, R. G.

    1985-04-01

    Regional structural doming of Neogene age has affected rocks of the Klamath and Cascade mountains near the California-Oregon border. Evidence for this is seen in (1) subannular outcrop patterns of pre-Cretaceous lithotectonic units, (2) a crude pattern of radially oriented high-angle faults, (3) tilted Jurassic plutons, (4) tilted Cretaceous to Miocene strata, and (5) various geomorphological features. The age of doming is constrained by a major middle Miocene to earliest Pliocene angular unconformity within the Cascade Mountains and uplifted upper Miocene marine beds on the western edge of the Klamath Mountains. Uplift and doming may be the result of shortening in the Cascade fore-arc region or, more speculatively, the recent accretion of subducted material to the North American plate beneath the Klamath Mountains. *Present addresses: Mortimer, Department of Geological Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2B4, Canada; Coleman, U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California 94025

  9. Laterally bendable belt conveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, W.J.

    1985-07-02

    An endless, laterally flexible and bendable belt conveyor particularly adapted for coal mining applications in facilitating the transport of the extracted coal up- or downslope and around corners in a continuous manner is disclosed. The conveying means includes a flat rubber belt reinforced along the middle portion thereof along which the major portion of the belt tension is directed so as to cause rotation of the tubular shaped belt when trammed around lateral turns thus preventing excessive belt bulging distortion between adjacent belt supports which would inhibit belt transport. Pretension induced into the fabric reinforced flat rubber belt by conventional belt take-up means supports the load conveyed when the belt conveyor is making laterial turns. The carrying and return portions of the belt are supported and formed into a tubular shape by a plurality of shapers positioned along its length. Each shaper is supported from above by a monorail and includes clusters of idler rolles which support the belt. Additional cluster rollers in each shaper permit the belt supporting roller clusters to rotate in response to the belt's operating tension imposed upon the cluster rollers by induced lateral belt friction forces. The freely rotating roller clusters thus permit the belt to twist on lateral curves without damage to itself while precluding escape of the conveyed material by effectively enclosing it in the tube-shaped, inner belt transport length.

  10. Humor in Later Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Billie H.

    This document contains a brief bibliography of peer-reviewed literature, with abstracts, on humor in later life. It is one of 12 bibliographies on aging prepared by the National Agricultural Library for its "Pathfinders" series of publications. Topics covered by the other 11 bibliographies include aging parents, adult children, dementia and…

  11. Holographic lateral shear interferometer.

    PubMed

    Malacara, D; Mallick, S

    1976-11-01

    A new type of lateral shear holographic interferometer is described. It can be used to test lenses as well as spherical and aspherical surfaces. A null pattern with straight fringes can be obtained for an aspherical surface, provided one has a prototype that can be used for making the hologram.

  12. The 2006 lava dome eruption of Merapi Volcano (Indonesia): Detailed analysis using MODIS TIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Brett B.; Clarke, Amanda B.; Vanderkluysen, Loÿc

    2016-02-01

    Merapi is one of Indonesia's most active and dangerous volcanoes. Prior to the 2010 VEI 4 eruption, activity at Merapi during the 20th century was characterized by the growth and collapse of a series of lava domes. Periods of very slow growth were punctuated by short episodes of increased eruption rates characterized by dome collapse-generated pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). An eruptive event of this type occurred in May-June, 2006. For effusive eruptions such as this, detailed extrusion rate records are important for understanding the processes driving the eruption and the hazards presented by the eruption. We use thermal infrared (TIR) images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites to estimate extrusion rates at Merapi Volcano during the 2006 eruption using the method of Harris and Ripepe (2007). We compile a set of 75 nighttime MODIS images of the eruptive period to produce a detailed time series of thermal radiance and extrusion rate that reveal multiple phases of the 2006 eruption. These data closely correspond to the published ground-based observational record and improve observation density and detail during the eruption sequence. Furthermore, additional analysis of radiance values for thermal anomalies in Band 21 (λ = 3.959 μm) of MODIS images results in a new framework for detecting different styles of activity. We successfully discriminate among slow dome growth, rapid dome growth, and PDC-producing dome collapse. We also demonstrate a positive correlation between PDC frequency and extrusion rate, and provide evidence that extrusion rate can increase in response to external events such as dome collapses or tectonic earthquakes. This study represents a new method of documenting volcanic activity that can be applied to other similar volcanic systems.

  13. Volumes and eruption rates for the 2008-2009 Chaitén rhyolite lava dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallister, J. S.; Diefenbach, A. K.; Griswold, J.; Muñoz, J.; Lara, L. E.; Valenzuela, C.; Burton, W. C.; Keeler, R.

    2010-12-01

    The 2008 eruption of Chaitén caldera, southern Chile, was one of the most explosive on Earth in the past two decades. The eruption began early on 2 May 2008 (UTC) and produced sub-plinian to plinian ash columns between 2 May and 9 May, before transitioning from explosive eruption of tephra to effusive eruption of rhyolite lava. A series of lava flow lobes accumulated within the caldera between late May and the end of the year, burying most of Chaitén’s prehistoric lava dome. A prominent lava spine was also extruded, starting in late 2008. The spine collapsed on 19 February 2009, producing a pyroclastic flow that extended out of the caldera and 7 km down the Río Chaitén. Dome growth continued through 2009, filling in much of the spine-collapse area and further expanding the composite dome through endogenous growth. Dome volumes are computed and eruption rates estimated using satellite data from 2008-10, photogrammetric analysis of oblique aerial photographs taken in January 2010, and digital elevation models derived from ASTER, SRTM, LIDAR and topographic maps. The 2008-10 dome has a total volume of approximately 0.8 km3. About 0.5 km3 erupted within the first four months, when extrusion rates were in the range 10-100 m3s-1. Extrusion rates decreased exponentially over the eruptive period. The 2008-10 dome is similar in volume and composition to the prehistoric lava dome, which has a volume of at least 0.5 km3. Together the two domes constitute about 20-40% of the 3.5-7 km3 collapse volume of the prehistoric caldera. The unusually rapid extrusion rates during the first four months are among the highest ever measured for silicic lava. Chaitén’s 2008-10 lava is obsidian and microcrystalline rhyolite with 75.35+/-0.02% SiO2. A large volume of low viscosity crystal-poor magma (about 0.1% phenocrysts) coupled with high extrusion pressures during the extended transition from explosive to effusive eruption style resulted in these exceptionally high extrusion rates.

  14. Volcanism on Venus: Large shields and major accumulations of small domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaber, Gerald G.; Kozak, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    The outer layers of the Venusian lithosphere appear to dissipate heat from the interior through mantle-driven thermal anomalies (hot spots, swells). As a result, Venus exhibits diverse forms of thin-skin tectonism and magmatic transfer to and extrusion from countless numbers of volcanic centers (e.g., shields, paterae, domes) and volcano-tectonic complexes (e.g., coronae, arachnoids). What is known about the distribution and morphologies of major Venusian shields is summarized, and the evidence for possible structural control of major accumulations as long as 5000 km of small volcanic domes is described.

  15. Drilling investigation of a young magmatic intrusion beneath Inyo Dome, Long Valley Caldera, California. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Progress to date indicates: (1) the conduit and lava flow at Obsidian Dome consist of two magma types; (2) the more mafic magma occurs at the base of Obsidian Dome and at the margins of the conduit and was emplaced first; (3) the more silicic magma occurs in the center of the conduit and in the dike; (4) the ilmenite-magnetite and orthopyroxene-augite geothermometers have not reequilibrated in the conduit or dike; (5) the more mafic magma's emplacement temperature was 974/sup 0/C compared to the silicic magma's 951/sup 0/C; and (6) trace elements are characteristic of each magma type. (ACR)

  16. A Review of Optical Sky Brightness and Extinction at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, S. L.; Storey, J. W. V.

    2006-03-01

    The recent discovery of exceptional seeing conditions at Dome C, Antarctica, raises the possibility of constructing an optical observatory there with unique capabilities. However, little is known from an astronomer's perspective about the optical sky brightness and extinction at Antarctic sites. We review the contributions to sky brightness at high-latitude sites and calculate the amount of usable dark time at Dome C. We also explore the implications of the limited sky coverage of high-latitude sites and review optical extinction data from the South Pole. Finally, we examine the proposal of Baldry & Bland-Hawthorn to extend the amount of usable dark time through the use of polarizing filters.

  17. Growth of single-layer boron nitride dome-shaped nanostructures catalysed by iron clusters.

    PubMed

    Torre, A La; Åhlgren, E H; Fay, M W; Ben Romdhane, F; Skowron, S T; Parmenter, C; Davies, A J; Jouhannaud, J; Pourroy, G; Khlobystov, A N; Brown, P D; Besley, E; Banhart, F

    2016-08-11

    We report on the growth and formation of single-layer boron nitride dome-shaped nanostructures mediated by small iron clusters located on flakes of hexagonal boron nitride. The nanostructures were synthesized in situ at high temperature inside a transmission electron microscope while the e-beam was blanked. The formation process, typically originating at defective step-edges on the boron nitride support, was investigated using a combination of transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and computational modelling. Computational modelling showed that the domes exhibit a nanotube-like structure with flat circular caps and that their stability was comparable to that of a single boron nitride layer. PMID:27486917

  18. Kinematics of Deformation in West-Central Walker Lane; Paleomagnetic Testing of Fault-Block Rotation and Doming Models, Eastern California and Western Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredrickson, S. M.; Pluhar, C. J.; Carlson, C. W.

    2013-12-01

    Walker Lane is a broad (~100-200 km) zone of dextral shear located between the Sierra Nevada microplate and the Basin and Range Province. We consider Bodie Hills a part of the greater Walker Lane because it has experienced clockwise, vertical-axis rotation of crustal blocks due to dextral shear accommodation. This strain is variable, resulting in rotations ranging from ~10°-70° depending on location. The Miocene Eureka Valley Tuff (EVT) is an ideal strain marker, because it is a geologically instantaneous and laterally extensive unit. We use paleomagnetic analysis of ignimbrites to improve the resolution of strain domain boundaries as well as test for doming in Bodie Hills. EVT site mean directions were compared to reference directions of the Tollhouse Flat and By Day Members collected from the stable Sierra Nevada to determine magnitudes of vertical-axis rotation. Three new sites and three previously sampled sites define a high-rotation domain including Bridgeport Valley and the East Walker River Canyon with an average clockwise rotation of ~50°-60°. We define the eastern boundary of this high-rotation domain as coinciding with a mapped fault exhibiting 11.7°×7.9° rotation of the presumed footwall. Our data corroborates and improves on Carlson's (2012) kinematic model in which the greater Bodie Hills has rotated clockwise ~30° since EVT emplacement. Eutaxitic textures, dipping up to 90°, are gross indicators of true tilt, but are also influenced by original dips in some localities, complicating interpretations. John et al. (2012) describe a simple doming model of Bodie Hills since EVT emplacement, supported by the high elevation of outflow channels compared to source areas. Our paleomagnetic data does not support simple doming, suggesting that there is either no doming of Bodie Hills, or that vertical crustal displacements have occurred without large-scale folding. John et al. (2012) dated undifferentiated EVT in Bodie Hills at ~9.4 Ma; using

  19. Magnitude and timing of downstream channel aggradation and degradation in response to a dome-building eruption at Mount Hood, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, Thomas C.; Pringle, Patrick T.; Cameron, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    A dome-building eruption at Mount Hood, Oregon, starting in A.D. 1781 and lasting until ca. 1793, produced dome-collapse lithic pyroclastic flows that triggered lahars and intermittently fed 108 m3 of coarse volcaniclastic sediment to sediment reservoirs in headwater canyons of the Sandy River. Mobilization of dominantly sandy sediment from these reservoirs by lahars and seasonal floods initiated downstream migration of a sediment wave that resulted in a profound cycle of aggradation and degradation in the lowermost reach of the river (depositional reach), 61-87 km from the source. Stratigraphic and sedimentologic relations in the alluvial fill, together with dendrochronologic dating of degradation terraces, demonstrate that (1) channel aggradation in response to sediment loading in the headwater canyons raised the river bed in this reach at least 23 m in a decade or less; (2) the transition from aggradation to degradation in the upper part of this reach roughly coincided with the end of the dome-building eruption; (3) fluvial sediment transport and deposition, augmented by one lahar, achieved a minimum average aggradation rate of ~2 m/yr; (4) the degradation phase of the cycle was more prolonged than the aggradation phase, requiring more than half a century for the river to reach its present bed elevation; and (5) the present longitudinal profile of the Sandy River in this reach is at least 3 m above the pre-eruption profile. The pattern and rate of channel response and recovery in the Sandy River following heavy sediment loading resemble those of other rivers similarly subjected to very large sediment inputs. The magnitude of channel aggradation in the lower Sandy River, greater than that achieved at other volcanoes following much larger eruptions, was likely enhanced by lateral confinement of the channel within a narrow incised valley. A combination of at least one lahar and winter floods from frequent moderate-magnitude rainstorms and infrequent very large

  20. Approach alternatives for treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus.

    PubMed

    Navid, David O; Myerson, Mark S

    2002-09-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus are common injuries, especially in the athletic population. Although multiple etiologies exist, lateral lesions have a higher incidence of association with a specific traumatic event. It has been postulated that lateral lesions are produced when the anterolateral aspect of the talar dome impacts the fibula on application of an inversion or dorsiflexion stress to the ankle [2]. There is general agreement that surgery should be performed only in symptomatic cases, as osteochondral lesions of the talar dome show little tendency to progression and do not seem to lead to osteoarthritis [10,42]. Appropriate preoperative imaging is extremely important. Standard radiographs of the ankle supplemented with lateral plantar flexion and dorsiflexion views and CT or Mr imaging can be helpful in evaluating the size, depth, and exact location of the lesion. This information is essential in planning the appropriate surgical procedure. Although many stage I and II lesions respond well to conservative therapy and a period of immobilization, some higher-grade lesions (stage III and IV) eventually require surgical intervention. Most lesions can be approached arthroscopically. Many arthroscopic procedures have been shown to be successful, including debridement with abrasion chondroplasty, subchondral drilling, and microfracture [18-20]. But certain larger or refractory lesions may require an open approach to the ankle joint to restore the articular cartilage. Most lateral lesions have an anterior location and are easily accessible through a standard anterolateral approach. Most medial lesions are located on the posterior talar dome, and a medial malleolar osteotomy is usually required. Osteotomies, in particular of the medial malleolus, should be approached carefully. The possible complications of nonunion and malunion can lead to progressive arthritis of the ankle joint.

  1. Crowning the Cathedral of Florence: Brunelleschi Builds His Dome. A Unit of Study for Grades 7-10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symcox, Linda

    This unit focuses on a dramatic moment in the Renaissance from about 1420 when Filippo Brunelleschi single handedly created, defined, and engineered a new architecture by building the great dome of the cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence. The dome became the symbol of Florence's grandeur during the Renaissance, and a model for great…

  2. Development of in-structure design spectra for dome mounted equipment on underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Julyk, L.J.

    1995-09-01

    In-structure response spectra for dome mounted equipment on underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site are developed on the basis of recent soil-structure-interaction analyses. Recommended design spectra are provided for various locations on the tank dome.

  3. Exhumation of high-pressure rocks in a Variscan migmatite dome (Montagne Noire, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Donna; Roger, Francoise; Rey, Patrice; Teyssier, Christian

    2015-04-01

    The Variscan orogen contains numerous domal structures composed mostly of migmatitic gneiss and granite, with lesser amounts of mafic rock. In the Montagne Noire (MN) migmatite dome of the southern Massif Central (France), some mafic rocks record eclogite facies metamorphism that contrasts with the low-pressure/high-temperature (LP/HT) conditions recorded by host gneiss. To understand the relationship of eclogite to migmatite/gneiss evolution, we determined P-T-time conditions of eclogite and gneiss and evaluated the location of HP rocks within the dome in the context of dome dynamics. Migmatite and granite in the dome commonly contain sillimanite and/or cordierite, and the schist carapace also contains index minerals of LP/HT metamorphism (andalusite, cordierite, sillimanite). There is sparse evidence, however, for earlier HP conditions: relict kyanite in schist and gneiss. The age of this metamorphism is not known but the LP/HT metamorphism and migmatite/granite crystallization was ~315-300 Ma (monazite, zircon U-Pb). Most MN eclogites have been significantly retrogressed. We focused our study on a relatively fresh eclogite (Terme de Fourcaric locality) containing omphacite (Jd36) + zoned pyrope-rich garnet (up to prp50 at the rim) + rutile + zircon. P-T conditions determined from a pseudosection and from Zr-in-rutile and grt-cpx thermometry indicates T = 700-800 C at P ~ 1.5 GPa. U-Pb dating of zircon by LA-ICP-MS reveals core ages of ~360 Ma and rim ages of ~315 Ma. The zircon core age is similar to results obtained by Faure et al. (2014) for eclogite from the same general locality using a Sm-Nd grt-cpx-whole rock isochron (interpreted as age of eclogite metamorphism). The rim age is similar to their U-Pb zircon and rutile results that they interpreted as the age of "hydrothermal" metamorphism. The interpretation of Faure is consistent with regional geologic age information, although the lack of retrogression in the Fourcaric eclogite and the high prp content

  4. Lateral flow assays.

    PubMed

    Koczula, Katarzyna M; Gallotta, Andrea

    2016-06-30

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. PMID:27365041

  5. Lateral flow assays

    PubMed Central

    Koczula, Katarzyna M.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. PMID:27365041

  6. Lateral Attitude Change.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Tina; Dickel, Nina; Liersch, Benjamin; Rees, Jonas; Süssenbach, Philipp; Bohner, Gerd

    2015-08-01

    The authors propose a framework distinguishing two types of lateral attitude change (LAC): (a) generalization effects, where attitude change toward a focal object transfers to related objects, and (b) displacement effects, where only related attitudes change but the focal attitude does not change. They bring together examples of LAC from various domains of research, outline the conditions and underlying processes of each type of LAC, and develop a theoretical framework that enables researchers to study LAC more systematically in the future. Compared with established theories of attitude change, the LAC framework focuses on lateral instead of focal attitude change and encompasses both generalization and displacement. Novel predictions and designs for studying LAC are presented.

  7. Conjugal amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dewitt, John D.; Kwon, Julia; Burton, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disease characterized by progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the motor cortex, brainstem, and spinal cord. The incidence of sporadic ALS is 1.5 to 2.7 in 100,000, and the prevalence is 5.2 to 6.0 in 100,000. Conjugal ALS is even rarer than sporadic ALS. We report a case of conjugal ALS encountered in our outpatient neurology clinic. PMID:22275781

  8. Hemispheric lateralization in reasoning.

    PubMed

    Turner, Benjamin O; Marinsek, Nicole; Ryhal, Emily; Miller, Michael B

    2015-11-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that reasoning in humans relies on a number of related processes whose neural loci are largely lateralized to one hemisphere or the other. A recent review of this evidence concluded that the patterns of lateralization observed are organized according to two complementary tendencies. The left hemisphere attempts to reduce uncertainty by drawing inferences or creating explanations, even at the cost of ignoring conflicting evidence or generating implausible explanations. Conversely, the right hemisphere aims to reduce conflict by rejecting or refining explanations that are no longer tenable in the face of new evidence. In healthy adults, the hemispheres work together to achieve a balance between certainty and consistency, and a wealth of neuropsychological research supports the notion that upsetting this balance results in various failures in reasoning, including delusions. However, support for this model from the neuroimaging literature is mixed. Here, we examine the evidence for this framework from multiple research domains, including an activation likelihood estimation analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of reasoning. Our results suggest a need to either revise this model as it applies to healthy adults or to develop better tools for assessing lateralization in these individuals. PMID:26426534

  9. Dome growth at Mount Cleveland, Aleutian Arc, quantified by time-series TerraSAR-X imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Teng; Poland, Michael; Lu, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar imagery is widely used to study surface deformation induced by volcanic activity; however, it is rarely applied to quantify the evolution of lava domes, which is important for understanding hazards and magmatic system characteristics. We studied dome formation associated with eruptive activity at Mount Cleveland, Aleutian Volcanic Arc, in 2011–2012 using TerraSAR-X imagery. Interferometry and offset tracking show no consistent deformation and only motion of the crater rim, suggesting that ascending magma may pass through a preexisting conduit system without causing appreciable surface deformation. Amplitude imagery has proven useful for quantifying rates of vertical and areal growth of the lava dome within the crater from formation to removal by explosive activity to rebirth. We expect that this approach can be applied at other volcanoes that host growing lava domes and where hazards are highly dependent on dome geometry and growth rates.

  10. Log analysis of six boreholes in conjunction with geologic characterization above and on top of the Weeks Island salt dome

    SciTech Connect

    Sattler, A.R.

    1996-04-01

    Six boreholes were drilled during the geologic characterization and diagnostics of the Weeks Island sinkhole that is over the two-tiered salt mine which was converted for oil storage by the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. These holes were drilled to provide for geologic characterization of the Weeks Island Salt Dome and its overburden in the immediate vicinity of the sinkhole (mainly through logs and core); to establish a crosswell configuration for seismic tomography; to establish locations for hydrocarbon detection and tracer injection; and to Provide direct observations of sinkhole geometry and material properties. Specific objectives of the logging program were to: (1) identify the top of and the physical state of the salt dome; (2) identify the water table; (3) obtain a relative salinity profile in the aquifer within the alluvium, which ranges from the water table directly to the top of the Weeks Island salt dome; and (4) identify a reflecting horizon seen on seismic profiles over this salt dome. Natural gamma, neutron, density, sonic, resistivity and caliper logs were run. Neutron and density logs were run from inside the well casing because of the extremely unstable condition of the deltaic alluvium overburden above the salt dome. The logging program provided important information about the salt dome and the overburden in that (1) the top of the salt dome was identified at {approximately}189 ft bgl (103 ft msl), and the top of the dome contains relatively few fractures; (2) the water table is approximately 1 ft msl, (3) this aquifer appears to become steadily more saline with depth; and (4) the water saturation of much of the alluvium over the salt dome is shown to be influenced by the prevalent heavy rainfall. This logging program, a part of the sinkhole diagnostics, provides unique information about this salt dome and the overburden.

  11. Interaction between an emerging flux region and a pre-existing fan-spine dome observed by IRIS and SDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fayu; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Shuhong

    2016-04-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of a fan-spine dome in the active region NOAA 11996 with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) on March 9, 2014. The destruction of the fan-spine topology owing to the interaction between its magnetic fields and an nearby emerging flux region (EFR) is firstly observed. The line-of-sight magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the SDO reveal that the dome is located on the mixed magnetic fields, with its rim rooted in the redundant positive polarity surrounding the minority parasitic negative fields. The fan surface of the dome consists of a filament system and recurring jets are observed along its spine. The jet occurring around 13:54 UT is accompanied with a quasi-circular ribbon that brightens in the clockwise direction along the bottom rim of the dome, which may indicate an occurrence of slipping reconnection in the fan-spine topology. The EFR emerges continuously and meets with the magnetic fields of the dome. Magnetic cancellations take place between the emerging negative polarity and the outer positive polarity of the dome's fields, which lead to the rise of the loop connecting the EFR and brightenings related to the dome. A single Gaussian fit to the profiles of the IRIS SI IV 1394 Å line is used in the analysis. It appears that there are two rising components along the slit, except for the rise in the line-of-sight direction. The cancellation process repeats again and again. Eventually the fan-spine dome is destroyed and a new connectivity is formed. We suggest that magnetic reconnection between the EFR and the magnetic fields of the fan-spine dome in the process is responsible for the destruction of the dome.

  12. Robotic Manufacturing of 5.5 Meter Cryogenic Fuel Tank Dome Assemblies for the NASA Ares I Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ronald E.

    2012-01-01

    The Ares I rocket is the first launch vehicle scheduled for manufacture under the National Aeronautic and Space Administration's (NASA's) Constellation program. A series of full-scale Ares I development articles have been constructed on the Robotic Weld Tool at the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The Robotic Weld Tool is a 100 ton, 7-axis, robotic manufacturing system capable of machining and friction stir welding large-scale space hardware. This presentation will focus on the friction stir welding of 5.5m diameter cryogenic fuel tank components; specifically, the liquid hydrogen forward dome (LH2 MDA), the common bulkhead manufacturing development articles (CBMDA) and the thermal protection system demonstration dome (TPS Dome). The LH2 MDA was the first full-scale, flight-like Ares I hardware produced under the Constellation Program. It is a 5.5m diameter elliptical dome assembly consisting of eight gore panels, a y-ring stiffener and a manhole fitting. All components are made from aluminumlithium alloy 2195. Conventional and self-reacting friction stir welding was used on this article. An overview of the manufacturing processes will be discussed. The LH2 MDA is the first known fully friction stir welded dome ever produced. The completion of four Common Bulkhead Manufacturing Development Articles (CBMDA) and the TPS Dome will also be highlighted. Each CBMDA and the TPS Dome consists of a 5.5m diameter spun-formed dome friction stir welded to a y-ring stiffener. The domes and y-rings are made of aluminum 2014 and 2219 respectively. The TPS Dome has an additional aluminum alloy 2195 barrel section welded to the y-ring. Manufacturing solutions will be discussed including "fixtureless" welding with self reacting friction stir welding.

  13. About the theory of initial stage of oil accumulation in a dome-separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimaltdinov, I. K.; Kildibaeva, S. R.

    2015-05-01

    A mathematical model was developed for accumulation of oil in a cylindrical tank (the dome-separator) designed for capturing of oil from oil leakage at the sea bottom. Two key stages were described, and time dependencies for interface evolution and alcohol layer temperature were calculated.

  14. The Energy Dome. Social Studies Packet-Grades 4, 5, 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Teachers Association, Washington, DC.

    This teacher's guide contains a unit of study for teaching about energy in grades four, five, and six. The guide is self-contained and includes the fact sheets students need to work out the activity problems. The unit is organized around the theme of the domed athletic stadium. The students begin by surveying the energy it takes to travel from…

  15. A Symbol of Peace and Peace Education: The Genbaku Dome in Hiroshima

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ide, Kanako

    2007-01-01

    There are numerous paintings expressing both the glory and horror of war. These pictures are a powerful medium in peace education. In this article, the author focuses on a symbol of Hiroshima called the Genbaku Dome, a United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Site. She believes that images of the…

  16. LOFT. West side of containment building and dome (TAN650). Camera ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOFT. West side of containment building and dome (TAN-650). Camera is atop earth -shield control building (TAN-630), facing east. Vertical structure at right of view (with light affixed) is west end of railroad door shroud. Date: May 2004. INEEL negative no. HD-39-19-1 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. The head dome: A simplified method for human exposures to inhaled air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Bowes, S.M. III; Frank, R.; Swift, D.L. )

    1990-05-01

    Acute controlled exposures of human subjects to air pollutants are customarily carried out with whole-body chambers, masks, or mouthpieces. The use of these methods may be limited by cost or technical considerations. To permit a study involving a highly unstable pollutant, artificial acid fog, administered to subjects during natural breathing, a head-only exposure chamber, called a head dome, was developed. It consists of a transparent cylinder with a neck seal which fits over the subject's head and rests lightly on his shoulders. The head dome does not constrain the upper airways or impede exercise on a bicycle ergometer. Ventilation can be monitored accurately and unobtrusively with a pneumotachograph at the exhaust port of the dome. A thermocouple may be used to monitor the onset and persistence of oronasal breathing. For short-term exposures to unstable or reactive pollutants lasting up to several hours, the head dome is an effective alternative to a whole-body chamber and probably superior to a face mask or mouthpiece.

  18. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Formed Domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Simulated service testing (SST) development was required to help qualify a new 2195 aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloy spin forming dome fabrication process for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Development Technology Program. The application for the technology is to produce high strength low weight tank components for NASA s next generation launch vehicles. Since plate material is not currently manufactured large enough to fabricate these domes, two plates are joined by means of friction stir welding. The plates are then pre-contour machined to near final thicknesses allowing for a thicker weld land and anticipating the level of stretch induced by the spin forming process. The welded plates are then placed in a spin forming tool and hot stretched using a trace method producing incremental contours. Finally the dome receives a room temperature contour stretch to final dimensions, heat treatment, quenching, and artificial aging to emulate a T-8 condition of temper. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were also performed by alternate immersion in a sodium chloride (NaCl) solution using the typical double beam assembly and with 4-point loaded specimens and use of bent-beam stress-corrosion test specimens under alternate immersion conditions. In addition, experiments were conducted to determine the threshold stress intensity factor for SCC (K(sub ISCC)) which to our knowledge has not been determined previously for Al-Li 2195 alloy. The successful simulated service and stress corrosion testing helped to provide confidence to continue to Ares 1 scale dome fabrication

  19. Discovery of Possible Meteoritic Matter on Shatter Cones — 3. Marquez Dome, Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, M.; Buchner, E.

    2016-08-01

    In the frame of the “Shatter Cone Coatings Project”, we investigated shatter cones from the Marquez Dome impact structure that contain Fe-Ni-Co particles (kamacite); the composition of a Fe-sulfide particle suggests the particle is troilite.

  20. The Effects of Truncated Dome Detectable Warnings on Travelers Negotiating Curb Ramps in Wheelchairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Truncated domes on curb ramps benefit travelers with visual impairments. However, concerns associated with the safety and negotiability of such detectable warnings for other travelers have resulted in much controversy. The findings of the study presented here indicate that detectable warnings did not adversely affect the negotiability of ramps by…

  1. A Comparison of Dome and Computer Planetaria in the Teaching of Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, John H.; Preece, Peter F. W.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates 5th and 6th grade students' learning when taught with the aid of dome and computer planetaria. Finds both planetaria equally effective with female pupils. Recommends the use of planetaria, which might enable females to catch up with males in areas that place heavy demands on spatial ability such as astronomy. (Contains 16 references.)…

  2. The eastern Central Pamir Gneiss Domes: temporal and spatial geometry of burial and exhumation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutte, Daniel; Stearns, Michael; Ratschbacher, Lothar

    2013-04-01

    We present a structural and thermochronologic study of the Gneiss Domes and their cover in the Central Pamir. Emphasis is laid on presentation and discussion of new 40Ar-39Ar dates embedded in two structural profiles through the central Muskol and western Shatput domes. The structure of the Central Pamir is dominated by Cenozoic deformation related to the India-Asia collision. Only few structures of the Phanerozoic amalgamation of the Pamir were not reactivated. The Cenozoic structural development of the Central Pamir can be simplified into three phases: 1) Between initial collision of India and Asia to 28-20 Ma (peak metamorphism, U-Pb monazite) the emplacement of large thrust sheets led to strong north-south shortening;" in the eastern Central Pamir the major thrust sheet has a minimum displacement of 35 km. The stratigraphic thickness of this nappe is ~7 km but its internal structure and thus its true thickness is weakly constrained by the available data. Klippen of Early Paleozoic strata of this thrust sheet south of the Central Pamir Muskol and Shatput domes cover Carboniferous to Triassic strata of the footwall; they can be linked to the Akbaital nappe previously mapped by Russian geologists north of the domes. In the Sasaksu valley of the Muskol dome, the thrust sheet is intruded by a ~36 Ma granodiorite (new U-Pb zircon dates). (2) This crustal imbricate stack is cut by east-trending normal faults and shear zones that define the Central Pamir Gneiss Domes. Normal shear is concentrated along the northern margin of the domes and was the main process associated with exhumation of the domes from ~30 km depth at 20-15 Ma (U-Th/Pb titanite and monazite, Ar-Ar, fission-track geo-thermochronology). One granite at ~35 Ma (U-Pb zircon) pre-dates exhumation while three leucocratic dykes (18-20 Ma U-Pb monazite and zircon) are dated to be coeval with the initial stages of exhumation. Detrital U-Pb zircon ages of the high-grade metasediments indicate that the protoliths

  3. A new Termination I temperature history from the Taylor Dome area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggenstos, D.; Severinghaus, J. P.; McConnell, J. R.; Sigl, M.; Maselli, O.; Bauska, T. K.; Brook, E.; Petit, J. R.; Grente, B.

    2012-12-01

    The spatial and temporal patterns of climate changes during the last glacial cycle are an important clue to understand the causes and mechanisms of these events. The consensus Antarctic temperature history through the last glacial transition begins with a gradual warming from 19 ka to 14.7 ka BP followed by a small cooling, termed the Antarctic cold reversal, to 13 ka and a strong final warming to typical Holocene values by 11.5 ka. This temperature signal is a robust feature in many ice cores throughout all of Antarctica. The only record that does not support this block behavior is from Taylor Dome where an abrupt, Greenland-like warming has been documented. The validity of the Taylor Dome record has been questioned but there are to date no other temperature records from that region. We present a new d18Oice proxy record from Taylor Glacier, which is fed by ice deposited on the northern slope of Taylor Dome. We describe a transect spanning 80m in the ablation zone of Taylor Glacier that contains the full deglaciation from ~30 ka to ~12 ka. A sequence of 50cm long sticks, cut with a chainsaw from 70-80cm below the surface, was analyzed for dust proxies, stable water isotopes, and other aerosol tracers using a continuous melter system at DRI. We use the dust data to tie our record to the EPICA Dome C timescale. The absolute values of the d18Oice and dDice records indicate that the ice was deposited at similar elevation as the Taylor Dome deep ice core. This confirms that the deposition sites must have been relatively close. The results show that the Taylor Dome region went through a similar deglacial climatic transition as the rest of Antarctica. Antarctic Isotope Maximum 2 features prominently at the end of the LGM as in West Antarctic ice cores, but unlike e.g. Talos Dome despite its proximity. The subsequent deglacial warming happens rather smoothly in general but there are episodes where rapid changes are apparent. We also discuss in greater detail the regional

  4. Annually-resolved temperature reconstructions of the past 2000 years from Dome-Fuji, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motizuki, Yuko; Takahashi, Kazuya; Nakai, Yoichi; Motoyama, Hideaki

    2016-04-01

    We present annually-resolved temperature and SST reconstructions of the past 2000 years based on water (oxygen and deuterium) isotope measurement on a shallow ice core drilled in 2010 at Dome Fuji station, East Antarctica. These time series records will be an essential contribution to the PAGES 2k project from sparse data area in Antarctica. Dome Fuji station is located on a summit of Dronning Maud Land at an altitude of 3810 m a.s.l. (above sea level) (77o19'01'' S, 39o42'12'' E) in East Antarctica. The 10 m depth mean snow temperature at Dome Fuji is -57.3oC1). The inland area around Dome Fuji has been recognized to be especially unique: The snow and ice there contain much stratospheric information. The direct evidence for this comes from tritium contents originated from the nuclear bomb tests in the 1960s; the tritium fallout at the Dome Fuji site is outstandingly high among 16 snow pit samples widely collected over Antarctica2). To date the concerned Dome Fuji ice core, we applied volcanic signature matching to transfer the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide ice core chronology constructed by annual layer counting as used in the study by Sigl et al. (2014)3). In our presentation, we confine ourselves to discuss the oscillation periodicity that we observed in the oxygen isotope record in our data: The periods of approximately 10, 20, and 200 years were found. We will present the time series analyses for this in detail, and will discuss the origin of this periodicity. References: 1) Kameda, T., Motoyama, H., Fujita, S., and Takahashi, S.: "Past temporal and spatial variability of surface mass balance at Dome Fuji", East Antarctica, by the stake method from 1995 to 2006, J. Glaciol., 54, 107-116, 2008. 2) Fourre, E., Jean-Baptiste, P., Dapoigny, A., Baumier, D., Petit, J.-R., and Jouzel, J.: "Past and recent tritium levels in Arctic and Antarctic polar caps", Earth Planet. Sc. Lett., 245, 56-64, 2006. 3) Sigl, M., J. McConnell, M. Toohey, M. Curran, S. Das, R

  5. Arthroscopic Anatomy of the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Ray, Ronald G

    2016-10-01

    There are a number of variations in the intra-articular anatomy of the ankle which should not be considered pathological under all circumstances. The anteromedial corner of the tibial plafond (between the anterior edge of the tibial plafond and the medial malleolus) can have a notch, void of cartilage and bone. This area can appear degenerative arthroscopically; it is actually a normal variant of the articular surface. The anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITF) can possess a lower, accessory band which can impinge on the anterolateral edge of the talar dome. In some cases it can cause irritation along this area of the talus laterally. If it is creating local irritation it can be removed since it does not provide any additional stabilization to the syndesmosis. There is a beveled region at the anterior leading edge of the lateral and dorsal surfaces of the talus laterally. This triangular region is void of cartilage and subchondral bone. The lack of talar structure in this region allows the lower portion of the AITF ligament to move over the talus during end range dorsiflexion of the ankle, preventing impingement. The variation in talar anatomy for this area should not be considered pathological. PMID:27599433

  6. Measuring the Dome Growth of the 2004-2005 Eruption of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, S. P.; Denlinger, R.; Thompson, R. A.; Messerich, J.

    2005-12-01

    In October 2004, a new period of dome growth began that changed the topography of the 1980 crater at Mount St. Helens dramatically. From October 2004 through July 2005, nearly 60 million cubic meters of lava extruded onto the crater floor immediately south of the 1980-1986 lava dome. The eruption intensely deformed and divided the crater glacier on this floor. It created spectacular crevassing and rapid advance of the east arm of the glacier then caused crevassing and broad uplift of the glacier's west arm. Time-sequential vertical aerial photography documents morphologic change and enabled construction of a series of 13 2-m-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for the period between October 4, 2004 and July 14, 2005. Vertical aerial photographs flown at a nominal 1:12000 scale were acquired at three-week intervals, scanned at 12-micron resolution, and rectified using a soft-copy (i.e., digital image) photogrammetric workstation. Aerotriangulated models were constructed using ground control outside the area of active deformation, derived from pre-eruption GPS and photogrammetric data, and passed to subsequent model sets. Resulting location accuracy is on the order of decimeters. The DEM data allow us to estimate dome volumes during growth. To extract volumetric changes and calculate extrusion rates, each DEM surface was compared to pre-eruption reference surfaces from 2000 and 2003, as well as to the preceding DEM surface. On July 14, 2005, the new dome was approximately 700 m long (NW-SE) and 560 m wide (SW-NE). The volume of the new dome (including talus), was about 58 million cubic meters, approximately two-thirds the volume of the 1980-1986 dome. The volumetric growth rate in 2004-2005 ranged from a maximum of 9 m3/sec in the early stages of growth to an average of 1-3 m3/sec thereafter. The DEMs also are used to quantify dome height variations, size of the conduit opening, and the mechanics of dome emplacement (growth and collapse) as well as deformation

  7. Geochronology of the Sleeper deposit, Humboldt County, Nevada: epithermal gold-silver mineralization following emplacement of a silicic flow-dome complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conrad, J.E.; McKee, E.H.; Rytuba, J.J.; Nash, J.T.; Utterback, W.C.

    1993-01-01

    The high-grade gold-silver deposits at the Sleeper mine are low sulfidation, quartz-adularia-type epithermal deposits, formed during the final stages of igneous hydrothermal activity of a small middle Miocene silicic flow-dome complex in north-central Nevada. There were multiple pulses of alteration and mineralization but all occurred within a period of less than 2 m.y. Later supergene alteration formed opal and alunite about 5.4 Ma but produced no Au or Ag mineralization other than some remobilization to produce locally rich pockets of secondary Au and Ag enrichment and is unrelated to the older magmatic hydrothermal system. The Sleeper deposit in the northern part of the Great Basin is genetically related to bimodal volcanism that followed a long period of arc-related andesitic volcanism in the same general region. -from Authors

  8. A Laboratory Study of the 2004-2008 Mount St Helens Lava Dome: Mechanical Behaviour, Rheology, and Earthquakes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R.; Sammonds, P. R.; Tuffen, H.; Meredith, P. G.

    2009-05-01

    Lava domes are often modelled as a fluid whose dynamics are controlled by the viscosity and pressurisation of the fluid. However, the behaviour of active domes such as the 2004-2008 Mount St Helens dome and spine complex reveals that most of the lava dome deformation occurs on shear fracture planes. Evidence from seismology and exposed magma conduits at other volcanoes also indicates that the final ascent of magma into these domes may be controlled by shear fracture zones at the conduit margins. These observations demonstrate that fracturing may exert a stronger control on lava dome dynamics than fluid mechanics does. It is therefore important to expand the limited existing data on the high temperature rock mechanics of dome lavas under eruptive conditions. Acoustic emissions (AE) recorded whilst producing such data can provide a link between laboratory experiments and seismicity recorded during lava dome eruptions. Here we present results of uniaxial and triaxial deformation of a dacite sample extruded at Mount St Helens lava dome in December 2005, which has unsurpassed age constraints. This provides the unique opportunity to compare experimental results to the geophysical signals recorded as the sample was extruded. A newly modified high temperature triaxial compression apparatus was used to deform 25 mm diameter cylindrical samples at temperatures up to 1000°C, effective pressures up to 10 MPa, and strain rates from 10-4 s-1 to 10-6 s-1. It was thus possible to deform samples at temperatures, strain rates, and effective pressures typical of the Mount St Helens lava dome system and of active andesitic and dacitic lava dome systems in general, whilst also recording AE. The experimental results show the effect of temperature, effective pressure, and strain rate on the compressive strength, failure mode, and rheology of dome lavas within the brittle ductile transition. They provide key parameters and constraints for developing numerical and analytical models of

  9. Permeability development during compaction of pumiceous dome lavas: testing the permeable foam collapse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwell, P.; Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallee, Y.; kennedy, B.; Hess, K.; von Aulock, F. W.; Cole, J. W.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    The evolution of the porous network during lava dome extrusions is commonly perceived as the key control on the permeability which regulates the pore pressure, thereby challenging the stability of the dome. Here, we present experimental results of porosity and permeability evolution during compaction of aphiric and crystal-bearing rhyolitic, pumiceous (porosity ~60 %) lavas from Tarawera and Ngongotaha volcanoes (Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand), respectively. The The Ngongotaha sample is from the crystal-free dome carapace (erupted ~200 ka following caldera collapse at Rotorua Caldera), while the Tarawera sample is a crystalline, pumiceous clast from a dome-collapse generated block and ash flow (at Okataina Caldera ~1314 AD). This study tests the validity of the 'permeable foam' model by comparing properties of the experimentally compacted pumice to denser material seen in the exposed cores of Tarawera and Ngongotaha. Cylindrical samples were deformed under an axial stress of 2.8 MPa at 650-750°C (above their calorimetric glass transition temperature) up a total axial strain of 50 %. The porosity and permeability of the samples were characterized at strain increments of 10 %. The samples exhibit strain hardening during compaction. A rapid reduction in permeability along the primary axis occurs during the initial stage of compression and continues to decrease with increasing strain and densification of the lava. Development of permeability of each lava differs as the crystallinity affects the compaction process. The development of textures and microstructures is characterised using petrographic analysis and neutron computed tomography. The findings from the study are then put into the context of lava dome growth at Tarawera and Ngongotaha volcanoes.

  10. Intensity and polarization of the atmospheric emission at millimetric wavelengths at Dome Concordia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battistelli, E. S.; Amico, G.; Baù, A.; Bergé, L.; Bréelle, É.; Charlassier, R.; Collin, S.; Cruciani, A.; de Bernardis, P.; Dufour, C.; Dumoulin, L.; Gervasi, M.; Giard, M.; Giordano, C.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Guglielmi, L.; Hamilton, J.-C.; Landé, J.; Maffei, B.; Maiello, M.; Marnieros, S.; Masi, S.; Passerini, A.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Piccirillo, L.; Pisano, G.; Polenta, G.; Rosset, C.; Salatino, M.; Schillaci, A.; Sordini, R.; Spinelli, S.; Tartari, A.; Zannoni, M.

    2012-06-01

    Atmospheric emission is a dominant source of disturbance in ground-based astronomy at millimetric wavelengths. The Antarctic plateau is recognized as an ideal site for millimetric and submillimetric observations, and the French/Italian base of Dome Concordia (Dome C) is among the best sites on Earth for these observations. In this paper, we present measurements at Dome C of the atmospheric emission in intensity and polarization at a 2-mm wavelength. This is one of the best observational frequencies for cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations when considering cosmic signal intensity, atmospheric transmission, detector sensitivity and foreground removal. Using the B-mode radiation interferometer (BRAIN)-pathfinder experiment, we have performed measurements of the atmospheric emission at 150 GHz. Careful characterization of the airmass synchronous emission has been performed, acquiring more than 380 elevation scans (i.e. 'skydip') during the third BRAIN-pathfinder summer campaign in 2009 December/2010 January. The extremely high transparency of the Antarctic atmosphere over Dome C is proven by the very low measured optical depth, <τI>= 0.050 ± 0.003 ± 0.011, where the first error is statistical and the second is the systematic error. Mid-term stability, over the summer campaign, of the atmosphere emission has also been studied. Adapting the radiative transfer atmosphere emission model am to the particular conditions found at Dome C, we also infer the level of the precipitable water vapor (PWV) content of the atmosphere, which is notoriously the main source of disturbance in millimetric astronomy (? mm). Upper limits on the airmass correlated polarized signal are also placed for the first time. The degree of circular polarization of atmospheric emission is found to be lower than 0.2 per cent [95 per cent confidence level (CL)], while the degree of linear polarization is found to be lower than 0.1 per cent (95 per cent CL). These limits include signal

  11. Beryllium-10 in the Taylor Dome ice core: Applications to Antarctic glaciology and paleoclimatology

    SciTech Connect

    Steig, E.J.

    1996-12-31

    An ice core was drilled at Taylor dome, East Antarctica, reaching to bedrock at 554 meters. Oxygen-isotope measurements reveal climatic fluctuations through the last interglacial period. To facilitate comparison of the Taylor Dome paleoclimate record with geologic data and results from other deep ice cores, several glaciological issues need to be addressed. In particular, accumulation data are necessary as input for numerical ice-flow-models, for determining the flux of chemical constituents from measured concentrations, and for calculation of the offset in age between ice and trapped air in the core. The analysis of cosmogenic beryllium-10 provides a geochemical method for constraining the accumulation-rate history at Taylor Dome. High-resolution measurements were made in shallow firn cores and snow pits to determine the relationship among beryllium-10 concentrations, wet and dry deposition mechanisms, and snow-accumulation rates. Comparison between theoretical and measured variations in deposition over the last 75 years constrains the relationship between beryllium-10 deposition and global average production rates. The results indicate that variations in geomagnetically-modulated production-rate do not strongly influence beryllium-10 deposition at Taylor Dome. Although solar modulation of production rate is important for time scales of years to centuries, snow-accumulation rate is the dominant control on ice-core beryllium-10 concentrations for longer periods. Results show that the Taylor Dome core can be used to provide new constraints on regional climate over the last 130,000 years, complementing the terrestrial and marine geological record from the Dry Valley, Transantarctic Mountains and western Ross Sea.

  12. Laboratory Studies of High Temperature Deformation and Fracture of Lava Domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R.; Sammonds, P.; Tuffen, H.; Meredith, P.

    2007-12-01

    The high temperature fracture mechanics of magma at high temperatures exerts a fundamental control on the stability of lava domes and the timing and style of eruptions at andesitic to dacitic volcanoes. This is evidenced in the pervasive fracturing seen in both ancient and active magma conduits and lava domes; in addition to the volcanic earthquakes that occur before and during episodes of dome growth and dome collapse. Uniaxial and triaxial deformation experiments have been performed on crystal rich and crystal free magmas (andesite from Ancestral Mount Shasta, California, USA and a rhyolitic obsidian from Krafla, Iceland) at a range of temperatures (up to 900°C), confining pressures (up to 50 MPa) and strain rates (10-5s-1) to 10-3s-1) whilst recording acoustic emissions (AE). Results from these experiments provide useful inputs into models of lava dome stability, extrusion mechanisms, and source mechanisms for volcanic earthquakes. However, the large sample sizes used to ensure valid results (25mm diameter and 75mm length) made it difficult to maintain stable high temperatures under confined conditions. Also, only rudimentary AE data could be obtained, due to the distance of the transducers from the samples to keep them away from the high temperatures. Here, we present modifications to this apparatus, which include a new furnace, improved loading system, additional pore pressure and permeability measurement capability, and vastly improved acoustic monitoring. This allows (1)stable higher temperatures (up to 1000°C) to be achieved under confined conditions, (2) high temperature and moderate pressure (up to 70 MPa) hydrostatic measurements of permeability and acoustic velocities, (3) high temperature triaxial deformation under different pore fluid and pressure conditions, and (4) full waveform AE monitoring for all deformation experiments. This system can thus be used to measure the physical properties and strength of rocks under volcanic conditions and to

  13. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit; Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-12-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  14. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  15. Geologic technical assessment of the Chacahoula Salt Dome, Louisiana, for potential expansion of the U.S. strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect

    Snider, Anna C.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Looff, Karl M.

    2006-03-01

    The Chacahoula salt dome, located in southern Louisiana, approximately 66 miles southwest of New Orleans, appears to be a suitable site for a 160-million-barrel-capacity expansion facility for the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve, comprising sixteen 10-million barrel underground storage caverns. The overall salt dome appears to cover an area of some 1800 acres, or approximately 2.8 square miles, at a subsea elevation of 2000 ft, which is near the top of the salt stock. The shallowest known salt is present at 1116 ft, subsea. The crest of the salt dome is relatively flatlying, outward to an elevation of -4000 ft. Below this elevation, the flanks of the dome plunge steeply in all directions. The dome appears to comprise two separate spine complexes of quasi-independently moving salt. Two mapped areas of salt overhang, located on the eastern and southeastern flanks of the salt stock, are present below -8000 ft. These regions of overhang should present no particular design issues, as the conceptual design SPR caverns are located in the western portion of the dome. The proposed cavern field may be affected by a boundary shear zone, located between the two salt spines. However, the large size of the Chacahoula salt dome suggests that there is significant design flexibility to deal with such local geologic issues.

  16. 8. UPPER INSIDE CHORD, VERTICAL, LATERAL STRUT, UPPER LATERAL & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. UPPER INSIDE CHORD, VERTICAL, LATERAL STRUT, UPPER LATERAL & GUSSET PLATE, ONE DIAGONAL BRACE - Enterprise Parker Truss Bridge, Spanning Smoky Hill River on K-43 Highway, Enterprise, Dickinson County, KS

  17. 7. UPPER INSIDE CHORD, VERTICAL, LATERAL STRUT, UPPER LATERAL & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. UPPER INSIDE CHORD, VERTICAL, LATERAL STRUT, UPPER LATERAL & GUSSET PLATE, TWO DIAGONAL BRACES - Enterprise Parker Truss Bridge, Spanning Smoky Hill River on K-43 Highway, Enterprise, Dickinson County, KS

  18. Magma Injection as a Trigger for Dome Collapse Eruption of the Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat: Evidence from a Single Pyroclast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, B. J.; di Muro, A.; Horwell, C.

    2009-05-01

    A single, pumiceous pyroclast collected following a major (85 million m3) dome collapse eruption of the Soufriere Hills volcano, Montserrat (21 September 1997) was found to contain textural and geochemical evidence for: 1) multiple decompression events, and 2) magma injection into the dome at the onset of dome collapse. Quartz, plagioclase and hornblende phenocrysts contain a variety of closed and burst melt inclusions (MIs). Burst MIs occur on fracture surfaces within exploded phenocrysts, with melt extruded as either foam or cylindrical pipe-forms. Fractures within exploded quartz phenocrysts are infilled with glass, whereas those within plagioclase are entirely free of glass, indicating relatively early fracturing (decompression) of the quartz. This interpretation is supported by slightly higher measured H2OT in burst MIs in quartz (av. 0.45 wt%) compared with plagioclase (av. 0.34 wt%), indicating equilibration on bursting of the quartz at higher relative pressures. From the low levels of H2OT in glass from the burst MIs in quartz, this fracturing occurred within the dome or upper conduit/dense plug at pressures < 10 MPa, probably at a depth much less than 400 m. The fracturing of plagioclase occurred at even higher levels. Both the fracturing of quartz and plagioclase occurred whilst the matrix was still molten, as evident from the presence of stretched vesicles in matrix glass at fracture terminations. The fractures in plagioclase are empty of vapour phase precipitates (such as cristobalite), whereas the pumiceous vesicles commonly contain such crystals, and therefore the fracturing of plagioclase is thought to have been the last depressurisation event recorded in the pyroclast. Indeed the fracturing is considered to have occurred due to the overpressure caused by the dome collapse which resulted in the pyroclast being ejected from the dome. We suggest that this is the first direct evidence for the injection of magma into the dome at the onset of dome

  19. Electrical resistivity tomography applied to a complex lava dome: 2D and 3D models comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portal, Angélie; Fargier, Yannick; Lénat, Jean-François; Labazuy, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The study of volcanic domes growth (e.g. St. Helens, Unzen, Montserrat) shows that it is often characterized by a succession of extrusion phases, dome explosions and collapse events. Lava dome eruptive activity may last from days to decades. Therefore, their internal structure, at the end of the eruption, is complex and includes massive extrusions and lava lobes, talus and pyroclastic deposits as well as hydrothermal alteration. The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method, initially developed for environmental and engineering exploration, is now commonly used for volcano structure imaging. Because a large range of resistivity values is often observed in volcanic environments, the method is well suited to study the internal structure of volcanic edifices. We performed an ERT survey on an 11ka years old trachytic lava dome, the Puy de Dôme volcano (French Massif Central). The analysis of a recent high resolution DEM (LiDAR 0.5 m), as well as other geophysical data, strongly suggest that the Puy de Dôme is a composite dome. 11 ERT profiles have been carried out, both at the scale of the entire dome (base diameter of ~2 km and height of 400 m) on the one hand, and at a smaller scale on the summit part on the other hand. Each profile is composed of 64 electrodes. Three different electrode spacing have been used depending on the study area (35 m for the entire dome, 10 m and 5 m for its summit part). Some profiles were performed with half-length roll-along acquisitions, in order to keep a good trade-off between depth of investigation and resolution. Both Wenner-alpha and Wenner-Schlumberger protocols were used. 2-D models of the electrical resistivity distribution were computed using RES2DINV software. In order to constrain inversion models interpretation, the depth of investigation (DOI) method was applied to those results. It aims to compute a sensitivity index on inversion results, illustrating how the data influence the model and constraining models

  20. Laterality and language experience.

    PubMed

    Hull, Rachel; Vaid, Jyotsna

    2006-09-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted on studies that examined hemispheric functional asymmetry for language in brain-intact monolingual and bilingual adults. Data from 23 laterality studies that directly compared bilingual and monolingual speakers on the same language were analysed (n = 1234). Variables examined were language experience (monolingual, bilingual), experimental paradigm (dichotic listening, visual hemifield presentation, and dual task) and, among bilinguals, the influence of second language proficiency (proficient vs nonproficient) and onset of bilingualism (early, or before age 6; and late, or after age 6). Overall, monolinguals and late bilinguals showed reliable left hemisphere dominance, while early bilinguals showed reliable bilateral hemispheric involvement. Within bilinguals, there was no reliable effect of language proficiency when age of L2 acquisition was controlled. The findings indicate that early learning of one vs. two languages predicts divergent patterns of cerebral language lateralisation in adulthood. PMID:16882556

  1. Lateral Flow Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Ching, Kathryn H

    2015-01-01

    Lateral flow immunoassays (LFIAs) are a staple in the field of rapid diagnostics. These small handheld devices require no specialized training or equipment to operate, and generate a result within minutes of sample application. They are an ideal format for many types of home test kits, for emergency responders and for food manufacturers and producers looking for a quick evaluation of a given sample. LFIAs rely on high quality monoclonal antibodies that recognize the analyte of interest. As monoclonal antibody technology becomes more accessible to smaller laboratories, there has been increased interest in developing LFIA prototypes for potential commercial manufacture. In this chapter, the basics of designing and building an LFIA prototype are described. PMID:26160571

  2. Lateral conduction infrared photodetector

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jin K.; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2011-09-20

    A photodetector for detecting infrared light in a wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m is disclosed. The photodetector has a mesa structure formed from semiconductor layers which include a type-II superlattice formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5. Impurity doped regions are formed on sidewalls of the mesa structure to provide for a lateral conduction of photo-generated carriers which can provide an increased carrier mobility and a reduced surface recombination. An optional bias electrode can be used in the photodetector to control and vary a cut-off wavelength or a depletion width therein. The photodetector can be formed as a single-color or multi-color device, and can also be used to form a focal plane array which is compatible with conventional read-out integrated circuits.

  3. Laterality and language experience.

    PubMed

    Hull, Rachel; Vaid, Jyotsna

    2006-09-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted on studies that examined hemispheric functional asymmetry for language in brain-intact monolingual and bilingual adults. Data from 23 laterality studies that directly compared bilingual and monolingual speakers on the same language were analysed (n = 1234). Variables examined were language experience (monolingual, bilingual), experimental paradigm (dichotic listening, visual hemifield presentation, and dual task) and, among bilinguals, the influence of second language proficiency (proficient vs nonproficient) and onset of bilingualism (early, or before age 6; and late, or after age 6). Overall, monolinguals and late bilinguals showed reliable left hemisphere dominance, while early bilinguals showed reliable bilateral hemispheric involvement. Within bilinguals, there was no reliable effect of language proficiency when age of L2 acquisition was controlled. The findings indicate that early learning of one vs. two languages predicts divergent patterns of cerebral language lateralisation in adulthood.

  4. Lateral Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral abdominal wall (LAW) defects can manifest as a flank hernias, myofascial laxity/bulges, or full-thickness defects. These defects are quite different from those in the anterior abdominal wall defects and the complexity and limited surgical options make repairing the LAW a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. LAW reconstruction requires an understanding of the anatomy, physiologic forces, and the impact of deinnervation injury to design and perform successful reconstructions of hernia, bulge, and full-thickness defects. Reconstructive strategies must be tailored to address the inguinal ligament, retroperitoneum, chest wall, and diaphragm. Operative technique must focus on stabilization of the LAW to nonyielding points of fixation at the anatomic borders of the LAW far beyond the musculofascial borders of the defect itself. Thus, hernias, bulges, and full-thickness defects are approached in a similar fashion. Mesh reinforcement is uniformly required in lateral abdominal wall reconstruction. Inlay mesh placement with overlying myofascial coverage is preferred as a first-line option as is the case in anterior abdominal wall reconstruction. However, interposition bridging repairs are often performed as the surrounding myofascial tissue precludes a dual layered closure. The decision to place bioprosthetic or prosthetic mesh depends on surgeon preference, patient comorbidities, and clinical factors of the repair. Regardless of mesh type, the overlying soft tissue must provide stable cutaneous coverage and obliteration of dead space. In cases where the fasciocutaneous flaps surrounding the defect are inadequate for closure, regional pedicled flaps or free flaps are recruited to achieve stable soft tissue coverage. PMID:23372458

  5. Volcano dome dynamics at Mount St. Helens: Deformation and intermittent subsidence monitored by seismicity and camera imagery pixel offsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzer, J. T.; Thelen, W. A.; James, M. R.; Walter, T. R.; Moran, S. C.; Denlinger, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    The morphology of a volcanic lava dome and its rate of change play key roles in the estimation of dome stability. While long term variations of dome morphology can be quantified using aerial remote sensing, changes over shorter time scales and smaller spatial scales are more difficult to determine. However, intermittent destabilization of the dome, in particular on flanks of the domes, can be significant. This study focuses on short term deformation associated with earthquakes and tremor at Mount St. Helens, observed over a 6 week period in the summer of 2006. We use Digital Image Correlation (DIC) to compute the displacement field between successive optical images acquired by multiple fixed cameras with clear views of the dome. The results of the these calculations are compared to the occurrence of seismic events. A systematic time-series DIC analysis of image pairs showed no sharp changes in the dome morphology during periods without seismic events. However, the results reveal that the steady dome growth at Mount St. Helens was interrupted by short term displacements reaching magnitudes on the order of a meter. These displacements are only observed in association with low frequency, large magnitude seismic events, followed by tremor with frequencies between 5 Hz and likely exceeding 30 Hz. For selected events that coincide with the timing of the acquisition of an accurate DEM of the crater floor, we reproject the displacement fields obtained from two cameras onto the topography. This enables 3D displacement vectors to be derived, showing that the co-seismic deformation is marked by subsidence of the dome in a segmented fashion, the central region displaying mainly vertical motion, while the displacements on the talus are more slope-parallel. The exact relationship between the recorded seismic energy and the observed deformation of the dome can not be resolved because the cameras were only sampling every 15 - 60 minutes. However, our analysis suggests that the

  6. Geologic and hydrologic summary of salt domes in Gulf Coast region of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R. Ernest; Eargle, Dolan H.; Davis, Beth O.

    1973-01-01

    There are 263 known or suspected onshore salt domes in the Texas-Louisiana-Mississippi-Alabama portion of the Gulf Coast geosyncline. The top of the salt in 148 of them is probably deeper than desirable for a waste repository site, and 79 of those that are shallow enough are probably unavailable for a site because of present use by industry for gas storage or production of oil, salt, or sulfur. In this report we have compiled the available geologic and hydrologic background data pertinent to the evaluation of the remaining 36 known or suspected salt domes as potential sites for waste storage. There are three parts to this compilations: 1) summaries of the geology and hydrology of the salt-dome province as a whole; 2) summaries of the physiography, climate, geology, and hydrology of each of the five salt-dome basins that occur within the province; and 3) an appendix of background data for each of the 36 potentially acceptable domes. The distribution of salt domes in the province is genetically related to areas of relative subsidence that formed basins or depocenters within the Gulf Coast geosyncline. In some cases, as in northeast Texas and south Louisiana, the locations of individual domes or groups of domes are related to deep movement of salt along axial trends. The salt domes in the interior salt-dome subprovince are probably more structurally stable than those of the coastal subprovince because salt diapirism is inferred to have ceased around Miocene time in the interior but may still be active in parts of the coastal subprovince. Although the size and shape of many domes is unknown or can only be roughly approximated, each of the five basins in the province appears to contain potentially acceptable domes of adequate size for a repository. We recognize no pattern to the distribution of salt-dome size. Caprock thicknesses vary greatly within each salt-dome basin,and we recognize no pattern to the variations. Among the potentially acceptable domes, the depths to

  7. Lava Dome Growth at Volcan de Fuego MEXICO (Colima Volcano), October 2001 to May 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Reyes-Davila, G. A.

    2002-12-01

    The Volcan de Fuego (19.512 N, 103.617 W) is located on the border between the States of Jalisco and Colima, Mexico, it is also known as Colima Volcano or Zapotl n Volcano, is a stratovolcano rising nearly 4000 m above sea level, and is the most active volcano in Mexico. Recent activity has been characterized by at least 3 different phases since January 1998 when seismic swarms began and ended with the extrusion of blocky lava in November 22, 1998 by the West vent as the 1991 eruptive process. That extrusive period lasted until the end of January, 1999 when was possible to observe a change in the seismic pattern, which mark the beginning of a new eruptive regime, an explosive one. On February 10, 1999 at approximately 0154 local time, 0754 gmt, an explosive event happens at the summit dome of Volc n de Fuego, four more big explosions took place at the summit the last one at dawn February 22, 2001. These explosions opened a new crater at the summit with a elliptical form with radius of 260 x 225 m and depth between 40 m and 15 m. A small dome structure inside the new crater was reported by March 2001. A reconnaissance flight in August 2001 shows two main features in the main crater an steep-sided mound(scoria cone) over the West vent and an inner crater on the NE vent. On October 31 Civil Defense members at Nevado Base on Nevado de Colima observed a neddle over the main crater rim, reconnaissance flight shows a spiny, 40 m high with a diameter of 20 m grows from the NE vent, the spiny seems to formed by material of the 1976 eruption. Continuous aerial observations allow us to follow the growth of a new dome pushing out the spiny. On November 23 the dimensions of the dome under the spiny were a radius of about 14 m and 21 m high for a total extrusion of 86,000 m3 which implies a extrusion rate of 0.027m3 /seg. By December the dome push out the spiny and began to grow from the NW vent. By December 29 an increase in the rate of extrusion was observed reaching a value

  8. Blowing off steam: Tuffisite formation as a regulator for lava dome eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; Varley, Nick; Wadsworth, Fabian; Lamb, Oliver; Vasseur, Jérémie

    2016-04-01

    Tuffisites are veins of variably sintered, pyroclastic particles that form in conduits and lava domes as a result of localized fragmentation events during gas-and-ash explosions. Those observed in-situ on the active 2012 lava dome of Volcán de Colima range from voids with intra-clasts showing little movement and interpreted to be failure-nuclei, to sub-parallel lenses of sintered granular aggregate interpreted as fragmentation horizons, through to infilled fractures with evidence of viscous remobilization. All tuffisites show evidence of sintering. Further examination of the complex fracture-and-channel patterns reveals viscous backfill by surrounding magma, suggesting that lava fragmentation was followed by stress relaxation and continued viscous deformation as the tuffisites formed. The natural tuffisites are more permeable than the host andesite, and have a wide range of porosity and permeability compared to a narrower window for the host rock, and gauging from their significant distribution across the dome, we posit that the tuffisite veins may act as important outgassing pathways. To investigate tuffisite formation we crushed and sieved andesite from the lava dome and sintered it at magmatic temperatures for different times. We then assessed the healing and sealing ability by measuring porosity and permeability, showing that sintering reduces both over time. During sintering the porosity-permeability reduction occurs due to the formation of viscous necks between adjacent grains, a process described by the neck-formation model of Frenkel (1945). This process leads the granular starting material to a porosity-permeability regime anticipated for effusive lavas, and which describes the natural host lava as well as the most impervious of natural tuffisites. This suggests that tuffisite formation at Volcán de Colima constructed a permeable network that enabled gas to bleed passively from the magma. We postulate that this progressively reduced the lava dome

  9. Tremors in the Bayou: The Events on the Napoleonville Salt Dome, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellsworth, W. L.; Horton, S.; Benz, H.; Hickman, S.; Leeds, A.; Leith, W. S.; Meremonte, M.; Rubinstein, J. L.; Withers, M. M.; Herrmann, R. B.

    2012-12-01

    Beginning in early June, 2012, an extended series of earth tremors were reported by residents of Bayou Corne in Assumption Parish, Louisiana, and at well control facilities on the nearby Napoleonville salt dome. The salt dome contains numerous caverns resulting from solution mining; some are used to store LPG and natural gas while others produce saltwater brine. Residents also reported natural gas bubbling at nearby locations in Bayou Corne and Grand Bayou. Some of the tremors were large enough to produce "cracks in sheet rock and foundations" (The Advocate, Baton Rouge, July 5, 2012). It was thus quite surprising to find that no earthquakes were detected in this region by either the USGS NEIC or the USArray Array Network Facility despite the presence of Transportable Array station 544A only 10 km from Bayou Corne. Careful inspection of the seismograms at 544A did reveal multiple events characterized by virtually no body wave energy and strong surface waves at the times of reported tremors. In response to a request for assistance from the State of Louisiana six temporary seismic stations with Trillium broad band sensors were deployed in the immediate epicentral region by the USGS and University of Memphis starting on July 12. Seismograms recorded by the temporary stations revealed a variable rate of tremor activity, with several hundred events registered on active days. Even at very close distance (S-P < 0.5 s) the body waves are weak and surface waves prominent, indicating a very shallow source depth. Precise location of the events is complicated by the presence of the high-seismic velocity and steep-sided Napoleonville salt dome that reaches to within 220 m of the surface and is overlain and surrounded by very low velocity sediments. Following several repositionings of the seismic network we have determined that the source region lies on the western edge of the salt dome top at very shallow depth and in the vicinity of an abandoned brine supply cavern. Tremor

  10. Lateral compartment cartilage changes and lateral elbow pain.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Aysha; Pooley, Joseph

    2009-02-01

    The aim of our study is to document the arthroscopic findings in resistant lateral elbow pain. We have reviewed the findings in a consecutive series of 117 elbow arthroscopies performed on patients with lateral elbow pain resistant to conservative treatment. We found established degenerative changes involving articular cartilage in 68 patients (59%). In 60 of these 68 patients (88%) the degenerative changes were confined to the lateral compartment and contrasted with a normal appearance of the articular cartilage of the medial compartment. Primary lateral compartment arthritis is more common than previously thought, it mostly affects a young population and could easily be misdiagnosed as lateral epicondylitis.

  11. Computational modeling of lava domes using particle dynamics to investigate the effect of conduit flow mechanics on flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Taha Murtuza

    Large (1--4 x 106 m3) to major (> 4 x 106 m3) dome collapses for andesitic lava domes such as Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat are observed for elevated magma discharge rates (6--13 m3/s). The gas rich magma pulses lead to pressure build up in the lava dome that result in structural failure of the over steepened canyon-like walls which may lead to rockfall or pyroclastic flow. This indicates that dome collapse intimately related to magma extrusion rate. Variation in magma extrusion rate for open-system magma chambers is observed to follow alternating periods of high and low activity. Periodic behavior of magma exhibits a rich diversity in the nature of its eruptive history due to variation in magma chamber size, total crystal content, linear crystal growth rate and magma replenishment rate. Distinguished patterns of growth were observed at different magma flow rates ranging from endogenous to exogenous dome growth for magma with varying strengths. Determining the key parameters that control the transition in flow pattern of the magma during its lava dome building eruption is the main focus. This dissertation examines the mechanical effects on the morphology of the evolving lava dome on the extrusion of magma from a central vent using a 2D particle dynamics model. The particle dynamics model is coupled with a conduit flow model that incorporates the kinetics of crystallization and rheological stiffening to investigate important mechanisms during lava dome building eruptions. Chapter I of this dissertation explores lava dome growth and failure mechanics using a two-dimensional particle-dynamics model. The model follows the evolution of fractured lava, with solidification driven by degassing induced crystallization of magma. The particle-dynamics model emulates the natural development of dome growth and rearrangement of the lava dome which is difficult in mesh-based analyses due to mesh entanglement effects. The deformable talus evolves naturally as a frictional

  12. Reflexive Planning for Later Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Margaret A.; Kemp, Candace L.; French, Susan; Gafni, Amiram; Joshi, Anju; Rosenthal, Carolyn J.; Davies, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    Informed by Giddens' (1991) concept of "reflexive life" planning and the notion of later life as a time of increasing social and financial risk, this research explores the idea of "reflexive planning for later life". We utilize a conceptual model that incorporates three types of planning for later life: public protection, self-insurance, and…

  13. Pressure-driven dome-shaped superconductivity and electronic structural evolution in tungsten ditelluride.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xing-Chen; Chen, Xuliang; Liu, Huimei; Feng, Yanqing; Wei, Zhongxia; Zhou, Yonghui; Chi, Zhenhua; Pi, Li; Yen, Fei; Song, Fengqi; Wan, Xiangang; Yang, Zhaorong; Wang, Baigeng; Wang, Guanghou; Zhang, Yuheng

    2015-07-23

    Tungsten ditelluride has attracted intense research interest due to the recent discovery of its large unsaturated magnetoresistance up to 60 T. Motivated by the presence of a small, sensitive Fermi surface of 5d electronic orbitals, we boost the electronic properties by applying a high pressure, and introduce superconductivity successfully. Superconductivity sharply appears at a pressure of 2.5 GPa, rapidly reaching a maximum critical temperature (Tc) of 7 K at around 16.8 GPa, followed by a monotonic decrease in Tc with increasing pressure, thereby exhibiting the typical dome-shaped superconducting phase. From theoretical calculations, we interpret the low-pressure region of the superconducting dome to an enrichment of the density of states at the Fermi level and attribute the high-pressure decrease in Tc to possible structural instability. Thus, tungsten ditelluride may provide a new platform for our understanding of superconductivity phenomena in transition metal dichalcogenides.

  14. Analysis Methodologies and Ameliorative Techniques for Mitigation of the Risk in Churches with Drum Domes

    SciTech Connect

    Zingone, Gaetano; Licata, Vincenzo; Calogero, Cucchiara

    2008-07-08

    The present work fits into the interesting theme of seismic prevention for protection of the monumental patrimony made up of churches with drum domes. Specifically, with respect to a church in the historic area of Catania, chosen as a monument exemplifying the typology examined, the seismic behavior is analyzed in the linear field using modern dynamic identification techniques. The dynamically identified computational model arrived at made it possible to identify the macro-element most at risk, the dome-drum system. With respect to this system the behavior in the nonlinear field is analyzed through dynamic tests on large-scale models in the presence of various types of improving reinforcement. The results are used to appraise the ameliorative contribution afforded by each of them and to choose the most suitable type of reinforcement, optimizing the stiffness/ductility ratio of the system.

  15. Study on acoustic resonance and its damping of BWR steam dome

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsuka, Masaya; Fujimoto, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Shirou; Hirokawa, Fumihito; Tsubaki, Masaaki

    2006-07-01

    Acoustic resonance characteristics in a BWR steam dome are investigated analytically and experimentally to evaluate the acoustic vibration of a steam dryer. Acoustic modes and frequencies of the ABWR, which represents the BWRs in this study, are calculated by the SYSNOISE code. The lowest mode (32 Hz) is a half stand wave anti-symmetric mode to the center line of the steam dome at normal condition. Acoustic pressure distributions and phases on the steam dryer surface are analyzed for evaluating the vibration driving force of the structure. Acrylic 1/11 scale model tests are performed to verify the acoustic analysis and to develop the acoustic damping system. The experimental frequencies and modes agree with analysis ones for low frequencies. Experimentally, the acoustic pressure amplitude is significantly lowered using the Helmholtz resonators after tuning up the acoustic resonant frequency of the resonator to the acoustic resonant frequency of the main system. (authors)

  16. Seafloor doming driven by degassing processes unveils sprouting volcanism in coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passaro, Salvatore; Tamburrino, Stella; Vallefuoco, Mattia; Tassi, Franco; Vaselli, Orlando; Giannini, Luciano; Chiodini, Giovanni; Caliro, Stefano; Sacchi, Marco; Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Ventura, Guido

    2016-03-01

    We report evidences of active seabed doming and gas discharge few kilometers offshore from the Naples harbor (Italy). Pockmarks, mounds, and craters characterize the seabed. These morphologies represent the top of shallow crustal structures including pagodas, faults and folds affecting the present-day seabed. They record upraise, pressurization, and release of He and CO2 from mantle melts and decarbonation reactions of crustal rocks. These gases are likely similar to those that feed the hydrothermal systems of the Ischia, Campi Flegrei and Somma-Vesuvius active volcanoes, suggesting the occurrence of a mantle source variously mixed to crustal fluids beneath the Gulf of Naples. The seafloor swelling and breaching by gas upraising and pressurization processes require overpressures in the order of 2-3 MPa. Seabed doming, faulting, and gas discharge are manifestations of non-volcanic unrests potentially preluding submarine eruptions and/or hydrothermal explosions.

  17. Seafloor doming driven by degassing processes unveils sprouting volcanism in coastal areas.

    PubMed

    Passaro, Salvatore; Tamburrino, Stella; Vallefuoco, Mattia; Tassi, Franco; Vaselli, Orlando; Giannini, Luciano; Chiodini, Giovanni; Caliro, Stefano; Sacchi, Marco; Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Ventura, Guido

    2016-03-01

    We report evidences of active seabed doming and gas discharge few kilometers offshore from the Naples harbor (Italy). Pockmarks, mounds, and craters characterize the seabed. These morphologies represent the top of shallow crustal structures including pagodas, faults and folds affecting the present-day seabed. They record upraise, pressurization, and release of He and CO2 from mantle melts and decarbonation reactions of crustal rocks. These gases are likely similar to those that feed the hydrothermal systems of the Ischia, Campi Flegrei and Somma-Vesuvius active volcanoes, suggesting the occurrence of a mantle source variously mixed to crustal fluids beneath the Gulf of Naples. The seafloor swelling and breaching by gas upraising and pressurization processes require overpressures in the order of 2-3 MPa. Seabed doming, faulting, and gas discharge are manifestations of non-volcanic unrests potentially preluding submarine eruptions and/or hydrothermal explosions.

  18. Geology and geochemistry of Summitville, Colorado: an epithermal acid sulfate deposit in a volcanic dome

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, J.E.; Coolbaugh, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    Geologic studies during recent open-pit mining at Summitville, Colorado, have provided new information on an epithermal acid sulfate Au-Ag-Cu deposit formed in a volcanic dome. Geologic mapping, geochemical studies of whole-rock samples from blast holes, and geologic and geochemical traverse studies refine the details of the evolution of the Summitville deposit. Six distinct events followed emplacement of the quartz latite volcanic dome and define the development of the Summitville deposit: 1) an early stage of acid sulfate alteration, 2) subsequent Cu sulfide and gold mineralization, 3) widespread hydrothermal brecciation, 4) volumetrically minor, base metal sulfide-bearing barite veining, 5) volumetrically minor, kaolinite matrix brecciation, and finally, 6) supergene oxidation. -from Authors

  19. Pressure-driven dome-shaped superconductivity and electronic structural evolution in tungsten ditelluride

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xing-Chen; Chen, Xuliang; Liu, Huimei; Feng, Yanqing; Wei, Zhongxia; Zhou, Yonghui; Chi, Zhenhua; Pi, Li; Yen, Fei; Song, Fengqi; Wan, Xiangang; Yang, Zhaorong; Wang, Baigeng; Wang, Guanghou; Zhang, Yuheng

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten ditelluride has attracted intense research interest due to the recent discovery of its large unsaturated magnetoresistance up to 60 T. Motivated by the presence of a small, sensitive Fermi surface of 5d electronic orbitals, we boost the electronic properties by applying a high pressure, and introduce superconductivity successfully. Superconductivity sharply appears at a pressure of 2.5 GPa, rapidly reaching a maximum critical temperature (Tc) of 7 K at around 16.8 GPa, followed by a monotonic decrease in Tc with increasing pressure, thereby exhibiting the typical dome-shaped superconducting phase. From theoretical calculations, we interpret the low-pressure region of the superconducting dome to an enrichment of the density of states at the Fermi level and attribute the high-pressure decrease in Tc to possible structural instability. Thus, tungsten ditelluride may provide a new platform for our understanding of superconductivity phenomena in transition metal dichalcogenides. PMID:26203922

  20. Localization of electrons in dome-shaped GeSi/Si islands

    SciTech Connect

    Yakimov, A. I.; Kirienko, V. V.; Bloshkin, A. A.; Armbrister, V. A.; Kuchinskaya, P. A.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.

    2015-01-19

    We report on intraband photocurrent spectroscopy of dome-shaped GeSi islands embedded in a Si matrix with n{sup +}-type bottom and top Si layers. An in-plane polarized photoresponse in the 85–160 meV energy region has been observed and ascribed to the optical excitation of electrons from states confined in the strained Si near the dome apexes to the continuum states of unstrained Si. The electron confinement is caused by a modification of the conduction band alignment induced by inhomogeneous tensile strain in Si around the buried GeSi quantum dots. Sensitivity of the device to the normal incidence radiation proves a zero-dimensional nature of confined electronic wave functions.

  1. Measurements and numerical simulation of fabric evolution along the Talos Dome ice core, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnat, M.; Buiron, D.; Arnaud, L.; Broquet, A.; Schlitz, P.; Jacob, R.; Kipfstuhl, S.

    2012-12-01

    We present measurements of fabrics and microstructures made along the Talos Dome ice core, a core drilled in East Antarctica in the framework of the TALDICE project. Fabric and average grain size data are analyzed regarding changes in climatic conditions. In particular, the fabric strength increases sharply going downward from Holocene to Wisconsin ice. Following (Durand et al., 2007), this change is associated with a positive feedback between variations in ice viscosity, due to variations in dust content, and the impact of a shear stress component, increasing with depth. A ViscoPlastic Self-Consistent modeling approach is used to simulate the fabric evolution for a "perfect dome" configuration. The discrepancies between the measured and the simulated fabrics highlight the depth ranges where shear strongly affects the fabric strengthening. Finally, the grain size and fabric analyses show the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization mechanisms (continuous and discontinuous) along the core.

  2. Seafloor doming driven by degassing processes unveils sprouting volcanism in coastal areas.

    PubMed

    Passaro, Salvatore; Tamburrino, Stella; Vallefuoco, Mattia; Tassi, Franco; Vaselli, Orlando; Giannini, Luciano; Chiodini, Giovanni; Caliro, Stefano; Sacchi, Marco; Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Ventura, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We report evidences of active seabed doming and gas discharge few kilometers offshore from the Naples harbor (Italy). Pockmarks, mounds, and craters characterize the seabed. These morphologies represent the top of shallow crustal structures including pagodas, faults and folds affecting the present-day seabed. They record upraise, pressurization, and release of He and CO2 from mantle melts and decarbonation reactions of crustal rocks. These gases are likely similar to those that feed the hydrothermal systems of the Ischia, Campi Flegrei and Somma-Vesuvius active volcanoes, suggesting the occurrence of a mantle source variously mixed to crustal fluids beneath the Gulf of Naples. The seafloor swelling and breaching by gas upraising and pressurization processes require overpressures in the order of 2-3 MPa. Seabed doming, faulting, and gas discharge are manifestations of non-volcanic unrests potentially preluding submarine eruptions and/or hydrothermal explosions. PMID:26925957

  3. Geometric and Optic Characterization of a Hemispherical Dome Port for Underwater Photogrammetry

    PubMed Central

    Menna, Fabio; Nocerino, Erica; Fassi, Francesco; Remondino, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The popularity of automatic photogrammetric techniques has promoted many experiments in underwater scenarios leading to quite impressive visual results, even by non-experts. Despite these achievements, a deep understanding of camera and lens behaviors as well as optical phenomena involved in underwater operations is fundamental to better plan field campaigns and anticipate the achievable results. The paper presents a geometric investigation of a consumer grade underwater camera housing, manufactured by NiMAR and equipped with a 7′′ dome port. After a review of flat and dome ports, the work analyzes, using simulations and real experiments, the main optical phenomena involved when operating a camera underwater. Specific aspects which deal with photogrammetric acquisitions are considered with some tests in laboratory and in a swimming pool. Results and considerations are shown and commented. PMID:26729133

  4. Fluid inclusions in salt from the Rayburn and Vacherie domes, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, Edwin; Belkin, H.E.

    1979-01-01

    Core samples from the Rayburn and Vacherie salt domes in Louisiana were examined for fluid inclusions, in connection with the possible use of such domes for nuclear waste storage sites. Three types of fluid inclusions were found, brine, compressed gas, and oil (in decreasing volume percent abundance). The total amount of such fluids is small, certainly < 0.1 vol. % and probably in the range 0.01 to 0.001 volume %, but the inclusions are highly erratic in distribution. Unlike many bedded salt deposits, the brine inclusions in this salt contain fluids that are not far from simple NaCl-H2O solutions, with very little of other ions. One of three possible explanations for such fluids is that fresh water penetrated the salt at some unknown time in the past and was trapped; if such entry of fresh water has occurred in the past, it might also occur again in the future.

  5. Seafloor doming driven by degassing processes unveils sprouting volcanism in coastal areas

    PubMed Central

    Passaro, Salvatore; Tamburrino, Stella; Vallefuoco, Mattia; Tassi, Franco; Vaselli, Orlando; Giannini, Luciano; Chiodini, Giovanni; Caliro, Stefano; Sacchi, Marco; Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Ventura, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We report evidences of active seabed doming and gas discharge few kilometers offshore from the Naples harbor (Italy). Pockmarks, mounds, and craters characterize the seabed. These morphologies represent the top of shallow crustal structures including pagodas, faults and folds affecting the present-day seabed. They record upraise, pressurization, and release of He and CO2 from mantle melts and decarbonation reactions of crustal rocks. These gases are likely similar to those that feed the hydrothermal systems of the Ischia, Campi Flegrei and Somma-Vesuvius active volcanoes, suggesting the occurrence of a mantle source variously mixed to crustal fluids beneath the Gulf of Naples. The seafloor swelling and breaching by gas upraising and pressurization processes require overpressures in the order of 2–3 MPa. Seabed doming, faulting, and gas discharge are manifestations of non-volcanic unrests potentially preluding submarine eruptions and/or hydrothermal explosions. PMID:26925957

  6. Limit Load and Buckling Analysis for Assessing Hanford Single-Shell Tank Dome Structural Integrity - 12278

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Ken I.; Deibler, John E.; Karri, Naveen K.; Pilli, Siva P.; Julyk, Larry J.

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection has commissioned a structural analysis of record for the Hanford single shell tanks to assess their structural integrity. The analysis used finite element techniques to predict the tank response to the historical thermal and operating loads. The analysis also addressed the potential tank response to a postulated design basis earthquake. The combined response to static and seismic loads was then evaluated against the design requirements of American Concrete Institute standard, ACI-349-06, for nuclear safety-related concrete structures. Further analysis was conducted to estimate the plastic limit load and the elastic-plastic buckling capacity of the tanks. The limit load and buckling analyses estimate the margin between the applied loads and the limiting load capacities of the tank structure. The potential for additional dome loads from waste retrieval equipment and the addition of large dome penetrations to accommodate retrieval equipment has generated additional interest in the limit load and buckling analyses. This paper summarizes the structural analysis methods that were used to evaluate the limit load and buckling of the single shell tanks. This paper summarizes the structural analysis methods that were used to evaluate the limit load and buckling limit states of the underground single shell tanks at the Hanford site. The limit loads were calculated using nonlinear finite element models that capture the progressive deformation and damage to the concrete as it approaches the limit load. Both uniform and concentrated loads over the tank dome were considered, and the analysis shows how adding a penetration in the center of the tank would affect the limit loads. For uniform surface loads, the penetration does not affect the limit load because concrete crushing and rebar yielding initiates first at the top of the wall, away from the penetration. For concentrated loads, crushing initiates at the center of the

  7. Geometric and Optic Characterization of a Hemispherical Dome Port for Underwater Photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Menna, Fabio; Nocerino, Erica; Fassi, Francesco; Remondino, Fabio

    2016-01-02

    The popularity of automatic photogrammetric techniques has promoted many experiments in underwater scenarios leading to quite impressive visual results, even by non-experts. Despite these achievements, a deep understanding of camera and lens behaviors as well as optical phenomena involved in underwater operations is fundamental to better plan field campaigns and anticipate the achievable results. The paper presents a geometric investigation of a consumer grade underwater camera housing, manufactured by NiMAR and equipped with a 7'' dome port. After a review of flat and dome ports, the work analyzes, using simulations and real experiments, the main optical phenomena involved when operating a camera underwater. Specific aspects which deal with photogrammetric acquisitions are considered with some tests in laboratory and in a swimming pool. Results and considerations are shown and commented.

  8. Compactional deformation bands in Wingate Sandstone; additional evidence of an impact origin for Upheaval Dome, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Chris H.; Schultz, Richard A.

    2007-04-01

    Field and microstructural observations from Upheaval Dome, in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, show that inelastic strain of the Wingate Sandstone is localized along compactional deformation bands. These bands are tabular discontinuities (< 0.5 cm thick) that accommodate inelastic shear and compaction of inter-granular volume. Measurements of porosity and grain size from non-deformed samples are used to define a set of capped strength envelopes for the Wingate Sandstone. These strength envelopes reveal that compactional deformation bands require at least ca. 0.7 GPa (and potentially more than 2.3 GPa) of effective mean stress in order to nucleate within this sandstone. We find that the most plausible geologic process capable of generating these required magnitudes of mean stress is a meteoritic impact. Therefore the compactional deformation bands observed within the Wingate Sandstone are additional evidence of an impact event at Upheaval Dome and support a post-Wingate (post-Early Jurassic) age for this impact.

  9. Metal-insulator quantum critical point beneath the high Tc superconducting dome

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Suchitra E.; Harrison, N.; Altarawneh, M. M.; Mielke, C. H.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D. A.; Lonzarich, G. G.; Hardy, W. N.

    2010-01-01

    An enduring question in correlated systems concerns whether superconductivity is favored at a quantum critical point (QCP) characterized by a divergent quasiparticle effective mass. Despite such a scenario being widely postulated in high Tc cuprates and invoked to explain non-Fermi liquid transport signatures, experimental evidence is lacking for a critical divergence under the superconducting dome. We use ultrastrong magnetic fields to measure quantum oscillations in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x, revealing a dramatic doping-dependent upturn in quasiparticle effective mass at a critical metal-insulator transition beneath the superconducting dome. Given the location of this QCP under a plateau in Tc in addition to a postulated QCP at optimal doping, we discuss the intriguing possibility of two intersecting superconducting subdomes, each centered at a critical Fermi surface instability. PMID:20304800

  10. DomeTree: a canonical toolkit for mitochondrial DNA analyses in domesticated animals.

    PubMed

    Peng, Min-Sheng; Fan, Long; Shi, Ni-Ni; Ning, Tiao; Yao, Yong-Gang; Murphy, Robert W; Wang, Wen-Zhi; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is widely used in various genetic studies of domesticated animals. Many applications require comprehensive knowledge about the phylogeny of mtDNA variants. Herein, we provide the most up-to-date mtDNA phylogeny (i.e. haplogroup tree or matrilineal genealogy) and a standardized hierarchical haplogroup nomenclature system for domesticated cattle, dogs, goats, horses, pigs, sheep, yaks and chickens. These high-resolution mtDNA haplogroup trees based on 1240 complete or near-complete mtDNA genome sequences are available in open resource DomeTree (http://www.dometree.org). In addition, we offer the software MitoToolPy (http://www.mitotool.org/mp.html) to facilitate the mtDNA data analyses. We will continuously and regularly update DomeTree and MitoToolPy. PMID:25655564

  11. Quasi-static rock mechanics data for rocksalt from three Strategic Petroleum Reserve domes

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.H.; Wawersik, W.R.; Hannum, D.W.; Zirzow, J.A.

    1981-12-01

    Triaxial compression and extension experiments have been run on rocksalt samples from three Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) domes. Seventeen quasi-static tests were loaded at mean stress rates of .66 to 1.04 psi/sec (4.5 to 7.2 kPa/sec), confining pressures of 14.5 to 2000 psi (0.1 to 13.8 MPa) and temperatures of 22 to 100/sup 0/C. Eleven of the test specimens were from Bryan Mound, Texas, and three each were from Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana, and West Hackberry, Louisiana. In general, the resulting mechanical data from the three domes are similar, and they are consistent with previously published data. Ultimate sample strengths are directly related to confining pressure (least principal stress) and indirectly related to temperature, while ductility increases with both pressure and temperature.

  12. Joint influences of aerodynamic flow field and aerodynamic heating of the dome on imaging quality degradation of airborne optical systems.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Haosu; Zuo, Baojun; Tian, Yi; Zhang, Wang; Hao, Chenglong; Liu, Chaofeng; Li, Qi; Li, Fan; Zhang, Li; Fan, Zhigang

    2012-12-20

    We investigated the joint influences exerted by the nonuniform aerodynamic flow field surrounding the optical dome and the aerodynamic heating of the dome on imaging quality degradation of an airborne optical system. The Spalart-Allmaras model provided by FLUENT was used for flow computations. The fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm based ray tracing program was used to simulate optical transmission through the aerodynamic flow field and the dome. Four kinds of imaging quality evaluation parameters were presented: wave aberration of the exit pupil, point spread function, encircled energy, and modulation transfer function. The results show that the aero-optical disturbance of the aerodynamic flow field and the aerodynamic heating of the dome significantly affect the imaging quality of an airborne optical system.

  13. Base of fresh ground water, northern Louisiana Salt-Dome Basin and vicinity, northern Louisiana and southern Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryals, G.N.

    1980-01-01

    The National Waste Terminal Storage Program is an effort by the U.S. Department of Energy to locate and develop sites for disposal or storage of commercially produced radioactive wastes. As part of this program, salt domes in the northern Louisiana salt-dome basin are being studied to determine their suitability as repositories. Part of the U.S. Geological Survey 's participation in the program has been to describe the regional geohydrology of the northern Louisiana salt-dome basin. A map based on a compilation of published data and the interpretation of electrical logs shows the altitude of the base of freshwater in aquifers in the northern Louisiana salt-dome basin. (USGS)

  14. Constraints on the magnitude and rate of CO2 dissolution at Bravo Dome natural gas field.

    PubMed

    Sathaye, Kiran J; Hesse, Marc A; Cassidy, Martin; Stockli, Daniel F

    2014-10-28

    The injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) captured at large point sources into deep saline aquifers can significantly reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions from fossil fuels. Dissolution of the injected CO2 into the formation brine is a trapping mechanism that helps to ensure the long-term security of geological CO2 storage. We use thermochronology to estimate the timing of CO2 emplacement at Bravo Dome, a large natural CO2 field at a depth of 700 m in New Mexico. Together with estimates of the total mass loss from the field we present, to our knowledge, the first constraints on the magnitude, mechanisms, and rates of CO2 dissolution on millennial timescales. Apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology records heating of the Bravo Dome reservoir due to the emplacement of hot volcanic gases 1.2-1.5 Ma. The CO2 accumulation is therefore significantly older than previous estimates of 10 ka, which demonstrates that safe long-term geological CO2 storage is possible. Integrating geophysical and geochemical data, we estimate that 1.3 Gt CO2 are currently stored at Bravo Dome, but that only 22% of the emplaced CO2 has dissolved into the brine over 1.2 My. Roughly 40% of the dissolution occurred during the emplacement. The CO2 dissolved after emplacement exceeds the amount expected from diffusion and provides field evidence for convective dissolution with a rate of 0.1 g/(m(2)y). The similarity between Bravo Dome and major US saline aquifers suggests that significant amounts of CO2 are likely to dissolve during injection at US storage sites, but that convective dissolution is unlikely to trap all injected CO2 on the 10-ky timescale typically considered for storage projects.

  15. Interaction of mid-latitude air masses with the polar dome area during RACEPAC and NETCARE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozem, Heiko; Hoor, Peter; Koellner, Franziska; Kunkel, Daniel; Schneider, Johannes; Schulz, Christiane; Herber, Andreas; Borrmann, Stephan; Wendisch, Manfred; Ehrlich, Andre; Leaitch, Richard; Willis, Megan; Burkart, Julia; Thomas, Jennie; Abbatt, Jon

    2016-04-01

    We present aircraft based trace gas measurements in the Arctic during RACEPAC (2014) and NETCARE (2014 and 2015) with the Polar 6 aircraft of Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) covering an area from 134°W to 17°W and 68°N to 83°N. We focus on cloud, aerosol and general transport processes of polluted air masses into the high Arctic. Based on CO and CO2 measurements and kinematic 10-day back trajectories as well as Flexpart particle dispersion modeling we analyze the transport regimes of mid-latitude air masses traveling to the high Arctic prevalent during spring (RACEPAC 2014, NETCARE 2015) and summer (NETCARE 2014). In general more northern parts of the high Arctic (Lat > 75°N) were relatively unaffected from mid-latitude air masses. In contrast, regions further south are influenced by air masses from Asia and Russia (eastern part of Canadian Arctic and European Arctic) as well as from North America (central and western parts of Canadian Arctic). The transition between the mostly isolated high Arctic and more southern regions indicated by tracer gradients is remarkably sharp. This allows for a chemical definition of the Polar dome based on the variability of CO and CO2 as a marker. Isentropic surfaces that slope from the surface to higher altitudes in the high Arctic form the polar dome that represents a transport barrier for mid-latitude air masses to enter the lower troposphere in the high Arctic. Synoptic-scale weather systems frequently disturb this transport barrier and foster the exchange between air masses from the mid-latitudes and polar regions. This can finally lead to enhanced pollution levels in the lower polar troposphere. Mid-latitude pollution plumes from biomass burning or flaring entering the polar dome area lead to an enhancement of 30% of the observed CO mixing ratio within the polar dome area.

  16. Temporal Evolution of Magma Flow Conditions during Dome Growth, Insights from Numerical Modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, L. A. C.; Collombet, M.; Pinel, V.

    2015-12-01

    Transitions from effusive to explosive regime at andesitic volcanoes are almost unpredictable at the moment. The reliability of empirical methods based on geophysical precursory patterns is still debated. A better understanding of the physical processes happening in the volcanic system before explosions and associated geophysical signals is needed. At andesitic volcanoes, dome building is often observed during the effusive phase. The weight of a forming dome is expected to have several effects: 1) It obviously induces a ground subsidence in the near field; 2) pressure increase at the top of the conduit causes magma properties and flow conditions evolution; 3) it increases pressure in the surrounding rock such decreasing rock permeability and thus gas loss through the conduit walls, possibly leading to gas pressurisation. Here we use numerical models that couple realistic magma flow conditions in the upper conduit with solid deformation, in 2D axisymmetry, to investigate all these effects. Subsiding effect due to the dome emplacement is simulated by a pressure loading of the rock surrounding the conduit. From realistic initial magma flow conditions in effusive regime (Collombet, 2009), we apply increasing pressure at the conduit top. Volatile solubility increases with pressure, then dome growth causes a decrease of magma porosity and permeability at the top of the conduit. This also causes a decrease of magma viscosity. From magma flow model, we extract pressure and shear stress conditions at the conduit wall, and apply them to the surrounding rock for ground deformation calculation . Darcy flow model is used to study the impacts of permeability decrease inside the conduit and in the surrounding rock on gas loss cinematics. Permeability decrease in the conduit and pressure increase in the surrounding rock cause gas pressurisation.

  17. Explosive destruction of a Pliocene hot lava dome underwater: Dogashima (Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutzeler, Martin; McPhie, Jocelyn; Allen, Sharon R.

    2015-10-01

    Transition from effusive to explosive volcanism is common during subaerial eruptions, and here we demonstrate that this behavior is also possible underwater. The pyroclastic facies produced underwater are distinctive and can be used to distinguish subaqueous from subaerial eruptions and depositional settings. The Pliocene Dogashima Formation (Izu Peninsula, Japan) is a pumice-rich succession originally deposited in an open-marine, below wave-base setting (Jutzeler et al., 2014a). A thick, clast-supported, gray andesite breccia composed of very coarse, dense andesite clasts with quenched margins was sourced from disintegration of an active lava dome. Overall, the gray andesite breccia is gradationally to sharply overlain by thick, graded, clast-supported white pumice breccia chiefly composed of angular pumice clasts and free broken crystals. Regional setting and distinctive facies show that this succession was produced by a fully underwater, magmatic volatile-driven, pumice-forming explosive eruption. The gradational contact between the two breccias, compositional similarities, rare mingled clasts, and fluidal textures in the gray andesite clasts suggest that the explosive eruption destroyed a hot lava dome and generated an eruption-fed, high-concentration density current. In most places, the coarsest hot lava dome fragments were deposited first, followed by the lower density white pumice clasts. The low amount of fine (< 2 mm) components, well-developed hydraulically controlled grading and sorting, clast angularity, and very coarse dome-derived clasts, some including well-defined quenched margins and common fluidal textures, distinguish the products of subaqueous effusive-to-explosive eruptions from their subaerial counterparts.

  18. Importance of maintaining the basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome during acetabular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Pei, Fuxing; Shen, Bin; Kang, Pengde; Li, Zongming

    2016-01-01

    The basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome is important for the maintenance of implant stability in press-fit acetabular reconstruction of total hip arthroplasty. However, information on the basic stress pathway and its impact factors remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of the orientations and positions of the acetabular component on the basic stress pathway. The basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome was defined as two parts: 3D basic trabecular bone stress distribution and quantified basic cortical bone stress level, using two subject-specific finite element normal hip models. The effects were then analysed by generating 32 reconstructed acetabular cases with different cup abduction and anteversion angles within a range of 35-50° and 10-25°, respectively, and 12 cases with different hip centre heights within a range of 0-15 mm above the acetabular dome. The 3D trabecular stress distribution decreased remarkably in all cases, while the 80% of the basic cortical bone stress level was maintained in cases when the acetabular component was positioned at 10° or 15° anteversion and 40° or 45° abduction angles. The basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome was disturbed when the superior displacement of the hip centre exceeded 5 mm above the anatomical hip centre. Positioning the acetabular component correctly contributes to maintain the stress balance between the acetabular cup and the bone during acetabular reconstruction, thus helping restore the normal hip biomechanics and preserve the stability of the implants.

  19. Gold anomalies and magnetometer profile data, Ester Dome area, Fairbanks district, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, D.L.; Forbes, Robert B.; Hawkins, D.B.

    1969-01-01

    Gold analysis of grab and auger samples of bedrock taken along the new Ester Dome Road reveals that this road cuts several mineralized zones characterized by anomalous concentrations of gold. The results of a magnetometer traverse along this road indicate that the negative magnetic anomalies along the traverse may be correlative with the gold anomalies. The presence of previously unreported gold anomalies indicates that additional prospecting may be warranted.

  20. Investigation of Seismic Events associated with the Sinkhole at Napoleonville Salt Dome, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, A.; Dreger, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    This study describes the ongoing efforts in analysis of the intense sequence of complex seismic events associated with the formation of a large sinkhole at Napoleonville Salt Dome, Assumption Parish, Louisiana in August 2012. Point source centroid seismic moment tensor (MT) inversion of these events using data from a temporary network of broadband stations established by the United States Geological Survey had previously revealed large volume-increase components. We investigate the effect of 3D velocity structure of the salt dome on wave propagation in the frequency range of interest (0.1-0.3 Hz) by forward modeling synthetic waveforms using MT solutions that were computed using Green's functions assuming two separate 1D velocity models for stations over the salt dome and stations on the sedimentary strata surrounding the salt dome separately. We also use a matched filter technique to detect smaller events that went undetected by the automated grid-search based scanning and MT inversion algorithm using the waveforms of the larger events as templates. We also analyze the change in spectral content of the events, many of which exhibit a spectral peak at 0.4 Hz with a duration of > 60 seconds. The decrease in spectral amplitudes with distance also gives an estimate of high anelastic attenuation that damps reverberations within the shallow low velocity layers. Finally, we use noise cross-correlation analysis to explore changes in the green's functions during the development of the sinkhole and verify the sediment velocity model by comparing observed and synthetic surface wave dispersion.

  1. Dome Fuji Station in East Antarctica and the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE) commenced on the occasion of International Geophysical Year in 1957-1958. Syowa Station, the primary station for JARE operations, is located along the northeastern coastal region of Lützow-Holm Bay, East Antarctica (69° 00'S, 39° 35'E), and was opened on 29 January 1957. Since then, JARE have been carrying out research in various fields of earth and planetary sciences and life science. Astronomical science, however, has not been popular in Antarctica. In 1995, JARE established a new inland station, Dome Fuji Station (77° 19'S, 39° 42'E), which, at 3,810 m a.s.l., is located on one of major domes of the Antarctic ice sheet, some 1,000 km south of Syowa. The climatic conditions at Dome Fuji are harsh, with an annual average air temperature of -54°C, and a recorded minimum of -79°C. In 2007, JARE completed scientific drilling to obtain ice core samples of the Antarctic ice sheet reaching 3,050 m in depth. These ice cores record environmental conditions of the earth extending back some 720,000 B.P. In recent years, it is widely known that the high-altitude environment of inland Antarctica is suitable for astronomical observations and the Japanese astronomy community identified Dome Fuji Station as a potential candidate for a future astronomical observatory. In this article, the history of Japanese Antarctic activities are described in terms of access to the inland plateau of the Antarctic continent. The general scheme and future plans of science objectives and logistics of JARE will also be introduced.

  2. The Fulldome Curriculum for the Spitz SciDome Digital Planetarium: Volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradstreet, David H.; Sanders, S. J.; Huggins, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Spitz Fulldome Curriculum (FDC) for the SciDome digital planetarium ushered in a new and innovative way to present astronomical pedagogy via its use of the unique teaching attributes of the digital planetarium. In the case of the FDC, which uses the ubiquitous Starry Night planetarium software as its driving engine, these engaging and novel teaching techniques have also been made usable to desktop computers and flat-screen video projectors for classroom use. Volume 2 of the FDC introduces exciting new classes and mini-lessons to further enlighten and invigorate students as they struggle with often difficult three dimensional astronomical concepts. Additionally, other topics with related astronomical ties have been created to integrate history into planetarium presentations. One of the strongest advantages of the SciDome is its use of Starry Night as its astronomical engine. With it students can create their own astronomical configurations in the computer lab or at home, using the PC or Mac version. They can then simply load their creations onto the SciDome planetarium system and display them for their classmates on the dome. This poster will discuss and illustrate some of the new content that has been developed for Volume 2. Topics covered in Volume 2 include eclipses, plotting planet locations on a curtate orbit chart by observing their positions in the sky, time and timekeeping (including sidereal day, hour angles, sidereal time, LAST, LMST, time zones and the International Date Line), teaching to the Boy Scout Merit Badge requirements, plotting scale analemmas on the surface of planets and interpreting them, precession, astronomical events in revolutionary Boston, the Lincoln Almanac Trial, eclipsing binaries, lunar librations, a trip through the universe, watching the speed of light move in real time, stellar sizes and the Milky Way.

  3. Volcán de Colima dome collapse of July, 2015 and associated pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Dávila, Gabriel A.; Arámbula-Mendoza, Raúl; Espinasa-Pereña, Ramón; Pankhurst, Matthew J.; Navarro-Ochoa, Carlos; Savov, Ivan; Vargas-Bracamontes, Dulce M.; Cortés-Cortés, Abel; Gutiérrez-Martínez, Carlos; Valdés-González, Carlos; Domínguez-Reyes, Tonatiuh; González-Amezcua, Miguel; Martínez-Fierros, Alejandro; Ramírez-Vázquez, Carlos Ariel; Cárdenas-González, Lucio; Castañeda-Bastida, Elizabeth; Vázquez Espinoza de los Monteros, Diana M.; Nieto-Torres, Amiel; Campion, Robin; Courtois, Loic; Lee, Peter D.

    2016-06-01

    During July 10th-11th 2015, Volcán de Colima, Mexico, underwent its most intense eruptive phase since its Subplinian-Plinian 1913 AD eruption. Production of scoria coincident with elevated fumarolic activity and SO2 flux indicate a significant switch of upper-conduit dynamics compared with the preceding decades of dome building and vulcanian explosions. A marked increase in rockfall events and degassing activity was observed on the 8th and 9th of July. On the 10th at 20:16 h (Local time = UTM - 6 h) a partial collapse of the dome generated a series of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) that lasted 52 min and reached 9.1 km to the south of the volcano. The PDCs were mostly channelized by the Montegrande and San Antonio ravines, and produced a deposit with an estimated volume of 2.4 × 106 m3. Nearly 16 h after the first collapse, a second and larger collapse occurred which lasted 1 h 47 min. This second collapse produced a series of PDCs along the same ravines, reaching a distance of 10.3 km. The total volume calculated for the PDCs of the second event is 8.0 × 106 m3. Including associated ashfall deposits, the two episodes produced a total of 14.2 × 106 m3 of fragmentary material. The collapses formed an amphitheater-shaped crater open towards the south. We propose that the dome collapse was triggered by arrival of gas-rich magma to the upper conduit, which then boiled-over and sustained the PDCs. A juvenile scoria sample selected from the second partial dome collapse contains hornblende, yet at an order of magnitude less abundant (0.2%) than that of 1913, and exhibits reaction rims, whereas the 1913 hornblende is unreacted. At present there is no compelling petrologic evidence for imminent end-cycle activity observed at Volcán de Colima.

  4. A Virtual Environment System for the Comparison of Dome and HMD Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jian; Harm, Deboran L.; Loftin, R. Bowen; Lin, Ching-yao; Leiss, Ernst L.

    2002-01-01

    For effective astronaut training applications, choosing the right display devices to present images is crucial. In order to assess what devices are appropriate, it is important to design a successful virtual environment for a comparison study of the display devices. We present a comprehensive system for the comparison of Dome and head-mounted display (HMD) systems. In particular, we address interactions techniques and playback environments.

  5. Constraints on the magnitude and rate of CO2 dissolution at Bravo Dome natural gas field.

    PubMed

    Sathaye, Kiran J; Hesse, Marc A; Cassidy, Martin; Stockli, Daniel F

    2014-10-28

    The injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) captured at large point sources into deep saline aquifers can significantly reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions from fossil fuels. Dissolution of the injected CO2 into the formation brine is a trapping mechanism that helps to ensure the long-term security of geological CO2 storage. We use thermochronology to estimate the timing of CO2 emplacement at Bravo Dome, a large natural CO2 field at a depth of 700 m in New Mexico. Together with estimates of the total mass loss from the field we present, to our knowledge, the first constraints on the magnitude, mechanisms, and rates of CO2 dissolution on millennial timescales. Apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology records heating of the Bravo Dome reservoir due to the emplacement of hot volcanic gases 1.2-1.5 Ma. The CO2 accumulation is therefore significantly older than previous estimates of 10 ka, which demonstrates that safe long-term geological CO2 storage is possible. Integrating geophysical and geochemical data, we estimate that 1.3 Gt CO2 are currently stored at Bravo Dome, but that only 22% of the emplaced CO2 has dissolved into the brine over 1.2 My. Roughly 40% of the dissolution occurred during the emplacement. The CO2 dissolved after emplacement exceeds the amount expected from diffusion and provides field evidence for convective dissolution with a rate of 0.1 g/(m(2)y). The similarity between Bravo Dome and major US saline aquifers suggests that significant amounts of CO2 are likely to dissolve during injection at US storage sites, but that convective dissolution is unlikely to trap all injected CO2 on the 10-ky timescale typically considered for storage projects. PMID:25313084

  6. Constraints on the magnitude and rate of CO2 dissolution at Bravo Dome natural gas field

    PubMed Central

    Sathaye, Kiran J.; Hesse, Marc A.; Cassidy, Martin; Stockli, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    The injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) captured at large point sources into deep saline aquifers can significantly reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions from fossil fuels. Dissolution of the injected CO2 into the formation brine is a trapping mechanism that helps to ensure the long-term security of geological CO2 storage. We use thermochronology to estimate the timing of CO2 emplacement at Bravo Dome, a large natural CO2 field at a depth of 700 m in New Mexico. Together with estimates of the total mass loss from the field we present, to our knowledge, the first constraints on the magnitude, mechanisms, and rates of CO2 dissolution on millennial timescales. Apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology records heating of the Bravo Dome reservoir due to the emplacement of hot volcanic gases 1.2–1.5 Ma. The CO2 accumulation is therefore significantly older than previous estimates of 10 ka, which demonstrates that safe long-term geological CO2 storage is possible. Integrating geophysical and geochemical data, we estimate that 1.3 Gt CO2 are currently stored at Bravo Dome, but that only 22% of the emplaced CO2 has dissolved into the brine over 1.2 My. Roughly 40% of the dissolution occurred during the emplacement. The CO2 dissolved after emplacement exceeds the amount expected from diffusion and provides field evidence for convective dissolution with a rate of 0.1 g/(m2y). The similarity between Bravo Dome and major US saline aquifers suggests that significant amounts of CO2 are likely to dissolve during injection at US storage sites, but that convective dissolution is unlikely to trap all injected CO2 on the 10-ky timescale typically considered for storage projects. PMID:25313084

  7. Traversing Microphone Track Installed in NASA Lewis' Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory Dome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, Steven W.; Perusek, Gail P.

    1999-01-01

    The Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory is an acoustically treated, 65-ft-tall dome located at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Inside this laboratory is the Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig (NATR), which is used in support of Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) and High Speed Research (HSR) to test engine exhaust nozzles for thrust and acoustic performance under simulated takeoff conditions. Acoustic measurements had been gathered by a far-field array of microphones located along the dome wall and 10-ft above the floor. Recently, it became desirable to collect acoustic data for engine certifications (as specified by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)) that would simulate the noise of an aircraft taking off as heard from an offset ground location. Since nozzles for the High-Speed Civil Transport have straight sides that cause their noise signature to vary radially, an additional plane of acoustic measurement was required. Desired was an arched array of 24 microphones, equally spaced from the nozzle and each other, in a 25 off-vertical plane. The various research requirements made this a challenging task. The microphones needed to be aimed at the nozzle accurately and held firmly in place during testing, but it was also essential that they be easily and routinely lowered to the floor for calibration and servicing. Once serviced, the microphones would have to be returned to their previous location near the ceiling. In addition, there could be no structure could between the microphones and the nozzle, and any structure near the microphones would have to be designed to minimize noise reflections. After many concepts were considered, a single arched truss structure was selected that would be permanently affixed to the dome ceiling and to one end of the dome floor.

  8. Distal orogenic effects on peripheral bulge sedimentation: Middle and Upper Ordovician of the Nashville Dome

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, S.M.; Patzkowsky, M.E.

    1997-03-01

    A major switch in depositional style in the Ordovician carbonates of the Nashville Dome corresponds closely with the onset of the late Middle Ordovician Taconic orogeny. This time marks a shift from tropical-type to temperate-type carbonates, the initiation of widespread major phosphate deposition, the introduction of large amounts of terrigenous silt and clay, the occurrence of widespread seismically induced soft-sediment deformation, and a change from a low-energy flat-topped carbonate shelf to a high-energy doubly dipping carbonate ramp. Soft-sediment deformation and the introduction of siliciclastics are direct effects of the Taconic orogeny; the switch from tropical-type to temperate-type carbonates, the initiation of phosphate deposition, and the switch in carbonate ramp are largely oceanographic effects triggered by the orogeny. In particular, phosphate deposition and the switch to temperate-type limestones appears to have been driven by upwelling along the eastern side of the Nashville Dome within the newly deepened Taconic foreland basin. A fourfold decrease in the rate of relative sea-level rise occurred on the Nashville Dome nearly 3 m.y. following the onset of thrusting and foreland basin initiation. Subsidence rates were constant before and after this decrease, and no evidence of a change in subsidence rates is seen to coincide with the onset of thrusting. The slowing of subsidence may reflect viscoelastic uplift of the Nashville Dome, but the abrupt change from one constant subsidence rate to another is not predicted by existing foreland basin models.

  9. Depositional patterns and structural styles-Hackberry Salt Dome, Cameron Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.A.; Sharpe, C.L.; Gillham, T.H.; Wright, D.N.

    1994-12-31

    The West and East Hackberry fields of north-central Cameron Parish, Louisiana, are associated with a large southeast-plunging salt ridge. Episodes of salt movement influenced the depositional patterns and reservoir trap styles of the Oligocene- and Miocene-age sedimentary section. The Oligocene lower Hackberry channels were influenced by the salt structure, resulting in the Manchester-Holmwood channel system flanking the east and south sides of the salt dome and the Choupique channel system flanking the west side of the salt dome. The depositional patterns and structural bed dips of the younger Oligocene Camerina A to marginulina section demonstrate a major period of salt movement and erosion. The resulting truncation of the Camerian A sandstones, sealed by overlying shales, provides the dominant trap style for the majority of the reservoirs. This same general period of salt movement influenced the orientation of the Oligocene Marginulina to Miogypsinoides expansion fault system to the east. The Sweet Lake salt dome, down through to this expansion system, probably represents a southeast extension of this ancestral salt ridge.

  10. Early Miocene granitoids from the Leo Pargil gneiss dome, northwest Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassett, W.; Leech, M. L.

    2007-12-01

    The Leo Pargil gneiss dome is comprised of upper amphibolite-facies metasedimentary rocks of the lower Tethyan Himalayan sequence (known as the Haimantas Group), that are intruded by numerous small granitoid bodies and leucogranite dikes. The dome is located in northern India/southwestern Tibet at the junction of the Sutlej and Spiti rivers, west of the Zada basin. U-Pb SHRIMP dating of zircon yield concordant ages ranging from Late Archean to Late Proterozoic for paragneisses (2.6 Ga to 970 Ma) corresponding to the Haimantas group, and Early Oligocene to Middle Miocene ages for granitoid intrusions (33 Ma to 15 Ma). Concordant analyses and lower intercept ages from Tera-Wasserburg concordia plots range from 28.1-17.2 Ma. Late Oligocene to Early Miocene ages are from zircon domains with consistently high U contents (1500 to over 25000 ppm). Linear regression of age vs. U content scatter plots show a trend toward younger ages (22-20 Ma) corresponding to ages from zircon with lower U contents (1000-3000 ppm) and that is consistent with lower intercept ages. These Early Miocene ages for Leo Pargil granitoids correspond to the ages for the widespread leucogranite bodies exposed throughout the Himalaya and granites from the North Himalayan gneiss domes further east.

  11. An application of time-reversed acoustics to the imaging of a salt-dome flank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. E.; Lu, R.; Campman, X.; Toksöz, N.; Zhang, Y.; de Hoop, M. V.

    2005-12-01

    We present results of applying the concept of time-reversed acoustics (TRA) to the imaging of a salt-dome flank in a v(z) medium. A simulated multi-level walk-away VSP survey with sources at the surface and receivers in the borehole can be sorted into an equivalent reverse VSP (RVSP) with effective downhole sources and surface receivers. We apply the TRA process to the RVSP traces and create a zero offset seismic section as if it had been collected from collocated downhole sources and receivers. This procedure effectively redatums the wavefield from the surface to the borehole, eliminating the need for any complicated processing. The redatummed traces are created by summing the autocorrelations of the traces in the RVSP common shot gather. Theory says that each shot gather should be from receivers which completely surround the source. From practical considerations, we only have available the RVSP common receivers on the earth's surface, so we obtain an approximate zero offset section. Even with this restriction, our example shows that the results are encouraging. The image of the salt dome flank is created from the redatummed traces using a standard post-stack depth migration algorithm. This image compares favorably with the salt dome flank model.

  12. Instability signature for detecting snap-through buckling of dome structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guirong; Duan, Qiuhua; Hua, Xugang

    2016-04-01

    Dome structures have been built as roofs for venues where many people convene. Failure of this type of structure may jeopardize the safety of hundreds or even thousands people. For this type of structure, snap-through buckling may occur in a local area and gradually expand to the entire structure, leading to a failure of the overall structure. Although numerous structural health monitoring techniques and damage detection approaches have been developed, no research on the detection of a snap-through buckling has been reported. The objective of this study is to find a signature that is sensitive to snap-through buckling in dome structures and can be used to detect snap-through buckling. Considering that a snap-through buckling results in a significant deformation in a local area, which can be reflected by the change in tilting angles of members in that local area, the change in tilting angles of members will be proposed to be a signature to detect snap-through buckling. To verify the proposed instability signature, a reticulated dome structure will be investigated. Both an eigenvalue buckling analysis and a nonlinear buckling analysis will be conducted. The significant changes in tilting angles of members in the buckled regions have demonstrated the efficacy of the proposed instability signature. This research will bridge the research gap between structural health monitoring and structural stability research.

  13. A new approach for salt dome detection using a 3D multidirectional edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asjad, Amin; Mohamed, Deriche

    2015-09-01

    Accurate salt dome detection from 3D seismic data is crucial to different seismic data analysis applications. We present a new edge based approach for salt dome detection in migrated 3D seismic data. The proposed algorithm overcomes the drawbacks of existing edge-based techniques which only consider edges in the x (crossline) and y (inline) directions in 2D data and the x (crossline), y (inline), and z (time) directions in 3D data. The algorithm works by combining 3D gradient maps computed along diagonal directions and those computed in x, y, and z directions to accurately detect the boundaries of salt regions. The combination of x, y, and z directions and diagonal edges ensures that the proposed algorithm works well even if the dips along the salt boundary are represented only by weak reflectors. Contrary to other edge and texture based salt dome detection techniques, the proposed algorithm is independent of the amplitude variations in seismic data. We tested the proposed algorithm on the publicly available Netherlands offshore F3 block. The results suggest that the proposed algorithm can detect salt bodies with high accuracy than existing gradient based and texture-based techniques when used separately. More importantly, the proposed approach is shown to be computationally efficient allowing for real time implementation and deployment.

  14. Deep Radiostratigraphy of the East Antarctic Plateau: Connecting the Dome C and Vostok Ice Core Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavitte, Marie G. P.; Blankenship, Donald D.; Young, Duncan A.; Schroeder, Dustin M.; Parrenin, Frederic; Lemeur, Emmanuel; Macgregor, Joseph A.; Siegert, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Several airborne radar-sounding surveys are used to trace internal reflections around the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica Dome C and Vostok ice core sites. Thirteen reflections, spanning the last two glacial cycles, are traced within 200 km of Dome C, a promising region for million-year-old ice, using the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics High-Capacity Radar Sounder. This provides a dated stratigraphy to 2318 m depth at Dome C. Reflection age uncertainties are calculated from the radar range precision and signal-to-noise ratio of the internal reflections. The radar stratigraphy matches well with the Multichannel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder (MCoRDS) radar stratigraphy obtained independently. We show that radar sounding enables the extension of ice core ages through the ice sheet with an additional radar-related age uncertainty of approximately 1/3-1/2 that of the ice cores. Reflections are extended along the Byrd-Totten Glacier divide, using University of Texas/Technical University of Denmark and MCoRDS surveys. However, core-to-core connection is impeded by pervasive aeolian terranes, and Lake Vostok's influence on reflection geometry. Poor radar connection of the two ice cores is attributed to these effects and suboptimal survey design in affected areas. We demonstrate that, while ice sheet internal radar reflections are generally isochronal and can be mapped over large distances, careful survey planning is necessary to extend ice core chronologies to distant regions of the East Antarctic ice sheet.

  15. The unique radar scattering properties of silicic lava flows and domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jeffrey J.; Stofan, Ellen R.; Anderson, Steven W.; Crown, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Silicic (silica-rich) lava flows, such as rhyolite, rhyodacite, and dacite, possess unique physical properties primarily because of the relatively high viscosity of the molten lava. Silicic flows tend to be thicker than basaltic flows, and the resulting large-scale morphology is typically a steep-sided dome or flow lobe, with aspect ratios (height/length) sometimes approaching unity. The upper surfaces of silicic domes and flows are normally emplaced as relatively cool, brittle slabs that fracture as they are extruded from the central vent areas, and are then rafted away toward the flow margin as a brittle carapace above a more ductile interior layer. This mode of emplacement results in a surface with unique roughness characteristics, which can be well-characterized by multiparameter synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations. In this paper, we examine the scattering properties of several silicic domes in the Inyo volcanic chain in the Eastern Sierra of California, using AIRSAR and TOPSAR data. Field measurements of intermediate-scale (cm to tens of m) surface topography and block size are used to assess the mechanisms of the scattering process, and to quantify the unique roughness characteristics of the flow surfaces.

  16. Friction-Stir-Welded and Spin-Formed End Domes for Cryogenic Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, S. J.; Tayon, W. A.; Domack, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Manufacturing of single-piece end domes for cryogenic tanks employing spin forming of tailored, friction-stir-welded blanks of Al-Li alloy 2195 plate offers cost and reliability benefits. The introduction of plastic deformation into a friction stir weld is a unique feature of the proposed manufacturing route. This investigation addressed abnormal grain growth [AGG] within the friction stir weldments during postfabrication processing of a prototype dome. The phenomenon of AGG was observed during the solution heat treatment [SHT] phase of T8 tempering and is a major concern for meeting specifications. Such abrupt microstructural transitions can be detrimental to notch-sensitive mechanical properties, such as ductility and/or fracture toughness. If the issue of AGG cannot be resolved, then the acceptance of this approach as a viable manufacturing route may be in jeopardy. The innovative approach adopted in this investigation was the insertion of a stand-alone, Intermediate Annealing Treatment [IAT] between the spin forming and T8 processing operations. A simple, recovery annealing step was deemed to be the most readily-scalable solution when fabricating thin-walled, ellipsoidal domes. The research effort culminated in the development of an effective IAT, which resulted in a significant decrease in AGG following SHT. The processing philosophy adopted in designing the IAT is outlined and the microstructural reasons for success are discussed. The analytical results presented are consistent with promoting continuous grain growth during the IAT, thereby suppressing AGG during the SHT.

  17. Preliminary geological and geophysical evaluation of the Castle Dome HDR geothermal prospect, Southwestern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Gutmann, J.T.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Ander, M.E.; Laney, R.T.

    1980-01-01

    The Castle Dome HDR geothermal prospect is located in Yuma County, Arizona, in a region centered about 80 km north of Yuma along US Rte. 95. The area of interest is broadly defined by a negative residual Bouguer gravity anomaly which is about 45 km across, steep-sided in many places, and as much as 30 mgals in magnitude. The geology of this Basin and Range area is poorly known, but the few published reports and current Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) field studies indicate that the Castle Dome Mountains and adjacent ranges are chiefly a thick pile of welded ash-flow tuffs of probable mid-Tertiary age. The tuffs rest unconformably on Mesozoic metasedimentary rocks exposed only outside steep edges of the gravity low. This gravity anomaly may reflect the presence of a large caldera. A regional magnetotelluric study now in progress will define the depths to electrical conductors within the crust and upper mantle and contribute to understanding of crustal structure, the gravity anomaly, and the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal potential of the Castle Dome area.

  18. Central pit and dome craters - Exposing the interiors of Ganymede and Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, Paul M.

    1993-01-01

    Central pit craters on Ganymede and Callisto are an unusual crater class, perhaps related to the unusual properties of water ice. The domes and pits form rapidly, on the time scale of the impact itself, rather than by long-term, post-impact intrusion or extrusion. The bright domes in pit craters are most simply explained as the uplift and exposure of relatively ice-rich material from depths of approximately 3.5 to 5 km during impact. The unusual pit morphology on icy satellites may be the result of impact into crust that is mechanically much weaker at shallow depth than on rocky bodies such as the moon. Because crater morphology is strongly dependent on ice-rock composition, the similarity of pit and dome dimensions on Ganymede and Callisto indicates that the structure and rheology of the crusts of these bodies are very similar, and have been for several billion years. Pit crater morphology indicates that the crusts of both satellites are probably ice-rich and differentiated.

  19. The Laschamp geomagnetic excursion featured in nitrate record from EPICA-Dome C ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traversi, R.; Becagli, S.; Poluianov, S.; Severi, M.; Solanki, S. K.; Usoskin, I. G.; Udisti, R.

    2016-01-01

    Here we present the first direct comparison of cosmogenic 10Be and chemical species in the period of 38-45.5 kyr BP spanning the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion from the EPICA-Dome C ice core. A principal component analysis (PCA) allowed to group different components as a function of the main sources, transport and deposition processes affecting the atmospheric aerosol at Dome C. Moreover, a wavelet analysis highlighted the high coherence and in-phase relationship between 10Be and nitrate at this time. The evident preferential association of 10Be with nitrate rather than with other chemical species was ascribed to the presence of a distinct source, here labelled as “cosmogenic”. Both the PCA and wavelet analyses ruled out a significant role of calcium in driving the 10Be and nitrate relationship, which is particularly relevant for a plateau site such as Dome C, especially in the glacial period during which the Laschamp excursion took place. The evidence that the nitrate record from the EDC ice core is able to capture the Laschamp event hints toward the possibility of using this marker for studying galactic cosmic ray flux variations and thus also major geomagnetic field excursions at pluri-centennial-millennial time scales, thus opening up new perspectives in paleoclimatic studies.

  20. The Laschamp geomagnetic excursion featured in nitrate record from EPICA-Dome C ice core.

    PubMed

    Traversi, R; Becagli, S; Poluianov, S; Severi, M; Solanki, S K; Usoskin, I G; Udisti, R

    2016-01-01

    Here we present the first direct comparison of cosmogenic (10)Be and chemical species in the period of 38-45.5 kyr BP spanning the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion from the EPICA-Dome C ice core. A principal component analysis (PCA) allowed to group different components as a function of the main sources, transport and deposition processes affecting the atmospheric aerosol at Dome C. Moreover, a wavelet analysis highlighted the high coherence and in-phase relationship between (10)Be and nitrate at this time. The evident preferential association of (10)Be with nitrate rather than with other chemical species was ascribed to the presence of a distinct source, here labelled as "cosmogenic". Both the PCA and wavelet analyses ruled out a significant role of calcium in driving the (10)Be and nitrate relationship, which is particularly relevant for a plateau site such as Dome C, especially in the glacial period during which the Laschamp excursion took place. The evidence that the nitrate record from the EDC ice core is able to capture the Laschamp event hints toward the possibility of using this marker for studying galactic cosmic ray flux variations and thus also major geomagnetic field excursions at pluri-centennial-millennial time scales, thus opening up new perspectives in paleoclimatic studies. PMID:26819064

  1. Calculation of Thermally-Induced Displacements in Spherically Domed Ion Engine Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    2006-01-01

    An analytical method for predicting the thermally-induced normal and tangential displacements of spherically domed ion optics grids under an axisymmetric thermal loading is presented. A fixed edge support that could be thermally expanded is used for this analysis. Equations for the displacements both normal and tangential to the surface of the spherical shell are derived. A simplified equation for the displacement at the center of the spherical dome is also derived. The effects of plate perforation on displacements and stresses are determined by modeling the perforated plate as an equivalent solid plate with modified, or effective, material properties. Analytical model results are compared to the results from a finite element model. For the solid shell, comparisons showed that the analytical model produces results that closely match the finite element model results. The simplified equation for the normal displacement of the spherical dome center is also found to accurately predict this displacement. For the perforated shells, the analytical solution and simplified equation produce accurate results for materials with low thermal expansion coefficients.

  2. Central pit and dome craters - Exposing the interiors of Ganymede and Callisto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, P. M.

    1993-04-01

    Central pit craters on Ganymede and Callisto are an unusual crater class, perhaps related to the unusual properties of water ice. The domes and pits form rapidly, on the time scale of the impact itself, rather than by long-term, post-impact intrusion or extrusion. The bright domes in pit craters are most simply explained as the uplift and exposure of relatively ice-rich material from depths of approximately 3.5 to 5 km during impact. The unusual pit morphology on icy satellites may be the result of impact into crust that is mechanically much weaker at shallow depth than on rocky bodies such as the moon. Because crater morphology is strongly dependent on ice-rock composition, the similarity of pit and dome dimensions on Ganymede and Callisto indicates that the structure and rheology of the crusts of these bodies are very similar, and have been for several billion years. Pit crater morphology indicates that the crusts of both satellites are probably ice-rich and differentiated.

  3. The Laschamp geomagnetic excursion featured in nitrate record from EPICA-Dome C ice core

    PubMed Central

    Traversi, R.; Becagli, S.; Poluianov, S.; Severi, M.; Solanki, S. K.; Usoskin, I. G.; Udisti, R.

    2016-01-01

    Here we present the first direct comparison of cosmogenic 10Be and chemical species in the period of 38–45.5 kyr BP spanning the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion from the EPICA-Dome C ice core. A principal component analysis (PCA) allowed to group different components as a function of the main sources, transport and deposition processes affecting the atmospheric aerosol at Dome C. Moreover, a wavelet analysis highlighted the high coherence and in-phase relationship between 10Be and nitrate at this time. The evident preferential association of 10Be with nitrate rather than with other chemical species was ascribed to the presence of a distinct source, here labelled as “cosmogenic”. Both the PCA and wavelet analyses ruled out a significant role of calcium in driving the 10Be and nitrate relationship, which is particularly relevant for a plateau site such as Dome C, especially in the glacial period during which the Laschamp excursion took place. The evidence that the nitrate record from the EDC ice core is able to capture the Laschamp event hints toward the possibility of using this marker for studying galactic cosmic ray flux variations and thus also major geomagnetic field excursions at pluri-centennial-millennial time scales, thus opening up new perspectives in paleoclimatic studies. PMID:26819064

  4. Is there 1 million-year old ice near Dome C, Antarctica?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrenin, Frédéric; Blankenship, Donald D.; Cavitte, Marie G. P.; Chappellaz, Jérôme; Fischer, Hubertus; Gagliardini, Olivier; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Passalacqua, Olivier; Ritz, Catherine; Siegert, Martin J.; Young, Duncan

    2015-04-01

    Ice sheets provide exceptional archives of past changes in polar climate, regional environment and global atmospheric composition. The oldest deep ice drilled in Antarctica has been retrieved at EPICA Dome C (Antarctica), reaching 800,000 years. Retrieving an older paleoclimatic record from Antarctica is one of the biggest challenges of the ice core community. Here, we use a combination of internal layers identified with airborne radar and ice-flow modeling to estimate the age of basal ice along two transects across the Dome C summit. Based on the age of the bottom ic eat EDC, we find a geothermal heat flux of 66.8 mW/m2. Assuming the same geothermal heat flux all along both transects, we identify a region located only ~40 km from the dome on a bedrock relilef where the estimated basal melting is small or inexistant. As a result, basal age is estimated to be >1,500,000 years. However, this oldest ice hot spot disappears if the geothermal heat flux is only 5 mW/m2 higher than at EDC. Our work also demonstrates the utility of combining radar layering with ice flow modelling to accurately represent the true nature of ice flow in the center of large ice sheets.

  5. ALON optical ceramic transparencies for window, dome, and transparent armor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Lee M.; Twedt, Rich; Balasubramanian, Sreeram; Sastri, Suri

    2011-06-01

    Surmet continues to invest in and expand its manufacturing capability for ALON® Optical Ceramic, as the market demand for this material increases. The biggest demand and opportunity continues to be in the area of transparent armor, however, the market for sensor domes and windows, made from ALON, continues to grow at an impressive rate as well. ALON® Transparent Armor's unsurpassed ballistic performance, combined with the robustness of ALON's manufacturing process and reproducibly high material quality make ALON the leading candidate for many future armor systems. Recent results for ALON armor windows will be presented. Advances being made in Surmet's production capability to support the very large quantities of material required by the transparent armor market also benefit the sensor market. Improvements in quality, quantity and manufacturability of ALON material, combined with improvements being made in optical quality, ensure a robust supply of high quality material for high volume window and dome applications. Recent advancement in ALON® window and dome blanks, as well as in optical fabrication will be presented.

  6. Cooling rate and thermal structure determined from progressive magnetization of the Dacite Dome at Mount St. Helens, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Denlinger, Roger P.; Rosenbaum, Joseph G.

    1990-03-01

    Our study of a magnetic anomaly associated with the recently active dacite dome at Mount St. Helens suggests that the dome consists of a hot, nonmagnetized core surrounded by a cool, magnetized carapace and flanking talus. The talus does not contribute to the anomaly because its constituent blocks are randomly oriented. Temporal changes in the magnetic anomaly indicate that the magnetized carapace thickened at an average rate of 0.03±0.01 m/d from 1984 to 1986. Petrographic and rock magnetic properties of dome samples indicate that the dominant process responsible for these changes is magnetization of extensively oxidized rock at progressively deeper levels within the dome as the rock cools through its blocking temperature, rather than subsequent changes in magnetization caused by further oxidation. Newly extruded material cools rapidly for a short period as heat is conducted outward in response to convective heat loss from its surface. The cooling rate gradually declines for several weeks, and thereafter the material cools at a relatively constant rate by convective heat loss from its interior along fractures that propagate inward. The rate of internal convective heat loss through fractures varies with rainfall, snowmelt, and large-scale fracturing during subsequent eruptive episodes. In accordance with a model for solidification of the 1959 lava lake at Kilauea Iki, Hawaii, we picture the dome's magnetized carapace as being a two-phase, porous, convective zone separated from the nonmagnetized core of the dome by a thin, single-phase conductive zone. As a consequence of the heat balance between the conductive and convective zones, the blocking-temperature isotherm migrates inward at a relatively constant rate. If the dome remains inactive, the time scale for its complete magnetization is estimated to be 18-36 years, a forecast which can be refined by shallow drilling into the dome and by continuing studies of its growing magnetic anomaly.

  7. An experimental study on Sokkuram Cave Temple dome's indoor environment using a miniature model in winter season

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, S.H.; Chung, K.S.; Park, J.S.; Shin, I.S.; Han, H.T.

    1999-07-01

    Currently, there are many researches on the analysis of indoor environment in Sokkuram Cave Temple. However, there is not enough researches about an experimental study on the dome's indoor environment in Sokkuram Cave Temple using a miniature model. The purpose of this investigation is to measure and analyze characteristics of indoor environment such as relative humidity, dry bulb temperature and air velocity in the miniature model of Sokkuram Cave dome during winter season.

  8. Diamond heteroepitaxial lateral overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yung-Hsiu

    This dissertation describes improvements in the growth of single crystal diamond by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Heteroepitaxial (001) diamond was grown on 1 cm. 2 a-plane sapphiresubstrates using an epitaxial (001) Ir thin-film as a buffer layer. Low-energy ion bombardment of the Ir layer, a process known as bias-enhanced nucleation, is a key step in achieving a high density of diamond nuclei. Bias conditions were optimized to form uniformly-high nucleation densities across the substrates, which led to well-coalesced diamond thin films after short growth times. Epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) was used as a means of decreasing diamond internal stress by impeding the propagation of threading dislocations into the growing material. Its use in diamond growth requires adaptation to the aggressive chemical and thermal environment of the hydrogen plasma in a CVD reactor. Three ELO variants were developed. The most successful utilized a gold (Au) mask prepared by vacuum evaporation onto the surface of a thin heteroepitaxial diamond layer. The Au mask pattern, a series of parallel stripes on the micrometer scale, was produced by standard lift-off photolithography. When diamond overgrows the mask, dislocations are largely confined to the substrate. Differing degrees of confinement were studied by varying the stripe geometry and orientation. Significant improvement in diamond quality was found in the overgrown regions, as evidenced by reduction of the Raman scattering linewidth. The Au layer was found to remain intact during diamond overgrowth and did not chemically bond with the diamond surface. Besides impeding the propagation of threading dislocations, it was discovered that the thermally-induced stress in the CVD diamond was significantly reduced as a result of the ductile Au layer. Cracking and delamination of the diamond from the substrate was mostly eliminated. When diamond was grown to thicknesses above 0.1 mm it was found that

  9. Where is the Best Site on Earth? Domes A, B, C, and F, and Ridges A and B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suanders, Will; Lawrence, Jon S.; Storey, John W. V.; Ashley, Michael C. B.; Kato, Seiji; Minnis, Patrick; Winker, David M.; Liu, Guiping; Kulesa, Craig

    2009-01-01

    The Antarctic plateau contains the best sites on earth for many forms of astronomy, but none of the existing bases were selected with astronomy as the primary motivation. In this paper, we try to systematically compare the merits of potential observatory sites. We include South Pole, Domes A, C and F, and also Ridge B (running NE from Dome A), and what we call Ridge A (running SW from Dome A). Our analysis combines satellite data, published results and atmospheric models, to compare the boundary layer, weather, free atmosphere, sky brightness, pecipitable water vapour, and surface temperature at each site. We find that all Antarctic sites are likely compromised for optical work by airglow and aurorae. Of the sites with existing bases, Dome A is the best overall; but we find that Ridge A offers an even better site. We also find that Dome F is a remarkably good site. Dome C is less good as a thermal infrared or terahertz site, but would be able to take advantage of a predicted OH hole over Antarctica during Spring.

  10. Quaternary subrosion and transformation of Stassfurt potash seam (Zechstein 2) at top of Gorleben salt dome, Federal Republic of Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Bornemann, O.; Fischbeck, R.

    1989-03-01

    The Gorleben salt dome is located in the eastern part of Lower Saxony in northern Germany. The dome consists of salt layers of cycles 2, 3, and 4 (z2-z4) of the Zechstein. Above-ground studies have been conducted since 1979 to determine whether the Gorleben salt dome is suited for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste. During the Elster glacial stage, the Gorleben salt dome was covered by up to 1000 m-thick ice. The meltwater eroded up to 300-m deep runoff channels into the rock beneath the glacier. One of these Quaternary channels runs across the salt dome; locally, the channel cuts the cap rock down to the rock salt. The Stassfurt potash seam cuts across at the bottom of this channel under Quaternary sediments. Between 90 and 170 m below the top of the salt dome, the potash seam was encountered in different stages of transformation. The sequence from bottom to top was as follows: unchanged carnallitic rock, followed by a zone of kainitic rock, ending with a potash-free halitic rock containing clastic material from the overlying sediments. Diagenesis of the clastic Elsterian sediments interbedded in the rock salt blocked further migration of solutions into the potash seam. No evidence has been found for further subrosion of the potash seam since the Elsterian (i.e., the last 300,000 years).

  11. A new application of a finite element heat and mass transfer numerical modeling code (FEHM) to heat and fluid circulation in lava domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. L.; Stauffer, P. H.; Calder, E. S.

    2012-12-01

    Lava domes have been well-characterized in terms of their surface structure and activity, but there is much to be learned about their internal structure and geothermal systems. Even when a lava dome is no longer actively erupting, subsurface studies are often difficult to conduct; lava domes are highly complex structures, but their rugged nature often precludes systematic drilling and/or geophysical surveys. Because of this, we know little about the internal geothermal activity that may still contribute to both hazards and opportunities for exploitation of mineral deposits and hot groundwater. Despite the difficulty of studying the interior of lava domes directly, numerical modeling can still provide insights into the behavior of their geothermal systems. Lava domes have the potential to be highly transmissive structures, and the presence of hot springs in the vicinity of lava domes (Santiaguito in Guatemala, La Soufriere on Guadeloupe) suggests that water circulation may be an important process in post-eruptive dome evolution. FEHM, a heat and mass transfer modeling code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (fehm.lanl.gov) is an ideal tool to study fluid and gas circulation in geologic structures. FEHM was developed for subsurface reservoir modeling (originally for the Hot Dry Rock geothermal project) and is capable of dealing with both high- (magmatic) and low-temperature fluids. In this study, FEHM has been used in combination with a LANL-developed grid-generating utility (LaGriT) to create an idealized model of water circulation in a saturated lava dome. Multiple material regions are used to represent the dome core, outer talus layer, conduit, and volcanic substrate. Material properties (such as permeability, porosity, density, etc.) were chosen from a combination of literature review and sensitivity testing using a simplified dome geometry and a continuum modeling approach that accounts for fractures (Equivalent Porous Medium) was used when applying

  12. Cosmetic Lateral Canthoplasty: Preserving the Lateral Canthal Angle

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu Ho; Choi, Hong Lim; Jeong, Eui Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Cosmetic lateral canthoplasty, in which the size of the eye is increased by extending the palpebral fissure and decreasing the degree of the eye slant, has become a prevalent procedure for East Asians. However, it is not uncommon for there to be complications or unfavorable results after the surgery. With this in mind, the authors have designed a surgical method to reduce complications in cosmetic lateral canthoplasty by preserving the lateral canthal angle. We discuss here the anatomy required for surgery, the surgical methods, and methods for reducing complications during cosmetic lateral canthoplasty. PMID:27462563

  13. Pre-35 Ma Na-rich peraluminous leucogranites in the Yardoi gneiss dome, southern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, L.; Zeng, L.; Liu, J.; Xie, K.

    2008-12-01

    The Northern Himalayan Gneiss Dome (NHGD) consists of a series of semi-continuous east-west trending gneiss domes within the Tethyan Himalayan Belt. The Yardoi gneiss dome, the easternmost among these domes, consists of garnet two-mica gneiss, garnet amphibolite,Cenozoic two-mica granite and leucogranite. New SHRIMP zircon U/Pb dating show that the Yardoi leucogranite formed at 35.5±1.1Ma, which is older than those similar leucogranites to the west (commonly with ages < 25 Ma). We have performed bulk chemical and Sr and Nd isotope analyses on a suite of leucogranites and the wall-rocks to characterize their geochemistry and evaluate their formation mechanism. These data show that: (1) a majority of the Yardoi leucogranites are of Na-rich peraluminous granite; (2) similar to the wall-rock gneisses, the Yardoi leucogranites are enriched in LILE (K, Sr, Rb, Ba, and Th), but highly depleted in Ti, Y, Yb, Sc, and Cr; (3) as compared to those either in the gneisses or in the amphibolites, the Yardoi leucogranites are depleted both in LREE and in HREE. However, they are enriched in LREE relative to HREE;(4) the Yardoi leucogranites have initial Sr isotope compositions (0.71195~0.71934), similar to those of the amphibolites, whereas their "ÕNd(i) values (-8.9~-15.0) are between those in the amphibolites and the gneisses. Simple mixing calculations indicate that partial melting of a source mixed of garnet amphibolite with subordinate pelitic gneiss could account for the formation of the Yardoi Na-rich peraluminous melts. Though both H2O-fluxed melting of metapelite at high pressures (~10 kbar) and amphibolite parting melting can produce Na-rich peraluminous granitic melts, the ~35 Ma anatectic event in the Yardoi gneiss dome was dominated by amphibolite partial melting. This event might be a major factor led to transition from compressional to extensional deformation in the overthickened Himalayan belt.

  14. Atmospheric nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) at Dome C, East Antarctica, during the OPALE campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, M. M.; Roscoe, H. K.; Kukui, A.; Savarino, J.; France, J. L.; King, M. D.; Legrand, M.; Preunkert, S.

    2015-07-01

    Mixing ratios of the atmospheric nitrogen oxides NO and NO2 were measured as part of the OPALE (Oxidant Production in Antarctic Lands & Export) campaign at Dome C, East Antarctica (75.1° S, 123.3° E, 3233 m), during December 2011 to January 2012. Profiles of NOx mixing ratios of the lower 100 m of the atmosphere confirm that, in contrast to the South Pole, air chemistry at Dome C is strongly influenced by large diurnal cycles in solar irradiance and a sudden collapse of the atmospheric boundary layer in the early evening. Depth profiles of mixing ratios in firn air suggest that the upper snowpack at Dome C holds a significant reservoir of photolytically produced NO2 and is a sink of gas-phase ozone (O3). First-time observations of bromine oxide (BrO) at Dome C show that mixing ratios of BrO near the ground are low, certainly less than 5 pptv, with higher levels in the free troposphere. Assuming steady state, observed mixing ratios of BrO and RO2 radicals are too low to explain the large NO2 : NO ratios found in ambient air, possibly indicating the existence of an unknown process contributing to the atmospheric chemistry of reactive nitrogen above the Antarctic Plateau. During 2011-2012, NOx mixing ratios and flux were larger than in 2009-2010, consistent with also larger surface O3 mixing ratios resulting from increased net O3 production. Large NOx mixing ratios at Dome C arise from a combination of continuous sunlight, shallow mixing height and significant NOx emissions by surface snow (FNOx). During 23 December 2011-12 January 2012, median FNOx was twice that during the same period in 2009-2010 due to significantly larger atmospheric turbulence and a slightly stronger snowpack source. A tripling of FNOx in December 2011 was largely due to changes in snowpack source strength caused primarily by changes in NO3- concentrations in the snow skin layer, and only to a secondary order by decrease of total column O3 and associated increase in NO3- photolysis rates. A

  15. High-resolution mineral dust and sea ice proxy records from the Talos Dome ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüpbach, S.; Federer, U.; Kaufmann, P. R.; Albani, S.; Barbante, C.; Stocker, T. F.; Fischer, H.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we report on new non-sea salt calcium (nssCa2+, mineral dust proxy) and sea salt sodium (ssNa+, sea ice proxy) records along the East Antarctic Talos Dome deep ice core in centennial resolution reaching back 150 thousand years (ka) before present. During glacial conditions nssCa2+ fluxes in Talos Dome are strongly related to temperature as has been observed before in other deep Antarctic ice core records, and has been associated with synchronous changes in the main source region (southern South America) during climate variations in the last glacial. However, during warmer climate conditions Talos Dome mineral dust input is clearly elevated compared to other records mainly due to the contribution of additional local dust sources in the Ross Sea area. Based on a simple transport model, we compare nssCa2+ fluxes of different East Antarctic ice cores. From this multi-site comparison we conclude that changes in transport efficiency or atmospheric lifetime of dust particles do have a minor effect compared to source strength changes on the large-scale concentration changes observed in Antarctic ice cores during climate variations of the past 150 ka. Our transport model applied on ice core data is further validated by climate model data. The availability of multiple East Antarctic nssCa2+ records also allows for a revision of a former estimate on the atmospheric CO2 sensitivity to reduced dust induced iron fertilisation in the Southern Ocean during the transition from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene (T1). While a former estimate based on the EPICA Dome C (EDC) record only suggested 20 ppm, we find that reduced dust induced iron fertilisation in the Southern Ocean may be responsible for up to 40 ppm of the total atmospheric CO2 increase during T1. During the last interglacial, ssNa+ levels of EDC and EPICA Dronning Maud Land (EDML) are only half of the Holocene levels, in line with higher temperatures during that period, indicating much reduced sea

  16. A petrographic study of shocked minerals from the Vredefort Dome, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero, R. R.; Cavosie, A. J.

    2007-12-01

    The effects of impact-induced shock metamorphism can be preserved in the microstructure of individual mineral grains in target rocks, and thus provide a record of past impact events. This undergraduate research project is a petrographic study of shock metamorphism preserved in minerals from the Vredefort Dome impact structure, South Africa, with the goal of documenting shock features using standard petrographic techniques. The Vredefort Dome is widely regarded as the oldest and largest preserved impact crater on Earth at 2.02 Ga (Kamo et al., 1996 EPSL), and is thus important in studies of impact processes on the Precambrian Earth. Five samples representing three rock types were collected from the Vredefort Dome: two different quartzites were sampled from the collar zone, including Dominion Group quartzite (Ro) on R53 north of Parys, and quartzite Rjo1 on the maps of Bisschoff (1999). In addition, three granitoids were sampled, including two pseudotachylite breccias, from the center of the dome. Two pseudotachylite samples from quarries within the amphibolite zone contain granitoid clasts; a third sample of granulite-facies granitoid (charnockite) was collected from the amphibolite-granulate transition near Vredefort. In general, all of the samples are quartz-rich, and exhibit quartz grains with variably developed planar deformation features (PDFs). Two and three compelling sets of PDFs within individual grains were only observed in quartz from the collar zone; most samples contain quartz with only one set of conspicuous PDFs, usually decorated, that are readily visible with optical light microscopy. Shock microstructures were also observed in accessory minerals, including zircon. Detrital zircons in quartzite (unit Ro) contain PDFs that are readily apparent with a 10x to 40x objective. The zircons are average size (e.g. 125 microns), and contain parallel PDFs with an apparent regular spacing of 5 microns. Zircons were observed in all granitoid and pseudotachylite

  17. Time, temperature and water pressure dependent reheating of volcanic plugs, conduits and domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, B. M.; Jellinek, M.; Russell, K.

    2009-12-01

    Active lava domes show periodic magma supply and are frequently re-intruded and reheated. We propose that the timescale, temperature, and water pressure of reheating control whether crack and bubble networks open or close, and whether or not gas can escape. Interpretations of historic eruptions indicate open, permeable magmatic systems favour degassing and non-explosive eruptions, whereas, closed impermeable systems favour pressure build up and explosive eruptions. Despite the observations and interpretations mentioned above, the evolution of open and closed systems during reheating remains poorly understood. We reheated rhyolite dome and pumice samples under open (atmospheric pressure and dry) and closed (pressurized and wet) conditions. Open and closed porosity was measured before and after experiments by helium pycnometry, textures were examined with the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and bulk water contents were measured by infrared spectroscopy during loss on ignition. Open (atmospheric pressure, 200-1100°C) experiments show that (1) short timescales and low temperatures allow degassing without deformation, (2) intermediate timescales and temperatures favour bubble and crack growth, and (3) longer timescales and higher temperatures produce bubble collapse and crack healing. Closed experiments at (450C-750°C and 2-10 MPa) show that, (1) low temperatures and high pressures promote rehydration (regassing) without deformation, and (2) high temperatures at all pressures allow degassing with bubble collapse. Our results indicate that during reheating of an open silicic volcanic plug residual water will degas with little deformation, unless mafic magma temperatures and longer timescales occur. Bubble collapse in remelted enclaves of rhyolite supports that the explosivity of the 1886 basaltic eruption of Mt. Tarawera, New Zealand, may have been enhanced by extreme reheating and sealing of the rhyolite plug by reheating from hot basaltic magma. In contrast, our

  18. Rise in frequency of surface melting at Siple Dome through the Holocene: Evidence for increasing marine influence on the climate of West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sarah B.; Alley, Richard B.

    2008-01-01

    A new melt layer history from Siple Dome, West Antarctica, indicates notable late-Holocene summertime warming. Visual stratigraphic analyses of the 1004-m ice core identified 62 years with melt layers. Melting events began around 11.7 ka, followed by a period of no melting from 8.8-6.6 ka. Melt layer frequency increased from 6.6 ka to the present, with the 1000-year-average melt layer frequency reaching a maximum of 2% at 0.8 ka. We use our millennial-scale archive of melt events as a unique seasonal paleothermometer to elucidate changes in West Antarctic Holocene summer climate. Our calibration suggests the change in melt frequency from 0% to 2% may represent a summer temperature increase of ≥2°C from the middle to late Holocene. This temperature change cannot be explained entirely by local change in ice elevation or summer insolation and is in contrast to East Antarctic climate records, which show peak warmth in the early Holocene followed by stable or decreasing temperature. We interpret the rise in melt frequency as evidence of an increasing marine influence on the Ross Sea sector of West Antarctica. Although the surface elevation of Siple Dome has not changed greatly, the continued lateral retreat of the West Antarctic ice sheet from its Last Glacial Maximum configuration (across the outer continental shelf), and the delayed drawdown in ice thickness from the adjacent coastal Marie Byrd Land region, in conjunction with periods of increased cyclogenesis, perhaps related to variations in ENSO, would allow a moderated maritime climate to more easily reach West Antarctica.

  19. The Collapse of the Lava Dome at Soufriere Hills Volcano, 12-13 July 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herd, R.; Edmonds, M.; Strutt, M.; Ottermeiler, L.

    2003-12-01

    A large dome collapse took place at the Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat, on 12 July 2003. Around 120 million m3 of lava dome and talus collapsed to the east, generating large pyroclastic flows in the Tar River Valley. The collapse took place after a three-day-long hybrid earthquake swarm, which merged into a continuous tremor in the early morning of 12 July 2003. A period of brief but intense period of rainfall occurred between 6:30 and 9:30 am, which coincided with the onset of pyroclastic flow activity. Pyroclastic flows continued throughout the day, slowly increasing in volume and energy as the hotter interior of the talus and dome were exposed, this stage being similar to the evolution of dome collapses on 20 March 2000 and 29 July 2001. At 18:00 phreatic explosions began to take place where the block and ash flows were hitting sea on the Tar River Fan, sending black jets 50-100 metres vertically above the Fan. By 20:00 the pyroclastic flows were associated with energetic surges that were observed to be traveling 2-3 km over the surface of the sea at the mouth of the Tar River Valley. From 22:30 to 01:30 13 July the most energetic sequence of events took place, with one very large vulcanian explosion from the exposed upper conduit and dome remnants and 3-4 smaller explosive events. These explosions took place shortly after large volumes of dome material slumped into the sea down the Tar River Valley, the largest occurring at 23:34. This event caused a 1 metre high tsunami in Guadeloupe. The subsequent explosions were recorded by pressure sensors both on Montserrat and on the island of Martinique, 260 km to the south. This large single flow in the Tar River was associated with a block and ash flow that was confined to the Tar River valley and a powerful surge component derived from the lower reaches of the Tar River valley, which spread northwards, covering 10 km2 and reaching as far as Spanish Point, Bethel Village and White's Yard. This surge was immensely

  20. Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Harwell, M. A.; Brandstetter, A.; Benson, G. L.; Bradley, D. J.; Serne, R. J.; Soldat, J. K; Cole, C. R.; Deutsch, W. J.; Gupta, S. K.; Harwell, C. C.; Napier, B. A.; Reisenauer, A. E.; Prater, L. S.; Simmons, C. S.; Strenge, D. L.; Washburn, J. F.; Zellmer, J. T.

    1982-06-01

    As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario

  1. Evidence for Neoarchaean extensional faults in the Vredefort Dome, South Africa.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    mashabela, sello

    2013-04-01

    The Vredefort Dome is an approximately 80-90 km wide impact structure, situated 120 km southwest of Johannesburg in South Africa. The dome is a preserved centrally uplifted region of an ancient 250-300 km wide multi-ringed crater that formed at 2.02 Ga. The ancient crater underwent 5-10 km of erosion to expose the Vredefort Dome, allowing for unique study of the deeper levels of the impact crater. The Vredefort Dome is composed of a 40 km wide core, bounded by a 20-25 km wide collar. The core is wholly composed of Mesoarchaean basement gneiss (ca. 3.1 Ga), and the collar is made up of mid-amphibolite to lower greenschist facies supracrustal rocks (ca. 3.0-2.2 Ga). Fault development in the collar has largely been attributed to the impact, except for two fault systems. The two exceptions have been described as pre-impact faults, with apparent strike-slip displacements up to 3 km. It is the focus of this study to distinguish pre-impact structures from impact-related structures. Ortho-photographs, satellite images, and field mapping have shown that pre-impact faults were listric in character, and associated with second order accommodation faults. The main fault is associated with a 20 m wide zone of pseudotachylitic breccia. Most of the pseudotachylitic breccia in the dome has been attributed to the impact, so these faults were possibly associated with earlier pseudotachylite generation. Cleavage associated with the listric faults is displaced by impact-related faults, confirming the existence of two deformation events in the dome. The geometry of the listric faults is similar to those observed in the West Wits Line and West Rand goldfields (55 km north of Vredefort Dome), which have been modelled by Manzi et al. (2012, a, b; submitted) using 3D seismic techniques. The authors attribute the development of listric faults (or a rift-like system of faults) to crustal extension that took place during deposition of Klipriviersberg Group lavas and Platberg Group (2709

  2. Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Harwell, M. A.; Brandstetter, A.; Benson, G. L.; Raymond, J. R.; Brandley, D. J.; Serne, R. J.; Soldat, J. K.; Cole, C. R.; Deutsch, W. J.; Gupta, S. K.; Harwell, C. C.; Napier, B. A.; Reisenauer, A. E.; Prater, L. S.; Simmons, C. S.; Strenge, D. L.; Washburn, J. F.; Zellmer, J. T.

    1982-06-01

    As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario

  3. Ice crystal c-axis orientation and mean grain size measurements from the Dome Summit South ice core, Law Dome, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treverrow, Adam; Jun, Li; Jacka, Tim H.

    2016-06-01

    We present measurements of crystal c-axis orientations and mean grain area from the Dome Summit South (DSS) ice core drilled on Law Dome, East Antarctica. All measurements were made on location at the borehole site during drilling operations. The data are from 185 individual thin sections obtained between a depth of 117 m below the surface and the bottom of the DSS core at a depth of 1196 m. The median number of c-axis orientations recorded in each thin section was 100, with values ranging from 5 through to 111 orientations. The data from all 185 thin sections are provided in a single comma-separated value (csv) formatted file which contains the c-axis orientations in polar coordinates, depth information for each core section from which the data were obtained, the mean grain area calculated for each thin section and other data related to the drilling site. The data set is also available as a MATLAB™ structure array. Additionally, the c-axis orientation data from each of the 185 thin sections are summarized graphically in figures containing a Schmidt diagram, histogram of c-axis colatitudes and rose plot of c-axis azimuths. All these data are referenced by doi:10.4225/15/5669050CC1B3B and are available free of charge at https://data.antarctica.gov.au.<

  4. Development and Calibration of New 3-D Vector VSP Imaging Technology: Vinton Salt Dome, LA

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt J. Marfurt; Hua-Wei Zhou; E. Charlotte Sullivan

    2004-09-01

    Vinton salt dome is located in Southwestern Louisiana, in Calcasieu Parish. Tectonically, the piercement dome is within the salt dome minibasin province. The field has been in production since 1901, with most of the production coming from Miocene and Oligocene sands. The goal of our project was to develop and calibrate new processing and interpretation technology to fully exploit the information available from a simultaneous 3-D surface seismic survey and 3-C, 3-D vertical seismic profile (VSP) survey over the dome. More specifically the goal was to better image salt dome flanks and small, reservoir-compartmentalizing faults. This new technology has application to mature salt-related fields across the Gulf Coast. The primary focus of our effort was to develop, apply, and assess the limitations of new 3-C, 3-D wavefield separation and imaging technology that could be used to image aliased, limited-aperture, vector VSP data. Through 2-D and 3-D full elastic modeling, we verified that salt flank reflections exist in the horizontally-traveling portion of the wavefield rather than up- and down-going portions of the wavefield, thereby explaining why many commercial VSP processing flow failed. Since the P-wave reflections from the salt flank are measured primarily on the horizontal components while P-wave reflections from deeper sedimentary horizons are measured primarily on the vertical component, a true vector VSP analysis was needed. We developed an antialiased discrete Radon transform filter to accurately model P- and S-wave data components measured by the vector VSP. On-the-fly polarization filtering embedded in our Kirchhoff imaging algorithm was effective in separating PP from PS wave images. By the novel application of semblance-weighted filters, we were able to suppress many of the migration artifacts associated with low fold, sparse VSP acquisition geometries. To provide a better velocity/depth model, we applied 3-D prestack depth migration to the surface data

  5. Cooling rate and thermal structure determined from progressive magnetization of the dacite dome at Mount St. Helens, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Dzurisin, D. ); Denlinger, R.P. ); Rosenbaum, J.G. )

    1990-03-10

    The study suggests that the dome consists of a hot, nonmagnetized core surrounded by a cool magnetized carapace and flanking talus. Temporal changes in the magnetic anomaly indicate that the magnetized carapace thickened at an average rate of 0.03 {plus minus} 0.01 m/d from 1984 to 1986. Petrographic and rock magnetic properties of dome samples indicate that the dominant process responsible for these changes is magnetization of extensively oxidized rock at progressively deeper levels within the dome as the rock cools through its blocking temperature, rather than subsequent changes in magetization caused by further oxidation. Newly extruded material cools rapidly for a short period as heat is conducted outward in response to convective heat loss from its surface. The cooling rate gradually declines for several weeks, and thereafter the material cools at a relatively constant rate by convective heat loss from its interior along fractures that propagate inward. The rate of internal convective heat loss through fractures varies with rainfall, snowmelt, and large-scale fracturing during subsequent eruptive episodes. In accordance with a model for solidification of the 1959 lava lake at Kilauea Iki, Hawaii, the authors picture the dome's magnetized carapace as being a two-phase, porous, convective zone separated from the nonmagnetized core of the dome by a thin, single-phase conductive zone. As a consequence of the heat balance between the conductive and convective zones, the blocking-temperature isotherm migrates inward at a relatively constant rate. If the dome remains inactive, the time scale for its complete magnetization is estimated to be 18-36 years, a forecast which can be refined by shallow drilling into the dome and by continuing studies of its growing magnetic anomaly.

  6. Strictly homogeneous laterally complete modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilin, V. I.; Karimov, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Let A be a laterally complete commutative regular algebra and X be a laterally complete A-module. In this paper we introduce a notion of homogeneous and strictly homogeneous A-modules. It is proved that any homogeneous A-module is strictly homogeneous A-module, if the Boolean algebra of all idempotents in A is multi-σ-finite.

  7. The significance of laterality effects.

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, E K; Pratt, R T

    1981-01-01

    Language laterality can be unequivocally ascertained by comparing the effects of unilateral ECT to the right and the left hemisphere. It has been shown in right-handed depressed patients that a unilateral treatment to the left hemisphere resulted in transient dysphasia whereas unilateral ECT to the right hemisphere did not. The language laterality in a small group of left-handed depressed patients has been ascertained. Evidence is presented to show that neither dichotic listening nor hand position for writing provide satisfactory indices of language laterality. The ear advantage was more closely related to strength of sinistrality than to language laterality--that is sidedness appears to overide brainedness. The results favour a spatial attention hypothesis rather than a structural hypothesis as the main determinant of laterality effects. PMID:7229640

  8. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, H.

    2016-09-01

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  9. Unusual gravitational failures on lava domes of Tatun Volcanic Group, Northern Taiwan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, Alexander; Belousova, Marina; Chen, Chang-Hwa; Zellmer, Georg

    2010-05-01

    Tatun Volcanic Group of Northern Taiwan was formed mainly during the Pleistocene - Early Holocene. Most of the volcanoes are represented by andesitic lava domes of moderate sizes: heights up to 400 m (absolute altitudes 800-1100 m a.s.l.), base diameters up to 2 km, and volumes up to 0.3 km³. Many of the domes have broadly opened (0.5-1.0 km across and up to 140° wide), shallow-incised horseshoe-shaped scars formed by gravitational collapses. The failure planes did not intersect the volcanic conduits, and the scars were not filled by younger volcanic edifices: most of the collapses occurred a long time after the eruptions had ceased. The largest collapse, with a volume 0.1 km³, occurred at eastern part of Datun lava dome. Specific feature of the collapse was that the rear slide blocks did not travel far from the source; they stopped high inside the collapse scar, forming multiple narrow toreva blocks descending downslope. The leading slide blocks formed a low mobile debris avalanche (L~5 km; H~1 km; H/L~0.2). The deposit is composed mainly of block facies. The age of the collapse is older than 24,000 yrs, because the related debris avalanche deposit is covered by a younger debris avalanche deposit of Siaoguanyin volcano having calibrated 14C age 22,600-23,780 BP. The Siaoguanyin debris avalanche was formed as a result of collapse of southern part of a small flank dome. Specific feature of the resulted avalanche - it was hot during deposition. The deposit contains carbonized wood; andesite boulders within the deposit frequently have radial cooling joints, and in rare cases "bread-crust" surfaces. The paucity of fine fractions in the deposit can be connected with elutriation of fines into the convective cloud when the hot avalanche travelled downslope. However in several locations the deposit is represented by typical avalanche blocks surrounded by heterolithologic mixed facies containing abundant clasts of Miocene sandstone (picked up from the substrate). Thus

  10. All-year-round aerosol chemical composition at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udisti, Roberto; Becagli, Silvia; Frosini, Daniele; Galli, Gaia; Ghedini, Costanza; Rugi, Francesco; Severi, Mirko; Traversi, Rita

    2010-05-01

    Since 2005, continuous, all-year-round aerosol sampling was carried out at Dome C (Central East Antarctica, 3233 m a.s.l., about 1100 km far from the coastline), in the framework of "Station Concordia" project, an Italian PNRA - French IPEV joint program. Size-segregated aerosol samples were collected in summer and winter periods by using different low- and medium-volume systems, including pre-selected cut-off samplers (with PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 cut-off heads) and multi-stage (Andersen 8-stage and Dekati 4-stage) impactors. Sampling resolution and volumes ranged from 1 day to 1 month and from 2.3 to 12 m3/h, respectively. Aerosol study at Dome C is expected improving our knowledge on present-day source intensity, transport efficiency and pathways (including stratosphere-troposphere interchanges) of particles reaching internal sites of Antarctica. Besides, more detailed information on atmosphere-snow interactions, including depositional and post-depositional processes, as well as the effect of sublimation/condensation processes on snow surface, will be used for improving the reconstruction of past atmosphere composition from ice core chemical stratigraphies (EPICA Dome C ice core). Here we report major results from the chemical composition of the Antarctic background aerosol reaching Dome C, pointing out the seasonal pattern and the temporal trend of some ionic components used as tracers of sea spray, marine biogenic and crustal emissions. Oxidised sulfur compounds are assumed to affect the climate system by influencing the Earth's radiative budget, both directly (solar light scattering) and indirectly (acting as cloud condensation nuclei). Among these compounds, methanesulphonic acid (MSA) and H2SO4 (arising from the atmospheric oxidation of phytoplanktonic dimethylsulphide - DMS), are considered the best tracers of marine productivity. Their use as reliable markers of oceanic biogenic emissions is hindered by poorly known mechanisms (temperature and photochemistry

  11. Late Pleistocene zircon ages for intracaldera domes at Gölcük (Isparta, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Axel K.; Danišík, Martin; Siebel, Wolfgang; Elitok, Ömer; Chang, Yu-Wei; Shen, Chuan-Chou

    2014-10-01

    Pleistocene to Quaternary volcanism in the Isparta region (SW Anatolia, Turkey) comprises potassic lavas and pyroclastic deposits, which are largely centered around Gölcük caldera. Trachytic intracaldera lava domes represent the latest eruptive event at Gölcük, and their eruption age is crucial for defining a minimum age for the preceding caldera-forming explosive eruption. Here, we present combined U-Th and (U-Th)/He zircon geochronological data for two intracaldera lava domes constraining their crystallization and eruption ages, respectively. U-Th zircon crystallization ages peak between ca. 15 and 25 ka. In rare instances U-Th zircon crystallization ages date back to ca. 59 and 136 ka. U-Th zircon crystallization ages also permit (U-Th)/He eruption ages from the same crystals to be individually corrected for uranium series decay chain disequilibrium, which is mainly due to the deficit of the intermediate daughter 230Th in zircon. Average disequilibrium-corrected (U-Th)/He zircon ages are 14.1 ± 0.5 and 12.9 ± 0.4 ka (1σ). These ages are indistinguishable within analytical uncertainties suggesting that both lavas erupted quasi simultaneously. This contradicts published K-Ar ages that suggest an extended hiatus from ca. 52 to 24 ka between intracaldera dome eruptions. Evidence for protracted zircon crystallization over several thousands of years prior to eruption indicates the presence of a long-lived magma reservoir underneath Gölcük caldera. Implications of the revised eruptive geochronology presented here include younger ages for the latest effusive eruptions at Gölcük, and potentially also a more recent explosive eruption than previously assumed.

  12. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bryan Mound Salt Dome, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.; Magorian, T.R.; Ahmad, S.

    1994-11-01

    This report revises the original report that was published in 1980. Some of the topics covered in the earlier report were provisional and it is now practicable to reexamine them using new or revised geotechnical data and that obtained from SPR cavern operations, which involves 16 new caverns. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences as compared with the 1980 report and more definition in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major southeast-northwest trending anomalous zone. The original interpretation was of westward tilt of the dome, this revision shows a tilt to the southeast, consistent with other gravity and seismic data. This interpretation refines the evaluation of additional cavern space, by adding more salt buffer and allowing several more caverns. Additional storage space is constrained on this nearly full dome because of low-lying peripheral wetlands, but 60 MMBBL or more of additional volume could be gained in six or more new caverns. Subsidence values at Bryan Mound are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging about 11 mm/yr (0.4 in/yr), but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values are about the same as survey measurement accuracy. Periodic flooding is a continuing threat because of the coastal proximity and because peripheral portions of the site are at elevations less than 15 ft. This threat may increase slightly as future subsidence lowers the surface, but the amount is apt to be small. Caprock integrity may be affected by structural features, especially the faulting associated with anomalous zones. Injection wells have not been used extensively at Bryan Mound, but could be a practicable solution to future brine disposal needs. Environmental issues center on the areas of low elevation that are below 15 feet above mean sea level: the coastal proximity and lowland environment combined with the potential for flooding create conditions that require continuing surveillance.

  13. Using Horizontal Cosmic Muons to Investigate the Density Distribution of the Popocatepetl Volcano Lava Dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabski, V.; Lemus, V.; Nuñez-Cadena, R.; Aguilar, S.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Fucugauchi, J. U.

    2013-05-01

    Study of volcanic inner density distributions using cosmic muons is an innovative method, which is still in stage of development[1]. The method can be used to determine the average density along the muon track, as well as the density distribution of any volume by measuring the attenuation of cosmic muon flux in it[2]. In this study we present an analysis of using the muon radiography, integrating geophysical data to determine the density distribution of the Popocatepetl volcano. Popocatepelt is a large andesitic stratovolcano built in the Trans-Mexican volcanic arc, which has been active over the past years. The recent activity includes emplacement of a lava dome, with vulcanian explosions and frequent scoria and ash emissions. The study is directed to detect any variations in the dome and magmatic conduit system in some interval of time in the volume of Popocatepetl volcano lava dome. The study forms part of a long-term project of volcanic hazard monitoring that includes the Popocatepetl and Colima volcanoes[3]. The volcanoes are being studied by conventional geophysical techniques, including aerogeophysical surveys directed to determine the internal structure and characterize source characteristics and mechanism. The detector design mostly depends on the volume size to be investigated as well as the image-taking frequency to detect dynamic density variations. In this study we present a detector prototype design and suggestions on data taking, transferring and analyzing systems. We also present the approximate cost estimation of the suggested detector and discussion on a proposal about the creation of a national network for a volcanic alarm system. References [1] eg.H. Tanaka, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 507 (2003) 657. [2] V. Grabski et al, NIM A 585 (2008) 128-135. [3] G. Conte, J. Urrutia-Fucugauchi, et al., International Geology Review, Vol. 46, 2004, p. 210-225.

  14. Effect of subseabed salt domes on Tidal Residual currents in the Persian Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashayekh Poul, Hossein; Backhaus, Jan; Dehghani, Ali; Huebner, Udo

    2016-05-01

    Geological studies in the Persian Gulf (PG) have revealed the existence of subseabed salt-domes. With suitable filtering of a high-resolution PG seabed topography, it is seen that the domes leave their signature in the seabed, i.e., numerous hills and valleys with amplitudes of several tens of meters and radii from a few up to tens of kilometers. It was suspected that the "shark skin" of the PG seabed may affect the tidal residual flow. The interaction of tidal dynamics and these obstacles was investigated in a nonlinear hydrodynamic numerical tidal model of the PG. The model was first used to characterize flow patterns of residual currents generated by a tidal wave passing over symmetric, elongated and tilted obstacles. Thereafter it was applied to the entire PG. The model was forced at its open boundary by the four dominant tidal constituents residing in the PG. Each tidal constituent was simulated separately. Results, i.e., tidal residual currents in the PG, as depicted by Lagrangian trajectories reveal a stationary flow that is very rich in eddies. Each eddy can be identified with a topographic obstacle. This confirms that the tidal residual flow field is strongly influenced by the nonlinear interaction of the tidal wave with the bottom relief which, in turn, is deformed by salt-domes beneath the seabed. Different areas of maximum residual current velocities are identified for major tidal constituents. The pattern of trajectories indicates the presence of two main cyclonic gyres and several adjacent gyres rotating in opposite directions and a strong coastal current in the northern PG.

  15. Modelling stable water isotopes during "high-precipitation" events at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, Elisabeth; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Risi, Camille; Stenni, Barbara; Valt, Mauro; Powers, Jordan G.; Manning, Kevin W.; Duda, Michael G.; Cagnati, Anselmo

    2014-05-01

    For a correct paleoclimatologic interpretation of stable water isotopes from ice cores both pre- and post-depositional processes and their role for isotope fractionation have to be better understood. Our study focusses on "pre-depositional processes", namely the atmospheric processes that determine moisture transport and precipitation formation. At the deep ice core drilling site "Dome C", East Antarctica, fresh snow samples have been taken since 2006. These samples have been analysed crystallographically, which enables us to clearly distinguish between blowing snow, diamond dust, and "synoptic precipitation". Also the stable oxygen/hydrogen isotope ratios of the snow samples were measured, including measurements of 17-O. This is the first and only multi-year fresh-snow data series from an Antarctic deep drilling site. The Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System (AMPS) employs Polar WRF for aviation weather forecasts in Antarctica. The data are archived and can be used for scientific purposes. The mesoscale atmospheric model was adapted especially for polar regions. The horizontal resolution for the domain that covers the Antarctic continent is 10 km. It was shown that precipitation at Dome C is temporally dominated by diamond dust. However, comparatively large amounts of precipitation are observed during several "high-precipitation" events per year, caused by synoptic activity in the circumpolar trough and related advection of relatively warm and moist air from lower latitudes to the interior of Antarctica. AMPS archive data are used to investigate the synoptic situations that lead to "high-precipitation" events at Dome C; in particular, possible moisture sources are determined using back-trajectories. With this meteorological information, the isotope ratios are calculated using two different isotope models, the Mixed Cloud Isotope Model, a simple Rayleigh-type model, and the LMDZ-iso (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamic Zoom), a General Circulation Model (GCM

  16. Multidisciplinary Investigation of Surface Deformation Above Salt Domes in Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z. Y.; Khan, S. D.; Stewart, R.; Shrestha, R. L.

    2012-12-01

    Surface deformation has been an ongoing problem in the Houston Metropolitan area because of the city's location in a passive margin where faulting and subsidence are common. According to previous studies the causes of the surface deformation are typically attributed to anthropogenic activities, mainly the subsurface withdrawals of oil, gas, and groundwater. However, the majority of the studies done have not accounted for the vast amount of salt underneath the Houston area and its role in the surface deformation. The objective of this study was to identify areas of surface deformation in the greater Houston area and their possible relationship with subsurface salt movements. To accomplish this, I integrated three kinds of data: 1) GPS 2) LiDAR (Airborne and TLS) and 3) Gravity. The GPS data documented substantial subsidence and uplift in the Houston area. These surface deformations may suggest continued salt withdrawal and salt diapirism. DEM derived from LiDAR documented elevation changes between areas within the salt domes and their surroundings. This could suggest salt movement, possibly the result of secondary salt withdrawal during diapirism. The changes in the gravity measurements could be another indicator of subsurface salt movements. Kriging surface displaying GPS (PAM and CORS) derived surface deformation in the greater Houston area for the years 1994 through 2010. The area is extensively covered by both CORS and PAM GPS stations. As seen in this surface there is an area of subsidence in the northwest and an area of uplift in the southeast. One key difference is the distribution of salt domes in the two areas. In the southeast there are more known salt domes relative to the northwest. This may suggest some association between uplift and salt diapirism.

  17. A preoperative mathematic model for computed tomographic guided microwave ablation treatment of hepatic dome tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Xue, Jing-Bing; Mo, Zhi-Qiang; Zhong, Zhi-Hui; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Fu-Jun; Fan, Wei-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study sought to prospectively evaluate the feasibility and safety of a preoperative mathematic model for computed tomographic(CT) guided microwave(MW) ablation treatment of hepatic dome tumors. Methods This mathematic model was a regular cylinder quantifying appropriate puncture routes from the bottom up. A total of 103 patients with hepatic dome tumors were enrolled and randomly divided into 2 groups based on whether this model was used or not: Group A (using the model; n = 43) versus Group B (not using the model; n = 60). All tumors were treated by CT-guided MW ablation and follow-up contrast CT were reviewed. Results The average number of times for successful puncture, average ablation time, and incidence of right shoulder pain were less in Group A than Group B (1.4 vs. 2.5, P = 0.001; 8.8 vs. 11.1 minutes, P = 0.003; and 4.7% vs. 20%, P = 0.039). The technical success rate was higher in Group A than Group B (97.7% vs. 85.0%, P = 0.032). There were no significant differences between the two groups in primary and secondary technique efficacy rates (97.7% vs. 88.3%, P = 0.081; 90.0% vs. 72.7%, P = 0.314). No major complications occurred in both groups. Conclusion The mathematic model of regular cylinder is feasible and safe for CT-guided MW ablation in treating hepatic dome tumors. PMID:27028994

  18. Doming at large scale on Europa: a model of formation of Thera Macula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mével, L.; Tobie, G.; Mercier, E.; Sotin, C.

    2003-04-01

    Thera Macula is an approximately 140 by 80 km elliptical feature of the southern hemisphere of Europa. Our morphological analysis shows two types of terrains. The north west part is weakly disturbed and only some cuesta-like structures are recognized. Nevertheless, the south east part looks like a chaotic area similar to Conamara Chaos with ice overflowing on the southern margin. The chaotic terrains have a lower elevation than the weakly disturbed terrains. Both units are separated by a steep scarp cutting across the middle of Thera Macula. This dichotomy may reflect the processes by which Thera was build. Detailed observation of the chaotic area reveals the presence of little sinuous scarps limiting terraces lying at different elevations. We have calculated the cumulated height along a N-S profile and deduced a mean regional slope ranging from 0.2% to 0.8% along the entire profile. On the basis of these morphological arguments, we purpose an original model for the emplacement of Thera Macula. The rise of ductile or liquid material beneath an inclined brittle icy crust may induce vertical upward, doming, and a median fracture. Then, the soft material may overflow alongside the regional slope and the dome may collapse as the reservoir empties out. In order to constrain this emplacement model, we are currently performing numerical experiments of thermal convection for a fluid with a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity, including tidal heating and damage rheology. Preliminary results suggest that, although a thick stagnant lid forms at the top of a convective ice layer, damaged icy material in this rigid lid permits the rise of warm ductile ice at shallow depth. This could explain both doming and softening of the crustal material.

  19. Ecosystem studies, endangered species survey - Gibson Dome and Elk Ridge study areas, Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This report is published as a product of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program. The objective of this program is the development of terminal waste storage facilities in deep stable geologic formations for high-level nuclear wastes, including spent fuel elements from commercial power reactors and transuranic nuclear waste for which the federal government is responsible. This report is part of the location and site characterization phase and contains threatened and endangered species information for the Gibson Dome and Elk Ridge study areas of the Paradox Region. The threatened and endangered species information was obtained through site surveys designed and implemented by area experts. The site surveys were performed during the period late summer 1981 - spring 1982 in the Gibson Dome and Elk Ridge Study Areas. No threatened or endangered species were identified in either Lavender or Davis canyons. Additional studies at the borehole locations in Beef Basin did identify the nearest occurrence of a species proposed for endangered status (Astragalus monumentalis, a monument milkvetch, member of the legume family). The species was identified approximately 160 to 300 m (500 to 1000 ft) from a hydro testing drill site. Consequently, construction and operation activity should not cause any adverse impacts. This report will be used to satisfy Section 7 requirements of the Endangered Species Act (PL 93-205 as amended) and to allow the United States Fish and Wildlife Service to verify that no protected species are subject to disturbance as the result of project activities occurring in the Gibson Dome and Elk Ridge study areas.

  20. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.; Magorian, T.R.; Byrne, K.O.; Denzler, S.

    1993-09-01

    This report revises and updates the geologic site characterization report that was published in 1980. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major east-west trending shear zone, not mapped in the 1980 report. Excessive gas influx in Caverns 18 and 20 may be associated with this shear zone. Subsidence values at Bayou Choctaw are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging only about 10 mm/yr but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values often approximate measurement accuracy. Periodic, temporary flooding is a continuing concern because of the low site elevation (less than 10 ft), and this may intensify as future subsidence lowers the surface even further. Cavern 4 was re-sonared in 1992 and the profiles suggest that significant change has not occurred since 1980, thereby reducing the uncertainty of possible overburden collapse -- as occurred at Cavern 7 in 1954. Other potential integrity issues persist, such as the proximity of Cavern 20 to the dome edge, and the narrow web separating Caverns 15 and 17. Injection wells have been used for the disposal of brine but have been only marginally effective thus far; recompletions into more permeable lower Pleistocene gravels may be a practical way of increasing injection capacity and brinefield efficiency. Cavern storage space is limited on this already crowded dome, but 15 MMBBL could be gained by enlarging Cavern 19 and by constructing a new cavern beneath and slightly north of abandoned Cavern 13. Environmental issues center on the low site elevation: the backswamp environment combined with the potential for periodic flooding create conditions that will require continuing surveillance.